Science.gov

Sample records for nuclear medicine residency

  1. Career prospects for graduating nuclear medicine residents: survey of nuclear medicine program directors.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A; Guiberteau, Milton J; Metter, Darlene F; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    There has been much consternation in the nuclear medicine (NM) community in recent years regarding the difficulty many NM graduates experience in securing initial employment. A survey designed to determine the extent and root causes behind the paucity of career opportunities was sent to all 2010-2011 NM residency program directors. The results of that survey and its implications for NM trainees and the profession are presented and discussed in this article.

  2. [Nuclear medicine residents' clinical aptitude for interpreting gammagraphic images].

    PubMed

    Pérez Campos, José Pascual; Aguilar Mejía, Estela; Viniegra Velázquez, Leonardo

    2002-01-01

    The study deals theoretical aspects of evaluation and the importance of consider one as part of a research process. The diverse theoretical trends in the field of education are synthesized in two main tendencies: the participating and passive education perspectives. The influences of these two tendencies in selection the subjects for evaluation are also discussed in order to explore the gammagraphic interpretation aptitude in residents of nuclear medicine. An evaluation instrument developed by us to explore aptitudes result of a long validation process. It consists of 90 questions was applied to the whole sample (19 residents in two IMSS courses) in one single session. We also applied other instrument of multiple choice (90 questions too) within the passive tendency of education (control instrument). Scores obtained by three groups of residents in nuclear medicine in the aptitudes instrument, showed difference in accordance with the respective time of experience: first year obtained the lowest scores (31.5) second year showed intermediate scores (36) 3rd the highest (43) (p = 0.03 between 1st and 3rd). The scores obtained by the control instrument, was not clear difference: the 2nd year of residents was found better (score of 56) than 3rd year residents (score 52.5) The aptitude instrument is better than the control instrument in order to explored, discriminated and estratificated by time of formative experience in medical courses. We believe that the aptitude instrument is capable of detecting learning dependent on the time of clinical experience. Some considerations on the advantages and scope of this instrument, as compared to other current instruments, which are also intended to measure clinical aptitudes, are done. The theoretical superiority of the clinical aptitudes instrument in relation the others are discussed.

  3. Integrated residency training pathways of the future: diagnostic radiology, nuclear radiology, nuclear medicine, and molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Oates, M Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    Following up on the recommendations of the ACR/SNM Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training, the respective leaderships convened Task Force II. Its charge is to develop realistic residency training pathways integrating diagnostic radiology, nuclear radiology, nuclear medicine, and molecular imaging. The diagnostic radiology participants offer these "pathways of the future" that are built on a foundation of training in diagnostic radiology. It is hoped that these pathways will ensure that the traditional and emerging clinical, educational, and research domains of nuclear radiology, nuclear medicine, and molecular imaging will be sustained and will indeed flourish in the decades to come. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Integrated residency training leading to radiology and nuclear medicine board certification: the Arkansas experience.

    PubMed

    McDonald, James E; Deloney, Linda A; Jambhekar, Kedar

    2014-08-01

    The pool of qualified nuclear medicine (NM) physicians is declining as fewer choose to enter the specialty. In June 2012, we began developing an integrated categorical residency training position satisfying the requirements of both the American Board of Radiology (ABR) and the American Board of Nuclear Medicine (ABNM). Termed "NuRad," this was listed and filled in the 2013 NRMP match. We found it to be more attractive to qualified applicants than our traditional, three year NM residency. This approach may play a significant role in the future in ensuring the training of physicians expert in NM and molecular imaging.

  5. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  6. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  7. CT training of nuclear medicine residents in the United States, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A; Metter, Darlene; Oates, M Elizabeth; Guiberteau, Milton J

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the ACGME Nuclear Medicine (NM) Residency Review Committee revised the NM program requirements, which increased CT training for NM residents. This article examines the effect of this revision. Requests were e-mailed to all NM program directors asking that their residents be given the opportunity to complete an online survey regarding their CT training. Subsequently, an identical online survey regarding CT training was e-mailed directly to all members of the NM Residents Organization of the American College of NM asking that they complete the survey regarding their CT training if they had not already done so. Resident responses, compared with those from a similar 2011 survey, indicate a perception that CT training and CT expertise gained in ACGME-accredited NM programs have improved. However, some NM residents are not provided with the opportunity to develop critical skills in interpreting and dictating CT scans during their time on dedicated CT services. The survey indicates that experience gained during NM residency in head and neck/neuroradiology, emergency, and musculoskeletal CT is marginal at best. A slight majority felt that CT training should be further increased. Compared with a 2011 survey of NM residents and the 2011 implementation of expanded CT training requirements, a follow-up survey seems to indicate improvement in CT training for most NM residents. Nevertheless, an opportunity clearly remains to further improve the breadth and depth of CT skills during NM residency. However, whether such an improvement will result in a reversal of multiyear downward trends in the number of NM residents and training programs in the United States is not clear. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Science Education » Science Topics » Nuclear Medicine SCIENCE EDUCATION SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource ... Related Documents: Nuclear Medicine Fact Sheet.pdf SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource ...

  9. Nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-10-17

    In 1985 and 1986 nuclear medicine became more and more oriented toward in vov chemistry, chiefly as a result of advances in positron emission tomography (PET). The most important trend was the extension of PET technology into the care of patients with brain tumors, epilepsy, and heart disease. A second trend was the increasing use of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

  10. Nuclear Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Streek, Penny Vande; Carretta, Robert; Weiland, Frederick L.

    1994-01-01

    The Council on Scientific Affairs of the California Medical Association presents the following epitomes of progress in nuclear medicine. Each item, in the judgment of a panel of knowledgeable physicians, has recently become reasonably firmly established, both as to scientific fact and clinical importance. The items are presented in simple epitome, and an authoritative reference, both to the item itself and to the subject as a whole, is generally given for those who may be unfamiliar with a particular item. The purpose is to assist busy practitioners, students, researchers, and scholars to stay abreast of progress in medicine, whether in their own field of special interest or another. The epitomes included here were selected by the Advisory Panel to the Section on Nuclear Medicine of the California Medical Association, and the summaries were prepared under the direction of Dr Lyons and the panel. PMID:7529452

  11. Adoption of the 16-month American Board of Radiology pathway to dual board certifications in nuclear radiology and/or nuclear medicine for diagnostic radiology residents.

    PubMed

    Oates, M Elizabeth; Guiberteau, Milton J

    2014-10-01

    In 2010, the American Board of Radiology (ABR) approved a new 16-month nuclear subspecialty training pathway within a standard 48-month Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited diagnostic radiology (DR) residency available to institutions sponsoring ACGME-accredited nuclear radiology (NR) and/or nuclear medicine (NM) program(s). This accelerated pathway leads to eligibility for dual ABR certifications in DR and NR or in NM by the American Board of Nuclear Medicine (ABNM). The American College of Radiology, in conjunction with the ABR, aimed to understand adoption of this new pathway, barriers to implementation, preferences for subspecialty certification, and competing alternative combined DR/NR/NM training pathways. During 2013-2014, there were 20 ACGME-accredited NR fellowship and 43 ACGME-accredited NM residency programs eligible to adopt this new 16-month pathway. They were surveyed by e-mail correspondence regarding implementation and barriers to implementation, board certification (ABR-NR and ABNM) preferences, and local alternative training pathways. With 100% of the surveys completed, a small cadre of qualifying DR programs (14, 22%) has adopted (9, 14%) or is seriously considering adopting (5, 8%) the 16-month ABR pathway. For most, implementation is problematic with numerous barriers in common. Five (8%) institutions are developing 60-month nontraditional models as alternative routes to ABR-DR/ABR-NR certifications and/or dual ABR/ABNM board certifications. In spite of strategies to promote a shortened training pathway in NR/NM, traditional subspecialty fellowships outside the DR residency remain the dominant pathway leading to ABR subspecialty certification in NR and/or ABNM certification for diagnostic radiologists. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. General Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Radioactive Iodine (I-131) Therapy Biopsies - Overview Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) Alzheimer's Disease X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine ...

  13. Nuclear medicine annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, L.M.; Weissmann, H.S.

    1984-01-01

    The following topics are reviewed in this work: nuclear physicians role in planning for and handling radiation accidents; the role of nuclear medicine in evaluating the hypertensive patient; studies of the heart with radionuclides; role of radionuclide imaging in the patient undergoing chemotherapy; hematologic nuclear medicine; the role of nuclear medicine in sports related injuries; radionuclide evaluation of hepatic function with emphasis on cholestatis.

  14. Proposition: a pregnant resident physician should be excused from training rotations such as angiography and nuclear medicine because of the potential exposure of the fetus.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, E L; Brateman, L

    1999-12-01

    It has been reasonably well documented that a pregnant resident physician can assume radiology rotations, including higher-exposure rotations such as angiography and nuclear medicine, without exposing the fetus to radiation levels that exceed national and international guidelines. Hence, many medical physicists support the contention that rotations should not be altered because a resident is pregnant. On the other hand, many if not most physicists subscribe to the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle, especially in cases of fetal exposure where increased radiation susceptibility is combined with an inability to decide for one-self. In addition, altered rotations usually can be accommodated by swapping rotations with other residents, with the pregnant resident taking high exposure rotations after delivery of the child. Policies on this issue vary among institutions, possibly because medical physicists have not come to closure on the issue. This issue of Point/Counterpoint is directed toward that objective.

  15. Choosing family medicine residency programs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joseph; Alfieri, Marg; Patel, Tejal; Lee, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe key determinants for residents’ selection of a new community-based, interprofessional site for their family medicine training, and to evaluate residents’ satisfaction with their programs. Design Combined qualitative and quantitative methods using in-depth interviews and a survey. Setting McMaster University, including the new site of the Centre for Family Medicine in Kitchener-Waterloo, Ont, and a long-established site in Hamilton, Ont. Participants Eleven first-year and second-year family medicine residents from the Kitchener-Waterloo site participated in in-depth interviews. Forty-four first-year and second-year family medicine residents completed the survey, 22 in Kitchener-Waterloo and 22 in Hamilton. Methods Kitchener-Waterloo residents participated in in-depth interviews during their residency programs in 2008 to 2009 using a semistructured format to explore their choice of site and the effect of an interprofessional environment on their education. Common themes were established using qualitative analysis techniques; based on these themes, a survey was developed and distributed to residents from both sites to further explore factors influencing site selection, satisfaction, and effects of interprofessional education. Main findings Residents identified several reasons for selecting a new community-based, interprofessional family medicine residency program. Reasons included preference for the location and opportunities to learn in an interprofessional teaching environment. A less hierarchical structure and greater opportunities for one-on-one teaching also influenced their choices. Perception of poor communication from the well established site was identified as a challenge. Residents at both sites indicated similarly high levels of program satisfaction. Conclusion Residents selected the new community-based family medicine site for reasons of geographic location and the potential for clinical learning experiences and

  16. Technologists for Nuclear Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Huey D.

    1974-01-01

    Physicians need support personnel for work with radioisotopes in diagnosing dangerous diseases. The Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT) Program at Hillsborough Community College in Tampa, Florida, is described. (MW)

  17. Technologists for Nuclear Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Huey D.

    1974-01-01

    Physicians need support personnel for work with radioisotopes in diagnosing dangerous diseases. The Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT) Program at Hillsborough Community College in Tampa, Florida, is described. (MW)

  18. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify ...

  19. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ... d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify disease ...

  20. Implementation of an Integrative Medicine Curriculum for Preventive Medicine Residents.

    PubMed

    Chiaramonte, Delia R; D'Adamo, Christopher; Amr, Sania

    2015-11-01

    The University of Maryland Department of Epidemiology and Public Health collaborated with the Center for Integrative Medicine at the same institution to develop and implement a unique integrative medicine curriculum within a preventive medicine residency program. Between October 2012 and July 2014, Center for Integrative Medicine faculty provided preventive medicine residents and faculty, and occasionally other Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, with comprehensive exposure to the field of integrative medicine, including topics such as mind-body medicine, nutrition and nutritional supplements, Traditional Chinese Medicine, massage, biofield therapies, manual medicine, stress management, creative arts, and the use of integrative medicine in the inpatient setting. Preventive medicine residents, under the supervision of Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, led integrative medicine-themed journal clubs. Resident assessments included a case-based knowledge evaluation, the Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire, and a qualitative evaluation of the program. Residents received more than 60 hours of integrative medicine instruction, including didactic sessions, experiential workshops, and wellness retreats in addition to clinical experiences and individual wellness mentoring. Residents rated the program positively and recommended that integrative medicine be included in preventive medicine residency curricula. The inclusion of a wellness-focused didactic, experiential, and skill-based integrative medicine program within a preventive medicine residency was feasible and well received by all six preventive medicine residents. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nuclear Medicine Annual, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, L.M.; Weissmann, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Among the highlights of Nuclear Medicine Annual, 1989 are a status report on the thyroid scan in clinical practice, a review of functional and structural brain imaging in dementia, an update on radionuclide renal imaging in children, and an article outlining a quality assurance program for SPECT instrumentation. Also included are discussions on current concepts in osseous sports and stress injury scintigraphy and on correlative magnetic resonance and radionuclide imaging of bone. Other contributors assess the role of nuclear medicine in clinical decision making and examine medicolegal and regulatory aspects of nuclear medicine.

  2. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Rosário; Costa, Gracinda

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear medicine in Portugal has been an autonomous speciality since 1984. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, 5 years of training are necessary. The curriculum is very similar to the one approved under the auspices of the European Union of Medical Specialists, namely concerning the minimum recommended number of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. There is a final assessment, and during the training the resident is in an approved continuing education programme. Departments are accredited by the Medical College in order to verify their capacity to host nuclear medicine residencies.

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... nuclear medicine facility. Through the natural process of radioactive decay, the small amount of radiotracer in your child’s body will lose its radioactivity over time. In many cases, the radioactivity will ...

  4. Nuclear Medicine Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... and answer any questions you might have. A nuclear medicine technologist is a skilled medical professional who has received specialized education in the areas of anatomy, radiation protection, patient ...

  5. Specialty competencies for residents in aerospace medicine.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, T T; Dodge, R E; Jennings, R T; Valdez, M R

    1999-06-01

    The American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM), with sponsorship from the Health Resources Administration (HRSA), has published core competencies that are common to all preventive medicine residencies-aerospace medicine (ASM), occupational medicine (OM), and general preventive medicine/public health (GPM/PH). Further development of specialty area competencies for ASM residents was addressed by a working group comprised of representatives from each of the four ASM residency programs. Representatives from the U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, Wright State University, University of Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, and the Naval Operational Medicine Institute convened to develop a set of broad competency statements for ASM residents that would encompass the breadth of ASM residency training as it is currently provided in the U.S. A listing of six ASM resident competencies, with supporting skill sets, are presented. In combination with the ACPM core competencies, the ASM resident competencies represent a refocusing of educational objectives on skills attainment. The ASM resident competencies identify the capabilities of graduating ASM residents as distinct from OM and GPM/PH residents. At the same time, they are broad enough to permit specific areas of emphasis (e.g., military, civil, or space) to be pursued within the various ASM residencies. This represents the first successful attempt to draft a consolidated statement of educational objectives that has universal acceptance and applicability across all U.S. aerospace medicine residencies.

  6. Evaluation of Emergency Medicine Residents by Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tintinalli, Judith E.

    1989-01-01

    Emergency medicine residents at William Beaumont Hospital are evaluated quarterly by the nursing staff. The nurses discuss each resident and reach consensus on each evaluation item and copies are given to each resident. Although the residents' attitudes have not been favorable, overall their behavioral interactions have improved markedly.…

  7. Clinical Evaluation in a Family Medicine Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, James M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A study assessed (1) the validity of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine evaluation instrument regarding the occurrence of halo effects and (2) possible relationships between the faculty's evaluations of the residents and the residents' cognitive knowledge and productivity. (MLW)

  8. Clinical Evaluation in a Family Medicine Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, James M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A study assessed (1) the validity of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine evaluation instrument regarding the occurrence of halo effects and (2) possible relationships between the faculty's evaluations of the residents and the residents' cognitive knowledge and productivity. (MLW)

  9. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  10. Nuclear medicine annual, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, L.M.; Weissmann, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    Radionuclide evaluation of brain death, bone imaging with SPECT, and lymphoscintigraphy are among the topics covered in Nuclear Medicine Annual, 1987. In addition, the book includes reviews of the role of nuclear medicine in the diagnosis of the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and in the management of patients with acute myocardial infarction. Reports describe advances in radionuclide and magnetic resonance imaging of the adrenal gland and assess the current status of diuretic renography. Also included are articles on changes in functional imaging with aging, on radionuclide evaluation of the lower genitourinary tract in children, and on cholescintigraphy in children.

  11. Pharmacists teaching in family medicine residency programs

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, Derek; Muller, Andries; Whelan, Anne Marie; Buxton, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the percentage of family medicine residency programs that have pharmacists directly involved in teaching residents, the types and extent of teaching provided by pharmacists in family medicine residency programs, and the primary source of funding for the pharmacists. Design Web-based survey. Setting One hundred fifty-eight resident training sites within the 17 family medicine residency programs in Canada. Participants One hundred residency program directors who were responsible for overseeing the training sites within the residency programs were contacted to determine the percentage of training sites in which pharmacists were directly involved in teaching. Pharmacists who were identified by the residency directors were invited to participate in the Web-based survey. Main outcome measures The percentage of training sites for family medicine residency that have pharmacists directly involved in teaching residents. The types and the extent of teaching performed by the pharmacists who teach in the residency programs. The primary source of funding that supports the pharmacists’ salaries. Results More than a quarter (25.3%) of family medicine residency training sites include direct involvement of pharmacist teachers. Pharmacist teachers reported that they spend a substantial amount of their time teaching residents using a range of teaching modalities and topics, but have no formal pharmacotherapy curriculums. Nearly a quarter (22.6%) of the pharmacists reported that their salaries were primarily funded by the residency programs. Conclusion Pharmacists have a role in training family medicine residents. This is a good opportunity for family medicine residents to learn about issues related to pharmacotherapy; however, the role of pharmacists as educators might be optimized if standardized teaching methods, curriculums, and evaluation plans were in place. PMID:21918131

  12. Interprofessional Integrative Medicine Training for Preventive Medicine Residents.

    PubMed

    Cowen, Virginia S; Thomas, Pauline A; Gould-Fogerite, Susan E; Passannante, Marian R; Mahon, Gwendolyn M

    2015-11-01

    Integrative medicine training was incorporated into the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School Preventive Medicine residency at the Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences Newark Campus as a collaboration between the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School and the School of Health Related Professions. Beginning in 2012, an interdisciplinary faculty team organized an Integrative Medicine program in a Preventive Medicine residency that leveraged existing resources across Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences. The overarching aim of the programs was to introduce residents and faculty to the scope and practice of integrative medicine in the surrounding Newark community and explore evidence-based research on integrative medicine. The faculty team tapped into an interprofessional network of healthcare providers to organize rotations for the preventive medicine residents that reflected the unique nature of integrative medicine in the greater Newark area. Residents provided direct care as part of interdisciplinary teams at clinical affiliates and shadowed health professionals from diverse disciplines as they filled different roles in providing patient care. The residents also participated in research projects. A combination of formal and informal programs on integrative medicine topics was offered to residents and faculty. The Integrative Medicine program, which ran from 2013 through 2014, was successful in exposing residents and faculty to the unique nature of integrative medicine across professions in the community served by Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Traceability in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Brian E.; Judge, Steven

    2007-08-01

    Accurate, reproducible measurement of radioactivity in nuclear medicine applications is vital to ensure the safety and effectiveness of disease diagnosis and treatment using unsealed radioactive sources. The need to maintain a high degree of confidence in those measurements requires that they be carried out so as to be traceable to national and international standards. In addition, measurement traceability for radioactivity in medicine helps ensure international consistency in measurement at all levels of practice (national measurement laboratories, research institutions, isotope producers, radiopharmaceutical manufacturers and clinics). This paper explores the importance of radioactivity measurement in nuclear medicine and demonstrates how traceability can be extended from international standards to the quantity of the drug administered to the patient.

  14. [Nuclear medicine in Europe: education].

    PubMed

    Hellwig, D; Freudenberg, L S; Mottaghy, F M; Franzius, C; Krause, T; Garai, I; Biermann, M; Grüning, T; Leitha, T; Gotthardt, M

    2012-01-01

    The technical developments that have taken place in the preceding years (PET, hybrid imaging) have changed nuclear medicine. The future cooperation with radiologists will be challenging as well as positioning nuclear medicine in an European context. It can also be expected that education in nuclear medicine will undergo a harmonization process in the states of the European Union. In this paper, we describe how nuclear medicine education is organized in several European countries. We aim to stimulate constructive discussions on the future development of the specialization in nuclear medicine in Germany.

  15. Nuclear medicine in oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.

    1996-12-31

    Radioactivity was discovered in the late 1890s, and as early as 1903, Alexander Graham Bell advocated that radioactivity be used to treat tumors. In 1913, the first paper describing therapeutic uses of radium was published; in 1936, {sup 24}Na was administered as a therapy to a leukemia patient. Three years later, uptake of {sup 89}Sr was noted in bone metastases. During the 1940s, there was increasing use of iodine therapy for thyroid diseases, including thyroid cancer. Diagnostic {open_quotes}imaging{close_quotes} with radioisotopes was increasingly employed in the 1930s and 40s using probes and grew in importance and utility with the development of scintillation detectors with photorecording systems. Although coincidence counting to detect positron emissions was developed in 1953, the first medical center cyclotron was not installed until 1961. The 1960s saw the development of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, emission reconstruction tomography [giving rise to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)], and {sup 64}Ga tumor imaging. Nuclear medicine was recognized as a medical specialty in 1971. Radiolabeled antibodies targeting human tumors in animals was reported in 1973; antibody tumor imaging in humans was reported in 1978. Technology has continued to advance, including the development of SPECT cameras with coincidence detection able to perform FDG/PET imaging. With this overview as as backdrop, this paper focuses on the role of nuclear medicine in oncology from three perspectives: nonspecific tumor imaging agents, specific tumor imaging agents, and radioisotopes for tumor therapy. In summary, while tumor diagnosis and treatment were among the first uses explored for radioactivity, these areas have yet to reach their full potential. Development of new radioisotopes and new radiopharmaceuticals, coupled with improvements in technology, make nuclear oncology an area of growth for nuclear medicine.

  16. Frontiers in nuclear medicine symposium: Nuclear medicine & molecular biology

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This document contains the abstracts from the American College of Nuclear Physicians 1993 Fall Meeting entitled, `Frontiers in Nuclear Medicine Symposium: Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Biology`. This meeting was sponsored by the US DOE, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. The program chairman was Richard C. Reba, M.D.

  17. Coordination compounds in nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Jurisson, S.; Berning, D.; Wei Jia; Dangshe Ma )

    1993-05-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals, drugs containing a radionuclide, are used routinely in nuclear medicine departments for the diagnosis of disease and are under investigation for use in the treatment of disease. Nuclear medicine takes advantage of both the nuclear properties of the radionuclide and the pharmacological properties of the radiopharmaceutical. Herein lies the real strength of nuclear medicine, the ability to monitor biochemical and physiological functions in vivo. This review discusses the coordination chemistry that forms the basis for nuclear medicine applications of the FDA-approved radiopharmaceuticals that are in clinical use, and of the most promising diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals that are in various stages of development. 232 refs.

  18. Internal medicine residency training and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Griffith, C H; Rich, E C; Hillson, S D; Wilson, J F

    1997-06-01

    To review the impact of the clinical education of internal medicine residents on patients' outcomes. English-language studies of the relation between internal medicine housestaff training and patients' outcomes were systematically identified by a MEDLINE search and from bibliographies and reference lists of recently published articles. We hypothesized that the primary impact of internal medicine residency training on patients' outcomes would be the result of: (1) the inexperience of the residents; (2) the heavy workload these inexperienced residents are expected to manage: or (3) some structural feature of the internal medicine teaching services, such as the discontinuity of patient care inherent in night float systems and the fact that residents rotate to different services each month. We also hypothesized that residents may in may ways provide superior care, and many actually improve certain patient outcomes. Housestaff inexperience, workload, and structural features that promote discontinuity have been shown to affect especially outcomes of resource utilization, length of stay, and patient satisfaction. No study has demonstrated that internal medicine residents contribute to excess patient morbidity or mortality. However, the published studies in this area are for the most part retrospective and were conducted 10 to 15 years ago. The full extent of the untoward (or the beneficial) effects of internal medicine residency training on patients' outcomes is unknown. Multisite, prospective studies would remedy the deficiencies in the published research in this area and would yield the most valid insight into the range and extent of the effects of housestaff training on patients' outcomes. In the absence of such studies and in a rapidly changing managed care environment, academic medical centers and departments of medicine need to be aware of those aspects of the clinical education of residents that are most likely to affect patients' outcomes.

  19. Women residents, women physicians and medicine's future.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Karen

    2007-08-01

    The number of women in medicine has increased dramatically in the last few decades, and women now represent half of all incoming medical students. Yet residency training still resembles the historical model when there were few women in medicine. This article reviews the issues facing women in residency today. Data suggest that the experience of female residents is more negative than that of males. Unique challenges facing female residents include the existence of gender bias and sexual harassment, a scarcity of female mentors in leadership positions, and work/family conflicts. Further research is needed to understand the experience of female residents and to identify barriers that hinder their optimal professional and personal development. Structural and cultural changes to residency programs are needed to better accommodate the needs of female trainees.

  20. Nuclear medicine annual

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    This book features a state-of-the-art report on single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in abdominal imaging, which highlights the emergency of /sup 99m/Tc-red cell imaging as the procedure of choice for diagnosing heptatic hemangioma. In addition, the use of captropril scinitigraphy in the study of suspected renovascular hypertension is reviewed. Articles survey research on radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and assess the clinical experience with bone scanning for osseous metastases from breast carcinoma. An article on the role of nuclear medicine in the management of osteoporosis examines the problems that must be overcome before the bone mineral analysis with dual photon absorptiometry gains widespread clinical acceptance.

  1. [Nuclear medicine today].

    PubMed

    Dujmović, F

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with those nuclear medicine investigations, which, in spite of development of other diagnostic methods and imaging procedures, remain important and in some cases, exclusive diagnostic tool in differential diagnostics of certain disorders and diseases. Examination of myocardial perfusion with radiotracers is the only non-invasive imaging method. Typically two sets of images are acquired. The first one reflecting myocardial perfusion at peak stress (exercise) and the second set reflecting perfusion at rest. Fixed defects in the scintigrams show infarcted myocardiac regions. Thallium-201 exercise-rest perfusion imaging has a strong prognostic value for coronary artery disease. Lung perfusion-ventilation scanning is an essentially non-invasive method of evaluating pulmonary embolism. Normal lung scan excludes clinically significant pulmonary embolism and patients with normal or very low probability perfusion scintigrams do not require therapy for pulmonary embolism. Radioisotopes play an important role in the diagnosis of malignant bone lesions. Bone scanning is commonly used to detect metastases from malignant tumours, because it is more sensitive than x-rays. In benign bone diseases, scintigraphy is used to evaluate sports injuries, avascular necrosis and infection of joint prostheses. Methods of nuclear medicine are useful for evaluating renal outflow obstructions, cortical and renovascular dysfunction. Normal finding of dynamic renography excludes an obstructive disease, whereas loss of radionuclide elimination after stimulation with furosemide is characteristic for it. In patients with suspected renovascular hypertension dynamic renography combined with captopril is a useful diagnostic test. In patients with fever of unknown origin imaging with labelled autologous leukocytes may be used to establish the location in gastrointestinal, neurological, psychiatric and other disorders. Radionuclide investigations are helpful in diagnostics of some

  2. Occupational and environmental medicine in a family medicine residency.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, T E; Teitelbaum, H S

    2001-05-01

    Well-rounded instruction in occupational medicine as part of family medicine residency training is feasible through a program that balances a longitudinal curriculum of monthly occupational and environmental medicine (OEM) lectures, community-based OEM patient care, and worksite assessment. Such training would help equip family medicine residents to integrate occupational medicine into their practices, which, in light of a shortage of board-certified practitioners in OEM, would help fill community needs. The Intern-Resident Training Committee of Carson City Hospital in rural Michigan established both learner and institutional goals and objectives for such a program of instruction. A learner-needs assessment found appreciable interest among the residents for occupational medicine training. In addition, results of a survey of the occupational health community suggested there is inadequate coverage of OEM in medical schools and residencies. Furthermore, a focus group of occupational health managers revealed that clarity of communication and standardization of reporting were paramount concerns. Instruments for standardized OEM history and for OEM case management were developed for use within the residency continuity clinic. The curriculum was implemented with a variety of teaching strategies, including worksite assessment. Practice-based, case-oriented instruction was subsequently phased into the program as residents assumed responsibility for managing cases under the supervision of family medicine preceptors knowledgeable in OEM. An occupational medicine rotation was developed that included focused clinical exposure to OEM patients and studies that would lead to eligibility for a certificate of additional qualification in occupational medicine. Learner evaluations included chart reviews and patient satisfaction surveys. Program evaluations included interviews with occupational health managers. The residents were judged by their preceptors to have performed well. The

  3. [Nuclear medicine and radiopharmaceuticals].

    PubMed

    Sopena Novales, P; Plancha Mansanet, M C; Martinez Carsi, C; Sopena Monforte, R

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a medical specialty that allows modern diagnostics and treatments using radiopharmaceuticals original radiotracers (drugs linked to a radioactive isotope). In Europe, radiopharmaceuticals are considered a special group of drugs and thus their preparation and use are regulated by a set of policies that have been adopted by individual member countries. The radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic examinations are administered in very small doses. So, in general, they have no pharmacological action, side effects or serious adverse reactions. The biggest problem associated with their use are the alterations in their biodistribution that may cause diagnostic errors. Nuclear Medicine is growing considerably influenced by the appearance and development of new radiopharmaceuticals in both the diagnostic and therapeutic fields and primarily to the impact of new multimodality imaging techniques (SPECT-CT, PET-CT, PET-MRI, etc.). It's mandatory to know the limitations of these techniques, distribution and eventual physiological alterations of radiopharmaceuticals, contraindications and adverse reactions of radiological contrasts, and the possible interference of both.

  4. New "horizontal" curriculum in family medicine residency.

    PubMed Central

    Tannenbaum, D. W.

    1998-01-01

    PROBLEM ADDRESSED: Opportunities for residents in a family medicine program to experience continuity of care with a group of patients and to be immersed in the role of a family physician were thought by faculty to be insufficient. OBJECTIVES OF THE PROGRAM: To enhance residents' experience of continuity of care with a group of patients; to create a model for training that better simulates clinical practice; and to position core family medicine experiences as the central and continuing focus of the residency program. MAIN COMPONENTS OF THE PROGRAM: The new curriculum replaces block rotations in family medicine with "horizontal" experiences comprising 3 half-days of patient care and 1 half-day seminar each week for all residents through both years of the program. The remaining time in first year is spent on the major disciplines--medicine, pediatrics, emergency, and obstetrics--for which a horizontal family medicine-centred experience has also been introduced. The second-year curriculum is flexible and largely self-directed. Initial evaluations indicate improved continuity of care of family practice patients and broadened clinical exposure for residents. The program has been fully accredited by the College. CONCLUSIONS: A horizontal curriculum in family medicine, designed to address perceived deficiencies in the traditional block rotational model of training, can be developed and implemented in an urban teaching hospital. PMID:9721423

  5. Synopsis of nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Waweru, F N; Othieno, J O

    1989-10-01

    The application of radionuclides to medical diagnosis and treatment has a relatively short history. The phenomenon of radioactivity was originally discovered by Henri Bacquerel in 1896, whereas Pierre and Marie Curie isolated the naturally occurring element radium in 1899. The use of radium in the treatment of malignant disease was first introduced at the turn of this century, and was established by 1920. It was not until 1938, however, that the discovery of nuclear fission made possible the subsequent development of the nuclear reactor, and the large-scale production of artificial radioactive nuclides. It was immediately realised that the latter opened up great possibilities in the medical field. The radioactive isotope was chemically indistinguishable from the stable isotopes of the element, and minute quantities of it in the body could be detected externally by virtue of the radiation they emitted; it could be used as a "tracer" to follow the metabolism of a substance throughout the body. The following synopsis is a brief attempt to introduce the Kenyan medical personnel into the scope of nuclear energy in medicine.

  6. Paediatric nuclear medicine imaging.

    PubMed

    Biassoni, Lorenzo; Easty, Marina

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging explores tissue viability and function by using radiotracers that are taken up at cellular level with different mechanism. This imaging technique can also be used to assess blood flow and transit through tubular organs. Nuclear medicine imaging has been used in paediatrics for decades and this field is continuously evolving. The data presented comes from clinical experience and some milestone papers on the subject. Nuclear medicine imaging is well-established in paediatric nephro-urology in the context of urinary tract infection, ante-natally diagnosed hydronephrosis and other congenital renal anomalies. Also, in paediatric oncology, I-123-meta-iodobenzyl-guanidine has a key role in the management of children with neuroblastic tumours. Bone scintigraphy is still highly valuable to localize the source of symptoms in children and adolescents with bone pain when other imaging techniques have failed. Thyroid scintigraphy in neonates with congenital hypothyroidism is the most accurate imaging technique to confirm the presence of ectopic functioning thyroid tissue. Radionuclide transit studies of the gastro-intestinal tract are potentially useful in suspected gastroparesis or small bowel or colonic dysmotility. However, until now a standardized protocol and a validated normal range have not been agreed, and more work is necessary. Research is ongoing on whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with its great advantage of great anatomical detail and no ionizing radiations, can replace nuclear medicine imaging in some clinical context. On the other hand, access to MRI is often difficult in many district general hospitals and general anaesthesia is frequently required, thus adding to the complexity of the examination. Patients with bone pain and no cause for it demonstrated on MRI can benefit from bone scintigraphy with single photon emission tomography and low-dose computed tomography. This technique can identify areas of mechanical stress at

  7. Nuclear medicine at a crossroads.

    PubMed

    Schelbert, Heinrich R

    2011-12-01

    The growth of molecular imaging heightens the promise of clinical nuclear medicine as a tool for individualization of patient care and for improvement of health-care outcomes. Together with greater use of integrated structure-function imaging, clinical nuclear medicine reaches beyond traditional specialty borders into diagnostic radiology and oncology. Yet, there are concerns about the future of nuclear medicine, including progressively declining reimbursement, the competitive advantages of diagnostic radiology, limited translation of research accomplishments to clinical diagnostic imaging and patient care, and an insufficient pool of incoming highly qualified nuclear medicine clinicians. Thus, nuclear medicine views itself as being at a critical crossroads. What will be important is for nuclear medicine to be positioned as the quintessential molecular imaging modality more centrally within medical imaging and for the integration of nuclear medicine with primary care specialties to be driven more by patient needs than by specialty needs. In this way, the full potential of nuclear medicine as an effective and efficient tool for improving patient outcomes can be realized.

  8. Nucleology, nuclear medicine, molecular nuclear medicine and subspecialties.

    PubMed

    Grammaticos, Philip C

    2005-01-01

    Henry N. Wagner Jr started the presentation of the highlights of the 39th Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine by quoting: "The economist JM Keynes said: "the difficult lies not in new ideas but in escaping from the old ones". Many changes have taken place in the actual term describing our specialty during the last 15 years. Cardiologists have adopted an important chapter of nuclear medicine and to describe that they use the term of "nuclear cardiology". Radiologists have proposed the term "radionuclide radiology". "Nuclear endocrinology", "nuclear oncology", "nuclear nephrology" may be considered as terms describing chapters of nuclear medicine related to other specialties. Will that indicate that our specialty will be divided into smaller chapters and be offered to colleagues working in other specialties leaving to us the role of the supervisor or perhaps the radioprotection officer for in vivo studies? Of course this role is now being exercised by our colleagues in medical physics. It is suggested to use the word " nucleology", instead of "nuclear medicine" where "nuclear" is used as an adjective. Thus, we will avoid being part of another specialty and cardiologists would use the term cardiac nucleology where "cardiac" is the adjective. The proposed term "nucleology" as compared to the existing term "nuclear medicine" has the advantage of being simpler, correct from the grammar point of view and not related to combined terms that may seem to offer part of our specialty to other specialties. At present our specialty faces many problems. The term "nucleology" supports our specialty from the point of view of terminology. During the 3rd International Meeting of Nuclear Medicine of N. Greece which was held in Thessaloniki, Macedonia, Greece on 4-6 November 2005, a discussion arose among participants as to whether the name of "nucleology" could replace the existing name of "nuclear medicine". Finally, a vote (between "yes" and "no") for the new proposed

  9. Work force problems in nuclear medicine and possible solutions.

    PubMed

    Lull, R J; Littlefield, J L

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear medicine practice and work force demographics reflect the historically diverse evolution of this specialty. The most pressing problem for nuclear medicine is a projected shortage of fully trained physicians due to practitioner retirement that is unmatched by residency program output. During the past decade the number of 2-year nuclear medicine residency programs (average of 90) and the total number of residents (average of 191 in both years) have remained remarkably stable. In contrast, the number of 1-year nuclear radiology residency programs, available positions, and residents have declined significantly. A similar decline is seen in radiologists obtaining full nuclear medicine training and American Board of Nuclear Medicine (ABNM) board certification. This void has been filled by nonradiologist trainees who only seek certification by ABNM. Perhaps such shifts in resident profile are an early indicator that the United States is evolving toward practice models in which nuclear medicine is provided by fully trained, full-time physicians, similar to the European work force model. The recent Society of Nuclear Medicine survey of 10,446 physicians who practice nuclear medicine shows a current practice pattern in the United States that is distinctly different from that in Europe. The vast majority of those surveyed practice part time. Only 7% of all physicians who practice nuclear medicine do so full time, (ie more than 90% of the time), but they account for as much full-time employee (FTE) work load as 70% of all part-time physicians. Although the number of radiologists entering nuclear medicine is declining, 51% of total FTE work load is still done by radiologists with only American Board of Radiology certification. Physicians certified by ABNM represent 42% of all FTE work load. Cardiologists certified by American Board of Internal Medicine-Cardiovascular Specialization account for approximately 4% of nuclear medicine (15% of total cardiovascular nuclear

  10. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gerald W.; Brill, A. Bertrand; Bizais, Yves J. C.; Rowe, R. Wanda; Zubal, I. George

    1986-01-01

    A nuclear medicine imaging system having two large field of view scintillation cameras mounted on a rotatable gantry and being movable diametrically toward or away from each other is disclosed. In addition, each camera may be rotated about an axis perpendicular to the diameter of the gantry. The movement of the cameras allows the system to be used for a variety of studies, including positron annihilation, and conventional single photon emission, as well as static orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography. In orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography, each camera is fitted with a seven pinhole collimator to provide seven views from slightly different perspectives. By using two cameras at an angle to each other, improved sensitivity and depth resolution is achieved. The computer system and interface acquires and stores a broad range of information in list mode, including patient physiological data, energy data over the full range detected by the cameras, and the camera position. The list mode acquisition permits the study of attenuation as a result of Compton scatter, as well as studies involving the isolation and correlation of energy with a range of physiological conditions.

  11. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gerald W.; Brill, A. Bertrand; Bizais, Yves J.; Rowe, R. Wanda; Zubal, I. George

    1986-01-07

    A nuclear medicine imaging system having two large field of view scintillation cameras mounted on a rotatable gantry and being movable diametrically toward or away from each other is disclosed. In addition, each camera may be rotated about an axis perpendicular to the diameter of the gantry. The movement of the cameras allows the system to be used for a variety of studies, including positron annihilation, and conventional single photon emission, as well as static orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography. In orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography, each camera is fitted with a seven pinhole collimator to provide seven views from slightly different perspectives. By using two cameras at an angle to each other, improved sensitivity and depth resolution is achieved. The computer system and interface acquires and stores a broad range of information in list mode, including patient physiological data, energy data over the full range detected by the cameras, and the camera position. The list mode acquisition permits the study of attenuation as a result of Compton scatter, as well as studies involving the isolation and correlation of energy with a range of physiological conditions.

  12. Morning report in military family medicine residencies.

    PubMed

    Drifmeyer, Erin; Oh, Robert

    2008-08-01

    Morning report is a standard component of residency training; however, little is written about this conference in family medicine. We emailed a survey to all 17 military family medicine residency directors. Descriptive statistics were used to calculate means and SDs. Twelve of 17 programs responded. All conducted morning report and all agreed that the main purpose of morning report is education. Its educational value ranked highly (mean, 4.2; SD = 0.78; with 1 = minimal educational value and 5 = very important educational value). Programs reported morning report being held four to five times a week (66%) for 30 minutes (92%) and using preprepared cases (75%) half the time or more. Most (75%) reported having no written goals and objectives; 77% did not track educational outcomes. Although military residencies appear to regard morning report as an important educational venue, most do not have goals or objectives nor formally evaluate effectiveness.

  13. Teaching pediatric laboratory medicine to pathology residents.

    PubMed

    Pysher, Theodore J; Bach, Philip R; Geaghan, Sharon M; Hamilton, Marilyn S; Laposata, Michael; Lockitch, Gillian; Brugnara, Carlo; Coffin, Cheryl M; Pasquali, Marzia; Rinaldo, Piero; Roberts, William L; Rutledge, Joe C; Ashwood, Edward R; Blaylock, Robert C; Campos, Joseph M; Goldsmith, Barbara; Jones, Patricia M; Lim, Megan; Meikle, A Wayne; Perkins, Sherrie L; Perry, Deborah A; Petti, Cathy A; Rogers, Beverly B; Steele, Paul E; Weiss, Ronald L; Woods, Gail

    2006-07-01

    Laboratory data are essential to the medical care of fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents. However, the performance and interpretation of laboratory tests on specimens from these patients, which may constitute a significant component of the workload in general hospitals and integrated health care systems as well as specialized perinatal or pediatric centers, present unique challenges to the clinical pathologist and the laboratory. Therefore, pathology residents should receive training in pediatric laboratory medicine. Children's Health Improvement through Laboratory Diagnostics, a group of pathologists and laboratory scientists with interest and expertise in pediatric laboratory medicine, convened a task force to develop a list of curriculum topics, key resources, and training experiences in pediatric laboratory medicine for trainees in anatomic and clinical pathology or straight clinical pathology residency programs and in pediatric pathology fellowship programs. Based on the experiences of 11 training programs, we have compiled a comprehensive list of pediatric topics in the areas of clinical chemistry, endocrinology, hematology, urinalysis, coagulation medicine, transfusion medicine, immunology, microbiology and virology, biochemical genetics, cytogenetics and molecular diagnostics, point of care testing, and laboratory management. This report also includes recommendations for training experiences and a list of key texts and other resources in pediatric laboratory medicine. Clinical pathologists should be trained to meet the laboratory medicine needs of pediatric patients and to assist the clinicians caring for these patients with the selection and interpretation of laboratory studies. This review helps program directors tailor their curricula to more effectively provide this training.

  14. General medicine vs subspecialty career plans among internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    West, Colin P; Dupras, Denise M

    2012-12-05

    Current medical training models in the United States are unlikely to produce sufficient numbers of general internists and primary care physicians. Differences in general internal medicine (GIM) career plans between internal medicine residency program types and across resident demographics are not well understood. To evaluate the general medicine career plans of internal medicine residents and how career plans evolve during training. A study of US internal medicine residents using an annual survey linked to the Internal Medicine In-Training Examination taken in October of 2009-2011 to evaluate career plans by training program, sex, and medical school location. Of 67,207 US eligible categorical and primary care internal medicine residents, 57,087 (84.9%) completed and returned the survey. Demographic data provided by the National Board of Medical Examiners were available for 52,035 (77.4%) of these residents, of whom 51,390 (76.5%) responded to all survey items and an additional 645 (1.0%) responded to at least 1 survey item. Data were analyzed from the 16,781 third-year residents (32.2%) in this sample. Self-reported ultimate career plans of internal medicine residents. A GIM career plan was reported by 3605 graduating residents (21.5%). A total of 562 primary care program (39.6%) and 3043 categorical (19.9%) residents reported GIM as their ultimate career plan (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.76; 99% CI, 2.35-3.23; P < .001). Conversely, 10 008 categorical (65.3%) and 745 primary care program (52.5%) residents reported a subspecialty career plan (AOR, 1.90; 99% CI, 1.62-2.23; P < .001). GIM career plans were reported more frequently by women than men (26.7% vs 17.3%, respectively; AOR, 1.69; 99% CI, 1.53-1.87; P < .001). US medical graduates were slightly more likely to report GIM career plans than international medical graduates (22.0% vs 21.1%, respectively; AOR, 1.76; 99% CI, 1.50-2.06; P < .001). Within primary care programs, US medical graduates were much more

  15. Satisfaction with civilian family medicine residency training

    PubMed Central

    Wolfrom, Brent; Hodgetts, Geoff; Kotecha, Jyoti; Pollock, Emily; Martin, Mary; Han, Han; Morissette, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate satisfaction with civilian residency training programs among serving general duty medical officers within the Canadian Armed Forces. Design A 23-item, cross-sectional survey face-validated by the office of the Surgeon General of the Canadian Armed Forces. Setting Canada. Participants General duty medical officers serving in the Canadian Armed Forces as of February 2014 identified through the Directorate of Health Services Personnel of the Canadian Forces Health Services Group Headquarters. Main outcome measures Satisfaction with and time spent in 7 domains of training: trauma, critical care, emergency medicine, psychiatry, occupational health, sports medicine, and base clinic training. Overall preparedness for leading a health care team, caring for a military population, working in isolated and challenging environments, and being deployed were evaluated on a 5-point Likert scale. Results Among the survey respondents (n = 135, response rate 54%), 77% agreed or strongly agreed that their family medicine residency training was relevant to their role as a general duty medical officer. Most respondents were either satisfied or very satisfied with their emergency medicine training (77%) and psychiatry training (63%), while fewer were satisfied or very satisfied with their sports medicine (47%), base clinic (41%), and critical care (43%) training. Even fewer respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with their trauma (26%) and occupational health (12%) training. Regarding overall preparedness, 57% believed that they were adequately prepared to care for a military patient population, and 52% of respondents believed they were prepared for their first posting. Fewer respondents (38%) believed they were prepared to work in isolated, austere, or challenging environments, and even fewer (32%) believed that residency training prepared them to lead a health care team. Conclusion General duty medical officers were satisfied with many aspects of

  16. [Costing nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures].

    PubMed

    Markou, Pavlos

    2005-01-01

    To the Editor: Referring to a recent special report about the cost analysis of twenty-nine nuclear medicine procedures, I would like to clarify some basic aspects for determining costs of nuclear medicine procedure with various costing methodologies. Activity Based Costing (ABC) method, is a new approach in imaging services costing that can provide the most accurate cost data, but is difficult to perform in nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures. That is because ABC requires determining and analyzing all direct and indirect costs of each procedure, according all its activities. Traditional costing methods, like those for estimating incomes and expenses per procedure or fixed and variable costs per procedure, which are widely used in break-even point analysis and the method of ratio-of-costs-to-charges per procedure may be easily performed in nuclear medicine departments, to evaluate the variability and differences between costs and reimbursement - charges.

  17. Nuclear Medicine Training: What Now?

    PubMed

    Mankoff, David; Pryma, Daniel A

    2017-10-01

    Although the multidisciplinary nature of nuclear medicine (NM) and clinical molecular imaging is a key strength of the specialty, the breadth of disciplines involved in the practice of NM creates challenges for education and training. The evolution of NM science and technology-and the practice of clinical molecular imaging and theranostics-has created a need for changes in the approach to specialty training. The broader U.S. community of imaging physicians has been slow to accept this change, in good part due to historical divides between the NM and nuclear radiology (NR) communities. In this Journal of Nuclear Medicine Hot Topics discussion, we review the historical pathways to training; discuss the training needs for the modern practice of NM, clinical molecular imaging, and radionuclide therapy; and suggest a path forward for an approach to training that matches the needs of the evolving clinical specialty. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  18. Vitamin D insufficiency in internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Haney, E M; Stadler, D; Bliziotes, M M

    2005-01-01

    Medical residents may be vulnerable to low vitamin D status because of long work hours and lack of sun exposure. We conducted a prospective cohort study to measure serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations among internal medicine residents, document seasonal variation in vitamin D status, and assess risk factors for inadequate vitamin D stores. Dietary intake of calcium and vitamin D, lifestyle characteristics, and serum concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) were measured in 35 resident volunteers before and after the winter season. A total of 63-69% of medical residents consumed <400 IU/day of vitamin D; 61-67% consumed <1000 mg/day of calcium. Twenty-five (74%) had lower serum 25(OH)-vitamin D concentrations and 23 (68%) had higher serum iPTH in the spring than in the fall. Nine (26%) residents had serum concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D of <20 ng/mL in the fall; and sixteen (47%) in the spring. Seven residents (20%) had serum concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D of <20 ng/mL at both time-periods; Eighteen residents (51.4%) had 25(OH)-vitamin D levels of <20 ng/mL for at least one of the time-periods. Medical residents are at risk for hypovitaminosis D, particularly during the winter months and should be aware of the need to supplement their vitamin D stores. Insufficient vitamin D status and inadequate vitamin D intake may have long-term implications for bone health in these individuals. Increased educational efforts to promote healthy dietary and lifestyle choices that allow attainment and maintenance of skeletal health are appropriate in this population.

  19. Curricula and Organization of Primary Care Residencies in Internal Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, John M.

    1980-01-01

    The organization and curricula of internal medicine residencies programs that emphasize primary care are described and compared with traditional residencies in internal medicine. It is noted that primary care residents spend more time in ambulatory care and are allowed more electives in specialties outside of internal medicine. Out-of-hospital…

  20. Publication productivity in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    McKellar, Cheryl; Currie, Geoff

    2015-06-01

    Publications form the knowledge base of any profession. Patterns in professional publications provide insight into the profession's maturity and global status. To our knowledge, publication productivity in nuclear medicine technology has not been reported. A recent study on publication productivity in radiography and radiation therapy provided interesting insight; however, a sampling bias resulted in study flaws. The most productive medical radiation technologists were determined by collecting data from 7 key, international peer-reviewed journals for the medical radiation sciences over a 5-y period. A full list of the technologists' publications, for the 5-y period, was obtained using a PubMed and ResearchGate search, and the authors were analyzed. In total, 165 medical radiation technologists were identified who had published 3 or more articles between 2009 and 2013. Of these authors, 55.2% (91/165) were radiographers, 35.2% (58/165) were radiation therapists, and 9.6% (16/165) were nuclear medicine technologists. Overall, the majority of the most prolific authors were academics (104/165; 63.0%). After we applied a correction factor (the productivity per member of the registered workforce), radiography had the fewest authors publishing, compared with the relative workflow sizes. Nuclear medicine technologists demonstrated a high degree of productivity both absolutely and relatively. Consequently, nuclear medicine technologists have a productive research culture and command a large footprint within and outside the key medical radiation science journals. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  1. Remediation plans in family medicine residency

    PubMed Central

    Audétat, Marie-Claude; Voirol, Christian; Béland, Normand; Fernandez, Nicolas; Sanche, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess use of the remediation instrument that has been implemented in training sites at the University of Montreal in Quebec to support faculty in diagnosing and remediating resident academic difficulties, to examine whether and how this particular remediation instrument improves the remediation process, and to determine its effects on the residents’ subsequent rotation assessments. Design A multimethods approach in which data were collected from different sources: remediation plans developed by faculty, program statistics for the corresponding academic years, and students’ academic records and rotation assessment results. Setting Family medicine residency program at the University of Montreal. Participants Family medicine residents in academic difficulty. Main outcome measures Assessment of the content, process, and quality of remediation plans, and students’ academic and rotation assessment results (successful, below expectations, or failure) both before and after the remediation period. Results The framework that was developed for assessing remediation plans was used to analyze 23 plans produced by 10 teaching sites for 21 residents. All plans documented cognitive problems and implemented numerous remediation measures. Although only 48% of the plans were of good quality, implementation of a remediation plan was positively associated with the resident’s success in rotations following the remediation period. Conclusion The use of remediation plans is well embedded in training sites at the University of Montreal. The residents’ difficulties were mainly cognitive in nature, but this generally related to deficits in clinical reasoning rather than knowledge gaps. The reflection and analysis required to produce a remediation plan helps to correct many academic difficulties and normalize the academic career of most residents in difficulty. Further effort is still needed to improve the quality of plans and to support teachers.

  2. Mentorship in physical medicine and rehabilitation residencies.

    PubMed

    Galicia, A R; Klima, R R; Date, E S

    1997-01-01

    Mentorship is considered by many authorities as being possibly the most important developmental tool for the progression of a professional in training. In recent years, progressively increasing support of mentoring programs has been documented, especially in business, academia, and overall career development. Despite its recognized importance, there is a paucity of literature examining the needs of physicians in residency training programs in regard to mentorship. A 21-item questionnaire was sent to all physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) residents in training in United States residency programs in May of 1993. The objectives of this survey were 3-fold: to assess interest in mentorship among PM&R residents, to determine the effect of preresidency mentorship on candidates choosing PM&R as a specialty, and to identify the factors that establish a successful mentorship in PM&R residency. A response rate of 36.2% (406/1123) was obtained. Analysis of the results indicated that 97.3% (390/401) of the respondents were interested in mentorship programs during PM&R residency; however, only 28.1% (114/406) had a mentor at the time of the survey. Before residency, 35.4% (143/404) of the respondents had a mentor, and of those, 75.9% (107/141) indicated that mentorship had a positive effect on their decision to choose PM&R as a specialty. Regarding the current mentorship, respondents benefited the most in the categories of increased knowledge of PM&R, 72.8% (83/114), and improved clinical skills, 65.8% (75/114). The least satisfaction was with the mentor's assistance with a research project, 46% (52/113), and with the effect of mentorship on the resident's visibility and reputation, 38.6% (44/114). Overall resident satisfaction with mentorship was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in mentorships formed by free choice compared with those that were formally assigned by the residency program. Success of mentorship significantly correlated (P < 0.0001) with frequency of

  3. Quo vadis pediatric nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Conway, James J

    2007-07-01

    What has happened to the nuclear medicine subspecialty since those earlier issues of the Seminars in Nuclear Medicine? The earliest issues in 1972 presented topics in vogue at the time that included brain "scanning," cisternography, whole body counting, and abdominal imaging with (99m)Tc pertechnetate. The second pediatric subspecialty issues in 1993 reflected a 21-year evolution of the subspecialty and included the topics of renal scintigraphy, labeled cells for abdominal imaging, metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging, single photon emission computed tomography, and bone scintigraphy for benign disorders. The current issues will address diverse topics that cover the spectrum of the current practice of pediatric nuclear medicine. They include radiation exposure and absorbed dose reduction, positron emission tomography/computed tomography in children, neuroblastoma and other neuroendocrine tumors, thyroid cancer and therapy, bone density studies and, of course, the most prevalent studies in children, renal and bone. Brain, heart, and lung studies complete the spectrum.

  4. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.W.; Brill, A.B.; Bizais, Y.J.C.; Rowe, R.W.; Zubal, I.G.

    1983-03-11

    It is an object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system having the versatility to do positron annihilation studies, rotating single or opposed camera gamma emission studies, and orthogonal gamma emission studies. It is a further object of this invention to provide an imaging system having the capability for orthogonal dual multipinhole tomography. It is another object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system in which all available energy data, as well as patient physiological data, are acquired simultaneously in list mode.

  5. Structure and Activities of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H; Owunwanne, Azuwuike; Alenezi, Saud

    2016-07-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine in Kuwait began in 1965 as a clinic for treating thyroid diseases. The practice developed gradually and until 1981 when the Faculty of Medicine established the Division of Nuclear Medicine in the Department of Radiology, which later became a separate department responsible for establishing and managing the practice in all hospitals of Kuwait. In 1987, a nuclear medicine residency program was begun and it is administered by Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations originally as a 4-year but currently as a 5-year program. Currently there are 11 departments in the ministry of health hospitals staffed by 49 qualified attending physicians, mostly the diplomats of the Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations nuclear medicine residency program, 4 academic physicians, 2 radiopharmacists, 2 physicists, and 130 technologists. These departments are equipped with 33 dual-head gamma cameras, 10 SPET/CT, 5 PET/CT, 2 cyclotrons, 1 breast-specific gamma imaging, 1 positron-emitting mammography, 10 thyroid uptake units, 8 technegas machines, 7 PET infusion systems, and 8 treadmills. Activities of nuclear medicine in Kuwait include education and training, clinical service, and research. Education includes nuclear medicine technology program in the Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, the 5-year residency program, medical school teaching distributed among different modules of the integrated curriculum with 14 didactic lecture, and other teaching sessions in nuclear medicine MSc program, which run concurrently with the first part of the residency program. The team of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait has been active in research and has published more than 300 paper, 11 review articles, 12 book chapters, and 17 books in addition to 36 grants and 2 patents. A PhD program approved by Kuwait University Council would begin in 2016.

  6. Nuclear medicine/radiology training and certification requirements recent changes.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay; Graham, Michael M; Maurer, Alan; Guiberteau, Milton J; Miller, Tom R; Vydareny, Kay

    2006-11-01

    There have been many recent changes in governmental regulations affecting nuclear medicine/nuclear radiology practice and training requirements. This article summarizes the background for these changes, and summarizes the new requirements for residency training, board certification, and authorized user status.

  7. Identifying inaccuracies on emergency medicine residency applications

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Eric D; Shockley, Lee; Kass, Lawrence; Howes, David; Tupesis, Janis P; Weaver, Christopher; Sayan, Osman R; Hogan, Victoria; Begue, Jason; Vrocher, Diamond; Frazer, Jackie; Evans, Timothy; Hern, Gene; Riviello, Ralph; Rivera, Antonio; Kinoshita, Keith; Ferguson, Edward

    2005-01-01

    Background Previous trials have showed a 10–30% rate of inaccuracies on applications to individual residency programs. No studies have attempted to corroborate this on a national level. Attempts by residency programs to diminish the frequency of inaccuracies on applications have not been reported. We seek to clarify the national incidence of inaccuracies on applications to emergency medicine residency programs. Methods This is a multi-center, single-blinded, randomized, cohort study of all applicants from LCME accredited schools to involved EM residency programs. Applications were randomly selected to investigate claims of AOA election, advanced degrees and publications. Errors were reported to applicants' deans and the NRMP. Results Nine residencies reviewed 493 applications (28.6% of all applicants who applied to any EM program). 56 applications (11.4%, 95%CI 8.6–14.2%) contained at least one error. Excluding "benign" errors, 9.8% (95% CI 7.2–12.4%), contained at least one error. 41% (95% CI 35.0–47.0%) of all publications contained an error. All AOA membership claims were verified, but 13.7% (95%CI 4.4–23.1%) of claimed advanced degrees were inaccurate. Inter-rater reliability of evaluations was good. Investigators were reluctant to notify applicants' dean's offices and the NRMP. Conclusion This is the largest study to date of accuracy on application for residency and the first such multi-centered trial. High rates of incorrect data were found on applications. This data will serve as a baseline for future years of the project, with emphasis on reporting inaccuracies and warning applicants of the project's goals. PMID:16105178

  8. Computer vision in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Gerald

    1990-11-01

    Computervision is used to overcome the mismatch between user models and implementation models of software systems for image analysis in nuclear medicine. Computer vision in nuclear medicine results in an active support of the user by the system. This is reached by modeling of imaging equipment and schedules scenes of interest and the process of visual image interpretation. Computer vision is demonstrated especially in the low level and medium level range. Special highlights are given for the estimation of image quality an uniform approach to enhancement and restoration of images and analysis of shape and dynamics of patterns. 1.

  9. Communication skills training for emergency medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Orhan; Ak, Mehmet; Sutcigil, Levent; Congologlu, Emel Dovyap; Canbaz, Hayri; Kilic, Erden; Ozmenler, Kamil Nahit

    2012-02-01

    To determine the effects of a communication skills training program on emergency medicine residents and patient satisfaction. Twenty emergency medicine residents attended a 6-week psychoeducation program that was intended to improve their communication skills. The first three sessions of the psychoeducation program consisted of theoretical education on empathy and communication. Other sessions covered awareness, active communication, and empathic skills on a cognitive behavioral basis using discussion, role play, and homework within an interactive group. The effects of the program were assessed using a communication skills scale, empathy scale, and patient satisfaction survey and were reflected by the reduction in the number of undesirable events between doctors and patients in the emergency department. The mean communication skills score increased from 178.7±19 to 189.2±16 after training (P<0.02). Empathy score also increased from 29.5±9 to 30.7±8, but this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.1). The patient satisfaction survey of 576 patients demonstrated increased scores on confidence in the doctor (88.2±14.6-93.6±10.3; P<0.01); the doctor's respect, kindness, and thoughtfulness (90.3±10.8-94.1±16.5; P<0.01); individualized attention (86.7±9.4-93.9±11.1; P<0.01); devotion of adequate time to listening (88.6±12.3-90.8±14.1; P=0.04); and counseling and information delivery (90.1±11.3-92.2±11.7; P=0.02). The number of undesirable events between doctors and patients decreased 75% from 12 to three. Participation in a communication skills training program was associated with improved communication skills of emergency medicine residents, increased patient satisfaction, and decreased complaints.

  10. Emergency Medicine Resident Perceptions of Medical Professionalism

    PubMed Central

    Jauregui, Joshua; Gatewood, Medley O.; Ilgen, Jonathan S.; Schaninger, Caitlin; Strote, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Medical professionalism is a core competency for emergency medicine (EM) trainees; but defining professionalism remains challenging, leading to difficulties creating objectives and performing assessment. Because professionalism is dynamic, culture-specific, and often taught by modeling, an exploration of trainees’ perceptions can highlight their educational baseline and elucidate the importance they place on general conventional professionalism domains. To this end, our objective was to assess the relative value EM residents place on traditional components of professionalism. Methods We performed a cross-sectional, multi-institutional survey of incoming and graduating EM residents at four programs. The survey was developed using the American Board of Internal Medicine’s “Project Professionalism” and the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education definition of professionalism competency. We identified 27 attributes within seven domains: clinical excellence, humanism, accountability, altruism, duty and service, honor and integrity, and respect for others. Residents were asked to rate each attribute on a 10-point scale. We analyzed data to assess variance across attributes as well as differences between residents at different training levels or different institutions. Results Of the 114 residents eligible, 100 (88%) completed the survey. The relative value assigned to different professional attributes varied considerably, with those in the altruism domain valued significantly lower and those in the “respect for others” and “honor and integrity” valued significantly higher (p<0.001). Significant differences were found between interns and seniors for five attributes primarily in the “duty and service” domain (p<0.05). Among different residencies, significant differences were found with attributes within the “altruism” and “duty and service” domains (p<0.05). Conclusion Residents perceive differences in the relative

  11. Progression of emergency medicine resident productivity.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Daniel F; Silvestri, Salvatore; Sun, Joanne Y; Papa, Linda

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate the progression in productivity of emergency medicine (EM) residents by postgraduate year, as measured by hourly work in relative value units (RVUs). This retrospective study was conducted at an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited EM residency with a postgraduate year (PGY) 1-2-3 configuration. A query of an electronic billing database composed of more than 230,000 visits from academic years July 2003 to December 2006, representing at least four classes at each PGY level, was conducted. The main outcome was change in productivity in RVUs generated per hour, compared by resident PGY level. This measure encompasses not only volume of patients seen but also patient acuity in terms of evaluation and management services and procedures provided and supported by documentation adequate for coding. Descriptive statistics and Tukey's test were used for data analysis. Over the three-year study period, 70 EM residents were assessed at various levels of training. Productivity, as measured by mean RVUs generated per hour, was 2.51 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.20 to 2.82) for PGY-1 residents, 3.51 (95% CI = 3.12 to 3.90) for PGY-2 residents, and 3.61 (95% CI = 3.41 to 3.80) for PGY-3 residents (p < 0.001). Patient acuity (RVUs generated per patient) increased 5%-8% with each PGY progression: 3.05 (95% CI = 2.96 to 3.13) for PGY-1, 3.20 (95% CI = 3.09 to 3.31) for PGY-2, and 3.46 (95% CI = 3.42 to 3.50) for PGY-3 (p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant increase in productivity (p < 0.001) and acuity (p = 0.03) from PGY-1 to PGY-2, with acuity also increasing between PGY-2 and PGY-3 (p < 0.001). Hourly work productivity and acuity increased with experience within this ACGME-accredited EM residency. The progression in workload and acuity by PGY is measurable and commensurate with the graduated level of responsibility desired in an EM program.

  12. Radiation Safety in Nuclear Medicine Procedures.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sang-Geon; Kim, Jahae; Song, Ho-Chun

    2017-03-01

    Since the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011, radiation safety has become an important issue in nuclear medicine. Many structured guidelines or recommendations of various academic societies or international campaigns demonstrate important issues of radiation safety in nuclear medicine procedures. There are ongoing efforts to fulfill the basic principles of radiation protection in daily nuclear medicine practice. This article reviews important principles of radiation protection in nuclear medicine procedures. Useful references, important issues, future perspectives of the optimization of nuclear medicine procedures, and diagnostic reference level are also discussed.

  13. Nuclear medicine in NET.

    PubMed

    Sorschag, Manfred; Malle, Phillip; Gallowitsch, Hans-Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are, despite increasing incidence, still rare, usually slow growing neoplasms with resemblance to nerve cells and the endocrine capability of hormone production. In contrast to commonly used conventional imaging procedures, nuclear imaging is feasible to visualize the presence of molecular biomarkers, particularly the overexpression of somatostatin receptors (sstr) with high diagnostic accuracy which has led to the establishment of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) as essential component and gold standard of functional imaging in the workup of NET. Another major feature is the selection of patients with inoperable or metastasized tumors showing sufficient uptake for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). While somatostatin receptor PET and PET/CT using Ga-68-labeled SSR analogs represents the consistent further development of SRS, FDG-PET can only be used in tumors with high proliferative activity but not on a routine basis for imaging of neuroendocrine tumors. (18)F-DOPA represents an alternative PET tracer worth mentioning currently under assessment for NET imaging.

  14. Nuclear medicine training and practice in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Kamínek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear medicine in the Czech Republic is a full specialty with an exclusive practice. Since the training program was organized and structured in recent years, residents have had access to the specialty of nuclear medicine, starting with a two-year general internship (in internal medicine or radiology). At present, nuclear medicine services are provided in 45 departments. In total, 119 nuclear medicine specialists are currently registered. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, five years of training are necessary; the first two years consist of a general internship in internal medicine or radiology. The remaining three years consist of training in the nuclear medicine specialty itself, but includes three months of practice in radiology. Twenty-one physicians are currently in nuclear medicine training and a mean of three specialists pass the final exam per year. The syllabus is very similar to that of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), namely concerning the minimum recommended numbers for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In principle, the Czech law requires continuous medical education for all practicing doctors. The Czech Medical Chamber has provided a continuing medical education (CME) system. Other national CMEs are not accepted in Czech Republic.

  15. Pediatric training in emergency medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, S; Fleisher, G; Henretig, F; Ruddy, R

    1982-04-01

    Endorsed emergency medicine (EM) residency programs were surveyed as to the nature and extent of training they provided in pediatric emergency care (PEC). In the surveys returned (82%) there were several important findings. The amount of time in PEC training was generally two months per year of training. This accounted for 16% of training time. However, the volume of pediatric patients was 25% of the overall patient population. There was wide variation in the sites of PEC training. Didactic sessions often did not cover even core topics. The training program directors were equally divided in their satisfaction with this aspect of their programs. Changes were recommended by 80% of the directors. Changes most often suggested were increasing pediatric patient exposure and obtaining PEC specialists as trainers.

  16. Integrative Medicine in a Preventive Medicine Residency: A Program for the Urban Underserved.

    PubMed

    Berz, Jonathan P B; Gergen Barnett, Katherine A; Gardiner, Paula; Saper, Robert B

    2015-11-01

    The Preventive Medicine Residency Program collaborated with the Department of Family Medicine's Program for Integrative Medicine and Health Disparities at Boston Medical Center to create a new rotation for preventive medicine residents starting in autumn 2012. Residents participated in integrative medicine group visits and consults, completed an online curriculum in dietary supplements, and participated in seminars all in the context of an urban safety net hospital. This collaboration was made possible by a federal Health Resources and Services Administration grant for integrative medicine in preventive medicine residencies and helped meet a need of the program to increase residents' exposure to clinical preventive medicine and integrative health clinical skills and principles. The collaboration has resulted in a required rotation for all residents that continues after the grant period and has fostered additional collaborations related to integrative medicine across the programs. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation detectors in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Ranger, N T

    1999-01-01

    Single-photon-emitting or positron-emitting radionuclides employed in nuclear medicine are detected by using sophisticated imaging devices, whereas simpler detection devices are used to quantify activity for the following applications: measuring doses of radiopharmaceuticals, performing radiotracer bioassays, and monitoring and controlling radiation risk in the clinical environment. Detectors are categorized in terms of function, the physical state of the transducer, or the mode of operation. The performance of a detector is described by the parameters efficiency, energy resolution and discrimination, and dead time. A detector may be used to detect single events (pulse mode) or to measure the rate of energy deposition (current mode). Some detectors are operated as simple counting systems by using a single-channel pulse height analyzer to discriminate against background or other extraneous events. Other detectors are operated as spectrometers and use a multichannel analyzer to form an energy spectrum. The types of detectors encountered in nuclear medicine are gas-filled detectors, scintillation detectors, and semiconductor detectors. The ionization detector, Geiger-Müller detector, extremity and area monitor, dose calibrator, well counter, thyroid uptake probe, Anger scintillation camera, positron emission tomographic scanner, solid-state personnel dosimeter, and intraoperative probe are examples of detectors used in clinical nuclear medicine practice.

  18. Evolution of nuclear medicine training: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Graham, Michael M; Metter, Darlene F

    2007-02-01

    Since the official inception of nuclear medicine in 1971, the practice of nuclear medicine and its training programs have undergone major revisions. Numerous procedures that were common in the 1970s are no longer available, and many new radiotracers and procedures have since been developed. Training programs have evolved from an unstructured experience before 1971 to 2 y of nuclear medicine training after 2 clinical years, to 2 y of nuclear medicine training after 1 clinical year and, most recently, to 3 y of nuclear medicine training after 1 clinical year. The most substantial content changes in the new 2007 training program requirements are an increased emphasis on 6 clinical competencies, an increased emphasis on Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements, and a new CT training requirement that was spawned by the advent of PET/CT. In addition to the new training program requirements, residents will need to become familiar with the concept of maintenance of certification, which will continue to be an important component of their professional careers. Nuclear medicine is gradually evolving into molecular imaging. Hence, it is inevitable that in the near future, training programs will be required to place greater emphasis on molecular imaging in both clinical and research applications. The incorporation of molecular imaging will represent a significant paradigm shift for the specialty but will ensure that nuclear medicine will be a major part of medical practice for the foreseeable future.

  19. Evaluation of a quality improvement curriculum for family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Tudiver, Fred; Click, Ivy A; Ward, Patricia; Basden, Jeri Ann

    2013-01-01

    East Tennessee State University's (ETSU) Department of Family Medicine initiated Quality Improvement (QI) training in its three residency programs in 2008. The purpose of the project was to develop, implement, and assess a formal curriculum and experiential learning process to train family medicine residents in QI knowledge and skills. Family medicine faculty members received training in QI theory and design. Rising second-year residents received a day-long workshop on the basics of QI principles. Residents worked in teams to develop and implement QI projects. Self-assessed QI proficiency was measured prior to and immediately following the workshop. QI knowledge was assessed with the Quality Improvement Knowledge Application Tool (QIKAT) at baseline and following project completion. Two groups of residents (n=37) received training and completed at least 1 year on their projects. Analyses revealed that residents' self-assessed QI proficiency improved after receiving a day-long training workshop and was consistent for both groups of resident training. Application of QI knowledge as assessed by the QIKAT did not improve following QI project participation in resident Group 1 but did improve in resident Group 2. A formal QI curriculum was successfully developed and implemented into three family medicine residency programs. Residents' QI knowledge and skills improved following training and experience conducting QI projects. Faculty and resident commitment to the program and competing time demands proved challenging to the introduction of QI training. Future studies should assess residents' sustained learning and translating QI residency experiences into practice.

  20. Nuclear Medicine in Pediatric Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Ornella; Stellin, Giovanni; Zucchetta, Pietro

    2017-03-01

    Accurate cardiovascular imaging is essential for the successful management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Echocardiography and angiography have been for long time the most important imaging modalities in pediatric cardiology, but nuclear medicine has contributed in many situations to the comprehension of physiological consequences of CHD, quantifying pulmonary blood flow symmetry or right-to-left shunting. In recent times, remarkable improvements in imaging equipments, particularly in multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have led to the progressive integration of high resolution modalities in the clinical workup of children affected by CHD, reducing the role of diagnostic angiography. Technology has seen a parallel evolution in the field of nuclear medicine, with the advent of hybrid machines, as SPECT/CT and PET/CT scanners. Improved detectors, hugely increased computing power, and new reconstruction algorithms allow for a significant reduction of the injected dose, with a parallel relevant decrease in radiation exposure. Nuclear medicine retains its distinctive capability of exploring at the tissue level many functional aspects of CHD in a safe and reproducible way. The lack of invasiveness, the limited need for sedation, the low radiation burden, and the insensitivity to body habitus variations make nuclear medicine an ideal complement of echocardiography. This is particularly true during the follow-up of patients with CHD, whose increasing survival represent a great medical success and a challenge for the health system in the next decades. Metabolic imaging using (18)FDG PET/CT has expanded its role in the management of infection and inflammation in adult patients, particularly in cardiology. The same expansion is observed in pediatric cardiology, with an increasing rate of studies on the use of FDG PET for the evaluation of children with vasculitis, suspected valvular infection or infected prosthetic devices. The

  1. Enhancing laboratory activities in nuclear medicine education.

    PubMed

    Grantham, Vesper; Martin, Chris; Schmitz, Casey

    2009-12-01

    Hands-on or active learning is important in nuclear medicine education. As more curricula start to require greater standards and as distance education expands, the effective use of laboratories in nuclear medicine education remains important in physics, instrumentation, and imaging but is often overlooked or underutilized. Laboratory exercises are a unique opportunity for nuclear medicine educators to facilitate students' critical thinking and problem-solving skills in a manner that often cannot occur in lectures or during online education. Given the lack of current laboratory tools and publications, there exists a requirement for nuclear medicine educators to develop, enhance, and monitor educational tools for laboratory exercises. Expanding technologies, variations in imaging and measurement systems, and the need to ensure that the taught technology is relevant to nuclear medicine students are issues faced by nuclear medicine educators. This article, based on principles of instructional design, focuses on the components and development of effective and enhanced nuclear medicine laboratories in our current educational environment.

  2. The Residency Training Experience in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shofler, David; Chuang, Taijung; Argade, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The podiatric medicine and surgery residency is currently characterized by 3 years of comprehensive training. Contemporary issues have recently influenced the direction of training in the profession of podiatric medicine. Formal investigation into the residency training experience has, nonetheless, been limited. The purpose of the present study was to conduct a learning needs assessment of podiatric residency training. An electronic survey was developed, with comparable versions for program directors and residents. The specific topics investigated included the use of minimum activity volume numbers, learning resources, duty hours, strengths and weaknesses of residents, motivation of hosting student externship positions, noncognitive residency traits, meetings between residents and directors, resident satisfaction, and director satisfaction. A total of 197 program directors nationwide were sent the survey electronically, and 109 (53%) responded. Of 230 residents receiving the survey, 159 (78%) responded. Several statistically significant differences, and notable similarities, were observed between the 2 groups encompassing many aspects of the survey. A majority opinion, among both directors and residents, was found that the use of procedural assessment tools might improve resident evaluation. The responding directors and residents agreed that the following 3 topics were weaknesses in podiatric training: practice management, biomechanics, and performing podiatric research. Direct feedback immediately after surgery was the most valuable learning resource reported by the residents. The results of our study reflect the current status of the podiatric medicine and surgery residency and could facilitate improvement in the residency training experience. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Experiences with a combined residency in internal and preventive medicine.

    PubMed

    Wild, Dorothea M G; Tessier-Sherman, Baylah; Jekel, James F; Ahmadi, Ramin; D'Souza, Seema; Nawaz, Haq

    2008-10-01

    The importance of integrating preventive medicine training into other residency programs was reinforced recently by the residency review committee for preventive medicine. Griffin Hospital in Derby CT has offered a 4-year integrated internal medicine and preventive medicine residency program since 1997. This article reports the outcomes of that program. Data were collected from surveys of program graduates and the American Boards of Internal and Preventive Medicine in 2005-2007, and analyzed in 2007-2008. Graduates rated the program in regard to job preparation, the ease of transition to employment, the value of skills learned, the perceived quality of board preparation, and the quality of the program overall. Graduates rated themselves on core competencies set by the Accreditation Committee for Graduate Medical Education. Since 1997, the program has enrolled 22 residents. Residents and graduates contribute significantly toward quality of care at the hospital. Graduates take and pass at high rates the boards for both for internal and preventive medicine: 100% took internal medicine boards, 90% of them passed; 63% took preventive medicine boards, 100% of them passed). The program has recruited residents mainly through the match. Graduates rated most elements of the program highly. They felt well-prepared for their postgraduation jobs; most respondents reported routinely using preventive medicine skills learned during residency. Graduates either have gone into academic medicine (31%); public health (14%); clinical fellowships (18%); or primary care (9%); or they combine elements of clinical medicine and public health (28%). Integrating preventive medicine training into clinical residency programs may be an efficient, viable, and cost-effective way of creating more medical specialists with population-medicine skills.

  4. Teaching strategies used by internal medicine residents on the wards.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dustin T; Kohlwes, R Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Residents serve as teachers to interns and students in most internal medicine residency programs. The purpose of our study is to explore what internal medicine residents perceive as effective teaching strategies in the inpatient setting and to formulate a guideline for preparing residents to lead their ward teams. Housestaff identified as excellent teaching residents were recruited from a large internal medicine residency program. Focus groups were formed and interviews were conducted using open-ended questions. Transcripts of the interviews were reviewed, analyzed, and compared for accuracy by two investigators. The transcripts were then coded to categorize data into similar subjects from which recurrent themes in resident teaching were identified. Twenty-two residents participated in four focus group interviews held in 2008. We identified five principal themes for effective teaching by residents: (T)aking advantage of teaching opportunities, (E)mpowering learners, (A)ssuming the role of leader, (C)reating a learning environment, and (H)abituating the practice of teaching. Strategies for effective teaching by residents exist. The TEACH mnemonic is a resident-identified method of instruction. Use of this tool could enable residency programs to create instructional curricula to prepare their residents and interns to take on the roles of team leaders and teachers.

  5. Training Experiences of Family Medicine Residents on Behavioral Health Rotations.

    PubMed

    Zubatsky, Max; Brieler, Jay; Jacobs, Christine

    2017-09-01

    Although accreditation guidelines for residency in family medicine include behavioral health curriculum, little is known about resident learning activities in real world training. Our study explored residents' perceptions about and exposure to specific activities during their behavioral health rotations. Family medicine residents (N=84) recruited via faculty list serves completed a survey about their experiences during behavioral health rotations. The survey included quantitative Likert scale questions, along with open-ended questions on which a qualitative content analysis was performed. Open-ended responses indicated that many residents receive constructive observation and collaboration opportunities during their training month. However, residents wanted more time to practice behavioral health skills beyond the rotation, more practice in psychotherapy skills, and additional education on medication management. Most residents (62%) received either limited or no training in couples or family therapy during their behavioral health rotation. Residents who reported more behavioral health knowledge gain during the rotation also reported higher self-perceived competency using Motivational Interviewing (M=3.82, P<.01). While family medicine as a discipline is based on the biopsychosocial model of care, residents reported deficits in education about family systems. Residents desire additional opportunities to learn psychotherapy techniques and practice counseling skills. Family medicine residency programs and faculty may consider supplementing their core behavioral curriculum to include these content areas.

  6. Topics of nuclear medicine research in Europe.

    PubMed

    Inubushi, Masayuki; Kaneta, Tomohiro; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Okizaki, Atsutaka; Oku, Naohiko

    2017-07-25

    Last year in the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, we introduced some recent nuclear medicine research conducted in Japan. This was favorably received by European readers in the main. This year we wish to focus on the Annals of Nuclear Medicine on some of the fine nuclear medicine research work executed in Europe recently. In the current review article, we take up five topics: prostate-specific membrane antigen imaging, recent advances in radionuclide therapy, [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (PET) for dementia, quantitative PET assessment of myocardial perfusion, and iodine-124 ((124)I). Just at the most recent annual meeting of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine 2016, Kyoto was selected as the host city for the 2022 Congress of the World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology. We hope that our continuous efforts to strengthen scientific cooperation between Europe and Japan will bring many European friends and a great success to the Kyoto meeting.

  7. Diagnostic interventions in nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Thrall, J.H.; Swanson, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnostic interventions in nuclear medicine may be defined as the coadministration of a nonradioactive drug or application of a physical stimulus or physiologic maneuver to enhance the diagnostic utility of a nuclear medicine test. The rationale for each interventional maneuver follows from the physiology or metabolism of the particular organ or organ system under evaluation. Diagnostic inference is drawn from the pattern of change in the biodistribution of the tracer in response to the intervention-induced change in metabolism or function. In current practice, the most commonly performed interventional maneuvers are aimed at studies of the heart, genitourinary system, hepatobiliary system, and gastrointestinal tract. The single most commonly performed interventional study in the United States is the stress Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scan aimed at the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The stress portion of the study is accomplished with dynamic leg exercise on a treadmill and is aimed at increasing myocardial oxygen demands. Areas of myocardium distal to hemodynamically significant lesions in the coronary arteries become ischemic at peak stress due to the inability of the stenotic vessel to respond to the oxygen demand/blood flow needs of the myocardium. Ischemic areas are readily recognized as photopenic defects on scans obtained immediately after exercise, with normalization upon delayed imaging. Diuresis renography is aimed at the differential diagnosis of hydroureteronephrosis. By challenging the urinary tract collecting structures with an augmented urine flow, dilated, unobstructed systems can be differentiated from systems with significant mechanical obstruction. 137 references.

  8. Hospitalist involvement in family medicine residency training: A CERA study.

    PubMed

    Baldor, Robert; Savageau, Judith A; Shokar, Navkiran; Potts, Stacy; Gravel, Joseph; Eisenstock, Kimberly; Ledwith, James

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about the impact of hospitalists on family medicine residencies. We surveyed family medicine residency directors to assess attitudes about hospitalists and their involvement in residency teaching. Questions were included in the 2012 Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) survey of family medicine residency directors. Univariate statistics were used to describe programs, directors, and our questions on the use of hospitalists. Bivariate statistics were used to examine relationships between the use of hospitalists to teach and program characteristics. Forty-one percent (n=175) of residency directors completed the hospitalist section of the CERA survey. Sixty-six percent of residency programs were community based/university affiliated. The majority of directors who have, or are planning to develop, a hospitalist service currently use an internal medicine service (92.5%), followed by family medicine (39.1%), pediatrics (35.4%), OB/laborists (18.0%), and combined services (8.7%). The majority of programs with a hospitalist training track (or plans to develop one) indicated that this was for a family medicine service. Sixty percent of programs that have a hospitalist service involve hospitalists in teaching. Twenty percent of directors reported that hospitalists serve as family medicine faculty, and 63% viewed them as "good educators." However, 85% reported no reduction in inpatient teaching by family medicine faculty despite using hospitalist teaching services. Hospitalists have a significant educational role in family medicine resident training. Further research is needed to explore how hospitalists and family medicine faculty can collaborate to promote enhanced efficiency and effectiveness as residency teachers.

  9. Project ASPIRE: Incorporating Integrative Medicine Into Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Haq; Via, Christina M.; Ali, Ather; Rosenberger, Lisa D.

    2016-01-01

    Griffin Hospital, a community hospital affiliated with Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Medicine, received Health Resources and Services Administration funding to strengthen and improve its combined internal medicine and general preventive medicine residency program by incorporating an integrative medicine curriculum. The purpose of project ASPIRE (Advancing Skills of Preventive medicine residents through Integrative medicine Education, Research and Evaluation) was to create, implement, and evaluate a needs-based, innovative training curriculum in integrative medicine. Through this robust new training, the authors aimed to produce preventive medicine-trained physicians with competencies in integrative medicine to collaboratively work with other integrative medicine practitioners in interdisciplinary teams to provide holistic, patient-centered care. The multifaceted collaborative curriculum was composed of didactics, grand rounds, journal club, objective structured clinical examinations, and two new practicum rotations in integrative medicine. The new practicum rotations included block rotations at the Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital and the Yale Stress Center. Between 2012 and 2014, three cohorts participated in the curriculum; two of these cohorts included three advanced preventive medicine residents each and the fourth included four residents. Project faculty conducted 14 lectures and journal clubs, and two grand rounds. Six of the ten participating residents (60%) completed integrative medicine clinical rotations. Residents’ attitudes toward integrative medicine were evaluated through self-assessment using the Complementary, Alternative, and Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire; data were analyzed in 2015. This article describes the results of this prospective observational study based on single-institution experience over the course of the 2-year project period. PMID:26477907

  10. Nuclear medicine applications for the diabetic foot

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorne, M.F.; Peters, V.

    1987-04-01

    Although not frequently described in the podiatric literature, nuclear medicine imaging may be of great assistance to the clinical podiatrist. This report reviews in detail the use of modern nuclear medicine approaches to the diagnosis and management of the diabetic foot. Nuclear medicine techniques are helpful in evaluating possible osteomyelitis, in determining appropriate amputation levels, and in predicting response to conservative ulcer management. Specific indications for bone, gallium, and perfusion imaging are described.

  11. Fellowship or Further Training for Family Medicine Residents?

    PubMed

    Sairenji, Tomoko; Dai, Mingliang; Eden, Aimee R; Peterson, Lars E; Mainous, Arch G

    2017-09-01

    The breadth of family medicine (FM) generates debate about the length of residency training. One argument used by proponents for lengthening training is that residents feel unprepared for practice. The objectives of our study were to (1) identify the proportion of FM residency graduates intending to pursue fellowship training and those who would have done an additional year of core residency training had it been available, and (2) determine whether an association exists between these two variables. We used data collected by the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) as part of resident certification examination application in 2014 and 2015. Data included fellowship intention, and interest in pursuing another year of residency training if it were available. We used descriptive and bivariate statistics. The questionnaire was completed by 6,235 residents, of which 17.0% (n=1,063) intended to enroll in a fellowship. Overall 54.2% of residents were "not at all likely" to extend residency training, with 19.9% "extremely/moderately likely". Forty-six percent of those intending a fellowship were "not at all likely" to extend training and only 29% of those "extremely/moderately likely" to extend residency training intended to enroll in a fellowship. We found a disconnect between fellowship intention and desire for another year of residency training. Desire for fellowship may be more about obtaining specific skills and expertise or additional certifications, and less about being prepared for general practice in family medicine.

  12. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland.

    PubMed

    Teresińska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Królicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2014-10-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes regular

  13. Animal laboratories for procedural education of emergency medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Custalow, Catherine B; Williams-Murphy, Monica

    2004-04-01

    Many Emergency Medicine residencies incorporate animal laboratories into their training for procedural education because clinical opportunities to practice some emergency technical procedures are limited. To determine the proportion of Emergency Medicine residency programs utilizing animal laboratories, their characteristics, and the major impediments to providing animal laboratories, a cross-sectional descriptive survey of Emergency Medicine residency directors was conducted. Surveys were returned by 109/123 (89%) program directors. Ninety-four (87%) programs provide live animal laboratories for procedural training, an increase from previous studies. Although only 28% of directors knew the cost of the laboratories, this was the most commonly listed impediment (66%) to providing them. In conclusion, the use of animal laboratories for procedural training in Emergency Medicine residencies has increased in recent years. Cost is reported to be the most significant impediment to providing animal laboratories. The majority of program directors do not know the actual expense of providing animal laboratories.

  14. Family medicine residency directors' perceptions of the position of chief resident.

    PubMed

    Susman, J; Gilbert, C

    1992-03-01

    This report describes a survey that explored the selection, training, duties, skills, and evaluation of chief residents as perceived by the program directors of the 381 family medicine residencies in the United States in 1989. A response rate of 79% (300 programs) was achieved. In 70% of the programs the chief resident received no formal training, and in 41% no formal evaluation. The program directors believed the most important duties and skills of a chief resident were acting as a liaison and advocate for residents, scheduling, and leadership. The directors thought that the most exciting aspects of being a chief resident included the development of leadership skills and the ability to influence curriculum; the aspects that caused the most concern included time pressures and demands that detract from clinical learning. The authors suggest that more attention should be directed to the nurturing and development of chief residents, who are the future leaders in academic medicine.

  15. Nuclear Medicine Technology: A Suggested Postsecondary Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Cambridge, MA.

    The purpose of this curriculum guide is to assist administrators and instructors in establishing nuclear medicine technician programs that will meet the accreditation standards of the American Medical Association (AMA) Council on Medical Education. The guide has been developed to prepare nuclear medicine technicians (NMT's) in two-year…

  16. Nuclear Medicine Technology: A Suggested Postsecondary Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Cambridge, MA.

    The purpose of this curriculum guide is to assist administrators and instructors in establishing nuclear medicine technician programs that will meet the accreditation standards of the American Medical Association (AMA) Council on Medical Education. The guide has been developed to prepare nuclear medicine technicians (NMT's) in two-year…

  17. Training family medicine residents to care for children

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Pauline; Curran, Vernon; Hollett, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed There is a lack of consensus around the optimal way to train family medicine residents to care for children. Objective of program Evaluation of an ambulatory versus an inpatient pediatrics rotation for family medicine residents. Program description A 4-week pediatrics rotation for second-year family medicine residents was introduced involving half-day ambulatory pediatric clinics. A nonequivalent control group evaluation study design was followed. Patient logbook entries, as well as residents’ satisfaction, knowledge, and self-reported confidence outcomes were compared between family medicine residents completing the new ambulatory rotation and those completing a traditional inpatient-ambulatory pediatrics rotation. Conclusion An ambulatory rotation in pediatrics is a feasible option for facilitating family medicine resident learning in child health care. Residents report exposure to more patient cases that reflect a family practice office setting and the same level of knowledge and confidence as residents completing an inpatient-ambulatory rotation. Intraprofessional collaboration, flexibility in scheduling, and the support of pediatric preceptors are key factors in the organization and implementation of an ambulatory rotation. PMID:21321160

  18. Family medicine residency training and burnout: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Kimberly; Oda, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Background Almost three-quarters of family practice residents in British Columbia (BC) meet criteria for burnout. We sought to understand how burnout is perceived and experienced by family medicine residents, and to identify both contributory and protective factors for resident burnout. Method Two semi-structured focus groups were conducted with ten family practice residents from five distinct University of British Columbia training sites. Participants completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Seventy percent of the focus group participants met criteria for burnout using the MBI. The experience of burnout was described as physical and emotional exhaustion, loss of motivation, isolation from loved ones, and disillusionment with the medical profession. Contributory factors included high workload, burned-out colleagues, perceived undervaluing of family medicine, lack of autonomy, and inability to achieve work-life balance. Protective factors included strong role models in medicine, feeling that one’s work is valued and rotations in family medicine. Conclusions The high level of burnout in family medicine residents in BC is a multifactorial and complex phenomenon. Training programs and faculty should be aware of burnout risk factors and strive to implement changes to reduce burnout, including allowing residents increased control over scheduling, access to counseling services and training for resident mentors. PMID:26451218

  19. Pediatric residents' experiences of a clinical rotation in Adolescent Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although Adolescent Medicine is a pediatric subspecialty, it addresses many issues that differ from other aspects of pediatrics clinical training. The aim of this study was to explore the general experiences of pediatric residents during their rotations in Adolescent Medicine. Methods Qualitative methods were applied. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with pediatric residents who had completed a rotation in Adolescent Medicine. Emergent themes were identified. Results Three key themes emerged: gaining exposure, taking on a professional role, and achieving self-awareness. Subcategories were also identified. There was particular emphasis on the multidisciplinary team and the biopsychosocial approach to adolescent health care. Conclusions The experiences in Adolescent Medicine reflected residents' learning, notably gains in the "non-expert" as well as "medical expert" physician competencies. Future studies should explore how the interprofessional nature of an Adolescent Medicine team and the patient populations themselves contribute to this learning. PMID:21122143

  20. Pediatric residents' experiences of a clinical rotation in Adolescent Medicine.

    PubMed

    Albuhairan, Fadia; Leslie, Karen; Goldberg, Eudice

    2010-12-01

    Although Adolescent Medicine is a pediatric subspecialty, it addresses many issues that differ from other aspects of pediatrics clinical training. The aim of this study was to explore the general experiences of pediatric residents during their rotations in Adolescent Medicine. Qualitative methods were applied. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with pediatric residents who had completed a rotation in Adolescent Medicine. Emergent themes were identified. Three key themes emerged: gaining exposure, taking on a professional role, and achieving self-awareness. Subcategories were also identified. There was particular emphasis on the multidisciplinary team and the biopsychosocial approach to adolescent health care. The experiences in Adolescent Medicine reflected residents' learning, notably gains in the "non-expert" as well as "medical expert" physician competencies. Future studies should explore how the interprofessional nature of an Adolescent Medicine team and the patient populations themselves contribute to this learning.

  1. Redesigning the nuclear medicine reading room.

    PubMed

    Zemariame, Nigist; Knight, Nancy; Siegel, Eliot L

    2011-11-01

    The process of image review and interpretation has become increasingly complex and challenging for today's nuclear medicine physician from many perspectives, especially with regard to workstation integration and reading room ergonomics. With the recent proliferation of hybrid imaging systems, this complexity has increased rapidly, along with the number of studies performed. At the same time, clinicians throughout the health care enterprise are expecting remote access to nuclear medicine images whereas nuclear medicine physicians require reliable access at the point of care to the electronic medical record and to medical images from radiology and cardiology. The authors discuss the background and challenges related to integration of nuclear medicine into the health care enterprise and provide a series of recommendations for advancing successful integration efforts. Also addressed are unique characteristics of the nuclear medicine environment as well as ergonomic, lighting, and environmental considerations in the design and redesign of the modern reading room.

  2. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in Pediatric Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Akdemir, Ümit Özgür; Atay Kapucu, Lütfiye Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging can provide important complementary information in the management of pediatric patients with neurological diseases. Pre-surgical localization of the epileptogenic focus in medically refractory epilepsy patients is the most common indication for nuclear medicine imaging in pediatric neurology. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, nuclear medicine imaging is particularly useful when magnetic resonance imaging findings are normal or its findings are discordant with electroencephalogram findings. In pediatric patients with brain tumors, nuclear medicine imaging can be clinically helpful in the diagnosis, directing biopsy, planning therapy, differentiating tumor recurrence from post-treatment sequelae, and assessment of response to therapy. Among other neurological diseases in which nuclear medicine has proved to be useful are patients with head trauma, inflammatory-infectious diseases and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:27299282

  3. Trends in American nuclear medicine training: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, E B

    2000-07-01

    As soon as the capability to produce radioactive atoms was achieved in the 1930s, physician-scientists gravitated as apprentices toward important research centers, such as those at Berkeley, Washington University, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.)/Massachusetts General Hospital. After World War II, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) trained many of the founders of the specialty of nuclear medicine. The initial ORAU preparatory course lasted only 3 weeks. Over the 20 years after World War II, only 100 to 200 physicians had learned radioisotopic techniques and their clinical applications from their older preceptors. The founding of the conjoint American Board of Nuclear Medicine in 1971 (cosponsored by the American Boards of Internal Medicine, Pathology, and Radiology) marked a new era in certifying the quality of graduates of a growing number of nuclear medicine residency programs. Future trends in nuclear medicine education include the following: greater availability of jobs for physicians with board certification in radiology and nuclear medicine; an increased emphasis on training in positron-emission tomography (PET); and recertification and documentation of maintenance of professional competence as certainties.

  4. Lifestyle medicine curriculum for a preventive medicine residency program: implementation and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Haq; Petraro, Paul V; Via, Christina; Ullah, Saif; Lim, Lionel; Wild, Dorothea; Kennedy, Mary; Phillips, Edward M

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of the healthcare problems burdening our society today are caused by disease-promoting lifestyles (e.g., physical inactivity and unhealthy eating). Physicians report poor training and lack of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes. To evaluate a new curriculum and rotation in lifestyle medicine for preventive medicine residents. Training included didactics (six sessions/year), distance learning, educational conferences, and newly developed lifestyle medicine rotations at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and the Integrative Medicine Center. We used a number of tools to assess residents' progress including Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), self-assessments, and logs of personal health habits. A total of 20 residents participated in the lifestyle medicine training between 2010 and 2013. There was a 15% increase in residents' discussions of lifestyle issues with their patients based on their baseline and follow-up surveys. The performance of preventive medicine residents on OSCEs increased each year they were in the program (average OSCE score: PGY1 73%, PGY2 83%, PGY3 87%, and PGY4 91%, p=0.01). Our internal medicine and preliminary residents served as a control, since they did participate in didactics but not in lifestyle medicine rotations. Internal medicine and preliminary residents who completed the same OSCEs had a slightly lower average score (76%) compared with plural for resident, preventive medicine residents (80%). However, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.11). Incorporating the lifestyle medicine curriculum is feasible for preventive medicine training allowing residents to improve their health behavior change discussions with patients as well as their own personal health habits.

  5. Lifestyle medicine curriculum for a preventive medicine residency program: implementation and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Haq; Petraro, Paul V; Via, Christina; Ullah, Saif; Lim, Lionel; Wild, Dorothea; Kennedy, Mary; Phillips, Edward M

    2016-01-01

    Background The vast majority of the healthcare problems burdening our society today are caused by disease-promoting lifestyles (e.g., physical inactivity and unhealthy eating). Physicians report poor training and lack of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes. Objective To evaluate a new curriculum and rotation in lifestyle medicine for preventive medicine residents. Methods Training included didactics (six sessions/year), distance learning, educational conferences, and newly developed lifestyle medicine rotations at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and the Integrative Medicine Center. We used a number of tools to assess residents' progress including Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), self-assessments, and logs of personal health habits. Results A total of 20 residents participated in the lifestyle medicine training between 2010 and 2013. There was a 15% increase in residents' discussions of lifestyle issues with their patients based on their baseline and follow-up surveys. The performance of preventive medicine residents on OSCEs increased each year they were in the program (average OSCE score: PGY1 73%, PGY2 83%, PGY3 87%, and PGY4 91%, p=0.01). Our internal medicine and preliminary residents served as a control, since they did participate in didactics but not in lifestyle medicine rotations. Internal medicine and preliminary residents who completed the same OSCEs had a slightly lower average score (76%) compared with plural for resident, preventive medicine residents (80%). However, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.11). Conclusion Incorporating the lifestyle medicine curriculum is feasible for preventive medicine training allowing residents to improve their health behavior change discussions with patients as well as their own personal health habits.

  6. Screening for Cancer by Residents in an Internal Medicine Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Garrett R.; Prout, Marianne N.

    1986-01-01

    A study of cancer screening by internal medicine residents in an inner-city clinic revealed that screening was more frequent for male patients, and breast examinations and Pap smears were performed on less than a third of female patients, suggesting a need for more intensive early-detection education of residents. (MSE)

  7. Internal Medicine Residents Do Not Accurately Assess Their Medical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Roger; Panda, Mukta; Desbiens, Norman

    2008-01-01

    Background: Medical knowledge is essential for appropriate patient care; however, the accuracy of internal medicine (IM) residents' assessment of their medical knowledge is unknown. Methods: IM residents predicted their overall percentile performance 1 week (on average) before and after taking the in-training exam (ITE), an objective and well…

  8. Effect of location on family medicine residents' training.

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, D.; Hogg, W.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of family medicine residents trained at community-based or hospital-based centres suggested differences in experience and in career plans. Community-based residents saw more patients in the same family, believed they knew the community better, made more housecalls, expected to use allied health professionals more frequently, and were more likely to choose a small community practice. PMID:8499787

  9. Internal Medicine Residents Do Not Accurately Assess Their Medical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Roger; Panda, Mukta; Desbiens, Norman

    2008-01-01

    Background: Medical knowledge is essential for appropriate patient care; however, the accuracy of internal medicine (IM) residents' assessment of their medical knowledge is unknown. Methods: IM residents predicted their overall percentile performance 1 week (on average) before and after taking the in-training exam (ITE), an objective and well…

  10. Screening for Cancer by Residents in an Internal Medicine Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Garrett R.; Prout, Marianne N.

    1986-01-01

    A study of cancer screening by internal medicine residents in an inner-city clinic revealed that screening was more frequent for male patients, and breast examinations and Pap smears were performed on less than a third of female patients, suggesting a need for more intensive early-detection education of residents. (MSE)

  11. Experience with Nuclear Medicine Information System

    PubMed Central

    Volkan-Salanci, Bilge; Şahin, Figen; Babekoğlu, Vahide; Uğur, Ömer

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Radiology information system (RIS) is basically evolved for the need of radiologists and ignores the vital steps needed for a proper work flow of Nuclear Medicine Department. Moreover, CT/MRI oriented classical PACS systems are far from satisfying Nuclear Physicians like storing dynamic data for reprocessing and quantitative analysis of colored images. Our purpose was to develop a workflow based Nuclear Medicine Information System (NMIS) that fulfills the needs of Nuclear Medicine Department and its integration to hospital PACS system. Material and Methods: Workflow in NMIS uses HL7 (health level seven) and steps include, patient scheduling and retrieving information from HIS (hospital information system), radiopharmacy, acquisition, digital reporting and approval of the reports using Nuclear Medicine specific diagnostic codes. Images and dynamic data from cameras of are sent to and retrieved from PACS system (Corttex©) for reprocessing and quantitative analysis. Results: NMIS has additional functions to the RIS such as radiopharmaceutical management program which includes stock recording of both radioactive and non-radioactive substances, calculation of the radiopharmaceutical dose for individual patient according to body weight and maximum permissible activity, and calculation of radioactivity left per unit volume for each radionuclide according their half lives. Patient scheduling and gamma camera patient work list settings were arranged according to specific Nuclear Medicine procedures. Nuclear Medicine images and reports can be retrieved and viewed from HIS. Conclusion: NMIS provides functionality to standard RIS and PACS system according to the needs of Nuclear Medicine. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23487446

  12. Experience with nuclear medicine information system.

    PubMed

    Volkan-Salanci, Bilge; Sahin, Figen; Babekoğlu, Vahide; Uğur, Omer

    2012-12-01

    Radiology information system (RIS) is basically evolved for the need of radiologists and ignores the vital steps needed for a proper work flow of Nuclear Medicine Department. Moreover, CT/MRI oriented classical PACS systems are far from satisfying Nuclear Physicians like storing dynamic data for reprocessing and quantitative analysis of colored images. Our purpose was to develop a workflow based Nuclear Medicine Information System (NMIS) that fulfills the needs of Nuclear Medicine Department and its integration to hospital PACS system. Workflow in NMIS uses HL7 (health level seven) and steps include, patient scheduling and retrieving information from HIS (hospital information system), radiopharmacy, acquisition, digital reporting and approval of the reports using Nuclear Medicine specific diagnostic codes. Images and dynamic data from cameras of are sent to and retrieved from PACS system (Corttex©) for reprocessing and quantitative analysis. NMIS has additional functions to the RIS such as radiopharmaceutical management program which includes stock recording of both radioactive and non-radioactive substances, calculation of the radiopharmaceutical dose for individual patient according to body weight and maximum permissible activity, and calculation of radioactivity left per unit volume for each radionuclide according their half lives. Patient scheduling and gamma camera patient work list settings were arranged according to specific Nuclear Medicine procedures. Nuclear Medicine images and reports can be retrieved and viewed from HIS. NMIS provides functionality to standard RIS and PACS system according to the needs of Nuclear Medicine. None declared.

  13. The Teaching of Liberal Arts in Internal Medicine Residency Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Povar, Gail J.; Keith, Karla J.

    1984-01-01

    A survey on the teaching of liberal arts in internal medicine residency programs and the importance of liberal arts to the practice of medicine is discussed. Law and organization of the health care system as well as economics and bioethics were rated as essential to medical practice. (Author/MLW)

  14. The Teaching of Liberal Arts in Internal Medicine Residency Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Povar, Gail J.; Keith, Karla J.

    1984-01-01

    A survey on the teaching of liberal arts in internal medicine residency programs and the importance of liberal arts to the practice of medicine is discussed. Law and organization of the health care system as well as economics and bioethics were rated as essential to medical practice. (Author/MLW)

  15. Hands-On Sports Medicine Training for Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the development of a hands-on sports medicine training program for residents at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center. Education strategies include clinical teaching, on-the-field education, experiential learning, and didactic instruction. Programs focusing exclusively on sports medicine are needed because the number of…

  16. Hands-On Sports Medicine Training for Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the development of a hands-on sports medicine training program for residents at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center. Education strategies include clinical teaching, on-the-field education, experiential learning, and didactic instruction. Programs focusing exclusively on sports medicine are needed because the number of…

  17. American Board of Emergency Medicine report on residency training information (2013-2014), American Board of Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Baren, Jill M; Beeson, Michael S; Counselman, Francis L; Kowalenko, Terry; Marco, Catherine A; Muelleman, Robert L; Nelson, Lewis S; Wahl, Robert P; Korte, Robert C

    2014-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency programs and the residents in them. We present the 2014 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs.

  18. American Board of Emergency Medicine report on residency training information (2012-2013), American Board of Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Baren, Jill M; Counselman, Francis L; Kowalenko, Terry; Marco, Catherine A; Muelleman, Robert L; Wahl, Robert P; Korte, Robert C

    2013-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency programs and the residents in those programs. We present the 2013 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs.

  19. Training family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology trainees.

    PubMed

    Porcerelli, John H; Fowler, Shannon L; Murdoch, William; Markova, Tsveti; Kimbrough, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe a training curriculum for family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology (doctoral) trainees at the Wayne State University/Crittenton Family Medicine Residency program. The collaborative care curriculum involves a series of patient care and educational activities that require collaboration between family medicine residents and psychology trainees. Activities include: (1) clinic huddle, (2) shadowing, (3) pull-ins and warm handoffs, (4) co-counseling, (5) shared precepting, (6) feedback from psychology trainees to family medicine residents regarding consults, brief interventions, and psychological testing, (7) lectures, (8) video-observation and feedback, (9) home visits, and (10) research. The activities were designed to teach the participants to work together as a team and to provide a reciprocal learning experience. In a brief three-item survey of residents at the end of their academic year, 83% indicated that they had learned new information or techniques from working with the psychology trainees for assessment and intervention purposes; 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their patient care; and 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their ability to work as part of a team. Informal interviews with the psychology trainees indicated that reciprocal learning had taken place. Family medicine residents can learn to work collaboratively with psychology trainees through a series of shared patient care and educational activities within a primary care clinic where an integrated approach to care is valued.

  20. The validity and reliability of attending evaluations of medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jeffrey L; Kay, Cynthia; Frank, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To assess the reliability and validity of faculty evaluations of medicine residents. We conducted a retrospective study (2004-2012) involving 228 internal medicine residency graduates at the Medical College of Wisconsin who were evaluated by 334 attendings. Measures included evaluations of residents by attendings, based on six competencies and interns and residents' performance on the American Board of Internal Medicine certification exam and annual in-service training examination. All residents had at least one in-service training examination result and 80% allowed the American Board of Internal Medicine to release their scores. Attending evaluations had good consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.96). There was poor construct validity with modest inter-rater reliability and evidence that attendings were rating residents on a single factor rather than the six competencies intended to be measured. There was poor predictive validity as attending ratings correlated weakly with performance on the in-service training examination or American Board of Internal Medicine certification exam. We conclude that attending evaluations are poor measures for assessing progress toward competency. It may be time to move beyond evaluations that rely on global, end-of-rotation appraisals.

  1. Global health education in emergency medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Havryliuk, Tatiana; Bentley, Suzanne; Hahn, Sigrid

    2014-06-01

    Interest in global health and international electives is growing among Emergency Medicine (EM) residents in the United States (US). The majority of EM residency programs offer opportunities for international electives. The degree of participation among residents and type of support provided by the residency program, however, remains unclear. To explore the current state of global health education among EM residents who participate in international electives. A 12-question survey was e-mailed to the program directors of the 192 EM residency programs in the US. The survey included questions about the number of residents participating in international electives and the types of preparation, project requirements, supervision, and feedback participating residents receive. The response rate was 53% with 102 responses. Seventy-five of 102 (74%) programs reported that at least one resident participated in an international elective in the 2010-2011 academic year. Forty-three programs (42%) report no available funding to support any resident on an international elective. Residents receive no preparation for international work in 41 programs (40%). Only 25 programs (26%) required their residents to conduct a project while abroad. Forty-nine programs (48%) reported no formal debriefing session, and no formal feedback was collected from returning residents in 57 of 102 (59%) programs. The majority of EM residencies have residents participating in international electives. However, the programs report variable preparation, requirements, and resident supervision. These results suggest a need for an expanded and more structured approach to international electives undertaken by EM residents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Family Medicine Residency Program Directors Attitudes and Knowledge of Family Medicine CAM Competencies

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Paula; Filippelli, Amanda C.; Lebensohn, Patricia; Bonakdar, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Context Little is known about the incorporation of integrative medicine (IM) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) into family medicine residency programs. Objective The Society for Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) approved a set of CAM/IM competencies for family medicine residencies. We hope to evaluate with an online survey tool, whether residency programs are implementing such competencies into their curriculum. We also hope to assess the knowledge and attitudes of Residency Directors (RDs) on the CAM/IM competencies. Design A survey was distributed by the CAFM (Council of Academic Family Medicine) Educational Research Alliance to RDs via email. The survey was distributed to 431 RDs. Of those who received it, 212 responded for a response rate of 49.1%. Questions assessed the knowledge and attitudes of CAM/IM competencies and incorporation of CAM/IM into residency curriculum. Results Forty-five percent of RDs were aware of the competencies. In term of RD attitudes, 58% reported that CAM/IM is an important component of residents' curriculum yet, 60% report not having specific learning objectives for CAM/IM in their residency curriculum. Among all programs, barriers to CAM/IM implementation included: time in residents' schedules (77%); faculty training (75%); access to CAM experts (43%); lack of reimbursement (43%), and financial resources (29%). Conclusions While many RDs are aware of the STFM CAM/IM competencies and acknowledge their role in residence education, there are many barriers preventing residencies to implementing the STFM CAM/IM competencies. PMID:24021471

  3. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  4. Emergency Medicine Resident Rotations Abroad: Current Status and Next Steps

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Stephen C.; Schroeder, Erika D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction International rotations for residents are increasingly popular, but there is a dearth of evidence to demonstrate that these rotations are safe and that residents have appropriate training and support to conduct them. Methods A survey was sent to all U.S. emergency medicine (EM) residencies with publicly available e-mail addresses. The survey documents and examines the training and support that emergency medicine residents are offered for international rotations and the frequency of adverse safety events. Results 72.5% of program director responded that their residents are participating in rotations abroad. However, only 15.4% of programs reported offering training specific to working abroad. The results point to an increased need for specific training and insurance coverage. Conclusion Oversight of international rotations should be improved to guarantee safety and education benefit. PMID:26823933

  5. Patient dosimetry in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Sören

    2015-07-01

    In diagnostic nuclear medicine, the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical (actually of the radionuclide) is determined for a number of representative patients. At therapy, it is essential to determine the patient's individual biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical in order to calculate the absorbed doses to critical normal organs/tissues and to the target volume(s) with high accuracy. For the diagnostic situations, there is still a lack of quantitative determinations of the organ/tissue contents of radiopharmaceuticals and their variation with time. Planar gamma camera imaging using the conjugate view technique combined with a limited number of SPECT/CT images is the main method for such studies. In a similar way, PET/CT is used for 3D image-based internal dosimetry for PET substances. The transition from stylised reference phantoms to voxel phantoms will lead to improved dose estimates for diagnostic procedures. Examples of dose coefficients and effective doses for diagnostic substances are given. For the therapeutic situation, a pre-therapeutic low activity administration is used for quantitative measurements of organ/tissue distribution data by a gamma camera or a SPECT- or PET-unit. Together with CT and/or MR images this will be the base for individual dose calculations using Monte Carlo technique. Treatments based on administered activity should only be used if biological variations between patients are small or if a pre-therapeutic activity administration is impossible.

  6. Observations on burnout in family medicine and psychiatry residents.

    PubMed

    Woodside, Jack Richard; Miller, Merry Noel; Floyd, Michael R; McGowen, K Ramsey; Pfortmiller, Debi T

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between burnout, work environment, and a variety of personal variables, including age, gender, marital, parental and acculturation status within a population of family medicine and psychiatry resident physicians. Between 2002 and 2005, 155 residents in family medicine and psychiatry at East Tennessee State University College of Medicine were surveyed at intervals using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and Work Environment Scale, form R, to assess their current state of emotional health and job satisfaction. Female residents had lower scores on the Depersonalization scale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (t=3.37, p=0.001). Parenting was associated with lower Depersonalization (t=3.98, p<0.001) and Emotional Exhaustion (t=2.59, p=0.011). Residents from the United States culture reported higher Depersonalization and Emotional Exhaustion (t=-3.64, p<0.001; t=-3.85, p<0.001). On the Work Environment Scale, residents from United States culture reported less Task Orientation and Control but higher Work Pressure (t=2.89, p=0.005; t=2.24, p=0.027; t=-2.79, p=0.006). Psychiatry residents reported less burnout than family medicine residents on the Depersonalization and Emotional Exhaustion scales (t=2.49, p=0.014: t=2.05, p=0.042) and higher Physical Comfort on the Work Environment Scale (t=-2.60, p=0.011); while family medicine residents reported higher Peer Cohesion, Supervisor Support, and Autonomy (t=3.41, p=0.001; t=2.38, p=0.019; t=2.27, p=0.025). This study design, using well established, standard, and valid measures, identified important issues for further exploration: the relationship between acculturation to burnout, the potential role of parenting as a protective factor from burnout, and the recognition that women residents may not be as vulnerable to burnout as previously reported.

  7. Lifestyle medicine curriculum for a preventive medicine residency program: implementation and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Haq; Petraro, Paul V.; Via, Christina; Ullah, Saif; Lim, Lionel; Wild, Dorothea; Kennedy, Mary; Phillips, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The vast majority of the healthcare problems burdening our society today are caused by disease-promoting lifestyles (e.g., physical inactivity and unhealthy eating). Physicians report poor training and lack of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes. Objective To evaluate a new curriculum and rotation in lifestyle medicine for preventive medicine residents. Methods Training included didactics (six sessions/year), distance learning, educational conferences, and newly developed lifestyle medicine rotations at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and the Integrative Medicine Center. We used a number of tools to assess residents’ progress including Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), self-assessments, and logs of personal health habits. Results A total of 20 residents participated in the lifestyle medicine training between 2010 and 2013. There was a 15% increase in residents’ discussions of lifestyle issues with their patients based on their baseline and follow-up surveys. The performance of preventive medicine residents on OSCEs increased each year they were in the program (average OSCE score: PGY1 73%, PGY2 83%, PGY3 87%, and PGY4 91%, p=0.01). Our internal medicine and preliminary residents served as a control, since they did participate in didactics but not in lifestyle medicine rotations. Internal medicine and preliminary residents who completed the same OSCEs had a slightly lower average score (76%) compared with plural for resident, preventive medicine residents (80%). However, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.11). Conclusion Incorporating the lifestyle medicine curriculum is feasible for preventive medicine training allowing residents to improve their health behavior change discussions with patients as well as their own personal health habits. PMID:27507540

  8. Nuclear medicine applications: Summary of Panel 4

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is currently facing a desperate shortage of organic and inorganic chemists and nuclear pharmacists who also have advanced training in nuclear and radiochemistry. Ironically, this shortfall is occurring in the face of rapid growth and technological advances which have made the practice of nuclear medicine an integral part of the modern health care system. This shortage threatens to limit the availability of radiopharmaceuticals required in routine hospital procedures and to impede the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic agents. To redress this need and prevent a similar shortfall in the future, this panel recommends immediate action and a long-term commitment to the following: educating the public on the benefits of nuclear medicine; informing undergraduate and graduate chemistry students about career opportunities in nuclear medicine; offering upper level courses in nuclear and radiochemistry (including laboratory) in universities; establishing training centers and fellowships at the postgraduate level for specialized education in the aspects of nuclear and radiochemistry required by the nuclear medicine profession. 1 tab.

  9. Nuclear medicine in district general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Croft, D

    1979-11-24

    Nuclear medicine is a recognised clinical specialty both nationally and internationally. Compared with other countries, it is inadequately developed in Britain, particularly in district general hospitals. To create clinical radioisotope services at district level physicians or radiologists with experience in nuclear medicine need to be trained and appointed. Such appointments would allow facilities to evolve that would provide either a comprehensive nuclear medicine service formed around a physician or an imaging service based on a radiologist. Such units would improve the care of patients at a reasonable recurring cost of 15 pounds--30 pounds per investigation.

  10. Radiolabeled Dendrimers for Nuclear Medicine Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingzhou; Zhu, Meilin; Li, Yujie; Xing, Yan; Zhao, Jinhua

    2017-08-25

    Recent advances in nuclear medicine have explored nanoscale carriers for targeted delivery of various radionuclides in specific manners to improve the effect of diagnosis and therapy of diseases. Due to the unique molecular architecture allowing facile attachment of targeting ligands and radionuclides, dendrimers provide versatile platforms in this filed to build abundant multifunctional radiolabeled nanoparticles for nuclear medicine applications. This review gives special focus to recent advances in dendrimer-based nuclear medicine agents for the imaging and treatment of cancer, cardiovascular and other diseases. Radiolabeling strategies for different radionuclides and several challenges involved in clinical translation of radiolabeled dendrimers are extensively discussed.

  11. Musculoskeletal education in physical medicine and rehabilitation residency programs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jay; Krabak, Brian J; Malanga, Gerard A; Moutvic, Margaret A

    2004-10-01

    To characterize current musculoskeletal (MSK) education experiences in physical medicine and rehabilitation residency programs and to identify perceived barriers to providing more extensive MSK education experiences. In addition, to establish utilization patterns for the PASSOR Physical Examination Core Competencies List. Between March and November 2003, all 81 physical medicine and rehabilitation residency program directors were asked to complete an MSK education survey developed by the authors. A total of 69 of 81 program directors (86%) responded after multiple contacts. The most frequently utilized MSK education formats were MSK lecture series, MSK departmental conferences, and physical examination workshops. Potential barriers to expanded MSK education included money, time, and staff number. Given unlimited resources, most residency programs would greatly increase utilization of visiting lecturers, CD-ROMs/DVDs, objective structured clinical examinations, and physical examination videos. Of the 30 program directors who recalled receiving the Core Competencies List, only 40% (12 of 30) have formally integrated the list into their residency training. Barriers to implementation included logistical challenges and lack of direction regarding implementation. Residency program directors indicate a strong interest in expanding resident MSK education through the use of CD-ROMs/DVDs, physical examination videos, objective structured clinical examinations, and visiting lecturer programs. CD-ROMs/DVDs and videos represent particularly attractive educational formats for supplementing resident MSK education due to the advantages of central production, nominal costs, widespread distribution, multimedia capabilities, and accessibility. These educational formats should be considered for targeted educational initiatives to enhance resident MSK education, regardless of residency program size or resources.

  12. Development of a novel sports medicine rotation for emergency medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Waterbrook, Anna L; Pritchard, T Gail; Lane, Allison D; Stoneking, Lisa R; Koch, Bryna; McAtee, Robert; Grall, Kristi H; Min, Alice A; Prior, Jessica; Farrell, Isaac; McNulty, Holly G; Stolz, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal complaints are the most common reason for patients to visit a physician, yet competency in musculoskeletal medicine is invariably reported as a deficiency in medical education in the USA. Sports medicine clinical rotations improve both medical students' and residents' musculoskeletal knowledge. Despite the importance of this knowledge, a standardized sports medicine curriculum in emergency medicine (EM) does not exist. Hence, we developed a novel sports medicine rotation for EM residents to improve their musculoskeletal educational experience and to improve their knowledge in musculoskeletal medicine by teaching the evaluation and management of many common musculoskeletal disorders and injuries that are encountered in the emergency department. The University of Arizona has two distinct EM residency programs, South Campus (SC) and University Campus (UC). The UC curriculum includes a traditional 4-week orthopedic rotation, which consistently rated poorly on evaluations by residents. Therefore, with the initiation of a new EM residency at SC, we replaced the standard orthopedic rotation with a novel sports medicine rotation for EM interns. This rotation includes attendance at sports medicine clinics with primary care and orthopedic sports medicine physicians, involvement in sport event coverage, assigned reading materials, didactic experiences, and an on-call schedule to assist with reductions in the emergency department. We analyzed postrotation surveys completed by residents, postrotation evaluations of the residents completed by primary care sports medicine faculty and orthopedic chief residents, as well as the total number of dislocation reductions performed by each graduating resident at both programs over the last 5 years. While all residents in both programs exceeded the ten dislocation reductions required for graduation, residents on the sports medicine rotation had a statistically significant higher rate of satisfaction of their educational

  13. Introducing a psychosomatic medicine interest group for psychiatry residents.

    PubMed

    Puri, Neil V; Azzam, Pierre; Gopalan, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Having gained subspecialty certification in 2003, the field of psychosomatic medicine (PM) addresses the mental health needs of individuals who suffer from general medical conditions. The rising prevalence of chronic illness, along with trends in medical delivery toward more collaborative models of care, underscores the value of recruitment to PM specialty programs. To foster interest and education in PM, we have developed and implemented a Psychosomatic Medicine Interest Group for trainees within a psychiatry residency program. Participants have found the Psychosomatic Medicine Interest Group to be an enjoyable experience that has improved their clinical practice and interest in PM. The Psychosomatic Medicine Interest Group has also been a successful vehicle to enhance clinical knowledge and mentoring opportunities during training, while bolstering residents' desire to pursue a career in PM. Copyright © 2015 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. All rights reserved.

  14. Experiences of family medicine residents in primary care obstetrics training.

    PubMed

    Koppula, Sudha; Brown, Judith Belle; Jordan, John M

    2012-03-01

    Obstetrical practice by family physicians has been declining rapidly for many reasons over the past number of decades. One reason for this trend is family medicine residents not considering intrapartum care as part of their future careers. Decisions such as this may be related to experiences during obstetrical training. This study explored the experiences of family medicine residents in core primary care obstetrics training. Using qualitative approaches, focus groups of family medicine residents were conducted. The resulting data were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Independent and team analysis was both iterative and interpretive. Data obtained from the focus groups revealed findings relating to the following categories: (1) perceived facilitators to practicing primary care obstetrics, (2) perceived barriers to practicing primary care obstetrics, and (3) learner experiences at the fulcrum of career decision making. Family medicine residents were encouraged by favorable learning experiences and group shared-call arrangements by their primary care obstetrics preceptors. Some concerns about a career including obstetrics persisted; however, positive experiences, including influential fulcrum points, may inspire family medicine residents to pursue a career involving primary care obstetrics.

  15. The validity and reliability of attending evaluations of medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Cynthia; Frank, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the reliability and validity of faculty evaluations of medicine residents. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study (2004–2012) involving 228 internal medicine residency graduates at the Medical College of Wisconsin who were evaluated by 334 attendings. Measures included evaluations of residents by attendings, based on six competencies and interns and residents’ performance on the American Board of Internal Medicine certification exam and annual in-service training examination. All residents had at least one in-service training examination result and 80% allowed the American Board of Internal Medicine to release their scores. Results: Attending evaluations had good consistency (Cronbach’s α = 0.96). There was poor construct validity with modest inter-rater reliability and evidence that attendings were rating residents on a single factor rather than the six competencies intended to be measured. There was poor predictive validity as attending ratings correlated weakly with performance on the in-service training examination or American Board of Internal Medicine certification exam. Conclusion: We conclude that attending evaluations are poor measures for assessing progress toward competency. It may be time to move beyond evaluations that rely on global, end-of-rotation appraisals. PMID:26770788

  16. Predictors of a Top Performer During Emergency Medicine Residency.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Rahul; Takenaka, Katrin; Levine, Brian; Goyal, Nikhil; Garg, Manish; Visconti, Annette; Oyama, Leslie; Castillo, Edward; Broder, Joshua; Omron, Rodney; Hayden, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    Emergency Medicine (EM) residency program directors and faculty spend significant time and effort creating a residency rank list. To date, however, there have been few studies to assist program directors in determining which pre-residency variables best predict performance during EM residency. To evaluate which pre-residency variables best correlated with an applicant's performance during residency. This was a retrospective multicenter sample of all residents in the three most recent graduating classes from nine participating EM residency programs. The outcome measure of top residency performance was defined as placement in the top third of a resident's graduating class based on performance on the final semi-annual evaluation. A total of 277 residents from nine institutions were evaluated. Eight of the predictors analyzed had a significant correlation with the outcome of resident performance. Applicants' grade during home and away EM rotations, designation as Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA), U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 score, interview scores, "global rating" and "competitiveness" on nonprogram leadership standardized letter of recommendation (SLOR), and having five or more publications or presentations showed a significant association with residency performance. We identified several predictors of top performers in EM residency: an honors grade for an EM rotation, USMLE Step 1 score, AOA designation, interview score, high SLOR rankings from nonprogram leadership, and completion of five or more presentations and publications. EM program directors may consider utilizing these variables during the match process to choose applicants who have the highest chance of top performance during residency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Burnout and Physical Activity in Minnesota Internal Medicine Resident Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Shawn M.; Odo, Nnaemeka U.; Duran, Alisa M.; Pereira, Anne G.; Mandel, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Regular physical activity plays an important role in the amelioration of several mental health disorders; however, its relationship with burnout has not yet been clarified. Objective To determine the association between achievement of national physical activity guidelines and burnout in internal medicine resident physicians. Methods A Web-based survey of internal medicine resident physicians at the University of Minnesota and Hennepin County Medical Center was conducted from September to October 2012. Survey measures included the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Results Of 149 eligible residents, 76 (51.0%) completed surveys, which were used in the analysis. Burnout prevalence, determined by the Maslach Burnout Inventory, was 53.9% (41 of 76). Prevalence of failure to achieve US Department of Health and Human Services physical activity guidelines was 40.8% (31 of 76), and 78.9% (60 of 76) of residents reported that their level of physical activity has decreased since they began medical training. Residents who were able to meet physical activity guidelines were less likely to be burned out than their fellow residents (OR, 0.38, 95% CI 0.147–0.99). Conclusions Among internal medicine resident physicians, achievement of national physical activity guidelines appears to be inversely associated with burnout. Given the high national prevalence of burnout and inactivity, additional investigation of this relationship appears warranted. PMID:26140116

  18. Leadership training in a family medicine residency program

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Erin; Moore, Ainsley; Schabort, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the current status of leadership training as perceived by family medicine residents to inform the development of a formal leadership curriculum. Design Cross-sectional quantitative survey. Setting Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, in December 2013. Participants A total of 152 first- and second-year family medicine residents. Main outcome measures Family medicine residents’ attitudes toward leadership, perceived level of training in various leadership domains, and identified opportunities for leadership training. Results Overall, 80% (152 of 190) of residents completed the survey. On a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = neutral, 7 = strongly agree), residents rated the importance of physician leadership in the clinical setting as high (6.23 of 7), whereas agreement with the statement “I am a leader” received the lowest rating (5.28 of 7). At least 50% of residents desired more training in the leadership domains of personal mastery, mentorship and coaching, conflict resolution, teaching, effective teamwork, administration, ideals of a healthy workplace, coalitions, and system transformation. At least 50% of residents identified behavioural sciences seminars, a lecture and workshop series, and a retreat as opportunities to expand leadership training. Conclusion The concept of family physicians as leaders resonated highly with residents. Residents desired more personal and system-level leadership training. They also identified ways that leadership training could be expanded in the current curriculum and developed in other areas. The information gained from this survey might facilitate leadership development among residents through application of its results in a formal leadership curriculum. PMID:28292816

  19. ACR-SNM Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training: report of the task force.

    PubMed

    Guiberteau, Milton J; Graham, Michael M

    2011-06-01

    The expansion of knowledge and technological advances in nuclear medicine and radiology require physicians to have more expertise in functional and anatomic imaging. The convergence of these two specialties into the new discipline of molecular imaging has also begun to place demands on residency training programs for additional instruction in physiology and molecular biology. These changes have unmasked weaknesses in current nuclear medicine and radiology training programs. Adding to the impetus for change are the attendant realities of the job market and uncertain employment prospects for physicians trained in nuclear medicine but not also trained in diagnostic radiology. With this background, the ACR and the Society of Nuclear Medicine convened the Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training to define the issues and develop recommendations for resident training.

  20. ACR-SNM Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training: report of the task force.

    PubMed

    Guiberteau, Milton J; Graham, Michael M

    2011-06-01

    The expansion of knowledge and technological advances in nuclear medicine and radiology require physicians to have more expertise in functional and anatomic imaging. The convergence of these two specialties into the new discipline of molecular imaging has also begun to place demands on residency training programs for additional instruction in physiology and molecular biology. These changes have unmasked weaknesses in current nuclear medicine and radiology training programs. Adding to the impetus for change are the attendant realities of the job market and uncertain employment prospects for physicians trained in nuclear medicine but not also trained in diagnostic radiology. With this background, the ACR and the Society of Nuclear Medicine convened the Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training to define the issues and develop recommendations for resident training. Copyright © 2011 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of a novel sports medicine rotation for emergency medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Waterbrook, Anna L; Pritchard, T Gail; Lane, Allison D; Stoneking, Lisa R; Koch, Bryna; McAtee, Robert; Grall, Kristi H; Min, Alice A; Prior, Jessica; Farrell, Isaac; McNulty, Holly G; Stolz, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal complaints are the most common reason for patients to visit a physician, yet competency in musculoskeletal medicine is invariably reported as a deficiency in medical education in the USA. Sports medicine clinical rotations improve both medical students’ and residents’ musculoskeletal knowledge. Despite the importance of this knowledge, a standardized sports medicine curriculum in emergency medicine (EM) does not exist. Hence, we developed a novel sports medicine rotation for EM residents to improve their musculoskeletal educational experience and to improve their knowledge in musculoskeletal medicine by teaching the evaluation and management of many common musculoskeletal disorders and injuries that are encountered in the emergency department. The University of Arizona has two distinct EM residency programs, South Campus (SC) and University Campus (UC). The UC curriculum includes a traditional 4-week orthopedic rotation, which consistently rated poorly on evaluations by residents. Therefore, with the initiation of a new EM residency at SC, we replaced the standard orthopedic rotation with a novel sports medicine rotation for EM interns. This rotation includes attendance at sports medicine clinics with primary care and orthopedic sports medicine physicians, involvement in sport event coverage, assigned reading materials, didactic experiences, and an on-call schedule to assist with reductions in the emergency department. We analyzed postrotation surveys completed by residents, postrotation evaluations of the residents completed by primary care sports medicine faculty and orthopedic chief residents, as well as the total number of dislocation reductions performed by each graduating resident at both programs over the last 5 years. While all residents in both programs exceeded the ten dislocation reductions required for graduation, residents on the sports medicine rotation had a statistically significant higher rate of satisfaction of their

  2. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Zehra; Bozkurt, M Fani; Erbas, Belkıs; Durak, Hatice

    2017-01-31

    Nuclear medicine applications in Turkey started in the early 1950s, grew as an independent medical discipline and finally were recognized by the Ministry of Health in 1973. Later on, the professional organization of nuclear medicine physicians and other related professionals including radiopharmacists and technologists under the Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine were established in 1975. Recently after completing more than a half century in Turkey, nuclear medicine has proved to be a strong and evolving medical field with more than 600 physicians serving for the changing needs of clinical practice throughout these years. This article describes past and present facts in this field and attempts to provide insights into the future which hopefully will be brighter than before.

  3. An overview of nuclear medicine imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Peter; Lawson, Richard

    2015-11-25

    Nuclear medicine imaging is not generally well understood by nurses who work outside this area. Consequently, nurses can find themselves unable to answer patients' questions about nuclear medicine imaging procedures or give them proper information before they attend for a test. This article aims to explain what is involved in some common diagnostic nuclear medicine imaging procedures so that nurses are able to discuss this with patients. It also addresses some common issues about radiation protection that nurses might encounter in their usual working routine. The article includes links to videos showing some typical nuclear medicine imaging procedures from a patient's point of view and links to an e-Learning for Healthcare online resource that provides detailed information for nurses.

  4. International Health Experiences in Family Medicine Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Porter, Maribeth; Mims, Lisa; Garven, Chad; Gavin, Jennifer; Carek, Peter; Diaz, Vanessa

    2016-02-01

    International health experiences (IHEs) have been associated with improved clinical skills, altruistic attitudes, cross-cultural sensitivity, and exposure to community medicine for residents and medical students. Although an increasing number of family medicine residencies offer IHEs, there are currently no standardized competencies or guidelines for developing IHEs. The aim of this study was to examine the content of IHEs in order to provide an overview of the current landscape of global health training in family medicine residency programs. Residency programs self-identifying as offering IHEs on the American Medical Association's (AMA) FREIDA Online website were emailed an electronic survey with questions regarding IHE characteristics, resident selection criteria, faculty support, motivations for participation, challenges to implementation, and funding. Of the 153 programs that responded, 84% still offered IHEs. Most IHEs are 3--4 weeks (71.1%) and are funded by the resident (74.2%). Faculty from the resident's department or institution generally provide supervision (76.6%) and have undergone some type of specialized training in global health (65.6%). Being in good academic standing was the most important eligibility criteria for residents participating in an IHE (86.7%), and funding was reported as the most challenging aspect (62.5%) of offering IHEs. IHEs are increasing in number and receiving more funding, but the experiences are variable among residency programs. While most program directors believe residents participate in IHEs to gain exposure with underserved populations, only a small percentage (5.5%) include a commitment to community service as part of a requirement for participation in an IHE.

  5. UK nuclear medicine survey 2003-2004.

    PubMed

    Hart, David; Wall, Barry F

    2005-11-01

    This survey was designed to assess the trends in the frequencies of nuclear medicine procedures in the UK and to determine their contributions to the annual collective effective dose to the UK population. The average activities administered by nuclear medicine departments were compared with guidance on diagnostic reference levels issued by the Administration of Radioactive Substances Advisory Committee. The survey was carried out by e-mailing a questionnaire to every known nuclear medicine centre in the UK. The total number of procedures performed annually has increased by 36% over the last 10 years to a level of about 11 procedures per 1000 head of population in the financial year 2003-2004. Seventy-three per cent of all nuclear medicine administrations are for planar imaging, with single-photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography contributing 16% and 2%, respectively. Non-imaging diagnostic procedures represent 7% of all nuclear medicine administrations, and therapy 2%. Bone scans continue to be the most frequent procedure. The UK annual collective effective dose from diagnostic nuclear medicine is about 1600 man Sv, resulting in an annual per caput dose of nearly 0.03 mSv. Bone scans are the largest contributor to the collective dose, but myocardium scans are close behind. Planar imaging is responsible for 62% of the total collective effective dose from diagnostic nuclear medicine in the UK, with single-photon emission computed tomography, positron emission tomography and non-imaging contributing 33%, 5% and 0.3%, respectively. The practice of nuclear medicine is still expanding in the UK with single-photon emission computed tomography imaging of the myocardium rapidly approaching bone scans as the main contributor to population exposure. The activities administered for most procedures have remained substantially unchanged and adhere closely to those recommended by the Administration of Radioactive Substances Advisory Committee.

  6. Global health education in general preventive medicine residencies.

    PubMed

    Bussell, Scottie A; Kihlberg, Courtney J; Foderingham, Nia M; Dunlap, Julie A; Aliyu, Muktar H

    2015-05-01

    Opportunities for global health training during residency are steadily increasing. For example, surveys show that more than half of residency programs now offer international electives. Residency programs are increasingly recognizing that global health training improves communication skills, fosters awareness of health disparities, and inspires careers in primary care and public health. Although research has focused on global health education in other specialties, there is a paucity of research on global health training in public health and general preventive medicine (GPM). We sought to describe the extent of global health training across GPM residencies, capture the perspectives of program directors regarding competencies residents need for careers in global health, and identify program directors' perceived barriers to providing global health training. The survey was sent electronically to 42 U.S. GPM residency program directors from September to October 2013. Twenty-three completed surveys were returned. Information from residencies that did not complete the study survey was collected through a predefined search protocol. Data analysis was performed from February through July 2014. Among program directors completing the survey, the most common types of reported global health education were courses (n=17), followed by international rotations (n=10). Ten program directors indicated that resident(s) were involved in global health training, research, or service initiatives. Commonly perceived barriers included funding (87%), scheduling (56.5%), and partnership and sustainability (34.8%). Through global health coursework, research, and practicum rotations, GPM residents could acquire skills, knowledge, and attitudes contributing to careers in global health.

  7. Impact of pharmaceutical company representatives on internal medicine residency programs. A survey of residency program directors.

    PubMed

    Lichstein, P R; Turner, R C; O'Brien, K

    1992-05-01

    To survey internal medicine residency program directors regarding interactions between their residents and pharmaceutical company (PC) representatives (PCRs) a questionnaire was sent to the directors of all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved internal medicine residency programs. The survey included 444 program directors, of whom 272 (61.16%) responded. The majority of program directors, 228 (83.8%), allowed PCRs to meet with residents during working hours and 241 (88.6%) permitted PC sponsorship of conferences. About half of the program directors were "moderately" or "very" concerned about the potential adverse effects of PC marketing on resident attitudes and prescribing practices. Seventy percent "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that the benefits of PC sponsorship outweigh the adverse effects and 41.5% believed that refusal to allow PCRs to meet with residents would jeopardize PC funding of other departmental activities. Most program directors reported that alternate funds for conferences were available if PC support was withdrawn. "Unethical" marketing activities were observed by 14.3% of program directors and 37.5% reported that residents had participated in PC-sponsored trips during the 3 years prior to the survey. At the time of this survey, only 35.3% of programs had developed formal policies regulating PCR activities and 25.7% provided residents with formal instruction on marketing issues. Knowledge of the current extent of PCR interactions with residents may be helpful to program directors in developing policies regulating PC-marketing activities.

  8. The Impact of Computers in Nuclear Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Alderson, Philip O.

    1978-01-01

    Computers have had a major impact on the development of Nuclear Medicine. Computer technology has allowed improved acquisition, display and analysis of radionuclide data and is largely responsible for the ability of radionuclide studies to accurately quantify organ physiology. In addition, computers are vital to reconstruction tomography, which has been applied to nuclear imaging. Mathematical modeling, which provides improved quantitative descriptions of complex physiologic systems investigated by radionuclides is also aided by computer technology. The role of the computer has even be extended to administrative functions like patient record keeping, automated data reporting, and programmed instruction of nuclear medicine trainees. In this review these aspects of computers in nuclear medicine will be reviewed, with emphasis on the recent improvements in nuclear imaging. Imagesp59-a

  9. Academic career development for emergency medicine residents: a road map.

    PubMed

    Stead, Latha G; Sadosty, Annie T; Decker, Wyatt W

    2005-05-01

    As the marketplace for academic positions in emergency medicine grows more competitive, it becomes increasingly important for residents who desire academic careers to distinguish themselves during their residency. This report attempts to outline a road map for department and residency program leaders to help their houseofficers become successful candidates for an academic emergency medicine position. Specific ways a resident can enhance his or her "academic marketability" include 1) involvement in research, 2) establishment of a track record of productivity via scholarly writing, 3) awareness of the literature in the specialty, 4) involvement in specialty organizations and hospital committees, 5) competition for national awards, 6) gaining education skills, 7) developing an academic niche, and 8) fellowship training.

  10. Trends in nuclear medicine in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Dondi, Maurizio; Kashyap, Ravi; Paez, Diana; Pascual, Thomas; Zaknun, John; Bastos, Fernando Mut; Pynda, Yaroslav

    2011-12-01

    This article describes trends in nuclear medicine in the developing world as noted by nuclear medicine professionals at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The trends identified are based on data gathered from several sources, including information gathered through a database maintained by the IAEA; evaluation of country program frameworks of various IAEA Member States; personal interactions with representatives in the nuclear medicine field from different regions of the world; official proceedings and meeting reports of the IAEA; participation in numerous national, regional, and international conferences; discussions with the leadership of major professional societies; and relevant literature. The information presented in this article relied on both objective and subjective observations. The aims of this article were to reflect on recent developments in the specialty of nuclear medicine and to envision the directions in which it is progressing. These issues are examined in terms of dimensions of practice, growth, and educational and training needs in the field of nuclear medicine. This article will enable readers to gain perspective on the status of nuclear medicine practice, with a specific focus on the developing world, and to examine needs and trends arising from the observations.

  11. Report on residency training information (2011-2012), American Board of Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Carius, Michael L; Collier, Robert E; Counselman, Francis L; Kowalenko, Terry; Marco, Catherine A; Muelleman, Robert L; Korte, Robert C

    2012-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency training programs and the residents in those programs. We present the 2012 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs.

  12. American Board of Emergency Medicine report on residency training information (2014-2015).

    PubMed

    Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Marco, Catherine A; Baren, Jill M; Beeson, Michael S; Carius, Michael L; Counselman, Francis L; Heller, Barry N; Kowalenko, Terry; Muelleman, Robert L; Nelson, Lewis S; Wahl, Robert P; Korte, Robert C; Joldersma, Kevin B

    2015-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency programs and the residents in those programs. We present the 2015 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs.

  13. American Board of Emergency Medicine Report on Residency Training Information (2015-2016).

    PubMed

    Marco, Catherine A; Baren, Jill M; Beeson, Michael S; Carius, Michael L; Counselman, Francis L; Gausche-Hill, Marianne; Goyal, Deepi G; Kowalenko, Terry; Muelleman, Robert L; Wahl, Robert P; Joldersma, Kevin B

    2016-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency programs and the residents training in those programs. We present the 2016 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs.

  14. Predictors of final specialty choice by internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Andrew K; Kumar, Vineeta; Gateley, Ann; Appleby, Jane L; O'Keefe, Mary E

    2006-10-01

    Sociodemographic factors and personality attributes predict career decisions in medical students. Determinants of internal medicine residents' specialty choices have received little attention. To identify factors that predict the clinical practice of residents following their training. Prospective cohort study. Two hundred and four categorical residents from 2 university-based residency programs. Sociodemographic and personality inventories performed during residency, and actual careers 4 to 9 years later. International medical school graduates (IMGs) were less likely to practice general medicine than U.S. graduates (33.3% vs 70.6%, P < .001). Residents with higher loan indebtedness more often became generalists (P = .001). A corresponding trend favoring general internal medicine was observed among those who perceived General Internists to have lower potential incomes (69.0% vs 53.3%, P = .08). There was a trend for generalists to have lower scores on scales measuring authoritarianism, negative orientation to psychological problems, and Machiavellianism (0.05 < P < .10). In a logistic regression, graduation from a U.S. medical school (odds ratio [OR] 3.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00 to 9.10, P = .049) and perception of low future income (OR 1.65; 95% CI, 1.06 to 2.56, P = .03) predicted entry into general medicine, with trends apparent for higher debt (P = .05) and greater comfort caring for patients with psychological problems (P = .07). Recruitment of IMGs may not increase the supply of General Internists. Prospects of lower income, even in the face of large debt, may not discourage residents from becoming generalists. If increasing generalist manpower is a goal, residencies should consider weighing applicants' personal attributes during the selection process.

  15. Predictors of Final Specialty Choice by Internal Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Andrew K; Kumar, Vineeta; Gateley, Ann; Appleby, Jane L; O'Keefe, Mary E

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sociodemographic factors and personality attributes predict career decisions in medical students. Determinants of internal medicine residents' specialty choices have received little attention. OBJECTIVE To identify factors that predict the clinical practice of residents following their training. DESIGN Prospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS Two hundred and four categorical residents from 2 university-based residency programs. MEASUREMENTS Sociodemographic and personality inventories performed during residency, and actual careers 4 to 9 years later. RESULTS International medical school graduates (IMGs) were less likely to practice general medicine than U.S. graduates (33.3% vs 70.6%, P<.001). Residents with higher loan indebtedness more often became generalists (P = .001). A corresponding trend favoring general internal medicine was observed among those who perceived General Internists to have lower potential incomes (69.0% vs 53.3%, P = .08). There was a trend for generalists to have lower scores on scales measuring authoritarianism, negative orientation to psychological problems, and Machiavellianism (0.05medicine, with trends apparent for higher debt (P = .05) and greater comfort caring for patients with psychological problems (P = .07). CONCLUSION Recruitment of IMGs may not increase the supply of General Internists. Prospects of lower income, even in the face of large debt, may not discourage residents from becoming generalists. If increasing generalist manpower is a goal, residencies should consider weighing applicants' personal attributes during the selection process. PMID:16836624

  16. Research funding and mentoring in family medicine residencies.

    PubMed

    Young, Richard A; DeHaven, Mark J; Passmore, Cindy; Baumer, Joane G; Smith, Karen V

    2007-06-01

    This study's purpose was to measure the current status of research funding and mentoring in family medicine residencies and to ascertain what resources are needed to increase residencies' research output. This was a cross-sectional survey of family medicine residency program directors in the United States. We measured grant funding sources, availability of mentors, the likelihood programs could qualify for National Institutes of Health (NIH) K awards, barriers to research, and how these factors varied by program type. The response rate was 66% (298/453). Medical school-based programs were much more likely to report that their family medicine faculty wrote funded research grants than were community-based medical school affiliated programs (76% versus 32%). The majority of both program types reported that research mentors were available (85% versus 60%). Very few programs of either type were likely to meet the minimum requirements for NIH K01, K08, or K23 awards (29% for medical school programs versus 3% for community programs). The most commonly reported specific resources needed to increase research output were time, money, and more faculty (range 86% to 92% between program types). The majority of family medicine residencies did not receive grant funding for research, reported that time and money were the most significant barriers to research, but were ineligible to receive support from NIH K awards. More realistic funding mechanisms are needed to support residency-based research faculty.

  17. Routine Quality Control of Clinical Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation: A Brief Review*

    PubMed Central

    Zanzonico, Pat

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews routine quality-control (QC) procedures for current nuclear medicine instrumentation, including the survey meter, dose calibrator, well counter, intraoperative probe, organ (“thyroid”) uptake probe, γ-camera, SPECT and SPECT/CT scanner, and PET and PET/CT scanner. It should be particularly useful for residents, fellows, and other trainees in nuclear medicine, nuclear cardiology, and radiology. The procedures described and their respective frequencies are presented only as general guidelines. PMID:18587088

  18. Routine quality control of clinical nuclear medicine instrumentation: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Zanzonico, Pat

    2008-07-01

    This article reviews routine quality-control (QC) procedures for current nuclear medicine instrumentation, including the survey meter, dose calibrator, well counter, intraoperative probe, organ ("thyroid") uptake probe, gamma-camera, SPECT and SPECT/CT scanner, and PET and PET/CT scanner. It should be particularly useful for residents, fellows, and other trainees in nuclear medicine, nuclear cardiology, and radiology. The procedures described and their respective frequencies are presented only as general guidelines.

  19. Musculoskeletal exam and joint injection training for internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Tracie; Oyler, Julie; Harada, Caroline; Utset, Tammy

    2006-05-01

    We developed a musculoskeletal education intervention for internal medicine residents consisting of lectures, anatomic models, and a joint injection clinic. Written tests, observed musculoskeletal exams, and self-confidence scales were administered to 27 internal medicine residents before and after the intervention. Improvement was found in observed physical exam and self-reported confidence levels in performing knee injections. Confidence in shoulder injection skills improved, but remained low. Improved scores on written examination, though statistically significant, were not educationally significant. This single-institution pilot study demonstrates that a simple educational program results in improved knee and shoulder examination skills and confidence in performing knee injections.

  20. Amputee care education in physical medicine and rehabilitation residency programs.

    PubMed

    Elias, Joseph Abraham; Morgenroth, David Crespi

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess amputee care-related educational offerings and barriers to further educational opportunities in United States physical medicine and rehabilitation residency programs. A two-part survey was distributed to all United States physical medicine and rehabilitation residency program directors. Part 1 assessed the use of educational tools in amputee education. Part 2 assessed the potential barriers to amputee care-related education. Sixty-nine percent of the program directors responded. Seventy-five percent or more of the programs that responded have didactic lectures; grand rounds; reading lists; self-assessment exam review; gait analysis training; training with prosthetists; faculty with amputee expertise; and amputee care during inpatient, outpatient, and consult rotations. Less than 25% of the programs use intranet resources. No more than 14% of the programs said any one factor was a major barrier. However, some of the most prominent major barriers were limited faculty number, finances, and patient volume. The factors many of the programs considered somewhat of a barrier included lack of national standardized resources for curriculum, resident time, and faculty time. This study identified the most commonly used amputee educational opportunities and methods in physical medicine and rehabilitation residencies as well as the barriers to furthering resident amputee education. Developing Web-based resources on amputee care and increasing awareness of physiatrists as perioperative consultants could improve resident amputee education and have important implications toward optimizing care of individuals with amputation.

  1. Palliative Care Exposure in Internal Medicine Residency Education.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Asher; Nam, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    As the baby boomer generation ages, the need for palliative care services will be paramount and yet training for palliative care physicians is currently inadequate to meet the current palliative care needs. Nonspecialty-trained physicians will need to supplement the gap between supply and demand. Yet, no uniform guidelines exist for the training of internal medicine residents in palliative care. To our knowledge, no systematic study has been performed to evaluate how internal medicine residencies currently integrate palliative care into their training. In this study, we surveyed 338 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited internal medicine program directors. We queried how palliative care was integrated into their training programs. The vast majority of respondents felt that palliative care training was "very important" (87.5%) and 75.9% of respondents offered some kind of palliative care rotation, often with a multidisciplinary approach. Moving forward, we are hopeful that the data provided from our survey will act as a launching point for more formal investigations into palliative care education for internal medicine residents. Concurrently, policy makers should aid in palliative care instruction by formalizing required palliative care training for internal medicine residents.

  2. Internal Medicine Residents' Perspectives on Receiving Feedback in Milestone Format

    PubMed Central

    Angus, Steven; Moriarty, John; Nardino, Robert J.; Chmielewski, Amy; Rosenblum, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In contrast to historical feedback, which was vague or provided residents' numerical scores without clear meaning, milestone-based feedback is focused on specific knowledge, skills, and behaviors that define developmental trajectory. It was anticipated that residents would welcome the more specific and actionable feedback provided by the milestone framework, but this has not been studied. Objective We assessed internal medicine (IM) residents' perceptions of receiving feedback in the milestone framework, particularly assessing perception of the utility of milestone-based feedback compared to non–milestone-based feedback. Methods We surveyed a total of 510 IM residents from 7 institutions. Survey questions assessed resident perception of milestone feedback in identifying strengths, weaknesses, and trajectory of professional development. Postgraduate years 2 and 3 (PGY-2 and PGY-3) residents were asked to compare milestones with prior methods of feedback. Results Of 510 residents, 356 (69.8%) responded. Slightly less than half of the residents found milestone-based feedback “extremely useful” or “very useful” in identifying strengths (44%), weaknesses (43%), specific areas for improvement (45%), and appropriate education progress (48%). Few residents found such feedback “not very useful” or “not at all useful” in these domains. A total of 51% of PGY-2 and PGY-3 residents agreed that receiving milestone-based feedback was more helpful than previous forms of feedback. Conclusions IM residents are aware of the concepts of milestones, and half of the residents surveyed found milestone feedback more helpful than previous forms of feedback. More work needs to be done to understand how milestone-based feedback could be delivered more effectively to enhance resident development. PMID:26221438

  3. Internal Medicine Residents' Perspectives on Receiving Feedback in Milestone Format.

    PubMed

    Angus, Steven; Moriarty, John; Nardino, Robert J; Chmielewski, Amy; Rosenblum, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to historical feedback, which was vague or provided residents' numerical scores without clear meaning, milestone-based feedback is focused on specific knowledge, skills, and behaviors that define developmental trajectory. It was anticipated that residents would welcome the more specific and actionable feedback provided by the milestone framework, but this has not been studied. We assessed internal medicine (IM) residents' perceptions of receiving feedback in the milestone framework, particularly assessing perception of the utility of milestone-based feedback compared to non-milestone-based feedback. We surveyed a total of 510 IM residents from 7 institutions. Survey questions assessed resident perception of milestone feedback in identifying strengths, weaknesses, and trajectory of professional development. Postgraduate years 2 and 3 (PGY-2 and PGY-3) residents were asked to compare milestones with prior methods of feedback. Of 510 residents, 356 (69.8%) responded. Slightly less than half of the residents found milestone-based feedback "extremely useful" or "very useful" in identifying strengths (44%), weaknesses (43%), specific areas for improvement (45%), and appropriate education progress (48%). Few residents found such feedback "not very useful" or "not at all useful" in these domains. A total of 51% of PGY-2 and PGY-3 residents agreed that receiving milestone-based feedback was more helpful than previous forms of feedback. IM residents are aware of the concepts of milestones, and half of the residents surveyed found milestone feedback more helpful than previous forms of feedback. More work needs to be done to understand how milestone-based feedback could be delivered more effectively to enhance resident development.

  4. A Training Manual for Nuclear Medicine Technologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Guy H.; Alexander, George W.

    This manual was prepared for a training program in Nuclear Medicine Technology at the University of Cincinnati. Instructional materials for students enrolled in these courses in the training program include: Nuclear Physics and Instrumentation, Radionuclide Measurements, Radiation Protection, and Tracer Methodology and Radiopharmaceuticals. (CS)

  5. [Potential radiation hazard in nuclear medicine].

    PubMed

    Guilabert, Nadine; Ricard, Marcel; Chamoulaud, Karen; Mazelier, Carole; Schlumberger, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear medicine uses unsealed radioisotopes. The potential radiation hazards depend on the amount of radioactivity administered and the type of radionucleide. Thus, radiation safety instructions will minimize radiation exposure and contamination as low as reasonably achievable. National nuclear safety authority requires rules, regulations and exposure limits for both patients and workers. Good practices and training staff contribute to optimize the radioprotection.

  6. Integrating an evidence-based medicine rotation into an internal medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    Akl, Elie A; Izuchukwu, Ifeoma S; El-Dika, Samer; Fritsche, Lutz; Kunz, Regina; Schünemann, Holger J

    2004-09-01

    To measure the impact of a resident focused evidence-based medicine (EBM) educational intervention on EBM knowledge of residents and students, to assess its feasibility, and to evaluate residents' attitudes regarding this rotation. In 2002, based on the EBM user and EBM practitioner model, the authors designed the EBM elective rotation and conducted a controlled trial of its implementation in the internal medicine residency program in three teaching hospitals affiliated with the University at Buffalo, New York. The intervention group (one hospital, 17 medical students and residents) received a multifaceted intervention. In the control group (two hospitals, 23 medical students and residents), there was no curriculum change. The effectiveness in a pre- and post-test was assessed using the English version of the Berlin Questionnaire. A survey of all internal medicine residents (n = 119) was conducted to evaluate their attitudes toward the EBM elective rotation. In the intervention group, knowledge improved slightly, but not significantly (.71 on a scale ranging from 0-15 on the Berlin questionnaire, p =.3). The mean score in the control group decreased significantly (1.65, p =.005). The difference in change scores between the two groups was significant even after adjustment for covariates (2.52, p =.006). Residents (response rate 83%) had positive attitudes regarding the rotation. An EBM elective rotation was successfully integrated into a residency program. This multifaceted educational approach with an "on-the-ward" EBM resident, may improve the EBM knowledge and skills of targeted students and residents.

  7. Generating developmentally appropriate competency assessment at a family medicine residency.

    PubMed

    Baglia, Jay; Foster, Elissa; Dostal, Julie; Keister, Drew; Biery, Nyann; Larson, Daniel

    2011-02-01

    Ten years after the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME) mandate that residency programs evaluate learners' competency, research is needed to guide efforts to meet this challenge. During an innovative residency redesign, the authors developed a process to effectively measure "competence." This particular family medicine residency admits six residents per class year and is sponsored by an academic community hospital. Our objective was to generate developmentally appropriate observable behaviors that assess competencies. Eight steps guided the development of this assessment system: (1) Generate residency-specific competencies, (2) Define residency-specific competencies, (3) Identify principles of assessment, (4) Compose and analyze narratives of excellence within each competency, (5) Distill standard statements from narratives and organize into Dreyfus levels of competence, (6) Derive observable behaviors from standard statements to directly correlate behaviors and competency levels, (7) Design assessment tools (based on observable behaviors) for six residency learning sites, and (8) Translate assessment tools for ACGME competencies. The results of this process include an assessment system that (1) features six tools used with strategic frequency throughout the academic year and (2) generates global assessment of residents' performance in both ACGME and residency-specific competencies. Narrative reflection was an effective method to tie observable behaviors to competencies. The process was time intensive; however, greater efficiency and enthusiasm is expected in the use of these assessment tools, with greater confidence in the program's capacity to assess training outcomes. Future research should include comparison of these tools with those of other programs.

  8. Assessment of emergency medicine residents: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Colmers-Gray, Isabelle N.; Walsh, Kieran; Chan, Teresa M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Competency-based medical education is becoming the new standard for residency programs, including Emergency Medicine (EM). To inform programmatic restructuring, guide resources and identify gaps in publication, we reviewed the published literature on types and frequency of resident assessment. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo and ERIC from Jan 2005 – June 2014. MeSH terms included “assessment,” “residency,” and “emergency medicine.” We included studies on EM residents reporting either of two primary outcomes: 1) assessment type and 2) assessment frequency per resident. Two reviewers screened abstracts, reviewed full text studies, and abstracted data. Reporting of assessment-related costs was a secondary outcome. Results The search returned 879 articles; 137 articles were full-text reviewed; 73 met inclusion criteria. Half of the studies (54.8%) were pilot projects and one-quarter (26.0%) described fully implemented assessment tools/programs. Assessment tools (n=111) comprised 12 categories, most commonly: simulation-based assessments (28.8%), written exams (28.8%), and direct observation (26.0%). Median assessment frequency (n=39 studies) was twice per month/rotation (range: daily to once in residency). No studies thoroughly reported costs. Conclusion EM resident assessment commonly uses simulation or direct observation, done once-per-rotation. Implemented assessment systems and assessment-associated costs are poorly reported. Moving forward, routine publication will facilitate transitioning to competency-based medical education. PMID:28344722

  9. Exploring the experience of residents during the first six months of family medicine residency training

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Dawn; Nasmith, Louise; Takahashi, Susan Glover; Harvey, Bart J.

    2017-01-01

    Background The shift from undergraduate to postgraduate education signals a new phase in a doctor’s training. This study explored the resident’s perspective of how the transition from undergraduate to postgraduate (PGME) training is experienced in a Family Medicine program as they first meet the reality of feeling and having the responsibility as a doctor. Methods Qualitative methods explored resident experiences using interpretative inquiry through monthly, individual in-depth interviews with five incoming residents during the first six months of training. Focus groups were also held with residents at various stages of training to gather their reflection about their experience of the first six months. Residents were asked to describe their initial concerns, changes that occurred and the influences they attributed to those changes. Results Residents do not begin a Family Medicine PGME program knowing what it means to be a Family Physician, but learn what it means to fulfill this role. This process involves adjusting to significant shifts in responsibility in the areas of Knowledge, Practice Management, and Relationships as they become more responsible for care outcomes. Conclusion This study illuminated the resident perspective of how the transition is experienced. This will assist medical educators to better understand the early training experiences of residents, how these experiences contribute to consolidating their new professional identity, and how to better align teaching strategies with resident learning needs. PMID:28344713

  10. Increasing Patient Safety Event Reporting in an Emergency Medicine Residency.

    PubMed

    Steen, Sven; Jaeger, Cassie; Price, Lindsay; Griffen, David

    2017-01-01

    Patient safety event reporting is an important component for fostering a culture of safety. Our tertiary care hospital utilizes a computerized patient safety event reporting system that has been historically underutilized by residents and faculty, despite encouragement of its use. The objective of this quality project was to increase patient safety event reporting within our Emergency Medicine residency program. Knowledge of event reporting was evaluated with a survey. Eighteen residents and five faculty participated in a formal educational session on event reporting followed by feedback every two months on events reported and actions taken. The educational session included description of which events to report and the logistics of accessing the reporting system. Participants received a survey after the educational intervention to assess resident familiarity and comfort with using the system. The total number of events reported was obtained before and after the educational session. After the educational session, residents reported being more confident in knowing what to report as a patient safety event, knowing how to report events, how to access the reporting tool, and how to enter a patient safety event. In the 14 months preceding the educational session, an average of 0.4 events were reported per month from the residency. In the nine months following the educational session, an average of 3.7 events were reported per month by the residency. In addition, the reported events resulted in meaningful actions taken by the hospital to improve patient safety, which were shared with the residents. Improvement efforts including an educational session, feedback to the residency of events reported, and communication of improvements resulting from reported events successfully increased the frequency of safety event reporting in an Emergency Medicine residency.

  11. Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Lacasse, Miriam; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To review the literature on teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents and to identify formats and content of these programs and their effects. DATA SOURCES Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to mid-July 2008) and the Education Resources Information Center database (pre-1966 to mid-July 2008) were searched using and combining the MeSH terms teaching, internship and residency, and family practice; and teaching, graduate medical education, and family practice. STUDY SELECTION The initial MEDLINE and Education Resources Information Center database searches identified 362 and 33 references, respectively. Titles and abstracts were reviewed and studies were included if they described the format or content of a teaching-skills program or if they were primary studies of the effects of a teaching-skills program for family medicine residents or family medicine and other specialty trainees. The bibliographies of those articles were reviewed for unidentified studies. A total of 8 articles were identified for systematic review. Selection was limited to articles published in English. SYNTHESIS Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents vary from half-day curricula to a few months of training. Their content includes leadership skills, effective clinical teaching skills, technical teaching skills, as well as feedback and evaluation skills. Evaluations mainly assessed the programs’ effects on teaching behaviour, which was generally found to improve following participation in the programs. Evaluations of learner reactions and learning outcomes also suggested that the programs have positive effects. CONCLUSION Family medicine residency training programs differ from all other residency training programs in their shorter duration, usually 2 years, and the broader scope of learning within those 2 years. Few studies on teaching-skills training, however, were designed specifically for family medicine residents. Further studies assessing the

  12. Resident Career Planning Needs in Internal Medicine: A Qualitative Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rina L.; Windish, Donna M.; Rosenbaum, Julie R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Few residency programs have centralized resources for career planning. As a consequence, little is known about residents' informational needs regarding career planning. Objective To examine career preparation stressors, practical needs, and information that residents wished they were privy to when applying. Methods In 2007 and 2008, we surveyed 163 recent graduates or graduating residents from 10 Yale-based and Yale-affiliated hospitals' internal medicine programs regarding their experiences with applying for positions after residency. We included questions about demographics, mentorship, stress of finding a job or fellowship, and open-ended questions to assess barriers and frustrations. Qualitative data were coded independently and a classification scheme was negotiated by consensus. Results A total of 89 residents or recent graduates responded, and 75% of them found career planning during residency training at least somewhat stressful. Themes regarding the application process included (1) knowledge about the process, (2) knowledge about career paths and opportunities, (3) time factors, (4) importance of adequate personal guidance and mentorship, and (5) self-knowledge regarding priorities and the desired outcome. Residents identified the following advice as most important: (1) start the process as early as possible and with a clear knowledge of the process timeline, (2) be clear about personal goals and priorities, and (3) be well-informed about a prospective employer and what that employer is looking for. Most residents felt career planning should be structured into the curriculum and should occur in the first year or throughout residency. Conclusions This study highlights residents' desire for structured dissemination of information and counseling with regard to career planning during residency. Our data suggest that exposure to such resources may be beneficial as early as the first year of training. PMID:22132271

  13. Resident career planning needs in internal medicine: a qualitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Rina L; Windish, Donna M; Rosenbaum, Julie R

    2010-12-01

    Few residency programs have centralized resources for career planning. As a consequence, little is known about residents' informational needs regarding career planning. To examine career preparation stressors, practical needs, and information that residents wished they were privy to when applying. In 2007 and 2008, we surveyed 163 recent graduates or graduating residents from 10 Yale-based and Yale-affiliated hospitals' internal medicine programs regarding their experiences with applying for positions after residency. We included questions about demographics, mentorship, stress of finding a job or fellowship, and open-ended questions to assess barriers and frustrations. Qualitative data were coded independently and a classification scheme was negotiated by consensus. A total of 89 residents or recent graduates responded, and 75% of them found career planning during residency training at least somewhat stressful. Themes regarding the application process included (1) knowledge about the process, (2) knowledge about career paths and opportunities, (3) time factors, (4) importance of adequate personal guidance and mentorship, and (5) self-knowledge regarding priorities and the desired outcome. Residents identified the following advice as most important: (1) start the process as early as possible and with a clear knowledge of the process timeline, (2) be clear about personal goals and priorities, and (3) be well-informed about a prospective employer and what that employer is looking for. Most residents felt career planning should be structured into the curriculum and should occur in the first year or throughout residency. This study highlights residents' desire for structured dissemination of information and counseling with regard to career planning during residency. Our data suggest that exposure to such resources may be beneficial as early as the first year of training.

  14. [Professional motivation and family medicine residency: a national study].

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Dina; Jesus, Saul Neves; Cruz, José Pestana

    2011-01-01

    Family medicine has some constraints, which may be considered critical for physicians' career choice, and motivation may be one of them. Motivation should be seen as a determinant of career success, particularly in educational context. The aim of this study was to develop an understanding about the family medicine residents' professional motivation, based on psychological and cognitive factors. The following objectives were set: (1) to characterize the residents, in terms of cognitive-motivational variables; (2) to evaluate their assertive skills during the vocational training. In 2005, we designed a mail survey applied to all graduates entering Family Medicine, in Portugal (N = 228), at the start of their specialty program. As part of a larger observational study, a 57 Likert scale items questionnaire was designed to collect descriptive data. In this cross sectional study we present data from professional project, professional commitment, intrinsic motivation, self-efficacy expectancies, results control expectancies, initial motivation to the specialty and assertiveness skills (cross sectional study). From the target population, 109 completed questionnaires (47.8%) were returned. Most of the participants indicated high levels of professional orientation (77.1%) for family medicine and 92.6% had been globally committed in practice. At the beginning of the residency, the participants had medium (59.6%) or high (33.9%) levels of motivation for choosing this specialty, 89% were intrinsically motivated and 60.5% proved to be quite assertive in their patient approach. These findings suggest that medical graduates, studied in this research, were globally motivated for practicing in a Family Medicine context, contradicting the overall perception of a physicians' declined interest for this specialty. These results may have implications in the design of real-life training programs for postgraduate education in Family Medicine, a time when physicians are forming expectations

  15. Status of general medicine training and education in psychiatry residency.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, Aniyizhai; Rohrbaugh, Robert M; Sernyak, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    With the current emphasis on integrated care, the role of psychiatrists is expanding to either directly provide medical care or coordinate its delivery. The purpose of this study was to survey general psychiatry programs on the extent of general medicine training provided during residency. A short web-based survey was sent to 173 residency program directors to recruit participants for a larger survey. Thirty-seven participants were recruited and surveyed, and of these, 12 (32.4%) responded. The survey assessed the extent of general medicine training and didactics during and after the first postgraduate year and attitudes towards enhancing this training in residency. This study was approved by the local institutional review board. Seventy-five percent of programs require only the minimum 4 months of primary care in the first postgraduate year, and didactics during these months is often not relevant to psychiatry residents. Some programs offer elective didactics on chronic medical conditions in the fourth postgraduate year. Respondents are in favor of enhancing general medicine training in psychiatry but indicate some resistance from their institutions. These results suggest that very few programs require additional clinical training in relevant medical illnesses after the first postgraduate year. Respondents indicated favorable institutional support for enhancing training, but also expected resistance. The reasons for resistance should be an area of future research. Also important is to determine if enhancing medical didactics improves patient care and outcomes. The changing role of psychiatrists entails a closer look at resident curricula.

  16. Firearm injury prevention training in Preventive Medicine Residency programs.

    PubMed

    Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H; Dake, Joseph A

    2009-08-01

    Preventive medicine plays a central role in the reducing the number of deaths due to preventable causes of premature deaths. General Preventive Medicine Residency programs have not been studied in relation to training in this area. A three-wave mail survey was conducted with email and telephone follow-ups. The outcome measures were the portion of program directors involved in training residents on firearm injury prevention issues and their perceived benefits and barriers of training residents on firearm injury prevention issues. Only 25% of the programs provided formal training on firearm injury prevention. Program directors who provided formal training perceived significantly higher number of benefits to offering such training than did directors who did not provide such training but no significant difference was found between the two for number of perceived barriers. If preventive medicine residency graduates are to play a role in reducing premature morbidity and mortality from firearms it will require more residencies to offer formal training in this area. The Association for Prevention Teaching and Research needs to develop guidelines on specific curriculum topics regarding firearm injury prevention.

  17. Education in long-term care for family medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Doug; Emili, Anna; Chan, David; Taniguchi, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed Family medicine residents require more exposure to all aspects of care of the elderly in the community, including care in long-term care (LTC) homes. Objective of program To provide a framework for the development of integrated LTC rotations in family medicine programs. Program description Clear objectives for residents and clinical preceptors provided the foundation for the program. Rotations of 4 half days per year in LTC homes were integrated into core family medicine blocks. Residents worked with family physician preceptors providing LTC in the community. Teaching was case based and aligned with the core competencies set out in the CanMEDS (Canadian Medical Directives for Specialists) framework for medical education. The program was strongly supported by the university’s administration, clinical preceptors in the community, and LTC homes. Conclusion All the residents rated their LTC rotations as useful or extremely useful in preparing them to provide LTC in their future practices. Long-term care homes realized that investing in training medical residents in LTC could help improve care of the elderly in the community. PMID:21841091

  18. Internal Medicine Residents' Preferences regarding Medical Ethics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Jay A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A survey of residents (N=323) in 6 internal medicine programs investigated the topics students wanted included in the medical ethics curriculum and by which of 17 methods they would prefer to be taught. About three-fourths had previous medical ethics instruction, and most wanted more on specific topics, especially legal and end-of-life issues.…

  19. Internal Medicine Residents' Preferences regarding Medical Ethics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Jay A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A survey of residents (N=323) in 6 internal medicine programs investigated the topics students wanted included in the medical ethics curriculum and by which of 17 methods they would prefer to be taught. About three-fourths had previous medical ethics instruction, and most wanted more on specific topics, especially legal and end-of-life issues.…

  20. A Novel Approach to Medicine Training for Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onate, John; Hales, Robert; McCarron, Robert; Han, Jaesu; Pitman, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A unique rotation was developed to address limited outpatient internal medicine training in psychiatric residency by the University of California, Davis, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, which provides medical care to patients with mental illness. Methods: The number of patients seen by the service and the number of…

  1. A Novel Approach to Medicine Training for Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onate, John; Hales, Robert; McCarron, Robert; Han, Jaesu; Pitman, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A unique rotation was developed to address limited outpatient internal medicine training in psychiatric residency by the University of California, Davis, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, which provides medical care to patients with mental illness. Methods: The number of patients seen by the service and the number of…

  2. A Combined Primary Care Residency in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Kim; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A program combining pediatrics and internal medicine is described. The four-year program, focusing on ambulatory care, alternates six-month rotations in each field and includes clinic training. Success factors include comparison of outpatient and inpatient care, developing an ambulatory practice to support resident salaries, and preparation for…

  3. Can Emergency Medicine Residents Predict Cost of Diagnostic Testing?

    PubMed Central

    Tainter, Christopher R.; Gentges, Joshua A.; Thomas, Stephen H.; Burns, Boyd D.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Diagnostic testing represents a significant portion of healthcare spending, and cost should be considered when ordering such tests. Needless and excessive spending may occur without an appreciation of the impact on the larger healthcare system. Knowledge regarding the cost of diagnostic testing among emergency medicine (EM) residents has not previously been studied. Methods A survey was administered to 20 EM residents from a single ACGME-accredited three-year EM residency program, asking for an estimation of patient charges for 20 commonly ordered laboratory tests and seven radiological exams. We compared responses between residency classes to evaluate whether there was a difference based on level of training. Results The survey completion rate was 100% (20/20 residents). We noted significant discrepancies between the median resident estimates and actual charge to patient for both laboratory and radiological exams. Nearly all responses were an underestimate of the actual cost. The group median underestimation for laboratory testing was $114, for radiographs $57, and for computed tomography exams was $1,058. There was improvement in accuracy with increasing level of training. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrates that EM residents have a poor understanding of the charges burdening patients and health insurance providers. In order to make balanced decisions with regard to diagnostic testing, providers must appreciate these factors. Education regarding the cost of providing emergency care is a potential area for improvement of EM residency curricula, and warrants further attention and investigation. PMID:28116030

  4. Portfolios: possibilities for addressing emergency medicine resident competencies.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Patricia; Greene, Constance

    2002-11-01

    Portfolios are an innovative approach to evaluate the competency of emergency medicine residents. Three key characteristics add to their attractiveness. First, portfolios draw from the resident's actual work. Second, they require self-reflection on the part of the resident. Third, they are inherently practice-based learning since residents must review and consider their practice in order to begin the portfolio. This paper illustrates five different applications of portfolios. First, portfolios are applied to evaluating specific competencies as part of the training of emergency physicians. While evaluating specific competencies, the portfolio captures aspects of the general competencies. Second, the article illustrates using portfolios as a way to address a specific residency review committee (RRC) requirement such as follow-ups. Third is a description of how portfolios can be used to evaluate resident conferences capturing the competency of practice-based learning and possibly other competencies such as medical knowledge and patient care. Fourth, the authors of the article designed a portfolio as a way to demonstrate clinical competence. Fifth, they elaborate as to how a continuous quality improvement project could be cast within the portfolio framework. They provide some guidance concerning issues to address when designing the portfolios. Portfolios are carefully structured and not haphazard collections of materials. Following criteria is important in maintaining the validity of the portfolio as well as contributing to reliability. The portfolios can enhance the relationship between faculty and residents since faculty will suggest cases, discuss anomalies, and interact with the residents around the portfolio. The authors believe that in general portfolios can cover many of the general competencies specified by the ACGME while still focusing on issues important to emergency medicine. The authors believe that portfolios provide an approach to evaluation commensurate

  5. Family medicine residents' practice intentions: Theory of planned behaviour evaluation.

    PubMed

    Grierson, Lawrence E M; Fowler, Nancy; Kwan, Matthew Y W

    2015-11-01

    To assess residents' practice intentions since the introduction of the College of Family Physicians of Canada's Triple C curriculum, which focuses on graduating family physicians who will provide comprehensive care within traditional and newer models of family practice. A survey based on Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour was administered on 2 occasions. McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont. Residents (n = 135) who were enrolled in the Department of Family Medicine Postgraduate Residency Program at McMaster University in July 2012 and July 2013; 54 of the 60 first-year residents who completed the survey in 2012 completed it again in 2013. The survey was modeled so as to measure the respondents' intentions to practise with a comprehensive scope; determine the degree to which their attitudes, subjective norms, and perceptions of control about comprehensive practice influence those intentions; and investigate how these relationships change as residents progress through the curriculum. The survey also queried the respondents about their intentions with respect to particular medical services that underpin comprehensive practice. The responses indicate that the factors modeled by the theory of planned behaviour survey account for 60% of the variance in the residents' intentions to adopt a comprehensive scope of practice upon graduation, that there is room for curricular improvement with respect to encouraging residents to practise comprehensive care, and that targeting subjective norms about comprehensive practice might have the greatest influence on improving resident intentions. The theory of planned behaviour presents an effective approach to assessing curricular effects on resident practice intentions while also providing meaningful information for guiding further program evaluation efforts in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University.

  6. Herbal medicine use among urban residents in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Over three-quarter of the world's population is using herbal medicines with an increasing trend globally. Herbal medicines may be beneficial but are not completely harmless. This study aimed to assess the extent of use and the general knowledge of the benefits and safety of herbal medicines among urban residents in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods The study involved 388 participants recruited by cluster and random sampling techniques. Participants were interviewed with a structured open- and close-ended questionnaire. The information obtained comprises the demography and types of herbal medicines used by the respondents; indications for their use; the sources, benefits and adverse effects of the herbal medicines they used. Results A total of 12 herbal medicines (crude or refined) were used by the respondents, either alone or in combination with other herbal medicines. Herbal medicines were reportedly used by 259 (66.8%) respondents. 'Agbo jedi-jedi' (35%) was the most frequently used herbal medicine preparation, followed by 'agbo-iba' (27.5%) and Oroki herbal mixture® (9%). Family and friends had a marked influence on 78.4% of the respondents who used herbal medicine preparations. Herbal medicines were considered safe by half of the respondents despite 20.8% of those who experienced mild to moderate adverse effects. Conclusions Herbal medicine is popular among the respondents but they appear to be ignorant of its potential toxicities. It may be necessary to evaluate the safety, efficacy and quality of herbal medicines and their products through randomised clinical trial studies. Public enlightenment programme about safe use of herbal medicines may be necessary as a means of minimizing the potential adverse effects. PMID:22117933

  7. Herbal medicine use among urban residents in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oreagba, Ibrahim Adekunle; Oshikoya, Kazeem Adeola; Amachree, Mercy

    2011-11-25

    Over three-quarter of the world's population is using herbal medicines with an increasing trend globally. Herbal medicines may be beneficial but are not completely harmless.This study aimed to assess the extent of use and the general knowledge of the benefits and safety of herbal medicines among urban residents in Lagos, Nigeria. The study involved 388 participants recruited by cluster and random sampling techniques. Participants were interviewed with a structured open- and close-ended questionnaire.The information obtained comprises the demography and types of herbal medicines used by the respondents; indications for their use; the sources, benefits and adverse effects of the herbal medicines they used. A total of 12 herbal medicines (crude or refined) were used by the respondents, either alone or in combination with other herbal medicines. Herbal medicines were reportedly used by 259 (66.8%) respondents. 'Agbo jedi-jedi' (35%) was the most frequently used herbal medicine preparation, followed by 'agbo-iba' (27.5%) and Oroki herbal mixture® (9%). Family and friends had a marked influence on 78.4% of the respondents who used herbal medicine preparations. Herbal medicines were considered safe by half of the respondents despite 20.8% of those who experienced mild to moderate adverse effects. Herbal medicine is popular among the respondents but they appear to be ignorant of its potential toxicities. It may be necessary to evaluate the safety, efficacy and quality of herbal medicines and their products through randomised clinical trial studies. Public enlightenment programme about safe use of herbal medicines may be necessary as a means of minimizing the potential adverse effects.

  8. Moral distress and burnout in internal medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Sajjadi, Sharareh; Norena, Monica; Wong, Hubert; Dodek, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background Residents frequently encounter situations in their workplace that may induce moral distress or burnout. The objective of this study was to measure overall and rotation-specific moral distress and burnout in medical residents, and the relationship between demographics and moral distress and burnout. Methods The revised Moral Distress Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (Human Service version) were administered to Internal Medicine residents in the 2013–2014 academic year at the University of British Columbia. Results Of the 88 residents, 45 completed the surveys. Participants (mean age 30+/−3; 46% male) reported a median moral distress score (interquartile range) of 77 (50–96). Twenty-six percent of residents had considered quitting because of moral distress, 21% had a high level of burnout, and only 5% had a low level of burnout. Moral distress scores were highest during Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and Clinical Teaching Unit (CTU) rotations, and lowest during elective rotations (p<0.0001). Women reported higher emotional exhaustion. Moral distress was associated with depersonalization (p=0.01), and both moral distress and burnout were associated with intention to leave the job. Conclusion Internal Medicine residents report moral distress that is greatest during ICU and CTU rotations, and is associated with burnout and intention to leave the job. PMID:28344714

  9. Benchmarks of support in internal medicine residency training programs.

    PubMed

    Wolfsthal, Susan D; Beasley, Brent W; Kopelman, Richard; Stickley, William; Gabryel, Timothy; Kahn, Marc J

    2002-01-01

    To identify benchmarks of financial and staff support in internal medicine residency training programs and their correlation with indicators of quality. A survey instrument to determine characteristics of support of residency training programs was mailed to each member program of the Association of Program Directors of Internal Medicine. Results were correlated with the three-year running average of the pass rates on the American Board of Internal Medicine certifying examination using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Of 394 surveys, 287 (73%) were completed: 74% of respondents were program directors and 20% were both chair and program director. The mean duration as program director was 7.5 years (median = 5), but it was significantly lower for women than for men (4.9 versus 8.1; p =.001). Respondents spent 62% of their time in educational and administrative duties, 30% in clinical activities, 5% in research, and 2% in other activities. Most chief residents were PGY4s, with 72% receiving compensation additional to base salary. On average, there was one associate program director for every 33 residents, one chief resident for every 27 residents, and one staff person for every 21 residents. Most programs provided trainees with incremental educational stipends, meals while oncall, travel and meeting expenses, and parking. Support from pharmaceutical companies was used for meals, books, and meeting expenses. Almost all programs provided meals for applicants, with 15% providing travel allowances and 37% providing lodging. The programs' board pass rates significantly correlated with the numbers of faculty fulltime equivalents (FTEs), the numbers of resident FTEs per office staff FTEs, and the numbers of categorical and preliminary applications received and ranked by the programs in 1998 and 1999. Regression analyses demonstrated three independent predictors of the programs' board pass rates: number of faculty (a positive predictor), percentage of clinical work

  10. Increasing resident recruitment into family medicine: effect of a unique curriculum in integrative medicine.

    PubMed

    Lebensohn, Patricia; Dodds, Sally; Brooks, Audrey J; Cook, Paula; Guerrera, Mary; Sierpina, Victor; Teets, Raymond; Woytowicz, John; Maizes, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare reform is highlighting the need for more family practice and other primary care physicians. The Integrative Medicine in Residency (IMR) curriculum project helped family medicine residencies pilot a new, online curriculum promoting prevention, patient-centered care competencies, use of complementary and alternative medicine along with conventional medicine for management of chronic illness. A major potential benefit of the IMR program is enhanced recruitment into participating residencies, which is reported here. Using an online questionnaire, accepted applicants to the eight IMR pilot programs (n = 152) and four control programs (n = 50) were asked about their interests in learning integrative medicine (IM) and in the pilot sites how the presence of the IMR curriculum affected their ranking decisions. Of residents at the IMR sites, 46.7% reported that the presence of the IMR was very important or important in their ranking decision. The IMR also ranked fourth overall in importance of ranking after geography, quality of faculty, and academic reputation of the residency. The majority of IMR residents (87.5%) had high to moderate interest in learning IM during their residency; control residents also had a high interest in learning IM (61.2%). The presence of the IMR curriculum was seen as a strong positive by applicants in ranking residencies. Increasing the adoption of innovative IM curricula, such as the IMR, by residency programs may be helpful in increasing applications of competitive medical students into primary care residencies as well as in responding to the expressed interest in learning the IM approach to patient care. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Initial experience with a nuclear medicine viewing workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Robert M.; Burt, Robert W.

    1992-07-01

    Graphical User Interfaced (GUI) workstations are now available from commercial vendors. We recently installed a GUI workstation in our nuclear medicine reading room for exclusive use of staff and resident physicians. The system is built upon a Macintosh platform and has been available as a DELTAmanager from MedImage and more recently as an ICON V from Siemens Medical Systems. The workstation provides only display functions and connects to our existing nuclear medicine imaging system via ethernet. The system has some processing capabilities to create oblique, sagittal and coronal views from transverse tomographic views. Hard copy output is via a screen save device and a thermal color printer. The DELTAmanager replaced a MicroDELTA workstation which had both process and view functions. The mouse activated GUI has made remarkable changes to physicians'' use of the nuclear medicine viewing system. Training time to view and review studies has been reduced from hours to about 30-minutes. Generation of oblique views and display of brain and heart tomographic studies has been reduced from about 30-minutes of technician''s time to about 5-minutes of physician''s time. Overall operator functionality has been increased so that resident physicians with little prior computer experience can access all images on the image server and display pertinent patient images when consulting with other staff.

  12. The State of Communication Education in Family Medicine Residencies.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Kate L; Rosenbaum, Marcy E

    2016-06-01

    Communication skills are essential to medical training and have lasting effects on patient satisfaction and adherence rates. However, relatively little is reported in the literature identifying how communication is taught in the context of residency education. Our goal was to determine current practices in communication curricula across family medicine residency programs. Behavioral scientists and program directors in US family medicine residencies were surveyed via email and professional organization listservs. Questions included whether programs use a standardized communication model, methods used for teaching communication, hours devoted to teaching communication, as well as strengths and areas for improvement in their program. Analysis identified response frequencies and ranges complemented by analysis of narrative comments. A total of 204 programs out of 458 family medicine residency training sites responded (45%), with 48 out of 50 US states represented. The majority of respondents were behavioral scientists. Seventy-five percent of programs identified using a standard communication model; Mauksch's patient-centered observation model (34%) was most often used. Training programs generally dedicated more time to experiential teaching methods (video review, work with simulated patients, role plays, small groups, and direct observation of patient encounters) than to lectures (62% of time and 24% of time, respectively). The amount of time dedicated to communication education varied across programs (average of 25 hours per year). Respondent comments suggest that time dedicated to communication education and having a formal curriculum in place are most valued by educators. This study provides a picture of how communication skills teaching is conducted in US family medicine residency programs. These findings can provide a comparative reference and rationale for residency programs seeking to evaluate their current approaches to communication skills teaching and

  13. Quantifying internal medicine resident clinical experience using resident-selected primary diagnosis codes.

    PubMed

    Mattana, Joseph; Kerpen, Howard; Lee, Clifton; Multz, Alan; Pekmezaris, Renee; Napolitano, Barbara; Walia, Rajni; Steinberg, Harry

    2011-09-01

    While experiential learning is a desirable goal of residency education, little is known regarding the actual clinical experience of internal medicine residents during their training. We modified an electronic patient handoff tool to include a system for resident entry of a primary diagnosis for each of their patients. Using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) system, we created two methods to select the code: 1) an organ system-based dropdown list containing frequently used codes; and 2) a search option for the complete ICD-9 database. The codes were then grouped using ICD-9 categorization. A total of 7562 resident-patient diagnostic encounters were studied. A wide spectrum of clinical conditions was observed, with symptoms and ill-defined conditions, circulatory disorders, respiratory disorders, neoplasms, genitourinary disorders, digestive disorders, diseases of the blood/blood forming organs, endocrinologic/nutritional/metabolic/immune disorders, and disorders of the skin and subcutaneous tissue accounting for about 86% of resident clinical experience. Symptoms and ill-defined conditions were noted to represent a sizable portion of resident clinical experience. Within this category, the most common conditions were fever; abdominal pain; and chest pain, unspecified. Analysis of resident-selected ICD-9 codes might serve as a method to attempt to define resident clinical experience, and may be useful in the development of innovative experiential learning-based residency curricula. This might also be used to assess gaps in experiential learning at the program or resident level, and may serve to identify topics that require additional teaching supplementation. Copyright © 2011 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  14. Physician knowledge of nuclear medicine radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Riley, Paul; Liu, Hongjie; Wilson, John D

    2013-01-01

    Because physician knowledge of patient exposure to ionizing radiation from computed tomography (CT) procedures previously has been recognized as poor, the purpose of this systematic review is to determine whether physician or physician trainee knowledge of patient exposure to radiation from nuclear medicine procedures is similarly insufficient. Online databases and printed literature were systematically searched to acquire peer-reviewed published research studies involving assessment of physician or physician trainee knowledge of patient radiation exposure levels incurred during nuclear medicine and CT procedures. An a priori inclusion/exclusion criteria for study selection was used as a review protocol aimed at extracting information pertaining to participants, collection methods, comparisons within studies, outcomes, and study design. Fourteen studies from 8 countries were accepted into the review and revealed similar insufficiencies in physician knowledge of nuclear medicine and CT patient radiation exposures. Radiation exposure estimates for both modalities similarly featured a strong tendency toward physician underestimation. Discussion Comparisons were made and ratios established between physican estimates of patient radiation exposure from nuclear medicine procedures and estimates of CT procedures. A theoretical median of correct physician exposure estimates was used to examine factors affecting lower and higher estimates. The tendency for ordering physicians to underestimate patient radiation exposures from nuclear medicine and CT procedures could lead to their overuse and contribute to increasing the public's exposure to ionizing radiation.

  15. Integrating abortion training into family medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Dehlendorf, Christine; Brahmi, Dalia; Engel, David; Grumbach, Kevin; Joffe, Carole; Gold, Marji

    2007-05-01

    Family physicians provide many office-based procedures in primary care settings. While first-trimester abortion is a procedure appropriate for and performed by family physicians, few residency programs offer routine training in this skill. This study explored the experience of residency programs that have initiated or are in the process of initiating required abortion training. Faculty members responsible for abortion training curricula in identified programs completed questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Faculty members from nine programs with required training and seven programs interested in initiating this training were included in the study. Factors that assisted in curriculum development included the support of family medicine and obstetrician-gynecologist faculty. Commonly encountered challenges included the need for dedicated resources, inter-specialty conflict, and limited access to training sites. Family medicine programs can be successful at developing required abortion training. Collaboration with colleagues inside and outside the family medicine department and with receptive training sites will benefit programs interested in such.

  16. Introduction of nuclear medicine research in Japan.

    PubMed

    Inubushi, Masayuki; Higashi, Tatsuya; Kuji, Ichiei; Sakamoto, Setsu; Tashiro, Manabu; Momose, Mitsuru

    2016-12-01

    There were many interesting presentations of unique studies at the Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine, although there were fewer attendees from Europe than expected. These presentations included research on diseases that are more frequent in Japan and Asia than in Europe, synthesis of original radiopharmaceuticals, and development of imaging devices and methods with novel ideas especially by Japanese manufacturers. In this review, we introduce recent nuclear medicine research conducted in Japan in the five categories of Oncology, Neurology, Cardiology, Radiopharmaceuticals and Technology. It is our hope that this article will encourage the participation of researchers from all over the world, in particular from Europe, in scientific meetings on nuclear medicine held in Japan.

  17. Informed consent in the nuclear medicine setting.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, M Sara

    2011-03-01

    In the nuclear medicine setting, the task of obtaining informed consent for procedures that require it is frequently left to the nuclear medicine technologist. Unfortunately, a patient's signature on a consent form does not mean the patient has given informed consent, or what legal scholars call valid consent. On completion of this scholarly bioethics article, the reader will understand the troubled history that led to informed consent as social and regulatory policy. Additionally, the reader will discover the meaning of "informed consent," which includes 3 critical components: disclosure, decision-making capacity, and voluntariness. Finally, this article will discuss which nuclear medicine procedures require informed consent, how to assess whether patients have given informed consent, what to do when the patient refuses a procedure, and what to do when informed consent is unachievable.

  18. Integrating family medicine residents into a rural practice.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, L.

    1997-01-01

    PROBLEM: Integrating residents into community family practices can be challenging for busy doctors, especially when new preceptors have no formal preparation or teaching experience. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To develop an organized and practical approach to teaching residents in our busy rural group practice. Our seven northern Ontario family doctors have been training elective residents and clerks for 15 years. Recently, we have gone from hosting elective residents and students to teaching core family medicine residents. Our precepting plan allows us to dedicate a reasonable time to teaching while fulfilling our primary care duties. MAIN COMPONENTS: The program involves contracting, teaching, monitoring, feedback, and evaluation. CONCLUSION: We think we have developed a sustainable, workable set of teaching parameters that is applicable by various preceptors in different settings. It has simplified our teaching role and lessened our anxieties. Residents have benefited from the consistent protocol, which can be flexible enough to adapt to individual residents and preceptors, and have valued this teaching approach. Images p278-a p280-a PMID:9040915

  19. Five Key Leadership Actions Needed to Redesign Family Medicine Residencies.

    PubMed

    Kozakowski, Stanley M; Eiff, M Patrice; Green, Larry A; Pugno, Perry A; Waller, Elaine; Jones, Samuel M; Fetter, Gerald; Carney, Patricia A

    2015-06-01

    New skills are needed to properly prepare the next generation of physicians and health professionals to practice in medical homes. Transforming residency training to address these new skills requires strong leadership. We sought to increase the understanding of leadership skills useful in residency programs that plan to undertake meaningful change. The Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4) project (2007-2014) was a comparative case study of 14 family medicine residencies that engaged in innovative training redesign, including altering the scope, content, sequence, length, and location of training to align resident education with requirements of the patient-centered medical home. In 2012, each P4 residency team submitted a final summary report of innovations implemented, overall insights, and dissemination activities during the study. Six investigators conducted independent narrative analyses of these reports. A consensus meeting held in September 2012 was used to identify key leadership actions associated with successful educational redesign. Five leadership actions were associated with successful implementation of innovations and residency transformation: (1) manage change; (2) develop financial acumen; (3) adapt best evidence educational strategies to the local environment; (4) create and sustain a vision that engages stakeholders; and (5) demonstrate courage and resilience. Residency programs are expected to change to better prepare their graduates for a changing delivery system. Insights about effective leadership skills can provide guidance for faculty to develop the skills needed to face practical realities while guiding transformation.

  20. Documentation of quality improvement exposure by internal medicine residency applicants.

    PubMed

    Kolade, Victor O; Sethi, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) has become an essential component of medical care in the United States. In residency programs, QI is a focus area of the Clinical Learning Environment Review visits conducted by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The readiness of applicants to internal medicine residency to engage in QI on day one is unknown. To document the reporting of QI training or experience in residency applications. Electronic Residency Application Service applications to a single internal medicine program were reviewed individually looking for reported QI involvement or actual projects in the curriculum vitae (CVs), personal statements (PSs), and letters of recommendation (LORs). CVs were also reviewed for evidence of education in QI such as completion of Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) modules. Of 204 candidates shortlisted for interview, seven had QI items on their CVs, including one basic IHI certificate. Three discussed their QI work in their PSs, and four had recommendation letters describing their involvement in QI. One applicant had both CV and LOR evidence, so that 13 (6%) documented QI engagement. Practice of or instruction in QI is rarely mentioned in application documents of prospective internal medicine interns.

  1. Dose Estimation in Pediatric Nuclear Medicine.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Frederic H; Goodkind, Alison B; Plyku, Donika; Khamwan, Kitiwat; O'Reilly, Shannon E; Cao, Xinhua; Frey, Eric C; Li, Ye; Bolch, Wesley E; Sgouros, George; Treves, S Ted

    2017-03-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine in children is well established for imaging practically all physiologic systems but particularly in the fields of oncology, neurology, urology, and orthopedics. Pediatric nuclear medicine yields images of physiologic and molecular processes that can provide essential diagnostic information to the clinician. However, nuclear medicine involves the administration of radiopharmaceuticals that expose the patient to ionizing radiation and children are thought to be at a higher risk for adverse effects from radiation exposure than adults. Therefore it may be considered prudent to take extra care to optimize the radiation dose associated with pediatric nuclear medicine. This requires a solid understanding of the dosimetry associated with the administration of radiopharmaceuticals in children. Models for estimating the internal radiation dose from radiopharmaceuticals have been developed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging and other groups. But to use these models accurately in children, better pharmacokinetic data for the radiopharmaceuticals and anatomical models specifically for children need to be developed. The use of CT in the context of hybrid imaging has also increased significantly in the past 15 years, and thus CT dosimetry as it applies to children needs to be better understood. The concept of effective dose has been used to compare different practices involving radiation on a dosimetric level, but this approach may not be appropriate when applied to a population of children of different ages as the radiosensitivity weights utilized in the calculation of effective dose are not specific to children and may vary as a function of age on an organ-by-organ bias. As these gaps in knowledge of dosimetry and radiation risk as they apply to children are filled, more accurate models can be developed that allow for better approaches to dose optimization. In turn, this

  2. The State of Sleep Medicine Education in North American Psychiatry Residency Training Programs in 2013: Chief Resident's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Imran S; Dickmann, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Thomas D; Thuras, Paul D; Feinstein, Robert E; Douglass, Alan B; Lee, Elliott Kyung

    2017-08-31

    To assess the current state of sleep medicine educational resources and training offered by North American psychiatry residency programs. In June 2013, a 9-item peer-reviewed Sleep Medicine Training Survey was administered to 39 chief residents of psychiatry residency training programs during a meeting in New York. Thirty-four percent of the participating programs offered an elective rotation in sleep medicine. A variety of innovative approaches for teaching sleep medicine were noted. The majority of the chief residents felt comfortable screening patients for obstructive sleep apnea (72%), half felt comfortable screening for restless legs syndrome (53%), and fewer than half were comfortable screening for other sleep disorders (47%). This is the first report in the last decade to provide any analysis of current sleep medicine training in North American psychiatry residency training programs. These data indicate that sleep medicine education in psychiatry residency programs is possibly in decline.

  3. Examining Critical Thinking Skills in Family Medicine Residents.

    PubMed

    Ross, David; Schipper, Shirley; Westbury, Chris; Linh Banh, Hoan; Loeffler, Kim; Allan, G Michael; Ross, Shelley

    2016-02-01

    Our objective was to determine the relationship between critical thinking skills and objective measures of academic success in a family medicine residency program. This prospective observational cohort study was set in a large Canadian family medicine residency program. Intervention was the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST), administered at three points in residency: upon entry, at mid-point, and at graduation. Results from the CCTST, Canadian Residency Matching Service file, and interview scores were compared to other measures of academic performance (Medical Colleges Admission Test [MCAT] and College of Family Physicians of Canada [CCFP] certification examination results). For participants (n=60), significant positive correlations were found between critical thinking skills and performance on tests of knowledge. For the MCAT, CCTST scores correlated positively with full scores (n=24, r=0.57) as well as with each section score (verbal reasoning: r=0.59; physical sciences: r=0.64; biological sciences: r=0.54). For CCFP examination, CCTST correlated reliably with both sections (n=49, orals: r=0.34; short answer: r=0.47). Additionally, CCTST was a better predictor of performance on the CCFP exam than was the interview score at selection into the residency program (Fisher's r-to-z test, z=2.25). Success on a critical thinking skills exam was found to predict success on family medicine certification examinations. Given that critical thinking skills appear to be stable throughout residency training, including an assessment of critical thinking in the selection process may help identify applicants more likely to be successful on final certification exam.

  4. Implementation of a Multifaceted Interactive Electrodiagnostic Medicine Workshop in a Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residency Program.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Jayne; van de Rijn, Marc; McCabe, Elizabeth L; Shih, Shirley; Paganoni, Sabrina

    2017-09-25

    Electrodiagnostic medicine is a required component of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation residency education, but limited resources exist to guide curriculum development. Our objective was to create a focused workshop to enhance our residency program's electrodiagnostic curriculum. We created two separate 1.5-day workshops, one basic and one advanced, for all residents. Each workshop included didactic sessions, case discussion, question and answer sessions, demonstrations, and hands-on participation with direct supervision and feedback. Presurveys and postsurveys were administered to evaluate the value of the workshops. We also assessed trends in electrodiagnostic self-assessment examination scores. Residents reported clinical electrodiagnostic rotations to be more valuable to their education than previous didactic sessions and independent learning. Self-reported knowledge of electrodiagnostic concepts, resident comfort level in planning, performing, and interpreting studies, and perceived value in independent learning of electrodiagnostic medicine improved after implementation of the workshops. There was a 7% improvement in the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine electrodiagnostic self-assessment examination score compared with the previous year and a 15% improvement in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation self-assessment examination electrodiagnostic subscore compared with the previous 5 yrs. All participants recommended similar educational experience for other residents. This successful workshop may serve as a resource for other training programs.

  5. Workplace Violence and Harassment Against Emergency Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Schnapp, Benjamin H.; Slovis, Benjamin H.; Shah, Anar D.; Fant, Abra L.; Gisondi, Michael A.; Shah, Kaushal H.; Lech, Christie A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have shown that workplace violence in the emergency department (ED) is common. Residents may be among the most vulnerable staff, as they have the least experience with these volatile encounters. The goal for this study was to quantify and describe acts of violence against emergency medicine (EM) residents by patients and visitors and to identify perceived barriers to safety. Methods This cross-sectional survey study queried EM residents at multiple New York City hospitals. The primary outcome was the incidence of violence experienced by residents while working in the ED. The secondary outcomes were the subtypes of violence experienced by residents, as well as the perceived barriers to safety while at work. Results A majority of residents (66%, 78/119) reported experiencing at least one act of physical violence during an ED shift. Nearly all residents (97%, 115/119) experienced verbal harassment, 78% (93/119) had experienced verbal threats, and 52% (62/119) reported sexual harassment. Almost a quarter of residents felt safe “Occasionally,” “Seldom” or “Never” while at work. Patient-based factors most commonly cited as contributory to violence included substance use and psychiatric disease. Conclusion Self-reported violence against EM residents appears to be a significant problem. Incidence of violence and patient risk factors are similar to what has been found previously for other ED staff. Understanding the prevalence of workplace violence as well as the related systems, environmental, and patient-based factors is essential for future prevention efforts. PMID:27625721

  6. Duty hours in emergency medicine: balancing patient safety, resident wellness, and the resident training experience: a consensus response to the 2008 institute of medicine resident duty hours recommendations.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Mary Jo; Wolf, Stephen; Promes, Susan; McGee, Doug; Hobgood, Cheri; Doty, Christopher; McErlean, Mara Ann; Janssen, Alan; Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Ling, Louis; Mattu, Amal; Tantama, Stephen; Beeson, Michael; Brabson, Thomas; Christiansen, Greg; King, Brent; Luerssen, Emily; Muelleman, Robert

    2010-09-01

    Representatives of emergency medicine (EM) were asked to develop a consensus report that provided a review of the past and potential future effects of duty hour requirements for EM residency training. In addition to the restrictions made in 2003 by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the potential effects of the 2008 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on resident duty hours were postulated. The elements highlighted include patient safety, resident wellness, and the resident training experience. Many of the changes and recommendations did not affect EM as significantly as other specialties. Current training standards in EM have already emphasized patient safety by requiring continuous on-site supervision of residents. Resident fatigue has been addressed with restrictions of shift lengths and limitation of consecutive days worked. One recommendation from the IOM was a required 5-hour rest period for residents on call. Emergency department (ED) patient safety becomes an important concern with the decrease in the availability and in the patient load of a resident consultant that may result from this recommendation. Of greater concern is the already observed slower throughput time for admitted patients waiting for resident care, which will increase ED crowding and decrease patient safety in academic institutions. A balance between being overly prescriptive with duty hour restrictions and trying to improve resident wellness was recommended. Discussion is included regarding the appropriate length of EM training programs if clinical experiences were limited by new duty hour regulations. Finally, this report presents a review of the financing issues associated with any changes. 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

  7. Comparison of Male vs Female Resident Milestone Evaluations by Faculty During Emergency Medicine Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Arjun; O'Connor, Daniel M; Qadri, Usama; Arora, Vineet M

    2017-05-01

    Although implicit bias in medical training has long been suspected, it has been difficult to study using objective measures, and the influence of sex and gender in the evaluation of medical trainees is unknown. The emergency medicine (EM) milestones provide a standardized framework for longitudinal resident assessment, allowing for analysis of resident performance across all years and programs at a scope and level of detail never previously possible. To compare faculty-observed training milestone attainment of male vs female residency training. This multicenter, longitudinal, retrospective cohort study took place at 8 community and academic EM training programs across the United States from July 1, 2013, to July 1, 2015, using a real-time, mobile-based, direct-observation evaluation tool. The study examined 33 456 direct-observation subcompetency evaluations of 359 EM residents by 285 faculty members. Milestone attainment for male and female EM residents as observed by male and female faculty throughout residency and analyzed using multilevel mixed-effects linear regression modeling. A total of 33 456 direct-observation evaluations were collected from 359 EM residents (237 men [66.0%] and 122 women [34.0%]) by 285 faculty members (194 men [68.1%] and 91 women [31.9%]) during the study period. Female and male residents achieved similar milestone levels during the first year of residency. However, the rate of milestone attainment was 12.7% (0.07 levels per year) higher for male residents through all of residency (95% CI, 0.04-0.09). By graduation, men scored approximately 0.15 milestone levels higher than women, which is equivalent to 3 to 4 months of additional training, given that the average resident gains approximately 0.52 levels per year using our model (95% CI, 0.49-0.54). No statistically significant differences in scores were found based on faculty evaluator gender (effect size difference, 0.02 milestone levels; 95% CI for males, -0.09 to 0.11) or

  8. Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.7 Necessity of Patient-Specific Dose Planning in Radionuclide Therapy' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy'.

  9. Pediatric residency education: is sports medicine getting its fair share?

    PubMed

    Demorest, Rebecca A; Bernhardt, David T; Best, Thomas M; Landry, Gregory L

    2005-01-01

    Sports are the leading injury-related cause for pediatric primary care visits. Pediatric residency education guidelines suggest incorporating sports medicine (SM) education into curricula; however, research is lacking regarding effective teaching methods. To assess reported US pediatric residency SM curricula, teaching methods, and resident evaluation of SM education. Chief residents (CRs) and third-year residents (PL3s) from 100 randomly selected US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency programs, stratified by size and geographic location, received surveys regarding programs' SM curriculum and teaching methods and individuals' methods for learning SM. Response rates were 63% and 39% for CRs and PL3s, respectively. According to CRs, 34% of programs had no one in charge of their SM curriculum. Lecture (77%) was the primary method used for teaching SM. Hands-on teaching (37%) was used less frequently. CRs stated that 29% of programs did not include musculoskeletal examination teaching in their curriculums; 24% did not include formal teaching of concussion management, and 29% did not include reasons for medical disqualification. PL3s rated teaching of joint examinations and the preparticipation physical as the most poorly taught components of the physical examination. PL3s rated hands-on teaching and patient experience as the best methods for improving SM education. CRs reported that only 36% of programs have discussed incorporating more SM into their curriculum. SM education is deficient in US pediatric residency programs. Standardized curricula should be developed with a focus on hands-on training as a means for teaching SM to pediatric residents.

  10. A nuclear chocolate box: the periodic table of nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Blower, Philip J

    2015-03-21

    Radioisotopes of elements from all parts of the periodic table find both clinical and research applications in radionuclide molecular imaging and therapy (nuclear medicine). This article provides an overview of these applications in relation to both the radiological properties of the radionuclides and the chemical properties of the elements, indicating past successes, current applications and future opportunities and challenges for inorganic chemistry.

  11. Outcomes assessment of a residency program in laboratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Morse, E E; Pisciotto, P T; Hopfer, S M; Makowski, G; Ryan, R W; Aslanzadeh, J

    1997-01-01

    During a down-sizing of residency programs at a State University Medical School, hospital based residents' positions were eliminated. It was determined to find out the characteristics of the residents who graduated from the Laboratory Medicine Program, to compare women graduates with men graduates, and to compare IMGs with United States Graduates. An assessment of a 25 year program in laboratory medicine which had graduated 100 residents showed that there was no statistically significant difference by chi 2 analysis in positions (laboratory directors or staff), in certification (American Board of Pathology [and subspecialties], American Board of Medical Microbiology, American Board of Clinical Chemistry) nor in academic appointments (assistant professor to full professor) when the male graduates were compared with the female graduates or when graduates of American medical schools were compared with graduates of foreign medical schools. There were statistically significant associations by chi 2 analysis between directorship positions and board certification and between academic appointments and board certification. Of 100 graduates, there were 57 directors, 52 certified, and 41 with academic appointments. Twenty-two graduates (11 women and 11 men) attained all three.

  12. Test ordering for preventive health care among family medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Daisy; Schabort, Inge; MacLean, Catherine A.; Asrar, Farhan M.; Khory, Ayesha; Vandermeer, Ben; Allan, G. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine which screening tests family medicine residents order as part of preventive health care. Design A cross-sectional survey. Setting Alberta and Ontario. Participants First- and second-year family medicine residents at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, the University of Calgary in Alberta, and McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, during the 2011 to 2012 academic year. Main outcome measures Demographic information, Likert scale ratings assessing ordering attitudes, and selections from a list of 38 possible tests that could be ordered for preventive health care for sample 38-year-old and 55-year-old female and male patients. Descriptive and comparative statistics were calculated. Results A total of 318 of 482 residents (66%) completed the survey. Recommended or appropriate tests were ordered by 82% (for cervical cytology) to 95% (for fasting glucose measurement) of residents. Across the different sample patients, residents ordered an average of 3.3 to 5.7 inappropriate tests per patient, with 58% to 92% ordering at least 1 inappropriate test per patient. The estimated average excess costs varied from $38.39 for the 38-year-old man to $106.46 for the 55-year-old woman. More regular use of a periodic health examination screening template did not improve ordering (P = .88). Conclusion In general, residents ordered appropriate preventive health tests reasonably well but also ordered an average of 3.3 to 5.7 inappropriate tests for each patient. Training programs need to provide better education for trainees around inappropriate screening and work hard to establish good ordering behaviour in preparation for entering practice. PMID:25767171

  13. Test ordering for preventive health care among family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Fung, Daisy; Schabort, Inge; MacLean, Catherine A; Asrar, Farhan M; Khory, Ayesha; Vandermeer, Ben; Allan, G Michael

    2015-03-01

    To determine which screening tests family medicine residents order as part of preventive health care. A cross-sectional survey. Alberta and Ontario. First- and second-year family medicine residents at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, the University of Calgary in Alberta, and McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, during the 2011 to 2012 academic year. Demographic information, Likert scale ratings assessing ordering attitudes, and selections from a list of 38 possible tests that could be ordered for preventive health care for sample 38-year-old and 55-year-old female and male patients. Descriptive and comparative statistics were calculated. A total of 318 of 482 residents (66%) completed the survey. Recommended or appropriate tests were ordered by 82% (for cervical cytology) to 95% (for fasting glucose measurement) of residents. Across the different sample patients, residents ordered an average of 3.3 to 5.7 inappropriate tests per patient, with 58% to 92% ordering at least 1 inappropriate test per patient. The estimated average excess costs varied from $38.39 for the 38-year-old man to $106.46 for the 55-year-old woman. More regular use of a periodic health examination screening template did not improve ordering (P = .88). In general, residents ordered appropriate preventive health tests reasonably well but also ordered an average of 3.3 to 5.7 inappropriate tests for each patient. Training programs need to provide better education for trainees around inappropriate screening and work hard to establish good ordering behaviour in preparation for entering practice. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  14. Electrodiagnostic medicine skills competency in physical medicine and rehabilitation residents: a method for development and assessment.

    PubMed

    Brown, David; Cuccurullo, Sara; Lee, Joseph; Petagna, Ann; Strax, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    This project sought to create an educational module including evaluation methodology to instruct physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) residents in electrodiagnostic evaluation of patients with neuromuscular problems, and to verify acquired competencies in those electrodiagnostic skills through objective evaluation methodology. Sixteen residents were trained by board-certified neuromuscular and electrodiagnostic medicine physicians through technical training, lectures, and review of self-assessment examination (SAE) concepts from the American Academy of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation syllabus provided in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. After delivery of the educational module, knowledge acquisition and skill attainment were measured in (1) clinical skill in diagnostic procedures via a procedure checklist, (2) diagnosis and ability to design a patient-care management plan via chart simulated recall (CSR) exams, (3) physician/patient interaction via patient surveys, (4) physician/staff interaction via 360-degree global ratings, and (5) ability to write a comprehensive patient-care report and to document a patient-care management plan in accordance with Medicare guidelines via written patient reports. Assessment tools developed for this program address the basic competencies outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). To test the success of the standardized educational module, data were collected on an ongoing basis. Objective measures compared resident SAE scores in electrodiagnostics (EDX) before and after institution of the comprehensive EDX competency module in a PM&R residency program. Fifteen of 16 residents (94%) successfully demonstrated proficiency in every segment of the evaluation element of the educational module by the end of their PGY-4 electrodiagnostic rotation. The resident who did not initially pass underwent remedial coursework and passed on the second attempt. Furthermore, the

  15. Neuromuscular medicine competency in physical medicine and rehabilitation residents: a method of development and assessment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lei; Cuccurullo, Sara J; Innerfield, Caitlin E; Strax, Thomas E; Petagna, Anne

    2013-03-01

    This project endeavored to create an educational module including methodology to instruct physical medicine and rehabilitation residents in the evaluation and appropriate treatment of patients with neuromuscular disorders. It further sought to verify acquired competencies in neuromuscular rehabilitation through objective evaluation methodology. An American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine board-certified physician with 10 yrs of clinical experience in neuromuscular and general rehabilitation trained 19 residents using a standardized competency-based module. The residents were trained through clinical training, lectures, and review of self-assessment examination concepts from the American Academy of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation syllabus provided in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. After delivery of the educational module, knowledge acquisition and skill proficiency were measured in (1) completion of neuromuscular history and physical examination satisfactorily, (2) diagnosis and ability to design a patient care management plan via chart stimulated recall examinations, (3) physician-patient interaction via patient surveys, (4) physician-staff interaction via 360-degree global ratings, and (5) ability to write a comprehensive patient care report and to document a patient care management plan in accordance with Medicare guidelines via written patient reports. Assessment tools developed for this program address the basic competencies outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. To test the success of the standardized educational module, data were collected on an ongoing basis. The objective measures compared resident self-assessment examination scores in neuromuscular rehabilitation before and after the institution of the comprehensive neuromuscular competency module in the residency program. Nineteen (100%) of 19 residents successfully demonstrated proficiency in every segment of the

  16. Benefits of comprehensive reproductive health education in family medicine residency.

    PubMed

    Nothnagle, Melissa; Prine, Linda; Goodman, Susan

    2008-03-01

    Given the high prevalence of unintended pregnancy and early pregnancy failure, family physicians frequently encounter these clinical problems. Early abortion care and miscarriage management are within the scope of family medicine, yet few family medicine residency programs' curricula routinely include training in these skills. Comprehensive reproductive health education for family physicians could benefit patients by improving access to safe care for unintended pregnancy and early pregnancy loss and by improving continuity of care, especially for rural and low-income women. By promoting reflection on conflicts between personal beliefs and responsibility to patients, training in options counseling and abortion care fosters patient-centered care and informed decision making. Managing pregnancy loss and termination also improves skills in patient-centered counseling and primary care gynecology. Multiple studies document the feasibility and success of several training models for abortion and miscarriage management in family medicine. Incorporating comprehensive reproductive health care into family medicine residency training enables family physicians to provide a full range of reproductive health services.

  17. Duty hours in emergency medicine: balancing patient safety, resident wellness, and the resident training experience: a consensus response to the 2008 Institute of Medicine resident duty hours recommendations.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Mary Jo; Wolf, Stephen; Promes, Susan; McGee, Doug; Hobgood, Cheri; Doty, Christopher; McErlean, Mara Ann; Janssen, Alan; Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Ling, Louis; Mattu, Amal; Tantama, Stephen; Beeson, Michael; Brabson, Thomas; Christiansen, Greg; King, Brent; Luerssen, Emily; Muelleman, Robert

    2010-09-01

    Representatives of emergency medicine (EM) were asked to develop a consensus report that provided a review of the past and potential future effects of duty hour requirements for EM residency training. In addition to the restrictions made in 2003 by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, the potential effects of the 2008 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on resident duty hours were postulated. The elements highlighted include patient safety, resident wellness, and the resident training experience. Many of the changes and recommendations did not affect EM as significantly as other specialties. Current training standards in EM have already emphasized patient safety by requiring continuous onsite supervision of residents. Resident fatigue has been addressed with restrictions of shift lengths and limitation of consecutive days worked. One recommendation from the IOM was a required 5-h rest period for residents on call. Emergency department (ED) patient safety becomes an important concern with the decrease in the availability and in the patient load of a resident consultant that may result from this recommendation. Of greater concern is the already observed slower throughput time for admitted patients waiting for resident care, which will increase ED crowding and decrease patient safety in academic institutions. A balance between being overly prescriptive with duty hour restrictions and trying to improve resident wellness was recommended. Discussion is included regarding the appropriate length of EM training programs if clinical experiences were limited by new duty hour regulations. Finally, this report presents a review of the financing issues associated with any changes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Importance of residency program web sites to emergency medicine applicants.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Simon A; Wagner, Mary-Jo; Church, Amy; Sokolosky, Mitchell; Cline, David M

    2009-01-01

    Emergency Medicine (EM) residency program web sites are an important tool that programs use to attract applicants. However, there are only a few studies examining the aspects of a program's web site that are most important to EM applicants. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 142 prospective residency applicants interviewing for an EM position at one of three EM residency programs for the 2003 match. The survey demonstrated that almost all applicants researched EM programs online. The majority (71%) identified geographic location as the most important factor in applying to a specific program. Approximately 40% considered an easily navigated web site as very/moderately important to their application decision-making process. Rotation schedule was also important in applicant decision-making. The Internet is a significant source of information to the majority of applicants in EM. Online information from programs' web sites, although not as significant as geography, influences an applicant's choice of where to apply for a residency position. An easily navigated, complete web site may improve the recruitment of candidates to EM residency programs.

  19. Performance criteria for emergency medicine residents: a job analysis.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Danielle; Dagnone, Jeffrey Damon

    2008-11-01

    A major role of admission interviews is to assess a candidate's suitability for a residency program. Structured interviews have greater reliability and validity than do unstructured ones. The development of content for a structured interview is typically based on the dimensions of performance that are perceived as important to succeed in a particular line of work. A formal job analysis is normally conducted to determine these dimensions. The dimensions essential to succeed as an emergency medicine (EM) resident have not yet been studied. We aimed to analyze the work of EM residents to determine these essential dimensions. The "critical incident technique" was used to generate scenarios of poor and excellent resident performance. Two reviewers independently read each scenario and labelled the performance dimensions that were reflected in each. All labels assigned to a particular scenario were pooled and reviewed again until a consensus was reached. Five faculty members (25% of our total faculty) comprised the subject experts. Fifty-one incidents were generated and 50 different labels were applied. Eleven dimensions of performance applied to at least 5 incidents. "Professionalism" was the most valued performance dimension, represented in 56% of the incidents, followed by "self-confidence" (22%), "experience" (20%) and "knowledge" (20%). "Professionalism," "self-confidence," "experience" and "knowledge" were identified as the performance dimensions essential to succeed as an EM resident based on our formal job analysis using the critical incident technique. Performing a formal job analysis may assist training program directors with developing admission interviews.

  20. Effectiveness of resident as teacher curriculum in preparing emergency medicine residents for their teaching role

    PubMed Central

    HOSEIN NEJAD, HOOMAN; BAGHERABADI, MEHDI; SISTANI, ALIREZA; DARGAHI, HELEN

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Over the past 30 years, recognizing the need and importance of training residents in teaching skills has resulted in several resident-as-teacher programs. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of this teaching initiative and investigate the improvement in residents’ teaching skills through evaluating their satisfaction and perceived effectiveness as well as assessing medical students’ perception of the residents’ teaching quality. Methods: This research is a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-tests, continuing from Dec 2010 to May 2011 in Imam Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. In this survey, Emergency Medicine Residents (n=32) participated in an 8-hour workshop. The program evaluation was performed based on Kirkpatrick’s model by evaluation of residents in two aspects: self-assessment and evaluation by interns who were trained by these residents. Content validity of the questionnaires was judged by experts and reliability was carried out by test re-test. The questionnaires were completed before and after the intervention. Paired sample t-test was applied to analyze the effect of RAT curriculum and workshop on the improvement of residents’ teaching skills based on their self-evaluation and Mann-Whitney U test was used to identify significant differences between the two evaluator groups before and after the workshop. Results: The results indicated that residents’ attitude towards their teaching ability was improved significantly after participating in the workshop (p<0.001). The result of residents’ evaluation by interns showed no significant difference before and after the workshop (p=0.07). Conclusion: On the whole, the educational workshop for Residents as Teacher for emergency medicine residents resulted in favorable outcomes in the second evaluated level of Kirkpatrick’s model, i.e. it showed measurable positive changes in the self-assessments of medical residents about different aspects of

  1. Global Health in Family Medicine Residency Programs: A Nationwide Survey of US Residency Directors: A CERA Study.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Ruben; Sevilla Martir, Javier F; Van Durme, Daniel J; Faller, Meredith J; Yong-Yow, Sabrina; Davies, M Kelly; Achkar, Morhaf Al

    2016-07-01

    Interest in global health (GH) has increased significantly among medical trainees in the past 3 decades. Despite the potential for family medicine to be a major contributor to GH, there are no recent, large-scale studies of GH education and experiences in family medicine training. This study was designed to assess current opportunities, educational activities, resident interest, perceived program benefits, and barriers to international and domestic GH training in US family medicine residencies. Data for this study were elicited as part of a 2015 survey conducted by the Council of Academic Family Medicine (CAFM) Educational Research Alliance (CERA). The nationwide, web-based survey was sent to 452 family medicine residency program directors. A total of 257 program directors completed the GH portion of the survey. A total of 74.3% of programs offered international or domestic GH experiences. Program directors identified preparing physicians to practice underserved medicine and teaching community medicine or public health as primary goals for GH training. Program directors also reported that GH opportunities were important for attracting future residents. Programs offered a variety of preparatory activities to their residents. Funding and time constraints were identified as the primary barriers to GH training in residency. Global health continues to be a focus of interest in the training of family medicine residents while attracting the passion of student applicants and residents.

  2. Real time curriculum map for internal medicine residency

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Roger Y; Roberts, J Mark

    2007-01-01

    Background To manage the voluminous formal curriculum content in a limited amount of structured teaching time, we describe the development and evaluation of a curriculum map for academic half days (AHD) in a core internal medicine residency program. Methods We created a 3-year cyclical curriculum map (an educational tool combining the content, methodology and timetabling of structured teaching), comprising a matrix of topics under various specialties/themes and corresponding AHD hours. All topics were cross-matched against the ACP-ASIM in-training examination, and all hours were colour coded based on the categories of core competencies. Residents regularly updated the map on a real time basis. Results There were 208 topics covered in 283 AHD hours. All topics represented core competencies with minimal duplication (78% covered once in 3 years). Only 42 hours (15%) involved non-didactic teaching, which increased after implementation of the map (18–19 hours/year versus baseline 5 hours/year). Most AHD hours (78%) focused on medical expert competencies. Resident satisfaction (90% response) was high throughout (range 3.64 ± 0.21, 3.84 ± 0.14 out of 4), which improved after 1 year but returned to baseline after 2 years. Conclusion We developed and implemented an internal medicine curriculum map based on real time resident input, with minimal topic duplication and high resident satisfaction. The map provided an opportunity to balance didactic versus non-didactic teaching, and teaching on medical versus non medical expert topics. PMID:17988402

  3. The effect of dual accreditation on family medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Mims, Lisa D; Bressler, Lindsey C; Wannamaker, Louise R; Carek, Peter J

    2015-04-01

    In 1985, the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) Board of Trustees agreed to allow residency programs to become dually accredited by the AOA and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Despite the increase in such programs, there has been minimal research comparing these programs to exclusively ACGME-accredited residencies. This study examines the association between dual accreditation and suggested markers of quality. Standard characteristics such as regional location, program structure (community or university based), postgraduate year one (PGY-1) positions offered, and salary (PGY-1) were obtained for each residency program. In addition, the faculty to resident ratio in the family medicine clinic and the number of half days residents spent in the clinic each week were recorded. Initial Match rates and pass rates of new graduates on the ABFM examination from 2009 to 2013 were also obtained. Variables were analyzed using chi-square and Student's t test. Logistic regression models were then created to predict a program's 5-year aggregate initial Match rate and Board pass rate in the top tertile as compared to the lowest tertile. Dual accreditation was obtained by 117 (27.0%) of programs. Initial analyses revealed associations between dually accredited programs and mean year of initial ACGME program accreditation, regional location, program structure, tracks, and alternative medicine curriculum. When evaluated in logistic regression, dual accreditation status was not associated with Match rates or ABFM pass rates. By examining suggested markers of program quality for dually accredited programs in comparison to ACGME-only accredited programs, this study successfully established both differences and similarities among the two types.

  4. Converting energy to medical progress [nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    2001-04-01

    For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases.

  5. Converting Energy to Medical Progress [Nuclear Medicine

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    2001-04-01

    For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases.

  6. Coded-aperture imaging in nuclear medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Warren E.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Aarsvold, John N.

    1989-01-01

    Coded-aperture imaging is a technique for imaging sources that emit high-energy radiation. This type of imaging involves shadow casting and not reflection or refraction. High-energy sources exist in x ray and gamma-ray astronomy, nuclear reactor fuel-rod imaging, and nuclear medicine. Of these three areas nuclear medicine is perhaps the most challenging because of the limited amount of radiation available and because a three-dimensional source distribution is to be determined. In nuclear medicine a radioactive pharmaceutical is administered to a patient. The pharmaceutical is designed to be taken up by a particular organ of interest, and its distribution provides clinical information about the function of the organ, or the presence of lesions within the organ. This distribution is determined from spatial measurements of the radiation emitted by the radiopharmaceutical. The principles of imaging radiopharmaceutical distributions with coded apertures are reviewed. Included is a discussion of linear shift-variant projection operators and the associated inverse problem. A system developed at the University of Arizona in Tucson consisting of small modular gamma-ray cameras fitted with coded apertures is described.

  7. Coded-aperture imaging in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Warren E.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Aarsvold, John N.

    1989-11-01

    Coded-aperture imaging is a technique for imaging sources that emit high-energy radiation. This type of imaging involves shadow casting and not reflection or refraction. High-energy sources exist in x ray and gamma-ray astronomy, nuclear reactor fuel-rod imaging, and nuclear medicine. Of these three areas nuclear medicine is perhaps the most challenging because of the limited amount of radiation available and because a three-dimensional source distribution is to be determined. In nuclear medicine a radioactive pharmaceutical is administered to a patient. The pharmaceutical is designed to be taken up by a particular organ of interest, and its distribution provides clinical information about the function of the organ, or the presence of lesions within the organ. This distribution is determined from spatial measurements of the radiation emitted by the radiopharmaceutical. The principles of imaging radiopharmaceutical distributions with coded apertures are reviewed. Included is a discussion of linear shift-variant projection operators and the associated inverse problem. A system developed at the University of Arizona in Tucson consisting of small modular gamma-ray cameras fitted with coded apertures is described.

  8. Internal medicine program directors' perceptions of resident work rounds.

    PubMed

    Boutros, A; Della Ratta, R K

    1994-08-01

    Work rounds have received little attention in the medical education literature. At the outset of the second post graduate year, medical residents are expected to function, without much guidance, as both team leaders and teacher. New York State health code regulation 405 restrict house staff work hours and may influence the manner and content of work rounds. The goals of work rounds were identified through a literature review and our own experiences. A 36-item questionnaire utilizing the identified goals was used in this cross-sectional descriptive study. The participants were the Program Directors of New York State Internal Medicine residency programs. Each of the fourteen goals identified reflects one of three resident behaviors: patient care, teaching, and evaluation. The goals that received the highest importance scores were patient management and updating team leader of events. Ninety percent (90%) or more of the participants indicated that patient management, teaching clinical reasoning and problem solving, verifying important chart data, and verifying physical examination should be performed "often" or "almost always." Most programs employed verbal instructions but only few held conference or provided literature on the expectations and conduct of work rounds. New York State Internal Medicine program directors perceive work rounds as primarily a patient care task, and many rely on verbal instructions to convey the objectives to the house staff. While previous research has demonstrated that work rounds are an important setting for house staff education, this study reveals that in most New York State programs this opportunity may be missed.

  9. Assimilating Traditional Healing Into Preventive Medicine Residency Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Denece O; Hopkins, L Olivia; Torres, Eliseo; Prasad, Arti

    2015-11-01

    Comprehensive cultural competency includes knowledge and awareness of culturally based healing and wellness practices. Healthcare providers should be aware of the individual patient's beliefs, culture, and use of culturally based health practices because patients may adopt such practices for general wellness or as adjunct therapies without the benefit of discussion with their healthcare provider. This article describes the culturally based traditional healing curriculum that has been implemented in the University of New Mexico Public Health and General Preventive Medicine Residency Program in order to fulfill this knowledge necessity. Curricular elements were added in a stepwise manner starting in 2011, with the full content as described implemented starting in 2013. Data were collected annually with evaluation of the full curriculum occurring in 2015. New Mexico has a diverse population base that includes predominantly Hispanic and Native American cultures, making the inclusion of curriculum regarding traditional healing practices very pertinent. Residents at the University of New Mexico were educated through several curricular components about topics such as Curanderismo, the art of Mexican Folk Healing. An innovative approach was used, with a compendium of training methods that included learning directly from traditional healers and participation in healing practices. The incorporation of this residency curriculum resulted in a means to produce physicians well trained in approaching patient care and population health with knowledge of culturally based health practices in order to facilitate healthy patients and communities. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Social media in the emergency medicine residency curriculum: social media responses to the residents' perspective article.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Bryan D; Kobner, Scott; Trueger, N Seth; Yiu, Stella; Lin, Michelle

    2015-05-01

    In July to August 2014, Annals of Emergency Medicine continued a collaboration with an academic Web site, Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM), to host an online discussion session featuring the 2014 Annals Residents' Perspective article "Integration of Social Media in Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum" by Scott et al. The objective was to describe a 14-day worldwide clinician dialogue about evidence, opinions, and early relevant innovations revolving around the featured article and made possible by the immediacy of social media technologies. Six online facilitators hosted the multimodal discussion on the ALiEM Web site, Twitter, and YouTube, which featured 3 preselected questions. Engagement was tracked through various Web analytic tools, and themes were identified by content curation. The dialogue resulted in 1,222 unique page views from 325 cities in 32 countries on the ALiEM Web site, 569,403 Twitter impressions, and 120 views of the video interview with the authors. Five major themes we identified in the discussion included curriculum design, pedagogy, and learning theory; digital curation skills of the 21st-century emergency medicine practitioner; engagement challenges; proposed solutions; and best practice examples. The immediacy of social media technologies provides clinicians the unique opportunity to engage a worldwide audience within a relatively short time frame. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Solid state detectors in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Darambara, D G; Todd-Pokropek, A

    2002-03-01

    Since Nuclear Medicine diagnostic applications are growing fast, room temperature semiconductor detectors such CdTe and CdZnTe either in the form of single detectors or as segmented monolithic detectors have been investigated aiming to replace the NaI scintillator. These detectors have inherently better energy resolution that scintillators coupled to photodiodes or photomultiplier tubes leading to compact imaging systems with higher spatial resolution and enhanced contrast. Advantages and disadvantages of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors in imaging systems are discussed and efforts to develop semiconductor-based planar and tomographic cameras as well as nuclear probes are presented.

  12. Senior internal medicine residents' confidence with essential topics in evidence-based medicine taught during internship.

    PubMed

    Keddis, Mira T; Beckman, Thomas J; Cullen, Michael W; Reed, Darcy A; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Wittich, Christopher M; West, Colin P; McDonald, Furman S

    2011-12-01

    Few studies have examined residents' retained knowledge and confidence regarding essential evidence-based medicine (EBM) topics. To compare postgraduate year-3 (PGY-3) residents' confidence with EBM topics taught during internship with that of PGY-1 residents before and after exposure to an EBM curriculum. All residents participated in an EBM curriculum during their intern year. We surveyed residents in 2009. PGY-1 residents completed a Likert-scale type survey (which included questions from the validated Berlin questionnaire and others, developed based on input from local EBM experts). We administered the Berlin questionnaire to a subset of PGY-3 residents. Forty-five PGY-3 (88%; n  =  51) and 42 PGY-1 (91%; n  =  46) residents completed the survey. Compared with PGY-1 residents pre-curriculum, PGY-3 residents were significantly more confident in their knowledge of pre- and posttest probability (mean difference, 1.14; P  =  .002), number needed to harm (mean difference, 1.09; P  =  .002), likelihood ratio (mean difference, 1.01; P  =  .003), formulation of a focused clinical question (mean difference, 0.98; P  =  .001), and critical appraisal of therapy articles (mean difference, 0.91; P  =  .002). Perceived confidence was significantly lower for PGY-3 than post-curriculum PGY-1 residents on relative risk (mean difference, -0.86; P  =  .002), study design for prognosis questions (mean difference, -0.75; P  =  .004), number needed to harm (mean difference, -0.67; P  =  .01), ability to critically appraise systematic reviews (mean difference, -0.65, P  =  .009), and retrieval of evidence (mean difference, -0.56; P  =  .008), among others. There was no relationship between confidence with and actual knowledge of EBM topics. Our findings demonstrate lower confidence among PGY-3 than among PGY-1 internal medicine residents for several EBM topics. PGY-3 residents demonstrated poor knowledge of several core topics taught

  13. Nuclear medicine technologist training in European countries.

    PubMed

    Lass, Piotr

    2002-08-01

    This article overviews the training of nuclear medicine technologists in chosen European countries, the United States and Canada. There are basically two types of training: at medical schools following secondary school, without any university degree, usually on a 2- or 3-year basis, or else as a university course, leading to a BSc degree after 3 years, and in some countries to an MSc degree after an additional 2 years. In the United States both systems coexist, while in Europe the picture varies from country to country. The number of hours devoted to nuclear medicine also varies between curricula. Some efforts are being made to unify this system by transition to the university model of education in many European countries.

  14. Introduction to suspension levels: nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Stelios; Malone, Lesley; Mattson, Soren; Horton, Pat

    2013-02-01

    In 2007, the European Commission (EC) commissioned a group of experts to undertake the revision of Report Radiation Protection (RP) 91, written in 1997, on 'Criteria for acceptability of radiological (including radiotherapy) and nuclear medicine installations'. The revised draft report was submitted to the EC. Before publication, the EC issued this document for public consultation and has commissioned the same group of experts to consider the comments of the public consultation in further improving the revised report. The EC intends to publish the final report under its Radiation Report Series with the number RP 162. This paper introduces the project and presents the methodology adopted to devise the criteria of acceptability/suspension levels for nuclear medicine equipment.

  15. Effective Research Strategies for Trainees in Internal Medicine Residency Programs

    PubMed Central

    Wiederman, Michael W.; Sawyer, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    For most training programs, the development of research endeavors among trainees is an ongoing challenge. In this article, we review various considerations when attempting to undertake research activities within an internal medicine residency training program, including availability of institutional resources (eg, dedicated research time for trainees and faculty, available faculty mentors, accessible adjunctive personnel), engagement of residents into research, classic project quagmires in training programs, the institutional review board, publication options (eg, letters to the editor, case reports, literature reviews, original research reports), and journal submission strategies. Given that research entails multiple components and distinct skills, the overall program goal should be to make research an educationally understandable process for trainees. Research can be a rewarding activity when nurtured in a facilitating educational environment. PMID:26137359

  16. Nuclear Medicine Procedures in Children: Special Considerations.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Michael J; Clements, Crysta; MacLean, Joseph R

    2017-03-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging in children is best accomplished when a child-friendly environment is provided for patients and parents. An approach that minimizes patient anxiety and fear is described. International guidelines for administered activity should be used to minimize absorbed radiation doses from radiopharmaceuticals. CT exposure parameters may be reduced to pediatric best practice for diagnostic CT and further reduced when CT images are needed only for localization purposes.

  17. Is nuclear medicine cost-effective?

    PubMed

    Ripley, S

    1991-03-01

    Clearly, there is currently no consensus on the cost-effectiveness of nuclear medicine--or in fact any other aspect of medicine. It is hoped that common sense prevails in clinical medicine today. An appropriate case history and physical examination may negate the need for any additional investigation. From the perspective of the capital cost of equipment and supply costs, ultrasound is clearly the most cost-effective diagnostic imaging modality. But while it is useful, it does not always provide definitive answers, and other modalities must be used to arrive at a diagnosis. In comparison, the capital cost of general radiology equipment and nuclear medicine equipment is relatively equal. Radiology has more operating costs per case than nuclear medicine and requires a lower staffing component per given volume of examinations. In any given diagnostic imaging procedure, the practitioner and imagist must maintain a dialogue to ascertain the appropriateness of the study and to use the available resources in the most effective manner. This is even more imperative when CT scanning and MRI are included in the equation. The development of an investigative protocol that makes the most efficient use of the various imaging modalities without compromising the quality of care makes sense for the patient, the physician and the insurance provider. It is unreasonable to expect the physician to be aware of the optimal protocol for the diagnostic workup of every patient. The guidance of the imaging department is required to maximize the efficient use of the available facilities. A critical and exhaustive appraisal of the medical literature may be required to determine the optimal diagnostic protocol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Virtual Alternative to the Oral Examination for Emergency Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Jillian; Kman, Nicholas; Danforth, Douglas; Bahner, David P.; Khandelwal, Sorabh; Martin, Daniel R.; Nagel, Rollin; Verbeck, Nicole; Way, David P.; Nelson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The oral examination is a traditional method for assessing the developing physician’s medical knowledge, clinical reasoning and interpersonal skills. The typical oral examination is a face-to-face encounter in which examiners quiz examinees on how they would confront a patient case. The advantage of the oral exam is that the examiner can adapt questions to the examinee’s response. The disadvantage is the potential for examiner bias and intimidation. Computer-based virtual simulation technology has been widely used in the gaming industry. We wondered whether virtual simulation could serve as a practical format for delivery of an oral examination. For this project, we compared the attitudes and performance of emergency medicine (EM) residents who took our traditional oral exam to those who took the exam using virtual simulation. Methods EM residents (n=35) were randomized to a traditional oral examination format (n=17) or a simulated virtual examination format (n=18) conducted within an immersive learning environment, Second Life (SL). Proctors scored residents using the American Board of Emergency Medicine oral examination assessment instruments, which included execution of critical actions and ratings on eight competency categories (1–8 scale). Study participants were also surveyed about their oral examination experience. Results We observed no differences between virtual and traditional groups on critical action scores or scores on eight competency categories. However, we noted moderate effect sizes favoring the Second Life group on the clinical competence score. Examinees from both groups thought that their assessment was realistic, fair, objective, and efficient. Examinees from the virtual group reported a preference for the virtual format and felt that the format was less intimidating. Conclusion The virtual simulated oral examination was shown to be a feasible alternative to the traditional oral examination format for assessing EM residents

  19. Nuclear medicine imaging of posttraumatic osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Govaert, G A M; Glaudemans, A W J M

    2016-08-01

    Early recognition of a possible infection and therefore a prompt and accurate diagnostic strategy is essential for a successful treatment of posttraumatic osteomyelitis (PTO). However, at this moment there is no single routine test available that can detect osteomyelitis beyond doubt and the performed diagnostic tests mostly depend on personal experience, available techniques and financial aspects. Nuclear medicine techniques focus on imaging pathophysiological changes which usually precede anatomical changes. Together with recent development in hybrid camera systems, leading to better spatial resolution and quantification possibilities, this provides new opportunities and possibilities for nuclear medicine modalities to play an important role in diagnosing PTO. In this overview paper the techniques and available literature results for PTO are discussed for the three most commonly used nuclear medicine techniques: the three phase bone scan (with SPECT-CT), white blood cell scintigraphy (also called leukocyte scan) with SPECT-CT and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT. Emphasis is on how these techniques are able to answer the diagnostic questions from the clinicians (trauma and orthopaedic surgeons) and which technique should be used to answer a specific question. Furthermore, three illustrative cases from clinical practice are described.

  20. Psychiatry Training in Canadian Family Medicine Residency Programs

    PubMed Central

    Kates, Nick; Toews, John; Leichner, Pierre

    1985-01-01

    Family physicians may spend up to 50% of their time diagnosing and managing mental disorders and emotional problems, but this is not always reflected in the training they receive. This study of the teaching of psychiatry in the 16 family medicine residency programs in Canada showed that although the majority of program directors are reasonably satisfied with the current training, they see room for improvement—particularly in finding psychiatrists with a better understanding of family practice, in integrating the teaching to a greater degree with clinical work, thereby increasing its relevance, and in utilizing more suitable clinical settings. PMID:21279156

  1. Development of an International Elective in an Emergency Medicine Residency.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Stephen R; Valderrama, Chad M; Xu, Marian; Curran, Maureen A; Mazondo, Roberto; Soliman, Mounir A

    2016-01-01

    There is a continued interest in global emergency medicine (EM) training, research, and clinical program development. There are many opportunities for "voluntourism" in medicine, but many of these experiences do not have standard goals and objectives. This article describes a rotation for EM residents from the United States to have a structured learning experience focusing on emergency medical settings in the prehospital phase (something often lacking in U.S. programs). The authors discuss the structure of the training program, including goals, objectives, and core competencies. First-hand accounts of the training experience are also presented. Global training experiences can have clear benefits. Students go to places to "learn," but can also "teach" at the same time. Setting goals and objectives helps to assure that students are gaining specific core competencies as part of the experience. Other global rotations would benefit from having a defined structure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education: Competency and Curriculum Development for Preventive Medicine and Other Specialty Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Jani, Asim A; Trask, Jennifer; Ali, Ather

    2015-11-01

    During 2012, the USDHHS's Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 accredited preventive medicine residencies to incorporate an evidence-based integrative medicine curriculum into their training programs. It also funded a national coordinating center at the American College of Preventive Medicine, known as the Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education (IMPriME) Center, to provide technical assistance to the 12 grantees. To help with this task, the IMPriME Center established a multidisciplinary steering committee, versed in integrative medicine, whose primary aim was to develop integrative medicine core competencies for incorporation into preventive medicine graduate medical education training. The competency development process was informed by central integrative medicine definitions and principles, preventive medicine's dual role in clinical and population-based prevention, and the burgeoning evidence base of integrative medicine. The steering committee considered an interdisciplinary integrative medicine contextual framework guided by several themes related to workforce development and population health. A list of nine competencies, mapped to the six general domains of competence approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education, was operationalized through an iterative exercise with the 12 grantees in a process that included mapping each site's competency and curriculum products to the core competencies. The competencies, along with central curricular components informed by grantees' work presented elsewhere in this supplement, are outlined as a roadmap for residency programs aiming to incorporate integrative medicine content into their curricula. This set of competencies adds to the larger efforts of the IMPriME initiative to facilitate and enhance further curriculum development and implementation by not only the current grantees but other stakeholders in graduate medical education around integrative medicine training.

  3. A Model Longitudinal Observation Medicine Curriculum for an Emergency Medicine Residency.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Matthew; Baugh, Christopher; Osborne, Anwar; Clark, Carol; Shayne, Philip; Ross, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The role of observation services for emergency department patients has increased in recent years. Driven by changing health care practices and evolving payer policies, many hospitals in the United States currently have or are developing an observation unit (OU) and emergency physicians are most often expected to manage patients in this setting. Yet, few residency programs dedicate a portion of their clinical curriculum to observation medicine. This knowledge set should be integrated into the core training curriculum of emergency physicians. Presented here is a model observation medicine longitudinal training curriculum, which can be integrated into an emergency medicine (EM) residency. It was developed by a consensus of content experts representing the observation medicine interest group and observation medicine section, respectively, from EM's two major specialty societies: the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) and the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). The curriculum consists of didactic, clinical, and self-directed elements. It is longitudinal, with learning objectives for each year of training, focusing initially on the basic principles of observation medicine and appropriate observation patient selection; moving to the management of various observation appropriate conditions; and then incorporating further concepts of OU management, billing, and administration. This curriculum is flexible and designed to be used in both academic and community EM training programs within the United States. Additionally, scholarly opportunities, such as elective rotations and fellowship training, are explored.

  4. Emergency ultrasound usage among recent emergency medicine residency graduates of a convenience sample of 14 residencies.

    PubMed

    Dean, Anthony J; Breyer, Michael J; Ku, Bon S; Mills, Angela M; Pines, Jesse M

    2010-02-01

    Emergency Medicine (EM) residency graduates are trained to perform Emergency Medicine bedside ultrasound (EMBU). However, the degree to which they use this skill in their practice after graduation is unknown. We sought to test the amount and type of usage of EMBU among recent residency graduates, and how usage and barriers vary among various types of EM practice settings. Graduates from 14 EM residency programs in 2003-2005 were surveyed on their current practice setting and use of EMBU. There were 252 (73%) graduates who completed the survey. Of the 73% of respondents reporting access to EMBU, 98% had used it within the past 3 months. Access to EMBU was higher in academic (97%) vs. community teaching (79%) vs. community non-teaching settings (62%) (p < 0.001), and in Emergency Departments (EDs) where yearly census exceeded 60,000 visits (87% vs. 65%, p < 0.001). Physicians in academic settings reported "high use" of EMBU more frequently than those in community settings for most modalities. FAST (focused assessment by sonography in trauma) was the most common high-use application and the most useful in practice. The greatest impediment to EMBU use was "not enough time" (61%). Ultrasound usage among recent EM residency graduates is significantly higher in teaching than in community settings and in high-volume EDs. Its use is more widespread than in previous reports in all types of practice. There is a wide range of utilization of ultrasound in the various applications in emergency practice, with the evaluation of trauma being the most common. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Knowledge of addiction medicine among internal medicine residents and medical students.

    PubMed

    Brown, Angel T; Kolade, Victor O; Staton, Lisa J; Patel, Neha K

    2013-03-01

    More than 22 million Americans are living with addiction, including nearly seven million who misuse prescription medications. However, most medical schools and residency programs provide little to no education addressing alcohol and drug addiction. Implementation of a new addiction medicine curriculum at a single internal medicine program provided an opportunity for knowledge assessment in a select population of health professionals. We hypothesized that knowledge of addiction medicine would not differ by training level or geographical location of medical school, but that knowledge would improve following a structured curriculum. Study participants included internal medicine and transitional year residents, as well as a group of medical students who were enrolled in a single internal medicine program at the time of the didactic series. A pre-test was administered prior to a four-week structured curriculum. The topics addressed included but were not limited to: 1) an overview of addiction, 2) opioids and chronic pain, 3) benzodiazepines and illicit stimulants, and 4) alcohol. A panel discussion was convened at the end of the fourth session. Following participation in the symposium, participants completed an online post-test. ANOVA was used to compare means. Paired t-tests were used to compare pre-test and post-test scores. 36 of 44 eligible medical students and residents completed the pre-test. Mean pre-test percentage scores were 64 percent for fourth year medical students and 62.5 percent for all residents. For residents, U.S. medical school trainees answered 65 percent of the pre-test questions correctly, versus 58.6 percent correct responses among their international medical graduate peers. No inter-group differences were statistically significant. Of the 36 participants, 20 completed both pre-tests and post-tests. The mean post-test score of 68.75 percent was higher than the mean pre-test score of 61.75 percent, p = 0.009. Knowledge of addiction medicine can be

  6. [Perception of adolescent medicine among French pediatric residents].

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, N; de Tournemire, R; Jacquin, P; Stheneur, C; Boudailliez, B

    2016-07-01

    The perception of adolescent medicine (AM) among future pediatricians in France has scarcely been explored although adolescent health care is an integral part of the pediatrician's job. Moreover, pediatric residents seem to have a lack of enthusiasm for this field. The aim of this study was to assess the beliefs and perceptions of fourth-year French pediatric residents regarding adolescents and AM. We conducted a national electronic survey among French pediatric residents in their last year of residency. An original 51-item, open-ended declarative questionnaire was sent out including questions on demographics, career expectations, AM block rotation experiences, and perceptions and beliefs regarding adolescents and AM. Difficulties and barriers experienced in this field were investigated. Queries about residents' specific AM courses and about their educational needs were also explored. The survey was conducted online between January and March 2015. There were 121 respondents, achieving a 43% response rate. The majority of respondents perceived teens as interesting (75%), vulnerable (83%), and time-consuming (84%). Up to four fifths of respondents (81%) considered AM to be a skill that all pediatricians should acquire. A subgroup analysis showed that the residents who had not experienced an AM block rotation did not seem to be convinced of the need for training in this field (P=0.09). The following issues were reported as major difficulties by residents: providing care for teens reluctant to seek health care (65%), managing violent behavior among adolescents in the emergency ward (98%), and managing adolescents who attempt suicide (80%). Less than half (45%) of the residents reported their residency program had a specific AM course. Among them, 73% attended the lectures and 57% found them useful. One third (32%) of the respondents had experienced a 2-month block rotation in the field of AM during their residency. This is the first nationwide study in France in this

  7. Involvement of Visit Companions in Internal Medicine Resident Ambulatory Clinic Visits: Perspectives of Patients, Companions, and Internal Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Colburn, Jessica L; Christmas, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    information about the general health of the patient was the most important, followed by education about warning signs and symptoms, and the opportunity to share concerns about the patient. These rankings were consistent with the views of the companions themselves. In this pilot investigation, half of the patients of the internal medicine clinic who brought a companion did so for every visit. These patients relied on their companions to ask questions during the visit and to help remember the physician's instructions. Residents and companions generally agreed on the roles of companions, but almost none of the residents had any formal training in interacting with visit companions.

  8. The Effects of Abortion Training on Family Medicine Residents' Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Summit, Aleza K; Gold, Marji

    2017-01-01

    RHEDI, Reproductive Health Education in Family Medicine, offers technical assistance and funding to family medicine residency programs to support integrated opt-out abortion and reproductive health training for residents. This study assessed the impact of this enhanced training on residents' reproductive health experience. Investigator-developed pre- and post-surveys were administered online to 214 residents at 12 family medicine residency programs before and after their RHEDI training experience. Surveys addressed experience in contraception and abortion, attitudes around abortion provision, and post-residency intentions. Descriptive statistics were generated, and statistical tests were performed to assess changes after training. Surveys had a 90% response rate. After the RHEDI enhanced reproductive health rotation, residents reported increased experience in contraception provision, early pregnancy ultrasound, aspiration and medication abortion, and miscarriage management. After training, residents with experience in IUD insertion increased from 85% to 99%, and contraceptive implant insertion experience rose from 60% to 85%. Residents who had performed any abortions increased from 15% to 79%, and self-rated competency in abortion increased. Finally, almost all residents agreed that early abortion was within the scope of family medicine, and training confirmed residents' intentions to provide reproductive health services after residency. Integrated training in reproductive health, with an emphasis on abortion, increases residents' experience and underscores their understanding of the role of these services in family medicine. Increasing the number of family medicine residency programs that offer this training could help prepare family physicians to meet their patients' needs for reproductive health services.

  9. A Perspective of the future of nuclear medicine training and certification

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo-Perez, Julio; Paris, Manuel; Graham, Michael M.; Osborne, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine has evolved from a medical subspecialty using quite basic tests to one using elaborate methods to image organ physiology and has truly become “Molecular Imaging”. Concurrently, there has also been a timely debate about who has to be responsible for keeping pace with all of the components of the developmental cycle; imaging, radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation. Since the foundation of the ABNM, the practice of Nuclear Medicine and the process toward certification have undergone major revisions. At present, the debate is focused on the inevitable future convergence of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine. The potential for further cooperation or fusion of the American Board of Radiology (ABR) and the American Board of Nuclear Medicine (ABNM) is likely to bring about a new path for Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging training. If the merger is done carefully, respecting the strengths of both partners equally, there is an excellent potential to create a hybrid Nuclear Medicine – Radiology specialty that combines Physiology and Molecular Biology with detailed anatomic imaging that will sustain the innovation that has been central to nuclear medicine residency and practice. Herein, we also introduce a few basic trends in imaging utilization in the United States. These trends do not predict future utilization, but highlight the need for an appropriately credentialed practitioner to interpret these examinations and provide value to the healthcare system. PMID:26687859

  10. American Board of Emergency Medicine Report on Residency and Fellowship Training Information (2016-2017).

    PubMed

    Marco, Catherine A; Nelson, Lewis S; Baren, Jill M; Beeson, Michael S; Carius, Michael L; Chudnofsky, Carl R; Gausche-Hill, Marianne; Goyal, Deepi G; Keim, Samuel M; Kowalenko, Terry; Muelleman, Robert L; Joldersma, Kevin B

    2017-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency programs and the residents training in those programs. We present the 2017 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Outpatient Management of Hypertension By General Medicine and Traditional Track Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robie, Peter W.; Andrus, Peter L.

    1982-01-01

    A study to determine whether general internal medicine and traditional track medicine residents differed in their outpatient management of essential hypertension is discussed. General internal medicine residents seem to do better in the areas of assessment of drug side effects and patient education. (MLW)

  12. Residents as teachers: psychiatry and family medicine residents' self-assessment of teaching knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Brand, Michael W; Ekambaram, Vijayabharathi; Tucker, Phebe; Aggarwal, Ruchi

    2013-09-01

    Residents are one of the prime sources of information and education for medical students. As an initial step in supporting residents as teachers, a baseline self-assessment of residents' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values related to teaching was conducted among psychiatry and family medicine residents to compare and improve their confidence and skills as teachers. Psychiatry residents (N=12) and family medicine residents (N=23) completed self-assessments of their knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values related to teaching. Residents also were asked to list steps used in the One-Minute Preceptor process and estimate the time each spent in teaching. Descriptive summary statistics were used for four main areas related to teaching; t-test and chi-square analyses were conducted to ascertain whether there was a significant difference in resident groups. In the current study, the perceived amount of time spent for teaching patients was significantly higher among family practice residents, whereas no group differences were found for time teaching medical students, peers, community members, non-physicians, or others. However, family medicine residents rated themselves higher than psychiatry residents in their understanding of their roles in teaching medical students and teaching patients. Also, family medicine residents' self-reported teaching skills were more advanced (82.4%) than psychiatry residents' (54.2%). They most likely applied at least two different teaching methods in inpatient and outpatient settings, as compared with psychiatry residents. No significant group differences were found in the other 15 items assessing teaching knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values. Results indicate that residents' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values regarding teaching varies across institutions and training programs. The psychiatry residents in this study do not clearly understand their role as educators with patients and medical students; they have a less clear

  13. Nanotechnology and nuclear medicine; research and preclinical applications.

    PubMed

    Assadi, Majid; Afrasiabi, Kolsoom; Nabipour, Iraj; Seyedabadi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    The birth of nanotechnology in human society was around 2000 years ago and soon found applications in various fields. In this article, we highlight the current status of research and preclinical applications and also future prospects of nanotechnology in medicine and in nuclear medicine. The most important field is cancer. A regular nanotechnology training program for nuclear medicine physicians may be welcome.

  14. Emergency Medicine Resident Orientation: How Training Programs Get Their Residents Started

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Jillian; Barrie, Michael; Way, David P.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The first formal orientation program for incoming emergency medicine (EM) residents was started in 1976. The last attempt to describe the nature of orientation programs was by Brillman in 1995. Now almost all residencies offer orientation to incoming residents, but little is known about the curricular content or structure of these programs. The purpose of this project was to describe the current composition and purpose of EM resident orientation programs in the United States. Methods In autumn of 2014, we surveyed all U.S. EM residency program directors (n=167). We adapted our survey instrument from one used by Brillman (1995). The survey was designed to assess the orientation program’s purpose, structure, content, and teaching methods. Results The survey return rate was 63% (105 of 167). Most respondents (77%) directed three-year residencies, and all but one program offered intern orientation. Orientations lasted an average of nine clinical (Std. Dev.=7.3) and 13 non-clinical days (Std. Dev.=9.3). The prototypical breakdown of program activities was 27% lectures, 23% clinical work, 16% skills training, 10% administrative activities, 9% socialization and 15% other activities. Most orientations included activities to promote socialization among interns (98%) and with other members of the department (91%). Many programs (87%) included special certification courses (ACLS, ATLS, PALS, NRP). Course content included the following: use of electronic medical records (90%), physician wellness (75%), and chief complaint-based lectures (72%). Procedural skill sessions covered ultrasound (94%), airway management (91%), vascular access (90%), wound management (77%), splinting (67%), and trauma skills (62%). Conclusion Compared to Brillman (1995), we found that more programs (99%) are offering formal orientation and allocating more time to them. Lectures remain the most common educational activity. We found increases in the use of skills labs and specialty

  15. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety.

    PubMed

    Blum, Alexander B; Shea, Sandra; Czeisler, Charles A; Landrigan, Christopher P; Leape, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    Long working hours and sleep deprivation have been a facet of physician training in the US since the advent of the modern residency system. However, the scientific evidence linking fatigue with deficits in human performance, accidents and errors in industries from aeronautics to medicine, nuclear power, and transportation has mounted over the last 40 years. This evidence has also spawned regulations to help ensure public safety across safety-sensitive industries, with the notable exception of medicine. In late 2007, at the behest of the US Congress, the Institute of Medicine embarked on a year-long examination of the scientific evidence linking resident physician sleep deprivation with clinical performance deficits and medical errors. The Institute of Medicine's report, entitled "Resident duty hours: Enhancing sleep, supervision and safety", published in January 2009, recommended new limits on resident physician work hours and workload, increased supervision, a heightened focus on resident physician safety, training in structured handovers and quality improvement, more rigorous external oversight of work hours and other aspects of residency training, and the identification of expanded funding sources necessary to implement the recommended reforms successfully and protect the public and resident physicians themselves from preventable harm. Given that resident physicians comprise almost a quarter of all physicians who work in hospitals, and that taxpayers, through Medicare and Medicaid, fund graduate medical education, the public has a deep investment in physician training. Patients expect to receive safe, high-quality care in the nation's teaching hospitals. Because it is their safety that is at issue, their voices should be central in policy decisions affecting patient safety. It is likewise important to integrate the perspectives of resident physicians, policy makers, and other constituencies in designing new policies. However, since its release, discussion of the

  16. Development of Scintillators in Nuclear Medicine.

    PubMed

    Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Babak

    2015-01-01

    High-quality image is necessary for accurate diagnosis in nuclear medicine. There are many factors in creating a good image and detector is the most important one. In recent years, several detectors are studied to get a better picture. The aim of this paper is comparison of some type of these detectors such as thallium activated sodium iodide bismuth germinate cesium activated yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG: Ce) YAP: Ce "lutetium aluminum garnet activated by cerium" CRY018 "CRY019" lanthanum bromide and cadmium zinc telluride. We studied different properties of these crystals including density, energy resolution and decay times that are more important factors affecting the image quality.

  17. Quantitative Analysis in Nuclear Medicine Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Habib

    This book provides a review of image analysis techniques as they are applied in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. Driven in part by the remarkable increase in computing power and its ready and inexpensive availability, this is a relatively new yet rapidly expanding field. Likewise, although the use of radionuclides for diagnosis and therapy has origins dating back almost to the discovery of natural radioactivity itself, radionuclide therapy and, in particular, targeted radionuclide therapy has only recently emerged as a promising approach for therapy of cancer and, to a lesser extent, other diseases.

  18. Development of residency program guidelines for interaction with the pharmaceutical industry. Education Council, Residency Training Programme in Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont.

    PubMed

    1993-08-15

    Medical residency programs are likely to face increasing pressure to address their relations with the pharmaceutical industry. Our internal medicine residency program has developed guidelines that were adopted after extensive debate by residents and faculty members. The guidelines are based on the principles that residents and faculty should set the educational agenda and that the residency program should not allow gifts of any sort from industry to residents. Specific policies include obtaining and screening educational materials from the industry before residents are exposed to them, proscribing "drug lunches" and accepting industry sponsorship only when the residency program maintains complete control of the educational event being sponsored. The industry response to the guidelines was split; about half reacted negatively, and half found the guidelines acceptable. Our experience suggests that productive debate about guidelines for the interaction of residency programs with the pharmaceutical industry is possible and desirable and that explicit policies can clarify areas of ambiguity.

  19. Highlights of articles published in annals of nuclear medicine 2016.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2017-07-28

    This article is the first installment of highlights of selected articles published during 2016 in the Annals of Nuclear Medicine, an official peer-reviewed journal of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine. A companion article highlighting selected articles published during 2016 in the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, which is the official peer-reviewed journal of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, will also appear in the Annals Nuclear Medicine. This new initiative by the respective journals will continue as an annual endeavor and is anticipated to not only enhance the scientific collaboration between Europe and Japan but also facilitate global partnership in the field of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging.

  20. [Three Dimensional Display in Nuclear Medicine].

    PubMed

    Teraoka, Satomi; Souma, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Imaging techniques to obtain a tomographic image in nuclear medicine such as PET and SPECT are widely used. It is necessary to interpreting all of the tomographic images obtained in order to accurately evaluate the individual lesion, whereas three dimensional display is often useful in order to overview and evaluate the feature of the entire lesion or disease such as the position, size and abnormal pattern. In Japan, the use of three dimensional image analysis workstation with an application of the co-registration and image fusion between the functional images such as PET or SPECT and anatomical images such as CT or MRI has been generalized. In addition, multimodality imaging system such as a PET/CT and SPECT/CT has been widespread. Therefore, it is expected to improve the diagnostic accuracy using three dimensionally image fusion to functional images with poor anatomical information. In this commentary, as an example of a three dimensional display that are commonly used in nuclear medicine examination in Japan, brain regions, cardiac region and bone and tumor region will be introduced separately.

  1. Employment in nuclear medicine during pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetto, A.R.

    1986-12-01

    A nuclear medicine technologist can work throughout a pregnancy with high confidence that her occupational radiation exposure will not add any significant risk to her changes of having a normal pregnancy and child. All that is required is for the employer to provide an ALARA work place and for the technologist to observe carefully all radiation safety guidelines and to maintain her occupational exposure ALARA. Current guidance is that the total uterine dose during gestation be less than 0.5 rem (5 mSv). The vast majority of nuclear medicine technologists can achieve this dose level easily, with no modifications of duties or work practices. Technologists working with generators and radiopharmaceutical kits may wish to temporarily transfer to other duties within the clinic, not necessarily to reduce routine exposures but to minimize the changes of an accident having high-dose or high-contamination potential. All of the available human data show that there is small additional risk to the fetus or neonate due to occupational radiation exposure compared to naturally occurring risks so long as the dose is within recommended guidelines.

  2. Emergency Medicine Resident Physicians’ Perceptions of Electronic Documentation and Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Neri, P.M.; Redden, L.; Poole, S.; Pozner, C.N.; Horsky, J.; Raja, A.S.; Poon, E.; Schiff, G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To understand emergency department (ED) physicians’ use of electronic documentation in order to identify usability and workflow considerations for the design of future ED information system (EDIS) physician documentation modules. Methods We invited emergency medicine resident physicians to participate in a mixed methods study using task analysis and qualitative interviews. Participants completed a simulated, standardized patient encounter in a medical simulation center while documenting in the test environment of a currently used EDIS. We recorded the time on task, type and sequence of tasks performed by the participants (including tasks performed in parallel). We then conducted semi-structured interviews with each participant. We analyzed these qualitative data using the constant comparative method to generate themes. Results Eight resident physicians participated. The simulation session averaged 17 minutes and participants spent 11 minutes on average on tasks that included electronic documentation. Participants performed tasks in parallel, such as history taking and electronic documentation. Five of the 8 participants performed a similar workflow sequence during the first part of the session while the remaining three used different workflows. Three themes characterize electronic documentation: (1) physicians report that location and timing of documentation varies based on patient acuity and workload, (2) physicians report a need for features that support improved efficiency; and (3) physicians like viewing available patient data but struggle with integration of the EDIS with other information sources. Conclusion We confirmed that physicians spend much of their time on documentation (65%) during an ED patient visit. Further, we found that resident physicians did not all use the same workflow and approach even when presented with an identical standardized patient scenario. Future EHR design should consider these varied workflows while trying to

  3. Nuclear Medicine Physics: The Basics. 7th ed.

    PubMed

    Mihailidis, Dimitris

    2012-10-01

    Nuclear Medicine Physics: The Basics. 7th ed. Ramesh Chandra, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, a Wolters Kluwer Business. Philadelphia, 2012. Softbound, 224 pp. Price: $69.99. ISBN: 9781451109412. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Emergency medicine directors' perceptions on professionalism: a Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors survey.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Christine; Murano, Tiffany; Comes, Jim; Smith, Jessica L; Katz, Eric D

    2011-10-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residency training programs to teach and assess professionalism in residents; however, programs may struggle to successfully remediate residents not meeting professionalism standards. To assist programs with this complex issue, a Professionalism Remediation Task Force was formed by the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD-EM), which surveyed program directors (PDs) concerning their experiences. The purpose of this study is to report survey results regarding the identification and rating of unprofessional behaviors and challenges in the evaluation and remediation of professionalism. In June 2010, the task force sent an anonymous survey via the CORD-EM listserv to PDs with active EM programs. Fifty percent (77/154) of eligible PDs responded to the survey. Most PDs rated the unprofessional behaviors of interpersonal/communication conflicts, lack of responsibility during patient care, lack of respect of coworkers, and reports of impairment as "critical"; repeated tardiness, incomplete work, poor ability to accept feedback, poor attitude, and repetitive unresponsiveness to aid colleagues were rated as "very serious"; frequent missed deadlines were "serious"; and repetitive failure to complete medical records was rated as "mildly serious." A resident with "less serious" professionalism issues was also felt to be likely to have "serious" or "critical" issues "often" (33.8% of respondents) or "always" (6.5%). The most common methods of assessment were clinical/advisor evaluations. However, existing assessment methods were described as inadequate in identifying serious professionalism issues by 50.7% of responding PDs. Unprofessionalism was most commonly discovered by unofficial faculty complaint (54.5%). Eighty percent report that professionalism is more difficult to remediate than other core competencies. Resident ownership of the problem was reported as most critical to remediation

  5. The business of emergency medicine: a nonclinical curriculum proposal for emergency medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Falvo, Thomas; McKniff, Sueanne; Smolin, Gregory; Vega, David; Amsterdam, James T

    2009-09-01

    Over the course of their postgraduate medical education, physicians are expected not only to acquire an extensive knowledge of clinical medicine and sound procedural skills, but also to develop competence in their other professional roles as communicator, collaborator, mediator, manager, teacher, and patient advocate. Although the need for physicians to develop stronger service delivery skills is well recognized, residency programs may underemphasize formal training in nonclinical proficiencies. As a result, graduates can begin their professional careers with an incomplete understanding of the operation of health care systems and how to utilize system resources in the manner best suited to their patients' needs. This article proposes the content, educational strategy, and needs assessment for an academic program entitled The Business of Emergency Medicine (BOEM). Developed as an adjunct to the (predominantly) clinical content of traditional emergency medicine (EM) training programs, BOEM is designed to enhance the existing academic curricula with additional learning opportunities by which EM residents can acquire a fundamental understanding of the nonclinical skills of their specialty. (c) 2009 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  6. The role of general nuclear medicine in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Lacey R; Wilkinson, Deborah

    2015-03-15

    The rising incidence of breast cancer worldwide has prompted many improvements to current care. Routine nuclear medicine is a major contributor to a full gamut of clinical studies such as early lesion detection and stratification; guiding, monitoring, and predicting response to therapy; and monitoring progression, recurrence or metastases. Developments in instrumentation such as the high-resolution dedicated breast device coupled with the diagnostic versatility of conventional cameras have reinserted nuclear medicine as a valuable tool in the broader clinical setting. This review outlines the role of general nuclear medicine, concluding that targeted radiopharmaceuticals and versatile instrumentation position nuclear medicine as a powerful modality for patients with breast cancer.

  7. The situation of nuclear medicine in Central and Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Lass, Piotr

    2005-12-01

    This paper reviews the situation of nuclear medicine in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), i.e. a group of 15 countries lying east of the Oder river-Trieste line and west of the present/planned EU eastern border. Together these countries have 106.6 million inhabitants, i.e. about a quarter of the population of the "European economic space". Its nuclear medicine, however, represents less than 10% of European nuclear medicine manpower and equipment. In these countries there are at least 245 nuclear medicine departments with 661 nuclear medicine specialists and at least 376 gamma cameras. There are six dedicated PET units and three PET/SPECT centres, as well as one manufacturer of gamma cameras, six radiopharmaceutical manufacturers and two nuclear medicine scientific journals. The biggest nuclear medicine communities are in the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland. The scientific input of the CEE countries to European science is moderate-about 10% when measured by EANM congress abstracts, and 5% when measured by the number of papers in MEDLINE-indexed journals. Mean European bibliometric parameters are approached only by Hungary and-to some extent-the Czech Republic. This survey indicates the need for international cooperation to improve the level of nuclear medicine in the CEE countries so that it reaches European standards. The potential of these countries could also be better used to the benefit of European nuclear medicine.

  8. The role of general nuclear medicine in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Greene, Lacey R; Wilkinson, Deborah

    2015-03-01

    The rising incidence of breast cancer worldwide has prompted many improvements to current care. Routine nuclear medicine is a major contributor to a full gamut of clinical studies such as early lesion detection and stratification; guiding, monitoring, and predicting response to therapy; and monitoring progression, recurrence or metastases. Developments in instrumentation such as the high-resolution dedicated breast device coupled with the diagnostic versatility of conventional cameras have reinserted nuclear medicine as a valuable tool in the broader clinical setting. This review outlines the role of general nuclear medicine, concluding that targeted radiopharmaceuticals and versatile instrumentation position nuclear medicine as a powerful modality for patients with breast cancer.

  9. The role of general nuclear medicine in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Lacey R; Wilkinson, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The rising incidence of breast cancer worldwide has prompted many improvements to current care. Routine nuclear medicine is a major contributor to a full gamut of clinical studies such as early lesion detection and stratification; guiding, monitoring, and predicting response to therapy; and monitoring progression, recurrence or metastases. Developments in instrumentation such as the high-resolution dedicated breast device coupled with the diagnostic versatility of conventional cameras have reinserted nuclear medicine as a valuable tool in the broader clinical setting. This review outlines the role of general nuclear medicine, concluding that targeted radiopharmaceuticals and versatile instrumentation position nuclear medicine as a powerful modality for patients with breast cancer. PMID:26229668

  10. Supplemental Milestones for Emergency Medicine Residency Programs: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Ketterer, Andrew R.; Salzman, David H.; Branzetti, Jeremy B.; Gisondi, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Emergency medicine (EM) residency programs may be 36 or 48 months in length. The Residency Review Committee for EM requires that 48-month programs provide educational justification for the additional 12 months. We developed additional milestones that EM training programs might use to assess outcomes in domains that meet this accreditation requirement. This study aims to assess for content validity of these supplemental milestones using a similar methodology to that of the original EM Milestones validation study. Methods A panel of EM program directors (PD) and content experts at two institutions identified domains of additional training not covered by the existing EM Milestones. This led to the development of six novel subcompetencies: “Operations and Administration,” “Critical Care,” “Leadership and Management,” “Research,” “Teaching and Learning,” and “Career Development.” Subject-matter experts at other 48-month EM residency programs refined the milestones for these subcompetencies. PDs of all 48-month EM programs were then asked to order the proposed milestones using the Dreyfus model of skill acquisition for each subcompetency. Data analysis mirrored that used in the original EM Milestones validation study, leading to the final version of our supplemental milestones. Results Twenty of 33 subjects (58.8%) completed the study. No subcompetency or individual milestone met deletion criteria. Of the 97 proposed milestones, 67 (69.1%) required no further editing and remained at the same level as proposed by the study authors. Thirty milestones underwent level changes: 15 (15.5%) were moved one level up and 13 (13.4%) were moved one level down. One milestone (1.0%) in “Leadership and Management” was moved two levels up, and one milestone in “Operations and Administration” was moved two levels down. One milestone in “Research” was ranked by the survey respondents at one level higher than that proposed by the authors

  11. Entry of US medical school graduates into family medicine residencies: 2011--2012.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Wendy S; Bieck, Ashley D; Crosley, Philip W; Kozakowski, Stanley M

    2012-10-01

    This study reports on the number of graduates entering family medicine residencies in 2011 from allopathic, osteopathic, and international medical schools. Allopathic graduate data come from medical school registrars or the American Medical Association Masterfile. The 2012 family medicine residency program director census, with a response rate of 100%, verified residents who entered training July 2011 from all medical schools. Approximately 8.4% allopathic medical school's graduates of the 17,478 graduates (July 2010 to June 2011) were first-year family medicine residents in 2011, compared with 8.0% in 2010 and 7.5% in 2009. The percent of medical school graduates entering family medicine from each of the allopathic schools was calculated and averaged over 3 years to diminish 1-year fluctuations. Allopathic medical schools' 3-year average percentage of graduates who entered family medicine residency programs in 2011 ranged from 0.6% to 21.4%. Compared to 2010, osteopathic graduates in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited family medicine residencies (21.5%) increased 2.8% from 2010, whereas international medical graduates (32.1%) decreased 3.4%. An increasing trend is seen in the number of allopathic graduates entering family medicine residencies. Osteopathic and international graduates' entry to residency appears inversely related. As medical schools emphasize social accountability to improve the health of communities, higher family medicine graduation rates may occur. Initiatives in medical school admissions may increase the number of medical students more likely to select family medicine careers.

  12. Family medicine residents' perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States.

    PubMed

    Amoako, Adae O; Amoako, Agyenim B; Pujalte, George Ga

    2015-01-01

    Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7%) compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8%) respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively). Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, <0.0001, and 0.0001, respectively; comfort level, P=0.0016, <0.0001, 0.0897, and 0.0010, respectively). Medical education background, factors that affect training, and an interest in sports medicine contribute to residents' knowledge and comfort level in treatment of common sports injuries.

  13. Initial results of a structured rotation in hematology and transfusion medicine for anesthesiology residents.

    PubMed

    Rebel, Annette; Hassan, Zaki-Udin; Boral, Leonard; Lin, Yushun; DiLorenzo, Amy; Schell, Randall M

    2011-09-01

    To develop and evaluate a new curriculum in transfusion medicine for anesthesiology residents. Quasi-experimental study. Single center, pilot curriculum in the anesthesiology residency program at a university-affiliated medical center. Group TM consisted of residents who participated in the one month-long transfusion medicine rotation in postgraduate year 2 (PGY2; n = 9). The comparison group (non-TM) consisted of residents who had no exposure to the transfusion medicine rotation (n = 21). We compared results of the 2009 American Board of Anesthesiology In-Training Exam (ABA-ITE) 2009 by residents of our program with the national performance of residents in the first clinical anesthesia year (AMG CA1 = PGY-2) and second clinical anesthesia year (AMG CA2 = PGY-3) on transfusion medicine/hematology knowledge. Performance on a pre-test and post-test of those who took part in the transfusion medicine curriculum, and overall performance on the ABA-ITE, of departmental residents who had and had not participated in the Transfusion Medicine curriculum within the target knowledge area of hematology/transfusion medicine and compared against national peer performance data, was assessed. An anonymous electronic survey (5-Point Likert scale) was used to assess the perceived educational value of the curriculum. Transfusion medicine-related knowledge of anesthesia residents markedly improved from the pre- to post-rotation examination and on the ABA-ITE. In the ABA-ITE 2009, the TM group performed better than their national peers (AMG CA1 and CA2) in the hematology content area. The post-rotation anonymous resident survey indicated high resident satisfaction. A structured transfusion medicine curriculum improved anesthesiology resident knowledge in transfusion medicine and was associated with high learner satisfaction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Computer Information System For Nuclear Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, P. T.; Knowles, R. J.....; Tsen, O.

    1983-12-01

    To meet the complex needs of a nuclear medicine division serving a 1100-bed hospital, a computer information system has been developed in sequential phases. This database management system is based on a time-shared minicomputer linked to a broadband communications network. The database contains information on patient histories, billing, types of procedures, doses of radiopharmaceuticals, times of study, scanning equipment used, and technician performing the procedure. These patient records are cycled through three levels of storage: (a) an active file of 100 studies for those patients currently scheduled, (b) a temporary storage level of 1000 studies, and (c) an archival level of 10,000 studies containing selected information. Merging of this information with reports and various statistical analyses are possible. This first phase has been in operation for well over a year. The second phase is an upgrade of the size of the various storage levels by a factor of ten.

  15. Development of Scintillators in Nuclear Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Babak

    2015-01-01

    High-quality image is necessary for accurate diagnosis in nuclear medicine. There are many factors in creating a good image and detector is the most important one. In recent years, several detectors are studied to get a better picture. The aim of this paper is comparison of some type of these detectors such as thallium activated sodium iodide bismuth germinate cesium activated yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG: Ce) YAP: Ce “lutetium aluminum garnet activated by cerium” CRY018 “CRY019” lanthanum bromide and cadmium zinc telluride. We studied different properties of these crystals including density, energy resolution and decay times that are more important factors affecting the image quality. PMID:26420984

  16. Nurses as Evaluators of the Humanistic Behavior of Internal Medicine Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Paula S.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The reliability of a 13-item questionnaire designed to assess the humanistic behaviors of internal medicine residents and the reliability of nurses as raters of those behaviors were examined. Residents were evaluated by nurses on two general medicine services and on cardiology and hematology-oncology services. (Author/MLW)

  17. Evaluation of a Substance Use Disorder Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Melissa R.; Arnsten, Julia H.; Parish, Sharon J.; Kunins, Hillary V.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching about diagnosis, treatment, and sequelae of substance use disorders (SUDs) is insufficient in most Internal Medicine residency programs. To address this, the authors developed, implemented, and evaluated a novel and comprehensive SUD curriculum for first year residents (interns) in Internal Medicine, which anchors the ensuing 3-year…

  18. Evaluation of a Substance Use Disorder Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Melissa R.; Arnsten, Julia H.; Parish, Sharon J.; Kunins, Hillary V.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching about diagnosis, treatment, and sequelae of substance use disorders (SUDs) is insufficient in most Internal Medicine residency programs. To address this, the authors developed, implemented, and evaluated a novel and comprehensive SUD curriculum for first year residents (interns) in Internal Medicine, which anchors the ensuing 3-year…

  19. Nurses as Evaluators of the Humanistic Behavior of Internal Medicine Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Paula S.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The reliability of a 13-item questionnaire designed to assess the humanistic behaviors of internal medicine residents and the reliability of nurses as raters of those behaviors were examined. Residents were evaluated by nurses on two general medicine services and on cardiology and hematology-oncology services. (Author/MLW)

  20. [The Computer Book of the Internal Medicine resident: validity and reliability of a questionnaire for self-assessment of competences in internal medicine residents].

    PubMed

    Oristrell, J; Casanovas, A; Jordana, R; Comet, R; Gil, M; Oliva, J C

    2012-12-01

    There are no simple and validated instruments for evaluating the training of specialists. To analyze the reliability and validity of a computerized self-assessment method to quantify the acquisition of medical competences during the Internal Medicine residency program. All residents of our department participated in the study during a period of 28 months. Twenty-two questionnaires specific for each rotation (the Computer-Book of the Internal Medicine Resident) were constructed with items (questions) corresponding to three competence domains: clinical skills competence, communication skills and teamwork. Reliability was analyzed by measuring the internal consistency of items in each competence domain using Cronbach's alpha index. Validation was performed by comparing mean scores in each competence domain between senior and junior residents. Cut-off levels of competence scores were established in order to identify the strengths and weaknesses of our training program. Finally, self-assessment values were correlated with the evaluations of the medical staff. There was a high internal consistency of the items of clinical skills competences, communication skills and teamwork. Higher scores of clinical skills competence and communication skills, but not in those of teamwork were observed in senior residents than in junior residents. The Computer-Book of the Internal Medicine Resident identified the strengths and weaknesses of our training program. We did not observe any correlation between the results of the self- evaluations and the evaluations made by staff physicians. The items of Computer-Book of the Internal Medicine Resident showed high internal consistency and made it possible to measure the acquisition of medical competences in a team of Internal Medicine residents. This self-assessment method should be complemented with other evaluation methods in order to assess the acquisition of medical competences by an individual resident. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Espa

  1. A Tool to Assess Family Medicine Residents' Patient Encounters Using Secure Messaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung G.; Morris, Carl G.; Heidrich, Fred E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Secure messages exchanged between patients and family medicine residents via an electronic health record (EHR) could be used to assess residents' clinical and communication skills, but the mechanism is not well understood. Objective To design and test a secure messaging competency assessment for family medicine residents in a patient-centered medical home (PCMH). Methods Using the existing literature and evidence-based guidelines, we designed an assessment tool to evaluate secure messaging competency for family medicine residents training in a PCMH. Core faculty performed 2-stage validity and reliability testing (n = 2 and n = 9, respectively). A series of randomly selected EHR secure messages (n = 45) were assessed from a sample of 10 residents across all years of training. Results The secure message assessment tool provided data on a set of competencies and a framework for resident feedback. Assessment showed 10% (n = 2) of residents at the novice level, 50% (n = 10) as progressing, and 40% (n = 8) as proficient. The most common deficiencies for residents' secure messages related to communication rather than clinical competencies (n = 37 [90%] versus n = 4 [10%]). Interrater reliability testing ranged from 60% to 78% agreement and 20% to 44% disagreement. Disagreement centered on interpersonal communication factors. After 2 stages of testing, the assessment using residents' secure messages was incorporated into our existing evaluation process. Conclusions Assessing family medicine residents' secure messaging for patient encounters closed an evaluation gap in our family medicine program, and offered residents feedback on their clinical and communication skills in a PCMH. PMID:26692980

  2. Social Media in Professional Medicine: New Resident Perceptions and Practices.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Cedric; Mesner, Jason; Stopyra, Jason; O'Neill, James; Husain, Iltifat; Geer, Carol; Gerancher, Karen; Atkinson, Hal; Harper, Erin; Huang, William; Cline, David M

    2016-06-09

    For younger generations, unconstrained online social activity is the norm. Little data are available about perceptions among young medical practitioners who enter the professional clinical arena, while the impact of existing social media policy on these perceptions is unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the existing perceptions about social media and professionalism among new physicians entering in professional clinical practice; and to determine the effects of formal social media instruction and policy on young professionals' ability to navigate case-based scenarios about online behavior in the context of professional medicine. This was a prospective observational study involving the new resident physicians at a large academic medical center. Medical residents from 9 specialties were invited to participate and answer an anonymous questionnaire about social media in clinical medicine. Data were analyzed using SAS 9.4 (Cary, NC), chi-square or Fisher's exact test was used as appropriate, and the correct responses were compared between different groups using the Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance. Familiarity with current institutional policy was associated with an average of 2.2 more correct responses (P=.01). Instruction on social media use during medical school was related to correct responses for 2 additional questions (P=.03). On dividing the groups into no policy exposure, single policy exposure, or both exposures, the mean differences were found to be statistically significant (3.5, 7.5, and 9.4, respectively) (P=.03). In this study, a number of young physicians demonstrated a casual approach to social media activity in the context of professional medical practice. Several areas of potential educational opportunity and focus were identified: (1) online privacy, (2) maintaining digital professionalism, (3) safeguarding the protected health information of patients, and (4) the impact of existing social media policies. Prior social media

  3. Social Media in Professional Medicine: New Resident Perceptions and Practices

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background For younger generations, unconstrained online social activity is the norm. Little data are available about perceptions among young medical practitioners who enter the professional clinical arena, while the impact of existing social media policy on these perceptions is unclear. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the existing perceptions about social media and professionalism among new physicians entering in professional clinical practice; and to determine the effects of formal social media instruction and policy on young professionals’ ability to navigate case-based scenarios about online behavior in the context of professional medicine. Methods This was a prospective observational study involving the new resident physicians at a large academic medical center. Medical residents from 9 specialties were invited to participate and answer an anonymous questionnaire about social media in clinical medicine. Data were analyzed using SAS 9.4 (Cary, NC), chi-square or Fisher’s exact test was used as appropriate, and the correct responses were compared between different groups using the Kruskal–Wallis analysis of variance. Results Familiarity with current institutional policy was associated with an average of 2.2 more correct responses (P=.01). Instruction on social media use during medical school was related to correct responses for 2 additional questions (P=.03). On dividing the groups into no policy exposure, single policy exposure, or both exposures, the mean differences were found to be statistically significant (3.5, 7.5, and 9.4, respectively) (P=.03). Conclusions In this study, a number of young physicians demonstrated a casual approach to social media activity in the context of professional medical practice. Several areas of potential educational opportunity and focus were identified: (1) online privacy, (2) maintaining digital professionalism, (3) safeguarding the protected health information of patients, and (4) the impact of

  4. A problem-based approach to teaching outcomes research in family medicine residency.

    PubMed

    Ostbye, Truls; Krause, Katrina M; Gradison, Margaret; Eisenstein, Eric L; Wagner, Galen S

    2004-01-01

    This study's objective was to introduce research concepts and skills in family medicine residency through a problem-based course. Eight third-year residents per year in 3 academic years participated. Groups of two-three were presented with the task of developing, executing, and reporting on a small research project within the family medicine clinic. Residents' research skills and attitudes toward research improved. The projects resulted in successful presentations to colleagues and submissions to national conferences and peer-reviewed journals. This problem- based approach to research education for family medicine residents is productive and enjoyable.

  5. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Resident Use of iPad Mini Mobile Devices.

    PubMed

    Niehaus, William; Boimbo, Sandra; Akuthota, Venu

    2015-05-01

    Previous research on the use of tablet devices in residency programs has been undertaken in radiology and medicine or with standard-sized tablet devices. With new, smaller tablet devices, there is an opportunity to assess their effect on resident behavior. This prospective study attempts to evaluate resident behavior after receiving a smaller tablet device. To evaluate whether smaller tablet computers facilitate residents' daily tasks. Prospective study that administered surveys to evaluate tablet computer use. Residency program. Thirteen physical medicine and rehabilitation residents. Residents were provided 16-GB iPad Minis and surveyed with Redcap to collect usage information at baseline, 3, and 6 months. Survey analysis was conducted using SAS (SAS, Cary, NC) for descriptive analysis. To evaluate multiple areas of resident education, the following tasks were selected: accessing e-mail, logging duty hours, logging procedures, researching clinical information, accessing medical journals, reviewing didactic presentations, and completing evaluations. Then, measurements were taken of: (1) residents' response to how tablet computers made it easier to access the aforementioned tasks; and (2) residents' response to how tablet computers affected the frequency they performed the aforementioned tasks. After being provided tablet computers, our physical medicine and rehabilitation residents reported significantly greater access to e-mail, medical journals, and didactic material. Also, receiving tablet computers was reported to increase the frequency that residents accessed e-mail, researched clinical information, accessed medical journals, reviewed didactic presentations, and completed evaluations. After receiving a tablet computer, residents reported an increase in the use of calendar programs, note-taking programs, PDF readers, online storage programs, and file organization programs. These physical medicine and rehabilitation residents reported tablet computers

  6. Career interest and perceptions of nephrology: A repeated cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Michael N; Maynard, Sharon; Porter, Ivan; Kincaid, Hope; Jain, Deepika; Aslam, Nabeel

    2017-01-01

    Interest in nephrology careers among internal medicine residents in the United States is declining. Our objective was to assess the impact of the presence of a nephrology fellowship training program on perceptions and career interest in nephrology among internal medicine residents. A secondary objective was to identify commonly endorsed negative perceptions of nephrology among internal medicine residents. This was a repeated cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents before (Group 1) and 3 years after (Group 2) the establishment of nephrology fellowship programs at two institutions. The primary outcome was the percentage of residents indicating nephrology as a career interest in Group 1 vs. Group 2. Secondary outcomes included the frequency that residents agreed with negative statements about nephrology. 131 (80.9%) of 162 residents completed the survey. 19 (14.8%) residents indicated interest in a nephrology career, with 8 (6.3%) indicating nephrology as their first choice. There was no difference in career interest in nephrology between residents who were exposed to nephrology fellows during residency training (Group 2) and residents who were not (Group 1). The most commonly endorsed negative perceptions of nephrology were: nephrology fellows have long hours/burdensome call (36 [28.1%] of residents agreed or strongly agreed), practicing nephrologists must take frequent/difficult call (35 [27.6%] agreed or strongly agreed), and nephrology has few opportunities for procedures (35 [27.3%] agreed or strongly agreed). More residents in Group 2 agreed that nephrology is poorly paid (8.9% in Group 1 vs. 20.8% in Group 2, P = 0.04), whereas more residents in Group 1 agreed that nephrologists must take frequent/difficult call (40.0% in Group 1 vs. 18.1% in Group 2, P = 0.02). The initiation of a nephrology fellowship program was not associated with an increase in internal medicine residents' interest in nephrology careers. Residents endorsed several negative

  7. Source Book of Educational Materials for Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pijar, Mary Lou, Comp.; Lewis, Jeannine T., Comp.

    The contents of this sourcebook of educational materials are divided into the following sections: Anatomy and Physiology; Medical Terminology; Medical Ethics and Department Management; Patient Care and Medical Decision-Making; Basic Nuclear Medicine; Diagnostic in Vivo; Diagnostic in Vitro; Pediatric Nuclear Medicine; Radiation Detection and…

  8. Common uses of nonradioactive drugs in nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Ponto, J.A.; Hladik, W.B.

    1984-06-01

    A variety of nonradioactive pharmaceuticals commonly used in patients who receive nuclear medicine diagnostic tests are described. Nonradioactive drugs used in thyroid, brain, hepatobiliary, cardiac, renal, Meckel's diverticulum, gallium, adrenal, and hematological studies are described. Pharmaceutical necessities used as disinfectants, diluents, and anticoagulants are also described. Hospital pharmacists should be familiar with the uses of commonly prescribed nonradioactive drugs in nuclear medicine studies.

  9. Estimated dose from diagnostic nuclear medicine patients to people outside the Nuclear Medicine department.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Marissa L

    2013-11-01

    Patients undergoing nuclear medicine scans can be a source of radiation exposure for staff, family and the public. In this paper, 12 common nuclear medicine scans are considered. Doses are estimated for a range of scenarios, to hospital staff, to the public and to the patients' co-workers and family. Estimates are based on dose rates measured as patients left the Nuclear Medicine department. Radiopharmaceutical clearance is calculated from biokinetic models described in International Commission on Radiological Protection publications 53, 80 and 106. For all scan types, and all scenarios, doses are estimated to be substantially less than the trigger level of 300 µSv. Within the hospital, Intensive Care Unit staff receive the highest dose (up to 80 µSv) from patients who have had a myocardial scan or a positron emission tomography scan. For out-patients, the highest doses (up to 100 µSv) are associated with travel on public transport (for 4 h) on the same day as the scan.

  10. Teaching adaptive leadership to family medicine residents: what? why? how?

    PubMed

    Eubank, Daniel; Geffken, Dominic; Orzano, John; Ricci, Rocco

    2012-09-01

    Health care reform calls for patient-centered medical homes built around whole person care and healing relationships. Efforts to transform primary care practices and deliver these qualities have been challenging. This study describes one Family Medicine residency's efforts to develop an adaptive leadership curriculum and use coaching as a teaching method to address this challenge. We review literature that describes a parallel between the skills underlying such care and those required for adaptive leadership. We address two questions: What is leadership? Why focus on adaptive leadership? We then present a synthesis of leadership theories as a set of process skills that lead to organization learning through effective work relationships and adaptive leadership. Four models of the learning process needed to acquire such skills are explored. Coaching is proposed as a teaching method useful for going beyond information transfer to create the experiential learning necessary to acquire the process skills. Evaluations of our efforts to date are summarized. We discuss key challenges to implementing such a curriculum and propose that teaching adaptive leadership is feasible but difficult in the current medical education and practice contexts.

  11. Survey of emergency medicine resident debt status and financial planning preparedness.

    PubMed

    Glaspy, Jeffrey N; Ma, O John; Steele, Mark T; Hall, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    Most resident physicians accrue significant financial debt throughout their medical and graduate medical education. The objective of this study was to analyze emergency medicine resident debt status, financial planning actions, and educational experiences for financial planning and debt management. A 22-item questionnaire was sent to all 123 Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education-accredited emergency medicine residency programs in July 2001. Two follow-up mailings were made to increase the response rate. The survey addressed four areas of resident debt and financial planning: 1) accrued debt, 2) moonlighting activity, 3) financial planning/debt management education, and 4) financial planning actions. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Survey responses were obtained from 67.4% (1,707/2,532) of emergency medicine residents in 89 of 123 (72.4%) residency programs. Nearly one half (768/1,707) of respondents have accrued more than 100,000 dollars of debt. Fifty-eight percent (990/1,707) of all residents reported that moonlighting would be necessary to meet their financial needs, and more than 33% (640/1,707) presently moonlight to supplement their income. Nearly one half (832/1,707) of residents actively invested money, of which online trading was the most common method (23.3%). Most residents reported that they received no debt management education during residency (82.1%) or medical school (63.7%). Furthermore, 79.1% (1,351/1,707) of residents reported that they received no financial planning lectures during residency, although 84.2% (1,438/1,707) reported that debt management and financial planning education should be available during residency. Most emergency medicine residency programs do not provide their residents with financial planning education. Most residents have accrued significant debt and believe that more financial planning and debt management education is needed during residency.

  12. Minimizing and communicating radiation risk in pediatric nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Frederic H; Treves, S Ted; Adelstein, S James

    2011-08-01

    The value of pediatric nuclear medicine is well established. Pediatric patients are referred to nuclear medicine from nearly all pediatric specialties including urology, oncology, cardiology, gastroenterology, and orthopedics. Radiation exposure is associated with a potential, small, risk of inducing cancer in the patient later in life and is higher in younger patients. Recently, there has been enhanced interest in exposure to radiation from medical imaging. Thus, it is incumbent on practitioners of pediatric nuclear medicine to have an understanding of dosimetry and radiation risk to communicate effectively with their patients and their families. This article reviews radiation dosimetry for radiopharmaceuticals and also CT given the recent proliferation of PET/CT and SPECT/CT. It also describes the scientific basis for radiation risk estimation in the context of pediatric nuclear medicine. Approaches for effective communication of risk to patients' families are discussed. Lastly, radiation dose reduction in pediatric nuclear medicine is explicated.

  13. Minimizing and communicating radiation risk in pediatric nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Frederic H; Treves, S Ted; Adelstein, S James

    2012-03-01

    The value of pediatric nuclear medicine is well established. Pediatric patients are referred to nuclear medicine from nearly all pediatric specialties including urology, oncology, cardiology, gastroenterology, and orthopedics. Radiation exposure is associated with a potential, small, risk of inducing cancer in the patient later in life and is higher in younger patients. Recently, there has been enhanced interest in exposure to radiation from medical imaging. Thus, it is incumbent on practitioners of pediatric nuclear medicine to have an understanding of dosimetry and radiation risk to communicate effectively with their patients and their families. This article reviews radiation dosimetry for radiopharmaceuticals and also CT given the recent proliferation of PET/CT and SPECT/CT. It also describes the scientific basis for radiation risk estimation in the context of pediatric nuclear medicine. Approaches for effective communication of risk to patients' families are discussed. Lastly, radiation dose reduction in pediatric nuclear medicine is explicated.

  14. Thirty years from now: future physics contributions in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Dale L

    2014-12-01

    This paper is the first in a series of invited perspectives by pioneers of nuclear medicine imaging and physics. A medical physicist and a nuclear medicine physician each take a backward and a forward look at the contributions of physics to nuclear medicine. Here, we provide a forward look from the medical physicist's perspective. The author examines a number of developments in nuclear medicine and discusses the ways in which physics has contributed to these. Future developments are postulated in the context of an increasingly personalised approach to medical diagnostics and therapies. A skill set for the next generation of medical physicists in nuclear medicine is proposed in the context of the increasing complexity of 'Molecular Imaging' in the next three decades. The author sees a shift away from 'traditional' roles in instrumentation QA to more innovative approaches in understanding radiobiology and human disease.

  15. Graphic user interface-based nuclear medicine reporting system.

    PubMed

    Sanger, J J

    1993-03-01

    A graphically based, computerized report generation program has been developed and deployed at a dozen nuclear medicine facilities. The system is based on the Macintosh graphical user interface (GUI) and has been designed to be easy to learn and use. The system allows the nuclear medicine practitioner to generate reports for any nuclear medicine or nuclear cardiology procedure without transcriptionist support, dramatically decreasing report turnaround time. The system includes a relational database engine that allows cost-effective storage and rapid retrieval of final reports and also supports facsimile transmission of reports directly to referring clinicians' offices.

  16. Neurology for internal medicine residents: working towards a national Canadian curriculum consensus.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, Jason; Hopyan, Julia; Panisko, Danny; Tai, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Partly due to the absence of a standardized neurology curriculum, internal medicine residents often perceive neurology lowest in terms of the level of knowledge and clinical confidence. To compare the learning needs of internal medicine residents with the perceived learning needs of neurology and internal medicine program directors and to integrate these needs by developing a focused nationwide neurology curriculum for internal medicine residents rotating through neurology. Medical residents and neurology and internal medicine program directors from programs across the Canada were asked to complete an online survey and to rank an exhaustive list of neurology topics. A modified Delphi approach was used to obtain consensus on the top 20 topics to include in the curriculum. Over 80% of residents felt their competency in neurology was average or below after completing their neurology rotation. There was very high correlation between the topics ranked by residents and staff. We were able to achieve consensus on 20 topics to be included in a neurology curriculum for internal medicine residents. Through a modified Delphi approach we were able to produce a neurology curriculum for internal medicine residents rotating through neurology based on the input of program directors across the country.

  17. Leadership for All: An Internal Medicine Residency Leadership Development Program.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jared M; Wininger, David A; Martin, Bryan

    2016-10-01

    Developing effective leadership skills in physicians is critical for safe patient care. Few residency-based models of leadership training exist. We evaluated residents' readiness to engage in leadership training, feasibility of implementing training for all residents, and residents' acceptance of training. In its fourth year, the Leadership Development Program (LDP) consists of twelve 90-minute modules (eg, Team Decision Making and Bias, Leadership Styles, Authentic Leadership) targeting all categorical postgraduate year (PGY) 1 residents. Modules are taught during regularly scheduled educational time. Focus group surveys and discussions, as well as annual surveys of PGY-1s assessed residents' readiness to engage in training. LDP feasibility was assessed by considering sustainability of program structures and faculty retention, and resident acceptance of training was assessed by measuring attendance, with the attendance goal of 8 of 12 modules. Residents thought leadership training would be valuable if content remained applicable to daily work, and PGY-1 residents expressed high levels of interest in training. The LDP is part of the core educational programming for PGY-1 residents. Except for 2 modules, faculty presenters have remained consistent. During academic year 2014-2015, 45% (13 of 29) of categorical residents participated in at least 8 of 12 modules, and 72% (21 of 29) participated in at least 7 of 12. To date, 125 categorical residents have participated in training. Residents appeared ready to engage in leadership training, and the LDP was feasible to implement. The attendance goal was not met, but attendance was sufficient to justify program continuation.

  18. Competency-Based Medical Education: Can Both Junior Residents and Senior Residents Achieve Competence After a Sports Medicine Training Module?

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Tim; Wright, Sara; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan M; Theodoropoulos, John; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Wasserstein, David; Ringsted, Charlotte; Hodges, Brian; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell

    2015-12-02

    Competency-based medical education as a resident-training format will move postgraduate training away from time-based training, to a model based on observable outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether junior residents and senior residents could demonstrate clinical skills to a similar level, after a sports medicine rotation. All residents undertaking a three-month sports medicine rotation had to pass an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. The stations tested the fundamentals of history-taking, examination, image interpretation, differential diagnosis, informed consent, and clinical decision-making. Performance at each station was assessed with a binary station-specific checklist and an overall global rating scale, in which 1 indicated novice, 2 indicated advanced beginner, 3 indicated competent, 4 indicated proficient, and 5 indicated expert. A global rating scale was also given for each domain of knowledge. Over eighteen months, thirty-nine residents (twenty-one junior residents and eighteen senior residents) and six fellows (for a total of forty-five participants) completed the examination. With regard to junior residents and senior residents, analysis using a two-tailed t test demonstrated a significant difference (p < 0.01) in both total checklist score and overall global rating scale; the mean total checklist score (and standard deviation) was 56.15% ± 10.99% for junior residents and 71.87% ± 8.94% for senior residents, and the mean global rating scale was 2.44 ± 0.55 for junior residents and 3.79 ± 0.49 for senior residents. There was a significant difference between junior residents and senior residents for each knowledge domain, with a significance of p < 0.05 for history-taking and p < 0.01 for the remainder of the domains. Despite intensive teaching within a competency-based medical education model, junior residents were not able to demonstrate knowledge as well as senior residents, suggesting that overall clinical experience

  19. Pulmonary nuclear medicine: Techniques in diagnosis of lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on the application of nuclear medicine to the diagnosis of lung diseases. Topics considered include lung physiology and anatomy, radiopharmaceuticals in pulmonary medicine, pulmonary embolism, obstructive pulmonary disease, diffuse infiltrative lung disease, pneumoconioses, tumor localization scans in primary lung tumors, the interactions of heart diseases and lung diseases on radionuclide tests of lung anatomy and function, radionuclide imaging in pediatric lung diseases, and future possibilities in pulmonary nuclear medicine.

  20. 360-degree feedback: possibilities for assessment of the ACGME core competencies for emergency medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Kevin G; Manifold, Craig

    2002-11-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has challenged residency programs to provide documentation via outcomes assessment that all residents have successfully mastered the six core competencies. A variety of assessment "tools" has been identified by the ACGME for outcomes assessment determination. Although rarely cited in the medical literature, 360-degree feedback is currently in widespread use in the business sector. This tool provides timely, consolidated feedback from sources in the resident's sphere of influence (emergency medicine faculty, emergency medicine residents, off-service residents and faculty, nurses, ancillary personnel, patients, out-of-hospital care providers, and a self-assessment). This is a significant deviation from both the peer review process and the resident review process that almost exclusively use physicians as raters. Because of its relative lack of development, utilization, and validation as a method of resident assessment in graduate medical education, a great opportunity exists to develop the 360-degree feedback tool for resident assessment.

  1. Japanese consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. Part 1: Pediatric radiopharmaceutical administered doses (JSNM pediatric dosage card). Part 2: Technical considerations for pediatric nuclear medicine imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Masaki, Hidekazu; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Okuno, Mitsuo; Oguma, Eiji; Onuma, Hiroshi; Kanegawa, Kimio; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Karasawa, Kensuke; Kitamura, Masayuki; Kida, Tetsuo; Kono, Tatsuo; Kondo, Chisato; Sasaki, Masayuki; Terada, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Teisuke; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Hirono, Keishi; Fujita, Yukihiko; Hoshino, Ken; Yano, Masayuki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2014-06-01

    The Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine has recently published the consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. This article is the English version of the guidelines. Part 1 proposes the dose optimization in pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Part 2 comprehensively discusses imaging techniques for the appropriate conduct of pediatric nuclear medicine procedures, considering the characteristics of imaging in children.

  2. Health Literacy Teaching in U.S. Family Medicine Residency Programs: A National Survey.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Clifford A; Nguyen, Nancy T; Garvin, Roger; Sou, Channbunmorl; Carney, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Health care providers, including medical residents, often lack adequate knowledge and skills to work effectively with patients who have limited health literacy. Little is known about the degree to which medical residents are trained to communicate effectively with people who have limited health literacy. This study aimed to assess the status of health literacy training for physicians in U.S. family medicine residency programs. We conducted an online survey of residency directors at 444 U.S. family medicine residencies. Among 138 respondents (31% response rate), 58 programs (42%) reported teaching residents about health literacy as part of the required curriculum. Most instruction occurred during the 1st year of training. Hours of instruction ranged from 2 to 5 during Years 1 through 3. Skills-based training (e.g., plain language techniques) was taught by most programs. Not having access to a faculty authority on health literacy was strongly associated with lack of a required health literacy curriculum. Respondents overwhelmingly agreed that increasing health literacy training for medical students and residents would help improve residents' clinical skills. This study provides a baseline snapshot of health literacy curricula in U.S. family medicine residencies and likely overestimates the prevalence of such curricula. Additional studies are needed to determine the quality of health literacy instruction in U.S. family medicine residencies and the most effective methods for teaching residents about health literacy.

  3. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  4. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  5. The effect of a primary-care pathway on internal medicine residents' career plans.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, D L; Pozen, J T; Cohen, A S

    1979-08-01

    There has been no evidence that primary-care pathways, a recent innovation in internal medicine residency programs, have affected the career choices of their trainees. We report the experience of the first four cohorts of primary-care trainees in internal medicine compared with traditional-pathway trainees at Boston City Hospital. Primary-care residents remained committed to their plans for a career in general internal medicine throughout training. In contrast, two thirds of the traditionally trained residents who were planning a career in general internal medicine at the beginning of their training changed their plans to subspecialty medicine. Thus, the primary-care pathway reinforced the career plans of trainees in general internal medicine, whereas traditional training influenced potential generalists toward subspecialty medicine.

  6. Adequacy of Training in Preventive Medicine and Public Health: A National Survey of Residency Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, David H.; Salive, Marcel E.

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 797 preventive medicine residency graduates found that improvements are needed in the curricula for health administration, environmental health, health education, and occupational medicine. Women found their training less adequate than men did in all areas except clinical preventive medicine. Graduates tended to practice ultimately in…

  7. Adequacy of Training in Preventive Medicine and Public Health: A National Survey of Residency Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, David H.; Salive, Marcel E.

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 797 preventive medicine residency graduates found that improvements are needed in the curricula for health administration, environmental health, health education, and occupational medicine. Women found their training less adequate than men did in all areas except clinical preventive medicine. Graduates tended to practice ultimately in…

  8. Emergency medicine resident research requirements and director characteristics.

    PubMed

    Blanda, M; Gerson, L W; Dunn, K

    1999-04-01

    To describe emergency medicine (EM) residency program research requirements, characterize research directors (RDs), and describe their research activities and productivity. A survey with questions addressing program research requirements, RDs' background, type of research productivity, time spent, and compensation was mailed to RDs at all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-approved programs. One hundred of 111 (90%) RDs responded; 54 of the 100 respondents were from university programs. Research is a formal requirement in 80% of EM programs. Writing a manuscript (35%) and major involvement in a project (31%) are the most common minimum requirements. University and community programs had similar research requirements and were equally likely to have delayed/withheld certificates. Eighty-six percent of the RDs were male; 70% held this position for <5 years and 70% plan on being in the position for <5 additional years. More than half were junior faculty and 21 had completed a fellowship. Most (88%) did not serve in an associate RD position, and currently only 20 programs reported having this position. Fifty-four percent had protected time. Median hour/week time allocations are: clinical-22, own research--10, other people's research--6, administration--5, and department administration--5. Factors associated with research productivity were senior rank (OR 6.87), having a research assistant (OR 4.78), protected time for their own research (OR 3.06), and reporting that extramural funding was considered in the RD's performance evaluation (OR 2.69). Most programs have established research requirements. Most RDs are junior faculty, have limited research training, expect a short tenure in the position, and have variable access to research resources. EM needs to foster an environment that will enable us to thrive in the academic community and create opportunity for residents to participate in meaningful research. This requires that all RDs have

  9. Use of Team-Based Learning Pedagogy for Internal Medicine Ambulatory Resident Teaching

    PubMed Central

    Balwan, Sandy; Fornari, Alice; DiMarzio, Paola; Verbsky, Jennifer; Pekmezaris, Renee; Stein, Joanna; Chaudhry, Saima

    2015-01-01

    Background Team-based learning (TBL) is used in undergraduate medical education to facilitate higher-order content learning, promote learner engagement and collaboration, and foster positive learner attitudes. There is a paucity of data on the use of TBL in graduate medical education. Our aim was to assess resident engagement, learning, and faculty/resident satisfaction with TBL in internal medicine residency ambulatory education. Methods Survey and nominal group technique methodologies were used to assess learner engagement and faculty/resident satisfaction. We assessed medical learning using individual (IRAT) and group (GRAT) readiness assurance tests. Results Residents (N = 111) involved in TBL sessions reported contributing to group discussions and actively discussing the subject material with other residents. Faculty echoed similar responses, and residents and faculty reported a preference for future teaching sessions to be offered using the TBL pedagogy. The average GRAT score was significantly higher than the average IRAT score by 22%. Feedback from our nominal group technique rank ordered the following TBL strengths by both residents and faculty: (1) interactive format, (2) content of sessions, and (3) competitive nature of sessions. Conclusions We successfully implemented TBL pedagogy in the internal medicine ambulatory residency curriculum, with learning focused on the care of patients in the ambulatory setting. TBL resulted in active resident engagement, facilitated group learning, and increased satisfaction by residents and faculty. To our knowledge this is the first study that implemented a TBL program in an internal medicine residency curriculum. PMID:26692979

  10. Use of Team-Based Learning Pedagogy for Internal Medicine Ambulatory Resident Teaching.

    PubMed

    Balwan, Sandy; Fornari, Alice; DiMarzio, Paola; Verbsky, Jennifer; Pekmezaris, Renee; Stein, Joanna; Chaudhry, Saima

    2015-12-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is used in undergraduate medical education to facilitate higher-order content learning, promote learner engagement and collaboration, and foster positive learner attitudes. There is a paucity of data on the use of TBL in graduate medical education. Our aim was to assess resident engagement, learning, and faculty/resident satisfaction with TBL in internal medicine residency ambulatory education. Survey and nominal group technique methodologies were used to assess learner engagement and faculty/resident satisfaction. We assessed medical learning using individual (IRAT) and group (GRAT) readiness assurance tests. Residents (N = 111) involved in TBL sessions reported contributing to group discussions and actively discussing the subject material with other residents. Faculty echoed similar responses, and residents and faculty reported a preference for future teaching sessions to be offered using the TBL pedagogy. The average GRAT score was significantly higher than the average IRAT score by 22%. Feedback from our nominal group technique rank ordered the following TBL strengths by both residents and faculty: (1) interactive format, (2) content of sessions, and (3) competitive nature of sessions. We successfully implemented TBL pedagogy in the internal medicine ambulatory residency curriculum, with learning focused on the care of patients in the ambulatory setting. TBL resulted in active resident engagement, facilitated group learning, and increased satisfaction by residents and faculty. To our knowledge this is the first study that implemented a TBL program in an internal medicine residency curriculum.

  11. What You Should Know About Pediatric Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Safety

    MedlinePlus

    What You Should Know About Pediatric Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Safety www.imagegently.org What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine uses radioactive isotopes to create pictures of the human body. These pictures ...

  12. Balancing the Roles of a Family Medicine Residency Faculty: A Grounded Theory Study.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Randall; Sudano, Laura; Siler, Anne; Trimble, Kristopher

    2016-05-01

    Great variety exists in the roles that family medicine residency faculty fill in the lives of their residents. A family medicine-specific model has never been created to describe and promote effective training relationships. This research aims to create a consensus model for faculty development, ethics education, and policy creation. Using a modified grounded theory methods, researchers conducted phone interviews with 22 key informants from US family medicine residencies. Data were analyzed to delineate faculty roles, common role conflicts, and ethical principles for avoiding and managing role conflicts. Key informants were asked to apply their experience and preferences to adapt an existing model to fit with family medicine residency settings. The primary result of this research is the creation of a family medicine-specific model that describes faculty roles and provides insight into how to manage role conflicts with residents. Primary faculty roles include Role Model, Advisor, Teacher, Supervisor, and Evaluator. Secondary faculty roles include Friendly Colleague, Wellness Supporter, and Helping Hand. The secondary roles exist on a continuum from disengaged to enmeshed. When not balanced, the secondary roles can detract from the primary roles. Differences were found between role expectations of physician versus behavioral science faculty and larger/university/urban residencies versus smaller/community/rural residencies. Diversity of opinion exists related to the types of roles that are appropriate for family medicine faculty to maintain with residents. This new model is a first attempt to build consensus in the field and has application to faculty development, ethics education, and policy creation.

  13. Nuclear oncology, a fast growing field of nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, Pierre

    2004-07-01

    Nuclear Medicine in oncology has been for a long time synonymous with bone scintigraphy, the first ever whole body imaging modality, and with treatment of thyroid cancer with iodine-131. More recently, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) using peptides such as 111In-labelled octreotide became a reference imaging method in the detection and staging of neuroendocrine tumors while 131I- and 123I-MIBG remain the tracers of reference for pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas. Lymphoscintigraphic imaging based on peritumoral injection of 99mTc-labelled colloids supports, in combination with per operative detection, the procedure of sentinel node identification in breast cancers and melanomas. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is currently experiencing a considerable growth in oncology based on the use of 18F-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), a very sensitive, although non-specific, tumor tracer. Development of instrumentation is crucial in this expansion of PET imaging with new crystals being more sensitive and hybrid imagers that permit to reduce the acquisition time and offer fused PET-CT images. Current developments in therapy can be classified into three categories. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) based on monoclonal antibodies (or fragments) labelled with beta-emitters. This technique has recently made its entrance in clinical practice with a 90Y-labelled anti-CD20 antibody ( 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin ®)) approved in US for the treatment of some subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Radionuclide-bone pain palliation has experienced developments with 153Sm-EDTMP, 186Re-HEDP or 89Sr, efficient in patients with widespread disease. Last, the same peptides, as those used in SRS, are being developed for therapy, labelled with 90Y, 111In or 177Lu in patients who failed to respond to other treatments. Overall, nuclear oncology is currently a fast growing field thanks to the combined developments of radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation.

  14. Weaving public health education into the fabric of a family medicine residency.

    PubMed

    Potts, Stacy E; Deligiannidis, Konstantinos E; Cashman, Suzanne B; Caggiano, Marie E; Carter, Lisa H; Haley, Heather-Lyn; Ferguson, Warren J

    2011-10-01

    Policymakers and accrediting bodies have recognized the importance of integrating public health, population health, and prevention into graduate medical education programs. The high prevalence of chronic illness, coupled with the impact of behavioral and societal determinants of health, necessitate an urgent call for family medicine residencies to prepare future leaders to meet these challenges. The University of Massachusetts Worcester Family Medicine Residency recently developed an integrated curriculum that strives to develop a culture of incorporating fundamental public health principles into everyday practice. This public health curriculum was designed to integrate new topics within the current residency structure through longitudinal and concentrated experiences. This strategy has substantially improved public health and prevention education without substantial impact on the already strained residency curricular structure. This paper describes the integration of public health and prevention education into a family medicine residency to help residents acquire the fundamental skills necessary to improve a population's health.

  15. Communicating With Residents About Risks Following the Fukushima Nuclear Accident.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Michio; Sato, Akiko; Matsui, Shiro; Goto, Aya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Orita, Makiko; Takamura, Noboru; Kuroda, Yujiro; Ochi, Sae

    2017-03-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011 posed major threats to public health. In response, medical professionals have tried to communicate the risks to residents. To investigate forms of risk communication and to share lessons learned, we reviewed medical professionals' activities in Fukushima Prefecture from the prefectural level to the individual level: public communication through Fukushima Health Management Surveys, a Yorozu ("general") health consultation project, communications of radiological conditions and health promotion in Iitate and Kawauchi villages, dialogues based on whole-body counter, and science communications through online media. The activities generally started with radiation risks, mainly through group-based discussions, but gradually shifted to face-to-face communications to address comprehensive health risks to individuals and well-being. The activities were intended to support residents' decisions and to promote public health in a participatory manner. This article highlights the need for a systematic evaluation of ongoing risk communication practices, and a wider application of successful approaches for Fukushima recovery and for better preparedness for future disasters.

  16. How we implemented a resident-led medical simulation curriculum in a large internal medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    Mathai, Susan K; Miloslavsky, Eli M; Contreras-Valdes, Fernando M; Milosh-Zinkus, Tanya; Hayden, Emily M; Gordon, James A; Currier, Paul F

    2014-04-01

    Mannequin-based simulation in graduate medical education has gained widespread acceptance. Its use in non-procedural training within internal medicine (IM) remains scant, possibly due to the logistical barriers to implementation of simulation curricula in large residency programs. We report the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Medicine's scale-up of a voluntary pilot program to a mandatory longitudinal simulation curriculum in a large IM residency program (n = 54). We utilized an eight-case curriculum implemented over the first four months of the academic year. An intensive care unit curriculum was piloted in the spring. In order to administer a comprehensive curriculum in a large residency program where faculty resources are limited, thirty second-year and third-year residents served as session facilitators and two senior residents served as chairpersons of the program. Post-session anonymous survey revealed high learner satisfaction scores for the mandatory program, similar to those of the voluntary pilot program. Most interns believed the sessions should continue to be mandatory. Utilizing residents as volunteer facilitators and program leaders allowed the implementation of a well-received mandatory simulation program in a large IM residency program and facilitated program sustainability.

  17. Assessment of hydrocodone prescribing within a family medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Dosha; Frank, Tom; Dickson, Scott; Deel, Amanda; McGrath, Leslye; Stallings, Joe; Laffoon, Scott; Mackey, Mike; Carter, Skip

    2015-02-01

    Hydrocodone is one of the most frequently prescribed medications in the United States. Chronic users of hydrocodone are high-risk patients who consume valuable time and resources within a Family Medicine Residency Program. A narcotic agreement is a tool to help providers define patient expectations regarding chronic medication use. Objectives of this project were to classify hydrocodone utilizers by frequency of use, determine use of narcotic agreements in chronic users, and evaluate patients' ad- herence to agreement parameters. A report was created for all hydrocodone prescriptions generated between January and June 2013. Patients were classified as acute, episodic or chronic users. Clinic records were reviewed to determine if chronic users had an existing narcotic agreement with the Family Medical Clinic (FMC). Adherence to agreement criteria was assessed by reviewing the Arkansas Prescription Monitoring Program. A total of 371 patients received hydrocodone prescriptions; forty-eight percent (N = 177) were chronic users. Chronic users accounted for 85% (N = 44,693) of the 52,478 hydrocodone units prescribed. Forty-four percent (N = 78) of chronic users had a narcotic agreement; 37% (N = 29) were completely compliant with the terms. The majority of hydrocodone prescribed within our FMC during the study period was for chronic users, most of whom did not have narcotic agreements. A minority of patients with agreements were adherent to all parameters. Identifying chronic utilizers in a timely manner, standardizing implementation of narcotic agreements, and integrating prescription database monitoring into routine care would permit pro- viders to more appropriately manage these high risk patients.

  18. Nuclear medicine imaging and therapy: gender biases in disease.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Valeria M; Aarsvold, John N; Alazraki, Naomi P

    2014-01-01

    Gender-based medicine is medical research and care conducted with conscious consideration of the sex and gender differences of subjects and patients. This issue of Seminars is focused on diseases for which nuclear medicine is part of routine management and for which the diseases have sex- or gender-based differences that affect incidence or pathophysiology and that thus have differences that can potentially affect the results of the relevant nuclear medicine studies. In this first article, we discuss neurologic diseases, certain gastrointestinal conditions, and thyroid conditions. The discussion is in the context of those sex- or gender-based aspects of these diseases that should be considered in the performance, interpretation, and reporting of the relevant nuclear medicine studies. Cardiovascular diseases, gynecologic diseases, bone conditions such as osteoporosis, pediatric occurrences of some diseases, human immunodeficiency virus-related conditions, and the radiation dose considerations of nuclear medicine studies are discussed in the other articles in this issue.

  19. Residents' Expectation of Family Medicine-Specific Training Program and Its Current State

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Jun; Cheong, Yoo Seock; Choi, Eun Young; Baek, Kuk Hyun; Sung, Hwa Yoen; Lee, Hong-Yeon; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Background The family medicine residency program consists mainly of clinical rotations in other specialties and the family medicine-specific training. We conducted this study to investigate how family medicine residents evaluated their training program that include family-oriented medicine, clinical preventive medicine, behavioral science and research in primary care. Methods In 2009, third-year residents of 129 training hospitals in Korea were surveyed to investigate the current state and their expectation of the residency program. The contents of questionnaires included training periods, conferences, procedures, interview techniques, outpatient and inpatient consultations, and written thesis. Results Total 133 out of 142 residents (93.7%) responded that 3 years of training is ideal or pertinent. Residents responded that the types of conference that they need most are journal review (81%), staff lecture (73.2%), and clinical topic review (73.2%), in that order. Procedures and interview techniques that the residents want to learn most were gastroscopy (72.5%), abdominal ultrasonography (65.2%), and pain management (46.4%). Hospitals where family medicine residents do not see hospitalized patients or patients in the outpatient clinic were 7.9% and 6.5%, respectively, whereas hospitals that maintain continuous family medicine outpatient clinics were only 40.8%. Education in outpatient clinic and articlewriting seminars was done less frequently in the secondary hospitals than in the tertiary hospitals. Conclusion Evaluation and quality improvement of family medicine training program as well as specialty rotations should be considered in order to foster better family physicians. The efforts have to be made to minimize the difference in quality of each family medicine residency program. PMID:22745877

  20. Evidence-based medicine among internal medicine residents in a community hospital program using smart phones.

    PubMed

    León, Sergio A; Fontelo, Paul; Green, Linda; Ackerman, Michael; Liu, Fang

    2007-02-21

    This study implemented and evaluated a point-of-care, wireless Internet access using smart phones for information retrieval during daily clinical rounds and academic activities of internal medicine residents in a community hospital. We did the project to assess the feasibility of using smart phones as an alternative to reach online medical resources because we were unable to find previous studies of this type. In addition, we wanted to learn what Web-based information resources internal medicine residents were using and whether providing bedside, real-time access to medical information would be perceived useful for patient care and academic activities. We equipped the medical teams in the hospital wards with smart phones (mobile phone/PDA hybrid devices) to provide immediate access to evidence-based resources developed at the National Library of Medicine as well as to other medical Websites. The emphasis of this project was to measure the convenience and feasibility of real-time access to current medical literature using smart phones. The smart phones provided real-time mobile access to medical literature during daily rounds and clinical activities in the hospital. Physicians found these devices easy to use. A post-study survey showed that the information retrieved was perceived to be useful for patient care and academic activities. In community hospitals and ambulatory clinics without wireless networks where the majority of physicians work, real-time access to current medical literature may be achieved through smart phones. Immediate availability of reliable and updated information obtained from authoritative sources on the Web makes evidence-based practice in a community hospital a reality.

  1. Evidence-based medicine among internal medicine residents in a community hospital program using smart phones

    PubMed Central

    León, Sergio A; Fontelo, Paul; Green, Linda; Ackerman, Michael; Liu, Fang

    2007-01-01

    Background This study implemented and evaluated a point-of-care, wireless Internet access using smart phones for information retrieval during daily clinical rounds and academic activities of internal medicine residents in a community hospital. We did the project to assess the feasibility of using smart phones as an alternative to reach online medical resources because we were unable to find previous studies of this type. In addition, we wanted to learn what Web-based information resources internal medicine residents were using and whether providing bedside, real-time access to medical information would be perceived useful for patient care and academic activities. Methods We equipped the medical teams in the hospital wards with smart phones (mobile phone/PDA hybrid devices) to provide immediate access to evidence-based resources developed at the National Library of Medicine as well as to other medical Websites. The emphasis of this project was to measure the convenience and feasibility of real-time access to current medical literature using smart phones. Results The smart phones provided real-time mobile access to medical literature during daily rounds and clinical activities in the hospital. Physicians found these devices easy to use. A post-study survey showed that the information retrieved was perceived to be useful for patient care and academic activities. Conclusion In community hospitals and ambulatory clinics without wireless networks where the majority of physicians work, real-time access to current medical literature may be achieved through smart phones. Immediate availability of reliable and updated information obtained from authoritative sources on the Web makes evidence-based practice in a community hospital a reality. PMID:17313680

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques in medicine.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, E M; Radda, G K; Allen, P S

    1983-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are now finding exciting new noninvasive applications in medicine. There are two major approaches. The first is as an analytical technique using 31P NMR spectroscopy for the identification and quantitation of the more abundant phosphate metabolites in various tissues. Changes in the levels of these metabolites and in intracellular cytoplasmic pH can be followed in various ischemic and hypoxic conditions to monitor metabolic response to stress situations and to diagnose inborn errors of metabolism. The second major approach is an entirely different application of NMR techniques and uses 1H, the nucleus most abundant in biological tissues, largely in water and fats, to produce NMR images of any section of the body. By applying non-uniform magnetic fields across a section of the body, hydrogen nuclei in different elemental volumes in the section are tagged with different frequencies and their signals can be processed to give an image of the section. In contrast to computed tomographic scanning, NMR has particularly powerful application in the imaging of soft tissues.

  3. Determination of efficacy of nuclear medicine procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Saenger, E.L.; Buncher, C.R.; Specker, B.; McDevitt, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear medicine, a high technology field, is evaluated as to its usefulness. This paper describes the SNM study of 2023 patients comparing two methods evaluating efficacy for lung scanning (LS). Only the referring physicians determined the probabilities of the most important (MI) and most likely (ML) diagnoses and management before and after lung scanning. A logistic regression model was developed for probability of a signout diagnosis of PE. Equal patient groups tested the validity of the regression equations for the probability of PE as MI or ML. The models developed on Group I (G-I) and used on Group II (G-II) gave similar results. This shows that LS classifies PE and NOT PE categories where PE was considered both MI and ML. Entropy minimax pattern detection (EMPD) attempts prediction of signout diagnosis and management from prior patient attributes. In 2023 cases, attributes alone could not eliminate the use of LS for all patients. Comparing the two methods, the predictive values, sensitivity and specificity of each method are similar. EMPD predicts on a relatively small percent (40% before LS, 71% post LS) while the logistic equation predicts on 100% of the cases. An advantage of EMPD is that it does not require estimates of prior probability. However, LR, uses this estimate, thus incorporating intuitive knowledge not evaluated by EMPD. These methods are unique in showing that LS can direct the referring physician toward or away from anticoagulant therapy based on findings of the lung scan.

  4. Congenital Hypothyroidism: Role of Nuclear Medicine.

    PubMed

    Keller-Petrot, Isabelle; Leger, Juliane; Sergent-Alaoui, Aline; de Labriolle-Vaylet, Claire

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid scintigraphy holds a key place in the etiologic workup of neonatal hypothyroidism. Routine screening for this disorder in maternity hospitals in industrialized countries, for nearly 40 years, has permitted early treatment and thereby helped to prevent its physical and mental complications. Neonatal hypothyroidism affects approximately 1 in 3000 births. The most common causes are abnormal thyroid gland development and defective hormone synthesis by an eutopic thyroid gland. The incidence of the latter has risen in recent years, for reasons that remain unclear. A thorough etiologic workup helps to determine the disease type. Current guidelines recommend thyroid imaging by means of ultrasound and scintigraphy. Ultrasound should be done by a practitioner trained to examine the cervical region of newborns, as the thyroid is very small and must be distinguished from the particular aspect of the "thyroid empty lodge." Ultrasound lacks sensitivity for detecting small ectopic glands but is the gold standard for measuring thyroid dimensions. Scintigraphy provides an etiologic diagnosis in most cases. The two isotopes used in this setting are technetium-99m and iodine-123. The latter isotope gives more contrast and allows the perchlorate discharge test to be performed to detect abnormal iodide organification in the neonate with an eutopic thyroid. If scintigraphy cannot be performed during the neonatal period, a postponed procedure can be achieved after 3 years of age. Close cooperation between the nuclear medicine physician and the pediatric endocrinologist is crucial for timely and optimized scintigraphy.

  5. A national survey of residents in combined Internal Medicine and Dermatology residency programs: educational experience and future plans.

    PubMed

    Mostaghimi, Arash; Wanat, Karolyn; Crotty, Bradley H; Rosenbach, Misha

    2015-10-16

    In response to a perceived erosion of medical dermatology, combined internal medicine and dermatology programs (med/derm) programs have been developed that aim to train dermatologists who take care of medically complex patients. Despite the investment in these programs, there is currently no data with regards to the potential impact of these trainees on the dermatology workforce. To determine the experiences, motivations, and future plans of residents in combined med/derm residency programs. We surveyed residents at all United States institutions with both categorical and combined training programs in spring of 2012. Respondents used visual analog scales to rate clinical interests, self-assessed competency, career plans, and challenges. The primary study outcomes were comfort in taking care of patients with complex disease, future practice plans, and experience during residency. Twenty-eight of 31 med/derm residents (87.5%) and 28 of 91 (31%) categorical residents responded (overall response rate 46%). No significant differences were seen in self-assessed dermatology competency, or comfort in performing inpatient consultations, cosmetic procedures, or prescribing systemic agents. A trend toward less comfort in general dermatology was seen among med/derm residents. Med/derm residents were more likely to indicate career preferences for performing inpatient consultation and taking care of medically complex patients. Categorical residents rated their programs and experiences more highly. Med/derm residents have stronger interests in serving medically complex patients. Categorical residents are more likely to have a positive experience during residency. Future work will be needed to ascertain career choices among graduates once data are available.

  6. Community Health Workers and Family Medicine Resident Education: Addressing the Social Determinants of Health.

    PubMed

    McCalmont, Kate; Norris, Jeffrey; Garzon, Agustina; Cisneros, Raquel; Greene, Heather; Regino, Lidia; Sandoval, Virginia; Gomez, Roberto; Page-Reeves, Janet; Kaufman, Arthur

    2016-04-01

    Neither the health care system nor the training of medical residents focus sufficiently on social determinants of health. Community health workers (CHWs) are a growing presence in health care settings. Culturally and linguistically competent, typically they are from underserved communities and spend more time addressing social determinants of health than others on the health care team. However, CHWs are an infrequent presence in resident clinical training environments. The University of New Mexico Family Medicine Residency placed family medicine residents at a community clinic in Albuquerque managed by CHWs, recognizing that CHWs' collaboration with residents would enhance resident competency in multiple domains. Residents gained skills from CHWs in inter-professional teamwork, cultural proficiency in patient care, effective communication, provision of cost-conscious care, and advocating for both individual and community health. Our model recognizes the value of CHW skills and knowledge and creates a powerful rationale for greater recognition of CHW expertise and integration of CHWs as members of the care team.

  7. Using the American Board of Internal Medicine Practice Improvement Modules to Teach Internal Medicine Residents Practice Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Shunk, Rebecca; Dulay, Maya; Julian, Kathy; Cornett, Patricia; Kohlwes, Jeffrey; Tarter, Laura; Hollander, Harry; O'Brien, Bridget; O'Sullivan, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Background Although residency programs must prepare physicians who can analyze and improve their practice, practice improvement (PI) is new for many faculty preceptors. We describe the pilot of a PI curriculum incorporating a practice improvement module (PIM) from the American Board of Internal Medicine for residents and their faculty preceptors. Methods Residents attended PI didactics and completed a PIM during continuity clinic and outpatient months working in groups under committed faculty. Results All residents participated in PI group projects. Residents agreed or strongly agreed that the projects and the curriculum benefited their learning and patient care. A self-assessment revealed significant improvement in PI competencies, but residents were just reaching a “somewhat confident” level. Conclusion A PI curriculum incorporating PIMs is an effective way to teach PI to both residents and faculty preceptors. We recommend the team approach and use of the PIM tutorial approach especially for faculty. PMID:21975892

  8. Undergraduate teaching of nuclear medicine in European universities.

    PubMed

    Lass, Piotr; Scheffler, Justyna

    2003-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of the curricula of undergraduate training in nuclear medicine in 77 European medical departments and, for comparison, in nine departments outside Europe. The data show a high level of variation in the number of hours (0-62) devoted to nuclear medicine in the different departments. In most cases this teaching is integrated into one of the radiology or clinical modules, and in some cases also into training in clinical physiology. The paper discusses the differences in the particular approaches to nuclear medicine teaching.

  9. Recommendations on strengthening the development of nuclear medicine in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-chen

    2009-03-01

    This paper outlines briefly the role of nuclear medicine in life sciences and health care. Molecular imaging by using isotopic tracers can noninvasively visualize the chemistry or hidden process in the cells and tissues inside the body, obtaining "functional" images to provide early information of any disease and revealing the secrets of life. The vitality of nuclear medicine is its ability to translate bench into new clinical application that can benefits the patients. Although nuclear medicine community in China has made significant achievement with a great effort since 1950s, there are many obstacles to future development. Recommended measures are proposed here in an attempt to solve our existing problems.

  10. Training Internal Medicine Residents in Social Medicine and Research-Based Health Advocacy: A Novel, In-Depth Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Basu, Gaurab; Pels, Richard J; Stark, Rachel L; Jain, Priyank; Bor, David H; McCormick, Danny

    2017-04-01

    Health disparities are pervasive worldwide. Physicians have a unique vantage point from which they can observe the ways social, economic, and political factors impact health outcomes and can be effective advocates for enhanced health outcomes and health equity. However, social medicine and health advocacy curricula are uncommon in postgraduate medical education. In academic year (AY) 2012, the Cambridge Health Alliance internal medicine residency program transformed an elective into a required social medicine and research-based health advocacy curriculum. The course has three major innovations: it has a yearlong longitudinal curriculum, it is required for all residents, and all residents complete a group research-based health advocacy project within the curricular year. The authors describe the structure, content, and goals of this curriculum. Over the last four years (AYs 2012-2015), residents (17/32; 53%) have rated the overall quality of the course highly (mean = 5.2, where 6 = outstanding; standard deviation = 0.64). In each year since the new course has been implemented, all scholarly work from the course has been presented at conferences by 31 resident presenters and/or coauthors. The course seems to enhance the residency program's capacity to recruit high-caliber residents and faculty members. The authors are collecting qualitative and quantitative data on the impact of the course. They will use their findings to advocate for a national health advocacy competency framework. Recommendations about how to initiate or further develop social medicine and health advocacy curricula are offered.

  11. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Alexander B; Shea, Sandra; Czeisler, Charles A; Landrigan, Christopher P; Leape, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    Long working hours and sleep deprivation have been a facet of physician training in the US since the advent of the modern residency system. However, the scientific evidence linking fatigue with deficits in human performance, accidents and errors in industries from aeronautics to medicine, nuclear power, and transportation has mounted over the last 40 years. This evidence has also spawned regulations to help ensure public safety across safety-sensitive industries, with the notable exception of medicine. In late 2007, at the behest of the US Congress, the Institute of Medicine embarked on a year-long examination of the scientific evidence linking resident physician sleep deprivation with clinical performance deficits and medical errors. The Institute of Medicine’s report, entitled “Resident duty hours: Enhancing sleep, supervision and safety”, published in January 2009, recommended new limits on resident physician work hours and workload, increased supervision, a heightened focus on resident physician safety, training in structured handovers and quality improvement, more rigorous external oversight of work hours and other aspects of residency training, and the identification of expanded funding sources necessary to implement the recommended reforms successfully and protect the public and resident physicians themselves from preventable harm. Given that resident physicians comprise almost a quarter of all physicians who work in hospitals, and that taxpayers, through Medicare and Medicaid, fund graduate medical education, the public has a deep investment in physician training. Patients expect to receive safe, high-quality care in the nation’s teaching hospitals. Because it is their safety that is at issue, their voices should be central in policy decisions affecting patient safety. It is likewise important to integrate the perspectives of resident physicians, policy makers, and other constituencies in designing new policies. However, since its release

  12. Associations between subspecialty fellowship interest and knowledge of internal medicine: a hypothesis-generating study of internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Ofoma, Uchenna R; Lehman, Erik E; Haidet, Paul; Yacht, Andrew C

    2011-01-31

    Little is known about whether and how medical knowledge relates to interest in subspecialty fellowship training. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between residents' interest in subspecialty fellowship training and their knowledge of internal medicine (IM). A questionnaire was emailed to 48 categorical postgraduate-year (PGY) two and three residents at a New York university-affiliated IM residency program in 2007 using the Survey Monkey online survey instrument. Overall and content area-specific percentile scores from the IM in-training examination (IM-ITE) for the same year was used to determine objective knowledge. Forty-five of 48 residents (response rate was 93.8%) completed the survey. Twenty-two (49%) were PG2 residents and 23(51%) were PGY3 residents. Sixty percent of respondents were male. Six (13%) residents were graduates of U.S. medical schools. Eight (18%) reported formal clinical training prior to starting internal medicine residency in the U.S. Of this latter group, 6 (75%) had training in IM and 6 (75) % reported a training length of 3 years or less. Thirty-seven of 45 (82%) residents had a subspecialty fellowship interest. Residents with a fellowship interest had a greater mean overall objective knowledge percentile score (56.44 vs. 31.67; p = 0.04) as well as greater mean percentile scores in all content areas of IM. The adjusted mean difference was statistically significant (p < 0.02) across three content areas. More than half of surveyed residents indicated interest in pursuing a subspecialty fellowship. Fellowship interest appears positively associated with general medical knowledge in this study population. Further work is needed to explore motivation and study patterns among internal medicine residents.

  13. Training Family Medicine Residents to Perform Home Visits: A CERA Survey.

    PubMed

    Sairenji, Tomoko; Wilson, Stephen A; D'Amico, Frank; Peterson, Lars E

    2017-02-01

    Home visits have been shown to improve quality of care, save money, and improve outcomes. Primary care physicians are in an ideal position to provide these visits; of note, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education no longer requires home visits as a component of family medicine residency training. To investigate changes in home visit numbers and expectations, attitudes, and approaches to training among family medicine residency program directors. This research used the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) national survey of family medicine program directors in 2015. Questions addressed home visit practices, teaching and evaluation methods, common types of patient and visit categories, and barriers. There were 252 responses from 455 possible respondents, representing a response rate of 55%. At most programs, residents performed 2 to 5 home visits by graduation in both 2014 (69% of programs, 174 of 252) and 2015 (68%, 172 of 252). The vast majority (68%, 172 of 252) of program directors expect less than one-third of their graduates to provide home visits after graduation. Scheduling difficulties, lack of faculty time, and lack of resident time were the top 3 barriers to residents performing home visits. There appeared to be no decline in resident-performed home visits in family medicine residencies 1 year after they were no longer required. Family medicine program directors may recognize the value of home visits despite a lack of few formal curricula.

  14. Connecting resident education to patient outcomes: the evolution of a quality improvement curriculum in an internal medicine residency.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad A; Diers, Tiffiny; Schauer, Daniel P; Warm, Eric J

    2014-10-01

    As part of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System, residency programs must connect resident-physician education to improved patient care outcomes. Residency training programs, however, face multiple obstacles in doing so. Results from residency quality improvement (QI) curricula tend to show improvement in simple process-based measures but not in more complex outcomes of care such as diabetes or blood pressure control. In this article, the authors describe the evolution of their QI educational program for internal medicine residents at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center within the structure of a novel training model called the Ambulatory Long Block. They discuss a resident-run project that led to reduced rates of patients with uncontrolled diabetes as an example of improvement in outcome measures. Despite favorable results from that particular resident group, the successful intervention did not spread practice-wide. Using this example, they detail the phases of evolution and lessons learned from their curriculum from 2006 to 2014 within a framework of previously published general principles for successful QI education, including those of exemplary care and learning sites. Successful programs require leadership, faculty expertise and mentorship, data management, learner buy-in, and patient engagement. Their experience will hopefully be of help to others as they attempt to simultaneously improve care and education. Further research and innovation are needed in this area, including optimizing strategies for strengthening resident-driven projects through partnership with nursing, allied health, and longitudinally engaged faculty members.

  15. Perceptions of current and recent military internal medicine residents on operational medicine, managed care, graduate medical education, and continued military service.

    PubMed

    Salerno, S; Cash, B; Cranston, M; Schoomaker, E

    1998-06-01

    Current and recent internal medicine residents were surveyed on their level of confidence in practicing operational medicine, satisfaction with graduate medical education, the impact of TRICARE, the military managed care plan, on their patients and education, and intentions on remaining in uniformed service. Their sentiments were recorded on a five-point Likert scale (1 = strongly agree, 3 = neutral, 5 = strongly disagree). Two hundred twenty-one of the 294 surveys were returned (75.2%). Most physicians felt unprepared to perform duties in a nuclear, biological, or chemical warfare environment, or handle administrative aspects of operational medicine (mean scores, 3.2-3.7). A majority of respondents felt satisfied with the quality of their residency experience (mean score, 1.9). Although more than half of those surveyed (53.6%) listed the opportunity to teach residents as a top factor influencing their retention decision, most felt skeptical that graduate medical education would remain important in the future (mean score, 3.6). Most physicians agreed that restriction of TRICARE to patients less than 65 years old may degrade the quality of military internal medicine residencies (mean score, 1.6). Previous service, Reserve Officer Training Corps experience, and graduation from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences were factors associated with increased physician intention to remain beyond their obligated service. The most common factors inducing physicians to leave the military included frequent deployments, relocations, and financial compensation. Factors cited most frequently as influencing physicians to stay on active duty included high-quality colleagues, opportunities for teaching residents, and freedom from malpractice and office management details.

  16. First-year family medicine residents' use of computers: knowledge, skills and attitudes.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, B H; Ryan, D T; Therrien, S; Mulloy, J V

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the computer knowledge, skills and attitudes of first-year family medicine residents. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey of family medicine residents during the academic year 1993-94; sampling began in July 1993 and ended in October 1993. SETTING: Canada. PARTICIPANTS: All 727 first-year family medicine residents, of whom 433 (60%) responded. OUTCOME MEASURES: Previous computer experience or training, current use, barriers to use, and comfort with and attitudes regarding computers. RESULTS: There was no difference in age or sex between the respondents and all first-year family medicine residents in Canada. French-speaking respondents from Quebec were underrepresented (p < 0.001). Only 56 respondents (13%) felt extremely or very comfortable with computer use. The most commonly cited barriers to obtaining computer training were lack of time (243 respondents [56%]) and the high cost of computers (214 [49%]) but not lack of interest (69 [16%]). Most residents wanted more computer training (367 [85%]) and felt that computer training should be a mandatory component of family medicine training programs (308 [71%]). CONCLUSIONS: Computer knowledge and skills and comfort with computer use appear low among first-year family medicine residents in Canada, and barriers to acquisition of computer knowledge are impressive. Computer training should become an integral part of family medicine training in Canada, and user-friendly applicable computer systems are needed. PMID:7614442

  17. Teaching internal medicine residents to sustain their improvement through the quality assessment and improvement curriculum.

    PubMed

    Oyler, Julie; Vinci, Lisa; Johnson, Julie K; Arora, Vineet M

    2011-02-01

    Although sustainability is a key component in the evaluation of continuous quality improvement (CQI) projects, medicine resident CQI projects are often evaluated by immediate improvements in targeted areas without addressing sustainability. AIM/SETTING: To assess the sustainability of resident CQI projects in an ambulatory university-based clinic. During their ambulatory rotation, all second year internal medicine residents use the American Board of Internal Medicine's Clinical Preventive Services (CPS) Practice Improvement Modules (PIM) to complete chart reviews, patient surveys, and a system survey. The residents then develop a group CQI project and collect early post data. Third year residents return to evaluate their original CQI project during an ambulatory rotation two to six months later and complete four plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycles on each CQI project. From July 2006 to June 2009, 64 (100%) medicine residents completed the CQI curriculum. Residents completed six group projects and examined their success using early (2 to 6 weeks) and late (2 to 6 months) post-intervention data. Three of the projects demonstrated sustainable improvement in the resident continuity clinic. When residents are taught principles of sustainability and spread and asked to complete multiple PDSA cycles, they are able to identify common themes that may contribute to success of QI projects over time.

  18. The Computer Book of the Internal Medicine Resident: competence acquisition and achievement of learning objectives.

    PubMed

    Oristrell, J; Oliva, J C; Casanovas, A; Comet, R; Jordana, R; Navarro, M

    2014-01-01

    The Computer Book of the Internal Medicine resident (CBIMR) is a computer program that was validated to analyze the acquisition of competences in teams of Internal Medicine residents. To analyze the characteristics of the rotations during the Internal Medicine residency and to identify the variables associated with the acquisition of clinical and communication skills, the achievement of learning objectives and resident satisfaction. All residents of our service (n=20) participated in the study during a period of 40 months. The CBIMR consisted of 22 self-assessment questionnaires specific for each rotation, with items on services (clinical workload, disease protocolization, resident responsibilities, learning environment, service organization and teamwork) and items on educational outcomes (acquisition of clinical and communication skills, achievement of learning objectives, overall satisfaction). Associations between services features and learning outcomes were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate analysis. An intense clinical workload, high resident responsibilities and disease protocolization were associated with the acquisition of clinical skills. High clinical competence and teamwork were both associated with better communication skills. Finally, an adequate learning environment was associated with increased clinical competence, the achievement of educational goals and resident satisfaction. Potentially modifiable variables related with the operation of clinical services had a significant impact on the acquisition of clinical and communication skills, the achievement of educational goals, and resident satisfaction during the specialized training in Internal Medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. The U.S. Army Occupational and Environmental Medicine Residency at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland: 1960-1996.

    PubMed

    Gaydos, Joel C; Mallon, Timothy M; Rice, William A

    2016-11-01

    heightened interest in environmental protection and restoration of military installations, and in the threats posed by nuclear, biological and chemical weapons. Additionally, President Reagan initiated a military buildup that brought new health risks to soldiers who would use and maintain modern equipment. Army OEM physicians were required to possess competencies in many areas, to include depots in the Army industrial base, occupational health for the soldier for exposures like carbon monoxide in armored vehicles, military unique exposures like those from chemical threat agents, and environmental medicine to assess health risks on contaminated U.S. military sites and from exposures of deployed forces. These offered interesting OEM training opportunities that challenged residents in the program and helped recruit new residents. The strength of the first Army OEM residency was that it was part of a dynamic cycle that consisted of identifying and defining Army OEM needs, training physicians to meet those needs and assigning residency graduates to positions where they would have a positive impact. This paradigm can be used as the basis for contemporary assessments of the Army's need for uniformed OEM physicians and a uniformed OEM residency program. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. A Low-Cost Nuclear Medicine Acquisition Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goble, John C.

    1986-06-01

    A significant obstacle to the use of local area networks in Nuclear Medicine has been the high cost of computer systems capable of digitizing the analog outputs of conventional gamma cameras. A PC-based Nuclear Image Acquisition Station has been designed using readily available components that permits acquisition, display and transfer of nuclear images. Processing functions, including camera uniformity corrections, image rotation and edge enhancement and other operators Elre available locally. With appropriate file format manipulation, images may alternatively be transferred to a conventional Nuclear Medicine computer for processing and archival storage. Hardware and software costs required to implement these functions on an existing micro are less than $4000.

  1. The development of nuclear medicine in Slovenia and Ljubljana; half a century of nuclear medicine in Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Slavec, Zvonka Zupanic; Gaberscek, Simona; Slavec, Ksenija

    2012-01-01

    Background Nuclear medicine began to be developed in the USA after 1938 when radionuclides were introduced into medicine and in Europe after radionuclides began to be produced at the Harwell reactor (England, 1947). Slovenia began its first investigations in the 1950s. This article describes the development of nuclear medicine in Slovenia and Ljubljana. The first nuclear medicine interventions were performed in Slovenia at the Internal Clinic in Ljubljana in the period 1954–1959. In 1954, Dr Jože Satler started using radioactive iodine for thyroid investigations. In the same year, Dr Bojan Varl, who is considered the pioneer of nuclear medicine in Slovenia, began systematically introducing nuclear medicine. The first radioisotope laboratories were established in January 1960 at the Institute of Oncology and at the Internal Clinic. Under the direction of Dr. Varl, the laboratory at the Internal Clinic developed gradually and in 1973 became the Clinic for Nuclear Medicine with departments for in vivo and in vitro diagnostics and for the treatment of inpatients and outpatients at the thyroid department. The Clinic for Nuclear Medicine became a teaching unit of the Medical Faculty and developed its own post-graduate programme – the first student enrolled in 1972. In the 1960s, radioisotope laboratories opened in the general hospitals of Slovenj Gradec and Celje, and in the 1970s also in Maribor, Izola and Šempeter pri Novi Gorici. Conclusions Nowadays, nuclear medicine units are modernly equipped and the staff is trained in morphological, functional and laboratory diagnostics in clinical medicine. They also work on the treatment of cancer, increased thyroid function and other diseases. PMID:22933984

  2. The development of nuclear medicine in Slovenia and Ljubljana; half a century of nuclear medicine in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Slavec, Zvonka Zupanic; Gaberscek, Simona; Slavec, Ksenija

    2012-03-01

    Nuclear medicine began to be developed in the USA after 1938 when radionuclides were introduced into medicine and in Europe after radionuclides began to be produced at the Harwell reactor (England, 1947). Slovenia began its first investigations in the 1950s. This article describes the development of nuclear medicine in Slovenia and Ljubljana. The first nuclear medicine interventions were performed in Slovenia at the Internal Clinic in Ljubljana in the period 1954-1959. In 1954, Dr Jože Satler started using radioactive iodine for thyroid investigations. In the same year, Dr Bojan Varl, who is considered the pioneer of nuclear medicine in Slovenia, began systematically introducing nuclear medicine. The first radioisotope laboratories were established in January 1960 at the Institute of Oncology and at the Internal Clinic. Under the direction of Dr. Varl, the laboratory at the Internal Clinic developed gradually and in 1973 became the Clinic for Nuclear Medicine with departments for in vivo and in vitro diagnostics and for the treatment of inpatients and outpatients at the thyroid department. The Clinic for Nuclear Medicine became a teaching unit of the Medical Faculty and developed its own post-graduate programme - the first student enrolled in 1972. In the 1960s, radioisotope laboratories opened in the general hospitals of Slovenj Gradec and Celje, and in the 1970s also in Maribor, Izola and Šempeter pri Novi Gorici. Nowadays, nuclear medicine units are modernly equipped and the staff is trained in morphological, functional and laboratory diagnostics in clinical medicine. They also work on the treatment of cancer, increased thyroid function and other diseases.

  3. Maintaining a Twitter Feed to Advance an Internal Medicine Residency Program's Educational Mission.

    PubMed

    Bergl, Paul A; Narang, Akhil; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-07-10

    Residency programs face many challenges in educating learners. The millennial generation's learning preferences also force us to reconsider how to reach physicians in training. Social media is emerging as a viable tool for advancing curricula in graduate medical education. The authors sought to understand how social media enhances a residency program's educational mission. While chief residents in the 2013-2014 academic year, two of the authors (PB, AN) maintained a Twitter feed for their academic internal medicine residency program. Participants included the chief residents and categorical internal medicine house staff. At the year's end, the authors surveyed residents about uses and attitudes toward this initiative. Residents generally found the chief residents' tweets informative, and most residents (42/61, 69%) agreed that Twitter enhanced their overall education in residency. Data from this single-site intervention corroborate that Twitter can strengthen a residency program's educational mission. The program's robust following on Twitter outside of the home program also suggests a need for wider adoption of social media in graduate medical education. Improved use of data analytics and dissemination of these practices to other programs would lend additional insight into social media's role in improving residents' educational experiences.

  4. Residency: Can It Transform Teaching the Way It Did Medicine?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorpe, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Universal teacher residency would benefit the teaching profession and ultimately the education of our children. We have yet to work out the fine details, but there is nothing more important than developing robust residency schools where young educators go between their undergraduate preparation and their arrival in the classroom as autonomous…

  5. Residency: Can It Transform Teaching the Way It Did Medicine?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorpe, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Universal teacher residency would benefit the teaching profession and ultimately the education of our children. We have yet to work out the fine details, but there is nothing more important than developing robust residency schools where young educators go between their undergraduate preparation and their arrival in the classroom as autonomous…

  6. Continuing medical education: interests of former and current residents of a physical medicine and rehabilitation residency program.

    PubMed

    Hart, K A; Kevorkian, G; Rintala, D H

    1999-01-01

    To plan targeted, relevant continuing medical educational activities, a study was undertaken to assess demographic data, practice patterns, and current continuing medical educational needs of former graduates of the physical medicine and rehabilitation program. A survey was sent to the 168 physicians who had completed a physical medicine and rehabilitation residency program from 1961 to 1995 and to the 34 then current residents in the program. Questions were asked regarding gender, year of completion of residency, certification, fellowships, current employment situation, size of practice community, work time distribution, and busiest areas of clinical practice. In addition, from a list of 47 topics plus "other," the respondents indicated in which topics they had a current strong interest in continuing their education. They also responded to questions about their most important considerations when deliberating about attending an educational activity, the amount of notice required regarding an upcoming course, and the preferred duration of educational activities. The response rate of former residents was 56% and of then current residents was 100%. Topics of interest to greater than half of the respondents, in descending order, were musculoskeletal/soft tissue disorders, therapeutic injections/nerve blocks, industrial medicine, back and neck pain rehabilitation, and sports-related disorders. There were significant differences on some topics based on gender, year of residency completion, academic affiliation, private practice, and ratings of residency training in that topic. The most important consideration when deciding whether to attend an educational activity was, by far, interest in topic, followed by provision of continuing medical educational credits. There are among physiatrists several differences in educational interests that challenge continuing medical education planners to determine efficient, effective ways to deliver continuing medical education to meet

  7. Osteoporosis: radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, B N

    1987-01-01

    A number of radiographic and nuclear medicine techniques are available for the assessment of patients suspected of having osteoporosis or at risk for the development of osteoporosis. Spinal radiographs are insensitive indicators of osteoporosis. They can document the presence of metastatic tumors or other lesions that may produce compression fracture. The Singh index assesses the trabecular pattern of the proximal femur. As bone loss occurs, the trabeculae disappear in a definite sequence. Radiogrammetry refers to the measurement of bone and cortical widths in the peripheral skeleton, usually the second metacarpal. The method is low cost and most useful for population studies. It does not reflect early osteoporosis. Photodensitometry entails radiography of a part of a bone with inclusion of a standard reference wedge on the radiograph. The density of the bone is compared with the wedge. In some laboratories, precision is good (1.5 percent) and the radiation dose is low. Peripheral cortical bone is measured primarily, which is a disadvantage. Single photon absorptiometry uses the transmission of 27.5 keV photons emitted from an iodine-125 source to assess bone density. In most instances, measurements of the radial shaft are made, which reflect primarily cortical bone rather than the more reactive trabecular bone. The distal end of the radius and the calcaneus may also be measured; these areas contain primarily trabecular bone. Radiation dose is low (less than 10 mrad), but when cortical bone is evaluated, the results correlate poorly with spinal bone mineral. Thus, the test is an insensitive indicator of spinal osteoporosis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3120210

  8. Psychosomatic Medicine for Non-Psychiatric Residents: Video Education and Incorporation of Technology.

    PubMed

    Saunders, J; Gopalan, P; Puri, N; Azzam, P N; Zhou, L; Ghinassi, F; Jain, A; Travis, M; Ryan, N D

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric education for non-psychiatric residents varies between training programs, and may affect resident comfort with psychiatric topics. This study's goals were to identify non-psychiatric residents' comfort with psychiatric topics and to test the effectiveness of a video intervention. Residents in various departments were given a survey. They were asked to rank their comfort level with multiple psychiatric topics, answer questions about medical decision making capacity (MDMC), watch a 15-min video about MDMC, and answer a post-test section. In total, 91 Internal Medicine, General Surgery, and Obstetrics and Gynecology residents responded to the study. Of the 91 residents, 55 completed the pre- and post-test assessments. There was no significant difference in correct responses. Residents' comfort levels were assessed, and a significant improvement in comfort level with MDMC was found. This study highlights potential opportunities for psychiatric education, and suggests brief video interventions can increase resident physicians' comfort with a psychiatric topic.

  9. Can internal medicine residents master microscopic urinalysis? Results of an evaluation and teaching intervention.

    PubMed

    Canaris, Gay J; Flach, Stephen D; Tape, Thomas G; Stierwalt, Kathyrn M; Haggstrom, David A; Wigton, Robert S

    2003-05-01

    Although microscopic urinalysis (micro UA) is commonly used in clinical practice, and residents are trained in micro UA, proficiency in this procedure has not been studied. In 1996-97, 38 residents in the University of Nebraska Medical Center's internal medicine (IM) residency program were evaluated on their technical ability to perform micro UA, and on their cognitive skills in recognizing common micro UA findings. After identifying deficits in the residents' cognitive competency, two educational interventions were applied and residents were tested after each intervention. A total of 24 residents (63%) correctly prepared the specimen for analysis (the technical portion). On the cognitive portion, only one of the 38 residents correctly identified 80% of all micro UA findings in the urinary sediment, although 11 (29%) residents identified UA findings specific to urinary tract infection (UTI). The first educational intervention did little to improve residents' performance. A second more intensive intervention resulted in 10 (45%) residents identifying 80% of all micro UA findings, and 19 (86%) residents correctly identifying UTI findings. Many residents were not proficient in performing micro UA, even after intensive educational interventions. Although micro UA is a simple procedure, residents' mastery cannot be assumed. Residency programs should assess competency in this procedure.

  10. A National CERA Study of the Use of Laborists in Family Medicine Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Baldor, Robert A; Pecci, Christine Chang; Moreno, Gerardo; Van Duyne, Virginia; Potts, Stacy E

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about the impact of laborists (which we defined as "clinicians dedicated to providing L&D care services in the hospital environment for pregnant patients, regardless of who provided the prenatal care" for this survey) on family medicine residency training. We surveyed family medicine residency directors to assess characteristics about laborist services and their involvement in family medicine residency teaching. Questions were included in the 2015 Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) survey of family medicine residency directors. Univariate statistics were used to describe programs, directors, and our questions on the use of laborists. Chi-square tests and Student's t tests were used to evaluate bivariate relationships using a P<.05 to denote statistical significance. A total of 250/473 (52.9%) of residency directors completed the laborist section of the CERA survey. Sixty-four percent of residency programs were community based/university affiliated, representing the expected range, size, and location of family medicine programs. Almost half of programs (44.4%) reported a laborist service in their main teaching hospital for L&D training. Of directors, 64.1 % viewed laborists as good/excellent educators; 54.3% reported little or no reduction in L&D teaching required of their faculty despite the presence of a laborist service. Fifteen percent reported that >30% of their graduates included L&D care in their first practice.. Laborists have an important role in family medicine resident obstetrics training and education. More research is needed to explore how laborists and family medicine faculty can collaborate to promote enhanced efficiency and effectiveness as residency teachers.

  11. A laboratory medicine residency training program that includes clinical consultation and research.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, E D; Pierce, G F; McDonald, J M

    1990-04-01

    We describe a laboratory medicine residency training program that includes ongoing interaction with both clinical laboratories and clinical services as well as significant research experience. Laboratory medicine residents serve as on-call consultants in the interpretation of test results, design of testing strategies, and assurance of test quality. The consultative on-call beeper system was evaluated and is presented as an effective method of clinical pathology training that is well accepted by the clinical staff. The research component of the residency program is also described. Together, these components provide training in real-time clinical problem solving and prepare residents for the changing technological environment of the clinical laboratory. At the completion of the residency, the majority of the residents are qualified laboratory subspecialists and are also capable of running an independent research program.

  12. Are All Competencies Equal in the Eyes of Residents? A Multicenter Study of Emergency Medicine Residents' Interest in Feedback.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Suzanne; Hu, Kevin; Messman, Anne; Moadel, Tiffany; Khandelwal, Sorabh; Streich, Heather; Noelker, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Feedback, particularly real-time feedback, is critical to resident education. The emergency medicine (EM) milestones were developed in 2012 to enhance resident assessment, and many programs use them to provide focused resident feedback. The purpose of this study was to evaluate EM residents' level of interest in receiving real-time feedback on each of the 23 competencies/sub-competencies. This was a multicenter cross-sectional study of EM residents. We surveyed participants on their level of interest in receiving real-time on-shift feedback on each of the 23 competencies/sub-competencies. Anonymous paper or computerized surveys were distributed to residents at three four-year training programs and three three-year training programs with a total of 223 resident respondents. Residents rated their level of interest in each milestone on a six-point Likert-type response scale. We calculated average level of interest for each of the 23 sub-competencies, for all 223 respondents and separately by postgraduate year (PGY) levels of training. One-way analyses of variance were performed to determine if there were differences in ratings by level of training. The overall survey response rate across all institutions was 82%. Emergency stabilization had the highest mean rating (5.47/6), while technology had the lowest rating (3.24/6). However, we observed no differences between levels of training on any of the 23 competencies/sub-competencies. Residents seem to ascribe much more value in receiving feedback on domains involving high-risk, challenging procedural skills as compared to low-risk technical and communication skills. Further studies are necessary to determine whether residents' perceived importance of competencies/sub-competencies needs to be considered when developing an assessment or feedback program based on these 23 EM competencies/sub-competencies.

  13. Diagnostic Services and Communication Protocols for Remote Nuclear Medicine Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Herbig, F.K.; Daly, J.L.; Gooch, N.E.; Donati, R.M.; Fletcher, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    A telecommunications system has been designed and implemented which provides diagnostic services to nuclear medicine laboratories established in smaller primary care medical facilities. These remote laboratories are located in areas where nuclear medicine patient services were not previously available because of the lack of trained nuclear physicians. The system provides through the use of computerized data acquisition and telephone data communication capability all routine and specialized imaging procedures with a degree of quality and sophistication normally available only in large urban medical centers. Nuclear image data acquired remotely is transmitted to Saint Louis, Missouri for interpretation by specialists in the Nuclear Medicine Service of the Veterans Administration Medical Center. The functions of hardware and software protocols necessary to assure the correctness and completeness of transmitted data are presented together with essential data descriptors for identification and format.

  14. Nuclear medicine and radionuclide imaging: a survey of recruitment issues in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Gray, H W; Prvulovich, E; Nunan, T

    2003-04-01

    This wide ranging survey has highlighted difficulties in recruiting trained and committed individuals into nuclear medicine and radionuclide radiology. Several key factors have been recognised that reduce the attractiveness of the training. Recommendations include the rotation of medical senior house officers through nuclear medicine, reconsideration of dual accreditation in nuclear medicine and medicine, an increase in the number of consultant posts in nuclear medicine, parity of remuneration for nuclear medicine trainees and finally, an appropriate sessional provision for those providing radionuclide radiology services.

  15. Assessing the New Competencies for Resident Education: A Model from an Emergency Medicine Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisdorff, Earl J.; Hayes, Oliver W.; Carlson, Dale J.; Walker, Gregory L.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the experience of Michigan State University's emergency medicine residency program, proposes a practical method for modifying an existing student evaluation format. The model provides a template other programs could use in assessing residents' acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes reflected in the six general competencies…

  16. Acting as Standardized Patients Enhances Family Medicine Residents' Self-Reported Skills in Palliative Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittikariyakul, Pat; Jaturapatporn, Darin; Kirshen, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent publications have confirmed the use of standardized patients (SPs) in improving clinical skills and enhancing competency. Little research has studied the benefits residents may themselves gain in palliative care playing the role of SPs. Nineteen Family Medicine residents were recruited as standardized patients (FMR-SPs) for a mandatory…

  17. Personalized peer-comparison feedback and its effect on emergency medicine resident ultrasound scan numbers.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Dorothea; Pivetta, Emanuele; Kimberly, Heidi H

    2014-01-14

    Clinician-performed ultrasound has become a widely utilized tool in emergency medicine and is a mandatory component of the residency curricula. We aimed to assess the effect of personalized peer-comparison feedback on the number of ultrasound scans performed by emergency medicine residents. A personalized peer-comparison feedback was performed by sending 44 emergency medicine residents a document including personally identified scan numbers and class averages. The number of ultrasound scans per clinical shift for a 3-month period before and after the feedback intervention was calculated. The average number of ultrasound exams per shift improved from 0.39 scans/shift before to 0.61 scans/shift after feedback (p = 0.04). Among the second year residents, the scans/shift ratio improved from 0.35 to 0.87 (p = 0.07); for third year residents, from 0.51 to 0.58 (p = 0.46); and from 0.33 to 0.41 (p = 0.21) for the fourth year residents before and after the intervention, respectively. A personalized peer-comparison feedback provided to emergency medicine residents resulted in increased ultrasound scan numbers per clinical shift. Incorporating this method of feedback may help encourage residents to scan more frequently.

  18. Multi-Source Evaluation of Interpersonal and Communication Skills of Family Medicine Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Kai-Kuen; Wang, Wei-Dan; Chen, Yen-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of information on the use of multi-source evaluation to assess trainees' interpersonal and communication skills in Oriental settings. This study is conducted to assess the reliability and applicability of assessing the interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents by patients, peer residents, nurses, and…

  19. Multi-Source Evaluation of Interpersonal and Communication Skills of Family Medicine Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Kai-Kuen; Wang, Wei-Dan; Chen, Yen-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of information on the use of multi-source evaluation to assess trainees' interpersonal and communication skills in Oriental settings. This study is conducted to assess the reliability and applicability of assessing the interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents by patients, peer residents, nurses, and…

  20. Acting as Standardized Patients Enhances Family Medicine Residents' Self-Reported Skills in Palliative Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittikariyakul, Pat; Jaturapatporn, Darin; Kirshen, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent publications have confirmed the use of standardized patients (SPs) in improving clinical skills and enhancing competency. Little research has studied the benefits residents may themselves gain in palliative care playing the role of SPs. Nineteen Family Medicine residents were recruited as standardized patients (FMR-SPs) for a mandatory…

  1. History and Perspectives of Nuclear Medicine in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Raihan

    2016-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of the smaller states in Asia. But it has a long and rich history of nuclear medicine for over sixty years. The progress in science and technology is always challenging in a developing country. In 1958, work for the first Nuclear Medicine facility was commenced in Dhaka in a tin-shed known as 'Radioisotope Centre' and was officially inaugurated in 1962. Since the late 50s of the last century nuclear medicine in Bangladesh has significantly progressed through the years in its course of development, but still the facilities are inadequate. At present there are 20 nuclear medicine establishments with 3 PET-CTs, 42 gamma camera/SPECTs with 95 physicians, 20 physicists, 10 radiochemists and 150 technologists. The Society of Nuclear Medicine, Bangladesh (SNMB) was formed in 1993 and publishing its official journal since 1997. Bangladesh also has close relationships with many international organizations like IAEA, ARCCNM, AOFNMB, ASNM, WFNMB and WARMTH. The history and the present scenario of the status of nuclear medicine in Bangladesh are being described here.

  2. Radiation safety audit of a high volume Nuclear Medicine Department.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ashish Kumar; Singh, Abhijith Mohan; Shetye, Bhakti; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu Chandrakant; Monteiro, Priya; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2014-10-01

    Professional radiation exposure cannot be avoided in nuclear medicine practices. It can only be minimized up to some extent by implementing good work practices. The aim of our study was to audit the professional radiation exposure and exposure rate of radiation worker working in and around Department of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, Tata Memorial Hospital. We calculated the total number of nuclear medicine and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) procedures performed in our department and the radiation exposure to the radiation professionals from year 2009 to 2012. We performed an average of 6478 PET/CT scans and 3856 nuclear medicine scans/year from January 2009 to December 2012. The average annual whole body radiation exposure to nuclear medicine physician, technologist and nursing staff are 1.74 mSv, 2.93 mSv and 4.03 mSv respectively. Efficient management and deployment of personnel is of utmost importance to optimize radiation exposure in a high volume nuclear medicine setup in order to work without anxiety of high radiation exposure.

  3. History and Perspectives of Nuclear Medicine in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Raihan

    2016-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of the smaller states in Asia. But it has a long and rich history of nuclear medicine for over sixty years. The progress in science and technology is always challenging in a developing country. In 1958, work for the first Nuclear Medicine facility was commenced in Dhaka in a tin-shed known as ‘Radioisotope Centre’ and was officially inaugurated in 1962. Since the late 50s of the last century nuclear medicine in Bangladesh has significantly progressed through the years in its course of development, but still the facilities are inadequate. At present there are 20 nuclear medicine establishments with 3 PET-CTs, 42 gamma camera/SPECTs with 95 physicians, 20 physicists, 10 radiochemists and 150 technologists. The Society of Nuclear Medicine, Bangladesh (SNMB) was formed in 1993 and publishing its official journal since 1997. Bangladesh also has close relationships with many international organizations like IAEA, ARCCNM, AOFNMB, ASNM, WFNMB and WARMTH. The history and the present scenario of the status of nuclear medicine in Bangladesh are being described here. PMID:27904875

  4. Nuclear medicine in the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Treves, S Ted; Baker, Amanda; Fahey, Frederic H; Cao, Xinhua; Davis, Royal T; Drubach, Laura A; Grant, Frederick D; Zukotynski, Katherine

    2011-06-01

    Nuclear medicine has an important role in the care of newborns and children less than 1 y old. Patients in this age group present with a spectrum of diseases different from those of older children or adults. These patients can benefit from the full range of nuclear medicine studies. In these young children, nuclear medicine studies are more likely to be used to evaluate a wide range of congenital conditions but also can be helpful for evaluating acquired conditions such as infection, cancer, and trauma. This review first will cover the general aspects of nuclear medicine practice with these patients, including the special considerations that can help achieve successful diagnostic imaging. These topics will include clinical indications, imaging technology, instrumentation, software, positioning and immobilization, sedation, local and general anesthesia, radiopharmaceutical doses, radiation risk, and dose reduction. The review then will discuss the specific nuclear medicine studies that typically are obtained in patients in this age group. With extra care and attention to the special needs of this population, nuclear medicine departments can successfully study patients less than 1 y old.

  5. Radiation safety audit of a high volume Nuclear Medicine Department

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Ashish Kumar; Singh, Abhijith Mohan; Shetye, Bhakti; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu Chandrakant; Monteiro, Priya; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Professional radiation exposure cannot be avoided in nuclear medicine practices. It can only be minimized up to some extent by implementing good work practices. Aim and Objectives: The aim of our study was to audit the professional radiation exposure and exposure rate of radiation worker working in and around Department of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, Tata Memorial Hospital. Materials and Methods: We calculated the total number of nuclear medicine and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) procedures performed in our department and the radiation exposure to the radiation professionals from year 2009 to 2012. Results: We performed an average of 6478 PET/CT scans and 3856 nuclear medicine scans/year from January 2009 to December 2012. The average annual whole body radiation exposure to nuclear medicine physician, technologist and nursing staff are 1.74 mSv, 2.93 mSv and 4.03 mSv respectively. Conclusion: Efficient management and deployment of personnel is of utmost importance to optimize radiation exposure in a high volume nuclear medicine setup in order to work without anxiety of high radiation exposure. PMID:25400361

  6. Impact of the Primary Care Exception on Family Medicine Resident Coding.

    PubMed

    Cawse-Lucas, Jeanne; Evans, David V; Ruiz, David R; Allcut, Elizabeth A; Andrilla, C Holly A; Thompson, Matthew; Norris, Thomas E

    2016-03-01

    The Medicare Primary Care Exception (PCE) allows residents to see and bill for less-complex patients independently in the primary care setting, requiring attending physicians only to see patients for higher-level visits and complete physical exams in order to bill for them as such. Primary care residencies apply the PCE in various ways. We investigated the impact of the PCE on resident coding practices. Family medicine residency directors in a five-state region completed a survey regarding interpretation and application of the PCE, including the number of established patient evaluation and management codes entered by residents and attending faculty at their institution. The percentage of high-level codes was compared between residencies using chi-square tests. We analyzed coding data for 125,016 visits from 337 residents and 172 faculty physicians in 15 of 18 eligible family medicine residencies. Among programs applying the PCE criteria to all patients, residents billed 86.7% low-mid complexity and 13.3% high-complexity visits. In programs that only applied the PCE to Medicare patients, residents billed 74.9% low-mid complexity visits and 25.2% high-complexity visits. Attending physicians coded more high-complexity visits at both types of programs. The estimated revenue loss over the 1,650 RRC-required outpatient visits was $2,558.66 per resident and $57,569.85 per year for the average residency in our sample. Residents at family medicine programs that apply the PCE to all patients bill significantly fewer high-complexity visits. This finding leads to compliance and regulatory concerns and suggests significant revenue loss. Further study is required to determine whether this discrepancy also reflects inaccuracy in coding.

  7. Applications of CdTe to nuclear medicine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Entine, G.

    1985-05-07

    Uses of cadmium telluride (CdTe) nuclear detectors in medicine are briefly described. They include surgical probes and a system for measuring cerebral blood flow in the intensive care unit. Other uses include nuclear dentistry, x-ray exposure control, cardiology, diabetes, and the testing of new pharmaceuticals. (ACR)

  8. Nuclear medicine imaging of bone infections.

    PubMed

    Love, C; Palestro, C J

    2016-07-01

    Osteomyelitis is a broad group of infectious diseases that involve the bone and/or bone marrow. It can arise haematogenously, via extension from a contiguous infection, or by direct inoculation during surgery or trauma. The diagnosis is not always obvious and imaging tests are frequently performed as part of the diagnostic work-up. Commonly performed radionuclide tests include technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-diphosphonate bone scintigraphy (bone), and gallium-67 ((67)Ga) and in vitro labelled leukocyte (white blood cell; WBC) imaging. Although they are useful, each of these tests has limitations. Bone scintigraphy is sensitive but not specific, especially when underlying osseous abnormalities are present. (67)Ga accumulates in tumour, trauma, and in aseptic inflammation; furthermore, there is typically an interval of 1-3 days between radiopharmaceutical injection of and imaging. Currently, this agent is used primarily for spinal infections. Except for the spine, WBC imaging is the nuclear medicine test of choice for diagnosing complicating osteomyelitis. The in vitro leukocyte labelling process requires skilled personnel, is laborious, and is not always available. Complementary marrow imaging is usually required to maximise accuracy. Not surprisingly, alternative radiopharmaceuticals are continuously being investigated. Radiolabelled anti-granulocyte antibodies and antibody fragments, investigated as in vivo leukocyte labelling agents, have their own limitations and are not widely available. (111)In-biotin is useful for diagnosing spinal infections. Radiolabelled synthetic fragments of ubiquicidin, a naturally occurring human antimicrobial peptide that targets bacteria, have shown promise as infection specific radiopharmaceuticals. 2-[(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) with or without computed tomography (CT) is very useful in musculoskeletal infection. Sensitivities of more than 95% and specificities ranging from 75-99% have been

  9. Nuclear weapons and medicine: some ethical dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Haines, A; de B White, C; Gleisner, J

    1983-12-01

    The enormous destructive power of present stocks of nuclear weapons poses the greatest threat to public health in human history. Technical changes in weapons design are leading to an increased emphasis on the ability to fight a nuclear war, eroding the concept of deterrence based on mutually assured destruction and increasing the risk of nuclear war. Medical planning and civil defence preparations for nuclear war have recently been increased in several countries although there is little evidence that they will be of significant value in the aftermath of a nuclear conflict. These developments have raised new ethical dilemmas for those in health professions. If there is any risk of use of weapons of mass destruction, then support for deterrence with these weapons as a policy for national or global security appears to be incompatible with basic principles of medical ethics and international law. The primary medical responsibility under such circumstances is to participate in attempts to prevent nuclear war.

  10. Nuclear weapons and medicine: some ethical dilemmas.

    PubMed Central

    Haines, A; de B White, C; Gleisner, J

    1983-01-01

    The enormous destructive power of present stocks of nuclear weapons poses the greatest threat to public health in human history. Technical changes in weapons design are leading to an increased emphasis on the ability to fight a nuclear war, eroding the concept of deterrence based on mutually assured destruction and increasing the risk of nuclear war. Medical planning and civil defence preparations for nuclear war have recently been increased in several countries although there is little evidence that they will be of significant value in the aftermath of a nuclear conflict. These developments have raised new ethical dilemmas for those in health professions. If there is any risk of use of weapons of mass destruction, then support for deterrence with these weapons as a policy for national or global security appears to be incompatible with basic principles of medical ethics and international law. The primary medical responsibility under such circumstances is to participate in attempts to prevent nuclear war. PMID:6668585

  11. Attitudes about Cancer Medicine among Primary Care Residents and Their Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Richard R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    A cancer attitude survey is analyzed that was administered to residents and faculty physicians in the departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Human Oncology at the University of Wisconsin. Categories surveyed include opinions about the benefits of prevention, risk management, early detection and screening, treatment and care, and…

  12. Attitudes about Cancer Medicine among Primary Care Residents and Their Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Richard R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    A cancer attitude survey is analyzed that was administered to residents and faculty physicians in the departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Human Oncology at the University of Wisconsin. Categories surveyed include opinions about the benefits of prevention, risk management, early detection and screening, treatment and care, and…

  13. Out of the wilderness: flipping the classroom to advance scholarship in an internal medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Dale S

    2014-11-01

    Residents in an internal medicine residency program "flipped the classroom" in a series of learner-centered activities which included the creation of a medical student interest group, a continuing medical education symposium, and a journal supplement focused on wilderness medicine topics in Hawai'i and Asia Pacific. The project encompassed both scholarly activities (discovery, integration, application, and teaching) as well as scholarship (writing for publication). The project advanced the professional formation of residents by developing competencies and producing outcomes that are key features of the ACGME Next Accreditation System.

  14. The effect of simulation training on PALS skills among family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Gerard, James M; Thomas, Scott M; Germino, Kevin W; Street, Megan H; Burch, Wesley; Scalzo, Anthony J

    2011-06-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires that family medicine residents receive structured skills training on pediatric advanced life support (PALS) and should learn procedures for medical emergencies in patients of all ages. Traditional methods of training family medicine residents in PALS is challenging given their limited clinical exposure to critically ill patients. The primary objective of this study was to assess the effect of a 2-hour PALS training session utilizing high-fidelity mannequins on residents' psychomotor skills performances. Between February and June 2009, residents from two urban family medicine residency programs received training on four PALS procedures (bag-mask ventilation, tracheal intubation, intraosseous line placement, and cardiac rhythm assessment/defibrillation) at a university simulation center. Residents completed questionnaires to provide data on previous resuscitation training and experience. We collected self-confidence data and video recordings of residents performing the procedures before and after training. To assess retention at 6 months, we collected self-confidence data and video recordings of PGY-1 and PGY-2 residents performing the procedures. A blinded reviewer scored the video recordings. Forty-seven residents completed the study. The majority of residents (53.2%) had never performed any of the procedures on a real patient. Immediately following skills training, mean overall performance improved from 39.5% (± 11.5%) to 76.5% (± 10.4%), difference 37.0% (95% CI, 33.5%--40.6%). Bag-mask ventilation and intraosseous insertion skills remained above baseline at 6-month follow-up. Simulation training is beneficial for teaching PALS procedures to family medicine residents.

  15. Preventive medicine and public health residency training: federal policy and advocacy opportunities.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Sara; Siu, Kimberly

    2009-11-01

    Preventive medicine physicians are uniquely trained in both clinical medicine and public health to understand and reduce the risks of disease, disability, and death in individuals and populations. The nation is facing a severe shortage of preventive medicine-trained physicians, which is largely due to unstable and inadequate residency program funding. Several policy options have been explored and evaluated to fund preventive medicine residency training programs as part of a multipronged approach to engage physicians in the policy-making process. The most adequate, sustainable, distributable, and politically feasible policy option was pursued, and a bill called the "Preventive Medicine and Public Health Training Act" was introduced into the House and the Senate. Opportunities to participate in the policy-making process and interact with key legislators and stakeholders exist in a variety of ways. Leadership at the federal level helps preventive medicine and public health physicians recognize their vital role in shaping public policy.

  16. The contribution of medical physics to nuclear medicine: a physician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Ell, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    This paper is the second in a series of invited perspectives by four pioneers of nuclear medicine imaging and physics. A medical physicist and a nuclear medicine clinical specialist each take a backward look and a forward look at the contributions of physics to nuclear medicine. Here is a backward look from a nuclear medicine physician's perspective.

  17. Teaching and evaluating multitasking ability in emergency medicine residents - what is the best practice?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Multitasking is an essential skill to develop during Emergency Medicine (EM) residency. Residents who struggle to cope in a multitasking environment risk fatigue, stress, and burnout. Improper management of interruption has been causally linked with medical errors. Formal teaching and evaluation of multitasking is often lacking in EM residency programs. This article reviewed the literature on multitasking in EM to identify best practices for teaching and evaluating multitasking amongst EM residents. With the advancement in understanding of what multitasking is, deliberate attempts should be made to teach residents pitfalls and coping strategies. This can be taught through a formal curriculum, role modeling by faculty, and simulation training. The best way to evaluate multitasking ability in residents is by direct observation. The EM Milestone Project provides a framework by which multitasking can be evaluated. EM residents should be deployed in work environments commiserate with their multitasking ability and their progress should be graduated after identified deficiencies are remediated. PMID:25635201

  18. Teaching and evaluating multitasking ability in emergency medicine residents - what is the best practice?

    PubMed

    Heng, Kenneth Wj

    2014-01-01

    Multitasking is an essential skill to develop during Emergency Medicine (EM) residency. Residents who struggle to cope in a multitasking environment risk fatigue, stress, and burnout. Improper management of interruption has been causally linked with medical errors. Formal teaching and evaluation of multitasking is often lacking in EM residency programs. This article reviewed the literature on multitasking in EM to identify best practices for teaching and evaluating multitasking amongst EM residents. With the advancement in understanding of what multitasking is, deliberate attempts should be made to teach residents pitfalls and coping strategies. This can be taught through a formal curriculum, role modeling by faculty, and simulation training. The best way to evaluate multitasking ability in residents is by direct observation. The EM Milestone Project provides a framework by which multitasking can be evaluated. EM residents should be deployed in work environments commiserate with their multitasking ability and their progress should be graduated after identified deficiencies are remediated.

  19. Attitudes and perceptions of internal medicine residents regarding pulmonary and critical care subspecialty training.

    PubMed

    Lorin, Scott; Heffner, John; Carson, Shannon

    2005-02-01

    To evaluate the attitudes and perceptions of internal medicine residents regarding pulmonary and critical care medicine (PCCM) training. Prospective study. Three university hospitals. An eight-page survey was distributed and collected between March 1, 2002, and June 30, 2002. All internal medicine or internal medicine/pediatric residents training at the three institutions were eligible for the study. One hundred seventy-eight residents in internal medicine from an eligible pool of 297 residents returned the survey (61% response rate). PCCM accounted for only 3.4% of the career choices. Forty-one percent of the residents seriously considered a pulmonary and/or critical care fellowship during their residency. Of these residents, 23.5% found the combination of programs the more attractive option, while 2.8% found pulmonary alone and 14.5% found critical care alone more attractive. Key factors associated with a higher resident interest in PCCM subspecialty training included more weeks in the ICU (p = 0.008), more role models in PCCM (3.02 +/- 0.78 vs 3.45 +/- 0.78, p = 0.0004), and resident observations of a greater sense of satisfaction among PCCM faculty (3.07 +/- 0.82 vs 3.33 +/- 0.82, p = 0.04) and fellows (3.05 +/- 0.69 vs 3.31 +/- 0.86, p = 0.03) [mean +/- SD]. The five most commonly cited attributes of PCCM fellowship that would attract residents to the field included intellectual stimulation (69%), opportunities to manage critically ill patients (51%), application of complex physiologic principles (45%), number of procedures performed (31%), and academically challenging rounds (29%). The five most commonly cited attributes of PCCM that would dissuade residents from the field included overly demanding responsibilities with lack of leisure time (54%), stress among faculty and fellows (45%), management responsibilities for chronically ill patients (30%), poor match of career with resident personality (24%), and treatment of pulmonary diseases (16%). Internal

  20. Maintaining a Twitter Feed to Advance an Internal Medicine Residency Program’s Educational Mission

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Akhil; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-01-01

    Background Residency programs face many challenges in educating learners. The millennial generation’s learning preferences also force us to reconsider how to reach physicians in training. Social media is emerging as a viable tool for advancing curricula in graduate medical education. Objective The authors sought to understand how social media enhances a residency program’s educational mission. Methods While chief residents in the 2013-2014 academic year, two of the authors (PB, AN) maintained a Twitter feed for their academic internal medicine residency program. Participants included the chief residents and categorical internal medicine house staff. Results At the year’s end, the authors surveyed residents about uses and attitudes toward this initiative. Residents generally found the chief residents’ tweets informative, and most residents (42/61, 69%) agreed that Twitter enhanced their overall education in residency. Conclusions Data from this single-site intervention corroborate that Twitter can strengthen a residency program’s educational mission. The program’s robust following on Twitter outside of the home program also suggests a need for wider adoption of social media in graduate medical education. Improved use of data analytics and dissemination of these practices to other programs would lend additional insight into social media’s role in improving residents’ educational experiences. PMID:27731845

  1. Cost of Incremental Expansion of an Existing Family Medicine Residency Program.

    PubMed

    Ashkin, Evan A; Newton, Warren P; Toomey, Brian; Lingley, Ronald; Page, Cristen P

    2017-07-01

    Expanding residency training programs to address shortages in the primary care workforce is challenged by the present graduate medical education (GME) environment. The Medicare funding cap on new GME positions and reductions in the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Teaching Health Center (THC) GME program require innovative solutions to support primary care residency expansion. Sparse literature exists to assist in predicting the actual cost of incremental expansion of a family medicine residency program without federal or state GME support. In 2011 a collaboration to develop a community health center (CHC) academic medical partnership (CHAMP), was formed and created a THC as a training site for expansion of an existing family medicine residency program. The cost of expansion was a critical factor as no Federal GME funding or HRSA THC GME program support was available. Initial start-up costs were supported by a federal grant and local foundations. Careful financial analysis of the expansion has provided actual costs per resident of the incremental expansion of the residencyRESULTS: The CHAMP created a new THC and expanded the residency from eight to ten residents per year. The cost of expansion was approximately $72,000 per resident per year. The cost of incremental expansion of our residency program in the CHAMP model was more than 50% less than that of the recently reported cost of training in the HRSA THC GME program.

  2. What are internal medicine residents missing? A communication needs assessment of outpatient clinical encounters.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Kristina L

    2014-09-01

    In order to guide curricular innovation, we looked at the feasibility and utility of performing a targeted needs assessment of the communication skills of PGY2 internal medicine (IM) residents in their continuity clinic, utilizing faculty direct observation with a validated instrument for communication skills evaluation. A convenience sample of PGY2 residents in the Emory University School of Medicine IM Residency Program was invited to participate. Using the SEGUE Framework, a checklist of medical communication tasks, faculty assessed residents during a clinic encounter. Thirty out of 53 (57%) PGY2 residents were assessed. SEGUE results indicate residents were most likely to "maintain patient's privacy" (100%), "greet patient appropriately" (97%) and "check/clarify information" (100%). Residents were least likely to "acknowledge waiting time" (7%), "explore psychosocial/emotional factors" (27%) and "outline agenda for visit" (33%). The SEGUE Framework is a feasible tool to evaluate the communication skills of IM residents in a clinic setting. Many PGY2 IM residents in a large, urban practice do not elicit important psychosocial information during outpatient clinic visits. More observation and evaluation of residents' communication skills are needed, with emphasis on building skills to "Understand the Patient's Perspective." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Comparison between Emergency Medicine Residency Training Programs in the United States and Saudi Arabia from the Residents' Perception

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study was designed to compare the trainees' perception of emergency medicine (EM) training in the United States (US) and Saudi Arabia (SA) and to identify residents' levels of confidence and points of satisfaction in education, procedural skills, and work environment. Method. An IRB-exempt anonymous web-based survey was distributed to five EM residency training programs in the USA and three residency regions in SA. Results. 342 residents were polled with a 20% response rate (16.8% USA and 25.8% SA). The Saudi residents responded less positively to the questions about preparation for their boards' examinations, access to multiple educational resources, and weekly academic activities. The Saudi trainees felt less competent in less common procedures than US trainees. American trainees also more strongly agree that they have more faculty interest in their education compared to the Saudi trainees. The Saudi residents see more patients per hour compared to their US peers. Conclusion. These findings may be due to the differences in training techniques including less formal didactics and simulation experience in SA and more duty hour regulations in the USA. PMID:24563784

  4. Family Medicine Clerkship Directors' Influence on the Residency Program Selection Process: A CERA Study.

    PubMed

    Mims, Lisa D; Everard, Kelly; Hall, Karen; Hatch, Robert; Malaty, John; Rubin, Daniel; Fe Agana, Denny; Carek, Peter J

    2016-02-01

    Residency directors and their associated programs devote a considerable amount of time and effort recruiting medical students. Family medicine clerkship directors may be in a position to influence a student's decision regarding specific residency programs. In this study we examined the frequency and content of discussions between family medicine clerkship directors and medical students regarding residency programs. Data were collected as part of the 2014 Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) Family Medicine Clerkship Director Survey. A list of 13 residency program features was provided, and clerkship directors were asked to categorize each item on a 5-point Likert scale assessing their importance with regards to recommendation or quality. The response rate was 91%. Nearly all clerkship directors (99.2%) reported that medical students often or occasionally ask their opinion regarding specific residency programs. The three most common factors considered by clerkship directors to be very or extremely influential when recommending a program are accreditation status (73.1%), location (70.3%), and curriculum (68.3%). To determine quality of a program, accreditation status (80.7%), curriculum (80.0%), and faculty reputation for teaching (78.3%) were most often cited. Marginal agreement was noted for location, board pass rate, attrition rate, and curriculum. Since nearly all clerkship directors report that medical students ask their opinion regarding specific residency programs, program directors and faculty may wish to enhance their communication with these individuals in regards to specific attributes of their residency program.

  5. Faculty perceptions of the ACGME resident duty hour regulations in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Choby, Beth; Passmore, Cindy

    2007-06-01

    Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty hour regulations have significantly changed residency education. Initial research focused heavily on resident experiences, while changes in faculty roles and effects on patient care and resident education have received less attention. This survey examines faculty perceptions of the effect of duty hour changes in academic family medicine. Family medicine faculty members from 15% of ACGME-accredited residencies were surveyed. The survey included demographic information and Likert-type questions about changes in faculty duties, patient care, resident education, and satisfaction with academic medicine. A total of 368 of 672 surveys were returned; 97% of the 69 surveyed programs were represented. The average faculty workweek was 66 hours, including call. Of respondents, 81% felt that weekly faculty hours were unchanged since duty hours; 19% thought work hours had increased. Faculty felt that residency education and patient care were not positively affected by duty hours. Statistically significant differences were found between perceptions of faculty who did and did not deliver babies. Twenty percent of faculty members are considering leaving academic medicine in relation to duty hours. Consistent with research from other specialties, many faculty members perceive that their work roles have increased in certain areas. Resident performance and patient care are not seen to be improved as a result of duty hours. Further research into the unexpected findings involving labor and delivery responsibilities is needed.

  6. Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency (PIMR): Description of a New Online Educational Curriculum.

    PubMed

    McClafferty, Hilary; Dodds, Sally; Brooks, Audrey J; Brenner, Michelle G; Brown, Melanie L; Frazer, Paige; Mark, John D; Weydert, Joy A; Wilcox, Graciela M G; Lebensohn, Patricia; Maizes, Victoria

    2015-03-17

    Use of integrative medicine (IM) is prevalent in children, yet availability of training opportunities is limited. The Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency (PIMR) program was designed to address this training gap. The PIMR program is a 100-hour online educational curriculum, modeled on the successful Integrative Medicine in Residency program in family medicine. Preliminary data on site characteristics, resident experience with and interest in IM, and residents' self-assessments of perceived knowledge and skills in IM are presented. The embedded multimodal evaluation is described. Less than one-third of residents had IM coursework in medical school or personal experience with IM. Yet most (66%) were interested in learning IM, and 71% were interested in applying IM after graduation. Less than half of the residents endorsed pre-existing IM knowledge/skills. Average score on IM medical knowledge exam was 51%. Sites endorsed 1-8 of 11 site characteristics, with most (80%) indicating they had an IM practitioner onsite and IM trained faculty. Preliminary results indicate that the PIMR online curriculum targets identified knowledge gaps. Residents had minimal prior IM exposure, yet expressed strong interest in IM education. PIMR training site surveys identified both strengths and areas needing further development to support successful PIMR program implementation.

  7. IAEA support to medical physics in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Sgouros, George

    2013-05-01

    Through its programmatic efforts and its publications, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has helped define the role and responsibilities of the nuclear medicine physicist in the practice of nuclear medicine. This paper describes the initiatives that the IAEA has undertaken to support medical physics in nuclear medicine. In 1984, the IAEA provided guidance on how to ensure that the equipment used for detecting, imaging, and quantifying radioactivity is functioning properly (Technical Document [TECDOC]-137, "Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine Instruments"). An updated version of IAEA-TECDOC-137 was issued in 1991 as IAEA-TECDOC-602, and this included new chapters on scanner-computer systems and single-photon emission computed tomography systems. Nuclear medicine physics was introduced as a part of a project on radiation imaging and radioactivity measurements in the 2002-2003 IAEA biennium program in Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics. Ten years later, IAEA activities in this field have expanded to cover quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of nuclear medicine equipment, education and clinical training, professional recognition of the role of medical physicists in nuclear medicine physics, and finally, the coordination of research and development activities in internal dosimetry. As a result of these activities, the IAEA has received numerous requests to support the development and implementation of QA or QC programs for radioactivity measurements in nuclear medicine in many Member States. During the last 5 years, support was provided to 20 Member States through the IAEA's technical cooperation programme. The IAEA has also supported education and clinical training of medical physicists. This type of support has been essential for the development and expansion of the Medical Physics profession, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The need for basic as well as specialized clinical training in medical physics was identified as a

  8. Career interest and perceptions of nephrology: A repeated cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Michael N.; Porter, Ivan; Kincaid, Hope; Jain, Deepika; Aslam, Nabeel

    2017-01-01

    Background Interest in nephrology careers among internal medicine residents in the United States is declining. Our objective was to assess the impact of the presence of a nephrology fellowship training program on perceptions and career interest in nephrology among internal medicine residents. A secondary objective was to identify commonly endorsed negative perceptions of nephrology among internal medicine residents. Methods This was a repeated cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents before (Group 1) and 3 years after (Group 2) the establishment of nephrology fellowship programs at two institutions. The primary outcome was the percentage of residents indicating nephrology as a career interest in Group 1 vs. Group 2. Secondary outcomes included the frequency that residents agreed with negative statements about nephrology. Results 131 (80.9%) of 162 residents completed the survey. 19 (14.8%) residents indicated interest in a nephrology career, with 8 (6.3%) indicating nephrology as their first choice. There was no difference in career interest in nephrology between residents who were exposed to nephrology fellows during residency training (Group 2) and residents who were not (Group 1). The most commonly endorsed negative perceptions of nephrology were: nephrology fellows have long hours/burdensome call (36 [28.1%] of residents agreed or strongly agreed), practicing nephrologists must take frequent/difficult call (35 [27.6%] agreed or strongly agreed), and nephrology has few opportunities for procedures (35 [27.3%] agreed or strongly agreed). More residents in Group 2 agreed that nephrology is poorly paid (8.9% in Group 1 vs. 20.8% in Group 2, P = 0.04), whereas more residents in Group 1 agreed that nephrologists must take frequent/difficult call (40.0% in Group 1 vs. 18.1% in Group 2, P = 0.02). Conclusions The initiation of a nephrology fellowship program was not associated with an increase in internal medicine residents’ interest in nephrology

  9. Is Training in a Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency Associated with a Career in Primary Care Medicine?

    PubMed

    Stanley, Marion; O'Brien, Bridget; Julian, Katherine; Jain, Sharad; Cornett, Patricia; Hollander, Harry; Baron, Robert B; Kohlwes, R Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Professional and governmental organizations recommend an ideal US physician workforce composed of at least 40 % primary care physicians. They also support primary care residencies to promote careers in primary care. Our study examines the relationship between graduation from a primary care or categorical internal medicine residency program and subsequent career choice. We conducted a cross-sectional electronic survey of a cohort of internal medicine residency alumni who graduated between 2001 and 2010 from a large academic center. Our primary predictor was graduation from a primary care versus a categorical internal medicine program and our primary outcome is current career role. We performed chi-square analysis comparing responses of primary care and categorical residents. We contacted 481 out of 513 alumni, of whom 322 responded (67 %). We compared 106 responses from primary care alumni to 169 responses from categorical alumni. Fifty-four percent of primary care alumni agreed that the majority of their current clinical work is in outpatient primary care vs. 20 % of categorical alumni (p < 0.001). While 92.5 % of primary-care alumni were interested in a primary care career prior to residency, only 63 % remained interested after residency. Thirty of the 34 primary care alumni (88 %) who lost interest in a primary care career during residency agreed that their ambulatory experience during residency influenced their subsequent career choice. A higher percentage of primary care alumni practice outpatient primary care as compared to categorical alumni. Some alumni lost interest in primary care during residency. The outpatient clinic experience may impact interest in primary care.

  10. Burnout syndrome during residency in internal medicine and pediatrics in a country without working time directive.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Duygu Yazgan; Durusu Tanriover, Mine; Unal, Sule; Dizdar, Omer; Kalyoncu, Umut; Karakaya, Jale; Unal, Serhat; Kale, Gulsev

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate burnout syndrome among internal medicine and pediatrics residents in a country that does not have the working time directive (WTD) and also to determine the risk factors and consequent impact on efficient functioning in clinical areas. A 57-item questionnaire was given to internal medicine and pediatrics residents. Responses from 22 pediatrics and 33 internal medicine residents were evaluated. Demographic findings, burnout scores, having hobbies, social activities and reading books unrelated to medicine were similar between the two groups. Six pediatrics residents (27.3 per cent) and 11 (33.3 per cent) internal medicine residents met the criteria for clinically significant burnout. Personal accomplishment scores and reading books unrelated to medicine were found to be related to burnout. Burnout is a syndrome characterized by depersonalization, emotional exhaustion and a low sense of personal accomplishment. It is important to document burnout in countries where WTDs are not implemented. Further studies might demonstrate burnout's effect on patient safety, service quality and physician's performance.

  11. Do emergency ultrasound fellowship programs impact emergency medicine residents' ultrasound education?

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Srikar; Raio, Christopher; Morrison, Daniel; Tsung, James; Leech, Stephen; Meer, Jehangir; Lyon, Matthew; Lopez, Fernando; Akhtar, Saadia

    2014-06-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid proliferation of emergency ultrasound (EUS) programs in the United States. To date, there is no evidence supporting that EUS fellowships enhance residents' ultrasound (US) educational experiences. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of EUS fellowships on emergency medicine (EM) residents' US education. We conducted a cross-sectional study at 9 academic medical centers. A questionnaire on US education and bedside US use was pilot tested and given to EM residents. The primary outcomes included the number of US examinations performed, scope of bedside US applications, barriers to residents' US education, and US use in the emergency department. The secondary outcomes were factors that would impact residents' US education. The outcomes were compared between residency programs with and without EUS fellowships. A total of 244 EM residents participated in this study. Thirty percent (95% confidence interval, 24%-35%) reported they had performed more than 150 scans. Residents in programs with EUS fellowships reported performing more scans than those in programs without fellowships (P = .04). Significant differences were noted in most applications of bedside US between residency programs with and without fellowships (P < .05). There were also significant differences in the barriers to US education between residency programs with and without fellowships (P < .05). Emergency US fellowship programs had a positive impact on residents' US educational experiences. Emergency medicine residents performed more scans overall and also used bedside US for more advanced applications in programs with EUS fellowships. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. The state of the service: a survey of psychiatry resident education in psychosomatic medicine.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Thomas W; Schwartz, Ann C; Zimbrean, Paula C; Wright, Mark T

    2013-01-01

    Although required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, training of general psychiatry residents in Psychosomatic Medicine (PM) varies significantly between programs. In 1996, the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine (APM) developed guidelines for residency training in PM. Since then, there has been no assessment of the status of PM training during psychiatry residency. Assessment of the current state of PM training in U.S. psychiatry residency programs. A 46-item questionnaire was sent via e-mail to 206 residency directors. Four major areas were assessed: the timing and duration of the PM rotation, level of faculty supervision, didactic curriculum, and role (or potential role) of the APM in residency education. Ninety-two surveys were returned (response rate 45%). Forty-four (54%) of the general psychiatry residencies reported the total duration of the C-L rotation as being between 3 and 6 months (including both full- and part-time rotation). Only 38 (46%) programs' residents complete their PM experience in 1 year of residency. The average Full-Time Equivalent of teaching faculty per service was 1.74 (standard deviation 0.92). Sixty-four (77%) programs have a formal didactic curriculum in C-L. Eighty-one (98%) respondents were aware of the APM. Fifty-eight (70%) had APM members among faculty. The most popular responses on how the APM could best serve training programs were the creation of a subspecialty curriculum (73%) as well as the development of a competency-based evaluation tool (66%). There is significant variation in how residents are taught PM during their training. The APM is a well-recognized organization that may define what constitutes adequate residency training in PM and may help programs fulfill the educational needs of residents. © 2013 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Community Health Needs Assessment as a Teaching Tool in a Family Medicine Residency.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Venis; Gagnon, Monica; Olatunbosun, Bamidele; Adedokun, Olanrewaju; Blanas, Demetri; Arniella, Guedy; Maharaj-Best, Ayiti-Carmel

    2016-09-01

    Community-based primary care is a fundamental concept taught in family medicine. Best practices for community-oriented and public health training in medical training programs are underreported in the published literature. A Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) offers an opportunity for family medicine residents to practice research and evaluation skills while learning about public health and the community they serve. A family medicine residency program in Harlem, NY, conducted a CHNA in order to assess their community's health landscape and as an opportunity to teach the resident trainees research skills. Primary and secondary data were collected by the residents using public databases, surveys, focus groups, and key informant interviews. Residents completed a survey at the project's completion to assess their experience with the CHNA and to obtain suggestions for improving the process in the future. More than 50% of the 15 residents surveyed reported that the CHNA greatly improved their comfort level speaking to patients about social factors that affect their health. Participants responded that they valued the opportunity to engage with community members and to understand their patients on a population level. The greatest challenge for most residents was lack of devoted time to complete the project considering competing residency responsibilities. Conducting a CHNA in a primary care training program can help the next generation of family physicians become culturally competent and community focused in their work.

  14. Evidence-based medicine training during residency: a randomized controlled trial of efficacy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has been widely integrated into residency curricula, although results of randomized controlled trials and long term outcomes of EBM educational interventions are lacking. We sought to determine if an EBM workshop improved internal medicine residents' EBM knowledge and skills and use of secondary evidence resources. Methods This randomized controlled trial included 48 internal medicine residents at an academic medical center. Twenty-three residents were randomized to attend a 4-hour interactive workshop in their PGY-2 year. All residents completed a 25-item EBM knowledge and skills test and a self-reported survey of literature searching and resource usage in their PGY-1, PGY-2, and PGY-3 years. Results There was no difference in mean EBM test scores between the workshop and control groups at PGY-2 or PGY-3. However, mean EBM test scores significantly increased over time for both groups in PGY-2 and PGY-3. Literature searches, and resource usage also increased significantly in both groups after the PGY-1 year. Conclusions We were unable to detect a difference in EBM knowledge between residents who did and did not participate in our workshop. Significant improvement over time in EBM scores, however, suggests EBM skills were learned during residency. Future rigorous studies should determine the best methods for improving residents' EBM skills as well as their ability to apply evidence during clinical practice. PMID:20807453

  15. Understanding Resident Learning Preferences Within an Internal Medicine Noon Conference Lecture Series: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sawatsky, Adam P.; Zickmund, Susan L.; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2014-01-01

    Background The lecture remains the most common approach for didactic offerings in residency programs despite conflicting evidence about the effectiveness of this format. Objective The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of internal medicine residents toward conferences held in the lecture format. Methods The investigators invited internal medicine residents (N  =  144) to participate in focus groups discussing their perspectives about noon conference lectures. The investigators used a semistructured guide to ask about motivations for attendance and effectiveness of noon conferences, transcribed the recordings, coded the discussions, and analyzed the results. Results Seven focus groups with a total of 41 residents were held. This identified 4 major domains: (1) motivations for attendance; (2) appropriate content; (3) effective teaching methods; and (4) perspectives on active participation. Residents' motivations were categorized into external factors, including desire for a break and balance to their workload, and intrinsic attributes, including the learning opportunity, topic, and speaker. Appropriate content was described as clinically relevant, practical, and presenting a balance of evidence. Identified effective teaching methods included shorter teaching sessions focused on high-yield learning points structured around cases and questions. While active participation increases residents' perceived level of stress, the benefits of this format include increased attention and learning. Conclusions This study furthers our knowledge of the learning preferences of internal medicine residents within the changing environment of residency education and can be used in conjunction with principles of adult learning to reform how we deliver core medical knowledge. PMID:24701307

  16. Addressing the Primary Care Shortage on a Shoestring: A Successful Track in an Internal Medicine Residency.

    PubMed

    Brislen, Heather; Dunn, Angela; Parada, Alisha; Rendon, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    Nationally, shortages of primary care providers are of major concern. Internal medicine programs, once the major supplier of primary care physicians, are no longer producing large numbers of primary care providers to help meet the needs of the growing patient population. In 2009, residents at the University of New Mexico created a resident-driven Primary Care Track (PCT) within the internal medicine residency, and after six years this track is thriving. The PCT allows residents to designate blocks of time specifically devoted to primary care training. Residents opt in to the track at the end of intern year and arrange their own schedules over large blocks of time in the last two years of training to allow for an individualized curriculum that prepares them for independent practice in primary care. Approximately 85% (11/13) of residents who have graduated from the track have gone on to practice in primary care after graduation, and the internal medicine residency program as a whole has also seen an increase in the fraction of residents pursuing primary care since the inception of this track. The PCT is currently at maximum capacity and may be forced to turn away applicants. To expand while still maintaining the core principles of the track, the PCT will strive to find additional ways to use New Mexico's existing resources and to develop a more robust mentoring structure and didactic programs. Formalized financial, faculty, and administrative support of the program also will be needed.

  17. Understanding resident learning preferences within an internal medicine noon conference lecture series: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Adam P; Zickmund, Susan L; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2014-03-01

    The lecture remains the most common approach for didactic offerings in residency programs despite conflicting evidence about the effectiveness of this format. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of internal medicine residents toward conferences held in the lecture format. The investigators invited internal medicine residents (N  =  144) to participate in focus groups discussing their perspectives about noon conference lectures. The investigators used a semistructured guide to ask about motivations for attendance and effectiveness of noon conferences, transcribed the recordings, coded the discussions, and analyzed the results. Seven focus groups with a total of 41 residents were held. This identified 4 major domains: (1) motivations for attendance; (2) appropriate content; (3) effective teaching methods; and (4) perspectives on active participation. Residents' motivations were categorized into external factors, including desire for a break and balance to their workload, and intrinsic attributes, including the learning opportunity, topic, and speaker. Appropriate content was described as clinically relevant, practical, and presenting a balance of evidence. Identified effective teaching methods included shorter teaching sessions focused on high-yield learning points structured around cases and questions. While active participation increases residents' perceived level of stress, the benefits of this format include increased attention and learning. This study furthers our knowledge of the learning preferences of internal medicine residents within the changing environment of residency education and can be used in conjunction with principles of adult learning to reform how we deliver core medical knowledge.

  18. New family medicine residency training programme: Residents’ perspectives from the University of Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Tshitenge, Stephane; Setlhare, Vincent; Tsima, Billy; Adewale, Ganiyu; Parsons, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Background Family Medicine (FM) training is new in Botswana. No previous evaluation of the experiences and opinions of residents of the University of Botswana (UB) Family Medicine training programme has been reported. Aims This study explored and assessed residents’ experiences and satisfaction with the FM training programme at the UB and solicited potential strategies for improvement from the residents. Methods A descriptive survey using a self-administered questionnaire based on a Likert-type scale and open-ended questions was used to collect data from FM residents at the UB. Results Eight out the 14 eligible residents participated to this study. Generally, residents were not satisfied with the FM training programme. Staff shortage, inadequate supervision and poor programme organisation by the faculty were the main reasons for this. However, the residents were satisfied with weekly training schedules and the diversity of patients in the current training sites. Residents’ potential solutions included an increase in staff, the acquisition of equipment at teaching sites and emphasis on FM core topics teachings. They had different views regarding how certain future career paths will be. Conclusions Despite the general dissatisfaction among residents because of challenges faced by the training programme, we have learnt that residents are capable of valuable inputs for improvement of their programme when engaged. There is need for the Department of Family Medicine to work with the Ministry of Health to set a clear career pathway for future graduates and to reflect on residents’ input for possible implementation. PMID:27796117

  19. Psychiatry Residents' Opinions of a Substance Abuse Rotation in a VA Hospital General Internal Medicine Unit.

    PubMed

    Khouzam, Hani Raoul

    2000-09-01

    Written optional evaluation forms were devised to gather psychiatry residents' opinions regarding their substance use disorder rotation in a general internal medicine unit. Over a 4-year period 24 residents completed that rotation and 83% (N = 20) completed the form. Of the responding residents, 95% (N = 19) rated an above-average satisfaction with the rotation and 90% (N = 18) would recommend the rotation to other residents. All respondents 100% (N = 20) reported that the rotation met its stated training objectives. Considering the recent changes in the delivery of health care with its focus toward primary care and away from specialty care, these findings raise the possibility of incorporating the substance abuse training of psychiatry residents into the primary care setting of general internal medicine.

  20. Developing Educators, Investigators, and Leaders During Internal Medicine Residency: The Area of Distinction Program

    PubMed Central

    Kohlwes, R. Jeffrey; Cornett, Patricia; Dandu, Madhavi; Julian, Katherine; Vidyarthi, Arpana; Minichiello, Tracy; Shunk, Rebecca; Jain, Sharad; Harleman, Elizabeth; Ranji, Sumant; Sharpe, Brad; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Hollander, Harry

    2011-01-01

    Background Professional organizations have called for individualized training approaches, as well as for opportunities for resident scholarship, to ensure that internal medicine residents have sufficient knowledge and experience to make informed career choices. Context and Purpose To address these training issues within the University of California, San Francisco, internal medicine program, we created the Areas of Distinction (AoD) program to supplement regular clinical duties with specialized curricula designed to engage residents in clinical research, global health, health equities, medical education, molecular medicine, or physician leadership. We describe our AoD program and present this initiative's evaluation data. Methods and Program Evaluation We evaluated features of our AoD program, including program enrollment, resident satisfaction, recruitment surveys, quantity of scholarly products, and the results of our resident's certifying examination scores. Finally, we described the costs of implementing and maintaining the AoDs. Results AoD enrollment increased from 81% to 98% during the past 5 years. Both quantitative and qualitative data demonstrated a positive effect on recruitment and improved resident satisfaction with the program, and the number and breadth of scholarly presentations have increased without an adverse effect on our board certification pass rate. Conclusions The AoD system led to favorable outcomes in the domains of resident recruitment, satisfaction, scholarship, and board performance. Our intervention showed that residents can successfully obtain clinical training while engaging in specialized education beyond the bounds of core medicine training. Nurturing these interests 5 empower residents to better shape their careers by providing earlier insight into internist roles that transcend classic internal medicine training. PMID:23205204

  1. Effect of Educational Debt on Emergency Medicine Residents: A Qualitative Study Using Individual Interviews.

    PubMed

    Young, Timothy P; Brown, Madison M; Reibling, Ellen T; Ghassemzadeh, Sassan; Gordon, Dawn M; Phan, Tammy H; Thomas, Tamara L; Brown, Lance

    2016-10-01

    In 2001, less than 20% of emergency medicine residents had more than $150,000 of educational debt. Our emergency medicine residents anecdotally reported much larger debt loads. Surveys have reported that debt affects career and life choices. Qualitative approaches are well suited to explore how and why such complex phenomena occur. We aim to gain a better understanding of how our emergency medicine residents experience debt. We conducted individual semistructured interviews with emergency medicine residents. We collected self-reported data related to educational debt and asked open-ended questions about debt influence on career choices, personal life, future plans, and financial decisions. We undertook a structured thematic analysis using a qualitative approach based in the grounded theory method. Median educational debt was $212,000. Six themes emerged from our analysis: (1) debt influenced career and life decisions by altering priorities; (2) residents experienced debt as a persistent source of background stress and felt powerless to change it; (3) residents made use of various techniques to negotiate debt in order to focus on day-to-day work; (4) personal debt philosophy, based on individual values and obtained from family, shaped how debt affected each individual; (5) debt had a normative effect and was acculturated in residency; and (6) residents reported a wide range of financial knowledge, but recognized its importance to career success. Our emergency medicine residents' debt experience is complex and involves multiple dimensions. Given our current understanding, simple solutions are unlikely to be effective in adequately addressing this issue. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effectiveness of educational interventions in improving clinical competence of residents in an internal medicine residency program in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Tariq, M; Syed, N A; Motiwala, A; Jafri, W; Hameed, K; Islam, N; Riaz, M; Awan, S; Akhter, J; Talati, J

    2011-12-01

    Medical education is a continuously evolving field. Training institutes and programs should have a process in place to gather continuous feedback and then make appropriate modifications in order to provide education and training effectively. Our study aimed to assess the effect of a quality improvement cycle approach in using various educational interventions within a residency. Effects were measured on the key educational outcomes of residents; medical knowledge, skills and professional attitudes using results of postgraduate examination with both written and clinical skills components. A number of educational interventions were implemented which included changes in work hours with increased time for self-study, new educational activities including a Residents Hour, a Residents Slide Session, Grand Rounds and Journal Clubs, Clinico-pathological conferences, and a two- week postgraduate course for senior residents. Newer and improved assessment tools were also implemented, including an annual in-training mock exam based on the format of the postgraduate examination. Pass rates in postgraduate examinations (Fellow of College of Physicians and Surgeons exam and Member of Royal College of Physicians exam) were compared before and after the interventions to assess the effectiveness of the interventions. The first group of residents after introduction of the educational interventions completed residency training in 2001. Postgraduate exam pass rates (sometimes after two or more attempts) were 59.2% (42 of 71 graduates) before 2001 and 86.4% (38 of 44 graduates after 2001 (p = 0.002). The number of candidates passing the examinations in either their first or second attempts before 2001 was 17 of 42 (40.5%), which increased to 33 of 38 (86.8%) after 2001 (p = <0.001). Our study describes a number of interventions that were successful in bringing about an improvement in the performance of our residents. These can serve as a guide for postgraduate training programs

  3. The incorporation of stress management programming into family medicine residencies-results of a national survey of residency directors: a CERA study.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Paula; Filippelli, Amanda C; Lebensohn, Patricia; Bonakdar, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Residents' stress and burnout is a concern among family medicine residency programs. Our objective is to assess stress management options available to family medicine residents. In 2012, the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) e-mailed a survey to US residency directors. Questions were asked on four types of stress management programming (SMP): (1) access to counselors, social workers, or mental health providers, (2) residency support or Balint groups, (3) stress management lectures or workshops, and (4) residency retreats. We assessed how many programs contained all four types of SMP and their relationship to the following topics: stress management techniques for patients, spirituality, mind/body techniques, and self-care for residents. Of the 212 responses, 29% reported having all four types of SMP. Eighty-three percent reported stress management lectures or workshops, and 79% reported residency retreats. Smaller and mid-size residencies (36%) and residencies in the West (36%) were more likely to have all four types of SMP. There was a correlation between having didactics, clinical rotations, and electives on stress management techniques for patient care and having stress management lectures or workshops for residents. There was statistical significance between having resident self-care curriculum and (1) having retreats and (2) stress management lectures or workshops. It is necessary to evaluate whether residency programs are providing appropriate stress management skills for residents that will improve physician wellness and patient outcomes.

  4. Mindfulness, burnout, and effects on performance evaluations in internal medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Sarah E; Auerbach, Stephen M; Rybarczyk, Bruce; Lee, Bennett; Call, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Burnout has been documented at high levels in medical residents with negative effects on performance. Some dispositional qualities, like mindfulness, may protect against burnout. The purpose of the present study was to assess burnout prevalence among internal medicine residents at a single institution, examine the relationship between mindfulness and burnout, and provide preliminary findings on the relation between burnout and performance evaluations in internal medicine residents. Methods Residents (n = 38) completed validated measures of burnout at three time points separated by 2 months and a validated measure of dispositional mindfulness at baseline. Program director end-of-year performance evaluations were also obtained on 22 milestones used to evaluate internal medicine resident performance; notably, these milestones have not yet been validated for research purposes; therefore, the investigation here is exploratory. Results Overall, 71.1% (n = 27) of the residents met criteria for burnout during the study. Lower scores on the “acting with awareness” facet of dispositional mindfulness significantly predicted meeting burnout criteria χ2(5) = 11.88, p = 0.04. Lastly, meeting burnout criteria significantly predicted performance on three of the performance milestones, with positive effects on milestones from the “system-based practices” and “professionalism” domains and negative effects on a milestone from the “patient care” domain. Conclusion Burnout rates were high in this sample of internal medicine residents and rates were consistent with other reports of burnout during medical residency. Dispositional mindfulness was supported as a protective factor against burnout. Importantly, results from the exploratory investigation of the relationship between burnout and resident evaluations suggested that burnout may improve performance on some domains of resident evaluations while compromising performance on other domains. Implications and

  5. Mindfulness, burnout, and effects on performance evaluations in internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Braun, Sarah E; Auerbach, Stephen M; Rybarczyk, Bruce; Lee, Bennett; Call, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Burnout has been documented at high levels in medical residents with negative effects on performance. Some dispositional qualities, like mindfulness, may protect against burnout. The purpose of the present study was to assess burnout prevalence among internal medicine residents at a single institution, examine the relationship between mindfulness and burnout, and provide preliminary findings on the relation between burnout and performance evaluations in internal medicine residents. Residents (n = 38) completed validated measures of burnout at three time points separated by 2 months and a validated measure of dispositional mindfulness at baseline. Program director end-of-year performance evaluations were also obtained on 22 milestones used to evaluate internal medicine resident performance; notably, these milestones have not yet been validated for research purposes; therefore, the investigation here is exploratory. Overall, 71.1% (n = 27) of the residents met criteria for burnout during the study. Lower scores on the "acting with awareness" facet of dispositional mindfulness significantly predicted meeting burnout criteria χ(2)(5) = 11.88, p = 0.04. Lastly, meeting burnout criteria significantly predicted performance on three of the performance milestones, with positive effects on milestones from the "system-based practices" and "professionalism" domains and negative effects on a milestone from the "patient care" domain. Burnout rates were high in this sample of internal medicine residents and rates were consistent with other reports of burnout during medical residency. Dispositional mindfulness was supported as a protective factor against burnout. Importantly, results from the exploratory investigation of the relationship between burnout and resident evaluations suggested that burnout may improve performance on some domains of resident evaluations while compromising performance on other domains. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  6. Pharmaceutical industry interactions in family medicine residencies decreased between 2008 and 2013: a CERA study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven R; Evans, David V; Fugh-Berman, Adriane

    2015-04-01

    Most medical residents have some interaction with the pharmaceutical industry. It is not known if this interaction has changed over time. We determined whether interactions between family medicine residencies and the pharmaceutical industry have changed in the past 5 years. We surveyed program directors of US family medicine residencies with questions addressing industry-sponsored gifts, drug samples, access of industry representatives to trainees, and industry-sponsored residency activities. The questions were part of a larger 2013 survey administered by the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA). The authors compared results from 2008 and 2013. The response rate to the 2013 CERA program director survey was 56% (251/445); 47% (208/445) of surveyed directors viewed and answered all survey questions. Between 2008 and 2013, residency programs that accept no gifts or industry-sponsored food increased from 48% (137/286) to 73% (151/208). Residencies refusing samples increased from 52% (148/286) to 78% (166/212), and residencies that do not allow industry representatives to have access to learners increased from 43% (124/286) to 74% (157/212). Residency programs that forbade industry-sponsored activities remained stable (67% versus 73%). About half (49%) (101/208)) of programs in 2013 qualified as "pharma-free," compared to 26% (75/286) in 2008. In 2013, one of two family medicine residencies disallow gifts, drug samples, interactions between residents and pharmaceutical sales representatives, and pharmaceutical industry-sponsored activities. This proportion is twice what was observed in 2008. Restrictions increased in all categories except industry-sponsored activities.

  7. Residents' Awareness of Folk Medicine Beliefs of Their Mexican Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mull, J. Dennis; Mull, Dorothy S.

    1981-01-01

    A study is presented that documents widespread unfamiliarity with traditional health beliefs among 30 residents who had been caring for Mexican patients in a Southern California clinic for periods ranging from one to three years. It is suggested that formal curricular material on health beliefs and practices should be provided. (MLW)

  8. Residents' Awareness of Folk Medicine Beliefs of Their Mexican Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mull, J. Dennis; Mull, Dorothy S.

    1981-01-01

    A study is presented that documents widespread unfamiliarity with traditional health beliefs among 30 residents who had been caring for Mexican patients in a Southern California clinic for periods ranging from one to three years. It is suggested that formal curricular material on health beliefs and practices should be provided. (MLW)

  9. Non-Family Medicine Resident Training for Primary Care: A Comparative Evaluation of Federally and Non-Federally Supported Primary Care Oriented Medical Residency Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosinski, Edwin F.; Dagenais, Fred

    Data collected as part of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation study of residency programs for training in primary medicine and pediatrics are analyzed. The seven residencies supported by the federal government and the nine residencies supported by the Foundation are compared. A brief description of the programs as they existed in 1978 are…

  10. Use of computers and the Internet by residents in US family medicine programmes.

    PubMed

    King, Richard V; Murphy-Cullen, Cassie L; Mayo, Helen G; Marcee, Alice K; Schneider, Gregory W

    2007-06-01

    Computers, personal digital assistants (PDA), and the Internet are widely used as resources in medical education and clinical care. Educators who intend to incorporate these resources effectively into residency education programmes can benefit from understanding how residents currently use these tools, their skills, and their preferences. The researchers sent questionnaires to 306 US family medicine residency programmes for all of their residents to complete. Respondents were 1177 residents from 125 (41%) programmes. Access to a computer was reported by 95% of respondents. Of these, 97% of desktop and 89% of laptop computers could access the Internet. Residents accessed various educational and clinical resources. Half felt they had 'intermediate' skills at Web searches, 23% had 'some skills,' and 27% were 'quite skilled.' Those under 30 years of age reported higher skill levels. Those who experienced a Web-based curriculum in medical school reported higher search skills and greater success in finding clinical information. Respondents preferred to use technology to supplement the didactic sessions offered in resident teaching conferences. Favourable conditions exist in family medicine residency programmes to implement a blend of traditional and technology-based learning experiences. These conditions include residents' experience, skills, and preferences.

  11. Effectiveness of a 2-year menopause medicine curriculum for obstetrics and gynecology residents.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Mindy S; Washington, Chantel I; Stewart, Katherine I; Shen, Wen

    2016-03-01

    Previous work has shown American obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents are lacking in menopause training. Our objective was to assess the effectiveness of a 2-year menopause medicine curriculum in improving OB/GYN residents' knowledge and self-assessed competency in menopause topics. We developed a menopause medicine-teaching curriculum for OB/GYN residents at our academic hospital-based residency program. The 2-year curriculum was composed of year 1: four 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab with cases presentations, and year 2: three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab. Core topics included menopause physiology, hormone therapy, breast health, bone health, cardiovascular disease, and autoimmune disease. Pre- and posttests assessed resident knowledge and comfort in core topics, and a pre- and postcurriculum survey assessed utility and learning satisfaction. From July 2011 to June 2013, 34 OB/GYN residents completed the menopause curriculum annually with an average attendance at each module of 23 residents. Pre-/posttest scores improved from a mean pretest score of 57.3% to a mean posttest score of 78.7% (P < 0.05). Before the curriculum, most residents did not feel comfortable managing menopause patients with 75.8% reporting feeling "barely comfortable" and 8.4% feeling "not at all comfortable." After the 2-year curriculum, 85.7% reported feeling "comfortable/very comfortable" taking care of menopause patients. The majority of residents (95.2%) reported the menopause curriculum was "extremely useful." A 2-year menopause medicine curriculum for OB/GYN residents utilizing lectures and a lab with case studies is an effective modality to improve resident knowledge required to manage menopause patients.

  12. Medicine Resident Preparedness to Diagnose and Treat Substance Use Disorders: Impact of an Enhanced Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Wakeman, Sarah E; Pham-Kanter, Genevieve; Baggett, Meridale V; Campbell, Eric G

    2015-01-01

    The authors' previous study found that despite caring for many patients with addiction, most Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) internal medicine residents feel unprepared to treat substance use disorders (SUDs) and rate SUD instruction during training as fair or poor. This follow-up study evaluates the impact of an enhanced curriculum on resident perceptions of the quality of instruction, knowledge base, and self-perceived preparedness to diagnose and treat SUDs. Based on the findings of the earlier study, an enhanced SUD curriculum was designed and delivered to MGH medicine residents. Impact of the curriculum was evaluated using the same Web-based survey that was administered in the earlier study to compare pre- and posttest results. The authors' earlier study found that 75% of residents felt prepared to diagnose and 37% to treat SUDs and 45% of residents rated the overall quality of SUD instruction as good or excellent. Following the curriculum intervention, 87% of residents reported feeling prepared to diagnose (P=.028) and 60% to treat (P=.002) SUDs. Three quarters of residents rated the overall quality of instruction as good or excellent (P<.001), and 98% reported residency curriculum had a positive impact on their preparedness to care for patients with a SUDs. Residents who reported receiving an adequate amount of SUD instruction were more likely to feel prepared to diagnose and treat addiction (P<.001). Thirty-one percent of residents still rated the overall amount of SUD instruction as too little. The intervention did not significantly improve answers to knowledge questions. An enhanced SUDs curriculum for medicine residents increased self-perceived preparedness to diagnose and treat SUDs and educational quality ratings. However, there was no significant change in knowledge. Implementation of a more comprehensive curriculum and evaluation at other sites are necessary to determine the ideal SUD training model.

  13. Comparative analysis of dosimetry parameters for nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Toohey, R.E.; Stabin, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    For years many have employed the concept of ``total-body dose`` or ``whole-body dose,`` i.e., the total energy deposited in the body divided by the mass of the body, when evaluating the risks of different nuclear medicine procedures. The effective dose equivalent (H{sub E}), first described in ICRP Publication 26, has been accepted by some as a better quantity to use in evaluating the total risk of a procedure, but its use has been criticized by others primarily because the tissue weighting factors were intended for use in the radiation worker, rather than the nuclear medicine patient population. Nevertheless, in ICRP Publication 52, the ICRP has suggested that the H{sub E} may be used in nuclear medicine. The ICRP also has published a compendium of dose estimates, including H{sub E} values, for various nuclear medicine procedures at various ages in ICRP Publication 53. The effective dose (E) of ICRP Publication 60 is perhaps more suitable for use in nuclear medicine, with tissue weighting factors based on the entire population. Other comparisons of H{sub E} and E have been published. The authors have used the program MIRDOSE 3.1 to compute total-body dose, H{sub E}, and E for 62 radiopharmaceutical procedures, based on the best current biokinetic data available.

  14. Internal medicine residents' perceived ability to direct patient care: impact of gender and experience.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Christie; Goetz, Sarah; Ward, Earlise; Carnes, Molly

    2008-12-01

    Physicians are expected to effect patient care by giving orders to members of a healthcare team. Because women are socialized to be less directive than men, the assertive behavior required of new physicians may be experienced differently by male and female residents. We sought to explore the effects of gender and year of training on residents' experiences and perceived ability to direct patient care. This was a mixed-methods, cross-sectional, descriptive study employing a quantitative written survey and qualitative interviews among internal medicine residents at an academic health center. Measurements included questionnaires and interviews about stress, assertiveness, and personal factors that influence their effectiveness in directing patient care. Analyses examined differences by gender and year of training. One hundred residents were invited to participate; 65 returned questionnaires, and 16 of these residents were interviewed. Compared with male residents, female residents selected less assertive behaviors for clinical scenarios (p = 0.047) and were more likely to perceive gender as inhibiting their ability to influence patient care (p < 0.01). Stress associated with being assertive varied more with experience than gender. Interviews corroborated these findings and supported the complexity of gender norms for behavior for female residents in a directive leadership position. When compared with male peers, female residents reported more gender issues in residency and chose less assertive behaviors in clinical scenarios. Experience mitigated some gender differences. Our findings suggest that discussion of the existing research on prescriptive gender norms for behavior and leadership may be warranted in resident orientation.

  15. Insights from outstanding rural internal medicine residency rotations at the University of Washington.

    PubMed

    DeWitt, D E; Migeon, M; LeBlond, R; Carline, J D; Francis, L; Irby, D M

    2001-03-01

    Despite being well suited to provide the breadth of care needed in rural areas, few general internists become rural physicians. Little formal rural residency training is available and no formal curricula exist. For over 25 years the University of Washington School of Medicine has provided elective WWAMI (Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, Idaho) rural residency rotations to expose residents to the rewards and challenges of rural practice. This study identified the characteristics of outstanding rural residency rotations. The key preceptors at three outstanding rural residency sites were interviewed about their experiences, teaching strategies, and opinions about curriculum. Their responses were categorized. Seven university-based residents and eight training at WWAMI sites recorded and rated the value of over 1,500 learning encounters. The preceptors agreed that outstanding rotations were led by enthusiastic preceptors who served as role models for excellence. These preceptors provided residents with meaningful responsibilities and emphasized independent decision making based on the history and physical examination. They stressed supervised independence and self-directed learning with frequent structured feedback for residents. The residents rated the learning value of patient encounters in rural locations significantly higher than that of those in university clinics. Exceptional rural residency experiences involve excellent role models who provide meaningful responsibility and emphasize core skills using a learner-centered approach. Rural training experiences should be supported, and the suggestions of outstanding preceptors should be used to develop and disseminate a curriculum that will better prepare residents for rural practice.

  16. Competency-based achievement system: using formative feedback to teach and assess family medicine residents' skills.

    PubMed

    Ross, Shelley; Poth, Cheryl N; Donoff, Michel; Humphries, Paul; Steiner, Ivan; Schipper, Shirley; Janke, Fred; Nichols, Darren

    2011-09-01

    Family medicine residency programs require innovative means to assess residents' competence in "soft" skills (eg, patient-centred care, communication, and professionalism) and to identify residents who are having difficulty early enough in their residency to provide remedial training. To develop a method to assess residents' competence in various skills and to identify residents who are having difficulty. The Competency-Based Achievement System (CBAS) was designed to measure competence using 3 main principles: formative feedback, guided self-assessment, and regular face-to-face meetings. The CBAS is resident driven and provides a framework for meaningful interactions between residents and advisors. Residents use the CBAS to organize and review their feedback, to guide their own assessment of their progress, and to discern their future learning needs. Advisors use the CBAS to monitor, guide, and verify residents' knowledge of and competence in important skills. By focusing on specific skills and behaviour, the CBAS enables residents and advisors to make formative assessments and to communicate their findings. Feedback indicates that the CBAS is a user-friendly and helpful system to assess competence.

  17. BRIEF REPORT: Multiprogram Evaluation of Reading Habits of Primary Care Internal Medicine Residents on Ambulatory Rotations

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Cindy J; Aagaard, Eva; Brandenburg, Suzanne; Nadkarni, Mohan; Wei, Henry G; Baron, Robert

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the reading habits and educational resources of primary care internal medicine residents for their ambulatory medicine education. DESIGN Cross-sectional, multiprogram survey of primary care internal medicine residents. PARTICIPANTS/SETTING Second- and third-year residents on ambulatory care rotations at 9 primary care medicine programs (124 eligible residents; 71% response rate). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Participants were asked open-ended and 5-point Likert-scaled questions about reading habits: time spent reading, preferred resources, and motivating and inhibiting factors. Participants reported reading medical topics for a mean of 4.3 ± 3.0 SD hours weekly. Online-only sources were the most frequently utilized medical resource (mean Likert response 4.16 ± 0.87). Respondents most commonly cited specific patients' cases (4.38 ± 0.65) and preparation for talks (4.08 ± 0.89) as motivating factors, and family responsibilities (3.99 ± 0.65) and lack of motivation (3.93 ± 0.81) as inhibiting factors. CONCLUSIONS To stimulate residents' reading, residency programs should encourage patient- and case-based learning; require teaching assignments; and provide easy access to online curricula. PMID:16704393

  18. A comparison of surgery and family medicine residents' perceptions of cross-cultural care training.

    PubMed

    Chun, Maria B J; Jackson, David S; Lin, Susan Y; Park, Elyse R

    2010-12-01

    The need for physicians formally trained to deliver care to diverse patient populations has been widely advocated. Utilizing a validated tool, Weissman and Betancourt's Cross-Cultural Care Survey, the aim of this current study was to compare surgery and family medicine residents' perceptions of their preparedness and skillfulness to provide high quality cross-cultural care. Past research has documented differences between the two groups' reported impressions of importance and level of instruction received in cross-cultural care. Twenty surgery and 15 family medicine residents participated in the study. Significant differences were found between surgery and family medicine residents on most ratings of the amount of training they received in cross-cultural skills. Specifically, family medicine residents reported having received more training on: 1) determining how patients want to be addressed, 2) taking a social history, 3) assessing their understanding of the cause of illness, 4) negotiating their treatment plan, 5) assessing whether they are mistrustful of the health care system and÷or doctor, 6) identifying cultural customs, 7) identifying how patients make decisions within the family, and 8) delivering services through a medical interpreter. One unexpected finding was that surgery residents, who reported not receiving much formal cultural training, reported higher mean scores on perceived skillfulness (i.e. ability) than family medicine residents. The disconnect may be linked to the family medicine residents' training in cultural humility - more knowledge and understanding of cross-cultural care can paradoxically lead to perceptions of being less prepared or skillful in this area.

  19. Podiatric Resident Performance on a Basic Competency Examination in Musculoskeletal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Creech, Corine L; Pettineo, Steven J; Meyr, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    A basic competency examination in musculoskeletal medicine has previously been administered to residents across a variety of medical specialties and has demonstrated that medical school preparation in musculoskeletal medicine might be inadequate. The objectives of the present study were to assess podiatric surgical resident performance on this examination and to assess podiatric surgical residency director opinions of the level of importance of the test subject areas. A total of 117 podiatric surgical residents from 15 residency programs completed the 25-question examination. The residents scored a mean ± standard deviation of 60.32% ± 12.60% (range 22.00% to 92.00%). On the 7 questions rated by podiatric residency directors as ≥8 on a 10-point scale of relative importance, this score improved to 84.92% ± 11.93% (range 39.29% to 100.0%). Senior level residents did not outperform junior level residents (60.76% versus 60.44%; p = .898), and those who had completed a general orthopedics rotation at some point in their education did not outperform those who had not (61.12% versus 58.64%; p = .370). The podiatric residency directors assigned a mean ± standard deviation importance score of 6.97 ± 2.07 out of 10 for the 25 questions and suggested a mean ± standard deviation passing score of 69.14% ± 9.03% for the examination. The results of the present investigation provide original data on podiatric surgical resident performance on a basic competency examination in musculoskeletal medicine. Although the residents scored well for some specific test areas, the overall performance was similar to that of previous iterations of the examination given to general surgery and internal medicine residents. The lower scores compared with those from the orthopedic and physical therapy specialties might indicate a need for improved general musculoskeletal medicine education within the podiatric curriculum. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons

  20. Family medicine residency program director expectations of procedural skills of medical school graduates.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Gretchen M; Chesser, Amy K; Woods, Nikki Keene; Krug, Nathan R; Kellerman, Rick D

    2013-06-01

    Mismatch between program directors' expectations of medical school graduates and the experience of students in medical school has important implications for patient safety and medical education. We sought to define family medicine residency program directors' expectations of medical school graduates to independently perform various procedural skills and medical school graduates' self-reported competence to perform those skills at residency outset. In July of 2011, a paper-based survey was distributed nationwide by mail to 441 family medicine residency program directors and 3,287 medical school graduates enrolled as postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) residents in family medicine residency programs. Program director expectation of independent performance and recent medical school graduate self-reported ability to independently perform each of 40 procedures was assessed. Surveys were completed and returned from 186 program directors (response rate 42%) and 681 medical school graduates (response rate 21%). At least 66% of program directors expected interns to enter residency able to independently perform 15 of 40 procedures. More than 80% of new interns reported they were able to independently perform five of the 15 procedures expected by program directors. Incongruity exists between program director expectations and intern self-reported ability to perform common procedures. Both patient safety and medical education may be jeopardized by a mismatch of expectation and experience. Assessment of medical students prior to medical school graduation or at the start of residency training may help detect procedural skill gaps and protect patient safety.

  1. A Reduced Duty Hours Model for Senior Internal Medicine Residents: A Qualitative Analysis of Residents' Experiences and Perceptions.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Rebecca; Gundy, Serena; Ulic, Diana; Haider, Shariq; Wasi, Parveen

    2016-09-01

    To assess senior internal medicine residents' experience of the implementation of a reduced duty hours model with night float, the transition from the prior 26-hour call system, and the new model's effects on resident quality of life and perceived patient safety in the emergency department and clinical teaching unit at McMaster University. Qualitative data were collected during May 2013-July 2014, through resident focus groups held prior to implementation of a reduced duty hours model and 10 to 12 months postimplementation. Data analysis was guided by a constructivist grounded theory based in a relativist paradigm. Transcripts were coded; codes were collapsed into themes. Thematic analysis revealed five themes. Residents described reduced fatigue in the early morning, counterbalanced with worsened long-term fatigue on night float blocks; anticipation of negative impacts of the loss of distributed on-call experience and on-call shift volume; an urgency to sleep postcall in anticipation of consecutive night float shifts accompanied by conflicting role demands to stay postcall for care continuity; increased handover frequency accompanied by inaccurate/incomplete communication of patients' issues; and improvement in the senior resident experience on the clinical teaching unit, with increased ownership over patient care and improved relationships with junior housestaff. A reduced duty hours model with night float has potential to improve residents' perceived fatigue on call and care continuity on the clinical teaching unit. This must be weighed against increased handover frequency and loss of the postcall day, which may negatively affect patient care and resident quality of life.

  2. Mentorship and pursuit of academic medicine careers: a mixed methods study of residents from diverse backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mentorship influences career planning, academic productivity, professional satisfaction, and most notably, the pursuit of academic medicine careers. Little is known about the role of mentoring in recruiting Black/African American and Hispanic/Latino residents into academia. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of mentoring on academic medicine career choice among a cohort of racially and ethnically diverse residents. Methods A strategic convenience sample of U.S. residents attending national professional conferences between March and July 2010; residents completed a quantitative survey and a subset participated in focus groups. Results Of the 250 residents, 183 (73%) completed surveys and 48 participated in focus groups. Thirty-eight percent of residents were white, 31% Black/African American, 17% Asian/other, and 14% Hispanic/Latino. Most respondents (93%) reported that mentorship was important for entering academia, and 70% reported having sufficient mentorship to pursue academic careers. Three themes about mentorship emerged from focus groups: (1) qualities of successful mentorship models; (2) perceived benefits of mentorship; and (3) the value of racial/ethnic and gender concordance. Residents preferred mentors they selected rather than ones assigned to them, and expressed concern about faculty using checklists. Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, and female residents described actively seeking out mentors of the same race/ethnicity and gender, but expressed difficulty finding such mentors. Lack of racial/ethnic concordance was perceived as an obstacle for minority mentees, requiring explanation of the context and nuances of their perspectives and situations to non-minority mentors. Conclusions The majority of residents in this study reported having access to mentors. However, data show that the lack of diverse faculty mentors may impede diverse residents’ satisfaction and benefit from mentorship relationships compared to

  3. [Legal implications of information to the patient in nuclear medicine].

    PubMed

    Fernández Sánchez, J

    2004-01-01

    Every patient has the right to be informed about a medical procedure. The nuclear medicine physician has the duty to inform the patients and, if necessary, to obtain a reasonable written consent before some radioisotopic examinations. The following must be considered in every informed consent of a nuclear medicine procedure: the need for the patient information ("why"), the type of information given ("how"), the person who performs it ("who"), the moment in the time ("when") and the place ("where") where the consent is performed. It must always be kept in mind that, although the informed consent has a protection function from the medicolegal point of view, this function may be lost if the consent is not performed correctly. In this paper the importance and the medicolegal implications of the patient information in Nuclear Medicine are evaluated and discussed.

  4. Training requirements for chemists in radiotracer development for nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, R.; Fowler, J.

    1988-01-01

    This panel was organized to address the current and anticipated future shortage of chemists with advanced training to fill positions in the nuclear medicine field. Although hard data and statistics are difficult to acquire, we will attempt to highlight the impact of chemistry on nuclear medicine and to describe the growth of the field which has led to an increasing need for chemists resulting in the current manpower shortage. We also will make recommendations for attracting Ph.D. chemists to careers in nuclear medicine research and possible mechanisms for postgraduate training. Solving this problem and establishing a long term committment and mechanism for advanced training is critically important to meet the current needs of the profession and to assure future growth and innovation. 3 tabs.

  5. Training Future Clinician-Educators: A Track for Family Medicine Residents.

    PubMed

    Lin, Steven; Sattler, Amelia; Chen Yu, Grace; Basaviah, Preetha; Schillinger, Erika

    2016-03-01

    Despite a growing demand for skilled clinician-educators, residents today rarely receive formal training in clinical teaching, curriculum development, administration, leadership, or educational scholarship. The authors describe the development, implementation, and preliminary evaluation of the O'Connor Stanford Leaders in Education Residency (OSLER) track, a novel clinician-educator track within the family medicine residency program affiliated with Stanford University School of Medicine. In 2010, the OSLER track was introduced at O'Connor Hospital, a community hospital that houses an 8-8-8 family medicine residency program. Residents who are in good standing can apply to the track at the midpoint of their first postgraduate year. Residents are immersed in a flexible, experience-based, 2.5-year-long curriculum with hands-on teaching activities at its core. To foster skills in educational scholarship, track residents are required to design and complete a scholarly project. A comprehensive evaluation plan is currently in progress. Preliminary data indicates high levels of satisfaction with the track's overall value, impact on core teaching skills, and effect on career trajectory. Residents gained more confidence in core teaching skills as they progressed through the track. Scholarly work output by residents has increased significantly since the track was implemented. The residency program has seen an increased interest from applicants since the track was started, with data suggesting that applicant quality has increased from the pre-track to post-track years. More research is needed to assess the effectiveness and reproducibility of this clinician-educator track. If proven, this model may be replicated at other academic medical centers.

  6. Learning behaviour and preferences of family medicine residents under a flexible academic curriculum.

    PubMed

    Sy, Alice; Wong, Eric; Boisvert, Leslie

    2014-11-01

    To determine family medicine residents' learning behaviour and preferences outside of clinical settings in order to help guide the development of an effective academic program that can maximize their learning. Retrospective descriptive analysis of academic learning logs submitted by residents as part of their academic training requirements between 2008 and 2011. London, Ont. All family medicine residents at Western University who had completed their academic program requirements (N = 72) by submitting 300 or more credits (1 credit = 1 hour). Amount of time spent on various learning modalities, location where the learning took place, resources used for self-study, and the objective of the learning activity. A total of 72 residents completed their academic requirements during the study period and logged a total of 25 068 hours of academic learning. Residents chose to spend most of their academic time engaging in self-study (44%), attending staff physicians' teaching sessions (20%),and participating in conferences, courses, or workshops (12%) and in postgraduate medical education sessions (12%). Textbooks (26%), medical journals (20%), and point-of-care resources (12%) were the 3 most common resources used for self-study. The hospital (32%), residents' homes (32%),and family medicine clinics (14%) were the most frequently cited locations where academic learning occurred. While all physicians used a variety of educational activities, most residents (67%) chose self-study as their primary method of learning. The topic for academic learning appeared to have some influence on the learning modalities used by residents. Residents used a variety of learning modalities and chose self-study over other more traditional modalities (eg, lectures) for most of their academic learning. A successful academic program must take into account residents' various learning preferences and habits while providing guidance and training in the use of more effective learning methods and

  7. Increasing Faculty Attendance at Emergency Medicine Resident Conferences: Does CME Credit Make a Difference?

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Cedric W; Hiestand, Brian; Bond, Michael C; Fox, Sean M; Char, Doug; Weber, Drew S; Glenn, David; Patterson, Leigh A; Manthey, David E

    2013-03-01

    Faculty involvement in resident teaching events is beneficial to resident education, yet evidence about the factors that promote faculty attendance at resident didactic conferences is limited. To determine whether offering continuing medical education (CME) credits would result in an increase in faculty attendance at weekly emergency medicine conferences and whether faculty would report the availability of CME credit as a motivating factor. Our prospective, multi-site, observational study of 5 emergency medicine residency programs collected information on the number of faculty members present at CME and non-CME lectures for 9 months and collected information from faculty on factors influencing decisions to attend resident educational events and from residents on factors influencing their learning experience. Lectures offering CME credit on average were attended by 5 additional faculty members per hour, compared with conferences that did not offer CME credit (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.9-6.1; P < .001). Faculty reported their desire to "participate in resident education" was the most influential factor prompting them to attend lectures, followed by "explore current trends in emergency medicine" and the lecture's "specific topic." Faculty also reported that "clinical/administrative duties" and "family responsibilities" negatively affected their ability to attend. Residents reported that the most important positive factor influencing their conference experience was "lectures given by faculty." Although faculty reported that CME credit was not an important factor in their decision to attend resident conferences, offering CME credit resulted in significant increases in faculty attendance. Residents reported that "lectures given by faculty" and "faculty attendance" positively affected their learning experience.

  8. Application of nuclear physics in medical physics and nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehr, Cornelia

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear physics has a long history of influencing and advancing medical fields. At TRIUMF we use the applications of nuclear physics to diagnose several diseases via medical isotopes and treat cancer by using proton beams. The Life Science division has a long history of producing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) isotopes but we are also investigating the production of SPECT and PET isotopes with a potential shortage for clinical operation or otherwise limited access to chemists, biologists and medical researchers. New targets are being developed, aided by a simulation platform investigating the processes inside a target under proton irradiation - nuclear, thermodynamic, and chemical. Simulations also aid in the development of new beam-shaping devices for TRIUMF's Proton Therapy facility, Canada's only proton therapy facility, as well as new treatment testing systems. Both promise improved treatment delivery for cancer patients.

  9. Appraisal of the communication skills of residents in the Family Medicine Program in Central Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alsaad, Saad M.; Alshammari, Sulaiman A.; Almogbel, Turki A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess patients’ perceptions of the communication skills of family medicine residents. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. Data were collected from patients, seeing 23 residents from 4 family medicine residency programs in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia namely, King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh Military Hospital, Security Forces Hospital, and King Abdul-Aziz Medical City. The translated version of the Communication Assessment Tool (CAT) was used. Data were collected during January and February 2013. Results: A total of 350 patients completed the CAT, with an 87.5% response rate. Patients rated each resident differently, but the mean percentage of items, which residents rated as excellent was 71%. In general, male residents were rated higher 72.8 ± 27.2 than female residents 67.8 ± 32.2 with a significant difference; (p<0.005). Also, significant differences were found based on the gender of the residents, when each item of the CAT was compared. Comparing training centers, there were no significant differences found in the overall percentage of items rated as excellent or among items of the CAT. Conclusion: The study identified areas of strength and weaknesses that need to be addressed to improve communication skills of physicians. PMID:27381544

  10. The resident scholar program: a research training opportunity for internal medicine house staff.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Abigail B; McCormack, Francis X; Diers, Tiffiny; Jazieh, Abdul-Rahman

    2007-01-01

    Housestaff research training is a challenging task that is complicated by the lack of a structured process and dedicated time. The Resident Scholar Program (RSP) at the University of Cincinnati, Department of Internal Medicine was created to overcome these challenges. Interested internal medicine house staff are required to submit an application to the residency research director including a project description signed by a faculty mentor. If the project is approved, a 4-month elective rotation is scheduled for the following year. Residents spend the first month on a consult service in the subspecialty area of their research and the remaining 3 months performing their research project. The RSP was launched in July 2003. The percentage of residents participating in research more than tripled. The subspecialty areas represented by RSP research were more diverse than those represented in prior years. Most participants participated in clinical research projects (84%), with 63% of projects being prospective in design. The RSP residents were twice as likely to obtain subspecialty fellowship positions compared to non-RSP residents (89% vs 46%, respectively). The RSP enables house staff to participate in research opportunities in their areas of interest. Development of a more systematic assessment method to study the impact of the program is underway, but the high participation rate reflects resident interest in such a program, particularly for residents with aspirations in pursuing fellowship training.

  11. The use of nuclear medicine techniques in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    McGlone, B; Balan, K

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear medicine techniques have received little attention in the practice of emergency medicine, yet radionuclide imaging can provide valuable and unique information in the management of acutely ill patients. In this review, emphasis is placed on the role of these techniques in patients with bone injuries, non-traumatic bone pain and in those with pleuritic chest pain. New developments such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in myocardial infarction are outlined and older techniques such as scrotal scintigraphy are reviewed. Radionuclide techniques are discussed in a clinical context and in relation to alternative imaging modalities or strategies that may be available to the emergency medicine physician. Aspects of a 24 hour nuclear medicine service are considered. PMID:11696487

  12. Utilization of nuclear medicine scintigraphy in Taiwan, 1997-2009.

    PubMed

    Hung, Mao-Chin; Hsieh, Wanhua Annie; Chang, Peter Wushou; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2011-12-01

    To analyze the utilization of nuclear medicine scintigraphy in the Taiwanese population within the national health-care system between 1997 and 2009. Based on the Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database of 1997-2009, a retrospective population-based analysis was conducted. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were employed to analyze the frequencies and longitudinal trends in the utilization of diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures during the period. In addition, correlation analysis was applied to determine the correlated factors in the utility of nuclear medicine scintigraphy. The annual total nuclear medicine scintigraphy was estimated to be 256,389 on average in 1997-2009 and 11.7 per 1,000 population over the period. The frequency had increased by 67% over the years, from 8.2 per 1,000 population in 1997 to 13.7 per 1,000 population in 2009. The most frequently performed procedures were whole-body bone scans (33.4% of total) and myocardial perfusion scans (29.4% of total), with 4,615 and 5,620 increments per year, respectively. Most patients were in the age group of 41-65 years old when taking examinations. In addition, male subjects were slightly more than female patients (51.5 vs. 48.5%). Furthermore, the frequencies of whole-body bone scans and PET scans were proportional to the incidences of cancers (correlation coefficients were 0.96 and 0.94, respectively). The utilization of nuclear medicine scintigraphy with the National Health Insurance system in Taiwan has been changed considerably in the past 13 years. Both whole-body bone scan and myocardial perfusion scan were performed most often with significantly increases. The trend of nuclear medicine scintigraphy may have potential impact on making health-care policy in Taiwan.

  13. Pioneers of nuclear medicine, Madame Curie.

    PubMed

    Grammaticos, Philip C

    2004-01-01

    Among those who have made important discoveries in the field of radioactivity and thus helped in the development of nuclear medicine as an identical entity are: Heinrich Hertz who in 1886 demonstrated the existence of radiowaves. In 1895 Wilhelm Röntgen discovered the X-rays. In 1896 H. Becquerel described the phenomenon of radioactivity. He showed that a radioactive uranium salt was emitting radioactivity which passing through a metal foil darkened a photographic plate. An analogous experiment performed by S.Thomson in London was announced to the president of the Royal Society of London before the time H.Becquerel announced his discovery but Thomson never claimed priority for his discovery. Muarie Sklodowska Curie (1867-1934) was undoubtedly the most important person to attribute to the discovery of radioactivity. In 1898 she discovered radium as a natural radioactive element. This is how she describes the hard time she had, working with her husband Pierre Curie (1859-1906) for the discovery of radium and polonium: "During the first year we did not go to the theater or to a concert or visited friends. I miss my relatives, my father and my daughter that I see every morning and only for a little while. But I do not complain...". In presenting her discovery of radium, Madame Curie said: " ...in the hands of a criminal, radium is very dangerous. So we must often ask ourselves: will humanity earn or lose from this discovery? I, myself belong to those who believe the former...". The notebooks that Madame Curie had when she was working with radium and other radioactive elements like polonium, thorium and uranium are now kept in Paris. They are contaminated with radioactive materials having very long half-lives and for this reason anyone who wishes to have access to these notes should sign that he takes full responsibility. There are some more interesting points in Madame Curie's life which may not be widely known like: Although her full name is Maria Sklodowska

  14. The Cost and Burden of the Residency Match in Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Blackshaw, Aaron M; Watson, Simon C; Bush, Jeffrey S

    2017-01-01

    To obtain a residency match, medical students entering emergency medicine (EM) must complete away rotations, submit a number of lengthy applications, and travel to multiple programs to interview. The expenses incurred acquiring this residency position are burdensome, but there is little specialty-specific data estimating it. We sought to quantify the actual cost spent by medical students applying to EM residency programs by surveying students as they attended a residency interview. Researchers created a 16-item survey, which asked about the time and monetary costs associated with the entire EM residency application process. Applicants chosen to interview for an EM residency position at our institution were invited to complete the survey during their interview day. In total, 66 out of a possible 81 residency applicants (an 81% response rate) completed our survey. The "average applicant" who interviewed at our residency program for the 2015-16 cycle completed 1.6 away, or "audition," rotations, each costing an average of $1,065 to complete. This "average applicant" applied to 42.8 programs, and then attended 13.7 interviews. The cost of interviewing at our program averaged $342 and in total, an average of $8,312 would be spent in the pursuit of an EM residency. Due to multiple factors, the costs of securing an EM residency spot can be expensive. By understanding the components that are driving this trend, we hope that the academic EM community can explore avenues to help curtail these costs.

  15. Training Pathology Residents to Practice 21st Century Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Black-Schaffer, W. Stephen; Morrow, Jon S.; Steinberg, Jacob J.

    2016-01-01

    Scientific advances, open information access, and evolving health-care economics are disrupting extant models of health-care delivery. Physicians increasingly practice as team members, accountable to payers and patients, with improved efficiency, value, and quality. This change along with a greater focus on population health affects how systems of care are structured and delivered. Pathologists are not immune to these disruptors and, in fact, may be one of the most affected medical specialties. In the coming decades, it is likely that the number of practicing pathologists will decline, requiring each pathologist to serve more and often sicker patients. The demand for increasingly sophisticated yet broader diagnostic skills will continue to grow. This will require pathologists to acquire appropriate professional training and interpersonal skills. Today’s pathology training programs are ill designed to prepare such practitioners. The time to practice for most pathology trainees is typically 5 to 6 years. Yet, trainees often lack sufficient experience to practice independently and effectively. Many studies have recognized these challenges suggesting that more effective training for this new century can be implemented. Building on the strengths of existing programs, we propose a redesign of pathology residency training that will meet (and encourage) a continuing evolution of American Board of Pathology and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements, reduce the time to readiness for practice, and produce more effective, interactive, and adaptable pathologists. The essence of this new model is clear definition and acquisition of core knowledge and practice skills that span the anatomic and clinical pathology continuum during the first 2 years, assessed by competency-based metrics with emphasis on critical thinking and skill acquisition, followed by individualized modular training with intensively progressive responsibility during the final years

  16. Simultaneous acquisition of physiological data and nuclear medicine images

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.S.; Klein, H.A.; Orenstein, S.R.

    1988-11-01

    A technique has been developed that allows the simultaneous acquisition of both image and physiological data into a standard nuclear medicine computer system. The physiological data can be displayed along with the nuclear medicine images allowing temporal correlation between the two. This technique has been used to acquire images of gastroesophageal reflux simultaneously with the intraluminal esophageal pH. The resulting data are displayed either as a standard dynamic sequence with the physiological data appearing in a corner of the image or as condensed dynamic images.

  17. Lessons learned in developing family medicine residency training programs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Murai, Mitsuya; Kitamura, Kazuya; Fetters, Michael D

    2005-09-15

    While family medicine is not well established as a discipline in Japan, a growing number of Japanese medical schools and training hospitals have recently started sougoushinryoubu (general medicine departments). Some of these departments are incorporating a family medicine approach to residency training. We sought to learn from family medicine pioneers of these programs lessons for developing residency training. This qualitative project utilized a long interview research design. Questions focused on four topics: 1) circumstances when becoming chair/faculty member; 2) approach to starting the program; 3) how Western ideas of family medicine were incorporated; and 4) future directions. We analyzed the data using immersion/crystallization to identify recurring themes. From the transcribed data, we selected representative quotations to illustrate them. We verified the findings by emailing the participants and obtaining feedback. Participants included: five chairpersons, two program directors, and three faculty members. We identified five lessons: 1) few people understand the basic concepts of family medicine; 2) developing a core curriculum is difficult; 3) start with undergraduates; 4) emphasize clinical skills; and 5) train in the community. While organizational change is difficult, the identified lessons suggest issues that merit consideration when developing a family medicine training program. Lessons from complexity science could inform application of these insights in other countries and settings newly developing residency training.

  18. Lessons learned in developing family medicine residency training programs in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Mitsuya; Kitamura, Kazuya; Fetters, Michael D

    2005-01-01

    Background While family medicine is not well established as a discipline in Japan, a growing number of Japanese medical schools and training hospitals have recently started sougoushinryoubu (general medicine departments). Some of these departments are incorporating a family medicine approach to residency training. We sought to learn from family medicine pioneers of these programs lessons for developing residency training. Methods This qualitative project utilized a long interview research design. Questions focused on four topics: 1) circumstances when becoming chair/faculty member; 2) approach to starting the program; 3) how Western ideas of family medicine were incorporated; and 4) future directions. We analyzed the data using immersion/crystallization to identify recurring themes. From the transcribed data, we selected representative quotations to illustrate them. We verified the findings by emailing the participants and obtaining feedback. Results Participants included: five chairpersons, two program directors, and three faculty members. We identified five lessons: 1) few people understand the basic concepts of family medicine; 2) developing a core curriculum is difficult; 3) start with undergraduates; 4) emphasize clinical skills; and 5) train in the community. Conclusion While organizational change is difficult, the identified lessons suggest issues that merit consideration when developing a family medicine training program. Lessons from complexity science could inform application of these insights in other countries and settings newly developing residency training. PMID:16162298

  19. Benchmarks for Support and Outcomes for Internal Medicine-Pediatrics Residency Programs: A 5-Year Review

    PubMed Central

    Aronica, Michael; Williams, Ronald; Dennar, Princess E.; Hopkins, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Combined internal medicine and pediatrics (medicine-pediatrics) residencies were Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited separately from their corresponding categorical residencies in June 2006. Objective We investigated how ACGME accreditation of medicine-pediatrics programs has affected the levels of support (both financial and personnel), the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) match rate, performance on the board examination, and other graduate outcomes. Methods From 2009 through 2013 we sent an annual SurveyMonkey online survey to members of the Medicine-Pediatrics Program Directors Association. Questions pertained to program characteristics, program director support, recruitment, ambulatory training, and graduate data. More than 79% of responders completed the entire survey for each year (sample size was 60 program directors). Results Compared to the time prior to accreditation of the specialty, there was an increase in program directors who are dually trained (89% versus 93%), an increase in program director salary ($134,000 before accreditation versus $185,000 in 2013, P < .05), and an increase in the average full-time equivalent support (0.32 before accreditation versus 0.42 in 2013, P < .05). There was also an increase in programs with associate program directors (35% versus 78%), programs with chief residents (71% versus 91%), and an increase in program budgets controlled by program directors (52% versus 69%). The 2013 NRMP match rates increased compared to those of 2005 (99% versus 49%). Performance on the American Board of Pediatrics examination was comparable to that for pediatrics residents. Since accreditation, a larger number of residents are choosing careers in hospital medicine. Conclusions Our data show widespread improved support for medicine-pediatrics programs since the 2006 start of ACGME accreditation. PMID:26692969

  20. Benchmarks for Support and Outcomes for Internal Medicine-Pediatrics Residency Programs: A 5-Year Review.

    PubMed

    Aronica, Michael; Williams, Ronald; Dennar, Princess E; Hopkins, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    Combined internal medicine and pediatrics (medicine-pediatrics) residencies were Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited separately from their corresponding categorical residencies in June 2006. We investigated how ACGME accreditation of medicine-pediatrics programs has affected the levels of support (both financial and personnel), the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) match rate, performance on the board examination, and other graduate outcomes. From 2009 through 2013 we sent an annual SurveyMonkey online survey to members of the Medicine-Pediatrics Program Directors Association. Questions pertained to program characteristics, program director support, recruitment, ambulatory training, and graduate data. More than 79% of responders completed the entire survey for each year (sample size was 60 program directors). Compared to the time prior to accreditation of the specialty, there was an increase in program directors who are dually trained (89% versus 93%), an increase in program director salary ($134,000 before accreditation versus $185,000 in 2013, P < .05), and an increase in the average full-time equivalent support (0.32 before accreditation versus 0.42 in 2013, P < .05). There was also an increase in programs with associate program directors (35% versus 78%), programs with chief residents (71% versus 91%), and an increase in program budgets controlled by program directors (52% versus 69%). The 2013 NRMP match rates increased compared to those of 2005 (99% versus 49%). Performance on the American Board of Pediatrics examination was comparable to that for pediatrics residents. Since accreditation, a larger number of residents are choosing careers in hospital medicine. Our data show widespread improved support for medicine-pediatrics programs since the 2006 start of ACGME accreditation.

  1. Integrative medicine in residency education: developing competency through online curriculum training.

    PubMed

    Lebensohn, Patricia; Kligler, Benjamin; Dodds, Sally; Schneider, Craig; Sroka, Selma; Benn, Rita; Cook, Paula; Guerrera, Mary; Low Dog, Tieraona; Sierpina, Victor; Teets, Raymond; Waxman, Dael; Woytowicz, John; Weil, Andrew; Maizes, Victoria

    2012-03-01

    The Integrative Medicine in Residency (IMR) program, a 200-hour Internet-based, collaborative educational initiative was implemented in 8 family medicine residency programs and has shown a potential to serve as a national model for incorporating training in integrative/complementary/alternative medicine in graduate medical education. The curriculum content was designed based on a needs assessment and a set of competencies for graduate medical education developed following the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outcome project guidelines. The content was delivered through distributed online learning and included onsite activities. A modular format allowed for a flexible implementation in different residency settings. TO ASSESS THE FEASIBILITY OF IMPLEMENTING THE CURRICULUM, A MULTIMODAL EVALUATION WAS UTILIZED, INCLUDING: (1) residents' evaluation of the curriculum; (2) residents' competencies evaluation through medical knowledge testing, self-assessment, direct observations, and reflections; and (3) residents' wellness and well-being through behavioral assessments. The class of 2011 (n  =  61) had a high rate of curriculum completion in the first and second year (98.7% and 84.2%) and course evaluations on meeting objectives, clinical utility, and functioning of the technology were highly rated. There was a statistically significant improvement in medical knowledge test scores for questions aligned with content for both the PGY-1 and PGY-2 courses. The IMR program is an advance in the national effort to make training in integrative medicine available to physicians on a broad scale and is a success in terms of online education. Evaluation suggests that this program is feasible for implementation and acceptable to residents despite the many pressures of residency.

  2. Finding the Perfect Match: Factors That Influence Family Medicine Residency Selection.

    PubMed

    Wright, Katherine M; Ryan, Elizabeth R; Gatta, John L; Anderson, Lauren; Clements, Deborah S

    2016-04-01

    Residency program selection is a significant experience for emerging physicians, yet there is limited information about how applicants narrow their list of potential programs. This study examines factors that influence residency program selection among medical students interested in family medicine at the time of application. Medical students with an expressed interest in family medicine were invited to participate in a 37-item, online survey. Students were asked to rate factors that may impact residency selection on a 6-point Likert scale in addition to three open-ended qualitative questions. Mean values were calculated for each survey item and were used to determine a rank order for selection criteria. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors that predict a strong interest in urban, suburban, and rural residency programs. Logistic regression was also used to identify factors that predict a strong interest in academic health center-based residencies, community-based residencies, and community-based residencies with an academic affiliation. A total of 705 medical students from 32 states across the country completed the survey. Location, work/life balance, and program structure (curriculum, schedule) were rated the most important factors for residency selection. Logistic regression analysis was used to refine our understanding of how each factor relates to specific types of residencies. These findings have implications for how to best advise students in selecting a residency, as well as marketing residencies to the right candidates. Refining the recruitment process will ensure a better fit between applicants and potential programs. Limited recruitment resources may be better utilized by focusing on targeted dissemination strategies.

  3. Clinical ethics in rehabilitation medicine: core objectives and algorithm for resident education.

    PubMed

    Sliwa, J A; McPeak, L; Gittler, M; Bodenheimer, C; King, J; Bowen, J

    2002-09-01

    Described as the balance of values on either side of a moral dilemma, ethics and ethical issues are of increasing importance in the changing practice of rehabilitation medicine. Because the substance of ethics and true ethical issues can be difficult to identify, the education of rehabilitation residents in ethics can similarly be challenging. This article discusses topics pertinent to an understanding of clinical ethics in rehabilitation medicine and provides a method of teaching residents through an algorithm of ethical issues, learning objectives, and illustrative cases.

  4. A Prospective Evaluation of Transverse Tracheal Sonography During Emergent Intubation by Emergency Medicine Resident Physicians.

    PubMed

    Lahham, Shadi; Baydoun, Jamie; Bailey, James; Sandoval, Sandra; Wilson, Sean P; Fox, John C; Slattery, David E

    2017-10-01

    Establishing a definitive airway is often the first step in emergency department treatment of critically ill patients. Currently, there is no agreed upon consensus as to the most efficacious method of airway confirmation. Our objective was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of real-time sonography performed by resident physicians to confirm placement of the endotracheal tube during emergent intubation. We performed a prospective cohort study of adult patients in the emergency department undergoing emergent endotracheal intubation. Thirty emergency medicine residents, who were blinded to end-tidal carbon dioxide detection results, performed real-time transverse tracheal sonography during intubation to evaluate correct endotracheal tube placement. Seventy-two patients were enrolled in the study. Sixty-eight instances (94.4%) were interpreted as correct placement in the trachea; 4 (5.6%) were interpreted as esophageal, of which 1 was a false-negative finding, therefore conferring sensitivity of 98.5% (95% confidence interval, 92.1%-99.9%) and specificity of 75.0% (95% confidence interval, 19.4%-99.4%) for correct placement. There was no significant difference in accuracy among resident sonographers with different levels of residency training. A simple transverse tracheal sonographic examination performed by emergency medicine resident physicians can be used as an adjunct to help confirm correct endotracheal tube placement during intubation. In our cohort, the level of training did not appear to affect the ability of residents to correctly identify the endotracheal tube position. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  5. Emergency medicine residents' use of psychostimulants and sedatives to aid in shift work.

    PubMed

    Shy, Bradley D; Portelli, Ian; Nelson, Lewis S

    2011-11-01

    We evaluated the frequency that emergency medicine house staff report use of stimulants and sedatives to aid in shift work and circadian transitions. We surveyed residents from 12 regional emergency medicine programs inviting them to complete a voluntary, anonymous electronic questionnaire regarding their use of stimulants and sedatives. Out of 485 eligible residents invited to participate in the survey, 226 responded (47% response frequency). The reported use of prescription stimulants for shift work is uncommon (3.1% of respondents.) In contrast, 201 residents (89%) report use of caffeine during night shifts, including 118 residents (52%) who use this substance every night shift. Eighty-six residents (38%) reported using sedative agents to sleep following shift work with the most common agents being anti-histamines (31%), nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics such as zolpidem (14%), melatonin (10%), and benzodiazepines (9%). Emergency medicine residents report substantial use of several classes of hypnotics to aid in shift work. Despite anecdotal reports, use of prescription stimulants appears rare, and is notably less common than use of sedatives and non-prescription stimulants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Keeping family physicians in rural practice. Solutions favoured by rural physicians and family medicine residents.

    PubMed Central

    Rourke, James T. B.; Incitti, Filomena; Rourke, Leslie L.; Kennard, MaryAnn

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine how family medicine residents and practising rural physicians rate possible solutions for recruiting and sustaining physicians in rural practice. DESIGN: Cross-sectional mailed survey. SETTING: Rural family practices and family medicine residency programs in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred seventy-six physicians and 210 residents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Ratings of proposed solutions on a 4-point scale from "very unimportant" to "very important". RESULTS: Rural family physicians rated funding for learner-driven continuing medical education (CME) and limiting on-call duty to 1 night in 5 as the most important education and practice solutions, respectively. Residents rated an alternate payment plan to include time off for attending and teaching CME and comprehensive payment plans with a guaranteed income for locums as the most important education and practice solutions, respectively. CONCLUSION: Residents and physicians rated solutions very similarly. A comprehensive package of the highest-rated solutions could help recruit and sustain physicians in rural practice because the solutions were developed by experts on rural practice and rated by family medicine residents and practising rural physicians. PMID:14526866

  7. Do community medicine residency trainees learn through journal club? An experience from a developing country.

    PubMed

    Akhund, Saima; Kadir, Muhammad Masood

    2006-08-22

    Journal clubs are an internationally recognized teaching tool in many postgraduate medical education fields. In developing countries lack of funds for current print materials may have limited journal club use. But with advancing information technology trainees in developing countries increasingly have more access to high quality journals online. However, we are aware of no studies describing journal club existence and effectiveness in postgraduate medical training in Pakistan. Also we have found no published effectiveness studies of this teaching modality in Community Medicine (Public Health) in any country. This study evaluated the effectiveness of Community Medicine (Public Health) Resident Journal Club (CMR-JC) in Aga Khan University, Pakistan using international criteria for successful journal clubs (2 years continuous existence and more than 50% attendance) and examining resident and alumni satisfaction. Journal club effectiveness criteria were searched using electronic search databases. Departmental records were reviewed from September 1999-September 2005. Ninety percent of residents and alumni of Community Medicine Residency Programme participated voluntarily in a confidential survey. The CMR-JC was regularly conducted. More than 95% of residents attended. (Total residents in the CMR-Programme: 32). Twenty-seven out of 29 current residents/alumni responded to the anonymous questionnaire. Acquisition of critical appraisal skills (23 respondents) and keeping up with current literature (18 respondents) were the two most important objectives achieved. Respondents recommended improved faculty participation and incorporating a structured checklist for article review. CMR-JC fulfils criteria for effective journal clubs. Residents and alumni agree CMR-JC meets its objectives. Incorporating suggested recommendations will further improve standards. The journal club learning modality should be included in residency training programs in developing countries. Effective

  8. Do community medicine residency trainees learn through journal club? An experience from a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Akhund, Saima; Kadir, Muhammad Masood

    2006-01-01

    Background Journal clubs are an internationally recognized teaching tool in many postgraduate medical education fields. In developing countries lack of funds for current print materials may have limited journal club use. But with advancing information technology trainees in developing countries increasingly have more access to high quality journals online. However, we are aware of no studies describing journal club existence and effectiveness in postgraduate medical training in Pakistan. Also we have found no published effectiveness studies of this teaching modality in Community Medicine (Public Health) in any country. This study evaluated the effectiveness of Community Medicine (Public Health) Resident Journal Club (CMR-JC) in Aga Khan University, Pakistan using international criteria for successful journal clubs (2 years continuous existence and more than 50% attendance) and examining resident and alumni satisfaction. Methods Journal club effectiveness criteria were searched using electronic search databases. Departmental records were reviewed from September1999–September 2005. Ninety percent of residents and alumni of Community Medicine Residency Programme participated voluntarily in a confidential survey. Results The CMR-JC was regularly conducted. More than 95% of residents attended. (Total residents in the CMR-Programme: 32). Twenty-seven out of 29 current residents/alumni responded to the anonymous questionnaire. Acquisition of critical appraisal skills (23 respondents) and keeping up with current literature (18 respondents) were the two most important objectives achieved. Respondents recommended improved faculty participation and incorporating a structured checklist for article review. Conclusion CMR-JC fulfils criteria for effective journal clubs. Residents and alumni agree CMR-JC meets its objectives. Incorporating suggested recommendations will further improve standards. The journal club learning modality should be included in residency training

  9. Internal medicine resident knowledge, attitudes, and barriers to naloxone prescription in hospital and clinic settings.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J Deanna; Spicyn, Natalie; Matson, Pamela; Alvanzo, Anika; Feldman, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    The United States is facing an epidemic of opioid use and misuse leading to historically high rates of overdose. Community-based overdose education and naloxone distribution has effectively trained lay bystanders to recognize signs of overdose and administer naloxone for reversal. There has been a movement to encourage physicians to prescribe naloxone to all patients at risk of overdose; however, the rate of physician prescribing remains low. This study aims to describe resident knowledge of overdose risk assessment, naloxone prescribing practices, attitudes related to naloxone, and barriers to overdose prevention and naloxone prescription. The HOPE (Hospital-based Overdose Prevention and Education) Initiative is an educational campaign to teach internal medicine residents to assess overdose risk, provide risk reduction counseling, and prescribe naloxone. As part of a needs assessment, internal medicine residents at an academic medical center in Baltimore, Maryland, were surveyed in 2015. Data were collected anonymously using Qualtrics. Ninety-seven residents participated. Residents were overwhelmingly aware of naloxone (80%) and endorsed a willingness to prescribe (90%). Yet despite a high proportion of residents reporting patients in their panels at increased overdose risk (79%), few had prescribed naloxone (15%). Residents were willing to discuss overdose prevention strategies, although only a minority reported doing so (47%). The most common barriers to naloxone prescribing were related to knowledge gaps in how to prescribe and how to assess risk of overdose and identify candidates for naloxone (52% reporting low confidence in ability to identify patients who are at risk). Medicine residents are aware of naloxone and willing to prescribe it to at-risk patients. Due to decreased applied knowledge and limited self-efficacy, few residents have prescribed naloxone in the past. In order to improve rates of physician prescribing, initiatives must help physicians

  10. Emergency Medicine Resident Assessment of the Emergency Ultrasound Milestones and Current Training Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Lori A; Stolz, Uwe; Fields, J Matthew; Saul, Turandot; Secko, Michael; Flannigan, Matthew J; Sheele, Johnathan M; Rifenburg, Robert P; Weekes, Anthony J; Josephson, Elaine B; Bedolla, John; Resop, Dana M; Dela Cruz, Jonathan; Boysen-Osborn, Megan; Caffery, Terrell; Derr, Charlotte; Bengiamin, Rimon; Chiricolo, Gerardo; Backlund, Brandon; Heer, Jagdipak; Hyde, Robert J; Adhikari, Srikar

    2017-03-01

    Emergency ultrasound (EUS) has been recognized as integral to the training and practice of emergency medicine (EM). The Council of Emergency Medicine Residency-Academy of Emergency Ultrasound (CORD-AEUS) consensus document provides guidelines for resident assessment and progression. The Accredited Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has adopted the EM Milestones for assessment of residents' progress during their residency training, which includes demonstration of procedural competency in bedside ultrasound. The objective of this study was to assess EM residents' use of ultrasound and perceptions of the proposed ultrasound milestones and guidelines for assessment. This study is a prospective stratified cluster sample survey of all U.S. EM residency programs. Programs were stratified based on their geographic location (Northeast, South, Midwest, West), presence/absence of ultrasound fellowship program, and size of residency with programs sampled randomly from each stratum. The survey was reviewed by experts in the field and pilot tested on EM residents. Summary statistics and 95% confidence intervals account for the survey design, with sampling weights equal to the inverse of the probability of selection, and represent national estimates of all EM residents. There were 539 participants from 18 residency programs with an overall survey response rate of 85.1%. EM residents considered several applications to be core applications that were not considered core applications by CORD-AEUS (quantitative bladder volume, diagnosis of joint effusion, interstitial lung fluid, peritonsillar abscess, fetal presentation, and gestational age estimation). Of several core and advanced applications, the Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma examination, vascular access, diagnosis of pericardial effusion, and cardiac standstill were considered the most likely to be used in future clinical practice. Residents responded that procedural guidance would be more crucial to

  11. Best educational practices in pediatric emergency medicine during emergency medicine residency training: guiding principles and expert recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Robert L; Walthall, Jennifer D H; Mull, Colette C; Nypaver, Michele M; Baren, Jill M

    2010-10-01

    The state of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) education within emergency medicine (EM) residency programs is reviewed and discussed in the context of shifting practice environments and new demands for a greater focus on the availability and quality of PEM services. The rapid growth of PEM within pediatrics has altered the EM practice landscape with regard to PEM. The authors evaluate the composition, quantity, and quality of PEM training in EM residency programs, with close attention paid to the challenges facing programs. A set of best practices is presented as a framework for discussion of future PEM training that would increase the yield and relevance of knowledge and experiences within the constraints of 3- and 4-year residencies. Innovative educational modalities are discussed, as well as the role of simulation and pediatric-specific patient safety education. Finally, barriers to PEM fellowship training among EM residency graduates are discussed in light of the shortage of practitioners from this training pathway and in recognition of the ongoing importance of the EM voice in PEM. © 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  12. The research rotation: competency-based structured and novel approach to research training of internal medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Kanna, Balavenkatesh; Deng, Changchun; Erickson, Savil N; Valerio, Jose A; Dimitrov, Vihren; Soni, Anita

    2006-01-01

    Background In the United States, the Accreditation Council of graduate medical education (ACGME) requires all accredited Internal medicine residency training programs to facilitate resident scholarly activities. However, clinical experience and medical education still remain the main focus of graduate medical education in many Internal Medicine (IM) residency-training programs. Left to design the structure, process and outcome evaluation of the ACGME research requirement, residency-training programs are faced with numerous barriers. Many residency programs report having been cited by the ACGME residency review committee in IM for lack of scholarly activity by residents. Methods We would like to share our experience at Lincoln Hospital, an affiliate of Weill Medical College Cornell University New York, in designing and implementing a successful structured research curriculum based on ACGME competencies taught during a dedicated "research rotation". Results Since the inception of the research rotation in 2004, participation of our residents among scholarly activities has substantially increased. Our residents increasingly believe and appreciate that research is an integral component of residency training and essential for practice of medicine. Conclusion Internal medicine residents' outlook in research can be significantly improved using a research curriculum offered through a structured and dedicated research rotation. This is exemplified by the improvement noted in resident satisfaction, their participation in scholarly activities and resident research outcomes since the inception of the research rotation in our internal medicine training program. PMID:17044924