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Sample records for nuclear microprobe analysis

  1. Materials analysis with a nuclear microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The ability to produce focused beams of a few MeV light ions from Van de Graaff accelerators has resulted in the development of nuclear microprobes. Rutherford backscattering, nuclear reactions, and particle-induced x-ray emission are used to provide spatially resolved information from the near surface region of materials. Rutherford backscattering provides nondestructive depth and mass resolution. Nuclear reactions are sensitive to light elements (Z < 15). Particle-induced x-ray analysis is similar to electron microprobe analysis, but 2 orders of magnitude more sensitive. The focused beams are usually produced with specially designed multiplets of magnetic quadrupoles. The LASL microprobe uses a superconducting solenoid as a final lens. The data are acquired by a computer interfaced to the experiment with CAMAC. The characteristics of the information acquired with a nuclear microprobe are discussed; the means of producing the beams of nuclear particles are described; and the limitations and applications of such systems are given.

  2. Analysis of biological materials using a nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulware, Stephen Juma

    The use of nuclear microprobe techniques including: Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) for elemental analysis and quantitative elemental imaging of biological samples is especially useful in biological and biomedical research because of its high sensitivity for physiologically important trace elements or toxic heavy metals. The nuclear microprobe of the Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) has been used to study the enhancement in metal uptake of two different plants. The roots of corn (Zea mays) have been analyzed to study the enhancement of iron uptake by adding Fe (II) or Fe(III) of different concentrations to the germinating medium of the seeds. The Fe uptake enhancement effect produced by lacing the germinating medium with carbon nanotubes has also been investigated. The aim of this investigation is to ensure not only high crop yield but also Fe-rich food products especially from calcareous soil which covers 30% of world's agricultural land. The result will help reduce iron deficiency anemia, which has been identified as the leading nutritional disorder especially in developing countries by the World Health Organization. For the second plant, Mexican marigold (Tagetes erecta ), the effect of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus intraradices ) for the improvement of lead phytoremediation of lead contaminated soil has been investigated. Phytoremediation provides an environmentally safe technique of removing toxic heavy metals (like lead), which can find their way into human food, from lands contaminated by human activities like mining or by natural disasters like earthquakes. The roots of Mexican marigold have been analyzed to study the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in enhancement of lead uptake from the contaminated rhizosphere.

  3. The proton (nuclear) microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legge, G. J. F.

    1989-04-01

    The scanning proton microprobe (SPMP) is closely related to the scanning electron microprobe (SEMP) or scanning electron microscope (SEM) with X-ray detector. Though the much greater elemental sensitivity of the SPMP is inherent in the physics, the generally inferior spatial resolution of the SPMP is not inherent and big improvements are possible, As its alternative name would imply, the SPMP is often used with heavier particle beams and with nuclear rather than atomic reactions. Its versatility and quantitative accuracy have justified greater instrumentation and computer power than that associated with other microprobes. It is fast becoming an industrially and commercially important instrument and there are few fields of scientific research in which it has not played a part. Notable contributions have been made in biology, medicine, agriculture, semiconductors, geology, mineralogy, extractive metallurgy, new materials, archaeology, forensic science, catalysis, industrial problems and reactor technology.

  4. Nuclear microprobe analysis of lead profile in crocodile bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlic, I.; Siegele, R.; Hammerton, K.; Jeffree, R. A.; Cohen, D. D.

    2003-09-01

    Elevated concentrations of lead were found in Australian free ranging saltwater crocodile ( Crocodylus porosus) bone and flesh. Lead shots were found as potential source of lead in these animals. ANSTO's heavy ion nuclear microprobe was used to measure the distribution of Pb in a number of bones and osteoderms. The aim was to find out if elevated Pb concentration remains in growth rings and if the concentration is correlated with the blood levels recorded at the time. Results of our study show a very distinct distribution of accumulated Pb in bones and osteoderms as well as good correlation with the level of lead concentration in blood. To investigate influence of ion species on detection limits measurements of the same sample were performed by using 3 MeV protons, 9 MeV He ions and 20 MeV carbon ions. Peak to background ratios, detection limits and the overall 'quality' of obtained spectra are compared and discussed.

  5. Nuclear micro-probe analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ager, F. J.; Ynsa, M. D.; Domínguez-Solís, J. R.; López-Martín, M. C.; Gotor, C.; Romero, L. C.

    2003-09-01

    Phytoremediation is a cost-effective plant-based approach for remediation of soils and waters which takes advantage of the remarkable ability of some plants to concentrate elements and compounds from the environment and to metabolize various molecules in their tissues, such as toxic heavy metals and organic pollutants. Nowadays, phytoremediation technology is becoming of paramount importance when environmental decontamination is concerned, due to the emerging knowledge of its physiological and molecular mechanisms and the new biological and engineering strategies designed to optimize and improve it. In addition, the feasibility of using plants for environmental cleanup has been confirmed by many different trials around the world. Arabidopsis thaliana plants can be used for basic studies to improve the technology on phytoremediation. Making use of nuclear microscopy techniques, in this paper we study leaves of wild type and transgenic A. thaliana plants grown in a cadmium-rich environment under different conditions. Micro-PIXE, RBS and SEM analyses, performed on the scanning proton micro-probe at the CNA in Seville (Spain), prove that cadmium is preferentially sequestered in the central region of epidermal trichome and allow comparing the effects of genetic modifications.

  6. Nuclear microprobe analysis of 14N and its application to the study of ammonium-bearing minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosbah, M.; Bastoul, A.; Cuney, M.; Pironon, J.

    1993-05-01

    Nuclear microprobe technique has been applied to the study of ammonium-bearing feldspar, biotite and muscovite crystals selected from metamorphosed black shales and pegmatite veins cross-cutting the shales sampled in the Central Jebilet (Morocco). 14N is easily detected by the nuclear reactions (d, p 0) and (d, α 0) with deuteron energy > 1.6 MeV for a better detection limit ( 14N ⩽ 50 ppm) . The experimental procedure has been developed and is detailed herein. TiN has been used for calibration. The nitrogen content measured in feldspar, biotite and muscovite crystals by the nuclear microprobe is perfectly consistent with quantitative nitrogen analysis by catharometry and semiquantitative analysis by Fourier transform infrared microspectrometry. The nuclear microprobe results can be used to calibrate complementary methods such as ion microprobe and IR microspectrometry.

  7. Mars Microprobe Entry Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Robert D.; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Microprobe mission will provide the first opportunity for subsurface measurements, including water detection, near the south pole of Mars. In this paper, performance of the Microprobe aeroshell design is evaluated through development of a six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) aerodynamic database and flight dynamics simulation. Numerous mission uncertainties are quantified and a Monte-Carlo analysis is performed to statistically assess mission performance. Results from this 6-DOF Monte-Carlo simulation demonstrate that, in a majority of the cases (approximately 2-sigma), the penetrator impact conditions are within current design tolerances. Several trajectories are identified in which the current set of impact requirements are not satisfied. From these cases, critical design parameters are highlighted and additional system requirements are suggested. In particular, a relatively large angle-of-attack range near peak heating is identified.

  8. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is a compilation of X-ray tables and spectra recorded from various mineral matrices. Spectra were obtained using electron microprobe, equipped with LiF geared, curved crystal X-ray spectrometers, utilizing typical analytical operating conditions: 15 Kv acceleration potential, 0.02 microampere sample current as measured on a clinopyroxene standard (CP19). Tables and spectra are presented for the majority of elements, fluorine through uranium, occurring in mineral samples from lunar, meteoritic and terrestrial sources. Tables for each element contain relevant analytical information, i.e., analyzing crystal, X-ray peak, background and relative intensity information, X-ray interferences and a section containing notes on the measurement. Originally intended to cover silicates and oxide minerals the tables and spectra have been expanded to cover other mineral phases. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is intended as a spectral base to which additional spectra can be added as the analyst encounters new mineral matrices.

  9. Data acquisition with a nuclear microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, C.

    1980-01-01

    Spatially resolved information from the near surfaces of materials can be obtained with a nuclear microprobe. The spatial resolution is determined by the optics of the instrument and radiation damage in the specimen. Two- and three-dimensional maps of elemental concentration may be obtained from the near surfaces of materials. Data are acquired by repeated scans of a constantly moving beam over the region of interest or by counting for a preset integrated charge at each specimen location.

  10. Biomedical application of the nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindh, Ulf

    1987-04-01

    The Studsvik Nuclear Microprobe (SMP) has mainly been devoted to applications in the biomedical field. Its ultimate resolution is reached at 2.9×2.9 μm 2 with a proton current of 100 pA. With this performance the SMP has been used in a wide range of disciplines covering environmental hygiene, toxicology, various aspects of internal medicine and trace element physiology. Examples of recent applications in these fields are described.

  11. Study of metal bioaccumulation by nuclear microprobe analysis of algae fossils and living algae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, P.; Wang, J.; Li, X.; Zhu, J.; Reinert, T.; Heitmann, J.; Spemann, D.; Vogt, J.; Flagmeyer, R.-H.; Butz, T.

    2000-03-01

    Microscopic ion-beam analysis of palaeo-algae fossils and living green algae cells have been performed to study the metal bioaccumulation processes. The algae fossils, both single cellular and multicellular, are from the late Neoproterozonic (570 million years ago) ocean and perfectly preserved within a phosphorite formation. The biosorption of the rare earth element ions Nd 3+ by the green algae species euglena gracilis was investigated with a comparison between the normal cells and immobilized ones. The new Leipzig Nanoprobe, LIPSION, was used to produce a proton beam with 2 μm size and 0.5 nA beam current for this study. PIXE and RBS techniques were used for analysis and imaging. The observation of small metal rich spores ( <10 μm) surrounding both of the fossils and the living cells proved the existence of some specific receptor sites which bind metal carrier ligands at the microbic surface. The bioaccumulation efficiency of neodymium by the algae cells was 10 times higher for immobilized algae cells. It confirms the fact that the algae immobilization is an useful technique to improve its metal bioaccumulation.

  12. Microprobe analysis of chlorpromazine pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, T.L.; McCormack, K.M.; Ingram, P.; Kaplan, D.L.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    We describe the histochemical, ultrastructural, and microanalytical features of a skin biopsy specimen obtained from a patient with chlorpromazine pigmentation. Golden-brown pigment granules were present in the dermis, predominantly in a perivascular arrangement. The granules stained positively with the Fontana-Masson stain for silver-reducing substances and negatively with Perl's stain for iron. Electron microscopy revealed dense inclusion bodies in dermal histiocytes, pericytes, endothelial cells, and Schwann cells, as well as lying free in the extracellular matrix. These ''chlorpromazine bodies'' were quite dense even in unosmicated, unstained ultrathin sections, indicating that the pigmentation is related, at least in part, to the inclusions. Microprobe analysis of the chlorpromazine bodies revealed a striking peak for sulfur, which strongly suggests the presence of the drug or its metabolite within these inclusions.

  13. The new nuclear microprobe at Livermore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, M. L.; Bench, G. S.; Heikkinen, D. W.; Morse, D. H.; Bach, P. R.; Pontau, A. E.

    1995-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories/California have jointly constructed a new nuclear microprobe beamline. This beamline is located on the LLNL 10 MV tandem accelerator and can be used for multidisciplinary research using PIXE, PIGE, energy loss tomography, or IBS techniques. Distinctive features of the beamline include incorporation of magnet power supplies into the accelerator control system, computer-controlled object and image slits, automated target positioning to sub-micron resolution, and video optics for beam positioning and observation. Mitigation of vibrations was accomplished with vibration isolators and a rigid beamline design while integral beamline shielding was used to shield from stray magnetic fields. Available detectors include a wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometer, a High-Purity Germanium detector (HPGe), a Lithium-Drifted Silicon X-Ray detector (SiLi), and solid state surface barrier detectors. Along with beamline performance, results from recent measurements on determination of trace impurities in an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) super conducting wire strand, determination of Ca/Sr ratios in seashells, and determination of minor and trace element concentrations in sperm cells are presented.

  14. Nuclear microprobe applications to radioactive waste management basic research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trocellier, P.; Badillo, V.; Barré, N.; Bois, L.; Cachoir, C.; Gallien, J. P.; Guilbert, S.; Mercier, F.; Tiffreau, C.

    1999-10-01

    Radioactive waste management is one of the major technical and scientific challenge to be solved by industrialized countries near the beginning of the 21st century. Relevant questions arise about the extrapolation of the long term-behavior of materials from waste package, engineered barriers and near field repository. Whatever the strategical option might be, wet atmosphere or water intrusion through the different barriers constitute the two main remobilization factors for radionuclides in the geosphere and the biosphere. The study of solid alteration processes and elemental sorption phenomena on mineral surfaces is one of the most efficient basic research approaches to assess the long term performance of waste materials. Ion beam analysis and more recently nuclear microprobe techniques have been applied to investigate exchange mechanisms near representative solid/liquid interfaces such as glass/deionized water, uranium dioxide/granitic or clay water or mineral surface/aqueous solution doped with chemical elements analogue to actinide or fission products. This paper intends to describe the different works that have been carried out in Saclay using the nuclear microprobe facility. The coupling of μRBS, μPIXE and μNRA permits to determine the evolution of the surface composition induced by chemical reactions involved. Complementary observation of solid morphology and solution analysis allows to obtain a complete elemental balance on exchange processes.

  15. Applications of the nuclear microprobe in planetary science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vis, R. D.

    1997-07-01

    Nuclear microprobes have been used in a variety of studies on extra-terrestrial materials. Although by far the most used analytical technique is micro-PIXE, valuable contributions have also been given to planetary science using other methods available among the suite of analytical techniques provided by the microprobe. Also a few studies of the application of synchrotron radiation to planetary science has been published. Research aims are either to get a full analysis of very small objects such as cosmic dust or to extract elemental profiles over areas of interest. In the latter case, these distributions may give insight into the temperature history of the objects studied. In this way single crystals, chondrules in ordinary chondrites but also phase transitions in iron-meteorites have been investigated. Being by far the oldest objects available for research and being conserved for billions of years without serious wearing and erosion as would happen on earth, their detailed studies provide knowledge about the early history of the solar system and on primary geological processes.

  16. Elastic recoil detection analysis on the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegele, R.; Orlic, I.; Cohen, David D.

    2002-05-01

    The heavy ion microprobe at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation is capable of focussing heavy ions with an ME/ q2 of up to 100 amu MeV. This makes the microprobe ideally suited for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). However, beam currents on a microprobe are usually very small, which requires a detection system with a large solid angle. We apply microbeam heavy ion ERDA using a large solid angle ΔE- E telescope with a gas ΔE detector to layered structures. We demonstrate the capability to measure oxygen and carbon with a lateral resolution of 20 μm, together with determination of the depth of the contamination in thin deposited layers.

  17. The nuclear microprobe: An insight of applications in cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, Ph.; Llabador, Y.

    1997-07-01

    During the last five years, the evolution of biomedical research based upon nuclear microprobe analysis has followed the development of experimental models of cultured or isolated cells. Fundamental studies of cellular mechanisms have been approached by means of in vitro assays associated with single cell analysis. Within those groups which are involved in such programs, special emphasis has been placed on cell culture and processing techniques which fulfill the methodological requirements for intracellular ion beam analysis. Great efforts have been orientated towards the improvement of normalization procedures. It is now possible to provide reliable quantitative results expressed in such units that they can be easily cross-checked using conventional methods. Imaging techniques have been also developed for the identification of the analyzed structures. In this paper, different domains of cell biology which have been addressed during the last years are reviewed. Studies dealing with cellular physiology and pharmacology are briefly presented as are also those related to the role of trace elements. Topics under development in our group as well as ongoing investigations will be also evoked.

  18. Spherical chamber effective solution for multipurpose nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelicon, P.; Simčič, J.; Jakšić, M.; Medunić, Z.; Naab, F.; McDaniel, F. D.

    2005-04-01

    Vacuum chambers for multipurpose nuclear microprobes must provide for the installation and servicing of several detection systems operating simultaneously, as well as sample visual control and mechanical manipulation. Detectors for X-rays, scattered ions, nuclear reaction products, secondary electrons, secondary luminescence and optical microscopes are mounted at the angles preferably larger than 120° with respect to the beam direction. Their positioning should not increase the space in the region between the ion lens and the focal point of the microprobe. Spherical chambers presented here effectively solve this problem and offer, at the same time, ports for gamma-ray detector, annular microscope, easy manual access in the sample region, ports for vertical and horizontal sample positioning and manipulation, as well as STIM and ERDA detectors at forward scattering angles and the Faraday cup. The basic construction, resulting in the three different but similar chamber designs at three nuclear microprobes worldwide, are presented. Current installation details, comments on the performance and suggested improvements are given.

  19. Proton beam micromachined resolution standards for nuclear microprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Rajta, I.; van Kan, J. A.; Bettiol, A. A.; Osipowicz, T.

    2002-05-01

    The quest for smaller spot sizes has long been the goal of many nuclear microprobe groups worldwide, and consequently there is a need for good quality resolution standards. Such standards have to be consistent with the accurate measurement of state-of-the-art nuclear microbeam spot sizes, i.e. 400 nm for high current applications such as Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and proton-induced X-ray emission, and 100 nm for low current applications such as scanning transmission ion microscopy or ion beam-induced charge. The criteria for constructing a good quality nuclear microprobe resolution standard is therefore demanding: the standard has to be three dimensional with a smooth surface, have an edge definition better than the state-of-the-art beam spot resolutions, and exhibit vertical side walls. Proton beam micromachining (PBM) is a new technique of high potential for the manufacture of precise 3D microstructures. Recent developments have shown that metallic microstructures (nickel and copper) can be formed from these microshapes. Prototype nickel PBM resolution standards have been manufactured at the Research Centre for Nuclear Microscopy, NUS and these new standards are far superior to the 2000 mesh gold grids currently in use by many groups in terms of surface smoothness, vertical walls and edge definition. Results of beam resolution tests using the new PBM standards with the OM2000 microprobe end station/HVEE Singletron system have yielded spot sizes of 290 nm×450 nm for a 50 pA beam of 2 MeV protons.

  20. Quantitative elemental imaging of octopus stylets using PIXE and the nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubleday, Zoë; Belton, David; Pecl, Gretta; Semmens, Jayson

    2008-01-01

    By utilising targeted microprobe technology, the analysis of elements incorporated within the hard bio-mineralised structures of marine organisms has provided unique insights into the population biology of many species. As hard structures grow, elements from surrounding waters are incorporated effectively providing a natural 'tag' that is often unique to the animal's particular location or habitat. The spatial distribution of elements within octopus stylets was investigated, using the nuclear microprobe, to assess their potential for determining dispersal and population structure in octopus populations. Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was conducted using the Dynamic Analysis method and GeoPIXE software package, which produced high resolution, quantitative elemental maps of whole stylet cross-sections. Ten elements were detected within the stylets which were heterogeneously distributed throughout the microstructure. Although Ca decreased towards the section edge, this trend was consistent between individuals and remained homogeneous in the inner region of the stylet, and thus appears a suitable internal standard for future microprobe analyses. Additional analyses used to investigate the general composition of the stylet structure suggested that they are amorphous and largely organic, however, there was some evidence of phosphatic mineralisation. In conclusion, this study indicates that stylets are suitable for targeted elemental analysis, although this is currently limited to the inner hatch region of the microstructure.

  1. The Debrecen Scanning Nuclear Microprobe and its Applications in Biology and Environmental Science

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Zsofia

    2007-11-26

    Nuclear microscopy is one of the most powerful tools which are able to determine quantitative trace element distributions in complex samples on a microscopic scale. The advantage of nuclear microprobes are that different ion beam analytical techniques, like PIXE, RBS, STIM and NRA can be applied at the same time allowing the determination of the sample structure, major, minor and trace element distribution simultaneously.In this paper a nuclear microprobe setup developed for the microanalysis of thin complex samples of organic matrix at the Debrecen Scanning Nuclear Microprobe Facility is presented. The application of nuclear microscopy in life sciences is shown through an example, the study of penetration of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles of bodycare cosmetics in skin layers.

  2. Applications to cultural heritage diagnostics at the new nuclear microprobe beam line at CEDAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagnile, L.; Quarta, G.; Demortier, G.; Maruccio, L.; D'Elia, M.

    2009-06-01

    A nuclear microprobe beam line has been installed at CEDAD (Centre for Dating and Diagnostics), University of Salento, Lecce, Italy. The beam line is connected to the -30° port of the high energy switching magnet of a 3 MV HVEE 4130HC Tandetron accelerator. It is based on an Oxford Microbeam magnetic quadrupole triplet and its general features are presented. The results of functional tests are presented showing how a lateral spatial resolution as low as ˜2 μm has been achieved in vacuum by analysing standard reference material. The results obtained in the analysis of ancient radiocarbon dated biological tissues are presented for the identification and distribution of toxic elements such as Pb.

  3. Preparation of ultra small samples for optical and microprobe analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes a simple but satisfactory new method for the preparation of tiny, varied and specialized specimens for electron or ion-microprobe analysis developed over the past five years. Microtektites, individual chondrules, single grains, blebs from lunar samples and meteoritic minerals have been prepared by this technique. A description of the preparation of these usually difficult samples from the initial mounting through the various polishing steps to their final polish is presented in detail. The procedures used to prevent any contamination of these specimens by the polishing agents and to prevent cross contamination to the other samples used for geochronology studies are presented.

  4. Development of an external beam nuclear microprobe on the Aglae facility of the Louvre museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calligaro, T.; Dran, J.-C.; Ioannidou, E.; Moignard, B.; Pichon, L.; Salomon, J.

    2000-03-01

    The external beam line of our facility has been recently equipped with the focusing system previously mounted on a classical nuclear microprobe. When using a 0.1 μm thick Si 3N 4 foil for the exit window and flowing helium on the sample under analysis, a beam spot as small as 10 μm is attainable at a distance of 3 mm from the window. Elemental micromapping is performed by mechanical scanning. An electronic device has been designed which allows XY scanning by moving the sample under the beam by steps down to 0.1 μm. Beam monitoring is carried out by means of the weak X-ray signal emitted by the exit foil and detected by a specially designed Si(Li) detector cooled by Peltier effect. The characteristics of external beams of protons and alpha particles are evaluated by means of resonance scanning and elemental mapping of a grid. An example of application is presented, dealing with elemental micro-mapping of inclusions in gemstones.

  5. The biological research programme of the nuclear microprobe at the National Accelerator Centre, Faure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prozesky, V. M.; Pineda, C. A.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, J.; Przybylowicz, W. J.; Churms, C. L.; Springhorn, K. A.; Moretto, Ph; Michelet, C.; Chikte, U.; Wenzl, P.

    2000-03-01

    The nuclear microprobe (NMP) unit of the National Accelerator Centre (NAC) has initiated a focused research programme on studies of biological material, ranging from applications in medicine to agriculture and botany. During this period a state-of-the-art cryo-preparation laboratory was also developed. This research programme has resulted in a wide range of projects, and has shown how well suited the NMP is for studies of biological material in general. This paper reports on some of the problems and demands in this field, as well as some of the results obtained using particle induced X-ray spectroscopy (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS). True elemental imaging is routinely performed using the dynamic analysis (DA) method, which forms part of the GeoPIXE suite of programmes. A collaborative project, together with the CENBG group of Bordeaux-Gradignan in France, on the development of a facility with the aim of studying effects of single-events of radiation in living cells was recently established and is discussed.

  6. Nuclear microprobe studies of elemental distributions in dormant seeds of Burkea africana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, E. T. F.; Weiersbye-Witkowski, I. M.; Przybyłowicz, W. J.; Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, J.

    1997-07-01

    Seed nutrient stores are vital post-germination for the establishment of seedlings in harsh and unpredictable environments. Plants of nutrient-poor environments allocate a substantial proportion of total acquired nutrients to reproduction (i.e. seeds). We propose that differential allocation of mineral resources to specific seed tissues is an indication of a species germination and establishment strategy. Burkea africana Hook is a leguminous tree typical of broad-leaved nutrient-poor savannas in southern Africa. Elemental distributions in dormant B. africana seed structures were obtained using the true elemental imaging system (Dynamic Analysis) of the NAC Van de Graaff nuclear microprobe. Raster scans of 3.0 MeV protons were complemented by simultaneous BS and PIXE point analyses. Mineral nutrient concentrations varied greatly between seed tissues. Elevated levels of metals known to play an important role as plant enzyme co-factors were found in the seed lens and embryonic axis. Distributions of most of these metals (Ca, Mn, Fe and Zn, but not K or Cu) were positively correlated with embryonic P distribution, and probably represent phytin deposits. The distribution of metals within seed structures is 'patchy' due to their complexation with P as electron-dense globoid phytin crystals, which constrains the interpretation of PIXE point analyses.

  7. Nuclear Microprobe using Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) for Hydrogen Profiling in High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Pascal; Sayir, Ali; Berger, Marie-Helene

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between hydrogen and various high temperature protonic conductors (HTPC) has not been clearly understood due to poor densification and unreacted secondary phases. the melt-processing technique is used in producing fully dense simple SrCe(0.9)Y (0.10) O(3-delta) and complex Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) perovskites that can not be achieved by solid-state sintering. the possibilities of ion beam analysis have been investigated to quantify hydrogen distribution in HTPC perovskites subjected to water heat treatment. Nuclear microprobe technique is based on the interactions of a focused ion beam of MeV light ions (H-1, H-2, He-3, He-4,.) with the sample to be analyzed to determine local elemental concentrations at the cubic micrometer scale, the elastic recoil detection analysis technique (ERDA) has been carried out using He-4(+) microbeams and detecting the resulting recoil protons. Mappings of longitudinal sections of water treated SrCeO3 and Sr(Ca(1/3)Nb(2/3))O3 perovskites have been achieved, the water treatment strongly alters the surface of simple SrCe(0.9)Y(0.10)O(3-delta) perovskite. From Rutherford Back Scattering measurements (RBS), both Ce depletion and surface re-deposition is evidenced. the ERDA investigations on water treated Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) perovskite did not exhibit any spatial difference for the hydrogen incorporation from the surface to the centre. the amount of hydrogen incorporation for Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) was low and required further development of two less conventional techniques, ERDA in forward geometry and forward elastic diffusion H-1(p,p) H-1 with coincidence detection.

  8. The Perils of Electron Microprobe Analysis of Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, C. E.; Essene, E. J.; Wang, K. L.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate electron microprobe analysis of apatite is problematic, especially for F and Cl, whose concentrations are essential in calculating a non-analyzable OH component. The issues include beam-induced sample damage and temporal variation of F and Cl X-rays; both effects are mainly dependent on beam current, beam spot size and apatite orientation [1]. To establish a rigorous analytical procedure, several oriented apatite samples, including the well-known Durango and Wilberforce fluorapatites, were analyzed for a large suite of elements, including oxygen. Careful X-ray spectroscopy was performed, including selection of appropriate analytical standards, background measurement positions and comparison of area peak factors. Polarized infrared spectra on oriented apatite samples were also collected for complementary information. The results show that when apatite samples are oriented with the c-axis parallel to the electron beam, there is significant nonlinear variation (an increase or decrease, depending on measurement conditions) of F and Cl X-ray intensities during analyses, and systematically higher-than-expected F apparent concentrations, despite the careful selection of electron beam conditions from a series of X-ray time scans and zero-time count rate extrapolation. On the other hand, when the electron beam is oriented perpendicular to the c-axis, with a ≤ 15 nA beam current and a ≥ 5 µm diameter defocused beam, F and Cl X-ray intensities do not vary or vary slowly and predictably with time, yielding quantitative analysis results for the Durango and Wilberforce apatites (both containing little OH) which are in good agreement with published wet chemical analyses. Furthermore, the OH and CO2 contents inferred for three other analyzed apatite samples are roughly consistent with infrared analyses. For example, for an apatite from Silver Crater Mine in Ontario, significant deficiency in the P site, as well as extra F, was inferred from microprobe analyses

  9. Light stable isotope analysis of meteorites by ion microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The main goal was to develop the necessary secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS) techniques to use a Cameca ims-4f ion microprobe to measure light stable isotope ratios (H, C, O and S) in situ and in non-conducting mineral phases. The intended application of these techniques was the analysis of meteorite samples, although the techniques that have been developed are equally applicable to the investigation of terrestrial samples. The first year established techniques for the analysis of O isotope ratios (delta O-18 and delta O-17) in conducting mineral phases and the measurement of S isotope ratios (delta S-34) in a variety of sulphide phases. In addition, a technique was developed to measure delta S-34 values in sulphates, which are insulators. Other research undertaken in the first year resulted in SIMS techniques for the measurement of wide variety of trace elements in carbonate minerals, with the aim of understanding the nature of alteration fluids in carbonaceous chondrites. In the second year we developed techniques for analyzing O isotope ratios in nonconducting mineral phases. These methods are potentially applicable to the measurement of other light stable isotopes such as H, C and S in insulators. Also, we have further explored the analytical techniques used for the analysis of S isotopes in sulphides by analyzing troilite in a number of L and H ordinary chondrites. This was done to see if there was any systematic differences with petrological type.

  10. Electron Microprobe Analysis Techniques for Accurate Measurements of Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldoff, B. A.; Webster, J. D.; Harlov, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F, Cl, OH)] is a ubiquitous accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. The mineral contains halogens and hydroxyl ions, which can provide important constraints on fugacities of volatile components in fluids and other phases in igneous and metamorphic environments in which apatite has equilibrated. Accurate measurements of these components in apatite are therefore necessary. Analyzing apatite by electron microprobe (EMPA), which is a commonly used geochemical analytical technique, has often been found to be problematic and previous studies have identified sources of error. For example, Stormer et al. (1993) demonstrated that the orientation of an apatite grain relative to the incident electron beam could significantly affect the concentration results. In this study, a variety of alternative EMPA operating conditions for apatite analysis were investigated: a range of electron beam settings, count times, crystal grain orientations, and calibration standards were tested. Twenty synthetic anhydrous apatite samples that span the fluorapatite-chlorapatite solid solution series, and whose halogen concentrations were determined by wet chemistry, were analyzed. Accurate measurements of these samples were obtained with many EMPA techniques. One effective method includes setting a static electron beam to 10-15nA, 15kV, and 10 microns in diameter. Additionally, the apatite sample is oriented with the crystal’s c-axis parallel to the slide surface and the count times are moderate. Importantly, the F and Cl EMPA concentrations are in extremely good agreement with the wet-chemical data. We also present EMPA operating conditions and techniques that are problematic and should be avoided. J.C. Stormer, Jr. et al., Am. Mineral. 78 (1993) 641-648.

  11. An x-ray microprobe beam line for trace element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Long, G.J.; Pounds, J.G.; Schidlovsky, G.; Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    The application of synchrotron radiation to an x-ray microprobe for trace element analysis is a complementary and natural extension of existing microprobe techniques using electrons, protons, and heavier ions as excitation sources for x-ray fluorescence. The ability to focus charged particles leads to electron microprobes with spatial resolutions in the sub-micrometer range and down to 100 ppM detection limits and proton microprobes with micrometer resolution and ppM detection limits. The characteristics of synchrotron radiation that prove useful for microprobe analysis include a broad and continuous energy spectrum, a relatively small amount of radiation damage compared to that deposited by charged particles, a highly polarized source which reduces background scattered radiation in an appropriate counting geometry, and a small vertical divergence angle of approx.0.2 mrad which allows for focussing of the light beam into a small spot with high flux. The features of a dedicated x-ray microprobe beam line developed at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) are described. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Nuclear microprobe study of TiO 2-penetration in the epidermis of human skin xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Zs.; Szikszai, Z.; Gontier, E.; Moretto, P.; Surlève-Bazeille, J.-E.; Kiss, B.; Juhász, I.; Hunyadi, J.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2005-04-01

    Titanium-dioxide is a widely used physical photoprotective component of various cosmetic products. However, very few experiments have been carried out on its penetration through the human epidermal barrier and its possible biological effects in vivo and in vitro. In the frame of the NANODERM EU5 project, the penetration of TiO2-nanoparticles through the epidermis of human foreskin grafts transplanted into SCID mice was investigated in the Debrecen and Bordeaux nuclear microprobe laboratories using combined IBA techniques. Transmission electron microscope studies of the same samples were also carried out in the DMPFCS laboratory. The skin grafts were treated with a hydrophobic emulsion containing micronised TiO2-nanoparticles in occlusion, for different time periods. Quantitative elemental concentrations and distributions have been determined in 14-16 μm thick freeze-dried sections obtained from quick frozen punch biopsies using STIM, PIXE and RBS analytical methods. Using both microscopic methods, we have observed nanoparticles having penetrated into the corneocyte layers of stratum corneum by direct visualisation in TEM and via their chemical fingerprint in PIXE. The human skin xenograft has proved to be a model particularly well adapted to such penetration studies.

  13. Recent advances in laser microprobe mass analysis (LAMMA) of inner ear tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer zum Gottesberge-Orsulakova, A.; Kaufmann, R.

    1985-01-01

    Maintenance of ionic gradients within the various fluids compartments of the inner ear requires transport active cellular systems at different locations. LAMMA analysis is ideally suited for detection of ions in microquantity on cellular levels overcoming many technical difficulties. The present paper summarizes the results of microprobe analysis obtained with laser induced mass spectrometry (LAMMA) supplemented by X-ray microprobe analysis of epithelial cell layers adjacent to the endolymphatic space in the cochlear duct, in the vestibular organ and in the endolymphatic sac. The possible role of inner ear as well as ocular melanin in the mechanisms of active ion transport is discussed.

  14. Nuclear microprobe investigation of the effects of ionization and displacement damage in vertical, high voltage GaN diodes

    DOE PAGES

    Vizkelethy, G.; King, M. P.; Aktas, O.; ...

    2016-12-02

    Radiation responses of high-voltage, vertical gallium-nitride (GaN) diodes were investigated using Sandia National Laboratories’ nuclear microprobe. Effects of the ionization and the displacement damage were studied using various ion beams. We found that the devices show avalanche effect for heavy ions operated under bias well below the breakdown voltage. Here, the displacement damage experiments showed a surprising effect for moderate damage: the charge collection efficiency demonstrated an increase instead of a decrease for higher bias voltages.

  15. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavpetič, P.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Jeromel, L.; Ogrinc Potočnik, N.; Pongrac, P.; Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M.; Pelicon, P.

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on-off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  16. Ion microscope and ion microprobe analysis under oxygen, cesium and gallium bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migeon, H.-N.; Saldi, F.; Gao, Y.; Schuhmacher, M.

    1995-05-01

    This article concentrates on dynamic SIMS analysis using a magnetic sector instrument at micron and sub-micron resolutions with the ion microscope and ion microprobe modes. The advantages and drawbacks of both alternatives for recording measurements in laterally heterogeneous specimens are highlighted expecially concerning transmission and acquisition times. The ionization efficiencies and matrix effects under oxygen, cesium and gallium bombardment are compared. The ion microscope is shown to provide fast acquisition times owing to the parallel detection of the entire analyzed area and the most adequate mode for lateral resolutions above 1 [mu]m, whereas the ion microprobe provides better sensitivity and is best suited for high resolution. Combining cesium and oxygen ion sources provides, in most cases, a better ionization efficiency than the gallium beam but all three sources induce matrix effects which are shown to be much less critical using cationized species.

  17. IMAP ©©

    Copyright Sandia Corporation and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, April 1993.

    : a complete Ion Micro-Analysis Package for the nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolak, A. J.; Bench, G. S.; Morse, D. H.

    1994-03-01

    Microprobe techniques using scanned, focused MeV ions are routinely used in Livermore for materials characterization. Comprehensive data analysis with these techniques is accomplished with the computer software package IMAP, for Ion Micro-Analysis Package. IMAP consists of a set of command language procedures for data processing and quantitative spectral analysis. Deconvolution of the data is achieved by spawning sub-processes within IMAP which execute analysis codes for each specific microprobe technique. IMAP is structured to rapidly analyze individual spectra or multi-dimensional data blocks which classify individual events by the two scanning dimensions, the energy of the detected radiation and, when necessary, one sample rotation dimension. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the utility of the package.

  18. Study of microstructure and silicon segregation in cast iron using color etching and electron microprobe analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vazehrad, S.; Diószegi, A.

    2015-06-15

    An investigation on silicon segregation of lamellar, compacted and nodular graphite iron was carried out by applying a selective, immersion color etching and a modified electron microprobe to study the microstructure. The color etched micrographs of the investigated cast irons by revealing the austenite phase have provided data about the chronology and mechanism of microstructure formation. Moreover, electron microprobe has provided two dimensional segregation maps of silicon. A good agreement was found between the segregation profile of silicon in the color etched microstructure and the silicon maps achieved by electron microprobe analysis. However, quantitative silicon investigation was found to be more accurate than color etching results to study the size of the eutectic colonies. - Highlights: • Sensitivity of a color etchant to silicon segregation is quantitatively demonstrated. • Si segregation measurement by EMPA approved the results achieved by color etching. • Color etched micrographs provided data about solidification mechanism in cast irons. • Austenite grain boundaries were identified by measuring the local Si concentration.

  19. Quantitative simultaneous multi-element microprobe analysis using combined wavelength and energy dispersive systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, L. S.; Doan, A. S., Jr.; Wood, F. M., Jr.; Bredekamp, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    A combined WDS-EDS system obviates the severe X-ray peak overlap problems encountered with Na, Mg, Al and Si common to pure EDS systems. By application of easily measured empirical correction factors for pulse pile-up and peak overlaps which are normally observed in the analysis of silicate minerals, the accuracy of analysis is comparable with that expected for WDS electron microprobe analyses. The continuum backgrounds are subtracted for the spectra by a spline fitting technique based on integrated intensities between the peaks. The preprocessed data are then reduced to chemical analyses by existing data reduction programs.

  20. Electron microprobe analysis of trace elements in minerals at 10 PPM concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, G. A.; Seymour, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    An improved technique is developed for measuring backgrounds during trace element analysis of crystals and glass using electron microprobes. This technique overcomes major difficulties encountered with conventional techniques, such as the problem of obtaining the net X-ray intensity of the characteristic emission line of interest with sufficient precision and accuracy, as well as the error due to the inability to directly measure the intensity at the wavelength of the characteristic line on the sample being analyzed. It is shown that this technique can yield reproducible results to within 4 ppm in olivine, and has a minimum uncertainty and detection limit of 10 ppm Nd in olivine.

  1. Application of a nuclear microprobe to the study of calcified tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coote, Graeme E.; Vickridge, Ian C.

    1988-03-01

    The mineral fraction of calcified tissue is largely calcium hydroxyapatite (bones and teeth) or calcium carbonate (shells and fish otoliths). Apatite has such a strong affinity for fluoride ions that the F/Ca ratio can vary markedly with position in a bone or tooth, depending on the amount of fluoride present at the time of calcification or partial recrystallization. New biological information can be obtained by introducing extra fluoride into the diet of an animal and using a microprobe later to scan sections of bones or teeth. In suitable burial sites extra fluoride is introduced after death, and the new distribution may have applications in forensic science and archaeology. Fish otoliths are also of interest since a new carbonate layer is formed each day and the distribution of trace elements may record some aspects of the fish's life history. Results from the following studies are presented: fluorine distributions in the teeth of sheep which ingested extra fluoride for known periods; distributions of calcium and fluorine in femurs of rats which drank water high in fluoride for periods from 2 to 15 weeks; calcium and fluorine distributions in artificially-prepared lesions in tooth enamel; diffusion profiles in archaeological human teeth and animal bones; patterns in the strontium/calcium ratio in sectioned otoliths of several species of fish.

  2. Proton microprobe analysis of zinc in skeletal tissues. [Proton induced x-ray emission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, S B; Jones, K W; Kraner, H W; Shroy, R E; Hanson, A L

    1980-06-01

    A proton microprobe with windowless exit port was used to study zinc distributions in various types of skeletal tissues. The use of an external beam facilitated positioning of the targets for examination of particular points of interest. The proton microprobe is uniquely suited to this work since it combines high sensitivity for zinc determinations in thick samples with good spatial resolution. Measurements on rat and rabbit Achilles tendon showed a significant increase in zinc concentrations as the beam moved from the unmineralized collagen into the mineralized attachment site. Cartilage gave a similar result, with calcified cartilage having a greater zinc level than the articular surface on unmineralized epiphyseal cartilage.

  3. A wavelength dispersive detector for synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe analysis (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, Mark L.; Sutton, Stephen R.

    1995-02-01

    The synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobe has proven to be a valuable tool for trace element research. It permits analysis down to a few parts per million of many elements in a spot size of less than 10 μm. Existing SXRF microprobes are using energy dispersive detectors (EDS), either Si(Li) or intrinsic Ge diodes. Such detectors have the advantage of collecting the entire fluorescence spectrum at once. They can also be positioned to collect a relatively large solid angle. However, EDS detectors suffer from several significant problems: resolution at Fe Kα is about 150 eV, which is roughly 60 times the natural linewidth; the maximum count rate is less than 20 000 counts/s in the entire spectrum; there is significant low-energy background due to scattering and incomplete charge collection in the device. For geochemical analyses these limitations preclude trace element analyses in the presence of a large amount of a high atomic number element: for example, trace element studies of galena (PbS) and zircon (ZrSiO4), or measurements of Cr or Ti in minerals with more than a few percent Fe or Mn. The poor energy resolution prevents the measurement of small amounts of rare-earth elements in samples with significant concentrations of first-row transition elements. Wavelength dispersive spectrometers, based upon Bragg diffraction from a bent crystal, have several distinct advantages over EDS detectors. The resolution at Fe Kα is about 10 eV, or only 4 times the natural linewidth. This permits the analysis of rare-earth elements and also lowers the background which improves detection limits to the 0.1 ppm range. The WDS spectrometer only detects a single energy at once, so it is possible to measure trace elements in the presence of intense fluorescence of a major element. We have installed a commercial wavelength dispersive spectrometer (model WDX-3PC from Microspec Corp., Fremont, CA) on the X-26A microprobe beamline at the NSLS. The spectrometer can scan the

  4. Challenge to Electron Microprobe Analysis by Nano-features in Geo-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.; Rossman, G. R.

    2007-12-01

    With current high-resolution analytical scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope technology, nano-features (i.e., inclusions, exsolutions, pores) are being discovered in many common geo- materials routinely analyzed by EPMA. Most EPMA instruments have a thermionic electron gun with a tungsten "hairpin" type filament and operate at such high probe currents that they do not produce the high resolution imaging that field emission SEMs do. Such nano-features present difficulties to electron microprobe analysis of the host materials. It is an accuracy issue. Presented here are a few examples. Nano-inclusions like magnetite or pyroxene are common in volcanic glass. Massive rose quartz contains nano-fibers of a dumortierite-related phase that is pink, which is the cause of rose color and optical star effects. Blue quartz has nano-inclusions of ilmenite. Nano-exsolutions and nano-inclusions occur in some feldspars (moonstone and sunstone). Nano- pores in corundum and opals are observed. Thin coatings of nanocrystals on grains of hematite bring Al and P (or As) into the analytical picture. In each of these cases, electron microprobe analyses of host materials were contaminated or affected by the nano-features. For a complete analytical description of a geo-material it is necessary to first examine probe samples under an optical microscope (400× minimum) and a FE-SEM. If the sample contains nano-features, it would then be necessary to combine FIB and TEM-EDS-EELS to comprehensively analyze the host composition.

  5. Study of Italian Renaissance sculptures using an external beam nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchiatti, A.; Bouquillon, A.; Moignard, B.; Salomon, J.; Gaborit, J. R.

    2000-03-01

    The use of an extracted proton micro-beam for the PIXE analysis of glazes is discussed in the context of the growing interest in the creation of an analytical database on Italian Renaissance glazed terracotta sculptures. Some results concerning the frieze of an altarpiece of the Louvre museum, featuring white angels and cherubs heads, are presented.

  6. Gaining Precision and Accuracy on Microprobe Trace Element Analysis with the Multipoint Background Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaz, J. M.; Williams, M. L.; Jercinovic, M. J.; Donovan, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Electron microprobe trace element analysis is a significant challenge, but can provide critical data when high spatial resolution is required. Due to the low peak intensity, the accuracy and precision of such analyses relies critically on background measurements, and on the accuracy of any pertinent peak interference corrections. A linear regression between two points selected at appropriate off-peak positions is a classical approach for background characterization in microprobe analysis. However, this approach disallows an accurate assessment of background curvature (usually exponential). Moreover, if present, background interferences can dramatically affect the results if underestimated or ignored. The acquisition of a quantitative WDS scan over the spectral region of interest is still a valuable option to determine the background intensity and curvature from a fitted regression of background portions of the scan, but this technique retains an element of subjectivity as the analyst has to select areas in the scan, which appear to represent background. We present here a new method, "Multi-Point Background" (MPB), that allows acquiring up to 24 off-peak background measurements from wavelength positions around the peaks. This method aims to improve the accuracy, precision, and objectivity of trace element analysis. The overall efficiency is amended because no systematic WDS scan needs to be acquired in order to check for the presence of possible background interferences. Moreover, the method is less subjective because "true" backgrounds are selected by the statistical exclusion of erroneous background measurements, reducing the need for analyst intervention. This idea originated from efforts to refine EPMA monazite U-Th-Pb dating, where it was recognised that background errors (peak interference or background curvature) could result in errors of several tens of million years on the calculated age. Results obtained on a CAMECA SX-100 "UltraChron" using monazite

  7. Granulation in amine-storage organelles of mouse megakaryocytes: X-ray microprobe analysis and radioautography.

    PubMed

    Daimon, T; Kawai, K; Uchida, K

    1995-02-01

    The mechanisms and the processes of the storage of bivalent cations, ATP and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) in the precursors of the amine-storage organelles of megakaryocytes were studied at the electron microscopic level. Although the precursors of the amine-storage organelles in the megakaryocytes fixed with glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide were empty, the electron opaque granules were observed in these organelles of the freeze-substituted megakaryocytes cut onto ethylene glycol. X-ray microprobe analysis demonstrated that they contained P, Mg and Ca. Quantitative differences in bivalent cations in the granules were not observed between megakaryocytes and blood platelets. Electron opaque uranaffin-reaction products were observed in the precursors of the amine-storage organelles of the megakaryocytes after treatment with the uranaffin reaction for ATP. However, few chromaffin positive granules were observed in the precursors of the amine-storage organelles after the chromaffin reaction for monoamines. Radioautographic analysis demonstrated that blood platelets avidly took up 3H-5HT but megakaryocytes were not able to accumulate 3H-5HT in vivo. These results indicate that megakaryocytes do not yet acquire the well developed uptake system of 5HT in vivo, while they readily accumulate cations and ATP in the precursors of the amine-storage organelles.

  8. Electron Microprobe Analysis of Fe2+/Fe3+ in Minerals With low Total Iron Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creighton, S. D.; Matveev, S.; Stachel, T.; Luth, R. W.

    2004-12-01

    method, we have been able to precisely measure ferric iron concentrations of less than 1 wt.% in mantle-derived pyrope garnets with true microprobe spatial resolution. The accuracy of the flank method is currently being verified with spectrophotometric wet-chemical analysis of ferric iron in pyrope garnet standards. References Höfer, H.E., Brey, G.P., Schulz-Dobrick, B., and Oberhänsli, R., 1994. Eur. J. Min., 6: 407-418

  9. Processing of electron microprobe data from the analysis of altered cementitious materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bertron, A. Escadeillas, G.; Parseval, P. de; Duchesne, J.

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this paper is to present a method for processing electron microprobe data coming from the analysis of degraded cementitious materials. The application domain is that of cement matrices exposed to attack by aggressive media inducing the leaching of one or more chemical elements from the cement paste - typically attacked by neutral or acid aqueous environments. As raw data obtained from electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) come in the form of relative quantities of elements, the aim of the processing is to obtain the absolute variation of the specimen's chemical composition in the degraded zone and consequently to allow a better understanding of the degradation mechanisms by the aggressive environment under consideration. This method was designed for degraded specimens in which the porosity was not filled with resin before the EPMA. The method uses the titanium content of the cement matrix as a control, this element being stable during attack by neutral or acidic media. The method is described in detail using the example of the attack of cement pastes by a mix of several organic acids (notably acetic acid) at pH 4. The use of EPMA for sound and altered cement pastes is also validated. The application domain of the correction method is discussed.

  10. Boron analysis by electron microprobe using MoB4C layered synthetic crystals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, J.J.; Slack, J.F.; Herrington, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary electron microprobe studies of B distribution in minerals have been carried out using MoB4C-layered synthetic crystals to improve analytical sensitivity for B. Any microprobe measurements of the B contents of minerals using this crystal must include analyses for Cl to assess and correct for the interference of Cl X-rays on the BK?? peak. Microprobe analyses for B can be made routinely in tourmaline and other B-rich minerals, and minor B contents also can be determined in common rock-forming minerals. Incorporation of unusually high B contents in minerals other than borosilicates has been discovered in prograde and retrograde minerals in tourmalinites from the Broken Hill district, Australia, and may reflect high B activities produced during the metamorphism of tourmaline-rich rocks. -from Authors

  11. On the analysis of neonatal hamster tooth germs with the photon microprobe at Daresbury, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tros, G. H. J.; Van Langevelde, F.; Vis, R. D.

    1990-04-01

    Complementary to the micro-PIXE experiments performed on hamster tooth germs to elucidate the role of fluoride during the growth, the photon microprobe at Daresbury was used to obtain information on the distribution of Zn. The germs of fluoride-administered hamsters, together with a control group, were analyzed with the micro-synchrotron radiation fluorescence method (micro-SXRF).

  12. Trace elemental analysis of bituminuos coals using the Heidelberg proton microprobe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, J.R.; Kneis, H.; Martin, B.; Nobiling, R.; Traxel, K.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Trace elements in coal can occur as components of either the organic constituents (macerals) or the inorganic constituents (minerals). Studies of the concentrations and distribution of the trace elements are vital to understanding the geochemical millieu in which the coal was formed and in evaluating the attempts to recover rare but technologically valuable metals. In addition, information on the trace element concentrations is important in predicting the environmental impact of burning particular coals, as many countries move toward greater utilization of coal reserves for energy production. Traditionally, the optical and the electron microscopes and more recently the electron microprobe have been used in studying the components of coal. The proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) microprobe offers a new complementary approach with an order of magnitude or more better minimum detection limit. We present the first measurements with a PIXE microprobe of the trace element concentrations of bituminous coal samples. Elemental analyses of the coal macerals-vitrinite, exinite, and inertinite-are discussed for three coal samples from the Eastern U.S.A., three samples from the Western U.S.A., and one sample from the Peoples Republic of China. ?? 1981.

  13. Ion microprobe magnesium isotope analysis of plagioclase and hibonite from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, R. W.; Bischoff, A.

    1984-03-01

    In a search for 26Mg excesses generated by 26Al decay the authors analysed four Al-rich objects from the type 3 ordinary chondrites using an ion microprobe. They report here the presence of 26Mg excesses of up to 100% in an unusually pure hibonite clast from the Dhajala chondrite; this 26Mg excess is the first to be found in an ordinary chondrite. No 26Mg excesses were observed in the three plagioclase-bearing chondrules analysed. It is concluded that 26Al may not have been sufficiently plentiful to act as a major heat source in condensed Solar System bodies.

  14. Ion microprobe magnesium isotope analysis of plagioclase and hibonite from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, R. W.; Bischoff, A.

    1984-01-01

    Ion and electron microprobes were used to examine Mg-26 excesses from Al-26 decay in four Al-rich objects from the type 3 ordinary hibonite clast in the Dhajala chondrite. The initial Al-26/Al-27 ratio was actually significantly lower than Al-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites. Also, no Mg-26 excesses were found in three plagioclase-bearing chondrules that were also examined. The Mg-26 excesses in the hibonite chondrites indicated a common origin for chondrites with the excesses. The implied Al-26 content in a proposed parent body could not, however, be confirmed as a widespread heat source in the early solar system.

  15. A new correction scheme and standards for the analysis of oxygen isotopes in garnet by ion microprobe (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, F.; Kita, N.; Valley, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    Improvements in technique and instrumentation for analysis of oxygen isotopes by ion microprobe have dramatically increased analytical precision, creating the capability and need for better standardization. Accurate ion microprobe analysis of oxygen isotope ratios is possible only if appropriate standards are employed to correct for instrumental bias. In minerals with solid solutions, a component of the bias depends on the cation chemistry of the analyzed mineral; because garnets have a wide variety of solid solutions, a broad range of standards is required. Although the first δ18O(Gt) analyses by ion microprobe were made in Ca-rich garnets with variable Fe3+/Al ratios, at present the majority of published garnet standards are Ca-poor, and current Ca-rich standards yield conflicting results. Here we examine 13 existing garnet standards that span the compositional range of pyrope, almandine, grossular and spessartine, and introduce 14 new standards with variable Ca content including 6 standards along the grossular-andradite join. Bias due to cation composition in garnet is found to correlate with grossular content in pyralspite garnets and with andradite in ugrandite garnets. Instrumental bias is correlated with molar volume in garnets of all compositions in this study, however, there is substantial scatter about this linear relationship, particularly among grossular-rich standards. Although this correlation can be used as a correction scheme for bias, a more accurate method based on a 2nd-order polynomial relationship between X(grossular) in pyralspite or X(andradite) in ugrandite and bias is proposed. This correction reproduces instrumental bias in all but one of the 27 standards to within ±0.4‰. Thus accuracy approaches the spot-to-spot reproducibility of analyses (±0.3‰, 2 S.D.) of the homogeneous master garnet standard UWG-2. The new correction scheme successfully reproduces laser fluorination analyses along a traverse of a polymetamorphic, zoned skarn

  16. Ion microprobe mass analysis of plagioclase from 'non-mare' lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C., Jr.; Anderson, D. H.; Bradley, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    The ion microprobe was used to measure the composition and distribution of trace elements in lunar plagioclase, and these analyses are used as criteria in determining the possible origins of some nonmare lunar samples. The Apollo 16 samples with metaclastic texture and high-bulk trace-element contents contain plagioclase clasts with extremely low trace-element contents. These plagioclase inclusions represent unequilibrated relicts of anorthositic, noritic, or troctolitic rocks that have been intermixed as a rock flour into the KREEP-rich matrix of these samples. All of the plagioclase-rich inclusions which were analyzed in the KREEP-rich Apollo 14 breccias were found to be rich in trace elements. This does not seem to be consistent with the interpretation that the Apollo 14 samples represent a pre-Imbrium regolith, because such an ancient regolith should have contained many plagioclase clasts with low trace-element contents more typical of plagioclase from the pre-Imbrium crust. Ion-microprobe analyses for Ba and Sr in large plagioclase phenocrysts in 14310 and 68415 are consistent with the bulk compositions of these rocks and with the known distribution coefficients for these elements. The distribution coefficient for Li (basaltic liquid/plagioclase) was measured to be about 2.

  17. Experimental and numerical analysis of the temperature distribution of injection molded products using protruding microprobes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shih-Jung; Ho, Chia-Wei

    2011-05-01

    Injection molding has been one of the most important polymer processing methods for manufacturing plastic parts. In the process, the temperature is an important parameter that influences process features such as cycle times, crystallization rates, degree of crystallinity, melt flow properties, and molded product qualities. This study aims to, experimentally and numerically, examine the three-dimensional temperature distribution along the melt flow path of injection molded parts. A special experimental set-up, which includes an injection mold equipped with protruding microprobes for guiding embedded thermocouples, was designed and built to measure the temperature field along the flow path, i.e., inside the runner and the cavity, of injection molded products. The experimental results suggested that the disturbance induced by the probes remained negligible and precise temperature profiles could be measured at various positions inside the cavity. A significant increase of melt temperature was found to result from the viscous dissipation of the polymeric materials in the runner. Additionally, a commercially available code was employed to simulate and predict the temperature variation in injection molded parts. It was shown that the numerical simulation predicted better the temperature distributions inside the cavity than those along the runner.

  18. Experimental and numerical analysis of the temperature distribution of injection molded products using protruding microprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shih-Jung; Ho, Chia-Wei

    2011-05-01

    Injection molding has been one of the most important polymer processing methods for manufacturing plastic parts. In the process, the temperature is an important parameter that influences process features such as cycle times, crystallization rates, degree of crystallinity, melt flow properties, and molded product qualities. This study aims to, experimentally and numerically, examine the three-dimensional temperature distribution along the melt flow path of injection molded parts. A special experimental set-up, which includes an injection mold equipped with protruding microprobes for guiding embedded thermocouples, was designed and built to measure the temperature field along the flow path, i.e., inside the runner and the cavity, of injection molded products. The experimental results suggested that the disturbance induced by the probes remained negligible and precise temperature profiles could be measured at various positions inside the cavity. A significant increase of melt temperature was found to result from the viscous dissipation of the polymeric materials in the runner. Additionally, a commercially available code was employed to simulate and predict the temperature variation in injection molded parts. It was shown that the numerical simulation predicted better the temperature distributions inside the cavity than those along the runner.

  19. Planktonic foraminiferal oxygen isotope analysis by ion microprobe technique suggests warm tropical sea surface temperatures during the Early Paleogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozdon, Reinhard; Kelly, D. Clay; Kita, Noriko T.; Fournelle, John H.; Valley, John W.

    2011-09-01

    Cool tropical sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are reported for warm Paleogene greenhouse climates based on the δ18O of planktonic foraminiferal tests. These results are difficult to reconcile with models of greenhouse gas-forced climate. It has been suggested that this "cool tropics paradox" arises from postdepositional alteration of foraminiferal calcite, yielding erroneously high δ18O values. Recrystallization of foraminiferal tests is cryptic and difficult to quantify, and the compilation of robust δ18O records from moderately altered material remains challenging. Scanning electron microscopy of planktonic foraminiferal chamber-wall cross sections reveals that the basal area of muricae, pustular outgrowths on the chamber walls of species belonging to the genus Morozovella, contain no mural pores and may be less susceptible to postdepositional alteration. We analyzed the δ18O in muricae bases of morozovellids from the central Pacific (Ocean Drilling Program Site 865) by ion microprobe using 10 μm pits with an analytical reproducibility of ±0.34‰ (2 standard deviations). In situ measurements of δ18O in these domains yield consistently lower values than those published for conventional multispecimen analyses. Assuming that the original δ18O is largely preserved in the basal areas of muricae, this new δ18O record indicates Early Paleogene (˜49-56 Ma) tropical SSTs in the central Pacific were 4°-8°C higher than inferred from the previously published δ18O record and that SSTs reached at least ˜33°C during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum. This study demonstrates the utility of ion microprobe analysis for generating more reliable paleoclimate records from moderately altered foraminiferal tests preserved in deep-sea sediments.

  20. Micro-fluidics and integrated optics glass sensor for in-line micro-probing of nuclear samples

    SciTech Connect

    Schimpf, A.; Canto, F.; Bucci, D.; Magnaldo, A.; Couston, L.; Broquin, J. E.

    2011-07-01

    We study the miniaturisation of Thermal Lens Spectrometry (TLS) towards Lab-on-chip integration in order to reduce the volume of fluid assays in nuclear process control. TLS is of great interest in this context since it combines the advantages of optical detection methods with an inherent suitability for small-scale samples. After validating the experimental principle in a classical thermal lens crossed-beam setup, we show the integration of a Young-interferometer with a microcapillary on a glass substrate, reducing the necessary sample size to 400 nl. The interferometer translates the photo-thermally induced refractive index change in the fluid to a phase shift of the fringe pattern, which can then be detected by a camera. Measurements of Co(II) in ethanol yield a detection limit of c = 5 x 10{sup -4} M for the crossed-beam setup and c = 6x10{sup -3} M for the integrated sensor. At an interaction length of 10 {mu}m, it detects a minimum absorbance of AU = 6 x 10{sup -5} in a probed volume of 10 pl. (authors)

  1. Micro-fluidics and integrated optics glass sensor for in-line micro-probing of nuclear samples

    SciTech Connect

    Schimpf, A.; Bucci, D.; Broquin, J.E.; Canto, F.; Magnaldo, A.; Couston, L.

    2012-08-15

    We study the miniaturization of Thermal Lens Spectrometry (TLS) towards Lab-on-chip integration in order to reduce the volume of fluid assays in nuclear process control. TLS is of great interest in this context since it combines the advantages of optical detection methods with an inherent suitability for small-scale samples. After validating the experimental principle in a classical thermal lens crossed-beam setup, we show the integration of a Young-interferometer with a microcapillary on a glass substrate, reducing the necessary sample size to 400 nl. The interferometer translates the photo-thermally induced refractive index change in the fluid to a phase shift of the fringe pattern, which can then be detected by a camera. Measurements of Co(II) in ethanol yield a detection limit of c = 5 x 10{sup -4} M for the crossed-beam setup and c = 6 x 10{sup -3} M for the integrated sensor. At an interaction length of 10 m, it detects a minimum absorbance of K = 1.2 x 10{sup -4} in a probed volume of 14 pl. (authors)

  2. Nuclear microprobe investigation into the trace elemental contents of carotid artery walls of apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minqin, Ren; En, Huang; Beck, Konstanze; Rajendran, Reshmi; Wu, Ben J.; Halliwell, Barry; Watt, Frank; Stocker, Roland

    2007-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease that causes lesions in large and medium-sized arteries. There is increasing evidence that the function of vascular endothelial cells is impaired by oxidation reactions, and that metal ions may participate in these processes. The nuclear microscopy facility in NUS, which has the ability to focus a 2 MeV proton beam down to sub micron spot sizes, was used to investigate the trace elemental changes (e.g. Zn and Fe) in atherosclerotic lesions in the common carotid artery of apolipoprotein E deficient mice fed a high fat diet. In this preliminary study, which is part of a larger study to investigate the effects of probucol on carotid artery atherosclerosis, two sets of mice were used; a test set fed a high fat diet +1% probucol, and a control set which was fed a high fat diet only. The results show that the Zn/Fe ratio was significantly higher in the media of arteries of probucol treated animals without overlying lesion (4.3) compared to the media with overlying lesion (1.3) ( p = 0.004) for test mice. For the control mice, the arterial Zn/Fe ratio was 1.8 for media without overlying lesion, compared with 1.0 for media with overlying lesion ( p = 0.1). Thus, for media without overlying lesion, the Zn/Fe ratio was significantly higher ( p = 0.009) in probucol-treated (4.3) than control mice (1.8), whereas there was little difference in the ratios between the two groups in media with overlying lesion (1.3 compared with 1.0). These preliminary results are consistent with the idea that the levels of iron and zinc concentrations within the artery wall may influence the formation of atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid artery.

  3. Electron microprobe analysis of human labial gland secretory granules in cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Izutsu, K.; Johnson, D.; Schubert, M.; Wang, E.; Ramsey, B.; Tamarin, A.; Truelove, E.; Ensign, W.; Young, M.

    1985-06-01

    X-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried labial gland cryosections revealed that Na concentration was doubled and the Ca/S concentration ratio was decreased in secretory granules of labial glands from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) when compared with glands from normal subjects. Other results suggested that the decrease in the Ca/S concentration ratio resulted from an increase in S concentration. These findings imply that mucous granules in labial saliva showed a CF-related increase in Na and S content, and such changes would be expected to affect the rheology of the mucus after exocytosis. In contrast with a previous study in human parotid glands, no evidence was found for CF-related changes in cytoplasmic or nuclear Na, K, and Ca concentrations. Significant elemental differences were found between secretory granules and nuclei and cytoplasm of control cells.

  4. PROTON MICROPROBE ANALYSIS OF TRACE-ELEMENT VARIATIONS IN VITRINITES IN THE SAME AND DIFFERENT COAL BEDS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minkin, J.A.; Chao, E.C.T.; Blank, Herma; Dulong, F.T.

    1987-01-01

    The PIXE (proton-induced X-ray emission) microprobe can be used for nondestructive, in-situ analyses of areas as small as those analyzed by the electron microprobe, and has a sensitivity of detection as much as two orders of magnitude better than the electron microprobe. Preliminary studies demonstrated that PIXE provides a capability for quantitative determination of elemental concentrations in individual coal maceral grains with a detection limit of 1-10 ppm for most elements analyzed. Encouraged by the earlier results, we carried out the analyses reported below to examine trace element variations laterally (over a km range) as well as vertically (cm to m) in the I and J coal beds in the Upper Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale in central Utah, and to compare the data with the data from two samples of eastern coals of Pennsylvanian age.

  5. Use of electron microprobe x-ray analysis for determination of low calcium concentrations across leaves deficient in calcium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, D. J.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    An electron microprobe with wavelength-dispersive x-ray spectrometry (WDS) was found to be useful for the determination of Ca concentrations in leaf tissue deficient in Ca. WDS effectively detected Ca concentrations as low as 0.2 mg/g dry wt in the presence of high levels of K and Mg (120 and 50 mg/g dry wt, respectively). Leaf specimens were prepared for analysis by quick-freezing in liquid nitrogen and freeze-drying at -20 degrees C to maintain elemental integrity within the tissue. Because dry material was analyzed, sample preparation was simple and samples could be stored for long periods before analysis. A large beam diameter of 50 gm was used to minimize tissue damage under the beam and analyze mineral concentrations within several cells at one time. Beam penetration was between 50 and 55 microns, approximately one-third of the thickness of the leaf. For analysis of concentrations in interveinal areas, analyses directed into the abaxial epidermis were found most useful. However, because of limited beam penetration, analyses of veinal areas would require use of cross sections [correction of crosssections]. Solid mineral standards were used for instrument standardization. To prevent measurement errors resulting from differences between the matrix of the mineral standards and the analyzed tissue, concentrations in leaves were corrected using gelatin standards prepared and analyzed under the same conditions. WDS was found to be useful for documenting that very low Ca levels occur in specific areas of lettuce leaves exhibiting the Ca deficiency injury termed tipburn.

  6. Laser Microprobe Mass Spectrometry 1: Basic Principles and Performance Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denoyer, Eric; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the historical development, performance characteristics (sample requirements, analysis time, ionization characteristics, speciation capabilities, and figures of merit), and applications of laser microprobe mass spectrometry. (JN)

  7. Features of metamict zircons based on their micrographs and the data of electron microprobe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votyakov, S. L.; Zamyatin, D. A.; Shchapova, Yu. V.; Porotnikov, A. V.; Krasnobaev, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    A new quantitative approach on the basis of joint probability distribution (JPD) analysis of BSE- and CL-images is proposed for studies of the zoning of polygenic (polychronous) grains of zircon. It was shown for the example of zircon of the Mugodzhar metamorphic rocks (South Ural) that a series of zones might be distinguished in the grains of high chemical (structural) heterogeneity. Zones Ia and Ib belong to the fragments of crystalline and radiation-damaged zircon, respectively. Zone II corresponds to the primarily disordered areas (the "genetically metamict" zones) of high concentrations of the impurities of Y, P, REE, U, Hf, etc. The Ia-Ic trend is related to the process of autoradiation metamictization. Based on the data on oxygen content, the declinations of zircon composition from the stoichiometry and the hydration effects were considered.

  8. High current pulsed positron microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Stoeffl, W.; Kumar, A.; Sterne, P.A.; Cowan, T.E.; Hartley, J.

    1997-05-01

    We are developing a low energy, microscopically focused, pulsed positron beam for defect analysis by positron lifetime spectroscopy to provide a new defect analysis capability at the 10{sup 10} e{sup +}s{sup -l} beam at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron linac. When completed, the pulsed positron microprobe will enable defect specific, 3-dimensional maps of defect concentrations with sub-micron resolution of defect location. By coupling these data with first principles calculations of defect specific positron lifetimes and positron implantation profiles we will both map the identity and concentration of defect distributions.

  9. Partitioning of Zr and Nb between coexisting opaque phases in lunar rocks _ Determined by quantitative proton microprobe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, H.; El Goresy, A.; Janicke, J.; Nobiling, R.; Traxel, K.

    1984-04-01

    The chemical partitioning among coexisting opaque phases of various assemblages in different lunar rocks from several landing sites is studied using electron microprobe techniques for major and minor elements and proton microprobe analyses for trace elements. In Apollo 17 rocks, the partitioning of Zr between armalcolite and ilmenite is determined in rocks showing different crystallization sequences. In olivine porphyritic basalts, Zr partitions in favor of armalcolite, probably due to equilibration between armalcolite and ilmenite achieved by the reactions involving armalcolite. Apollo 15 basalts contain ulvoespinel/ilmenite-bearing assemblages of entirely different origins: (1) subsolidus reactions leading to 'exosolution' of ilmenite from ulvoespinel and (2) isobarically invariant reaction leading to formation of ilmenite + fayalite as a result of the reaction between ulvoespinel + silica.

  10. Chemical and Isotopic Analysis of Trace Organic Matter on Meteorites and Interstellar Dust Using a Laser Microprobe Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zare, Richard N.; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of considerable interest today because they are ubiquitous on Earth and in the interstellar medium (ISM). In fact, about 20% of cosmic carbon in the galaxy is estimated to be in the form of PAHs. Investigation of these species has obvious uses for determining the cosmochemistry of the solar system. Work in this laboratory has focused on four main areas: 1) Mapping the spatial distribution of PAHs in a variety of meteoritic samples and comparing this distribution with mineralogical features of the meteorite to determine whether a correlation exists between the two. 2) Developing a method for detection of fullerenes in extraterrestrial samples using microprobe Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectroscopy and utilizing this technique to investigate fullerene presence, while exploring the possibility of spatially mapping the fullerene distribution in these samples through in situ detection. 3) Investigating a possible formation pathway for meteoritic and ancient terrestrial kerogen involving the photochemical reactions of PAHs with alkanes under prebiotic and astrophysically relevant conditions. 4) Studying reaction pathways and identifying the photoproducts generated during the photochemical evolution of PAH-containing interstellar ice analogs as part of an ongoing collaboration with researchers at the Astrochemistry Lab at NASA Ames. All areas involve elucidation of the solar system formation and chemistry using microprobe Laser Desorption Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometry. A brief description of microprobe Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectroscopy, which allows selective investigation of subattomole levels of organic species on the surface of a sample at 10-40 micrometer spatial resolution, is given.

  11. AMPHCAL: A quickbasic program for determining the amphibole name from electron microprobe analysis using the IMA rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, F.

    1996-03-01

    The program AMPHCAL enables the user data entry, recalculation of chemical analyses from the electron microprobe analyses into amphibole structural formulae, determination of prefix, and classification of calculated results with specific names according to the current IMA guidelines. The program also permits the user four Al-in-hornblende geobarometers and amphibole-plagioclase geothermometer for certain types of calcic amphiboles. This program, written in QUICKBASIC, is menu-driven and easy to use on any IBM compatible microcomputers with VGA card. The compiled form of AMPHCAL is approximately 506 kilobytes.

  12. New X-ray microprobe system for trace heavy element analysis using ultraprecise X-ray mirror optics of long working distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Yasuko; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Uruga, Tomoya

    2010-05-01

    A new X-ray microprobe system for trace heavy element analysis using ultraprecise X-ray mirror optics of 300 mm long working distance has been developed at beamline 37XU of SPring-8. A focusing test has been performed in the X-ray energy range 20-37.7 keV. A focused beam size of 1.3 μm ( V)×1.5 μm ( H) has been achieved at an X-ray energy of 30 keV, and a total photon flux of the focused beam was about 2.7×10 10 photons/s. Micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) analysis of eggplant roots has been carried out using the developed microprobe. It is clearly observed in the XRF images that cadmium is highly accumulated in the endodermis, exodermis and epidermis of roots. This study demonstrates the potential of scanning microscopy for heavy elements analysis in the high-energy X-ray region.

  13. Light detection with spectral analysis at the Legnaro nuclear microprobe: Applications in material and earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittone, E.; Lo Giudice, A.; Manfredotti, C.; Egeni, G.; Rudello, V.; Rossi, P.; Gennaro, G.; Pratesi, G.; Corazza, M.

    2001-07-01

    Among the numerous ion beam analytical (IBA) techniques available for material characterisation, ionoluminescence (IL) has not attracted the interest that it should deserve. Although the importance of IL technique, particularly if combined with other IBA techniques, has been widely proven, very few apparatuses to analyse light emission spectra have been installed at the microbeam facilities. In this paper we present the new IL apparatus installed at the Legnaro (LNL) Ion Microbeam Facility. The system is a modification of the OXFORD MONOCL2 apparatus for cathodoluminescence. Light collection is performed by using a retractable parabolic mirror located at a very short distance from the sample, with a small aperture to allow the ion beam to hit the sample. Accurate positioning of the retractable mirror directly coupled to a chamber mounted high-resolution monochromator allows for high light collection efficiency. This design assures that IL can be used with low beam currents (<1 pA) with the consequent reduction of the radiation damage, which often occurs during ionoluminescence measurements. A summary of some meaningful results obtained with such an apparatus is presented. The combination of IL/PIXE was used to characterise natural silica glass, known as Libyan Desert Glass, and cubic BN grains; polycristalline CVD diamond has been studied by a synergetic combination of IBICC/IL technique.

  14. Pb-207/Pb-206 ages of individual mineral phases in Luna 20 material by ion microprobe mass analysis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, C. A.; Hinthorne, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Ion microprobe analyses of returned lunar material have helped to demonstrate that U, Th, and radiogenic Pb are concentrated in small accessory mineral phases. It is possible to measure the isotopic composition of this Pb and obtain a radiometric Pb-207/Pb-206 age for the mineral. The ages so derived compare favorably with crystallization ages determined by conventional methods. A grain mount (22003,2/6) of Luna 20 material was searched for such accessory mineral phases, and two were found. One of these phases give an age of 4.12 plus or minus 0.04 b.y. and the other an age of 4.42 plus or minus 0.11 b.y. Ages of minerals dated by the ion probe in Apollo samples 14310 and 15555 are given for comparison. Data on the upper limit for Pb concentration in the outermost surface layers of free lunar soil particles are also given.

  15. San Francisco Estuary Striped Bass Migration History Determined by Electron-microprobe Analysis of Otolith Sr/Ca Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrach, D J; Phillis, C C; Weber, P K; Ingram, B L; Zinkl, J G

    2004-09-17

    Habitat use has been shown to be an important factor in the bioaccumulation of contaminants in striped bass. This study examines migration in striped bass as part of a larger study investigating bioaccumulation and maternal transfer of xenobiotics to progeny in the San Francisco Estuary system. Habitat use, residence time and spawning migration over the life of females (n = 23) was studied. Female striped bass were collected between Knights Landing and Colusa on the Sacramento River during the spawning runs of 1999 and 2001. Otoliths were removed, processed and aged via otolith microstructure. Subsequently, otoliths were analyzed for strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) ratio using an electron-microprobe to measure salinity exposure and to distinguish freshwater, estuary, and marine habitat use. Salinity exposure during the last year before capture was examined more closely for comparison of habitat use by the maternal parent to contaminant burden transferred to progeny. Results were selectively confirmed by ion microprobe analyses for habitat use. The Sr/Ca data demonstrate a wide range of migratory patterns. Age of initial ocean entry differs among individuals before returning to freshwater, presumably to spawn. Some fish reside in freshwater year-round, while others return to more saline habitats and make periodic migrations to freshwater. Frequency of habitat shifts and residence times differs among fish, as well as over the lifetime of individual fish. While at least one fish spent its final year in freshwater, the majority of spawning fish spent their final year in elevated salinity. However, not all fish migrated to freshwater to spawn in the previous year. Results from this investigation concerning migration history in striped bass can be combined with contaminant and histological developmental analyses to better understand the bioaccumulation of contaminants and the subsequent effects they and habitat use have on fish populations in the San Francisco Estuary system.

  16. Multidimensional Analysis of Nuclear Detonations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-17

    reconstructions and temperature distributions of the early time nuclear fireballs. Initial developments have resulted in the first 2-dimensional... temperature distribution of a nuclear fireball using digitized film. This temperature analysis underwent verification using the Digital Imaging and Remote... temperature profile of the nuclear fireball as a function of optical path length. A 3-dimensional reconstruction was performed using a variation of a

  17. HYPER-FORM—A Hypercard® program for Macintosh® microcomputers to calculate mineral formulae from electron microprobe and wet chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bjerg, Silvia C.; Mogessie, Aberra; Bjerg, Ernesto

    1992-07-01

    The program HYPER-FORM permits the input and calculation of a mineral formula from wet chemical and electron microprobe analysis. It includes autosaving of data, search routines, and other database functions. The calculated formula can be exported to wordprocessing programs such as MacWrite® or Microsoft Word® and can be edited as required. It also is possible to export the calculated data to graphic programs such as Cricket Graph® or Kaleidagraph® for a graphic representation of the data. HYPER-FORM is an interactive program written in HyperTalk™ (HyperCard® environment) and is designed to correspond to the Macintosh® interface.

  18. FUN with PANURGE - High mass resolution ion microprobe measurements of Mg in Allende inclusions. [meteoritic composition isotope analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huneke, J. C.; Armstrong, J. T.; Wassserburg, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Isotopic ratios have been determined, at a precision level approaching that of counting statistics using beam switching, by employing PANURGE, a modified CAMECA IMS3F ion microprobe at a mass resolving power of 5000. This technique is used to determine the isotopic composition of Mg and Si and the atomic ratio of Al/Mg in minerals from the Allende inclusion WA and the Allende FUN inclusion C1. Results show enrichment in Mg-26 of up to 260 percent. Results of Mg and Al/Mg measurements on cogenetic spinel inclusion and host plagiclase crystals show Mg-Al isochrons in excellent agreement with precise mineral isochrons determined by thermal emission mass spectrometry. The measurements are found to confirm the presence of substantial excess Mg-26 in WA and its near absence in C1. Data is obtained which indicates a metamorphic reequilibrium of Mg in Allende plagioclase at least 0.6 my after WA formation. Ion probe measurements are obtained which confirm that the Mg composition in Allende C1 is highly fractionated and is uniform among pyroxene, melilite, plagioclase, spinel crystals, and spinel included in melilite and plagioclase crystals.

  19. Positron microprobe at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka, P; Howell, R; Stoeffl, W

    1998-11-01

    The electron linac based positron source at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides the world's highest current beam of keV positrons. We are building a positron microprobe that will produce a pulsed, focused positron beam for 3-dimensional scans of defect size and concentration with sub-micron resolution. The widely spaced and intense positron packets from the tungsten moderator at the end of the 100 MeV LLNL linac are captured and trapped in a magnetic bottle. The positrons are then released in 1 ns bunches at a 20 MHz repetition rate. With a three-stage re-moderation we will compress the cm-sized original beam to a 1 micro-meter diameter final spot on the target. The buncher will compress the arrival time of positrons on the target to less than 100 ps. A detector array with up to 60 BaF2 crystals in paired coincidence will measure the annihilation radiation with high efficiency and low background. The energy of the positrons can be varied from less than 1 keV up to 50 keV.

  20. Subgroup report on hard x-ray microprobes

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, G.E.; Barbee, T.; Bionta, R.; Howells, M.; Thompson, A.C.; Yun, W.

    1994-09-01

    The increasing availability of synchrotron x-ray sources has stimulated the development of advanced hard x-ray (E{>=}5 keV) microprobes. New x-ray optics have been demonstrated which show promise for achieving intense submicron hard x-ray probes. These probes will be used for extraordinary elemental detection by x-ray fluorescence/absorption and for microdiffraction to identify phase and strain. The inherent elemental and crystallographic sensitivity of an x-ray microprobe and its inherently nondestructive and penetrating nature makes the development of an advanced hard x-ray microprobe an important national goal. In this workshop state-of-the-art hard x-ray microprobe optics were described and future directions were discussed. Gene Ice, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), presented an overview of the current status of hard x-ray microprobe optics and described the use of crystal spectrometers to improve minimum detectable limits in fluorescent microprobe experiments. Al Thompson, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), described work at the Center for X-ray Optics to develop a hard x-ray microprobe based on Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) optics. Al Thompson also showed the results of some experimental measurements with their KB optics. Malcolm Howells presented a method for bending elliptical mirrors and Troy Barbee commented on the use of graded d spacings to achieve highest efficiency in KB multilayer microfocusing. Richard Bionta, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), described the development of the first hard x-ray zone plates and future promise of so called {open_quotes}jelly roll{close_quotes} or sputter slice zone plates. Wenbing Yun, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), described characterization of jelly roll and lithographically produced zone plates and described the application of zone plates to focus extremely narrow bandwidths by nuclear resonance. This report summarizes the presentations of the workshop subgroup on hard x-ray microprobes.

  1. The Stanford-U.S. Geological Survey SHRIMP ion microprobe--a tool for micro-scale chemical and isotopic analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, Charles R.; Grove, Marty; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Coble, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Answers to many questions in Earth science require chemical analysis of minute volumes of minerals, volcanic glass, or biological materials. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is an extremely sensitive analytical method in which a 5–30 micrometer diameter "primary" beam of charged particles (ions) is focused on a region of a solid specimen to sputter secondary ions from 1–5 nanograms of the sample under high vacuum. The elemental abundances and isotopic ratios of these secondary ions are determined with a mass spectrometer. These results can be used for geochronology to determine the age of a region within a crystal thousands to billions of years old or to precisely measure trace abundances of chemical elements at concentrations as low as parts per billion. A partnership of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Stanford University School of Earth Sciences operates a large SIMS instrument, the Sensitive High-Resolution Ion Microprobe with Reverse Geometry (SHRIMP–RG) on the Stanford campus.

  2. Hard X-Ray Spectro Microprobe Analysis of Inhomogeneous Solids: A Case Study. Element Distribution and Speciation in Selected Iron Meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Cavell, R.G.; Feng, R.; Barnes, E.M.; Cavell, P.A.; McCready, A.J.; Webb, M.A.

    2007-06-08

    The hard X-ray microprobe provides an effective methodology for the non-destructive analysis of inhomogeneous materials. Application of X-ray absorption/fluroescence spectroscopy techniques (XANES and EXAFS) permits the speciation of the elements and yields information about the local structural environment. Microfocussed, monochromatic, tunable X-rays allows examination of small areas of micrometer dimensions with spectroscopic procedures. Typically the materials which are presented are thick and cannot be altered for the experiment. This condition introduces difficulties which may compromise the results. Herein we discuss those difficulties and show that the system can yield reliable results in spite of the compromises. Some results are presented on the two iron meteorites we have examined. These specimens are representative of highly inhomogeneous materials and illustrate the difficulties encountered with compositional variations which may occur at sub-millimeter dimensions and also illustrate the difficulties presented by the need to analyze components present at ppm concentration levels in a concentrated matrix. In these particular samples the major constituent is Fe which ranges from 90% to 70%, balanced by Ni which ranges from 10% to 30%. The critical diagnostic trace elements Ga and Ge which must also be analyzed are present at the 80 and 340 ppm level respectively. These diagnostic elements have been shown by EXAFS to be substitutionally placed in the matrix of the major element species in these meteorite samples.

  3. In situ trace-element analysis of individual silicate melt inclusions by laser ablation microprobe-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LAM-ICP-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. P.; Jackson, S. E.; Longerich, H. P.; Webster, J. D.

    1997-07-01

    This paper reports the successful application of laser ablation microprobe-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LAM-ICP-MS) to the in situ analysis of a diverse suite of twenty trace elements including Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta, Y, and REEs, in individual silicate melt inclusions in phenocrysts from Fantale volcano, Ethiopia. The UV laser, a frequency quadrupled Nd: YAG operating at 266 nm, significantly improves the ablation characteristics of minerals that do not absorb strongly at near-IR wavelengths (e.g., quartz and feldspar). Furthermore, it allows for a significant reduction in ablation pit size to ca. 10 μm, thereby permitting numerous applications that require high-resolution sampling. Multiple ablations in individual melt inclusions in the size range 10-50 μm demonstrate both the effectiveness of the technique and the generally homogeneous character of the inclusions. Comparison of the LAM-ICP-MS data for international reference material RGM-1 (a rhyolite), with recommended values, indicates an analytical precision of <10% for most of the trace elements determined in this study. The trace element abundances of the Fantale melt inclusions, determined by LAM-ICP-MS, are typical of those of pantellerites (i.e., peralkaline rhyolites), and are consistent with their origin as tiny volumes of melt trapped in quartz and alkali-feldspar phenocrysts during the final stage of fractional crystallization of the host peralkaline magma.

  4. In-situ determination of metallic variation and multi-association in single particles by combining synchrotron microprobe, sequential chemical extraction and multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu-Min; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Shi-Suo; Wang, Si-Jia; Xia, Yi; Shao, Li-Ming; He, Pin-Jing

    2014-07-15

    Due to the heterogeneity of metal distribution, it is challenging to identify the speciation, source and fate of metals in solid samples at micro scales. To overcome these challenges single particles of air pollution control residues were detected in situ by synchrotron microprobe after each step of chemical extraction and analyzed by multivariate statistical analysis. Results showed that Pb, Cu and Zn co-existed as acid soluble fractions during chemical extraction, regardless of their individual distribution as chlorides or oxides in the raw particles. Besides the forms of Fe2O3, MnO2 and FeCr2O4, Fe, Mn, Cr and Ni were closely associated with each other, mainly as reducible fractions. In addition, the two groups of metals had interrelations with the Si-containing insoluble matrix. The binding could not be directly detected by micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) and XRD, suggesting their partial existence as amorphous forms or in the solid solution. The combined method on single particles can effectively determine metallic multi-associations and various extraction behaviors that could not be identified by XRD, μ-XRD or X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results are useful for further source identification and migration tracing of heavy metals.

  5. Advanced nuclear energy analysis technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Murata, Kenneth K.; Romero, Vicente JosÔe; Young, Michael Francis; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2004-05-01

    A two-year effort focused on applying ASCI technology developed for the analysis of weapons systems to the state-of-the-art accident analysis of a nuclear reactor system was proposed. The Sandia SIERRA parallel computing platform for ASCI codes includes high-fidelity thermal, fluids, and structural codes whose coupling through SIERRA can be specifically tailored to the particular problem at hand to analyze complex multiphysics problems. Presently, however, the suite lacks several physics modules unique to the analysis of nuclear reactors. The NRC MELCOR code, not presently part of SIERRA, was developed to analyze severe accidents in present-technology reactor systems. We attempted to: (1) evaluate the SIERRA code suite for its current applicability to the analysis of next generation nuclear reactors, and the feasibility of implementing MELCOR models into the SIERRA suite, (2) examine the possibility of augmenting ASCI codes or alternatives by coupling to the MELCOR code, or portions thereof, to address physics particular to nuclear reactor issues, especially those facing next generation reactor designs, and (3) apply the coupled code set to a demonstration problem involving a nuclear reactor system. We were successful in completing the first two in sufficient detail to determine that an extensive demonstration problem was not feasible at this time. In the future, completion of this research would demonstrate the feasibility of performing high fidelity and rapid analyses of safety and design issues needed to support the development of next generation power reactor systems.

  6. Retrieval analysis of different orthodontic brackets: the applicability of electron microprobe techniques for determining material heterogeneities and corrosive potential

    PubMed Central

    HOLST, Alexandra Ioana; HOLST, Stefan; HIRSCHFELDER, Ursula; von SECKENDORFF, Volker

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the applicability of micro-analytical methods with high spatial resolution to the characterization of the composition and corrosion behavior of two bracket systems. Material and methods The surfaces of six nickel-free brackets and six nickel-containing brackets were examined for signs of corrosion and qualitative surface analysis using an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA), prior to bonding to patient's tooth surfaces and four months after clinical use. The surfaces were characterized qualitatively by secondary electron (SE) images and back scattered electron (BSE) images in both compositional and topographical mode. Qualitative and quantitative wavelength-dispersive analyses were performed for different elements, and by utilizing qualitative analysis the relative concentration of selected elements was mapped two-dimensionally. The absolute concentration of the elements was determined in specially prepared brackets by quantitative analysis using pure element standards for calibration and calculating correction-factors (ZAF). Results Clear differences were observed between the different bracket types. The nickel-containing stainless steel brackets consist of two separate pieces joined by a brazing alloy. Compositional analysis revealed two different alloy compositions, and reaction zones on both sides of the brazing alloy. The nickel-free bracket was a single piece with only slight variation in element concentration, but had a significantly rougher surface. After clinical use, no corrosive phenomena were detectable with the methods applied. Traces of intraoral wear at the contact areas between the bracket slot and the arch wire were verified. Conclusion Electron probe microanalysis is a valuable tool for the characterization of element distribution and quantitative analysis for corrosion studies. PMID:23032212

  7. Skeletal muscle fiber analysis by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging at high mass and high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Garrett, Timothy J; Carter, Christy S; Spengler, Bernhard; Yost, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of heterogeneous muscle fibers with various fiber types. These fibers can be classified into different classes based on their different characteristics. MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) has been applied to study and visualize different metabolomics profiles of different fiber types. Here, skeletal muscles were analyzed by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe MALDI-MSI at high spatial and high mass resolution.

  8. U-Th-Pb ion microprobe analysis of monazite from the Paleoproterozoic Karrat rare earth element (REE) deposit, western Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, A.; Grove, M.; Bird, D. K.

    2012-12-01

    The Karrat rare earth element (REE) deposit is located at 72°N on the Niaqornakavsak peninsula of Qeqertarssuq Island on the western coast of Greenland. Metasomatic alteration of an amphibolite host rock by carbonatite derived fluids resulted in REE mineralization in the Karrat Isfjord area. REE in the mineralization are primarily found in bastnasite, allanite, and monazite. In-situ analysis of monazite was conducted on samples obtained from three sites of mineralization: (1) the primary deposit at Niaqornakavsak consisting of a single distinct ~30m thick unit; (2) at Umiamako Nuna 7 km to the east of Niaqornakavsak where the majority of REE mineralization occurs within the first 20m of the surface; and (3) a 6m thick REE-rich vein 100m below the surface at Umiamako Nuna. Formation ages for monazite at Niaqornakavsak, Umiamako Nuna (surface), and Umiamako Nuna (vein) have been calculated using 207Pb/206Pb, 206Pb/238U, and 208Pb/232Th isotope ratios. Multiple isotope ratios were examined to determine the ideal method of monazite analysis based on the inherent issues of low U content of monazite, difficulties measuring 204Pb, common Pb corrections, and peak interferences resulting from high concentrations of REE. 208Pb/232Th analysis resulted in the best precision and smallest spread of values. Energy filtering was applied to 208Pb/232Th analyses in an effort to reduce interferences at several peaks. Although all three isotope ratio analyses result in a Paleoproterozoic age similar to the timing of convergence of the North Atlantic craton, Rae craton, and Aasiat domain as well as the emplacement of the Prøven Igneous Complex in Greenland (1.95-1.80Ga), the values range between 1.7-1.9Ga depending on the isotope ratio.

  9. X-ray microprobe analysis of the retina and RPE in sheep with ovine ceroid-lipofuscinosis

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, D.A.; Armstrong, D.; Jolly, R. )

    1990-11-01

    Ovine ceroid-lipofuscinosis (OCL) is one animal model for the human condition, and because autofluorescent lipopigments are prominent in the brain and eye, it may also prove useful as a model for aging. For example, a progressive decline in electrical recording from brain and retina are observed in both aging and OCL. Samples of retinal and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) tissues were obtained from a young control. 2 animals with OCL and a normal aged sheep. Specimens were cryo-fractured and examined by scanning electron microscopy/x-ray microanalysis. Measurements made of 6 individual cells in the ganglion layer of OCL specimens, the remainder of the retina, and RPE showed age-related changes in zinc, iron, and copper which were associated with lipopigment accumulation in the RPE. There was marked decrease in phosphate, sulfur, and manganese levels, as photoreceptor cells and their outer segments are lost in the disease process. This is the first report of metal analysis in the retina and RPE in a disease entity, and as a function of normal aging.

  10. Ion microprobe, electron microprobe and cathodoluminescence data for Allende inclusions with emphasis on plagioclase chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheon, I. D.; Steele, I. M.; Smith, J. V.; Clayton, R. N.

    1978-01-01

    Three Type B inclusions from the Allende meteorite have been analyzed. A grain-to-grain characterization of mineral chemistry and isotopic content was made possible by the use of a range of techniques, including luminescence and scanning electron microscopy and electron and ion microprobe analysis. Cathodoluminescence was used in fine-grained, optically opaque regions to distinguish between sub-micrometer phases, such as garnet and Si-rich material, subsequently identified by electron probe and scanning electron microscope analyses. Four types of luminescence patterns, due to twinning, primary sector zoning, alteration of boundaries and fractures, and shock effects, were identified in Allende plagioclase. Luminescence color exhibited a strong correlation with Mg content and provided a guide for an electron probe quantitative map of Mg and Na distributions. Ion microprobe studies of individual grains revealed large excesses of Mg-26.

  11. Molecular microanalysis of pathological specimens in situ with a laser-Raman microprobe.

    PubMed

    Abraham, J L; Etz, E S

    1979-11-09

    A laser-Raman microprobe has been used to identify microscopic inclusions of silicone polymer in standard paraffin sections of lymph node. This example of organic chemical microanalysis in situ in pathological tissue represents an extension of microanalytical capabilities from elemental analysis, performed with electron and ion microprobes, to compound-specific molecular microanalysis.

  12. Nuclear Power Plant Module, NPP-1: Nuclear Power Cost Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitelaw, Robert L.

    The purpose of the Nuclear Power Plant Modules, NPP-1, is to determine the total cost of electricity from a nuclear power plant in terms of all the components contributing to cost. The plan of analysis is in five parts: (1) general formulation of the cost equation; (2) capital cost and fixed charges thereon; (3) operational cost for labor,…

  13. Nuclear Proliferation Technology Trends Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Talbert, Robert J.

    2005-10-04

    A process is underway to develop mature, integrated methodologies to address nonproliferation issues. A variety of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) are being considered. All have one thing in common, a need for a consistent set of proliferation related data that can be used as a basis for application. One approach to providing a basis for predicting and evaluating future proliferation events is to understand past proliferation events, that is, the different paths that have actually been taken to acquire or attempt to acquire special nuclear material. In order to provide this information, this report describing previous material acquisition activities (obtained from open source material) has been prepared. This report describes how, based on an evaluation of historical trends in nuclear technology development, conclusions can be reached concerning: (1) The length of time it takes to acquire a technology; (2) The length of time it takes for production of special nuclear material to begin; and (3) The type of approaches taken for acquiring the technology. In addition to examining time constants, the report is intended to provide information that could be used to support the use of the different non-proliferation analysis methodologies. Accordingly, each section includes: (1) Technology description; (2) Technology origin; (3) Basic theory; (4) Important components/materials; (5) Technology development; (6) Technological difficulties involved in use; (7) Changes/improvements in technology; (8) Countries that have used/attempted to use the technology; (9) Technology Information; (10) Acquisition approaches; (11) Time constants for technology development; and (12) Required Concurrent Technologies.

  14. Microscale structure fabrication using microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinya, Norio; Konno, Takeshi; Egashira, Mitsuru

    1996-05-01

    Using a tungsten micro-probe with a tip of 2 micrometers radius, fine metallic powder particles could be manipulated one by one. By applying low voltage (about 10 V) between the probe and a metallic substrate, the powder particle on the substrate was adsorbed to the tip of probe easily, and by cutting off the voltage the powder particle was desorbed from the tip. Therefore it is possible to arrange powder particles as designed by controlling the voltage and movement of the probe. In addition to the powder particle manipulation, powder particles welding was studied. The tungsten micro-probe was contacted with the powder particle on the metallic substrate, and high voltage (about 10 kV) was applied between the probe and the substrate. It was observed that the glow discharge was caused between the powder particle and the substrate. The contacting parts of the powder particle and the substrate were melted and welded each other. By the manipulation and the welding, micro-structures composed of fine powder particles (about 60 micrometers ) were constructed. Powder particle towers and a micro- actuator were fabricated by way of trial. The results demonstrated the potential of the micro- probe assembly for the fabrication of electronic devices, micromachines and intelligent materials.

  15. Development and applications of an epifluorescence module for synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Lisa M.; Smith, Randy J.; Ruppel, Meghan E.; Ott, Cassandra H.; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2005-06-15

    Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe is a valuable analysis tool for imaging trace element composition in situ at a resolution of a few microns. Frequently, epifluorescence microscopy is beneficial for identifying the region of interest. To date, combining epifluorescence microscopy with x-ray microprobe has involved analyses with two different microscopes. We report the development of an epifluorescence module that is integrated into a synchrotron XRF microprobe beamline, such that visible fluorescence from a sample can be viewed while collecting x-ray microprobe images simultaneously. This unique combination has been used to identify metal accumulation in Alzheimer's disease plaques and the mineral distribution in geological samples. The flexibility of this accessory permits its use on almost any synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe beamline and applications in many fields of science can benefit from this technology.

  16. Microprobe analyses of glasses and minerals from Luna-16 soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.; Harmon, R. S.; Jakes, P.; Reid, A. M.; Ridley, W. I.; Warner, J. L.

    1971-01-01

    Electron microprobe analyses are presented for nine elements in 250 glasses and 434 pyroxenes, eight elements in 113 olivines, and six elements in 354 feldspars, 35 spinels, and 159 ilmenites. All grains are from the 125-425 micron fraction of horizon A and horizon D soil from the Luna 16 sample. A norm is presented for each glass analysis and the structural formula is calculated for each mineral analysis.

  17. Dating Archean zircon by ion microprobe: New light on an old problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, I. S.; Kinny, P. D.; Black, L. P.; Compston, W.; Froude, D. O.; Ireland, T. R.

    1985-01-01

    Ion microprobe analysis of zircons from three sites (Watersmeet Dome in northern Michigan, Mount Sones in eastern Antarctica, and Mount Narryer in western Australia) is discussed. Implications of the results to Archean geochronology and early Earth crust composition are addressed.

  18. TEAM - Titan Exploration Atmospheric Microprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Conor; Esper, Jaime; Aslam, Shahid; Quilligan, Gerald

    2016-10-01

    The astrobiological potential of Titan's surface hydrocarbon liquids and probable interior water ocean has led to its inclusion as a destination in NASA's "Ocean Worlds" initiative, and near-term investigation of these regions is a high-level scientific goal. TEAM is a novel initiative to investigate the lake and sea environs using multiple dropsondes -scientific probes derived from an existing cubesat bus architecture (CAPE - the Cubesat Application for Planetary Exploration) developed at NASA GSFC. Each 3U probe will parachute to the surface, making atmospheric structure and composition measurements during the descent, and photographing the surface - land, shoreline and seas - in detail. TEAM probes offer a low-cost, high-return means to explore multiple areas on Titan, yielding crucial data about the condensing chemicals, haze and cloud layers, winds, and surface features of the lakes and seas. These microprobes may be included on a near-term New Frontiers class mission to the Saturn system as additional payload, bringing increased scientific return and conducting reconnaissance for future landing zones. In this presentation we describe the probe architecture, baseline payload, flight profile and the unique engineering and science data that can be returned.

  19. The ANSTO high energy heavy ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegele, Rainer; Cohen, David D.; Dytlewski, Nick

    1999-10-01

    Recently the construction of the ANSTO High Energy Heavy Ion Microprobe (HIMP) at the 10 MV ANTARES tandem accelerator has been completed. The high energy heavy ion microprobe focuses not only light ions at energies of 2-3 MeV, but is also capable of focusing heavy ions at high energies with ME/ q2 values up to 150 MeV amu and greater. First performance tests and results are reported here.

  20. U, Th, Pb and REE abundances and Pb 207/Pb 206 ages of individual minerals in returned lunar material by ion microprobe mass analysis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, C. A.; Hinthorne, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Results of ion microprobe analyses of Apollo 11, 12 and 14 material, showing that U, Th, Pb and REE are concentrated in accessory minerals such as apatite, whitlockite, zircon, baddeleyite, zirkelite, and tranquillityite. Th/U ratios are found to vary by over a factor of 40 in these minerals. K, Ba, Rb and Sr have been localized in a K rich, U and Th poor glass phase that is commonly associated with the U and Th bearing accessory minerals. Li is observed to be fairly evenly distributed between the various accessory phases. The phosphates have been found to have REE abundance patterns (normalized to the chondrite abundances) that are fairly flat, while the Zr bearing minerals have patterns that rise steeply, by factors of ten or more, from La to Gd. All the accessory minerals have large negative Eu anomalies. Radiometric age dates (Pb 207/Pb 206) of the individual U and Th bearing minerals compare favorably with the Pb 207/Pb 206 age of the bulk rocks.

  1. Radioactive halos and ion microprobe measurement of Pb isotope ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    This investigation was to obtain, if possible, the Pb isotope ratios of both lunar and meteoritic troilite grains by utilizing ion microprobe techniques. Such direct in situ measurement of Pb isotope ratios would eliminate contamination problems inherent in wet chemistry separation procedures, and conceivably determine whether lunar troilite grains were of meteoritic origin. For comparison purposes two samples of meteoritic troilite were selected (one from Canyon Diablo) for analysis along with two very small lunar troilite grains (approximately 50-100 microns). It was concluded that the ion microprobe as presently operating, does not permit the in situ measurement of Pb isotope ratios in lunar or meteoritic troilite. On the basis of these experiments no conclusions could be drawn as to the origin of the lunar troilite grains.

  2. DS-2 Mars Microprobe Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H.; Kindler, A.; Deligiannis, F.; Davies, E.; Blankevoort, J.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Surampudi, S.

    1999-01-01

    In January of 1999 the NM DS-2 Mars microprobe will be launched to impact on Mars in December. The technical objectives of the missions are to demonstrate: key technologies, a passive atmospheric entry, highly integrated microelectronics which can withstand both low temperatures and high decelerations, and the capability to conduct in-situ, surface and subsurface science data acquisition. The scientific objectives are to determine if ice is present below the Martian surface, measure the local atmospheric pressure, characterize the thermal properties of the martian subsurface soil, and to estimate the vertical temperature gradient of the Martian soil. The battery requirements are 2-4 cell batteries, with voltage of 6-14 volts, capacity of 550 mAh at 80C, and 2Ah at 25C, shelf life of 2.5 years, an operating temperature of 60C and below, and the ability to withstand shock impact of 80,000 g's. The technical challenges and the approach is reviewed. The Li-SOCL2 system is reviewed, and graphs showing the current and voltage is displayed, along with the voltage over discharge time. The problems encountered during the testing were: (1) impact sensitivity, (2) cracking of the seals, and (3) delay in voltage. A new design resulted in no problems in the impact testing phase. The corrective actions for the seal problems involved: (1) pre weld fill tube, (2) an improved heat sink during case to cover weld and (3) change the seal dimensions to reduce stress. To correct the voltage delay problem the solutions involved: (1) drying the electrodes to reduce contamination by water, (2) assemblage of the cells within a week of electrode manufacture, (3) ensure electrolyte purity, and (4) provide second depassivation pulse after landing. The conclusions on further testing were that the battery can: (1) withstand anticipated shock of up to 80,000 g, (2) meet the discharge profile post shock at Mars temperatures, (3) meet the required self discharge rate and (4) meet environmental

  3. Autoclave nuclear criticality safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D`Aquila, D.M.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.

    1991-12-31

    Steam-heated autoclaves are used in gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants to heat large cylinders of UF{sub 6}. Nuclear criticality safety for these autoclaves is evaluated. To enhance criticality safety, systems are incorporated into the design of autoclaves to limit the amount of water present. These safety systems also increase the likelihood that any UF{sub 6} inadvertently released from a cylinder into an autoclave is not released to the environment. Up to 140 pounds of water can be held up in large autoclaves. This mass of water is sufficient to support a nuclear criticality when optimally combined with 125 pounds of UF{sub 6} enriched to 5 percent U{sup 235}. However, water in autoclaves is widely dispersed as condensed droplets and vapor, and is extremely unlikely to form a critical configuration with released UF{sub 6}.

  4. Nuclear microscopy in biomedical analysis with special emphasis on clinical metal biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindh, Ulf; Frisk, Peter; Nyström, Joakim; Danersund, Antero; Hudecek, Romuald; Lindvall, Anders; Thunell, Stig

    1997-07-01

    Nuclear microscopy based upon developments in high energy ion beam techniques is by now an accepted technique in many fields of research. The advancements into the biomedical field have, however, been slower than expected. A major factor explaining this tendency is the availability of nuclear microscopy. This paper reviews briefly the biomedical work using nuclear microscopy that has been carried out since the 4 th International Conference on Nuclear Microprobe Technology and Applications held in Shanghai. Nuclear microscopy of isolated individual blood cells from patients adversely affected by metal exposure from dental amalgam has been performed both before and after removal of the metallic fillings. The elemental profile of blood cells was more or less normalised after treatment. Some of these results will be presented to illustrate a medical application. Results from bulk analysis by ICP-MS of erythrocytes and plasma before and after treatment will also be presented to illustrate the difference in information content between these two approaches as well as the need for complementary information in solving biomedical problems. As part of a larger study of acute porphyria, nuclear microscopy of blood cells was included among the 78 laboratory tests. The approach in this study was unbiased in the sense that no hypothesis was formulated as to which laboratory parameters would be the most explanatory for health or disease. Multivariate discriminant analysis was applied to the large amounts of data acquired. This approach led to the hypothesis that oxidative stress increased the synthesis of manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase in the mitochondria of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, explaining the increase of manganese in these cells. Antioxidant therapy was therefore applied to a couple of patients with porphyria, however, without clinical success.

  5. Defense against nuclear weapons: a decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Orient, J M

    1985-02-01

    Response to the public health threat posed by nuclear weapons is a medical imperative. The United States, in contrast to other nations, has chosen a course that assures maximal casualties in the event of a nuclear attack, on the theory that prevention of the attack is incompatible with preventive measures against its consequences, such as blast injuries and radiation sickness. A decision analysis approach clarifies the risks and benefits of a change to a strategy of preparedness.

  6. Cassini nuclear risk analysis with SPARRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Chuong T.; Deane, Nelson A.

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear risk analysis of the Cassini mission is one of the most comprehensive risk analyses ever conducted for a space nuclear mission. The complexity of postulated accident scenarios and source term definitions, from launch to Earth swingby, has necessitated an extensive series of analyses in order to provide best-estimates of potential consequence results and bounding uncertainty intervals. The Space Accident Radiological Release and Consequence (SPARRC) family of codes, developed by Lockheed Martin to analyze polydispersed source terms and a combination of different atmospheric transport patterns, have been used for the Cassini Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). By identifying dominant contributors, the nuclear risk of each mission segment is understood with a high level of confidence. This paper provides the overall analysis process and insights developed from the risk analysis.

  7. The nuclear analysis program at MURR

    SciTech Connect

    Glascock, M.D. )

    1993-01-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) has continually upgraded research facilities and programs at the MU research reactor (MURR) throughout its 26-yr history. The Nuclear Analysis Program (NAP) area has participated in these upgrades over the years. As one of the largest activation analysis laboratories on a university campus, the activities of the NAP are broadly representative of the diversity of applications for activation analysis and related nuclear science. This paper describes the MURR's NAP and several of the research, education, and service projects in which the laboratory is currently engaged.

  8. Correlated petrographic, electron microprobe, and ion microprobe studies of selected primitive and processed phase assemblages in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, Arden L.

    1993-01-01

    During the past three years we have received support to continue our research in elucidating the formation and alteration histories of selected meteoritic materials by a combination of petrographic, trace element, and isotopic analyses employing optical and scanning electron microscopes and electron and ion microprobes. The awarded research funds enabled the P.I. to attend the annual LPSC, the co-I to devote approximately 15 percent of his time to the research proposed in the grant, and partial support for a visiting summer post-doctoral fellow to conduct electron microprobe analyses of meteoritic samples in our laboratory. The research funds, along with support from the NASA Education Initiative awarded to P.I. G. Wasserburg, enabled the co-I to continue a mentoring program with inner-city minority youth. The support enabled us to achieve significant results in the five projects that we proposed (in addition to the Education Initiative), namely: studies of the accretional and post-accretional alteration and thermal histories in CV meteorites, characterization of periclase-bearing Fremdlinge in CV meteorites, characterization of Ni-Pt-Ge-Te-rich Fremdlinge in CV meteorites in an attempt to determine the constraints they place on the petrogenetic and thermal histories of their host CAI's, correlated electron and ion microprobe studies of silicate and phosphate inclusions in the Colomera meteorite in an attempt to determine the petrogenesis of the IE iron meteorites, and development of improved instrumental and correction procedures for improved accuracy of analysis of meteoritic materials with the electron microprobe. This grant supported, in part or whole, 18 publications so far by our research team, with at least three more papers anticipated. The list of these publications is included. The details of the research results are briefly summarized.

  9. Analysis of nuclear reprogramming following nuclear transfer to Xenopus oocyte.

    PubMed

    Jullien, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Germinal vesicle of stage V-VI Xenopus Laevis oocytes (at the prophase I stage of meiosis) can be used to transplant mammalian nuclei. In this type of interspecies nuclear transfer no cell division occurs and no new cell types are generated. However, the transplanted nuclei undergo extensive transcriptional reprogramming. Here, it is first explained how to carry out transplantation of multiple mammalian cell nuclei to Xenopus oocytes. It is then described how to perform RT-qPCR, Western Blot, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation, and live imaging analysis to monitor transcriptional reprogramming of the nuclei transplanted to oocytes.

  10. Analysis of nuclear power plant component failures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Items are shown that have caused 90% of the nuclear unit outages and/or deratings between 1971 and 1980 and the magnitude of the problem indicated by an estimate of power replacement cost when the units are out of service or derated. The funding EPRI has provided on these specific items for R and D and technology transfer in the past and the funding planned in the future (1982 to 1986) are shown. EPRI's R and D may help the utilities on only a small part of their nuclear unit outage problems. For example, refueling is the major cause for nuclear unit outages or deratings and the steam turbine is the second major cause for nuclear unit outages; however, these two items have been ranked fairly low on the EPRI priority list for R and D funding. Other items such as nuclear safety (NRC requirements), reactor general, reactor and safety valves and piping, and reactor fuel appear to be receiving more priority than is necessary as determined by analysis of nuclear unit outage causes.

  11. Molecular forensic science analysis of nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Dallas David

    Concerns over the proliferation and instances of nuclear material in the environment have increased interest in the expansion of nuclear forensics analysis and attribution programs. A new related field, molecular forensic science (MFS) has helped meet this expansion by applying common scientific analyses to nuclear forensics scenarios. In this work, MFS was applied to three scenarios related to nuclear forensics analysis. In the first, uranium dioxide was synthesized and aged at four sets of static environmental conditions and studied for changes in chemical speciation. The second highlighted the importance of bulk versus particle characterizations by analyzing a heterogeneous industrially prepared sample with similar techniques. In the third, mixed uranium/plutonium hot particles were collected from the McGuire Air Force Base BOMARC Site and analyzed for chemical speciation and elemental surface composition. This work has identified new signatures and has indicated unexpected chemical behavior under various conditions. These findings have lead to an expansion of basic actinide understanding, proof of MFS as a tool for nuclear forensic science, and new areas for expansion in these fields.

  12. Nuclear analysis of Jordanian tobacco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saleh, K. A.; Saleh, N. S.

    The concentration of trace and minor elements in six different Jordanian and two foreign brands of cigarette tobacco and wrapping paper were determined using combined X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Rutherford backscatteing (RBS) analysis techniques. The cigarette filter and the ash were also analyzed to determine the trapped elements on the filter and their transference with smoke. The toxic effects of some elements have been briefly discussed.

  13. Microprobe sampling--photo ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for in situ chemical analysis of pyrolysis and combustion gases: examination of the thermo-chemical processes within a burning cigarette.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Romy; Streibel, Thorsten; Liu, Chuan; McAdam, Kevin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2012-02-10

    A microprobe sampling device (μ-probe) has been developed for in situ on-line photo ionization mass spectrometric analysis of volatile chemical species formed within objects consisting of organic matter during thermal processing. With this approach the chemical signature occurring during heating, pyrolysis, combustion, roasting and charring of organic material within burning objects such as burning fuel particles (e.g., biomass or coal pieces), lit cigarettes or thermally processed food products (e.g., roasting of coffee beans) can be investigated. Due to its dynamic changes between combustion and pyrolysis phases the cigarette smoking process is particularly interesting and has been chosen as first application. For this investigation the tip of the μ-probe is inserted directly into the tobacco rod and volatile organic compounds from inside the burning cigarette are extracted and real-time analyzed as the glowing front (or coal) approaches and passes the μ-probe sampling position. The combination of micro-sampling with photo ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PI-TOFMS) allows on-line intrapuff-resolved analysis of species formation inside a burning cigarette. Monitoring volatile smoke compounds during cigarette puffing and smoldering cycles in this way provides unparalleled insights into formation mechanisms and their time-dependent change. Using this technique the changes from pyrolysis conditions to combustion conditions inside the coal of a cigarette could be observed directly. A comparative analysis of species formation within a burning Kentucky 2R4F reference cigarette with μ-probe analysis reveals different patterns and behaviors for nicotine, and a range of semi-volatile aromatic and aliphatic species.

  14. An X-ray microprobe facility using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, B M; Jones, K W; Hanson, A L; Pounds, J G; Rivers, M L; Spanne, P; Sutton, S R

    1990-01-01

    An X-ray microprobe for trace elemental analysis at micrometer spatial resolutions, using synchrotron radiation (SR), is under development. The facility consists of two beamlines, one including a 1:1 focusing mirror and the other an 8:1 ellipsoidal mirror. At present, "white light" is used for excitation of the characteristic X-ray fluorescence lines. Sensitivities in thin biological samples are in the range of 2-20 fg in 100 microns2 areas in 5 min irradiation times. Scanning techniques, as well as microtomography and chemical speciation, are discussed. Application to a specific biomedical study is included.

  15. An x-ray microprobe facility using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Pounds, J.G.; Rivers, M.L.; Spanne, P.; Sutton, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    A x-ray microprobe for trace elemental analysis at micrometer spatial resolutions using synchrotron radiation (SR) is under development. The facility consists of two beamlines, one including a 1:1 focusing mirror and the other an 8:1 ellipsoidal mirror. At present ''white light''' is used for excitation of the characteristic x-ray fluorescence lines. Sensitivities in thin biological samples are in the range of 2-20 fg in 100 ..mu..m/sup 2/ areas in 5 min irradiation times. Scanning techniques as well as microtomography and chemical speciation are discussed. Application to a specific biomedical study is included. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket Analysis Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belair, Michael; Lavelle, Thomas; Saimento, Charles; Juhasz, Albert; Stewart, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion has long been considered an enabling technology for human missions to Mars and beyond. One concept of operations for these missions utilizes the nuclear reactor to generate electrical power during coast phases, known as bimodal operation. This presentation focuses on the systems modeling and analysis efforts for a NERVA derived concept. The NERVA bimodal operation derives the thermal energy from the core tie tube elements. Recent analysis has shown potential temperature distributions in the tie tube elements that may limit the thermodynamic efficiency of the closed Brayton cycle used to generate electricity with the current design. The results of this analysis are discussed as well as the potential implications to a bimodal NERVA type reactor.

  17. On the distribution of uranium in hair: Non-destructive analysis using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelsson, A.; Eriksson, M.; Pettersson, H. B. L.

    2015-06-01

    In the present study the distribution of uranium in single human hair shafts has been evaluated using two synchrotron radiation (SR) based micro X-ray fluorescence techniques; SR μ-XRF and confocal SR μ-XRF. The hair shafts originated from persons that have been exposed to elevated uranium concentrations. Two different groups have been studied, i) workers at a nuclear fuel fabrication factory, exposed mainly by inhalation and ii) owners of drilled bedrock wells exposed by ingestion of water. The measurements were carried out on the FLUO beamline at the synchrotron radiation facility ANKA, Karlsruhe. The experiment was optimized to detect U with a beam size of 6.8 μm × 3 μm beam focus allowing detection down to ppb levels of U in 10 s (SR μ-XRF setup) and 70 s (SR confocal μ-XRF setup) measurements. It was found that the uranium was present in a 10-15 μm peripheral layer of the hair shafts for both groups studied. Furthermore, potential external hair contamination was studied by scanning of unwashed hair shafts from the workers. Sites of very high uranium signal were identified as particles containing uranium. Such particles, were also seen in complementary analyses using variable pressure electron microscope coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (ESEM-EDX). However, the particles were not visible in washed hair shafts. These findings can further increase the understanding of uranium excretion in hair and its potential use as a biomonitor.

  18. Scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (SMALDI) mass spectrometry: instrumentation for sub-micrometer resolved LDI and MALDI surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Bernhard; Hubert, Martin

    2002-06-01

    A new instrument and method is described for laterally resolved mass spectrometric surface analysis. Fields of application are in both the life sciences and the material sciences. The instrument provides for imaging of the distribution of selected sample components from natural and artificial surfaces. Samples are either analyzed by laser desorption ionization (LDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry or, after preparation with a suitable matrix, by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. Areas of 100 x 100 microm are scanned with minimal increments of 0.25 microm, and between 10,000 and 160,000 mass spectra are acquired per image within 3 to 50 min (scan rate up to 50 pixels per s). The effective lateral resolution is in the range of 0.6 to 1.5 microm depending on sample properties, preparation methods and laser wavelength. Optical investigation of the same sample area by UV confocal scanning laser microscopy was found to be very attractive in combination with scanning MALDI mass analysis because pixel-identical images can be created with both techniques providing for a strong increase in analytical information. This article describes the method and instrumentation, including first applicational examples in elemental analysis, imaging of pine tree roots, and investigation of MALDI sample morphology in biomolecular analysis.

  19. Multiphysics Nuclear Thermal Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this effort is t o develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical thrust chamber design and analysis. The current task scope is to perform multidimensional, multiphysics analysis of thrust performance and heat transfer analysis for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine including thrust chamber and nozzle. The multiphysics aspects of the model include: real fluid dynamics, chemical reactivity, turbulent flow, and conjugate heat transfer. The model will be designed to identify thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments in all flow paths and materials. This model would then be used to perform non- nuclear reproduction of the flow element failures demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA testing, investigate performance of specific configurations and assess potential issues and enhancements. A two-pronged approach will be employed in this effort: a detailed analysis of a multi-channel, flow-element, and global modeling of the entire thrust chamber assembly with a porosity modeling technique. It is expected that the detailed analysis of a single flow element would provide detailed fluid, thermal, and hydrogen environments for stress analysis, while the global thrust chamber assembly analysis would promote understanding of the effects of hydrogen dissociation and heat transfer on thrust performance. These modeling activities will be validated as much as possible by testing performed by other related efforts.

  20. Analysis of Nuclear Quantum Phase Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. P.; Meng, J.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Ring, P.

    2009-08-26

    A microscopic analysis, based on nuclear energy density functionals, is presented for shape phase transitions in Nd isotopes. Low-lying excitation spectra and transition probabilities are calculated starting from a five-dimensional Hamiltonian, with parameters determined by constrained relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. The results reproduce available data, and show that there is an abrupt change of structure at N = 90, that corresponds to a first-order quantum phase transition between spherical and axially deformed shapes.

  1. Information Services at the Nuclear Safety Analysis Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simard, Ronald

    This paper describes the operations of the Nuclear Safety Analysis Center. Established soon after an accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, its efforts were initially directed towards a detailed analysis of the accident. Continuing functions include: (1) the analysis of generic nuclear safety issues,…

  2. Matrix effects on the relative sensitivity factors for manganese and chromium during ion microprobe analysis of carbonate: Implications for early Solar System chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Robert C. J.; Heber, Veronika S.; McKeegan, Kevin D.

    2017-03-01

    The short-lived radionuclide 53 Mn decays to 53 Cr providing a relative chronometer for dating the formation of Mn-rich minerals in meteorites. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been extensively used for in situ dating of meteoritic olivine and carbonate by the 53 Mn-53 Cr system, however a significant analytical challenge has been realising accurate measurements of the Mn/Cr ratio in individual minerals of differing chemical compositions. During SIMS analysis, elements are ionised with differing efficiencies and standard materials are required to calibrate measured ion intensities in terms of relative elemental concentrations. The carbonate system presents a particular analytical difficulty since such standards are not naturally available due to low and variable Cr contents. Here, we utilise ion implantation of Cr into carbonate and other phases to accurately determine the relative sensitivity factors of Mn/Cr during SIMS analysis. We find significant variations in Mn/Cr RSF values among different carbonate minerals that depend systematically on chemical composition and we propose an empirical correction scheme that quantitatively yields an accurate RSF for carbonates of diverse chemical compositions. Correction of SIMS carbonate data for this strong matrix effect may help to reconcile some outstanding problems regarding the timescales of aqueous alteration processes in carbonaceous chondrites. Mn-Cr ages, revised based our new understanding of the matrix effect, are, in general, earlier than previously thought and the duration of carbonate formation is shorter.

  3. Distributed computing and nuclear reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.; Derstine, K.L.; Blomquist, R.N.

    1994-03-01

    Large-scale scientific and engineering calculations for nuclear reactor analysis can now be carried out effectively in a distributed computing environment, at costs far lower than for traditional mainframes. The distributed computing environment must include support for traditional system services, such as a queuing system for batch work, reliable filesystem backups, and parallel processing capabilities for large jobs. All ANL computer codes for reactor analysis have been adapted successfully to a distributed system based on workstations and X-terminals. Distributed parallel processing has been demonstrated to be effective for long-running Monte Carlo calculations.

  4. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Ayer, J E; Clark, A T; Loysen, P; Ballinger, M Y; Mishima, J; Owczarski, P C; Gregory, W S; Nichols, B D

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH.

  5. FTIR Analysis of Aerogel Keystones from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector: Assessment of Terrestrial Organic Contamination and X-Ray Microprobe Beam Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Bechtel, H. A.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Cloetens, P.; Davis, A. M.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G. J.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Grun, E.; Hech, P R.; Hillier, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) was intended to capture and return contemporary interstellar dust. The approx.0.1 sq m collector was composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the collecting area) and aluminum foils and was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 sq m day. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a consortium-based project to characterize the collection using nondestructive techniques. Sandford et al. recently assessed numerous potential sources of organic contaminants in the Stardust cometary collector. These contaminants could greatly complicate the analysis and interperetation of any organics associated with interstellar dust, particularly because signals from these particles are expected to be exceedingly small. Here, we present a summary of FTIR analyses of over 20 aerogel keystones, many of which contained candidates for interstellar dust.

  6. Geochemistry of the Spor Mountain rhyolite, western Utah, as revealed by laser ablation ICP-MS, cathodoluminescence, and electron microprobe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, S. R.; Christiansen, E. H.; Dorais, M.; Fernandez, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Miocene topaz rhyolite at Spor Mountain in western Utah hosts one of the largest beryllium deposits in the world and was responsible for producing 85% of the beryllium mined worldwide in 2010 (Boland, 2012). The Spor Mountain rhyolite is composed primarily of Ca-poor plagioclase (An8), sodic sanidine (Or40), Fe-rich biotite (Fe/(Fe+Mg)>0.95; Al 1.2-1.4 apfu), and Ti-poor quartz, along with several trace-element rich accessory phases including zircon, monazite, thorite, columbite, and allanite. Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies of quartz show oscillatory zoning, with 80% of the examined crystals displaying euhedral edges and slightly darker rims. CL images were used to guide laser ablation (LA) ICP-MS analysis of quartz, along with analyses of plagioclase, sanidine, biotite, and glass. Ti concentrations in quartz are 20±6 ppm; there is no quantifiable variation of Ti from core to rim within the diameter of the laser spot (53 microns). Temperatures, calculated using Ti in quartz (at 2 kb, aTiO2=0.34), vary between 529±10 C (Thomas et al., 2011), 669±13 C (Huang and Audetat, 2012), and 691±13 C (Wark and Watson, 2006). Two feldspar thermometry yield temperatures of 686±33 C (Elkins and Grove, 1990) and 670±41 C (Benisek et al., 2010). Zr saturation temperatures (Watson and Harrison, 1983) average 711±28 C. Analysis of the glass reveal the Spor Mountain rhyolite is greatly enriched in rare elements (i.e. Li, Be, F, Ga, Rb, Nb, Mo, Sn, and Ta) compared to average continental crust (Rudnick and Gao, 2003). Be in the glass can have as much as 100 ppm, nearly 50 times the concentration in continental crust. REE partition coefficients for sanidine are 2 to 3 times higher in the Spor Mountain rhyolite when compared to other silicic magmas (Nash and Crecraft, 1985; Mahood and Hildreth, 1983), although plagioclase tends to have lower partition coefficients; biotite has lower partition coefficients for LREE and higher partition coefficients for HREE. The patterns of

  7. In vivo analysis of tissue by Raman microprobe: examination of human skin lesions and esophagus Barrett's mucosa on an animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tfayli, Ali; Piot, Olivier; Derancourt, Sylvie; Cadiot, Guillaume; Diebold, Marie D.; Bernard, Philippe; Manfait, Michel

    2006-02-01

    In the last few years, Raman spectroscopy has been increasingly used for the characterization of normal and pathological tissues. A new Raman system, constituted of optic fibers bundle coupled to an axial Raman spectrometer (Horiba Jobin Yvon SAS), was developed for in vivo investigations. Here, we present in vivo analysis on two tissues: human skin and esophagus mucosa on a rat model. The skin is a directly accessible organ, representing a high diversity of lesions and cancers. Including malignant melanoma, basal cell carcinoma and the squamous cell carcinoma, skin cancer is the cancer with the highest incidence worldwide. Several Raman investigations were performed to discriminate and classify different types of skin lesions, on thin sections of biopsies. Here, we try to characterize in vivo the different types of skin cancers in order to be able to detect them in their early stages of development and to define precisely the exeresis limits. Barrett's mucosa was also studied by in vivo examination of rat's esophagus. Barrett's mucosa, induced by gastro-esophageal reflux, is a pretumoral state that has to be carefully monitored due to its high risk of evolution in adenocarcinoma. A better knowledge of the histological transformation of esophagus epithelium in a Barrett's type will lead to a more efficient detection of the pathology for its early diagnosis. To study these changes, an animal model (rats developing Barrett's mucosa after duodenum - esophagus anastomosis) was used. Potential of vibrational spectroscopy for Barrett's mucosa identification is assessed on this model.

  8. Application of a new Raman microprobe spectrometer to nondestructive analysis of sulfate and other ions in individual phases in fluid inclusions in minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosasco, G.J.; Roedder, E.

    1979-01-01

    Rosasco et al. (1975), reported the first successful application of laser-excited Raman spectroscopy for the identification and nondestructive partial analysis of individual solid, liquid, and gaseous phases in selected fluid inclusions. We report here the results of the application of a new instrument, based on back-scattering, that eliminates many of the previous stringent sample limitations and hence greatly expands the range of applicability of Raman spectroscopy to fluid inclusions. Fluid inclusions in many porphyry copper deposits contain 5-10 ??m 'daughter' crystals thought to be anhydrite but too small for identification by the previous Raman technique. Using the new instrument, we have verified that such daughter crystals in quartz from Bingham, Utah, are anhydrite. They may form by leakage of hydrogen causing internal autooxidation of sulfide ion. Daughter crystals were also examined in apatite (Durango, Mexico) and emerald (Muzo, Colombia). Valid analyses of sulfur species in solution in small fluid inclusions from ore deposits would be valuable, but are generally impossible by conventional methods. We present a calibration procedure for analyses for SO42- in such inclusions from Bingham, Utah (12,000 ?? 4000 ppm) and Creede, Colo. (probably < 500 ppm). A fetid Brazilian quartz, originally thought to contain liquid H2S, is shown to contain only HS- in major amounts. ?? 1979.

  9. Tin accumulation in spermatozoa of the rats exposed to tributyltin chloride by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) analysis with microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma-Takeda, S.; Nishimura, Y.; Terada, Y.; Ueno, S.; Watanabe, Y.; Yukawa, M.

    2005-04-01

    Organotin compounds are widely used in industry and its environmental contamination by these compounds has recently become a concern. It is known that they act as endocrine disruptors but details of the dynamics of Sn in reproductive organs are still unknown. In the present study, we attempted to determine Sn distribution in the testis of rats exposed to tributyltin chloride (TBTC) by inductively coupled argon plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for microdissectioned seminiferous tubules and cell-selective metal determination of synchrotron radiation X-ray florescence (SR-XRF) analysis. TBTC was orally administered to rats at a dose of 45 μmol/kg per day for 3 days. One day later, Sn was detected in the microdissectioned seminiferous tubules at a level approximately equivalent to that in the testis. Significant stage-specificity of Sn accumulation was not observed in the experimental model. Sn was also detected in spermatozoa at the stage VIII seminiferous tubule, which are the final step of spermatogenesis in the testis. These data indicate that Sn accumulates in germ cells as well as in spermatozoa in a short period of TBTC exposure.

  10. NUCLEAR FORENSICS ANALYSIS CENTER FORENSIC ANALYSIS TO DATA INTERPRETATION

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, T.

    2011-02-07

    The Nuclear Forensics Analysis Center (NFAC) is part of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and is one of only two USG National Laboratories accredited to perform nuclear forensic analyses to the requirements of ISO 17025. SRNL NFAC is capable of analyzing nuclear and radiological samples from bulk material to ultra-trace samples. NFAC provides analytical support to the FBI's Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF), which is located within SRNL. REEF gives the FBI the capability to perform traditional forensics on material that is radiological and/or is contaminated. SRNL is engaged in research and development efforts to improve the USG technical nuclear forensics capabilities. Research includes improving predictive signatures and developing a database containing comparative samples.

  11. MicroProbe Small Unmanned Aerial System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, Geoffrey; Miles, Ted

    2012-01-01

    The MicroProbe unmanned aerial system (UAS) concept incorporates twin electric motors mounted on the vehicle wing, thus enabling an aerodynamically and environmentally clean nose area for atmospheric sensors. A payload bay is also incorporated in the fuselage to accommodate remote sensing instruments. A key feature of this concept is lightweight construction combined with low flying speeds to minimize kinetic energy and associated hazards, as well as maximizing spatial resolution. This type of aerial platform is needed for Earth science research and environmental monitoring. There were no vehicles of this type known to exist previously.

  12. Analysis of nuclear reconstitution, nuclear envelope assembly, and nuclear pore assembly using Xenopus in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Bernis, Cyril; Forbes, Douglass J

    2014-01-01

    The large and complex eukaryotic nucleus is the arbiter of DNA replication, RNA transcription, splicing, and ribosome assembly. With the advent of in vitro nuclear reconstitution extracts derived from Xenopus eggs in the 1980s, it became possible to assemble multiple nuclei in vitro around added DNA or chromatin substrates. Such reconstituted nuclei contain a nuclear lamina, double nuclear membranes, nuclear pores, and are competent for DNA replication and nuclear import. In vitro nuclear reconstitution has allowed the assembly of "wild-type" and "biochemically mutant" nuclei in which the impact of individual components can be assessed. Here, we describe protocols for preparation of the nuclear reconstitution extract, nuclear reconstitution in vitro, assessment of nuclear membrane integrity, and a more specialized assay for nuclear pore assembly into preformed pore-free nuclear intermediates.

  13. Analysis of Nuclear Reconstitution, Nuclear Envelope Assembly, and Nuclear Pore Assembly Using Xenopus In Vitro Assays

    PubMed Central

    Bernis, Cyril; Forbes, Douglass J.

    2015-01-01

    The large and complex eukaryotic nucleus is the arbiter of DNA replication, RNA transcription, splicing, and ribosome assembly. With the advent of in vitro nuclear reconstitution extracts derived from Xenopus eggs in the 1980s, it became possible to assemble multiple nuclei in vitro around added DNA or chromatin substrates. Such reconstituted nuclei contain a nuclear lamina, double nuclear membranes, nuclear pores, and are competent for DNA replication and nuclear import. In vitro nuclear reconstitution has allowed the assembly of “wild-type” and “biochemically mutant” nuclei in which the impact of individual components can be assessed. Here, we describe protocols for preparation of the nuclear reconstitution extract, nuclear reconstitution in vitro, assessment of nuclear membrane integrity, and a more specialized assay for nuclear pore assembly into preformed pore-free nuclear intermediates. PMID:24857730

  14. Single cell elemental analysis using nuclear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M. Q.; Thong, P. S. P.; Kara, U.; Watt, F.

    1999-04-01

    The use of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) to provide quantitative elemental analysis of single cells is an area which has high potential, particularly when the trace elements such as Ca, Fe, Zn and Cu can be monitored. We describe the methodology of sample preparation for two cell types, the procedures of cell imaging using STIM, and the quantitative elemental analysis of single cells using RBS and PIXE. Recent work on single cells at the Nuclear Microscopy Research Centre,National University of Singapore has centred around two research areas: (a) Apoptosis (programmed cell death), which has been recently implicated in a wide range of pathological conditions such as cancer, Parkinson's disease etc, and (b) Malaria (infection of red blood cells by the malaria parasite). Firstly we present results on the elemental analysis of human Chang liver cells (ATTCC CCL 13) where vanadium ions were used to trigger apoptosis, and demonstrate that nuclear microscopy has the capability of monitoring vanadium loading within individual cells. Secondly we present the results of elemental changes taking place in individual mouse red blood cells which have been infected with the malaria parasite and treated with the anti-malaria drug Qinghaosu (QHS).

  15. Adiabatic Hyperspherical Analysis of Realistic Nuclear Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, K. M.; Kievsky, Alejandro; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-12-01

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin T = 3/2 contribution in our analysis.

  16. The Bioscience Nuclear Microscopy Program at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G.; Freeman, S.; Roberts, M.; Sideras-Haddad, E.

    1996-12-31

    Since initiation in mid 1994, a bioscience nuclear microscopy program at Livermore has enabled collaboration with bio-scientists on a variety of projects requiring quantitative elemental microanalysis. For microprobe analysis a combination of PIXE and STIM are typically used; respectively generating element distribution maps with micron scale spatial resolution, and projected densities and histological information with sub-micron spatial resolution. Current studies demonstrate the applicability of nuclear microscopy (particularly when combined with other analysis techniques) in environmental tracing, toxicology, carcinogenesis, and structural biology. The program currently uses {approximately}10 percent of the available time on a 10 MV tandem accelerator that is also applied to a variety of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and other microprobe programs. The completion of a dedicated nuclear microprobe system, using a 5 SDH NEC 1.7 MV tandem accelerator and employing several energy dispersive x-ray detectors to improve x-ray counting rates, promises increased accelerator access, greater sample throughput and continued expansion of the program.

  17. A Task Analysis of Selected Nuclear Technician Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braden, Paul V.; Paul, Krishan K.

    A task analysis of nuclear technician occupations in selected organizations in the Southern Interstate Nuclear Board Region was conducted as part of a research and development project leading to a nuclear technician manpower information system for these 17 states. In order to answer 11 questions focusing on task performance frequency and…

  18. Analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this report is to present the results of a statistical analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs and lead-times (where lead-time is defined as the duration of the construction period), using a sample of units that entered construction during the 1966-1977 period. For more than a decade, analysts have been attempting to understand the reasons for the divergence between predicted and actual construction costs and lead-times. More importantly, it is rapidly being recognized that the future of the nuclear power industry rests precariously on an improvement in the cost and lead-time situation. Thus, it is important to study the historical information on completed plants, not only to understand what has occurred to also to improve the ability to evaluate the economics of future plants. This requires an examination of the factors that have affected both the realized costs and lead-times and the expectations about these factors that have been formed during the construction process. 5 figs., 22 tabs.

  19. Aerodynamics of the Mars Microprobe Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; Moss, J. N.; Cheatwood, F. M.; Greene, F. A.; Braun, R. D.

    1997-01-01

    The selection of the unique aeroshell shape for the Mars Microprobes is discussed. A description of its aerodynamics in hypersonic rarefied, hypersonic continuum, supersonic and transonic flow regimes is then presented. This description is based on Direct Simulation Monte Carlo analyses in the rarefied-flow regime, thermochemical nonequilibrium Computational Fluid Dynamics in the hypersonic regime, existing wind tunnel data in the supersonic and transonic regime, additional computational work in the transonic regime, and finally, ballistic range data. The aeroshell is shown to possess the correct combination of aerodynamic stability and drag to convert the probe's initial tumbling attitude and high velocity at atmospheric-interface into the desired surface-impact orientation and velocity.

  20. Seismic analysis of nuclear power plant structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Primary structures for nuclear power plants are designed to resist expected earthquakes of the site. Two intensities are referred to as Operating Basis Earthquake and Design Basis Earthquake. These structures are required to accommodate these seismic loadings without loss of their functional integrity. Thus, no plastic yield is allowed. The application of NASTRAN in analyzing some of these seismic induced structural dynamic problems is described. NASTRAN, with some modifications, can be used to analyze most structures that are subjected to seismic loads. A brief review of the formulation of seismic-induced structural dynamics is also presented. Two typical structural problems were selected to illustrate the application of the various methods of seismic structural analysis by the NASTRAN system.

  1. Application of the Karlsruhe proton microprobe to medical samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, D.; Rokita, E.

    1984-04-01

    The Karlsruhe nuclear microprobe was used in the investigation of healthy and malign tissue of animals and men. Target preparation tests showed that cryofixation of the tissue before cutting with a microtome and succeeding lyophilization of the slices gave reliable results. The slices were mounted on backing foils of Formvar the thickness of which varied between 30 and 50 {μg}/{cm 2}. For irradiation we tested various patterns generated by the 3 MeV proton beam by sweeping in one or two dimensions. Most of the data were collected in line-scan mode, where 256 equidistant irradiation dots of 3 × 10 μm 2 formed a line of 750 μm length at beam currents of 250 pA. The target thickness was determined simultaneously by proton elastic scattering in all cases. Radial concentration profiles of degenerated human arteries (atherosclerosis) showed a remarkable increase of Ca, partly correlated with local maxima of the Zn content, when compared with non-degenerated capillaries. Microtome cuts across a Morris Hepatoma 7777 cancer grown in a rat leg were investigated to correlate the concentration shifts of some trace elements in malign tissue with single cells.

  2. Three Techniques for Task Analysis: Examples from the Nuclear Utilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Kenneth E.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses three task analysis techniques utilized at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station to review training programs: analysis of (1) job positions, (2) procedures, and (3) instructional presentations. All of these include task breakdown, relationship determination, and task restructuring. (MBR)

  3. Aerothermal Heating Predictions for Mars Microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; DiFulvio, M.; Horvath, T. J.; Braun, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    A combination of computational predictions and experimental measurements of the aerothermal heating expected on the two Mars Microprobes during their entry to Mars are presented. The maximum, non-ablating, heating rate at the vehicle's stagnation point (at alpha = 0 degrees) is predicted for an undershoot trajectory to be 194 Watts per square centimeters with associated stagnation point pressure of 0.064 atm. Maximum stagnation point pressure occurs later during the undershoot trajectory and is 0.094 atm. From computations at seven overshoot-trajectory points, the maximum heat load expected at the stagnation point is near 8800 Joules per square centimeter. Heat rates and heat loads on the vehicle's afterbody are much lower than the forebody. At zero degree angle-of-attack, heating over much of the hemi-spherical afterbody is predicted to be less than 2 percent of the stagnation point value. Good qualitative agreement is demonstrated for forebody and afterbody heating between CFD calculations at Mars entry conditions and experimental thermographic phosphor measurements from the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. A novel approach which incorporates six degree-of-freedom trajectory simulations to perform a statistical estimate of the effect of angle-of-attack, and other off-nominal conditions, on heating is included.

  4. Stand-alone microprobe at Livermore

    SciTech Connect

    Antolak, A J; Bench, G S; Brown, T A; Frantz, B R; Grant, P G; Morse, D H; Roberts, M L

    1998-10-02

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories/California have jointly constructed a new stand-alone microprobe facility. Although the facility was built to develop a method to rapidly locate and determine elemental concentrations of micron scale particulates on various media using PIXE, the facility has found numerous applications in biology and materials science. The facility is located at LLNL and uses a General Ionex Corporation Model 358 duoplasmatron negative ion source, a National Electrostatics Corporation 5SDH-2 tandem accelerator, and an Oxford triplet lens. Features of the system include complete computer control of the beam transport using LabVIEWTM for Macintosh, computer controlled beam collimating and divergence limiting slits, automated sample positioning to micron resolution, and video optics for beam positioning and sample observation. Data collection is accomplished with the simultaneous use of as many as four EG&G Ortec IGLET-XTM X-Ray detectors, digital amplifiers made by X-Ray Instruments and Associates (XIA), and LabVIEWTM for Macintosh acquisition software.

  5. Deep Space 2: The Mars Microprobe Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smrekar, Suzanne; Catling, David; Lorenz, Ralph; Magalhães, Julio; Moersch, Jeffrey; Morgan, Paul; Murray, Bruce; Presley-Holloway, Marsha; Yen, Albert; Zent, Aaron; Blaney, Diana

    The Mars Microprobe Mission will be the second of the New Millennium Program's technology development missions to planetary bodies. The mission consists of two penetrators that weigh 2.4 kg each and are being carried as a piggyback payload on the Mars Polar Lander cruise ring. The spacecraft arrive at Mars on December 3, 1999. The two identical penetrators will impact the surface at ~190 m/s and penetrate up to 0.6 m. They will land within 1 to 10 km of each other and ~50 km from the Polar Lander on the south polar layered terrain. The primary objective of the mission is to demonstrate technologies that will enable future science missions and, in particular, network science missions. A secondary goal is to acquire science data. A subsurface evolved water experiment and a thermal conductivity experiment will estimate the water content and thermal properties of the regolith. The atmospheric density, pressure, and temperature will be derived using descent deceleration data. Impact accelerometer data will be used to determine the depth of penetration, the hardness of the regolith, and the presence or absence of 10 cm scale layers.

  6. Characterization of nuclear material by Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradela, C.; Alaerts, G.; Becker, B.; Heyse, J.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Mondelaers, W.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Koizumi, M.; Tsuchiya, H.

    2016-11-01

    The use of Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis for the characterization of nuclear materials is discussed. The method, which relies on resonance structures in neutron-induced reaction cross sections, can be applied as a non-destructive method to characterise complex nuclear materials such as melted fuel resulting from a severe nuclear accident. Results of a demonstration experiment at the GELINA facility reveal that accurate data can be obtained at a compact facility even in the case of strong overlapping resonances.

  7. Determination of trace element mineral/liquid partition coefficients in melilite and diopside by ion and electron microprobe techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehner, S. M.; Laughlin, J. R.; Grossman, L.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1989-01-01

    The applicability of ion microprobe (IMP) for quantitative analysis of minor elements (Sr, Y, Zr, La, Sm, and Yb) in the major phases present in natural Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) was investigated by comparing IMP results with those of an electron microprobe (EMP). Results on three trace-element-doped glasses indicated that it is not possible to obtain precise quantitative analysis by using IMP if there are large differences in SiO2 content between the standards used to derive the ion yields and the unknowns.

  8. A High-Speed Detector System for X-ray Fluorescence Microprobes.

    SciTech Connect

    Siddons,P.D.; Dragone, A.; De Geronimo, g.; Kuczewski, A.; Kuczewski, J.; O

    2006-10-29

    We have developed a high-speed system for collecting x-ray fluorescence microprobe data, based on ASICs developed at BNL and high-speed processors developed by CSIRO. The system can collect fluorescence data in a continuous raster scan mode, and present elemental images in real time using Ryan's Dynamic Analysis algorithm. We will present results from a 32-element prototype array illustrating the concept. The final instrument will have 384 elements arranged in a square array around a central hole.

  9. Biological Effects in Coral Biomineralization: The Ion-Microprobe Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, A.

    2004-12-01

    Scleractinian corals are among the most prolific biomineralizing organisms on Earth and massive, reef-building corals are used extensively as proxies for past variations in the global climate. It is therefore of wide interest to understand the degree to which biological versus inorganic processes control the chemistry of the coral skeleton. Early workers considered aragonitic coral skeleton formation to be a purely physiochemical process. More recent studies have increasingly emphasized the role of a skeletal organic matrix, or intercalated organic macro-molecules that control the macroscopic shape and size of the growing crystals. It is now well established that organic compounds play a key role in controlling the morphology of crystals in a wide variety of calcium carbonate biomineralization processes by binding to specific sites, thereby causing direction-specific binding energies on the crystal surfaces. Macro-molecules, such as aspartic acid-rich or glutamic proteins and sulfated polysaccharides, are known to be embedded within the aragonitic skeletal components of coral. In addition, endosymbiotic algae and the layer of cells adjacent to the mineralizing surface, the calicoblastic ectoderm, are believed to play important roles in driving and controlling hermatypic coral skeletogenesis. However, until recently, further progress has been somewhat limited because it was not possible to obtain chemical analyses of the coral skeleton with sufficiently high spatial resolution and sensitivity to correlate chemical variations with the micrometer scale organization of its different structural components. The recent emergence of new ion microprobe technology is changing this situation radically. Conventional ion microprobe and laser ablation techniques have already contributed substantially to our knowledge about the micro-distribution of key trace elements such as B, Mg, Sr, Ba and U. However, with the development of the NanoSIMS, a newly designed ion microprobe

  10. Ion microprobe measurement of strontium isotopes in calcium carbonate with application to salmon otoliths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weber, P.K.; Bacon, C.R.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Ingram, B.L.; Wooden, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    The ion microprobe has the capability to generate high resolution, high precision isotopic measurements, but analysis of the isotopic composition of strontium, as measured by the 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio, has been hindered by isobaric interferences. Here we report the first high precision measurements of 87Sr/ 86Sr by ion microprobe in calcium carbonate samples with moderate Sr concentrations. We use the high mass resolving power (7000 to 9000 M.R.P.) of the SHRIMP-RG ion microprobe in combination with its high transmission to reduce the number of interfering species while maintaining sufficiently high count rates for precise isotopic measurements. The isobaric interferences are characterized by peak modeling and repeated analyses of standards. We demonstrate that by sample-standard bracketing, 87Sr/86Sr ratios can be measured in inorganic and biogenic carbonates with Sr concentrations between 400 and 1500 ppm with ???2??? external precision (2??) for a single analysis, and subpermil external precision with repeated analyses. Explicit correction for isobaric interferences (peak-stripping) is found to be less accurate and precise than sample-standard bracketing. Spatial resolution is ???25 ??m laterally and 2 ??m deep for a single analysis, consuming on the order of 2 ng of material. The method is tested on otoliths from salmon to demonstrate its accuracy and utility. In these growth-banded aragonitic structures, one-week temporal resolution can be achieved. The analytical method should be applicable to other calcium carbonate samples with similar Sr concentrations. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Use of X-ray microprobe to diagnose bone tissue demineralization after caffeine administration.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Marek; Olchowik, Grazyna; Tomaszewska, Monika; Burdan, Franciszek

    2012-10-08

    Caffeine is a methylxanthine which permeates the placenta. In studies on animals, it has been shown to produce teratogenic and embryotoxic effects in large doses. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of caffeine on the development of bone tissue, with particular reference to elemental bone composition using an X-ray microprobe. The research was conducted on rats. The fertilized females were randomly divided into an experimental and a control group. The experimental group was given caffeine orally in 30 mg/day doses from the 8th to the 21st day of pregnancy, while the control group was given water. The fetuses were used to assess the growth and mineralization of the skeleton. On the basis of double dyeing, a qualitative analysis of the bone morphology and mineralization was conducted. For calcium and potassium analysis, an X-ray microprobe was used. In 67 fetuses from the experimental group, changes in skeleton staining with the alcian-alizarin method were noticed. The frequency of the development of variants in the experimental group was statistically higher. In the experimental group,a significant decrease in the calcium level, as well as an increase in the potassium level, was observed. The X-ray microprobe's undoubted advantage is that is offers a quick qualitative and quantitative analysis of the elemental composition of the examined samples. Employing this new technique may furnish us with new capabilities when investigating the essence of the pathology process.

  12. Rethinking Sensitivity Analysis of Nuclear Simulations with Topology

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Paul Rosen; Andrea Alfonsi; Giovanni Pastore; Cristian Rabiti; Valerio Pascucci

    2016-01-01

    In nuclear engineering, understanding the safety margins of the nuclear reactor via simulations is arguably of paramount importance in predicting and preventing nuclear accidents. It is therefore crucial to perform sensitivity analysis to understand how changes in the model inputs affect the outputs. Modern nuclear simulation tools rely on numerical representations of the sensitivity information -- inherently lacking in visual encodings -- offering limited effectiveness in communicating and exploring the generated data. In this paper, we design a framework for sensitivity analysis and visualization of multidimensional nuclear simulation data using partition-based, topology-inspired regression models and report on its efficacy. We rely on the established Morse-Smale regression technique, which allows us to partition the domain into monotonic regions where easily interpretable linear models can be used to assess the influence of inputs on the output variability. The underlying computation is augmented with an intuitive and interactive visual design to effectively communicate sensitivity information to the nuclear scientists. Our framework is being deployed into the multi-purpose probabilistic risk assessment and uncertainty quantification framework RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual Control Environment). We evaluate our framework using an simulation dataset studying nuclear fuel performance.

  13. Multilayer Network Analysis of Nuclear Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liang; Ma, Yu-Gang; Chen, Qu; Han, Ding-Ding

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear reaction network is usually studied via precise calculation of differential equation sets, and much research interest has been focused on the characteristics of nuclides, such as half-life and size limit. In this paper, however, we adopt the methods from both multilayer and reaction networks, and obtain a distinctive view by mapping all the nuclear reactions in JINA REACLIB database into a directed network with 4 layers: neutron, proton, 4He and the remainder. The layer names correspond to reaction types decided by the currency particles consumed. This combined approach reveals that, in the remainder layer, the β-stability has high correlation with node degree difference and overlapping coefficient. Moreover, when reaction rates are considered as node strength, we find that, at lower temperatures, nuclide half-life scales reciprocally with its out-strength. The connection between physical properties and topological characteristics may help to explore the boundary of the nuclide chart. PMID:27558995

  14. Analysis of nuclear reactor instability phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The phenomena known as density-wave instability often occurs in phase change systems, such as boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRS). Our current understanding of density-wave oscillations is in fairly good shape for linear phenomena (eg, the onset of instabilities) but is not very advanced for non-linear phenomena [Lahey and Podowski, 1989]. In particular, limit cycle and chaotic instability modes are not well understood in boiling systems such as current and advanced generation BWRs (eg, SBWR). In particular, the SBWR relies on natural circulation and is thus inherently prone to problems with density-wave instabilities. The purpose of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of nonlinear nuclear-coupled density-wave instability phenomena in BWRS. This research builds on the work of Achard et al [1985] and Clausse et al [1991] who showed, respectively, that Hopf bifurcations and chaotic oscillations may occur in boiling systems.

  15. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.

    1992-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power generating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with and analyzing radioactive components are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in service. The failures discussed are (a) intergranular stress corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (b) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressure water reactor, (c) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (d) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor.

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shedrow, C.B.

    1999-11-29

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) made a FY98 commitment to the Department of Energy (DOE) to recommend a technology for the disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The two technologies being considered, direct co-disposal and melt and dilute, had been previously selected from a group of eleven potential SNF management technologies by the Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team chartered by the DOE''s Office of Spent Fuel Management. To meet this commitment, WSRC organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and ultimately provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE on a preferred SNF alternative management technology.

  17. A nuclear source term analysis for spacecraft power systems

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, W.H.

    1998-12-01

    All US space missions involving on board nuclear material must be approved by the Office of the President. To be approved the mission and the hardware systems must undergo evaluations of the associated nuclear health and safety risk. One part of these evaluations is the characterization of the source terms, i.e., the estimate of the amount, physical form, and location of nuclear material, which might be released into the environment in the event of credible accidents. This paper presents a brief overview of the source term analysis by the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel for the NASA Cassini Space Mission launched in October 1997. Included is a description of the Energy Interaction Model, an innovative approach to the analysis of potential releases from high velocity impacts resulting from launch aborts and reentries.

  18. U/Th dating by SHRIMP RG ion-microprobe mass spectrometry using single ion-exchange beads

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Wooden, J.; Murphy, F.; Williams, Ross W.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new analytical method for U-series isotopes using the SHRIMP RG (Sensitive High mass Resolution Ion MicroProbe) mass spectrometer that utilizes the preconcentration of the U-series isotopes from a sample onto a single ion-exchange bead. Ion-microprobe mass spectrometry is capable of producing Th ionization efficiencies in excess of 2%. Analytical precision is typically better than alpha spectroscopy, but not as good as thermal ionization mass spectroscopy (TIMS) and inductively coupled plasma multicollector mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Like TIMS and ICP-MS the method allows analysis of small samples sizes, but also adds the advantage of rapidity of analysis. A major advantage of ion-microprobe analysis is that U and Th isotopes are analyzed in the same bead, simplifying the process of chemical separation. Analytical time on the instrument is ???60 min per sample, and a single instrument-loading can accommodate 15-20 samples to be analyzed in a 24-h day. An additional advantage is that the method allows multiple reanalyses of the same bead and that samples can be archived for reanalysis at a later time. Because the ion beam excavates a pit only a few ??m deep, the mount can later be repolished and reanalyzed numerous times. The method described of preconcentrating a low concentration sample onto a small conductive substrate to allow ion-microprobe mass spectrometry is potentially applicable to many other systems. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Error analysis in nuclear density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, Nicolas; McDonnell, Jordan D.; Sarich, Jason; Wild, Stefan M.; Higdon, Dave

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is the only microscopic, global approach to the structure of atomic nuclei. It is used in numerous applications, from determining the limits of stability to gaining a deep understanding of the formation of elements in the Universe or the mechanisms that power stars and reactors. The predictive power of the theory depends on the amount of physics embedded in the energy density functional as well as on efficient ways to determine a small number of free parameters and solve the DFT equations. In this article, we discuss the various sources of uncertainties and errors encountered in DFT and possible methods to quantify these uncertainties in a rigorous manner.

  20. Satellite nuclear power station: An engineering analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. R.; Clement, J. D.; Rosa, R. J.; Kirby, K. D.; Yang, Y. Y.

    1973-01-01

    A nuclear-MHD power plant system which uses a compact non-breeder reactor to produce power in the multimegawatt range is analyzed. It is shown that, operated in synchronous orbit, the plant would transmit power safely to the ground by a microwave beam. Fuel reprocessing would take place in space, and no radioactive material would be returned to earth. Even the effect of a disastrous accident would have negligible effect on earth. A hydrogen moderated gas core reactor, or a colloid-core, or NERVA type reactor could also be used. The system is shown to approach closely the ideal of economical power without pollution.

  1. Cellular distribution of uranium after acute exposure of renal epithelial cells: SEM, TEM and nuclear microscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrière, Marie; Gouget, Barbara; Gallien, Jean-Paul; Avoscan, Laure; Gobin, Renée; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Khodja, Hicham

    2005-04-01

    The major health effect of uranium exposure has been reported to be chemical kidney toxicity, functional and histological damages being mainly observed in proximal tubule cells. Uranium enters the proximal tubule as uranyl-bicarbonate or uranyl-citrate complexes. The aim of our research is to investigate the mechanisms of uranium toxicity, intracellular accumulation and repartition after acute intoxication of rat renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, as a function of its chemical form. Microscopic observations of renal epithelial cells after acute exposure to uranyl-bicarbonate showing the presence of intracellular precipitates as thin needles of uranyl-phosphate localized in cell lysosomes have been published. However the initial site of precipitates formation has not been identified yet: they could either be formed outside the cells before internalization, or directly inside the cells. Uranium solubility as a function and initial concentration was specified by ICP-MS analysis of culture media. In parallel, uranium uptake and distribution in cell monolayers exposed to U-bicarbonate was investigated by nuclear microprobe analyses. Finally, the presence of uranium precipitates was tested out by scanning electron microscopic observations (SEM), while extracellular and/or intracellular precipitates were observed on thin sections of cells by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  2. Focusing optics for a synchrotron x radiation microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    We propose two constant deviation and energy-tunable fluorescent microprobe optical designs which efficiently use x rays available from ending magnets and insertion devices of synchrotron radiation sources. The simpler system consists of a cylindrically bent multilayer to focus the vertical opening angle by in-plane scattering, a fixed radius cylindrically curved multilayer which sagittally focuses the horizontal divergence, and a pinhole to further reduce the beam to microprobe dimensions. A more versatile system has a pair of flat nondispersively arranged diffracting optics followed by crossed elliptical mirrors. These nondispersive combinations can produce a fixed-exit beam. We compare the relative intensity with other optical systems.

  3. Microactuator fabricated by powder particle assemblage using microprobe technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Takeshi; Egashira, Mitsuru; Shinya, Norio

    1997-06-01

    In the previous paper, preliminary research results on powder particle assemblage technique using a microprobe was reported. It was shown that the technique makes it possible to manipulate powder particles one by one, etch microscopically and weld the powder particle into a substrate or other powder particles. In this work, the welding mechanism of this method and metallurgical properties of welded parts were investigated, and micro- actuators were fabricated by means of powder particle assemblage technique using the microprobe. The results indicated the potentiality of this technique for application to assemblage of micro-machine and micro-devices.

  4. Nuclear power plant fire protection: philosophy and analysis. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, D. L.

    1980-05-01

    This report combines a fire severity analysis technique with a fault tree methodology for assessing the importance to nuclear power plant safety of certain combinations of components and systems. Characteristics unique to fire, such as propagation induced by the failure of barriers, have been incorporated into the methodology. By applying the resulting fire analysis technique to actual conditions found in a representative nuclear power plant, it is found that some safety and nonsafety areas are both highly vulnerable to fire spread and impotant to overall safety, while other areas prove to be of marginal importance. Suggestions are made for further experimental and analytical work to supplement the fire analysis method.

  5. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs.

  6. Advanced nuclear rocket engine mission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsthaler, J.; Farbman, G.; Sulmeisters, T.; Buden, D.; Harris, P.

    1987-12-01

    The use of a derivative of the NERVA engine developed from 1955 to 1973 was evluated for potential application to Air Force orbital transfer and maneuvering missions in the time period 1995 to 2020. The NERVA stge was found to have lower life cycle costs (LCC) than an advanced chemical stage for performing low earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous orbit (GEO0 missions at any level of activity greater than three missions per year. It had lower life cycle costs than a high performance nuclear electric engine at any level of LEO to GEO mission activity. An examination of all unmanned orbital transfer and maneuvering missions from the Space Transportation Architecture study (STAS 111-3) indicated a LCC advantage for the NERVA stage over the advanced chemical stage of fifteen million dollars. The cost advanced accured from both the orbital transfer and maneuvering missions. Parametric analyses showed that the specific impulse of the NERVA stage and the cost of delivering material to low earth orbit were the most significant factors in the LCC advantage over the chemical stage. Lower development costs and a higher thrust gave the NERVA engine an LCC advantage over the nuclear electric stage. An examination of technical data from the Rover/NERVA program indicated that development of the NERVA stage has a low technical risk, and the potential for high reliability and safe operation. The data indicated the NERVA engine had a great flexibility which would permit a single stage to perform all Air Force missions.

  7. Constraining the symmetry energy content of nuclear matter from nuclear masses: A covariance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, C.; Agrawal, B. K.; De, J. N.

    2015-08-01

    Elements of nuclear symmetry energy evaluated from different energy density functionals parametrized by fitting selective bulk properties of few representative nuclei are seen to vary widely. Those obtained from experimental data on nuclear masses across the periodic table, however, show that they are better constrained. A possible direction in reconciling this paradox may be gleaned from comparison of results obtained from use of the binding energies in the fitting protocol within a microscopic model with two sets of nuclei, one a representative standard set and another where very highly asymmetric nuclei are additionally included. A covariance analysis reveals that the additional fitting protocol reduces the uncertainties in the nuclear symmetry energy coefficient, its slope parameter, as well as the neutron-skin thickness in 208Pb nucleus by ˜50 % . The central values of these entities are also seen to be slightly reduced.

  8. A thermal microprobe fabricated with wafer-stage processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongxia; Zhang, Yanwei; Blaser, Juliana; Sriram, T. S.; Enver, Ahsan; Marcus, R. B.

    1998-05-01

    A thermal microprobe has been designed and built for high resolution temperature sensing. The thermal sensor is a thin-film thermocouple junction at the tip of an atomic force microprobe (AFM) silicon probe needle. Only wafer-stage processing steps are used for the fabrication. For high resolution temperature sensing it is essential that the junction be confined to a short distance at the AFM tip. This confinement is achieved by a controlled photoresist coating process. Experiment prototypes have been made with an Au/Pd junction confined to within 0.5 μm of the tip, with the two metals separated elsewhere by a thin insulating oxide layer. Processing begins with double-polished, n-type, 4 in. diameter, 300-μm-thick silicon wafers. Atomically sharp probe tips are formed by a combination of dry and wet chemical etching, and oxidation sharpening. The metal layers are sputtering deposited and the cantilevers are released by a combination of KOH and dry etching. A resistively heated calibration device was made for temperature calibration of the thermal microprobe over the temperature range 25-110 °C. Over this range the thermal outputs of two microprobes are 4.5 and 5.6 μV/K and is linear. Thermal and topographical images are also obtained from a heated tungsten thin film fuse.

  9. CAC - NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKET CORE ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most important factors in the development of nuclear rocket engine designs is to be able to accurately predict temperatures and pressures throughout a fission nuclear reactor core with axial hydrogen flow through circular coolant passages. CAC is an analytical prediction program to study the heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics of a circular coolant passage. CAC predicts as a function of time axial and radial fluid conditions, passage wall temperatures, flow rates in each coolant passage, and approximate maximum material temperatures. CAC incorporates the hydrogen properties model STATE to provide fluid-state relations, thermodynamic properties, and transport properties of molecular hydrogen in any fixed ortho-para combination. The program requires the general core geometry, the core material properties as a function of temperature, the core power profile, and the core inlet conditions as function of time. Although CAC was originally developed in FORTRAN IV for use on an IBM 7094, this version is written in ANSI standard FORTRAN 77 and is designed to be machine independent. It has been successfully compiled on IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS with Lahey F77L, a Sun4 series computer running SunOS 4.1.1, and a VAX series computer running VMS 5.4-3. CAC requires 300K of RAM under MS-DOS, 422K of RAM under SunOS, and 220K of RAM under VMS. No sample executable is provided on the distribution medium. Sample input and output data are included. The standard distribution medium for this program is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. CAC was developed in 1966, and this machine independent version was released in 1992. IBM-PC and IBM are registered trademarks of International Business Machines. Lahey F77L is a registered trademark of Lahey Computer Systems, Inc. SunOS is a trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc. VMS is a trademark of Digital Equipment Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  10. Chemometric Analysis of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Data

    SciTech Connect

    ALAM,TODD M.; ALAM,M. KATHLEEN

    2000-07-20

    Chemometric analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has increased dramatically in recent years. A variety of different chemometric techniques have been applied to a wide range of problems in food, agricultural, medical, process and industrial systems. This article gives a brief review of chemometric analysis of NMR spectral data, including a summary of the types of mixtures and experiments analyzed with chemometric techniques. Common experimental problems encountered during the chemometric analysis of NMR data are also discussed.

  11. Neutron transport analysis for nuclear reactor design

    DOEpatents

    Vujic, J.L.

    1993-11-30

    Replacing regular mesh-dependent ray tracing modules in a collision/transfer probability (CTP) code with a ray tracing module based upon combinatorial geometry of a modified geometrical module (GMC) provides a general geometry transfer theory code in two dimensions (2D) for analyzing nuclear reactor design and control. The primary modification of the GMC module involves generation of a fixed inner frame and a rotating outer frame, where the inner frame contains all reactor regions of interest, e.g., part of a reactor assembly, an assembly, or several assemblies, and the outer frame, with a set of parallel equidistant rays (lines) attached to it, rotates around the inner frame. The modified GMC module allows for determining for each parallel ray (line), the intersections with zone boundaries, the path length between the intersections, the total number of zones on a track, the zone and medium numbers, and the intersections with the outer surface, which parameters may be used in the CTP code to calculate collision/transfer probability and cross-section values. 28 figures.

  12. Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, Sydney J; Burchell, Timothy D; Corwin, William R; Fisher, Stephen Eugene; Forsberg, Charles W.; Morris, Robert Noel; Moses, David Lewis

    2008-12-01

    As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

  13. Neutron transport analysis for nuclear reactor design

    DOEpatents

    Vujic, Jasmina L.

    1993-01-01

    Replacing regular mesh-dependent ray tracing modules in a collision/transfer probability (CTP) code with a ray tracing module based upon combinatorial geometry of a modified geometrical module (GMC) provides a general geometry transfer theory code in two dimensions (2D) for analyzing nuclear reactor design and control. The primary modification of the GMC module involves generation of a fixed inner frame and a rotating outer frame, where the inner frame contains all reactor regions of interest, e.g., part of a reactor assembly, an assembly, or several assemblies, and the outer frame, with a set of parallel equidistant rays (lines) attached to it, rotates around the inner frame. The modified GMC module allows for determining for each parallel ray (line), the intersections with zone boundaries, the path length between the intersections, the total number of zones on a track, the zone and medium numbers, and the intersections with the outer surface, which parameters may be used in the CTP code to calculate collision/transfer probability and cross-section values.

  14. Fuzzy risk analysis for nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Zardecki, A.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of a safeguards system, based on the notion of fuzzy sets and linguistic variables, concerns such as complexity and inherent imprecision in estimating the possibility of loss or compromise. The automated risk analysis allows the risk to be determined for an entire system based on estimates for lowest level components and the component proportion. In addition, for each component (asset) the most effective combination of protection mechanisms against a given set of threats is determined. A distinction between bar and featured risk is made.

  15. Nuclear Forensics: Scientific Analysis Supporting Law Enforcement and Nuclear Security Investigations.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Elizabeth; Kristo, Michael J; Toole, Kaitlyn; Kips, Ruth; Young, Emma

    2016-02-02

    Nuclear forensic science, or "nuclear forensic", aims to answer questions about nuclear material found outside of regulatory control. In this Feature, we provide a general overview of nuclear forensics, selecting examples of key "nuclear forensic signatures" which have allowed investigators to determine the identity of unknown nuclear material in real investigations.

  16. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Mars Mission Systems Analysis and Requirements Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulqueen, Jack; Chiroux, Robert C.; Thomas, Dan; Crane, Tracie

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the Mars transportation vehicle design concepts developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Concepts Office. These vehicle design concepts provide an indication of the most demanding and least demanding potential requirements for nuclear thermal propulsion systems for human Mars exploration missions from years 2025 to 2035. Vehicle concept options vary from large "all-up" vehicle configurations that would transport all of the elements for a Mars mission on one vehicle. to "split" mission vehicle configurations that would consist of separate smaller vehicles that would transport cargo elements and human crew elements to Mars separately. Parametric trades and sensitivity studies show NTP stage and engine design options that provide the best balanced set of metrics based on safety, reliability, performance, cost and mission objectives. Trade studies include the sensitivity of vehicle performance to nuclear engine characteristics such as thrust, specific impulse and nuclear reactor type. Tbe associated system requirements are aligned with the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Reference Mars mission as described in the Explorations Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) report. The focused trade studies include a detailed analysis of nuclear engine radiation shield requirements for human missions and analysis of nuclear thermal engine design options for the ESAS reference mission.

  17. Multi-Elemental Nuclear Analysis of soil reference material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metairon, S.; Zamboni, C. B.; Medeiros, I. M. M. Amaral; Menezes, M. À. B. C.

    2011-08-01

    The elements concentration in the soil reference material (IAEA/SOIL-7) was obtained using the parametric Neutron Activation Analysis technique in the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor at IPEN (CNEN-SP). The results obtained were in good agreement with the respective nominal values from this reference material suggesting the viability of using this parametric procedure for environmental investigations.

  18. Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy System Market Analysis Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, Mark

    2016-06-09

    This presentation describes nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems (N-R HESs), states their potential benefits, provides figures for the four tightly coupled N-R HESs that NREL is currently analyzing, and outlines the analysis process that is underway.

  19. Practical applications of activation analysis and other nuclear techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W S

    1982-01-01

    Neeutron activation analysis (NAA) is a versatile, sensitive multielement, usually nondestructive analytical technique used to determine elemental concentrations in a variety of materials. Samples are irradiated with neutrons in a nuclear reactor, removed, and for the nondestructive technique, the induced radioactivity measured. This measurement of ..gamma.. rays emitted from specific radionuclides makes possible the quantitative determination of elements present. The method is described, advantages and disadvantages listed and a number of examples of its use given. Two other nuclear methods, particle induced x-ray emission and synchrotron produced x-ray fluorescence are also briefly discussed.

  20. X-ray microprobe measurements of the chemical compositions of ALH84001 carbonate globules

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.J.; Sutton, S.R.; Keller, L.P.

    2004-01-28

    We measured minor element contents of carbonate from ALH84001 and report trends in tbe Ca, V, Mn and Sr in carbonate and the associated magnetite bands. McKay et al. suggested that carbonate globules in the ALH84001 meteorite from Mars contained evidence consistent with the development of bacterial life early in the history of Mars. This result provoked an extensive study of the ALH84001 meteorite. More recently Thomas-Keprta et al. have published a study showing that the magnetite associated with carbonate rims are of the size and shape produced by terrestrial bacteria. This paper has revived interest in ALH84001. The typical ALH84001 carbonate globule consists of four regions: a core of Fe-rich carbonate, a thin magnetite-rich band, a rim of Mn-rich carbonate, and another thin magnetite-rich band. Trace element analysis of each of these phases may allow us to address several important questions about these carbonates: (1) The origin of the magnetite-rich bands in the ALH84001 carbonate globules. If the magnetites are derived from the underlying carbonate through thermal decomposition (as proposed by Golden et al.), then we expect to see 'inherited' trace elements in these magnetite bands. (2) The origin of the rim carbonate, by determining whether the carbonate in the core has the same trace elements as the rim carbonates. (3) The age of the rim carbonate. Borg et al. dated the formation of the rim carbonate using the Rb/Sr chronometer. Borg et al. performed their measurements on an aliquot of what they called a high-Rb, low-Sr carbonate separate from the rim. We previously measured the trace element contents of chips from core and rim carbonates from an ALH84001 carbonate globule using an X-Ray Microprobe on Beamline X26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source. These measurements showed the rim carbonate had a very low Rb content, with Sr>>Rb, inconsistent with the {approx}5 ppm Rb reported by Borg et al. in the sample they dated by the Rb/Sr chronometer. The

  1. Comparative Analysis on Nuclear Fuel Sustainability Aspect of FBR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik; Irwanto, Dwi; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Recycle program of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will have some challanges in term of fuel cycle capability and its facilities as well as nuclear non-proliferation concern of special nuclear materials. A different analysis approach as a comparative study have been analyzed based on breeding ratio and heavy metal inventory ratio concepts in fast breeder reactor (FBR) type. Breeding ratio and heavy metal inventory obtain higher than unity which shows breeding gain or surplus inventory of heavy metals are obtained. Breeding ratio indicates the fuel conversion capability from conversion process of fertile materials into fissile material such as fertile materials of U-238, Pu-238, Pu-240 and fissile materials of Pu-239 and Pu-241. Inventory ratio approaches are appropriate to estimate some selected actinide as a mass inventory production such as plutonium inventory ratio which estimate the surplus mass inventory from the ratio of produced plutonium at the net of operation to the initial inventory ratio.

  2. Microstructural characterization and pore structure analysis of nuclear graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, J.; Karthik, C.; Butt, D. P.; Windes, W. E.; Ubic, R.

    2011-08-01

    Graphite will be used as a structural and moderator material in next-generation nuclear reactors. While the overall nature of the production of nuclear graphite is well understood, the historic nuclear grades of graphite are no longer available. This paper reports the virgin microstructural characteristics of filler particles and macro-scale porosity in virgin nuclear graphite grades of interest to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant program. Optical microscopy was used to characterize filler particle size and shape as well as the arrangement of shrinkage cracks. Computer aided image analysis was applied to optical images to quantitatively determine the variation of pore structure, area, eccentricity, and orientation within and between grades. The overall porosity ranged between ˜14% and 21%. A few large pores constitute the majority of the overall porosity. The distribution of pore area in all grades was roughly logarithmic in nature. The average pore was best fit by an ellipse with aspect ratio of ˜2. An estimated 0.6-0.9% of observed porosity was attributed to shrinkage cracks in the filler particles. Finally, a preferred orientation of the porosity was observed in all grades.

  3. Microstructural Characterization and Pore Structure Analysis of Nuclear Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    J. Kane; C. Karthik; D. P. Butt; W. E. Windes; R. Ubic

    2011-08-01

    Graphite will be used as a structural and moderator material in next-generation nuclear reactors. While the overall nature of the production of nuclear graphite is well understood, the historic nuclear grades of graphite are no longer available. This paper reports the virgin microstructural characteristics of filler particles and macro-scale porosity in virgin nuclear graphite grades of interest to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant program. Optical microscopy was used to characterize filler particle size and shape as well as the arrangement of shrinkage cracks. Computer aided image analysis was applied to optical images to quantitatively determine the variation of pore structure, area, eccentricity, and orientation within and between grades. The overall porosity ranged between {approx}14% and 21%. A few large pores constitute the majority of the overall porosity. The distribution of pore area in all grades was roughly logarithmic in nature. The average pore was best fit by an ellipse with aspect ratio of {approx}2. An estimated 0.6-0.9% of observed porosity was attributed to shrinkage cracks in the filler particles. Finally, a preferred orientation of the porosity was observed in all grades.

  4. Nuclear monitoring by nonradioactive noble gas sampling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fearey, B.L.; Nakhleh, C.W.; Stanbro, W.D.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The perceived importance of measuring the xenon and krypton isotopics of nuclear activities has increased substantially in recent years. We have performed a systems analysis and theoretical simulation of the production, atmospheric dispersion, and isotopic abundances of noble-gas fission products, addressing several questions of interest, including: the relative isotopic variation as a function of nuclear fuel composition, reactor operational history, reactor type, distance from stack, and ambient meteorological conditions. Of particular importance in this analysis was the question of back-calculating process parameters of interest given noble-gas isotopic data. An analysis of the effect of measurement uncertainties was also performed. The results of these analyses indicate that this monitoring concept should be experimentally feasible.

  5. ADDING REALISM TO NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISSOLVING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, B.

    2011-08-15

    Two new criticality modeling approaches have greatly increased the efficiency of dissolver operations in H-Canyon. The first new approach takes credit for the linear, physical distribution of the mass throughout the entire length of the fuel assembly. This distribution of mass is referred to as the linear density. Crediting the linear density of the fuel bundles results in using lower fissile concentrations, which allows higher masses to be charged to the dissolver. Also, this approach takes credit for the fact that only part of the fissile mass is wetted at a time. There are multiple assemblies stacked on top of each other in a bundle. On average, only 50-75% of the mass (the bottom two or three assemblies) is wetted at a time. This means that only 50-75% (depending on operating level) of the mass is moderated and is contributing to the reactivity of the system. The second new approach takes credit for the progression of the dissolving process. Previously, dissolving analysis looked at a snapshot in time where the same fissile material existed both in the wells and in the bulk solution at the same time. The second new approach models multiple consecutive phases that simulate the fissile material moving from a high concentration in the wells to a low concentration in the bulk solution. This approach is more realistic and allows higher fissile masses to be charged to the dissolver.

  6. An analysis of international nuclear fuel supply options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J'tia Patrice

    As the global demand for energy grows, many nations are considering developing or increasing nuclear capacity as a viable, long-term power source. To assess the possible expansion of nuclear power and the intricate relationships---which cover the range of economics, security, and material supply and demand---between established and aspirant nuclear generating entities requires models and system analysis tools that integrate all aspects of the nuclear enterprise. Computational tools and methods now exist across diverse research areas, such as operations research and nuclear engineering, to develop such a tool. This dissertation aims to develop methodologies and employ and expand on existing sources to develop a multipurpose tool to analyze international nuclear fuel supply options. The dissertation is comprised of two distinct components: the development of the Material, Economics, and Proliferation Assessment Tool (MEPAT), and analysis of fuel cycle scenarios using the tool. Development of MEPAT is aimed for unrestricted distribution and therefore uses publicly available and open-source codes in its development when possible. MEPAT is built using the Powersim Studio platform that is widely used in systems analysis. MEPAT development is divided into three modules focusing on: material movement; nonproliferation; and economics. The material movement module tracks material quantity in each process of the fuel cycle and in each nuclear program with respect to ownership, location and composition. The material movement module builds on techniques employed by fuel cycle models such as the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) code developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) for the analysis of domestic fuel cycle. Material movement parameters such as lending and reactor preference, as well as fuel cycle parameters such as process times and material factors are user-specified through a Microsoft Excel(c) data spreadsheet

  7. Electron Microprobe Analyses of Lithic Fragments and Their Minerals from Luna 20 Fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, G. H.; Hlava, P. F.; Green, J. A.; Moore, R. B.; Moreland, G.; Dowty, E.; Prinz, M.; Keil, K.; Nehru, C. E.; Bunch, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    The bulk analyses (determined with the broad beam electron microprobe technique) of lithic fragments are given in weight percentages and are arranged according to the rock classification. Within each rock group the analyses are arranged in order of increasing FeO content. Thin section and lithic fragment numbers are given at the top of each column of analysis and correspond to the numbers recorded on photo mosaics on file in the Institute of Meteoritics. CIPW molecular norms are given for each analysis. Electron microprobe mineral analyses (given in oxide weight percentages), structural formulae and molecular end member values are presented for plagioclase, olivine, pyroxene and K-feldspar. The minerals are selected mostly from lithic fragments that were also analyzed for bulk composition. Within each mineral group the analyses are presented according to the section number and lithic fragment number. Within each lithic fragment the mineral analyses are arranged as follows: Plagioclase in order of increasing CaO; olivine and pyroexene in order of increasing FeO; and K-feldspar in order of increasing K2O. The mineral grains are identified at the top of each column of analysis by grain number and lithic fragment number.

  8. Investigation of Periodic Nuclear Decay Data with Spectral Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javorsek, D.; Sturrock, P.; Buncher, J.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, T.; Hoft, A.; Horan, T.; Jenkins, J.; Kerford, J.; Lee, R.; Mattes, J.; Morris, D.; Mudry, R.; Newport, J.; Petrelli, M.; Silver, M.; Stewart, C.; Terry, B.; Willenberg, H.

    2009-12-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay experiments displaying unexplained periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data was from 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center in Houston, 32Si decay reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische-Bundesanstalt in Germany. All three data sets possess the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additionally a spectral comparison of the local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and the plasma speed and latitude of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) was performed. Following analysis of these six possible causal factors, their reciprocals, and their linear combinations, a possible link between nuclear decay rate fluctuations and the linear combination of the HCS latitude and 1/R motivates searching for a possible mechanism with such properties.

  9. A human reliability analysis of a nuclear explosives dismantlement

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, T.F.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the methodology used in a human reliability analysis (HRA) conducted during a quantitative hazard assessment of a nuclear weapon disassembly process performed at the Pantex plant. The probability of human errors during the disassembly process is an extremely important aspect of estimating accident-sequence frequency for nuclear weapons processing. The methods include the systematic identification of potential human-initiated or enabled accident sequences using an accident-sequence fault tree, the extensive use of walkthroughs and videotaping of the disassembly process, and hands-on testing of postulated human errors. THERP modeling of rule-based behavior and operational data analysis of errors in skill-based behavior are described. A simple method for evaluating the approximate likelihood of nonmalevolent violations of procedures was developed and used to examine the process. The HRA occurred concurrently with process design, so considerable interaction between the analysts and designers occurred and resulted in design changes that are discussed in the paper.

  10. Nuclear Criticality Safety Application Guide: Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) is committed to performing and documenting safety analyses for facilities it manages for the Department of Energy (DOE). Safety analyses are performed to identify hazards and potential accidents; to analyze the adequacy of measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate hazards; and to evaluate potential accidents and determine associated risks. Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) are prepared to document the safety analysis to ensure facilities can be operated safely and in accordance with regulations. Many of the facilities requiring a SAR process fissionable material creating the potential for a nuclear criticality accident. MMES has long had a nuclear criticality safety program that provides the technical support to fissionable material operations to ensure the safe processing and storage of fissionable materials. The guiding philosophy of the program has always been the application of the double-contingency principle, which states: {open_quotes}process designs shall incorporate sufficient factors of safety to require at least two unlikely, independent, and concurrent changes in process conditions before a criticality accident is possible.{close_quotes} At Energy Systems analyses have generally been maintained to document that no single normal or abnormal operating conditions that could reasonably be expected to occur can cause a nuclear criticality accident. This application guide provides a summary description of the MMES Nuclear Criticality Safety Program and the MMES Criticality Accident Alarm System requirements for inclusion in facility SARs. The guide also suggests a way to incorporate the analyses conducted pursuant to the double-contingency principle into the SAR. The prime objective is to minimize duplicative effort between the NCSA process and the SAR process and yet adequately describe the methodology utilized to prevent a nuclear criticality accident.

  11. Vulnerability Analysis Considerations for the Transportation of Special Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, Lary G.; Purvis, James W.

    1999-07-21

    The vulnerability analysis methodology developed for fixed nuclear material sites has proven to be extremely effective in assessing associated transportation issues. The basic methods and techniques used are directly applicable to conducting a transportation vulnerability analysis. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that the same physical protection elements (detection, delay, and response) are present, although the response force plays a dominant role in preventing the theft or sabotage of material. Transportation systems are continuously exposed to the general public whereas the fixed site location by its very nature restricts general public access.

  12. Integration of facility modeling capabilities for nuclear nonproliferation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Humberto; Burr, Tom; Coles, Garill A; Edmunds, Thomas A.; Garrett, Alfred; Gorensek, Maximilian; Hamm, Luther; Krebs, John; Kress, Reid L; Lamberti, Vincent; Schoenwald, David; Tzanos, Constantine P; Ward, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  13. Safety analysis of irradiated nuclear fuel transportation container

    SciTech Connect

    Uspuras, E.; Rimkevicius, S.

    2007-07-01

    Ignalina NPP comprises two Units with RBMK-1500 reactors. After the Unit 1 of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant was shut down in 2004, approximately 1000 fuel assemblies from Unit were available for further reuse in Unit 2. The fuel-transportation container, vehicle, protection shaft and other necessary equipment were designed in order to implement the process for on-site transportation of Unit 1 fuel for reuse in the Unit 2. The Safety Analysis Report (SAR) was developed to demonstrate that the proposed set of equipment performs all functions and assures the required level of safety for both normal operation and accident conditions. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the content and main results of SAR, focusing attention on the container used to transport spent fuel assemblies from Unit I on Unit 2. In the SAR, the structural integrity, thermal, radiological and nuclear safety calculations are performed to assess the acceptance of the proposed set of equipment. The safety analysis demonstrated that the proposed nuclear fuel transportation container and other equipment are in compliance with functional, design and regulatory requirements and assure the required safety level. (authors)

  14. INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

    2011-07-18

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  15. Radionuclide Analysis on Bamboos following the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    PubMed Central

    Higaki, Takumi; Higaki, Shogo; Hirota, Masahiro; Akita, Kae; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2012-01-01

    In response to contamination from the recent Fukushima nuclear accident, we conducted radionuclide analysis on bamboos sampled from six sites within a 25 to 980 km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Maximum activity concentrations of radiocesium 134Cs and 137Cs in samples from Fukushima city, 65 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi plant, were in excess of 71 and 79 kBq/kg, dry weight (DW), respectively. In Kashiwa city, 195 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi, the sample concentrations were in excess of 3.4 and 4.3 kBq/kg DW, respectively. In Toyohashi city, 440 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi, the concentrations were below the measurable limits of up to 4.5 Bq/kg DW. In the radiocesium contaminated samples, the radiocesium activity was higher in mature and fallen leaves than in young leaves, branches and culms. PMID:22496858

  16. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage Conceptual Design and Mission Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kos, Larry D.; Russell, Tiffany E.

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) is an in-space transportation vehicle, comprised of three main elements, designed to support a long-stay human Mars mission architecture beginning in 2035. The stage conceptual design and the mission analysis discussed here support the current nuclear thermal propulsion going on within partnership activity of NASA and the Department of Energy (DOE). The transportation system consists of three elements: 1) the Core Stage, 2) the In-line Tank, and 3) the Drop Tank. The driving mission case is the piloted flight to Mars in 2037 and will be the main point design shown and discussed. The corresponding Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle (LV) is also presented due to it being a very critical aspect of the NCPS Human Mars Mission architecture due to the strong relationship between LV lift capability and LV volume capacity.

  17. Seismological analysis of the fourth North Korean nuclear test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Gernot; Gestermann, Nicolai; Ceranna, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The Democratic People's Republic of Korea has conducted its fourth underground nuclear explosions on 06.01.2016 at 01:30 (UTC). The explosion was clearly detected and located by the seismic network of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Additional seismic stations of international earthquake monitoring networks at regional distances, which are not part of the IMS, are used to precisely estimate the epicenter of the event in the North Hamgyong province (41.38°N / 129.05°E). It is located in the area of the North Korean Punggye-ri nuclear test site, where the verified nuclear tests from 2006, 2009, and 2013 were conducted as well. The analysis of the recorded seismic signals provides the evidence, that the event was originated by an explosive source. The amplitudes as well as the spectral characteristics of the signals were examined. Furthermore, the similarity of the signals with those from the three former nuclear tests suggests very similar source type. The seismograms at the 8,200 km distant IMS station GERES in Germany, for example, show the same P phase signal for all four explosions, differing in the amplitude only. The comparison of the measured amplitudes results in the increasing magnitude with the chronology of the explosions from 2006 (mb 4.2), 2009 (mb 4.8) until 2013 (mb 5.1), whereas the explosion in 2016 had approximately the same magnitude as that one three years before. Derived from the magnitude, a yield of 14 kt TNT equivalents was estimated for both explosions in 2013 and 2016; in 2006 and 2009 yields were 0.7 kt and 5.4 kt, respectively. However, a large inherent uncertainty for these values has to be taken into account. The estimation of the absolute yield of the explosions depends very much on the local geological situation and the degree of decoupling of the explosive from the surrounding rock. Due to the missing corresponding information, reliable magnitude-yield estimation for the

  18. Measurement of carbon distribution in nuclear fuel pin cladding specimens by means of a secondary ion mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bart, Gerhard; Aerne, Ernst Tino; Burri, Martin; Zwicky, Hans-Urs

    1986-11-01

    Cladding carburization during irradiation of advanced mixed uranium plutonium carbide fast breeder reactor fuel is possibly a life limiting fuel pin factor. The quantitative assessment of such clad carbon embrittlement is difficult to perform by electron microprobe analysis because of sample surface contamination, and due to the very low energy of the carbon K α X-ray transition. The work presented here describes a method developed at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research (EIR) to use shielded secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) as an accurate tool to determine radial distribution profiles of carbon in radioactive stainless steel fuel pin cladding. Compared with nuclear microprobe analysis (NMA) [1], which is also an accurate method for carbon analysis, the SIMS method distinguishes itself by its versatility for simultaneous determination of additional impurities.

  19. Design considerations for an x-ray microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Hastings, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    The optical design of a fluorescent microprobe covering the x-ray region from 2 to 16 keV is considered for the NSLS x-ray ring. The limit on detectability is from total flux (photons/..mu..m/sup 2/) and several design choices are considered to match the optical system to the storage ring to maximize throughput. The tradeoffs in image quality and energy resolution of these designs have been considered and within these constraints two firm proposals are presented.

  20. Electrostatic microprobe for determining charge domains on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    An electrostatic microprobe was developed to measure charge on wipes and various test surfaces. The device is constructed on an optical microscope platform utilizing a computer controlled XY stage. Test surfaces can be optically imaged to identify microscopic features that can be correlated to the measured charge domain maps. The ultimate goal is to quantify charge on wipe cloths to determine the influence of electrostatic forces on wipe sampling efficiency. We found that certain wipe materials do not extensively charge while others accumulate charge by making contact with other surfaces (through the triboelectric effect). Charge domains are found to be nonuniform.

  1. Elemental mapping of biological samples using a scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Grime, G. W.

    1988-03-01

    Elemental mapping using a scanning proton microprobe (SPM) can be a powerful technique for probing trace elements in biology, allowing complex interfaces to be studied in detail, identifying contamination and artefacts present in the specimen, and in certain circumstances obtaining indirect chemical information. Examples used to illustrate the advantages of the technique include the elemental mapping of growing pollen tubes, honey bee brain section, a mouse macrophage cell, human liver section exhibiting primary biliary cirrhosis, and the attack by a mildew fungus on a pea leaf.

  2. A High Resolution Microprobe Study of EETA79001 Lithology C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Cohen, B. A.; Donovan, J. J.; Vicenzi, E. P.

    2010-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite EETA79001 has received substantial attention for possibly containing a component of Martian soil in its impact glass (Lithology C) [1]. The composition of Martian soil can illuminate near-surface processes such as impact gardening [2] and hydrothermal and volcanic activity [3,4]. Impact melts in meteorites represent our most direct samples of Martian regolith. We present the initial findings from a high-resolution electron microprobe study of Lithology C from Martian meteorite EETA79001. As this study develops we aim to extract details of a potential soil composition and to examine Martian surface processes using elemental ratios and correlations.

  3. Super-achromatic microprobe for ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic OCT imaging at 800 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wu; Alemohammad, Milad; Yu, Xiaoyun; Yu, Shaoyong; Li, Xingde

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report a super-achromatic microprobe made with fiber-optic ball lens to enable ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic OCT imaging. An axial resolution of ~2.4 µm (in air) can be achieved with a 7-fs Ti:Sapphire laser. The microprobe has minimal astigmatism which affords a high transverse resolution of ~5.6 µm. The miniaturized microprobe has an outer diameter of ~520 µm including the encasing metal guard and can be used to image small luminal organs. The performance of the ultrahigh-resolution OCT microprobe was demonstrated by imaging rat esophagus, guinea pig esophagus, and mouse rectum in vivo.

  4. Nuclear design analysis of square-lattice honeycomb space nuclear rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widargo, Reza; Anghaie, Samim

    1999-01-01

    The square-lattice honeycomb reactor is designed based on a cylindrical core that is determined to have critical diameter and length of 0.50 m and 0.50 c, respectively. A 0.10-cm thick radial graphite reflector, in addition to a 0.20-m thick axial graphite reflector are used to reduce neutron leakage from the reactor. The core is fueled with solid solution of 93% enriched (U, Zr, Nb)C, which is one of several ternary uranium carbides that are considered for this concept. The fuel is to be fabricated as 2 mm grooved (U, Zr, Nb)C wafers. The fuel wafers are used to form square-lattice honeycomb fuel assemblies, 0.10 m in length with 30% cross-sectional flow area. Five fuel assemblies are stacked up axially to form the reactor core. Based on the 30% void fraction, the width of the square flow channel is about 1.3 mm. The hydrogen propellant is passed through these flow channels and removes the heat from the reactor core. To perform nuclear design analysis, a series of neutron transport and diffusion codes are used. The preliminary results are obtained using a simple four-group cross-section model. To optimize the nuclear design, the fuel densities are varied for each assembly. Tantalum, hafnium and tungsten are considered and used as a replacement for niobium in fuel material to provide water submersion sub-criticality for the reactor. Axial and radial neutron flux and power density distributions are calculated for the core. Results of the neutronic analysis indicate that the core has a relatively fast spectrum. From the results of the thermal hydraulic analyses, eight axial temperature zones are chosen for the calculation of group average cross-sections. An iterative process is conducted to couple the neutronic calculations with the thermal hydraulics calculations. Results of the nuclear design analysis indicate that a compact core can be designed based on ternary uranium carbide square-lattice honeycomb fuel. This design provides a relatively high thrust to weight

  5. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    von Appen, Alexander; Kosinski, Jan; Sparks, Lenore; Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Determining their 110-megadalton structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Of approximately 30 nucleoporins (Nups), 15 are structured and form the Y and inner-ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ~60 nm in diameter. The scaffold is decorated with transport-channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here we combine cryo-electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modelling to generate, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive architectural model of the human nuclear pore complex to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y complexes and to inner-ring complex members. We show that the transport-channel Nup358 (also known as Ranbp2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport-channel Nups. We conclude that, similar to coated vesicles, several copies of the same structural building block--although compositionally identical--engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations.

  6. Human Factors Considerations in New Nuclear Power Plants: Detailed Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    OHara,J.; Higgins, J.; Brown, W.; Fink, R.

    2008-02-14

    This Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored study has identified human-performance issues in new and advanced nuclear power plants. To identify the issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were organized into seven high-level HFE topic areas: Role of Personnel and Automation, Staffing and Training, Normal Operations Management, Disturbance and Emergency Management, Maintenance and Change Management, Plant Design and Construction, and HFE Methods and Tools. The issues where then prioritized into four categories using a 'Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table' methodology based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts. The subject matter experts were knowledgeable in a variety of disciplines. Vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators all participated. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. This Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technical report provides the detailed methodology, issue analysis, and results. A summary of the results of this study can be found in NUREG/CR-6947. The research performed for this project has identified a large number of human-performance issues for new control stations and new nuclear power plant designs. The information gathered in this project can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas through regulatory research. Addressing human-performance issues will provide the technical basis from which regulatory review guidance can be developed to meet these challenges. The availability of this review guidance will help set clear expectations for how the NRC staff will evaluate new designs, reduce regulatory uncertainty, and provide a well-defined path to new nuclear power plant licensing.

  7. Mathematical analysis of compressive/tensile molecular and nuclear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dayu

    Mathematical analysis in chemistry is a fascinating and critical tool to explain experimental observations. In this dissertation, mathematical methods to present chemical bonding and other structures for many-particle systems are discussed at different levels (molecular, atomic, and nuclear). First, the tetrahedral geometry of single, double, or triple carbon-carbon bonds gives an unsatisfying demonstration of bond lengths, compared to experimental trends. To correct this, Platonic solids and Archimedean solids were evaluated as atoms in covalent carbon or nitrogen bond systems in order to find the best solids for geometric fitting. Pentagonal solids, e.g. the dodecahedron and icosidodecahedron, give the best fit with experimental bond lengths; an ideal pyramidal solid which models covalent bonds was also generated. Second, the macroscopic compression/tension architectural approach was applied to forces at the molecular level, considering atomic interactions as compressive (repulsive) and tensile (attractive) forces. Two particle interactions were considered, followed by a model of the dihydrogen molecule (H2; two protons and two electrons). Dihydrogen was evaluated as two different types of compression/tension structures: a coaxial spring model and a ring model. Using similar methods, covalent diatomic molecules (made up of C, N, O, or F) were evaluated. Finally, the compression/tension model was extended to the nuclear level, based on the observation that nuclei with certain numbers of protons/neutrons (magic numbers) have extra stability compared to other nucleon ratios. A hollow spherical model was developed that combines elements of the classic nuclear shell model and liquid drop model. Nuclear structure and the trend of the "island of stability" for the current and extended periodic table were studied.

  8. Computational image analysis of nuclear morphology associated with various nuclear-specific aging disorders.

    PubMed

    Choi, Siwon; Wang, Wei; Ribeiro, Alexandrew J S; Kalinowski, Agnieszka; Gregg, Siobhan Q; Opresko, Patricia L; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Rohde, Gustavo K; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2011-01-01

    Computational image analysis is used in many areas of biological and medical research, but advanced techniques including machine learning remain underutilized. Here, we used automated segmentation and shape analyses, with pre-defined features and with computer generated components, to compare nuclei from various premature aging disorders caused by alterations in nuclear proteins. We considered cells from patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) with an altered nucleoskeletal protein; a mouse model of XFE progeroid syndrome caused by a deficiency of ERCC1-XPF DNA repair nuclease; and patients with Werner syndrome (WS) lacking a functional WRN exonuclease and helicase protein. Using feature space analysis, including circularity, eccentricity, and solidity, we found that XFE nuclei were larger and significantly more elongated than control nuclei. HGPS nuclei were smaller and rounder than the control nuclei with features suggesting small bumps. WS nuclei did not show any significant shape changes from control. We also performed principle component analysis (PCA) and a geometric, contour based metric. PCA allowed direct visualization of morphological changes in diseased nuclei, whereas standard, feature-based approaches required pre-defined parameters and indirect interpretation of multiple parameters. Both methods yielded similar results, but PCA proves to be a powerful pre-analysis methodology for unknown systems.

  9. Solid Phase Microextraction for the Analysis of Nuclear Weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D M

    2001-06-01

    This document is a compendium of answers to commonly asked questions about solid phase microextraction as it relates to the analysis of nuclear weapons. We have also included a glossary of terms associated with this analytical method as well as pertinent weapons engineering terminology. Microextraction is a new collection technique being developed to nonintrusively sample chemicals from weapon headspace gases for subsequent analysis. The chemicals that are being targeted outgas from the high explosives and other organic materials used in the weapon assembly. This technique is therefore a valuable tool to: (1) remotely detect and assess the aging of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and, in some cases, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) organic materials; and (2) identify potential compatibility issues (i.e., materials interactions) that should be more carefully monitored during surveillance tear-downs. Microextraction is particularly attractive because of the practical constraints inherent to the weapon surveillance procedure. To remain transparent to other core surveillance activities and fall within nuclear safety guidelines, headspace analysis of the weapons requires a procedure that: (1) maintains ambient temperature conditions; (2) allows practical collection times of less than 20 min; (3) maintains the integrity of the weapon gas volume; (4) provides reproducible and quantitative results; and (5) can identify all possible targets.

  10. Numerical analysis of a nuclear fuel element for nuclear thermal propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Schutzenhofer, Luke

    1991-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics model with porosity and permeability formulations in the transport equations has been developed to study the concept of nuclear thermal propulsion through the analysis of a pulsed irradiation of a particle bed element (PIPE). The numerical model is a time-accurate pressure-based formulation. An adaptive upwind scheme is employed for spatial discretization. The upwind scheme is based on second- and fourth-order central differencing with adaptive artificial dissipation. Multiblocked porosity regions have been formulated to model the cold frit, particle bed, and hot frit. Multiblocked permeability regions have been formulated to describe the flow shaping effect from the thickness-varying cold frit. Computational results for several zero-power density PIPEs and an elevated-particle-temperature PIPE are presented. The implications of the computational results are discussed.

  11. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 22: Advanced Radionuclide Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  12. Nuclear Forensic Science: Analysis of Nuclear Material Out of Regulatory Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristo, Michael J.; Gaffney, Amy M.; Marks, Naomi; Knight, Kim; Cassata, William S.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear forensic science seeks to identify the origin of nuclear materials found outside regulatory control. It is increasingly recognized as an integral part of a robust nuclear security program. This review highlights areas of active, evolving research in nuclear forensics, with a focus on analytical techniques commonly employed in Earth and planetary sciences. Applications of nuclear forensics to uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) are discussed first. UOCs have become an attractive target for nuclear forensic researchers because of the richness in impurities compared to materials produced later in the fuel cycle. The development of chronometric methods for age dating nuclear materials is then discussed, with an emphasis on improvements in accuracy that have been gained from measurements of multiple radioisotopic systems. Finally, papers that report on casework are reviewed, to provide a window into current scientific practice.

  13. High-order harmonic generation from polyatomic molecules including nuclear motion and a nuclear modes analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, C. B.; Abu-samha, M.; Madsen, L. B.

    2010-04-15

    We present a generic approach for treating the effect of nuclear motion in high-order harmonic generation from polyatomic molecules. Our procedure relies on a separation of nuclear and electron dynamics where we account for the electronic part using the Lewenstein model and nuclear motion enters as a nuclear correlation function. We express the nuclear correlation function in terms of Franck-Condon factors, which allows us to decompose nuclear motion into modes and identify the modes that are dominant in the high-order harmonic generation process. We show results for the isotopes CH{sub 4} and CD{sub 4} and thereby provide direct theoretical support for a recent experiment [S. Baker et al., Science 312, 424 (2006)] that uses high-order harmonic generation to probe the ultrafast structural nuclear rearrangement of ionized methane.

  14. SYSTEM ANALYSIS OF NUCLEAR-ASSISTED SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM COAL

    SciTech Connect

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien

    2008-09-01

    A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via high-temperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. Results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 66.1% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

  15. Structural analysis of strained quantum dots using nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Chekhovich, E A; Kavokin, K V; Puebla, J; Krysa, A B; Hopkinson, M; Andreev, A D; Sanchez, A M; Beanland, R; Skolnick, M S; Tartakovskii, A I

    2012-10-01

    Strained semiconductor nanostructures can be used to make single-photon sources, detectors and photovoltaic devices, and could potentially be used to create quantum logic devices. The development of such applications requires techniques capable of nanoscale structural analysis, but the microscopy methods typically used to analyse these materials are destructive. NMR techniques can provide non-invasive structural analysis, but have been restricted to strain-free semiconductor nanostructures because of the significant strain-induced quadrupole broadening of the NMR spectra. Here, we show that optically detected NMR spectroscopy can be used to analyse individual strained quantum dots. Our approach uses continuous-wave broadband radiofrequency excitation with a specially designed spectral pattern and can probe individual strained nanostructures containing only 1 × 10(5) quadrupole nuclear spins. With this technique, we are able to measure the strain distribution and chemical composition of quantum dots in the volume occupied by the single confined electron. The approach could also be used to address problems in quantum information processing such as the precise control of nuclear spins in the presence of strong quadrupole effects.

  16. Turbopump Design and Analysis Approach for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shu-cheng S.; Veres, Joseph P.; Fittje, James E.

    2006-01-01

    A rocket propulsion system, whether it is a chemical rocket or a nuclear thermal rocket, is fairly complex in detail but rather simple in principle. Among all the interacting parts, three components stand out: they are pumps and turbines (turbopumps), and the thrust chamber. To obtain an understanding of the overall rocket propulsion system characteristics, one starts from analyzing the interactions among these three components. It is therefore of utmost importance to be able to satisfactorily characterize the turbopump, level by level, at all phases of a vehicle design cycle. Here at NASA Glenn Research Center, as the starting phase of a rocket engine design, specifically a Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine design, we adopted the approach of using a high level system cycle analysis code (NESS) to obtain an initial analysis of the operational characteristics of a turbopump required in the propulsion system. A set of turbopump design codes (PumpDes and TurbDes) were then executed to obtain sizing and performance characteristics of the turbopump that were consistent with the mission requirements. A set of turbopump analyses codes (PUMPA and TURBA) were applied to obtain the full performance map for each of the turbopump components; a two dimensional layout of the turbopump based on these mean line analyses was also generated. Adequacy of the turbopump conceptual design will later be determined by further analyses and evaluation. In this paper, descriptions and discussions of the aforementioned approach are provided and future outlooks are discussed.

  17. Turbopump Design and Analysis Approach for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shucheng S.; Veres, Joseph P.; Fittje, James E.

    2006-01-20

    A rocket propulsion system, whether it is a chemical rocket or a nuclear thermal rocket, is fairly complex in detail but rather simple in principle. Among all the interacting parts, three components stand out: they are pumps and turbines (turbopumps), and the thrust chamber. To obtain an understanding of the overall rocket propulsion system characteristics, one starts from analyzing the interactions among these three components. It is therefore of utmost importance to be able to satisfactorily characterize the turbopump, level by level, at all phases of a vehicle design cycle. Here at the NASA Glenn Research Center, as the starting phase of a rocket engine design, specifically a Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine design, we adopted the approach of using a high level system cycle analysis code (NESS) to obtain an initial analysis of the operational characteristics of a turbopump required in the propulsion system. A set of turbopump design codes (PumpDes and TurbDes) were then executed to obtain sizing and performance parameters of the turbopump that were consistent with the mission requirements. A set of turbopump analyses codes (PUMPA and TURBA) were applied to obtain the full performance map for each of the turbopump components; a two dimensional layout of the turbopump based on these mean line analyses was also generated. Adequacy of the turbopump conceptual design will later be determined by further analyses and evaluation. In this paper, descriptions and discussions of the aforementioned approach are provided and future outlooks are discussed.

  18. An Analysis of Nuclear-Rocket Nozzle Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, William H.; Bachkin, Daniel; Medeiros, Arthur A.

    1960-01-01

    A nuclear-rocket regenerative-cooling analysis was conducted over a range of reactor power of 46 to 1600 megawatts and is summarized herein. Although the propellant (hydrogen) is characterized by a large heat-sink capacity, an analysis of the local heat-flux capability of the coolant at the nozzle throat indicated that, for conventional values of system pressure drop, the cooling capability was inadequate to maintain a selected wall temperature of 1440 R. Several techniques for improving the cooling capability were discussed, for example, high pressure drop, high wall temperature, refractory wall coatings, thin highly conductive walls, and film cooling. In any specific design a combination of methods will probably be utilized to achieve successful cooling.

  19. Chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite analysis of Aegilops cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Harish T; Vales, M Isabel; Watson, Christy J W; Mallory-Smith, Carol A; Mori, Naoki; Rehman, Maqsood; Zemetra, Robert S; Riera-Lizarazu, Oscar

    2005-08-01

    Aegilops cylindrica Host (2n = 4x = 28, genome CCDD) is an allotetraploid formed by hybridization between the diploid species Ae. tauschii Coss. (2n = 2x = 14, genome DD) and Ae. markgrafii (Greuter) Hammer (2n = 2x = 14, genome CC). Previous research has shown that Ae. tauschii contributed its cytoplasm to Ae. cylindrica. However, our analysis with chloroplast microsatellite markers showed that 1 of the 36 Ae. cylindrica accessions studied, TK 116 (PI 486249), had a plastome derived from Ae. markgrafii rather than Ae. tauschii. Thus, Ae. markgrafii has also contributed its cytoplasm to Ae. cylindrica. Our analysis of chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite markers also suggests that D-type plastome and the D genome in Ae. cylindrica were closely related to, and were probably derived from, the tauschii gene pool of Ae. tauschii. A determination of the likely source of the C genome and the C-type plastome in Ae. cylindrica was not possible.

  20. Characterization of Nuclear Fuel using Multivariate Statistical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Robel, M; Robel, M; Robel, M; Kristo, M J; Kristo, M J

    2007-11-27

    Various combinations of reactor type and fuel composition have been characterized using principle components analysis (PCA) of the concentrations of 9 U and Pu isotopes in the 10 fuel as a function of burnup. The use of PCA allows the reduction of the 9-dimensional data (isotopic concentrations) into a 3-dimensional approximation, giving a visual representation of the changes in nuclear fuel composition with burnup. Real-world variation in the concentrations of {sup 234}U and {sup 236}U in the fresh (unirradiated) fuel was accounted for. The effects of reprocessing were also simulated. The results suggest that, 15 even after reprocessing, Pu isotopes can be used to determine both the type of reactor and the initial fuel composition with good discrimination. Finally, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PSLDA) was investigated as a substitute for PCA. Our results suggest that PLSDA is a better tool for this application where separation between known classes is most important.

  1. Analysis of fine structure in the nuclear continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, A.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Carter, J.; Usman, I.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.

    2008-02-15

    Fine structure has been shown to be a general phenomenon of nuclear giant resonances of different multipolarities over a wide mass range. In this article we assess various techniques that have been proposed to extract quantitative information from the fine structure in terms of characteristic scales. These include the so-called local scaling dimension, the entropy index method, Fourier analysis, and continuous and discrete wavelet transforms. As an example, results on the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in {sup 208}Pb from high-energy-resolution inelastic proton scattering and calculations with the quasiparticle-phonon model are analyzed. Wavelet analysis, both continuous and discrete, of the spectra is shown to be a powerful tool to extract the magnitude and localization of characteristic scales.

  2. A probabilistic safety analysis of incidents in nuclear research reactors.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Valdir Maciel; Agostinho Angelo Sordi, Gian Maria; Moralles, Mauricio; Filho, Tufic Madi

    2012-06-01

    This work aims to evaluate the potential risks of incidents in nuclear research reactors. For its development, two databases of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) were used: the Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) and the Incident Report System for Research Reactor (IRSRR). For this study, the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) was used. To obtain the result of the probability calculations for PSA, the theory and equations in the paper IAEA TECDOC-636 were used. A specific program to analyse the probabilities was developed within the main program, Scilab 5.1.1. for two distributions, Fischer and chi-square, both with the confidence level of 90 %. Using Sordi equations, the maximum admissible doses to compare with the risk limits established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were obtained. All results achieved with this probability analysis led to the conclusion that the incidents which occurred had radiation doses within the stochastic effects reference interval established by the ICRP-64.

  3. Inner/Outer nuclear membrane fusion in nuclear pore assembly: biochemical demonstration and molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Fichtman, Boris; Ramos, Corinne; Rasala, Beth; Harel, Amnon; Forbes, Douglass J

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large proteinaceous channels embedded in double nuclear membranes, which carry out nucleocytoplasmic exchange. The mechanism of nuclear pore assembly involves a unique challenge, as it requires creation of a long-lived membrane-lined channel connecting the inner and outer nuclear membranes. This stabilized membrane channel has little evolutionary precedent. Here we mapped inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion in NPC assembly biochemically by using novel assembly intermediates and membrane fusion inhibitors. Incubation of a Xenopus in vitro nuclear assembly system at 14°C revealed an early pore intermediate where nucleoporin subunits POM121 and the Nup107-160 complex were organized in a punctate pattern on the inner nuclear membrane. With time, this intermediate progressed to diffusion channel formation and finally to complete nuclear pore assembly. Correct channel formation was blocked by the hemifusion inhibitor lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), but not if a complementary-shaped lipid, oleic acid (OA), was simultaneously added, as determined with a novel fluorescent dextran-quenching assay. Importantly, recruitment of the bulk of FG nucleoporins, characteristic of mature nuclear pores, was not observed before diffusion channel formation and was prevented by LPC or OA, but not by LPC+OA. These results map the crucial inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion event of NPC assembly downstream of POM121/Nup107-160 complex interaction and upstream or at the time of FG nucleoporin recruitment.

  4. RABBIT: an electron microprobe data-reduction program using empirical corrections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, Fraser E.

    1977-01-01

    RABBIT is a FORTRAN IV computer Program that uses Bence-Albee empirical corrections for the reduction of electron microprobe data of silicates, oxides, sulphates, carbonates, and phosphates. RABBIT efficiently reduces large volumes of data collected on 3-11 channel microprobes.

  5. Motor-based microprobe powered by bio-assembled catalase for motion detection of DNA.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuzhe; Fu, Shizhe; Wu, Jie; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2017-01-15

    A motor-based microprobe is proposed using a tubular microengine powered by bio-assembled enzyme as catalyst and exploited for washing-free detection of DNA through motion readout. The microprobe is fabricated by assembling a catalase layer on the inner surface of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/Au (PEDOT/Au) microtube through DNA conjugate, which is responsible for the biocatalytic bubble propulsion. The sensing concept of the microprobe relies on the target-induced release of catalase through the DNA strand-replacement hybridization, which decreases the amount of enzyme assembled on microtube to slow down the movement of the microprobe. Therefore, the motion speed is negatively correlated with the target concentration. At the optimal conditions, the microprobe can conveniently distinguish the concentration of specific DNA in a range of 0.5-10µM without any washing and separation step. This microprobe can be prepared in batch with good reproducibility and stability, and its motion speed can be conveniently visualized by optical microscope. The proposed motor-based microprobe and its dynamic sensing method provide a novel platform for the development of intelligent microprobe and clinical diagnostic strategy.

  6. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, U.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Cabellos, O.; Kodeli, I.; Koning, A.; Konobeyev, A.Yu.; Leeb, H.; Rochman, D.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Sauvan, P.; Sublet, J.-C.; Dupont, E.; Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J.

    2014-06-15

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  7. Application of laser microprobe (LAMMA 1000) to "fingerprinting" of coal constituents in bituminous coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, P.C.; Hercules, D.M.; Morelli, J.J.; Sellers, G.A.; Mattern, D.; Thompson-Rizer, C. L.; Brown, F.W.; Millay, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    A laser microprobe (LAMMA-1000) microchemical analysis of vitrinites of different morphologies but similar reflectances within the same bituminous coal bed indicates distinct "fingerprint" spectra. The banded form of vitrinite contains Li, Ti, Ba, Sr, F, and Cl which were not detected in the nonbanded vitrinite. These differences may indicate a different plant source or the introduction of these elements from fluids mobilized during diagenesis. The nonbanded vitrinite (called corpocollinite), which was contained in a pyrite coal-ball seed fern permineralization of Myeloxylon, may have been protected from influx of these elements due to entrapment by pyrite during an early peat stage. An ion at M/Z 65, which is characteristic of the banded vitrinite, may indicate C5H5+ and, perhaps a difference in the chemical structure of the two vitrinites. These results demonstrate that "fingerprint" spectra can be obtained from vitrinite macerals by LAMMA and that these "fingerprints" have genetic implications. ?? 1987.

  8. Volatility in the lunar crust: Trace element analyses of lunar minerals by PIXE proton microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, M. D.; Griffin, W. L.; Ryan, C. G.

    1993-01-01

    In situ determination of mineral compositions using microbeam techniques can characterize magma compositions through mineral-melt partitioning, and be used to investigate fine-grained or rare phases which cannot be extracted for analysis. Abundances of Fe, Mn, Sr, Ga, Zr, Y, Nb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Se, and Sb were determined for various mineral phases in a small number of lunar highlands rocks using the PIXE proton microprobe. Sr/Ga ratios of plagioclase and Mn/Zn ratios of mafic silicates show that the ferroan anorthosites and Mg-suite cumulates are depleted in volatile lithophile elements to about the same degree compared with chondrites and the Earth. This links the entire lunar crust to common processes or source compositions. In contrast, secondary sulfides in Descartes breccia clasts are enriched in chalcophile elements such as Cu, Zn, Ni, Se, and Sb, and represent a potential resource in the lunar highlands.

  9. Integration of facility modeling capabilities for nuclear nonproliferation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, Tom; Gorensek, M. B.; Krebs, John; Kress, Reid L; Lamberti, Vincent; Schoenwald, David; Ward, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclearnonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facilitymodeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facilitymodeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facilitymodelingcapabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferationanalysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facilitymodeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facilitymodelingcapabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  10. An Empirical Analysis of Human Performance and Nuclear Safety Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Joe; Larry G. Blackwood

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this analysis, which was conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), was to test whether an empirical connection exists between human performance and nuclear power plant safety culture. This was accomplished through analyzing the relationship between a measure of human performance and a plant’s Safety Conscious Work Environment (SCWE). SCWE is an important component of safety culture the NRC has developed, but it is not synonymous with it. SCWE is an environment in which employees are encouraged to raise safety concerns both to their own management and to the NRC without fear of harassment, intimidation, retaliation, or discrimination. Because the relationship between human performance and allegations is intuitively reciprocal and both relationship directions need exploration, two series of analyses were performed. First, human performance data could be indicative of safety culture, so regression analyses were performed using human performance data to predict SCWE. It also is likely that safety culture contributes to human performance issues at a plant, so a second set of regressions were performed using allegations to predict HFIS results.

  11. Development of an x-ray microprobe using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Albert C.; Chapman, Karen L.; Underwood, James H.

    1993-01-01

    An X-ray microprobe is being built that will use a bending magnet port on the new Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A pair of elliptical multi-layer mirrors will be used to focus and monochromatize the white radiation beam from the synchrotron. A beam spot size of 1 micrometers X 1 micrometers will be produced with a bandwidth of 1 keV at 10 keV. The energy of the beam will be variable from 3 keV to 12 keV. With a counting time of 30 sec it should be possible to simultaneously measure femtogram amounts of elements from potassium to zinc.

  12. Micro Electron MicroProbe and Sample Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Bearman, Gregory; Douglas, Susanne; Bronikowski, Michael; Urgiles, Eduardo; Kowalczyk, Robert; Bryson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    A proposed, low-power, backpack-sized instrument, denoted the micro electron microprobe and sample analyzer (MEMSA), would serve as a means of rapidly performing high-resolution microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) of soil, dust, and rock particles in the field. The MEMSA would be similar to an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) but would be much smaller and designed specifically for field use in studying effects of geological alteration at the micrometer scale. Like an ESEM, the MEMSA could be used to examine uncoated, electrically nonconductive specimens. In addition to the difference in size, other significant differences between the MEMSA and an ESEM lie in the mode of scanning and the nature of the electron source.

  13. Implementation of ionoluminescence in the AGLAE scanning external microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichon, L.; Calligaro, T.; Gonzalez, V.; Lemasson, Q.; Moignard, B.; Pacheco, C.

    2015-04-01

    The scope of this work is to present the implementation of an IBIL imaging system in the scanning external microprobe of the AGLAE facility so as to correlate luminescence and composition maps provided by PIXE, RBS and PIGE. The challenging integration of the optical spectrometer, due to incompatibility of acquisition timings and data formats with the other IBA channels has motivated the development of a specific acquisition system. This article details the IBIL setup and explains the technical solutions retained for the coupling of IBIL with IBA techniques in order to produce fast and large IBIL-IBA maps. The IBIL maps stored in the same format as the PIXE, RBS and PIGE ones can be visualised and compared using the dedicated AGLAEmap program or the PyMCA processing package. An example of such a coupled mapping on Mesoamerican jade is presented to emphasise the interest of performing simultaneously IBA and IBIL large mappings.

  14. Secondary ion collection and transport system for ion microprobe

    DOEpatents

    Ward, James W.; Schlanger, Herbert; McNulty, Jr., Hugh; Parker, Norman W.

    1985-01-01

    A secondary ion collection and transport system, for use with an ion microprobe, which is very compact and occupies only a small working distance, thereby enabling the primary ion beam to have a short focal length and high resolution. Ions sputtered from the target surface by the primary beam's impact are collected between two arcuate members having radii of curvature and applied voltages that cause only ions within a specified energy band to be collected. The collected ions are accelerated and focused in a transport section consisting of a plurality of spaced conductive members which are coaxial with and distributed along the desired ion path. Relatively high voltages are applied to alternate transport sections to produce accelerating electric fields sufficient to transport the ions through the section to an ion mass analyzer, while lower voltages are applied to the other transport sections to focus the ions and bring their velocity to a level compatible with the analyzing apparatus.

  15. The Oxford scanning proton microprobe: A medical diagnostic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Grime, G. W.; Takacs, J.; Vaux, D. J. T.

    1984-04-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a disease characterised by progressive destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts, cholestasis, and high levels of copper within the liver. The Oxford 1 μm scanning proton microprobe (SPM) has been used to construct elemental maps of a 7 μm section of diseased liver at several different magnifications. The results of these investigations have shown that the copper is distributed in small deposits ( < 5 μm) at specific locations in the liver. Further there appears to be a 1:1 atomic correlation between copper and sulphur, indicating the presence of an inorganic salt or a protein with approximately equal numbers of copper and sulphur atoms.

  16. Summary of Prometheus Radiation Shielding Nuclear Design Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J. Stephens

    2006-01-13

    This report transmits a summary of radiation shielding nuclear design studies performed to support the Prometheus project. Together, the enclosures and references associated with this document describe NRPCT (KAPL & Bettis) shielding nuclear design analyses done for the project.

  17. Tactile 3D microprobe system with exchangeable styli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzer, Felix G.; Hausotte, Tino; Dorozhovets, Nataliya; Manske, Eberhard; Jäger, Gerd

    2011-09-01

    Over the past decade a trend of component miniaturization can be observed both in industry and in the laboratory, which involves an increasing demand for nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machines as well as for miniature tactile probes for measuring complex three-dimensional objects. The challenge is that these components—for example, diesel injectors, microgears and small optics—feature dimensions in the micrometre range with associated dimensional tolerances below 100 nm. For this reason, a significant number of research projects have dealt with microprobes for performing the dimensional measurements of microstructures with the goal of achieving measurement uncertainties in the nanometre range. This paper introduces an updated version of a 3D microprobe with an optical detection system developed at the Institute of Process Measurement and Sensor Technology. It consists of a measuring head and a separate probe system. The mechanical design of the probe system has been completely overhauled to enable the exchange of the stylus separately from the flexure elements. This is very important for the determination of the probing sphere's roundness deviations. The silicon membranes used in the first system design are therefore replaced by metal membranes. A new design of these membranes, optimized for isotropic probing forces and locking parasitic movements, is presented. Regarding the measuring head, the optical design has been redesigned to eliminate disruptive interference on the quadrant photodiode used for deflection measurement and to improve adjustment. Its dimensioning is discussed, especially the influence of the laser beam diameter on the interference contrast due to the parallel misalignment of the collimated laser beam. Initial measurement results are presented to prove functionality.

  18. Deep Space 2: The Mars Microprobe Project and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smrekar, S. E.; Gavit, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Microprobe Project, or Deep Space 2 (DS2), is the second of the New Millennium Program planetary missions and is designed to enable future space science network missions through flight validation of new technologies. A secondary goal is the collection of meaningful science data. Two micropenetrators will be deployed to carry out surface and subsurface science. The penetrators are being carried as a piggyback payload on the Mars Polar Lander cruise ring and will be launched in January 1999. The microprobe has no active control, attitude determination, or propulsive systems. It is a single stage from separation until landing and will passively orient itself due to its aerodynamic design. The aeroshell will be made of a nonerosive heat shield material, Silicon impregnated Reusable Ceramic Ablator(SIRCA), developed at Ames Research Center. The aeroshell shatters on impact, at which time the probe separates into an aftbody that remains at the surface and a forebody that penetrates into the subsurface. Each probe has a total mass of up to 3 kg, including the aeroshell. The impact velocity will be about 180 meters per second. The forebody will experience up to 30,000 g's and penetrate between 0.3 and 2 meters, depending on the ice content of the soil. The aftbody deceleration will be up to 80,000 g. The penetrators arrive in December 1999. The landing ellipse latitude range is 73 deg-77 deg S. The longitude will be selected by the Mars Surveyor Project to place the lander on the polar layered deposits in the range of 180 deg -230 deg W. The two micropenetrators are likely to land within 100 km of the Mars Surveyor Lander, on the polar deposits. The likely arrival date is Ls = 256, late southern spring. The nominal mission lasts 2 days. A science team was selected in April 1998.

  19. A Nuclear Reaction Analysis study of fluorine uptake in flint

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jian-Yue; Weathers, D. L.; Picton, F.; Hughes, B. F.; Duggan, J. L.; McDaniel, F. D.; Matteson, S.

    1999-06-10

    Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) using the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 16}O resonance reaction is a powerful method of fluorine depth profiling. We have used this method to study the fluorine uptake phenomenon in mineral flint, which could potentially develop into a method of dating archeological flint artifacts. Flint samples cut with a rock saw were immersed in aqueous fluoride solutions for different times for the uptake study. The results suggest that fluorine uptake is not a simple phenomenon, but rather a combination of several simultaneous processes. Fluorine surface adsorption appears to play an important role in developing the fluorine profiles. The surface adsorption was affected by several parameters such as pH value and fluorine concentration in the solution, among others. The problem of surface charging for the insulator materials during ion bombardment is also reported.

  20. Global NLO Analysis of Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, M.; Kumano, S.; Nagai, T.-H.

    2008-02-21

    Nuclear parton distribution functions (NPDFs) are determined by a global analysis of experimental measurements on structure-function ratios F{sub 2}{sup A}/F{sub 2}{sup A{sup '}} and Drell-Yan cross section ratios {sigma}{sub DY}{sup A}/{sigma}{sub DY}{sup A{sup '}}, and their uncertainties are estimated by the Hessian method. The NPDFs are obtained in both leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) of {alpha}{sub s}. As a result, valence-quark distributions are relatively well determined, whereas antiquark distributions at x>0.2 and gluon distributions in the whole x region have large uncertainties. The NLO uncertainties are slightly smaller than the LO ones; however, such a NLO improvement is not as significant as the nucleonic case.

  1. Electron microprobe analysis program for biological specimens: BIOMAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, B. F.

    1972-01-01

    BIOMAP is a Univac 1108 compatible program which facilitates the electron probe microanalysis of biological specimens. Input data are X-ray intensity data from biological samples, the X-ray intensity and composition data from a standard sample and the electron probe operating parameters. Outputs are estimates of the weight percentages of the analyzed elements, the distribution of these estimates for sets of red blood cells and the probabilities for correlation between elemental concentrations. An optional feature statistically estimates the X-ray intensity and residual background of a principal standard relative to a series of standards.

  2. Electron microprobe analysis of elemental distribution in excavated human femurs

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, J.B.; Simpson, S.V.; Buikstra, J.E.; Hanson, D.

    1983-12-01

    Elemental distributions have been determined for femur cross sections of eight individuals from the Gibson and Ledders Woodland sites. The analyses were obtained by x-ray fluorescence with a scanning electron microscope. Movement of an element from soil to bone should give rise to inhomogeneous distributions within the bone. We found that the distributions of zinc, strontium, and lead are homogeneous throughout the femur. In contrast, iron, aluminum, potassium, and manganese show clear buildup along the outer surface of the femur and sometimes along the inner (endosteal) surface, as the result of postmortem enrichment. The buildup penetrates 10-400 micron into the femur. The major elements calcium and sodium show homogeneous distributions, but considerable material could be lost by leaching (10-15%) without causing a palpable effect on the electron maps. Magnesium shows buildup on the outer edge of some samples. These results suggest that diagenetic contamination may exclude Fe, Al, K, Mn, and probably Mg from use as indicators of ancient data. The homogeneous distributions of Zn, Sr, and Pb suggest that these elements are not altered appreciably and may serve as useful dietary indicators.

  3. Helium mobility in SON68 borosilicate nuclear glass: A nuclear reaction analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bès, R.; Sauvage, T.; Peuget, S.; Haussy, J.; Chamssedine, F.; Oliviero, E.; Fares, T.; Vincent, L.

    2013-11-01

    The 3He behavior in the non active R7T7 type borosilicate glass called SON68 has been investigated using the implantation method to introduce helium in the material. Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) was performed to follow the helium concentration depth profile evolution as a function of annealing time and temperature. In addition, in situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been implemented to study the formation of helium bubbles during both implantation and annealing processes. Numerical modeling with two different approaches is proposed and discussed to investigate the helium mobility mechanisms. Our study reveals for helium incorporation by implantation at low temperature the presence of several helium populations with disparate diffusivities. The most mobile helium fraction would be attributed to atomic diffusion. The corresponding activation energy value (0.61 eV) extracted from Arrhenius graphs is in good agreement with literature data. The results also highlight that the damages associated to helium sursaturation are the source of small helium clusters formation, with a reduced mobility instead of the atomic mobility measured by the infusion technique. Small cavities that support this assumption have been observed by TEM at low temperature.

  4. Development of nuclear analysis capabilities for DOE waste management activities

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; DeHart, M.D.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hopper, C.M.; Petrie, L.M.

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate prototypic analysis capabilities that can be used by the nuclear safety analysis practitioners to: (1) demonstrate a more thorough understanding of the underlying physics phenomena that can lead to improved reliability and defensibility of safety evaluations; and (2) optimize operations related to the handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of fissile material and DOE spent fuel. To address these problems, the project will investigate the implementation of sensitivity and uncertainty methods within existing Monte Carlo codes used for criticality safety analyses, as well as within a new deterministic code that allows specification of arbitrary grids to accurately model the geometry details required in a criticality safety analysis. This capability can facilitate improved estimations of the required subcritical margin and potentially enable the use of a broader range of experiments in the validation process. The new arbitrary-grid radiation transport code will also enable detailed geometric modeling valuable for improved accuracy in application to a myriad of other problems related to waste characterization. Application to these problems will also be explored.

  5. Nuclear DNA content analysis of plant seeds by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Sliwinska, Elwira

    2006-02-01

    Procedures describing the utilization of seeds or their parts for flow cytometric determination of plant ploidy and endopolyploidy, genome size, and cell cycle activity are presented. The methods have been developed for a single-fluorescence-parameter flow cytometer, equipped with light sources for 488-nm and UV-light illumination. The procedures presented in this unit utilize the two most widely used fluorochromes for plant DNA content analysis, propidium iodide (PI) and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). These methods provide an alternative to estimation of DNA content based on the fluorescence of DNA in cell nuclei isolated from plant leaves. In some instances seeds are more suitable for analysis than leaves, e.g., when plant material must be transported for a long distances or stored for prolonged periods before flow cytometric analysis, or when leaves contain fluorochrome-staining inhibitors. In addition, flow cytometric determination of nuclear replication stages in seeds gives information about their physiological status (e.g., maturity, advancement of germination), which is valuable to seed producers and technologists.

  6. NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) : a tool for evaluation of sheltering and evacuation responses following urban nuclear detonations.

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2009-11-01

    The NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories to support the analysis of shelter-evacuate (S-E) strategies following an urban nuclear detonation. This tool can model a range of behaviors, including complex evacuation timing and path selection, as well as various sheltering or mixed evacuation and sheltering strategies. The calculations are based on externally generated, high resolution fallout deposition and plume data. Scenario setup and calculation outputs make extensive use of graphics and interactive features. This software is designed primarily to produce quantitative evaluations of nuclear detonation response options. However, the outputs have also proven useful in the communication of technical insights concerning shelter-evacuate tradeoffs to urban planning or response personnel.

  7. Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Package Misload Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Knudson

    2003-10-02

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate the probability of misloading a commercial spent nuclear fuel waste package with a fuel assembly(s) that has a reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) outside the waste package design. The waste package designs are based on the expected commercial spent nuclear fuel assemblies and previous analyses (Macheret, P. 2001, Section 4.1 and Table 1). For this calculation, a misloaded waste package is defined as a waste package that has a fuel assembly(s) loaded into it with an enrichment and/or burnup outside the waste package design. An example of this type of misload is a fuel assembly designated for the 21-PWR Control Rod waste package being incorrectly loaded into a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. This constitutes a misloaded 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package, because the reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) of a 21-PWR Control Rod waste package fuel assembly is outside the design of a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. These types of misloads (i.e., fuel assembly with enrichment and/or burnup outside waste package design) are the only types that are evaluated in this calculation. This calculation utilizes information from ''Frequency of SNF Misload for Uncanistered Fuel Waste Package'' (CRWMS M&O 1998) as the starting point. The scope of this calculation is limited to the information available. The information is based on the whole population of fuel assemblies and the whole population of waste packages, because there is no information about the arrival of the waste stream at this time. The scope of this calculation deviates from that specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Risk and Criticality Department'' (BSC 2002a, Section 2.1.30) in that only waste package misload is evaluated. The remaining issues identified (i.e., flooding and geometry reconfiguration) will be addressed elsewhere. The intended use of the calculation is to provide information and inputs to the Preclosure Safety Analysis

  8. Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Package Misload Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    A. Alsaed

    2005-07-28

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate the probability of misloading a commercial spent nuclear fuel waste package with a fuel assembly(s) that has a reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) outside the waste package design. The waste package designs are based on the expected commercial spent nuclear fuel assemblies and previous analyses (Macheret, P. 2001, Section 4.1 and Table 1). For this calculation, a misloaded waste package is defined as a waste package that has a fuel assembly(s) loaded into it with an enrichment and/or burnup outside the waste package design. An example of this type of misload is a fuel assembly designated for the 21-PWR Control Rod waste package being incorrectly loaded into a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. This constitutes a misloaded 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package, because the reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) of a 21-PWR Control Rod waste package fuel assembly is outside the design of a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. These types of misloads (i.e., fuel assembly with enrichment and/or burnup outside waste package design) are the only types that are evaluated in this calculation. This calculation utilizes information from ''Frequency of SNF Misload for Uncanistered Fuel Waste Package'' (CRWMS M&O 1998) as the starting point. The scope of this calculation is limited to the information available. The information is based on the whole population of fuel assemblies and the whole population of waste packages, because there is no information about the arrival of the waste stream at this time. The scope of this calculation deviates from that specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Risk and Criticality Department'' (BSC 2002a, Section 2.1.30) in that only waste package misload is evaluated. The remaining issues identified (i.e., flooding and geometry reconfiguration) will be addressed elsewhere. The intended use of the calculation is to provide information and inputs to the Preclosure Safety Analysis

  9. Characterization of a Continuous Wave Laser for Resonance Ionization Mass Spectroscopy Analysis in Nuclear Forensics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    elements of concern. While current systems incorporate pulsed lasers for analysis of debris from nuclear detonation , the possibility exists to consider...nuclear detonation . The current approach to ionize uranium and plutonium uses three Ti-Sapphire pulsed lasers capable of a fundamental wavelength...pulsed lasers for analysis of debris from nuclear detonation , the possibility exists to consider using continuous wave, or CW lasers RIMS has the

  10. Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in an Underground Geologic Repository - Volume 3: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.L.; Wilson, J.R.; Sanchez, L.C.; Aguilar, R.; Trellue, H.R.; Cochrane, K.; Rath, J.S.

    1998-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE/EM's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), through a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is conducting a systematic Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) of the disposal of SNFs in an underground geologic repository sited in unsaturated tuff. This analysis is intended to provide interim guidance to the DOE for the management of the SNF while they prepare for final compliance evaluation. This report presents results from a Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) that examined the potential consequences and risks of criticality during the long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel owned by DOE-EM. This analysis investigated the potential of post-closure criticality, the consequences of a criticality excursion, and the probability frequency for post-closure criticality. The results of the NDCA are intended to provide the DOE-EM with a technical basis for measuring risk which can be used for screening arguments to eliminate post-closure criticality FEPs (features, events and processes) from consideration in the compliance assessment because of either low probability or low consequences. This report is composed of an executive summary (Volume 1), the methodology and results of the NDCA (Volume 2), and the applicable appendices (Volume 3).

  11. Multivariate analysis of gamma spectra to characterize used nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coble, Jamie; Orton, Christopher; Schwantes, Jon

    2017-04-01

    The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor provides an efficient means to monitor the process conditions in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities to support process verification and validation. The MIP Monitor applies multivariate analysis to gamma spectroscopy of key stages in the reprocessing stream in order to detect small changes in the gamma spectrum, which may indicate changes in process conditions. This research extends the MIP Monitor by characterizing a used fuel sample after initial dissolution according to the type of reactor of origin (pressurized or boiling water reactor; PWR and BWR, respectively), initial enrichment, burn up, and cooling time. Simulated gamma spectra were used to develop and test three fuel characterization algorithms. The classification and estimation models employed are based on the partial least squares regression (PLS) algorithm. A PLS discriminate analysis model was developed which perfectly classified reactor type for the three PWR and three BWR reactor designs studied. Locally weighted PLS models were fitted on-the-fly to estimate the remaining fuel characteristics. For the simulated gamma spectra considered, burn up was predicted with 0.1% root mean squared percent error (RMSPE) and both cooling time and initial enrichment with approximately 2% RMSPE. This approach to automated fuel characterization can be used to independently verify operator declarations of used fuel characteristics and to inform the MIP Monitor anomaly detection routines at later stages of the fuel reprocessing stream to improve sensitivity to changes in operational parameters that may indicate issues with operational control or malicious activities.

  12. Shielding Analysis of a Small Compact Space Nuclear Reactor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    there will be a need for a power source that’s reliable, has a high pow,-- density, and, in some cases, portable. These reasons, and many more, make...Conventional power sources are not able to reasonably obtain these higher power levels. The Space Power 100 kWe (SP-100) space nuclear reactor is the...space nuclear reactors an attractive power source for future space missions. The idea of using space nuclear reactors in space is not new. The United

  13. Improved resolution and sensitivity on the ANSTO microprobe and it’s application to μ-PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegele, R.; Kachenko, A. G.; Ionescu, M.; Cohen, D. D.

    2009-06-01

    We report on the improved spatial resolution of the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe, achieved through the use of a higher brightness ion source for hydrogen. The improved resolution will be demonstrated for applications of μ-PIXE. With the higher brightness source, a 3 μm resolution was achieved for μ-PIXE elemental analysis. This is illustrated in high resolution images of nickel (Ni)-hyperaccumulating Hybanthus floribundus subsp. floribundus leaf tissues, where individual cells were clearly visible in the acquired elemental images. The higher resolution images illustrated that Ni was localised in epidermal cell walls.

  14. Interviewing a Silent (Radioactive) Witness through Nuclear Forensic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Klaus; Wallenius, Maria; Varga, Zsolt

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear forensics is a relatively young discipline in science which aims at providing information on nuclear material of unknown origin. The determination of characteristic parameters through tailored analytical techniques enables establishing linkages to the material's processing history and hence provides hints on its place and date of production and on the intended use.

  15. Monte-Carlo Application for Nondestructive Nuclear Waste Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carasco, C.; Engels, R.; Frank, M.; Furletov, S.; Furletova, J.; Genreith, C.; Havenith, A.; Kemmerling, G.; Kettler, J.; Krings, T.; Ma, J.-L.; Mauerhofer, E.; Neike, D.; Payan, E.; Perot, B.; Rossbach, M.; Schitthelm, O.; Schumann, M.; Vasquez, R.

    2014-06-01

    Radioactive waste has to undergo a process of quality checking in order to check its conformance with national regulations prior to its transport, intermediate storage and final disposal. Within the quality checking of radioactive waste packages non-destructive assays are required to characterize their radio-toxic and chemo-toxic contents. The Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety of the Forschungszentrum Jülich develops in the framework of cooperation nondestructive analytical techniques for the routine characterization of radioactive waste packages at industrial-scale. During the phase of research and development Monte Carlo techniques are used to simulate the transport of particle, especially photons, electrons and neutrons, through matter and to obtain the response of detection systems. The radiological characterization of low and intermediate level radioactive waste drums is performed by segmented γ-scanning (SGS). To precisely and accurately reconstruct the isotope specific activity content in waste drums by SGS measurement, an innovative method called SGSreco was developed. The Geant4 code was used to simulate the response of the collimated detection system for waste drums with different activity and matrix configurations. These simulations allow a far more detailed optimization, validation and benchmark of SGSreco, since the construction of test drums covering a broad range of activity and matrix properties is time consuming and cost intensive. The MEDINA (Multi Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation) test facility was developed to identify and quantify non-radioactive elements and substances in radioactive waste drums. MEDINA is based on prompt and delayed gamma neutron activation analysis (P&DGNAA) using a 14 MeV neutron generator. MCNP simulations were carried out to study the response of the MEDINA facility in terms of gamma spectra, time dependence of the neutron energy spectrum

  16. Identification of cosmogenic argon components in Allende by laser microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschbaum, C.

    1986-01-01

    New techniques are presented for using a laser microprobe to determine the spallation argon systematics of calcium-aluminum inclusions. The Ar-38(s) amounts determined for melilite and anorthite in a coarse-grained inclusion from Allende are 2.9 x 10 to the -8th and 1.3 x 10 to the -8th cc/g, respectively. The ratio of the amounts is consistent with the calcium contents of these two minerals. The Ar-38(s) amount determined for a fine-grained inclusion from Allende is 1.1 x 10 to the -8th cc/g. Calcium and potassium amounts were determined from irradiated samples of the same inclusions so that production of Ar-38 from calcium during the cosmic ray exposure of Allende could be determined for these samples. The production observed was 12.4 + or - 2.1 x 10 to the -8th cc STP Ar-38/g Ca for the coarse-grained inclusion and 9.9 + or - 2.4 cc STP Ar-38/g Ca for the fine-grained inclusion. No evidence of unusual exposure was observed in the two inclusions studied.

  17. Enhanced Raman Microprobe Imaging of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadjiev, V. G.; Arepalli, S.; Nikolaev, P.; Jandl, S.; Yowell, L.

    2003-01-01

    We explore Raman microprobe capabilities to visualize single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Although this technique is limited to a micron scale, we demonstrate that images of individual SWCNTs, bundles or their agglomerates can be generated by mapping Raman active elementary excitations. We measured the Raman response from carbon vibrations in SWCNTs excited by confocal scanning of a focused laser beam. Carbon vibrations reveal key characteristics of SWCNTs as nanotube diameter distribution (radial breathing modes, RBM, 100-300 cm(exp -1)), presence of defects and functional groups (D-mode, 1300-1350 cm(exp -1)), strain and oxidation states of SWCNTs, as well as metallic or semiconducting character of the tubes encoded in the lineshape of the G-modes at 1520-1600 cm(exp - 1). In addition, SWCNTs are highly anisotropic scatterers. The Raman response from a SWCNT is maximal for incident light polarization parallel to the tube axis and vanishing for perpendicular directions. We show that the SWCNT bundle shape or direction can be determined, with some limitations, from a set of Raman images taken at two orthogonal directions of the incident light polarization.

  18. A hazards analysis of a nuclear explosives dismantlement

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, T.F.; Eisenhawer, S.W.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the methodology used in a quantitative hazard assessment of a nuclear weapon disassembly process. Potential accident sequences were identified using an accident-sequence fault tree based on operational history, weapon safety studies, a hazard analysis team composed of weapons experts, and walkthroughs of the process. The experts provided an initial screening of the accident sequences to reduce the number of accident sequences that would be quantified. The accident sequences that survived the screening process were developed further using event trees. Spreadsheets were constructed for each event tree, the accident sequences associated with that event tree were entered as rows on the spreadsheet, and that spreadsheet was linked to spreadsheets with initiating-event frequencies, enabling event probabilities, and weapon response probabilities. The probability and frequency distribution estimates used in these spreadsheets were gathered from weapon process operational data, surrogate industrial data, expert judgment, and probability models. Frequency distributions were calculated for the sequences whose point-value frequency represented 99% of the total point-value frequency using a Monte Carlo simulation. Partial differential importances of events and distributions of accident frequency by weapon configuration, location, process, and other parameters were calculated.

  19. Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nondestructive Isotopic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Mozin, Vladimir; Haefner, Andrew; Quiter, Brian

    2010-07-14

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) has been studied as one of the nondestructive analysis (NDA) techniques currently being investigated by a multi-laboratory collaboration for the determination of Pu mass in spent fuel. In NRF measurements specific isotopes are identified by their characteristic lines in recorded gamma spectra. The concentration of an isotope in a material can be determined from measured NRF signal intensities if NRF cross sections and assay geometries are known. The potential of NRF to quantify isotopic content and Pu mass in spent fuel has been studied. The addition of NRF data to MCNPX and an improved treatment of the elastic photon scattering at backward angles has enabled us to more accurately simulate NRF measurements on spent fuel assemblies. Using assembly models from the spent fuel assembly library generated at LANL, NRF measurements are simulated to find the best measurement configurations, and to determine measurement sensitivities and times, and photon source and gamma detector requirements. A first proof-of-principal measurement on a mock-up assembly with a bremsstrahlung photon source demonstrated isotopic sensitivity to approximately 1% limited by counting statistics. Data collection rates are likely a limiting factor of NRF-based measurements of fuel assemblies but new technological advances may lead to drastic improvements.

  20. An analysis of evacuation options for nuclear accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Tawil, J.J.; Strenge, D.L.; Schultz, R.W.

    1987-11-01

    In this report we consider the threat posed by the accidental release of radionuclides from a nuclear power plant. The objective is to establish relationships between radiation dose and the cost of evacuation under a wide variety of conditions. The dose can almost always be reduced by evacuating the population from a larger area. However, extending the evacuation zone outward will cause evacuation costs to increase. The purpose of this analysis was to provide the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) a data base for evaluating whether implementation costs and risks averted could be used to justify evacuation at lower doses. The procedures used and results of these analyses are being made available as background information for use by others. We develop cost/dose relationships for 54 scenarios that are based upon the severity of the reactor accident, meteorological conditions during the release of radionuclides into the environment, and the angular width of the evacuation zone. The 54 scenarios are derived from combinations of three accident severity levels, six meteorological conditions and evacuation zone widths of 70{degree}, 90{degree}, and 180{degree}.

  1. Applying microscopy to the analysis of nuclear structure and function.

    PubMed

    Iborra, Francisco; Cook, Peter R; Jackson, Dean A

    2003-02-01

    One of the ultimate goals of biological research is to understand mechanisms of cell function within living organisms. With this in mind, many sophisticated technologies that allow us to inspect macromolecular structure in exquisite detail have been developed. Although knowledge of structure derived from techniques such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance is of vital importance, these approaches cannot reveal the remarkable complexity of molecular interactions that exists in vivo. With this in mind, this review focuses on the use of microscopy techniques to analyze cell structure and function. We describe the different basic microscopic methodologies and how the routine techniques are best applied to particular biological problems. We also emphasize the specific capabilities and uses of light and electron microscopy and highlight their individual advantages and disadvantages. For completion, we also comment on the alternative possibilities provided by a variety of advanced imaging technologies. We hope that this brief analysis of the undoubted power of microscopy techniques will be enough to stimulate a wider participation in this rapidly developing area of biological discovery.

  2. Sensitivity analysis and optimization of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Passerini, S.; Kazimi, M. S.; Shwageraus, E.

    2012-07-01

    A sensitivity study has been conducted to assess the robustness of the conclusions presented in the MIT Fuel Cycle Study. The Once Through Cycle (OTC) is considered as the base-line case, while advanced technologies with fuel recycling characterize the alternative fuel cycles. The options include limited recycling in LWRs and full recycling in fast reactors and in high conversion LWRs. Fast reactor technologies studied include both oxide and metal fueled reactors. The analysis allowed optimization of the fast reactor conversion ratio with respect to desired fuel cycle performance characteristics. The following parameters were found to significantly affect the performance of recycling technologies and their penetration over time: Capacity Factors of the fuel cycle facilities, Spent Fuel Cooling Time, Thermal Reprocessing Introduction Date, and in core and Out-of-core TRU Inventory Requirements for recycling technology. An optimization scheme of the nuclear fuel cycle is proposed. Optimization criteria and metrics of interest for different stakeholders in the fuel cycle (economics, waste management, environmental impact, etc.) are utilized for two different optimization techniques (linear and stochastic). Preliminary results covering single and multi-variable and single and multi-objective optimization demonstrate the viability of the optimization scheme. (authors)

  3. Optimum Design of Cantilevered Microprobes for Inspecting Lcd Panels and Measurement of Contacting Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol; Kim, Kwang-Joong

    Fine pitch microprobe arrays are microneedle-like probes for inspecting the pixels of LCD panels or IC. They are usually made of multi-layers of metallic, nonmetallic, or combination of the two. The design requirement for a contacting force is less than 2 gf and a deflection should be less than 100 µm. Many microprobe shapes satisfying the design requirements are possible. A cantilever-type microprobe having many needles was chosen and optimized in this study. Several candidate shapes were chosen using topology and shape optimization technique subjected to design requirements. Then, the microprobe arrays were fabricated using the process applied for MEMS fabrication and they were made of BeNi, BeCu, or Si. The contact probing forces and deflections were measured for checking the results from optimum design by newly developed measuring equipment in our laboratory. Numerical and experimental results were compared and both showed a good correlation.

  4. Nuclear criticality safety calculational analysis for small-diameter containers

    SciTech Connect

    LeTellier, M.S.; Smallwood, D.J.; Henkel, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents calculations performed to establish a technical basis for the nuclear criticality safety of favorable geometry containers, sometimes referred to as 5-inch containers, in use at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A list of containers currently used in the plant is shown in Table 1.0-1. These containers are currently used throughout the plant with no mass limits. The use of containers with geometries or material types other than those addressed in this evaluation must be bounded by this analysis or have an additional analysis performed. The following five basic container geometries were modeled and bound all container geometries in Table 1.0-1: (1) 4.32-inch-diameter by 50-inch-high polyethylene bottle; (2) 5.0-inch-diameter by 24-inch-high polyethylene bottle; (3) 5.25-inch-diameter by 24-inch-high steel can ({open_quotes}F-can{close_quotes}); (4) 5.25-inch-diameter by 15-inch-high steel can ({open_quotes}Z-can{close_quotes}); and (5) 5.0-inch-diameter by 9-inch-high polybottle ({open_quotes}CO-4{close_quotes}). Each container type is evaluated using five basic reflection and interaction models that include single containers and multiple containers in normal and in credible abnormal conditions. The uranium materials evaluated are UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O and UF{sub 4}+oil materials at 100% and 10% enrichments and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, and H{sub 2}O at 100% enrichment. The design basis safe criticality limit for the Portsmouth facility is k{sub eff} + 2{sigma} < 0.95. The KENO study results may be used as the basis for evaluating general use of these containers in the plant.

  5. Multivariate analysis of gamma spectra to characterize used nuclear fuel

    DOE PAGES

    Coble, Jamie; Orton, Christopher; Schwantes, Jon

    2017-01-17

    The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor provides an efficient means to monitor the process conditions in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities to support process verification and validation. The MIP Monitor applies multivariate analysis to gamma spectroscopy of key stages in the reprocessing stream in order to detect small changes in the gamma spectrum, which may indicate changes in process conditions. This research extends the MIP Monitor by characterizing a used fuel sample after initial dissolution according to the type of reactor of origin (pressurized or boiling water reactor; PWR and BWR, respectively), initial enrichment, burn up, and cooling time. Simulated gammamore » spectra were used in this paper to develop and test three fuel characterization algorithms. The classification and estimation models employed are based on the partial least squares regression (PLS) algorithm. A PLS discriminate analysis model was developed which perfectly classified reactor type for the three PWR and three BWR reactor designs studied. Locally weighted PLS models were fitted on-the-fly to estimate the remaining fuel characteristics. For the simulated gamma spectra considered, burn up was predicted with 0.1% root mean squared percent error (RMSPE) and both cooling time and initial enrichment with approximately 2% RMSPE. Finally, this approach to automated fuel characterization can be used to independently verify operator declarations of used fuel characteristics and to inform the MIP Monitor anomaly detection routines at later stages of the fuel reprocessing stream to improve sensitivity to changes in operational parameters that may indicate issues with operational control or malicious activities.« less

  6. Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

    2008-12-01

    This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

  7. Nuclear dynamics consequence analysis of SNF disposed in volcanic tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, L.C.; Cochrane, K.; Rath, J.S.; Taylor, L.L.

    1998-05-01

    This paper describes criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuels in a geologic repository. The analyses investigated criticality potential, criticality excursion consequences, and the probability frequency for nuclear criticality. Key findings include: expected number of fissions per excursion range from 10{sup 17} to 10{sup 20}, repeated rate of criticalities range from 3 to 30 per year, and the probability frequency for criticality initiators (based on rough-order-of-magnitude calculations) is 7{times}10{sup {minus}7}. Overall results indicate that criticality consequences are a minor contribution to the biological hazards caused by the disposal of spent nuclear material.

  8. Risk analysis and solving the nuclear waste siting problem

    SciTech Connect

    Inhaber, H.

    1993-12-01

    In spite of millions of dollars and countless human resources being expended on finding nuclear wastes sites, the search has proved extremely difficult for the nuclear industry. This may be due to the approach followed, rather than inadequacies in research or funding. A new approach to the problem, the reverse Dutch auction, is suggested. It retains some of the useful elements of the present system, but it also adds new ones.

  9. Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; David W. Nigg

    2009-11-01

    One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

  10. Systematic Analysis of the Functional Relevance of Nuclear Structure and Mechanics in Breast Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    ANSI Std. Z39.18 Systematic Analysis of the Functional Relevance of Nuclear Structure and Mechanics in Breast Cancer Progression Jan Lammerding... analysis of the functional consequences of changes in the expression of lamins (A, B1, B2, and C) and lamin B receptor on nuclear morphology and...enhanced passage), proliferation, and epithelial-to- mesenchymal transition (EMT). In addition, we proposed to conduct an analysis of samples

  11. Stanford-USGS shrimp-RG ion microprobe: A new approach to determining the distribution of trace elements in coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolker, A.; Wooden, J.L.; Persing, H.M.; Zielinski, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    The distribution of Cr and other trace metals of environmental interest in a range of widely used U.S. coals was investigated using the Stanford-USGS SHRIMP-RG ion microprobe . Using the oxygen ion source, concentrations of Cr (11 to 176 ppm), V (23 to 248 ppm), Mn (2 to 149 ppm), Ni (2 to 30 ppm), and 13 other elements were determined in illite/smectite, a group of clay minerals commonly present in coal. The results confirm previous indirect or semi-quantitative determinations indicating illite/smectite to be an important host of these metals. Calibration was achieved using doped aluminosilicate-glass synthetic standards and glasses prepared from USGS rock standards. Grains for analysis were identified optically, and confirmed by 1) precursory electron microprobe analysis and wavelength-dispersive compositional mapping, and 2) SHRIMP-RG major element data obtained concurrently with trace element results. Follow-up investigations will focus on the distribution of As and other elements that are more effectively ionized with the cesium primary beam currently being tested.

  12. Nuclear and radiochemical techniques in chemical analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Finston, H.L.; Williams, E.T.

    1981-06-01

    The areas studied during the period of the contract included determinations of cross sections for nuclear reactions, determination of neutron capture cross sections of radionuclides, application of special activation techniques, and x-ray counting, elucidation of synergic solvent extraction mechanisms and development of new solvent extraction techniques, and the development of a PIXE analytical facility. The thermal neutron capture cross section of /sup 22/Na was determined, and cross sections and energy levels were determined for /sup 20/Ne(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 17/O, /sup 20/Ne(n,P)/sup 20/F, and /sup 40/Ar(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 37/S. Inelastic scattering with 2 to 3 MeV neutrons followed by counting of the metastable states permits analysis of the following elements: In, Sr, Cd, Hg, and Pb. Bromine can be detected in the presence of a 500-fold excess of Na and/or K by thermal neutron activation and x-ray counting, and as little as 0.3 x 10/sup -9/ g of Hg can be detected by this technique. Mediun energy neutrons (10 to 160 MeV) have been used to determine Tl, Pb, and Bi by (n,Xn) and (n,PXn) reactions. The reaction /sup 19/F(P,..cap alpha..)/sup 76/O has been used to determine as little as 50 ..mu..mol of Freon -14. Mechanisms for synergic solvent extractions have been elucidated and a new technique of homogeneous liquid-liquid solvent extraction has been developed in which the neutral complex is rapidly extracted propylene carbonate by raising and lowering the temperature of the system. An external-beam PIXE system has been developed for trace element analyses of a variety of sample types. Various sample preparation techniques have been applied to a diverse range of samples including marine sediment, coral, coal, and blood.

  13. Functional analysis of the nuclear LIM domain interactor NLI.

    PubMed Central

    Jurata, L W; Gill, G N

    1997-01-01

    LIM homeodomain and LIM-only (LMO) transcription factors contain two tandemly arranged Zn2+-binding LIM domains capable of mediating protein-protein interactions. These factors have restricted patterns of expression, are found in invertebrates as well as vertebrates, and are required for cell type specification in a variety of developing tissues. A recently identified, widely expressed protein, NLI, binds with high affinity to the LIM domains of LIM homeodomain and LMO proteins in vitro and in vivo. In this study, a 38-amino-acid fragment of NLI was found to be sufficient for the association of NLI with nuclear LIM domains. In addition, NLI was shown to form high affinity homodimers through the amino-terminal 200 amino acids, but dimerization of NLI was not required for association with the LIM homeodomain protein Lmxl. Chemical cross-linking analysis revealed higher-order complexes containing multiple NLI molecules bound to Lmx1, indicating that dimerization of NLI does not interfere with LIM domain interactions. Additionally, NLI formed complexes with Lmx1 on the rat insulin I promoter and inhibited the LIM domain-dependent synergistic transcriptional activation by Lmx1 and the basic helix-loop-helix protein E47 from the rat insulin I minienhancer. These studies indicate that NLI contains at least two functionally independent domains and may serve as a negative regulator of synergistic transcriptional responses which require direct interaction via LIM domains. Thus, NLI may regulate the transcriptional activity of LIM homeodomain proteins by determining specific partner interactions. PMID:9315627

  14. 78 FR 4477 - Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Introduction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... COMMISSION Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Introduction AGENCY: Nuclear... Plants: LWR Edition.'' The new subsection is the Standard Review Plan (SRP), ``Introduction--Part 2... referenced. The SRP, subsection Introduction--Part 2 is under ADAMS Accession No. ML12142A237. NRC's PDR:...

  15. Electron microprobe observations of PB diffusion in metamorphosed detrital monazites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Adachi, M.; Kajizuka, I.

    1994-12-01

    Electron microprobe analyses have been made on monazite grains from paragneiss samples in the andalusite-sillimanite transition (620 +/- 15 C) and sillimanite-orthoclase (680 +/- 15 C) zones of the Cretaceous Ryoke metamorphic belt, southwest Japan. Monazites from pelitic gneisses are of metamorphic origin, euhedral to subhedral and chronologically homogeneous, giving chemical Th-U-total Pb isochron (CHIME) ages of 98.8 +/- 3.3 - 98.0 +/- 3.2 Ma. Two psammitic gneisses of individual metamorphic grade contain both metamorphic monazite grains and detrital ones as old as ca. 1700 Ma. Most detrital monazite grains are heterogeneous in the ThO2 and UO2 concentrations and have multiple or single rims as young as ca. 100 Ma. Several detrital monazite grains are well rounded in form, exhibit homogeneous Th and U distributions and show a Pb diffusion profile in the margin. The width of the diffusion zones is approximately constant throughout grains from each psammitic gneiss: 18-22 micrometers for 620 C and 48-58 micrometers for 680 C. Assuming the isothermal diffusion of Pb from homogeneous monazite spheres during a 5 Ma duration of peak metamorphism, we obtain diffusion coefficients of 1.9 (+/- 0.3) x 10-21 and 1.5 (+/- 0.3) x 10-20 sq cm/s at 620 C and 680 C, respectively. These data derive an activation energy of 2.44 (+2.85/-1.26) x 105 J/mol and a frequency factor of 3.4 x 10-7 (8.5 x 10-12 - 2.2 x 107 sq cm/s, taking account of uncertainties of +/- 15 C in the temperatures and of +/- 20% in the diffusion coefficients. The diffusion parameters obtained from natural samples in this study provide a reliable insight into the closure temperature for Pb in monazite that has been poorly understood so far.

  16. Thorite in an Apollo 12 granite fragment and age determination using the electron microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddio, Stephen M.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Korotev, Randy L.; Carpenter, Paul K.

    2014-06-01

    We present the first quantitative compositional analysis of thorite in a lunar sample. The sample, a granitic assemblage, also contains monazite and yttrobetafite grains, all with concentrations of U, Th, and Pb sufficiently high to determine reliably with the electron microprobe. The assemblage represents the first documented occurrence of these three minerals together and only the second reported occurrence of thorite in a lunar rock. Sample 12023,147-10 is a small, monomict rock fragment recovered from an Apollo 12 regolith sample. It comprises graphic intergrowths of K-feldspar and quartz, and plagioclase and quartz, along with minor or accessory hedenbergite, fayalite, ilmenite, zircon, yttrobetafite, thorite, monazite, and Fe metal. Thorite, ideally ThSiO4, occurs in the assemblage adjacent to quartz and plagioclase, and includes a 12% xenotime ([Y,HREE]PO4) component. From quantitative electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) of Th, U, and Pb in thorite, assuming that all of the measured Pb is radiogenic, we calculate an age of 3.87 ± 0.03 Ga. Yttrobetafite and monazite, which contain lesser concentrations of U, Th, and Pb than the thorite, yield ages of 3.78 ± 0.06 Ga and 3.9 ± 0.3 Ga, respectively. These dates are consistent with formation of the granitic material around 3.8-3.9 Ga, possibly associated with, or after, the formation of the Imbrium basin. This age falls within a group of younger ages for granitic samples, measured mainly by ion microprobe analysis of zircon, compared to a suite of older ages, ca. 4.20-4.32 Ga, also from zircons (Meyer et al., 1996). A 3.8-3.9 Ga age may reflect an origin following the Imbrium event whereby granitic melt formed as a result of heating and melting, and was mobilized and emplaced along an Imbrium-related ring-fracture system. Silicic volcanic or exposed intrusive materials occur in several circum-Imbrium locations such as the Mairan and Gruithuisen Domes and in ejecta excavated by Aristarchus crater. Perhaps

  17. Analysis of nuclear proliferation resistance reprocessing and recycling technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Gary Cerefice; Marcela Stacey; Steven Bakhtiar

    2011-05-01

    The PUREX process has been progressively and continuously improved during the past three decades, and these improvements account for successful commercialization of reprocessing in a few countries. The renewed interest in nuclear energy and the international growth of nuclear electricity generation do not equate – and should not be equated -with increasing proliferation risks. Indeed, the nuclear renaissance presents a unique opportunity to enhance the culture of non-proliferation. With the recent revival of interest in nuclear technology, technical methods for prevention of nuclear proliferation are being revisited. Robust strategies to develop new advanced separation technologies are emerging worldwide for sustainability and advancement of nuclear energy with enhanced proliferation resistance. On the other hand, at this moment, there are no proliferation resistance advanced technologies. . Until now proliferation resistance as it applies to reprocessing has been focused on not separating a pure stream of weapons-usable plutonium. France, as an example, has proposed a variant of the PUREX process, the COEX TM process, which does not result on a pure plutonium product stream. A further step is to implement a process based on group extraction of actinides and fission products associated with a homogeneous recycling strategy (UNEX process in the US, GANEX process in France). Such scheme will most likely not be deployable on an industrial scale before 2030 or so because it requires intensive R&D and robust flowsheets. Finally, future generation recycling schemes will handle the used nuclear fuel in fast neutron reactors. This means that the plutonium throughput of the recycling process may increase. The need is obvious for advanced aqueous recycling technologies that are intrinsically more proliferation resistant than the commercial PUREX process. In this paper, we review the actual PUREX process along with the advanced recycling technologies that will enhance

  18. DamID Analysis of Nuclear Organization in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Saldivar, Georgina; Meister, Peter; Askjaer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The development of genomics and next generation sequencing platforms has dramatically improved our insight into chromatin structure and organization and its fine interplay with gene expression. The nuclear envelope has emerged as a key component in nuclear organization via extensive contacts between the genome and numerous proteins at the nuclear periphery. These contacts may have profound effects on gene expression as well as cell proliferation and differentiation. Indeed, their perturbations are associated with several human pathologies known as laminopathies or nuclear envelopathies. However, due to their dynamic behavior the contacts between nuclear envelope proteins and chromatin are challenging to identify, in particular in intact tissues. Here, we propose the DamID technique as an attractive method to globally characterize chromatin organization in the popular model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. DamID is based on the in vivo expression of a chromatin-associated protein of interest fused to the Escherichia coli DNA adenine methyltransferase, which produces unique identification tags at binding site in the genome. This marking is simple, highly specific and can be mapped by sensitive enzymatic and next generation sequencing approaches.

  19. Comparative analysis of dosimetry parameters for nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Toohey, R.E.; Stabin, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    For years many have employed the concept of ``total-body dose`` or ``whole-body dose,`` i.e., the total energy deposited in the body divided by the mass of the body, when evaluating the risks of different nuclear medicine procedures. The effective dose equivalent (H{sub E}), first described in ICRP Publication 26, has been accepted by some as a better quantity to use in evaluating the total risk of a procedure, but its use has been criticized by others primarily because the tissue weighting factors were intended for use in the radiation worker, rather than the nuclear medicine patient population. Nevertheless, in ICRP Publication 52, the ICRP has suggested that the H{sub E} may be used in nuclear medicine. The ICRP also has published a compendium of dose estimates, including H{sub E} values, for various nuclear medicine procedures at various ages in ICRP Publication 53. The effective dose (E) of ICRP Publication 60 is perhaps more suitable for use in nuclear medicine, with tissue weighting factors based on the entire population. Other comparisons of H{sub E} and E have been published. The authors have used the program MIRDOSE 3.1 to compute total-body dose, H{sub E}, and E for 62 radiopharmaceutical procedures, based on the best current biokinetic data available.

  20. Age Dating from Electron Microprobe Analyses of U, Th, and Pb: Geological Advantages and Analytical Difficulties.

    PubMed

    Bowles, John F W

    2015-10-01

    Electron microprobe analysis of U, Th, and Pb in naturally occurring minerals can indicate their age. Where the Pb is entirely due to the radioactive decay of U and Th, the time since mineral formation or equilibration can be calculated. Uraninite (UO2), monazite (REE PO4), zircon (ZrSiO4), and xenotime (YPO4) have been used, the latter containing U and/or Th in minor proportions. Any stable U- or Th-bearing phase can be considered. Careful analysis is required with attention to interferences, background measurement, detection limits, and Pb-free sample preparation. Extended counting times (600 s) at a probe current >200 nA are recommended. Ages can be determined from uraninite older than 2 Ma for a Pb detection limit of 0.02% and up to 700-1,000 Ma, after which Pb can be lost from the structure. The youngest monazite ages permitted by the Pb detection limit are 50-100 Ma and ages greater than 3,000 Ma have been determined. The method does not provide the detail of isotopic methods, but results can be obtained more readily. Examples show dating of cheralite ((Ca,Ce)(Th,Ce)(PO4)2), a rock containing primary and secondary UO2, and a suite of detrital uraninite grains that formed a part of a mineral exploration program.

  1. Style, content and format guide for writing safety analysis documents. Volume 1, Safety analysis reports for DOE nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of Volume 1 of this 4-volume style guide is to furnish guidelines on writing and publishing Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for DOE nuclear facilities at Sandia National Laboratories. The scope of Volume 1 encompasses not only the general guidelines for writing and publishing, but also the prescribed topics/appendices contents along with examples from typical SARs for DOE nuclear facilities.

  2. Nuclear microbeam analysis of wear particles in tissue surrounding failed hip joint implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grime, G. W.; Triffitt, J. T.; Williamson, M. C.; Athanasou, N. A.

    1994-05-01

    Particulate wear debris from hip joint replacements is an important factor in determining the response of the surrounding tissue to the implants. Failed replacement joints are surrounded by a layer of fibrous tissue showing an inflammatory response to the wear debris. This reaction leads to bone resorption and the eventual failure of the prosthesis. In preliminary experiments the Oxford scanning proton microprobe has been used to study the composition of wear particles in the membranes surrounding failed implants constructed from Ti/V/Al alloy. The membranes were observed to contain 1-10 μm particles with major constituents from the alloy and also from the cement and polyethylene used in the fitting and construction of the implant. Histological staining shows that these particles are associated with areas of high macrophage activity. Individual PIXE analysis of the metal particles indicates that two populations (high Ti/low Al and low Ti/high Al) may be present. These observations will provide further information on the mechanisms of implant degradation.

  3. Factorized molecular wave functions: Analysis of the nuclear factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, R.

    2015-06-07

    The exact factorization of molecular wave functions leads to nuclear factors which should be nodeless functions. We reconsider the case of vibrational perturbations in a diatomic species, a situation usually treated by combining Born-Oppenheimer products. It was shown [R. Lefebvre, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 074106 (2015)] that it is possible to derive, from the solutions of coupled equations, the form of the factorized function. By increasing artificially the interstate coupling in the usual approach, the adiabatic regime can be reached, whereby the wave function can be reduced to a single product. The nuclear factor of this product is determined by the lowest of the two potentials obtained by diagonalization of the potential matrix. By comparison with the nuclear wave function of the factorized scheme, it is shown that by a simple rectification, an agreement is obtained between the modified nodeless function and that of the adiabatic scheme.

  4. Yankee Nuclear Power Station - analysis of decommissioning costs

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, L.P.

    1996-12-31

    The preparation of decommissioning cost estimates for nuclear power generating stations has received a great deal of interest in the last few years. Owners are required by regulation to ensure that adequate funds are collected for the timely decommissioning of their facilities. The unexpected premature shutdown of several facilities and uncertainties associated with radioactive waste disposal and long-term spent-fuel storage, when viewed in the light of a deregulated electric utility industry, has caused many companies to reevaluate their decommissioning cost estimates. The decommissioning of the Yankee Nuclear Power Station represents the first large-scale project involving the complete decontamination and dismantlement of a commercial light water nuclear power generation facility in the United States. Since this pressurized water reactor operated for 32 yr at a respectable 74% lifetime capacity factor, the actual costs and resources required to decommission the plant, when compared with decommissioning estimates, will yield valuable benchmarking data.

  5. Adapting Human Reliability Analysis from Nuclear Power to Oil and Gas Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Boring, Ronald Laurids

    2015-09-01

    ABSTRACT: Human reliability analysis (HRA), as currently used in risk assessments, largely derives its methods and guidance from application in the nuclear energy domain. While there are many similarities be-tween nuclear energy and other safety critical domains such as oil and gas, there remain clear differences. This paper provides an overview of HRA state of the practice in nuclear energy and then describes areas where refinements to the methods may be necessary to capture the operational context of oil and gas. Many key distinctions important to nuclear energy HRA such as Level 1 vs. Level 2 analysis may prove insignifi-cant for oil and gas applications. On the other hand, existing HRA methods may not be sensitive enough to factors like the extensive use of digital controls in oil and gas. This paper provides an overview of these con-siderations to assist in the adaptation of existing nuclear-centered HRA methods to the petroleum sector.

  6. Development of an NMR microprobe procedure for high-throughput environmental metabolomics of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Nagato, Edward G; Lankadurai, Brian P; Soong, Ronald; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the primary platform used in high-throughput environmental metabolomics studies because its non-selectivity is well suited for non-targeted approaches. However, standard NMR probes may limit the use of NMR-based metabolomics for tiny organisms because of the sample volumes required for routine metabolic profiling. Because of this, keystone ecological species, such as the water flea Daphnia magna, are not commonly studied because of the analytical challenges associated with NMR-based approaches. Here, the use of a 1.7-mm NMR microprobe in analyzing tissue extracts from D. magna is tested. Three different extraction procedures (D2O-based buffer, Bligh and Dyer, and acetonitrile : methanol : water) were compared in terms of the yields and breadth of polar metabolites. The D2O buffer extraction yielded the most metabolites and resulted in the best reproducibility. Varying amounts of D. magna dry mass were extracted to optimize metabolite isolation from D. magna tissues. A ratio of 1-1.5-mg dry mass to 40 µl of extraction solvent provided excellent signal-to-noise and spectral resolution using (1)H NMR. The metabolite profile of a single daphnid was also investigated (approximately 0.2 mg). However, the signal-to-noise of the (1)H NMR was considerably lower, and while feasible for select applications would likely not be appropriate for high-throughput NMR-based metabolomics. Two-dimensional NMR experiments on D. magna extracts were also performed using the 1.7-mm NMR probe to confirm (1)H NMR metabolite assignments. This study provides an NMR-based analytical framework for future metabolomics studies that use D. magna in ecological and ecotoxicity studies.

  7. Nuclear forensic analysis of a non-traditional actinide sample.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Jamie L; Kuhn, Kevin; Byerly, Benjamin; Colletti, Lisa; Fulwyler, James; Garduno, Katherine; Keller, Russell; Lujan, Elmer; Martinez, Alexander; Myers, Steve; Porterfield, Donivan; Spencer, Khalil; Stanley, Floyd; Townsend, Lisa; Thomas, Mariam; Walker, Laurie; Xu, Ning; Tandon, Lav

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear forensic publications, performance tests, and research and development efforts typically target the bulk global inventory of intentionally safeguarded materials, such as plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U). Other materials, such as neptunium (Np), pose a nuclear security risk as well. Trafficking leading to recovery of an interdicted Np sample is a realistic concern especially for materials originating in countries that reprocesses fuel. Using complementary forensic methods, potential signatures for an unknown Np oxide sample were investigated. Measurement results were assessed against published Np processes to present hypotheses as to the original intended use, method of production, and origin for this Np oxide.

  8. Nuclear forensic analysis of a non-traditional actinide sample

    DOE PAGES

    Doyle, Jamie L.; Kuhn, Kevin John; Byerly, Benjamin; ...

    2016-06-15

    Nuclear forensic publications, performance tests, and research and development efforts typically target the bulk global inventory of intentionally safeguarded materials, such as plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U). Other materials, such as neptunium (Np), pose a nuclear security risk as well. Trafficking leading to recovery of an interdicted Np sample is a realistic concern especially for materials originating in countries that reprocesses fuel. Using complementary forensic methods, potential signatures for an unknown Np oxide sample were investigated. Measurement results were assessed against published Np processes to present hypotheses as to the original intended use, method of production, and origin for thismore » Np oxide.« less

  9. Nuclear forensic analysis of a non-traditional actinide sample

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Jamie L.; Kuhn, Kevin John; Byerly, Benjamin; Colletti, Lisa Michelle; Fulwyler, James Brent; Garduno, Katherine; Keller, Russell; Lujan, Elmer J. W.; Martinez, Alexander; Myers, Steve Charles; Porterfield, Donivan R.; Spencer, Khalil J.; Stanley, Floyd E.; Townsend, Lisa Ellen; Thomas, Mariam; Walker, Laurie F.; Xu, Ning; Tandon, Lav

    2016-06-15

    Nuclear forensic publications, performance tests, and research and development efforts typically target the bulk global inventory of intentionally safeguarded materials, such as plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U). Other materials, such as neptunium (Np), pose a nuclear security risk as well. Trafficking leading to recovery of an interdicted Np sample is a realistic concern especially for materials originating in countries that reprocesses fuel. Using complementary forensic methods, potential signatures for an unknown Np oxide sample were investigated. Measurement results were assessed against published Np processes to present hypotheses as to the original intended use, method of production, and origin for this Np oxide.

  10. Applications of nuclear analytical methods to materials analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Kraner, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear analytical methods have now become important in the characterization of many types of materials and have been shown to be an extremely important extension of many more common methods. To illustrate the breadth of their use, some recent Brookhaven experiments are described that deal with the depth distribution of hydrogen in Nb-H alloys, the diffusion of Mo in graphite at high temperatures, and the measurement of Al and Si concentrations in zeolite catalysts. It is hoped that the presentation of these illustrative examples will serve as a stimulus and encouragement for the further application of nuclear analytical methods.

  11. Library of sophisticated functions for analysis of nuclear spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morháč, Miroslav; Matoušek, Vladislav

    2009-10-01

    In the paper we present compact library for analysis of nuclear spectra. The library consists of sophisticated functions for background elimination, smoothing, peak searching, deconvolution, and peak fitting. The functions can process one- and two-dimensional spectra. The software described in the paper comprises a number of conventional as well as newly developed methods needed to analyze experimental data. Program summaryProgram title: SpecAnalysLib 1.1 Catalogue identifier: AEDZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 42 154 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 379 437 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: Pentium 3 PC 2.4 GHz or higher, Borland C++ Builder v. 6. A precompiled Windows version is included in the distribution package Operating system: Windows 32 bit versions RAM: 10 MB Word size: 32 bits Classification: 17.6 Nature of problem: The demand for advanced highly effective experimental data analysis functions is enormous. The library package represents one approach to give the physicists the possibility to use the advanced routines simply by calling them from their own programs. SpecAnalysLib is a collection of functions for analysis of one- and two-parameter γ-ray spectra, but they can be used for other types of data as well. The library consists of sophisticated functions for background elimination, smoothing, peak searching, deconvolution, and peak fitting. Solution method: The algorithms of background estimation are based on Sensitive Non-linear Iterative Peak (SNIP) clipping algorithm. The smoothing algorithms are based on the convolution of the original data with several types of filters and algorithms based on discrete

  12. Direct Pb Isotopic Analysis of a Nuclear Fallout Debris Particle from the Trinity Nuclear Test.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Jeremy J; Snape, Joshua F; Whitehouse, Martin J; Nemchin, Alexander A

    2017-02-07

    The Pb isotope composition of a nuclear fallout debris particle has been directly measured in post-detonation materials produced during the Trinity nuclear test by a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) scanning ion image technique (SII). This technique permits the visual assessment of the spatial distribution of Pb and can be used to obtain full Pb isotope compositions in user-defined regions in a 70 μm × 70 μm analytical window. In conjunction with backscattered electron (BSE) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) mapping of the same particle, the Pb measured in this fallout particle cannot be from a major phase in the precursor arkosic sand. Similarly, the Pb isotope composition of the particle is resolvable from the surrounding glass at the 2σ uncertainty level (where σ represents the standard deviation). The Pb isotope composition measured in the particle here is in excellent agreement with that inferred from measurements of green and red trinitite, suggesting that these types of particles are responsible for the Pb isotope compositions measured in both trinitite glasses.

  13. Nuclear stockpile stewardship and Bayesian image analysis (DARHT and the BIE)

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, James L

    2011-01-11

    Since the end of nuclear testing, the reliability of our nation's nuclear weapon stockpile has been performed using sub-critical hydrodynamic testing. These tests involve some pretty 'extreme' radiography. We will be discussing the challenges and solutions to these problems provided by DARHT (the world's premiere hydrodynamic testing facility) and the BIE or Bayesian Inference Engine (a powerful radiography analysis software tool). We will discuss the application of Bayesian image analysis techniques to this important and difficult problem.

  14. Nuclear-labeling index analysis (NLIA), a software package used to perform accurate automation of cell nuclear-labeling index analysis on immunohistochemically stained rat liver samples.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y H; Sattler, G L; Edwards, H; Pitot, H C

    2000-08-01

    The nuclear labeling index (labeled nuclei/100 nuclei) and the apoptotic index (apoptotic cells/100 cells) are important parameters of cell growth and death. Automatic counting of labeled nuclei is desirable since manual counting is tedious, time-consuming, and with a greater potential for inaccuracies. A nuclear-labeling index analysis (NLIA) software package was developed in this laboratory to perform the counting process automatically and accurately. This software package consists of an application program NLIA and a set of macros for obtaining nuclear data that is used in Scion Image. It is designed to work cooperatively with Scion Image, Adobe Photoshop, and Microsoft Office. NLIA has two basic functions: building nuclear data files and analyzing nuclear data. A color image captured from an immunohistochemically stained or autoradiographic sample is loaded into NLIA. Nuclear data can be entered into the program manually, automatically, or in combination. In the manual data entering mode, NLIA acts as an object-counting tool, while in the automatic mode it acts as a data picker: picking up the data generated by Scion Image into memory. A method to enter nuclear data (both labeled nuclei and unlabeled nuclei) in the automatic mode is described. The color image is processed in Adobe Photoshop, where the interested color ranges are selected and separated. These are then analyzed in Scion Image with the help of the macros for obtaining nuclear data. Since the advanced particle analysis function is used, the counting process is automatic and rapid. Data from thousands of nuclei can be obtained within seconds. To ensure the accuracy of the analysis, a nuclear data checking and edit feature is employed in NLIA: results of computer-generated counting can be compared with the original color image by overlaying the plot of counting results onto the original color image. In this way any computer counting mistakes can be easily discovered and corrected by the operator

  15. Analysis of cross sections using various nuclear potential

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Azni Abdul; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Yusof, Norhasliza; Muhammad Zamrun, F.

    2014-05-02

    The relevant astrophysical reaction rates which are derived from the reaction cross sections are necessary input to the reaction network. In this work, we analyse several theoretical models of the nuclear potential which give better prediction of the cross sections for some selected reactions.

  16. 78 FR 64029 - Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... COMMISSION Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY... Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors,'' in which the NRC made editorial corrections and... analysis for liquid and gaseous radwaste system components for light water nuclear power...

  17. Ion microprobe elemental analyses of impact features on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Jerry L.; Wortman, Jim J.; Griffis, Dieter P.; Simon, Charles G.

    1991-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact features on several of the electro-active dust sensors utilized in the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) were subjected to elemental analysis using an ion microprobe. The negatively biased dust sensor surfaces acted as ion traps for cations produced in the plasma plumes of impacting particles. Impactor residue surrounds most impact features to two or three feature diameters. After etching away a layer of carbonaceous/silicaceous surface contamination, low mass resolution elemental survey scans are used to tentatively identify the presence of impactor debris. High mass resolution two-dimensional elemental maps and three dimensional depth profiling of the feature and surrounding area show the distribution and relative composition of the debris. The location of these sensors on the six primary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) sides provides a unique opportunity to further define the debris environment. Researchers applied the same techniques to impact and contaminant features on a set of ultra-pure, highly polished single crystal germanium wafer witness plates that were mounted on row 12 and exposed to the environment during the entire mission.

  18. Investigation of elemental distribution in human femoral head by PIXE and SRXRF microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. X.; Wang, Y. S.; Zhang, Y. P.; Zhang, G. L.; Huang, Y. Y.; He, W.

    2007-07-01

    In order to study the distribution and possible degenerative processes inducing the loss of inorganic substances in bone and to provide a scientific basis for the prevention and therapy of osteoporosis, proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method is used for the determination of elemental concentrations in femoral heads from five autopsies and seven patients with femoral neck fractures. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) microprobe analysis technique is used to scan a slice of the femoral head from its periphery to its center, via cartilage, compact and spongy zones. The specimen preparation and experiment procedure are described in detail. The results show that the concentrations of P, Ca, Fe, Cu, Sr in the control group are higher than those in the patient group, but the concentrations of S, K, Zn, Mn are not significantly different. The quantitative results of elemental distribution, such as Ca, P, K, Fe, Zn, Sr and Pb in bone slice tissue including cartilage, substantial compact and substantial spongy, are investigated. The data obtained show that the concentrations of Ca, P, K, (the major elements of bone composition), are obviously low in both spongy and cartilage zones in the patient group, but there are no remarkable differences in the compact zone. Combined with the correlations between P, K, Zn, Sr and Ca, the loss mechanism of minerals and the physiological functions of some metal elements in bone are also discussed.

  19. Development of a bio-PIXE setup at the Debrecen scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Zs.; Szikszai, Z.; Uzonyi, I.; Simon, A.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2005-04-01

    On the growing need of an accurate, quantitative method for the analysis of thin biological tissues down to the cell level, a measurement setup and data evaluating system has been developed at the Debrecen scanning proton microprobe facility, using its unique capability of the PIXE-PIXE technique. Quantitative elemental concentrations and true elemental maps from C to U can be produced in the case of thin (10-50 μm), inhomogeneous samples of organic matrix with a 2 μm lateral resolution. The method is based on the combined application of on-axis STIM and PIXE-PIXE ion beam analytical techniques. STIM spectra and maps are used to determine the morphology and the area density of the samples. PIXE spectra and maps of an ultra thin windowed and a conventional Be-windowed Si(Li) X-ray detectors are used to quantify concentrations and distributions of elements in the C to Fe (light and medium) and S to U (medium and heavy) atomic number regions, separately. For cross-checking the validation of the obtained data in a few cases RBS technique was used simultaneously. The application of the new bio-PIXE method is shown through an example, the study of the penetration and clearance of ultra-fine particles containing heavy metals (TiO2) of physical bodycare cosmetics in different layers of skin within the frame of the NANODERM EU5 project.

  20. Development of a High Resolution-High Sensitivity Ion Microprobe Facility for Cosmochemical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKeegan, Kevin D.

    1998-01-01

    NASA NAGW-4112 has supported development of the CAMECA ims 1270 ion microprobe at UCLA for applications in cosmochemistry. The instrument has been brought to an operational status and techniques developed for accurate, precise microbeam analysis of oxygen isotope ratios in polished thin-sections. We made the first oxygen isotopic (delta(18)O and delta(17)O) measurements of rare mafic silicates in the most chemically primitive meteorites, the a chondrites (Leshin et al., 1997). The results have implications for both high temperature processing in the nebula and low-T aqueous alteration on the CI asteroid. We have performed measurements of oxygen isotopic compositions of magnetite and co-existing olivine from carbonaceous (Choi et al., 1997) and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (Choi et al., in press). This work has identified a significant new oxygen isotope reservoir in the early solar system: water characterized by a very high Delta(17)) value of approx. 5 % per thousand. We have determined the spatial distributions of oxygen isotopic anomalies in all major mineral phases of a type B CAI from Allende. We have also studied an unusual fractionated CAI from Leoville and made the first oxygen isotopic measurements in rare CAIs from ordinary chondrites.

  1. Using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Microprobes in the Study of Metal Homeostasis in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Punshon, T.; Guerinot, M; Lanzirotti, A

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims: This Botanical Briefing reviews the application of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes to the plant sciences; how the technique has expanded our knowledge of metal(loid) homeostasis, and how it can be used in the future. Scope: The use of SXRF microspectroscopy and microtomography in research on metal homeostasis in plants is reviewed. The potential use of SXRF as part of the ionomics toolbox, where it is able to provide fundamental information on the way that plants control metal homeostasis, is recommended. Conclusions: SXRF is one of the few techniques capable of providing spatially resolved in-vivo metal abundance data on a sub-micrometre scale, without the need for chemical fixation, coating, drying or even sectioning of samples. This gives researchers the ability to uncover mechanisms of plant metal homeostasis that can potentially be obscured by the artefacts of sample preparation. Further, new generation synchrotrons with smaller beam sizes and more sensitive detection systems will allow for the imaging of metal distribution within single living plant cells. Even greater advances in our understanding of metal homeostasis in plants can be gained by overcoming some of the practical boundaries that exist in the use of SXRF analysis.

  2. Laser microprobe study of cosmic dust (IDPs) and potential source materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Sommer, M. S., II

    1986-01-01

    The study of cosmic dust or interplanetary dust particles (IDP) can provide vital information about primitive materials derived primarily from comets and asteroids along with a small unknown fraction from the nearby interstellar medium. The study of these particles can enhance our understanding of comets along with the decoding of the history of the early solar system. In addition the study of the cosmic dust for IDP particles can assist in the elucidation of the cosmic history of the organogenic elements which are vital to life processes. Studies to date on these particles have shown that they are complex, heterogeneous assemblages of both amorphous and crystalline components. In order to understand the nature of these particles, any analytical measurements must be able to distinguish between the possible sources of these particles. A study was undertaken using a laser microprobe interfaced to a quadrupole mass spectrometer for the analysis of the volatile components present in cosmic dust particles, terrestrial contaminants present in the upper atmosphere, and primitive carbonaceous chondrites. From the study of the volatiles released from the carbonaceous materials it is hoped that one could distinguish between components and sources in the IDP particles analyzed. The technique is briefly described and results for the CI, CM, and CV chondrites and cosmic dust particle W7027B8 are presented.

  3. In vivo monitoring of nanosphere onsite delivery using fiber optic microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Leu-Wei; Yang, Chung-Shi

    2005-02-01

    To recognize the information of ischemia-induced blood vessel permeability would be valuable to formulate the drugs for optimal local delivery, we constructed an implantable needle type fiber-optic microprobe for the monitoring of in vivo fluorescent substances in anesthetized rats. This fiber-optic microprobe was composed of coaxial optical fibers and catheterized using a thin wall tubing of stainless steel (~400 um O.D. and ~300 um I.D.). The central fiber, with 100 um core diameter and 20 um cladding, coated with a 30 um layer of gold, was surrounded by 10 fibers with 50 um cores. The central fiber carried the light from the 488 nm Argon laser to the tissue while the surrounding fibers collected the emitted fluorescence to the detector. When the fiber-optic microprobe was placed in the solutions containing various concentrations of fluorescent nanospheres (20 nm), either with or without 10% lipofundin as optical phantom, nanosphere concentration-dependent responses of the fluorescence intensity were observed. The microprobe was then implanted into the liver and the brain of anesthetized rats to monitor the in situ extravasation of pre-administered fluorescent nanospheres from vasculature following the ischemic insults. Both the hepatic and cerebral ischemic insults showed immediate increases of the extracellular 20 nm fluorescent nanospheres. The implantable fiber-optic microprobe constructed in present study provides itself as a minimally-invasive technique capable of investigating the vascular permeability for in vivo nanosphere delivery in both ischemic liver and brain.

  4. The NeuroMedicator—a micropump integrated with silicon microprobes for drug delivery in neural research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spieth, S.; Schumacher, A.; Kallenbach, C.; Messner, S.; Zengerle, R.

    2012-06-01

    The NeuroMedicator is a micropump integrated with application-specific silicon microprobes aimed for drug delivery in neural research with small animals. The micropump has outer dimensions of 11 × 15 × 3 mm3 and contains 16 reservoirs each having a capacity of 0.25 µL. Thereby, the reservoirs are interconnected in a pearl-chain-like manner and are connected to two 8 mm long silicon microprobes. Each microprobe has a cross-sectional area of 250 × 250 µm2 and features an integrated drug delivery channel of 50 × 50 µm2 with an outlet of 25 µm in diameter. The drug is loaded to the micropump prior to implantation. After implantation, individual 0.25 µL portions of drug can be sequentially released by short heating pulses applied to a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer containing Expancel® microspheres. Due to local, irreversible thermal expansion of the elastic composite material, the drug is displaced from the reservoirs and released through the microprobe outlet directly to the neural tissue. While implanted, leakage of drug by diffusion occurs due to the open microprobe outlets. The maximum leakage within the first three days after implantation is calculated to be equivalent to 0.06 µL of drug solution.

  5. Integrated structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex scaffold.

    PubMed

    Bui, Khanh Huy; von Appen, Alexander; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Ori, Alessandro; Sparks, Lenore; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Bock, Thomas; Hagen, Wim; Andrés-Pons, Amparo; Glavy, Joseph S; Beck, Martin

    2013-12-05

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a fundamental component of all eukaryotic cells that facilitates nucleocytoplasmic exchange of macromolecules. It is assembled from multiple copies of about 30 nucleoporins. Due to its size and complex composition, determining the structure of the NPC is an enormous challenge, and the overall architecture of the NPC scaffold remains elusive. In this study, we have used an integrated approach based on electron tomography, single-particle electron microscopy, and crosslinking mass spectrometry to determine the structure of a major scaffold motif of the human NPC, the Nup107 subcomplex, in both isolation and integrated into the NPC. We show that 32 copies of the Nup107 subcomplex assemble into two reticulated rings, one each at the cytoplasmic and nuclear face of the NPC. This arrangement may explain how changes of the diameter are realized that would accommodate transport of huge cargoes.

  6. Analysis of nuclear reactor instability phenomena. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1993-03-01

    The phenomena known as density-wave instability often occurs in phase change systems, such as boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRS). Our current understanding of density-wave oscillations is in fairly good shape for linear phenomena (eg, the onset of instabilities) but is not very advanced for non-linear phenomena [Lahey and Podowski, 1989]. In particular, limit cycle and chaotic instability modes are not well understood in boiling systems such as current and advanced generation BWRs (eg, SBWR). In particular, the SBWR relies on natural circulation and is thus inherently prone to problems with density-wave instabilities. The purpose of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of nonlinear nuclear-coupled density-wave instability phenomena in BWRS. This research builds on the work of Achard et al [1985] and Clausse et al [1991] who showed, respectively, that Hopf bifurcations and chaotic oscillations may occur in boiling systems.

  7. Temperature measuring analysis of the nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, F. E-mail: zdenko.zavodny@stuba.sk; Kučák, L. E-mail: zdenko.zavodny@stuba.sk; Bereznai, J. E-mail: zdenko.zavodny@stuba.sk; Závodný, Z. E-mail: zdenko.zavodny@stuba.sk; Muškát, P. E-mail: zdenko.zavodny@stuba.sk

    2014-08-06

    Study was based on rapid changes of measured temperature values from the thermocouple in the VVER 440 nuclear reactor fuel assembly. Task was to determine origin of fluctuations of the temperature values by experiments on physical model of the fuel assembly. During an experiment, heated water was circulating in the system and cold water inlet through central tube to record sensitivity of the temperature sensor. Two positions of the sensor was used. First, just above the central tube in the physical model fuel assembly axis and second at the position of the thermocouple in the VVER 440 nuclear reactor fuel assembly. Dependency of the temperature values on time are presented in the diagram form in the paper.

  8. Compartmental analysis of dynamic nuclear medicine data: models and identifiability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbary, Fabrice; Garbarino, Sara; Vivaldi, Valentina

    2016-12-01

    Compartmental models based on tracer mass balance are extensively used in clinical and pre-clinical nuclear medicine in order to obtain quantitative information on tracer metabolism in the biological tissue. This paper is the first of a series of two that deal with the problem of tracer coefficient estimation via compartmental modelling in an inverse problem framework. Specifically, here we discuss the identifiability problem for a general n-dimension compartmental system and provide uniqueness results in the case of two-compartment and three-compartment compartmental models. The second paper will utilize this framework in order to show how nonlinear regularization schemes can be applied to obtain numerical estimates of the tracer coefficients in the case of nuclear medicine data corresponding to brain, liver and kidney physiology.

  9. PSF Analysis Support System for Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Satoko Sakajo; Takashi Nakagawa; Naotaka Terashita

    2002-07-01

    Research during recent years has revealed that human errors tend to reflect the quality of performance shaping factors (PSFs). Therefore, from the viewpoint of reducing human error, PSFs, which include error-likely equipment design, written procedures, and other factors, must be analyzed and improved. This paper provides methodologies to identify and qualify the potential PSFs included in tasks at a nuclear power plant (NPP). The methodologies were applied to actual plants. (authors)

  10. Asymptotic Expansion Homogenization for Multiscale Nuclear Fuel Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J. D.; Tonks, M. R.; Chockalingam, K.; Perez, D. M.; Novascone, S. R.; Spencer, B. W.; Williamson, R. L.

    2015-03-01

    Engineering scale nuclear fuel performance simulations can benefit by utilizing high-fidelity models running at a lower length scale. Lower length-scale models provide a detailed view of the material behavior that is used to determine the average material response at the macroscale. These lower length-scale calculations may provide insight into material behavior where experimental data is sparse or nonexistent. This multiscale approach is especially useful in the nuclear field, since irradiation experiments are difficult and expensive to conduct. The lower length-scale models complement the experiments by influencing the types of experiments required and by reducing the total number of experiments needed. This multiscale modeling approach is a central motivation in the development of the BISON-MARMOT fuel performance codes at Idaho National Laboratory. These codes seek to provide more accurate and predictive solutions for nuclear fuel behavior. One critical aspect of multiscale modeling is the ability to extract the relevant information from the lower length-scale sim- ulations. One approach, the asymptotic expansion homogenization (AEH) technique, has proven to be an effective method for determining homogenized material parameters. The AEH technique prescribes a system of equations to solve at the microscale that are used to compute homogenized material constants for use at the engineering scale. In this work, we employ AEH to explore the effect of evolving microstructural thermal conductivity and elastic constants on nuclear fuel performance. We show that the AEH approach fits cleanly into the BISON and MARMOT codes and provides a natural, multidimensional homogenization capability.

  11. Analysis of suprathermal nuclear processes in the solar core plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronchev, Victor T.; Nakao, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Yukinobu

    2017-04-01

    A consistent model for the description of suprathermal processes in the solar core plasma naturally triggered by fast particles generated in exoergic nuclear reactions is formulated. This model, based on the formalism of in-flight reaction probability, operates with different methods of treating particle slow-down in the plasma, and allows for the influence of electron degeneracy and electron screening on processes in the matter. The model is applied to examine slowing-down of 8.7 MeV α-particles produced in the {}7{Li}(p,α )α reaction of the pp chain, and to analyze suprathermal processes in the solar CNO cycle induced by them. Particular attention is paid to the suprathermal {}14{{N}}{(α ,{{p}})}17{{O}} reaction unappreciated in standard solar model simulations. It is found that an appreciable non-standard (α ,p) nuclear flow due to this reaction appears in the matter and modifies running of the CNO cycle in ∼95% of the solar core region. In this region at R> 0.1{R}ȯ , normal branching of nuclear flow {}14{{N}}≤ftarrow {}17{{O}}\\to {(}18{{F}})\\to {}18{{O}} transforms to abnormal sequential flow {}14{{N}}\\to {}17{{O}}\\to {(}18{{F}})\\to {}18{{O}}, altering some element abundances. In particular, nuclear network calculations reveal that in the outer core the abundances of 17O and 18O isotopes can increase by a factor of 20 as compared with standard estimates. A conjecture is made that other CNO suprathermal (α ,p) reactions may also affect abundances of CNO elements, including those generating solar neutrinos.

  12. Economic and Nonproliferation Analysis Framework for Assessing Reliable Nuclear Fuel Service Arrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Jon R.; Kreyling, Sean J.; Short, Steven M.; Weimar, Mark R.

    2010-04-14

    Nuclear power is now broadly recognized as an essential technology in national strategies to provide energy security while meeting carbon management goals. Yet a long standing conundrum remains: how to enable rapid growth in the global nuclear power infrastructure while controlling the spread of sensitive enrichment and reprocessing technologies that lie at the heart of nuclear fuel supply and nuclear weapons programs. Reducing the latent proliferation risk posed by a broader horizontal spread of enrichment and reprocessing technology has been a primary goal of national nuclear supplier policies since the beginning of the nuclear power age. Attempts to control the spread of sensitive nuclear technology have been the subject of numerous initiatives in the intervening decades sometimes taking the form of calls to develop fuel supply and service assurances to reduce market pull to increase the number of states with fuel cycle capabilities. A clear understanding of what characteristics of specific reliable nuclear fuel service (RNFS) and supply arrangements qualify them as 'attractive offers' is critical to the success of current and future efforts. At a minimum, RNFS arrangements should provide economic value to all participants and help reduce latent proliferation risks posed by the global expansion of nuclear power. In order to inform the technical debate and the development of policy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been developing an analytical framework to evaluate the economics and nonproliferation merits of alternative approaches to RNFS arrangements. This paper provides a brief overview of the economic analysis framework developed and applied to a model problem of current interest: full-service nuclear fuel leasing arrangements. Furthermore, this paper presents an extended outline of a proposed analysis approach to evaluate the non-proliferation merits of various RNFS alternatives.

  13. Core Community Specifications for Electron Microprobe Operating Systems: Software, Quality Control, and Data Management Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournelle, John; Carpenter, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Modem electron microprobe systems have become increasingly sophisticated. These systems utilize either UNIX or PC computer systems for measurement, automation, and data reduction. These systems have undergone major improvements in processing, storage, display, and communications, due to increased capabilities of hardware and software. Instrument specifications are typically utilized at the time of purchase and concentrate on hardware performance. The microanalysis community includes analysts, researchers, software developers, and manufacturers, who could benefit from exchange of ideas and the ultimate development of core community specifications (CCS) for hardware and software components of microprobe instrumentation and operating systems.

  14. An x-ray microprobe using focussing optics with a synchrotron radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.C.; Underwood, J.H.; Wu, Y.; Giauque, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray microprobe can be used to produce maps of the concentration of elements in a sample. Synchrotron radiation provides x-ray beams with enough intensity and collimation to make possible elemental images with femtogram sensitivity. The use of focussing x-ray mirrors made from synthetic multilayers with a synchrotron x-ray beam allows beam spot sizes of less than 10 /mu/m /times/ 10 /mu/m to be produced. Since minimal sample preparation is required and a vacuum environment is not necessary, there will be a wide variety of applications for such microprobes. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Optimal Parameters of High Energy Ion Microprobe Systems Comprised of Lafayette Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymnikov, Alexander D.; Glass, Gary A.; Rout, Bibhudutta; Dias, Johnny F.

    2009-03-01

    High energy optimal ion microprobes comprised of new compact magnetic quadrupole lenses (Lafayette Quadrupole Lens) are numerically investigated. The smallest beam spot size and appropriate radii of object and divergence slits are presented for different emittances and compared with the corresponding parameters of the Oxford triplet for the same total length. The parameters of the calculated microprobes include demagnification, the magnetic field in the lenses and the coefficients of spherical and chromatic aberrations for several quadrupole system configurations including the doublet, the Lafayette symmetric triplet, the Russian magnetic quadruplets and sextuplets.

  16. Polymer SU-8 Based Microprobes for Neural Recording and Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuna, Ane; Fernandez, Luis; Berganzo, Javier

    2015-06-01

    This manuscript makes a reflection about SU-8 based microprobes for neural activity recording and drug delivery. By taking advantage of improvements in microfabrication technologies and using polymer SU-8 as the only structural material, we developed several microprobe prototypes aimed to: a) minimize injury in neural tissue, b) obtain high-quality electrical signals and c) deliver drugs at a micrometer precision scale. Dedicated packaging tools have been developed in parallel to fulfill requirements concerning electric and fluidic connections, size and handling. After these advances have been experimentally proven in brain using in vivo preparation, the technological concepts developed during consecutive prototypes are discussed in depth now.

  17. Living near nuclear power plants and thyroid cancer risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaeyoung; Bang, Yejin; Lee, Won Jin

    2016-02-01

    There has been public concern regarding the safety of residing near nuclear power plants, and the extent of risk for thyroid cancer among adults living near nuclear power plants has not been fully explored. In the present study, a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies was conducted to investigate the association between living near nuclear power plants and the risk of thyroid cancer. A comprehensive literature search was performed on studies published up to March 2015 on the association between nuclear power plants and thyroid cancer risk. The summary standardized incidence ratio (SIR), standardized mortality ratio (SMR), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effect model of meta-analysis. Sensitivity analyses were performed by study quality. Thirteen studies were included in the meta-analysis, covering 36 nuclear power stations in 10 countries. Overall, summary estimates showed no significant increased thyroid cancer incidence or mortality among residents living near nuclear power plants (summary SIR=0.98; 95% CI 0.87-1.11, summary SMR=0.80; 95% CI 0.62-1.04). The pooled estimates did not reveal different patterns of risk by gender, exposure definition, or reference population. However, sensitivity analysis by exposure definition showed that living less than 20 km from nuclear power plants was associated with a significant increase in the risk of thyroid cancer in well-designed studies (summary OR=1.75; 95% CI 1.17-2.64). Our study does not support an association between living near nuclear power plants and risk of thyroid cancer but does support a need for well-designed future studies.

  18. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear proteindistribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, David; Sudar, Damir; Bator, Carol; Bissell, Mina

    2006-02-01

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues.

  19. Austenitic steel corrosion in IGCC environment. Characterisation by photon and nuclear microprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillmann, Philippe; Weulersse, Katia; Regad, Belkacem; Moulin, Gérard; Barrett, Ray; Bonnin-Mosbah, Michelle; Lequien, Stéphane; Berger, Pascal

    2001-07-01

    An austenitic steel sample was treated simulating particular working conditions of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. Several classical characterisation techniques were used to investigate the oxide scales. In addition, micro-particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) analyses were performed and permit us to identify several phases constitutive of the oxide. Moreover, micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) experiments allow us to determine the valence of the vanadium incorporated in the scale in the form of microscopic islets. The comparison of all these results leads to the proposal of a corrosion mechanism for this alloy.

  20. Nuclear quadrupole resonance studies project. [spectrometer design and spectrum analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, A. N.

    1978-01-01

    The participation of undergraduates in nuclear quadrupole resonance research at Grambling University was made possible by NASA grants. Expanded laboratory capabilities include (1) facilities for high and low temperature generation and measurement; (2) facilities for radio frequency generation and measurement with the modern spectrum analyzers, precision frequency counters and standard signal generators; (3) vacuum and glass blowing facilities; and (4) miscellaneous electronic and machine shop facilities. Experiments carried out over a five year period are described and their results analyzed. Theoretical studies on solid state crystalline electrostatic fields, field gradients, and antishielding factors are included.

  1. Microscopic analysis of order parameters in nuclear quantum phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. P.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Meng, J.

    2009-12-15

    Microscopic signatures of nuclear ground-state shape phase transitions in Nd isotopes are studied using excitation spectra and collective wave functions obtained by diagonalization of a five-dimensional Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom, with parameters determined by constrained self-consistent relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. As a function of the physical control parameter, the number of nucleons, energy gaps between the ground state and the excited vibrational states with zero angular momentum, isomer shifts, and monopole transition strengths exhibit sharp discontinuities at neutron number N=90, which is characteristic of a first-order quantum phase transition.

  2. High Fidelity Thermal Simulators for Non-Nuclear Testing: Analysis and Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David

    2007-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power system, providing system characterization data and allowing one to work through various fabrication, assembly and integration issues without the cost and time associated with a full ground nuclear test. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Testing with non-optimized heater elements allows one to assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. High fidelity thermal simulators that match both the static and the dynamic fuel pin performance that would be observed in an operating, fueled nuclear reactor can vastly increase the value of non-nuclear test results. With optimized simulators, the integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronie response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing, providing a better assessment of system integration issues, characterization of integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assessment of potential design improvements' at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial conceptual thermal simulator designs are determined by simple one-dimensional analysis at a single axial location and at steady state conditions; feasible concepts are then input into a detailed three-dimensional model for comparison to expected fuel pin performance. Static and dynamic fuel pin performance for a proposed reactor design is determined using SINDA/FLUINT thermal analysis software, and comparison is made between the expected nuclear performance and the performance of conceptual thermal simulator designs. Through a series of iterative analyses, a conceptual high fidelity design can developed. Test results presented in this paper correspond to a "first cut" simulator design for a potential

  3. Combined analysis of fourteen nuclear genes refines the Ursidae phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Pagès, Marie; Calvignac, Sébastien; Klein, Catherine; Paris, Mathilde; Hughes, Sandrine; Hänni, Catherine

    2008-04-01

    Despite numerous studies, questions remain about the evolutionary history of Ursidae and additional independent genetic markers were needed to elucidate these ambiguities. For this purpose, we sequenced ten nuclear genes for all the eight extant bear species. By combining these new sequences with those of four other recently published nuclear markers, we provide new insights into the phylogenetic relationships of the Ursidae family members. The hypothesis that the giant panda was the first species to diverge among ursids is definitively confirmed and the precise branching order within the Ursus genus is clarified for the first time. Moreover, our analyses indicate that the American and the Asiatic black bears do not cluster as sister taxa, as had been previously hypothesised. Sun and sloth bears clearly appear as the most basal ursine species but uncertainties about their exact relationships remain. Since our larger dataset did not enable us to clarify this last question, identifying rare genomic changes in bear genomes could be a promising solution for further studies.

  4. Zircon geochronology and ca. 400 Ma exhumation of Norwegian ultrahigh-pressure rocks: An ion microprobe and chemical abrasion study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Root, D.B.; Hacker, B.R.; Mattinson, J.M.; Wooden, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the formation and exhumation of the remarkable ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) rocks of the Western Gneiss Region, Norway, hinges on precise determination of the time of eclogite recrystallization. We conducted detailed thermal ionization mass spectrometry, chemical abrasion analysis and sensitive high-resolution ion-microprobe analysis of zircons from four ultrahigh- and high-pressure (HP) rocks. Ion-microprobe analyses from the Flatraket eclogite yielded a broad range of apparently concordant Caledonian ages, suggesting long-term growth. In contrast, higher precision thermal ionization mass spectrometry analysis of zircon subject to combined thermal annealing and multi-step chemical abrasion yielded moderate Pb loss from the first (lowest temperature) abrasion step, possible minor Pb loss or minor growth at 400 Ma from the second step and a 407-404 Ma cluster of slightly discordant 206Pb/238U ages, most likely free from Pb loss, from the remaining abrasion steps. We interpret the latter to reflect zircon crystallization at ???405-400 Ma with minor discordance from inherited cores. Zircon crystallization occurred at eclogite-facies, possibly post-peak conditions, based on compositions of garnet inclusions in zircon as well as nearly flat HREE profiles and lack of Eu anomalies in zircon fractions subjected to chemical abrasion. These ages are significantly younger than the 425 Ma age often cited for western Norway eclogite recrystallization, implying faster rates of exhumation (>2.5-8.5 km/Myr), and coeval formation of eclogites across the UHP portion of the Western Gneiss Region. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Fuel cycle analysis of once-through nuclear systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-08-10

    Once-through fuel cycle systems are commercially used for the generation of nuclear power, with little exception. The bulk of these once-through systems have been water-cooled reactors (light-water and heavy water reactors, LWRs and HWRs). Some gas-cooled reactors are used in the United Kingdom. The commercial power systems that are exceptions use limited recycle (currently one recycle) of transuranic elements, primarily plutonium, as done in Europe and nearing deployment in Japan. For most of these once-through fuel cycles, the ultimate storage of the used (spent) nuclear fuel (UNF, SNF) will be in a geologic repository. Besides the commercial nuclear plants, new once-through concepts are being proposed for various objectives under international advanced nuclear fuel cycle studies and by industrial and venture capital groups. Some of the objectives for these systems include: (1) Long life core for remote use or foreign export and to support proliferation risk reduction goals - In these systems the intent is to achieve very long core-life with no refueling and limited or no access to the fuel. Most of these systems are fast spectrum systems and have been designed with the intent to improve plant economics, minimize nuclear waste, enhance system safety, and reduce proliferation risk. Some of these designs are being developed under Generation IV International Forum activities and have generally not used fuel blankets and have limited the fissile content of the fuel to less than 20% for the purpose on meeting international nonproliferation objectives. In general, the systems attempt to use transuranic elements (TRU) produced in current commercial nuclear power plants as this is seen as a way to minimize the amount of the problematic radio-nuclides that have to be stored in a repository. In this case, however, the reprocessing of the commercial LWR UNF to produce the initial fuel will be necessary. For this reason, some of the systems plan to use low enriched uranium

  6. Quantifying trace elements in individual aquatic protist cells with a synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe.

    SciTech Connect

    Twining, B. S.; Baines, S. B.; Fisher, N. S.; Maser, J.; Vogt, S.; Jacobsen, C.; Tovar-Sanchez, A.; Sanudo-Wihelmy, S. A.; Experimental Facilities Division; Stony Brook Univ.

    2003-01-01

    The study of trace metal cycling by aquatic protists is limited by current analytical techniques. Standard 'bulk' element analysis techniques that rely on physical separations to concentrate cells for analysis cannot separate cells from co-occurring detrital material or other cells of differing taxonomy or trophic function. Here we demonstrate the ability of a synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobe to quantify the elements Si, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Zn in individual aquatic protist cells. This technique distinguishes between different types of cells in an assemblage and between cells and other particulate matter. Under typical operating conditions, the minimum detection limits are 7.0 x 10{sup -16} mol {mu}m{sup -2} for Si and between 5.0 x 10{sup -20} and 3.9 x 10{sup -19} mol {mu}m{sup -2} for Mn, Fe, Ni, and Zn; this sensitivity is sufficient to detect these elements in cells from even the most pristine waters as demonstrated in phytoplankton cells collected from remote areas of the Southern Ocean. Replicate analyses of single cells produced variations of <5% for Si, Mn, Fe, and Zn and <10% for Ni. Comparative analyses of cultured phytoplankton cells generally show no significant differences in cellular metal concentrations measured with SXRF and standard bulk techniques (spectrophotometry and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry). SXRF also produces two-dimensional maps of element distributions in cells, thereby providing information not available with other analytical approaches. This technique enables the accurate and precise measurement of trace metals in individual aquatic protists collected from natural environments.

  7. Experimental determination of the partitioning of gallium between solid iron metal and synthetic basaltic melt Electron and ion microprobe study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, M. J.; Newsom, H. E.; Reed, S. J. B.; Enright, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of Ga between solid Fe metal and synthetic basaltic melt is investigated experimentally at temperatures of 1190 and 1330 C, and over a narrow range of oxygen fugacities. Metal-silicate reversal experiments were conducted, indicating a close approach to equilibrium. The analysis of the partitioned products was performed using electron and ion microprobes. At one bar total pressure, the solid metal/silicate melt partition coefficient D(Ga) is used to evaluate metal-silicate fractionation processes in the earth, moon, and Eucrite Parent Body (EPB). It is found that the depletion of Ga abundances in the EPB is due to the extraction of Ga into a metallic core. Likewise, the depletion of Ga in the lunar mantle is consistent with the extraction of Ga into a smaller lunar core if Ga was originally present in a subchondritic concentration. The relatively high Ga abundances in the earth's mantle are discussed, with reference to several theoretical models.

  8. Investigation of the uptake of drugs, carcinogens and mutagens by individual mammalian cells using a scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholewa, M.; Turnbull, I. F.; Legge, G. J. F.; Weigold, H.; Marcuccio, S. M.; Holan, G.; Tomlinson, E.; Wright, P. J.; Dillon, C. T.; Lay, P. A.; Bonin, A. M.

    1995-09-01

    The use of micro-PIXE [1] in measuring the quantitative uptake of drugs containing metal atoms by individual Vero cells (African green monkey kidney cell line) and V79 Chinese hamster lung cells is demonstrated. One class of drugs, heteropolytungstates, which are being assessed for activity against the HIV virus, were studied using Vero cells. The cellular uptake of a series of chromium compounds, including carcinogens and mutagens, in which the metal oxidation state was either (III), (V) or (VI), was measured using V79 cells. It was found that, unlike any other techniques, scanning proton microprobe (SPM) offers both the sensitivity and spatial resolution to carry out unicellular analysis. The use of cultured cell lines in these analyses was shown to have distinct advantages over cells such as peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs).

  9. A high throughput approach for analysis of cell nuclear deformability at single cell level

    PubMed Central

    Ermis, Menekse; Akkaynak, Derya; Chen, Pu; Demirci, Utkan; Hasirci, Vasif

    2016-01-01

    Various physiological and pathological processes, such as cell differentiation, migration, attachment, and metastasis are highly dependent on nuclear elasticity. Nuclear morphology directly reflects the elasticity of the nucleus. We propose that quantification of changes in nuclear morphology on surfaces with defined topography will enable us to assess nuclear elasticity and deformability. Here, we used soft lithography techniques to produce 3 dimensional (3-D) cell culture substrates decorated with micron sized pillar structures of variable aspect ratios and dimensions to induce changes in cellular and nuclear morphology. We developed a high content image analysis algorithm to quantify changes in nuclear morphology at the single-cell level in response to physical cues from the 3-D culture substrate. We present that nuclear stiffness can be used as a physical parameter to evaluate cancer cells based on their lineage and in comparison to non-cancerous cells originating from the same tissue type. This methodology can be exploited for systematic study of mechanical characteristics of large cell populations complementing conventional tools such as atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. PMID:27841297

  10. A high throughput approach for analysis of cell nuclear deformability at single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermis, Menekse; Akkaynak, Derya; Chen, Pu; Demirci, Utkan; Hasirci, Vasif

    2016-11-01

    Various physiological and pathological processes, such as cell differentiation, migration, attachment, and metastasis are highly dependent on nuclear elasticity. Nuclear morphology directly reflects the elasticity of the nucleus. We propose that quantification of changes in nuclear morphology on surfaces with defined topography will enable us to assess nuclear elasticity and deformability. Here, we used soft lithography techniques to produce 3 dimensional (3-D) cell culture substrates decorated with micron sized pillar structures of variable aspect ratios and dimensions to induce changes in cellular and nuclear morphology. We developed a high content image analysis algorithm to quantify changes in nuclear morphology at the single-cell level in response to physical cues from the 3-D culture substrate. We present that nuclear stiffness can be used as a physical parameter to evaluate cancer cells based on their lineage and in comparison to non-cancerous cells originating from the same tissue type. This methodology can be exploited for systematic study of mechanical characteristics of large cell populations complementing conventional tools such as atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation.

  11. Analysis of CRM1-Dependent Nuclear Export in Permeabilized Cells.

    PubMed

    Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Port, Sarah A

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear protein import and export assays in permeabilized cells have been instrumental for the identification of transport factors and for the molecular characterization of nucleocytoplasmic transport pathways. Our original assay to quantitatively analyze CRM1-dependent export was based on stably transfected cells expressing GFP-NFAT. We now present a simplified version of the assay using transiently transfected cells expressing GFP-NFAT or GFP-snurportin1 as a fluorescent export cargo and mCherry-emerin as a marker protein for transfected cells. CRM1- and Ran-dependent export is recapitulated in digitonin-permeabilized cells and quantified by flow cytometry. The assay should be applicable to other combinations of cargo and marker proteins.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis and molecular properties of berberine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Ju; Lee, Ken S.; Hurley, Sharon J.

    An extensive theoretical study of berberine has been performed at the ab initio HF/6-31G**, HF/6-311G**, and B3LYP/6-311G** levels with and without solvent effects. The optimized structures are compared with X-ray data. We found that the optimized structures with solvent effects are in slightly better agreement with X-ray data than those without solvent effects. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of berberine were calculated by using the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) (with and without solvent effects), CSGT, and IGAIM methods. The calculated chemical shifts were compared with the two-dimensional NMR experimental data. Overall, the calculated chemical shifts show very good agreement with the experimental results. The harmonic vibrational frequencies for berberine were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G** level.

  13. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lynne M. Stevens

    2010-07-01

    Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

  14. Analysis of nuclear thermal propulsion systems using computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, Robert M.; Kim, Suk C.; Papp, John L.

    1993-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of nuclear rockets with relatively low chamber pressures were carried out to assess the merits of using such low pressures to take advantage of hydrogen dissociation and recombination. The computations, using a Navier-Stokes code with chemical kinetics, describe the flow field in detail, including gas dynamics, thermodynamic and chemical properties, and provide global performance quantities such as specific impulse and thrust. Parametric studies were performed varying chamber temperature, chamber pressure and nozzle size. Chamber temperature was varied between 2700 K and 3600 K, and chamber pressure between 0.1 atm. and 10 atm. Performance advantages associated with lower chamber pressures are shown to occur at the higher chamber temperatures. Viscous losses are greater at lower chamber pressures and can be decreased in larger nozzles where the boundary layer is a smaller fraction of the flow field.

  15. Analysis of Nuclear Reactor Background Radiation for Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Ricky; Blackmon, J. C.; Rasco, B. C.; Mumm, H. P.; mTC; NuLat Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Prior measurements of reactor antineutrinos have found a lower flux than expected. Precision measurements of antineutrino energy spectra are important for understanding the anomaly, reactor safeguards, and nuclear nonproliferation. Antineutrino detector designs rely on good characterization of gamma-ray and neutron backgrounds near the reactor core. To study the gamma-ray background at the NIST research reactor, spectra were collected using a 6.25 cm diameter × 5.5 cm germanium detector. We analyzed the measured spectra using simulations of the detector response using the GEANT4 toolkit to determine background fluxes and build a background model that will be used to understand shielding requirements and the impact of backgrounds on potential short-baseline reactor antineutrino studies at NIST. This work supported by the National Science Foundation and LSU.

  16. Identification and Analysis of Critical Gaps in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Codes Required by the SINEMA Program

    SciTech Connect

    Adrian Miron; Joshua Valentine; John Christenson; Majd Hawwari; Santosh Bhatt; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar: Michael Lineberry

    2009-10-01

    The current state of the art in nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) modeling is an eclectic mixture of codes with various levels of applicability, flexibility, and availability. In support of the advanced fuel cycle systems analyses, especially those by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), Unviery of Cincinnati in collaboration with Idaho State University carried out a detailed review of the existing codes describing various aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle and identified the research and development needs required for a comprehensive model of the global nuclear energy infrastructure and the associated nuclear fuel cycles. Relevant information obtained on the NFC codes was compiled into a relational database that allows easy access to various codes' properties. Additionally, the research analyzed the gaps in the NFC computer codes with respect to their potential integration into programs that perform comprehensive NFC analysis.

  17. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometry Analysis of Data from Measurements on Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Gavron, Victor A.; Harris, Jason; Stewart, Trevor N.

    2015-01-12

    Improved non-destructive assay of isotopic masses in used nuclear fuel would be valuable for nuclear safeguards operations associated with the transport, storage and reprocessing of used nuclear fuel. Our collaboration is examining the feasibility of using lead slowing down spectrometry techniques to assay the isotopic fissile masses in used nuclear fuel assemblies. We present the application of our analysis algorithms on measurements conducted with a lead spectrometer. The measurements involved a single fresh fuel pin and discrete 239Pu and 235U samples. We are able to describe the isotopic fissile masses with root mean square errors over seven different configurations to 6.35% for 239Pu and 2.7% for 235U over seven different configurations. Funding Source(s):

  18. Report of the Nuclear Propulsion Mission Analysis, Figures of Merit Subpanel: Quantifiable figures of merit for nuclear thermal propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, Davy A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of an inquiry by the Nuclear Propulsion Mission Analysis, Figures of Merit subpanel are given. The subpanel was tasked to consider the question of what are the appropriate and quantifiable parameters to be used in the definition of an overall figure of merit (FoM) for Mars transportation system (MTS) nuclear thermal rocket engines (NTR). Such a characterization is needed to resolve the NTR engine design trades by a logical and orderly means, and to provide a meaningful method for comparison of the various NTR engine concepts. The subpanel was specifically tasked to identify the quantifiable engine parameters which would be the most significant engine factors affecting an overall FoM for a MTS and was not tasked with determining 'acceptable' or 'recommended' values for the identified parameters. In addition, the subpanel was asked not to define an overall FoM for a MTS. Thus, the selection of a specific approach, applicable weighting factors, to any interrelationships, for establishing an overall numerical FoM were considered beyond the scope of the subpanel inquiry.

  19. Analysis of surface, subsurface, and bulk hydrogen in ZnO using nuclear reaction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Traeger, F.; Kauer, M.; Woell, Ch.; Rogalla, D.; Becker, H.-W.

    2011-08-15

    Hydrogen concentrations in ZnO single crystals exposing different surfaces have been determined to be in the range of (0.02-0.04) at.% with an error of {+-}0.01 at.% using nuclear reaction analysis. In the subsurface region, the hydrogen concentration has been determined to be higher by up to a factor of 10. In contrast to the hydrogen in the bulk, part of the subsurface hydrogen is less strongly bound, can be removed by heating to 550 deg. C, and reaccommodated by loading with atomic hydrogen. By exposing the ZnO(1010) surface to water above room temperature and to atomic hydrogen, respectively, hydroxylation with the same coverage of hydrogen is observed.

  20. High-speed microprobe for roughness measurements in high-aspect-ratio microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, Lutz; Brand, Uwe; Bütefisch, Sebastian; Ahbe, Thomas; Weimann, Thomas; Peiner, Erwin; Frank, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Cantilever-type silicon microprobes with an integrated tip and a piezoresistive signal read out have successfully proven to bridge the gap between scanning force microscopy and stylus profilometry. Roughness measurements in high-aspect-ratio microstructures (HARMS) with depths down to 5 mm and widths down to 50 µm have been demonstrated. To improve the scanning speed up to 15 mm s‑1, the wear of the tip has to be reduced. The atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique with alumina (Al2O3) has been tested for this purpose. Repeated wear measurements with coated and uncoated microprobe cantilevers have been carried out on a roughness standard at a speed of 15 mm s‑1. The tip shape and the wear have been measured using a new probing tip reference standard containing rectangular silicon grooves with widths from 0.3 µm to 3 µm. The penetration depth of the microprobe allows one to measure the wear of the tip as well as the tip width and the opening angle of the tip. The roughness parameters obtained on the roughness standard during wear experiments agree well with the reference values measured with a calibrated stylus instrument, nevertheless a small amount of wear still is observable. Further research is necessary in order to obtain wear resistant microprobe tips for non-destructive inspection of microstructures in industry and microform measurements, for example in injection nozzles.

  1. Strain in UHMWPE for orthopaedic use studied by Raman microprobe spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kyomoto, Masayuki; Miwa, Yasutake; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been the most popular bearing material against both metal and ceramic counter-faces in total hip and knee joint replacements. Therefore, it is desirable to clarify the complex phenomena occurring both in vivo and in vitro, using highly sensitive analytical techniques. However, conventional analytical techniques used so far suffer from destructive measurements, lack of precision and/or intricate techniques. In the present study, the physical and chemical properties of both conventional UHMWPE (PE) and highly cross-linked UHMWPE (CLPE) were investigated by Raman microprobe spectroscopy, which combines the advantages of high precision and non-destructive measurements. It was found that the strain of UHMWPE can be evaluated by a change in the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of a selected Raman band (located at around 1127 cm(-1)), and that these spectroscopic strain coefficients were (0.42 +/- 0.01) x 10(-2) cm(-1)/% elongation and (0.48 +/- 0.01) x 10(-2) cm(-1)/% elongation for PE and CLPE (100 kGy), respectively. The difference in the crystalline nature between PE and CLPE was also confirmed by Raman microprobe spectroscopy. In addition, the Raman microprobe spectroscopy technique enabled us to obtain hyperspectral images of strain and crystallinity on a microscopic scale. Thus, Raman microprobe spectroscopy is a very effective method for analyzing UHMWPE for orthopaedic use.

  2. The application of utility analysis processes to estimate the impact of training for nuclear maintenance personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Groppel, C.F.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to test two utility analysis models, the Cascio-Ramos Estimate of Performance in Dollars (CREPID) model and Godkewitsch financial utility analysis model and to determine their appropriateness as tools for evaluating training. This study was conducted in conjunction with Philadelphia Electric Company's Nuclear Training Group. Job performance of nuclear maintenance workers was assessed to document the impact of the training program. Assessment of job performance covered six job performance themes. Additionally, front-line nuclear maintenance supervisors were interviewed to determine their perceptions of the nuclear maintenance training. A comparison of supervisor's perceptions and outcomes of the utility analysis models was made to determine the appropriateness of utility analysis as quantitative tools for evaluating the nuclear maintenance training program. Application of the CREPID utility analysis model indicated the dollar value of the benefits of training through utility analysis was $5,843,750 which represented only four of the job performance themes. Application of the Godkewitsch utility analysis model indicated the dollar value of the benefits of training was $3,083,845 which represented all six performance themes. A comparison of the outcomes indicated a sizeable difference between the dollar values produced by the models. Supervisors indicated training resulted in improved productivity, i.e., improved efficiency and effectiveness. Additionally, supervisors believed training was valuable because it provided nonmonetary benefits, e.g., improved self-esteem and confidence. The application of utility analysis addressed only monetary benefits of training. The variation evidenced by the difference in the outcome of the two models suggests that utility analysis [open quotes]estimates[close quotes] may not accurately reflect the impact of training.

  3. Analysis of operation TEAPOT nuclear test ZUCCHINI radiological and meterological data

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, V.E.

    1987-03-01

    This report describes the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) analyses of the radiological and meteorological data collected for the ZUCCHINI nuclear test of Operation TEAPOT. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of normalizing the radiological data to a standard time and estimating fallout-arrival times are presented. The meteorological situations on event day and the following day are described. A comparison of the WSNSO fallout analysis with an analysis performed in the 1950's is presented. The radiological data used to derive the WSNSO 1986 fallout pattern are tabulated in an appendix.

  4. Safety analysis of the nuclear chemistry Building 151

    SciTech Connect

    Kvam, D.

    1984-06-29

    This report summarizes the results of a safety analysis that was done on Building 151. The report outlines the methodology, the analysis, and the findings that led to the low hazard classification. No further safety evaluation is indicated at this time. 5 tables.

  5. Office of Nuclear Energy Knowledge Management Program Situational Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge management (KM) has been a high priority for the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the past several years. NE Programs are moving toward well-established knowledge management practices and a formal knowledge management program has been established. Knowledge management is being practiced to some level within each of the NE programs. Although it continues to evolve as NE programs evolve, a formal strategic plan that guides the implementation of KM has been developed. Despite the acceptance of KM within DOE NE, more work is necessary before the NE KM program can be considered fully successful. Per Dr. David J. Skyrme[1], an organization typically moves through the following evolutionary phases: (1) Ad-hoc - KM is being practiced to some level in some parts of the organization; (2) Formal - KM is established as a formal project or program; (3) Expanding - the use of KM as a discipline grows in practice across different parts of the organization; (4) Cohesive - there is a degree of coordination of KM; (5) Integrated - there are formal standards and approaches that give every individual access to most organizational knowledge through common interfaces; and (6) Embedded - KM is part-and-parcel of everyday tasks; it blends seamlessly into the background. According to the evolutionary phases, the NE KM program is operating at the two lower levels, Ad-hoc and Formal. Although KM is being practiced to some level, it is not being practiced in a consistent manner across the NE programs. To be fully successful, more emphasis must be placed on establishing KM standards and processes for collecting, organizing, sharing and accessing NE knowledge. Existing knowledge needs to be prioritized and gathered on a routine basis, its existence formally recorded in a knowledge inventory. Governance to ensure the quality of the knowledge being used must also be considered. For easy retrieval, knowledge must be organized according to a taxonomy that

  6. CALCMIN - an EXCEL™ Visual Basic application for calculating mineral structural formulae from electron microprobe analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandelik, Andreas

    2009-07-01

    CALCMIN, an open source Visual Basic program, was implemented in EXCEL™. The program was primarily developed to support geoscientists in their routine task of calculating structural formulae of minerals on the basis of chemical analysis mainly obtained by electron microprobe (EMP) techniques. Calculation programs for various minerals are already included in the form of sub-routines. These routines are arranged in separate modules containing a minimum of code. The architecture of CALCMIN allows the user to easily develop new calculation routines or modify existing routines with little knowledge of programming techniques. By means of a simple mouse-click, the program automatically generates a rudimentary framework of code using the object model of the Visual Basic Editor (VBE). Within this framework simple commands and functions, which are provided by the program, can be used, for example, to perform various normalization procedures or to output the results of the computations. For the clarity of the code, element symbols are used as variables initialized by the program automatically. CALCMIN does not set any boundaries in complexity of the code used, resulting in a wide range of possible applications. Thus, matrix and optimization methods can be included, for instance, to determine end member contents for subsequent thermodynamic calculations. Diverse input procedures are provided, such as the automated read-in of output files created by the EMP. Furthermore, a subsequent filter routine enables the user to extract specific analyses in order to use them for a corresponding calculation routine. An event-driven, interactive operating mode was selected for easy application of the program. CALCMIN leads the user from the beginning to the end of the calculation process.

  7. Ion microprobe U-Pb dating and REE abundance of biogenic apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Y.; Terada, K.; Ueki, S.

    2001-12-01

    If the direct U-Pb dating of a fossil itself is possible, the method could have great impact on stratigraphic studies in establishing the absolute chronology of sedimentary sequences. Micro fossil ?conodont? are candidates for this purpose since they consist of apatite (Ca2(PO5)3 (F,Cl,OH)), which would uptake U, Th and Pb after sedimentation no longer than a few million years and is supposed to remain closed to U and Pb under relatively low effective closure temperature. We report here results of direct ion microprobe U-Th-Pb dating of two conodonts; Trichognathus from Kinderhookian stage of Mississippian sedimentary sequence from Illinois Basin region in North America and Panderodus from a Llandoverian sedimentary sequence on Langkawi Island, northern Malaysia. Secondary purpose of the study is to indicate in situ analysis of all REE on the same spots of U-Pb measurements. Samples were cast into epoxy resin discs with a few grains of standard apatite, PRAP, derived from an alkaline rock of Prairie Lake circular complex in the Canadian Shield and polished until they were exposed through their mid-sections. U, Th and REE abundances, and Pb isotopic compositions were measured by using SHRIMP installed at Hiroshima University. Thirteen spots on Trichognathus yield a 238U/206Pb isochron age of 323+/-36 Ma, which is consistent with the depositional and early diagenetic ages. Fifteen spots on Panderodus give 232Th/208Pb isochron age of 429+/-50 Ma, which is again comparable to an early Silurian. Shale-normalized REE of Trichognathus shows a broadly flat pattern from light to middle REE and a decrease from middle to heavy REE with negative anomalies of Ce and Eu. In contrast Panderodus indicates a concave-shape pattern with middle REE enrichment. These characteristics are probably due to a different formation environment as suggested by other workers.

  8. Analysis of failure and maintenance experiences of motor operated valves in a Finnish nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simola, Kaisa; Laakso, Kari

    1992-01-01

    Eight years of operating experiences of 104 motor operated closing valves in different safety systems in nuclear power units were analyzed in a systematic way. The qualitative methods used were Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) and Maintenance Effects and Criticality Analysis (MECA). These reliability engineering methods are commonly used in the design stage of equipment. The successful application of these methods for analysis and utilization of operating experiences was demonstrated.

  9. Procedure for conducting a human-reliability analysis for nuclear power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, B.J.; Swain, A.D.

    1983-05-01

    This document describes in detail a procedure to be followed in conducting a human reliability analysis as part of a probabilistic risk assessment when such an analysis is performed according to the methods described in NUREG/CR-1278, Handbook for Human Reliability Analysis with Emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications. An overview of the procedure describing the major elements of a human reliability analysis is presented along with a detailed description of each element and an example of an actual analysis. An appendix consists of some sample human reliability analysis problems for further study.

  10. Antineutrino analysis for continuous monitoring of nuclear reactors: Sensitivity study

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Christopher; Erickson, Anna

    2015-10-28

    This paper explores the various contributors to uncertainty on predictions of the antineutrino source term which is used for reactor antineutrino experiments and is proposed as a safeguard mechanism for future reactor installations. The errors introduced during simulation of the reactor burnup cycle from variation in nuclear reaction cross sections, operating power, and other factors are combined with those from experimental and predicted antineutrino yields, resulting from fissions, evaluated, and compared. The most significant contributor to uncertainty on the reactor antineutrino source term when the reactor was modeled in 3D fidelity with assembly-level heterogeneity was found to be the uncertainty on the antineutrino yields. Using the reactor simulation uncertainty data, the dedicated observation of a rigorously modeled small, fast reactor by a few-ton near-field detector was estimated to offer reduction of uncertainty on antineutrino yields in the 3.0–6.5 MeV range to a few percent for the primary power-producing fuel isotopes, even with zero prior knowledge of the yields.

  11. Thermal analysis of cold vacuum drying of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Piepho, M.G.

    1998-07-20

    The thermal analysis examined transient thermal and chemical behavior of the Multi canister Overpack (MCO) container for a broad range of cases that represent the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) processes. The cases were defined to consider both normal and off-normal operations at the CVD Facility for an MCO with Mark IV N, Reactor spent fuel in four fuel baskets and one scrap basket. This analysis provides the basis for the MCO thermal behavior at the CVD Facility for its Phase 2 Safety Analysis Report (revision 4).

  12. Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    1987-05-01

    This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during calendar year 1986. Comments and observations are provided on operating experience at nuclear power plants and other NRC licensees, including results from selected AEOD studies; summaries of abnormal occurrences involving US nuclear plants; reviews of licensee event reports and their quality, reactor scram experience from 1984 to 1986, engineered safety features actuations, and the trends and patterns analysis program; and assessments of nonreactor and medical misadministration events. In addition, the report provides the year-end status of all recommendations included in AEOD studies, and listings of all AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1986.

  13. Analysis of nuclear export using photoactivatable GFP fusion proteins and interspecies heterokaryons.

    PubMed

    Nakrieko, Kerry-Ann; Ivanova, Iordanka A; Dagnino, Lina

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, we review protocols for the analysis of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors and nuclear proteins, using two different approaches. The first involves the use of photoactivatable forms of the protein of interest by fusion to photoactivatable green fluorescent protein to follow its movement out of the nucleus by live-cell confocal microscopy. This methodology allows for the kinetic characterization of protein movements as well as measurement of steady-state levels. In a second procedure to assess the ability of a nuclear protein to move into and out of the nucleus, we describe the use of interspecies heterokaryon assays, which provide a measurement of steady-state distribution. These technologies are directly applicable to the analysis of nucleocytoplasmic movements not only of transcription factors, but also other nuclear proteins.

  14. Discrimination of osteoarthritic and rheumatoid human synovial cells in culture by nuclear image analysis.

    PubMed

    Delage, B; Giroud, F; Monet, J D; Ekindjian, O G; Cals, M J

    1999-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritic (RA) and osteoarthritic (OA) synovial cells in culture differ in their metabolic and proliferative behaviour. To assess links between these properties and nuclear changes, we used image analysis to study chromatin texture, together with nuclear morphometry and densitometry of OA and RA cells in primary culture. Chromatin pattern at the third day (D3) was heterogeneous and granular with chromatin clumps whereas at the final stage (D11) of culture a homogeneous and finely granular chromatin texture was observed. This evolution indicates global chromatin decondensation. These characteristics were more marked for RA than for OA nuclei. At each culture time, RA nuclei could be discriminated with high confidence from OA ones from parameters evaluating the organization of the chromatine texture. Nuclear image analysis is thus a useful tool for investigating synovial cell biology.

  15. Analysis of the formation, expression, and economic impacts of risk perceptions associated with nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, T.; Hunter, S.; Calzonetti, F.J.

    1992-10-01

    This report investigates how communities hosting nuclear facilities form and express perceptions of risk and how these risk perceptions affect local economic development. Information was collected from site visits and interviews with plant personnel, officials of local and state agencies, and community activists in the hosting communities. Six commercial nuclear fuel production facilities and five nuclear facilities operated for the US Department of Energy by private contractors were chosen for analysis. The results presented in the report indicate that the nature of risk perceptions depends on a number of factors. These factors are (1) level of communication by plant officials within the local community, (2) track record of the facility. operator, (3) process through which community and state officials receive information and form opinions, (4) level of economic links each plant has with the local community, and (15) physical characteristics of the facility itself. This report finds that in the communities studied, adverse ask perceptions have not affected business location decisions, employment levels in the local community, tourism, or agricultural development. On the basis of case-study findings, this report recommends that nuclear facility siting programs take the following observations into account when addressing perceptions of risk. First, the quality of a facility`s participation with community activists, interest groups, and state agencies helps to determine the level of perceived risk within a community. Second, the development of strong economic links between nuclear facilities and their host communities will produce a higher level of acceptance of the nuclear facilities.

  16. Analysis of mitochondrial respiratory-related genes reveals nuclear and mitochondrial genome cooperation in allotetraploid hybrid.

    PubMed

    Peng, L-Y; Wang, J; Tao, M; You, C-P; Ye, L; Xiao, J; Zhang, C; Liu, Y; Liu, S-J

    2014-01-01

    An allotetraploid hybrid lineage derived from the distant hybridization of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var., ♀, 2n =100) × common carp (Cyprinus carpio L., ♂, 2n =100) was investigated for its mitochondrial and nuclear genome inheritance patterns. Based on liver transcriptomic data for this hybrid, red crucian carp, and common carp, we identified 94, 136, and 86 contigs corresponding to 41, 46, and 37 mitochondrial respiratory chain nuclear genes, respectively. Mitochondrial respiratory chain nuclear gene sequences from red crucian carp and common carp were both detected in the allotetraploid hybrid, indicating that both parental nuclear genomes were participated in the synthesis of mitochondrial respiratory protein complexes in the hybrid. For mitochondrial respiratory related genes, high sequence similarity (>90%) and a low nucleotide divergence rate (<0.2) between red crucian carp and common carp could be a critical factor allowing cooperation of the three genomes (red crucian carp mitochondrial genome, red crucian and common carp nuclear genomes) in the allotetraploid hybrid lineage. Interestingly, gene duplication events were identified in the allotetraploid hybrid, red crucian and common carp, as confirmed by analysis of orthologous gene trees for these fish. Our findings provide valuable information with which to study cooperation between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of other hybrids, and will provide basic genetic information of relevance to mitochondrial-related diseases in humans and animals.

  17. Nuclear reactor decommissioning: an analysis of the regulatory environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cantor, R.

    1986-08-01

    In the next several decades, the electric utility industry will be faced withthe retirement of 50,000 megawatts (mW) of nuclear capacity. Responsibility for the financial and technical burdens this activity entails has been delegated to the utilities operating the reactors. However, the operators will have to perform the tasks of reactor decommissioning within the regulatory environment dictated by federal, state and local regulations. The purpose of this study was to highlight some of the current and likely trends in regulations and regulatory practices that will significantly affect the costs, technical alternatives and financing schemes encountered by the electric utilities and their customers. To identify significant trends and practices among regulatory bodies and utilities, a reviw of these factors was undertaken at various levels in the regulatory hierarchy. The technical policies were examined in reference to their treatment of allowed technical modes, restoration of the plant site including any specific recognition of the residual radioactivity levels, and planning requirements. The financial policies were examined for specification of acceptable financing arrangements, mechanisms which adjust for changes in the important parameters used to establish the fund, tax and rate-base treatments of the payments to and earnings on the fund, and whether or not escalation and/or discounting were considered in the estimates of decommissioning costs. The attitudes of regulators toward financial risk, the tax treatment of the decommissioning fund, and the time distribution of the technical mode were found to have the greatest effect on the discounted revenue requirements. Under plausible assumptions, the cost of a highly restricted environment is about seven times that of the minimum revenue requirement environment for the plants that must be decommissioned in the next three decades.

  18. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE SOLIDIFICATION CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2009-06-01

    The Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Design Authority is in the design stage of the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for the treatment and solidification of the radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The waste streams will be mixed with a cementitious dry mix in a 55-gallon waste container. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been performing the testing and evaluations to support technical decisions for the WSB. Engineering Modeling & Simulation Group was requested to evaluate the thermal performance of the 55-gallon drum containing hydration heat source associated with the current baseline cement waste form. A transient axi-symmetric heat transfer model for the drum partially filled with waste form cement has been developed and heat transfer calculations performed for the baseline design configurations. For this case, 65 percent of the drum volume was assumed to be filled with the waste form, which has transient hydration heat source, as one of the baseline conditions. A series of modeling calculations has been performed using a computational heat transfer approach. The baseline modeling results show that the time to reach the maximum temperature of the 65 percent filled drum is about 32 hours when a 43 C initial cement temperature is assumed to be cooled by natural convection with 27 C external air. In addition, the results computed by the present model were compared with analytical solutions. The modeling results will be benchmarked against the prototypic test results. The verified model will be used for the evaluation of the thermal performance for the WSB drum. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

  19. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  20. A Delayed Neutron Counting System for the Analysis of Special Nuclear Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, Madison Theresa

    Nuclear forensic analysis is a modem science that uses numerous analytical techniques to identify and attribute nuclear materials in the event of a nuclear explosion, radiological terrorist attack or the interception of illicit nuclear material smuggling. The Canadian Department of National Defence has participated in recent international exercises that have highlighted the Nation's requirement to develop nuclear forensics expertise, protocol and capabilities, specifically pertaining to the analysis of special nuclear materials (SNM). A delayed neutron counting (DNC) system has been designed and established at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC) to enhance the Government's SNM analysis capabilities. This analytical technique complements those already at RMC by providing a rapid and non-destructive method for the analysis of the fissile isotopes of both uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu). The SLOWPOKE-2 reactor at RMC produces a predominately thermal neutron flux. These neutrons induce fission in the SNM isotopes 233U, 235U and 239Pu releasing prompt fast neutrons, energy and radioactive fission fragments. Some of these fission fragments undergo beta - decay and subsequently emit neutrons, which can be recorded by an array of sensitive 3He detectors. The significant time period between the fission process and the release of these neutrons results in their identification as 'delayed neutrons'. The recorded neutron spectrum varies with time and the count rate curve is unique to each fissile isotope. In-house software, developed by this project, can analyze this delayed neutron curve and provides the fissile mass in the sample. Extensive characterization of the DNC system has been performed with natural U samples with 235 U content ranging from 2--7 microg. The system efficiency and dead time behaviour determined by the natural uranium sample analyses were validated by depleted uranium samples with similar quantities of 235 U resulting in a typical relative error of

  1. Nuclear charge and neutron radii and nuclear matter: Trend analysis in Skyrme density-functional-theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Radii of charge and neutron distributions are fundamental nuclear properties. They depend on both nuclear interaction parameters related to the equation of state of infinite nuclear matter and on quantal shell effects, which are strongly impacted by the presence of nuclear surface. Purpose: In this work, by studying the correlation of charge and neutron radii, and neutron skin, with nuclear matter parameters, we assess different mechanisms that drive nuclear sizes. Method: We apply nuclear density functional theory using a family of Skyrme functionals obtained by means of optimization protocols, which do not include any radius information. By performing the Monte Carlo sampling of reasonable functionals around the optimal parametrization, we scan all correlations between nuclear matter properties and observables characterizing charge and neutron distributions of spherical closed-shell nuclei 48Ca,208Pb, and 298Fl. Results: By considering the influence of various nuclear matter properties on charge and neutron radii in a multidimensional parameter space of Skyrme functionals, we demonstrate the existence of two strong relationships: (i) between the nuclear charge radii and the saturation density of symmetric nuclear matter ρ0, and (ii) between the neutron skins and the slope of the symmetry energy L . The impact of other nuclear matter properties on nuclear radii is weak or nonexistent. For functionals optimized to experimental binding energies only, proton and neutron radii are found to be weakly correlated due to canceling trends from different nuclear matter characteristics. Conclusion: The existence of only two strong relations connecting nuclear radii with nuclear matter properties has important consequences. First, by requiring that the nuclear functional reproduces the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter practically fixes the charge (or proton) radii, and vice versa. This explains the recent results of ab initio calculations

  2. Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Data Analysis Guide - Berkelium Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R A

    2009-07-23

    This is a data analysis guide to the JINR system developed by Roger Henderson. It is intended as a complete guide to the data format and the calibration parameters utilized for the analysis of the data. This guide will provide the basic structure of the data files, the description of the individual data items, and the basic equations developed for the calculation of the results. Currently (7/17/2009), calculation of the calibration parameters is not a covered topic. It is intended that this will be covered in a future update.

  3. Combination of magnetic and electric quadrupole lenses as zoom Sextuplet ion microprobe focusing system with minimum spherical aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymnikov, Alexander D.; Rout, Bibhudutta; Glass, Gary A.

    2007-08-01

    The new generation nuclear microprobe system at the Louisiana Accelerator Center in the University of Louisiana at Lafayette consists of a 6.25 m beam line that employs the magnetic quadrupole Sextuplet lens system. This Sextuplet is a zoom system having the same demagnifications, the same focal lengths and the same positions of the focal points in (xoz) and (yoz) planes as in the case for the Russian quadruplet. It also can have the same spherical aberrations in both planes. The parameters which allow obtaining the lowest coefficients of spherical aberration are found for different geometrical configurations of electric and magnetic quadrupole lenses. Specifically, the configuration of a combined Sextuplet consisting of two magnetic and four electrostatic lenses or consisting of two electrostatic and four magnetic lenses is studied and compared with magnetic and electrostatic Sextuplets. The values of the chromatic and spherical aberrations for these combined systems are compared and the minimum spot radius and the half-widths of the corresponding slits for some optimal magnetic and electrostatic Sextuplets are given.

  4. Instrumental nuclear activation analysis (INAA) characterization of environmental air filter samples.

    PubMed

    Alemón, Ernesto; Herrera, Luis; Ortiz, Elba; Longoria, L C Luis C

    2004-06-01

    Nuclear techniques have been used in quantitations of environmental pollutants, and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) has turned out to be particularly useful in the analysis of airborne suspended particles. This work describes the INAA characterization of the particulate material in the environmental samples obtained in a monitoring campaign in Mexico City's Metropolitan Area. As the types of the irradiation facilities and gamma-ray detection system impose some limitations on the possibilities of INAA analysis, the actual experimental conditions at Gamma Spectroscopy Laboratory, where the analysis was performed, had been assessed. The facilities had been found suitable for the analysis of samples from this campaign, in which 22 elements were determined.

  5. An enhancement of NASTRAN for the seismic analysis of structures. [nuclear power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burroughs, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    New modules, bulk data cards and DMAP sequence were added to NASTRAN to aid in the seismic analysis of nuclear power plant structures. These allow input consisting of acceleration time histories and result in the generation of acceleration floor response spectra. The resulting system contains numerous user convenience features, as well as being reasonably efficient.

  6. Materials characterization center workshop on compositional and microstructural analysis of nuclear waste materials. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, J.L.; Strachan, D.M.; Shade, J.W.; Thomas, M.T.

    1981-06-01

    The purpose of the Workshop on Compositional and Microstructural Analysis of Nuclear Waste Materials, conducted November 11 and 12, 1980, was to critically examine and evaluate the various methods currently used to study non-radioactive, simulated, nuclear waste-form performance. Workshop participants recognized that most of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) test data for inclusion in the Nuclear Waste Materials Handbook will result from application of appropriate analytical procedures to waste-package materials or to the products of performance tests. Therefore, the analytical methods must be reliable and of known accuracy and precision, and results must be directly comparable with those from other laboratories and from other nuclear waste materials. The 41 participants representing 18 laboratories in the United States and Canada were organized into three working groups: Analysis of Liquids and Solutions, Quantitative Analysis of Solids, and Phase and Microstructure Analysis. Each group identified the analytical methods favored by their respective laboratories, discussed areas needing attention, listed standards and reference materials currently used, and recommended means of verifying interlaboratory comparability of data. The major conclusions from this workshop are presented.

  7. A Discriminant Analysis of Attitudes Related to the Nuclear Power Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girondi, Alfred J.

    1983-01-01

    This study was designed to develop a test instrument for measuring selected attitudes toward nuclear power, determine if attitudinal differences existed between selected groups of individuals, describe group differences in attitude, and classify group members as either anti- or pronuclear. Results, based on discriminant analysis, are reported and…

  8. Discussion about modeling the effects of neutron flux exposure for nuclear reactor core analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vondy, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    Methods used to calculate the effects of exposure to a neutron flux are described. The modeling of the nuclear-reactor core history presents an analysis challenge. The nuclide chain equations must be solved, and some of the methods in use for this are described. Techniques for treating reactor-core histories are discussed and evaluated.

  9. The TOMAS software system for approximate analysis of emergency situations at nuclear power stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukavin, A. P.

    2009-05-01

    The TOMAS software system for carrying out prompt analysis of different emergency situations in power units of nuclear power stations equipped with VVER-1000 and RBMK-1000 reactors is described. This software system can be used by experts of crisis centers for evaluating various situations, as well as for teaching students in higher schools specializing in the appropriate disciplines.

  10. Analysis of nuclear organization with TANGO, software for high-throughput quantitative analysis of 3D fluorescence microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Ollion, Jean; Cochennec, Julien; Loll, François; Escudé, Christophe; Boudier, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus is a highly organized cellular organelle that contains the genome. An important step to understand the relationships between genome positioning and genome functions is to extract quantitative data from three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence imaging. However, such approaches are limited by the requirement for processing and analyzing large sets of images. Here we present a practical approach using TANGO (Tools for Analysis of Nuclear Genome Organization), an image analysis tool dedicated to the study of nuclear architecture. TANGO is a generic tool able to process large sets of images, allowing quantitative study of nuclear organization. In this chapter a practical description of the software is drawn in order to give an overview of its different concepts and functionalities. This description is illustrated with a precise example that can be performed step-by-step on experimental data provided on the website http://biophysique.mnhn.fr/tango/HomePage.

  11. Ion microprobe studies of trace elements in Apollo 14 volcanic glass beads - Comparisons to Apollo 14 mare basalts and petrogenesis of picritic magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Simon, S. B.; Shimizu, N.; Yurimoto, H.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from trace element analysis, by ion microprobe techniques, of individual glass beads representing seven compositionally distinct types of picritic glass beads from the Apollo 14 landing site. The picritic glass beads at the A-14 exhibited a wide range of primary magma compositions and a lack of petrogenetic linkage (via crystal fractionation) to crystalline basalts. The wide range of major and trace element characteristics of the picritic glass beads is consistent with derivation from mineralogically distinct sources which consist of varying proportions of olivine + orthopyroxene +/- clonopyroxene +/- ilmenite +/- plagioclase +/- KREEP component.

  12. LANDSAT-4 image data quality analysis for energy related applications. [nuclear power plant sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wukelic, G. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    No useable LANDSAT 4 TM data were obtained for the Hanford site in the Columbia Plateau region, but TM simulator data for a Virginia Electric Company nuclear power plant was used to test image processing algorithms. Principal component analyses of this data set clearly indicated that thermal plumes in surface waters used for reactor cooling would be discrenible. Image processing and analysis programs were successfully testing using the 7 band Arkansas test scene and preliminary analysis of TM data for the Savanah River Plant shows that current interactive, image enhancement, analysis and integration techniques can be effectively used for LANDSAT 4 data. Thermal band data appear adequate for gross estimates of thermal changes occurring near operating nuclear facilities especially in surface water bodies being used for reactor cooling purposes. Additional image processing software was written and tested which provides for more rapid and effective analysis of the 7 band TM data.

  13. Toward the greening of nuclear energy: A content analysis of nuclear energy frames from 1991 to 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Sonya R.

    Framing theory has emerged as one of the predominant theories employed in mass communications research in the 21st century. Frames are identified as interpretive packages for content where some issue attributes are highlighted over other attributes. While framing effects studies appear plentiful, longitudinal studies assessing trends in dominant framing packages and story elements for an issue appear to be less understood. Through content analysis, this study examines dominant frame packages, story elements, headline tone, story tone, stereotypes, and source attribution for nuclear energy from 1991-2008 in the New York Times, USA Today, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. Unlike many content analysis studies, this study compares intercoder reliability among three indices---percentage agreement, proportional reduction of loss and Scott's Pi. The newspapers represented in this study possess a commonality in the types of dominant frames packages employed. Significant dominant frame packages among the four newspapers include human/health, proliferation, procedural, and marketplace. While the procedural frame package was more likely to appear prior to the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, the proliferation frame packaged was more likely to appear after the Kyoto Protol. Over time, the sustainable frame package demonstrated increased significance. This study is part of the growing literature regarding the function of frames over time.

  14. Applications of nuclear reaction analysis for determining hydrogen and deuterium distribution in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Altstetter, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ion beams for materials analysis has made a successful transition from the domain of the particle physicist to that of the materials scientist. The subcategory of this field, nuclear reaction analysis, is just now undergoing the transition, particularly in applications to hydrogen in materials. The materials scientist must locate the nearest accelerator, because now he will find that using it can solve mysteries that do not yield to other techniques. 9 figures

  15. Some studies on the use of NASTRAN for nuclear power plant structural analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlur, A. V.; Valathur, M.

    1973-01-01

    Studies made on the use of NASTRAN for nuclear power plant analysis and design are presented. These studies indicate that NASTRAN could be effectively used for static, dynamic and special purpose problems encountered in the design of such plants. Normal mode capability of NASTRAN is extended through a post-processor program to handle seismic analysis. Static and dynamic substructuring is discussed. Extension of NASTRAN to include the needs in the civil engineering industry is discussed.

  16. CONCH: A Visual Basic program for interactive processing of ion-microprobe analytical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, David R.

    2006-11-01

    A Visual Basic program for flexible, interactive processing of ion-microprobe data acquired for quantitative trace element, 26Al- 26Mg, 53Mn- 53Cr, 60Fe- 60Ni and U-Th-Pb geochronology applications is described. Default but editable run-tables enable software identification of secondary ion species analyzed and for characterization of the standard used. Counts obtained for each species may be displayed in plots against analysis time and edited interactively. Count outliers can be automatically identified via a set of editable count-rejection criteria and displayed for assessment. Standard analyses are distinguished from Unknowns by matching of the analysis label with a string specified in the Set-up dialog, and processed separately. A generalized routine writes background-corrected count rates, ratios and uncertainties, plus weighted means and uncertainties for Standards and Unknowns, to a spreadsheet that may be saved as a text-delimited file. Specialized routines process trace-element concentration, 26Al- 26Mg, 53Mn- 53Cr, 60Fe- 60Ni, and Th-U disequilibrium analysis types, and U-Th-Pb isotopic data obtained for zircon, titanite, perovskite, monazite, xenotime and baddeleyite. Correction to measured Pb-isotopic, Pb/U and Pb/Th ratios for the presence of common Pb may be made using measured 204Pb counts, or the 207Pb or 208Pb counts following subtraction from these of the radiogenic component. Common-Pb corrections may be made automatically, using a (user-specified) common-Pb isotopic composition appropriate for that on the sample surface, or for that incorporated within the mineral at the time of its crystallization, depending on whether the 204Pb count rate determined for the Unknown is substantially higher than the average 204Pb count rate for all session standards. Pb/U inter-element fractionation corrections are determined using an interactive log e-log e plot of common-Pb corrected 206Pb/ 238U ratios against any nominated fractionation-sensitive species pair

  17. Collaborative human-machine nuclear non-proliferation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, F.L.; Badalamente, R.V.; Stewart, T.S.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of a project investigating support concepts for the information treatment needs of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, also referred to as the Agency) and its attempts to strengthen international safeguards. The aim of the research was to define user/computer interface concepts and intelligent support features that will enhance the analyst`s access to voluminous and diverse information, the ability to recognize and evaluate uncertain data, and the capability to make decisions and recommendations. The objective was to explore techniques for enhancing safeguards analysis through application of (1) more effective user-computer interface designs and (2) advanced concepts involving human/system collaboration. The approach was to identify opportunities for human/system collaboration that would capitalize on human strengths and still accommodate human limitations. This paper documents the findings and describes a concept prototype, Proliferation Analysis Support System (PASS), developed for demonstration purposes. The research complements current and future efforts to enhance the information systems used by the IAEA, but has application elsewhere, as well.

  18. Nuclear methods of analysis in the advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, L.; Dyer, F.F.

    1994-12-31

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) research reactor is presently in the conceptual design phase. The thermal power of this heavy water cooled and moderated reactor will be about 350 megawatts. The core volume of 27 liter is designed to provide the optimum neutron fluence rate for the numerous experimental facilities. The peak thermal neutron fluence rate is expected to be slightly less than 10{sup 20} neutrons/m{sup 2}s. In addition to the more than 40 neutron scattering stations, there will be extensive facilities for isotope production, material irradiation and analytical chemistry including neutron activation analysis (NAA) and a slow positron source. The highlight of this reactor will be the capability that it will provide for conducting research using cold neutrons. Two cryostats containing helium-cooled liquid deuterium will be located in the heavy water reflector tank. Each cryostat will provide low-temperature neutrons to researchers via numerous guides. A hot source with two beam tubes and several thermal beam tubes will also be available. The NAA facilities in the ANS will consist of seven pneumatic tubes, one cold neutron guide for prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), and one cold neutron slanted guide for neutron depth profiling (NDP). In addition to these neutron interrogation systems, a gamma-ray irradiation facility for materials testing will be housed in a spent fuel storage pool. This paper will provide detailed information regarding the design and use of these various experimental systems.

  19. Mutational analysis of Mdm1p function in nuclear and mitochondrial inheritance.

    PubMed

    Fisk, H A; Yaffe, M P

    1997-08-11

    Nuclear and mitochondrial transmission to daughter buds of Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on Mdm1p, an intermediate filament-like protein localized to numerous punctate structures distributed throughout the yeast cell cytoplasm. These structures disappear and organelle inheritance is disrupted when mdm1 mutant cells are incubated at the restrictive temperature. To characterize further the function of Mdm1p, new mutant mdm1 alleles that confer temperature-sensitive growth and defects in organelle inheritance but produce stable Mdm1p structures were isolated. Microscopic analysis of the new mdm1 mutants revealed three phenotypic classes: Class I mutants showed defects in both mitochondrial and nuclear transmission; Class II alleles displayed defective mitochondrial inheritance but had no effect on nuclear movement; and Class III mutants showed aberrant nuclear inheritance but normal mitochondrial distribution. Class I and II mutants also exhibited altered mitochondrial morphology, possessing primarily small, round mitochondria instead of the extended tubular structures found in wild-type cells. Mutant mdm1 alleles affecting nuclear transmission were of two types: Class Ia and IIIa mutants were deficient for nuclear movement into daughter buds, while Class Ib and IIIb mutants displayed a complete transfer of all nuclear DNA into buds. The mutations defining all three allelic classes mapped to two distinct domains within the Mdm1p protein. Genetic crosses of yeast strains containing different mdm1 alleles revealed complex genetic interactions including intragenic suppression, synthetic phenotypes, and intragenic complementation. These results support a model of Mdm1p function in which a network comprised of multimeric assemblies of the protein mediates two distinct cellular processes.

  20. Towards understanding nuclear pore complex architecture and dynamics in the age of integrative structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Ed; Beck, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Determining the functional architecture of the nuclear pore complex, that remains only partially understood, requires bridging across different length scales. Recent technological advances in quantitative and cross-linking mass spectrometry, super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy have enormously accelerated the integration of different types of data into coherent structural models. Moreover, high-resolution structural analysis of nucleoporins and their in vitro reconstitution into complexes is now facilitated by the use of thermostable orthologs. In this review we highlight how the application of such technologies has led to novel insights into nuclear pore architecture and to a paradigm shift. Today nuclear pores are not anymore seen as static facilitators of nucleocytoplasmic transport but ensembles of multiple overlaying functional states that are involved in various cellular processes.

  1. Neutronics analysis for an accelerator-based nuclear waste transmuter

    SciTech Connect

    Sailor, W.C.; Beard, C.A.

    1993-07-01

    The neutronic analysis for a target/blanket design that is capable of supporting the high level waste stream from 2.5 LWR`s is described. The target consists of a set of solid tungsten and lead plates, cooled by heavy water and surrounded by a lead annulus. The annular blanket, which surrounds the target, consists of a set of AcO{sub 2} slurry bearing tubes, each 3 meters long, surrounded by heavy water moderator. Heat removal from the slurry tubes is by passing the rapidly moving slurry through an external heat exchanger. There are separate regions for long-lived fission product burning. Using the Monte Carlo codes LAHET and MCNP we have optimized the design for a minimum beam current of 62.5 mA of 1.6 GeV protons.

  2. MCO Pressurization analysis of spent nuclear fuel transporation and storage

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, D.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-20

    A series of analysis were performed to evaluate the pressurization of the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) during the stages of transport, processing and storage for expected operational and off normal events. The study examined both MCO sealing and venting issues. Computer models were developed for the MCO and its transport and storage environments using the GOTH and COBRA-TF computer codes. These thermal- hydraulic models included chemical corrosion and ranged in complexity from simple scoping models to full three-dimensional models. Results of the evaluation indicate that overpressurization of the MCO can occur within hours given the bounding reaction surface area and 3.0 Kg of residual water during shipping or 2.5 Kg of residual water during storage. Overpressurization can be prevented during shipping if the MCO reaction surface area is shown to be less than 80,000 cm{sup 2}. During storage the overpressurization can be prevented by limiting the available water.

  3. An analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs: A 1995 update

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-21

    Over the years real (inflation-adjusted) O&M cost have begun to level off. The objective of this report is to determine whether the industry and NRC initiatives to control costs have resulted in this moderation in the growth of O&M costs. Because the industry agrees that the control of O&M costs is crucial to the viability of the technology, an examination of the factors causing the moderation in costs is important. A related issue deals with projecting nuclear operating costs into the future. Because of the escalation in nuclear operating costs (and the fall in fossil fuel prices) many State and Federal regulatory commissions are examining the economics of the continued operation of nuclear power plants under their jurisdiction. The economics of the continued operation of a nuclear power plant is typically examined by comparing the cost of the plants continued operation with the cost of obtaining the power from other sources. This assessment requires plant-specific projections of nuclear operating costs. Analysts preparing these projections look at past industry-wide cost trends and consider whether these trends are likely to continue. To determine whether these changes in trends will continue into the future, information about the causal factors influencing costs and the future trends in these factors are needed. An analysis of the factors explaining the moderation in cost growth will also yield important insights into the question of whether these trends will continue.

  4. Common cause failure analysis of the rodded scram system of the Arkansas Nuclear One-Unit 1 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Montague, D.F.; Campbell, D.J.; Flanagan, G.F.

    1986-10-01

    This study demonstrates the use of a formal method for common cause failure analysis in a reliability analysis of the Arkansas Nuclear One - Unit 1 rodded scram system. The scram system failure of interest is loss of capability of the system to shut the reactor down when required. The results of this analysis support the ATWS program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The methods used in this analysis support the NRC's Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP).

  5. Automatic system for single ion/single cell irradiation based on Cracow microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselov, O.; Polak, W.; Lekki, J.; Stachura, Z.; Lebed, K.; Styczeń, J.; Ugenskiene, R.

    2006-05-01

    Recently, the Cracow ion microprobe has found its new application as a single ion hit facility (SIHF), allowing precise irradiations of living cells by a controlled number of ions. The instrument enables a broad field of research, such as survival studies, adaptive response investigations, bystander effect, inverse dose-rate effect, low-dose hypersensitivity, etc. This work presents principles of construction and operation of the SIHF based on the Cracow microprobe. We discuss some crucial features of optical, positioning, and blanking systems, including self-developed software responsible for semiautomatic cell recognition, for precise positioning of cells, and for controlling the irradiation process. We also show some tests carried out to determine the efficiency of the whole system and of its segments. In addition, we present results of the first irradiation measurements performed with living cells.

  6. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume V. Economics and systems analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This NASAP assessment considers the economics of alternative nuclear reactor and fuel-cycle systems in the light of possible patterns of uranium supply and energy demand, as well as the economic implications of improvng the proliferation resistance of the various systems. The assessment focuses on the costs of alternative nuclear technologies and the possible timing of their implementation, based on their economic attractiveness.

  7. Analysis of Nuclear RNA Interference (RNAi) in Human Cells by Subcellular Fractionation and Argonaute Loading

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Keith T.; Li, Liande; Janowski, Bethany A.; Corey, David R.

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is well known for its ability to regulate gene expression in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. In mammalian cell nuclei, however, the impact of RNAi has remained more controversial. A key technical hurdle has been a lack of optimized protocols for the isolation and analysis of cell nuclei. Here we describe a simplified protocol for nuclei isolation from cultured cells that incorporates a method for obtaining nucleoplasmic and chromatin fractions and removing cytoplasmic contamination. Cell fractions can then be used to detect the presence and activity of RNAi factors in the nucleus. We present a protocol for investigating an early step in RNAi, Argonaute protein loading with small RNAs, which is enabled by our improved extract preparations. These protocols facilitate characterization of nuclear RNAi and can be applied to the analysis of other nuclear proteins and pathways. From cellular fractionation to analysis of Argonaute loading results, this protocol takes 4–6 d to complete. PMID:25079428

  8. Exploration of High-Dimensional Scalar Function for Nuclear Reactor Safety Analysis and Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Valerio Pascucci; Peer-Timo Bremer; Michael Pernice; Robert Nourgaliev

    2013-05-01

    The next generation of methodologies for nuclear reactor Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) explicitly accounts for the time element in modeling the probabilistic system evolution and uses numerical simulation tools to account for possible dependencies between failure events. The Monte-Carlo (MC) and the Dynamic Event Tree (DET) approaches belong to this new class of dynamic PRA methodologies. A challenge of dynamic PRA algorithms is the large amount of data they produce which may be difficult to visualize and analyze in order to extract useful information. We present a software tool that is designed to address these goals. We model a large-scale nuclear simulation dataset as a high-dimensional scalar function defined over a discrete sample of the domain. First, we provide structural analysis of such a function at multiple scales and provide insight into the relationship between the input parameters and the output. Second, we enable exploratory analysis for users, where we help the users to differentiate features from noise through multi-scale analysis on an interactive platform, based on domain knowledge and data characterization. Our analysis is performed by exploiting the topological and geometric properties of the domain, building statistical models based on its topological segmentations and providing interactive visual interfaces to facilitate such explorations. We provide a user’s guide to our software tool by highlighting its analysis and visualization capabilities, along with a use case involving dataset from a nuclear reactor safety simulation.

  9. Ion beam induced charge characterisation of a silicon microdosimeter using a heavy ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Iwan; Siegele, Rainer; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Cohen, David D.

    2002-05-01

    An ion beam induced charge (IBIC) facility has been added to the existing capabilities of the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe and the results of the first measurements are presented. Silicon on insulator (SOI) diode arrays with microscopic junction sizes have recently been proposed as microdosimeters for hadron therapy. A 20 MeV carbon beam was used to perform IBIC imaging of a 10 μm thick SOI device.

  10. DSMC Simulations of Blunt Body Flows for Mars Entries: Mars Pathfinder and Mars Microprobe Capsules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; Price, Joseph M.

    1997-01-01

    The hypersonic transitional flow aerodynamics of the Mars Pathfinder and Mars Microprobe capsules are simulated with the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Calculations of axial, normal, and static pitching coefficients were obtained over an angle of attack range comparable to actual flight requirements. Comparisons are made with modified Newtonian and free-molecular-flow calculations. Aerothermal results were also obtained for zero incidence entry conditions.

  11. Quantum-well-laser mirror degradation investigated by microprobe optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvasce, C.; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Lugara, M.; Adduci, F.; Ferrara, Michele; Sibilano, Michele; Pellegrino, Sergio; del Giudice, Massimo; Re, M. G.

    1995-11-01

    A study of facet degradation of InGaAs quantum well lasers is reported. We tune up a Raman and photoluminescence micro-probe technique for determining the crystal structure and the temperature profile of the cladding layer, in steps of approximately 1 micrometer, with a temperature resolution better than 1 degree Kelvin. The cladding layer composition and cross- section temperature profile have been monitored during operation. A clear correlation between the facet degradation and the type of protective coating is found.

  12. Trace Element Zoning and Incipient Metamictization in a Lunar Zircon: Application of Three Microprobe Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wopenka, Brigitte; Jollife, Bradley L.; Zinner, Ernst; Kremser, Daniel T.

    1996-01-01

    We have determined major (Si, Zr, Hf), minor (Al, Y, Fe, P), and trace element (Ca, Sc, Ti, Ba, REE, Th, U) concentrations and Raman spectra of a zoned, 200 microns zircon grain in lunar sample 14161,7069, a quartz monzodiorite breccia collected at the Apollo 14 site. Analyses were obtained on a thin section in situ with an ion microprobe, an electron microprobe, and a laser Raman microprobe. The zircon grain is optically zoned in birefringence, a reflection of variable (incomplete) metamictization resulting from zo- nation in U and Th concentrations. Variations in the concentrations of U and Th correlate strongly with those of other high-field-strength trace elements and with changes in Raman spectral parameters. Concentrations of U and Th range from 21 to 55 ppm and 6 to 31 ppm, respectively, and correlate with lower Raman peak intensities, wider Raman peaks, and shifted Si-O peak positions. Concentrations of heavy rare earth elements range over a factor of three to four and correlate with intensities of fluorescence peaks. Correlated variations in trace element concentrations reflect the original magmatic differentiation of the parental melt approx. 4 b.y. ago. Degradation of the zircon structure, as reflected by the observed Raman spectral parameters, has occurred in this sample over a range of alpha-decay event dose from approx. 5.2 x 10(exp 14) to 1.4 x 10(exp 15) decay events per milligram of zircon, as calculated from the U and Th concentrations. This dose is well below the approx. 10(exp 16) events per milligram cumulative dose that causes complete metamictization and indicates that laser Raman microprobe spectroscopy is an analytical technique that is very sensitive to the radiation-induced damage in zircon.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of cichlid fishes using nuclear DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Sültmann, H; Mayer, W E; Figueroa, F; Tichy, H; Klein, J

    1995-11-01

    The recent explosive adaptive radiation of cichlids in the great lakes of Africa has attracted the attention of both morphologists and molecular biologists. To decipher the phylogenetic relationships among the various taxa within the family Cichlidae is a prerequisite for answering some fundamental questions about the nature of the speciation process. In the present study, we used the random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique to obtain sequence differences between selected cichlid species. We then designed specific primers based on these sequences and used them to amplify template DNA from a large number of species by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We sequenced the amplified products and searched the sequences for indels and shared substitutions. We identified a number of such characters at three loci--DXTU1, DXTU2, and DXTU3--and used them for phylogenetic and cladistic analysis of the relationships among the various cichlid groups. Our studies assign an outgroup position to Neotropical cichlids in relation to African cichlids, provide evidence for a sister-group relationship of tilapiines to the haplochromines, group Cyphotilapia frontosa with the lamprologines of Lake Tanganyika, place Astatoreochromis alluaudi to an outgroup position with respect to other haplochromines of Lakes Victoria and Malawi, and provide additional support for the monophyly of the remaining Lake Victoria haplochromines and the Lake Malawi haplochromines. The described approach holds great promise for further resolution of cichlid phylogeny.

  14. An analysis of three nuclear events in P-Tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Fourney, W.L.; Dick, R.D.; Taylor, S.R.; Weaver, T.A.

    1994-05-03

    This report examines experimental results obtained from three P Tunnel events -- Mission Cyber, Disko Elm, and Distant Zenith. The objective of the study was to determine if there were any differences in the explosive source coupling for the three events. It was felt that Mission Cyber might not have coupled well because the ground motions recorded for that event were much lower than expected based on experience from N Tunnel. Detailed examination of the physical and chemical properties of the tuff in the vicinity of each explosion indicated only minor differences. In general, the core samples are strong and competent out to at least 60 m from each working point. Qualitative measures of core sample strength indicate that the strength of the tuff near Mission Cyber may be greater than indicated by results of static testing. Slight differences in mineralogic content and saturation of the Mission Cyber tuff were noted relative to the other two tests, but probably would not result in large differences in ground motions. Examination of scaled free-field stress and acceleration records collected by Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) indicated that Disko Elm showed the least scatter and Distant Zenith the most scatter. Mission Cyber measurements tend to lie slightly below those of Distant Zenith, but still within two standard deviations. Analysis of regional seismic data from networks operated by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and SNL also show no evidence of Mission Cyber coupling low relative to the other two events. The overall conclusion drawn from the study is that there were no basic differences in the way that the explosions coupled to the rock.

  15. Anti-nuclear weapons activism in the United States and Great Britain: a comparative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, G.

    1987-01-01

    This study is a response to the lacuna in empirical research into political activism and the nuclear issue and seeks to ascertain the social and value characteristics, political attitudes, and political behavior of activists in the United States and Great Britain. Consideration is also given to gender differences in light of evidence of an emerging gender gap in these two countries. The study investigates the common forces cited in two sets of literature - post-industrialism and anti-nuclear weapons movements - which provide a framework for analysis. Survey research data is employed to assess cross-national similarities and differences. The findings obtained indicate that while American and British activists exhibit common social and value characteristics, British activists appear more integrated in their political opposition to nuclear weapons compared with their American counterparts. Survey results indicate that the political-action repertoire of these activists is quite diverse, suggesting a new style of politics in advanced industrial democracies. Gender-based analysis reveals two important findings. First, activist American men differ significantly from the other three social groups in their attitudes towards nuclear weapons. Second, activist women in both national settings participate at a level equal to or exceeding that of activist men.

  16. Monte Carlo analysis of thermochromatography as a fast separation method for nuclear forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Howard L

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear forensic science has become increasingly important for global nuclear security, and enhancing the timeliness of forensic analysis has been established as an important objective in the field. New, faster techniques must be developed to meet this objective. Current approaches for the analysis of minor actinides, fission products, and fuel-specific materials require time-consuming chemical separation coupled with measurement through either nuclear counting or mass spectrometry. These very sensitive measurement techniques can be hindered by impurities or incomplete separation in even the most painstaking chemical separations. High-temperature gas-phase separation or thermochromatography has been used in the past for the rapid separations in the study of newly created elements and as a basis for chemical classification of that element. This work examines the potential for rapid separation of gaseous species to be applied in nuclear forensic investigations. Monte Carlo modeling has been used to evaluate the potential utility of the thermochromatographic separation method, albeit this assessment is necessarily limited due to the lack of available experimental data for validation.

  17. Thermal hydraulic design analysis of ternary carbide fueled square-lattice honeycomb nuclear rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Eric M.; Anghaie, Samim

    1999-01-22

    A computational analysis is conducted to determine the optimum thermal-hydraulic design parameters for a square-lattice honeycomb nuclear rocket engine core that will incorporate ternary carbide based uranium fuels. Recent studies at the Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute (INSPI) have demonstrated the feasibility of processing solid solution, ternary carbide fuels such as (U, Zr, Nb)C, (U, Zr, Ta)C, (U, Zr, Hf)C and (U, Zr, W)C. The square-lattice honeycomb design provides high strength and is amenable to the processing complexities of these ultrahigh temperature fuels. A parametric analysis is conducted to examine how core geometry, fuel thickness and the propellant flow area effect the thermal performance of the nuclear rocket engine. The principal variables include core size (length and diameter) and fuel element dimensions. The optimum core configuration requires a balance between high specific impulse and thrust level performance, and maintaining the temperature and strength limits of the fuel. A nuclear rocket engine simulation code is developed and used to examine the system performance as well as the performance of the main reactor core components. The system simulation code was originally developed for analysis of NERVA-Derivative and Pratt and Whitney XNR-2000 nuclear thermal rockets. The code is modified and adopted to the square-lattice geometry of the new fuel design. Thrust levels ranging from 44,500 to 222,400 N (10,000 to 50,000 lbf) are considered. The average hydrogen exit temperature is kept at 2800 K, which is well below the melting point of these fuels. For a nozzle area ratio of 300 and a thrust chamber pressure of 4.8 Mpa (700 psi), the specific impulse is 930 s. Hydrogen temperature and pressure distributions in the core and the fuel maximum temperatures are calculated.

  18. Microstructural characterization of nuclear-waste ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F.J.; Clarke, D.R.

    1982-09-22

    Characterization of nuclear waste ceramics requires techniques possessing high spatial and x-ray resolution. XRD, SEM, electron microprobe, TEM and analytical EM techniques are applied to ceramic formulations designed to immobilize both commercial and defense-related reactor wastes. These materials are used to address the strengths and limitations of the techniques above. An iterative approach combining all these techniques is suggested. 16 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Dual fiber microprobe for mapping elemental distributions in biological cells

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Rodger C [Powell, TN; Martin, Madhavi Z [Powell, TN

    2007-07-31

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is applied on a microscale for in situ elemental analysis and spatial mapping in biological cells. A high power laser beam is focused onto a cell surface using a dual branching optical fiber probe for optical excitation of the cell constituents. Dual spectrometers and ICCD detectors capture the emission spectra from the excited cell(s). Repeated probing or repositioning of the laser beam with respect to the cell can provide 2-D or 3-D mapping of the cell.

  20. Applications of laser produced ion beams to nuclear analysis of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mima, K.; Azuma, H.; Fujita, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Okuda, C.; Ukyo, Y.; Kato, Y.; Arrabal, R. Gonzalez; Soldo, F.; Perlado, J. M.; Nishimura, H.; Nakai, S.

    2012-07-01

    Laser produced ion beams have unique characteristics which are ultra-short pulse, very low emittance, and variety of nuclear species. These characteristics could be used for analyzing various materials like low Z ion doped heavy metals or ceramics. Energies of laser produced ion beam extend from 0.1MeV to 100MeV. Therefore, various nuclear processes can be induced in the interactions of ion beams with samples. The ion beam driven nuclear analysis has been developed for many years by using various electrostatic accelerators. To explore the applicability of laser ion beam to the analysis of the Li ion battery, a proton beam with the diameter of ˜ 1.0 μm at Takasaki Ion Acceleration for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA), JAEA was used. For the analysis, the PIGE (Particle-Induced Gamma Ray Emission) is used. The proton beam scans over Li battery electrode samples to diagnose Li density in the LiNi0.85Co0.15O2 anode. As the results, PIGE images for Li area density distributions are obtained with the spatial resolution of better than 1.5μm FWHM. By the Li PIGE images, the depth dependence of de-intercalation levels of Li in the anode is obtained. By the POP experiments at TIARA, it is clarified that laser produced ion beam is appropriate for the Li ion battery analysis. 41.85.Lc, 41.75.Jv, 42.62.cf.

  1. Modal seismic analysis of a nuclear power plant control panel and comparison with SAP 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamidi, M. R.; Pamidi, P. R.

    1976-01-01

    The application of NASTRAN to seismic analysis by considering the example of a nuclear power plant control panel was considered. A modal analysis of a three-dimensional model of the panel, consisting of beam and quadri-lateral membrane elements, is performed. Using the results of this analysis and a typical response spectrum of an earthquake, the seismic response of the structure is obtained. ALTERs required to the program in order to compute the maximum modal responses as well as the resultant response are given. The results are compared with those obtained by using the SAP IV computer program.

  2. X-ray Mapping of Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Materials Using the Electron Microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, P.

    2006-01-01

    Lunar samples returned from the Apollo program motivated development of the Bence-Albee algorithm for the rapid and accurate analysis of lunar materials, and established interlaboratory comparability through its common use. In the analysis of mineral and rock fragments it became necessary to combine micro- and macroscopic analysis by coupling electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) with automated stage point counting. A coarse grid that included several thousand points was used, and initially wavelength-dispersive (WDS) and later energydispersive (EDS) data were acquired at discrete stage points using approx. 5 sec count times. A approx 50 micrometer beam diameter was used for WDS and up to 500 micrometer beam diameter for EDS analysis. Average analyses of discretely sampled phases were coupled with the point count data to calculate the bulk composition using matrix algebra. Use of a defocused beam resulted in a contribution from multiple phases to each analytical point, and the analytical data were deconvolved relative to end-member phase chemistry on the fly. Impressive agreement was obtained between WDS and EDS measurements as well as comparison with bulk chemistry obtained by other methods. In the 30 years since these methods were developed, significant improvements in EPMA automation and computer processing have taken place. Digital beam control allows routine collection of x-ray maps by EDS, and stage mapping for WDS is conducted continuously at slew speed and incrementally by sampling at discrete points. Digital pulse processing in EDS systems has significantly increased the throughput for EDS mapping, and the ongoing development of Si-drift detector systems promises mapping capabilities rivaling WDS systems. Spectrum imaging allows a data cube of EDS spectra to be acquired and sophisticated processing of the original data is possible using matrix algebra techniques. The study of lunar and meteoritic materials includes the need to conveniently: (1) Characterize

  3. Electron-microprobe study of chromitites associated with alpine ultramafic complexes and some genetic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bird, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    Electron-microprobe and petrographic studies of alpine chromite deposits from around the world demonstrate that they are bimodal with respect to the chromic oxide content of their chromite. The two modes occur at 54 ? 4 and 37 ? 3 weight per cent chromic oxide corresponding to chromite designated as high-chromium and high-aluminum chromite respectively. The high-chromium chromite occurs exclusively with highly magnesian olivine (Fo92-97) and some interstitial diopside. The high-aluminum chromite is associated with more ferrous olivine (Fo88-92), diopside, enstatite, and feldspar. The plot of the mole ratios Cr/(Cr+Al+Fe3+) vs. Mg/(Mg+Fe2+) usually presented for alpine chromite is shown to have a high-chromium, high-iron to low-chromium, low-iron trend contrary to that shown by stratiform chromite. This trend is characteristic of alpine type chromite and is termed the alpine trend. However, a trend similar to that for startiform chromite is discernable on the graph for the high-chromium chromite data. This latter trend is well-developed at Red Mountain, Seldovia, Alaska. Analysis of the iron-magnesium distribution coefficient, Kd=(Fe/Mg)ol/(Fe/Mg)ch, between olivine and chromite shows that Kd for the high-chromium chromite from all ultramafic complexes has essentially the same constant value of .05 while the distribution coefficient for the high-aluminum chromite varies with composition of the chromite. These distribution coefficients are also characteristic of alpine-type chromites. The constant value for Kd for the high-chromium chromite and associated high-magnesium olivine in all alpine complexes suggests that they all crystallized under similar physico-chemical conditions. The two types of massive chromite and their associations of silicate minerals suggest the possibility of two populations with different origins. Recrystallization textures associated with the high-aluminum chromite together with field relationships between the gabbro and the chromite pods

  4. Integrated Laser Microprobe (U-Th)/He and U/Pb Dating of Titanite and Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, A.; Van Soest, M. C.; Hodges, K. V.; Tripathy-Lang, A.

    2014-12-01

    The application of laser technologies for high spatial resolution dating has proven to be an important advancement in (U-Th)/He thermochronology. Excimer laser microprobes have been used to successfully date high U+Th minerals and are an especially promising way to determine the distribution of (U-Th)/He zircon ages in detrital sedimentary samples. We have also found that another detrital mineral, titanite, may be amenable to this method as well. While titanite contains lower concentrations of parent isotopes than zircon, and consequently less radiogenic 4He, its typically larger grain size allows for these characteristics to be mitigated by the use of larger laser beam diameters during the ablation process. With the integrated use of ICPMS, an established method for U/Pb geochronology, this phase of the laser microprobe (U-Th)/He technique can be modified slightly to enable (U-Th)/He and U/Pb 'double' dating of detrital samples. Here we present a proof of concept study demonstrating the viability of integrated laser microprobe (U-Th)/He and U/Pb through dating Oligocene Fish Canyon tuff titanite and zircon from Colorado. Our use of a well characterized sample with established (U-Th)/He and U/Pb dates allows us to fully evaluate the utility of this technique. By selecting medium- to fine-grained crystals we are able to simulate a realistic, uni-modal detrital sample. Using our modified laser microprobe approach, we are able to reproduce the expected age modes with an analytical imprecision roughly twice that of more established methods, a difference that has little practical effect on geologic interpretations. Additionally, we believe that the technique could prove a viable method for double dating detrital rutile and apatite, so long as characteristically lower U+Th concentrations in these minerals are balanced by appropriately scaled ablation pits in an aliquot unbiased by the need for larger detrital grains. Ultimately, integrated laser microprobe U/Pb and (U

  5. Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-06-06

    Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

  6. Phenotype Clustering of Breast Epithelial Cells in Confocal Imagesbased on Nuclear Protein Distribution Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Fuhui; Peng, Hanchuan; Sudar, Damir; Levievre, Sophie A.; Knowles, David W.

    2006-09-05

    Background: The distribution of the chromatin-associatedproteins plays a key role in directing nuclear function. Previously, wedeveloped an image-based method to quantify the nuclear distributions ofproteins and showed that these distributions depended on the phenotype ofhuman mammary epithelial cells. Here we describe a method that creates ahierarchical tree of the given cell phenotypes and calculates thestatistical significance between them, based on the clustering analysisof nuclear protein distributions. Results: Nuclear distributions ofnuclear mitotic apparatus protein were previously obtained fornon-neoplastic S1 and malignant T4-2 human mammary epithelial cellscultured for up to 12 days. Cell phenotype was defined as S1 or T4-2 andthe number of days in cultured. A probabilistic ensemble approach wasused to define a set of consensus clusters from the results of multipletraditional cluster analysis techniques applied to the nucleardistribution data. Cluster histograms were constructed to show how cellsin any one phenotype were distributed across the consensus clusters.Grouping various phenotypes allowed us to build phenotype trees andcalculate the statistical difference between each group. The resultsshowed that non-neoplastic S1 cells could be distinguished from malignantT4-2 cells with 94.19 percent accuracy; that proliferating S1 cells couldbe distinguished from differentiated S1 cells with 92.86 percentaccuracy; and showed no significant difference between the variousphenotypes of T4-2 cells corresponding to increasing tumor sizes.Conclusion: This work presents a cluster analysis method that canidentify significant cell phenotypes, based on the nuclear distributionof specific proteins, with high accuracy.

  7. Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-06-01

    Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

  8. The approach to risk analysis in three industries - Nuclear power, space systems, and chemical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick, B. J.

    A review is presented of how safety and risk analysis is conducted in the three major industries of space flight, nuclear power, and chemical and petroleum processes. This review is presented in the belief that safety enhancements and efficiencies may result from a greater exchange of risk assessment technology between these industries. The focus of this review relates to the engineered systems involved in the three industries.

  9. Activation analysis study on Li-ion batteries for nuclear forensic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Erik B.; Whitney, Chad; Holbert, Keith E.; Zhang, Taipeng; Stannard, Tyler; Christie, Anthony; Harper, Peter; Anderson, Blake; Christian, James F.

    2015-06-01

    The nuclear materials environment has been increasing significantly in complexity over the past couple of decades. The prevention of attacks from nuclear weapons is becoming more difficult, and nuclear forensics is a deterrent by providing detailed information on any type of nuclear event for proper attribution. One component of the nuclear forensic analysis is a measurement of the neutron spectrum. As an example, the neutron component provides information on the composition of the weapons, whether boosting is involved or the mechanisms used in creating a supercritical state. As 6Li has a large cross-section for thermal neutrons, the lithium battery is a primary candidate for assessing the neutron spectrum after detonation. The absorption process for 6Li yields tritium, which can be measured at a later point after the nuclear event, as long as the battery can be processed in a manner to successfully extract the tritium content. In addition, measuring the activated constituents after exposure provides a means to reconstruct the incident neutron spectrum. The battery consists of a spiral or folded layers of material that have unique, energy dependent interactions associated with the incident neutron flux. A detailed analysis on the batteries included a pre-irradiated mass spectrometry analysis to be used as input for neutron spectrum reconstruction. A set of batteries were exposed to a hard neutron spectrum delivered by the University of Massachusetts, Lowell research reactor Fast Neutron Irradiator (FNI). The gamma spectra were measured from the batteries within a few days and within a week after the exposure to obtain sufficient data on the activated materials in the batteries. The activity was calculated for a number of select isotopes, indicating the number of associated neutron interactions. The results from tritium extraction are marginal. A measurable increase in detected particles (gammas and betas) below 50 keV not self-attenuated by the battery was observed

  10. Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in an Underground Geologic Repository--Volume 2: Methodology and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.L.; Wilson, J.R.; Sanchez, L.C.; Aguilar, R.; Trellue, H.R.; Cochrane, K.; Rath, J.S.

    1998-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE/EM's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), through a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is conducting a systematic Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) of the disposal of SNFs in an underground geologic repository sited in unsaturated tuff. This analysis is intended to provide interim guidance to the DOE for the management of the SNF while they prepare for final compliance evaluation. This report presents results from a Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) that examined the potential consequences and risks of criticality during the long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel owned by DOE-EM. This analysis investigated the potential of post-closure criticality, the consequences of a criticality excursion, and the probability frequency for post-closure criticality. The results of the NDCA are intended to provide the DOE-EM with a technical basis for measuring risk which can be used for screening arguments to eliminate post-closure criticality FEPs (features, events and processes) from consideration in the compliance assessment because of either low probability or low consequences. This report is composed of an executive summary (Volume 1), the methodology and results of the NDCA (Volume 2), and the applicable appendices (Volume 3).

  11. Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in an Underground Geologic Repository--Volume 1: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.L.; Wilson, J.R.; Sanchez, L.Z.; Aguilar, R.; Trellue, H.R.; Cochrane, K.; Rath, J.S.

    1998-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE/EM's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), through a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is conducting a systematic Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) of the disposal of SNFs in an underground geologic repository sited in unsaturated tuff. This analysis is intended to provide interim guidance to the DOE for the management of the SNF while they prepare for final compliance evaluation. This report presents results from a Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) that examined the potential consequences and risks of criticality during the long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel owned by DOE-EM. This analysis investigated the potential of post-closure criticality, the consequences of a criticality excursion, and the probability frequency for post-closure criticality. The results of the NDCA are intended to provide the DOE-EM with a technical basis for measuring risk which can be used for screening arguments to eliminate post-closure criticality FEPs (features, events and processes) from consideration in the compliance assessment because of either low probability or low consequences. This report is composed of an executive summary (Volume 1), the methodology and results of the NDCA (Volume 2), and the applicable appendices (Volume 3).

  12. Assessing State Nuclear Weapons Proliferation: Using Bayesian Network Analysis of Social Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Olson, Jarrod; Whitney, Paul D.

    2010-04-16

    A Bayesian network (BN) model of social factors can support proliferation assessments by estimating the likelihood that a state will pursue a nuclear weapon. Social factors including political, economic, nuclear capability, security, and national identity and psychology factors may play as important a role in whether a State pursues nuclear weapons as more physical factors. This paper will show how using Bayesian reasoning on a generic case of a would-be proliferator State can be used to combine evidence that supports proliferation assessment. Theories and analysis by political scientists can be leveraged in a quantitative and transparent way to indicate proliferation risk. BN models facilitate diagnosis and inference in a probabilistic environment by using a network of nodes and acyclic directed arcs between the nodes whose connections, or absence of, indicate probabilistic relevance, or independence. We propose a BN model that would use information from both traditional safeguards and the strengthened safeguards associated with the Additional Protocol to indicate countries with a high risk of proliferating nuclear weapons. This model could be used in a variety of applications such a prioritization tool and as a component of state safeguards evaluations. This paper will discuss the benefits of BN reasoning, the development of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) BN state proliferation model and how it could be employed as an analytical tool.

  13. SUS in nuclear medicine in Brazil: analysis and comparison of data provided by Datasus and CNEN*

    PubMed Central

    Pozzo, Lorena; Coura Filho, George; Osso Júnior, João Alberto; Squair, Peterson Lima

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the outpatient access to nuclear medicine procedures by means of the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS), analyzing the correspondence between data provided by this system and those from Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN) (National Commission of Nuclear Energy). Materials and Methods Data provided by Datasus regarding number of scintillation chambers, outpatient procedures performed from 2008 to 2012, administrative responsibility for such procedures, type of service providers and outsourced services were retrieved and evaluated. Also, such data were compared with those from institutions certified by CNEN. Results The present study demonstrated that the system still lacks maturity in terms of correct data input, particularly regarding equipment available. It was possible to list the most common procedures and check the growth of the specialty along the study period. Private centers are responsible for most of the procedures covered and reimbursed by SUS. However, many healthcare facilities are not certified by CNEN. Conclusion Datasus provides relevant data for analysis as done in the present study, although some issues still require attention. The present study has quantitatively depicted the Brazilian reality regarding access to nuclear medicine procedures offered by/for SUS. PMID:25741070

  14. Developing a Validation Methodology for Expert-Informed Bayesian Network Models Supporting Nuclear Nonproliferation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Whitney, Paul D.

    2014-05-13

    Under the auspices of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Signature Discovery Initiative (SDI), the research team developed a series of Bayesian Network models to assess multi-source signatures of nuclear programs. A Bayesian network is a mathematical model that can be used to marshal evidence to assess competing hypotheses. The purpose of the models was to allow non-expert analysts to benefit from the use of expert-informed mathematical models to assess nuclear programs, because such assessments require significant technical expertise ranging from the nuclear fuel cycle, construction and engineering, imagery analysis, and so forth. One such model developed under this research was aimed at assessing the consistency of open-source information about a nuclear facility with the facility’s declared use. The model incorporates factors such as location, security and safety features among others identified by subject matter experts as crucial to their assessments. The model includes key features, observables and their relationships. The model also provides documentation, which serves as training materials for the non-experts.

  15. Survey of systems safety analysis methods and their application to nuclear waste management systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pelto, P.J.; Winegardner, W.K.; Gallucci, R.H.V.

    1981-11-01

    This report reviews system safety analysis methods and examines their application to nuclear waste management systems. The safety analysis methods examined include expert opinion, maximum credible accident approach, design basis accidents approach, hazard indices, preliminary hazards analysis, failure modes and effects analysis, fault trees, event trees, cause-consequence diagrams, G0 methodology, Markov modeling, and a general category of consequence analysis models. Previous and ongoing studies on the safety of waste management systems are discussed along with their limitations and potential improvements. The major safety methods and waste management safety related studies are surveyed. This survey provides information on what safety methods are available, what waste management safety areas have been analyzed, and what are potential areas for future study.

  16. Comparative Analysis of HIV-1 and Murine Leukemia Virus Three-Dimensional Nuclear Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Quercioli, Valentina; Di Primio, Cristina; Casini, Antonio; Mulder, Lubbertus C. F.; Vranckx, Lenard S.; Borrenberghs, Doortje; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy allow three-dimensional analysis of HIV-1 preintegration complexes in the nuclei of infected cells. To extend this investigation to gammaretroviruses, we engineered a fluorescent Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) system consisting of MLV-integrase fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (MLV-IN-EGFP). A comparative analysis of lentiviral (HIV-1) and gammaretroviral (MLV) fluorescent complexes in the nuclei of infected cells revealed their different spatial distributions. This research tool has the potential to achieve new insight into the nuclear biology of these retroviruses. PMID:26962222

  17. Determination of controlling earthquakes from probabilistic seismic hazard analysis for nuclear reactor sites

    SciTech Connect

    Boissonnade, A.; Bernreuter, D.; Chokshi, N.; Murphy, A.

    1995-04-04

    Recently, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission published, for public comments, a revision to 10 CFR Part 100. The proposed regulation acknowledges that uncertainties are inherent in estimates of the Safe Shutdown Earthquake Ground Motion (SSE) and requires that these uncertainties be addressed through an appropriate analysis. One element of this evaluation is the assessment of the controlling earthquake through the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) and its use in determining the SSE. This paper reviews the basis for the various key choices in characterizing the controlling earthquake.

  18. Nuclear wastes in the arctic: An analysis of arctic and other regional impacts from Soviet nuclear contamination

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    One of the lasting legacies of the Cold War, and the buildup in nuclear weaponry and military over the past 50 years, is nuclear waste and its threat to human health and the environment. Notable examples of waste dumped into the open environment have caused people and nations to demand information about what was done and what health risks may result. In 1993, disclosures about Russian dumping of submarine reactors, nuclear fuel, and other wastes into the Arctic and North Pacific Oceans brought this region and its problems into the world spotlight. This report examines the environmental and human health impacts from wastes dumped into the Arctic and North Pacific regions, from nuclear contaminants discharged into these environments, and from radioactive releases from both past and future nuclear activities in the region. The report presents what is known and unknown about this waste and contamination and how it may affect public health. It also stresses the need for a stable and enduring institutional framework and international cooperation for long-term observation and monitoring.

  19. First Ion Microprobe Determination Of Water And Sulfur Isotopic Ratios In Melt Inclusions Of Olivines At Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, P.; Metrich, N.; Deloule, E.; Belhadj, O.; Mandeville, C.; Spilliaert, N.

    2006-12-01

    Ion microprobe determination of the isotopic composition of magmatic volatiles preserved in crystal melt inclusions (MI), first applied to Hawaiian volcanoes [1], opens new perspectives to elucidate the source of magmas and their conditions of ascent, degassing and eruption. Here we report on the first ion microprobe isotopic analysis of water and sulfur dissolved in olivine-hosted MIs and glass embayments (40- 200 μm) in primitive alkali basaltic magma erupted from >15 km depth (400 MPa) during the 2002 flank of Mount Etna, in Sicily. The MIs, recovered from rapidly quenched explosive products, were previously analyzed for their content in dissolved H2O, CO2, S, Cl and F [2,3]. Isotopic measurements were performed at CRPG using Cameca IMS3F and IMS1270 microprobes, respectively. Calibration was made against Etna glass samples of similar composition and with known H2O-S concentrations and isotope ratios determined with mass spectrometry. δ34S (±0.7) and δD (±5-12) values are given in per mil deviations with respect to SMOW and CDT standards. The most primitive MIs representing S-undegassed magma contain 0.29-0.34 wt% S with a mean δ34S of +2.4±0.4, comparable to that of 800-1100°C Etna volcanic gases [4]. The δ34S of more evolved, S-poorer inclusions and embayments, trapped at lower pressure, track both the magma degassing process and S-removal by sulfide globule as the melt reaches sulfide-saturation. The results for water are more complex and their interpretation is still preliminary. The most pristine inclusions, trapped at >12 km depth below summit, contain 0.2-0.4 wt% CO2 and 3.2±0.3 wt% H2O with δD clustering at around -20 (range: -90 to 0). However, a second cluster of water- rich but CO2-poorer (<0.13 wt%) inclusions, trapped as magma ponds at 6-8 km depth [2], displays positive δD values of between 0 and +40. Such anomalous δD, coupled with evidence of heterogeneous gas-melt entrapment conditions, suggests deuterium enrichment mainly due to

  20. Multiscale integral analysis of a HT leakage in a fusion nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, M.; Fradera, J.; Perlado, J. M.; Zamora, I.; Martínez-Saban, E.; Colomer, C.; Briani, P.

    2016-05-01

    The present work presents an example of the application of an integral methodology based on a multiscale analysis that covers the whole tritium cycle within a nuclear fusion power plant, from a micro scale, analyzing key components where tritium is leaked through permeation, to a macro scale, considering its atmospheric transport. A leakage from the Nuclear Power Plants, (NPP) primary to the secondary side of a heat exchanger (HEX) is considered for the present example. Both primary and secondary loop coolants are assumed to be He. Leakage is placed inside the HEX, leaking tritium in elementary tritium (HT) form to the secondary loop where it permeates through the piping structural material to the exterior. The Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system removes the leaked tritium towards the NPP exhaust. The HEX is modelled with system codes and coupled to Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) to account for tritium dispersion inside the nuclear power plants buildings and in site environment. Finally, tritium dispersion is calculated with an atmospheric transport code and a dosimetry analysis is carried out. Results show how the implemented methodology is capable of assessing the impact of tritium from the microscale to the atmospheric scale including the dosimetric aspect.

  1. Exploring laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for nuclear materials analysis and in-situ applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne J.; Martin, Rodger C.; Andre, Nicolas O.

    2012-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the limits of detection of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs), common nuclear fission products. Additionally, detection limits were determined for cerium (Ce), often used as a surrogate for radioactive plutonium in laboratory studies. Results were obtained using a laboratory instrument with a Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, frequency doubled to 532 nm with energy of 50 mJ/pulse. The data was compared for different concentrations of Sr and Ce dispersed in a CaCO3 (white) and carbon (black) matrix. We have addressed the sampling errors, limits of detection, reproducibility, and accuracy of measurements as they relate to multivariate analysis in pellets that were doped with the different elements at various concentrations. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for in situ analysis of nuclear materials in hot cells. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) can be evaluated; (2) nuclear materials can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation; and (3) samples can be remotely analyzed very rapidly (ms-seconds). Our studies also show that the methods can be made quantitative. Very robust multivariate models have been used to provide quantitative measurement and statistical evaluation of complex materials derived from our previous research on wood and soil samples.

  2. Nuclear Criticality Safety Calculational Analysis for Fissile Mass Limits and Spacing Requirements for 55 - Gallon Waste Drums

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Thomas C.; Hesse, David J.; Tayloe, Jr., Robert W.

    1994-05-01

    A nuclear criticality safety analysis was performed to determine the fissile mass limits and spacing requirements for the storage of 55-gallon waste drums at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS).

  3. Analysis of antimycin A by reversed-phase liquid chromatography/nuclear magnetic-resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ha, Steven T.K.; Wilkins, Charles L.; Abidi, Sharon L.

    1989-01-01

    A mixture of closely related streptomyces fermentation products, antimycin A, Is separated, and the components are identified by using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with directly linked 400-MHz proton nuclear magnetic resonance detection. Analyses of mixtures of three amino acids, alanine, glycine, and valine, are used to determine optimal measurement conditions. Sensitivity increases of as much as a factor of 3 are achieved, at the expense of some loss in chromatographic resolution, by use of an 80-μL NMR cell, Instead of a smaller 14-μL cell. Analysis of the antimycin A mixture, using the optimal analytical high performance liquid chromatography/nuclear magnetic resonance conditions, reveals it to consist of at least 10 closely related components.

  4. Reference analysis on the utility of engineered barriers for geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel: overview

    SciTech Connect

    Cloninger, M.O.

    1981-09-01

    The development and characterization of waste forms, containers and other engineered barriers destined for use in the isolation of nuclear waste in deep geologic repositories has progressed to the point where there are several options for barrier systems that are available to help assure safe disposal of nuclear wastes. However, a rigorous basis has not yet developed to define whether various concepts or products are required or desirable, or how effective they should be for how long. This analysis is an attempt to contribute to that basis. Intent of the study is to determine what incentives exist for providing highly effective engineered barriers for the isolation of radioactive waste (spent fuel in this case) in a deep geologic repository. 6 figures.

  5. Preclosure analysis of conceptual waste package designs for a nuclear waste repository in tuff

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neal, W.C.; Gregg, D.W.; Hockman, J.N.; Russell, E.W.; Stein, W.

    1984-11-01

    This report discusses the selection and analysis of conceptual waste package developed by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project for possible disposal of high-level nuclear waste at a candidate site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The design requirements that the waste package must conform to are listed, as are several desirable design considerations. Illustrations of the reference and alternative designs are shown. Four austenitic stainless steels (316L SS, 321 SS, 304L SS and Incoloy 825 high nickel alloy) have been selected for candidate canister/overpack materials, and 1020 carbon steel has been selected as the reference metal for the borehole liners. A summary of the results of technical and ecnonmic analyses supporting the selection of the conceptual waste package designs is included. Postclosure containment and release rates are not analyzed in this report.

  6. Methods and practices used in incident analysis in the Finnish nuclear power industry.

    PubMed

    Suksi, Seija

    2004-07-26

    According to the Finnish Nuclear Energy Act it is licensee's responsibility to ensure safe use of nuclear energy. Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is the regulatory body responsible for the state supervision of the safe use of nuclear power in Finland. One essential prerequisite for the safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants is that lessons are learned from the operational experience. It is utility's prime responsibility to assess the operational events and implement appropriate corrective actions. STUK controls licensees' operational experience feedback arrangements and implementation as part of its inspection activities. In addition to this in Finland, the regulatory body performs its own assessment of the operational experience. Review and investigation of operational events is a part of the regulatory oversight of operational safety. Review of operational events is done by STUK basically at three different levels. First step is to perform a general review of all operational events, transients and reactor scram reports, which the licensees submit for information to STUK. The second level activities are related to the clarification of events at site and entering of events' specific data into the event register database of STUK. This is done for events which meet the set criteria for the operator to submit a special report to STUK for approval. Safety significance of operational events is determined using probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) techniques. Risk significance of events and the number of safety significant events are followed by STUK indicators. The final step in operational event assessment performed by STUK is to assign STUK's own investigation team for events deemed to have special importance, especially when the licensee's organisation has not operated as planned. STUK launches its own detail investigation once a year on average. An analysis and evaluation of event investigation methods applied at STUK, and at the two

  7. Structural, super-resolution microscopy analysis of paraspeckle nuclear body organization

    PubMed Central

    Mito, Mari; Yanaka, Kaori; Kingston, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Paraspeckles are nuclear bodies built on the long noncoding RNA Neat1, which regulates a variety of physiological processes including cancer progression and corpus luteum formation. To obtain further insight into the molecular basis of the function of paraspeckles, we performed fine structural analyses of these nuclear bodies using structural illumination microscopy. Notably, paraspeckle proteins are found within different layers along the radially arranged bundles of Neat1 transcripts, forming a characteristic core-shell spheroidal structure. In cells lacking the RNA binding protein Fus, paraspeckle spheroids are disassembled into smaller particles containing Neat1, which are diffusely distributed in the nucleoplasm. Sequencing analysis of RNAs purified from paraspeckles revealed that AG-rich transcripts associate with Neat1, which are distributed along the shell of the paraspeckle spheroids. We propose that paraspeckles sequester core components inside the spheroids, whereas the outer surface associates with other components in the nucleoplasm to fulfill their function. PMID:27646274

  8. Zero Boil-Off System Design and Thermal Analysis of the Bimodal Thermal Nuclear Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Robert J.; Plachta, David W.

    2006-01-01

    Mars exploration studies at NASA are evaluating vehicles that incorporate Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) propulsion which use a high temperature nuclear fission reactor and hydrogen to produce thermal propulsion. The hydrogen propellant is to be stored in liquid state for periods up to 18 months. To prevent boil-off of the liquid hydrogen, a system of passive and active components are needed to prevent heat from entering the tanks and to remove any heat that does. This report describes the design of the system components used for the BNTR Crew Transfer Vehicle and the thermal analysis performed. The results show that Zero Boil-Off (ZBO) can be achieved with the electrical power allocated for the ZBO system.

  9. Structural, super-resolution microscopy analysis of paraspeckle nuclear body organization.

    PubMed

    West, Jason A; Mito, Mari; Kurosaka, Satoshi; Takumi, Toru; Tanegashima, Chiharu; Chujo, Takeshi; Yanaka, Kaori; Kingston, Robert E; Hirose, Tetsuro; Bond, Charles; Fox, Archa; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2016-09-26

    Paraspeckles are nuclear bodies built on the long noncoding RNA Neat1, which regulates a variety of physiological processes including cancer progression and corpus luteum formation. To obtain further insight into the molecular basis of the function of paraspeckles, we performed fine structural analyses of these nuclear bodies using structural illumination microscopy. Notably, paraspeckle proteins are found within different layers along the radially arranged bundles of Neat1 transcripts, forming a characteristic core-shell spheroidal structure. In cells lacking the RNA binding protein Fus, paraspeckle spheroids are disassembled into smaller particles containing Neat1, which are diffusely distributed in the nucleoplasm. Sequencing analysis of RNAs purified from paraspeckles revealed that AG-rich transcripts associate with Neat1, which are distributed along the shell of the paraspeckle spheroids. We propose that paraspeckles sequester core components inside the spheroids, whereas the outer surface associates with other components in the nucleoplasm to fulfill their function.

  10. Analysis of Nuclear Mitochondrial DNA Segments of Nine Plant Species: Size, Distribution, and Insertion Loci

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial DNA segment (Numt) insertion describes a well-known phenomenon of mitochondrial DNA transfer into a eukaryotic nuclear genome. However, it has not been well understood, especially in plants. Numt insertion patterns vary from species to species in different kingdoms. In this study, the patterns were surveyed in nine plant species, and we found some tip-offs. First, when the mitochondrial genome size is relatively large, the portion of the longer Numt is also larger than the short one. Second, the whole genome duplication event increases the ratio of the shorter Numt portion in the size distribution. Third, Numt insertions are enriched in exon regions. This analysis may be helpful for understanding plant evolution. PMID:27729838

  11. Zero Boil-Off System Design and Thermal Analysis of the Bimodal Thermal Nuclear Rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, Robert J.; Plachta, David W.

    2006-01-20

    Mars exploration studies at NASA are evaluating vehicles that incorporate Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) propulsion which use a high temperature nuclear fission reactor and hydrogen to produce thermal propulsion. The hydrogen propellant is to be stored in liquid state for periods up to 18 months. To prevent boil-off of the liquid hydrogen, a system of passive and active components are needed to prevent heat from entering the tanks and to remove any heat that does. This report describes the design of the system components used for the BNTR Crew Transfer Vehicle and the thermal analysis performed. The results show that Zero Boil-Off (ZBO) can be achieved with the electrical power allocated for the ZBO system.

  12. Compact Short-Pulsed Electron Linac Based Neutron Sources for Precise Nuclear Material Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Tagi, K.; Matsuyama, D.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Harada, H.

    2015-10-01

    An X-band (11.424GHz) electron linac as a neutron source for nuclear data study for the melted fuel debris analysis and nuclear security in Fukushima is under development. Originally we developed the linac for Compton scattering X-ray source. Quantitative material analysis and forensics for nuclear security will start several years later after the safe settlement of the accident is established. For the purpose, we should now accumulate more precise nuclear data of U, Pu, etc., especially in epithermal (0.1-10 eV) neutrons. Therefore, we have decided to modify and install the linac in the core space of the experimental nuclear reactor "Yayoi" which is now under the decommission procedure. Due to the compactness of the X-band linac, an electron gun, accelerating tube and other components can be installed in a small space in the core. First we plan to perform the time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurement for study of total cross sections of the nuclei for 0.1-10 eV energy neutrons. Therefore, if we adopt a TOF line of less than 10m, the o-pulse length of generated neutrons should be shorter than 100 ns. Electronenergy, o-pulse length, power, and neutron yield are ~30 MeV, 100 ns - 1 micros, ~0.4 kW, and ~1011 n/s (~103 n/cm2/s at samples), respectively. Optimization of the design of a neutron target (Ta, W, 238U), TOF line and neutron detector (Ce:LiCAF) of high sensitivity and fast response is underway. We are upgrading the electron gun and a buncher to realize higher current and beam power with a reasonable beam size in order to avoid damage of the neutron target. Although the neutron flux is limited in case of the X-band electron linac based source, we take advantage of its short pulse aspect and availability for nuclear data measurement with a short TOF system. First, we form a tentative configuration in the current experimental room for Compton scattering in 2014. Then, after the decommissioning has been finished, we move it to the "Yayoi" room and perform

  13. Electron microprobe evaluation of terrestrial basalts for whole-rock K-Ar dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, E.A.; Brent, Dalrymple G.

    1972-01-01

    Four basalt samples for whole-rock K-Ar dating were analyzed with an electron microprobe to locate potassium concentrations. Highest concentrations of potassium were found in those mineral phases which were the last to crystallize. The two reliable samples had potassium concentrated in fine-grained interstitial feldspar and along grain boundaries of earlier formed plagioclase crystals. The two unreliable samples had potassium concentrated in the glassy matrix, demonstrating the ineffectiveness of basaltic glass as a retainer of radiogenic argon. In selecting basalt samples for whole-rock K-Ar dating, particular emphasis should be placed on determining the nature and condition of the fine-grained interstitial phases. ?? 1972.

  14. The Role of the Ion Microprobe in Solid-Earth Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauri, E. H.

    2002-12-01

    Despite the early success of the electron microprobe in taking petrology to the micron scale, and the widespread use of mass spectrometers in geochemistry and geochronology, it was not until the mid-1970s that the ion microprobe came into its own as an in situ analytical tool in the Earth sciences. Despite this inauspicious beginning, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was widely advertised as a technology that would eventually eclipse thermal ion mass spectrometry (TIMS) in isotope geology. However this was not to happen. While various technical issues in SIMS such as interferences and matrix effects became increasingly clear, an appreciation grew for the complimentary abilities of SIMS and TIMS that, even with the advent of ICP-MS, continues to this day. Today the ion microprobe is capable of abundance measurements in the parts-per-billion range across nearly the entire periodic table, and SIMS stable isotope data quality is now routinely crossing the 1 per mil threshold, all at the micron scale. Much of this success is due to the existence of multi-user community facilities for SIMS research, and the substantial efforts of interested scientists to understand the fundamentals of sputtered ion formation and their application to geochemistry. Recent discoveries of evidence for the existence of ancient crust and oceans, the emergence of life on Earth, the large-scale cycling of surficial materials into the deep Earth, and illumination of fundamental high-pressure phenomena have all been made possible by SIMS, and these (and many more) discoveries owe a debt to the vision of creating and supporting multi-user community facilities for SIMS. The ion microprobe remains an expensive instrument to purchase and maintain, yet it is also exceedingly diverse in application. Major improvements in SIMS, indeed in all mass spectrometry, are visible on the near horizon. Yet the geochemical community cannot depend on commercial manufacturers alone to design and build the next

  15. $ANBA; a rapid, combined data acquisition and correction program for the SEMQ electron microprobe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, James J.

    1983-01-01

    $ANBA is a program developed for rapid data acquisition and correction on an automated SEMQ electron microprobe. The program provides increased analytical speed and reduced disk read/write operations compared with the manufacturer's software, resulting in a doubling of analytical throughput. In addition, the program provides enhanced analytical features such as averaging, rapid and compact data storage, and on-line plotting. The program is described with design philosophy, flow charts, variable names, a complete program listing, and system requirements. A complete operating example and notes to assist in running the program are included.

  16. Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant.

  17. Quantifying Morphological Features of α-U3O8 with Image Analysis for Nuclear Forensics.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Adam M; Richards, Bryony; Schwerdt, Ian; Heffernan, Sean; Lusk, Robert; Smith, Braxton; Jurrus, Elizabeth; Ruggiero, Christy; McDonald, Luther W

    2017-03-07

    Morphological changes in U3O8 based on calcination temperature have been quantified enabling a morphological feature to serve as a signature of processing history in nuclear forensics. Five separate calcination temperatures were used to synthesize α-U3O8, and each sample was characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The p-XRD spectra were used to evaluate the purity of the synthesized U-oxide; the morphological analysis for materials (MAMA) software was utilized to quantitatively characterize the particle shape and size as indicated by the SEM images. Analysis comparing the particle attributes, such as particle area at each of the temperatures, was completed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov two sample test (K-S test). These results illustrate a distinct statistical difference between each calcination temperature. To provide a framework for forensic analysis of an unknown sample, the sample distributions at each temperature were compared to randomly selected distributions (100, 250, 500, and 750 particles) from each synthesized temperature to determine if they were statistically different. It was found that 750 particles were required to differentiate between all of the synthesized temperatures with a confidence interval of 99.0%. Results from this study provide the first quantitative morphological study of U-oxides, and reveals the potential strength of morphological particle analysis in nuclear forensics by providing a framework for a more rapid characterization of interdicted uranium oxide samples.

  18. An Integrated Analysis of a NERVA Based Nuclear Thermal Propulsion System

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, Hans; Cheng, L.-Y.; Ecker, Lynne; Todosow, Michael

    2006-01-20

    This paper presents results and conclusions derived from an integrated analysis of a NERVA based Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) system. The NTP system is sized to generate a thrust of 70,000 N (15,000 lbf), and have a specific impulse (Isp) of 860 s. This implies a reactor that operates at 350 MWth and has a mixed mean propellant outlet temperature of 2760 K. The integrated analysis will require that self-consistent neutronic/thermal-hydraulic/stress analyses be carried out. The major code packages used in this analysis are MCNP, RELAP, and ANSYS. Results from this analysis indicate that nuclear data will have to be re-generated to cover the wide temperature range, zone loading will be necessary to avoid entering the liquidus region for the fuel, and the effectiveness of the ZrC insulator will have implications for bi-modal applications. These results suggest a path forward in the development of a viable NTP system based on a NERVA reactor should initially concentrate on fuel and structural materials and associated coating development. A series of safety related criticality determinations were carried out addressing water immersion following a launch incident.

  19. Determination of the chemical properties of residues retained in individual cloud droplets by XRF microprobe at SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.-J.; Tohno, S.; Kasahara, M.; Hayakawa, S.

    2004-06-01

    To determine the chemical properties of residue retained in individual cloud droplets is primarily important for the understanding of rainout mechanism and aerosol modification in droplet. The sampling of individual cloud droplets were carried out on the summit of Mt. Taiko located in Tango peninsula, Kyoto prefecture, during Asian dust storm event in March of 2002. XRF microprobe system equipped at SPring-8, BL-37XU was applied to the subsequent quantification analysis of ultra trace elements in residues of individual cloud droplets. It was possible to form the replicas of separated individual cloud droplets on the thin collodion film. The two dimensional XRF maps for the residues in individual cloud droplets were clearly drawn by scanning of micro-beam. Also, XRF spectra of trace elements in residues were well resolved. From the XRF spectra for individual residues, the chemical mixed state of residues could be assumed. The chemical forms of Fe (Fe +++) and Zn (Zn +) could be clearly characterized by their K-edge micro-XANES spectra. By comparison of Z/Si mass ratios of residues in cloud droplets and those of the original sands collected in desert areas in China, the aging of ambient dust particles and their in cloud modification were indirectly assumed.

  20. Development and validation of scale nuclear analysis methods for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gehin, Jess C; Jessee, Matthew Anderson; Williams, Mark L; Lee, Deokjung; Goluoglu, Sedat; Ilas, Germina; Ilas, Dan; Bowman, Steve A

    2010-01-01

    In support of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ORNL is updating the nuclear analysis methods and data in the SCALE code system to support modeling of HTGRs. Development activities include methods used for reactor physics, criticality safety, and radiation shielding. This paper focuses on the nuclear methods in support of reactor physics, which primarily include lattice physics for cross-section processing of both prismatic and pebble-bed designs, Monte Carlo depletion methods and efficiency improvements for double heterogeneous fuels, and validation against relevant experiments. These methods enhancements are being validated using available experimental data from the HTTR and HTR-10 startup and initial criticality experiments. Results obtained with three-dimensional Monte Carlo models of the HTTR initial core critical configurations with SCALE6/KENO show excellent agreement between the continuous energy and multigroup methods and the results are consistent with results obtained by others. A three-dimensional multigroup Monte Carlo model for the initial critical core of the HTR-10 has been developed with SCALE6/KENO based on the benchmark specifications included in the IRPhE Handbook. The core eigenvalue obtained with this model is in very good agreement with the corresponding value obtained with a consistent continuous energy MCNP5 core model.

  1. SAID Partial Wave Analyses from CNS DAC (Center for Nuclear Studies Data Analysis Center)

    DOE Data Explorer

    George Washington University (GW) has one of the largest university-based nuclear-physics groups in the nation. Many of the current and future projects are geared to Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) at Newport News, VA. JLab is the world's premier electron accelerator for nuclear physics, and GW is one of the charter members of the governing body of JLab, the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA). The George Washington Data Analysis Center (DAC) was created in 1998 by an agreement among the Department of Energy, Jefferson Lab, and the GW Center for Nuclear Studies.The activities of the DAC fall into four distinct categories: 1) Performing partial-wave analyses of fundamental two- and three-body reactions; 2) Maintenance of databases associated with these reactions; 3) Development of software to disseminate DAC results (as well as the results of competing model-independent analyses and potential approaches); and 4) Phenomenological and theoretical investigations which bridge the gap between theory and experiment; in particular, the extraction of N* and D * hadronic and electromagnetic couplings. Partial Wave Analyses (and the associated databases) available at GW are: Pion-Nucleon, Kaon-Nucleon, Nucleon-Nucleon, Pion Photoproduction, Pion Electroproduction, Kaon Photoproduction, Eta Photoproduction, Eta-Prime Photoproduction, Pion-Deuteron (elastic), and Pion-Deuteron to Proton+Proton. [Taken from http://www.gwu.edu/~ndl/dac.htm">http://www.gwu.edu/~ndl/dac.htm

  2. Tethering RNA to chromatin for fluorescence microscopy based analysis of nuclear organization.

    PubMed

    Pankert, Teresa; Jegou, Thibaud; Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Rippe, Karsten

    2017-02-14

    Nuclear RNAs emerge as important factors to orchestrate the dynamic organization of the nucleus into functional subcompartments. By tethering RNAs to distinct genomic loci, RNA-dependent chromatin changes can be dissected by fluorescence microscopic analysis. Here we describe how this approach is implemented in mammalian cells. It involves two high-affinity protein-nucleic acid interactions that can be established with a number of different protein domains and DNA and RNA sequences. A prototypic system is described here in detail: It consists of the binding of MS2 bacteriophage coat protein to its RNA recognition sequence and the interaction between the bacterial LacI repressor protein to its target lacO operator DNA sequence. Via these interactions RNAs tagged with the MS2 recognition sequences can be recruited to a locus with integrated lacO repeats. By inducing RNA-chromatin binding a number of RNA-dependent activities can be dissected: (i) The RNA-induced compaction or decondensation of chromatin, (ii) identification of RNA-interacting chromatin modifiers that set epigenetic signals such as posttranslational histone modifications, and (iii) nuclear relocation of a genomic locus targeted by the tethered RNA. Thus, a variety of RNA-dependent activities can be evaluated with the MS2-LacI system, which are crucial for understanding how RNA shapes nuclear organization.

  3. Characterization/Selection of a Continuous Wave Laser for RIMS Analysis in Nuclear Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Sunny; Alves, F.; Karunasiri, G.; Smith, C.; Isselhardt, B.

    2015-03-01

    The effort to implement the technology of resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) to problems of nuclear forensics involves the use of multiple lasers to selectively ionize the elements of concern. While current systems incorporate pulsed lasers, we present the results of a feasibility study to determine alternative (Continuous Wave) laser technologies to be employed for analysis of the actinides and fission products of debris from a nuclear detonation. RIMS has the potential to provide rapid isotope ratio quantification of the actinides and important fission products for post detonation nuclear forensics. The current approach to ionize uranium and plutonium uses three Ti-Sapphire pulsed lasers capable of a fundamental wavelength range of 700-1000 nm. In this work, we describe the use of a COTS CW laser to replace one of the pulsed lasers used for the second resonance excitation step of plutonium near 847.282 nm. We characterize the critical laser parameters necessary to achieve high precision isotope ratio measurements including the stability over time of the mean wavelength, bandwidth and spectral mode purity. This far narrower bandwidth laser provides a simpler setup, more robust hardware (greater mobility), and more efficient use of laser irradiance.

  4. Integrated package for interactive analysis and interpretation of nuclear medicine images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Augusto F. d.; Sousa Pereira, Antonio; Botelho, M. F.; de Lima, J. J.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes a software package based on a set of integrated tools intended to be used in nuclear medicine imaging environments. These tools, following a functionally consistent and open architecture, aim to provide an efficient and user-friendly way for handling the analysis and interpretation of nuclear medicine images in a broad range of applications. The Image, Graphics, and Colors tools are the basic building blocks. Besides basic image handling facilities, the Image tool was designed to accomplish both conventional and special purposed processing tasks. Among these, the interactive definition of organ shaped regions of interest, functional imaging (e.g., mean transit time images in ventilatory lung studies) and activity quantitation should be pointed out as the most intensively used facilities. The Graphics tool is used mainly to display and analyze the activity/time curves resulting from parametric related studies. As intensity color coding has gained wide acceptance in nuclear medicine it was thought convenient to implement a Colors tool intended to provide interactive intensity manipulation. The X Window graphics interface system is the basis for the implementation of this set of independent but intercommunicating tools which are intended to run on all UNIX workstations provided with, at least, an 8 bit depth frame buffer.

  5. Electric Power quality Analysis in research reactor: Impacts on nuclear safety assessment and electrical distribution reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Touati, Said; Chennai, Salim; Souli, Aissa

    2015-07-01

    The increased requirements on supervision, control, and performance in modern power systems make power quality monitoring a common practise for utilities. Large databases are created and automatic processing of the data is required for fast and effective use of the available information. Aim of the work presented in this paper is the development of tools for analysis of monitoring power quality data and in particular measurements of voltage and currents in various level of electrical power distribution. The study is extended to evaluate the reliability of the electrical system in nuclear plant. Power Quality is a measure of how well a system supports reliable operation of its loads. A power disturbance or event can involve voltage, current, or frequency. Power disturbances can originate in consumer power systems, consumer loads, or the utility. The effect of power quality problems is the loss power supply leading to severe damage to equipments. So, we try to track and improve system reliability. The assessment can be focused on the study of impact of short circuits on the system, harmonics distortion, power factor improvement and effects of transient disturbances on the Electrical System during motor starting and power system fault conditions. We focus also on the review of the Electrical System design against the Nuclear Directorate Safety Assessment principles, including those extended during the last Fukushima nuclear accident. The simplified configuration of the required system can be extended from this simple scheme. To achieve these studies, we have used a demo ETAP power station software for several simulations. (authors)

  6. Methodology for risk analysis based on atmospheric dispersion modelling from nuclear risk sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baklanov, A.; Mahura, A.; Sørensen, J. H.; Rigina, O.

    2003-04-01

    The main purpose of this multidisciplinary study is to develop a methodology for complex nuclear risk and vulnerability assessment, and to test it on example of estimation of nuclear risk to the population in the Nordic countries in case of a severe accident at a nuclear risk site (NRS). The main focus of the paper is the methodology for the evaluation of the atmospheric transport and deposition of radioactive pollutants from NRSs. The method developed for this evaluation is derived from a probabilistic point of view. The main question we are trying to answer is: What is the probability for radionuclide atmospheric transport and impact to different neighbouring regions and countries in case of an accident at an NPP? To answer this question we applied a number of different tools: (i) Trajectory Modelling - to calculate multiyear forward trajectories originating over the locations of selected risk sites; (ii) Dispersion Modelling - for long-term simulation and case studies of radionuclide transport from hypothetical accidental releases at NRSs; (iii) Cluster Analysis - to identify atmospheric transport pathways from NRSs; (iv) Probability Fields Analysis - to construct annual, monthly, and seasonal NRS impact indicators to identify the most impacted geographical regions; (v) Specific Case Studies - to estimate consequences for the environment and the populations after a hypothetical accident; (vi) Vulnerability Evaluation to Radioactive Deposition - to describe its persistence in the ecosystems with a focus to the transfer of certain radionuclides into the food chains of key importance for the intake and exposure for a whole population and for certain population groups; (vii) Risk Evaluation and Mapping - to analyse socio-economical consequences for different geographical areas and various population groups taking into account social-geophysical factors and probabilities, and using demographic databases based on GIS analysis.

  7. NUSTART: A PC code for NUclear STructure And Radiative Transition analysis and supplementation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, G.L.; Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.

    1990-10-01

    NUSTART is a computer program for the IBM PC/At. It is designed for use with the nuclear reaction cross-section code STAPLUS, which is a STAPRE-based CRAY computer code that is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The NUSTART code was developed to handle large sets of discrete nuclear levels and the multipole transitions among these levels; it operates in three modes. The Data File Error Analysis mode analyzes an existing STAPLUS input file containing the levels and their multipole transition branches for a number of physics and/or typographical errors. The Interactive Data File Generation mode allows the user to create input files of discrete levels and their branching fractions in the format required by STAPLUS, even though the user enters the information in the (different) format used by many people in the nuclear structure field. In the Branching Fractions Calculations mode, the discrete nuclear level set is read, and the multipole transitions among the levels are computed under one of two possible assumptions: (1) the levels have no collective character, or (2) the levels are all rotational band heads. Only E1, M1, and E2 transitions are considered, and the respective strength functions may be constants or, in the case of E1 transitions, the strength function may be energy dependent. The first option is used for nuclei closed shells; the bandhead option may be used to vary the E1, M1, and E2 strengths for interband transitions. K-quantum number selection rules may be invoked if desired. 19 refs.

  8. Redefining the U.S. Agenda for Nuclear Disarmament, Analysis and Reflections

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Lewis A.

    2016-10-01

    With Lewis Dunn’s paper on nuclear disarmament diplomacy, we are inaugurating a new monograph series under the auspices of the Center for Global Security Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The series will explore complex emerging challenges in the emerging security environment as they bear on issues of deterrence, assurance, and strategic stability. Our goal is to explore these issues deeply enough to provide significant new understanding that is technically informed and policy relevant. Our premise is that thoughtful students of international security affairs continue to value such in-depth analysis as a way to help make sense of the large flow of data and opinion that reaches all of us on a daily basis. Our ambition is to generate four to six such papers per year on especially salient topics. The views expressed in these papers are those of the author and should not be attributed to the Center, the Laboratory, or the U.S. government. This inaugural paper addresses one of the key questions facing national leadership seven to eight years after President Obama’s April 2009 remarks in Prague and his commitment to take practical steps towards the long-term goal of the elimination of nuclear weapons. In the interim, some important steps have been taken. But there have also been many disappointments. The new presidential administration will face a security landscape quite different from that of eight years ago and must reassess U.S. priorities and approaches. As Lewis Dunn argues, some will be tempted to walk away entirely from the disarmament agenda, while others will advocate even more forcefully for unilateral U.S. steps to further reduce the role and number of nuclear weapons in its posture. Dr. Dunn sets out his own vision of how to adapt and carry forward the disarmament agenda, in a manner informed by developments in the security environment that point to a continuing role for nuclear deterrence. The result is both fresh and compelling.

  9. Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence FY 2016 Data Analysis Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Enders, Alexander L.; Harris, Tyrone C.; Pope, Thomas C.; Patterson, Jeremy B.

    2017-01-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence (NSDD) has facilitated the installation of more than 3,500 radiation portal monitors (RPMs) at 606 sites in 56 countries worldwide. This collection of RPMs represents the world’s largest network of radiation detectors and provides one element in the defense-in-depth approach that supports the Global Nuclear Detection Architecture. These systems support NSDD’s mission to build partner country capability to deter, detect, and interdict the illicit transport of radiological and fissile material through strategic points of entry and exit at seaports, airports, and border crossings. NSDD works collaboratively with partner countries and international organizations to optimize the operation of these RPMs. The large amount of data provided by NSDD partner countries highlights the close cooperation and partnerships NSDD has built with 56 countries around the world. Thirty-seven of these countries shared at least some RPM-related data with NSDD in fiscal year 2016. This significant level of data sharing is a key element that distinguishes the NSDD office as unique among nuclear nonproliferation programs and initiatives: NSDD can provide specific, objective, data-driven decisions and support for sustaining the radiation detection systems it helped deploy. This data analysis report summarizes and aggregates the RPM data provided to the NSDD office for analysis and review in fiscal year 2016. The data can be used to describe RPM performance and characterize the wide diversity of NSDD deployment sites. For example, NSDD deploys detector systems across sites with natural background radiation levels that can vary by a factor of approximately six from site to site. Some lanes have few occupancies, whereas others have approximately 8,000 occupancies per day and the different types of cargo that travel through a site can result in site-wide alarm rates that range from near 0% at

  10. Neutron activation analysis via nuclear decay kinetics using gamma-ray spectroscopy at SFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, Thomas; Chester, Aaron; Starosta, Krzysztof; Williams, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool used in a variety of fields including nuclear and analytical chemistry, environmental science, and health risk management. At SFU, the Germanium detector for Elemental Analysis and Radiation Studies (GEARS), a low-background shielded high-purity germanium gamma-ray detector, has been used recently in all of the above fields. The current project aims to expand upon the number of applications for which GEARS can be used while enhancing its current functionality. A recent addition to the SFU Nuclear Science laboratory is the Thermo Scientific P 385 neutron generator. This device provides a nominal yield of 3 ×108 neutrons/s providing the capacity for neutron activation analysis, opening a major avenue of research at SFU which was previously unavailable. The isotopes created via neutron activation have a wide range of half-lives. To measure and study isotopes with half-lives above a second, a new analogue data acquisition system has been installed on GEARS allowing accurate measurements of decay kinetics. This new functionality enables identification and quantification of the products of neutron activation. Results from the neutron activation analysis of pure metals will be presented.

  11. Nuclear forensic analysis of uranium oxide powders interdicted in Victoria, Australia

    DOE PAGES

    Kristo, Michael Joseph; Keegan, Elizabeth; Colella, Michael; ...

    2015-04-13

    Nuclear forensic analysis was conducted on two uranium samples confiscated during a police investigation in Victoria, Australia. The first sample, designated NSR-F-270409-1, was a depleted uranium powder of moderate purity (~1000 μg/g total elemental impurities). The chemical form of the uranium was a compound similar to K2(UO2)3O4·4H2O. While aliquoting NSR-F-270409-1 for analysis, the body and head of a Tineid moth was discovered in the sample. The second sample, designated NSR-F-270409-2, was also a depleted uranium powder. It was of reasonably high purity (~380 μg/g total elemental impurities). The chemical form of the uranium was primarily UO3·2H2O, with minor phases ofmore » U3O8 and UO2. While aliquoting NSR-F-270409-2 for analysis, a metal staple of unknown origin was discovered in the sample. The presence of 236U and 232U in both samples indicates that the uranium feed stocks for these samples experienced a neutron flux at some point in their history. The reactor burn-up calculated from the isotopic composition of the uranium is consistent with that of spent fuel from natural uranium (NU) fueled Pu production. These nuclear forensic conclusions allow us to categorically exclude Australia as the origin of the material and greatly reduce the number of candidate sources.« less

  12. Analysis of closed cycle megawatt class space power systems with nuclear reactor heat sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A. J.; Jones, B. I.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis and integration studies of multimegawatt nuclear power conversion systems for potential SDI applications is presented. A study is summarized which considered 3 separate types of power conversion systems for steady state power generation with a duty requirement of 1 yr at full power. The systems considered are based on the following conversion cycles: direct and indirect Brayton gas turbine, direct and indirect liquid metal Rankine, and in core thermionic. A complete mass analysis was performed for each system at power levels ranging from 1 to 25 MWe for both heat pipe and liquid droplet radiator options. In the modeling of common subsystems, reactor and shield calculations were based on multiparameter correlation and an in-house analysis for the heat rejection and other subsystems.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of carotenoids from the burgundy plumage of the Pompadour Cotinga (Xipholena punicea).

    PubMed

    LaFountain, Amy M; Pacheco, Carlos; Prum, Richard O; Frank, Harry A

    2013-11-15

    Previous analysis of carotenoids extracted from the burgundy plumage of the Pompadour Cotinga (Xipholena punicea) revealed six novel keto-carotenoid pigments with methoxyl groups in the C3-position of one or both β-rings. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), mass spectrometry, chemical analysis and, in some instances (1)H NMR spectroscopy were employed to determine the structures of the molecules. Further analysis by NMR was precluded due to lack of material. The recent acquisition of multiple feathers from X. punicea specimens has made it possible to complete this work using correlated homonuclear spectroscopy (COSY), nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) and (1)H NMR. These new data conclusively confirm the structures of the six methoxy-carotenoids suggested by the earlier work. In addition, the resonance positions of the protons from the novel 3-methoxy-4-keto-β-ring and 2,3-didehydro-3-methoxy-4-keto-β-ring moieties are reported here for the first time.

  14. Chemical characterization of pigment gallstones using /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfenden, W.R.; Grant, D.M.; Straight, R.C.; Englert, E. Jr.

    1982-07-30

    The unique ability of Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance analysis with cross polarization/magic angle spinning techniques to investigate chemical structures of solids is used to probe the chemical characteristics of several gallstone types. New pulse program techniques are used to distinguish various carbon atoms in studying the polymeric nature of the black bilirubinoid pigment of pigment gallstones. Evidence for the involvement of the carboxyl group and noninvolvement of vinyl groups of bilirubinoids in the polymeric bond formation is presented. Conjugated bilirubin structures are found to be present in some solid residues from pigment stones extracted with acidic methanol/chloroform.

  15. Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) as a potential source for maintaining the nation`s supply of tritium. The Proposed Action discussed in this environmental assessment is a limited scale confirmatory test that would provide DOE with information needed to assess that option. This document contains the environmental assessment results for the Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis for the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee, and the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington.

  16. BOLD VENTURE COMPUTATION SYSTEM for nuclear reactor core analysis, Version III

    SciTech Connect

    Vondy, D.R.; Fowler, T.B.; Cunningham, G.W. III.

    1981-06-01

    This report is a condensed documentation for VERSION III of the BOLD VENTURE COMPUTATION SYSTEM for nuclear reactor core analysis. An experienced analyst should be able to use this system routinely for solving problems by referring to this document. Individual reports must be referenced for details. This report covers basic input instructions and describes recent extensions to the modules as well as to the interface data file specifications. Some application considerations are discussed and an elaborate sample problem is used as an instruction aid. Instructions for creating the system on IBM computers are also given.

  17. Late Pleistocene granodiorite beneath Crater Lake caldera, Oregon, dated by ion microprobe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Persing, H.M.; Wooden, J.L.; Ireland, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Variably melted granodiorite blocks ejected during the Holocene caldera-forming eruption of Mount Mazama were plucked from the walls of the climactic magma chamber ~15 km depth. Ion-microprobe U-Pb dating of zircons from two unmelted granodiorite blocks with SHRIMP RG (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe-reverse geometry) gives a nominal 238U/206Pb age of 101+78-80 ka, or 174+89-115 ka when adjusted for an initial 230Th deficit. SHRIMP RG U-Th measurements on a subset of the zircons yield a 230Th/238U isochron age of 112 ?? 24 ka, considered to be the best estimate of the time of solidification of the pluton. These results suggest that the granodiorite is related to andesite and dacite of Mount Mazama and not to magmas of the climactic eruption. The unexposed granodiorite has an area of at least 28 km2. This young, shallow pluton was emplaced in virtually the same location where a similarly large magma body accumulated and powered violent explosive eruptions ~7700 yr ago, resulting in collapse of Crater Lake caldera.

  18. Characterisation of a ΔE E particle telescope using the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegele, Rainer; Reinhard, Mark; Prokopovich, Dale; Ionescu, Mihail; Cohen, David D.; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Cornelius, Iwan M.; Wroe, Andrew; Lerch, Michael L. F.; Fazzi, A.; Pola, A.; Agosteo, S.

    2007-07-01

    Semiconductor planar processing technology has spurned the development of novel radiation detectors with applications in space, high energy physics, medical diagnostics, radiation protection and cancer therapy. The ANSTO heavy ion microprobe, which allows a wide range of ions to be focused into spot sizes of a few micrometers in diameter, has proven to be an essential tool for characterising these detectors using the Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) imaging technique. The use of different ions and the wide range of available energies on the heavy ion microprobe, allows the testing of these devices with ionising particles associated with different values of linear energy transfer (LET). Quadruple coincidence measurements have been used to map the charge collection characteristics of a monolithic ΔE E telescope. This was done through simultaneous measurement of the spatial coordinates of the microbeam relative to the sample and the response of both detector elements. The resulting charge collection maps were used to better understand the functionality of the device as well as to ascertain ways in which future device designs could be modified to improve performance.

  19. Probe-AMPH—A spreadsheet program to classify microprobe-derived amphibole analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tindle, A. G.; Webb, P. C.

    1994-10-01

    A Microsoft Excel™ spreadsheet program has been developed to calculate structural formulae of microprobe-derived amphibole analyses and determine classification parameters according to the International Mineralogical Association scheme for amphibole nomenclature. The program has been tested in the determination of formulae and classification of 138 amphibole analyses from the literature. Of these, the small percentage (14%) of discrepancies were determined mainly to be the result of (i) differences between measured (wet chemical) and estimated values for FeO and Fe2O3 and (ii) differences inherent in summing structural formula of microprobe data to 23 oxygens and wet chemical data to 24 oxygens. The program has been developed for the Apple Macintosh but a PC version also is available. Spreadsheet implementations of four published geobarometers based on the total aluminium content of certain calcic amphiboles also are presented. These geobarometers are applicable to metaluminous plutonic (and associated volcanic) rocks containing the assemblage amphibole-biotite-quartz-plagioclase-(orthoclase)-sphene-FeTi oxides and apply to a pressure range of 2.5-13 kbar.

  20. Development of Ultra Low Temperature, Impact Resistant Lithium Battery for the Mars Microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H.; Deligiannis, F.; Davies, E.; Ratnakumar, Bugga V.; Surampudi, S.; Russel, P. G.; Reddy, T. B.

    1998-01-01

    The requirements of the power source for the Mars Microprobe, to be backpacked on the Mars 98 Spacecraft, are fairly demanding, with survivability to a shock of the order of 80,000 g combined with an operational requirement at -80 C. Development of a suitable power system, based on primary lithium-thionyl chloride is underway for the last eighteen months, together with Yardney Technical Products Inc., Pawcatuck, CT. The battery consists of 4 cells of 2 Ah capacity at 25 C, of which at least 25 % would be available at -80 C, at a moderate rate of C/20. Each probe contains two batteries and two such probes will be deployed. The selected cell is designed around an approximate 1/2 "D" cells, with flat plate electrodes. Significant improvements to the conventional Li-SOCl2 cell include: (a) use of tetrachlorogallate salt instead of aluminate for improved low temperature performance and reduced voltage delay, (b) optimization of the salt concentration, and (c) modification of the cell design to develop shock resistance to 80,000 g. We report here results from our several electrical performance tests, mission simulation tests, microcalorimetry and AC impedance studies, and Air gun tests. The cells have successfully gone through mission-enabling survivability and performance tests for the Mars Microprobe penetrator.

  1. Study of the toughening mechanisms in bone and biomimetic hydroxyapatite materials using Raman microprobe spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Sakakura, Seiji

    2003-05-01

    A Raman microprobe spectroscopy characterization of microscopic fracture mechanisms is presented for a natural hydroxyapatite material (cortical bovine femur) and two synthetic hydroxyapatite-based materials with biomimetic structures-a hydroxyapatite skeleton interpenetrated with a metallic (silver) or a polymeric (nylon-6) phase. In both the natural and synthetic materials, a conspicuous amount of toughening arose from a microscopic crack-bridging mechanism operated by elasto-plastic stretching of unbroken second-phase ligaments along the crack wake. This mechanism led to a rising R-curve behavior. An additional micromechanism, responsible for stress relaxation at the crack tip, was recognized in the natural bone material and was partly mimicked in the hydroxyapatite/silver composite. This crack-tip mechanism conspicuously enhanced the cortical bone material resistance to fracture initiation. A piezo-spectroscopic technique, based on a microprobe measurement of 980 cm(-1) Raman line of hydroxyapatite, enabled us to quantitatively assess in situ the microscopic stress fields developed during fracture both at the crack tip and along the crack wake. Using the Raman piezo-spectroscopy technique, toughening mechanisms were assessed quantitatively and rationally related to the macroscopic fracture characteristics of hydroxyapatite-based materials.

  2. In situ ion microprobe U-Pb dating and REE abundances of a carboniferous conodont

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yuji; Terada, Kentaro

    We report here in situ ion microprobe U-Pb dating of a conodont micro-fossil using an ion microprobe method. Thirteen spots on the single fragment of the Carboniferous conodont (size: approximately 800 µm × 100 µm) yield a 238U/206Pb isochron age of 323±36 Ma and a Tera-Wasserburg concordia intercept age of 332±44 Ma in a three-dimensional 238U/206Pb-207Pb/206 Pb-204Pb/206Pb diagram. These ages are consistent with the depositional and early diagenetic ages of the fossil in its host Mississippian sedimentary sequence within experimental error. The success of the method depends on the chemical fractionation of U from Pb within a hundred-µm length scale and the consequent variations in Pb isotopic compositions due to radioactive decay. Shale-normalized rare earth element (REE) abundances of two spots on the same sample show flat patterns from light REE to middle REE and decreases from middle REE to heavy REE with negative anomalies of both Ce and Eu. The REE characteristics are significantly different from those of Devonian conodonts reported by other workers, suggesting discrepant redox states and/or formation environments.

  3. Nuclear Geoplosics Sourcebook. Volume IV. Part II. Empirical Analysis of Nuclear and High-Explosive Cratering and Ejecta

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-01

    namely the coral atolls of Bikini and Enewetak . The NTS geology is sufficiertly diverse that cratering experiments have been conducted in four general...reexamination of six nuclear craters (IVY-MIKE, OAK, KOi SEMINOLE, LACROSSE, CACTUS) pfroduced at Enewetak Atoll in the early 1950’s wi performed by...water for the event. *For the most recent details on the geolo at the Enewetak Atoll craters (OAK, IVY-MIKE, KOA, SEMINOLE, LACROSSE, CACTUS), sc3

  4. Analysis of Emergency Diesel Generators Failure Incidents in Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ronderio LaDavis

    In early years of operation, emergency diesel generators have had a minimal rate of demand failures. Emergency diesel generators are designed to operate as a backup when the main source of electricity has been disrupted. As of late, EDGs (emergency diesel generators) have been failing at NPPs (nuclear power plants) around the United States causing either station blackouts or loss of onsite and offsite power. These failures occurred from a specific type called demand failures. This thesis evaluated the current problem that raised concern in the nuclear industry which was averaging 1 EDG demand failure/year in 1997 to having an excessive event of 4 EDG demand failure year which occurred in 2011. To determine the next occurrence of the extreme event and possible cause to an event of such happening, two analyses were conducted, the statistical and root cause analysis. Considering the statistical analysis in which an extreme event probability approach was applied to determine the next occurrence year of an excessive event as well as, the probability of that excessive event occurring. Using the root cause analysis in which the potential causes of the excessive event occurred by evaluating, the EDG manufacturers, aging, policy changes/ maintenance practices and failure components. The root cause analysis investigated the correlation between demand failure data and historical data. Final results from the statistical analysis showed expectations of an excessive event occurring in a fixed range of probability and a wider range of probability from the extreme event probability approach. The root-cause analysis of the demand failure data followed historical statistics for the EDG manufacturer, aging and policy changes/ maintenance practices but, indicated a possible cause regarding the excessive event with the failure components. Conclusions showed the next excessive demand failure year, prediction of the probability and the next occurrence year of such failures, with an

  5. Nuclear cardiac

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques. (KRM)

  6. Depth Probing Soft X-ray Microprobe (DPSXRM) for High Resolution Probing of Earth's Microstructural Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikedi, P. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Cambrian explosion; occurrence of landslides in very dry weather conditions; rockslides; dead, shriveled-up and crumbled leaves possessing fossil records with the semblance of well preserved, flat leaves; abundance of trilobite tracks in lower and higher rock layers; and sailing stones are enigmas demanding demystifications. These enigmas could be elucidated when data on soil structure, texture and strength are provided by some device with submicrometre accuracy; for these and other reasons, the design of a Depth Probing Soft X-ray Microprobe (DPSXRM), is being proposed; it is expected to deliver soft X-rays, at spatial resolution, ϛ≥600nm and to probe at the depth of 0.5m in 17s. The microprobe is portable compared to a synchrotron radiation facility (Diamond Light Source has land size of 43,300m2); spatial resolution,ϛ , of the DPSXRM surpasses those of the X-ray Fluorescence microanalysis (10µm), electron microprobe (1-3µm) and ion microprobe (5->30µm); the DPSXRM has allowance for multiple targets. Vanadium and Manganese membranes are proposed owing to respective 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV MnKα1 X-rays emitted, which best suits micro-probing of Earth's microstructural samples. Compound systems like the Kirk-Patrick and Baez and Wolter optics, aspheric mirrors like elliptical and parabolic optics, small apertures and Abbe sine condition are employed to reduce or remove astigmatism, obliquity, comatic and spherical aberrations—leading to good image quality. Results show that 5.899KeV MnKα1 and 4.952KeV VKα1 soft X-rays will travel a distance of 2.75mm to form circular patches of radii 2.2mm and 2.95mm respectively. Zone plate with nth zone radius of 1.5mm must be positioned 1.5mm and 2mm from the electron gun if circular patches must be formed from 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV MnKα1 soft X-rays respectively. The focal lengths of 0.25μm≤ƒ≤1.50μm and 0.04μm≤ƒ≤0.2μm covered by 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV Mn Kα1 soft X-Rays, will

  7. Use of a beta microprobe system to measure arterial input function in PET via an arteriovenous shunt in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Kinetic modeling of physiological function using imaging techniques requires the accurate measurement of the time-activity curve of the tracer in plasma, known as the arterial input function (IF). The measurement of IF can be achieved through manual blood sampling, the use of small counting systems such as beta microprobes, or by derivation from PET images. Previous studies using beta microprobe systems to continuously measure IF have suffered from high background counts. Methods In the present study, a light-insensitive beta microprobe with a temporal resolution of up to 1 s was used in combination with a pump-driven femoral arteriovenous shunt to measure IF in rats. The shunt apparatus was designed such that the placement of the beta microprobe was highly reproducible. The probe-derived IF was compared to that obtained from manual sampling at 5-s intervals and IF derived from a left ventricle VOI in a dynamic PET image of the heart. Results Probe-derived IFs were very well matched to that obtained by "gold standard" manual blood sampling, but with an increased temporal resolution of up to 1 s. The area under the curve (AUC) ratio between probe- and manually derived IFs was 1.07 ± 0.05 with a coefficient of variation of 0.04. However, image-derived IFs were significantly underestimated compared to the manually sampled IFs, with an AUC ratio of 0.76 ± 0.24 with a coefficient of variation of 0.32. Conclusions IF derived from the beta microprobe accurately represented the IF as measured by blood sampling, was reproducible, and was more accurate than an image-derived technique. The use of the shunt removed problems of tissue-background activity, and the use of a light-tight probe with minimal gamma sensitivity refined the system. The probe/shunt apparatus can be used in both microprobe and PET studies. PMID:22214227

  8. Assessment of Non-traditional Isotopic Ratios by Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Nuclear Activities: Annual Report Year 2

    SciTech Connect

    Biegalski, S; Buchholz, B

    2009-08-26

    The objective of this work is to identify isotopic ratios suitable for analysis via mass spectrometry that distinguish between commercial nuclear reactor fuel cycles, fuel cycles for weapons grade plutonium, and products from nuclear weapons explosions. Methods will also be determined to distinguish the above from medical and industrial radionuclide sources. Mass spectrometry systems will be identified that are suitable for field measurement of such isotopes in an expedient manner. Significant progress has been made with this project within the past year: (1) Isotope production from commercial nuclear fuel cycles and nuclear weapons fuel cycles have been modeled with the ORIGEN and MCNPX codes. (2) MCNPX has been utilized to calculate isotopic inventories produced in a short burst fast bare sphere reactor (to approximate the signature of a nuclear weapon). (3) Isotopic ratios have been identified that are good for distinguishing between commercial and military fuel cycles as well as between nuclear weapons and commercial nuclear fuel cycles. (4) Mass spectrometry systems have been assessed for analysis of the fission products of interest. (5) A short-list of forensic ratios have been identified that are well suited for use in portable mass spectrometry systems.

  9. Results of a nuclear power plant Application of a new technique for human error analysis (ATHEANA)

    SciTech Connect

    Forester, J.A.; Whitehead, D.W.; Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Thompson, C.M.

    1997-10-01

    A new method to analyze human errors has been demonstrated at a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant. This was the first application of the new method referred to as A Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA). The main goals of the demonstration were to test the ATHEANA process as described in the frame-of-reference manual and the implementation guideline, test a training package developed for the method, test the hypothesis that plant operators and trainers have significant insight into the error-forcing-contexts (EFCs) that can make unsafe actions (UAs) more likely, and to identify ways to improve the method and its documentation. A set of criteria to evaluate the {open_quotes}success{close_quotes} of the ATHEANA method as used in the demonstration was identified. A human reliability analysis (HRA) team was formed that consisted of an expert in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) with some background in HRA (not ATHEANA) and four personnel from the nuclear power plant. Personnel from the plant included two individuals from their PRA staff and two individuals from their training staff. Both individuals from training are currently licensed operators and one of them was a senior reactor operator {open_quotes}on shift{close_quotes} until a few months before the demonstration. The demonstration was conducted over a 5 month period and was observed by members of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ATHEANA development team, who also served as consultants to the HRA team when necessary. Example results of the demonstration to date, including identified human failure events (HFEs), UAs, and EFCs are discussed. Also addressed is how simulator exercises are used in the ATHEANA demonstration project.

  10. Results of a nuclear power plant application of A New Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, D.W.; Forester, J.A.; Bley, D.C.

    1998-03-01

    A new method to analyze human errors has been demonstrated at a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant. This was the first application of the new method referred to as A Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA). The main goals of the demonstration were to test the ATHEANA process as described in the frame-of-reference manual and the implementation guideline, test a training package developed for the method, test the hypothesis that plant operators and trainers have significant insight into the error-forcing-contexts (EFCs) that can make unsafe actions (UAs) more likely, and to identify ways to improve the method and its documentation. A set of criteria to evaluate the success of the ATHEANA method as used in the demonstration was identified. A human reliability analysis (HRA) team was formed that consisted of an expert in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) with some background in HRA (not ATHEANA) and four personnel from the nuclear power plant. Personnel from the plant included two individuals from their PRA staff and two individuals from their training staff. Both individuals from training are currently licensed operators and one of them was a senior reactor operator on shift until a few months before the demonstration. The demonstration was conducted over a 5-month period and was observed by members of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ATHEANA development team, who also served as consultants to the HRA team when necessary. Example results of the demonstration to date, including identified human failure events (HFEs), UAs, and EFCs are discussed. Also addressed is how simulator exercises are used in the ATHEANA demonstration project.

  11. Organizational analysis and safety for utilities with nuclear power plants: an organizational overview. Volume 1. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, R.N.; Olson, J.; Sommers, P.E.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Jackson, M.S.; Scott, W.G.; Connor, P.E.

    1983-08-01

    This two-volume report presents the results of initial research on the feasibility of applying organizational factors in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety assessment. A model is introduced for the purposes of organizing the literature review and showing key relationships among identified organizational factors and nuclear power plant safety. Volume I of this report contains an overview of the literature, a discussion of available safety indicators, and a series of recommendations for more systematically incorporating organizational analysis into investigations of nuclear power plant safety.

  12. Electron microprobe study of lunar and planetary zoned plagioclase feldspars: An analytical and experimental study of zoning in plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. K.; Lofgren, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    Natural and experimentally grown zoned plagioclase feldspars were examined by electron microprobe. The analyses revealed discontinuous, sector, and oscillary chemical zoning superimposed on continuous normal or reverse zoning trends. Postulated mechanisms for the origin of zoning are based on either physical changes external to the magma (P, T, H2O saturation) or kinetic changes internal to the magma (diffusion, supersaturation, growth rate). Comparison of microprobe data on natural zoned plagioclase with zoned plagioclase grown in controlled experiments show that it may be possible to distinguish zonal development resulting from physio-chemical changes to the bulk magma from local kinetic control on the growth of individual crystals.

  13. Ion and laser microprobes applied to the measurement of corrosion-produced hydrogen on a microscopic scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1971-01-01

    An ion microprobe and a laser microprobe were used to measure concentrations of corrosion-produced hydrogen on a microscopic scale. Hydrogen concentrations of several thousand ppm were measured by both analytical techniques below the fracture surfaces of hot-salt stress-corroded titanium alloy specimens. This segregation of hydrogen below fracture surfaces supports a previously proposed theory that corrosion-produced hydrogen is responsible for hot-salt stress-corrosion embrittlement and cracking of titanium alloys. These advanced analytical techniques suggest great potential for many areas of stress-corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement research, quality control, and field inspection applications.

  14. Forensic Analysis of Terrorist Counter-Financing to Combat Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Drame, B.; Toler, L.; Bachner, Katherine

    2016-02-01

    sharing, an essential tool for combating money laundering and terrorist financing, verifying sanctions against rogue nations and non-state actors, tracking nuclear proliferation networks, and protecting dual-use materials. These steps can save lives without interfering with state sovereignty or individual rights. The specter of nuclear threat is real and constant. This paper will provide forensic analysis of the most effective financial tools and policies to combat that threat, placing special emphasis on multinational and public-private cooperation.

  15. Acoustic Analysis of Plutonium and Nuclear Weapon Components at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, T. A.; Reynolds, J. J.; Rowe, C. A.; Freibert, F. J.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Ulrich, T. J.; Farrow, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the primary missions of Los Alamos National Laboratory is to use science based techniques to certify the nuclear weapons stockpile of the United States. As such we use numerous NDE techniques to monitor materials and systems properties in weapons. Two techniques will be discussed in this presentation, Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) and Acoustic Emission (AE). ARS is used to observe manufacturing variations or changes in the plutonium containing component (pit) of the weapon system. Both quantitative and qualitative comparisons can be used to determine variation in the pit components. Piezoelectric transducer driven acoustic resonance experiments will be described along with initial qualitative and more complex analysis and comparison techniques derived from earthquake analysis performed at LANL. Similarly, AE is used to measure the time of arrival of acoustic signals created by mechanical events that can occur in nuclear weapon components. Both traditional time of arrival techniques and more advanced techniques are used to pinpoint the location and type of acoustic emission event. Similar experiments on tensile tests of brittle phases of plutonium metal will be described.

  16. SAMPSON Parallel Computation for Sensitivity Analysis of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, M.; Bautista Gomez, L.; Maruyama, N.; Naitoh, M.; Matsuoka, S.; Cappello, F.

    2014-06-01

    On March 11th 2011 a high magnitude earthquake and consequent tsunami struck the east coast of Japan, resulting in a nuclear accident unprecedented in time and extents. After scram started at all power stations affected by the earthquake, diesel generators began operation as designed until tsunami waves reached the power plants located on the east coast. This had a catastrophic impact on the availability of plant safety systems at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi, leading to the condition of station black-out from unit 1 to 3. In this article the accident scenario is studied with the SAMPSON code. SAMPSON is a severe accident computer code composed of hierarchical modules to account for the diverse physics involved in the various phases of the accident evolution. A preliminary parallelization analysis of the code was performed using state-of-the-art tools and we demonstrate how this work can be beneficial to the nuclear safety analysis. This paper shows that inter-module parallelization can reduce the time to solution by more than 20%. Furthermore, the parallel code was applied to a sensitivity study for the alternative water injection into TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi unit 3. Results show that the core melting progression is extremely sensitive to the amount and timing of water injection, resulting in a high probability of partial core melting for unit 3.

  17. Tritium speciation in nuclear reactor bioshield concrete and its impact on accurate analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Ji; E Warwick, Phillip; Croudace, Ian W

    2008-07-15

    Tritium ((3)H) is produced in nuclear reactors via several neutron-induced reactions [(2)H(n, gamma)(3)H, (6)Li(n, alpha)(3)H, (10)B(n, 2alpha)(3)H, (14)N(n, (3)H)(12)C, and ternary fission (fission yield <0.01%)]. Typically, (3)H is present as tritiated water (HTO) and can become adsorbed into structural concrete from the surface inward where it will be held in a weakly bound form. However, a systematic analysis of a sequence of subsamples taken from a reactor bioshield using combustion and liquid scintillation analysis has identified two forms of (3)H, one weakly bound and one strongly bound. The strongly bound tritium, which originates from neutron capture on trace lithium ((6)Li) within mineral phases, requires temperatures in excess of 350 degrees C to achieve quantitative recovery. The weakly bound form of tritium can be liberated at significantly lower temperatures (100 degrees C) as HTO and is associated with dehydration of hydrous mineral components. Without an appreciation that two forms of tritium can exist in reactor bioshields, the (3)H content of samples may be severely underestimated using conventional analytical approaches. These findings exemplify the need to develop robust radioactive waste characterization procedures in support of nuclear decommissioning programs.

  18. Aseismic safety analysis of a prestressed concrete containment vessel for CPR1000 nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ping; Wang, Qingkang; Kong, Xianjing

    2017-01-01

    The containment vessel of a nuclear power plant is the last barrier to prevent nuclear reactor radiation. Aseismic safety analysis is the key to appropriate containment vessel design. A prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model with a semi-infinite elastic foundation and practical arrangement of tendons has been established to analyze the aseismic ability of the CPR1000 PCCV structure under seismic loads and internal pressure. A method to model the prestressing tendon and its interaction with concrete was proposed and the axial force of the prestressing tendons showed that the simulation was reasonable and accurate. The numerical results show that for the concrete structure, the location of the cylinder wall bottom around the equipment hatch and near the ring beam are critical locations with large principal stress. The concrete cracks occurred at the bottom of the PCCV cylinder wall under the peak earthquake motion of 0.50 g, however the PCCV was still basically in an elastic state. Furthermore, the concrete cracks occurred around the equipment hatch under the design internal pressure of 0.4MPa, but the steel liner was still in the elastic stage and its leak-proof function soundness was verified. The results provide the basis for analysis and design of containment vessels.

  19. Status of XSUSA for Sampling Based Nuclear Data Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwermann, W.; Gallner, L.; Klein, M.; Krzykacz-Hausmann, B.; Pasichnyk, I.; Pautz, A.; Velkov, K.

    2013-03-01

    In the present contribution, an overview of the sampling based XSUSA method for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis with respect to nuclear data is given. The focus is on recent developments and applications of XSUSA. These applications include calculations for critical assemblies, fuel assembly depletion calculations, and steadystate as well as transient reactor core calculations. The analyses are partially performed in the framework of international benchmark working groups (UACSA - Uncertainty Analyses for Criticality Safety Assessment, UAM - Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling). It is demonstrated that particularly for full-scale reactor calculations the influence of the nuclear data uncertainties on the results can be substantial. For instance, for the radial fission rate distributions of mixed UO2/MOX light water reactor cores, the 2σ uncertainties in the core centre and periphery can reach values exceeding 10%. For a fast transient, the resulting time behaviour of the reactor power was covered by a wide uncertainty band. Overall, the results confirm the necessity of adding systematic uncertainty analyses to best-estimate reactor calculations.

  20. Compact Detection System for High Sensitivity Hydrogen Profiling of Materials by Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, Daniel Keith; Urban, Ben; Pacheco, Jose

    2009-03-10

    Hydrogen is a ubiquitous contaminant that is known to have dramatic effects on the electrical, chemical, and mechanical properties of many types of materials in even minute quantities. Thus, the detection of hydrogen in materials is of major importance. Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) is a powerful technique for nondestructive profiling hydrogen in materials. However, NRA has found only limited use in many applications because of poor sensitivity due to cosmic ray background (CSRB). Most attempts to eliminate CSRB to achieve ppm detection levels using higher energy nuclear reactions or tons of passive shielding are not compatible with commercial ion beam analysis space and equipment requirements Zimmerman, et al. have previously reported upon a coincidence detector that meets IBA space requirements and reduces the cosmic ray background, but the detector suffers from lower detection efficiency and small sample size. We have replaced the BGO well detector in the Zimmerman coincidence detection scheme with a larger Nal well detector and used faster timing electronics to produce a detector that can handle larger samples with higher detection efficiency, and still eliminate cosmic ray background.

  1. Assessment of Non-traditional Isotopic Ratios by Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Nuclear Activities. Annual Report 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Biegalski, Steven R.; Buchholz, Bruce A.

    2011-08-24

    The objective of this work is to identify isotopic ratios suitable for analysis via mass spectrometry that distinguish between commercial nuclear reactor fuel cycles, fuel cycles for weapons grade plutonium, and products from nuclear weapons explosions. Methods will also be determined to distinguish the above from medical and industrial radionuclide sources. Mass spectrometry systems will be identified that are suitable for field measurement of such isotopes in an expedient manner.

  2. Some notes on data analysis for nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Michael Y.

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (NRIXS) is a spectroscopy method to study atomic vibrations and dynamics, currently done with synchrotron radiation at a few high energy third generation facilities. It finds a wide range of applications in condensed matter physics, materials science, chemistry, biophysics, geosciences, and high-pressure researches. Many atomic dynamics and lattice thermodynamics information can be derived from NRIXS measurements. Phonon Density of States (DOS) characterizes lattice dynamics of a material and can be derived under the quasi-harmonic approximation. Combined with modeling and simulations, results from NRIXS can provide unique and clarifying insights into many fields of research. As for a spectroscopic technique, in order to be able to provide reliable information, close attention should be paid to many issues during experiments and data analysis afterwards. Here we discuss several issues relevant to its data analysis, namely, those of multiple sites, background treatments, and error estimates for some derived quantities.

  3. Rapid multipoint linkage analysis of recessive traits in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglyak, L.; Daly, M.J.; Lander, E.S. |

    1995-02-01

    Homozygosity mapping is a powerful strategy for mapping rare recessive traits in children of consanguineous marriages. Practical applications of this strategy are currently limited by the inability of conventional linkage analysis software to compute, in reasonable time, multipoint LOD scores for pedigrees with inbreeding loops. We have developed a new algorithm for rapid multipoint likelihood calculations in small pedigrees, including those with inbreeding loops. The running time of the algorithm grows, at most, linearly with the number of loci considered simultaneously. The running time is not sensitive to the presence of inbreeding loops, missing genotype information, and highly polymorphic loci. We have incorporated this algorithm into a software package, MAPMAKER/HOMOZ, that allows very rapid multipoint mapping of disease genes in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping. Multipoint analysis with dozens of markers can be carried out in minutes on a personal workstation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Chemistry control analysis of lead alloys systems to be used as nuclear coolant or spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courouau, J.-L.; Robin, J.-C.

    2004-11-01

    This study presents the lead alloy system chemistry analysis for use as nuclear coolant or spallation target in ADS related systems in order to set down the needs for purification processes and monitoring. The study is limited here to the two main impurities, oxygen and iron. The analysis of the various potential pollution sources that may occur during the various operating modes is given, as well as a first pollution rate assessment. In order to limit the consequences in term of contamination (clogging) and corrosion, it is necessary to define specifications for operation as regards oxygen and iron content in the fluid. As iron cannot be measured and controlled up to now, the best specification is to set the oxygen as high as possible, defined by the cold leg interface temperature to ensure tolerable contamination, in order to maximize the oxidation area to ensure corrosion protection by self-healing oxide layer for the entire system.

  5. Common cause evaluations in applied risk analysis of nuclear power plants. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, T.; Ligon, D.; Stamatelatos, M.

    1983-04-01

    Qualitative and quantitative approaches were developed for the evaluation of common cause failures (CCFs) in nuclear power plants and were applied to the analysis of the auxiliary feedwater systems of several pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Key CCF variables were identified through a survey of experts in the field and a review of failure experience in operating PWRs. These variables were classified into categories of high, medium, and low defense against a CCF. Based on the results, a checklist was developed for analyzing CCFs of systems. Several known techniques for quantifying CCFs were also reviewed. The information provided valuable insights in the development of a new model for estimating CCF probabilities, which is an extension of and improvement over the Beta Factor method. As applied to the analysis of the PWR auxiliary feedwater systems, the method yielded much more realistic values than the original Beta Factor method for a one-out-of-three system.

  6. A simple apparatus for quick qualitative analysis of CR39 nuclear track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, D. C.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Gaillard, S. A.; Letzring, S. A.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2008-10-15

    Quantifying the ion pits in Columbia Resin 39 (CR39) nuclear track detector from Thomson parabolas is a time consuming and tedious process using conventional microscope based techniques. A simple inventive apparatus for fast screening and qualitative analysis of CR39 detectors has been developed, enabling efficient selection of data for a more detailed analysis. The system consists simply of a green He-Ne laser and a high-resolution digital single-lens reflex camera. The laser illuminates the edge of the CR39 at grazing incidence and couples into the plastic, acting as a light pipe. Subsequently, the laser illuminates all ion tracks on the surface. A high-resolution digital camera is used to photograph the scattered light from the ion tracks, enabling one to quickly determine charge states and energies measured by the Thomson parabola.

  7. Exchange-diffusion reactions in HfSiON during annealing studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis and narrow resonant nuclear reaction profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotti, L.; Bastos, K. P.; Soares, G. V.; Driemeier, C.; Pezzi, R. P.; Morais, J.; Baumvol, I. J. R.; Rotondaro, A. L. P.; Visokay, M. R.; Chambers, J. J.; Quevedo-Lopez, M.; Colombo, L.

    2004-11-01

    HfSiON films deposited on Si (001) by reactive sputtering were submitted to rapid thermal annealing at 1000°C in vacuum, N2 and O2 atmospheres. The stability of the dielectric was evaluated by measuring the atomic transport and exchange of the chemical species, using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis and narrow resonant nuclear reaction profiling. Annealing in O2 ambient reduced the N concentration mainly from near-surface regions where oxygen was incorporated in comparable amounts. Vacuum annealing, on the other hand, induced N loss preferentially from the Si/dielectric interface and O loss preferentially from near-surface regions. The results are explained in terms of exchange-diffusion reactions occurring in the HfSiON.

  8. Development of an x-ray fluorescence microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory: Early results: Comparison with data from other techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.V.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Gordon, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical predictions for the detection levels in x-ray fluorescence analysis with a synchrotron storage ring are being achieved experimentally at several laboratories. This paper is deliberately restricted to the state of development of the Brookhaven National Laboratory/University of Chicago instruments. Analyses at the parts per million (ppM) level are being made using white light apertured to 20 ..mu..m and an energy dispersive system. This system is particularly useful for elements with Z > 20 in materials dominated by elements with Z < 20. Diffraction causes an interference for crystalline materials. Development of a focusing microprobe for tunable monochromatic x-rays and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) is delayed by problems in shaping an 8:1 focusing mirror to the required accuracy. Reconnaissance analyses with a wiggler source on the CHESS synchrotron have been made in the K spectrum up to Z = 80.

  9. A Comparison of Excimer Laser Microprobe (U-Th)/He and Conventional Laser-Heating (U-Th)/He Thermochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, J. W.; Hodges, K. V.; Olszewski, W. J.; Jercinovic, M. J.; Carpenter, B.; Reiners, P. W.

    2005-12-01

    Recent advances in Excimer laser ablation (U-Th)/He thermochronology (ExLA-(U-Th)/He) of monazite have demonstrated the potential of the technique with regard to generating precise cooling age information while dealing with parent element zoning, inclusions and avoiding the alpha ejection correction and the uncertainty therein [1]. ExLA-(U-Th)/He age determinations consist of three independent measurements: 1) Moles of He, 2) Ablated volume, and 3) Parent element (U, Th, Sm) concentrations. After samples are polished, an Excimer laser is used to drill a 10-250 μm diameter hole in the surface, liberating radiogenic helium which is then quantified by isotope dilution. The volume of the hole is then measured by an ADE-Phase Shift MicroXAM vertical scanning interferometer, allowing us to calculate He concentration. U, Th, and Sm concentrations are obtained (in the case of monazite), by electron microprobe analysis (either before or after helium analysis). While the precision of the technique has been adequately demonstrated on monazites as young as ~700 ka [1,2], the question of accuracy has to this point been unanswered because of the lack of a suitable monazite (U-Th)/He standard amenable to conventional (U-Th)/He analysis for comparison. Typical natural monazites are very small and strongly zoned, resulting in large and poorly constrained alpha-recoil corrections, and therefore conventional (U-Th)/He ages with unacceptably large uncertainties. Eighteen ExLA-(U-Th)/He ages on a polished section of the centimeter-sized, gem-quality Brazilian monazite MOM1 yield an error-weighted mean of 447.4 ± 3.4 Ma (0.75% at two standard errors from the mean or 2SE). Ten additional 25 μm spot analyses on a small fragment of a second crystal (MOM3) result a similar weighted mean age, albeit with more scatter, of 454.6 ± 8.9 Ma (2.0% at 2SE). Taken together, the 28 ExLA-(U-Th)/He analyses on the two crystals can be used to calculate one age of 450.4 ± 3.9 Ma (0.86% at 2SE). The

  10. Nuclear forensic analysis of uranium oxide powders interdicted in Victoria, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Kristo, Michael Joseph; Keegan, Elizabeth; Colella, Michael; Williams, Ross; Lindvall, Rachel; Eppich, Gary; Roberts, Sarah; Borg, Lars; Gaffney, Amy; Plaue, Jonathan; Knight, Kim; Loi, Elaine; Hotchkis, Michael; Moody, Kenton; Singleton, Michael; Robel, Martin; Hutcheon, Ian

    2015-04-13

    Nuclear forensic analysis was conducted on two uranium samples confiscated during a police investigation in Victoria, Australia. The first sample, designated NSR-F-270409-1, was a depleted uranium powder of moderate purity (~1000 μg/g total elemental impurities). The chemical form of the uranium was a compound similar to K2(UO2)3O4·4H2O. While aliquoting NSR-F-270409-1 for analysis, the body and head of a Tineid moth was discovered in the sample. The second sample, designated NSR-F-270409-2, was also a depleted uranium powder. It was of reasonably high purity (~380 μg/g total elemental impurities). The chemical form of the uranium was primarily UO3·2H2O, with minor phases of U3O8 and UO2. While aliquoting NSR-F-270409-2 for analysis, a metal staple of unknown origin was discovered in the sample. The presence of 236U and 232U in both samples indicates that the uranium feed stocks for these samples experienced a neutron flux at some point in their history. The reactor burn-up calculated from the isotopic composition of the uranium is consistent with that of spent fuel from natural uranium (NU) fueled Pu production. These nuclear forensic conclusions allow us to categorically exclude Australia as the origin of the material and greatly reduce the number of candidate sources.

  11. Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2008-08-01

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating-current, AC, to direct-current, DC, conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

  12. 3D visualisation and analysis of single and coalescing tracks in Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, David; Gillmore, Gavin; Brown, Louise; Petford, Nick

    2010-05-01

    Exposure to radon gas (222Rn) and associated ionising decay products can cause lung cancer in humans (1). Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) can be used to monitor radon concentrations (2). Radon particles form tracks in the detectors and these tracks can be etched in order to enable 2D surface image analysis. We have previously shown that confocal microscopy can be used for 3D visualisation of etched SSNTDs (3). The aim of the study was to further investigate track angles and patterns in SSNTDs. A 'LEXT' confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan) was used to acquire 3D image datasets of five CR-39 plastic SSNTD's. The resultant 3D visualisations were analysed by eye and inclination angles assessed on selected tracks. From visual assessment, single isolated tracks as well as coalescing tracks were observed on the etched detectors. In addition varying track inclination angles were observed. Several different patterns of track formation were seen such as single isolated and double coalescing tracks. The observed track angles of inclination may help to assess the angle at which alpha particles hit the detector. Darby, S et al. Radon in homes and risk of lung cancer : collaborative analysis of individual data from 13 European case-control studies. British Medical Journal 2005; 330, 223-226. Phillips, P.S., Denman, A.R., Crockett, R.G.M., Gillmore, G., Groves-Kirkby, C.J., Woolridge, A., Comparative Analysis of Weekly vs. Three monthly radon measurements in dwellings. DEFRA Report No., DEFRA/RAS/03.006. (2004). Wertheim D, Gillmore G, Brown L, and Petford N. A new method of imaging particle tracks in Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors. Journal of Microscopy 2010; 237: 1-6.

  13. Improved spatial resolution for U-series dating of opal at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA, using ion-microprobe and microdigestion methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paces, J.B.; Neymark, L.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Persing, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Two novel methods of in situ isotope analysis, ion microprobe and microdigestion, were used for 230Th/U and 234U/238U dating of finely laminated opal hemispheres formed in unsaturated felsic tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, proposed site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. Both methods allow analysis of layers as many as several orders of magnitude thinner than standard methods using total hemisphere digestion that were reported previously. Average growth rates calculated from data at this improved spatial resolution verified that opal grew at extremely slow rates over the last million years. Growth rates of 0.58 and 0.69 mm/m.y. were obtained for the outer 305 and 740 ??m of two opal hemispheres analyzed by ion microprobe, and 0.68 mm/m.y. for the outer 22 ??m of one of these same hemispheres analyzed by sequential microdigestion. These Pleistocene growth rates are 2 to 10 times slower than those calculated for older secondary calcite and silica mineral coatings deposited over the last 5 to 10 m.y. dated by the U-Pb method and may reflect differences between Miocene and Pleistocene seepage flux. The microdigestion data also imply that opal growth rates may have varied over the last 40 k.y. These data are the first indication that growth rates and associated seepage in the proposed repository horizon may correlate with changes in late Pleistocene climate, involving faster growth during wetter, cooler climates (glacial maximum), slower growth during transition climates, and no growth during the most arid climate (modern). Data collected at this refined spatial scale may lead to a better understanding of the hydrologic variability expected within the thick unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain over the time scale of interest for radioactive waste isolation. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Hg diffusion in books of XVIII and XIX centuries by synchrotron microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessanha, S.; Carvalho, M. L.; Manso, M.; Guilherme, A.; Marques, A. F.; Perez, C. A.

    2009-08-01

    The pigment vermilion (HgS) was used to color the fore edge, tail and head of books. Dissemination and quantification of Hg present in the ink used to color books from XVIII and XIX centuries are reported. Mercury is a very toxic element for the human body, therefore it is extremely important to know whether Hg tends to disseminate throughout the paper or stays confined to the borders of the books with less danger for readers. Synchrotron X-ray microprobe was used to evaluate Hg dissemination from the border to the centre of the paper sheet. The diffusion pattern of Hg was compared with the results obtained by a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and mean quantitative calculations were obtained by a stationary X-ray fluorescence system with triaxial geometry. The results showed high concentrations of Hg in the external regions, but no diffusion was observed for the inner parts of the paper.

  15. Tetramine dichloro-palladium subcellular localization in the kidney: electron microprobe study.

    PubMed

    Berry, J P

    1987-01-01

    Palladium salt has been used for some time in experimental therapy protocols; with this in mind, we carried out a study of the effect of tetramine dichloro-palladium (soluble salt) upon kidney cells. Using an electron microprobe, we were able to detect the presence of palladium associated with sulfur and iron in the lysosomes of the proximal tubule cells. Our results were compared with those obtained using Cis-diaminedichloro-platinum (Cis-DDP), an anti-cancer drug used in the treatment of diverse tumors. The mechanism of intralysosomal concentration of palladium as a non soluble salt associated with sulfur appeared to be related to local sulfatase activity. Finally, iron concentration appeared to be related to the inhibition process of erythropoiesis.

  16. Transparent intracortical microprobe array for simultaneous spatiotemporal optical stimulation and multichannel electrical recording.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joonhee; Ozden, Ilker; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2015-12-01

    Optogenetics, the selective excitation or inhibition of neural circuits by light, has become a transformative approach for dissecting functional brain microcircuits, particularly in in vivo rodent models, owing to the expanding libraries of opsins and promoters. Yet there is a lack of versatile devices that can deliver spatiotemporally patterned light while performing simultaneous sensing to map the dynamics of perturbed neural populations at the network level. We have created optoelectronic actuator and sensor microarrays that can be used as monolithic intracortical implants, fabricated from an optically transparent, electrically highly conducting semiconductor ZnO crystal. The devices can perform simultaneous light delivery and electrical readout in precise spatial registry across the microprobe array. We applied the device technology in transgenic mice to study light-perturbed cortical microcircuit dynamics and their effects on behavior. The functionality of this device can be further expanded to optical imaging and patterned electrical microstimulation.

  17. LASER MICROPROBE **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar DATING OF MINERAL GRAINS IN SITU.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutter, J.F.; Hartung, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    A laser-microprobe attached to a mass spectrometer for **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar age determination of single mineral grains in geological materials has been made operational at the US Geological Survey, Reston, VA. This microanalytical technique involves focusing a pulsed laser beam onto a sample contained in an ultra-high vacuum chamber attached to a rare-gas mass spectrometer. Argon in the neutron-irradiated sample is released by heating with the laser pulse and its isotopic composition is measured to yield an **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar age. Laser probe **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar ages of single mineral grains measured in situ can aid greatly in understanding the chronology of many geological situations where datable minerals are present but are not physically separable in quantities needed for conventional age dating.

  18. Microprobe Evaluations of Grain Boundary Segregation in KM4 and IN100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Smith, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    Turbine disk alloys subjected to fatigue cycles with dwells at high temperatures and stresses can fail by cracking along grain boundaries. This could be due to concentrated creep deformation or environmental attack at grain boundaries. It would be important to identify any chemical segregation along grain boundaries to aid understanding of this intergranular failure mode. The objective of this study was to evaluate the degree of chemical segregation present at the grain boundaries of two disk alloys, KM4 and IN 100. An electron microprobe employing wavelength dispersive x-ray chemical analyses was used to characterize the chemistry along multiple grain boundaries in metallographically prepared samples of each alloy. Some degrees of boron, chromium, and cobalt enrichment of grain boundaries were observed in each alloy.

  19. Electron microprobe analyses of Ca, S, Mg and P distribution in incisors of Spacelab-3 rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, G. D.; Simmons, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of Ca, S, Mg and P was mapped within the incisors of Spacelab-3 rats using an electron microprobe. The data indicate that Flight rats maintained in orbit for 7 days have significantly higher Ca/Mg ratios in dentin due to both higher Ca and lower Mg content than in dentin of ground-based Controls. There is no statistical difference in distribution of either P or S within Fligth animals and Controls, but there is clear indication that, for P at least, the reason is the greater variability of the Control data. These results are consistent with those obtained on a previous NASA/COSMOS flight of 18.5 days duration, although they are not pronounced. The results further suggest that continuously growing rat incisors provide useful records of the effects of weightlessness on Ca metabolism.

  20. Garnet/high-silica rhyolite trace element partition coefficients measured by ion microprobe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Bacon, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Garnet/liquid trace element partition coefficients have been measured in situ by ion microprobe in a rhyolite from Monache Mountain, California. Partition coefficients are reported for La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Dy, Er, Yb, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Sr, Y, and Zr. The in situ analyses avoid the problem of contamination of the garnet phase by trace element-rich accessory minerals encountered in traditional bulk phenocryst/matrix partitioning studies. The partitioning pattern for the rare earth elements (REEs, excluding Eu) is smooth and rises steeply from the light to the heavy REEs with no sharp kinks or changes in slope, unlike patterns for garnet /silicic liquid REE partitioning determined by bulk methods. This difference suggests that the previous determinations by bulk methods are in error, having suffered from contamination of the phenocryst separates. ?? 1992.