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Sample records for nuclear parton distribution

  1. Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Schienbein, I.; Yu, J.-Y.; Keppel, Cynthia; Morfin, Jorge; Olness, F.; Owens, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    We study nuclear effects of charged current deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering in the framework of a chi^2 analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs). We extract a set of iron PDFs which are used to compute x_Bj-dependent and Q^2-dependent nuclear correction factors for iron structure functions which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs. We compare our results with nuclear correction factors from neutrino-nucleus scattering models and correction factors for charged-lepton--iron scattering. We find that, except for very high x_Bj, our correction factors differ in both shape and magnitude from the correction factors of the models and charged-lepton scattering.

  2. Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    I. Schienbein, J.Y. Yu, C. Keppel, J.G. Morfin, F. Olness, J.F. Owens

    2009-06-01

    We study nuclear effects of charged current deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering in the framework of a {chi}{sup 2} analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs). We extract a set of iron PDFs which are used to compute x{sub Bj}-dependent and Q{sup 2}-dependent nuclear correction factors for iron structure functions which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs. We compare our results with nuclear correction factors from neutrino-nucleus scattering models and correction factors for charged-lepton--iron scattering. We find that, except for very high x{sub Bj}, our correction factors differ in both shape and magnitude from the correction factors of the models and charged-lepton scattering.

  3. NUCLEAR MODIFICATION TO PARTON DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS AND PARTON SATURATION.

    SciTech Connect

    QIU, J.-W.

    2006-11-14

    We introduce a generalized definition of parton distribution functions (PDFs) for a more consistent all-order treatment of power corrections. We present a new set of modified DGLAP evolution equations for nuclear PDFs, and show that the resummed {alpha}{sub s}A{sup 1/3}/Q{sup 2}-type of leading nuclear size enhanced power corrections significantly slow down the growth of gluon density at small-x. We discuss the relation between the calculated power corrections and the saturation phenomena.

  4. Nuclear modifications of Parton Distribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeluyi, Adeola Adeleke

    This dissertation addresses a central question of modern nuclear physics: how does the behavior of fundamental degrees of freedom (quarks and gluons) change in the nuclear environment? This is an important aspect of experimental studies at current facilities such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLAB). It is also highly relevant to planned experimental efforts at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the future Electron Ion Collider (EIC). All these facilities probe matter via collisions involving nuclei; thus complications arise due to the presence of the attendant nuclear medium. Theoretical efforts to understand and interpret experimental results from such collisions are therefore largely dependent on the resolution of this question. The development of nuclear physics demonstrates that theoretical description is most efficient in terms of the effective degrees of freedom relevant to the scale (energy) being probed. Thus at low energies, nuclei are described as bound states of protons and neutrons (nucleons). At higher energies, the nucleons are no longer elementary, but are revealed to possess an underlying substructure: they are made up of quarks and gluons, collectively termed partons. The mometum distributions of these partons in the nucleon are referred to as Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs). Parton distributions can be determined from experimental measurements of structure functions. The ratio of nuclear structure functions to nucleon structure functions (generically referred to as nuclear ratio) is a measure of the nuclear modifications of the free nucleon PDFs. Thus a study of the nuclear ratio suffices to gain an understanding of nuclear modifications. In this dissertation we aim to describe theoretically nuclear modifications in a restricted region where the nuclear ratio is less than unity, the so

  5. Nuclear parton distributions and the Drell-Yan process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulagin, S. A.; Petti, R.

    2014-10-01

    We study the nuclear parton distribution functions on the basis of our recently developed semimicroscopic model, which takes into account a number of nuclear effects including nuclear shadowing, Fermi motion and nuclear binding, nuclear meson-exchange currents, and off-shell corrections to bound nucleon distributions. We discuss in detail the dependencies of nuclear effects on the type of parton distribution (nuclear sea vs valence), as well as on the parton flavor (isospin). We apply the resulting nuclear parton distributions to calculate ratios of cross sections for proton-induced Drell-Yan production off different nuclear targets. We obtain a good agreement on the magnitude, target and projectile x, and the dimuon mass dependence of proton-nucleus Drell-Yan process data from the E772 and E866 experiments at Fermilab. We also provide nuclear corrections for the Drell-Yan data from the E605 experiment.

  6. Nuclear Parton Distributions with the LHeC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Max

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear parton distributions are far from being known today because of an infant experimental base. Based on design studies of the LHeC and using new simulations, of the inclusive neutral and charged current cross section measurements and of the strange, charm and beauty densities in nuclei, it is demonstrated how that energy frontier electron-ion collider would unfold the complete set of nuclear PDFs in a hugely extended kinematic range of deep inelastic scattering, extending in Bjorken x down to values near to 10-6 in the perturbative domain. Together with a very precise and complete set of proton PDFs, the LHeC nPDFs will thoroughly change the theoretical understanding of parton dynamics and structure inside hadrons.

  7. Leading twist nuclear shadowing, nuclear generalized parton distributions and nuclear DVCS at small x

    SciTech Connect

    Guzey, Vadim; Goeke, Klaus; Siddikov, Marat

    2009-01-01

    We generalize the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing and calculate quark and gluon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) of spinless nuclei. We predict very large nuclear shadowing for nuclear GPDs. In the limit of the purely transverse momentum transfer, our nuclear GPDs become impact parameter dependent nuclear parton distributions (PDFs). Nuclear shadowing induces non-trivial correlations between the impact parameter $b$ and the light-cone fraction $x$. We make predictions for the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) amplitude and the DVCS cross section on $^{208}$Pb at high energies. We calculate the cross section of the Bethe-Heitler (BH) process and address the issue of the extraction of the DVCS signal from the $e A \\to e \\gamma A$ cross section. We find that the $e A \\to e \\gamma A$ differential cross section is dominated by DVCS at the momentum transfer $t$ near the minima of the nuclear form factor. We also find that nuclear shadowing leads

  8. Global NLO Analysis of Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, M.; Kumano, S.; Nagai, T.-H.

    2008-02-21

    Nuclear parton distribution functions (NPDFs) are determined by a global analysis of experimental measurements on structure-function ratios F{sub 2}{sup A}/F{sub 2}{sup A{sup '}} and Drell-Yan cross section ratios {sigma}{sub DY}{sup A}/{sigma}{sub DY}{sup A{sup '}}, and their uncertainties are estimated by the Hessian method. The NPDFs are obtained in both leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) of {alpha}{sub s}. As a result, valence-quark distributions are relatively well determined, whereas antiquark distributions at x>0.2 and gluon distributions in the whole x region have large uncertainties. The NLO uncertainties are slightly smaller than the LO ones; however, such a NLO improvement is not as significant as the nucleonic case.

  9. EPPS16: nuclear parton distributions with LHC data.

    PubMed

    Eskola, Kari J; Paakkinen, Petja; Paukkunen, Hannu; Salgado, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a global analysis of collinearly factorized nuclear parton distribution functions (PDFs) including, for the first time, data constraints from LHC proton-lead collisions. In comparison to our previous analysis, EPS09, where data only from charged-lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering (DIS), Drell-Yan (DY) dilepton production in proton-nucleus collisions and inclusive pion production in deuteron-nucleus collisions were the input, we now increase the variety of data constraints to cover also neutrino-nucleus DIS and low-mass DY production in pion-nucleus collisions. The new LHC data significantly extend the kinematic reach of the data constraints. We now allow much more freedom for the flavor dependence of nuclear effects than in other currently available analyses. As a result, especially the uncertainty estimates are more objective flavor by flavor. The neutrino DIS plays a pivotal role in obtaining a mutually consistent behavior for both up and down valence quarks, and the LHC dijet data clearly constrain gluons at large momentum fraction. Mainly for insufficient statistics, the pion-nucleus DY and heavy-gauge-boson production in proton-lead collisions impose less visible constraints. The outcome - a new set of next-to-leading order nuclear PDFs called EPPS16 - is made available for applications in high-energy nuclear collisions.

  10. EPPS16: nuclear parton distributions with LHC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskola, Kari J.; Paakkinen, Petja; Paukkunen, Hannu; Salgado, Carlos A.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a global analysis of collinearly factorized nuclear parton distribution functions (PDFs) including, for the first time, data constraints from LHC proton-lead collisions. In comparison to our previous analysis, EPS09, where data only from charged-lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering (DIS), Drell-Yan (DY) dilepton production in proton-nucleus collisions and inclusive pion production in deuteron-nucleus collisions were the input, we now increase the variety of data constraints to cover also neutrino-nucleus DIS and low-mass DY production in pion-nucleus collisions. The new LHC data significantly extend the kinematic reach of the data constraints. We now allow much more freedom for the flavor dependence of nuclear effects than in other currently available analyses. As a result, especially the uncertainty estimates are more objective flavor by flavor. The neutrino DIS plays a pivotal role in obtaining a mutually consistent behavior for both up and down valence quarks, and the LHC dijet data clearly constrain gluons at large momentum fraction. Mainly for insufficient statistics, the pion-nucleus DY and heavy-gauge-boson production in proton-lead collisions impose less visible constraints. The outcome - a new set of next-to-leading order nuclear PDFs called EPPS16 - is made available for applications in high-energy nuclear collisions.

  11. nCTEQ15 - Global analysis of nuclear parton distributions with uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Kusina, A.; Kovarik, K.; Jezo, T.; Clark, D. B.; Keppel, C.; Lyonnet, F.; Morfin, J. G.; Olness, F. I.; Owens, J. F.; Schienbein, I.; Yu, J. Y.

    2015-09-04

    We present the first official release of the nCTEQ nuclear parton distribution functions with errors. The main addition to the previous nCTEQ PDFs is the introduction of PDF uncertainties based on the Hessian method. Another important addition is the inclusion of pion production data from RHIC that give us a handle on constraining the gluon PDF. This contribution summarizes our results from arXiv:1509.00792, and concentrates on the comparison with other groups providing nuclear parton distributions.

  12. nCTEQ15 - Global analysis of nuclear parton distributions with uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Kusina, A.; Jezo, T.; Clark, D. B.; Keppel, Cynthia; Lyonnet, F.; Morfin, Jorge; Olness, F. I.; Owens, Jeff; Schienbein, I.

    2015-09-01

    We present the first official release of the nCTEQ nuclear parton distribution functions with errors. The main addition to the previous nCTEQ PDFs is the introduction of PDF uncertainties based on the Hessian method. Another important addition is the inclusion of pion production data from RHIC that give us a handle on constraining the gluon PDF. This contribution summarizes our results from arXiv:1509.00792 and concentrates on the comparison with other groups providing nuclear parton distributions.

  13. Generalized parton distributions in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey

    2009-12-01

    Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) of nuclei describe the distribution of quarks and gluons in nuclei probed in hard exclusive reactions, such as e.g. deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS). Nuclear GPDs and nuclear DVCS allow us to study new aspects of many traditional nuclear effects (nuclear shadowing, EMC effect, medium modifications of the bound nucleons) as well as to access novel nuclear effects. In my talk, I review recent theoretical progress in the area of nuclear GPDs.

  14. Impact of hadronic and nuclear corrections on global analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro; Accardi, Alberto; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2014-02-01

    We present the first results of a new global next-to-leading order analysis of spin-dependent parton distribution functions from the most recent world data on inclusive polarized deep-inelastic scattering, focusing in particular on the large-x and low-Q^2 regions. By directly fitting polarization asymmetries we eliminate biases introduced by using polarized structure function data extracted under nonuniform assumptions for the unpolarized structure functions. For analysis of the large-x data we implement nuclear smearing corrections for deuterium and 3He nuclei, and systematically include target mass and higher twist corrections to the g_1 and g_2 structure functions at low Q^2. We also explore the effects of Q^2 and W^2 cuts in the data sets, and the potential impact of future data on the behavior of the spin-dependent parton distributions at large x.

  15. Hadron production in deuteron-gold collisions and nuclear parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Adeluyi, Adeola; Fai, George

    2007-11-15

    We calculate nuclear modification factors R{sub dAu}, central-to-peripheral ratios, R{sub CP}, and pseudorapidity asymmetries Y{sub Asym} in deuteron-gold collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV in the framework of leading-order (LO) perturbative quantum chromodynamics. We use the Eskola-Kolhinen-Salgado (EKS), the Frankfurt-Guzey-Strikman (FGS), and the Hirai-Kumano-Nagai (HKN) nuclear parton distribution functions and the Albino-Kramer-Kniehl (AKK) fragmentation functions in our calculations. Results are compared to experimental data from the BRAHMS and STAR collaborations.

  16. Hadron production in deuteron-gold collisions and nuclear parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeluyi, Adeola; Fai, George

    2007-11-01

    We calculate nuclear modification factors RdAu, central-to-peripheral ratios, RCP, and pseudorapidity asymmetries YAsym in deuteron-gold collisions at s=200 GeV in the framework of leading-order (LO) perturbative quantum chromodynamics. We use the Eskola-Kolhinen-Salgado (EKS), the Frankfurt-Guzey-Strikman (FGS), and the Hirai-Kumano-Nagai (HKN) nuclear parton distribution functions and the Albino-Kramer-Kniehl (AKK) fragmentation functions in our calculations. Results are compared to experimental data from the BRAHMS and STAR collaborations.

  17. Parton Distributions Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    de Barbaro, L.; Keller, S. A.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schellman, H.; Tung, W.-K.

    2000-07-20

    This report summarizes the activities of the Parton Distributions Working Group of the QCD and Weak Boson Physics workshop held in preparation for Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. The main focus of this working group was to investigate the different issues associated with the development of quantitative tools to estimate parton distribution functions uncertainties. In the conclusion, the authors introduce a Manifesto that describes an optimal method for reporting data.

  18. nCTEQ15 - Global analysis of nuclear parton distributions with uncertainties in the CTEQ framework

    SciTech Connect

    Kovarik, K.; Kusina, A.; Clark, D. B.; Keppel, C.; Lyonnet, F.; Morfin, J. G.; Olness, F. I.; Owens, J. F.; Schienbein, I.

    2016-04-28

    We present the new nCTEQ15 set of nuclear parton distribution functions with uncertainties. This fit extends the CTEQ proton PDFs to include the nuclear dependence using data on nuclei all the way up to 208Pb. The uncertainties are determined using the Hessian method with an optimal rescaling of the eigenvectors to accurately represent the uncertainties for the chosen tolerance criteria. In addition to the Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and Drell-Yan (DY) processes, we also include inclusive pion production data from RHIC to help constrain the nuclear gluon PDF. Here, we investigate the correlation of the data sets with specific nPDF flavor components, and asses the impact of individual experiments. We also provide comparisons of the nCTEQ15 set with recent fits from other groups.

  19. nCTEQ15 - Global analysis of nuclear parton distributions with uncertainties in the CTEQ framework

    DOE PAGES

    Kovarik, K.; Kusina, A.; Jezo, T.; ...

    2016-04-28

    We present the new nCTEQ15 set of nuclear parton distribution functions with uncertainties. This fit extends the CTEQ proton PDFs to include the nuclear dependence using data on nuclei all the way up to 208Pb. The uncertainties are determined using the Hessian method with an optimal rescaling of the eigenvectors to accurately represent the uncertainties for the chosen tolerance criteria. In addition to the Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and Drell-Yan (DY) processes, we also include inclusive pion production data from RHIC to help constrain the nuclear gluon PDF. Here, we investigate the correlation of the data sets with specific nPDFmore » flavor components, and asses the impact of individual experiments. We also provide comparisons of the nCTEQ15 set with recent fits from other groups.« less

  20. nCTEQ15 - Global analysis of nuclear parton distributions with uncertainties in the CTEQ framework

    SciTech Connect

    Kovarik, K.; Kusina, A.; Clark, D. B.; Keppel, C.; Lyonnet, F.; Morfin, J. G.; Olness, F. I.; Owens, J. F.; Schienbein, I.

    2016-04-28

    We present the new nCTEQ15 set of nuclear parton distribution functions with uncertainties. This fit extends the CTEQ proton PDFs to include the nuclear dependence using data on nuclei all the way up to 208Pb. The uncertainties are determined using the Hessian method with an optimal rescaling of the eigenvectors to accurately represent the uncertainties for the chosen tolerance criteria. In addition to the Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and Drell-Yan (DY) processes, we also include inclusive pion production data from RHIC to help constrain the nuclear gluon PDF. Here, we investigate the correlation of the data sets with specific nPDF flavor components, and asses the impact of individual experiments. We also provide comparisons of the nCTEQ15 set with recent fits from other groups.

  1. Medium Effects in Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Huey-Wen Lin

    2011-12-01

    A defining experiment of high-energy physics in the 1980s was that of the EMC collaboration where it was first observed that parton distributions in nuclei are non-trivially related to those in the proton. This result implies that the presence of the nuclear medium plays an important role and an understanding of this from QCD has been an important goal ever since Here we investigate analogous, but technically simpler, effects in QCD and examine how the lowest moment of the pion parton distribution is modified by the presence of a Bose-condensed gas of pions or kaons.

  2. Determination of nuclear parton distribution functions and their uncertainties at next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, M.; Kumano, S.; Nagai, T.-H.

    2007-12-15

    Nuclear parton distribution functions (NPDFs) are determined by global analyses of experimental data on structure-function ratios F{sub 2}{sup A}/F{sub 2}{sup A'} and Drell-Yan cross-section ratios {sigma}{sub DY}{sup A}/{sigma}{sub DY}{sup A'}. The analyses are done in the leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) of running coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}. Uncertainties of the NPDFs are estimated in both LO and NLO for finding possible NLO improvement. Valence-quark distributions are well determined, and antiquark distributions are also determined at x<0.1. However, the antiquark distributions have large uncertainties at x>0.2. Gluon modifications cannot be fixed at this stage. Although the advantage of the NLO analysis, in comparison with the LO one, is generally the sensitivity to the gluon distributions, gluon uncertainties are almost the same in the LO and NLO. It is because current scaling-violation data are not accurate enough to determine precise nuclear gluon distributions. Modifications of the PDFs in the deuteron are also discussed by including data on the proton-deuteron ratio F{sub 2}{sup D}/F{sub 2}{sup p} in the analysis. A code is provided for calculating the NPDFs and their uncertainties at given x and Q{sup 2} in the LO and NLO.

  3. Partonic Transverse Momentum Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2010-08-04

    In recent years parton distributions have been generalized to account also for transverse degrees of freedom and new sets of more general distributions, Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) parton distributions and fragmentation functions were introduced. Different experiments worldwide (HERMES, COMPASS, CLAS, JLab-Hall A) have measurements of TMDs in semi-inclusive DIS processes as one of their main focuses of research. TMD studies are also an important part of the present and future Drell-Yan experiments at RICH and JPARC and GSI, respectively, Studies of TMDs are also one of the main driving forces of the Jefferson Lab (JLab) 12 GeV upgrade project. Progress in phenomenology and theory is flourishing as well. In this talk an overview of the latest developments in studies of TMDs will be given and newly released results, ongoing activities, as well as planned near term and future measurements will be discussed.

  4. The CJ12 parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Accardi, Alberto; Owens, Jeff F.

    2013-07-01

    Three new sets of next-to-leading order parton distribution functions (PDFs) are presented, determined by global fits to a wide variety of data for hard scattering processes. The analysis includes target mass and higher twist corrections needed for the description of deep-inelastic scattering data at large x and low Q^2, and nuclear corrections for deuterium targets. The PDF sets correspond to three different models for the nuclear effects, and provide a more realistic uncertainty range for the d quark PDF compared with previous fits. Applications to weak boson production at colliders are also discussed.

  5. Applicability of pion-nucleus Drell-Yan data in global analysis of nuclear parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paakkinen, Petja; Eskola, Kari J.; Paukkunen, Hannu

    2017-05-01

    Despite the success of modern nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs) in describing nuclear hard-process data, they still suffer from large uncertainties. One of the poorly constrained features is the possible asymmetry in nuclear modifications of valence u and d quarks. We study the possibility of using pion-nucleus Drell-Yan dilepton data as a new constraint in the global analysis of nPDFs. We find that the nuclear cross-section ratios from the NA3, NA10 and E615 experiments can be used without imposing significant new theoretical uncertainties and, in particular, that these datasets may have some constraining power on the u/d-asymmetry in nuclei.

  6. Unintegrated double parton distributions - A summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golec-Biernat, Krzysztof; Staśto, Anna

    2017-03-01

    We present main elements of the construction of unintegrated double parton distribution functions which depend on transverse momenta of partons. We follow the method proposed by Kimber, Martin and Ryskin for a construction of unintegrated single parton distributions from the standard parton distribution functions.

  7. Extractions of polarized and unpolarized parton distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    An overview of our ongoing extractions of parton distribution functions of the nucleon is given. First JAM results on the determination of spin-dependent parton distribution functions from world data on polarized deep-inelastic scattering are presented first, and followed by a short report on the status of the JR unpolarized parton distributions. Different aspects of PDF analysis are briefly discussed, including effects of the nuclear structure of targets, target-mass corrections and higher twist contributions to the structure functions.

  8. Structure functions and parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.D.; Stirling, W.J.; Roberts, R.G.

    1995-07-01

    The MRS parton distribution analysis is described. The latest sets are shown to give an excellent description of a wide range of deep-inelastic and other hard scattering data. Two important theoretical issues-the behavior of the distributions at small x and the flavor structure of the quark sea-are discussed in detail. A comparison with the new structure function data from HERA is made, and the outlook for the future is discussed.

  9. CTEQ5 parton distributions and ongoing studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlmann, S.

    1999-09-21

    The CTEQ5 parton distributions are described, with emphasis on the changes since CTEQ4. The most significant change is in the quark flavor dependence of the parton distributions. Ongoing studies of large-x parton distributions are discussed. Luminosity estimates are given for HERA in order to improve the present uncertainties of the quark distributions. A discussion of how to improve the gluon uncertainty in the future is presented.

  10. Jet correlations from unintegrated parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Hautmann, F.; Jung, H.

    2008-10-13

    Transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions can be introduced gauge-invariantly in QCD from high-energy factorization. We discuss Monte Carlo applications of these distributions to parton showers and jet physics, with a view to the implications for the Monte Carlo description of complex hadronic final states with multiple hard scales at the LHC.

  11. Parton distributions with LHC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Bertone, Valerio; Carrazza, Stefano; Deans, Christopher S.; Del Debbio, Luigi; Forte, Stefano; Guffanti, Alberto; Hartland, Nathan P.; Latorre, José I.; Rojo, Juan; Ubiali, Maria; Nnpdf Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    We present the first determination of parton distributions of the nucleon at NLO and NNLO based on a global data set which includes LHC data: NNPDF2.3. Our data set includes, besides the deep inelastic, Drell-Yan, gauge boson production and jet data already used in previous global PDF determinations, all the relevant LHC data for which experimental systematic uncertainties are currently available: ATLAS and LHCb W and Z rapidity distributions from the 2010 run, CMS W electron asymmetry data from the 2011 run, and ATLAS inclusive jet cross-sections from the 2010 run. We introduce an improved implementation of the FastKernel method which allows us to fit to this extended data set, and also to adopt a more effective minimization methodology. We present the NNPDF2.3 PDF sets, and compare them to the NNPDF2.1 sets to assess the impact of the LHC data. We find that all the LHC data are broadly consistent with each other and with all the older data sets included in the fit. We present predictions for various standard candle cross-sections, and compare them to those obtained previously using NNPDF2.1, and specifically discuss the impact of ATLAS electroweak data on the determination of the strangeness fraction of the proton. We also present collider PDF sets, constructed using only data from HERA, the Tevatron and the LHC, but find that this data set is neither precise nor complete enough for a competitive PDF determination.

  12. Unraveling hadron structure with generalized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Belitsky; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2004-10-01

    The recently introduced generalized parton distributions have emerged as a universal tool to describe hadrons in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. They combine the features of form factors, parton densities and distribution amplitudes - the functions used for a long time in studies of hadronic structure. Generalized parton distributions are analogous to the phase-space Wigner quasi-probability function of non-relativistic quantum mechanics which encodes full information on a quantum-mechanical system. We give an extensive review of main achievements in the development of this formalism. We discuss physical interpretation and basic properties of generalized parton distributions, their modeling and QCD evolution in the leading and next-to-leading orders. We describe how these functions enter a wide class of exclusive reactions, such as electro- and photo-production of photons, lepton pairs, or mesons.

  13. Generalized Valon Model for Double Parton Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broniowski, Wojciech; Ruiz Arriola, Enrique; Golec-Biernat, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    We show how the double parton distributions may be obtained consistently from the many-body light-cone wave functions. We illustrate the method on the example of the pion with two Fock components. The procedure, by construction, satisfies the Gaunt-Stirling sum rules. The resulting single parton distributions of valence quarks and gluons are consistent with a phenomenological parametrization at a low scale.

  14. Transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2011-10-24

    Transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) provide three-dimensional images of the partonic structure of the nucleon in momentum space. We made impressive progress in understanding TMDs, both from the theoretical and experimental point of view. This brief overview on TMDs is divided in two parts: in the first, an essential list of achievements is presented. In the second, a selection of open questions is discussed.

  15. Constraints on parton distribution from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Bodek, A.; CDF Collaboration

    1995-10-01

    The asymmetry in W{sup -} - W{sup +} production in p{bar p} collisions and Drell-Yan data place tight constraints on parton distributions functions. The W asymmetry data constrain the slope of the quark distribution ratio d(x)/u(x) in the x range 0.007-0.27. The published W asymmetry results from the CDF 1992.3 data ({approx} 20 pb{sup -1}) greatly reduce the systematic error originating from the choice of PDF`s in the W mass measurement at CDF. These published results have also been included in the CTEQ3, MRSA, and GRV94 parton distribution fits. These modern parton distribution functions axe still in good agreement with the new 1993-94 CDF data({approx} 108 pb{sup -1} combined). Preliminary results from CDF for the Drell-Yan cross section in the mass range 11-350 GeV/c{sup 2} are discussed.

  16. The parton distribution function library

    SciTech Connect

    Plothow-Besch, H.

    1995-07-01

    This article describes an integrated package of Parton Density Functions called PDFLIB which has been added to the CERN Program Library Pool W999 and is labelled as W5051. In this package all the different sets of parton density functions of the Nucleon, Pion and the Photon which are available today have been put together. All these sets have been combined in a consistent way such that they all have similar calling sequences and no external data files have to be read in anymore. A default set has been prepared, although those preferring their own set or wanting to test a new one may do so within the package. The package also offers a program to calculate the strong coupling constant {alpha}, to first or second order. The correct {Lambda}{sub QCD} associated to the selected set of structure functions and the number of allowed flavours with respect to the given Q{sup 2} is automatically used in the calculation. The selection of sets, the program parameters as well as the possibilities to modify the defaults and to control errors occurred during execution are described.

  17. Generalized parton distributions in the deuteron.

    PubMed

    Berger, E R; Cano, F; Diehl, M; Pire, B

    2001-10-01

    We introduce generalized quark and gluon distributions in the deuteron, which can be measured in exclusive processes like deeply virtual Compton scattering and meson electroproduction. We discuss the basic properties of these distributions and point out how they probe the interplay of nucleon and parton degrees of freedom in the deuteron wave function.

  18. Progress in the dynamical parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro

    2012-06-01

    The present status of the (JR) dynamical parton distribution functions is reported. Different theoretical improvements, including the determination of the strange sea input distribution, the treatment of correlated errors and the inclusion of alternative data sets, are discussed. Highlights in the ongoing developments as well as (very) preliminary results in the determination of the strong coupling constant are presented.

  19. Generalized Parton Distributions: Visions, Basics, and Realities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, D.

    2014-06-01

    An introductory to generalized parton distributions (GDPs) is given which emphasizes their spectral property and its uses as well as the equivalence of various GDP representations. Furthermore, the status of the theory and phenomenology of hard exclusive processes is shortly reviewed.

  20. Nonperturbative evolution of parton quasi-distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radyushkin, A. V.

    2017-04-01

    Using the formalism of parton virtuality distribution functions (VDFs) we establish a connection between the transverse momentum dependent distributions (TMDs) F (x , k⊥2) and quasi-distributions (PQDs) Q (y ,p3) introduced recently by X. Ji for lattice QCD extraction of parton distributions f (x). We build models for PQDs from the VDF-based models for soft TMDs, and analyze the p3 dependence of the resulting PQDs. We observe a strong nonperturbative evolution of PQDs for small and moderately large values of p3 reflecting the transverse momentum dependence of TMDs. Thus, the study of PQDs on the lattice in the domain of strong nonperturbative effects opens a new perspective for investigation of the 3-dimensional hadron structure.

  1. Momentum transfer dependence of generalized parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Neetika

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the model for parametrization of the momentum dependence of nucleon generalized parton distributions in the light of recent MRST measurements of parton distribution functions (A.D. Martin et al., Eur. Phys. J. C 63, 189 (2009)). Our parametrization method with a minimum set of free parameters give a sufficiently good description of data for Dirac and Pauli electromagnetic form factors of proton and neutron at small and intermediate values of momentum transfer. We also calculate the GPDs for up- and down-quarks by decomposing the electromagnetic form factors for the nucleon using the charge and isospin symmetry and also study the evolution of GPDs to a higher scale. We further investigate the transverse charge densities for both the unpolarized and transversely polarized nucleon and compare our results with Kelly's distribution.

  2. Generalized parton distributions and exclusive processes

    SciTech Connect

    Guzey, Vadim

    2013-10-01

    In last fifteen years, GPDs have emerged as a powerful tool to reveal such aspects of the QCD structure of the nucleon as: - 3D parton correlations and distributions; - spin content of the nucleon. Further advances in the field of GPDs and hard exclusive processes rely on: - developments in theory and new methods in phenomenology such as new flexible parameterizations, neural networks, global QCD fits - new high-precision data covering unexplored kinematics: JLab at 6 and 12 GeV, Hermes with recoil detector, Compass, EIC. This slide-show presents: Nucleon structure in QCD, particularly hard processes, factorization and parton distributions; and a brief overview of GPD phenomenology, including basic properties of GPDs, GPDs and QCD structure of the nucleon, and constraining GPDs from experiments.

  3. Parton distribution benchmarking with LHC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Carrazza, Stefano; Del Debbio, Luigi; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Hartland, Nathan; Huston, Joey; Nadolsky, Pavel; Rojo, Juan; Stump, Daniel; Thorne, Robert S.; Yuan, C.-P.

    2013-04-01

    We present a detailed comparison of the most recent sets of NNLO PDFs from the ABM, CT, HERAPDF, MSTW and NNPDF collaborations. We compare parton distributions at low and high scales and parton luminosities relevant for LHC phenomenology. We study the PDF dependence of LHC benchmark inclusive cross sections and differential distributions for electroweak boson and jet production in the cases in which the experimental covariance matrix is available. We quantify the agreement between data and theory by computing the χ 2 for each data set with all the various PDFs. PDF comparisons are performed consistently for common values of the strong coupling. We also present a benchmark comparison of jet production at the LHC, comparing the results from various available codes and scale settings. Finally, we discuss the implications of the updated NNLO PDF sets for the combined PDF+ α s uncertainty in the gluon fusion Higgs production cross section.

  4. Access to generalized parton distributions at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, Wolf-Dieter

    2015-04-10

    A brief experimentalist's introduction to Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) is given. Recent COMPASS results are shown on transverse target-spin asymmetries in hard exclusive ρ{sup 0} production and their interpretation in terms of a phenomenological model as indication for chiral-odd, transverse GPDs is discussed. For deeply virtual Compton scattering, it is briefly outlined how to access GPDs and projections are shown for future COMPASS measurements.

  5. Updated lattice results for parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Cichy, Krzysztof; Constantinou, Martha; Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos; Jansen, Karl; Steffens, Fernanda; Wiese, Christian

    2017-07-01

    We provide an analysis of the x dependence of the bare unpolarized, helicity, and transversity isovector parton distribution functions (PDFs) from lattice calculations employing (maximally) twisted mass fermions. The x dependence of the calculated PDFs resembles the one of the phenomenological parameterizations, a feature that makes this approach very promising. Furthermore, we apply momentum smearing for the relevant matrix elements to compute the lattice PDFs and find a large improvement factor when compared to conventional Gaussian smearing. This allows us to extend the lattice computation of the distributions to higher values of the nucleon momentum, which is essential for the prospects of a reliable extraction of the PDFs in the future.

  6. First moments of nucleon generalized parton distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, P.; Thomas, A. W.

    2010-06-01

    We extrapolate the first moments of the generalized parton distributions using heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. The calculation is based on the one loop level with the finite range regularization. The description of the lattice data is satisfactory, and the extrapolated moments at physical pion mass are consistent with the results obtained with dimensional regularization, although the extrapolation in the momentum transfer to t=0 does show sensitivity to form factor effects, which lie outside the realm of chiral perturbation theory. We discuss the significance of the results in the light of modern experiments as well as QCD inspired models.

  7. First moments of nucleon generalized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Thomas, A. W.

    2010-06-01

    We extrapolate the first moments of the generalized parton distributions using heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. The calculation is based on the one loop level with the finite range regularization. The description of the lattice data is satisfactory, and the extrapolated moments at physical pion mass are consistent with the results obtained with dimensional regularization, although the extrapolation in the momentum transfer to t=0 does show sensitivity to form factor effects, which lie outside the realm of chiral perturbation theory. We discuss the significance of the results in the light of modern experiments as well as QCD inspired models.

  8. Dynamics of hot and dense nuclear and partonic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Cassing, W.; Linnyk, O.; Konchakovski, V. P.; Voronyuk, V.; Ozvenchuk, V.

    2012-06-15

    The dynamics of hot and dense nuclear matter is discussed from the microscopic transport point of view. The basic concepts of the Hadron-String-Dynamical transport model (HSD)-derived from Kadanoff-Baym equations in phase phase-are presented as well as 'highlights' of HSD results for different observables in heavy-ion collisions from 100 A MeV (SIS) to 21 A TeV(RHIC) energies. Furthermore, a novel extension of the HSD model for the description of the partonic phase-the Parton-Hadron-String-Dynamics (PHSD) approach-is introduced. PHSD includes a nontrivial partonic equation of state-in line with lattice QCD-as well as covariant transition rates from partonic to hadronic degrees of freedom. The sensitivity of hadronic observables to the partonic phase is demonstrated for relativistic heavy-ion collisions from the FAIR/NICA up to the RHIC energy regime.

  9. Parton and valon distributions in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Hwa, R.C.; Sajjad Zahir, M.

    1981-06-01

    Structure functions of the nucleon are analyzed in the valon model in which a nucleon is assumed to be a bound state of three valence quark clusters (valons). At high Q/sup 2/ the structure of the valons is described by leading-order results in the perturbative quantum chromodynamics. From the experimental data on deep-inelastic scattering off protons and neutrons, the flavor-dependent valon distributions in the nucleon are determined. Predictions for the parton distributions are then made for high Q/sup 2/ without guesses concerning the quark and gluon distributions at low Q/sup 2/. The sea-quark and gluon distributions are found to have a sharp peak at very small x. Convenient parametrization is provided which interpolates between different numbers of flavors.

  10. Self-Organizing Maps and Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    K. Holcomb, Simonetta Liuti, D. Z. Perry

    2011-05-01

    We present a new method to extract parton distribution functions from high energy experimental data based on a specific type of neural networks, the Self-Organizing Maps. We illustrate the features of our new procedure that are particularly useful for an anaysis directed at extracting generalized parton distributions from data. We show quantitative results of our initial analysis of the parton distribution functions from inclusive deep inelastic scattering.

  11. Quasi-parton distribution functions, momentum distributions, and pseudo-parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radyushkin, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    We show that quasi-parton distribution functions (quasi-PDFs) may be treated as hybrids of PDFs and primordial rest-frame momentum distributions of partons. This results in a complicated convolution nature of quasi-PDFs that necessitates using large p3≳3 GeV momenta to get reasonably close to the PDF limit. As an alternative approach, we propose using pseudo-PDFs P (x ,z32) that generalize the light-front PDFs onto spacelike intervals and are related to Ioffe-time distributions M (ν ,z32), the functions of the Ioffe time ν =p3z3 and the distance parameter z32 with respect to which it displays perturbative evolution for small z3. In this form, one may divide out the z32 dependence coming from the primordial rest-frame distribution and from the problematic factor due to lattice renormalization of the gauge link. The ν dependence remains intact and determines the shape of PDFs.

  12. Parton distributions in nuclei: Quagma or quagmire

    SciTech Connect

    Close, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    The emerging information on the way quark, antiquark, and gluon distributions are modified in nuclei relative to free nucleons is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on Drell-Yan and /psi/ production on nuclei and caution against premature use of these as signals for quagma in heavy-ion collisions. If we are to identify the formation of quark-gluon plasma in heavy-ion collisions by changes in the production rates for /psi/ relative to Drell-Yan lepton pairs, then it is important that we first understand the ''intrinsic'' changes in parton distributions in nuclei relative to free nucleons. So, emerging knowledge on how quark, antiquark, and gluon distributions are modified in nuclei relative to free nucleons is reviewed, and the emerging theoretical concensus is briefly summarized.

  13. Relation between transverse momentum dependent distribution functions and parton distribution functions in the covariant parton model approach

    SciTech Connect

    A.V. Efremov, P. Schweitzer, O.V. Teryaev, P. Zavada

    2011-03-01

    We derive relations between transverse momentum dependent distribution functions (TMDs) and the usual parton distribution functions (PDFs) in the 3D covariant parton model, which follow from Lorentz invariance and the assumption of a rotationally symmetric distribution of parton momenta in the nucleon rest frame. Using the known PDFs f_1(x) and g_1(x) as input we predict the x- and pT-dependence of all twist-2 T-even TMDs.

  14. New model for nucleon generalized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new type of models for nucleon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) H and E. They are heavily based on the fact nucleon GPDs require to use two forms of double distribution (DD) representations. The outcome of the new treatment is that the usual DD+D-term construction should be amended by an extra term, {xi} E{sub +}{sup 1} (x,{xi}) which has the DD structure {alpha}/{beta} e({beta},{alpha}, with e({beta},{alpha}) being the DD that generates GPD E(x,{xi}). We found that this function, unlike the D-term, has support in the whole -1 <= x <= 1 region. Furthermore, it does not vanish at the border points |x|={xi}.

  15. First JAM results on the determination of polarized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro

    2013-04-01

    The Jefferson Lab Angular Momentum (JAM) collaboration is a new initiative aimed to the study of the angular-momentum-dependent structure of the nucleon. First results on the determination of spin-dependent parton distribution functions from world data on polarized deep-inelastic scattering will be presented and compared with previous determinations from other groups. Different aspects of global QCD analysis will be discussed, including effects due to nuclear structure, higher twist, and target-mass corrections, as well as the impact of different data selections.

  16. First JAM results on the determination of polarized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Accardi, Alberto; Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2014-01-01

    The Jefferson Lab Angular Momentum (JAM) Collaboration is a new initiative to study the angular momentum dependent structure of the nucleon. First results on the determination of spin-dependent parton distribution functions at intermediate and large x from world data on polarized deep-inelastic scattering are presented. Different aspects of global QCD analysis are discussed, including the effects of nuclear structure of deuterium and {sup 3}He targets, target mass corrections and higher twist contributions to the g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} structure functions.

  17. Nucleon Generalized Parton Distributions from Full Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards; Philipp Haegler; David Richards; John Negele; Konstantinos Orginos; Wolfram Schroers; Jonathan Bratt; Andrew Pochinsky; Michael Engelhardt; George Fleming; Bernhard Musch; Dru Renner

    2007-07-03

    We present a comprehensive study of the lowest moments of nucleon generalized parton distributions in N_f=2+1 lattice QCD using domain wall valence quarks and improved staggered sea quarks. Our investigation includes helicity dependent and independent generalized parton distributions for pion masses as low as 350 MeV and volumes as large as (3.5 fm)^3.

  18. Generalized parton distributions: Status and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Christian

    2009-01-01

    We summarize recent developments in understanding the concept of generalized parton distributions (GPDs), its relation to nucleon structure, and its application to high-Q^2 electroproduction processes. Following a brief review of QCD factorization and transverse nucleon structure, we discuss (a) new theoretical methods for the analysis of deeply-virtual Compton scattering (t-channel-based GPD parametrizations, dispersion relations); (b) the phenomenology of hard exclusive meson production (experimental tests of dominance of small-size configurations, model-independent comparative studies); (c) the role of GPDs in small-x physics and pp scattering (QCD dipole model, central exclusive diffraction). We emphasize the usefulness of the transverse spatial (or impact parameter) representation for both understanding the reaction mechanism in hard exclusive processes and visualizing the physical content of the GPDs.

  19. Quasi parton distributions and the gradient flow

    DOE PAGES

    Monahan, Christopher; Orginos, Kostas

    2017-03-22

    We propose a new approach to determining quasi parton distribution functions (PDFs) from lattice quantum chromodynamics. By incorporating the gradient flow, this method guarantees that the lattice quasi PDFs are finite in the continuum limit and evades the thorny, and as yet unresolved, issue of the renormalization of quasi PDFs on the lattice. In the limit that the flow time is much smaller than the length scale set by the nucleon momentum, the moments of the smeared quasi PDF are proportional to those of the lightfront PDF. Finally, we use this relation to derive evolution equations for the matching kernelmore » that relates the smeared quasi PDF and the light-front PDF.« less

  20. Deeply exclusive processes and generalized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Vanderhaegen

    2005-02-01

    We discuss how generalized parton distributions (GPDs) enter into hard exclusive processes, and focuses on the links between GPDs and elastic nucleon form factors. These links, in the form of sum rules, represent powerful constraints on parameterizations of GPDs. A Regge parameterization for the GPDs at small momentum transfer -t is extended to the large-t region and it is found to catch the basic features of proton and neutron electromagnetic form factor data. This parameterization allows to estimate the quark contribution to the nucleon spin. It is furthermore discussed how these GPDs at large-t enter into two-photon exchange processes and resolve the discrepancy between Rosenbluth and polarization experiments of elastic electron nucleon scattering.

  1. Improved quasi parton distribution through Wilson line renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Ji, Xiangdong; Zhang, Jian-Hui

    2017-02-01

    Recent developments showed that hadron light-cone parton distributions could be directly extracted from spacelike correlators, known as quasi parton distributions, in the large hadron momentum limit. Unlike the normal light-cone parton distribution, a quasi parton distribution contains ultraviolet (UV) power divergence associated with the Wilson line self energy. We show that to all orders in the coupling expansion, the power divergence can be removed by a "mass" counterterm in the auxiliary z-field formalism, in the same way as the renormalization of power divergence for an open Wilson line. After adding this counterterm, the quasi quark distribution is improved such that it contains at most logarithmic divergences. Based on a simple version of discretized gauge action, we present the one-loop matching kernel between the improved non-singlet quasi quark distribution with a lattice regulator and the corresponding quark distribution in dimensional regularization.

  2. Quasi-parton distribution functions, momentum distributions, and pseudo-parton distribution functions

    DOE PAGES

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2017-08-28

    Here, we show that quasi-PDFs may be treated as hybrids of PDFs and primordial rest-frame momentum distributions of partons. This results in a complicated convolution nature of quasi-PDFs that necessitates using large p3≳ 3 GeV momenta to get reasonably close to the PDF limit. Furthemore, as an alternative approach, we propose to use pseudo-PDFs P(x, zmore » $$2\\atop{3}$$) that generalize the light-front PDFs onto spacelike intervals and are related to Ioffe-time distributions M (v, z$$2\\atop{3}$$), the functions of the Ioffe time v = p3 z3 and the distance parameter z$$2\\atop{3}$$ with respect to which it displays perturbative evolution for small z3. In this form, one may divide out the z$$2\\atop{3}$$ dependence coming from the primordial rest-frame distribution and from the problematic factor due to lattice renormalization of the gauge link. The v-dependence remains intact and determines the shape of PDFs.« less

  3. Prospects For Measurements Of Generalized Parton Distributions At COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Neyret, Damien

    2007-06-13

    The concept of Generalized Parton Distributions extends classical parton distributions by giving a '3-dimensional' view of the nucleons, allowing to study correlations between the parton longitudinal momentum and its transverse position in the nucleon. Measurements of such generalized distributions can be done with the COMPASS experiment, in particular using Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering events. They require to modify the set-up of COMPASS by introducing a recoil proton detector, an additional electromagnetic calorimeter and a new liquid hydrogen target. These upgrades are presently under study, and the first data taking could take place in 2010.

  4. Standard Model parton distributions at very high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Christian W.; Ferland, Nicolas; Webber, Bryan R.

    2017-08-01

    We compute the leading-order evolution of parton distribution functions for all the Standard Model fermions and bosons up to energy scales far above the electroweak scale, where electroweak symmetry is restored. Our results include the 52 PDFs of the unpolarized proton, evolving according to the SU(3), SU(2), U(1), mixed SU(2)×U(1) and Yukawa interactions. We illustrate the numerical effects on parton distributions at large energies, and show that this can lead to important corrections to parton luminosities at a future 100 TeV collider.

  5. Nucleon parton distributions in a light-front quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    Continuing our analysis of parton distributions in the nucleon, we extend our light-front quark model in order to obtain both the helicity-independent and the helicity-dependent parton distributions, analytically matching the results of global fits at the initial scale μ ˜ 1 GeV; they also contain the correct Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution. We also calculate the transverse parton, Wigner and Husimi distributions from a unified point of view, using our light-front wave functions and expressing them in terms of the parton distributions q_v(x) and δ q_v(x). Our results are very relevant for the current and future program of the COMPASS experiment at SPS (CERN).

  6. Nonperturbative parton distributions and the proton spin problem

    SciTech Connect

    Simonov, Yu. A.

    2016-05-15

    The Lorentz contracted form of the static wave functions is used to calculate the valence parton distributions for mesons and baryons, boosting the rest frame solutions of the path integral Hamiltonian. It is argued that nonperturbative parton densities are due to excitedmultigluon baryon states. A simplemodel is proposed for these states ensuring realistic behavior of valence and sea quarks and gluon parton densities at Q{sup 2} = 10 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Applying the same model to the proton spin problem one obtains Σ{sub 3} = 0.18 for the same Q{sup 2}.

  7. Investigation of Nuclear Partonic Structure. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Henry J.; Engelage, J. M.

    2016-08-30

    Our research program had two primary goals during the period of this grant, to search for new and rare particles produced in high-energy nuclear collisions and to understand the internal structure of nuclear matter. We have developed electronics to pursue these goals at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) experiment and the AnDY experiment. Our results include discovery of the anti-hyper-triton, anti- 3Λ-barH, which opened a new branch on the chart of the nuclides, and the anti-alpha, anti- 4He, the heaviest form of anti-matter yet seen, as well as uncovering hints of gluon saturation in cold nuclear matter and observation of jets in polarized proton-proton collisions that will be used to probe orbital motion inside protons.

  8. Nuclear effects on tetraquark production by double parton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, F.; Navarra, F. S.

    2017-03-01

    In this work we study the nuclear effects in exotic meson production. We estimate the total cross section as a function of the energy for pPb scattering using a version of the color evaporation model (CEM) adapted to Double Parton Scattering (DPS). We fond that the cross section grows significantly with the atomic number, indicating that the hypothesis of tetraquark states can be tested in pA collisions at LHC.

  9. Reconstruction of Monte Carlo replicas from Hessian parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Tie-Jiun; Gao, Jun; Huston, Joey; Nadolsky, Pavel; Schmidt, Carl; Stump, Daniel; Wang, Bo-Ting; Xie, Ke Ping; Dulat, Sayipjamal; Pumplin, Jon; Yuan, C. P.

    2017-03-01

    We explore connections between two common methods for quantifying the uncertainty in parton distribution functions (PDFs), based on the Hessian error matrix and Monte-Carlo sampling. CT14 parton distributions in the Hessian representation are converted into Monte-Carlo replicas by a numerical method that reproduces important properties of CT14 Hessian PDFs: the asymmetry of CT14 uncertainties and positivity of individual parton distributions. The ensembles of CT14 Monte-Carlo replicas constructed this way at NNLO and NLO are suitable for various collider applications, such as cross section reweighting. Master formulas for computation of asymmetric standard deviations in the Monte-Carlo representation are derived. A correction is proposed to address a bias in asymmetric uncertainties introduced by the Taylor series approximation. A numerical program is made available for conversion of Hessian PDFs into Monte-Carlo replicas according to normal, log-normal, and Watt-Thorne sampling procedures.

  10. The role of the input scale in parton distribution analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pedro Jimenez-Delgado

    2012-08-01

    A first systematic study of the effects of the choice of the input scale in global determinations of parton distributions and QCD parameters is presented. It is shown that, although in principle the results should not depend on these choices, in practice a relevant dependence develops as a consequence of what is called procedural bias. This uncertainty should be considered in addition to other theoretical and experimental errors, and a practical procedure for its estimation is proposed. Possible sources of mistakes in the determination of QCD parameter from parton distribution analysis are pointed out.

  11. Concurrent approaches to Generalized Parton Distribution modeling: the pion's case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouika, N.; Mezrag, C.; Moutarde, H.; Rodríguez-Quintero, J.

    2017-03-01

    The concept of Generalized Parton Distributions promises an understanding of the generation of the charge, spin, and energy-momentum structure of hadrons by quarks and gluons. Forthcoming measurements with unprecedented accuracy at Jefferson Lab and at CERN will challenge our quantitative description of the three-dimensional structure of hadrons. To fully exploit these future measurements, new tools and models are currently being developed. We explain the difficulties of Generalized Parton Distribution modeling, and present some recent progresses. In particular we describe the symmetry-preserving Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter framework. We also discuss various equivalent parameterizations and sketch how to combine them to obtain models satisfying a priori all required theoretical constraints. At last we explain why these developments naturally fit in a versatile software framework, named PARTONS, dedicated to the theory and phenomenology of GPDs.

  12. Transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions: Status and prospects*

    DOE PAGES

    Angeles-Martinez, R.; Bacchetta, A.; Balitsky, Ian I.; ...

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we review transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions, their application to topical issues in high-energy physics phenomenology, and their theoretical connections with QCD resummation, evolution and factorization theorems. We illustrate the use of TMDs via examples of multi-scale problems in hadronic collisions. These include transverse momentum qT spectra of Higgs and vector bosons for low qT, and azimuthal correlations in the production of multiple jets associated with heavy bosons at large jet masses. We discuss computational tools for TMDs, and present the application of a new tool, TMDLIB, to parton density fits and parameterizations.

  13. Parton distribution functions in Monte Carlo factorisation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadach, S.; Płaczek, W.; Sapeta, S.; Siódmok, A.; Skrzypek, M.

    2016-12-01

    A next step in development of the KrkNLO method of including complete NLO QCD corrections to hard processes in a LO parton-shower Monte Carlo is presented. It consists of a generalisation of the method, previously used for the Drell-Yan process, to Higgs-boson production. This extension is accompanied with the complete description of parton distribution functions in a dedicated, Monte Carlo factorisation scheme, applicable to any process of production of one or more colour-neutral particles in hadron-hadron collisions.

  14. Higher twist parton distributions from light-cone wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, V. M.; Lautenschlager, T.; Pirnay, B.; Manashov, A. N.

    2011-05-01

    We explore the possibility to construct higher-twist parton distributions in a nucleon at some low reference scale from convolution integrals of the light-cone wave functions (WFs). To this end we introduce simple models for the four-particle nucleon WFs involving three valence quarks and a gluon with total orbital momentum zero, and estimate their normalization (WF at the origin) using QCD sum rules. We demonstrate that these WFs provide one with a reasonable description of both polarized and unpolarized parton densities at large values of the Bjorken variable x{>=}0.5. Twist-three parton distributions are then constructed as convolution integrals of qqqg and the usual three-quark WFs. The cases of the polarized structure function g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) and single transverse spin asymmetries are considered in detail. We find that the so-called gluon pole contribution to twist-three distributions relevant for single spin asymmetry vanishes in this model, but is generated perturbatively at higher scales by the evolution, in the spirit of Glueck-Reya-Vogt parton distributions.

  15. Dynamical parton distributions from DGLAP equations with nonlinear corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rong; Chen, Xu-Rong

    2017-05-01

    Determination of proton parton distribution functions is presented under the dynamical parton model assumption by applying DGLAP equations with GLR-MQ-ZRS corrections. We provide two data sets, referred to as IMParton16, which are from two different nonperturbative inputs. One is the naive input of three valence quarks and the other is the input of three valence quarks with flavor-asymmetric sea components. Basically, both data sets are compatible with the experimental measurements at high scale (Q 2 > 2 GeV2). Furthermore, our analysis shows that the input with flavor-asymmetric sea components better reproduces the structure functions at high Q 2. Generally, the parton distribution functions obtained, especially the gluon distribution function, are good options for inputs to simulations of high energy scattering processes. The analysis is performed under the fixed-flavor number scheme for n f = 3, 4, 5. Both data sets start from very low scales, around 0.07 GeV2, where the nonperturbative input is directly connected to the simple picture of the quark model. These results may shed some lights on the origin of the parton distributions observed at high Q 2. Supported by National Basic Research Program (973 Program 2014CB845406) and Century Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Y101020BR0)

  16. Recent progress in the statistical approach of parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Soffer, Jacques

    2011-07-15

    We recall the physical features of the parton distributions in the quantum statistical approach of the nucleon. Some predictions from a next-to-leading order QCD analysis are compared to recent experimental results. We also consider their extension to include their transverse momentum dependence.

  17. Unbiased determination of polarized parton distributions and their uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Forte, Stefano; Guffanti, Alberto; Nocera, Emanuele R.; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Rojo, Juan

    2013-09-01

    We present a determination of a set of polarized parton distributions (PDFs) of the nucleon, at next-to-leading order, from a global set of longitudinally polarized deep-inelastic scattering data: NNPDFpol1.0. The determination is based on the NNPDF methodology: a Monte Carlo approach, with neural networks used as unbiased interpolants, previously applied to the determination of unpolarized parton distributions, and designed to provide a faithful and statistically sound representation of PDF uncertainties. We present our dataset, its statistical features, and its Monte Carlo representation. We summarize the technique used to solve the polarized evolution equations and its benchmarking, and the method used to compute physical observables. We review the NNPDF methodology for parametrization and fitting of neural networks, the algorithm used to determine the optimal fit, and its adaptation to the polarized case. We finally present our set of polarized parton distributions. We discuss its statistical properties, test for its stability upon various modifications of the fitting procedure, and compare it to other recent polarized parton sets, and in particular obtain predictions for polarized first moments of PDFs based on it. We find that the uncertainties on the gluon, and to a lesser extent the strange PDF, were substantially underestimated in previous determinations.

  18. Illuminating the 1/x Moment of Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.; /Indiana U.

    2007-10-15

    The Weisberger relation, an exact statement of the parton model, elegantly relates a high-energy physics observable, the 1/x moment of parton distribution functions, to a nonperturbative low-energy observable: the dependence of the nucleon mass on the value of the quark mass or its corresponding quark condensate. We show that contemporary fits to nucleon structure functions fail to determine this 1/x moment; however, deeply virtual Compton scattering can be described in terms of a novel F1/x(t) form factor which illuminates this physics. An analysis of exclusive photon-induced processes in terms of the parton-nucleon scattering amplitude with Regge behavior reveals a failure of the high Q2 factorization of exclusive processes at low t in terms of the Generalized Parton-Distribution Functions which has been widely believed to hold in the past. We emphasize the need for more data for the DVCS process at large t in future or upgraded facilities.

  19. New parton distributions from large-x and low-Q2 data

    SciTech Connect

    Alberto Accardi; Christy, M. Eric; Keppel, Cynthia E.; Melnitchouk, Wally; Monaghan, Peter A.; Morfin, Jorge G.; Owens, Joseph F.

    2010-02-11

    We report results of a new global next-to-leading order fit of parton distribution functions in which cuts on W and Q are relaxed, thereby including more data at high values of x. Effects of target mass corrections (TMCs), higher twist contributions, and nuclear corrections for deuterium data are significant in the large-x region. The leading twist parton distributions are found to be stable to TMC model variations as long as higher twist contributions are also included. Furthermore, the behavior of the d quark as x → 1 is particularly sensitive to the deuterium corrections, and using realistic nuclear smearing models the d-quark distribution at large x is found to be softer than in previous fits performed with more restrictive cuts.

  20. New parton distributions from large-x and low-Q2 data

    DOE PAGES

    Alberto Accardi; Christy, M. Eric; Keppel, Cynthia E.; ...

    2010-02-11

    We report results of a new global next-to-leading order fit of parton distribution functions in which cuts on W and Q are relaxed, thereby including more data at high values of x. Effects of target mass corrections (TMCs), higher twist contributions, and nuclear corrections for deuterium data are significant in the large-x region. The leading twist parton distributions are found to be stable to TMC model variations as long as higher twist contributions are also included. Furthermore, the behavior of the d quark as x → 1 is particularly sensitive to the deuterium corrections, and using realistic nuclear smearing modelsmore » the d-quark distribution at large x is found to be softer than in previous fits performed with more restrictive cuts.« less

  1. Parton Distributions in the pion from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    W. Detmold; Wally Melnitchouk; Anthony Thomas

    2003-03-01

    We analyze the moments of parton distribution functions in the pion calculated in lattice QCD, paying particular attention to their chiral extrapolation. Using the lowest three non-trivial moments calculated on the lattice, we assess the accuracy with which the x-dependence of both the valence and sea quark distributions in the pion can be extracted. The resulting valence quark distributions at the physical pion mass are in fair agreement with existing Drell-Yan data, but the statistical errors are such that one cannot yet confirm (or rule out) the large-x behavior expected from hadron helicity conservation in perturbative QCD. One can expect, however, that the next generation of calculations in lattice QCD will allow one to extract parton distributions with a level of accuracy comparable with current experiments.

  2. Violation of positivity bounds in models of generalized parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiburzi, Brian C.; Verma, Gaurav

    2017-08-01

    As with parton distributions, flexible phenomenological parametrizations of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) are essential for their extraction from data. The large number of constraints imposed on GPDs make simple Lorentz covariant models viable; but, such models are often incomplete in that they employ the impulse approximation. Using the GPD of the pion as a test case, we show that the impulse approximation can lead to violation of the positivity bound required of GPDs. We focus on a particular model of the pion bound-state vertex that was recently proposed and demonstrate that satisfying the bound is not guaranteed by Lorentz covariance. Violation of the positivity bound is tied to a problematic mismatch between the behavior of the quark distribution at the end point and the crossover value of the GPD.

  3. Multiplicity distributions in nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Capella, A.; Casado, J.A.; Pajares, C.; Ramallo, A.V.; Tran Tranh Van, J.

    1987-05-01

    Multiplicity distributions in nuclear collisions are calculated in the framework of the dual parton model. A comparison with experimental data is performed. The multiplicity distributions for /sup 16/O-/sup 207/Pb collisions at 200 Gev/c per nucleon is predicted. The fluctuations of the energy density in the central rapidity region for such collisions are estimated.

  4. Charge symmetry breaking in parton distribution functions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Horsley, R.; Zanotti, J. M.; Nakamura, Y.; Pleiter, D.; Rakow, P. E. L.; Schierholz, G.; Stueben, H.; Thomas, A. W.; Young, R. D.; Winter, F.

    2011-03-01

    By determining the quark momentum fractions of the octet baryons from N{sub f}=2+1 lattice simulations, we are able to predict the degree of charge symmetry violation in the parton distribution functions of the nucleon. This is of importance, not only as a probe of our understanding of the nonperturbative structure of the proton, but also because such a violation constrains the accuracy of global fits to parton distribution functions and hence the accuracy with which, for example, cross sections at the LHC can be predicted. A violation of charge symmetry may also be critical in cases where symmetries are used to guide the search for physics beyond the standard model.

  5. Deeply Pseudoscalar Meson Electroproduction with CLAS and Generalized Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Guidal, Michel; Kubarovsky, Valery P.

    2015-06-01

    We discuss the recent data of exclusive $\\pi^0$ (and $\\pi^+$) electroproduction on the proton obtained by the CLAS collaboration at Jefferson Lab. It is observed that the cross sections, which have been decomposed in $\\sigma_T+\\epsilon\\sigma_L$, $\\sigma_{TT}$ and $\\sigma_{LT}$ structure functions, are dominated by transverse amplitude contributions. The data can be interpreted in the Generalized Parton Distribution formalism provided that one includes helicity-flip transversity GPDs.

  6. Transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions: Status and prospects*

    SciTech Connect

    Angeles-Martinez, R.; Bacchetta, A.; Balitsky, Ian I.; Boer, D.; Boglione, M.; Boussarie, R.; Ceccopieri, F. A.; Cherednikov, I. O.; Connor, P.; Echevarria, M. G.; Ferrera, G.; Grados Luyando, J.; Hautmann, F.; Jung, H.; Kasemets, T.; Kutak, K.; Lansberg, J. P.; Lykasov, G.; Madrigal Martinez, J. D.; Mulders, P. J.; Nocera, E. R.; Petreska, E.; Pisano, C.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Radici, M.; Schnell, G.; Signori, A.; Szymanowski, L.; Taheri Monfared, S.; Van der Veken, F. F.; van Haevermaet, H. J.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vladimirov, A. A.; Wallon, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we review transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions, their application to topical issues in high-energy physics phenomenology, and their theoretical connections with QCD resummation, evolution and factorization theorems. We illustrate the use of TMDs via examples of multi-scale problems in hadronic collisions. These include transverse momentum qT spectra of Higgs and vector bosons for low qT, and azimuthal correlations in the production of multiple jets associated with heavy bosons at large jet masses. We discuss computational tools for TMDs, and present the application of a new tool, TMDLIB, to parton density fits and parameterizations.

  7. Study of Generalized Parton Distributions at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Andrey

    2017-07-01

    The quark-gluon dynamics manifests itself in a set of non-perturbative functions describing all possible spin-spin and spin-orbit correlations. The Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) carry information not only on the longitudinal momentum but also on the transverse position of partons, providing rich and direct information on the orbital motion of quarks. The hard exclusive production of photons and pions provide a variety of spin and azimuthal angle dependent observables, sensitive to the dynamics of quark-gluon interactions. The study of the GPDs is one of the main goals of Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. In this talk, we present an overview of the current status and some future measurements of hard exclusive processes and extraction of underlying GPDs at Jefferson Lab.

  8. Generalized Parton Distributions, Analyticity and Formfactors

    SciTech Connect

    Teryaev, O. V

    2008-10-13

    The QCD factorization for hard exclusive amplitudes is compared with their crossing and analytic properties. The crucial role is played by their mathematical structure described by Radon and Abel transforms, leading to 'holographic' property of GPDs at LO. These transforms are very different in the even- and odd-dimensional spaces, the latter case related to 'creation' GPDs describing, say, the deuteron breakup. The bounds implied by crossing and analyticity for the angular distributions in two-photon processes are obtained. The contributions of different types of QCD factorization and duality between them are considered. The relations of GPDs to (gravitational) formfactors, equivalence principle (EP) and its extension (EEP) are analyzed. EEP is also considered for the case of vector mesons, showing the possible link with AdS/QCD correspondence.

  9. Pion and kaon valence-quark parton distribution functions.

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.; Bashir, A.; Roberts, C. D.; Tandy, P. C.

    2011-06-16

    A rainbow-ladder truncation of QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations, constrained by existing applications to hadron physics, is employed to compute the valence-quark parton distribution functions of the pion and kaon. Comparison is made to {pi}-N Drell-Yan data for the pion's u-quark distribution and to Drell-Yan data for the ratio u{sub K}(x)/u{sub {pi}}(x): the environmental influence of this quantity is a parameter-free prediction, which agrees well with existing data. Our analysis unifies the computation of distribution functions with that of numerous other properties of pseudoscalar mesons.

  10. Pion and kaon valence-quark parton distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Trang; Bashir, Adnan; Roberts, Craig D.; Tandy, Peter C.

    2011-06-15

    A rainbow-ladder truncation of QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations, constrained by existing applications to hadron physics, is employed to compute the valence-quark parton distribution functions of the pion and kaon. Comparison is made to {pi}-N Drell-Yan data for the pion's u-quark distribution and to Drell-Yan data for the ratio u{sub K}(x)/u{sub {pi}}(x): the environmental influence of this quantity is a parameter-free prediction, which agrees well with existing data. Our analysis unifies the computation of distribution functions with that of numerous other properties of pseudoscalar mesons.

  11. Parton distributions in the LHC era: MMHT 2014 PDFs.

    PubMed

    Harland-Lang, L A; Martin, A D; Motylinski, P; Thorne, R S

    We present LO, NLO and NNLO sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the proton determined from global analyses of the available hard scattering data. These MMHT2014 PDFs supersede the 'MSTW2008' parton sets, but they are obtained within the same basic framework. We include a variety of new data sets, from the LHC, updated Tevatron data and the HERA combined H1 and ZEUS data on the total and charm structure functions. We also improve the theoretical framework of the previous analysis. These new PDFs are compared to the 'MSTW2008' parton sets. In most cases the PDFs, and the predictions, are within one standard deviation of those of MSTW2008. The major changes are the [Formula: see text] valence quark difference at small [Formula: see text] due to an improved parameterisation and, to a lesser extent, the strange quark PDF due to the effect of certain LHC data and a better treatment of the [Formula: see text] branching ratio. We compare our MMHT PDF sets with those of other collaborations; in particular with the NNPDF3.0 sets, which are contemporary with the present analysis.

  12. Parton distributions in the LHC era: MMHT 2014 PDFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harland-Lang, L. A.; Martin, A. D.; Motylinski, P.; Thorne, R. S.

    2015-05-01

    We present LO, NLO and NNLO sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the proton determined from global analyses of the available hard scattering data. These MMHT2014 PDFs supersede the `MSTW2008' parton sets, but they are obtained within the same basic framework. We include a variety of new data sets, from the LHC, updated Tevatron data and the HERA combined H1 and ZEUS data on the total and charm structure functions. We also improve the theoretical framework of the previous analysis. These new PDFs are compared to the `MSTW2008' parton sets. In most cases the PDFs, and the predictions, are within one standard deviation of those of MSTW2008. The major changes are the valence quark difference at small due to an improved parameterisation and, to a lesser extent, the strange quark PDF due to the effect of certain LHC data and a better treatment of the branching ratio. We compare our MMHT PDF sets with those of other collaborations; in particular with the NNPDF3.0 sets, which are contemporary with the present analysis.

  13. Transverse momentum dependent parton distributions at small-x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng; Zhou, Jian

    2017-08-01

    We study the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distributions at small-x in a consistent framework that takes into account the TMD evolution and small-x evolution simultaneously. The small-x evolution effects are included by computing the TMDs at appropriate scales in terms of the dipole scattering amplitudes, which obey the relevant Balitsky-Kovchegov equation. Meanwhile, the TMD evolution is obtained by resumming the Collins-Soper type large logarithms emerged from the calculations in small-x formalism into Sudakov factors.

  14. Micro-review of structure functions and parton distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Morfin, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    There has recently been a great deal of discussion concerning the surprising differences in the measurements of the nucleon structure function F/sub 2/(x,Q/sup 2/), off of a hydrogen target, by the high statistics muoproduction experiments EMC and BCDMS. In this short review I will attempt to summarize the status of the experimental measurements of the structure functions and highlight any significant disagreements. At the conclusion I will comment on the status of the extraction of the parton distribution functions from these measurements. 17 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Transverse Momentum-Dependent Parton Distributions From Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Engelhardt, Bernhard Musch, Philipp Haegler, Andreas Schaefer

    2012-12-01

    Starting from a definition of transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions for semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering and the Drell-Yan process, given in terms of matrix elements of a quark bilocal operator containing a staple-shaped Wilson connection, a scheme to determine such observables in lattice QCD is developed and explored. Parametrizing the aforementioned matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes permits a simple transformation of the problem to a Lorentz frame suited for the lattice calculation. Results for the Sivers and Boer-Mulders transverse momentum shifts are presented, focusing in particular on their dependence on the staple extent and the Collins-Soper evolution parameter.

  16. Generalized parton distributions from deep virtual compton scattering at CLAS

    DOE PAGES

    Guidal, M.

    2010-04-24

    Here, we have analyzed the beam spin asymmetry and the longitudinally polarized target spin asymmetry of the Deep Virtual Compton Scattering process, recently measured by the Jefferson Lab CLAS collaboration. Our aim is to extract information about the Generalized Parton Distributions of the proton. By fitting these data, in a largely model-independent procedure, we are able to extract numerical values for the two Compton Form Factorsmore » $$H_{Im}$$ and $$\\tilde{H}_{Im}$$ with uncertainties, in average, of the order of 30%.« less

  17. Studies of transverse momentum dependent parton distributions and Bessel weighting

    SciTech Connect

    Aghasyan, M.; Avakian, H.; De Sanctis, E.; Gamberg, L.; Mirazita, M.; Musch, B.; Prokudin, A.; Rossi, P.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a new technique for analysis of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions, based on the Bessel weighting formalism. The procedure is applied to studies of the double longitudinal spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering using a new dedicated Monte Carlo generator which includes quark intrinsic transverse momentum within the generalized parton model. Using a fully differential cross section for the process, the effect of four momentum conservation is analyzed using various input models for transverse momentum distributions and fragmentation functions. We observe a few percent systematic offset of the Bessel-weighted asymmetry obtained from Monte Carlo extraction compared to input model calculations, which is due to the limitations imposed by the energy and momentum conservation at the given energy/Q2. We find that the Bessel weighting technique provides a powerful and reliable tool to study the Fourier transform of TMDs with controlled systematics due to experimental acceptances and resolutions with different TMD model inputs.

  18. Studies of transverse momentum dependent parton distributions and Bessel weighting

    DOE PAGES

    Aghasyan, M.; Avakian, H.; De Sanctis, E.; ...

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a new technique for analysis of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions, based on the Bessel weighting formalism. The procedure is applied to studies of the double longitudinal spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering using a new dedicated Monte Carlo generator which includes quark intrinsic transverse momentum within the generalized parton model. Using a fully differential cross section for the process, the effect of four momentum conservation is analyzed using various input models for transverse momentum distributions and fragmentation functions. We observe a few percent systematic offset of the Bessel-weighted asymmetry obtained from Montemore » Carlo extraction compared to input model calculations, which is due to the limitations imposed by the energy and momentum conservation at the given energy/Q2. We find that the Bessel weighting technique provides a powerful and reliable tool to study the Fourier transform of TMDs with controlled systematics due to experimental acceptances and resolutions with different TMD model inputs.« less

  19. Proton structure and parton distribution functions from HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekelian, Vladimir

    2016-11-01

    The H1 and ZEUS collaborations at the electron-proton collider HERA collected e± p scattering data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb-1. The data were taken at proton beam energies of 920, 820, 575 and 460 GeV and an electron beam energy of 27.5 GeV, with different electric charges and longitudinal polarisation of the electron beam. Using these data inclusive neutral and charged current deep inelastic cross sections were measured over six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q2, and Bjorken x. A combination of all inclusive cross sections, published by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations at HERA, was performed. Using these combined HERA data and the individual H1 and ZEUS data taken using the polarised electron beams, the proton structure functions F2, FγZ2, xFγZ3 and FL were obtained, and scaling violations, electroweak unification, and polarisation effects in the charged current process were demonstrated. The combined cross sections were used as a sole input to QCD analyses at leading, next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading orders, providing a new set of parton distribution functions, denoted as HERAPDF2.0. An extension of the analysis by including HERA data on charm and jet production allowed a simultaneous determination of parton distributions and the strong coupling.

  20. Transverse momentum-dependent parton distribution functions in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhardt, Michael G.; Musch, Bernhard U.; Haegler, Philipp G.; Negele, John W.; Schaefer, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    A fundamental structural property of the nucleon is the distribution of quark momenta, both parallel as well as perpendicular to its propagation. Experimentally, this information is accessible via selected processes such as semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and the Drell-Yan process (DY), which can be parametrized in terms of transversemomentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs). On the other hand, these distribution functions can be extracted from nucleon matrix elements of a certain class of bilocal quark operators in which the quarks are connected by a staple-shaped Wilson line serving to incorporate initial state (DY) or final state (SIDIS) interactions. A scheme for evaluating such matrix elements within lattice QCD is developed. This requires casting the calculation in a particular Lorentz frame, which is facilitated by a parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes. Exploratory results are presented for the time-reversal odd Sivers and Boer-Mulders transverse momentum shifts.

  1. Sketching the Pion's Valence-Quark Generalised Parton Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Mezrag, C.; Chang, L.; Moutarde, H.; Roberts, C. D.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.; Sabatie, F.; Schmidt, S. M.

    2015-02-04

    In order to learn effectively from measurements of generalised parton distributions (GPDs), it is desirable to compute them using a framework that can potentially connect empirical information with basic features of the Standard Model. We sketch an approach to such computations, based upon a rainbow-ladder (RL) truncation of QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations and exemplified via the pion's valence dressed-quark GPD, H-pi(V)(chi, xi, t). Our analysis focuses primarily on xi = 0, although we also capitalise on the symmetry-preserving nature of the RL truncation by connecting H-pi(V)(chi, xi = +/- 1, t) with the pion's valence-quark parton distribution amplitude. We explain that the impulse-approximation used hitherto to define the pion's valence dressed-quark GPD is generally invalid owing to omission of contributions from the gluons which bind dressed-quarks into the pion. A simple correction enables us to identify a practicable improvement to the approximation for H(pi)(V)p(chi, 0, t), expressed as the Radon transform of a single amplitude. Therewith we obtain results for H pi V(chi, 0, t) and the associated impact-parameter dependent distribution, q(pi)(V)(chi, vertical bar(b) over right arrow (perpendicular to)vertical bar), which provide a qualitatively sound picture of the pion's dressed-quark structure at a hadronic scale. We evolve the distributions to a scale zeta = 2 GeV, so as to facilitate comparisons in future with results from experiment or other nonperturbative methods. (C) 2014 Published by Elsevier B. V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

  2. Longitudinal and Transverse Parton Momentum Distributions for Hadrons within Relativistic Constituent Quark Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frederico, T.; Pace, E.; Pasquini, B.; Salme, G.

    2010-08-05

    Longitudinal and transverse parton distributions for pion and nucleon are calculated from hadron vertexes obtained by a study of form factors within relativistic quark models. The relevance of the one-gluon-exchange dominance at short range for the behavior of the form factors at large momentum transfer and of the parton distributions at the end points is stressed.

  3. How large is the gluon polarization in the statistical parton distributions approach?

    SciTech Connect

    Soffer, Jacques; Bourrely, Claude; Buccella, Franco

    2015-04-10

    We review the theoretical foundations of the quantum statistical approach to parton distributions and we show that by using some recent experimental results from Deep Inelastic Scattering, we are able to improve the description of the data by means of a new determination of the parton distributions. We will see that a large gluon polarization emerges, giving a significant contribution to the proton spin.

  4. ManeParse : A Mathematica reader for Parton Distribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. B.; Godat, E.; Olness, F. I.

    2017-07-01

    Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) are essential non-perturbative inputs for calculation of any observable with hadronic initial states. These PDFs are released by individual groups as discrete grids as a function of the Bjorken- x and energy scale Q. The LHAPDF project maintains a repository of PDFs from various groups in a new standardized LHAPDF6 format, additionally older formats such as the CTEQ PDS grid format are still in use. ManeParse is a package that provides access to PDFs within Mathematica to facilitate calculation and plotting. The program is self-contained so there are no external links to any FORTRAN, C or C++ programs. The package includes the option to use the built-in Mathematica interpolation or a custom cubic Lagrange interpolation routine which allows for flexibility in the extrapolation (particularly at small x-values). ManeParse is fast enough to enable simple calculations (involving even one or two integrations) in the Mathematica framework.

  5. From Bethe-Salpeter Wave functions to Generalised Parton Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezrag, C.; Moutarde, H.; Rodríguez-Quintero, J.

    2016-09-01

    We review recent works on the modelling of generalised parton distributions within the Dyson-Schwinger formalism. We highlight how covariant computations, using the impulse approximation, allows one to fulfil most of the theoretical constraints of the GPDs. Specific attention is brought to chiral properties and especially the so-called soft pion theorem, and its link with the Axial-Vector Ward-Takahashi identity. The limitation of the impulse approximation are also explained. Beyond impulse approximation computations are reviewed in the forward case. Finally, we stress the advantages of the overlap of lightcone wave functions, and possible ways to construct covariant GPD models within this framework, in a two-body approximation.

  6. From Bethe-Salpeter Wave Functions to Generalised Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Mezrag, C.; Moutarde, H.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2016-06-06

    We review recent works on the modelling of Generalised Parton Distributions within the Dyson-Schwinger formalism. We highlight how covariant computations, using the impulse approximation, allows one to fulfil most of the theoretical constraints of the GPDs. A specific attention is brought to chiral properties and especially the so-called soft pion theorem, and its link with the Axial-Vector Ward-Takahashi identity. The limitation of the impulse approximation are also explained. Beyond impulse approximation computations are reviewed in the forward case. Finally, we stress the advantages of the overlap of lightcone wave functions, and possible ways to construct covariant GPD models within this framework, in a two-body approximation

  7. Transverse momentum-dependent parton distribution functions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Engelhardt, Philipp Haegler, Bernhard Musch, John Negele, Andreas Schaefer

    2012-12-01

    Transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) relevant for semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and the Drell-Yan process can be defined in terms of matrix elements of a quark bilocal operator containing a staple-shaped Wilson connection. Starting from such a definition, a scheme to determine TMDs in lattice QCD is developed and explored. Parametrizing the aforementioned matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes permits a simple transformation of the problem to a Lorentz frame suited for the lattice calculation. Results for the Sivers and Boer-Mulders transverse momentum shifts are obtained using ensembles at the pion masses 369MeV and 518MeV, focusing in particular on the dependence of these shifts on the staple extent and a Collins-Soper-type evolution parameter quantifying proximity of the staples to the light cone.

  8. Multiple parton scattering in nuclei: Parton energy loss

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Guo, Xiao-feng

    2001-02-17

    Multiple parton scattering and induced parton energy loss are studied in deeply inelastic scattering (DIS) off nuclei. The effect of multiple scattering of a highly off-shell quark and the induced parton energy loss is expressed in terms of the modification to the quark fragmentation functions. The authors derive such modified quark fragmentation functions and their QCD evolution equations in DIS using the generalized factorization of higher twist parton distributions. They consider double-hard and hard-soft parton scattering as well as their interferences in the same framework. The final result, which depends on both the diagonal and off-diagonal twist-four parton distributions in nuclei, demonstrates clearly the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal interference features and predicts a unique nuclear modification of the quark fragmentation functions.

  9. Towards a model of pion generalized parton distributions from Dyson-Schwinger equations

    SciTech Connect

    Moutarde, H.

    2015-04-10

    We compute the pion quark Generalized Parton Distribution H{sup q} and Double Distributions F{sup q} and G{sup q} in a coupled Bethe-Salpeter and Dyson-Schwinger approach. We use simple algebraic expressions inspired by the numerical resolution of Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations. We explicitly check the support and polynomiality properties, and the behavior under charge conjugation or time invariance of our model. We derive analytic expressions for the pion Double Distributions and Generalized Parton Distribution at vanishing pion momentum transfer at a low scale. Our model compares very well to experimental pion form factor or parton distribution function data.

  10. Dual parametrization of generalized parton distributions in two equivalent representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, D.; Polyakov, M. V.; Semenov-Tian-Shansky, K. M.

    2015-03-01

    The dual parametrization and the Mellin-Barnes integral approach represent two frameworks for handling the double partial wave expansion of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) in the conformal partial waves and in the t-channel SO(3) partial waves. Within the dual parametrization framework, GPDs are represented as integral convolutions of forward-like functions whose Mellin moments generate the conformal moments of GPDs. The Mellin-Barnes integral approach is based on the analytic continuation of the GPD conformal moments to the complex values of the conformal spin. GPDs are then represented as the Mellin-Barnes-type integrals in the complex conformal spin plane. In this paper we explicitly show the equivalence of these two independently developed GPD representations. Furthermore, we clarify the notions of the J = 0 fixed pole and the D-form factor. We also provide some insight into GPD modeling and map the phenomenologically successful Kumerički-Müller GPD model to the dual parametrization framework by presenting the set of the corresponding forward-like functions. We also build up the reparametrization procedure allowing to recast the double distribution representation of GPDs in the Mellin-Barnes integral framework and present the explicit formula for mapping double distributions into the space of double partial wave amplitudes with complex conformal spin.

  11. Deeply Virtual Exclusive Processes and Generalized Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2011-06-01

    The goal of the comprehensive program in Deeply Virtual Exclusive Scattering at Jefferson Laboratory is to create transverse spatial images of quarks and gluons as a function of their longitudinal momentum fraction in the proton, the neutron, and in nuclei. These functions are the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) of the target nucleus. Cross section measurements of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) reaction ep {yields} ep{gamma} in Hall A support the QCD factorization of the scattering amplitude for Q^2 {>=} 2 GeV^2. Quasi-free neutron-DVCS measurements on the Deuteron indicate sensitivity to the quark angular momentum sum rule. Fully exclusive H(e, e'p{gamma} ) measurements have been made in a wide kinematic range in CLAS with polarized beam, and with both unpolarized and longitudinally polarized targets. Existing models are qualitatively consistent with the JLab data, but there is a clear need for less constrained models. Deeply virtual vector meson production is studied in CLAS. The 12 GeV upgrade will be essential for for these channels. The {rho} and {omega} channels reactions offer the prospect of flavor sensitivity to the quark GPDs, while the {phi}-production channel is dominated by the gluon distribution.

  12. Deeply Virtual Exclusive Processes and Generalized Parton Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Charles E.; Guidal, Michel; Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2011-05-01

    The goal of the comprehensive program in deeply virtual exclusive scattering at Jefferson Lab is to create transverse spatial images of quarks and gluons as a function of their longitudinal momentum fraction in the proton, the neutron, and in nuclei. These functions are the generalized parton distributions (GPDs) of the target nucleus. Cross section measurements of the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) reaction ep → epγ in Hall A support the QCD factorization of the scattering amplitude for Q2 >= 2 GeV2. Quasi-free neutron-DVCS measurements on the deuteron indicate sensitivity to the quark angular momentum sum rule. Fully exclusive H(e,e'pγ) measurements have been made in a wide kinematic range in CLAS with polarized beam, and with both unpolarized and longitudinally polarized targets. Existing models are qualitatively consistent with the Jefferson Lab data, but there is a clear need for less constrained models. Deeply virtual vector meson production is studied in CLAS. The 12 GeV upgrade will be essential for for these channels. The ρ and ω channels reactions offer the prospect of flavor sensitivity to the quark GPDs, while the ϕ-production channel is dominated by the gluon distribution.

  13. Agreement of neutrino deep inelastic scattering data with global fits of parton distributions.

    PubMed

    Paukkunen, Hannu; Salgado, Carlos A

    2013-05-24

    The compatibility of neutrino-nucleus deep inelastic scattering data within the universal, factorizable nuclear parton distribution functions has been studied independently by several groups in the past few years. The conclusions are contradictory, ranging from a violation of the universality up to a good agreement, most of the controversy originating from the use of the neutrino-nucleus data from the NuTeV Collaboration. Here, we pay attention to non-negligible differences in the absolute normalization between different neutrino data sets. We find that such variations are large enough to prevent a tensionless fit to all data simultaneously and could therefore misleadingly point towards nonuniversal nuclear effects. We propose a concrete method to deal with the absolute normalization and show that an agreement between independent neutrino data sets is established.

  14. The ABM parton distributions tuned to LHC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhin, S.; Blümlein, J.; Moch, S.

    2014-03-01

    We present a global fit of parton distributions at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD. The fit is based on the world data for deep-inelastic scattering, fixed-target data for the Drell-Yan process and includes, for the first time, data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for the Drell-Yan process and the hadroproduction of top-quark pairs. The analysis applies the fixed-flavor number scheme for nf=3, 4, 5, uses the MS¯ scheme for the strong coupling αs and the heavy-quark masses and keeps full account of the correlations among all nonperturbative parameters. At NNLO this returns the values of αs(MZ)=0.1132±0.0011 and mt(pole)=171.2±2.4 GeV for the top-quark pole mass. The fit results are used to compute benchmark cross sections for the Higgs production at the LHC to NNLO accuracy. We compare our results to those obtained by other groups and show that differences can be linked to different theoretical descriptions of the underlying physical processes.

  15. Constraints on large-x parton distributions from new weak boson production and deep-inelastic scattering data

    DOE PAGES

    Accardi, A.; Brady, L. T.; Melnitchouk, W.; ...

    2016-06-20

    A new set of leading twist parton distribution functions, referred to as "CJ15", is presented, which take advantage of developments in the theoretical treatment of nuclear corrections as well as new data. The analysis includes for the first time data on the free neutron structure function from Jefferson Lab, and new high-precision charged lepton and W-boson asymmetry data from Fermilab, which significantly reduce the uncertainty on the d/u ratio at large values of x.

  16. Q2-DEPENDENCE of the Statistical Parton Distributions in the Valon Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohaily, S.; Yazdanpanah, M. M.; Mirjalili, A.

    2012-06-01

    We employ the statistical approach to obtain the nucleon parton distributions. Statistical distributions are considered as well for partons in the valon model in which a nucleon is assumed to be a state of three valence quark clusters (valon). Analytic expressions of the x-dependent of parton distribution functions (PDFs) in the valon model are obtained statistically in the whole x region [0, 1] in terms of the statistical parameters such as temperature, chemical potential and accessible volume. Since PDFs are obtained by taking the required sum rules including Gottfried sum rule at different energy scales, the Q2-dependence of these parameters can be obtained. Therefore the parton distributions as a function of Q2 will be resulted. To make the calculations more precise, we extend our results to contain three flavors rather than two light u and d quarks.

  17. Spin-dependent parton distributions in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    I.C. Cloet; W. Bentz; A.W. Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Spin-dependent quark light-cone momentum distributions are calculated for a nucleon in the nuclear medium. We utilize a modified NJL model where the nucleon is described as a composite quark-diquark state. Scalar and vector mean fields are incorporated in the nuclear medium and these fields couple to the confined quarks in the nucleon. The effect of these fields on the spin-dependent distributions and consequently the axial charges is investigated. Our results for the ''spin-dependent EMC effect'' are also discussed.

  18. Working Group I: Parton distributions: Summary report for the HERA LHC Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmar, M.; Forte, S.; Glazov, A.; Moch, S.; Alekhin, S.; Altarelli, G.; Andersen, Jeppe R.; Ball, R.D.; Blumlein, J.; Bottcher, H.; Carli, T.; Ciafaloni, M.; Colferai, D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Corcella, G.; Del Debbio, L.; Dissertori, G.; Feltesse, J.; Guffanti, A.; Gwenlan, C.; Huston, J.; /Zurich, ETH /DESY, Zeuthen /Serpukhov, IHEP /CERN /Rome III U. /INFN, Rome3 /Cambridge U. /Edinburgh U. /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Oxford U. /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /Michigan State U. /Uppsala U. /Barcelona U., ECM /Podgorica U. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Harish-Chandra Res. Inst. /Fermilab /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II

    2005-11-01

    We provide an assessment of the impact of parton distributions on the determination of LHC processes, and of the accuracy with which parton distributions (PDFs) can be extracted from data, in particular from current and forthcoming HERA experiments. We give an overview of reference LHC processes and their associated PDF uncertainties, and study in detail W and Z production at the LHC.We discuss the precision which may be obtained from the analysis of existing HERA data, tests of consistency of HERA data from different experiments, and the combination of these data. We determine further improvements on PDFs which may be obtained from future HERA data (including measurements of F{sub L}), and from combining present and future HERA data with present and future hadron collider data. We review the current status of knowledge of higher (NNLO) QCD corrections to perturbative evolution and deep-inelastic scattering, and provide reference results for their impact on parton evolution, and we briefly examine non-perturbative models for parton distributions. We discuss the state-of-the art in global parton fits, we assess the impact on them of various kinds of data and of theoretical corrections, by providing benchmarks of Alekhin and MRST parton distributions and a CTEQ analysis of parton fit stability, and we briefly presents proposals for alternative approaches to parton fitting. We summarize the status of large and small x resummation, by providing estimates of the impact of large x resummation on parton fits, and a comparison of different approaches to small x resummation, for which we also discuss numerical techniques.

  19. Generalized parton distributions and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on proton at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    R. De Masi

    2007-12-01

    Two measurements of target and beam spin asymmetries for the reaction ep→epγ were performed with CLAS at Jefferson Laboratory. Polarized 5.7 GeV electrons were impinging on a longitudinally polarized ammonia and liquid hydrogen target respectively. These measurements are sensitive to Generalized Parton Distributions. Sizable sin phi azimuthal angular dependences were observed in both experiments, indicating the dominance of leading twist terms and the possibility of extracting combinations of Generalized Parton Distributions on the nucleon.

  20. Flavour symmetry breaking in the kaon parton distribution amplitude

    DOE PAGES

    none,

    2014-11-01

    We compute the kaon's valence-quark (twist-two parton) distribution amplitude (PDA) by projecting its Poincaré-covariant Bethe–Salpeter wave-function onto the light-front. At a scale ζ = 2 GeV, the PDA is a broad, concave and asymmetric function, whose peak is shifted 12–16% away from its position in QCD's conformal limit. These features are a clear expression of SU(3)-flavour-symmetry breaking. They show that the heavier quark in the kaon carries more of the bound-state's momentum than the lighter quark and also that emergent phenomena in QCD modulate the magnitude of flavour-symmetry breaking: it is markedly smaller than one might expect based on themore » difference between light-quark current masses. Our results add to a body of evidence which indicates that at any energy scale accessible with existing or foreseeable facilities, a reliable guide to the interpretation of experiment requires the use of such nonperturbatively broadened PDAs in leading-order, leading-twist formulae for hard exclusive processes instead of the asymptotic PDA associated with QCD's conformal limit. We illustrate this via the ratio of kaon and pion electromagnetic form factors: using our nonperturbative PDAs in the appropriate formulae, FK/Fπ=1.23 at spacelike-Q2=17 GeV2, which compares satisfactorily with the value of 0.92(5) inferred in e+e- annihilation at s=17 GeV2.« less

  1. Evolution equations for connected and disconnected sea parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keh-Fei

    2017-08-01

    It has been revealed from the path-integral formulation of the hadronic tensor that there are connected sea and disconnected sea partons. The former is responsible for the Gottfried sum rule violation primarily and evolves the same way as the valence. Therefore, the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equations can be extended to accommodate them separately. We discuss its consequences and implications vis-á-vis lattice calculations.

  2. Transverse Momentum Dependent Parton Distribution/Fragmentation Functions at an Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    M. Anselmino, H. Avakian, D. Boer, F. Bradamante, M. Burkardt, J.P. Chen, E. Cisbani, M. Contalbrigo, D. Crabb, D. Dutta, L. Gamberg, H. Gao, D. Hasch, J. Huang, M. Huang, Z. Kang, C. Keppel, G. Laskaris, Z-T. Liang, M.X. Liu, N. Makins, R.D. Mckeown, A. Metz, Z-E. Meziani, B. Musch, J-C. Peng, A. Prokudin, X. Qian, Y. Qiang, J.W. Qiu, P. Rossi, P. Schweitzer, J. Soffer, V. Sulkosky, Y. Wang, B. Xiao, Q. Ye, Q-J. Ye, F. Yuan, X. Zhan, Y. Zhang, W. Zheng, J. Zhou

    2011-03-01

    We present a summary of a recent workshop held at Duke University on Partonic Transverse Momentum in Hadrons: Quark Spin-Orbit Correlations and Quark-Gluon Interactions. The transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs), parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, and multi-parton correlation functions, were discussed extensively at the Duke workshop. In this paper, we summarize first the theoretical issues concerning the study of partonic structure of hadrons at a future electron-ion collider (EIC) with emphasis on the TMDs. We then present simulation results on experimental studies of TMDs through measurements of single spin asymmetries (SSA) from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) processes with an EIC, and discuss the requirement of the detector for SIDIS measurements. The dynamics of parton correlations in the nucleon is further explored via a study of SSA in D (`D) production at large transverse momenta with the aim of accessing the unexplored tri-gluon correlation functions. The workshop participants identified the SSA measurements in SIDIS as a golden program to study TMDs in both the sea and valence quark regions and to study the role of gluons, with the Sivers asymmetry measurements as examples. Such measurements will lead to major advancement in our understanding of TMDs in the valence quark region, and more importantly also allow for the investigation of TMDs in the sea quark region along with a study of their evolution.

  3. TMDlib and TMDplotter: library and plotting tools for transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions.

    PubMed

    Hautmann, F; Jung, H; Krämer, M; Mulders, P J; Nocera, E R; Rogers, T C; Signori, A

    Transverse-momentum-dependent distributions (TMDs) are extensions of collinear parton distributions and are important in high-energy physics from both theoretical and phenomenological points of view. In this manual we introduce the library [Formula: see text], a tool to collect transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution functions (TMD PDFs) and fragmentation functions (TMD FFs) together with an online plotting tool, TMDplotter. We provide a description of the program components and of the different physical frameworks the user can access via the available parameterisations.

  4. HARD PARTON PHYSICS IN HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 17

    SciTech Connect

    CARROLL,J.

    1999-09-10

    The RIKEN-BNL center workshop on ''Hard parton physics in high energy nuclear collisions'' was held at BNL from March 1st-5th! 1999. The focus of the workshop was on hard probes of nucleus-nucleus collisions that will be measured at RHIC with the PHENIX and STAR detectors. There were about 45 speakers and over 70 registered participants at the workshop, with roughly a quarter of the speakers from overseas. About 60% of the talks were theory talks. A nice overview of theory for RHIC was provided by George Sterman. The theoretical talks were on a wide range of topics in QCD which can be classified under the following: (a) energy loss and the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect; (b) minijet production and equilibration; (c) small x physics and initial conditions; (d) nuclear parton distributions and shadowing; (e) spin physics; (f) photon, di-lepton, and charm production; and (g) hadronization, and simulations of high pt physics in event generators. Several of the experimental talks discussed the capabilities of the PHENIX and STAR detectors at RHIC in measuring high pt particles in heavy ion collisions. In general, these talks were included in the relevant theory sessions. A session was set aside to discuss the spin program at RHIC with polarized proton beams. In addition, there were speakers from 08, HERA, the fixed target experiments at Fermilab, and the CERN fixed target Pb+Pb program, who provided additional perspective on a range of issues of relevance to RHIC; from jets at the Tevatron, to saturation of parton distributions at HERA, and recent puzzling data on direct photon production in fixed target experiments, among others.

  5. Evolution of the helicity and transversity Transverse-Momentum-Dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexey; Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and transversity parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on transverse momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized transverse momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.

  6. Evolution of the helicity and transversity Transverse-Momentum-Dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexei; Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2013-07-01

    We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and transversity parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on transverse momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized transverse momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.

  7. Evolution equations for the double parton distributions. Initial conditions and transverse momentum dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staśto, Anna M.; Golec-Biernat, Krzysztof

    2017-04-01

    In the first part of this contribution we discuss the problem of the initial conditions for the evolution of double parton distribution functions (PDFs). We show that one can construct a framework based on the expansion in terms of the Dirichlet functions in which both single and double PDFs satisfy momentum sum rules. In the second part, we propose how to include the transverse momentum dependence for the double parton distribution functions using the extension of the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin framework previously applied to the single PDFs.

  8. Bayesian extraction of the parton distribution amplitude from the Bethe-Salpeter wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Chang, Lei; Liu, Yu-xin

    2017-07-01

    We propose a new numerical method to compute the parton distribution amplitude (PDA) from the Euclidean Bethe-Salpeter wave function. The essential step is to extract the weight function in the Nakanishi representation of the Bethe-Salpeter wave function in Euclidean space, which is an ill-posed inversion problem, via the maximum entropy method (MEM). The Nakanishi weight function as well as the corresponding light-front parton distribution amplitude (PDA) can be well determined. We confirm prior work on PDA computations, which was based on different methods.

  9. Transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions in a spectator diquark model

    SciTech Connect

    F Conti, A Bacchetta, M Radici

    2009-09-01

    Within the framework of a spectator diquark model of the nucleon, involving both scalar and axial-vector diquarks, we calculate all the leading-twist transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs). Naive Time-odd densities are generated through a one-gluon-loop rescattering mechanism, simulating the final state interactions required for these functions to exist. Analytic results are obtained for all the TMDs, and a connection with the light-cone wave functions formalism is also established. The model parameters are fixed by reproducing the phenomenological parametrizations of unpolarized and helicity parton distributions at the lowest available scale. Predictions for the other parton densities are given and, whenever possible, compared with available parametrizations.

  10. Constraints on spin-dependent parton distributions at large x from global QCD analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Avakian, H.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2014-09-28

    This study investigate the behavior of spin-dependent parton distribution functions (PDFs) at large parton momentum fractions x in the context of global QCD analysis. We explore the constraints from existing deep-inelastic scattering data, and from theoretical expectations for the leading x → 1 behavior based on hard gluon exchange in perturbative QCD. Systematic uncertainties from the dependence of the PDFs on the choice of parametrization are studied by considering functional forms motivated by orbital angular momentum arguments. Finally, we quantify the reduction in the PDF uncertainties that may be expected from future high-x data from Jefferson Lab at 12 GeV.

  11. Note on lattice regularization and equal-time correlators for parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, G. C.; Testa, M.

    2017-07-01

    We show that a recent interesting idea to circumvent the difficulties with the continuation of parton distribution functions to the Euclidean region, which consists in looking at equal time correlators between proton states of infinite momentum, encounters some problems related to the power divergent mixing pattern of deep inelastic scattering operators, when implemented within the lattice regularization.

  12. Correlations in double parton distributions: perturbative and non-perturbative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, Matteo; Scopetta, Sergio; Traini, Marco; Vento, Vicente

    2016-10-01

    The correct description of Double Parton Scattering (DPS), which represents a background in several channels for the search of new Physics at the LHC, requires the knowledge of double parton distribution functions (dPDFs). These quantities represent also a novel tool for the study of the three-dimensional nucleon structure, complementary to the possibilities offered by electromagnetic probes. In this paper we analyze dPDFs using Poincaré covariant predictions obtained by using a Light-Front constituent quark model proposed in a recent paper, and QCD evolution. We study to what extent factorized expressions for dPDFs, which neglect, at least in part, two-parton correlations, can be used. We show that they fail in reproducing the calculated dPDFs, in particular in the valence region. Actually measurable processes at existing facilities occur at low longitudinal momenta of the interacting partons; to have contact with these processes we have analyzed correlations between pairs of partons of different kind, finding that, in some cases, they are strongly suppressed at low longitudinal momenta, while for other distributions they can be sizeable. For example, the effect of gluon-gluon correlations can be as large as 20 %. We have shown that these behaviors can be understood in terms of a delicate interference of non-perturbative correlations, generated by the dynamics of the model, and perturbative ones, generated by the model independent evolution procedure. Our analysis shows that at LHC kinematics two-parton correlations can be relevant in DPS, and therefore we address the possibility to study them experimentally.

  13. Nuclear parton density functions from jet production in DIS at an EIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klasen, M.; Kovařík, K.; Potthoff, J.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the potential of inclusive-jet production in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) at a future electron-ion collider (EIC) to improve our current knowledge of nuclear parton density functions (PDFs). We demonstrate that the kinematic reach is extended similarly to inclusive DIS, but that the uncertainty of the nuclear PDFs, in particular of the gluon density at low Bjorken-x , is considerably reduced, by up to an order of magnitude compared to the present situation. Using an approximate next-to-next-to-leading order (aNNLO) calculation implemented in the program JetViP, we also make predictions for three different EIC designs and for four different light and heavy nuclei.

  14. An analysis of the impact of LHC Run I proton-lead data on nuclear parton densities.

    PubMed

    Armesto, Néstor; Paukkunen, Hannu; Penín, José Manuel; Salgado, Carlos A; Zurita, Pía

    2016-01-01

    We report on an analysis of the impact of available experimental data on hard processes in proton-lead collisions during Run I at the large hadron collider on nuclear modifications of parton distribution functions. Our analysis is restricted to the EPS09 and DSSZ global fits. The measurements that we consider comprise production of massive gauge bosons, jets, charged hadrons and pions. This is the first time a study of nuclear PDFs includes this number of different observables. The goal of the paper is twofold: (i) checking the description of the data by nPDFs, as well as the relevance of these nuclear effects, in a quantitative manner; (ii) testing the constraining power of these data in eventual global fits, for which we use the Bayesian reweighting technique. We find an overall good, even too good, description of the data, indicating that more constraining power would require a better control over the systematic uncertainties and/or the proper proton-proton reference from LHC Run II. Some of the observables, however, show sizeable tension with specific choices of proton and nuclear PDFs. We also comment on the corresponding improvements as regards the theoretical treatment.

  15. An analysis of the impact of LHC Run I proton-lead data on nuclear parton densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armesto, Néstor; Paukkunen, Hannu; Penín, José Manuel; Salgado, Carlos A.; Zurita, Pía

    2016-04-01

    We report on an analysis of the impact of available experimental data on hard processes in proton-lead collisions during Run I at the large hadron collider on nuclear modifications of parton distribution functions. Our analysis is restricted to the EPS09 and DSSZ global fits. The measurements that we consider comprise production of massive gauge bosons, jets, charged hadrons and pions. This is the first time a study of nuclear PDFs includes this number of different observables. The goal of the paper is twofold: (i) checking the description of the data by nPDFs, as well as the relevance of these nuclear effects, in a quantitative manner; (ii) testing the constraining power of these data in eventual global fits, for which we use the Bayesian reweighting technique. We find an overall good, even too good, description of the data, indicating that more constraining power would require a better control over the systematic uncertainties and/or the proper proton-proton reference from LHC Run II. Some of the observables, however, show sizeable tension with specific choices of proton and nuclear PDFs. We also comment on the corresponding improvements as regards the theoretical treatment.

  16. The parton distributions in nuclei and in polarized nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Close, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    The emerging information was reviewed on the way quark and anti-quark, and gluon distributions are modified in nuclei relative to free nucleons. Some implications of the recent data on polarized leptoproduction are discussed. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  17. The Generalized Parton Distribution program after the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Franck Sabatie

    2009-12-01

    The Generalized Parton Distribution framework was introduced in the late 90's and describes the nucleon in a revolutionary way, correlating the information from both momentum and transverse position space into experimentally accessible functions. After a brief introduction, this article reviews the Jefferson Lab 6 GeV measurements of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering in Halls A and B, which give a unique access to Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD). The second half of this article reviews the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade in general terms, and then focuses on the GPD program in Halls A and B. This second generation of experiments will yield more accurate, more complete data in a wider kinematical range than any experiment ever before, using the full capability of a higher beam energy, higher luminosities, upgraded detectors and refined extraction techniques.

  18. Strange quark parton distribution functions and implications for Drell-Yan boson production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusina, A.; Stavreva, T.; Berge, S.; Olness, F. I.; Schienbein, I.; Kovařík, K.; Ježo, T.; Yu, J. Y.; Park, K.

    2012-05-01

    Global analyses of parton distribution functions (PDFs) have provided incisive constraints on the up and down quark components of the proton, but constraining the other flavor degrees of freedom is more challenging. Higher-order theory predictions and new data sets have contributed to recent improvements. Despite these efforts, the strange quark parton distribution function has a sizable uncertainty, particularly in the small x region. We examine the constraints from experiment and theory, and investigate the impact of this uncertainty on LHC observables. In particular, we study W/Z production to see how the s quark uncertainty propagates to these observables, and examine the extent to which precise measurements at the LHC can provide additional information on the proton flavor structure.

  19. Constraints on large-x parton distributions from new weak boson production and deep-inelastic scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Accardi, A.; Brady, L. T.; Melnitchouk, W.; Owens, J. F.; Sato, N.

    2016-06-20

    A new set of leading twist parton distribution functions, referred to as "CJ15", is presented, which take advantage of developments in the theoretical treatment of nuclear corrections as well as new data. The analysis includes for the first time data on the free neutron structure function from Jefferson Lab, and new high-precision charged lepton and W-boson asymmetry data from Fermilab, which significantly reduce the uncertainty on the d/u ratio at large values of x.

  20. Constraints on large-x parton distributions from new weak boson production and deep-inelastic scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Accardi, A.; Brady, L. T.; Melnitchouk, W.; Owens, J. F.; Sato, N.

    2016-06-20

    A new set of leading twist parton distribution functions, referred to as "CJ15", is presented, which take advantage of developments in the theoretical treatment of nuclear corrections as well as new data. The analysis includes for the first time data on the free neutron structure function from Jefferson Lab, and new high-precision charged lepton and W-boson asymmetry data from Fermilab, which significantly reduce the uncertainty on the d/u ratio at large values of x.

  1. Photon parton distributions in nuclei and the EMC effect

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, Leonid; Strikman, Mark

    2010-12-01

    Photons as well as quarks and gluons are constituents of the infinite momentum frame (IMF) wave function of an energetic particle. They are mostly equivalent photons whose amplitude follows from the Lorentz transformation of the particle rest frame Coulomb field into the IMF and from the conservation of the electromagnetic current. We evaluate in a model independent way the dominant photon contribution \\propto \\alpha_{em}(Z^2/A^{4/3})\\ln(1/R_{A}m_{N}x) to the nuclear structure functions as well as the term \\propto \\alpha_{em}Z/A. In addition we show that the definition of x consistent with the exact kinematics of eA scattering (with exact sum rules) works in the same direction as the nucleus field of equivalent photons. Combined, these effects account for the bulk of the EMC effect for x\\le 0.5 where Fermi motion effects are small. In particular for these x the hadronic mechanism contribution to the EMC effect does not exceed \\sim 3% for all nuclei. Also the A-dependence of the hadronic mechanism of the EMC effect for x > 0.5 is significantly modified.

  2. Photon parton distributions in nuclei and the EMC effect

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, L.; Strikman, M.

    2010-12-15

    Photons, as well as quarks and gluons, are constituents of the infinite momentum frame (IMF) wave function of an energetic particle. They are mostly equivalent photons whose amplitude follows from the Lorentz transformation of the particle rest frame Coulomb field into the IMF and from the conservation of the electromagnetic current. We evaluate in a model independent way the dominant photon contribution {proportional_to}{alpha}{sub em}(Z{sup 2}/A{sup 4/3})ln(1/R{sub A}m{sub N}x) to the nuclear structure functions as well as the term {proportional_to}{alpha}{sub em}Z/A. In addition we show that the definition of x consistent with the exact kinematics of eA scattering (with exact sum rules) works in the same direction as the nucleus field of equivalent photons. Combined, these effects account for the bulk of the hadronic European Muon Collaboration (EMC) effect for x{<=}0.5 where Fermi motion effects are small. In particular, for these x the hadronic mechanism contribution to the EMC effect does not exceed {approx}3% for all nuclei. Also, the A dependence of the hadronic mechanism of the EMC effect for x>0.5 is significantly modified.

  3. Transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions generated in the modified DGLAP formalism based on the valence-like distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinkhani, H.; Modarres, M.; Olanj, N.

    2017-07-01

    Transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distributions, also referred to as unintegrated parton distribution functions (UPDFs), are produced via the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin (KMR) prescription. The GJR08 set of parton distribution functions (PDFs) which are based on the valence-like distributions is used, at the leading order (LO) and the next-to-leading order (NLO) approximations, as inputs of the KMR formalism. The general and the relative behaviors of the generated TMD PDFs at LO and NLO and their ratios in a wide range of the transverse momentum values, i.e. kt2 = 10, 102, 104 and 108GeV2 are investigated. It is shown that the properties of the parent valence-like PDFs are imprinted on the daughter TMD PDFs. Imposing the angular ordering constraint (AOC) leads to the dynamical variable limits on the integrals which in turn increase the contributions from the lower scales at lower kt2. The results are compared with our previous studies based on the MSTW2008 input PDFs and it is shown that the present calculation gives flatter TMD PDFs. Finally, a comparison of longitudinal structure function (FL) is made by using the produced TMD PDFs and those that were generated through the MSTW2008-LO PDF from our previous work and the corresponding data from H1 and ZEUS collaborations and a reasonable agreement is found.

  4. The Generalized Parton Distribution program in Hall A at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, C. Munoz

    2008-10-13

    Recent results on the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD) program at Jefferson Lab (JLab) will be presented. The emphasis will be in the Hall A program aiming at measuring Q{sup 2}--dependences of different terms of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) cross section. This is a fundamental step before one can extract GPD information from JLab DVCS data. Neutral pion production will also be discussed and results from the CLAS collaboration will be shown. Finally, the upcoming program in Hall A, using both a 6 GeV beam ({approx_equal}2010) and a 11 GeV beam ({approx_equal}2015) will be described.

  5. APFEL Web: a web-based application for the graphical visualization of parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrazza, Stefano; Ferrara, Alfio; Palazzo, Daniele; Rojo, Juan

    2015-05-01

    We present APFEL Web, a Web-based application designed to provide a flexible user-friendly tool for the graphical visualization of parton distribution functions. In this note we describe the technical design of the APFEL Web application, motivating the choices and the framework used for the development of this project. We document the basic usage of APFEL Web and show how it can be used to provide useful input for a variety of collider phenomenological studies. Finally we provide some examples showing the output generated by the application.

  6. Partonic Equations of State in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions atRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Nu

    2006-10-01

    The authors discuss the recent results on equation of state for partonic matter created at RHIC. Issues of partonic collectivity for multi-strange hadrons and J/{psi} from Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV are the focus of this paper.

  7. The asymptotic behaviour of parton distributions at small and large x.

    PubMed

    Ball, Richard D; Nocera, Emanuele R; Rojo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued from the earliest days of quantum chromodynamics that at asymptotically small values of x the parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the proton behave as [Formula: see text], where the values of [Formula: see text] can be deduced from Regge theory, while at asymptotically large values of x the PDFs behave as [Formula: see text], where the values of [Formula: see text] can be deduced from the Brodsky-Farrar quark counting rules. We critically examine these claims by extracting the exponents [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] from various global fits of parton distributions, analysing their scale dependence, and comparing their values to the naive expectations. We find that for valence distributions both Regge theory and counting rules are confirmed, at least within uncertainties, while for sea quarks and gluons the results are less conclusive. We also compare results from various PDF fits for the structure function ratio [Formula: see text] at large x, and caution against unrealistic uncertainty estimates due to overconstrained parametrisations.

  8. The impact of CMS inclusive jet data on parton distribution functions and their uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleedaneshvar, A.; Khorramian, A.

    2017-08-01

    It is well known that the jet production data at LHC provide important constraints on the medium and large-x gluon parton distribution function (PDF), as well as on the large-x sea quarks. In this work, we study the impact of recent CMS measurements for the inclusive jet production at center-of-mass energy of s=13 TeV on the PDFs and their uncertainties. To this aim, with use of the FASTNLO and xFitter framework, we apply the parton distribution re-weighting procedure to study the impact of CMS data on two NLO modern CT14 and MMHT PDF sets. As a result, we found that the fit quality obtained using both of these PDF sets is very good. Moreover, the CMS data can impact both the central values and uncertainties of some PDFs especially at low and large x regions. Overall, it is indicated that the CT14 PDFs compared with the MMHT ones are more affected. We emphasis that the inclusion of these data in a new global analysis of PDFs can improve the determination of the gluon and quark PDFs at both low and large x regions.

  9. Generalized parton distributions and rapidity gap survival in exclusive diffractive pp scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, L.; Hyde, C. E.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2007-03-01

    We study rapidity gap survival (RGS) in the production of high-mass systems (H=dijet, heavy quarkonium, Higgs boson) in double-gap exclusive diffractive pp scattering, pp{yields}p+(gap)+H+(gap)+p. Our approach is based on the idea that hard and soft interactions are approximately independent because they proceed over widely different time and distance scales. We implement this idea in a partonic description of proton structure, which allows for a model-independent treatment of the interplay of hard and soft interactions. The high-mass system is produced in a hard scattering process with exchange of two gluons between the protons, whose amplitude is calculable in terms of the gluon generalized parton distribution (GPD), measured in exclusive ep scattering. The hard scattering process is modified by soft spectator interactions, which we calculate neglecting correlations between hard and soft interactions (independent interaction approximation). We obtain an analytic expression for the RGS probability in terms of the phenomenological pp elastic scattering amplitude, without reference to the eikonal approximation. Contributions from inelastic intermediate states are suppressed. The onset of the black-disk limit in pp scattering at TeV energies strongly suppresses diffraction at small impact parameters and is the main factor in determining the RGS probability. Correlations between hard and soft interactions (e.g. due to scattering from the long-range pion field of the proton or due to possible short-range transverse correlations between partons) further decrease the RGS probability. We also investigate the dependence of the diffractive cross section on the transverse momenta of the final-state protons ('diffraction pattern'). By measuring this dependence one can perform detailed tests of the interplay of hard and soft interactions and even extract information about the gluon GPD in the proton. Such studies appear to be feasible with the planned forward detectors at the

  10. New parton distribution functions from a global analysis of quantum chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulat, Sayipjamal; Hou, Tie-Jiun; Gao, Jun; Guzzi, Marco; Huston, Joey; Nadolsky, Pavel; Pumplin, Jon; Schmidt, Carl; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C.-P.

    2016-02-01

    We present new parton distribution functions (PDFs) at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) from the CTEQ-TEA global analysis of quantum chromodynamics. These differ from previous CT PDFs in several respects, including the use of data from LHC experiments and the new D0 charged-lepton rapidity asymmetry data, as well as the use of a more flexible parametrization of PDFs that, in particular, allows a better fit to different combinations of quark flavors. Predictions for important LHC processes, especially Higgs boson production at 13 TeV, are presented. These CT14 PDFs include a central set and error sets in the Hessian representation. For completeness, we also present the CT14 PDFs determined at the LO and the NLO in QCD. Besides these general-purpose PDF sets, we provide a series of (N)NLO sets with various αs values and additional sets in general-mass variable flavor number schemes, to deal with heavy partons, with up to three, four, and six active flavors.

  11. New parton distribution functions from a global analysis of quantum chromodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Dulat, Sayipjamal; Hou, Tie -Jiun; Gao, Jun; ...

    2016-02-16

    Here, we present new parton distribution functions (PDFs) up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) from the CTEQ-TEA global analysis of quantum chromodynamics. These differ from previous CT PDFs in several respects, including the use of data from LHC experiments and the new D0 charged lepton rapidity asymmetry data, as well as the use of more flexible parametrization of PDFs that, in particular, allows a better fit to different combinations of quark flavors. Predictions for important LHC processes, especially Higgs boson production at 13 TeV, are presented. These CT14 PDFs include a central set and error sets in the Hessian representation. Formore » completeness, we also present the CT14 PDFs determined at the leading order (LO) and the next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. Besides these general-purpose PDF sets, we provide a series of (N)NLO sets with various αs values and additional sets in general-mass variable flavor number (GM-VFN) schemes, to deal with heavy partons, with up to 3, 4, and 6 active flavors.« less

  12. New parton distribution functions from a global analysis of quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dulat, Sayipjamal; Hou, Tie -Jiun; Gao, Jun; Guzzi, Marco; Nadolsky, Pavel; Pumplin, Jon; Schmidt, Carl; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C. -P.; Huston, Joey

    2016-02-16

    Here, we present new parton distribution functions (PDFs) up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) from the CTEQ-TEA global analysis of quantum chromodynamics. These differ from previous CT PDFs in several respects, including the use of data from LHC experiments and the new D0 charged lepton rapidity asymmetry data, as well as the use of more flexible parametrization of PDFs that, in particular, allows a better fit to different combinations of quark flavors. Predictions for important LHC processes, especially Higgs boson production at 13 TeV, are presented. These CT14 PDFs include a central set and error sets in the Hessian representation. For completeness, we also present the CT14 PDFs determined at the leading order (LO) and the next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. Besides these general-purpose PDF sets, we provide a series of (N)NLO sets with various αs values and additional sets in general-mass variable flavor number (GM-VFN) schemes, to deal with heavy partons, with up to 3, 4, and 6 active flavors.

  13. Parton distribution in pseudoscalar mesons with a light-front constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, J. P. B. C.; Ahmed, Isthiaq; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    We compute the distribution amplitudes of the pion and kaon in the light-front constituent quark model with the symmetric quark-bound state vertex function [1, 2, 3]. In the calculation we explicitly include the flavor-SU(3) symmetry breaking effect in terms of the constituent quark masses of the up (down) and strange quarks. To calculate the kaon parton distribution functions (PDFs), we use both the conditions in the light-cone wave function, i.e., when s ¯ quark is on-shell, and when u quark is on-shell, and make a comparison between them. The kaon PDFs calculated in the two different conditions clearly show asymmetric behaviour due to the flavor SU(3)-symmetry breaking implemented by the quark masses [4, 5].

  14. CT10 NLO and NNLO Parton Distribution Functions from the Coordinated Theoretical-Experimental Project on QCD

    DOE Data Explorer

    Huston, Joey [Co-Spokesperson; Ownes, Joseph [Co-Spokesperson

    The Coordinated Theoretical-Experimental Project on QCD is a multi-institutional collaboration devoted to a broad program of research projects and cooperative enterprises in high-energy physics centered on Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and its implications in all areas of the Standard Model and beyond. The Collaboration consists of theorists and experimentalists at 18 universities and 5 national laboratories. More than 65 sets of Parton Distribution Functions are available for public access. Links to many online software tools, information about Parton Distribution Functions, papers, and other resources are also available.

  15. Collinear parton distributions and the structure of the nucleon sea in a light-front meson-cloud model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofler, Stefan; Pasquini, Barbara

    2017-05-01

    The unpolarized, helicity and transversity parton distribution functions of the nucleon are studied within a convolution model where the bare nucleon is dressed by its virtual meson cloud. Using light-front time-ordered perturbation theory, the Fock states of the physical nucleon are expanded in a series involving a bare nucleon and two-particle (meson-baryon) states. The bare baryons and mesons are described with light-front wave functions (LFWFs) for the corresponding valence-parton components. Using a representation in terms of overlap of LFWFs, the role of the nonperturbative antiquark degrees of freedom and the valence-quark contribution at the input scale of the model is discussed for the leading-twist collinear parton distributions. After introducing perturbative QCD effects through evolution to experimental scales, the results are compared with available data and phenomenological extractions. Predictions for the nucleon tensor charge are also presented, finding a very good agreement with recent phenomenological extractions.

  16. Iterative Monte Carlo analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Nobuo; Melnitchouk, Wally; Kuhn, Sebastian E.; Ethier, Jacob J.; Accardi, Alberto

    2016-04-05

    We present a comprehensive new global QCD analysis of polarized inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, including the latest high-precision data on longitudinal and transverse polarization asymmetries from Jefferson Lab and elsewhere. The analysis is performed using a new iterative Monte Carlo fitting technique which generates stable fits to polarized parton distribution functions (PDFs) with statistically rigorous uncertainties. Inclusion of the Jefferson Lab data leads to a reduction in the PDF errors for the valence and sea quarks, as well as in the gluon polarization uncertainty at x ≳ 0.1. Furthermore, the study also provides the first determination of the flavor-separated twist-3 PDFs and the d2 moment of the nucleon within a global PDF analysis.

  17. Iterative Monte Carlo analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Sato, Nobuo; Melnitchouk, Wally; Kuhn, Sebastian E.; ...

    2016-04-05

    We present a comprehensive new global QCD analysis of polarized inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, including the latest high-precision data on longitudinal and transverse polarization asymmetries from Jefferson Lab and elsewhere. The analysis is performed using a new iterative Monte Carlo fitting technique which generates stable fits to polarized parton distribution functions (PDFs) with statistically rigorous uncertainties. Inclusion of the Jefferson Lab data leads to a reduction in the PDF errors for the valence and sea quarks, as well as in the gluon polarization uncertainty at x ≳ 0.1. Furthermore, the study also provides the first determination of the flavor-separated twist-3 PDFsmore » and the d2 moment of the nucleon within a global PDF analysis.« less

  18. Exclusive η electroproduction at W>2 GeV with CLAS and transversity generalized parton distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Bedlinskiy, I.; Kubarovsky, V.; Stoler, P.; ...

    2017-03-10

    The cross section of the exclusive η electroproduction reaction ep → e'p'η was measured at Jefferson Laboratory with a 5.75 GeV electron beam and the CLAS detector. Differential cross sections d4σ/dtdQ2dxBdΦη and structure functions σU = σT + εσL, σTT, and σLT, as functions of t, were obtained over a wide range of Q2 and xB. The η structure functions are compared with those previously measured for π0 at the same kinematics. At low t, both π0 and η are described reasonably well by generalized parton distributions (GPDs) in which chiral-odd transversity GPDs are dominant. As a result, the π0more » and η data, when taken together, can facilitate the flavor decomposition of the transversity GPDs.« less

  19. Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques applied to parton distribution functions determination: Proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbedo, Yémalin Gabin; Mangin-Brinet, Mariane

    2017-07-01

    We present a new procedure to determine parton distribution functions (PDFs), based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. The aim of this paper is to show that we can replace the standard χ2 minimization by procedures grounded on statistical methods, and on Bayesian inference in particular, thus offering additional insight into the rich field of PDFs determination. After a basic introduction to these techniques, we introduce the algorithm we have chosen to implement—namely Hybrid (or Hamiltonian) Monte Carlo. This algorithm, initially developed for Lattice QCD, turns out to be very interesting when applied to PDFs determination by global analyses; we show that it allows us to circumvent the difficulties due to the high dimensionality of the problem, in particular concerning the acceptance. A first feasibility study is performed and presented, which indicates that Markov chain Monte Carlo can successfully be applied to the extraction of PDFs and of their uncertainties.

  20. New Angle on the Parton Distribution Functions: Self-Organizing Maps

    SciTech Connect

    Honkanen, H.; Liuti, S.

    2009-08-04

    Neural network (NN) algorithms have been recently applied to construct Parton Distribution Function (PDF) parametrizations, providing an alternative to standard global fitting procedures. Here we explore a novel technique using Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs). SOMs are a class of clustering algorithms based on competitive learning among spatially-ordered neurons. We train our SOMs with stochastically generated PDF samples. On every optimization iteration the PDFs are clustered on the SOM according to a user-defined feature and the most promising candidates are used as a seed for the subsequent iteration using the topology of the map to guide the PDF generating process. Our goal is a fitting procedure that, at variance with the standard neural network approaches, will allow for an increased control of the systematic bias by enabling user interaction in the various stages of the process.

  1. New avenue to the parton distribution functions: Self-organizing maps

    SciTech Connect

    Honkanen, H.; Liuti, S.; Carnahan, J.; Loitiere, Y.; Reynolds, P. R.

    2009-02-01

    Neural network algorithms have been recently applied to construct parton distribution function (PDF) parametrizations which provide an alternative to standard global fitting procedures. In this exploratory study we propose a technique using self-organizing maps (SOMs). SOMs are a class of clustering algorithms based on competitive learning among spatially ordered neurons. Our SOMs are trained on selections of stochastically generated PDF samples. The selection criterion for every optimization iteration is based on the features of the clustered PDFs. Our goal is a fitting procedure that, at variance with the standard neural network approaches, will allow for an increased control of the systematic bias by enabling user interaction in the various stages of the process.

  2. Cross Sections for the Exclusive Photon Electroproduction on the Proton and Generalized Parton Distributions.

    PubMed

    Jo, H S; Girod, F X; Avakian, H; Burkert, V D; Garçon, M; Guidal, M; Kubarovsky, V; Niccolai, S; Stoler, P; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Amaryan, M J; Anderson, M D; Anefalos Pereira, S; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Compton, N; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Dupre, R; Alaoui, A El; Fassi, L El; Elouadrhiri, L; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Filippi, A; Fleming, J A; Garillon, B; Gevorgyan, N; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guegan, B; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Harrison, N; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Hirlinger Saylor, N; Ho, D; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Joosten, S; Keller, D; Khachatryan, G; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Lenisa, P; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; McKinnon, B; Meziani, Z E; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R A; Moutarde, H; Movsisyan, A; Munevar, E; Munoz Camacho, C; Nadel-Turonski, P; Net, L A; Niculescu, G; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Phillips, J J; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Puckett, A J R; Raue, B A; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Roy, P; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Simonyan, A; Skorodumina, Iu; Smith, G D; Sokhan, D; Sparveris, N; Stepanyan, S; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W; Zonta, I

    2015-11-20

    Unpolarized and beam-polarized fourfold cross sections (d^{4}σ/dQ^{2}dx_{B}dtdϕ) for the ep→e^{'}p^{'}γ reaction were measured using the CLAS detector and the 5.75-GeV polarized electron beam of the Jefferson Lab accelerator, for 110 (Q^{2},x_{B},t) bins over the widest phase space ever explored in the valence-quark region. Several models of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) describe the data well at most of our kinematics. This increases our confidence that we understand the GPD H, expected to be the dominant contributor to these observables. Through a leading-twist extraction of Compton form factors, these results support the model predictions of a larger nucleon size at lower quark-momentum fraction x_{B}.

  3. Cross Sections for the Exclusive Photon Electroproduction on the Proton and Generalized Parton Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, H. S.; Girod, F. X.; Avakian, H.; Burkert, V. D.; Garçon, M.; Guidal, M.; Kubarovsky, V.; Niccolai, S.; Stoler, P.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Garillon, B.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Hirlinger Saylor, N.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; McKinnon, B.; Meziani, Z. E.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Unpolarized and beam-polarized fourfold cross sections (d4σ /d Q2d xBd t d ϕ ) for the e p →e'p'γ reaction were measured using the CLAS detector and the 5.75-GeV polarized electron beam of the Jefferson Lab accelerator, for 110 (Q2,xB,t ) bins over the widest phase space ever explored in the valence-quark region. Several models of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) describe the data well at most of our kinematics. This increases our confidence that we understand the GPD H , expected to be the dominant contributor to these observables. Through a leading-twist extraction of Compton form factors, these results support the model predictions of a larger nucleon size at lower quark-momentum fraction xB.

  4. Exclusive η electroproduction at W >2 GeV with CLAS and transversity generalized parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedlinskiy, I.; Kubarovsky, V.; Stoler, P.; Adhikari, K. P.; Akbar, Z.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khachatryan, M.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; McKinnon, B.; Meziani, Z. E.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Yurov, M.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    The cross section of the exclusive η electroproduction reaction e p →e'p'η was measured at Jefferson Laboratory with a 5.75 GeV electron beam and the CLAS detector. Differential cross sections d4σ /d t d Q2d xBd ϕη and structure functions σU=σT+ɛ σL,σT T , and σL T, as functions of t , were obtained over a wide range of Q2 and xB. The η structure functions are compared with those previously measured for π0 at the same kinematics. At low t , both π0 and η are described reasonably well by generalized parton distributions (GPDs) in which chiral-odd transversity GPDs are dominant. The π0 and η data, when taken together, can facilitate the flavor decomposition of the transversity GPDs.

  5. Cross sections for the exclusive photon electroproduction on the proton and Generalized Parton Distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Jo, Hyon -Suk

    2015-11-17

    Unpolarized and beam-polarized four-fold cross sectionsmore » $$\\frac{d^4 \\sigma}{dQ^2 dx_B dt d\\phi}$$ for the $$ep\\to e^\\prime p^\\prime \\gamma$$ reaction were measured using the CLAS detector and the 5.75-GeV polarized electron beam of the Jefferson Lab accelerator, for 110 ($$Q^2,x_B,t$$) bins over the widest phase space ever explored in the valence-quark region. Several models of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) describe the data well at most of our kinematics. This increases our confidence that we understand the GPD $H$, expected to be the dominant contributor to these observables. Thus, through a leading-twist extraction of Compton Form Factors, these results reveal a tomographic image of the nucleon.« less

  6. Cross sections for the exclusive photon electroproduction on the proton and Generalized Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Hyon -Suk

    2015-11-17

    Unpolarized and beam-polarized four-fold cross sections $\\frac{d^4 \\sigma}{dQ^2 dx_B dt d\\phi}$ for the $ep\\to e^\\prime p^\\prime \\gamma$ reaction were measured using the CLAS detector and the 5.75-GeV polarized electron beam of the Jefferson Lab accelerator, for 110 ($Q^2,x_B,t$) bins over the widest phase space ever explored in the valence-quark region. Several models of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) describe the data well at most of our kinematics. This increases our confidence that we understand the GPD $H$, expected to be the dominant contributor to these observables. Thus, through a leading-twist extraction of Compton Form Factors, these results reveal a tomographic image of the nucleon.

  7. New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Hobbs, T. J.; Londergan, J. T.; ...

    2015-02-27

    We present a new global QCD analysis of parton distribution functions, allowing for possible intrinsic charm (IC) contributions in the nucleon inspired by light-front models. The analysis makes use of the full range of available high-energy scattering data for Q2 ≥ 1 GeV2 and W2 ≥ 3.5 GeV2, including fixed-target proton and deuteron deep cross sections at lower energies that were excluded in previously global analyses. The expanded data set places more stringent constraints on the momentum carried by IC, with (x)IC at most 0.5% (corresponding to an IC normalization of ~1%) at the 4σ level for ΔX2 = 1.more » We also assess the impact of older EMC measurements of Fc2c at large x, which favor a nonzero IC, but with very large X2 values.« less

  8. Wee partons in large nuclei: From virtual dream to hard reality

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopalan, R.

    1995-06-01

    We construct a weak coupling, many body theory to compute parton distributions in large nuclei for x {much_lt} A{sup {minus} 1/3}. The wee partons are highly coherent, non-Abelian Weizsaecker-Williams fields. Radiative corrections to the classical results axe discussed. The parton distributions for a single nucleus provide the initial conditions for the dynamical evolution of matter formed in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions.

  9. How Bright is the Proton? A Precise Determination of the Photon Parton Distribution Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, Aneesh; Nason, Paolo; Salam, Gavin P.; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-12-01

    It has become apparent in recent years that it is important, notably for a range of physics studies at the Large Hadron Collider, to have accurate knowledge on the distribution of photons in the proton. We show how the photon parton distribution function (PDF) can be determined in a model-independent manner, using electron-proton (e p ) scattering data, in effect viewing the e p →e +X process as an electron scattering off the photon field of the proton. To this end, we consider an imaginary, beyond the Standard Model process with a flavor changing photon-lepton vertex. We write its cross section in two ways: one in terms of proton structure functions, the other in terms of a photon distribution. Requiring their equivalence yields the photon distribution as an integral over proton structure functions. As a result of the good precision of e p data, we constrain the photon PDF at the level of 1%-2% over a wide range of momentum fractions.

  10. Chiral-Odd Generalized Parton Distributions, Transversity and Double Transverse-Spin Asymmetry in Drell-Yan Dilepton Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pincetti, M.; Pasquini, B.; Boffi, S.

    2007-04-01

    Within the framework of light-cone quantization we derive the overlap representation of generalized parton distributions for transversely polarized quarks using the Fock-state decomposition in the transverse-spin basis. We apply this formalism to the case of light-cone wave functions in a constituent quark model giving numerical results for the four chiral-odd generalized parton distributions in a region where they describe the emission and reabsorption of a quark by the nucleon. With the transversity distribution obtained in the forward limit of the generalized distribution, we provide some predictions for the double transverse-spin asymmetry in Drell-Yan dilepton production in the kinematics of the \\cal {PAX} experiment.

  11. Prompt neutrino fluxes in the atmosphere with PROSA parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzelli, M. V.; Moch, S.; Zenaiev, O.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; Placakyte, R.; Sigl, G.

    2017-05-01

    Effects on atmospheric prompt neutrino fluxes of present uncertainties affecting the nucleon composition are studied by using the PROSA fit to parton distribution functions (PDFs). The PROSA fit extends the precision of the PDFs to low x, which is the kinematic region of relevance for high-energy neutrino production, by taking into account LHCb data on charm and bottom hadroproduction collected at the center-of-mass energy of √{s}=7 TeV. In the range of neutrino energies explored by present Very Large Volume Neutrino Telescopes, it is found that PDF uncertainties are far smaller with respect to those due to renormalization and factorization scale variation and to assumptions on the cosmic ray composition, which at present dominate and limit our knowledge of prompt neutrino fluxes. A discussion is presented on how these uncertainties affect the expected number of atmospheric prompt neutrino events in the analysis of high-energy events characterized by interaction vertices fully contained within the instrumented volume of the detector, performed by the IceCube collaboration. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Hobbs, T. J.; Londergan, J. T.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2015-02-27

    We present a new global QCD analysis of parton distribution functions, allowing for possible intrinsic charm (IC) contributions in the nucleon inspired by light-front models. The analysis makes use of the full range of available high-energy scattering data for Q2 ≥ 1 GeV2 and W2 ≥ 3.5 GeV2, including fixed-target proton and deuteron deep cross sections at lower energies that were excluded in previously global analyses. The expanded data set places more stringent constraints on the momentum carried by IC, with (x)IC at most 0.5% (corresponding to an IC normalization of ~1%) at the 4σ level for ΔX2 = 1. We also assess the impact of older EMC measurements of Fc2c at large x, which favor a nonzero IC, but with very large X2 values.

  13. CTEQ-TEA parton distribution functions and HERA Run I and II combined data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Tie-Jiun; Dulat, Sayipjamal; Gao, Jun; Guzzi, Marco; Huston, Joey; Nadolsky, Pavel; Pumplin, Jon; Schmidt, Carl; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C.-P.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the impact of the recent HERA Run I +II combination of inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross-section data on the CT14 global analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs). New PDFs at next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order, called CT14 HERA 2 , are obtained by a refit of the CT14 data ensembles, in which the HERA Run I combined measurements are replaced by the new HERA Run I +II combination. The CT14 functional parametrization of PDFs is flexible enough to allow good descriptions of different flavor combinations, so we use the same parametrization for CT14 HERA 2 but with an additional shape parameter for describing the strange quark PDF. We find that the HERA I +II data can be fit reasonably well, and both CT14 and CT14 HERA 2 PDFs can describe equally well the non-HERA data included in our global analysis. Because the CT14 and CT14 HERA 2 PDFs agree well within the PDF errors, we continue to recommend CT14 PDFs for the analysis of LHC Run 2 experiments.

  14. Moments of Nucleon's Parton Distribution for the Sea and Valence Quarks from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Mridupawan; Streuer, Thomas; Doi, Takumi; Dong, Shao-Jing; Draper, Terrence; Liu, Keh-Fei; Mathur, Nilmani; Thomas, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    We extend the study of lowest moments, $$ and $$, of the parton distribution function of the nucleon to include those of the sea quarks; this entails a disconnected insertion calculation in lattice QCD. This is carried out on a $16^3 \\times 24$ quenched lattice with Wilson fermion. The quark loops are calculated with $Z_2$ noise vectors and unbiased subtractions, and multiple nucleon sources are employed to reduce the statistical errors. We obtain 5$\\sigma$ signals for $$ for the $u,d,$ and $s$ quarks, but $$ is consistent with zero within errors. We provide results for both the connected and disconnected insertions. The perturbatively renormalized $$ for the strange quark at $\\mu = 2$ GeV is $_{s+\\bar{s}} = 0.027 \\pm 0.006$ which is consistent with the experimental result. The ratio of $$ for $s$ vs. $u/d$ in the disconnected insertion with quark loops is calculated to be $0.88 \\pm 0.07$. This is about twice as large as the phenomenologically fitted $\\displays

  15. A new phenomenological investigation of KMR and MRW unintegrated parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, M.; Hosseinkhani, H.; Olanj, N.; Masouminia, M. R.

    2015-11-01

    We address the longitudinal proton structure function, F_L(x,Q^2), from the k_t-factorization formalism by using the unintegrated parton distribution functions (UPDF) which are generated through the KMR and MRW procedures. The LO UPDF of the KMR prescription is extracted, by taking into account the PDF of Martin et al, i.e., MSTW2008-LO and MRST99-NLO, and next the NLO UPDF of the MRW scheme is generated through the set of MSTW2008-NLO PDF as the input. The different aspects of F_L(x,Q^2) in the two approaches, as well as its perturbative and non-perturbative parts, are calculated. Then the comparison of F_L(x,Q^2) is made with the data given by the ZEUS and H1 collaborations. It is demonstrated that the extracted F_L(x,Q^2), based on the UPDF of two schemes, are consistent with the experimental data, and to a good approximation they are independent of the input PDF. But the one developed from the KMR prescription has better agreement with the data with respect to that of MRW. As has been suggested, by lowering the factorization scale or the Bjorken variable in the related experiments it may be possible to analyze the present theoretical approaches more accurately.

  16. Parton distribution functions, αs, and heavy-quark masses for LHC Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhin, S.; Blümlein, J.; Moch, S.; PlačakytÄ--, R.

    2017-07-01

    We determine a new set of parton distribution functions (ABMP16), the strong coupling constant αs and the quark masses mc, mb and mt in a global fit to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD. The analysis uses the MS ¯ scheme for αs and all quark masses and is performed in the fixed-flavor number scheme for nf=3 , 4, 5. Essential new elements of the fit are the combined data from HERA for inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), data from the fixed-target experiments NOMAD and CHORUS for neutrino-induced DIS, data from Tevatron and the LHC for the Drell-Yan process and the hadro-production of single-top and top-quark pairs. The theory predictions include new improved approximations at NNLO for the production of heavy quarks in DIS and for the hadro-production of single-top quarks. The description of higher twist effects relevant beyond the leading twist collinear factorization approximation is refined. At NNLO, we obtain the value αs(nf=5 )(MZ)=0.1147 ±0.0008 .

  17. Parameterization of Parton Distributions Functions Based on Self-Organizing Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loitiere, Y.; Honkanen, H.; Liuti, S.

    2006-11-01

    Neural network algorithms have been recently applied to construct Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) parametrizations which provide an alternative to standard global fitting procedures [1]. In this contribution we propose a different technique, namely an interactive neural network algorithm using Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) [2]. SOMs generate a nonuniform projection from a high dimensional data space onto a low dimensional one (usually 1 or 2 dimensions) by clustering similar PDF representations together. Our SOMs are trained on progressively narrower selections of data samples. The selection criterion is that of convergence towards a neighborhood of the experimental data. Our procedure utilizes all available data on deep inelastic scattering in the kinematical region of 0.001 <=x <= 0.75, and 1 <=Q^2 <= 100 GeV^2, with a cut on the final state invariant mass, W^2 >= 10 GeV^2. Our main goal is to provide a fitting procedure that, at variance with standard neural network approaches, allows for an increased control of the systematic bias. SOMs, in fact, enable the user to directly control the data selection procedure at various stages of the process. [1] L. Del Debbio, S. Forte, J. I. Latorre, A. Piccione and J. Rojo, [NNPDF Collaboration], JHEP 0503, 080 (2005). [2] T. Kohonen, ``Self Organizing Maps,'' Springer-Verlag, 1997.

  18. Measurement of Exclusive π0 Electroproduction Structure Functions and their Relationship to Transverse Generalized Parton Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedlinskiy, I.; Kubarovsky, V.; Niccolai, S.; Stoler, P.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Avakian, H.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Fradi, A.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mao, Y.; Markov, N.; Martinez, D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Phelps, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Saylor, N.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2012-09-01

    Exclusive π0 electroproduction at a beam energy of 5.75 GeV has been measured with the Jefferson Lab CLAS spectrometer. Differential cross sections were measured at more than 1800 kinematic values in Q2, xB, t, and ϕπ, in the Q2 range from 1.0 to 4.6GeV2, -t up to 2GeV2, and xB from 0.1 to 0.58. Structure functions σT+ɛσL, σTT, and σLT were extracted as functions of t for each of 17 combinations of Q2 and xB. The data were compared directly with two handbag-based calculations including both longitudinal and transversity generalized parton distributions (GPDs). Inclusion of only longitudinal GPDs very strongly underestimates σT+ɛσL and fails to account for σTT and σLT, while inclusion of transversity GPDs brings the calculations into substantially better agreement with the data. There is very strong sensitivity to the relative contributions of nucleon helicity-flip and helicity nonflip processes. The results confirm that exclusive π0 electroproduction offers direct experimental access to the transversity GPDs.

  19. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    SciTech Connect

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; Blumlein, J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Garzelli, M. -V.; Guzzi, M.; Kuprash, O.; Moch, S. -O.; Nadolsky, P.; Placakyte, R.; Rabbertz, K.; Schienbein, I.; Starovoitov, P.

    2015-08-01

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x~5×10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by other experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.

  20. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    DOE PAGES

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; ...

    2015-08-01

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x~5×10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by othermore » experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.« less

  1. Transverse parton distribution functions at next-to-next-to-leading order: the quark-to-quark case.

    PubMed

    Gehrmann, Thomas; Lübbert, Thomas; Yang, Li Lin

    2012-12-14

    We present a calculation of the perturbative quark-to-quark transverse parton distribution function at next-to-next-to-leading order based on a gauge invariant operator definition. We demonstrate for the first time that such a definition works beyond the first nontrivial order. We extract from our calculation the coefficient functions relevant for a next-to-next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic Q(T) resummation in a large class of processes at hadron colliders.

  2. Reply to comment on ''New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distribution''

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro; Hobbs, Timothy J.; Londergan, J. T.; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2016-01-05

    We reply to the Comment of Brodsky and Gardner on our paper "New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distributions" [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 082002 (2015)]. We address a number of incorrect claims made about our fitting methodology, and elaborate how global QCD analysis of all available high-energy data provides no evidence for a large intrinsic charm component of the nucleon.

  3. CT14QED parton distribution functions from isolated photon production in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Carl; Pumplin, Jon; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C.-P.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the implementation of quantum electrodynamic (QED) evolution at leading order (LO) along with quantum chromodynamic (QCD) evolution at next-to-leading order (NLO) in the CTEQ-TEA global analysis package. The inelastic contribution to the photon parton distribution function (PDF) is described by a two-parameter ansatz, coming from radiation off the valence quarks, and based on the CT14 NLO PDFs. Setting the two parameters to be equal allows us to completely specify the inelastic photon PDF in terms of the inelastic momentum fraction carried by the photon, p0γ, at the initial scale Q0=1.295 GeV . We obtain constraints on the photon PDF by comparing with ZEUS data [S. Chekanov et al. (ZEUS Collaboration), Phys. Lett. B 687, 16 (2010)] on the production of isolated photons in deep inelastic scattering, e p →e γ +X . For this comparison we present a new perturbative calculation of the process that consistently combines the photon-initiated contribution with the quark-initiated contribution. Comparison with the data allows us to put a constraint at the 90% confidence level of p0γ≲0.14 % for the inelastic photon PDF at the initial scale of Q0=1.295 GeV in the one-parameter radiative ansatz. The resulting inelastic CT14QED PDFs will be made available to the public. In addition, we also provide CT14QEDinc PDFs, in which the inclusive photon PDF at the scale Q0 is defined by the sum of the inelastic photon PDF and the elastic photon distribution obtained from the equivalent photon approximation.

  4. The proton FL dipole approximation in the KMR and the MRW unintegrated parton distribution functions frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, M.; Masouminia, M. R.; Hosseinkhani, H.; Olanj, N.

    2016-01-01

    In the spirit of performing a complete phenomenological investigation of the merits of Kimber-Martin-Ryskin (KMR) and Martin-Ryskin-Watt (MRW) unintegrated parton distribution functions (UPDF), we have computed the longitudinal structure function of the proton, FL (x ,Q2), from the so-called dipole approximation, using the LO and the NLO-UPDF, prepared in the respective frameworks. The preparation process utilizes the PDF of Martin et al., MSTW2008-LO and MSTW2008-NLO, as the inputs. Afterwards, the numerical results are undergone a series of comparisons against the exact kt-factorization and the kt-approximate results, derived from the work of Golec-Biernat and Stasto, against each other and the experimental data from ZEUS and H1 Collaborations at HERA. Interestingly, our results show a much better agreement with the exact kt-factorization, compared to the kt-approximate outcome. In addition, our results are completely consistent with those prepared from embedding the KMR and MRW UPDF directly into the kt-factorization framework. One may point out that the FL, prepared from the KMR UPDF shows a better agreement with the exact kt-factorization. This is despite the fact that the MRW formalism employs a better theoretical description of the DGLAP evolution equation and has an NLO expansion. Such unexpected consequence appears, due to the different implementation of the angular ordering constraint in the KMR approach, which automatically includes the resummation of ln ⁡ (1 / x), BFKL logarithms, in the LO-DGLAP evolution equation.

  5. Investigating strangeness in the proton by studying the effects of Light Cone parton distributions in the Meson Cloud Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuppan, Sam; Budnik, Garrett; Fox, Jordan

    2014-09-01

    The Meson Cloud Model (MCM) has proven to be a natural explanation for strangeness in the proton because of meson-baryon splitting into kaon-hyperon pairs. Total strangeness is predicted by integrated splitting functions, which represent the probability that the proton will fluctuate into a given meson-baryon pair. However, the momentum distributions s (x) and s (x) in the proton are determined from convolution integrals that depend on the parton distribution functions (PDFs) used for the mesons and baryons in the MCM. Theoretical calculations of these momentum distributions use many different forms for these PDFs. In our investigation, we calculate PDFs for K, K*, Λ, and Σ from two-body wave functions in a Light Cone Model (LCM) of the hadrons. We use these PDFs in conjunction with the MCM to create a hybrid model and compare our results to other theoretical calculations, experimental data from NuTeV, HERMES, ATLAS, and global parton distribution analyses. The Meson Cloud Model (MCM) has proven to be a natural explanation for strangeness in the proton because of meson-baryon splitting into kaon-hyperon pairs. Total strangeness is predicted by integrated splitting functions, which represent the probability that the proton will fluctuate into a given meson-baryon pair. However, the momentum distributions s (x) and s (x) in the proton are determined from convolution integrals that depend on the parton distribution functions (PDFs) used for the mesons and baryons in the MCM. Theoretical calculations of these momentum distributions use many different forms for these PDFs. In our investigation, we calculate PDFs for K, K*, Λ, and Σ from two-body wave functions in a Light Cone Model (LCM) of the hadrons. We use these PDFs in conjunction with the MCM to create a hybrid model and compare our results to other theoretical calculations, experimental data from NuTeV, HERMES, ATLAS, and global parton distribution analyses. This research has been supported in part by the

  6. Variable flavor number parton distributions and weak gauge and Higgs boson production at hadron colliders at next-to-next-to-leading order of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Reya, E.

    2009-12-01

    Based on our recent next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) dynamical parton distributions as obtained in the 'fixed flavor number scheme', we generate radiatively parton distributions in the 'variable flavor number scheme' where the heavy-quark flavors (c,b,t) also become massless partons within the nucleon. Only within this latter factorization scheme are NNLO calculations feasible at present, since the required partonic subprocesses are only available in the approximation of massless initial-state partons. The NNLO predictions for gauge boson production are typically larger (by more than 1{sigma}) than the next-to-leading order (NLO) ones, and rates at LHC energies can be predicted with an accuracy of about 5%, whereas at Tevatron they are more than 2{sigma} above the NLO ones. The NNLO predictions for standard model Higgs-boson production via the dominant gluon fusion process have a total (parton distribution function and scale) uncertainty of about 10% at LHC which almost doubles at the lower Tevatron energies; they are typically about 20% larger than the ones at NLO but the total uncertainty bands overlap.

  7. Charge symmetry at the partonic level

    SciTech Connect

    Londergan, J. T.; Peng, J. C.; Thomas, A. W.

    2010-07-01

    This review article discusses the experimental and theoretical status of partonic charge symmetry. It is shown how the partonic content of various structure functions gets redefined when the assumption of charge symmetry is relaxed. We review various theoretical and phenomenological models for charge symmetry violation in parton distribution functions. We summarize the current experimental upper limits on charge symmetry violation in parton distributions. A series of experiments are presented, which might reveal partonic charge symmetry violation, or alternatively might lower the current upper limits on parton charge symmetry violation.

  8. First Simultaneous Extraction of Spin-Dependent Parton Distributions and Fragmentation Functions from a Global QCD Analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Ethier, Jacob J.; Sato Gonzalez, Nobuo; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2017-09-01

    We perform the first global QCD analysis of polarized inclusive and semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering and single-inclusive $e^+e^-$ annihilation data, fitting simultaneously the parton distribution and fragmentation functions using the iterative Monte Carlo method. Without imposing SU(3) symmetry relations, we find the strange polarization to be very small, consistent with zero for both inclusive and semi-inclusive data, which provides a resolution to the strange quark polarization puzzle. The combined analysis also allows the direct extraction from data of the isovector and octet axial charges, and is consistent with a small SU(2) flavor asymmetry of the polarized sea.

  9. Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall fermion calculations at 297 MeV pion mass

    DOE PAGES

    Engelhardt, M.; Musch, B.; Bhattacharya, T.; ...

    2014-06-23

    Here, lattice QCD calculations of transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) in a nucleon are performed based on a definition of TMDs via hadronic matrix elements of quark bilocal operators containing staple-shaped gauge connections. A parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes serves to cast them in the Lorentz frame preferred for the lattice calculation. Using a RBC/UKQCD domain wall fermion ensemble corresponding to a pion mass of 297 MeV, on a lattice with spacing 0.084 fm, selected TMD observables are accessed and compared to previous exploration at heavier pion masses on coarser lattices.

  10. Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall fermion calculations at 297 MeV pion mass

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhardt, Michael; Musch, Bernhard; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Gupta, Rajan; Hagler, Phillip; Negele, John; Pochinsky, Andrew; Shafer, Andreas; Syritsyn, Sergey; Yoon, Boram

    2014-12-01

    Lattice QCD calculations of transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) in a nucleon are performed based on a definition of TMDs via hadronic matrix elements of quark bilocal operators containing staple-shaped gauge connections. A parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes serves to cast them in the Lorentz frame preferred for the lattice calculation. Using a RBC/UKQCD domain wall fermion ensemble corresponding to a pion mass of 297MeV, on a lattice with spacing 0.084fm, selected TMD observables are accessed and compared to previous explorations at heavier pion masses on coarser lattices.

  11. Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall fermion calculations at 297 MeV pion mass

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhardt, M.; Musch, B.; Bhattacharya, T.; Gupta, R.; Hagler, P.; Negele, J.; Pochinsky, A.; Schafer, A.; Syritsyn, S.; Yoon, B.

    2014-06-23

    Here, lattice QCD calculations of transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) in a nucleon are performed based on a definition of TMDs via hadronic matrix elements of quark bilocal operators containing staple-shaped gauge connections. A parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes serves to cast them in the Lorentz frame preferred for the lattice calculation. Using a RBC/UKQCD domain wall fermion ensemble corresponding to a pion mass of 297 MeV, on a lattice with spacing 0.084 fm, selected TMD observables are accessed and compared to previous exploration at heavier pion masses on coarser lattices.

  12. Dynamical model of antishadowing of the nuclear gluon distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankfurt, L.; Guzey, V.; Strikman, M.

    2017-05-01

    We explore the theoretical observation that within the leading twist approximation, the nuclear effects of shadowing and antishadowing in nonperturbative nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs) at the input QCD evolution scale involve diffraction on nucleons of a nuclear target and originate from merging of two parton ladders belonging to two different nucleons, which are close in the rapidity space. It allows us to propose that for a given momentum fraction xI P carried by the diffractive exchange, nuclear shadowing and antishadowing should compensate each other in the momentum sum rule for nPDFs locally on the interval ln(x /xI P)≤1 . We realize this by constructing an explicit model of nuclear gluon antishadowing, which has a wide support in x ,10-4

  13. Accessing proton generalized parton distributions and pion distribution amplitudes with the exclusive pion-induced Drell-Yan process at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Takahiro; Chang, Wen-Chen; Kumano, Shunzo; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Sawada, Shinya; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) encoding multidimensional information of hadron partonic structure appear as the building blocks in a factorized description of hard exclusive reactions. The nucleon GPDs have been accessed by deeply virtual Compton scattering and deeply virtual meson production with lepton beam. A complementary probe with hadron beam is the exclusive pion-induced Drell-Yan process. In this paper, we discuss recent theoretical advances on describing this process in terms of nucleon GPDs and pion distribution amplitudes. Furthermore, we address the feasibility of measuring the exclusive pion-induced Drell-Yan process π-p →μ+μ-n via a spectrometer at the High Momentum Beamline being constructed at J-PARC in Japan. Realization of such measurement at J-PARC will provide a new test of perturbative QCD descriptions of a novel class of hard exclusive reactions. It will also offer the possibility of experimentally accessing nucleon GPDs at large timelike virtuality.

  14. Integral equation for spin dependent unintegrated parton distributions incorporating double ln2(1/x) effects at low x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwieciński, Jan; Maul, Martin

    2003-02-01

    In this paper we derive an integral equation for the evolution of unintegrated (longitudinally) polarized quark and gluon parton distributions. The conventional Catani-Ciafaloni-Fiorani-Marchesini (CCFM) framework is modified at small x in order to incorporate the QCD expectations concerning the double ln2(1/x) resummation at low x for the integrated distributions. Complete Altarelli-Parisi splitting functions are included that makes the formalism compatible with the leading order Altarelli-Parisi evolution at large and moderately small values of x. The obtained modified polarized CCFM equation is shown to be partially diagonalized by the Fourier-Bessel transformation. Results of the numerical solution for this modifed polarized CCFM equation for the nonsinglet quark distributions are presented.

  15. NLO+NLL squark and gluino production cross sections with threshold-improved parton distributions.

    PubMed

    Beenakker, Wim; Borschensky, Christoph; Krämer, Michael; Kulesza, Anna; Laenen, Eric; Marzani, Simone; Rojo, Juan

    We present updated predictions for the cross sections for pair production of squarks and gluinos at the LHC Run II. First of all, we update the calculations based on NLO+NLL partonic cross sections by using the NNPDF3.0NLO global analysis. This study includes a full characterization of theoretical uncertainties from higher orders, PDFs and the strong coupling. Then we explore the implications for this calculation of the recent NNPDF3.0 PDFs with NLO+NLL threshold resummation. We find that the shift in the results induced by the threshold-improved PDFs is within the total theory uncertainty band of the calculation based on NLO PDFs. However, we also observe that the central values of the NLO+NLL cross sections are modified both in a qualitative and a quantitative way, illustrating the relevance and impact of using threshold-improved PDFs together with resummed partonic cross sections. The updated NLO+NLL cross sections based on NNPDF3.0NLO are publicly available in the NLL-fast format, and should be an important ingredient for the interpretation of the searches for supersymmetric particles at Run II.

  16. Dynamical next-to-next-to-leading order parton distributions and the perturbative stability of F{sub L}(x,Q{sup 2})

    SciTech Connect

    Glueck, M.; Reya, E.; Pisano, C.

    2008-04-01

    Recent measurements for F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) have been analyzed in terms of the 'dynamical' and 'standard' parton model approach at next-to-leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) of perturbative QCD. Having fixed the relevant NLO and NNLO parton distributions, we present the implications and predictions for the longitudinal structure function F{sub L}(x,Q{sup 2}). It is shown that the previously noted extreme perturbative NNLO/NLO instability of F{sub L}(x,Q{sup 2}) is an artifact of the commonly utilized 'standard' gluon distributions. In particular it is demonstrated that using the appropriate--dynamically generated--parton distributions at NLO and NNLO, F{sub L}(x,Q{sup 2}) turns out to be perturbatively rather stable already for Q{sup 2}{>=}O(2-3 GeV{sup 2})

  17. Elliptic flow and nuclear modification factor in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions within a partonic transport model.

    PubMed

    Uphoff, Jan; Senzel, Florian; Fochler, Oliver; Wesp, Christian; Xu, Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2015-03-20

    The quark gluon plasma produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions exhibits remarkable features. It behaves like a nearly perfect liquid with a small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio and leads to the quenching of highly energetic particles. We show that both effects can be understood for the first time within one common framework. Employing the parton cascade Boltzmann approach to multiparton scatterings, the microscopic interactions and the space-time evolution of the quark gluon plasma are calculated by solving the relativistic Boltzmann equation. Based on cross sections obtained from perturbative QCD with explicitly taking the running coupling into account, we calculate the nuclear modification factor and elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. With only one single parameter associated with coherence effects of medium-induced gluon radiation, the experimental data of both observables can be understood on a microscopic level. Furthermore, we show that perturbative QCD interactions with a running coupling lead to a sufficiently small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of the quark gluon plasma, which provides a microscopic explanation for the observations stated by hydrodynamic calculations.

  18. Summing threshold logs in a parton shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Zoltán; Soper, Davison E.

    2016-10-01

    When parton distributions are falling steeply as the momentum fractions of the partons increases, there are effects that occur at each order in α s that combine to affect hard scattering cross sections and need to be summed. We show how to accomplish this in a leading approximation in the context of a parton shower Monte Carlo event generator.

  19. Delineating the polarized and unpolarized partonic structure of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro

    2015-03-01

    Our latest results on the extraction of parton distribution functions of the nucleon are reported. First an overview of the recent JR14 upgrade of our unpolarized PDFs, including NNLO determinations of the strong coupling constant and a discussion of the role of the input scale in parton distribution analysis. In the second part of the talk recent results on the determination of spin-dependent PDFs from the JAM collaboration are given, including a careful treatment of hadronic and nuclear corrections, as well as results on the impact of present and future data in our understanding of the spin of the nucleon.

  20. Delineating the polarized and unpolarized partonic structure of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro

    2015-03-01

    Reports on our latest extractions of parton distribution functions of the nucleon are given. First an overview of the recent JR14 upgrade of our unpolarized PDFs, including NNLO determinations of the strong coupling constant and a discussion of the role of the input scale in parton distribution analysis. In the second part of the talk recent results on the determination of spin-dependent PDFs from the JAM collaboration are reported, including a careful treatment of hadronic and nuclear corrections, as well as reports on the impact of present and future data in our understanding of the spin of the nucleon.

  1. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Minerν A Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5-50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy. However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x <0.1 . This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice et al. (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.

  2. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    DOE PAGES

    Mousseau, J.

    2016-04-19

    Here, the MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5–50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy.more » However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x < 0.1. This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.« less

  3. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Mousseau, J.

    2016-04-19

    Here, the MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5–50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy. However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x < 0.1. This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.

  4. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Mousseau, J.

    2016-04-19

    Here, the MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5–50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy. However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x < 0.1. This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.

  5. Lattice QCD calculations of nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions using clover and domain wall fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Boram; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Gupta, Rajan; Engelhardt, Michael; Green, Jeremy; Haegler, Philipp; Musch, Bernhard; Negele, John; Pochinsky, Andrew; Syritsyn, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a lattice QCD calculation of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) of protons using staple-shaped Wilson lines. For time-reversal odd observables, we calculate the generalized Sivers and Boer-Mulders transverse momentum shifts in SIDIS and DY cases, and for T-even observables we calculate the transversity related to the tensor charge and the generalized worm-gear shift. The calculation is done on two different nf = 2+1 ensembles: domain-wall fermion (DWF) with lattice spacing 0:084fm and pion mass of 297 MeV, and clover fermion with lattice spacing 0:114 fm and pion mass of 317 MeV. The results from those two different discretizations are consistent with each other.

  6. Lattice QCD calculations of nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions using clover and domain wall fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Boram; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Gupta, Rajan; ...

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a lattice QCD calculation of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) of protons using staple-shaped Wilson lines. For time-reversal odd observables, we calculate the generalized Sivers and Boer-Mulders transverse momentum shifts in SIDIS and DY cases, and for T-even observables we calculate the transversity related to the tensor charge and the generalized worm-gear shift. The calculation is done on two different nf = 2+1 ensembles: domain-wall fermion (DWF) with lattice spacing 0:084fm and pion mass of 297 MeV, and clover fermion with lattice spacing 0:114 fm and pion mass of 317 MeV. The results from thosemore » two different discretizations are consistent with each other.« less

  7. Modeling of exclusive parton distributions and long-range rapidity correlations in proton-proton collisions at the LHC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, V. N.

    2013-10-01

    The soft part of proton-proton interaction is considered within a phenomenological model that involves the formation of color strings. Under the assumption that an elementary collision is associated with the interaction of two color dipoles, the total inelastic cross section and the multiplicity of charged particles are estimated in order to fix model parameters. Particular attention is given to modeling of exclusive parton distributions with allowance for the energy-conservation law and for fixing the center of mass, which are necessary for describing correlations. An algorithm that describes the fusion of strings in the transverse plane and which takes into account their finite rapidity width is developed. The influence of string-fusion effects on long-range correlations is found within this mechanism.

  8. Parton Distribution Function Reweighting and Associated Uncertainties in a Search for Dark Matter with the ATLAS Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Annette; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Investigating the properties of a proton involved in a proton-proton collision at the Large Hadron Collider furthers our understanding of resulting processes from the collision. In the search for dark matter produced alongside a new heavy resonance, Z', or a W/Z boson, a process characterized by large missing transverse momentum from the undetected dark matter particles, parton distribution functions (PDFs) of protons were utilized to improve the Monte Carlo simulation of proton-proton collisions at &sqrt;s = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector. The PDF set NNPDF30 leading order was used to generate events with applied cuts: missing transverse momentum greater than 250 GeV, pseudorapidity of | η | < 2 . 5 , and groomed jets with R = 1 . 0 . An algorithm was developed to do PDF reweighting from NNPDF30 leading order to the following PDF sets: NNPDF30 next-to-leading order, MMHT2014, HERAPDF20, CT14, and MSTW2008. Distributions of the transverse momentum, mass, azimuthal angle, rapidity, and pseudorapidity for the leading and subleading jets, as well as the missing transverse momentum, were produced with the PDF reweighting algorithm. The uncertainty associated with the choice of a particular PDF in creating these distributions was calculated.

  9. Spin-flavor structure of chiral-odd generalized parton distributions in the large-Nc limit

    DOE PAGES

    Schweitzer, P.; Weiss, C.

    2016-10-05

    We study the spin-flavor structure of the nucleon's chiral-odd generalized parton distributions (transversity GPDs) in the large-Nc limit of QCD. In contrast to the chiral-even case, only three combinations of the four chiral-odd GPDs are nonzero in the leading order of the 1/Nc expansion: E-barT = ET+2H-tildeT, HT, and E-tildeT. The degeneracy is explained by the absence of spin-orbit interactions correlating the transverse momentum transfer with the transverse quark spin. It can also be deduced from the natural Nc scaling of the quark-nucleon helicity amplitudes associated with the GPDs. In the GPD E-barT the flavor-singlet component u+d is leading inmore » the 1/Nc expansion, while in HT and E-tildeT it is the flavor-nonsinglet components u–d. Furthermore, the large-Nc relations are consistent with the spin-flavor structure extracted from hard exclusive π0 and η electroproduction data, if it is assumed that the processes are mediated by twist-3 amplitudes involving the chiral-odd GPDs and the chiral-odd pseudoscalar meson distribution amplitudes.« less

  10. Strongly interacting parton matter equilibration

    SciTech Connect

    Ozvenchuk, V.; Linnyk, O.; Bratkovskaya, E.; Gorenstein, M.; Cassing, W.

    2012-07-15

    We study the kinetic and chemical equilibration in 'infinite' parton matter within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics transport approach. The 'infinite' matter is simulated within a cubic box with periodic boundary conditions initialized at different energy densities. Particle abundances, kinetic energy distributions, and the detailed balance of the off-shell quarks and gluons in the strongly-interacting quarkgluon plasma are addressed and discussed.

  11. Deuteron distribution in nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhar, O.; Fabrocini, A.; Fantoni, S.; Illarionov, A. Yu.; Lykasov, G. I.

    2002-05-01

    We analyze the properties of deuteron-like structures in infinite, correlated nuclear matter, described by a realistic hamiltonian containing the Urbana v14 two-nucleon and the Urbana TNI many-body potentials. The distribution of neutron-proton pairs, carrying the deuteron quantum numbers, is obtained as a function of the total momentum by computing the overlap between the nuclear matter in its ground state and the deuteron wave functions in correlated basis functions theory. We study the differences between the S- and D-wave components of the deuteron and those of the deuteron-like pair in the nuclear medium. The total number of deuteron type pairs is computed and compared with the predictions of Levinger's quasideuteron model. The resulting Levinger's factor in nuclear matter at equilibrium density is 11.63. We use the local density approximation to estimate the Levinger's factor for heavy nuclei, obtaining results which are consistent with the available experimental data from photoreactions.

  12. Connected-Sea Partons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keh-Fei; Chang, Wen-Chen; Cheng, Hai-Yang; Peng, Jen-Chieh

    2012-12-01

    According to the path-integral formalism of the hadronic tensor, the nucleon sea contains two distinct components called the connected sea (CS) and the disconnected sea (DS). We discuss how the CS and DS are accessed in the lattice QCD calculation of the moments of the parton distributions. We show that the CS and DS components of u¯(x)+d¯(x) can be extracted by using recent data on the strangeness parton distribution, the CT10 global fit, and the lattice result of the ratio of the strange to u(d) moments in the disconnected insertion. The extracted CS and DS for u¯(x)+d¯(x) have a distinct Bjorken x dependence in qualitative agreement with expectation. The analysis also shows that the momentum fraction of u¯(x)+d¯(x) is about equally divided between the CS and DS at Q2=2.5GeV2. Implications for the future global analysis of parton distributions are presented.

  13. The neural network approach to parton fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Rojo, Joan; Latorre, Jose I.; Del Debbio, Luigi; Forte, Stefano; Piccione, Andrea

    2005-10-06

    We introduce the neural network approach to global fits of parton distribution functions. First we review previous work on unbiased parametrizations of deep-inelastic structure functions with faithful estimation of their uncertainties, and then we summarize the current status of neural network parton distribution fits.

  14. Comment on "Reevaluation of the parton distribution of strange quarks in the nucleon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarski, M.

    2015-11-01

    The HERMES collaboration in Phys. Rev. D 89, 097101 (2014) extracted information about the strange quark density in the nucleon. One of the main results is an observation that the shape of the extracted density is very different from the shapes of the strange quark density from global QCD fits and also from that of the light antiquarks. In this paper systematic studies on the HERMES published multiplicity of pion and kaon data are presented. It is shown that the conclusions concerning the strange quark distribution in the nucleon reached in Phys. Rev. D 89, 097101 (2014) are at the moment premature.

  15. Flavor dependence of the pion and kaon form factors and parton distribution functions

    DOE PAGES

    Hutauruk, Parada T. P.; Cloët, Ian C.; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2016-09-01

    The separate quark flavor contributions to the pion and kaon valence quark distribution functions are studied, along with the corresponding electromagnetic form factors in the space-like region. The calculations are made using the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the model of Nambu and Jona-Lasinio with proper-time regularization. Both the pion and kaon form factors and the valence quark distribution functions reproduce many features of the available empirical data. The larger mass of the strange quark naturally explains the empirical fact that the ratio u(K) + (x)/u(pi) + (x) drops below unity at large x, with a value of approximately Mmore » $$2\\atop{u}$$/Ms$$2\\atop{s}$$ as x → 1. With regard to the elastic form factors we report a large flavor dependence, with the u-quark contribution to the kaon form factor being an order of magnitude smaller than that of the s-quark at large Q2, which may be a sensitive measure of confinement effects in QCD. Surprisingly though, the total K+ and π+ form factors differ by only 10%. Lastly, in general we find that flavor breaking effects are typically around 20%.« less

  16. Flavor dependence of the pion and kaon form factors and parton distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Hutauruk, Parada T. P.; Cloët, Ian C.; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2016-09-01

    The separate quark flavor contributions to the pion and kaon valence quark distribution functions are studied, along with the corresponding electromagnetic form factors in the space-like region. The calculations are made using the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the model of Nambu and Jona-Lasinio with proper-time regularization. Both the pion and kaon form factors and the valence quark distribution functions reproduce many features of the available empirical data. The larger mass of the strange quark naturally explains the empirical fact that the ratio u(K) + (x)/u(pi) + (x) drops below unity at large x, with a value of approximately M$2\\atop{u}$/Ms$2\\atop{s}$ as x → 1. With regard to the elastic form factors we report a large flavor dependence, with the u-quark contribution to the kaon form factor being an order of magnitude smaller than that of the s-quark at large Q2, which may be a sensitive measure of confinement effects in QCD. Surprisingly though, the total K+ and π+ form factors differ by only 10%. Lastly, in general we find that flavor breaking effects are typically around 20%.

  17. Determination of Polarised Parton Distributions in the Nucleon --- Next to Leading Order QCD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatur, Stanislaw; Bartelski, Jan; Kurzela, Miroslaw

    2000-03-01

    We have made next to leading order QCD fit to the deep inelastic spin asymmetries on nucleons and we have determined polarised quark and gluon densities. The functional form for such distributions was inspired by the Martin, Roberts and Stirling fit for unpolarised case. In addition to usually used data points (averaged over x and Q2) we have also considered the sample containing points with similar x and different Q2. It seems that splitting of quark densities into valence and sea contribution is strongly model dependent and only their sum (i.e. , Δ u and Δ d) can be precisely determined from the data. Integrated polarised gluon contribution, contrary to some expectations, is relatively small and the sign of it depends on the fact which sample of data points is used.

  18. Generalized parton correlation functions for a spin-0 hadron

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, Stephan; Metz, Andreas; Schlegel, Marc; Goeke, Klaus

    2008-08-01

    The fully unintegrated, off-diagonal quark-quark correlator for a spin-0 hadron is parameterized in terms of so-called generalized parton correlation functions. Such objects are of relevance for the phenomenology of certain hard exclusive reactions. In particular, they can be considered as mother distributions of generalized parton distributions on the one hand and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions on the other. Therefore, our study provides new, model-independent insights into the recently proposed nontrivial relations between generalized and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. As a by-product we obtain the first complete classification of generalized parton distributions beyond leading twist.

  19. Partonic collectivity at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shusu

    2009-10-01

    The measurement of event anisotropy, often called v2, provides a powerful tool for studying the properties of hot and dense medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions. The important discoveries of partonic collectivity and the brand-new process for hadronization - quark coalescence were obtained through a systematic analysis of the v2 for 200 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC [1]. However, early dynamic information might be masked by later hadronic rescatterings. Multistrange hadrons (φ, ξ and φ) with their large mass and presumably small hadronic cross sections should be less sensitive to hadronic rescattering in the later stage of the collisions and therefore a good probe of the early stage of the collision. We will present the measurement of v2 of π, p, KS^0, λ, ξ, φ and φ in heavy ion collisions. In minimum-bias Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV, a significant amount of elliptic flow, almost identical to other mesons and baryons, is observed for φ and φ. Experimental observations of pT dependence of v2 of identified particles at RHIC support partonic collectivity. [4pt] [1] B. I. Abelev et al., (STAR Collaboration), Phys. Rev. C 77, 054901 (2008).

  20. Pion transverse momentum dependent parton distributions in a light-front constituent approach, and the Boer-Mulders effect in the pion-induced Drell-Yan process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquini, B.; Schweitzer, P.

    2014-07-01

    At leading twist the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions of the pion consist of two functions, the unpolarized f1,π(x,k⊥2) and the Boer-Mulders function h1,π⊥(x ,k⊥2). We study both functions within a light-front constituent model of the pion, comparing the results with different pion models and the corresponding nucleon distributions from a light-front constituent model. After evolution from the model scale to the relevant experimental scales, the results for the collinear pion valence parton distribution function f1,π(x) are in very good agreement with available parametrizations. Using the light-front constituent model results for the Boer-Mulders functions of the pion and nucleon, we calculate the coefficient ν in the angular distribution of Drell-Yan dileptons produced in pion-nucleus scattering, which is responsible for the violation of the Lam-Tung relation. We find a good agreement with the data, and carefully discuss the range of applicability of our approach.

  1. Extraction of partonic transverse momentum distributions from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan and Z-boson production

    DOE PAGES

    Bacchetta, Alessandro; Delcarro, Filippo; Pisano, Cristian; ...

    2017-06-15

    We present an extraction of unpolarized partonic transverse momentum distributions (TMDs) from a simultaneous fit of available data measured in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan and Z boson production. To connect data at different scales, we use TMD evolution at next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The analysis is restricted to the low-transverse-momentum region, with no matching to fixed-order calculations at high transverse momentum. We introduce specific choices to deal with TMD evolution at low scales, of the order of 1 GeV2. Furthermore, this could be considered as a first attempt at a global fit of TMDs.

  2. Study of Generalized Parton Distributions and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on the nucleon with the CLAS and CLAS12 detectors at the Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Guegan, Baptiste

    2012-11-01

    The exclusive leptoproduction of a real photon is considered to be the "cleanest" way to access the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD). This process is called Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) lN {yields} lN{gamma} , and is sensitive to all the four GPDs. Measuring the DVCS cross section is one of the main goals of this thesis. In this thesis, we present the work performed to extract on a wide phase-space the DVCS cross-section from the JLab data at a beam energy of 6 GeV.

  3. Extraction of partonic transverse momentum distributions from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan and Z-boson production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchetta, Alessandro; Delcarro, Filippo; Pisano, Cristian; Radici, Marco; Signori, Andrea

    2017-06-01

    We present an extraction of unpolarized partonic transverse momentum distributions (TMDs) from a simultaneous fit of available data measured in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan and Z boson production. To connect data at different scales, we use TMD evolution at next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The analysis is restricted to the low-transverse-momentum region, with no matching to fixed-order calculations at high transverse momentum. We introduce specific choices to deal with TMD evolution at low scales, of the order of 1 GeV2. This could be considered as a first attempt at a global fit of TMDs.

  4. Perturbative QCD correlations in multi-parton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blok, B.; Dokshitzer, Yu.; Frankfurt, L.; Strikman, M.

    2014-06-01

    We examine the role played in double-parton interactions (DPI) by the parton-parton correlations originating from perturbative QCD parton splittings. Also presented are the results of the numerical analysis of the integrated DPI cross sections at Tevatron and LHC energies. To obtain the numerical results the knowledge of the single-parton GPDs gained by the HERA experiments was used to construct the non-perturbative input for generalized double-parton distributions. The perturbative two-parton correlations induced by three-parton interactions contribute significantly to a resolution of the longstanding puzzle of an excess of multi-jet production events in the back-to-back kinematics observed at the Tevatron.

  5. LHC production of forward-center and forward-forward di-jets in the kt-factorization and transverse dependent unintegrated parton distribution frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, M.; Masouminia, M. R.; Aminzadeh Nik, R.; Hosseinkhani, H.; Olanj, N.

    2017-09-01

    The present work is devoted to study the high-energy QCD events, such as the di-jet productions from proton-proton inelastic collisions at the LHC in the forward-center and the forward-forward configurations. This provides us with much valuable case study, since such phenomena can provide a direct glimpse into the partonic behavior of a hadron in a dominant gluonic region. We use the unintegrated parton distribution functions (UPDF) in the kt-factorization framework. The UPDF of Kimber et al. (KMR) and Martin et al. (MRW) are generated in the leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO), using the Harland-Lang et al. (MMHT2014) PDF libraries. While working in the forward-center and the forward-forward rapidity sectors, one can probe the parton densities at very low longitudinal momentum fractions (x). Such a model computation can provide simpler analytic description of data with respect to existing formalisms such as perturbative QCD. The differential cross-section calculations are performed at the center of mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to CMS collaboration measurement. It is shown that the gluonic jet productions are dominant and a good description of data as well as other theoretical attempts (i.e. KS-linear, KS-nonlinear and rcBK) is obtained. The uncertainty of the calculations is derived by manipulating the hard scale of the processes by a factor of two. This conclusion is achieved, due to the particular visualization of the angular ordering constraint (AOC), that is incorporated in the definition of these UPDF.

  6. Probing the leading-twist transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution function h1T⊥ via the polarized proton-antiproton Drell-Yan process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiacai; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2010-12-01

    We show that the polarized proton-antiproton Drell-Yan process is ideal to probe the pretzelosity distribution (h1T⊥), which is one of the new transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions of the nucleon. We present predictions of the cos⁡(2ϕ+ϕa-ϕb) asymmetry in the transversely polarized proton-antiproton Drell-Yan process at PAX kinematics and find that the results are significantly larger compared with those of the sin⁡(3ϕh-ϕS) asymmetry in the semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering process at HERMES, COMPASS, and JLab kinematics. We conclude that the cos⁡(2ϕ+ϕa-ϕb) asymmetry in the PAX experiment can probe the new physical quantity of the pretzelosity distribution.

  7. Probe initial parton density and formation time via jet quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2002-09-20

    Medium modification of jet fragmentation function due to multiple scattering and induced gluon radiation leads directly to jet quenching or suppression of leading particle distribution from jet fragmentation. One can extract an effective total parton energy loss which can be related to the total transverse momentum broadening. For an expanding medium, both are shown to be sensitive to the initial parton density and formation time. Therefore, one can extract the initial parton density and formation time from simultaneous measurements of parton energy loss and transverse momentum broadening. Implication of the recent experimental data on effects of detailed balance in parton energy loss is also discussed.

  8. Transverse nucleon structure and diagnostics of hard parton-parton processes at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    L. Frankfurt, M. Strikman, C. Weiss

    2011-03-01

    We propose a new method to determine at what transverse momenta particle production in high-energy pp collisions is governed by hard parton-parton processes. Using information on the transverse spatial distribution of partons obtained from hard exclusive processes in ep/\\gamma p scattering, we evaluate the impact parameter distribution of pp collisions with a hard parton-parton process as a function of p_T of the produced parton (jet). We find that the average pp impact parameters in such events depend very weakly on p_T in the range 2 < p_T < few 100 GeV, while they are much smaller than those in minimum-bias inelastic collisions. The impact parameters in turn govern the observable transverse multiplicity in such events (in the direction perpendicular to the trigger particle or jet). Measuring the transverse multiplicity as a function of p_T thus provides an effective tool for determining the minimum p_T for which a given trigger particle originates from a hard parton-parton process.

  9. The midpoint between dipole and parton showers

    SciTech Connect

    Höche, Stefan; Prestel, Stefan

    2015-09-28

    We present a new parton-shower algorithm. Borrowing from the basic ideas of dipole cascades, the evolution variable is judiciously chosen as the transverse momentum in the soft limit. This leads to a very simple analytic structure of the evolution. A weighting algorithm is implemented that allows one to consistently treat potentially negative values of the splitting functions and the parton distributions. Thus, we provide two independent, publicly available implementations for the two event generators PYTHIA and SHERPA.

  10. Measurement of double-differential cross sections for top quark pair production in pp collisions at √{s} = 8 {TeV} and impact on parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Dvornikov, O.; Makarenko, V.; Mossolov, V.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Zykunov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Alderweireldt, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Skovpen, K.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Vannerom, D.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Gul, M.; Khvastunov, I.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Komm, M.; Krintiras, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Chagas, E. Belchior Batista Das; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Guativa, L. M. Huertas; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, F.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, T.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Ruan, M.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, J.; Ban, Y.; Chen, G.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Sculac, T.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Mesic, B.; Susa, T.; Ather, M. W.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Järvinen, T.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Kucher, I.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Miné, P.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Stahl Leiton, A. G.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Zghiche, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Bihan, A.-C. Le; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Finco, L.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Khvedelidze, A.; Lomidze, D.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Preuten, M.; Schomakers, C.; Schulz, J.; Verlage, T.; Albert, A.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hamer, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Flügge, G.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Müller, T.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Arndt, T.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Beernaert, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bin Anuar, A. A.; Borras, K.; Campbell, A.; Connor, P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Eren, E.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grados Luyando, J. M.; Grohsjean, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Keaveney, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Lelek, A.; Lenz, T.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Zenaiev, O.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Dreyer, T.; Garutti, E.; Gonzalez, D.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kurz, S.; Lapsien, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Sonneveld, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Stöver, M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baur, S.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Butz, E.; Caspart, R.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Freund, B.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Kassel, F.; Katkov, I.; Kudella, S.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Shvetsov, I.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Kousouris, K.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Filipovic, N.; Pasztor, G.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Makovec, A.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Bahinipati, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Kumari, P.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Keshri, S.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutt, S.; Dutta, S.; Ghosh, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Thakur, S.; Behera, P. K.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Dugad, S.; Kole, G.; Mahakud, B.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Banerjee, S.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Jain, Sa.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Sarkar, T.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Hegde, V.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Pandey, S.; Rane, A.; Sharma, S.; Chenarani, S.; Eskandari Tadavani, E.; Etesami, S. M.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Albergo, S.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Russo, L.; Sguazzoni, G.; Strom, D.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Brivio, F.; Ciriolo, V.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malberti, M.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Ragazzi, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Fienga, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Antunes De Oliveira, A. Carvalho; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, U.; Gonella, F.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Rossin, R.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Ventura, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Braghieri, A.; Fallavollita, F.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Ressegotti, M.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Mantovani, G.; Mariani, V.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Cipriani, M.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Marzocchi, B.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Monteno, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Shchelina, K.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Traczyk, P.; Belforte, S.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Zanetti, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Oh, Y. D.; Sekmen, S.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Lee, A.; Kim, H.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, T. 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A.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Pyskir, A.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Calpas, B.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. 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    2017-07-01

    Normalized double-differential cross sections for top quark pair (t\\overline{t}) production are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 {TeV} with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The analyzed data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 {fb}^{-1}. The measurement is performed in the dilepton e^{± }μ ^{∓ } final state. The t\\overline{t} cross section is determined as a function of various pairs of observables characterizing the kinematics of the top quark and t\\overline{t} system. The data are compared to calculations using perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading and approximate next-to-next-to-leading orders. They are also compared to predictions of Monte Carlo event generators that complement fixed-order computations with parton showers, hadronization, and multiple-parton interactions. Overall agreement is observed with the predictions, which is improved when the latest global sets of proton parton distribution functions are used. The inclusion of the measured t\\overline{t} cross sections in a fit of parametrized parton distribution functions is shown to have significant impact on the gluon distribution.

  11. Measurement of double-differential cross sections for top quark pair production in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 8$$ TeV and impact on parton distribution functions

    DOE PAGES

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; ...

    2017-07-11

    Normalized double-differential cross sections for top quark pair (more » $$\\mathrm{t}\\overline{\\mathrm{t}}$$ ) production are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 $$\\,\\text {TeV}$$ with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The analyzed data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 $$\\,\\text {fb}^{-1}$$ . The measurement is performed in the dilepton $$\\mathrm {e}^{\\pm }\\mu ^{\\mp }$$ final state. The $$\\mathrm{t}\\overline{\\mathrm{t}}$$ cross section is determined as a function of various pairs of observables characterizing the kinematics of the top quark and $$\\mathrm{t}\\overline{\\mathrm{t}}$$ system. The data are compared to calculations using perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading and approximate next-to-next-to-leading orders. They are also compared to predictions of Monte Carlo event generators that complement fixed-order computations with parton showers, hadronization, and multiple-parton interactions. Overall agreement is observed with the predictions, which is improved when the latest global sets of proton parton distribution functions are used. Lastly, the inclusion of the measured $$\\mathrm{t}\\overline{\\mathrm{t}}$$ cross sections in a fit of parametrized parton distribution functions is shown to have significant impact on the gluon distribution.« less

  12. Measurement of double-differential cross sections for top quark pair production in pp collisions at [Formula: see text][Formula: see text] and impact on parton distribution functions.

    PubMed

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Orsini, L; Pape, L; Perez, E; Peruzzi, M; Petrilli, A; Petrucciani, G; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Racz, A; Reis, T; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Sakulin, H; Sauvan, J B; Schäfer, C; Schwick, C; Seidel, M; Sharma, A; Silva, P; Sphicas, P; Steggemann, J; Stoye, M; Takahashi, Y; Tosi, M; Treille, D; Triossi, A; Tsirou, A; Veckalns, V; Veres, G I; Verweij, M; Wardle, N; Wöhri, H K; Zagozdzinska, A; Zeuner, W D; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Rohe, T; Wiederkehr, S A; Bachmair, F; Bäni, L; Bianchini, L; Casal, B; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Donegà, M; Grab, C; Heidegger, C; Hits, D; Hoss, J; Kasieczka, G; Lustermann, W; Mangano, B; Marionneau, M; Martinez Ruiz Del Arbol, P; Masciovecchio, M; Meinhard, M T; Meister, D; Micheli, F; Musella, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pandolfi, F; Pata, J; Pauss, F; Perrin, G; Perrozzi, L; Quittnat, M; Rossini, M; Schönenberger, M; Starodumov, A; Tavolaro, V R; Theofilatos, K; Wallny, R; Aarrestad, T K; Amsler, C; Caminada, L; Canelli, M F; De Cosa, A; Donato, S; Galloni, C; Hinzmann, A; Hreus, T; Kilminster, B; Ngadiuba, J; Pinna, D; Rauco, G; Robmann, P; Salerno, D; Seitz, C; Yang, Y; Zucchetta, A; Candelise, V; Doan, T H; Jain, Sh; Khurana, R; Konyushikhin, M; Kuo, C M; Lin, W; Pozdnyakov, A; Yu, S S; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P; Chang, Y H; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Chen, P H; Fiori, F; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y; Liu, Y F; Lu, R-S; Miñano Moya, M; Paganis, E; Psallidas, A; Tsai, J F; Asavapibhop, B; Singh, G; Srimanobhas, N; Suwonjandee, N; Adiguzel, A; Boran, F; Cerci, S; Damarseckin, S; Demiroglu, Z S; Dozen, C; Dumanoglu, I; Girgis, S; Gokbulut, G; Guler, Y; Hos, I; Kangal, E E; Kara, O; Kiminsu, U; Oglakci, M; Onengut, G; Ozdemir, K; Sunar Cerci, D; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Turkcapar, S; Zorbakir, I S; Zorbilmez, C; Bilin, B; Bilmis, S; Isildak, B; Karapinar, G; Yalvac, M; Zeyrek, M; Gülmez, E; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Yetkin, E A; Yetkin, T; Cakir, A; Cankocak, K; Sen, S; Grynyov, B; Levchuk, L; Sorokin, P; Aggleton, R; Ball, F; Beck, L; Brooke, J J; Burns, D; Clement, E; Cussans, D; Flacher, H; Goldstein, J; Grimes, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Jacob, J; Kreczko, L; Lucas, C; Newbold, D M; Paramesvaran, S; Poll, A; Sakuma, T; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S; Smith, D; Smith, V J; Bell, K W; Belyaev, A; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Calligaris, L; Cieri, D; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Harder, K; Harper, S; Olaiya, E; Petyt, D; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Thea, A; Tomalin, I R; Williams, T; Baber, M; Bainbridge, R; Buchmuller, O; Bundock, A; Casasso, S; Citron, M; Colling, D; Corpe, L; Dauncey, P; Davies, G; De Wit, A; Della Negra, M; Di Maria, R; Dunne, P; Elwood, A; Futyan, D; Haddad, Y; Hall, G; Iles, G; James, T; Lane, R; Laner, C; Lyons, L; Magnan, A-M; Malik, S; Mastrolorenzo, L; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Pela, J; Penning, B; Pesaresi, M; Raymond, D M; Richards, A; Rose, A; Scott, E; Seez, C; Summers, S; Tapper, A; Uchida, K; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wright, J; Zenz, S C; Cole, J E; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Reid, I D; Symonds, P; Teodorescu, L; Turner, M; Borzou, A; Call, K; Dittmann, J; Hatakeyama, K; Liu, H; Pastika, N; Bartek, R; Dominguez, A; Buccilli, A; Cooper, S I; Henderson, C; Rumerio, P; West, C; Arcaro, D; Avetisyan, A; Bose, T; Gastler, D; Rankin, D; Richardson, C; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Zou, D; Benelli, G; Cutts, D; Garabedian, A; Hakala, J; Heintz, U; Hogan, J M; Jesus, O; Kwok, K H M; Laird, E; Landsberg, G; Mao, Z; Narain, M; Piperov, S; Sagir, S; Spencer, E; Syarif, R; Breedon, R; Burns, D; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Chauhan, S; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Conway, R; Cox, P T; Erbacher, R; Flores, C; Funk, G; Gardner, M; Ko, W; Lander, R; Mclean, C; Mulhearn, M; Pellett, D; Pilot, J; Shalhout, S; Shi, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stolp, D; Tos, K; Tripathi, M; Bachtis, M; Bravo, C; Cousins, R; Dasgupta, A; Florent, A; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Mccoll, N; Saltzberg, D; Schnaible, C; Valuev, V; Weber, M; Bouvier, E; Burt, K; Clare, R; Ellison, J; Gary, J W; Ghiasi Shirazi, S M A; Hanson, G; Heilman, J; Jandir, P; Kennedy, E; Lacroix, F; Long, O R; Olmedo Negrete, M; Paneva, M I; Shrinivas, A; Si, W; Wei, H; Wimpenny, S; Yates, B R; Branson, J G; Cerati, G B; Cittolin, S; Derdzinski, M; Gerosa, R; Holzner, A; Klein, D; Krutelyov, V; Letts, J; Macneill, I; Olivito, D; Padhi, S; Pieri, M; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Tadel, M; Vartak, A; Wasserbaech, S; Welke, C; Wood, J; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Zevi Della Porta, G; Amin, N; Bhandari, R; Bradmiller-Feld, J; Campagnari, C; Dishaw, A; Dutta, V; Franco Sevilla, M; George, C; Golf, F; Gouskos, L; Gran, J; Heller, R; Incandela, J; Mullin, S D; Ovcharova, A; Qu, H; Richman, J; Stuart, D; Suarez, I; Yoo, J; Anderson, D; Bendavid, J; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Duarte, J; Lawhorn, J M; Mott, A; Newman, H B; Pena, C; Spiropulu, M; Vlimant, J R; Xie, S; Zhu, R Y; Andrews, M B; Ferguson, T; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Sun, M; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Weinberg, M; Cumalat, J P; Ford, W T; Jensen, F; Johnson, A; Krohn, M; Leontsinis, S; Mulholland, T; Stenson, K; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chaves, J; Chu, J; Dittmer, S; Mcdermott, K; Mirman, N; Patterson, J R; Rinkevicius, A; Ryd, A; Skinnari, L; Soffi, L; Tan, S M; Tao, Z; Thom, J; Tucker, J; Wittich, P; Zientek, M; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Banerjee, S; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Bolla, G; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Cremonesi, M; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Grünendahl, S; Gutsche, O; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hasegawa, S; Hirschauer, J; Hu, Z; Jayatilaka, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Klima, B; Kreis, B; Lammel, S; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Liu, M; Liu, T; Lopes De Sá, R; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Magini, N; Marraffino, J M; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Merkel, P; Mrenna, S; Nahn, S; O'Dell, V; Pedro, K; Prokofyev, O; Rakness, G; Ristori, L; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Stoynev, S; Strait, J; Strobbe, N; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vernieri, C; Verzocchi, M; Vidal, R; Wang, M; Weber, H A; Whitbeck, A; Wu, Y; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bortignon, P; Bourilkov, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Carnes, A; Carver, M; Curry, D; Das, S; Field, R D; Furic, I K; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Low, J F; Ma, P; Matchev, K; Mei, H; Mitselmakher, G; Rank, D; Shchutska, L; Sperka, D; Thomas, L; Wang, J; Wang, S; Yelton, J; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Ackert, A; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bein, S; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Kolberg, T; Perry, T; Prosper, H; Santra, A; Yohay, R; Baarmand, M M; Bhopatkar, V; Colafranceschi, S; Hohlmann, M; Noonan, D; Roy, T; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Berry, D; Betts, R R; Cavanaugh, R; Chen, X; Evdokimov, O; Gerber, C E; Hangal, D A; Hofman, D J; Jung, K; Kamin, J; Sandoval Gonzalez, I D; Trauger, H; Varelas, N; Wang, H; Wu, Z; Zhang, J; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Durgut, S; Gandrajula, R P; Haytmyradov, M; Khristenko, V; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Penzo, A; Snyder, C; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yi, K; Blumenfeld, B; Cocoros, A; Eminizer, N; Fehling, D; Feng, L; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Roskes, J; Sarica, U; Swartz, M; Xiao, M; You, C; Al-Bataineh, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Boren, S; Bowen, J; Castle, J; Forthomme, L; Khalil, S; Kropivnitskaya, A; Majumder, D; Mcbrayer, W; Murray, M; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Tapia Takaki, J D; Wang, Q; Ivanov, A; Kaadze, K; Maravin, Y; Mohammadi, A; Saini, L K; Skhirtladze, N; Toda, S; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Anelli, C; Baden, A; Baron, O; Belloni, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Ferraioli, C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Jabeen, S; Jeng, G Y; Kellogg, R G; Kunkle, J; Mignerey, A C; Ricci-Tam, F; Shin, Y H; Skuja, A; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Abercrombie, D; Allen, B; Apyan, A; Azzolini, V; Barbieri, R; Baty, A; Bi, R; Bierwagen, K; Brandt, S; Busza, W; Cali, I A; D'Alfonso, M; Demiragli, Z; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Hsu, D; Iiyama, Y; Innocenti, G M; Klute, M; Kovalskyi, D; Krajczar, K; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Maier, B; Marini, A C; Mcginn, C; Mironov, C; Narayanan, S; Niu, X; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Salfeld-Nebgen, J; Stephans, G S F; Tatar, K; Velicanu, D; Wang, J; Wang, T W; Wyslouch, B; Benvenuti, A C; Chatterjee, R M; Evans, A; Hansen, P; Kalafut, S; Kao, S C; Kubota, Y; Lesko, Z; Mans, J; Nourbakhsh, S; Ruckstuhl, N; Rusack, R; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Claes, D R; Fangmeier, C; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kamalieddin, R; Kravchenko, I; Malta Rodrigues, A; Monroy, J; Siado, J E; Snow, G R; Stieger, B; Alyari, M; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Harrington, C; Iashvili, I; Kaisen, J; Nguyen, D; Parker, A; Rappoccio, S; Roozbahani, B; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Hortiangtham, A; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Teixeira De Lima, R; Trocino, D; Wang, R-J; Wood, D; Bhattacharya, S; Charaf, O; Hahn, K A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Schmitt, M H; Sung, K; Trovato, M; Velasco, M; Dev, N; Hildreth, M; Hurtado Anampa, K; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Marinelli, N; Meng, F; Mueller, C; Musienko, Y; Planer, M; Reinsvold, A; Ruchti, R; Rupprecht, N; Smith, G; Taroni, S; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Alimena, J; Antonelli, L; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Francis, B; Hart, A; Hill, C; Ji, W; Liu, B; Luo, W; Puigh, D; Winer, B L; Wulsin, H W; Cooperstein, S; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Lange, D; Luo, J; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mei, K; Ojalvo, I; Olsen, J; Palmer, C; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Tully, C; Malik, S; Barker, A; Barnes, V E; Folgueras, S; Gutay, L; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, A W; Khatiwada, A; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Schulte, J F; Shi, X; Sun, J; Wang, F; Xie, W; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Chen, Z; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Guilbaud, M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Northup, M; Padley, B P; Roberts, J; Rorie, J; Tu, Z; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Duh, Y T; Ferbel, T; Galanti, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Han, J; Hindrichs, O; Khukhunaishvili, A; Lo, K H; Tan, P; Verzetti, M; Agapitos, A; Chou, J P; Gershtein, Y; Gómez Espinosa, T A; Halkiadakis, E; Heindl, M; Hughes, E; Kaplan, S; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R; Kyriacou, S; Lath, A; Montalvo, R; Nash, K; Osherson, M; Saka, H; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Sheffield, D; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Delannoy, A G; Foerster, M; Heideman, J; Riley, G; Rose, K; Spanier, S; Thapa, K; Bouhali, O; Celik, A; Dalchenko, M; De Mattia, M; Delgado, A; Dildick, S; Eusebi, R; Gilmore, J; Huang, T; Juska, E; Kamon, T; Mueller, R; Pakhotin, Y; Patel, R; Perloff, A; Perniè, L; Rathjens, D; Safonov, A; Tatarinov, A; Ulmer, K A; Akchurin, N; Damgov, J; De Guio, F; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Gurpinar, E; Kunori, S; Lamichhane, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Peltola, T; Undleeb, S; Volobouev, I; Wang, Z; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Janjam, R; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Melo, A; Ni, H; Sheldon, P; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Xu, Q; Arenton, M W; Barria, P; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Neu, C; Sinthuprasith, T; Sun, X; Wang, Y; Wolfe, E; Xia, F; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Sturdy, J; Zaleski, S; Belknap, D A; Buchanan, J; Caillol, C; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Gomber, B; Grothe, M; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Hussain, U; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ruggles, T; Savin, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Woods, N

    2017-01-01

    Normalized double-differential cross sections for top quark pair ([Formula: see text]) production are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8[Formula: see text] with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The analyzed data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7[Formula: see text]. The measurement is performed in the dilepton [Formula: see text] final state. The [Formula: see text] cross section is determined as a function of various pairs of observables characterizing the kinematics of the top quark and [Formula: see text] system. The data are compared to calculations using perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading and approximate next-to-next-to-leading orders. They are also compared to predictions of Monte Carlo event generators that complement fixed-order computations with parton showers, hadronization, and multiple-parton interactions. Overall agreement is observed with the predictions, which is improved when the latest global sets of proton parton distribution functions are used. The inclusion of the measured [Formula: see text] cross sections in a fit of parametrized parton distribution functions is shown to have significant impact on the gluon distribution.

  13. Spin-flavor structure of chiral-odd generalized parton distributions in the large-Nc limit

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, P.; Weiss, C.

    2016-10-05

    We study the spin-flavor structure of the nucleon's chiral-odd generalized parton distributions (transversity GPDs) in the large-Nc limit of QCD. In contrast to the chiral-even case, only three combinations of the four chiral-odd GPDs are nonzero in the leading order of the 1/Nc expansion: E-barT = ET+2H-tildeT, HT, and E-tildeT. The degeneracy is explained by the absence of spin-orbit interactions correlating the transverse momentum transfer with the transverse quark spin. It can also be deduced from the natural Nc scaling of the quark-nucleon helicity amplitudes associated with the GPDs. In the GPD E-barT the flavor-singlet component u+d is leading in the 1/Nc expansion, while in HT and E-tildeT it is the flavor-nonsinglet components u–d. Furthermore, the large-Nc relations are consistent with the spin-flavor structure extracted from hard exclusive π0 and η electroproduction data, if it is assumed that the processes are mediated by twist-3 amplitudes involving the chiral-odd GPDs and the chiral-odd pseudoscalar meson distribution amplitudes.

  14. Distributed computing and nuclear reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.; Derstine, K.L.; Blomquist, R.N.

    1994-03-01

    Large-scale scientific and engineering calculations for nuclear reactor analysis can now be carried out effectively in a distributed computing environment, at costs far lower than for traditional mainframes. The distributed computing environment must include support for traditional system services, such as a queuing system for batch work, reliable filesystem backups, and parallel processing capabilities for large jobs. All ANL computer codes for reactor analysis have been adapted successfully to a distributed system based on workstations and X-terminals. Distributed parallel processing has been demonstrated to be effective for long-running Monte Carlo calculations.

  15. Constructing Parton Convolution in Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Ji, Xiangdong

    2001-10-08

    Parton convolution models have been used extensively in describing the sea quarks in the nucleon and explaining quark distributions in nuclei (the EMC effect). From the effective field theory point of view, we construct the parton convolution formalism which has been the underlying conception of all convolution models. We explain the significance of scheme and scale dependence of the auxiliary quantities such as the pion distributions in a nucleon. As an application, we calculate the complete leading nonanalytic chiral contribution to the isovector component of the nucleon sea.

  16. Nucleon Parton Structure from Continuum QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednar, Kyle; Cloet, Ian; Tandy, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The parton structure of the nucleon is investigated using QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations (DSEs). This formalism builds in numerous essential features of QCD, for example, the dressing of parton propagators and dynamical formation of non-pointlike di-quark correlations. All needed elements of the approach, including the nucleon wave function solution from a Poincaré covariant Faddeev equation, are encoded in spectral-type representations in the Nakanishi style. This facilitates calculations and the necessary connections between Euclidean and Minkowski metrics. As a first step results for the nucleon quark distribution functions will be presented. The extension to the transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) also be discussed. Supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-1516138.

  17. Central depression of nuclear charge density distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Yanyun; Ren Zhongzhou; Wang Zaijun; Dong Tiekuang

    2010-08-15

    The center-depressed nuclear charge distributions are investigated with the parametrized distribution and the relativistic mean-field theory, and their corresponding charge form factors are worked out with the phase shift analysis method. The central depression of nuclear charge distribution of {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S is supported by the relativistic mean-field calculation. According to the calculation, the valence protons in {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S prefer to occupy the 1d{sub 3/2} state rather than the 2s{sub 1/2} state, which is different from that in the less neutron-rich argon and sulfur isotopes. As a result, the central proton densities of {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S are highly depressed, and so are their central charge densities. The charge form factors of some argon and sulfur isotopes are presented, and the minima of the charge form factors shift upward and inward when the central nuclear charge distributions are more depressed. Besides, the effect of the central depression on the charge form factors is studied with a parametrized distribution, when the root-mean-square charge radii remain constant.

  18. Nuclear PDFs from neutrino deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    I. Schienbein; J. Y. Yu; C. Keppel; J. G. Morfin; F. Olness; J.F. Owens

    2007-11-13

    We study nuclear effects in charged current deep inelastic neutrino--iron scattering in the framework of a chi^2-analysis of parton distribution functions. We extract a set of iron PDFs and show that under reasonable assumptions it is possible to constrain the valence, light sea and strange quark distributions. We compare our results with nuclear parton distribution functions from the literature and find good agreement. Our iron PDFs are used to compute nuclear correction factors which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs.

  19. Parton Charge Symmetry Violation: Electromagnetic Effects and W Production Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Londergan; D.P. Murdock; A.W. Thomas

    2006-04-14

    Recent phenomenological work has examined two different ways of including charge symmetry violation in parton distribution functions. First, a global phenomenological fit to high energy data has included charge symmetry breaking terms, leading to limits on the magnitude of parton charge symmetry breaking. In a second approach, two groups have included the coupling of partons to photons in the QCD evolution equations. One possible experiment that could search for isospin violation in parton distributions is a measurement of the asymmetry in W production at a collider. In this work we include both of the postulated sources of parton charge symmetry violation. We show that, given charge symmetry violation of a magnitude consistent with existing high energy data, the expected W production asymmetries would be quite small, generally less than one percent.

  20. Improved modelling of independent parton hadronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddulph, Phillip; Thompson, Graham

    1989-04-01

    A modification is proposed to current versions of the Field-Feynman ansatz for the hadronization of a quark in Monte Carlo models of QCD interactions. This faster-running algorithm has no more parameters and imposes a better degree of energy conservation. It results in naturally introducing a limitation of the transverse momentum distribution, similar to the experimentally observed "seagull" effect. There is now a much improved conservation of quantum numbers between the original parton and resultant hadrons, and the momentum of the emitted parton is better preserved in the summed momentum vectors of the final state particles.

  1. Phenomenological study of unintegrated parton distribution functions in the frameworks of the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin and Martin-Ryskin-Watt approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, M.; Hosseinkhani, H.; Olanj, N.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the phenomenological behavior of unitegrated parton distribution functions (UPDF) by using the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin (KMR) and Martin-Ryskin-Watt (MRW) formalisms. In the first method, the leading order (LO) UPDF of the KMR prescription is extracted, by taking into account the PDF of Martin et al., i.e., MSTW2008-LO and MRST99-NLO and. While in the second scheme, the next-to-leading order (NLO) UPDF of the (MRW) procedure is generated through the set of MSTW2008-NLO PDFas the inputs. The different aspects of the UPDF in the two approaches, as well as the input PDF are discussed. Then, the deep inelastic proton structure functions, F2(x,Q2), are calculated from the above UPDF in the two schemes, and compared with the data, which are extracted from the ZEUS, NMC, and H1+ZEUS experimental measurements. In general, it is shown that the calculated structure functions based on the UPDF of two schemes, are consistent to the experimental data, and by a good approximation, they are independent to the input PDF. But the proton structure functions, which are extracted from the KMR prescription, have better agreement to the data with respect to that of MRW. Although the MRW formalism is in more compliance with the Dokshitzer-Bribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGLAP) evolution equation requisites, but it seems in the KMR case, the angular ordering constraint spreads the UPDF to the whole transverse momentum region, and makes the results to sum up the leading DGLAP and Balitski-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov (BFKL) Logarithms. This point is under study by the authors.

  2. 3-, 4-, and 5-flavor next-to-next-to-leading order parton distribution functions from deep-inelastic-scattering data and at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhin, S.; Blümlein, J.; Klein, S.; Moch, S.

    2010-01-01

    We determine the parton distribution functions (PDFs) in a next-to-next-to-leading order QCD analysis of the inclusive neutral-current deep-inelastic-scattering (DIS) world data combined with the neutrino-nucleon DIS di-muon data and the fixed-target Drell-Yan data. The PDF evolution is performed in the Nf=3 fixed-flavor scheme and supplementary sets of PDFs in the 4- and 5-flavor schemes are derived from the results in the 3-flavor scheme using matching conditions. The charm-quark DIS contribution is calculated in a general-mass variable-flavor-number (GMVFN) scheme interpolating between the zero-mass 4-flavor scheme at asymptotically large values of momentum transfer Q2 and the 3-flavor scheme prescription of Buza-Matiounine-Smith-van Neerven (BMSN) at the value of Q2=mc2. The results in the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme are compared with those of the fixed-flavor scheme and other prescriptions used in global fits of PDFs. The strong coupling constant is measured at an accuracy of ≈1.5%. We obtain at next-to-next-to-leading order αs(MZ2)=0.1135±0.0014 in the fixed-flavor scheme and αs(MZ2)=0.1129±0.0014 applying the Buza-Matiounine-Smith-van Neerven prescription. The implications for important standard candle and hard scattering processes at hadron colliders are illustrated. Predictions for cross sections of W±- and Z-boson, the top-quark pair, and Higgs-boson production at the Tevatron and the LHC based on the 5-flavor PDFs of the present analysis are provided.

  3. Are partons confined tachyons?

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.

    1996-03-01

    The author notes that if hadrons are gravitationally stabilized ``black holes``, as discrete physics suggests, it is possible that partons, and in particular quarks, could be modeled as tachyons, i.e. particles having v{sup 2} > c{sup 2}, without conflict with the observational fact that neither quarks nor tachyons have appeared as ``free particles``. Some consequences of this model are explored.

  4. Parton physics from large-momentum effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, XiangDong

    2014-07-01

    Parton physics, when formulated as light-front correlations, are difficult to study non-perturbatively, despite the promise of light-front quantization. Recently an alternative approach to partons have been proposed by re-visiting original Feynman picture of a hadron moving at asymptotically large momentum. Here I formulate the approach in the language of an effective field theory for a large hadron momentum P in lattice QCD, LaMET for short. I show that using this new effective theory, parton properties, including light-front parton wave functions, can be extracted from lattice observables in a systematic expansion of 1/ P, much like that the parton distributions can be extracted from the hard scattering data at momentum scales of a few GeV.

  5. Inclusive parton cross sections in photoproduction and photon structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, T.; Aid, S.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Baehr, J.; Bán, J.; Ban, Y.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Barth, M.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Beyer, R.; Biddulph, P.; Bispham, P.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Botterweck, F.; Boudry, V.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Brune, C.; Buchholz, R.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Burton, M.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Charlet, M.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Clerbaux, B.; Colombo, M.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormack, C.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cussans, D. G.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E. A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Droutskoi, A.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Gonzalez-Pineiro, B.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herynek, I.; Hess, M. F.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hiller, K. H.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Horisberger, R.; Hudgson, V. L.; Huet, Ph.; Hütte, M.; Hufnagel, H.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Janoth, J.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kant, D.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Katzy, J.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kazarian, S.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Köhne, J. H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krämerkämper, T.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Krüner-Marquis, U.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lacour, D.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J.-F.; Lebedev, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Link, J.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; List, B.; Lobo, G.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lomas, J.; Lopez, G. C.; Lubimov, V.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Maraček, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, T.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Migliori, A.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Moreau, F.; Morris, J. V.; Mroczko, E.; Müller, G.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Nicholls, T. C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Niedzballa, Ch.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg-Werther, M.; Oakden, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Panaro, E.; Panitch, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pieuchot, A.; Pitzl, D.; Pope, G.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rabbertz, K.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Ribarics, P.; Rick, H.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, H. E.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rouse, F.; Royon, C.; Rüter, K.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Rylko, R.; Sahlmann, N.; Salesch, S. G.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Schacht, P.; Schiek, S.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, G.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schuhmann, E.; Schwab, B.; Schwind, A.; Sefkow, F.; Seidel, M.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Solochenko, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Spiekermann, J.; Spielman, S.; Spitzer, H.; Starosta, R.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stiewe, J.; Stösslein, U.; Stolze, K.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Uelkes, P.; Usik, A.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Esch, P.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Verrecchia, P.; Villet, G.; Wacker, K.; Wagener, A.; Wagener, M.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; West, L. R.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wittek, C.; Wright, A. E.; Wünsch, E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Zarbock, D.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.; Zuber, K.; H1 Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Photoproduction of 2-jet events is studied with the H1 detector at HERA. Parton cross sections are extracted from the data by an unfolding method using leading order parton-jet correlations of a QCD generator. The gluon distribution in the photon is derived in the fractional momentum range 0.04 ⩽ xγ ⩽ 1 at the average factorization scale 75 GeV 2.

  6. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Mano K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2015-12-01

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  7. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-06-05

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  8. Global analysis of nuclear parton distribution functions at leading and next-to-leading order perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesznyak, Csilla

    The aim of the investigation is to give answer to some questions of the QC in the mega-voltage therapy for the sake of making the treatments more trouble-free. We investigated the terms of the usage of CT and PET/CT equipments in treatment planning that were made originally for diagnostic purposes. We compared the calculation algorithms of the Varian CadPlan(TM) and CMS XiORTM treatment planning systems (TPS) for photon and electron radiations of different energy. We also investigated the terms of usage of the PTW EPID QC PHANTOMRTM in the quality control of the EPID's and the portal images, as well. We laid down the terms in a protocol that make the diagnostic CT and PET/CT equipments capable for radiation treatment planning. The protocols should contain the exact patient setup, the tube voltage, detailed directions for use of patient immobilization tools, the review and use of the necessary QA/QC devices, the time consumption of the procedure, the frequency of controls and the worksheet to be used during the measurements. On the base of the measurements, it can be stated that on photon energies the superposition algorithm can be used for patient treatments in the case of the CMS XiORTM TPS while in the case of Varian CadPlan(TM) TPS the PBMB algorithm is the proper choice. It is not allowed to use the TPS without inhomogeneity correction. The CIRS Thorax IMRT phantom can be used for electron measurement only at higher than 10 MeV since only the Farmer chamber can be inserted into the holes of the phantom. On the base of the electron measurements, it can be stated that both planning systems give good results in soft tissue. In lung equivalent material the calculated values of the Varian CadPlan(TM) are in better agreement with the measured values, but the calculated values behind the bones are not accurate enough. In the QA/QC process the PTW EPID QC PHANTOMRTM is usable not only for the amorphous silicon EPID's but the image quality can be analysed on the video based devices and on EPID's operating with liquid filled ionisation chamber array detector and even on port films. In the protocol for measurements, the usable file format should be given since the DICOM implementation is not complete in the case of these systems.

  9. Sensitivity of Pion versus Parton-Jet Nuclear Modification Factors to the Path-Length Dependence of Jet-Energy Loss at RHIC and LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbara, Betz; Miklos, Gyulassy

    2015-12-01

    Not Available Supported by the Helmholtz International Centre for FAIR within the Framework of the LOEWE Program, and the US-DOE Nuclear Science under Grant Nos DE-FG02-93ER40764 and DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  10. NLO production of W± and Z0 vector bosons via hadron collisions in the frameworks of Kimber-Martin-Ryskin and Martin-Ryskin-Watt unintegrated parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, M.; Masouminia, M. R.; Aminzadeh Nik, R.; Hosseinkhani, H.; Olanj, N.

    2016-10-01

    In a series of papers, we have investigated the compatibility of the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin (KMR) and Martin-Ryskin-Watt (MRW) unintegrated parton distribution functions (UPDFs) as well as the description of the experimental data on the proton structure functions. The present work is a sequel to that survey, via calculation of the transverse-momentum distribution of the electroweak gauge vector bosons in the kt-factorization scheme, by the means of the KMR, the leading-order (LO) MRW, and the next-to-leading-order (NLO) MRW UPDF, in the NLO. To this end, we have calculated and aggregated the invariant amplitudes of the corresponding involved diagrams in the NLO and counted the individual contributions in different frameworks. The preparation process for the UPDF utilizes the parton distribution functions of Martin et al., MSTW2008-LO, MSTW2008-NLO, MMHT2014-LO, and MMHT2014-NLO, as the inputs. Afterward, the results have been analyzed against each other as well as the existing experimental data, i.e., D0, CDF, ATLAS, and CMS collaborations. Our calculations show excellent agreement with the experiment data. It is, however, interesting to point out that the calculation using the KMR framework illustrates a stronger agreement with the experimental data, despite the fact that the LO MRW and the NLO MRW formalisms employ a better theoretical description of the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equation. This is of course due to the use of the different implementation of the angular ordering constraint in the KMR approach, which automatically includes the resummation of ln (1 /x ) , Balitski-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov logarithms, in the LO Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equation.

  11. Generalized parton correlation functions for a spin-1/2 hadron

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan Meissner, Andreas Metz, Marc Schlegel

    2009-08-01

    The fully unintegrated, off-diagonal quark-quark correlator for a spin-1/2 hadron is parameterized in terms of so-called generalized parton correlation functions. Such objects, in particular, can be considered as mother distributions of generalized parton distributions on the one hand and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions on the other. Therefore, our study provides new, model-independent insights into the recently proposed nontrivial relations between generalized and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. We find that none of these relations can be promoted to a model-independent status. As a by-product we obtain the first complete classification of generalized parton distributions beyond leading twist. The present paper is a natural extension of our previous corresponding analysis for spin-0 hadrons.

  12. Nucleon structure at large x: nuclear effects in deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Wally Melnitchouk

    2010-07-01

    I review quark momentum distributions in the nucleon at large momentum fractions x. Particular attention is paid to the impact of nuclear effects in deuterium on the d/u quark distribution ratio as x -> 1. A new global study of parton distributions, using less restrictive kinematic cuts in Q^2 and W^2, finds strong suppression of the d quark distribution once nuclear corrections are accounted for.

  13. Photon angular distribution and nuclear-state alignment in nuclear excitation by electron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálffy, Adriana; Harman, Zoltán; Surzhykov, Andrey; Jentschura, Ulrich D.

    2007-01-01

    The alignment of nuclear states resonantly formed in nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC) is studied by means of a density matrix technique. The vibrational excitations of the nucleus are described by a collective model and the electrons are treated in a relativistic framework. Formulas for the angular distribution of photons emitted in the nuclear relaxation are derived. We present numerical results for alignment parameters and photon angular distributions for a number of heavy elements in the case of E2 nuclear transitions. Our results are intended to help future experimental attempts to discern NEEC from radiative recombination, which is the dominant competing process.

  14. Implications of current constraints on parton charge symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    J. T. Londergan; A. W. Thomas

    2005-11-01

    For the first time, charge symmetry breaking terms in parton distribution functions have been included in a global fit to high energy data. We review the results obtained for both valence and sea quark charge symmetry violation and compare these results with the most stringent experimental upper limits on charge symmetry violation for parton distribution functions, as well as with theoretical estimates of charge symmetry violation. The limits allowed in the global fit would tolerate a rather large violation of charge symmetry. We discuss the implications of this for various observables, including extraction of the Weinberg angle in neutrino DIS and the Gottfried and Adler sum rules.

  15. Large-x connections of nuclear and high-energy physics

    DOE PAGES

    Accardi, Alberto

    2013-11-20

    I discuss how global QCD fits of parton distribution functions can make the somewhat separated fields of high-energy particle physics and lower energy hadronic and nuclear physics interact to the benefit of both. I review specific examples of this interplay from recent works of the CTEQ-Jefferson Lab collaboration, including hadron structure at large parton momentum and gauge boson production at colliders. Particular attention is devoted to quantifying theoretical uncertainties arising in the treatment of large partonic momentum contributions to deep inelastic scattering observables, and to discussing the experimental progress needed to reduce these.

  16. Backward dilepton production in color dipole and parton models

    SciTech Connect

    Gay Ducati, Maria Beatriz; Graeve de Oliveira, Emmanuel

    2010-03-01

    The Drell-Yan dilepton production at backward rapidities is studied in proton-nucleus collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and LHC energies by comparing two different approaches: the k{sub T} factorization at next-to-leading order with intrinsic transverse momentum and the same process formulated in the target rest frame, i.e., the color dipole approach. Our results are expressed in terms of the ratio between p(d)-A and p-p collisions as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity. Three nuclear parton distribution functions are used: EKS (Eskola, Kolhinen, and Ruuskanen), EPS08, and EPS09 and, in both approaches, dileptons show sensitivity to nuclear effects, specially regarding the intrinsic transverse momentum. Also, there is room to discriminate between formalisms: the color dipole approach lacks soft effects introduced by the intrinsic k{sub T}. Geometric scaling GBW (Golec-Biernat and Wusthoff) and BUW (Boer, Utermann, and Wessels) color dipole cross section models and also a DHJ (Dumitru, Hayashigaki, and Jalilian-Marian) model, which breaks geometric scaling, are used. No change in the ratio between collisions is observed, showing that this observable is not changed by the particular shape of the color dipole cross section. Furthermore, our k{sub T} factorization results are compared with color glass condensate results at forward rapidities: the results agree at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider although disagree at LHC, mainly due to the different behavior of target gluon and quark shadowing.

  17. Distribution of Corbicula fluminea at nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Counts, C.L. III

    1985-11-01

    A review of the zoogeographic records for the exotic Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea (Muller, 1774), reveals its presence in 27 states where nuclear powered electric generating plants are either operating or under construction. Nineteen plant sites reported infestation of varying severity in facilities, or source water bodies immediately adjacent to the facility, by C. fluminea. Thirteen plant sites are located within the zoogeographic limits of C. fluminea but have a low risk of infestation due to either salt water cooling systems or locations a great distance from known populations. Eighteen plant sites are located wholly outside of the known zoogeographic range of C. fluminea. Thirty plant sites are located in close proximity to known populations of C. fluminea and therefore should maintain surveillance of the source water body and within plant water systems for possible infestations by these bivalves. 27 figs.

  18. Unveiling saturation effects from nuclear structure function measurements at the EIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquet, Cyrille; Moldes, Manoel R.; Zurita, Pía

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the possibility of extracting a clear signal of non-linear parton saturation effects from future measurements of nuclear structure functions at the Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), in the small-x region. Our approach consists in generating pseudodata for electron-gold collisions, using the running-coupling Balitsky-Kovchegov evolution equation, and in assessing the compatibility of these saturated pseudodata with existing sets of nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs), extrapolated if necessary. The level of disagreement between the two is quantified by applying a Bayesian reweighting technique. This allows to infer the parton distributions needed in order to describe the pseudodata, which we find quite different from the actual distributions, especially for sea quarks and gluons. This tension suggests that, should saturation effects impact the future nuclear structure function data as predicted, a successful refitting of the nPDFs may not be achievable, which would unambiguously signal the presence of non-linear effects.

  19. Emergent phenomena and partonic structure in hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Craig D.; Mezrag, Cédric

    2017-03-01

    Modern facilities are poised to tackle fundamental questions within the Standard Model, aiming to reveal the nature of confinement, its relationship to dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB) - the origin of visible mass - and the connection between these two, key emergent phenomena. There is strong evidence to suggest that they are intimately connected with the appearance of momentum-dependent masses for gluons and quarks in QCD, which are large in the infrared: mg 500MeV and Mq 350MeV. DCSB, expressed in the dynamical generation of a dressed-quark mass, has an enormous variety of verifiable consequences, including an enigmatic result that the properties of the (almost) massless pion are the cleanest expression of the mechanism which is responsible for almost all the visible mass in the Universe. This contribution explains that these emergent phenomena are expressed with particular force in the partonic structure of hadrons, e.g. in valence-quark parton distribution amplitudes and functions, and, consequently, in numerous hadronic observables, so that we are now in a position to exhibit the consequences of confinement and DCSB in a wide range of hadron observables, opening the way to empirical verification of their expression in the Standard Model.

  20. Constraints on parton distribution functions and extraction of the strong coupling constant from the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 7$$ $$\\,\\text {TeV}$$

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-26

    The inclusive jet cross section for proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeVwas measured by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1. The measurement covers a phase space up to 2TeV in jet transverse momentum and 2.5 in absolute jet rapidity. The statistical precision of these data leads to stringent constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton. The data provide important input for the gluon density at high fractions of the proton momentum and for the strong coupling constant at large energy scales. Using predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamicsmore » at next-to-leading order, complemented with electroweak corrections, the constraining power of these data is investigated and the strong coupling constant at the Z boson mass MZ is determined to be αS(MZ)=0.1185±0.0019(exp)+0.0060-0.0037(theo), which is in agreement with the world average.« less

  1. Constraints on parton distribution functions and extraction of the strong coupling constant from the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ $\\,\\text {TeV}$

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-26

    The inclusive jet cross section for proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeVwas measured by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1. The measurement covers a phase space up to 2TeV in jet transverse momentum and 2.5 in absolute jet rapidity. The statistical precision of these data leads to stringent constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton. The data provide important input for the gluon density at high fractions of the proton momentum and for the strong coupling constant at large energy scales. Using predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order, complemented with electroweak corrections, the constraining power of these data is investigated and the strong coupling constant at the Z boson mass MZ is determined to be αS(MZ)=0.1185±0.0019(exp)+0.0060-0.0037(theo), which is in agreement with the world average.

  2. Constraints on parton distribution functions and extraction of the strong coupling constant from the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at [Formula: see text][Formula: see text].

    PubMed

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Isildak, B; Karapinar, G; Ocalan, K; Sekmen, S; Surat, U E; Yalvac, M; Zeyrek, M; Albayrak, E A; Gülmez, E; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Yetkin, T; Cankocak, K; Vardarlı, F I; Levchuk, L; Sorokin, P; Brooke, J J; Clement, E; Cussans, D; Flacher, H; Goldstein, J; Grimes, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Jacob, J; Kreczko, L; Lucas, C; Meng, Z; Newbold, D M; Paramesvaran, S; Poll, A; Senkin, S; Smith, V J; Williams, T; Bell, K W; Belyaev, A; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Harder, K; Harper, S; Olaiya, E; Petyt, D; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Thea, A; Tomalin, I R; Womersley, W J; Worm, S D; Baber, M; Bainbridge, R; Buchmuller, O; Burton, D; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Cutajar, M; Dauncey, P; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Dunne, P; Ferguson, W; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Gilbert, A; Hall, G; Iles, G; Jarvis, M; Karapostoli, G; Kenzie, M; Lane, R; Lucas, R; Lyons, L; Magnan, A-M; Malik, S; Mathias, B; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Pela, J; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Raymond, D M; Rogerson, S; Rose, A; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Tapper, A; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Zenz, S C; Cole, J E; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leggat, D; Leslie, D; Martin, W; Reid, I D; Symonds, P; Teodorescu, L; Turner, M; Dittmann, J; Hatakeyama, K; Kasmi, A; Liu, H; Scarborough, T; Charaf, O; Cooper, S I; Henderson, C; Rumerio, P; Avetisyan, A; Bose, T; Fantasia, C; Lawson, P; Richardson, C; Rohlf, J; St John, J; Sulak, L; Alimena, J; Berry, E; Bhattacharya, S; Christopher, G; Cutts, D; Demiragli, Z; Dhingra, N; Ferapontov, A; Garabedian, A; Heintz, U; Kukartsev, G; Laird, E; Landsberg, G; Luk, M; Narain, M; Segala, M; Sinthuprasith, T; Speer, T; Swanson, J; Breedon, R; Breto, G; De La Barca Sanchez, M Calderon; Chauhan, S; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Conway, R; Cox, P T; Erbacher, R; Gardner, M; Ko, W; Lander, R; Miceli, T; Mulhearn, M; Pellett, D; Pilot, J; Ricci-Tam, F; Searle, M; Shalhout, S; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stolp, D; Tripathi, M; Wilbur, S; Yohay, R; Cousins, R; Everaerts, P; Farrell, C; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Rakness, G; Takasugi, E; Valuev, V; Weber, M; Burt, K; Clare, R; Ellison, J; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Heilman, J; Ivova Rikova, M; Jandir, P; Kennedy, E; Lacroix, F; Long, O R; Luthra, A; Malberti, M; Negrete, M Olmedo; Shrinivas, A; Sumowidagdo, S; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Cerati, G B; Cittolin, S; D'Agnolo, R T; Holzner, A; Kelley, R; Klein, D; Letts, J; Macneill, I; Olivito, D; Padhi, S; Palmer, C; Pieri, M; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Sudano, E; Tadel, M; Tu, Y; Vartak, A; Welke, C; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Barge, D; Bradmiller-Feld, J; Campagnari, C; Danielson, T; Dishaw, A; Dutta, V; Flowers, K; Franco Sevilla, M; Geffert, P; George, C; Golf, F; Gouskos, L; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Mccoll, N; Richman, J; Stuart, D; To, W; West, C; Yoo, J; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chen, Y; Duarte, J; Mott, A; Newman, H B; Pena, C; Rogan, C; Spiropulu, M; Timciuc, V; Vlimant, J R; Wilkinson, R; Xie, S; Zhu, R Y; Azzolini, V; Calamba, A; Carlson, B; Ferguson, T; Iiyama, Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Krohn, M; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chatterjee, A; Chaves, J; Chu, J; Dittmer, S; Eggert, N; Mirman, N; Nicolas Kaufman, G; Patterson, J R; Ryd, A; Salvati, E; Skinnari, L; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Thompson, J; Tucker, J; Weng, Y; Winstrom, L; Wittich, P; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Anderson, J; Apollinari, G; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Bolla, G; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gao, Y; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Grünendahl, S; Gutsche, O; Hanlon, J; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hirschauer, J; Hooberman, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Kaadze, K; Klima, B; Kreis, B; Kwan, S; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Liu, T; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Martinez Outschoorn, V I; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Merkel, P; Mishra, K; Mrenna, S; Musienko, Y; Nahn, S; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sharma, S; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitbeck, A; Whitmore, J; Yang, F; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bortignon, P; Bourilkov, D; Carver, M; Cheng, T; Curry, D; Das, S; De Gruttola, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Field, R D; Fisher, M; Furic, I K; Hugon, J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kypreos, T; Low, J F; Matchev, K; Milenovic, P; Mitselmakher, G; Muniz, L; Rinkevicius, A; Shchutska, L; Snowball, M; Sperka, D; Yelton, J; Zakaria, M; Hewamanage, S; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bochenek, J; Diamond, B; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Veeraraghavan, V; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Berry, D; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatyan, S; Kurt, P; Moon, D H; O'Brien, C; Silkworth, C; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Duru, F; Haytmyradov, M; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Penzo, A; Rahmat, R; Sen, S; Tan, P; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Fehling, D; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Martin, C; Swartz, M; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Bruner, C; Kenny, R P; Malek, M; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Sekaric, J; Stringer, R; Wang, Q; Wood, J S; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Saini, L K; Shrestha, S; Skhirtladze, N; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Baden, A; Belloni, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Marionneau, M; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Skuja, A; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Barbieri, R; Bauer, G; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Di Matteo, L; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gulhan, D; Klute, M; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; Gude, A; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Keller, J; Knowlton, D; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Meier, F; Snow, G R; Zvada, M; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wang, R J; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Sung, K; Velasco, M; Won, S; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Drozdetskiy, A; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Antonelli, L; Brinson, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Hart, A; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Smith, G; Winer, B L; Wolfe, H; Wulsin, H W; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Hunt, A; Koay, S A; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Mendez, H; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Gutay, L; Hu, Z; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, K; Kress, M; Leonardo, N; Lopes Pegna, D; Maroussov, V; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shi, X; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Wang, F; Xie, W; Xu, L; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Khukhunaishvili, A; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Kaplan, S; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Rose, K; Spanier, S; York, A; Bouhali, O; Castaneda Hernandez, A; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Krutelyov, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kovitanggoon, K; Kunori, S; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Friis, E; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Levine, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Verwilligen, P; Vuosalo, C; Woods, N

    The inclusive jet cross section for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7[Formula: see text] was measured by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0[Formula: see text]. The measurement covers a phase space up to 2[Formula: see text] in jet transverse momentum and 2.5 in absolute jet rapidity. The statistical precision of these data leads to stringent constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton. The data provide important input for the gluon density at high fractions of the proton momentum and for the strong coupling constant at large energy scales. Using predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order, complemented with electroweak corrections, the constraining power of these data is investigated and the strong coupling constant at the Z boson mass [Formula: see text] is determined to be [Formula: see text], which is in agreement with the world average.

  3. Parton shower evolution in a 3D hydrodynamical medium

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Thorsten

    2008-09-15

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation of the perturbative quantum chromodynamics shower developing after a hard process embedded in a heavy-ion collision. The main assumption is that the cascade of branching partons traverses a medium that (consistent with standard radiative energy loss pictures) is characterized by a local transport coefficient q-circumflex that measures the virtuality per unit length transferred to a parton that propagates in this medium. This increase in parton virtuality alters the development of the shower and in essence leads to extra induced radiation and hence a softening of the momentum distribution in the shower. After hadronization, this leads to the concept of a medium-modified fragmentation function. On the level of observables, this is manifest as the suppression of high-transverse-momentum (P{sub T}) hadron spectra. We simulate the soft medium created in heavy-ion collisions by a 3D hydrodynamical evolution and average the medium-modified fragmentation function over this evolution to compare with data on single inclusive hadron suppression and extract the q-circumflex that characterizes the medium. Finally, we discuss possible uncertainties of the model formulation and argue that the data in a soft momentum show evidence of qualitatively different physics that presumably cannot be described by a medium-modified parton shower.

  4. Study of nuclear matter density distributions using hadronic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kohama, Akihisa; Iida, Kei; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2011-05-06

    We briefly review our formula for a proton-nucleus total reaction cross section, {sigma}{sub R}, constructed in the black-sphere approximation of nuclei, in which a nucleus is viewed as a 'black' sphere of radius 'a'. Some years ago, using the Glauber model, one of the authors (A.K.) and his collaborators performed numerical simulations to examine the possibility to probe the nuclear matter density distributions of neutron-rich unstable nuclei from proton elastic scatterings 'model-independently'. The present study is another attempt to seek a 'model-independent' framework for systematically analyzing scattering data for studying the matter density distributions of atomic nuclei.

  5. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Keelan T.; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  6. Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on J/psi Production: Intrinsic and Extrinsic Transverse Momentum Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreiro, E.G.; Fleuret, F.; Lansberg, J.P.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; /SPhN, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2010-08-26

    Cold nuclear matter effects on J/{psi} production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are evaluated taking into account the specific J/{psi}-production kinematics at the partonic level, the shadowing of the initial parton distributions and the absorption in the nuclear matter. We consider two different parton processes for the c{bar c}-pair production: one with collinear gluons and a recoiling gluon in the final state and the other with initial gluons carrying intrinsic transverse momentum. Our results are compared to RHIC observables. The smaller values of the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} in the forward rapidity region (with respect to the mid rapidity region) are partially explained, therefore potentially reducing the need for recombination effects.

  7. DETAILED COMPARISON BETWEEN PARTON CASCADE AND HADRONIC CASCADE AT SPS AND RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    NARA,Y.

    1998-10-23

    The authors study the importance of the partonic phase produced in relativistic heavy ion collision by comparing the parton cascade model and the hadronic cascade model. Hadron yield, baryon stopping and transverse momentum distribution are calculated with JAM and discussions are given comparing with VNI. Both of these models give good description of experimental data. They also discuss the strangeness production mechanism and the directed transverse flow.

  8. Prompt photon photoproduction at HERA with non-collinear parton dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatov, A. V.; Zotov, N. P.

    2011-07-15

    We investigate the prompt photon photoproduction at HERA within the framework of the k{sub T}-factorization approach to QCD. Our consideration is based on the off-shell matrix elements for the underlying partonic subprocesses and the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin (KMR) unintegrated parton densities in the proton. We also use the Ciafaloni-Catani-Fiorani-Marchesini (CCFM) unintegrated gluon as well as valence and sea quark distributions.

  9. APACIC++ 2.0. A PArton Cascade In C++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, F.; Schälicke, A.; Soff, G.

    2006-06-01

    The new version of the parton shower module APACIC++ for the SHERPA event generator framework is presented. It incorporates some features, that are specific for the consistent merging with multi-particle matrix elements at tree-level. This publication also includes some example results and a short description of the upgraded class structure of APACIC++, version 2.0. Program summaryTitle of program:APACIC++, version 2.0 Catalogue identifier:ADNE_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADNE_v2_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADNE Authors of previous version: R. Kuhn, F. Krauss, B. Iványi, G. Soff Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Commun. 134 (2001) 223 Licensing provisions: none Operating system under which the program has been tested: Linux, Unix, Darwin Programming language: C++ No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 78 352 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 561 276 External routines/libraries used: The makeinstall requires the autotools package Distribution format: tar gzip file Nature of the physical problem: Modern collider-based experiments in particle physics are characterized by increasing energies that are released and, thus, by a growing number of particles that are produced. The large numbers of involved particles renders it impossible to derive fully analytical predictions for a detailed description of the final state. In addition, the transformation of the partons of perturbative quantum field theory into the experimentally observable hadrons is until now not understood on a quantitative level. These obstacles prevent a direct comparison of analytical predictions with experimental data, and simulation tools need to be employed to bridge this gap. Method of solution: The event generator SHERPA with a new version of the parton shower module APACIC++ is able to

  10. Multiparticle production in a two-component dual parton model

    SciTech Connect

    Aurenche, P. ); Bopp, F.W. ); Capella, A. ); Kwiecinski, J. ); Maire, M. ); Ranft, J.; Tran Thanh Van, J. )

    1992-01-01

    The dual parton model (DPM) describes soft and semihard multiparticle production. The version of the DPM presented in this paper includes soft and hard mechanisms as well as diffractive processes. The model is formulated as a Monte Carlo event generator. We calculate in this model, in the energy range of the hadron colliders, rapidity distributions and the rise of the rapidity plateau with the collision energy, transverse-momentum distributions and the rise of average transverse momenta with the collision energy, multiplicity distributions in different pseudorapidity regions, and transverse-energy distributions. For most of these quantities we find a reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  11. Fuel areal density distributions derived from nuclear scattering signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Yeamans, C. B.; Gatu Johnson, M. G.

    2016-10-01

    The spatial variation of activities measured in the array of 20 Nuclear Activation Detectors mounted on the flanges around the NIF target chamber (FNADs) are correlated with asymmetries in the underlying fuel areal density of compressed ICF targets. The asymmetric areal density distributions cause variations in the neutron spectra with direction which are seen in the dsr (down scattered ratio) metric, the ratio of the number of 10-12 MeV neutrons to the number of 13-15 MeV neutrons. We show, using a simple physics based simulation of neutron scattering through an idealized non-uniform DT shell with a realistic neutron source, that for most shots an areal distribution can be found which reproduces both the FNAD activity and the dsr measurements. Furthermore, by linking the simulation to a Marquardt minimizer, we fit the areal distribution to a truncated set of spherical harmonics. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Parallelization and automatic data distribution for nuclear reactor simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liebrock, L.M.

    1997-07-01

    Detailed attempts at realistic nuclear reactor simulations currently take many times real time to execute on high performance workstations. Even the fastest sequential machine can not run these simulations fast enough to ensure that the best corrective measure is used during a nuclear accident to prevent a minor malfunction from becoming a major catastrophe. Since sequential computers have nearly reached the speed of light barrier, these simulations will have to be run in parallel to make significant improvements in speed. In physical reactor plants, parallelism abounds. Fluids flow, controls change, and reactions occur in parallel with only adjacent components directly affecting each other. These do not occur in the sequentialized manner, with global instantaneous effects, that is often used in simulators. Development of parallel algorithms that more closely approximate the real-world operation of a reactor may, in addition to speeding up the simulations, actually improve the accuracy and reliability of the predictions generated. Three types of parallel architecture (shared memory machines, distributed memory multicomputers, and distributed networks) are briefly reviewed as targets for parallelization of nuclear reactor simulation. Various parallelization models (loop-based model, shared memory model, functional model, data parallel model, and a combined functional and data parallel model) are discussed along with their advantages and disadvantages for nuclear reactor simulation. A variety of tools are introduced for each of the models. Emphasis is placed on the data parallel model as the primary focus for two-phase flow simulation. Tools to support data parallel programming for multiple component applications and special parallelization considerations are also discussed.

  13. Distributional properties of stochastic shortest paths for smuggled nuclear material

    SciTech Connect

    Cuellar, Leticia; Pan, Feng; Roach, Fred; Saeger, Kevin J

    2011-01-05

    The shortest path problem on a network with fixed weights is a well studied problem with applications to many diverse areas such as transportation and telecommunications. We are particularly interested in the scenario where a nuclear material smuggler tries to succesfully reach herlhis target by identifying the most likely path to the target. The identification of the path relies on reliabilities (weights) associated with each link and node in a multi-modal transportation network. In order to account for the adversary's uncertainty and to perform sensitivity analysis we introduce random reliabilities. We perform some controlled experiments on the grid and present the distributional properties of the resulting stochastic shortest paths.

  14. Hard QCD processes in the nuclear medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Adam

    The environment inside the atomic nucleus is one of the most fascinating arenas for the study of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The strongly-interacting nature of the nuclear medium a?ects the nature of both QCD processes and the quark-gluon structure of hadrons, allowing several unique aspects of the strong nuclear force to be investigated in reactions involving nuclear targets. The research presented in this dissertation explores two aspects of nuclear QCD: firstly, the partonic structure of the nucleus itself; and secondly, the use of the nucleus as a micro-laboratory in which QCD processes can be studied. The partonic structure of the nucleus is calculated in this work by deriving and utilizing a convolution formula. The hadronic structure of the nucleus and the quark-gluon structure of its constituent nucleons are taken together to determine the nuclear partonic structure. Light cone descriptions of short range correlations, in terms of both hadronic and partonic structure, are derived and taken into account. Medium modifications of the bound nucleons are accounted for using the color screening model, and QCD evolution is used to connect nuclear partonic structure at vastly di?erent energy scales. The formalism developed for calculating nuclear partonic structure is applied to inclusive dijet production from proton-nucleus collisions at LHC kinematics, and novel predictions are calculated and presented for the dijet cross section. The nucleus is investigated as a micro-laboratory in vector meson photoproduction reactions. In particular, the deuteron is studied in the break-up reaction gammad → Vpn, for both the φ(1020) and J/v vector mesons. The generalized eikonal approximation is utilized, allowing unambiguous separation of the impulse approximation and final state interactions (FSIs). Two peaks or valleys are seen in the angular distribution of the reaction cross section, each of which is due to an FSI between either the proton and neutron, or the

  15. Squark production and decay matched with parton showers at NLO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavin, R.; Hangst, C.; Krämer, M.; Mühlleitner, M.; Pellen, M.; Popenda, E.; Spira, M.

    2015-01-01

    Extending previous work on the predictions for the production of supersymmetric (SUSY) particles at the LHC, we present the fully differential calculation of the next-to-leading order (NLO) SUSY-QCD corrections to the production of squark and squark-antisquark pairs of the first two generations. The NLO cross sections are combined with the subsequent decay of the final state (anti)squarks into the lightest neutralino and (anti)quark at NLO SUSY-QCD. No assumptions on the squark masses are made, and the various subchannels are taken into account independently. In order to obtain realistic predictions for differential distributions the fixed-order calculations have to be combined with parton showers. Making use of the Powheg method we have implemented our results in the Powheg-Box framework and interfaced the NLO calculation with the parton shower Monte Carlo programs Pythia6 and Herwig++. The code is publicly available and can be downloaded from the Powheg-Box webpage. The impact of the NLO corrections on the differential distributions is studied and parton shower effects are investigated for different benchmark scenarios.

  16. 3D crack aperture distribution from a nuclear imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardini, Paul; Kuva, Jukka; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Bonnet, Marine; Hellmuth, Karl-Heinz

    2017-04-01

    Cracks in solid rocks are multi-scale entities because of their spatial, length and aperture distributions. Aperture distributions of cracks are not well known because their full aperture range (<0.1 µm to >1 mm) is not accessible using common imaging techniques, such as SEM or X-Ray computed micro-tomography. Knowing the aperture distribution or cracks is, however, highly relevant to understanding flow in rocks. In crystalline rocks the lack of knowledge about the crack aperture distribution keeps us from a clear understanding of the relationships of porosity and permeability. A nuclear imaging method based on the full saturation of connected rock porosity by a 14C-doped resin (the 14-C PMMA method) allows detecting the connected microcrack network using autoradiography. Even if cracks are detected only on 2D sections, an estimate of the 3D aperture distribution of these cracks is possible. To this end, a set of "artificial crack" standards was prepared and investigated. These standards consisted of a PMMA layer of known thickness between two glass plates. Analysis of experimental autoradiographic profiles around these artificial cracks allows determination of their aperture. This methodology was then applied to different rock samples, mainly granitic ones.

  17. Chiral dynamics and partonic structure at large transverse distances

    SciTech Connect

    Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2009-12-30

    In this paper, we study large-distance contributions to the nucleon’s parton densities in the transverse coordinate (impact parameter) representation based on generalized parton distributions (GPDs). Chiral dynamics generates a distinct component of the partonic structure, located at momentum fractions x≲Mπ/MN and transverse distances b~1/Mπ. We calculate this component using phenomenological pion exchange with a physical lower limit in b (the transverse “core” radius estimated from the nucleon’s axial form factor, Rcore=0.55 fm) and demonstrate its universal character. This formulation preserves the basic picture of the “pion cloud” model of the nucleon’s sea quark distributions, while restricting its application to the region actually governed by chiral dynamics. It is found that (a) the large-distance component accounts for only ~1/3 of the measured antiquark flavor asymmetry d¯-u¯ at x~0.1; (b) the strange sea quarks s and s¯ are significantly more localized than the light antiquark sea; (c) the nucleon’s singlet quark size for x<0.1 is larger than its gluonic size, (b2)q+q¯>(b2)g, as suggested by the t-slopes of deeply-virtual Compton scattering and exclusive J/ψ production measured at HERA and FNAL. We show that our approach reproduces the general Nc-scaling of parton densities in QCD, thanks to the degeneracy of N and Δ intermediate states in the large-Nc limit. Finally, we also comment on the role of pionic configurations at large longitudinal distances and the limits of their applicability at small x.

  18. Pre-equilibrium parton dynamics: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    1993-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: parton production and evolution; QCD transport theory; interference in the medium; QCD and phase transition; and future heavy ion experiments. This papers have been indexed separately elsewhere on the data base.

  19. Double parton scattering in the color glass condensate: Hanbury-Brown-Twiss correlations in double inclusive photon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovner, Alex; Rezaeian, Amir H.

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a technique to study double parton scattering (DPS) in the color-glass-condensate (CGC) approach. We show that the cross section of the DPS in the CGC approach is calculable in terms of new nonperturbative objects, generalized double transverse momentum-dependent parton distribution (2GTMD) functions. We investigate the production of pairs of prompt photons from two partons in the projectile hadron in high-energy proton-nucleus collisions. We show that even for independent partons in the projectile, the prompt photon correlation function exhibits Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) correlations. The width of the HBT peak is controlled by the transverse distance between the partons of the pair, which is of the order of the proton size. Thus, the HBT measurements in two-particle production such as prompt photon pairs provide useful information about the nonperturbative 2GTMDs.

  20. Radon Transform and Light-Cone Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teryaev, O. V.

    2016-08-01

    The relevance of Radon transform for generalized and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions is discussed. The new application for conditional (fracture) parton distributions and dihadron fragmentation functions is suggested.

  1. Multiple parton interaction studies at DØ

    DOE PAGES

    Lincoln, D.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we present the results of studies of multiparton interactions done by the DØ collaboration using the Fermilab Tevatron at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. We also present three analyses, involving three distinct final signatures: (a) a photon with at least 3 jets ( γ + 3jets), (b) a photon with a bottom or charm quark tagged jet and at least 2 other jets ( γ + b/c + 2jets), and (c) two J/ ψ mesons. The fraction of photon + jet events initiated by double parton scattering is about 20%, while the fraction for events inmore » which two J/ ψ mesons were produced is 30 ± 10. While the two measurements are statistically compatible, the difference might indicate differences in the quark and gluon distribution within a nucleon. Finally, this speculation originates from the fact that photon + jet events are created by collisions with quarks in the initial states, while J/ ψ events are produced preferentially by a gluonic initial state.« less

  2. Multiple parton interaction studies at DØ

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, D.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we present the results of studies of multiparton interactions done by the DØ collaboration using the Fermilab Tevatron at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. We also present three analyses, involving three distinct final signatures: (a) a photon with at least 3 jets ( γ + 3jets), (b) a photon with a bottom or charm quark tagged jet and at least 2 other jets ( γ + b/c + 2jets), and (c) two J/ ψ mesons. The fraction of photon + jet events initiated by double parton scattering is about 20%, while the fraction for events in which two J/ ψ mesons were produced is 30 ± 10. While the two measurements are statistically compatible, the difference might indicate differences in the quark and gluon distribution within a nucleon. Finally, this speculation originates from the fact that photon + jet events are created by collisions with quarks in the initial states, while J/ ψ events are produced preferentially by a gluonic initial state.

  3. Radiocesium Distribution in Bamboo Shoots after the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    PubMed Central

    Higaki, Takumi; Higaki, Shogo; Hirota, Masahiro; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of radiocesium was examined in bamboo shoots, Phyllostachys pubescens, collected from 10 sites located some 41 to 1140 km from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Japan, in the Spring of 2012, 1 year after the Fukushima nuclear accident. Maximum activity concentrations for radiocesium 134Cs and 137Cs in the edible bamboo shoot parts, 41 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi plant, were in excess of 15.3 and 21.8 kBq/kg (dry weight basis; 1.34 and 1.92 kBq/kg, fresh weight), respectively. In the radiocesium-contaminated samples, the radiocesium activities were higher in the inner tip parts, including the upper edible parts and the apical culm sheath, than in the hardened culm sheath and underground basal parts. The radiocesium/potassium ratios also tended to be higher in the inner tip parts. The radiocesium activities increased with bamboo shoot length in another bamboo species, Phyllostachys bambusoides, suggesting that radiocesium accumulated in the inner tip parts during growth of the shoots. PMID:24831096

  4. Parton shower Monte Carlo event generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Bryan

    2011-12-01

    A parton shower Monte Carlo event generator is a computer program designed to simulate the final states of high-energy collisions in full detail down to the level of individual stable particles. The aim is to generate a large number of simulated collision events, each consisting of a list of final-state particles and their momenta, such that the probability to produce an event with a given list is proportional (approximately) to the probability that the corresponding actual event is produced in the real world. The Monte Carlo method makes use of pseudorandom numbers to simulate the event-to-event fluctuations intrinsic to quantum processes. The simulation normally begins with a hard subprocess, shown as a black blob in Figure 1, in which constituents of the colliding particles interact at a high momentum scale to produce a few outgoing fundamental objects: Standard Model quarks, leptons and/or gauge or Higgs bosons, or hypothetical particles of some new theory. The partons (quarks and gluons) involved, as well as any new particles with colour, radiate virtual gluons, which can themselves emit further gluons or produce quark-antiquark pairs, leading to the formation of parton showers (brown). During parton showering the interaction scale falls and the strong interaction coupling rises, eventually triggering the process of hadronization (yellow), in which the partons are bound into colourless hadrons. On the same scale, the initial-state partons in hadronic collisions are confined in the incoming hadrons. In hadron-hadron collisions, the other constituent partons of the incoming hadrons undergo multiple interactions which produce the underlying event (green). Many of the produced hadrons are unstable, so the final stage of event generation is the simulation of the hadron decays.

  5. Color fluctuation approximation for multiple interactions in leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey, Mark Strikman

    2010-04-01

    The leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing predicts nuclear parton distributions in the small $x$ shadowing region by connecting them to the leading twist hard diffraction in electron-nucleon scattering. The uncertainties of the predictions are related to the shadowing effects resulting from the interaction of the hard probe with $N \\ge 3$ nucleons. We argue that the pattern of hard diffraction observed at HERA allows one to reduce these uncertainties, and we develop a new approach to the treatment of these multiple collisions. It is based on the concept of the color fluctuations and accounts for the presence of both point-like and hadron-like configurations in the virtual photon. Using the developed framework, we update our predictions for the effect of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in nuclear parton distributions of heavy nuclei at small $x$.

  6. APFELgrid : A high performance tool for parton density determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertone, Valerio; Carrazza, Stefano; Hartland, Nathan P.

    2017-03-01

    We present a new software package designed to reduce the computational burden of hadron collider measurements in Parton Distribution Function (PDF) fits. The APFELgrid package converts interpolated weight tables provided by APPLgrid files into a more efficient format for PDF fitting by the combination with PDF and αs evolution factors provided by APFEL. This combination significantly reduces the number of operations required to perform the calculation of hadronic observables in PDF fits and simplifies the structure of the calculation into a readily optimised scalar product. We demonstrate that our technique can lead to a substantial speed improvement when compared to existing methods without any reduction in numerical accuracy.

  7. Measurement of Proton Structure and Parton Density Functions from HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Raicevic, Natasa

    2010-01-21

    A preliminary result is reported of the charged current and neutral current inclusive cross sections from e{sup +}p and e{sup -}p scattering obtained from a combination of published measurements from H1 and ZEUS. Taking into account the systematic error correlations in a coherent approach, a reduction of experimental uncertainties for combined results is achieved compared to the separate results of the H1 and ZEUS experiments. The combined results are used as input for a next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD parton distribution determination.

  8. Nuclear PDF for neutrino and charged lepton data

    SciTech Connect

    Kovarik, K.

    2011-10-06

    Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) on nuclei is an essential process to constrain the strange quark parton distribution functions (PDF) in the proton. The critical component on the way to using the neutrino DIS data in a proton PDF analysis is understanding the nuclear effects in parton distribution functions. We parametrize these effects by nuclear parton distribution functions (NPDF). Here we compare results from two analysis of NPDF both done at next-to-leading order in QCD. The first uses neutral current charged-lepton (l{sup {+-}A}) Deeply Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and Drell-Yan data for several nuclear targets and the second uses neutrino-nucleon DIS data. We compare the nuclear corrections factors (F{sub 2}{sup Fe}/F{sub 2}{sup D}) for the charged-lepton data with other results from the literature. In particular, we compare and contrast fits based upon the charged-lepton DIS data with those using neutrino-nucleon DIS data.

  9. Parton Propagation and Fragmentation in QCD Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alberto Accardi, Francois Arleo, William Brooks, David D'Enterria, Valeria Muccifora

    2009-12-01

    We review recent progress in the study of parton propagation, interaction and fragmentation in both cold and hot strongly interacting matter. Experimental highlights on high-energy hadron production in deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering, proton-nucleus and heavy-ion collisions, as well as Drell-Yan processes in hadron-nucleus collisions are presented. The existing theoretical frameworks for describing the in-medium interaction of energetic partons and the space-time evolution of their fragmentation into hadrons are discussed and confronted to experimental data. We conclude with a list of theoretical and experimental open issues, and a brief description of future relevant experiments and facilities.

  10. Evolution of parton fragmentation functions at finitetemperature

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, Jonathan; Wang, Enke; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2002-06-12

    The first order correction to the parton fragmentation functions in a thermal medium is derived in the leading logarithmic approximation in the framework of thermal field theory. The medium-modified evolution equations of the parton fragmentation functions are also derived. It is shown that all infrared divergences, both linear and logarithmic, in the real processes are canceled among themselves and by corresponding virtual corrections. The evolution of the quark number and the energy loss (or gain) induced by the thermal medium are investigated.

  11. Vesicle Size Distribution as a Novel Nuclear Forensics Tool.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Patrick H; Simonetti, Antonio

    The first nuclear bomb detonation on Earth involved a plutonium implosion-type device exploded at the Trinity test site (33°40'38.28″N, 106°28'31.44″W), White Sands Proving Grounds, near Alamogordo, New Mexico. Melting and subsequent quenching of the local arkosic sand produced glassy material, designated "Trinitite". In cross section, Trinitite comprises a thin (1-2 mm), primarily glassy surface above a lower zone (1-2 cm) of mixed melt and mineral fragments from the precursor sand. Multiple hypotheses have been put forward to explain these well-documented but heterogeneous textures. This study reports the first quantitative textural analysis of vesicles in Trinitite to constrain their physical and thermal history. Vesicle morphology and size distributions confirm the upper, glassy surface records a distinct processing history from the lower region, that is useful in determining the original sample surface orientation. Specifically, the glassy layer has lower vesicle density, with larger sizes and more rounded population in cross-section. This vertical stratigraphy is attributed to a two-stage evolution of Trinitite glass from quench cooling of the upper layer followed by prolonged heating of the subsurface. Defining the physical regime of post-melting processes constrains the potential for surface mixing and vesicle formation in a post-detonation environment.

  12. Vesicle Size Distribution as a Novel Nuclear Forensics Tool

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The first nuclear bomb detonation on Earth involved a plutonium implosion-type device exploded at the Trinity test site (33°40′38.28″N, 106°28′31.44″W), White Sands Proving Grounds, near Alamogordo, New Mexico. Melting and subsequent quenching of the local arkosic sand produced glassy material, designated “Trinitite”. In cross section, Trinitite comprises a thin (1–2 mm), primarily glassy surface above a lower zone (1–2 cm) of mixed melt and mineral fragments from the precursor sand. Multiple hypotheses have been put forward to explain these well-documented but heterogeneous textures. This study reports the first quantitative textural analysis of vesicles in Trinitite to constrain their physical and thermal history. Vesicle morphology and size distributions confirm the upper, glassy surface records a distinct processing history from the lower region, that is useful in determining the original sample surface orientation. Specifically, the glassy layer has lower vesicle density, with larger sizes and more rounded population in cross-section. This vertical stratigraphy is attributed to a two-stage evolution of Trinitite glass from quench cooling of the upper layer followed by prolonged heating of the subsurface. Defining the physical regime of post-melting processes constrains the potential for surface mixing and vesicle formation in a post-detonation environment. PMID:27658210

  13. Constraints on parton density functions from D0

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, Jonathan M.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2008-04-01

    Five recent results from D0 which either impact or have the potential to impact on uncertainties in parton density functions are presented. Many analyses at D0 are sensitive to the modeling of the partonic structure of the proton. When theoretical and experimental uncertainties are well controlled there exists the possibility for additional constraints on parton density functions (PDF). Five measurements are presented which either have already been included in global parton fits or have the potential to contribute in the future.

  14. Partonic calculation of the two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering at large momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Y. C. Chen; A. Afanasev; S. J. Brodsky; C. E. Carlson; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2004-03-01

    We estimate the two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering at large momentum transfer through the scattering off a parton in the proton. We relate the process on the nucleon to the generalized parton distributions which also enter in other wide angle scattering processes. We find that when taking the polarization transfer determinations of the form factors as input, adding in the 2 photon correction, does reproduce the Rosenbluth data.

  15. QCD parton model at collider energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.K.

    1984-09-01

    Using the example of vector boson production, the application of the QCD improved parton model at collider energies is reviewed. The reliability of the extrapolation to SSC energies is assessed. Predictions at ..sqrt..S = 0.54 TeV are compared with data. 21 references.

  16. Systematic Improvement of QCD Parton Showers

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Jan; Hoeche, Stefan; Hoeth, Hendrik; Krauss, Frank; Schonherr, Marek; Zapp, Korinna; Schumann, Steffen; Siegert, Frank; /Freiburg U.

    2012-05-17

    In this contribution, we will give a brief overview of the progress that has been achieved in the field of combining matrix elements and parton showers. We exemplify this by focusing on the case of electron-positron collisions and by reporting on recent developments as accomplished within the SHERPA event generation framework.

  17. Fragmentation of parton jets at small x

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, R.

    1985-08-01

    The parton fragmentation function is calculated in the region of small x in the doubly logarithmic approximation of QCD. For this, the method of separating the softest particle, which has hitherto been applied only in the Regge kinematic region, is developed. Simple arguments based on unitarity and gauge invariance are used to derive the well known condition of ordering of the emission angles.

  18. Spin correlations in the Drell–Yan process, parton entanglement, and other unconventional QCD effects

    SciTech Connect

    Nachtmann, O.

    2014-11-15

    We review ideas on the structure of the QCD vacuum which had served as motivation for the discussion of various non-standard QCD effects in high-energy reactions in articles from 1984 to 1995. These effects include, in particular, transverse-momentum and spin correlations in the Drell–Yan process and soft photon production in hadron–hadron collisions. We discuss the relation of the approach introduced in the above-mentioned articles to the approach, developed later, using transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TDMs). The latter approach is a special case of our more general one which allows for parton entanglement in high-energy reactions. We discuss signatures of parton entanglement in the Drell–Yan reaction. Also for Higgs-boson production in pp collisions via gluon–gluon annihilation effects of entanglement of the two gluons are discussed and are found to be potentially important. These effects can be looked for in the current LHC experiments. In our opinion studying parton-entanglement effects in high-energy reactions is, on the one hand, very worthwhile by itself and, on the other hand, it allows to perform quantitative tests of standard factorisation assumptions. Clearly, the experimental observation of parton-entanglement effects in the Drell–Yan reaction and/or in Higgs-boson production would have a great impact on our understanding how QCD works in high-energy collisions.

  19. An O([alpha][sub s]) Monte Carlo for W production with parton showering

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    We construct an event generator for p[bar p][yields]W[sup +]X[yields]e[sup +][nu]X including complete O([alpha][sub s]) corrections, and interface with initial and final state parton showers. Problems with negative weights and with double counting higher order parton radiation are averted. We present results for W+n-jet production, and compare with results from complete tree-level calculations, and shower calculations off of the lowest order 2[yields]2 sub-process. We also compute the [sub qT](W) distribution, and compare with data.

  20. An O({alpha}{sub s}) Monte Carlo for W production with parton showering

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.A.

    1991-12-31

    We construct an event generator for p{bar p}{yields}W{sup +}X{yields}e{sup +}{nu}X including complete O({alpha}{sub s}) corrections, and interface with initial and final state parton showers. Problems with negative weights and with double counting higher order parton radiation are averted. We present results for W+n-jet production, and compare with results from complete tree-level calculations, and shower calculations off of the lowest order 2{yields}2 sub-process. We also compute the {sub qT}(W) distribution, and compare with data.

  1. Non-dipolar Wilson Links for Parton Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hsiang-nan

    We propose a new definition of a transverse-momentum-dependent wave function with simpler soft subtraction. The unsubtracted wave function involves two pieces of non-light-like Wilson links oriented in different directions, so that the rapidity singularity appearing in usual kT factorization is regularized, and the pinched singularity from Wilson-link self-energy corrections is alleviated to a logarithmic one. We show explicitly at one-loop level that the simpler definition with the non-dipolar Wilson links exhibits the same infrared behavior as the one with the dipolar Wilson links. The non-dipolar Wilson links are also introduced to the quasi-parton distribution function (QPDF) with an equal-time correlator in the large momentum limit, which can remove the involved linear divergence, and allow perturbative matching to the standard light-cone parton distribution function. The latter can then be extracted reliably from Euclidean lattice data for the QPDF with the non-dipolar Wilson links.

  2. Effects produced by multi-parton interactions and color reconnection in small systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuautle, Eleazar; Ortiz, Antonio; Paić, Guy

    2016-12-01

    Multi-parton interactions and color reconnection can produce QGP-like effects in small systems, specifically, radial flow-like patterns. For pp collisions simulated with Pythia 8.212, in this work we investigate their effects on different observables like event multiplicity, event shapes and transverse momentum distributions.

  3. Investigation of parton fragmentation with the TPC detector at PEP: recent results

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, W.

    1985-08-01

    Long-range correlations are discussed as a new tool to test the parton model and jet universality and are used to determine general properties of quark fragmentation functions. Proton-antiproton correlatiosns and proton rapidity distribution yield information about details of the confinement process, excluding e.g. the decay of heavy mesonic clusters as the dominant source of baryons.

  4. Nuclear Shadowing and Select d+Au Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeluyi, Adeola; Fai, George

    2007-04-01

    Much of the complexity of the description of d+Au collisions in the framework of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (pQCD) derives from effects of the nuclear environment. Here we investigate the effects of the most recent available nuclear shadowing parametrization, the Hirai-Kumano-Nagai (HKN) nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs) and the updated Albino-Kniehl-Kramer (AKK) fragmentation functions on three select d+Au collision observables. We compare our results to available experimental data from the STAR and BRAHMS collaborations.

  5. Nuclear medium effects in Drell–Yan process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, H.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Singh, S. K.; Ruiz Simo, I.

    2017-04-01

    We study the nuclear medium effects in Drell–Yan process using quark parton distribution functions calculated in a microscopic nuclear model which takes into account the effects of Fermi motion, nuclear binding and nucleon correlations through a relativistic nucleon spectral function. The contributions of π and ρ mesons as well as shadowing effects are also included. The beam energy loss is calculated using a phenomenological approach. The present theoretical results are compared with the experimental results of the E772 and E866 experiments. These results are applicable to the forthcoming experimental analysis of E906 Sea Quest experiment at the Fermi Lab.

  6. Ballistic protons in incoherent exclusive vector meson production as a measure of rare parton fluctuations at an electron-ion collider

    DOE PAGES

    Lappi, T.; Venugopalan, R.; Mantysaari, H.

    2015-02-25

    We argue that the proton multiplicities measured in Roman pot detectors at an electron ion collider can be used to determine centrality classes in incoherent diffractive scattering. Incoherent diffraction probes the fluctuations in the interaction strengths of multi-parton Fock states in the nuclear wavefunctions. In particular, the saturation scale that characterizes this multi-parton dynamics is significantly larger in central events relative to minimum bias events. As an application, we examine the centrality dependence of incoherent diffractive vector meson production. We identify an observable which is simultaneously very sensitive to centrality triggered parton fluctuations and insensitive to details of the model.

  7. Single-point single-molecule FRAP distinguishes inner and outer nuclear membrane protein distribution

    PubMed Central

    Mudumbi, Krishna C; Schirmer, Eric C; Yang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The normal distribution of nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) is disrupted in several human diseases. NETs are synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum and then transported from the outer nuclear membrane (ONM) to the inner nuclear membrane (INM). Quantitative determination of the distribution of NETs on the ONM and INM is limited in available approaches, which moreover provide no information about translocation rates in the two membranes. Here we demonstrate a single-point single-molecule FRAP microscopy technique that enables determination of distribution and translocation rates for NETs in vivo. PMID:27558844

  8. On the maximum entropy distributions of inherently positive nuclear data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taavitsainen, A.; Vanhanen, R.

    2017-05-01

    The multivariate log-normal distribution is used by many authors and statistical uncertainty propagation programs for inherently positive quantities. Sometimes it is claimed that the log-normal distribution results from the maximum entropy principle, if only means, covariances and inherent positiveness of quantities are known or assumed to be known. In this article we show that this is not true. Assuming a constant prior distribution, the maximum entropy distribution is in fact a truncated multivariate normal distribution - whenever it exists. However, its practical application to multidimensional cases is hindered by lack of a method to compute its location and scale parameters from means and covariances. Therefore, regardless of its theoretical disadvantage, use of other distributions seems to be a practical necessity.

  9. Nuclear Shadowing at Small Values of X.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jian-Wei

    The nuclear parton distributions are given in a model where the nucleus is viewed as a collection of uncorrelated nucleons. Using these distributions, we determine nuclear shadowing at small values of x. We find that the effect of nuclear shadowing goes away very slowly when Q^2 increases. Our results are consistent with the experiment of Goodman et al. Using these distributions, we also determine the A-dependence of hadronic charm productions. Defining total cross sections of hadronic charm production in pA and pp collisions as sigma_{rm pAto c | c} = A^alpha sigma_{rm ppto c| c}, we find that alpha is bigger than 0.96 for all physically existing nuclei at present collider energies.

  10. Trace elemental distributions in induced atherosclerotic lesions using nuclear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minqin, Ren; Watt, Frank; Tan Kwong Huat, Benny; Halliwell, B.

    2003-09-01

    Nuclear Microscopy, using the combination of scanning transmission ion microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and proton induced X-ray emission has the ability to map and accurately quantify localised trace element levels in newly formed atherosclerotic lesions. In this study, New Zealand white rabbits fed on a high cholesterol diet were divided into two groups. One test group was treated with an iron chelating agent desferal, and the second group served as a control model. Tissue sections were taken from the aortic arch, flash frozen and air-dried, and scanned using the nuclear microscope of the Research Centre for Nuclear Microscopy, NUS. Results of this experiment, although not definitive ( p=0.07) indicated that during the treatment with desferal, there was a trend for lesion development to be slowed down. However, analysis of atherosclerotic lesions both from the test and control groups showed that iron concentrations within the lesions exhibit a high degree of correlation with the depth of the lesion in the artery wall, whereas zinc is observed to be anti-correlated to the size of the lesion area. This investigation implies that the observed high iron levels, which can lead to increased free radical damage, may cause premature or accelerated arterial damage.

  11. Effect of Particle Size Distribution on Slurry Rheology: Nuclear Waste Simulant Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Jaehun; Oh, Takkeun; Luna, Maria L.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2011-07-05

    Controlling the rheological properties of slurries has been of great interest in various industries such as cosmetics, ceramic processing, and nuclear waste treatment. Many physicochemical parameters, such as particle size, pH, ionic strength, and mass/volume fraction of particles, can influence the rheological properties of slurry. Among such parameters, the particle size distribution of slurry would be especially important for nuclear waste treatment because most nuclear waste slurries show a broad particle size distribution. We studied the rheological properties of several different low activity waste nuclear simulant slurries having different particle size distributions under high salt and high pH conditions. Using rheological and particle size analysis, it was found that the percentage of colloid-sized particles in slurry appears to be a key factor for rheological characteristics and the efficiency of rheological modifiers. This behavior was shown to be coupled with an existing electrostatic interaction between particles under a low salt concentration. Our study suggests that one may need to implement the particle size distribution as a critical factor to understand and control rheological properties in nuclear waste treatment plants, such as the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford and Savannah River sites, because the particle size distributions significantly vary over different types of nuclear waste slurries.

  12. Nuclear distribution of claudin-2 increases cell proliferation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Akira; Watanabe, Ryo; Sato, Tomonari; Taga, Saeko; Shimobaba, Shun; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Sugatani, Junko

    2014-09-01

    Claudin-2 is expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma tissue and cell lines, although it is absent in normal lung tissue. However, the role of claudin-2 in cell proliferation and the regulatory mechanism of intracellular distribution remain undefined. Proliferation of human adenocarcinoma A549 cells was decreased by claudin-2 knockdown together with a decrease in the percentage of S phase cells. This knockdown decreased the expression levels of ZONAB and cell cycle regulators. Claudin-2 was distributed in the nucleus in human adenocarcinoma tissues and proliferating A549 cells. The nuclear distribution of ZONAB and percentage of S phase cells were higher in cells exogenously expressing claudin-2 with a nuclear localization signal than in cells expressing claudin-2 with a nuclear export signal. Nuclear claudin-2 formed a complex with ZO-1, ZONAB, and cyclin D1. Nuclear distribution of S208A mutant, a dephosphorylated form of claudin-2, was higher than that of wild type. We suggest that nuclear distribution of claudin-2 is up-regulated by dephosphorylation and claudin-2 serves to retain ZONAB and cyclin D1 in the nucleus, resulting in the enhancement of cell proliferation in lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  13. Can the triple-parton scattering be observed in open charm meson production at the LHC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciuła, Rafał; Szczurek, Antoni

    2017-09-01

    We investigate whether the triple-parton scattering effects can be observed in open charm production in proton-proton collisions at the LHC. We use so-called factorized Ansatz for calculations of hard multiple-parton interactions. The numerical results for each parton interaction are obtained within the kT-factorization approach. Predictions for one, two and three c c bar pairs production are given for √{ s} = 7 TeV and √{ s} = 13 TeV. Quite large cross sections, of the order of milibarns, for the triple-parton scattering mechanism are obtained. We suggest a measurement of three D0 or three D0 bar mesons by the LHCb Collaboration. Confronting our results with recent LHCb experimental data for single and double D0 (or D0 bar) meson production we present our predictions for triple meson final state: D0D0D0 or D0 bar D0 bar D0 bar . We present cross sections for the LHCb fiducial volume as well as distributions for D0 meson transverse momentum and three-D0 meson invariant mass. The predicted visible cross sections, including the detector acceptance, hadronization effects and c →D0 branching fraction, is of the order of a few nanobarns. The counting rates including D0 →K-π+ branching fractions are given for known or expected integrated luminosities.

  14. Medium Modifications of Hadron Properties and Partonic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, W. K.; Strauch, S.; Tsushima, K.

    2011-06-01

    Chiral symmetry is one of the most fundamental symmetries in QCD. It is closely connected to hadron properties in the nuclear medium via the reduction of the quark condensate , manifesting the partial restoration of chiral symmetry. To better understand this important issue, a number of Jefferson Lab experiments over the past decade have focused on understanding properties of mesons and nucleons in the nuclear medium, often benefiting from the high polarization and luminosity of the CEBAF accelerator. In particular, a novel, accurate, polarization transfer measurement technique revealed for the first time a strong indication that the bound proton electromagnetic form factors in 4He may be modified compared to those in the vacuum. Second, the photoproduction of vector mesons on various nuclei has been measured via their decay to e+e- to study possible in-medium effects on the properties of the rho meson. In this experiment, no significant mass shift and some broadening consistent with expected collisional broadening for the rho meson has been observed, providing tight constraints on model calculations. Finally, processes involving in-medium parton propagation have been studied. The medium modifications of the quark fragmentation functions have been extracted with much higher statistical accuracy than previously possible.

  15. Relation between nuclear and nucleon structure functions and their moments

    SciTech Connect

    Rinat, A.S.; Taragin, M.F.

    2006-04-15

    Calculations of nuclear structure functions (SFs) F{sub k=1,2}{sup A}(x,Q{sup 2}) routinely exploit a generalized convolution, involving the SFs for nucleons F{sub k}{sup N} and the linking SF f{sup PN,A} of a fictitious nucleus, composed of point particles, with the latter usually expressed in terms of hadronic degrees of freedom. For finite Q{sup 2} the approach seemed to be lacking a solid justification and the same is the case for recently proposed, effective nuclear parton distribution functions, which exactly reproduce the above-mentioned hadronically computed F{sub k}{sup A}. Many years ago Jaffe and West proved the above convolution in the plane-wave impulse approximation for the nuclear components in the convolution. We extend the above proof to include classes of nuclear final-state interactions. One and the same function appears to relate parton distribution functions in nuclei and nucleons and SFs for nuclear targets and for nucleons. That relation is the previously conjectured one, with an entirely different interpretation of f{sup PN,A}. We conclude with an extensive analysis of moments of nuclear SFs based on the generalized convolution. Characteristics of those moments are shown to be quite similar to those for a nucleon. We conclude that the above is evidence of asymptotic freedom of a nucleon in a medium and not the same for a composite nucleus.

  16. Distribution of mitochondrial DNA fragments in the nuclear genome of the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Du, W X; Qin, Y C

    2015-10-27

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (numts), which originated from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) insertions in the nuclear genome, have been detected in many species. The distribution of numts in the honeybee nuclear genome has not yet been fully reported. By referring to the whole honeybee mtDNA sequence and to the recent version of the honeybee nuclear genome, 236 reference sequences were identified by BLAST, with 90 unmapped. The size of the numts ranged from 219 to 3788 bp, and the homologous identity between numts and their corresponding mtDNA fragments varied from 71 to 93%. Furthermore, identified honeybee numts covered nearly all mitochondrial genes and were distributed over all chromosomes. This study provides useful information for further research related to mitochondrial genes and the evolution of the honeybee.

  17. Excited nucleon as a van der Waals system of partons

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkovszky, L. L.; Muskeyev, A. O. Yezhov, S. N.

    2012-06-15

    Saturation in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) and deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) is associated with a phase transition between the partonic gas, typical of moderate x and Q{sup 2}, and partonic fluid appearing at increasing Q{sup 2} and decreasing Bjorken x. We suggest the van der Waals equation of state to describe properly this phase transition.

  18. Temperature Distribution within a Cold Cap during Nuclear Waste Vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Derek R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.; Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2015-07-21

    The kinetics of the feed-to-glass conversion affects the waste vitrification rate in an electric melter. The primary area of interest in this conversion process is the cold cap, a layer of reacting feed on top of molten glass. Knowing the temperature profile within a cold cap will help determine its characteristics and relate them to the rate of glass production. The work presented here provides an experimental determination of the temperature distribution within the cold cap. Since a direct measurement of the temperature field within the cold cap is impracticable, an indirect method was developed where the textural features in a laboratory-made cold cap with a high-level waste feed were mapped as a function of position using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. To correlate the temperature distribution to microstructures within the cold cap, microstructures were identified of individual feed samples that were heat treated to set temperatures between 400°C and 1200°C and quenched. The temperature distribution within the cold cap was then established by correlating cold-cap regions with the feed samples of nearly identical structures and was compared with the temperature profile from a mathematical model.

  19. Temperature Distribution within a Cold Cap during Nuclear Waste Vitrification.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Derek R; Schweiger, Michael J; Riley, Brian J; Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel

    2015-07-21

    The kinetics of the feed-to-glass conversion affects the waste vitrification rate in an electric glass melter. The primary area of interest in this conversion process is the cold cap, a layer of reacting feed on top of the molten glass. The work presented here provides an experimental determination of the temperature distribution within the cold cap. Because direct measurement of the temperature field within the cold cap is impracticable, an indirect method was developed in which the textural features in a laboratory-made cold cap with a simulated high-level waste feed were mapped as a function of position using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The temperature distribution within the cold cap was established by correlating microstructures of cold-cap regions with heat-treated feed samples of nearly identical structures at known temperatures. This temperature profile was compared with a mathematically simulated profile generated by a cold-cap model that has been developed to assess the rate of glass production in a melter.

  20. PACIAE 2.1: An updated issue of the parton and hadron cascade model PACIAE 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Ben-Hao; Zhou, Dai-Mei; Yan, Yu-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Cai, Xu

    2013-05-01

    a given impact parameter possesses an almond-like spatial asymmetry. Because of the strong parton rescattering, the local thermal equilibrium and asymmetric pressure gradient may build up in this initial fireball. The asymmetric pressure gradient then drives a collective anisotropic expansion. The expansion along the almond minor axis (along the large pressure gradient) is faster than the one along the major axis. This results in a strong asymmetric transverse momentum azimuthal distribution and hence a large elliptic flow coefficient v2 of the final hadronic state. As mentioned in [6], PACIAE is a parton and hadron cascade model for the ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions and is based on PYTHIA [7]. In the PACIAE model, a nucleus-nucleus collision is decomposed into a sequence of nucleon-nucleon (NN) collisions according to the collision geometry and the NN total cross section. Each NN collision is performed, in turn, by the PYTHIA model with the string fragmentation switched-off temporarily and the diquark (anti-diquark) broken into quark pairs (anti-quark pairs) randomly. The parton rescattering then proceeds. This parton evolution stage is followed by the hadronization at the moment of partonic freeze-out (exhausting the partonic collisions). The Lund string fragmentation regime and/or phenomenological coalescence model is provided for the hadronization. Then the rescattering among produced hadrons is dealt with by the usual two body collision model [6]. In the PYTHIA model [7] once the transverse momentum pT of a final state hadron generated from the string fragmentation and/or the unstable particle decay is randomly sampled, the px and py components are randomly placed on the circle with radius of pT. This px and py determination may strongly cancel the final state transverse momentum anisotropy developed dynamically. The charged particle transverse sphericity [8-10] may reach to unity (isotropic). This is inconsistent with the experimental observation that

  1. Nesprins anchor kinesin-1 motors to the nucleus to drive nuclear distribution in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Meredith H; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2015-01-01

    During skeletal muscle development, nuclei move dynamically through myotubes in a microtubule-dependent manner, driven by the microtubule motor protein kinesin-1. Loss of kinesin-1 leads to improperly positioned nuclei in culture and in vivo. Two models have been proposed to explain how kinesin-1 functions to move nuclei in myotubes. In the cargo model, kinesin-1 acts directly from the surface of the nucleus, whereas in an alternative model, kinesin-1 moves nuclei indirectly by sliding anti-parallel microtubules. Here, we test the hypothesis that an ensemble of Kif5B motors acts from the nuclear envelope to distribute nuclei throughout the length of syncytial myotubes. First, using an inducible dimerization system, we show that controlled recruitment of truncated, constitutively active kinesin-1 motors to the nuclear envelope is sufficient to prevent the nuclear aggregation resulting from depletion of endogenous kinesin-1. Second, we identify a conserved kinesin light chain (KLC)-binding motif in the nuclear envelope proteins nesprin-1 and nesprin-2, and show that recruitment of the motor complex to the nucleus via this LEWD motif is essential for nuclear distribution. Together, our findings demonstrate that the nucleus is a kinesin-1 cargo in myotubes and that nesprins function as nuclear cargo adaptors. The importance of achieving and maintaining proper nuclear position is not restricted to muscle fibers, suggesting that the nesprin-dependent recruitment of kinesin-1 to the nuclear envelope through the interaction of a conserved LEWD motif with kinesin light chain might be a general mechanism for cell-type-specific nuclear positioning during development.

  2. Mass and charge distributions in chlorine-induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, A.A.

    1991-12-31

    Projectile-like fragments were detected and characterized in terms of A, Z, and energy for the reactions {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca and {sup 209}Bi at E/A = 7.3 MeV, and {sup 35}Cl, on {sup 209}Bi at E/A = 15 MeV, at angles close to the grazing angle. Mass and charge distributions were generated in the N-Z plane as a function of energy loss, and have been parameterized in terms of their centroids, variances, and coefficients of correlation. Due to experimental problems, the mass resolution corresponding to the {sup 31}Cl on {sup 209}Bi reaction was very poor. This prompted the study and application of a deconvolution technique for peak enhancement. The drifts of the charge and mass centroids for the system {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca are consistent with a process of mass and charge equilibration mediated by nucleon exchange between the two partners, followed by evaporation. The asymmetric systems show a strong drift towards larger asymmetry, with the production of neutron-rich nuclei. It was concluded that this is indicative of a net transfer of protons from the light to the heavy partner, and a net flow of neutrons in the opposite direction. The variances for all systems increase with energy loss, as it would be expected from a nucleon exchange mechanism; however, the variances for the reaction {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca are higher than those expected from that mechanism. The coefficients of correlation indicate that the transfer of nucleons between projectile and target is correlated. The results were compared to the predictions of two current models based on a stochastic nucleon exchange mechanism. In general, the comparisons between experimental and predicted variances support this mechanism; however, the need for more realistic driving forces in the model calculations is indicated by the disagreement between predicted and experimental centroids.

  3. Phenotype Clustering of Breast Epithelial Cells in Confocal Imagesbased on Nuclear Protein Distribution Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Fuhui; Peng, Hanchuan; Sudar, Damir; Levievre, Sophie A.; Knowles, David W.

    2006-09-05

    Background: The distribution of the chromatin-associatedproteins plays a key role in directing nuclear function. Previously, wedeveloped an image-based method to quantify the nuclear distributions ofproteins and showed that these distributions depended on the phenotype ofhuman mammary epithelial cells. Here we describe a method that creates ahierarchical tree of the given cell phenotypes and calculates thestatistical significance between them, based on the clustering analysisof nuclear protein distributions. Results: Nuclear distributions ofnuclear mitotic apparatus protein were previously obtained fornon-neoplastic S1 and malignant T4-2 human mammary epithelial cellscultured for up to 12 days. Cell phenotype was defined as S1 or T4-2 andthe number of days in cultured. A probabilistic ensemble approach wasused to define a set of consensus clusters from the results of multipletraditional cluster analysis techniques applied to the nucleardistribution data. Cluster histograms were constructed to show how cellsin any one phenotype were distributed across the consensus clusters.Grouping various phenotypes allowed us to build phenotype trees andcalculate the statistical difference between each group. The resultsshowed that non-neoplastic S1 cells could be distinguished from malignantT4-2 cells with 94.19 percent accuracy; that proliferating S1 cells couldbe distinguished from differentiated S1 cells with 92.86 percentaccuracy; and showed no significant difference between the variousphenotypes of T4-2 cells corresponding to increasing tumor sizes.Conclusion: This work presents a cluster analysis method that canidentify significant cell phenotypes, based on the nuclear distributionof specific proteins, with high accuracy.

  4. Effect of realistic nuclear charge distributions on isotope shifts and progress towards the extraction of higher-order nuclear radial moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoulia, A.; Carlsson, B. G.; Ekman, J.

    2016-10-01

    Atomic spectral lines from different isotopes display a small shift in energy, commonly referred to as the line isotope shift. One of the components of the isotope shift is the field shift, which depends on the extent and the shape of the nuclear charge density distribution. The purpose of this work is to investigate how sensitive field shifts are with respect to variations in the nuclear size and shape and what information of nuclear charge distributions can be extracted from measurements. Nuclear properties are obtained from nuclear density functional theory calculations based on the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach. These results are combined with multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock methods to obtain realistic field shifts and it is seen that phenomena such as nuclear deformation and variations in the diffuseness of nuclear charge distributions give measurable contributions to the isotope shifts. Using a different approach, we demonstrate the possibility to extract information concerning the nuclear charge densities from the observed field shifts. We deduce that combining methods used in atomic and nuclear structure theory gives an improved description of field shifts and that extracting additional nuclear information from measured isotope shifts is possible in the near future with improved experimental methods.

  5. Hydration status affects nuclear distribution of transcription factor tonicity responsive enhancer binding protein in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Cha, J H; Woo, S K; Han, K H; Kim, Y H; Handler, J S; Kim, J; Kwon, H M

    2001-11-01

    Tonicity responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is the transcription factor that regulates tonicity responsive expression of proteins that catalyze cellular accumulation of compatible osmolytes. In cultured MDCK cells, hypertonicity stimulates the activity of TonEBP via a combination of increased protein abundance and increased nuclear localization. For investigating regulation of TonEBP in the kidney, rats were subjected to water loading or dehydration. Water loading lowered urine osmolality and mRNA expression of sodium/myo-inositol cotransporter (SMIT), a target gene of TonEBP, in the renal medulla; dehydration doubled the urine osmolality and increased SMIT mRNA expression. In contrast, overall abundance of TonEBP and its mRNA measured by immunoblot and ribonuclease protection assay, respectively, was not affected. Immunohistochemical analysis, however, revealed that nuclear distribution of TonEBP is generally increased throughout the medulla in dehydrated animals compared with water loaded animals. Increased nuclear localization was particularly dramatic in thin limbs. Notable exceptions were the middle to terminal portions of the inner medullary collecting ducts and blood vessels, where a change in TonEBP distribution was not evident. Immunohistochemical detection of SMIT mRNA revealed that the changes in nuclear distribution of TonEBP correlate with expression of SMIT. It is concluded that under physiologic conditions, nucleocytoplasmic distribution is the dominant mode of regulation of TonEBP in the renal medulla.

  6. Double parton scattering in pair production of J /ψ mesons at the LHC revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borschensky, Christoph; Kulesza, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Double parton scattering (DPS) is studied for the example of J /ψ pair production in the LHCb and ATLAS experiments of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at center-of-mass energies of √{S }=7 , 8, and 13 TeV. We report theoretical predictions delivered to the LHCb and ATLAS Collaborations adjusted for the fiducial volumes of the corresponding measurements during run I, and we provide new predictions at 13 TeV collision energy. It is shown that DPS can lead to noticeable contributions in the distributions of longitudinal variables of the di-J /ψ system, especially at 13 TeV. The increased DPS rate in double J /ψ production at high energies will open up more possibilities for the separation of single parton scattering and DPS contributions in future studies.

  7. Method of and apparatus for measuring the power distribution in nuclear reactor cores

    SciTech Connect

    Leyse, R.H.

    1983-07-12

    The invention disclosed is the method of exact calibration of gamma ray detectors called gamma thermometers prior to acceptance for installation into a nuclear reactor core. This exact calibration increases the accuracy of determining the power distribution in the nuclear reactor core. The calibration by electric resistance heating of the gamma thermometer consists of applying an electric current along the controlled heat path of the gamma thermometer and then measuring the temperature difference along this controlled heat path as a function of the amount of power generated by the electric resistance heating. Then, after the gamma thermometer is installed into the nuclear reactor core and the reactor core is operating at power producing conditions, the gamma ray heating of the detector produces a temperature difference along the controlled heat path. With the knowledge of this temperature difference, the calibration characteristic determined by the prior electric resistance heating is employed to accurately determine the local rate of gamma ray heating. The accurate measurement of the gamma heating rate at each location of a set of locations throughout the nuclear reactor core is the basis for accurately determining the power distribution within the nuclear reactor core.

  8. Distribution functions in plasmas generated by a volume source of fission fragments. [in nuclear pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deese, J. E.; Hassan, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The role played by fission fragments and electron distribution functions in nuclear pumped lasers is considered and procedures for their calculations are outlined. The calculations are illustrated for a He-3/Xe mixture where fission is provided by the He-3(n,p)H-3 reaction. Because the dominant ion in the system depends on the Xe fraction, the distribution functions cannot be determined without the simultaneous consideration of a detailed kinetic model. As is the case for wall sources of fission fragments, the resulting plasmas are essentially thermal but the electron distribution functions are non-Maxwellian.

  9. Nuclear proton and neutron distributions in the detection of weak interacting massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Co', G.; Donno, V. De; Anguiano, M.; Lallena, A.M. E-mail: viviana.de.donno@le.infn.it E-mail: lallena@ugr.es

    2012-11-01

    In the evaluation of weak interacting massive particles (WIMPs) detection rates, the WIMP-nucleus cross section is commonly described by using form factors extracted from charge distributions. In this work, we use different proton and neutron distributions taken from Hartree-Fock calculations. We study the effects of this choice on the total detection rates for six nuclei having different neutron excess, and taken from different regions of the nuclear chart. The use of different distributions for protons and neutrons becomes more important if isospin-dependent WIMP-nucleon interactions are considered. The need for distinct descriptions of proton and neutron densities decreases with the lowering of detection energy thresholds.

  10. Neutron Distribution in the Nuclear Fuel Cell using Collision Probability Method with Quadratic Flux Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafii, M. A.; Fitriyani, D.; Tongkukut, S. H. J.; Abdullah, A. G.

    2017-03-01

    To solve the integral neutron transport equation using collision probability (CP) method usually requires flat flux (FF) approach. In this research, it has been carried out in the cylindrical nuclear fuel cell with the spatial of mesh with quadratic flux approach. This means that the neutron flux at any region of the nuclear fuel cell is forced to follow the pattern of a quadratic function. The mechanism may be referred to as the process of non-flat flux (NFF) approach. The parameters that calculated in this study are the k-eff and the distribution of neutron flux. The result shows that all parameters are in accordance with the result of SRAC.

  11. Reweighting QCD matrix-element and parton-shower calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothmann, Enrico; Schönherr, Marek; Schumann, Steffen

    2016-11-01

    We present the implementation and validation of the techniques used to efficiently evaluate parametric and perturbative theoretical uncertainties in matrix-element plus parton-shower simulations within the Sherpa event-generator framework. By tracing the full α _s and PDF dependences, including the parton-shower component, as well as the fixed-order scale uncertainties, we compute variational event weights on-the-fly, thereby greatly reducing the computational costs to obtain theoretical-uncertainty estimates.

  12. Leading twist nuclear shadowing phenomena in hard processes with nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    L. Franfurt; Guzey, V.; Strikman, M.

    2012-01-08

    We present and discuss the theory and phenomenology of the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing which is based on the combination of the generalization of Gribov-Glauber theory, QCD factorization theorems, and HERA QCD analysis of diffraction in lepton-proton deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We apply this technique for the analysis of a wide range of hard processes with nuclei-inclusive DIS on deuterons, medium-range and heavy nuclei, coherent and incoherent diffractive DIS with nuclei, and hard diffraction in proton-nucleus scattering - and make predictions for the effect of nuclear shadowing in the corresponding sea quark and gluon parton distributions. We alsomore » analyze the role of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in generalized parton distributions in nuclei and certain characteristics of final states in nuclear DIS. We discuss the limits of applicability of the leading twist approximation for small x scattering off nuclei and the onset of the black disk regime and methods of detecting it. It will be possible to check many of our predictions in the near future in the studies of the ultraperipheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Further checks will be possible in pA collisions at the LHC and forward hadron production at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). As a result, detailed tests will be possible at an Electon-Ion Collider (EIC) in USA and at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) at CERN.« less

  13. Leading twist nuclear shadowing phenomena in hard processes with nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    L. Franfurt; Guzey, V.; Strikman, M.

    2012-01-08

    We present and discuss the theory and phenomenology of the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing which is based on the combination of the generalization of Gribov-Glauber theory, QCD factorization theorems, and HERA QCD analysis of diffraction in lepton-proton deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We apply this technique for the analysis of a wide range of hard processes with nuclei-inclusive DIS on deuterons, medium-range and heavy nuclei, coherent and incoherent diffractive DIS with nuclei, and hard diffraction in proton-nucleus scattering - and make predictions for the effect of nuclear shadowing in the corresponding sea quark and gluon parton distributions. We also analyze the role of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in generalized parton distributions in nuclei and certain characteristics of final states in nuclear DIS. We discuss the limits of applicability of the leading twist approximation for small x scattering off nuclei and the onset of the black disk regime and methods of detecting it. It will be possible to check many of our predictions in the near future in the studies of the ultraperipheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Further checks will be possible in pA collisions at the LHC and forward hadron production at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). As a result, detailed tests will be possible at an Electon-Ion Collider (EIC) in USA and at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) at CERN.

  14. Narrowing of the Overhauser field distribution by feedback-enhanced dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenberg, S.; McNeil, R. P. G.; Rubbert, S.; Bluhm, H.

    2015-11-01

    In many electron spin qubit systems coherent control is impaired by the fluctuating nuclear spin bath of the host material. Previous experiments have shown dynamic nuclear polarization with feedback to significantly prolong the inhomogeneous dephasing time T2* by narrowing the distribution of nuclear Overhauser field fluctuations. We present a model relating the achievable narrowing of the Overhauser field to both the pump rate and the noise magnitude and find reasonable agreement with experimental data. It shows that former experiments on gated GaAs quantum dots were limited by the pump rate of the pumping mechanism used. Here we propose an alternative feedback scheme using electron dipole spin resonance. Sequentially applying two ac electric fields with frequencies slightly detuned from the desired Larmor frequency results in a pump curve with a stable fixed point. Our model predicts that T2* values on the order of microseconds can be achieved.

  15. Nuclear contour irregularity and abnormal transporter protein distribution in anterior horn cells in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yoshimi; Ito, Hidefumi; Hirano, Asao; Fujita, Kengo; Wate, Reika; Nakamura, Masataka; Kaneko, Satoshi; Nakano, Satoshi; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2009-11-01

    The nucleocytoplasmic transport system is essential for maintaining cell viability; transport of proteins and nucleic acids between the nucleus and the cytoplasm occurs through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). In this study, we examined the immunohistochemical distribution of the major protein components of NPCs, Nup62, Nup88, and Nup153, in spinal cords from controls and patients with sporadic or familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS or FALS) and its mouse model. In control subjects, immunolabeling on the nuclear envelopes of anterior horn cells (AHCs) was invariably smooth and continuous, whereas in SALS and FALS patients, the AHCs predominantly showed irregular nuclear contours. Double immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that in SALS patients, importin-beta immunoreactivity was absent in the nuclei in a subset of AHCs; in these cells, Nup62 immunolabeling of nuclear membrane was invariably irregular, suggesting that there was dysfunctional nucleocytoplasmic transport in those AHCs. In the mouse model, Nup62-immunolabeled AHCs with irregular nuclear contours were predominant as early as the presymptomatic stage and the contours became progressively discontinuous along with disease development. Together, these observations suggest that dysfunctional nucleocytoplasmic transport may underlie the pathogenesis of ALS.

  16. Assessment of individual radionuclide distributions from the Fukushima nuclear accident covering central-east Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Norikazu; Sueki, Keisuke; Sasa, Kimikazu; Kitagawa, Jun-ichi; Ikarashi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Tomohiro; Wong, Ying-Shee; Satou, Yukihiko; Handa, Koji; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Sato, Masanori; Yamagata, Takeyasu

    2011-01-01

    A tremendous amount of radioactivity was discharged because of the damage to cooling systems of nuclear reactors in the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant in March 2011. Fukushima and its adjacent prefectures were contaminated with fission products from the accident. Here, we show a geographical distribution of radioactive iodine, tellurium, and cesium in the surface soils of central-east Japan as determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. Especially in Fukushima prefecture, contaminated area spreads around Iitate and Naka-Dori for all the radionuclides we measured. Distributions of the radionuclides were affected by the physical state of each nuclide as well as geographical features. Considering meteorological conditions, it is concluded that the radioactive material transported on March 15 was the major contributor to contamination in Fukushima prefecture, whereas the radioactive material transported on March 21 was the major source in Ibaraki, Tochigi, Saitama, and Chiba prefectures and in Tokyo. PMID:22084070

  17. Thermionic nuclear reactor with internal heat distribution and multiple duct cooling

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, C.R.; Perry, L.W. Jr.

    1975-11-01

    A Thermionic Nuclear Reactor is described having multiple ribbon-like coolant ducts passing through the core, intertwined among the thermionic fuel elements to provide independent cooling paths. Heat pipes are disposed in the core between and adjacent to the thermionic fuel elements and the ribbon ducting, for the purpose of more uniformly distributing the heat of fission among the thermionic fuel elements and the ducts.

  18. Results on the neutron energy distribution measurements at the RECH-1 Chilean nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, P.; Molina, F.; Romero-Barrientos, J.

    2016-07-01

    Neutron activations experiments has been perform at the RECH-1 Chilean Nuclear Reactor to measure its neutron flux energy distribution. Samples of pure elements was activated to obtain the saturation activities for each reaction. Using - ray spectroscopy we identify and measure the activity of the reaction product nuclei, obtaining the saturation activities of 20 reactions. GEANT4 and MCNP was used to compute the self shielding factor to correct the cross section for each element. With the Expectation-Maximization algorithm (EM) we were able to unfold the neutron flux energy distribution at dry tube position, near the RECH-1 core. In this work, we present the unfolding results using the EM algorithm.

  19. Results on the neutron energy distribution measurements at the RECH-1 Chilean nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, P. Romero-Barrientos, J.; Molina, F.

    2016-07-07

    Neutron activations experiments has been perform at the RECH-1 Chilean Nuclear Reactor to measure its neutron flux energy distribution. Samples of pure elements was activated to obtain the saturation activities for each reaction. Using - ray spectroscopy we identify and measure the activity of the reaction product nuclei, obtaining the saturation activities of 20 reactions. GEANT4 and MCNP was used to compute the self shielding factor to correct the cross section for each element. With the Expectation-Maximization algorithm (EM) we were able to unfold the neutron flux energy distribution at dry tube position, near the RECH-1 core. In this work, we present the unfolding results using the EM algorithm.

  20. Correlated electron-nuclear kinetic energy distribution following strong-field ionization of H2^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, C. B.; Anis, F.; Madsen, L. B.; Esry, B. D.

    2010-03-01

    Being the simplest molecule, understanding the behavior of H2^+ in a strong laser field helps to understand more complex molecules. Theoretically, however, it is challenging to account for both electronic and nuclear motion in the ionization of even this simple molecule. Accordingly, calculating correlated electron-nuclear physical observables --- such as energy or momentum distributions --- has rarely been accomplished. Such calculations are needed to interpret recent measurements of coincidence momentum distributions of electrons and ions following the ionization of molecules by short intense laser pulses. We study how the energy absorbed from an intense laser pulse (400--800 nm, ˜10^14 W/cm^2, >=10 cycles) is shared among the nuclei and the electron of H2^+ by calculating the 2D electron-nuclei momentum distribution for a 1D model with soft-core Coulomb interactions. These 2D momentum plots reveal multiphoton structure with the energy shared between the nuclei and electron. This structure survives integrating out the nuclear energy, but not integrating out the electronic energy. ^*Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. DoE.

  1. Transformation of correlation coefficients between normal and lognormal distribution and implications for nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Trkov, Andrej; Smith, Donald L.; Capote, Roberto

    2013-11-01

    Inherently positive parameters with large relative uncertainties (typically ≳30%) are often considered to be governed by the lognormal distribution. This assumption has the practical benefit of avoiding the possibility of sampling negative values in stochastic applications. Furthermore, it is typically assumed that the correlation coefficients for comparable multivariate normal and lognormal distributions are equivalent. However, this ideal situation is approached only in the linear approximation which happens to be applicable just for small uncertainties. This paper derives and discusses the proper transformation of correlation coefficients between both distributions for the most general case which is applicable for arbitrary uncertainties. It is seen that for lognormal distributions with large relative uncertainties strong anti-correlations (negative correlations) are mathematically forbidden. This is due to the asymmetry that is an inherent feature of these distributions. Some implications of these results for practical nuclear applications are discussed and they are illustrated with examples in this paper. Finally, modifications to the ENDF-6 format used for representing uncertainties in evaluated nuclear data libraries are suggested, as needed to deal with this issue.

  2. Aberrant distributions of nuclear pore complex proteins in ALS mice and ALS patients.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jingwei; Yamashita, Toru; Nakano, Yumiko; Morihara, Ryuta; Li, Xianghong; Feng, Tian; Liu, Xia; Huang, Yong; Fukui, Yusuke; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Abe, Koji

    2017-03-24

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) play important roles in traffic of molecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm, aberrant distributions of components of NPCs were demonstrated in C9orf72 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (C9-ALS) patients, but it is elusive whether such abnormities are also the case with other cause of ALS disease. In the present study, we investigated the spatiotemporal distributions of RanGAP1 and 4 representative nucleoporins (GP210, NUP205, NUP107 and NUP50) of NPCs in human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase-1 mutation transgenic (SOD1-Tg) mice and sporadic ALS patients. Compared with wild type (WT), these proteins displayed age-dependent and progressive nuclear precipitations, and cytoplasmic aberrant expressions in motor neurons of lumbar cord in SOD1-Tg mice from 10 to 18weeks (W). Double immunofluorescent analysis showed abnormal nuclear retention and apparent co-localizations of RanGAPl with NUP205 and NUP205 with NUPl07, meanwhile, GP210 with NUP205 mainly co-localized in the nuclear envelope (NE) of motor neurons. Furthermore, RanGAP1, GP210 and NUP50 showed similarly abnormal nuclear precipitations and cytoplasmic upregulations in SOD1-Tg mice and ALS patients, moreover, aberrant co-localizations of RanGAP1 with TDP-43 and NUP205 with TDP-43 were also observed in motor neurons. The present study indicated that the mislocalization of these proteins of NPCs may underlie the pathogenesis of ALS both in SOD1-Tg mice and human sporadic ALS patients, and these dysfunctions may be a fundamental pathway for ALS that is not specific only in C9-ALS but also in SOD1-ALS, which may be amenable to pharmacotherapeutic intervention.

  3. RELIABILITY ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRICAL POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM TO SELECTED PORTIONS OF THE NUCLEAR HVAC SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    N. Ramirez

    2004-12-16

    A design requirement probability of 0.01 or less in a 4-hour period ensures that the nuclear heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system in the primary confinement areas of the Dry Transfer Facilities (DTFs) and Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) is working during a Category 1 drop event involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) assemblies (BSC 2004a , Section 5.1.1.48). This corresponds to an hourly HVAC failure rate of 2.5E-3 per hour or less, which is contributed to by two dominant causes: equipment failure and loss of electrical power. Meeting this minimum threshold ensures that a Category 1 initiating event followed by the failure of HVAC is a Category 2 event sequence. The two causes for the loss of electrical power include the loss of offsite power and the loss of onsite power distribution. Thus, in order to meet the threshold requirement aforementioned, the failure rate of mechanical equipment, loss of offsite power, and loss of onsite power distribution must be less than or equal to 2.5E-3 per hour for the nuclear HVAC system in the primary confinement areas of the DTFs and FHF. The loss of offsite power occurs at a frequency of 1.1E-5 per hour (BSC 2004a, Section 5.1.1.48). The purpose of this analysis is to determine the probability of occurrence of the unavailability of the nuclear HVAC system in the primary confinement areas of the DTFs and FHF due to loss of electrical power. In addition, this analysis provides insights on the contribution to the unavailability of the HVAC system due to equipment failure. The scope of this analysis is limited to finding the frequency of loss of electrical power to the nuclear HVAC system in the primary confinement areas of the DTFs and FHF.

  4. Determination of Membrane Protein Distribution on the Nuclear Envelope by Single-Point Single-Molecule FRAP.

    PubMed

    Mudumbi, Krishna C; Yang, Weidong

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) are synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum and then transported from the outer nuclear membrane (ONM) to the inner nuclear membrane (INM) in eukaryotic cells. The abnormal distribution of NETs has been associated with many human diseases. However, quantitative determination of the spatial distribution and translocation dynamics of NETs on the ONM and INM is still very limited in currently existing approaches. Here we demonstrate a single-point single-molecule fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) microscopy technique that enables quick determination of distribution and translocation rates for NETs in vivo. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Distribution of nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes in three pollinator fig wasps associated with Ficus pumila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Liu, Min; Compton, Stephen G.; Chen, Xiao-Yong

    2014-05-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (NUMTs) are nuclear sequences transferred from mitochondrial genomes. Although widespread, their distribution patterns among populations or closely related species are rarely documented. We amplified and sequenced the mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cytb) gene to check for NUMTs in three fig wasp species that pollinate Ficus pumila (Wiebesia sp. 1, 2 and 3) in Southeastern China using direct and cloned sequencing. Unambiguous sequences (332) of 487 bp in length belonging to 33 haplotypes were found by direct sequencing. Their distribution was highly concordant with those of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI). Obvious signs of co-amplification of NUMTs were indicated by their uneven distribution. NUMTs were observed in all individuals of 12 populations of Wiebesia sp. 3, and 13 individuals of three northern populations of Wiebesia sp. 1. Sequencing clones of potential co-amplification products confirmed that they were NUMTs. These NUMTs either clustered as NUMT clades basal to mtDNA Cytb clades (basal NUMTs), or together with Cytb haplotypes. Basal NUMTs had either stop codons or frame-shifting mutations resulting from deletion of a 106 bp fragment. In addition, no third codon or synonymous substitutions were detected within each NUMT clade. The phylogenetic tree indicated that basal NUMTs had been inserted into nuclei before divergence of the three species. No significant pairwise differences were detected in their ratios of third codon substitutions, suggesting that these NUMTs originated from one transfer event, with duplication in the nuclear genome resulting in the coexistence of the 381 bp copy. No significant substitution differences were detected between Cytb haplotypes and NUMTs that clustered with Cytb haplotypes. However, these NUMTs coexisted with Cytb haplotypes in multiple populations, suggesting that these NUMT haplotypes were recently inserted into the nuclear genome. Both basal and recently inserted NUMTs were rare

  6. In silico analyses of dystrophin Dp40 cellular distribution, nuclear export signals and structure modeling

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Herrera, Alejandro; Aragón, Jorge; Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa Ma.; Bazán, Ma. Luisa; Soid-Raggi, Gabriela; Ceja, Víctor; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, Andrea; Alemán, Víctor; Depardón, Francisco; Montañez, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Dystrophin Dp40 is the shortest protein encoded by the DMD (Duchenne muscular dystrophy) gene. This protein is unique since it lacks the C-terminal end of dystrophins. In this data article, we describe the subcellular localization, nuclear export signals and the three-dimensional structure modeling of putative Dp40 proteins using bioinformatics tools. The Dp40 wild type protein was predicted as a cytoplasmic protein while the Dp40n4 was predicted to be nuclear. Changes L93P and L170P are involved in the nuclear localization of Dp40n4 protein. A close analysis of Dp40 protein scored that amino acids 93LEQEHNNLV101 and 168LLLHDSIQI176 could function as NES sequences and the scores are lost in Dp40n4. In addition, the changes L93/170P modify the tertiary structure of putative Dp40 mutants. The analysis showed that changes of residues 93 and 170 from leucine to proline allow the nuclear localization of Dp40 proteins. The data described here are related to the research article entitled “EF-hand domains are involved in the differential cellular distribution of dystrophin Dp40” (J. Aragón et al. Neurosci. Lett. 600 (2015) 115–120) [1]. PMID:26217814

  7. Diphoton production at the Tevatron and the LHC in the NLO approximation of the parton Reggeization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedov, M. A.; Saleev, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The hadroproduction of prompt isolated photon pairs at high energies is studied in the framework of the parton Reggeization approach. The real part of the NLO corrections is computed (the NLO⋆ approximation), and the procedure for the subtraction of double counting between real parton emissions in the hard-scattering matrix element and unintegrated parton distribution function is constructed for the amplitudes with Reggeized quarks in the initial state. The matrix element of the important next-to-next-to-leading-order subprocess R R →γ γ with full dependence on the transverse momenta of the initial-state Reggeized gluons is obtained. We compare obtained numerical results with diphoton spectra measured at the Tevatron and the LHC and find a good agreement of our predictions with experimental data at the high values of diphoton transverse momentum, pT, and especially at the pT larger than the diphoton invariant mass, M . In this multi-Regge kinematics region, the NLO correction is strongly suppressed, demonstrating the self-consistency of the parton Reggeization approach.

  8. Evaluation of population density and distribution criteria in nuclear power plant siting

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.

    1994-06-01

    The NRC has proposed revisions to 10 CFR 100 which include the codification of nuclear reactor site population density limits to 500 people per square mile, at the siting stage, averaged over any radial distance out to 30 miles, and 1,000 people per square mile within the 40-year lifetime of a nuclear plant. This study examined whether there are less restrictive alternative population density and/or distribution criteria which would provide equivalent or better protection to human health in the unlikely event of a nuclear accident. This study did not attempt to directly address the issue of actual population density limits because there are no US risk standards established for the evaluation of population density limits. Calculations were performed using source terms for both a current generation light water reactor (LWR) and an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) design. The results of this study suggest that measures which address the distribution of the population density, including emergency response conditions, could result in lower average individual risks to the public than the proposed guidelines that require controlling average population density. Studies also indicate that an exclusion zone size, determined by emergency response conditions and reactor design (power level and safety features), would better serve to protect public health than a rigid standard applied to all sites.

  9. VBFNLO: A parton level Monte Carlo for processes with electroweak bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, K.; Bähr, M.; Bozzi, G.; Campanario, F.; Englert, C.; Figy, T.; Greiner, N.; Hackstein, C.; Hankele, V.; Jäger, B.; Klämke, G.; Kubocz, M.; Oleari, C.; Plätzer, S.; Prestel, S.; Worek, M.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2009-09-01

    VBFNLO is a fully flexible parton level Monte Carlo program for the simulation of vector boson fusion, double and triple vector boson production in hadronic collisions at next-to-leading order in the strong coupling constant. VBFNLO includes Higgs and vector boson decays with full spin correlations and all off-shell effects. In addition, VBFNLO implements CP-even and CP-odd Higgs boson via gluon fusion, associated with two jets, at the leading-order one-loop level with the full top- and bottom-quark mass dependence in a generic two-Higgs-doublet model. A variety of effects arising from beyond the Standard Model physics are implemented for selected processes. This includes anomalous couplings of Higgs and vector bosons and a Warped Higgsless extra dimension model. The program offers the possibility to generate Les Houches Accord event files for all processes available at leading order. Program summaryProgram title:VBFNLO Catalogue identifier: AEDO_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDO_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPL version 2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 339 218 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 620 847 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran, parts in C++ Computer: All Operating system: Linux, should also work on other systems Classification: 11.1, 11.2 External routines: Optionally Les Houches Accord PDF Interface library and the GNU Scientific library Nature of problem: To resolve the large scale dependence inherent in leading order calculations and to quantify the cross section error induced by uncertainties in the determination of parton distribution functions, it is necessary to include NLO corrections. Moreover, whenever stringent cuts are required on decay products and/or identified jets the question arises whether the scale dependence and a k-factor, defined

  10. Parton distributions with the combined HERA charm production cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, Valerio; Rojo, Juan

    2013-04-15

    Heavy quark structure functions from HERA provide a direct handle on the medium and small-x gluon PDF. In this contribution, we discuss ongoing progress on the implementation of the FONLL General-Mass scheme with running heavy quark masses, and of its benchmarking with the HOPPET and OpenQCDrad codes, and then present the impact of the recently released combined HERA charm production cross sections in the NNPDF 2.3 analysis. We find that the combined charm data contribute to constraining the gluon and quarks at small values of Bjorken-x.

  11. Pion Parton Distribution Function from DSE-QCD Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khitrin, Konstantin; Cobos-Martinez, Javier; Roberts, Craig; Tandy, Peter

    2012-10-01

    We obtain the valence quark PDF of the pion from a direct formulation of the moments within a Euclidean-formated modeling of QCD. There are no limitations on the number of moments that can be obtained. This approach employs the ladder-rainbow (LR) truncation of the Dyson-Schwinger equation (DSE) formulation of QCD and eliminates an obstacle that hinders a direct approach to the PDF. Bethe-Salpeter wavefunctions and dressed quark propagators from previous extensive DSE-LR work are recast in a form that allows exact Feynman integral techniques. Performance of this approach will be assessed through results for the reconstructed PDF, and considerations of the momentum sum rule.

  12. Accuracy of Determination of the Parameters of Exotic Nuclei Nuclear Density Distributions in the Glauber Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueter, Keiti; Novikov, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Parameters of a nuclear density distribution for an exotic nuclei with halo or skin structures can be determined from the experimentally measure interaction cross-section. In the presented work, to extract parameters for a halo and core, we compare experimental data on interaction cross section with reaction cross-sections calculated using expressions obtained in the Glauber Model and its optical approximation. These calculations are performed using Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. In addition, we discuss the accuracy of the Monte Carlo approach to calculating the interaction and reaction cross-sections. The dependence of the accuracy of the density parameters of various exotic nuclei on the ``quality'' of the random numbers chains (here, ``quality'' is defined by lag-1 autocorrelation time of a sequence of random numbers) is obtained for the Gaussian density distribution for a core and the Gaussian density distribution for a halo. KY NSF EPSCoR Research Scholars Program.

  13. Analysis of Nuclear Mitochondrial DNA Segments of Nine Plant Species: Size, Distribution, and Insertion Loci

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial DNA segment (Numt) insertion describes a well-known phenomenon of mitochondrial DNA transfer into a eukaryotic nuclear genome. However, it has not been well understood, especially in plants. Numt insertion patterns vary from species to species in different kingdoms. In this study, the patterns were surveyed in nine plant species, and we found some tip-offs. First, when the mitochondrial genome size is relatively large, the portion of the longer Numt is also larger than the short one. Second, the whole genome duplication event increases the ratio of the shorter Numt portion in the size distribution. Third, Numt insertions are enriched in exon regions. This analysis may be helpful for understanding plant evolution. PMID:27729838

  14. Polarized 3 parton production in inclusive DIS at small x

    DOE PAGES

    Ayala, Alejandro; Hentschinski, Martin; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; ...

    2016-08-18

    Azimuthal angular correlations between produced hadrons/jets in high energy collisions are a sensitive probe of the dynamics of QCD at small x. Here we derive the triple differential cross section for inclusive production of 3 polarized partons in DIS at small x using the spinor helicity formalism. The target proton or nucleus is described using the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) formalism. The resulting expressions are used to study azimuthal angular correlations between produced partons in order to probe the gluon structure of the target hadron or nucleus. Finally, our analytic expressions can also be used to calculate the real partmore » of the Next to Leading Order (NLO) corrections to di-hadron production in DIS by integrating out one of the three final state partons.« less

  15. Systematic improvement of parton showers with effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart, Matthew; Marcantonini, Claudio; Stewart, Iain W.

    2011-02-01

    We carry out a systematic classification and computation of next-to-leading order kinematic power corrections to the fully differential cross section in the parton shower. To do this we devise a map between ingredients in a parton shower and operators in a traditional effective field theory framework using a chain of soft-collinear effective theories. Our approach overcomes several difficulties including avoiding double counting and distinguishing approximations that are coordinate choices from true power corrections. Branching corrections can be classified as hard-scattering, that occur near the top of the shower, and jet-structure, that can occur at any point inside it. Hard-scattering corrections include matrix elements with additional hard partons, as well as power suppressed contributions to the branching for the leading jet. Jet-structure corrections require simultaneous consideration of potential 1{yields}2 and 1{yields}3 branchings. The interference structure induced by collinear terms with subleading powers remains localized in the shower.

  16. Nuclear effects in neutrino production of pions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Iván; Siddikov, M.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we study nuclear effects in the neutrino production of pions. We found that in a Bjorken kinematics, for moderate xB accessible in ongoing and forthcoming neutrino experiments, the cross section is dominated by the incoherent contribution; the coherent contribution becomes visible only for small |t |≲1 /RA2, which requires xB≲0.1 . Our results could be relevant to the kinematics of the ongoing MINERvA experiment in the middle-energy regime. We provide a code which could be used for the evaluation of the neutrino induced deeply virtual meson production observables using different parametrizations of generalized parton distributions and different models of nuclear structure.

  17. Higgs characterisation via vector-boson fusion and associated production: NLO and parton-shower effects.

    PubMed

    Maltoni, Fabio; Mawatari, Kentarou; Zaro, Marco

    Vector-boson fusion and associated production at the LHC can provide key information on the strength and structure of the Higgs couplings to the Standard Model particles. Using an effective field theory approach, we study the effects of next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections matched to a parton shower on selected observables for various spin-0 hypotheses. We find that inclusion of NLO corrections is needed to reduce the theoretical uncertainties on the total rates as well as to reliably predict the shapes of the distributions. Our results are obtained in a fully automatic way via FeynRules and MadGraph5_aMC@NLO.

  18. Justifying the naive partonic sum rule for proton spin

    DOE PAGES

    Ji, Xiangdong; Zhang, Jian-Hui; Zhao, Yong

    2015-04-01

    We provide a theoretical basis for understanding the spin structure of the proton in terms of the spin and orbital angular momenta of free quarks and gluons in Feynman’s parton picture. We show that each term in the Jaffe–Manohar spin sum rule can be related to the matrix element of a gauge-invariant, but frame-dependent operator through a matching formula in large-momentum effective field theory. We present all the matching conditions for the spin content at one-loop order in perturbation theory, which provide a basis to calculate parton orbital angular momentum in lattice QCD at leading logarithmic accuracy.

  19. Double Parton Interactions in pp and pA Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treleani, Daniele; Calucci, Giorgio; Salvini, Simona

    2016-11-01

    As a consequence of the increasingly large flux of partons at small x, Double Parton Interactions (DPI) play an increasingly important role at high energies. A detail understanding of DPI dynamics is therefore mandatory, for a reliable subtraction of the background in the search of new physics. On the other hand, DPI are an interesting topic of research by themselves, as DPI probe the hadron structure in a rather different way, as compared with the large pt processes usually considered. In this note we will make a short illustration of some of the main features characterizing DPI in pp and in pA collisions.

  20. Interference effect in elastic parton energy loss in a finitemedium

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-04-18

    Similar to the radiative parton energy loss due to gluonbremsstrahlung, elastic energy loss of a parton undergoing multiplescattering in a finite medium is demonstrated to be sensitive tointerference effect. The interference between amplitudes of elasticscattering via a gluon exchange and that of gluon radiation reduces theeffective elastic energy loss in a finite medium and gives rise to anon-trivial length dependence. The reduction is most significant for apropagation length L<4/\\pi T in a medium with a temperature T. Thoughthe finite size effect is not significant for the average partonpropagation in the most central heavy-ion collisions, it will affect thecentrality dependence of its effect on jet quenching.

  1. Alpha-Particle Angular Distributions of At and Rn Isotopes and Their Relation to Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    NICOLE Collaboration and ISOLDE Collaboration

    1996-12-01

    We report on an extensive on-line nuclear orientation study of the angular distribution of {alpha} particles emitted in the favored decay of neutron deficient At and Rn nuclei near the {ital N}=126 shell closure. Surprisingly large anisotropies were observed, showing pronounced changes from one isotope to another. Comparing these data with several theoretical models shows that anisotropic {alpha} emission in favored decays from near-spherical nuclei can well be explained within the shell model, implying that it is mainly determined by the structure of the decaying nucleus. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Comparative Analysis of HIV-1 and Murine Leukemia Virus Three-Dimensional Nuclear Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Quercioli, Valentina; Di Primio, Cristina; Casini, Antonio; Mulder, Lubbertus C. F.; Vranckx, Lenard S.; Borrenberghs, Doortje; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy allow three-dimensional analysis of HIV-1 preintegration complexes in the nuclei of infected cells. To extend this investigation to gammaretroviruses, we engineered a fluorescent Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) system consisting of MLV-integrase fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (MLV-IN-EGFP). A comparative analysis of lentiviral (HIV-1) and gammaretroviral (MLV) fluorescent complexes in the nuclei of infected cells revealed their different spatial distributions. This research tool has the potential to achieve new insight into the nuclear biology of these retroviruses. PMID:26962222

  3. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions and the MINERvA Neutrino Nucleus Scattering Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfín, Jorge G.

    2011-09-01

    Nuclear effects of charged current deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering have been studied in the frame-work of a χ2 analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs)1. A set of iron PDFs have been extracted which are then used to compute xBj-dependent and Q2-dependent nuclear correction factors for iron structure functions which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs. Upon comparing our results with nuclear correction factors from neutrino-nucleus scattering models and correction factors for l±-iron scattering we find that, except for very high xBj, our correction factors differ in both shape and magnitude from the correction factors of the models and charged-lepton scattering. The MINERvA neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment at Fermilab, will systematically study neutrino nuclear effects off of He, C, Fe and Pb for a more thorough A-dependent study of nuclear PDFs and these correction factors.

  4. The potential role of sexual conflict and sexual selection in shaping the genomic distribution of Mito-nuclear genes.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rebecca; Zimmer, Fabian; Mank, Judith E

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial interactions with the nuclear genome represent one of life's most important co-evolved mutualisms. In many organisms, mitochondria are maternally inherited, and in these cases, co-transmission between the mitochondrial and nuclear genes differs across different parts of the nuclear genome, with genes on the X chromosome having two-third probability of co-transmission, compared with one-half for genes on autosomes. These asymmetrical inheritance patterns of mitochondria and different parts of the nuclear genome have the potential to put certain gene combinations in inter-genomic co-adaptation or conflict. Previous work in mammals found strong evidence that the X chromosome has a dearth of genes that interact with the mitochondria (mito-nuclear genes), suggesting that inter-genomic conflict might drive genes off the X onto the autosomes for their male-beneficial effects. Here, we developed this idea to test coadaptation and conflict between mito-nuclear gene combinations across phylogenetically independent sex chromosomes on a far broader scale. We found that, in addition to therian mammals, only Caenorhabditis elegans showed an under-representation of mito-nuclear genes on the sex chromosomes. The remaining species studied showed no overall bias in their distribution of mito-nuclear genes. We discuss possible factors other than inter-genomic conflict that might drive the genomic distribution of mito-nuclear genes.

  5. Electric Power quality Analysis in research reactor: Impacts on nuclear safety assessment and electrical distribution reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Touati, Said; Chennai, Salim; Souli, Aissa

    2015-07-01

    The increased requirements on supervision, control, and performance in modern power systems make power quality monitoring a common practise for utilities. Large databases are created and automatic processing of the data is required for fast and effective use of the available information. Aim of the work presented in this paper is the development of tools for analysis of monitoring power quality data and in particular measurements of voltage and currents in various level of electrical power distribution. The study is extended to evaluate the reliability of the electrical system in nuclear plant. Power Quality is a measure of how well a system supports reliable operation of its loads. A power disturbance or event can involve voltage, current, or frequency. Power disturbances can originate in consumer power systems, consumer loads, or the utility. The effect of power quality problems is the loss power supply leading to severe damage to equipments. So, we try to track and improve system reliability. The assessment can be focused on the study of impact of short circuits on the system, harmonics distortion, power factor improvement and effects of transient disturbances on the Electrical System during motor starting and power system fault conditions. We focus also on the review of the Electrical System design against the Nuclear Directorate Safety Assessment principles, including those extended during the last Fukushima nuclear accident. The simplified configuration of the required system can be extended from this simple scheme. To achieve these studies, we have used a demo ETAP power station software for several simulations. (authors)

  6. Nuclear Infrared Spectral Energy Distribution of Type II Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videla, Liza; Lira, Paulina; Andrews, Heather; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Alexander, David M.; Ward, Martin

    2013-02-01

    We present near- and mid-IR observations of a sample of Seyfert II galaxies drawn from the 12 μm Galaxy sample. The sample was observed in the J, H, K, L, M and N bands. Galaxy surface brightness profiles are modeled using nuclear, bulge, bar (when necessary), and disk components. To check the reliability of our findings, the procedure was tested using Spitzer observations of M 31. Nuclear spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are determined for 34 objects, and optical spectra are presented for 38, including analysis of their stellar populations using the STARLIGHT spectral synthesis code. Emission line diagnostic diagrams are used to discriminate between genuine active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and H II nuclei. Combining our observations with those found in the literature, we have a total of 40 SEDs. It is found that about 40% of the SEDs are characterized by an upturn in the near-IR, which we have quantified as a NIR slope α < 1 for an SED characterized as λf λvpropλα. The three objects with an H II nucleus and two Seyfert nuclei with strong contamination from a circumnuclear also show an upturn. For genuine AGNs, this component could be explained as emission from the accretion disk, a jet, or from a very hot dust component leaking from the central region through a clumpy obscuring structure. The presence of a very compact nuclear starburst as the origin for this NIR excess emission is not favored by our spectroscopic data for these objects.

  7. Active Degradation Explains the Distribution of Nuclear Proteins during Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Giampieri, Enrico; De Cecco, Marco; Remondini, Daniel; Sedivy, John; Castellani, Gastone

    2015-01-01

    The amount of cellular proteins is a crucial parameter that is known to vary between cells as a function of the replicative passages, and can be important during physiological aging. The process of protein degradation is known to be performed by a series of enzymatic reactions, ranging from an initial step of protein ubiquitination to their final fragmentation by the proteasome. In this paper we propose a stochastic dynamical model of nuclear proteins concentration resulting from a balance between a constant production of proteins and their degradation by a cooperative enzymatic reaction. The predictions of this model are compared with experimental data obtained by fluorescence measurements of the amount of nuclear proteins in murine tail fibroblast (MTF) undergoing cellular senescence. Our model provides a three-parameter stationary distribution that is in good agreement with the experimental data even during the transition to the senescent state, where the nuclear protein concentration changes abruptly. The estimation of three parameters (cooperativity, saturation threshold, and maximal velocity of the reaction), and their evolution during replicative passages shows that only the maximal velocity varies significantly. Based on our modeling we speculate the reduction of functionality of the protein degradation mechanism as a possible competitive inhibition of the proteasome. PMID:26115222

  8. Active Degradation Explains the Distribution of Nuclear Proteins during Cellular Senescence.

    PubMed

    Giampieri, Enrico; De Cecco, Marco; Remondini, Daniel; Sedivy, John; Castellani, Gastone

    2015-01-01

    The amount of cellular proteins is a crucial parameter that is known to vary between cells as a function of the replicative passages, and can be important during physiological aging. The process of protein degradation is known to be performed by a series of enzymatic reactions, ranging from an initial step of protein ubiquitination to their final fragmentation by the proteasome. In this paper we propose a stochastic dynamical model of nuclear proteins concentration resulting from a balance between a constant production of proteins and their degradation by a cooperative enzymatic reaction. The predictions of this model are compared with experimental data obtained by fluorescence measurements of the amount of nuclear proteins in murine tail fibroblast (MTF) undergoing cellular senescence. Our model provides a three-parameter stationary distribution that is in good agreement with the experimental data even during the transition to the senescent state, where the nuclear protein concentration changes abruptly. The estimation of three parameters (cooperativity, saturation threshold, and maximal velocity of the reaction), and their evolution during replicative passages shows that only the maximal velocity varies significantly. Based on our modeling we speculate the reduction of functionality of the protein degradation mechanism as a possible competitive inhibition of the proteasome.

  9. Neutron angular distribution in a plasma focus obtained using nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Mejía, F; Herrera, J J E; Rangel, J; Golzarri, J I; Espinosa, G

    2002-01-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) is a coaxial plasma gun in which a high-density, high-temperature plasma is obtained in a focused column for a few nanoseconds. When the filling gas is deuterium, neutrons can be obtained from fusion reactions. These are partially due to a beam of deuterons which are accelerated against the background hot plasma by large electric fields originating from plasma instabilities. Due to a beam-target effect, the angular distribution of the neutron emission is anisotropic, peaked in the forward direction along the axis of the gun. The purpose of this work is to illustrate the use of CR-39 nuclear track detectors as a diagnostic tool in the determination of the time-integrated neutron angular distribution. For the case studied in this work, neutron emission is found to have a 70% contribution from isotropic radiation and a 30% contribution from anisotropic radiation.

  10. Distribution of tritium in water vapour and precipitation around Wolsung nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Chae, Jung-Seok; Lee, Sang-Kuk; Kim, Yongjae; Lee, Jung-Min; Cho, Heung-Joon; Cho, Yong-Woo; Yun, Ju-Yong

    2011-07-01

    The distribution of tritium in water vapour and precipitation with discharge of tritiated water vapour and meteorological factors was studied around the Wolsung nuclear power plant (NPP) site during the period 2004-2008. The tritium concentrations in atmospheric water vapour and precipitation had a temporal variation with relatively high values in the early summer. Spatial distribution of tritium concentrations was affected by various factors such as distance from the NPP site, wind direction, tritium discharge into the atmosphere and atmospheric dispersion factor. The annual mean concentrations of atmospheric HTO and precipitation were correlated with the amount of gaseous tritium released from the Wolsung NPP. The tritium concentrations in precipitation decrease exponentially with an increase of the distance from the Wolsung NPP site.

  11. Pore size distributions in polyelectrolyte multilayers determined by nuclear magnetic resonance cryoporometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaca Chávez, Fabián; Schönhoff, Monika

    2007-03-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) are thin films, which are assembled one molecular layer at a time, by alternatingly adsorbing polycations and polyanions making use of their attractive electrostatic interaction. Since the porosity of PEMs is one of the properties of major interest, in the current work the first pore size distribution of PEMs in samples consisting of silica particles coated with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) is presented. To this end, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) cryoporometry technique was applied. The proton NMR signal of liquid water is analyzed assuming a log normal distribution of motional correlation times. From the results, it is possible to determine the size of water sites in the layers to around 1nm. In addition, a slight variation with the number of layers is found. The average pore size agrees with cutoff sizes found in permeation experiments.

  12. PROTEINS IN NUCLEOCYTOPLASMIC INTERACTIONS : II. Turnover and Changes in Nuclear Protein Distribution with Time and Growth.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, L; Prescott, D M

    1968-01-01

    In previous studies, we showed that essentially all the proteins of the Amoeba proteus nucleus could be classified either as Rapidly Migrating Proteins (RMP), which shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm continuously at a relatively rapid rate during interphase, or as Slow Turnover Proteins (STP), which seem to move hardly at all during interphase. In this paper, we report on the kinetics and direction of the movement of both classes of protein, as well as on aspects of their localization, with and without growth. The effects of growth were observed with and without cell division. These nuclear proteins have been studied in several ways: by transplantation of labeled nuclei into unlabeled cells and noting the rate of distribution to cytoplasm and host cell nuclei; by repeated amputation of cytoplasm from labeled cells-with and without initially labeled cytoplasm-each amputation being followed by refeeding on unlabeled food; by noting the redistribution of the various protein classes following growth and cell division. The data show (a) labeled RMP equilibrate between a grafted labeled nucleus and an unlabeled host nucleus in ca. 3 hr, but are detectable in the latter less than 30 min after the operation; (b) STP label does, indeed, leave the nucleus and does so at a rate of ca. 25% of the nuclear total per cell generation (ca. 36-40 hr at 23 degrees C); (c) the cytoplasm appears to have a reserve of material that is converted to RMP; (d) when labeled cells are amputated just before they would have divided and are refed unlabeled food after each amputation, there is a loss of 20-25% of the nuclear protein label with each amputation; (e) under the latter circumstances, an essentially complete turnover of all nuclear protein can be demonstrated.

  13. In-Medium Parton Branching Beyond Eikonal Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apolinário, Liliana

    2017-03-01

    The description of the in-medium modifications of partonic showers has been at the forefront of current theoretical and experimental efforts in heavy-ion collisions. It provides a unique laboratory to extend our knowledge frontier of the theory of the strong interactions, and to assess the properties of the hot and dense medium (QGP) that is produced in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and the LHC. The theory of jet quenching, a commonly used alias for the modifications of the parton branching resulting from the interactions with the QGP, has been significantly developed over the last years. Within a weak coupling approach, several elementary processes that build up the parton shower evolution, such as single gluon emissions, interference effects between successive emissions and corrections to radiative energy loss of massive quarks, have been addressed both at eikonal accuracy and beyond by taking into account the Brownian motion that high-energy particles experience when traversing a hot and dense medium. In this work, by using the setup of single gluon emission from a color correlated quark-antiquark pair in a singlet state (qbar{q} antenna), we calculate the in-medium gluon radiation spectrum beyond the eikonal approximation. The results show that we are able to factorize broadening effects from the modifications of the radiation process itself. This constitutes the final proof that a probabilistic picture of the parton shower evolution holds even in the presence of a QGP.

  14. Nuclear microprobe studies of elemental distributions in dormant seeds of Burkea africana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, E. T. F.; Weiersbye-Witkowski, I. M.; Przybyłowicz, W. J.; Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, J.

    1997-07-01

    Seed nutrient stores are vital post-germination for the establishment of seedlings in harsh and unpredictable environments. Plants of nutrient-poor environments allocate a substantial proportion of total acquired nutrients to reproduction (i.e. seeds). We propose that differential allocation of mineral resources to specific seed tissues is an indication of a species germination and establishment strategy. Burkea africana Hook is a leguminous tree typical of broad-leaved nutrient-poor savannas in southern Africa. Elemental distributions in dormant B. africana seed structures were obtained using the true elemental imaging system (Dynamic Analysis) of the NAC Van de Graaff nuclear microprobe. Raster scans of 3.0 MeV protons were complemented by simultaneous BS and PIXE point analyses. Mineral nutrient concentrations varied greatly between seed tissues. Elevated levels of metals known to play an important role as plant enzyme co-factors were found in the seed lens and embryonic axis. Distributions of most of these metals (Ca, Mn, Fe and Zn, but not K or Cu) were positively correlated with embryonic P distribution, and probably represent phytin deposits. The distribution of metals within seed structures is 'patchy' due to their complexation with P as electron-dense globoid phytin crystals, which constrains the interpretation of PIXE point analyses.

  15. Nuclear effects in the Drell-Yan process.

    SciTech Connect

    Raufeisen, J.

    2002-01-01

    In the target rest frame and at high energies, Drell-Yan (DY) dilepton production looks like bremsstrahlung of massive photons, rather than parton annihilation. The projectile quark is decomposed into a series of Fock states. Configurations with fixed transverse separations in impact parameter space are interaction eigenstates for p p scattering. The DY cross section can then be expressed in terms of the same color dipole cross section as DIS. We compare calculations in this dipole approach with E772 data and with next-to-leading order parton model calculations. This approach is especially suitable to describe nuclear effects, since it allows one to apply Glauber multiple scattering theory. We go beyond the Glauber eikonal approximation by taking into account transitions between states, which would be eigenstates for a proton target. We calculate nuclear shadowing at large Feynman-x{sub F} for DY in proton-nucleus collisions and compare to E772 data. Nuclear effects on the transverse momentum distribution are also investigated.

  16. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions

    PubMed Central

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    [1] For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation. Citation: Costabel, S., and U. Yaramanci (2013), Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions, Water

  17. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions.

    PubMed

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-04-01

    [1] For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation. Citation: Costabel, S., and U. Yaramanci (2013), Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions, Water

  18. Multi-parton interactions and rapidity gap survival probability in jet-gap-jet processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babiarz, Izabela; Staszewski, Rafał; Szczurek, Antoni

    2017-08-01

    We discuss an application of dynamical multi-parton interaction model, tuned to measurements of underlying event topology, for a description of destroying rapidity gaps in the jet-gap-jet processes at the LHC. We concentrate on the dynamical origin of the mechanism of destroying the rapidity gap. The cross section for jet-gap-jet is calculated within LL BFKL approximation. We discuss the topology of final states without and with the MPI effects. We discuss some examples of selected kinematical situations (fixed jet rapidities and transverse momenta) as distributions averaged over the dynamics of the jet-gap-jet scattering. The colour-singlet ladder exchange amplitude for the partonic subprocess is implemented into the PYTHIA 8 generator, which is then used for hadronisation and for the simulation of the MPI effects. Several differential distributions are shown and discussed. We present the ratio of cross section calculated with and without MPI effects as a function of rapidity gap in between the jets.

  19. NLO QCD+EW predictions for HV and HV +jet production including parton-shower effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granata, F.; Lindert, J. M.; Oleari, C.; Pozzorini, S.

    2017-09-01

    We present the first NLO QCD+EW predictions for Higgs boson production in association with a ℓν ℓ or ℓ + ℓ - pair plus zero or one jets at the LHC. Fixed-order NLO QCD+EW calculations are combined with a QCD+QED parton shower using the recently developed resonance-aware method in the POWHEG framework. Moreover, applying the improved MiNLO technique to Hℓν ℓ +jet and Hℓ + ℓ - +jet production at NLO QCD+EW, we obtain predictions that are NLO accurate for observables with both zero or one resolved jet. This approach permits also to capture higher-order effects associated with the interplay of EW corrections and QCD radiation. The behavior of EW corrections is studied for various kinematic distributions, relevant for experimental analyses of Higgsstrahlung processes at the 13 TeV LHC. Exact NLO EW corrections are complemented with approximate analytic formulae that account for the leading and next-to-leading Sudakov logarithms in the high-energy regime. In the tails of transverse-momentum distributions, relevant for analyses in the boosted Higgs regime, the Sudakov approximation works well, and NLO EW effects can largely exceed the ten percent level. Our predictions are based on the POWHEG BOX RES+OpenLoops framework in combination with the Pythia 8.1 parton shower.

  20. Smoke inputs to climate models: optical properties and height distribution for nuclear winter studies

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.; Haselman, L.C. Jr.

    1985-04-01

    Smoke from fires produced in the aftermath of a major nuclear exchange has been predicted to cause large decreases in land surface temperatures. The extent of the decrease and even the sign of the temperature change depend on the optical characteristics of the smoke and how it is distributed with altitude. The height distribution of smoke over a fire is determined by the amount of buoyant energy produced by the fire and the amount of energy released by the latent heat of condensation of water vapor. The optical properties of the smoke depend on the size distribution of smoke particles which changes due to coagulation within the lofted plume. We present calculations demonstrating these processes and estimate their importance for the smoke source term input for climate models. For high initial smoke densities and for absorbing smoke ( m = 1.75 - 0.3i), coagulation of smoke particles within the smoke plume is predicted to first increase, then decrease, the size-integrated extinction cross section. However, at the smoke densities predicted in our model (assuming a 3% emission rate for smoke) and for our assumed initial size distribution, the attachment rates for brownian and turbulent collision processes are not fast enough to alter the smoke size distribution enough to significantly change the integrated extinction cross section. Early-time coagulation is, however, fast enough to allow further coagulation, on longer time scales, to act to decrease the extinction cross section. On these longer time scales appropriate to climate models, coagulation can decrease the extinction cross section by almost a factor of two before the smoke becomes well mixed around the globe. This process has been neglected in past climate effect evaluations, but could have a significant effect, since the extinction cross section enters as an exponential factor in calculating the light attenuation due to smoke. 10 refs., 20 figs.

  1. Distributions of radionuclides on and in spent nuclear fuel claddings of pressurized water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, T.; Sato, T.; Sagawa, C.; Masaki, N. M.; Saeki, M.; Adachi, T.

    1990-11-01

    Radioactivities in Zircaloy-4 cladding of PWR spent nuclear fuel have been examined as a function of fuel burnup in the region of about 7000-40000 MWd/t. The fission products 137Cs and 106Ru in the cladding increased linearly with fuel burnup, whereas the radionuclides 134Cs and 154Eu, which were produced by neutron capture of fission products, increased with the second power of fuel burnup. Tritium and the activation products of alloy constituents and impurities increased in proportion with fuel burnup. The gross activities of α emitters on the inner and outer surfaces of the cladding increased with 3.1 and 1.3 powers of fuel burnup, respectively. The distribution of radionuclides in the cladding has been examined by radiochemical analysis combined with stepwise etching from the inner surface of the cladding. More than 98% of fission products were present within a 10 μm depth from the inner surface of the cladding, while activation products such as 60Co were distributed homogeneously in the interior of the cladding except on the outer surface. The distribution of tritium tended to become heterogeneous with increasing fuel burnup.

  2. Nuclear signature effect on spatial distribution of molecular harmonic in the presence of spatial inhomogeneous field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liqiang; Li, Wenliang

    2017-01-01

    Spatial distribution of the molecular harmonic spectra from \\text{H}\\text{2}+ in the presence of inhomogeneous field has been theoretically investigated. It shows that (i) the harmonic intensities from the negative-H nucleus play the dominating role in harmonic emission spectra. (ii) Through the investigations of the nuclear signature effect on the spatial distribution of the molecular harmonic spectra, the differences of the harmonic intensities between the negative-H nucleus and the positive-H nucleus can be enhanced and reduced with the introduction of the higher vibrational state and the heavy nucleus (i.e. \\text{D}2+ ), respectively. The time-frequency analyses of the harmonic spectra, the time-dependent wave function and the electron localization have been shown to explain the harmonic spatial distribution and the electron motion. (iii) Due to the plasmon-resonance-enhancement near the metallic nanostructure, the harmonic cutoff can be remarkably enhanced as the spatial position of the inhomogeneous field moving away from the gap center. The ionization probabilities have been shown to explain the harmonic cutoff extension.

  3. Nuclear longitudinal form factors for axially deformed charge distributions expanded by nonorthogonal basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Jinjuan; Xu, Chang; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the nuclear longitudinal form factors are systematically studied from the intrinsic charge multipoles. For axially deformed nuclei, two different types of density profiles are used to describe their charge distributions. For the same charge distributions expanded with different basis functions, the corresponding longitudinal form factors are derived and compared with each other. Results show the multipoles Cλ of longitudinal form factors are independent of the basis functions of charge distributions. Further numerical calculations of longitudinal form factors of 12C indicates that the C 0 multipole reflects the contributions of spherical components of all nonorthogonal basis functions. For deformed nuclei, their charge RMS radii can also be determined accurately by the C 0 measurement. The studies in this paper examine the model-independent properties of electron scattering, which are useful for interpreting electron scattering experiments on exotic deformed nuclei. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11505292, 11175085, 11575082, 11235001, 11275138, and 11447226), by Shandong Provincial Natural Science Foundation, China (BS2014SF007), Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities (15CX02072A).

  4. Distribution and migration of radiocesium in sloping landscapes three years after the Fukushima-1 nuclear accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarov, M. A.; Ogura, S.

    2017-07-01

    The results of the study are presented on the distribution and migration of radiocesium in mountainous (580-620 m a.s.l.) landscapes in the northeast of Honshu Island (Tohoku Region, Miyagi Prefecture) subjected to radioactive contamination after the nuclear accident at Fukushima-1 NPP. In July 2014, the average contamination density with radiocesium (134Cs and 137Cs) over the territory (150 km to the northwest from NPP) was equal to 16 kBq/m2. This contamination is estimated at the acceptable level according to both Japanese and Russian standards and legislation. Three years after the accident, radiocesium is found to be unevenly distributed by the biogeocenosis components, i.e. 45% in litter, 40% in plants, 10% in soil, and 5% in roots. As for the distribution of total radiocesium (Cs tot = 134Cs + 137Cs) by the profile of volcanic podzolic-ocherous soil ( Dystric Aluandic Andosols), its maximal content (about 80%) was found in the surface layer (0-2.5 cm), with the specific activity ranging from 250 to 10070 Bq/kg and sharply decreasing with the depth. Radiocesium amount in the soils of forest ecosystems was on average by 20% higher than in meadow ecosystems. Accumulation of radionuclides in soils of lower and middle parts of a slope with an insignificant vertical migration was found to be the most general regularity. The air dose rate did not exceed the maximal permissible level, and the snow cover acted as an absorbing and scattering screen.

  5. Nucleon Partonic Spin Structure to be Explored by the Unpolarized Drell-Yan Program of COMPASS Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wen-Chen

    2016-02-01

    The observation of the violation of Lam-Tung relation in the πN Drell-Yan process triggered many theoretical speculations. The TMD Boer-Mulders functions characterizing the correlation of transverse momentum and transverse spin for partons in unpolarized hadrons could nicely account for the violation. The COMPASS experiment at CERN will measure the angular distributions of dimuons from the unpolarized Drell-Yan process over a wide kinematic region and study the beam particle dependence. Significant statistics is expected from a successful run in 2015 which will bring further understanding of the origin of the violation of Lam-Tung relation and of the partonic transverse spin structure of the nucleon.

  6. The SUN protein Mps3 controls Ndc1 distribution and function on the nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingjing; Smoyer, Christine J; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Jaspersen, Sue L

    2014-02-17

    In closed mitotic systems such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and the spindle pole body (SPB) must assemble into an intact nuclear envelope (NE). Ndc1 is a highly conserved integral membrane protein involved in insertion of both complexes. In this study, we show that Ndc1 interacts with the SUN domain-containing protein Mps3 on the NE in live yeast cells using fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy. Genetic and molecular analysis of a series of new ndc1 alleles allowed us to understand the role of Ndc1-Mps3 binding at the NE. We show that the ndc1-L562S allele is unable to associate specifically with Mps3 and find that this mutant is lethal due to a defect in SPB duplication. Unlike other ndc1 alleles, the growth and Mps3 binding defect of ndc1-L562S is fully suppressed by deletion of POM152, which encodes a NPC component. Based on our data we propose that the Ndc1-Mps3 interaction is important for controlling the distribution of Ndc1 between the NPC and SPB.

  7. Analysis of pion production data in electron-hadron scattering at JLAB using the TMD Parton Model Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmate, Tamuno-Negiyeofori; Gamberg, Leonard; Prokudin, Alexei

    2016-09-01

    I have performed a phenomenological analysis of pion production data from Jefferson Laboratory in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons on unpolarized nucleons and deuterium using the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton model formalism. We parameterize the data in terms of TMD parton distribution functions that describe the three-dimensional (3-D) partonic structure of the nucleon. One of the main enigmas of data analysis is how to reliably estimate the errors of the parameters that describe some particular physical process. A common method is to use Hessian matrix or vary the delta chi-square of the corresponding fits to the data. In this particular project we use the so-called bootstrap method that is very robust for error estimation. This method has not been extensively used in the description of the TMD distributions that describe the 3-D nucleon structure. The reliable estimate of the errors and thus reliable predictions for future experiments is of great scientific interest. We are using Python and modern methods of data analysis in this project. The results of the project will be useful for understanding the effects of internal motion of quarks and gluons inside of the proton and will be reported in a forthcoming publication.

  8. [Study of the algorithm for inversion of low field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation distribution].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanshan; Wang, Hongzhi; Yang, Peiqiang; Zhang, Xuelong

    2014-06-01

    It is difficult to reflect the properties of samples from the signal directly collected by the low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyzer. People must obtain the relationship between the relaxation time and the original signal amplitude of every relaxation component by inversion algorithm. Consequently, the technology of T2 spectrum inversion is crucial to the application of NMR data. This study optimized the regularization factor selection method and presented the regularization algorithm for inversion of low field NMR relaxation distribution, which is based on the regularization theory of ill-posed inverse problem. The results of numerical simulation experiments by Matlab7.0 showed that this method could effectively analyze and process the NMR relaxation data.

  9. Temporal variation of dose rate distribution around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station using unmanned helicopter.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Yukihisa; Orita, Tadashi; Torii, Tatsuo

    2016-12-01

    Aerial radiological survey using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) was applied to measurement surface contamination around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station (FDNPS). An unmanned helicopter monitoring system (UHMS) was developed to survey the environmental effect of radioactive cesium scattered as a result of the FDNPS accident. The UHMS was used to monitor the area surrounding the FDNPS six times from 2012 to 2015. Quantitative changes in the radioactivity distribution trend were revealed from the results of these monitoring runs. With this information, we found that the actual reduction of dose rate was faster than the one calculated with radiocesium physical half-life. It is indicated that the attenuation effect of radiation by radiocesium penetration in soil is dominant as for reason of reduction of dose rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dose distributions in phantoms irradiated in thermal columns of two different nuclear reactors.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Agosteo, S; Altieri, S; Bortolussi, S; Carrara, M; Gay, S; Nava, E; Petrovich, C; Rosi, G; Valente, M

    2007-01-01

    In-phantom dosimetry studies have been carried out at the thermal columns of a thermal- and a fast-nuclear reactor for investigating: (a) the spatial distribution of the gamma dose and the thermal neutron fluence and (b) the accuracy at which the boron concentration should be estimated in an explanted organ of a boron neutron capture therapy patient. The phantom was a cylinder (11 cm in diameter and 12 cm in height) of tissue-equivalent gel. Dose images were acquired with gel dosemeters across the axial section of the phantom. The thermal neutron fluence rate was measured with activation foils in a few positions of this phantom. Dose and fluence rate profiles were also calculated with Monte Carlo simulations. The trend of these profiles do not show significant differences for the thermal columns considered in this work.

  11. Aging Management Guideline for commercial nuclear power plants: Power and distribution transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Toman, G.; Gazdzinski, R.

    1994-05-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) provides recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in power and distribution transformers important to license renewal in commercial nuclear power plants. The intent of this AMG to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner which allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  12. Intrinsic transverse momentum and parton correlations from dynamical chiral symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Schweitzer, Mark Strikman, Christian Weiss

    2013-01-01

    The dynamical breaking of chiral symmetry in QCD is caused by nonperturbative interactions on a distance scale rho ~ 0.3 fm, much smaller than the typical hadronic size R ~ 1 fm. These short-distance interactions influence the intrinsic transverse momentum distributions of partons and their correlations at a low normalization point. We study this phenomenon in an effective description of the low-energy dynamics in terms of chiral constituent quark degrees of freedom, which refers to the large-N_c limit of QCD. The nucleon is obtained as a system of constituent quarks and antiquarks moving in a self-consistent classical chiral field (relativistic mean-field approximation, or chiral quark-soliton model). The calculated transverse momentum distributions of constituent quarks and antiquarks are matched with QCD quarks, antiquarks and gluons at the chiral symmetry--breaking scale rho^{-2}. We find that the transverse momentum distribution of valence quarks is localized at p_T^2 ~ R^{-2} and roughly of Gaussian shape. The distribution of unpolarized sea quarks exhibits a would-be power-like tail ~1/p_T^2 extending up to the chiral symmetry-breaking scale. Similar behavior is observed in the flavor-nonsinglet polarized sea. The high-momentum tails are the result of short-range correlations between sea quarks in the nucleon's light-cone wave function, which are analogous to short-range NN correlations in nuclei. We show that the nucleon's light-cone wave function contains correlated pairs of transverse size rho << R with scalar-isoscalar (Sigma) and pseudoscalar-isovector (Pi) quantum numbers, whose internal wave functions have a distinctive spin structure and become identical at p_T^2 ~ rho^{-2} (restoration of chiral symmetry). These features are model-independent and represent an effect of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking on the nucleon's partonic structure. Our results have numerous implications for the transverse momentum distributions of particles produced in hard

  13. Comet nuclear magnitudes and a new size distribution using archived NEAT data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambery, R. J.; Hicks, M. D.; Pravdo, S. H.; Helin, E. F.; Lawrence, K. J.

    2002-09-01

    A reliable estimate of the size distribution of cometary nuclei provides important constraints on the formation and dynamical/physical evolution of these bodies as well as their relative proportions in the near-Earth population. The basic data of nuclear sizes has been difficult to obtain, due to the shroud of dust that envelopes the nucleus across a wide range of heliocentric distances. Only two comets, P/Halley and P/Borrelly, have had direct imaging of their nuclei from spacecraft encounters, though high spatial-resolution imaging by the Hubble Space Telescope has also yielded very reliable diameters [1]. Other observers have recently used ground-based photometry to obtain cumulative size-frequency distributions which are not in agreement [2,3]. One possible source of error is the need to include data from a wide range of telescopes and reduction techniques. We shall obtain a new estimate of the size-frequency distribution using a self-consistent data-set. The Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking (NEAT) Program at the Jet Propulsion laboratory remotely operates two 1.2-meter telescopes at widely geographically separated locations on a near-nightly basis. All NEAT data is archived and publically available through the SKYMORPH website (http:/skyview.gsfc.nasa.gov/skymorph/skymorph.html) Though optimized to discover near-Earth asteroids, we have obtained over 300 CCD images of approximately 40 short and long-period comets over the last 15 months. Though we model coma contamination for all images, we shall concentrate on the fraction of comets at heliocentric distances greater than 3 AU. Our data will be used to derive an independent comet size-frequency distribution .

  14. Large-pT production of D mesons at the LHCb in the parton Reggeization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpishkov, A. V.; Saleev, V. A.; Shipilova, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The production of D mesons in proton-proton collisions at the LHCb detector is studied. We consider the single production of D0/D¯0, D±, D*±, and Ds± mesons and correlation spectra in the production of D D ¯ and D D pairs at the √{S }=7 TeV and √{S }=13 TeV . In case of the single D -meson production we calculate differential cross sections over transverse momentum pT while in the pair D D ¯ , D D -meson production the cross sections are calculated over the azimuthal angle difference Δ φ , rapidity difference Δ y , invariant mass of the pair M and over the pT of the one meson from a pair. The cross sections are obtained at the leading order of the parton Reggeization approach using Kimber-Martin-Ryskin unintegrated parton distribution functions in a proton. To describe the D -meson production we use universal scale-dependent c -quark and gluon fragmentation functions fitted to e+e- annihilation data from CERN LEP1. Our predictions find a good agreement with the LHCb Collaboration data within uncertainties and without free parameters.

  15. Polarised Parton Densities from the Fits to the Deep Inelastic Spin Asymmetries on Nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelski, Jan; Tatur, Stanislaw

    2001-07-01

    We have updated our next to leading order QCD fit for polarised parton densities [S. Tatur, J. Bartelski, M. Kurzela, Acta Phys. Pol. B31, 647 (2000)] using recent experimental data on the deep inelastic spin asymmetries on nucleons. Our distributions have functional form inspired by the unpolarised ones given by MRST (Martin, Roberts, Stirling and Thorne) fit. In addition to usually used data sample (averaged over variable Q2 for the same value of x variable) we have also considered the points with the same x and different Q2. Our fits to both groups of data give very similar results with substantial antiquark contribution in the measured region of x. In the first case we get rather small (Δ G=0.31) gluon polarisation. For the non averaged data the best fit is obtained when gluon contribution vanishes at Q2=1GeV2. Our new parametrisation of parton densities and additional experimental data taken into account do not change much our previous results.

  16. Four-jet production in single- and double-parton scattering within high-energy factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutak, Krzysztof; Maciula, Rafal; Serino, Mirko; Szczurek, Antoni; van Hameren, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We perform a first study of 4-jet production in a complete high-energy factorization (HEF) framework. We include and discuss contributions from both single-parton scattering (SPS) and double-parton scattering (DPS). The calculations are performed for kinematical situations relevant for two experimental measurements (ATLAS and CMS) at the LHC. We compare our results to those reported by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations for different sets of kinematical cuts. The results of the HEF approach are compared with their counterparts for collinear factorization. For symmetric cuts the DPS HEF result is considerably smaller than the one obtained with collinear factorization. The mechanism leading to this difference is of kinematical nature. We conclude that an analysis of inclusive 4-jet production with asymmetric p T -cuts below 50 GeV would be useful to enhance the DPS contribution relative to the SPS contribution. In contrast to the collinear approach, the HEF approach nicely describes the distribution of the Δ S variable, which involves all four jets and their angular correlations.

  17. Constraint of the Low-X Parton Behaviour of the Proton.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, John Karl

    Electron-proton (ep) scattering at high energies has been extensively used in the past to study the structure of the proton. With the development of the HERA ep collider came the opportunity to study proton structure at never before attained energy scales. The theory of both elastic and inelastic ep scattering is presented, with an emphasis on the interpretation of early results with respect to proton structure. Also described is the origin of parton distribution functions and the numerous attempts to parameterize parton behaviour both in leading order and next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations. The ZEUS detector and the process of extracting deep, inelastic events from data collected in the Autumn of 1992 are described. These data are used to constrain the low-x behaviour of the proton structure functions at low to moderate values of Q^2. This was accomplished by comparing a number of different theoretical predictions to the data, representing a wide variety of gluon density behaviour at low-x. Results of this study indicate that as one moves down to x~ 10 ^{-4}, predictions with a slowly increasing gluon density are favoured over those with a rapidly increasing one.

  18. Combining states without scale hierarchies with ordered parton showers

    DOE PAGES

    Fischer, Nadine; Prestel, Stefan

    2017-09-12

    Here, we present a parameter-free scheme to combine fixed-order multi-jet results with parton-shower evolution. The scheme produces jet cross sections with leading-order accuracy in the complete phase space of multiple emissions, resumming large logarithms when appropriate, while not arbitrarily enforcing ordering on momentum configurations beyond the reach of the parton-shower evolution equation. This then requires the development of a matrix-element correction scheme for complex phase-spaces including ordering conditions as well as a systematic scale-setting procedure for unordered phase-space points. Our algorithm does not require a merging-scale parameter. We implement the new method in the Vincia framework and compare to LHCmore » data.« less

  19. Parton interpretation of the nucleon spin-dependent structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Mankiewicz, L. ); Ryzak, Z. )

    1991-02-01

    We discuss the interpretation of the nucleon's polarized structure function {ital g}{sub 2}({ital x}). If the target state is represented by its Fock decomposition on the light cone, the operator-product expansion allows us to demonstrate that moments of {ital g}{sub 2}({ital x}) are related to overlap integrals between wave functions of opposite longitudinal polarizations. In the light-cone formalism such wave functions are related by the kinematical operator {ital scrY}, or light-cone parity. As a consequence, it can be shown that moments of {ital g}{sub 2} give information about the same parton wave function, or probability amplitude to find a certain parton configuration in the target which defines {ital g}{sub 1}({ital x}) or {ital F}{sub 2}({ital x}). Specific formulas are given, and possible applications to the phenomenology of the nucleon structure in QCD are discussed.

  20. Projective symmetry of partons in Kitaev's honeycomb model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellado, Paula

    2015-03-01

    Low-energy states of quantum spin liquids are thought to involve partons living in a gauge-field background. We study the spectrum of Majorana fermions of Kitaev's honeycomb model on spherical clusters. The gauge field endows the partons with half-integer orbital angular momenta. As a consequence, the multiplicities reflect not the point-group symmetries of the cluster, but rather its projective symmetries, operations combining physical and gauge transformations. The projective symmetry group of the ground state is the double cover of the point group. We acknowledge Fondecyt under Grant No. 11121397, Conicyt under Grant No. 79112004, and the Simons Foundation (P.M.); the Max Planck Society and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (O.P.); and the US DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER46544 (O.T.).

  1. Distribution, Diversity, and Long-Term Retention of Grass Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements (SINEs)

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Hongliang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Instances of highly conserved plant short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) families and their enrichment near genes have been well documented, but little is known about the general patterns of such conservation and enrichment and underlying mechanisms. Here, we perform a comprehensive investigation of the structure, distribution, and evolution of SINEs in the grass family by analyzing 14 grass and 5 other flowering plant genomes using comparative genomics methods. We identify 61 SINE families composed of 29,572 copies, in which 46 families are first described. We find that comparing with other grass TEs, grass SINEs show much higher level of conservation in terms of genomic retention: The origin of at least 26% families can be traced to early grass diversification and these families are among most abundant SINE families in 86% species. We find that these families show much higher level of enrichment near protein coding genes than families of relatively recent origin (51%:28%), and that 40% of all grass SINEs are near gene and the percentage is higher than other types of grass TEs. The pattern of enrichment suggests that differential removal of SINE copies in gene-poor regions plays an important role in shaping the genomic distribution of these elements. We also identify a sequence motif located at 3′ SINE end which is shared in 17 families. In short, this study provides insights into structure and evolution of SINEs in the grass family. PMID:28903462

  2. Distribution of heavy metals around the Barakah nuclear power plant in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Al Rashdi, Mouza Rashid; Alaabed, Sulaiman; El Tokhi, Mohamed; Howari, Fares M; El Mowafi, Walid; Arabi, Alya A

    2017-07-07

    Inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy was used to measure the concentrations of heavy metals in 58 samples collected from the Barakah nuclear power plant (BNPP) area, UAE. The grain size distribution was symmetric, but the samples ranged from fine to coarse sand. The inverse relationship between grain size and heavy metal contaminations was validated. The pre-operational average heavy metal contaminations around the BNPP were 0.03, 0.40, 1.2, 2.05, 1.66, 1.6, 5.9, 7.3, 7, 8.8, 60, and 2521 ppm for Cd, Mo, Co, Cu, Pb, As, Zn, Ni, V, Cr, Mn, and Fe, respectively. The spatial distribution was more compact in the south compared to the north, with less severe contaminations in the east and west. The negative geoaccumulation indices suggest an uncontaminated area, and the BNPP has minor enrichments. All concentrations were significantly below the safe limits set by the Dutch guidelines. The levels of heavy metals reported in the UAE were lower than levels reported in countries around the world.

  3. Lam-Tung relation breaking in Z0 hadroproduction as a probe of parton transverse momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motyka, Leszek; Sadzikowski, Mariusz; Stebel, Tomasz

    2017-06-01

    The Lam-Tung relation breaking coefficient ALT=A0-A2 in the Drell-Yan dilepton angular distributions in the Z0 boson mass region at the LHC is analyzed in the kT-factorization approach. This observable was recently measured with high precision by the ATLAS Collaboration. Within the kT-factorization approach we perform an approximate O (αemαs2) calculation of the off-shell parton hard matrix elements in which we include the leading tree-level contributions of valence quarks and off-shell gluons: the qvalg*→q Z0 channel and the g*g*→q q ¯Z0 channel. The resulting ALT exhibits high sensitivity to the gluon transverse momentum distribution (TMD). Several gluon TMDs are probed derived from the Catani-Ciafaloni-Fiorani-Marchesini and Balisky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov evolution equations, and given by QCD-inspired phenomenological parameterizations. The ATLAS data favor a simple "Weizsäcker-Williams" (WW) hard gluon TMD with the asymptotic behavior of one-gluon exchange at large gluon transverse momenta and moderate x . It is verified that the proposed approach with the WW gluon TMD describes well also the A0 and A2 angular coefficients at the Z0 peak, as well as the Drell-Yan dilepton mass distribution at lower masses. We conclude that the inclusion of gluon transverse momentum effects improves the description of the angular distributions of Drell-Yan dileptons and that the Drell-Yan scattering provides an excellent probe of the parton TMDs.

  4. French approach for the distribution of iodine tablets in the vicinity of nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Le Guen, B; Hémidy, P Y; Garcier, Y

    2002-08-01

    In the event of an accident, isotopes of iodine including 131I can be released into the atmosphere. In 1997, as a safety measure, the French government decided to begin the distribution of stable iodine tablets in advance, directly to those living in the vicinity of the nuclear power plants, to avoid having to do so in an emergency. The tablets were previously stored by Electricite de France (EDF), which held them at the disposal of the government authorities. This year, as the existing tablets pass their use--by date, EDF has begun redistributing stable iodine within a ten-kilometer radius around its nineteen nuclear sites. We review the effectiveness of this countermeasure as well as the nature and incidence of possible side effects while measuring the duration of its action under the conditions in which it was administered. A bibliographic study of the kinetics of iodine in the human body has enabled the indications and the means of use to be determined. The effectiveness of the preventive effect and the onset of thyroid dysfunction depends on both external and individual factors: uptake of iodine from food, functional condition of the thyroid, and age. In an individual with a healthy thyroid, taking 100 mg of stable iodine immediately before exposure to radioactive iodine reduces the dose to the thyroid by at least 95%. In cases of prolonged exposure, the reduction is smaller. Therefore, if exposure lasts for a number of days, consideration needs to be given to taking stable iodine again, to maintain maximum protection. In addition to the bibliographic study, this presentation covers the impact of making iodine available and the action taken to educate the public; the attitudes of populations concerned; and the reaction of the health professionals.

  5. Correlations of geographic distribution and temperature of embryonic development with the nuclear DNA content in the Salamandridae (Urodela, Amphibia).

    PubMed

    Litvinchuk, Spartak N; Rosanov, Jury M; Borkin, Leo J

    2007-04-01

    We used flow cytometry to measure the nuclear DNA content in erythrocytes of 27 salamandrid species. Across these species, diploid genome size varied more than 2 fold (51.3-104.4 pg). According to genome size and geographic distribution, 3 groups of newt species were recognized: West Palearctics with smaller amounts of nuclear DNA; Nearctic, with intermediate values; and East Asiatic, with higher genome sizes. Viviparous West Palearctic salamanders differed from most of the oviparous West Palearctic newts in possessing larger genome sizes. The nuclear DNA content strongly correlates with species range limits. At the same temperature, embryos of salamandrid species with larger genome sizes have a markedly longer developmental time than those with smaller genomes. We present an analysis of the relationships between the amount of nuclear DNA and water temperature at the breeding sites.

  6. Partonic Flow and phi-Meson production in Au+Au collisions at sqrt radical sNN = 200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kurnadi, P; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, C; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, J; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2007-09-14

    We present first measurements of the phi-meson elliptic flow (v2(pT)) and high-statistics pT distributions for different centralities from radical sNN=200 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In minimum bias collisions the v2 of the phi meson is consistent with the trend observed for mesons. The ratio of the yields of the Omega to those of the phi as a function of transverse momentum is consistent with a model based on the recombination of thermal s quarks up to pT approximately 4 GeV/c, but disagrees at higher momenta. The nuclear modification factor (R CP) of phi follows the trend observed in the K S 0 mesons rather than in Lambda baryons, supporting baryon-meson scaling. These data are consistent with phi mesons in central Au+Au collisions being created via coalescence of thermalized s quarks and the formation of a hot and dense matter with partonic collectivity at RHIC.

  7. Implementation of a new energy-angular distribution of particles emitted by deuteron induced nuclear reaction in transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvan, Patrick; Koning, Arjan; Ogando, Francisco; Sanz, Javier

    2017-09-01

    MCUNED code is an MCNPX extension able to handle evaluated nuclear data library for light ion transport simulations. In this work the MCUNED code is improved to describe more accurately the neutron emission during deuteron induced nuclear reaction. This code update consists in introducing a new methodology to take into account the angular distribution of neutron produced by deuteron breakup reaction. To carry out this work a new formulation for the angular distribution of neutrons produced by breakup reaction has been proposed. The implementation of this new methodology requires the use of extra parameters which are provided by the nuclear code TALYS and stored in the ENDF file. This new methodology shows significant improvement in comparison with the former treatment of neutron emission kinematics, these results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  8. Nuclear microprobe analysis of iodine and iron distributions in tumor cells exposed to the anthracycline 4'-iodo-4'-deoxydoxorubicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, R.; Moretto, Ph.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M.

    1997-07-01

    In this study, we performed nuclear microprobe analysis on cultured human ovarian cancer cells exposed to pharmacological concentrations of 4'-iodo-4'-deoxydoxorubicin (IDX), an anthracycline anticancer drug. We observed that iodine and iron cellular distributions were strongly correlated, suggesting intracellular iron chelation by the anthracycline. The average cellular iron concentration did not change during drug exposure, but the cellular distribution of iron was modified following the preferential nuclear localization of iodine, as determined by single cell microanalysis. These results are important for understanding the cellular pharmacology of anthracyclines. They suggest that iron cellular delocalization and its subsequent nuclear accumulation may participate to the overall cytotoxicity of IDX, and more generally to anthracycline antitumor activity.

  9. Triple Parton Scatterings in High-Energy Proton-Proton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Enterria, David; Snigirev, Alexander M.

    2017-03-01

    A generic expression to compute triple parton scattering cross sections in high-energy proton-proton (p p ) collisions is presented as a function of the corresponding single parton cross sections and the transverse parton profile of the proton encoded in an effective parameter σeff,TPS . The value of σeff,TPS is closely related to the similar effective cross section that characterizes double parton scatterings, and amounts to σeff,TPS=12.5 ±4.5 mb . Estimates for triple charm (c c ¯) and bottom (b b ¯) production in p p collisions at LHC and FCC energies are presented based on next-to-next-to-leading-order perturbative calculations for single c c ¯ , b b ¯ cross sections. At √{s }≈100 TeV , about 15% of the p p collisions produce three c c ¯ pairs from three different parton-parton scatterings.

  10. Gene distribution and isochore organization in the nuclear genome of plants.

    PubMed

    Montero, L M; Salinas, J; Matassi, G; Bernardi, G

    1990-04-11

    The genomic distribution of 23 nuclear genes from three dicotyledons (pea, sunflower, tobacco) and five monocotyledons of the Gramineae family (barley, maize, rice, oat, wheat) was studied by localizing these genes in DNA fractions obtained by preparative centrifugation in Cs2SO4/BAMD density gradients. Each one of these genes (and of many other related genes and pseudogenes) was found to be located in DNA fragments (50-100 Kb in size) that were less than 1-2% GC apart from each other. This definitively demonstrates the existence of isochores in plant genomes, namely of compositionally homogeneous DNA regions at least 100-200 Kb in size. Moreover, the GC levels of the 23 coding sequences studied, of their first, second and third codon positions, and of the corresponding introns were found to be linearly correlated with the GC levels of the isochores harboring those genes. Compositional correlations displayed increasing slopes when going from second to first to third codon position with obvious effects on codon usage. Coding sequences for seed storage proteins and phytochrome of Gramineae deviate from the compositional correlations just described. Finally, CpG doublets of coding sequences were characterized by a shortage that decreased and vanished with increasing GC levels of the sequences. A number of these findings bear a striking similarity with results previously obtained for vertebrate genes.

  11. Evaluation of Near Field Atmospheric Dispersion Around Nuclear Facilities Using a Lorentzian Distribution Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkley, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric dispersion modeling within the near field of a nuclear facility typically applies a building wake correction to the Gaussian plume model, whereby a point source is modeled as a plane source. The plane source results in greater near field dilution and reduces the far field effluent concentration. However, the correction does not account for the concentration profile within the near field. Receptors of interest, such as the maximally exposed individual, may exist within the near field and thus the realm of building wake effects. Furthermore, release parameters and displacement characteristics may be unknown, particularly during upset conditions. Therefore, emphasis is placed upon the need to analyze and estimate an enveloping concentration profile within the near field of a release. This investigation included the analysis of 64 air samples collected over 128 wk. Variables of importance were then derived from the measurement data, and a methodology was developed that allowed for the estimation of Lorentzian-based dispersion coefficients along the lateral axis of the near field recirculation cavity; the development of recirculation cavity boundaries; and conservative evaluation of the associated concentration profile. The results evaluated the effectiveness of the Lorentzian distribution methodology for estimating near field releases and emphasized the need to place air-monitoring stations appropriately for complete concentration characterization. Additionally, the importance of the sampling period and operational conditions were discussed to balance operational feedback and the reporting of public dose.

  12. Gene distribution and isochore organization in the nuclear genome of plants.

    PubMed Central

    Montero, L M; Salinas, J; Matassi, G; Bernardi, G

    1990-01-01

    The genomic distribution of 23 nuclear genes from three dicotyledons (pea, sunflower, tobacco) and five monocotyledons of the Gramineae family (barley, maize, rice, oat, wheat) was studied by localizing these genes in DNA fractions obtained by preparative centrifugation in Cs2SO4/BAMD density gradients. Each one of these genes (and of many other related genes and pseudogenes) was found to be located in DNA fragments (50-100 Kb in size) that were less than 1-2% GC apart from each other. This definitively demonstrates the existence of isochores in plant genomes, namely of compositionally homogeneous DNA regions at least 100-200 Kb in size. Moreover, the GC levels of the 23 coding sequences studied, of their first, second and third codon positions, and of the corresponding introns were found to be linearly correlated with the GC levels of the isochores harboring those genes. Compositional correlations displayed increasing slopes when going from second to first to third codon position with obvious effects on codon usage. Coding sequences for seed storage proteins and phytochrome of Gramineae deviate from the compositional correlations just described. Finally, CpG doublets of coding sequences were characterized by a shortage that decreased and vanished with increasing GC levels of the sequences. A number of these findings bear a striking similarity with results previously obtained for vertebrate genes. Images PMID:2336360

  13. Radiation dose distribution for workers in South Korean nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoung-il; Kim, So-i; Suh, Dong-hee; Jin, Young-woo; Kim, Jeong-in; Choi, Hoon; Lim, Young-khi

    2010-07-01

    A total of 33 680 nuclear power plants (NPPs) workers were monitored and recorded from 1990 to 2007. According to the record, the average individual radiation dose has been decreasing continually from 3.20 mSv man(-1) in 1990 to 1.12 mSv man(-1) at the end of 2007. After the International Commission on Radiological Protection 60 recommendation was generalised in South Korea, no NPP workers received >20 mSv radiation, and the numbers of relatively highly exposed workers have been decreasing continuously. The age distribution of radiation workers in NPPs was composed mainly of 20-30 y olds (83 %) for 1990-1994 and 30-40 y olds (75 %) for 2003-2007. The difference in individual average dose by age was not significant. Most (77 %) of the NPP radiation exposures from 1990 to 2007 occurred mostly during the refueling period. With regard to exposure type, the majority of exposures was external exposures, representing 95 % of the total exposures, whereas internal exposures represented only 5 %. External effective dose was affected mainly by gamma radiation exposure, with an insignificant amount of neutron exposure. As for internal effective dose, tritium in the pressurised heavy water reactor was the biggest cause of exposure.

  14. QCD parton showers and NLO EW corrections to Drell-Yan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Peter; Sadykov, Renat R.; Sapronov, Andrey A.; Seymour, Michael H.; Skands, Peter Z.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the implementation of an interface between the SANC generator framework for Drell-Yan hard processes, which includes next-to-leading order electroweak (NLO EW) corrections, and the Herwig++ and Pythia8 QCD parton shower Monte Carlos. A special aspect of this implementation is that the initial-state shower evolution in both shower generators has been augmented to handle the case of an incoming photon-in-a- proton, diagrams for which appear at the NLO EW level. The difference between shower algorithms leads to residual differences in the relative corrections of 2-3 % in the p T ( μ) distributions at p T ( μ) ≳ 50 GeV (where the NLO EW correction itself is of order 10 %).

  15. Prompt-photon plus jet associated photoproduction at HERA in the parton Reggeization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniehl, B. A.; Nefedov, M. A.; Saleev, V. A.

    2014-06-01

    We study the photoproduction of isolated prompt photons associated with hadron jets in the framework of the parton Reggeization approach. The cross section distributions in the transverse energies and pseudorapidities of the prompt photon and the jet as well as the azimuthal-decorrelation variables measured by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations at DESY HERA are nicely described by our predictions. The main improvements with respect to previous studies in the kT-factorization framework include the application of the Reggeized-quark formalism, the generation of exactly gauge-invariant amplitudes with off-shell initial-state quarks, and the exact treatment of the γR→γg box contribution with off-shell initial-state gluons.

  16. Development of prediction models for radioactive caesium distribution within the 80-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Kinase, Sakae; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Sato, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Saito, Kimiaki

    2014-08-01

    Preliminary prediction models have been studied for the radioactive caesium distribution within the 80-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The models were represented by exponential functions using ecological half-life of radioactive caesium in the environment. The ecological half-lives were derived from the changes in ambient dose equivalent rates through vehicle-borne surveys. It was found that the ecological half-lives of radioactive caesium were not constant within the 80-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The ecological half-life of radioactive caesium in forest areas was found to be much larger than that in urban and water areas.

  17. Implementing the LPM effect in a parton cascade model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman-Smith, C. E.; Bass, S. A.; Srivastava, D. K.

    2011-07-01

    Parton Cascade Models (PCM [K. Geiger, B. Muller, Nucl. Phys. B369 (1992) 600-654; S. A. Bass, B. Muller, D. K. Srivastava, Phys. Lett. B551 (2003) 277-283; Z. Xu and C. Greiner, Phys. Rev. C 76, 024911 (2007); D. Molnar and M. Gyulassy, Phys. Rev. C 62, 054907 (2000)]), which describe the full time-evolution of a system of quarks and gluons using pQCD interactions are ideally suited for the description of jet production, including the emission, evolution and energy-loss of the full parton shower in a hot and dense QCD medium. The Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) effect [L. D. Landau, I. J. Pomeranchuk, Dolk. Akad. Nauk. SSSR 92 (92); A. B. Migdal, Phys. Rev. 103 (6) (1956) 1811-1820], the quantum interference of parton wave functions due to repeated scatterings against the background medium, is likely the dominant in-medium effect affecting jet suppression. We have implemented a probabilistic implementation of the LPM effect [K. Zapp, J. Stachel, U. A. Wiedemann, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 (2009) 152302] within the PCM which can be validated against previously derived analytical calculations by Baier et al (BDMPS-Z) [R. Baier, Y. L. Dokshitzer, A. H. Mueller, S. Peigne, D. Schiff, Nucl. Phys. B478 (1996) 577-597; R. Baier, Y. L. Dokshitzer, S. Peigne, D. Schiff, Phys. Lett. B345 (1995) 277-286; R. Baier, Y. L. Dokshitzer, A. H. Mueller, S. Peigne, D. Schiff, Nucl. Phys. B483 (1997) 291-320; B. Zakharov, JETP Lett. 63 (1996) 952-957; B. Zakharov, JETP Lett. 65 (1997) 615-620]. Presented at the 6th International Conference on Physics and Astrophysics of Quark Gluon Plasma (ICPAQGP 2010).

  18. A framework for second-order parton showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai Tao; Skands, Peter

    2017-08-01

    A framework is presented for including second-order perturbative corrections to the radiation patterns of parton showers. The formalism allows to combine O (αs2)-corrected iterated 2 → 3 kernels for ;ordered; gluon emissions with tree-level 2 → 4 kernels for ;unordered; ones. The combined Sudakov evolution kernel is thus accurate to O (αs2). As a first step towards a full-fledged implementation of these ideas, we develop an explicit implementation of 2 → 4 shower branchings in this letter.

  19. Experimental Evidence for Partonic Orbital Angular Momentum at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Douglas E.

    2011-12-14

    Although one might naively anticipate that the proton, being the lowest baryonic energy state, would be in a L = 0 state, the current theoretical understanding is that it must carry orbital angular momentum in order, for example, to have a non-zero anomalous magnetic moment. I will review the experimental evidence linked theoretically to orbital angular momentum of the proton's constituents from the RHIC experiments and summarize by presenting a challenge to the theory community--to develop a consistent framework which can explain the spin polarization asymmetries seen at RHIC and elsewhere, and give insight to the partonic wave-functions including orbital angular momentum.

  20. Parton showers as sources of energy-momentum deposition in the QGP and their implication for shockwave formation at RHIC and at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Neufeld, Richard B.; Vitev, Ivan M.

    2011-01-01

    We derive the distribution of energy and momentumtransmitted from a primary fast parton and its medium-induced bremsstrahlung gluons to a thermalized quark-gluon plasma. Our calculation takes into account the important and thus far neglected effects of quantum interference between the resulting color currents. We use our result to obtain the rate at which energy is absorbed by the medium as a function of time and find that the rate is modified by the quantum interference between the primary parton and secondary gluons. This Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal type interference persists for time scales relevant to heavy ion phenomenology. We further couple the newly derived source of energy and momentum deposition to linearized hydrodynamics to obtain the bulk medium response to realistic parton propagation and splitting in the quark-gluon plasma. We find that because of the characteristic large angle in-medium gluon emission and the multiple sources of energy deposition in a parton shower, formation of well defined Mach cones by energetic jets in heavy ion reactions is not likely.

  1. PHANTOM: A Monte Carlo event generator for six parton final states at high energy colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestrero, Alessandro; Belhouari, Aissa; Bevilacqua, Giuseppe; Kashkan, Vladimir; Maina, Ezio

    2009-03-01

    PHANTOM is a tree level Monte Carlo for six parton final states at proton-proton, proton-antiproton and electron-positron colliders at O(αEM6) and O(αEM4αS2) including possible interferences between the two sets of diagrams. This comprehends all purely electroweak contributions as well as all contributions with one virtual or two external gluons. It can generate unweighted events for any set of processes and it is interfaced to parton shower and hadronization packages via the latest Les Houches Accord protocol. It can be used to analyze the physics of boson-boson scattering, Higgs boson production in boson-boson fusion, tt¯ and three boson production. Program summaryProgram title:PHANTOM (V. 1.0) Catalogue identifier: AECE_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECE_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 175 787 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 965 898 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: Any with a UNIX, LINUX compatible Fortran compiler Operating system: UNIX, LINUX RAM: 500 MB Classification: 11.1 External routines: LHAPDF (Les Houches Accord PDF Interface, http://projects.hepforge.org/lhapdf/), CIRCE (beamstrahlung for ee ILC collider). Nature of problem: Six fermion final state processes have become important with the increase of collider energies and are essential for the study of top, Higgs and electroweak symmetry breaking physics at high energy colliders. Since thousands of Feynman diagrams contribute in a single process and events corresponding to hundreds of different final states need to be generated, a fast and stable calculation is needed. Solution method:PHANTOM is a tree level Monte Carlo for six parton final states at proton-proton, proton-antiproton and

  2. Tools for the Future of Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geesaman, Donald

    2014-03-01

    The challenges of Nuclear Physics, especially in understanding strongly interacting matter in all its forms in the history of the universe, place ever higher demands on the tools of the field, including the workhorse, accelerators. These demands are not just higher energy and higher luminosity. To recreate the matter that fleetingly was formed in the origin of the heavy elements, we need higher power heavy-ion accelerators and creative techniques to harvest the isotopes. We also need high-current low-energy accelerators deep underground to detect the very slow rate reactions in stellar burning. To explore the three dimensional distributions of high-momentum quarks in hadrons and to search for gluonic excitations we need high-current CW electron accelerators. Understanding the gluonic structure of nuclei and the three dimensional distributions of partons at lower x, we need high-luminosity electron-ion colliders that also have the capabilities to prepare, preserve and manipulate the polarization of both beams. A search for the critical point in the QCD phase diagram demands high luminosity beams over a broad range of species and energy. With advances in cavity design and construction, beam manipulation and cooling, and ion sources and targets, the Nuclear Physics community, in the U.S. and internationally has a coordinated vision to deliver this exciting science. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  3. The distribution of nuclear genetic variation and historical demography of sea otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aguilar, A.; Jessup, David A.; Estes, James; Garza, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    The amount and distribution of population genetic variation is crucial information for the design of effective conservation strategies for endangered species and can also be used to provide inference about demographic processes and patterns of migration. Here, we describe variation at a large number of nuclear genes in sea otters Enhydra lutris ssp. We surveyed 14 variable microsatellite loci and two genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in up to 350 California sea otters Enhydra lutris nereis, which represents ???10% of the subspecies' population, and 46 otters from two Alaskan sites. We utilized methods for detecting past reductions in effective population size to examine the effects of near extinction from the fur trade. Summary statistic tests largely failed to find a signal of a recent population size reduction (within the past 200years), but a Bayesian method found a signal of a strong reduction over a longer time scale (up to 500years ago). These results indicate that the reduction in size began long enough ago that much genetic variation was lost before the 19th century fur trade. A comparison of geographic distance and pairwise relatedness for individual otters found no evidence of kin-based spatial clustering for either gender. This indicates that there is no population structure, due to extended family groups, within the California population. A survey of population genetic variation found that two of the MHC genes, DQB and DRB, had two alleles present and one of the genes, DRA, was monomorphic in otters. This contrasts with other mammals, where they are often the most variable coding genes known. Genetic variation in the sea otter is among the lowest observed for a mammal and raises concerns about the long-term viability of the species, particularly in the face of future environmental changes. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2007 The Zoological Society of London No claim to original US government works.

  4. Microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Matsuki, Yoh; Woskov, Paul P.; Corzilius, Björn; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-05-01

    We present a calculation of the microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning (MAS) probe utilized in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The microwave magnetic field (B 1 S) profile was obtained from simulations performed with the High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) software suite, using a model that includes the launching antenna, the outer Kel-F stator housing coated with Ag, the RF coil, and the 4 mm diameter sapphire rotor containing the sample. The predicted average B 1 S field is 13 μT/W 1/2, where S denotes the electron spin. For a routinely achievable input power of 5 W the corresponding value is γSB 1 S = 0.84 MHz. The calculations provide insights into the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including reflections from the RF coil and diffraction of the power transmitted through the coil. The variation of enhancement with rotor wall thickness was also successfully simulated. A second, simplified calculation was performed using a single pass model based on Gaussian beam propagation and Fresnel diffraction. This model provided additional physical insight and was in good agreement with the full HFSS simulation. These calculations indicate approaches to increasing the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including the use of a converging lens and fine adjustment of the spacing of the windings of the RF coil. The present results should prove useful in optimizing the coupling of microwave power to the sample in future DNP experiments. Finally, the results of the simulation were used to predict the cross effect DNP enhancement ( ɛ) vs. ω1 S/(2 π) for a sample of 13C-urea dissolved in a 60:40 glycerol/water mixture containing the polarizing agent TOTAPOL; very good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment.

  5. Distribution of artificial radionuclides in particle-size fractions of soil on fallout plumes of nuclear explosions.

    PubMed

    Kabdyrakova, A M; Lukashenko, S N; Mendubaev, A T; Kunduzbayeva, A Ye; Panitskiy, A V; Larionova, N V

    2017-10-03

    In this paper are analyzed the artificial radionuclide distributions ((137)Cs, (90)Sr, (241)Am, (239+240)Pu) in particle-size fractions of soils from two radioactive fallout plumes at the Semipalatinsk Test Site. These plumes were generated by a low-yield surface nuclear test and a surface non-nuclear experiment with insignificant nuclear energy release, respectively, and their lengths are approximately 3 and 0,65 km. In contrast with the great majority of similar studies performed in areas affected mainly by global fallout where adsorbing radionuclides such as Pu are mainly associated with the finest soil fractions, in this study it was observed that along both analyzed plumes the highest activity concentrations are concentrated in the coarse soil fractions. At the plume generated by the surface nuclear test, the radionuclides are concentrated mainly in the 1000-500 μm soil fraction (enrichment factor values ranging from 1.2 to 3.8), while at the plume corresponding to the surface non-nuclear test is the 500-250 μm soil fraction the enriched one by technogenic radionuclides (enrichment factor values ranging from 1.1 to 5.1). In addition, the activity concentration distributions among the different soil size fractions are similar for all radionuclides in both plumes. All the obtained data are in agreement with the hypothesis indicating that enrichment observed in the coarse fractions is caused by the presence of radioactive particles resulted from the indicated nuclear tests. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A New Insight into Energy Distribution of Electrons in Fuel-Rod Gap in VVER-1000 Nuclear Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereshteh, Golian; Ali, Pazirandeh; Saeed, Mohammadi

    2015-06-01

    In order to calculate the electron energy distribution in the fuel rod gap of a VVER-1000 nuclear reactor, the Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) governing the non-equilibrium behavior of electrons passing through the fuel-rod gap as an absorber has been solved in this paper. Besides, the Monte Carlo Geant4 code was employed to simulate the electron migration in the fuel-rod gap and the energy distribution of electrons was found. As for the results, the accuracy of the FPE was compared to the Geant4 code outcomes and a satisfactory agreement was found. Also, different percentage of the volatile and noble gas fission fragments produced in fission reactions in fuel rod, i.e. Krypton, Xenon, Iodine, Bromine, Rubidium and Cesium were employed so as to investigate their effects on the electrons' energy distribution. The present results show that most of the electrons in the fuel rod's gap were within the thermal energy limitation and the tail of the electron energy distribution was far from a Maxwellian distribution. The interesting outcome was that the electron energy distribution is slightly increased due to the accumulation of fission fragments in the gap. It should be noted that solving the FPE for the energy straggling electrons that are penetrating into the fuel-rod gap in the VVER-1000 nuclear reactor has been carried out for the first time using an analytical approach.

  7. MODELING THE NUCLEAR INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF TYPE II ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Lira, Paulina; Videla, Liza; Wu, Yanling; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Alexander, David M.; Ward, Martin

    2013-02-20

    We present results from model fitting to the spectral energy distribution (SED) of a homogeneous sample of Seyfert II galaxies drawn from the 12 {mu}m Galaxy Sample. Imaging and nuclear flux measurements are presented in an accompanying paper. Here we add Spitzer/IRS observations to further constrain the SEDs after careful subtraction of a starburst component. We use the library of CLUMPY torus models from Nenkova et al. and also test the two-phase models recently produced by Stalevski et al. We find that photometric and spectroscopic observations in the mid-IR ({lambda} {approx}> 5 {mu}m) are crucial to properly constrain the best-fit torus models. About half of our sources show clear near-IR excess of their SEDs above the best-fit models. This problem can be less severe when using the Stalevski et al. models. The nature of this emission is not clear since best-fitted blackbody temperatures are very high ({approx}1700-2500 K) and the Type II classification of our sources would correspond to a small probability to peer directly into the hottest regions of the torus. Crucially, the derived torus parameters are quite robust when using CLUMPY models, independently of whether or not the sources require an additional blackbody component. Our findings suggest that tori are characterized by N{sub 0}{approx}>5, {sigma} {approx}> 40, {tau} {approx}< 25, Angle i {approx}> 40 Degree-Sign , Y {approx}< 50, and A {sup los} {sub v} {approx} 100-300, where N{sub 0} is the number of clouds in the equatorial plane of the torus, {sigma} is the characteristic opening angle of the cloud distribution, {tau} is the opacity of a single cloud, Angle i is the line-of-sight orientation of the torus, Y is the ratio of the inner to the outer radii, and A {sup los} {sub v} is the total opacity along the line of sight. From these, we can determine typical torus sizes and masses of 0.1-5.0 pc and 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} M {sub Sun }, respectively. We find tentative evidence that those nuclei with

  8. Identification of the methylation preference region in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 and its implication in regulating nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yuan-I; Hsu, Sheng-Chieh; Chau, Gar-Yang; Huang, Chi-Ying F.; Sung, Jung-Sung; Hua, Wei-Kai; Lin, Wey-Jinq

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} Verifying by direct methylation assay the substrate sites of PRMT1 in the hnRNP K protein. {yields} Identifying the preferred PMRT1 methylation regions in hnRNP K by kinetic analysis. {yields} Linking methylation in regulating nuclear localization of hnRNP K. -- Abstract: Protein arginine methylation plays crucial roles in numerous cellular processes. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein participating in a variety of cellular functions including transcription and RNA processing. HnRNP K is methylated at multiple sites in the glycine- and arginine-rich (RGG) motif. Using various RGG domain deletion mutants of hnRNP K as substrates, here we show by direct methylation assay that protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) methylated preferentially in a.a. 280-307 of the RGG motif. Kinetic analysis revealed that deletion of a.a. 280-307, but not a.a. 308-327, significantly inhibited rate of methylation. Importantly, nuclear localization of hnRNP K was significantly impaired in mutant hnRNP K lacking the PRMT1 methylation region or upon pharmacological inhibition of methylation. Together our results identify preferred PRMT1 methylation sequences of hnRNP K by direct methylation assay and implicate a role of arginine methylation in regulating intracellular distribution of hnRNP K.

  9. Changes of the elemental distributions in marine diatoms as a reporter of sample preparation artefacts. A nuclear microscopy application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, R. M.; Cabrita, M. T.; Alves, L. C.; Pinheiro, T.

    2015-04-01

    Studies of the elemental composition of whole marine diatoms cells have high interest as they constitute a direct measurement of environmental changes, and allow anticipating consequences of anthropogenic alterations to organisms, ecosystems and global marine geochemical cycles. Nuclear microscopy is a powerful tool allowing direct measurement of whole cells giving qualitative imaging of distribution, and quantitative determination of intracellular concentration. Major obstacles to the analysis of marine microalgae are high medium salinity and the recurrent presence of extracellular exudates produced by algae to maintain colonies in natural media and in vitro. The objective of this paper was to optimize the methodology of sample preparation of marine unicellular algae for elemental analysis with nuclear microscopy, allowing further studies on cellular response to metals. Primary cultures of Coscinodiscus wailesii maintained in vitro were used to optimize protocols for elemental analysis with nuclear microscopy techniques. Adequate cell preparation procedures to isolate the cells from media components and exudates were established. The use of chemical agents proved to be inappropriate for elemental determination and for intracellular morphological analysis. The assessment of morphology and elemental partitioning in cell compartments obtained with nuclear microscopy techniques enabled to infer their function in natural environment and imbalances in exposure condition. Exposure to metal affected C. wailesii morphology and internal elemental distribution.

  10. Altering a gene involved in nuclear distribution increases the repeat-induced point mutation process in the fungus Podospora anserina.

    PubMed Central

    Bouhouche, Khaled; Zickler, Denise; Debuchy, Robert; Arnaise, Sylvie

    2004-01-01

    Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is a homology-dependent gene-silencing mechanism that introduces C:G-to-T:A transitions in duplicated DNA segments. Cis-duplicated sequences can also be affected by another mechanism called premeiotic recombination (PR). Both are active over the sexual cycle of some filamentous fungi, e.g., Neurospora crassa and Podospora anserina. During the sexual cycle, several developmental steps require precise nuclear movement and positioning, but connections between RIP, PR, and nuclear distributions have not yet been established. Previous work has led to the isolation of ami1, the P. anserina ortholog of the Aspergillus nidulans apsA gene, which is required for nuclear positioning. We show here that ami1 is involved in nuclear distribution during the sexual cycle and that alteration of ami1 delays the fruiting-body development. We also demonstrate that ami1 alteration affects loss of transgene functions during the sexual cycle. Genetically linked multiple copies of transgenes are affected by RIP and PR much more frequently in an ami1 mutant cross than in a wild-type cross. Our results suggest that the developmental slowdown of the ami1 mutant during the period of RIP and PR increases time exposure to the duplication detection system and thus increases the frequency of RIP and PR. PMID:15166143

  11. LHAPDF6: parton density access in the LHC precision era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Andy; Ferrando, James; Lloyd, Stephen; Nordström, Karl; Page, Ben; Rüfenacht, Martin; Schönherr, Marek; Watt, Graeme

    2015-03-01

    The Fortran LHAPDF library has been a long-term workhorse in particle physics, providing standardised access to parton density functions for experimental and phenomenological purposes alike, following on from the venerable PDFLIB package. During Run 1 of the LHC, however, several fundamental limitations in LHAPDF's design have became deeply problematic, restricting the usability of the library for important physics-study procedures and providing dangerous avenues by which to silently obtain incorrect results. In this paper we present the LHAPDF 6 library, a ground-up re-engineering of the PDFLIB/LHAPDF paradigm for PDF access which removes all limits on use of concurrent PDF sets, massively reduces static memory requirements, offers improved CPU performance, and fixes fundamental bugs in multi-set access to PDF metadata. The new design, restricted for now to interpolated PDFs, uses centralised numerical routines and a powerful cascading metadata system to decouple software releases from provision of new PDF data and allow completely general parton content. More than 200 PDF sets have been migrated from LHAPDF 5 to the new universal data format, via a stringent quality control procedure. LHAPDF 6 is supported by many Monte Carlo generators and other physics programs, in some cases via a full set of compatibility routines, and is recommended for the demanding PDF access needs of LHC Run 2 and beyond.

  12. Nuclear effects in the deuteron and constraints on the d /u ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhin, S. I.; Kulagin, S. A.; Petti, R.

    2017-09-01

    We present a detailed study of nuclear corrections in the deuteron (D) by performing an analysis of data from deep inelastic scattering off proton and D, dilepton pair production in p p and p D interactions, and W± and Z boson production in p p and p p ¯ collisions. In particular, we discuss the determination of the off-shell function describing the modification of the parton distribution functions in bound nucleons in the context of global QCD fits. Our results are consistent with the ones obtained independently from the study of data on deep inelastic scattering off heavy nuclei with mass number A ≥4 , further confirming the universality of the off-shell function of the bound nucleon. We also study the sensitivity to the modeling of the deuteron wave function. As an important application we discuss the impact of nuclear corrections to the deuteron on the determination of the d quark distribution.

  13. Study of hard double-parton scattering in four-jet events in pp collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2016-11-21

    Inclusive four-jet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV are analysed for the presence of hard double-parton scattering using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 37.3 pb–1, collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The contribution of hard double-parton scattering to the production of four-jet events is extracted using an artificial neural network, assuming that hard double-parton scattering can be approximated by an uncorrelated overlaying of dijet events. For events containing at least four jets with transverse momentum pT ≥ 20 GeV and pseudorapidity |η| ≤ 4.4, and at least onemore » having pT ≥ 42.5 GeV, the contribution of hard double-parton scattering is estimated to be fDPS = 0.092–0.011+0.005(stat.)–0.037+0.033(syst.). After combining this measurement with those of the inclusive dijet and four-jet cross-sections in the appropriate phase space regions, the effective cross-section, σeff , was determined to be σeff = 14.9–1.0+1.2(stat.)– 3.8+5.1(syst.) mb. This result is consistent within the quoted uncertainties with previous measurements of σeff , performed at centre-of-mass energies between 63 GeV and 8 TeV using various final states, and it corresponds to 21–6+7% of the total inelastic cross-section measured at √s = 7 TeV. As a result, the distributions of the observables sensitive to the contribution of hard double-parton scattering, corrected for detector effects, are also provided.« less

  14. Study of hard double-parton scattering in four-jet events in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Carney, R. M. D.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'amen, G.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Díez Cornell, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudder, A. Chr.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dumancic, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Ezzi, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Ganguly, S.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; Navarro, J. E. García; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gasnikova, K.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisen, M.; Geisler, M. P.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; Gentsos, C.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghneimat, M.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuli, F.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, G.; Gonella, L.; Gongadze, A.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goudet, C. R.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gravila, P. M.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grevtsov, K.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groh, S.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guan, W.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Gui, B.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Hadef, A.; Hageböck, S.; Hagihara, M.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hartmann, N. M.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hayakawa, D.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J. J.; Heinrich, L.; Heinz, C.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Henkelmann, S.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Herde, H.; Herget, V.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Honda, T.; Hong, T. M.; Hooberman, B. H.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howarth, J.; Hoya, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, Q.; Hu, S.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Huo, P.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Ishijima, N.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ito, F.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, P.; Jain, V.; Jakobi, K. B.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. 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M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, L.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schouwenberg, J. F. P.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schulte, A.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shirabe, S.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shope, D. R.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sideras Haddad, E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, I. M.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanioka, R.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Tornambe, P.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usui, J.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-11-01

    Inclusive four-jet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √{s}=7 TeV are analysed for the presence of hard double-parton scattering using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 37 .3 pb-1, collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The contribution of hard double-parton scattering to the production of four-jet events is extracted using an artificial neural network, assuming that hard double-parton scattering can be approximated by an uncorrelated overlaying of dijet events. For events containing at least four jets with transverse momentum p T ≥ 20 GeV and pseudorapidity | η| ≤ 4 .4, and at least one having p T ≥ 42 .5 GeV, the contribution of hard double-parton scattering is estimated to be f DPS = 0.092 - 0.011 + 0.005 (stat.) - 0.037 + 0.033 (syst.). After combining this measurement with those of the inclusive dijet and four-jet cross-sections in the appropriate phase space regions, the effective cross-section, σ eff , was determined to be σ eff = 14. 9 - 1.0 + 1.2 (stat.) - 3.8 + 5.1 (syst.) mb. This result is consistent within the quoted uncertainties with previous measurements of σ eff , performed at centre-of-mass energies between 63 GeV and 8 TeV using various final states, and it corresponds to 21 - 6 + 7 % of the total inelastic cross-section measured at √{s}=7 TeV. The distributions of the observables sensitive to the contribution of hard double-parton scattering, corrected for detector effects, are also provided. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Study of hard double-parton scattering in four-jet events in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M; Aad, G; Abbott, B; ...

    2016-11-01

    Inclusive four-jet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of s=7 TeV are analysed for the presence of hard double-parton scattering using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 37.3 pb -1 , collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The contribution of hard double-parton scattering to the production of four-jet events is extracted using an artificial neural network, assuming that hard double-parton scattering can be approximated by an uncorrelated overlaying of dijet events. For events containing at least four jets with transverse momentum p T ≥ 20 GeV and pseudorapidity |η| ≤ 4.4, and at leastmore » one having p T ≥ 42.5 GeV, the contribution of hard double-parton scattering is estimated to be f DPS = 0.092 - 0.011 + 0.005 (stat.) - 0.037 + 0.033 (syst.). After combining this measurement with those of the inclusive dijet and four-jet cross-sections in the appropriate phase space regions, the effective cross-section, σ eff , was determined to be σ eff = 14. 9 - 1.0 + 1.2 (stat.) - 3.8 + 5.1 (syst.) mb. This result is consistent within the quoted uncertainties with previous measurements of σ eff , performed at centre-of-mass energies between 63 GeV and 8 TeV using various final states, and it corresponds to 21 - 6 + 7 % of the total inelastic cross-section measured at s=7 TeV. The distributions of the observables sensitive to the contribution of hard double-parton scattering, corrected for detector effects, are also provided.« less

  16. Computer program for afterheat temperature distribution for mobile nuclear power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, W. G.; Vanbibber, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    ESATA computer program was developed to analyze thermal safety aspects of post-impacted mobile nuclear power plants. Program is written in FORTRAN 4 and designed for IBM 7094/7044 direct coupled system.

  17. Direct Estimation of Power Distribution in Reactors for Nuclear Thermal Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Aldemir, Tunc; Miller, Don W.; Burghelea, Andrei

    2004-02-04

    A recently proposed constant temperature power sensor (CTPS) has the capability to directly measure the local power deposition rate in nuclear reactor cores proposed for space thermal propulsion. Such a capability reduces the uncertainties in the estimated power peaking factors and hence increases the reliability of the nuclear engine. The CTPS operation is sensitive to the changes in the local thermal conditions. A procedure is described for the automatic on-line calibration of the sensor through estimation of changes in thermal conditions.

  18. Size distribution of radioactive particles collected at Tokai, Japan 6 days after the nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yutaka; Yasuda, Kenichiro; Magara, Masaaki

    2014-06-01

    Airborne radioactive particles released by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident in 2011 were collected with a cascade low-pressure impactor at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in Tokai, Japan, 114 km south of the FDNPP. Size-fractionated samples were collected twice, in the periods of March 17-April 1, 2011, and May 9-13, 2011. These size-fractionated samplings were carried out in the earliest days at a short distance from the FDNPP. Radioactivity of short-lived nuclides (several ten days of half-life) was determined as well as (134)Cs and (137)Cs. The elemental composition of size-fractionated samples was also measured. In the first collection, the activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of (129m)Te, (140)Ba, (134)Cs, (136)Cs and (137)Cs was 1.5-1.6 μm, while the diameter of (131)I was 0.45 μm. The diameters of (134)Cs and (137)Cs in the second collection were expressed as three peaks at <0.5 μm, 0.94 μm, and 7.8 μm. The (134)Cs/(137)Cs ratio of the first collection was 1.02 in total, but the ratio in the fine fractions was 0.91. A distribution map of (134)Cs/(137)Cs - (136)Cs/(137)Cs ratios was helpful in understanding the change of radioactive Cs composition. The Cs composition of size fractions <0.43 μm and the composition in the 1.1-2.1 μm range (including the AMAD of 1.5-1.6 μm) were similar to the calculated compositions of fuels in the reactors No. 1 and No. 3 at the FDNPP using the ORIGEN-II code. The Cs composition collected in May, 2011 was similar to the calculation results of reactor No. 2 fuel composition. The change of Cs composition implies that the radioactive Cs was released from the three reactors at the FDNPP via different processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Immunocytochemical localization of the major polypeptides of the nuclear pore complex-lamina fraction. Interphase and mitotic distribution

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    This laboratory has previously isolated a fraction from rat liver nuclei consisting of nuclear pore complexes associated with the proteinaceous lamina which underlies the inner nuclear membrane. Using protein eluted from sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gels, we have prepared antibodies in chickens to each of the three predominant pore complex- lamina bands. Ouchterlony double diffusion analysis shows that each of these individual bands cross-reacts strongly with all three antisera. In immunofluorescence localization performed on tissue culture cells with these antibodies, we obtain a pattern of intense staining at the periphery of the interphase nucleus, with little or no cytoplasmic reaction. Electron microscope immunoperoxidase staining of rat liver nuclei with these antibodies labels exclusively the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, reaction occurs in areas which contain the lamina, but not at the pore complexes. While our isolation procedure extracts the internal contents of nuclei completely, semiquantitative Ouchterlony analysis shows that it releases negligible amounts of these lamina antigens. Considered together, our results indicate that these three bands represent major components of a peripheral nuclear lamina, and are not structural elements of an internal "nuclear protein matrix." Fluorescence microscopy shows that the perinuclear interphase localization of these lamina proteins undergoes dramatic changes during mitosis. Concomitant with nuclear envelope disassembly in prophase, these antigens assume a diffuse localization throughout the cell. This distribution persists until telophase, when the antigens become progressively and completely localized at the surface of the daughter chromosome masses. We propose that the lamina is a biological polymer which can undergo reversible disassembly during mitosis. PMID:102651

  20. Determination of Nuclear Charge Distributions of Fission Fragments from ^{235}U (n_th, f) with Calorimetric Low Temperature Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabitz, P.; Andrianov, V.; Bishop, S.; Blanc, A.; Dubey, S.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Faust, H.; Gönnenwein, F.; Gomez-Guzman, J. M.; Köster, U.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Mutterer, M.; Scholz, P.; Stolte, S.

    2016-08-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors (CLTD's) for heavy-ion detection have been combined with the LOHENGRIN recoil separator at the ILL Grenoble for the determination of nuclear charge distributions of fission fragments produced by thermal neutron-induced fission of ^{235}U. The LOHENGRIN spectrometer separates fission fragments according to their mass-to-ionic-charge ratio and their kinetic energy, but has no selectivity with respect to nuclear charges Z. For the separation of the nuclear charges, one can exploit the nuclear charge-dependent energy loss of the fragments passing through an energy degrader foil (absorber method). This separation requires detector systems with high energy resolution and negligible pulse height defect, as well as degrader foils which are optimized with respect to thickness, homogeneity, and energy loss straggling. In the present, contribution results of test measurements at the Maier Leibnitz tandem accelerator facility in Munich with ^{109}Ag and ^{127}I beams with the aim to determine the most suitable degrader material, as well as measurements at the Institut Laue-Langevin will be presented. These include a systematic study of the quality of Z-separation of fission fragments in the mass range 82le A le 132 and a systematic measurement of ^{92}Rb fission yields, as well as investigations of fission yields toward the symmetry region.

  1. Double parton effects for jets with large rapidity separation

    SciTech Connect

    Szczurek, Antoni; Cisek, Anna; Maciuła, Rafal

    2015-04-10

    We discuss production of four jets pp → jjjjX with at least two jets with large rapidity separation in proton-proton collisions at the LHC through the mechanism of double-parton scattering (DPS). The cross section is calculated in a factorizaed approximation. Each hard subprocess is calculated in LO collinear approximation. The LO pQCD calculations are shown to give a reasonably good descritption of CMS and ATLAS data on inclusive jet production. It is shown that relative contribution of DPS is growing with increasing rapidity distance between the most remote jets, center-of-mass energy and with decreasing (mini)jet transverse momenta. We show also result for angular azimuthal dijet correlations calculated in the framework of k{sub t} -factorization approximation.

  2. Monte Carlo approach for hadron azimuthal correlations in high energy proton and nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Dominguez, Isabel; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Magnin, J.; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2012-09-01

    We use a Monte Carlo approach to study hadron azimuthal angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton and central nucleus-nucleus collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energies at midrapidity. We build a hadron event generator that incorporates the production of 2→2 and 2→3 parton processes and their evolution into hadron states. For nucleus-nucleus collisions we include the effect of parton energy loss in the quark-gluon plasma using a modified fragmentation function approach. In the presence of the medium, for the case when three partons are produced in the hard scattering, we analyze the Monte Carlo sample in parton and hadron momentum bins to reconstruct the angular correlations. We characterize this sample by the number of partons that are able to hadronize by fragmentation within the selected bins. In the nuclear environment the model allows hadronization by fragmentation only for partons with momentum above a threshold pTthresh=2.4 GeV. We argue that one should treat properly the effect of those partons with momentum below the threshold, because their interaction with the medium may lead to showers of low-momentum hadrons along the direction of motion of the original partons as the medium becomes diluted.

  3. Jet Hadronization via Recombination of Parton Showers in Vacuum and in Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Rainer J.; Han, Kyongchol; Ko, Che Ming

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a hadronization algorithm for jet parton showers based on a hybrid approach involving recombination of quarks and fragmentation of strings. The algorithm can be applied to parton showers from a shower Monte Carlo generator at the end of their perturbative evolution. The algorithm forces gluon decays and then evaluates the recombination probabilities for quark-antiquark pairs into mesons and (anti)quark triplets into (anti)baryons. We employ a Wigner phase space formulation based on the assumption of harmonic oscillator wave functions for stable hadrons and resonances. Partons too isolated in phase space to find recombination partners are connected by QCD strings to other quarks. Fragmentation of those remnant strings and the decay of all hadron resonances complete the hadronization process. We find that our model applied to parton showers from the PYTHIA Monte Carlo event generator leads to results very similar to pure Lund string fragmentation. We suggest that our algorithm can be readily generalized to jets embedded in quark-gluon plasma by adding sampled thermal partons from the phase transition hypersurface. The recombination of thermal partons and shower partons leads to an enhancement of pions and protons at intermediate momentum at both RHIC and LHC.

  4. Werner complex deficiency in cells disrupts the Nuclear Pore Complex and the distribution of lamin B1.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Zhu, Yizhou; Zhai, Yujia; R Castroagudin, Michelle; Bao, Yifei; White, Tommy E; Glavy, Joseph S

    2013-12-01

    From the surrounding shell to the inner machinery, nuclear proteins provide the functional plasticity of the nucleus. This study highlights the nuclear association of Pore membrane (POM) protein NDC1 and Werner protein (WRN), a RecQ helicase responsible for the DNA instability progeria disorder, Werner Syndrome. In our previous publication, we connected the DNA damage sensor Werner's Helicase Interacting Protein (WHIP), a binding partner of WRN, to the NPC. Here, we confirm the association of the WRN/WHIP complex and NDC1. In established WRN/WHIP knockout cell lines, we further demonstrate the interdependence of WRN/WHIP and Nucleoporins (Nups). These changes do not completely abrogate the barrier of the Nuclear Envelope (NE) but do affect the distribution of FG Nups and the RAN gradient, which are necessary for nuclear transport. Evidence from WRN/WHIP knockout cell lines demonstrates changes in the processing and nucleolar localization of lamin B1. The appearance of "RAN holes" void of RAN corresponds to regions within the nucleolus filled with condensed pools of lamin B1. From WRN/WHIP knockout cell line extracts, we found three forms of lamin B1 that correspond to mature holoprotein and two potential post-translationally modified forms of the protein. Upon treatment with topoisomerase inhibitors lamin B1 cleavage occurs only in WRN/WHIP knockout cells. Our data suggest the link of the NDC1 and WRN as one facet of the network between the nuclear periphery and genome stability. Loss of WRN complex leads to multiple alterations at the NPC and the nucleolus. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of mica content on pore-size distribution and porosity of sandy sediment using proton nuclear magnetic resonance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, S.

    2015-12-01

    As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we performed a study on effect of mica content on pore size distribution and porosity of sandy sediment. This study used proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to measure the pore-size distribution and porosity of specimen to investigate mica content effect in sandy sediment. A mixture of silica sand No. 7 and mica (mica of 0 wt. %, 5 wt. % and 20 wt. %) was used in this study. The median D50 by laser diffraction method was obtained as 215.7 μm of silica sand No. 7 and 278.9 μm of mica. Pore-size distributions of specimens by the distribution of transverse magnetic relaxation time (T2) measurement by NMR were performed for the water-saturated sample under effective confining pressure of 1.0 MPa. The peaks of pore-size distribution curves decreased and showed finer shifts with increasing of mica content. The porosity of silica sand No. 7 specimen was 46.3%, and that of mica 5% and 20 % were 45.9% and 42.2%m, respectively. A change in pore-size distribution and porosity were observed with an increasing ratio of mica.

  6. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n ,f ) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data are available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. Purpose: In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Methods: Our theoretical framework is the nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large-amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically by using the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). In practice, the TDGCM is implemented in two steps. First, a series of constrained EDF calculations map the configuration and potential-energy landscape of the fissioning system for a small set of collective variables (in this work, the axial quadrupole and octupole moments of the nucleus). Then, nuclear dynamics is modeled by propagating a collective wave packet on the potential-energy surface. Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. Results: We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in two-dimensional collective spaces. Theory and experiment agree typically within two mass units for the position of the asymmetric peak. As expected, calculations are sensitive to the structure of the initial state and the prescription for the collective inertia. We emphasize that results are also sensitive to the continuity of the collective landscape near scission. Conclusions: Our analysis confirms

  7. Virtual photon structure functions and the parton content of the electron

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, M. ); Godbole, R.M. )

    1994-09-01

    We point out that in processes involving the parton content of the photon the usual effective photon approximation should be modified. The reason is that the parton content of virtual photons is logarithmically suppressed compared to real photons. We describe this suppression using several simple, physically motivated [ital Ansa]$[ital uml---tze]. Although the parton content of the electron in general no longer factorizes into an electron flux function and a photon structure function, it can still be expressed as a single integral. Numerical examples are given for the [ital e][sup +][ital e][sup [minus

  8. The effective cross section for double parton scattering within a holographic AdS/QCD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traini, Marco; Rinaldi, Matteo; Scopetta, Sergio; Vento, Vicente

    2017-05-01

    A first attempt to apply the AdS/QCD framework for a bottom-up approach to the evaluation of the effective cross section for double parton scattering in proton-proton collisions is presented. The main goal is the analytic evaluation of the dependence of the effective cross section on the longitudinal momenta of the involved partons, obtained within the holographic Soft-Wall model. If measured in high-energy processes at hadron colliders, this momentum dependence could open a new window on 2-parton correlations in a proton.

  9. First Successful Pre-Distribution of Stable Iodine Tablets Under Japan's New Policy After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident.

    PubMed

    Ojino, Mayo; Yoshida, Sumito; Nagata, Takashi; Ishii, Masami; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-12-08

    Stable iodine tablets are effective in reducing internal exposure to radioactive iodine, which poses a risk for thyroid cancer and other conditions. After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, the Japanese government shifted its policy on stable iodine tablet distribution from "after-the-fact" to "before-the-fact" and instructed local governments to pre-distribute stable iodine tablets to residents living within a 5-km radius of nuclear facilities. The nation's first pre-distribution of stable iodine tablets was carried out in June and July of 2014 in Kagoshima Prefecture. Health surveys were conducted so that the medication would not be handed out to people with the possibility of side effects. Of the 4715 inhabitants in the area, 132 were found to require a physician's judgment, mostly to exclude risks of side effects. This was considered important to prevent the misuse of the tablets in the event of a disaster. The importance of collective and individualized risk communication between physicians and inhabitants at the community health level was apparent through this study. Involvement of physicians through the regional Sendai City Medical Association was an important component of the pre-distribution. Physicians of the Sendai City Medical Association were successfully educated by using the Guidebook on Distributing and Administering Stable Iodine Tablets prepared by the Japan Medical Association and Japan Medical Association Research Institute with the collaboration of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences and the Japanese government. Thus, the physicians managed to make decisions on the dispensing of stable iodine tablets according to the health conditions of the inhabitants. All physicians nationwide should be provided continuing medical education on stable iodine tablets. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;page 1 of 5).

  10. Evidence for Parton {ital k}{sub {ital T}} Effects in High-{ital p}{sub {ital T}} Particle Production

    SciTech Connect

    Bacigalupi, J.; Mani, S.; Pellett, D.; Choudhary, B.; Kapoor, V.; Shivpuri, R.; Zutshi, V.; Baker, W.; Johnstone, C.; Lukens, P.; Skow, D.; Apanasevich, L.; Bromberg, C.; Huston, J.; Maul, A.; Miller, R.; Sorrell, L.; Yosef, C.; Chang, P.; Dlugosz, W.; Garelick, D.; Glaubman, M.; Lirakis, C.; Striley, D.; Yasuda, T.; Gutierrez, P.; Kuehler, J.; Hartman, K.; Oh, B.Y.; Toothacker, W.; Whitmore, J.J.; Blusk, S.; Chung, W.H.; Engels, E. Jr.; Shepard, P.; Weerasundara, D.; Begel, M.; de Barbaro, L.; DeSoi, W.; Dunlea, J.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferbel, T.; Ftacnik, J.; Ginther, G.; Lobkowicz, F.; Mansour, J.; Osborne, G.; Prebys, E.; Roser, R.; Slattery, P.; Varelas, N.; Zielinski, M.

    1998-09-01

    Inclusive {pi}{sup 0} and direct-photon cross sections in the kinematic range 3.5{lt}p{sub T}{lt}12 GeV/c with central rapidities (thinspy{sub cm} ) are presented for 530 and 800 GeV/c proton beams and a 515 GeV/c {pi}{sup {minus}} beam incident on Be targets. Current next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations fail to adequately describe the data for conventional choices of scales. Kinematic distributions from these hard scattering events provide evidence that the interacting partons carry significant initial-state parton transverse momentum (k{sub T} ). Incorporating these k{sub T} effects phenomenologically greatly improves the agreement between calculations and the measured cross sections. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. A measurement of the angular distribution of the diffuse optical transmittance of etched nuclear tracks in CR-39

    SciTech Connect

    Vázquez-López, C.; Zendejas-Leal, B. E.; Bogard, James S; Golzarri, J. I.; Espinosa Garcia, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a device to measure the angular distribution of the diffuse optical transmittance produced by etched nuclear tracks in polyallyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) detector. The device makes use of a stepper motor to move an array of four photodetectors around the sample in 1.8-degree steps. The integrated transmitted light was observed to increase monotonically with the etched track density in a range from zero to 2.8 x 10^5 per cm^2, using a neutron Am Be source.

  12. Applications of nuclear reaction analysis for determining hydrogen and deuterium distribution in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Altstetter, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ion beams for materials analysis has made a successful transition from the domain of the particle physicist to that of the materials scientist. The subcategory of this field, nuclear reaction analysis, is just now undergoing the transition, particularly in applications to hydrogen in materials. The materials scientist must locate the nearest accelerator, because now he will find that using it can solve mysteries that do not yield to other techniques. 9 figures

  13. Partonic structure of neutral pseudoscalars via two photon transition form factors

    DOE PAGES

    Raya, Khepani; Ding, Minghui; Bashir, Adnan; ...

    2017-04-10

    Here, the γγ* → ηc,b transition form factors are computed using a continuum approach to the two valence-body bound-state problem in relativistic quantum field theory, and thereby unified with equivalent calculations of electromagnetic pion elastic and transition form factors. The resulting γγ* → ηc form factor, Gηc(Q2), is consistent with available data; significantly, at accessible momentum transfers, Q2Gηc(Q2) lies well below its conformal limit. These observations confirm that the leading-twist parton distribution amplitudes of heavy-heavy bound states are compressed relative to the conformal limit. A clear understanding of the distribution of valence quarks within mesons thus emerges, a picture whichmore » connects Goldstone modes, built from the lightest quarks in nature, with systems containing the heaviest valence quarks that can now be studied experimentally, and highlights basic facts about manifestations of mass within the Standard Model.« less

  14. [Pneumocystosis distribution among accident liquidators in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in remote period].

    PubMed

    Meĭmarian, M A

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to discover etiological role of Pneumocystis carini/jiroveci and to determine frequency of pneumocystic infection in the structure of bronchopulmonary pathology among armenians-liquidators of accident consequences in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. For the study, 65 patients-liquidators with diagnosed pneumonia, 44 liquidators with chronic bronchitis and 34 with bronchial asthma were examined. The control group was included 65 patients with pneumonia, 44 with chronic bronchitis, 34 with bronchial asthma which were unlinked with radionucleotide aggression. Mean age in main group was 46,9 and in control group- 47,6 years old. Main and control groups were randomized by sexual characteristics also. Serologic examinations were performed by the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunoSorbent assay) and method of immunofluorescent detection of P.carinii. Circulation of pneumocystosis etiologic agent among patients-liquidators of accident consequences in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant with different bronchopulmonary pathology was established and high percentage of seropositivity was revealed. Overall these data revealed high probability of Pneumocystis carini/jiroveci in the etiology of bronchopulmonary pathology among liquidators of accident consequences in the the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Even among immunocompromised patients, liquidators of accident consequences, represent an exclusive group, that is in risk for activation of latent infection or new infection with P. carini/jiroveci. Therefore these findings suggest that there is a need for regular complex epidemiological monitoring of these patients.

  15. Application for internal dosimetry using biokinetic distribution of photons based on nuclear medicine images.

    PubMed

    Leal Neto, Viriato; Vieira, José Wilson; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a way to obtain estimates of dose in patients submitted to radiotherapy with basis on the analysis of regions of interest on nuclear medicine images. A software called DoRadIo (Dosimetria das Radiações Ionizantes [Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry]) was developed to receive information about source organs and target organs, generating graphical and numerical results. The nuclear medicine images utilized in the present study were obtained from catalogs provided by medical physicists. The simulations were performed with computational exposure models consisting of voxel phantoms coupled with the Monte Carlo EGSnrc code. The software was developed with the Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack and the project template Windows Presentation Foundation for C# programming language. With the mentioned tools, the authors obtained the file for optimization of Monte Carlo simulations using the EGSnrc; organization and compaction of dosimetry results with all radioactive sources; selection of regions of interest; evaluation of grayscale intensity in regions of interest; the file of weighted sources; and, finally, all the charts and numerical results. The user interface may be adapted for use in clinical nuclear medicine as a computer-aided tool to estimate the administered activity.

  16. Application for internal dosimetry using biokinetic distribution of photons based on nuclear medicine images*

    PubMed Central

    Leal Neto, Viriato; Vieira, José Wilson; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Objective This article presents a way to obtain estimates of dose in patients submitted to radiotherapy with basis on the analysis of regions of interest on nuclear medicine images. Materials and Methods A software called DoRadIo (Dosimetria das Radiações Ionizantes [Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry]) was developed to receive information about source organs and target organs, generating graphical and numerical results. The nuclear medicine images utilized in the present study were obtained from catalogs provided by medical physicists. The simulations were performed with computational exposure models consisting of voxel phantoms coupled with the Monte Carlo EGSnrc code. The software was developed with the Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack and the project template Windows Presentation Foundation for C# programming language. Results With the mentioned tools, the authors obtained the file for optimization of Monte Carlo simulations using the EGSnrc; organization and compaction of dosimetry results with all radioactive sources; selection of regions of interest; evaluation of grayscale intensity in regions of interest; the file of weighted sources; and, finally, all the charts and numerical results. Conclusion The user interface may be adapted for use in clinical nuclear medicine as a computer-aided tool to estimate the administered activity. PMID:25741101

  17. Electron energy distribution in a helium plasma created by nuclear radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. H.; Miley, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    An integral balance technique for calculation of the electron energy distribution in a radiation-induced plasma is described. Results predict W-values reasonably well and compare favorably with more complicated Monte-Carlo calculations. The distribution found differs from that in a normal electrical discharge and is of interest in radiation-pumped laser research.

  18. Laminin isoforms: biological roles and effects on the intracellular distribution of nuclear proteins in intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Turck, Natacha; Gross, Isabelle; Gendry, Patrick; Stutzmann, Jeanne; Freund, Jean-Noel; Kedinger, Michele; Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Launay, Jean-Francois . E-mail: Jean-Francois.Launay@inserm.u-strasbg.fr

    2005-02-15

    Laminins are structurally and functionally major components of the extracellular matrix. Four isoforms of laminins (laminin-1, -2, -5 and -10) are expressed in a specific pattern along the crypt-villus axis of the intestine. Previous works indicated that expression of these isoforms is developmentally regulated and that laminins could modulate the behaviour of intestinal cells, but the exact role of each isoform remained unclear. Here, we report the first systematic analysis of the cellular functions of the four isoforms using the human colon adenocarcinoma Caco2/TC7 cell line as a model. We compared the respective abilities of each isoform to modulate adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. We found that the isoforms were functionally distinct, with laminin-10 being the most adhesive substratum, laminin-2, laminin-5 and laminin-10 enhancing cellular proliferation and at the opposite, laminin-1 stimulating intestinal cell differentiation. To begin to characterise the molecular events induced by the different isoforms, we examined by immunofluorescence the intracellular distribution of several nuclear proteins, recently highlighted by a nuclear proteomic approach. We observed clear nucleocytoplasmic redistribution of these proteins, which depended on the laminin isoform. These results provide evidence for a distinct functional role of laminins in intestinal cell functions characterised by specific localisation of nuclear proteins.

  19. Intracellular Distribution and Nuclear Activity of Antisense Oligonucleotides After Unassisted Uptake in Myoblasts and Differentiated Myotubes In Vitro.

    PubMed

    González-Barriga, Anchel; Nillessen, Bram; Kranzen, Julia; van Kessel, Ingeborg D G; Croes, Huib J E; Aguilera, Begoña; de Visser, Peter C; Datson, Nicole A; Mulders, Susan A M; van Deutekom, Judith C T; Wieringa, Bé; Wansink, Derick G

    2017-04-04

    Clinical efficacy of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) for the treatment of neuromuscular disorders depends on efficient cellular uptake and proper intracellular routing to the target. Selection of AONs with highest in vitro efficiencies is usually based on chemical or physical methods for forced cellular delivery. Since these methods largely bypass existing natural mechanisms for membrane passage and intracellular trafficking, spontaneous uptake and distribution of AONs in cells are still poorly understood. Here, we report on the unassisted uptake of naked AONs, so-called gymnosis, in muscle cells in culture. We found that gymnosis works similarly well for proliferating myoblasts as for terminally differentiated myotubes. Cell biological analyses combined with microscopy imaging showed that a phosphorothioate backbone promotes efficient gymnosis, that uptake is clathrin mediated and mainly results in endosomal-lysosomal accumulation. Nuclear localization occurred at a low level, but the gymnotically delivered AONs effectively modulated the expression of their nuclear RNA targets. Chloroquine treatment after gymnotic delivery helped increase nuclear AON levels. In sum, we demonstrate that gymnosis is feasible in proliferating and non-proliferating muscle cells and we confirm the relevance of AON chemistry for uptake and intracellular trafficking with this method, which provides a useful means for bio-activity screening of AONs in vitro.

  20. Ballistic protons in incoherent exclusive vector meson production as a measure of rare parton fluctuations at an electron-ion collider.

    PubMed

    Lappi, T; Mäntysaari, H; Venugopalan, R

    2015-02-27

    We argue that the proton multiplicities measured in Roman pot detectors at an electron ion collider can be used to determine centrality classes in incoherent diffractive scattering. Incoherent diffraction probes the fluctuations in the interaction strengths of multiparton Fock states in the nuclear wave functions. In particular, the saturation scale that characterizes this multiparton dynamics is significantly larger in central events relative to minimum bias events. As an application, we study the centrality dependence of incoherent diffractive vector meson production. We identify an observable which is simultaneously very sensitive to centrality triggered parton fluctuations and insensitive to details of the model.

  1. Irradiation-induced changes of the atomic distributions around the interfaces of carbides in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, T.; Tsuchiya, N.; Nagai, Y.; Almazouzi, A.; Hatakeyama, M.; Hasegawa, M.; Ohkubo, T.; van Walle, E.; Gerard, R.

    2010-10-01

    Irradiation-induced changes of the atomic distributions of solute and impurity elements around carbides in a reactor pressure vessel steel of a Belgium nuclear power reactor were investigated by laser-assisted local electrode-type three-dimensional atom probe, before and after in-service irradiation of 12 years. Before irradiation, nano-scale Fe-Mn-Cr-Mo carbides were found to be intragranular. The atomic distributions of Mn, Cr and Mo inside the carbide indicate that their concentrations around the inner carbide-matrix interface were enhanced, while a clear segregation of P at the interface was observed. After irradiation, the Mn concentration in the carbide increased substantially. In addition, the enhancement of Mn, Cr and Mo concentrations around the interface and the segregation of P were markedly intensified.

  2. Single perturbative splitting diagrams in double parton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed study of a specific class of graph that can potentially contribute to the proton-proton double parton scattering (DPS) cross section. These are the `2v1' or `single perturbative splitting' graphs, in which two `nonperturbatively generated' ladders interact with two ladders that have been generated via a perturbative 1 → 2 branching process. Using a detailed calculation, we confirm the result written down originally by Ryskin and Snigirev — namely, that the 2v1 graphs in which the two nonperturbatively generated ladders do not interact with one another do contribute to the leading order proton-proton DPS cross section, albeit with a different geometrical prefactor to the one that applies to the `2v2'/`zero perturbative splitting' graphs. We then show that 2v1 graphs in which the `nonperturbatively generated' ladders exchange partons with one another also contribute to the leading order proton-proton DPS cross section, provided that this `crosstalk' occurs at a lower scale than the 1 → 2 branching on the other side of the graph. Due to the preference in the 2v1 graphs for the x value at which the branching occurs, and crosstalk ceases, to be very much larger than the x values at the hard scale, the effect of crosstalk interactions is likely to be a decrease in the 2v1 cross section except at exceedingly small x values (≲ 10-6). At moderate x values ≃ 10-3 -10-2, the x value at the splitting is in the region ≃ 10-1 where PDFs do not change much with scale, and the effect of crosstalk interactions is likely to be small. We give an explicit formula for the contribution from the 2v1 graphs to the DPS cross section, and combine this with a suggestion that we made in a previous publication, that the `double perturbative splitting'/`1v1' graphs should be completely removed from the DPS cross section, to obtain a formula for the DPS cross section. It is pointed out that there are two potentially concerning features in this equation, that

  3. Effects of hormonal supplementation on nuclear maturation and cortical granules distribution of canine oocytes during various reproductive stages.

    PubMed

    Apparicio, M; Alves, A E; Pires-Butler, E A; Ribeiro, A P C; Covizzi, G J; Vicente, W R R

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hCG, progesterone and oestradiol supplementation on nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation of canine oocytes cultured for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. Oocytes obtained from 18 healthy bitches were divided into three groups according to their reproductive status (follicular, luteal and anoestrus stages) and cultured in TCM 199 + 25 UI/ml of hCG + 1 μg/ml of progesterone + 1 μg/ml of 17-β oestradiol or without hormonal supplementation (control) for different periods. Then, they were stained with FITC-LCA-Hoescht for chromatin configuration and cortical granules distribution and evaluated under an epifluorescence microscope. Culture time and the influence of different stages of the oestrous cycle were also evaluated. The present study demonstrated that there was no significant difference among the reproductive stages. With regards to culture medium, only oocytes from the supplemented medium were able to complete meiosis; however, significant difference was only noticed in the percentage of MI stage oocytes (p < 0.05) in the follicular and luteal group at 72 h of culture. Most oocytes in germinal vesicle, germinal vesicle breakdown and metaphase I stage had cortical granules distributed throughout the cytoplasm (immature pattern), irrespective of the culture period (p < 0.05). Cortical granules distributed immediately beneath the plasma membrane (mature) was only observed in metaphase II stage oocytes, but not all of them presented matured cytoplasm. Our results reveal that cortical granules distribution in canine oocytes matured in vitro did not progressed in correspondence with nuclear stage changes and are in accordance with those from other species.

  4. A revised molecular phylogeny of the globally distributed hawkmoth genus Hyles (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae), based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Hundsdoerfer, Anna K; Rubinoff, Daniel; Attié, Marc; Wink, Michael; Kitching, Ian J

    2009-09-01

    The hawkmoth genus Hyles comprises some 29 species with a global distribution. In this study, we augment the previous taxon sampling with more species and add sequences from a nuclear gene to produce a refined phylogenetic hypothesis. A total evidence reconstruction based on Bayesian analysis of the combined mitochondrial (COI, t-RNA-Leu, COII; 2284 bp) and nuclear (EF1alpha; 773 bp) sequences is discussed and compared with the results from separate analyses of the two genes. The total evidence phylogeny corroborates many of the phylogenetic relationships previously postulated within the genus. In addition, the hitherto unsampled enigmatic species Hyles biguttata from Madagascar appears as sister group to Hyles livornicoides from Australia, although support for the relationship is relatively weak. The high level of differentiation of Hyles perkinsi from H. calida (both Hawaii), and the status of these two as sister species, is corroborated by both sources of sequence data. However, their phylogenetic position when mt DNA sequences alone are considered differs markedly from that under total evidence. The previously postulated relationships within the Hyles euphorbiae complex (HEC) s.s. are largely corroborated, but H. dahlii is now more closely related and the HEC s.l. is redefined to include H. zygophylli and H. stroehlei (two species that had not been studied previously using molecular data) and to exclude H. siehei and H. hippophaes. The nuclear sequences alone are insufficiently variable to fully resolve all lineages and the phylogeny suggests that nuclear gene swapping and incomplete lineage sorting have occurred implying recent divergence. The results from the total evidence analysis provide a phylogenetic hypothesis that both corroborates and complements the previous biogeographic scenario, and provides new insights into the origins of several of the included taxa.

  5. Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    This chapter first gives a survey on the history of the discovery of nuclear fission. It briefly presents the liquid-drop and shell models and their application to the fission process. The most important quantities accessible to experimental determination such as mass yields, nuclear charge distribution, prompt neutron emission, kinetic energy distribution, ternary fragment yields, angular distributions, and properties of fission isomers are presented as well as the instrumentation and techniques used for their measurement. The contribution concentrates on the fundamental aspects of nuclear fission. The practical aspects of nuclear fission are discussed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0720-2_57 of Vol. 6.

  6. Review on DTU-parton model for hadron-hadron and hadron-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, C.B.

    1980-08-01

    The parton picture of color separation of dual string and its subsequent breakup is used to motivate the DTU-parton model for high energy small p/sub T/ multiparticle productions in hadron-hadron and hadron-nucleus collisions. A brief survey on phenomenological applications of the model: such as the inclusive spectra for various hh processes and central plateau heights predicted, hA inclusive spectra and the approximate anti v-universalities is presented.

  7. Hard processes at high energies in the Reggeized-parton approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpishkov, A. V.; Nefedov, M. A.; Saleev, V. A.; Shipilova, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    Dominant contributions to the cross sections of hard processes at high energies come from the processes with multi-Regge kinematics which reflect the Reggeization of partonic amplitudes as a fundamental property of quantum-field gauge theories. The report briefly describes the Reggeized-parton approach based on the k T factorization at high energies and on the Lipatov's effective field theory for Reggeized gluons and quarks.

  8. Toroidal Nuclear Matter Distributions of Superheavy Nuclei from Constrained Skyrme-HFB Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kosior, Amelia; Staszczak, A.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Using the Hartree Fock Bogoliubov (HFB) self-consistent mean-field theory with the SkM* Skyrme energy-density functional, we study nuclear structure properties of even even superheavy nuclei (SHN) of Z = 120 isotopes and N = 184 isotones. The shape of the nucleus along the lowest energy curve as a function of the quadrupole moment Q20 makes a sud- den transition from the oblate spheroids (biconcave discs) to the toroidal shapes, in the region of large oblate quadrupole moments.

  9. Nuclear magnetization distribution radii determined by hyperfine transitions in the 1s level of H-like ions 185Re74+ and 187Re74+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widmann, K.; Birkett, B. B.; Mårtensson-Pendrill, A.-M.; Gustavsson, M. G. H.

    1998-02-01

    The F=3 to F=2 hyperfine transitions in the 1s ground state of the two isotopes 185Re74+ and 187Re74+ were measured to be (4560.5+/-3) Å and (4516.9+/-3) Å, respectively, using emission spectroscopy in an electron beam ion trap. After applying appropriate corrections for the nuclear charge distribution and QED effects, a Bohr-Weisskopf effect of ɛ=2.23(9)% and 2.30(9)% are found for 185Re and 187Re, respectively. This value is almost twice that of a previous theoretical estimate, and indicates a distribution of the nuclear magnetization far more extended than that of the nuclear charge. A radius of the magnetization distribution of 1/2=7.57(32) fm and 1/2=7.69(32) fm for 185Re and 187Re, respectively, is inferred from the data. These radii are larger than the nuclear charge distribution radius [1/2=5.39(1) fm] for both isotopes by factors 1.40(6) and 1.43(6), respectively. We find that the Bohr-Weisskopf effect in H-like ions is a sensitive probe of nuclear magnetization distribution, especially for cases where the charge distribution and magnetic moments are accurately known.

  10. Triple Parton Scatterings in High-Energy Proton-Proton Collisions.

    PubMed

    d'Enterria, David; Snigirev, Alexander M

    2017-03-24

    A generic expression to compute triple parton scattering cross sections in high-energy proton-proton (pp) collisions is presented as a function of the corresponding single parton cross sections and the transverse parton profile of the proton encoded in an effective parameter σ_{eff,TPS}. The value of σ_{eff,TPS} is closely related to the similar effective cross section that characterizes double parton scatterings, and amounts to σ_{eff,TPS}=12.5±4.5  mb. Estimates for triple charm (cc[over ¯]) and bottom (bb[over ¯]) production in pp collisions at LHC and FCC energies are presented based on next-to-next-to-leading-order perturbative calculations for single cc[over ¯], bb[over ¯] cross sections. At sqrt[s]≈100  TeV, about 15% of the pp collisions produce three cc[over ¯] pairs from three different parton-parton scatterings.

  11. Estimation of Ground-Level Radioisotope Distributions for Underground Nuclear Test Leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, James H.; Fast, James E.; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Warren, Glen A.

    2009-06-19

    On-site inspections (OSI) will be an important process to deter and help verify compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). An important tool in narrowing the possible locations to collect evidence of a nuclear test during an on-site inspection may be over-flights of the general area using aerial gamma spectroscopy which can measure the energy and intensity of gamma radiation and help identify areas that may warrant further investigation of areas of high concentrations of radioactivity. This paper will investigate the capabilities of gamma ray detectors that are typically used in aerial searches. Modeling and simulation results of the detector response for radionuclide species for an OSI will be presented for a variety of assumed releases, depositions on the ground, and times after a suspected Treaty violation for typical over flight heights and speeds. This data will provide information on the possible applicability for airborne spectroscopy and the challenges and limitations of this tool for OSI. Of particular interest will be analysis of the data for gross count, regions of interest, and isotope identification types of algorithms and the characteristics of each.

  12. Automated parton-shower variations in PYTHIA 8

    SciTech Connect

    Mrenna, S.; Skands, P.

    2016-10-03

    In the era of precision physics measurements at the LHC, efficient and exhaustive estimations of theoretical uncertainties play an increasingly crucial role. In the context of Monte Carlo (MC) event generators, the estimation of such uncertainties traditionally requires independent MC runs for each variation, for a linear increase in total run time. In this work, we report on an automated evaluation of the dominant (renormalization-scale and nonsingular) perturbative uncertainties in the pythia 8 event generator, with only a modest computational overhead. Each generated event is accompanied by a vector of alternative weights (one for each uncertainty variation), with each set separately preserving the total cross section. Explicit scale-compensating terms can be included, reflecting known coefficients of higher-order splitting terms and reducing the effect of the variations. In conclusion, the formalism also allows for the enhancement of rare partonic splittings, such as g→bb¯ and q→qγ, to obtain weighted samples enriched in these splittings while preserving the correct physical Sudakov factors.

  13. Automated parton-shower variations in PYTHIA 8

    DOE PAGES

    Mrenna, S.; Skands, P.

    2016-10-03

    In the era of precision physics measurements at the LHC, efficient and exhaustive estimations of theoretical uncertainties play an increasingly crucial role. In the context of Monte Carlo (MC) event generators, the estimation of such uncertainties traditionally requires independent MC runs for each variation, for a linear increase in total run time. In this work, we report on an automated evaluation of the dominant (renormalization-scale and nonsingular) perturbative uncertainties in the pythia 8 event generator, with only a modest computational overhead. Each generated event is accompanied by a vector of alternative weights (one for each uncertainty variation), with each set separatelymore » preserving the total cross section. Explicit scale-compensating terms can be included, reflecting known coefficients of higher-order splitting terms and reducing the effect of the variations. In conclusion, the formalism also allows for the enhancement of rare partonic splittings, such as g→bb¯ and q→qγ, to obtain weighted samples enriched in these splittings while preserving the correct physical Sudakov factors.« less

  14. Automated parton-shower variations in pythia 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrenna, S.; Skands, P.

    2016-10-01

    In the era of precision physics measurements at the LHC, efficient and exhaustive estimations of theoretical uncertainties play an increasingly crucial role. In the context of Monte Carlo (MC) event generators, the estimation of such uncertainties traditionally requires independent MC runs for each variation, for a linear increase in total run time. In this work, we report on an automated evaluation of the dominant (renormalization-scale and nonsingular) perturbative uncertainties in the pythia 8 event generator, with only a modest computational overhead. Each generated event is accompanied by a vector of alternative weights (one for each uncertainty variation), with each set separately preserving the total cross section. Explicit scale-compensating terms can be included, reflecting known coefficients of higher-order splitting terms and reducing the effect of the variations. The formalism also allows for the enhancement of rare partonic splittings, such as g →b b ¯ and q →q γ , to obtain weighted samples enriched in these splittings while preserving the correct physical Sudakov factors.

  15. Energy flow along the medium-induced parton cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Blaizot, J.-P.

    2016-05-15

    We discuss the dynamics of parton cascades that develop in dense QCD matter, and contrast their properties with those of similar cascades of gluon radiation in vacuum. We argue that such cascades belong to two distinct classes that are characterized respectively by an increasing or a constant (or decreasing) branching rate along the cascade. In the former class, of which the BDMPS, medium-induced, cascade constitutes a typical example, it takes a finite time to transport a finite amount of energy to very soft quanta, while this time is essentially infinite in the latter case, to which the DGLAP cascade belongs. The medium induced cascade is accompanied by a constant flow of energy towards arbitrary soft modes, leading eventually to the accumulation of the initial energy of the leading particle at zero energy. It also exhibits scaling properties akin to wave turbulence. These properties do not show up in the cascade that develops in vacuum. There, the energy accumulates in the spectrum at smaller and smaller energy as the cascade develops, but the energy never flows all the way down to zero energy. Our analysis suggests that the way the energy is shared among the offsprings of a splitting gluon has little impact on the qualitative properties of the cascades, provided the kernel that governs the splittings is not too singular.

  16. Automated parton-shower variations in PYTHIA 8

    SciTech Connect

    Mrenna, S.; Skands, P.

    2016-10-03

    In the era of precision physics measurements at the LHC, efficient and exhaustive estimations of theoretical uncertainties play an increasingly crucial role. In the context of Monte Carlo (MC) event generators, the estimation of such uncertainties traditionally requires independent MC runs for each variation, for a linear increase in total run time. In this work, we report on an automated evaluation of the dominant (renormalization-scale and nonsingular) perturbative uncertainties in the pythia 8 event generator, with only a modest computational overhead. Each generated event is accompanied by a vector of alternative weights (one for each uncertainty variation), with each set separately preserving the total cross section. Explicit scale-compensating terms can be included, reflecting known coefficients of higher-order splitting terms and reducing the effect of the variations. In conclusion, the formalism also allows for the enhancement of rare partonic splittings, such as g→bb¯ and q→qγ, to obtain weighted samples enriched in these splittings while preserving the correct physical Sudakov factors.

  17. Simple interpretation of nuclear orientation for Coulomb barrier distributions derived from a realistic effective interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, M.; Seif, W. M.

    2010-03-15

    A simple straightforward method has been presented to predict the dependence of barrier distributions at arbitrary orientations on different deformations. The proposed interpretation is developed independently of the complicated numerical calculations. It is related to the change of half-density radius of the deformed nucleus, in the direction of the separation vector. The microscopic calculations of Coulomb barrier are carried out by using a realistic density dependent nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction, BDM3Y, for the interaction between spherical, {sup 48}Ca, and deformed, {sup 244}Pu, nuclei, as an example. To do so, the double-folding model for the interaction of spherical-deformed nuclei is put in a suitable computational form for the calculation of the potential at several separation distances and orientation angles using the density dependent NN force without consuming computational time. We found that the orientation distributions of the Coulomb barrier parameters show similar patterns to those of the interacting deformed nucleus radius. It is found that the orientation distribution of the Coulomb barrier radius follows the same variation of the deformed nucleus radius while the barrier height distribution follows it inversely. This correlation (anticorrelation) allows a simple evaluation of the orientation barrier distribution which would be very helpful to estimate when the barrier parameters will increase or decrease and at which orientations they will be independent of the deformation. This also allows us to estimate the compact and elongated configurations of the interacting nuclei which lead to hot and cold fusion, respectively.

  18. Simple interpretation of nuclear orientation for Coulomb barrier distributions derived from a realistic effective interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M.; Seif, W. M.

    2010-03-01

    A simple straightforward method has been presented to predict the dependence of barrier distributions at arbitrary orientations on different deformations. The proposed interpretation is developed independently of the complicated numerical calculations. It is related to the change of half-density radius of the deformed nucleus, in the direction of the separation vector. The microscopic calculations of Coulomb barrier are carried out by using a realistic density dependent nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction, BDM3Y, for the interaction between spherical, Ca48, and deformed, Pu244, nuclei, as an example. To do so, the double-folding model for the interaction of spherical-deformed nuclei is put in a suitable computational form for the calculation of the potential at several separation distances and orientation angles using the density dependent NN force without consuming computational time. We found that the orientation distributions of the Coulomb barrier parameters show similar patterns to those of the interacting deformed nucleus radius. It is found that the orientation distribution of the Coulomb barrier radius follows the same variation of the deformed nucleus radius while the barrier height distribution follows it inversely. This correlation (anticorrelation) allows a simple evaluation of the orientation barrier distribution which would be very helpful to estimate when the barrier parameters will increase or decrease and at which orientations they will be independent of the deformation. This also allows us to estimate the compact and elongated configurations of the interacting nuclei which lead to hot and cold fusion, respectively.

  19. Have the tsunami and nuclear accident following the Great East Japan Earthquake affected the local distribution of hospital physicians?

    PubMed

    Kashima, Saori; Inoue, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Masatoshi

    2017-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake occurred on 11 March 2011 near the northeast coast of the main island, 'Honshu', of Japan. It wreaked enormous damage in two main ways: a giant tsunami and an accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP). This disaster may have affected the distribution of physicians in the region. Here, we evaluate the effect of the disaster on the distribution of hospital physicians in the three most severely affected prefectures (Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima). We obtained individual information about physicians from the Physician Census in 2010 (pre-disaster) and 2012 (post-disaster). We examined geographical distributions of physicians in two ways: (1) municipality-based analysis for demographic evaluation; and (2) hospital-based analysis for geographic evaluation. In each analysis, we calculated the rate of change in physician distributions between pre- and post-disaster years at various distances from the tsunami-affected coast, and from the restricted area due to the FDNPP accident. The change in all, hospital, and clinic physicians were 0.2%, 0.7%, and -0.7%, respectively. In the municipality-based analysis, after taking account of the decreased population, physician numbers only decreased within the restricted area. In the hospital-based analysis, hospital physician numbers did not decrease at any distance from the tsunami-affected coast. In contrast, there was a 3.3% and 2.3% decrease in hospital physicians 0-25 km and 25-50 km from the restricted area surrounding the FDNPP, respectively. Additionally, decreases were larger and increases were smaller in areas close to the FDNPP than in areas further away. Our results suggest that the tsunami did not affect the distribution of physicians in the affected regions. However, the FDNPP accident changed physician distribution in areas close to the power plant.

  20. Have the tsunami and nuclear accident following the Great East Japan Earthquake affected the local distribution of hospital physicians?

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Masatoshi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The Great East Japan Earthquake occurred on 11 March 2011 near the northeast coast of the main island, ‘Honshu’, of Japan. It wreaked enormous damage in two main ways: a giant tsunami and an accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP). This disaster may have affected the distribution of physicians in the region. Here, we evaluate the effect of the disaster on the distribution of hospital physicians in the three most severely affected prefectures (Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima). Methods We obtained individual information about physicians from the Physician Census in 2010 (pre-disaster) and 2012 (post-disaster). We examined geographical distributions of physicians in two ways: (1) municipality-based analysis for demographic evaluation; and (2) hospital-based analysis for geographic evaluation. In each analysis, we calculated the rate of change in physician distributions between pre- and post-disaster years at various distances from the tsunami-affected coast, and from the restricted area due to the FDNPP accident. Results The change in all, hospital, and clinic physicians were 0.2%, 0.7%, and −0.7%, respectively. In the municipality-based analysis, after taking account of the decreased population, physician numbers only decreased within the restricted area. In the hospital-based analysis, hospital physician numbers did not decrease at any distance from the tsunami-affected coast. In contrast, there was a 3.3% and 2.3% decrease in hospital physicians 0–25 km and 25–50 km from the restricted area surrounding the FDNPP, respectively. Additionally, decreases were larger and increases were smaller in areas close to the FDNPP than in areas further away. Conclusions Our results suggest that the tsunami did not affect the distribution of physicians in the affected regions. However, the FDNPP accident changed physician distribution in areas close to the power plant. PMID:28542461

  1. Conventional versus single-ladder-splitting contributions to double parton scattering production of two quarkonia, two Higgs bosons, and cc xAFcc xAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, Jonathan R.; Maciuła, Rafał; Szczurek, Antoni

    2014-09-01

    The double parton distributions (dPDF), both conventional (i.e. double ladder) and those corresponding to 1→2 ladder splitting, are calculated and compared for different two-parton combinations. The conventional and splitting dPDFs have very similar shape in x1 and x2. We make a first quantitative evaluation of the single-ladder-splitting contribution to double parton scattering (DPS) production of two S- or P-wave quarkonia, two Higgs bosons and cc ¯cc ¯. The ratio of the single-ladder-splitting to conventional (i.e. double ladder against double ladder) contributions is discussed as a function of center-of-mass energy, mass of the produced system and other kinematical variables. Using a simple model for the dependence of the conventional two-parton distribution on transverse parton separation (Gaussian and independent of xi and scales), we find that the single-ladder-splitting (or 2v1) contribution is as big as the conventional (or 2v2) contribution discussed in recent years in the literature. In many experimental studies of DPS, one extracts the quantity 1/σeff=σDPS/(σSPS ,1σSPS,2), with σSPS ,1 and σSPS ,2 being the single scattering cross sections for the two subprocesses in the DPS process. Many past phenomenological studies of DPS have only considered the conventional contribution and have obtained values a factor of ˜2 too small for 1/σeff. Our analysis shows that it is important also to consider the ladder-splitting mechanism, and that this might resolve the discrepancy (this was also pointed out in a recent study by Blok et al.). The differential distributions in rapidity and transverse momenta calculated for conventional and single-ladder-splitting DPS processes are however very similar which causes their experimental separation to be rather difficult, if not impossible. The direct consequence of the existence of the two components (conventional and splitting) is the energy and process dependence of the empirical parameter σeff. This is

  2. Departure from equilibrium of the quasiparticle distribution functions in high-energy nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, P.; Kapusta, J. I.

    2017-01-01

    In simulations of high energy heavy ion collisions that employ viscous hydrodynamics, single particle distributions are distorted from their thermal equilibrium form due to gradients in the flow velocity. These are closely related to the formulas for the shear and bulk viscosities in the quasiparticle approximation. Distorted single particle distributions are now commonly used to calculate the emission of photons and dilepton pairs, and in the late stage to calculate the conversion of a continuous fluid to individual particles. We show how distortions of the single particle distribution functions due to both shear and bulk viscous effects can be done rigorously in the quasiparticle approximation and illustrate it with the linear σ model at finite temperature.

  3. High density, uniformly distributed W/UO2 for use in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Barnes, Marvin W.; Hone, Lance; Cook, Steven

    2017-04-01

    An inexpensive, quick method has been developed to obtain uniform distributions of UO2 particles in a tungsten matrix utilizing 0.5 wt percent low density polyethylene. Powders were sintered in a Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) furnace at 1600 °C, 1700 °C, 1750 °C, 1800 °C and 1850 °C using a modified sintering profile. This resulted in a uniform distribution of UO2 particles in a tungsten matrix with high densities, reaching 99.46% of theoretical for the sample sintered at 1850 °C. The powder process is described and the results of this study are given below.

  4. TRAF2 regulates the cytoplasmic/nuclear distribution of TRAF4 and its biological function in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Wen, Zhifeng; Sun, Limei; Wang, Jian; Song, Min; Wang, Enhua; Mi, Xiaoyi

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •TRAF2 appears to interact with TRAF4 in breast cancer cell lines. •TRAF2 affects the localization and function of TRAF4 in breast cancer cell lines. •TRAF4 may play an important role in the activation of NF-κB via TRAF2. -- Abstract: Although numerous studies have shown that tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 4 (TRAF4) plays an important role in the carcinogenesis of many tumor types, its exact molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we examined the regulation function of TRAF2 to the cytoplasmic/nuclear distribution of TRAF4 in the breast cancer cell line. Using cell immunofluorescent staining, we found that TRAF2 and TRAF4 were co-localized to the cytoplasm in MCF-7 cells. Co-immunoprecipitation showed that TRAF2 could interact with TRAF4 in MCF-10A, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. Western blotting showed TRAF2 depletion by targeted siRNA in MDA-MB-231 cells led to reduced TRAF4 expression in the cytoplasm and augmented TRAF4 expression in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic expression of TRAF4 was augmented and nuclear expression was reduced when MCF-7 cells were transfected with hTRAF2pLPCX-HA-Flag/P874. MCF-7 cells expressing hTRAF2pLPCX-HA-Flag/P874 had enhanced cell proliferation rates. The nuclear expression of NF-κB significantly increased after TNF-α treatment. When hTRAF2pLPCX-HA-Flag/P874 and the siRNA-TRAF4 plasmid were cotransfected, the nuclear expression of NF-κB was significantly reduced compared with cells transfected with hTRAF2pLPCX-HA-Flag/P874 only. In conclusion, TRAF2 appears to interact with TRAF4 and affect the localization of TRAF4 in breast cancer cell lines. The overexpression of TRAF2 augmented the cytoplasmic expression of TRAF4 which promoted cell proliferation and inhibited cell apoptosis by activating NF-κB nuclear transcription. TRAF4 may play an important role in the activation of NF-κB via TRAF2.

  5. Transverse momentum distributions inside the nucleon from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Musch, B. U.; Haegler, Ph.; Negele, J. W.; Schaefer, A.

    2011-07-15

    We study transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) with non-local operators in lattice QCD, using MILC/LHPC lattices. Results obtained with a simplified operator geometry show visible dipole deformations of spin-dependent quark momentum densities.

  6. Transverse momentum distributions inside the nucleon from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard Musch, Philipp Haegler, John Negele, Andreas Schaefer

    2011-07-01

    We study transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) with non-local operators in lattice QCD, using MILC/LHPC lattices. Results obtained with a simplified operator geometry show visible dipole deformations of spin-dependent quark momentum densities.

  7. HMS-burn: a model for hydrogen distribution and combustion in nuclear reactor containments

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    It is now possible to analyze the time-dependent, fully three-dimensional behavior of hydrogen combustion in nuclear reactor containments. This analysis involves coupling the full Navier-Stokes equations with multi-species transport to the global chemical kinetics of hydrogen combustion. A transport equation for the subgrid scale turbulent kinetic energy density is solved to produce the time and space dependent turbulent transport coefficients. The heat transfer coefficient governing the exchange of heat between fluid computational cells adjacent to wall cells is calculated by a modified Reynolds analogy formulation. The analysis of a MARK-III containment indicates very complex flow patterns that greatly influence fluid and wall temperatures and heat fluxes.

  8. Application of TL dosemeters for dose distribution measurements at high temperatures in nuclear reactors.

    PubMed

    Osvay, M; Deme, S

    2006-01-01

    Al2O3:Mg,Y ceramic thermoluminescence dosemeters were developed at the Institute of Isotopes for high dose applications at room temperatures. The glow curve of Al2O3:Mg,Y exhibits two peaks--one at 250 degrees C (I) and another peak at approximately 400 degrees C (II). In order to extend the application of these dosemeters to high temperatures, the effect of irradiation temperature was investigated using temperature controlled heating system during high dose irradiation at various temperatures (20-100 degrees C). The new calibration and measuring method has been successfully applied for dose mapping within the hermetic zone of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant even at high temperature parts of blocks.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of velocity distributions in an ultrasonically vibrated granular bed

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, J. M.; Tarvaz, T.; Mantle, M. D.; Sederman, A. J.; Gladden, L. F.; Sheikh, N. A.; Wildman, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging experiments on granular beds of mustard grains fluidized by vertical vibration at ultrasonic frequencies. The variation of both granular temperature and packing fraction with height was measured within the three-dimensional cell for a range of vibration frequencies, amplitudes and numbers of grains. Small increases in vibration frequency were found—contrary to the predictions of classical ‘hard-sphere’ expressions for the energy flux through a vibrating boundary—to result in dramatic reductions in granular temperature. Numerical simulations of the grain–wall interactions, using experimentally determined Hertzian contact stiffness coefficients, showed that energy flux drops significantly as the vibration period approaches the grain–wall contact time. The experiments thus demonstrate the need for new models for ‘soft-sphere’ boundary conditions at ultrasonic frequencies. PMID:24711488

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of velocity distributions in an ultrasonically vibrated granular bed.

    PubMed

    Huntley, J M; Tarvaz, T; Mantle, M D; Sederman, A J; Gladden, L F; Sheikh, N A; Wildman, R D

    2014-05-13

    We report the results of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging experiments on granular beds of mustard grains fluidized by vertical vibration at ultrasonic frequencies. The variation of both granular temperature and packing fraction with height was measured within the three-dimensional cell for a range of vibration frequencies, amplitudes and numbers of grains. Small increases in vibration frequency were found--contrary to the predictions of classical 'hard-sphere' expressions for the energy flux through a vibrating boundary--to result in dramatic reductions in granular temperature. Numerical simulations of the grain-wall interactions, using experimentally determined Hertzian contact stiffness coefficients, showed that energy flux drops significantly as the vibration period approaches the grain-wall contact time. The experiments thus demonstrate the need for new models for 'soft-sphere' boundary conditions at ultrasonic frequencies.