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Sample records for nuclear photofission reactions

  1. Pulsed Photofission Delayed Gamma Ray Detection for Nuclear Material Identification

    SciTech Connect

    John Kavouras; Xianfei Wen; Daren R. Norman; Dante R. Nakazawa; Haori Yang

    2012-11-01

    Innovative systems with increased sensitivity and resolution are in great demand to detect diversion and to prevent misuse in support of nuclear materials management for the U.S. fuel cycle. Nuclear fission is the most important multiplicative process involved in non-destructive active interrogation. This process produces the most easily recognizable signature for nuclear materials. High-energy gamma rays can also excite a nucleus and cause fission through a process known as photofission. After photofission reactions, delayed signals are easily distinguishable from the interrogating radiation. Linac-based, advanced inspection techniques utilizing the fission signals after photofission have been extensively studied for homeland security applications. Previous research also showed that a unique delayed gamma ray energy spectrum exists for each fissionable isotope. Isotopic composition measurement methods based on delayed gamma ray spectroscopy will be the primary focus of this work.

  2. Active Interrogation using Photofission Technique for Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Haori

    2016-03-31

    Innovative systems with increased sensitivity and resolution are in great demand to detect diversion and to prevent misuse in support of nuclear materials management for the U.S. fuel cycle. Nuclear fission is the most important multiplicative process involved in non-destructive active interrogation. This process produces the most easily recognizable signature for nuclear materials. In addition to thermal or high-energy neutrons, high-energy gamma rays can also excite a nucleus and cause fission through a process known as photofission. Electron linear accelerators (linacs) are widely used as the interrogating photon sources for inspection methods involving photofission technique. After photofission reactions, prompt signals are much stronger than the delayed signals, but it is difficult to quantify them in practical measurements. Delayed signals are easily distinguishable from the interrogating radiation. Linac-based, advanced inspection techniques utilizing the delayed signals after photofission have been extensively studied for homeland security applications. Previous research also showed that a unique delayed gamma ray energy spectrum exists for each fissionable isotope. In this work, high-energy delayed γ-rays were demonstrated to be signatures for detection, identification, and quantification of special nuclear materials. Such γ-rays were measured in between linac pulses using independent data acquisition systems. A list-mode system was developed to measure low-energy delayed γ-rays after irradiation. Photofission product yields of 238U and 239Pu were determined based on the measured delayed γ-ray spectra. The differential yields of delayed γ-rays were also proven to be able to discriminate nuclear from non-nuclear materials. The measurement outcomes were compared with Monte Carlo simulation results. It was demonstrated that the current available codes have capabilities and limitations in the simulation of photofission process. A two

  3. Nuclear photofission studies with monochromatic γ ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csige, L.; Gulyás, J.; Habs, D.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Thirolf, P. G.; Tornyi, T. G.

    2012-07-01

    Two new research facilities will be ready for operation very soon (MEGa-Ray at Liver-more National Laboratory) or start construction (ELI-Nuclear Physics in Bucharest), both providing highly brilliant γ beams with so far unprecedented properties via Compton backscattering of laser photons from a high-quality, relativistic electron beam. With these intense, monochromatic γ beams, a new era of photonuclear physics will be enabled. A new research campaign is proposed to exploit the unprecedented properties of these highly-brilliant, novel γ beams on highly-selective studies of extremely deformed nuclei in the multiple-humped potential energy landscape of the actinides via photofission. With the unique γ beam bandwidth of ΔE/E = 10-3, we can aim at resolving individual resonances which could never be achieved so far due to the limited γ bandwidth of bremsstrahlung beams. Exploratory, non-bremsstrahlung photofission experiments are going to be performed very soon at the HIγS facility (Duke University, USA) to investigate the fine structure of the sub-barrier transmission resonances of the actinides.

  4. Nuclear photofission studies with monochromatic {gamma} ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Csige, L.; Gulyas, J.; Habs, D.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Thirolf, P. G.; Tornyi, T. G.

    2012-07-09

    Two new research facilities will be ready for operation very soon (MEGa-Ray at Liver-more National Laboratory) or start construction (ELI-Nuclear Physics in Bucharest), both providing highly brilliant {gamma} beams with so far unprecedented properties via Compton backscattering of laser photons from a high-quality, relativistic electron beam. With these intense, monochromatic {gamma} beams, a new era of photonuclear physics will be enabled. A new research campaign is proposed to exploit the unprecedented properties of these highly-brilliant, novel {gamma} beams on highly-selective studies of extremely deformed nuclei in the multiple-humped potential energy landscape of the actinides via photofission. With the unique {gamma} beam bandwidth of {Delta}E/E = 10{sup -3}, we can aim at resolving individual resonances which could never be achieved so far due to the limited {gamma} bandwidth of bremsstrahlung beams. Exploratory, non-bremsstrahlung photofission experiments are going to be performed very soon at the HI{gamma}S facility (Duke University, USA) to investigate the fine structure of the sub-barrier transmission resonances of the actinides.

  5. Simulation of delayed γ-ray emission following photofission reactions induced by pulsed bremsstrahlung x-rays using MCNPX and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xianfei; Yang, Haori

    2016-12-01

    There is a great demand to develop non-destructive techniques to identify and quantify Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) in homeland security and nuclear safeguards applications. Passive assay could be extremely challenging in some scenarios. Active interrogation technique based on photofission has been identified as one of the promising approaches. In radiation detection system design based on such technique, it is highly desired to have abilities to accurately and efficiently simulate delayed γ-rays emitted from photofission reactions. In this work, simulation results were compared with measurement outcomes to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the code MCNPX 2.7.0 in the simulation of delayed γ-rays from photofission of uranium and plutonium samples. First, high-energy delayed γ-rays (Eγ 2.7-4.5 MeV) from photofission of 238U were simulated and validated against the energy spectra measured in between linac pulses. Second, low-energy delayed γ-ray spectra (Eγ 0.6-2.7 MeV) measured with a list-mode system after irradiation of 239Pu were used in the validation.

  6. Photofission product yields of 238U and 239Pu with 22-MeV bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xianfei; Yang, Haori

    2016-06-01

    In homeland security and nuclear safeguards applications, non-destructive techniques to identify and quantify special nuclear materials are in great demand. Although nuclear materials naturally emit characteristic radiation (e.g. neutrons, γ-rays), their intensity and energy are normally low. Furthermore, such radiation could be intentionally shielded with ease or buried in high-level background. Active interrogation techniques based on photofission have been identified as effective assay approaches to address this issue. In designing such assay systems, nuclear data, like photofission product yields, plays a crucial role. Although fission yields for neutron-induced reactions have been well studied and readily available in various nuclear databases, data on photofission product yields is rather scarce. This poses a great challenge to the application of photofission techniques. In this work, short-lived high-energy delayed γ-rays from photofission of 238U were measured in between linac pulses. In addition, a list-mode system was developed to measure relatively long-lived delayed γ-rays from photofission of 238U and 239Pu after the irradiation. Time and energy information of each γ-ray event were simultaneously recorded by this system. Cumulative photofission product yields were then determined using the measured delayed γ-ray spectra.

  7. Photofission Analysis for Fissile Dosimeters Dedicated to Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourganel, Stéphane; Faucher, Margaux; Thiollay, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    Fissile dosimeters are commonly used in reactor pressure vessel surveillance programs. In this paper, the photofission contribution is analyzed for in-vessel 237Np and 238U fissile dosimeters in French PWR. The aim is to reassess this contribution using recent tools (the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code) and latest nuclear data (JEFF3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII nuclear libraries). To be as exhaustive as possible, this study is carried out for different configurations of fissile dosimeters, irradiated inside different kinds of PWR: 900 MWe, 1300 MWe, and 1450 MWe. Calculation of photofission rate in dosimeters does not present a major problem using the TRIPOLI-4® Monte Carlo code and the coupled neutron-photon simulation mode. However, preliminary studies were necessary to identify the origin of photons responsible of photofissions in dosimeters in relation to the photofission threshold reaction (around 5 MeV). It appears that the main contribution of high enough energy photons generating photofissions is the neutron inelastic scattering in stainless steel reactor structures. By contrast, 137Cs activity calculation is not an easy task since photofission yield data are known with high uncertainty.

  8. Coincidence/Multiplicity Photofission Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Jones; M.T. Swinhoe; S.J. Tobin; W. H. Geist; D.R. Norman; R.B. Rothrock; C.R. Freeman; K. J. Haskell

    2009-09-01

    An series of experiments using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) photonuclear inspection system and a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)-supplied, list-mode data acquisition method have shown enhanced performance utilizing pulsed photofission-induced, neutron coincidence counting between pulses of an up-to-10-MeV electron accelerator for nuclear material detection and identification. The enhanced inspection methodology has applicability to homeland security, treaty-related support, and weapon dismantlement applications. For the latter, this technology can directly support of Department of Energy/NA241 programmatic mission objectives relative to future Rocky Ridge-type testing campaigns for active inspection systems.

  9. Simulation of photofission experiments at the ELI-NP facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, P.; Balabanski, D. L.; Cuong, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    An extensive experimental program for the study of photofission will take place at the Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility, where different actinide targets will be exposed to a brilliant gamma beam to produce fission fragments. We report on the implementation within the Geant4 simulation toolkit of the photofission process, of related background processes, and of extended ionic charge parameterization. These developments are used to evaluate the production rates of photofission fragments and their release efficiency from the actinide targets.

  10. On the role of energy separated in fission process, excitation energy and reaction channels effects in the isomeric ratios of fission product 135Xe in photofission of actinide elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiep, Tran Duc; An, Truong Thi; Cuong, Phan Viet; Vinh, Nguyen The; Mishinski, G. V.; Zhemenik, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we present the isomeric ratio of fission product 135Xe in the photo-fission of actinide elements 232Th, 233U and 237Np induced by end-point bremsstrahlung energies of 13.5, 23.5 and 25.0 MeV which were determined by the method of inert gaseous flow. The data were analyzed, discussed and compared with the similar data from literature to examine the role of energy separated in fission process, excitation energy and reaction channels effects.

  11. Cryogenic stopping cell for photofission fragments at the ELI-NP facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, P.; Balabanski, D. L.; Cuong, P. V.

    2015-10-01

    The brilliant gamma beam at the future Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility will be used to generate a beam of exotic neutron-rich isotopes via photofission of actinide targets. We present simulations with the Geant4 toolkit of the photofission process for the design and optimization of the expected performance parameters of the Cryogenic Stopping Cell (CSC). The CSC will be used to extract the photofission fragments into the secondary beam of about 106 ions/s. We propose an experimental program to study refractory neutron-rich isotopes.

  12. Cryogenic stopping cell for photofission fragments at the ELI-NP facility

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, P. Balabanski, D. L.; Cuong, P. V.

    2015-10-15

    The brilliant gamma beam at the future Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility will be used to generate a beam of exotic neutron-rich isotopes via photofission of actinide targets. We present simulations with the Geant4 toolkit of the photofission process for the design and optimization of the expected performance parameters of the Cryogenic Stopping Cell (CSC). The CSC will be used to extract the photofission fragments into the secondary beam of about 10{sup 6} ions/s. We propose an experimental program to study refractory neutron-rich isotopes.

  13. Two neutron correlations in photo-fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, D. S.; Kosinov, O.; Forest, T.; Burggraf, J.; Stave, S.; Warren, G.; Starovoitova, V.

    2016-09-01

    A large body of experimental work has established the strong kinematical correlation between fission fragments and fission neutrons. Here, we report on the progress of investigations of the potential for strong two neutron correlations arising from the nearly back-to-back nature of the two fission fragments that emit these neutrons in the photo-fission process. In initial measurements, a pulsed electron linear accelerator was used to generate bremsstrahlung photons that impinged upon an actinide target, and the energy and opening angle distributions of coincident neutrons were measured using a large acceptance neutron detector array. A planned comprehensive set of measurements of two neutron correlations in the photo-fission of actinides is expected to shed light on several fundamental aspects of the fission process including the multiplicity distributions associated with the light and heavy fission fragments, the nuclear temperatures of the fission fragments, and the mass distribution of the fission fragments as a function of energy released. In addition to these measurements providing important nuclear data, the unique kinematics of fission and the resulting two neutron correlations have the potential to be the basis for a new tool to detect fissionable materials. A key technical challenge of this program arises from the need to perform coincidence measurements with a low duty factor, pulsed electron accelerator. This has motivated the construction of a large acceptance neutron detector array, and the development of data analysis techniques to directly measure uncorrelated two neutron backgrounds.

  14. Two neutron correlations in photo-fission

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, D. S.; Kosinov, O.; Forest, T.; Burggraf, J.; Stave, S.; Warren, G.; Starovoitova, V.

    2016-01-01

    A large body of experimental work has established the strong kinematical correlation between fission fragments and fission neutrons. Here, we report on the progress of investigations of the potential for strong two neutron correlations arising from the nearly back-to-back nature of the two fission fragments that emit these neutrons in the photo-fission process. In initial measurements, a pulsed electron linear accelerator was used to generate bremsstrahlung photons that impinged upon an actinide target, and the energy and opening angle distributions of coincident neutrons were measured using a large acceptance neutron detector array. A planned comprehensive set of measurements of two neutron correlations in the photo-fission of actinides is expected to shed light on several fundamental aspects of the fission process including the multiplicity distributions associated with the light and heavy fission fragments, the nuclear temperatures of the fission fragments, and the mass distribution of the fission fragments as a function of energy released. In addition to these measurements providing important nuclear data, the unique kinematics of fission and the resulting two neutron correlations have the potential to be the basis for a new tool to detect fissionable materials. A key technical challenge of this program arises from the need to perform coincidence measurements with a low duty factor, pulsed electron accelerator. This has motivated the construction of a large acceptance neutron detector array, and the development of data analysis techniques to directly measure uncorrelated two neutron backgrounds.

  15. Assessment of actinide mass embedded in large concrete waste packages by photon interrogation and photofission.

    PubMed

    Gmar, M; Jeanneau, F; Lainé, F; Makil, H; Poumarède, B; Tola, F

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a method based on photofission developed in our laboratory to characterize in depth large waste packages. The method consists in using photons of high-energy (Bremsstrahlung radiation) in order to induce reactions of photofission on the heavy nuclei present in the wastes. The measurement of the delayed neutrons allows quantifying the actinides in the wastes. We present the first results of measurement performed with a concrete mock-up of 870l and two real waste packages.

  16. Enhanced Photofission-based, Coincidence/Multiplicity Inspection Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Jones; D.R. Norman; K.J. Haskell; M.T. Swinhoe; S.J. Tobin; W.H. Geist; R.B. Rothrock; C.R. Freeman

    2010-07-01

    An enhanced active interrogation system has been developed that integrates a transportable Idaho National Laboratory (INL) photonuclear inspection system, using a pulsed bremsstrahlung source and a reconfigurable neutron detection system, with a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) list-mode data acquisition system. A series of active interrogation experiments have shown enhanced nuclear material detection and identification utilizing pulsed photofission-induced, neutron coincidence/multiplicity counting between pulses of an up-to-10-MeV electron accelerator. This paper describes the integrated inspection system and presents some key shielded and unshielded nuclear material inspection results. The enhanced inspection methodology has applicability to homeland security and possible nuclear weapon dismantlement treaties.

  17. Transfer reactions in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, D. W.

    2016-08-01

    To a high degree many aspects of the large-scale behavior of objects in the Universe are governed by the underlying nuclear physics. In fact the shell structure of nuclear physics is directly imprinted into the chemical abundances of the elements. The tranquility of the night sky is a direct result of the relatively slow rate of nuclear reactions that control and determines a star’s fate. Understanding the nuclear structure and reaction rates between nuclei is vital to understanding our Universe. Nuclear-transfer reactions make accessible a wealth of knowledge from which we can extract much of the required nuclear physics information. A review of transfer reactions for nuclear astrophysics is presented with an emphasis on the experimental challenges and opportunities for future development.

  18. Nuclear excitation and precompound nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    De, A.; Ray, S.; Ghosh, S.K.

    1988-06-01

    The angular distribution of nucleons emitted in nucleon-induced precompound nuclear reactions are calculated taking into account the effect of excitation on the kinematics of nucleon-nucleon scattering inside the target-plus-projectile system. The results are compared with quantum mechanical calculations and those of reaction models based on a pure nucleon-nucleon collision picture.

  19. Th and U fuel photofission study by NTD for AD-MSR subcritical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Greaves, Eduardo D.; Barros, Haydn; Pino, Felix; Barrera, Maria T.; Farina, Fulvio; Davila, Jesus

    2015-07-23

    During the last decade a considerable effort has been devoted for developing energy generating systems based on advanced nuclear technology within the design concepts of GEN-IV. Thorium base fuel systems such as accelerator driven nuclear reactors are one of the often mentioned attractive and affordable options. Several radiotherapy linear accelerators are on the market and due to their reliability, they could be employed as drivers for subcritical liquid fuel assemblies. Bremsstrahlung photons with energies above 5.5MeV, induce (γ,n) and (e,e’n) reactions in the W-target. Resulting gamma radiation and photo or fission neutrons may be absorbed in target materials such as thorium and uranium isotopes to induce sustained fission or nuclear transmutation in waste radioactive materials. Relevant photo driven and photo-fission reaction cross sections are important for actinides {sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U and {sup 237}Np in the radiotherapy machines energy range of 10-20 MV. In this study we employ passive nuclear track detectors (NTD) to determine fission rates and neutron production rates with the aim to establish the feasibility for gamma and photo-neutron driven subcritical assemblies. To cope with these objectives a 20 MV radiotherapy machine has been employed with a mixed fuel target. Results will support further development for a subcritical assembly employing a thorium containing liquid fuel. It is expected that acquired technological knowledge will contribute to the Venezuelan nuclear energy program.

  20. Th and U fuel photofission study by NTD for AD-MSR subcritical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Greaves, Eduardo D.; Davila, Jesus; Barros, Haydn; Pino, Felix; Barrera, Maria T.; Farina, Fulvio

    2015-07-01

    During the last decade a considerable effort has been devoted for developing energy generating systems based on advanced nuclear technology within the design concepts of GEN-IV. Thorium base fuel systems such as accelerator driven nuclear reactors are one of the often mentioned attractive and affordable options. Several radiotherapy linear accelerators are on the market and due to their reliability, they could be employed as drivers for subcritical liquid fuel assemblies. Bremsstrahlung photons with energies above 5.5MeV, induce (γ,n) and (e,e'n) reactions in the W-target. Resulting gamma radiation and photo or fission neutrons may be absorbed in target materials such as thorium and uranium isotopes to induce sustained fission or nuclear transmutation in waste radioactive materials. Relevant photo driven and photo-fission reaction cross sections are important for actinides 232Th, 238U and 237Np in the radiotherapy machines energy range of 10-20 MV. In this study we employ passive nuclear track detectors (NTD) to determine fission rates and neutron production rates with the aim to establish the feasibility for gamma and photo-neutron driven subcritical assemblies. To cope with these objectives a 20 MV radiotherapy machine has been employed with a mixed fuel target. Results will support further development for a subcritical assembly employing a thorium containing liquid fuel. It is expected that acquired technological knowledge will contribute to the Venezuelan nuclear energy program.

  1. Nuclear reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ``hot`` nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ``flow`` measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study {sup 40}Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs.

  2. Photoneutron and Photofission Cross Sections for URANIUM-238 and THORIUM-232 Using Neutron Capture Gamma Rays.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varhue, Walter John

    The photofission and total photoneutron cross sections of ('238)U and ('232)Th have been measured as a function of energy between 4 and 11 Mev. The photons used were those produced in the neutron capture reaction in the Tangential Beam Port Facility of the University of Virginia Reactor. The capture gamma ray sources used were the following; Al, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, S, and Ti. A computer code was used to calculate the spectrum of each capture gamma ray beam used in the irradiations. This calculation accounted for the attenuation in the beam and the contribution from neutron capture in Al and H. A second code iteratively solved for the best fit cross section curve for the experimentally obtained yield data. In the total photoneutron measurement, the neutrons were counted with a Halpern type detector containing 4 BF(,3) tubes. The intensity of the beam was determined with LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters. The results agree very well with those of previous studies. In the photofission measurement, fission fragments were counted in Lexan polycarbonate, a solid state nuclear track detector. The efficiency of this counting system has been determined analytically as a function of energy with the aid of published experimental measurements of the angular distribution of fission fragments and the etching properties of Lexan. In general the technique has proved to be successful in producing differential photonuclear cross section results. Resolution of the unfolding technique is limited by the density of principal gamma ray lines available from the capture targets. An obvious improvement would be the use of more capture targets. The results and conclusions of previous studies using neutron capture gamma rays have been placed in doubt due to the nature of calculations used to obtain cross values.

  3. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-02-01

    One of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, quantum chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three-nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between LQCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from LQCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  4. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculationsmore » of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.« less

  5. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  6. Molecular screening in nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetinovic, A.; Lipoglavsek, M.; Markelj, S.; Vesic, J.

    2015-12-01

    The dependence of electron screening in nuclear reactions on projectile or target atomic number has been studied by bombarding different hydrogen-containing targets with beams of 7Li , 11B , and 19F . The largest electron screening potentials were obtained in a graphite target containing hydrogen as an impurity. Some measured potentials are almost two orders of magnitude above the theoretical predictions. To explain the measurements, a new concept of electron screening is introduced.

  7. Surrogate Nuclear Reactions using STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Church, J A; Ahle, L; Cooper, J R; Hoffman, R D; Moody, K; Punyon, J; Schiller, A; Algin, E; Plettner, C; Ai, H; Beausang, C W; Casten, R F; Hughes, R; Ricard-McCutchan, E; Meyer, D; Ressler, J J; Caggiano, J A; Zamfir, N V; Amro, H; Heinz, A; Fallon, P; McMahan, M A; Macchiavelli, A O; Phair, L W

    2004-10-26

    The results from two surrogate reaction experiments using the STARS (Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies) spectrometer are presented. The surrogate method involves measuring the particle and/or {gamma}-ray decay probabilities of excited nuclei populated via a direct reaction. These probabilities can then be used to deduce neutron-induced reaction cross sections that lead to the same compound nuclei. In the first experiment STARS coupled to the GAMMASPHERE {gamma}-ray spectrometer successfully reproduce surrogate (n,{gamma}), (n,n'{gamma}) and (n,2n{gamma}) cross sections on {sup 155,156}Gd using Gd {sup 3}He-induced reactions. In the second series of experiments an energetic deuteron beam from the ESTU tandem at the Wright Nuclear Structure Lab at Yale University was used to obtain the ratio of fission probabilities for {sup 238}U/ {sup 236}U and {sup 237}U/ {sup 239}U populated using the {sup 236,238}U(d,d'f) and {sup 236,238}U(d,pf) reactions. Results from these experiments are presented and the implications for the surrogate reaction technique are discussed.

  8. Nuclear Reactions for Astrophysics and Other Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Scielzo, N D; Ressler, J J

    2011-03-01

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions are required for many applications. The surrogate nuclear reactions method provides an indirect approach for determining cross sections for reactions on unstable isotopes, which are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise. Current implementations of the method provide useful cross sections for (n,f) reactions, but need to be improved upon for applications to capture reactions.

  9. {sup 231}Pa photofission cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatov, A.S.; Rudnikov, V.E.; Smirenkin, G.N.

    1995-12-01

    The measurements of the {sup 231}Pa yield and cross section photofission in the energy range 7-9 MeV are presented. These measurements are a continuation of similar measurements performed for the {gamma}-ray energy range 4.8-7 MeV. The entire collection of experimental data which combine the results obtained in the present work and in Ref. 1 was analyzed.

  10. Indirect Methods for Nuclear Reaction Data

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Dietrich, F S

    2005-11-18

    Several indirect approaches for obtaining reaction cross sections are briefly reviewed. The Surrogate Nuclear Reactions method, which aims at determining cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions, is discussed in some detail. The validity of the Weisskopf-Ewing approximation in the Surrogate approach is studied for the example of neutron-induced fission of an actinide nucleus.

  11. Nuclear reaction inputs based on effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilaire, S.; Goriely, S.; Péru, S.; Dubray, N.; Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E.

    2016-11-01

    Extensive nuclear structure studies have been performed for decades using effective interactions as sole input. They have shown a remarkable ability to describe rather accurately many types of nuclear properties. In the early 2000s, a major effort has been engaged to produce nuclear reaction input data out of the Gogny interaction, in order to challenge its quality also with respect to nuclear reaction observables. The status of this project, well advanced today thanks to the use of modern computers as well as modern nuclear reaction codes, is reviewed and future developments are discussed.

  12. Nuclear Reaction Data File for Astrophysics (NRDF/A) in Hokkaido University Nuclear Reaction Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katō, Kiyoshi; Kimura, Masaaki; Furutachi, Naoya; Togashi, Tomoaki; Makinaga, Ayano; Otuka, Naohiko

    2010-06-01

    The activities of the Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Centre is explained. The main task of the centre is data compilation of Japanese nuclear reaction data in collaboration of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres. As one of recent activities, preparation of a new database (NRDF/A) and evaluation of astronuclear reaction data are reported. Collaboration in the nuclear data activities among Asian countries is proposed.

  13. Supernova shock revival by nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamrua, Ko; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei; Nishimura, Nobuya

    2012-11-12

    We performed hydrodynamic simulations of core collapse and bounce for a progenitor model with 15.0 solar mass, using ZEUS-MP code in axi-symmetric coordinate. Our numerical code is equipped with a nuclear reaction network including 13 alpha nuclei form {sup 4}He to {sup 56}Ni to investigate the potential role played by nuclear reactions in reviving a stalled shock wave at the central region of core-collapse supernovae. We found that the energy released by nuclear reactions is significantly helpful in accelerating shock waves and is able to produce energetic explosion even if inputted neutrino luminosity is low.

  14. EXFOR Library of Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The EXFOR library contains an extensive compilation of experimental nuclear reaction data up to 1 GeV. Neutron reactions have been compiled systematically since the discovery of the neutron, while charged particle(up to carbon) and photon reactions have been covered less extensively. Files contain nuclear reaction data such as cross sections, spectra, angular distributions, polarizations, etc, along with information on experimental technique, error analysis, and applied standards. Numerous search parameters include: target, beam, product, experimental method, and even author and publication names. The library contains data from more than 20,000 experiments. (Specialized Interface)

  15. Nuclear phenomena in low-energy nuclear reaction research.

    PubMed

    Krivit, Steven B

    2013-09-01

    This is a comment on Storms E (2010) Status of Cold Fusion, Naturwissenschaften 97:861-881. This comment provides the following remarks to other nuclear phenomena observed in low-energy nuclear reactions aside from helium-4 make significant contributions to the overall energy balance; and normal hydrogen, not just heavy hydrogen, produces excess heat.

  16. Public reactions to nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlap, R.E.; Kraft, M.E.; Rosa, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    For many scientists, engineers, and regulators, the public controversy over siting a repository for high-level nuclear wastes exemplifies the clash between rational scientific judgment and irrational public attitudes. Even many who are more sympathetic to public concerns about risk and management believe the controversy is exacerbated by incompatibilities between good science and public participation in regulatory decision-making. Understanding the incompatibilities, however, is crucial to managing science and technology in a democratic society and provides an important motivation to study the relationship between public opinion and nuclear waste policy. In this book, Dunlap and his colleagues present a solid base of empirical research on the subject, and the strength of the collection is the careful unraveling of social factors and context to explain the overwhelmingly negative public view of nuclear waste and its management.

  17. Experimental nuclear reaction data collection EXFOR

    SciTech Connect

    Semkova, V.; Otuka, N.; Simakov, S. P.; Zerkin, V.

    2011-07-01

    The International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC) constitutes a worldwide cooperation of 14 nuclear data centres. The main activity of the NRDC Network is collection and compilation of experimental nuclear reaction cross section data and the related bibliographic information in the EXFOR and CINDA databases as well as dissemination of nuclear reaction data and associated documentation to users. The database contains information and numerical data from more than about 19000 experiments consisting of more than 140000 datasets. EXFOR is kept up to date by constantly adding newly published experimental information. Tools developed for data dissemination utilise modern database technologies with fast online capabilities over the Internet. Users are provided with sophisticated search options, a user-friendly retrieval interface for downloading data in different formats, and additional output options such as improved data plotting capabilities. The present status of the EXFOR database will be presented together with the latest development for data access and retrieval. (authors)

  18. Nuclear chain reaction: forty years later

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    The proceedings from a 1982 symposium 40 years after the first controlled nuclear chain reaction took place in Chicago covers four sessions and public discussion. The session covered the history of the chain reaction; peaceful uses in technology, medicine, and biological science; peaceful uses in power generation; and nuclear weapons control. Among the speakers were Eugene Wigner, Glenn Seaborg, Alvin Weinberg, and others who participated in the first chain reaction experiments. The proceedings reflect differences of opinion among the scientists as well as the general public. References, slides, and tables used to illustrate the individual talks are included with the papers.

  19. MEANS FOR TERMINATING NUCLEAR REACTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, C.M.

    1959-02-17

    An apparatus is presented for use in a reactor of the heterogeneous, fluid cooled type for the purpose of quickly terminating the reaction, the coolant being circulated through coolant tubes extending through the reactor core. Several of the tubes in the critical region are connected through valves to a tank containing a poisoning fluid having a high neutron capture crosssection and to a reservoir. When it is desired to quickly terminate the reaction, the valves are operated to permit the flow of the poisoning fluid through these particular tubes and into the reservoir while normal coolant is being circulated through the remaining tubes. The apparatus is designed to prevent contamination of the primary coolant by the poisoning fluid.

  20. Generation of Gravitational Waves with Nuclear Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, Giorgio; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.

    2006-01-20

    The problem of efficient generation of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) and pulses of Gravitational Radiation might find a reasonably simple solution by employing nuclear matter, especially isomers. A fissioning isomer not only rotates at extremely high frequency ({approx} 3.03x1024 s-1), but is also highly deformed in the first stages of fission (the nucleus is rotating and made asymmetric 'before' fission). Thus one achieves significant impulsive forces (e.g., 3.67x108 N) acting over extremely short time spans (e.g., 3.3x10-22 s). Alternatively, a pulsed particle beam, which could include antimatter, could trigger nuclear reactions and build up a coherent GW as the particles move through a target mass. The usual difficulty with HFGWs generated by nuclear reactions is the small dimensions of their nuclear-reaction volumes, that is, the small moment of inertia and submicroscopic radii of gyration (e.g., 10-16 m) of the nuclear-mass system. Such a difficulty is overcome by utilizing clusters of nuclear material, whose nuclear reactions are in synchronization (through the use of a computer controlled logic system) and are at a large distance apart, e.g., meters, kilometers, etc. The effective radius of gyration of the overall nuclear mass system is enormous and if the quadrupole formalism holds even approximately, then significant HFGW is generated, for example up to 8.5x1010 W to 1.64x1025 W bursts for the transient asymmetrical spinning nucleus case. In this preliminary analysis, possible conceptual designs of reactors suitable for the generation of HFGWs are discussed as well as applications to space technology. In an optimized dual-beam design, GW amplitudes on the order of A {approx} 0.005 are theoretically achieved in the laboratory, which might have interesting general-relativity and nuclear-physics consequences.

  1. Nuclear excitations and reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Fallieros, S.; Levin, F.S.

    1990-08-01

    The main theme of this report is the study and interpretation of the sequence of events that occur during the collisions of nuclear particles. Some of the processes discussed in parts A and B involve short range interactions; others involve interactions of long range. In most of part A one of the particles in the initial or in the final state (or in both) is a photon, which serves as a probe of the second particle, which may be a nucleus, a proton, a pion or any other hadron. The complexity of the processes taking place during the collisions makes it necessary to simplify some aspects of the physical problem. This leads to the introduction of modals which are used to describe a limited number of features in as much detail as possible. The main interest is the understanding of the hadronic excitations which result from the absorption of a photon and the determination of the fundamental structure constants of the target particle. In part B, all the particles are hadrons. The purpose here is to develop and apply optimal quantal methods appropriate for describing the interacting systems. Of particular interest are three-particle collision systems in which the final state consists of three free particles. Part B also considers the process of nuclear fusion as catalyzed by bound muons.

  2. Multilayer Network Analysis of Nuclear Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liang; Ma, Yu-Gang; Chen, Qu; Han, Ding-Ding

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear reaction network is usually studied via precise calculation of differential equation sets, and much research interest has been focused on the characteristics of nuclides, such as half-life and size limit. In this paper, however, we adopt the methods from both multilayer and reaction networks, and obtain a distinctive view by mapping all the nuclear reactions in JINA REACLIB database into a directed network with 4 layers: neutron, proton, 4He and the remainder. The layer names correspond to reaction types decided by the currency particles consumed. This combined approach reveals that, in the remainder layer, the β-stability has high correlation with node degree difference and overlapping coefficient. Moreover, when reaction rates are considered as node strength, we find that, at lower temperatures, nuclide half-life scales reciprocally with its out-strength. The connection between physical properties and topological characteristics may help to explore the boundary of the nuclide chart. PMID:27558995

  3. Photo-fission Product Yield Measurements at Eγ=13 MeV on 235U, 238U, and 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornow, W.; Bhike, M.; Finch, S. W.; Krishichayan, Fnu; Tonchev, A. P.

    2016-09-01

    We have measured Fission Product Yields (FPYs) in photo-fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu at TUNL's High-Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HI γS) using mono-energetic photons of Eγ = 13 MeV. Details of the experimental setup and analysis procedures will be discussed. Yields for approximately 20 fission products were determined. They are compared to neutron-induced FPYs of the same actinides at the equivalent excitation energies of the compound nuclear systems. In the future photo-fission data will be taken at Eγ = 8 . 0 and 10.5 MeV to find out whether photo-fission exhibits the same so far unexplained dependence of certain FPYs on the energy of the incident probe, as recently observed in neutron-induced fission, for example, for the important fission product 147Nd. Work supported by the U. S. Dept. of Energy, under Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER41033, and by the NNSA, Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program, Grant No. DE-NA0001838 and the Lawrence Livermore, National Security, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Global Microscopic Models for Nuclear Reaction Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2005-05-24

    Important effort has been devoted in the last decades to measuring reaction cross sections. Despite such effort, many nuclear applications still require the use of theoretical predictions to estimate experimentally unknown cross sections. Most of the nuclear ingredients in the calculations of reaction cross sections need to be extrapolated in an energy and/or mass domain out of reach of laboratory simulations. In addition, some applications often involve a large number of unstable nuclei, so that only global approaches can be used. For these reasons, when the nuclear ingredients to the reaction models cannot be determined from experimental data, it is highly recommended to consider preferentially microscopic or semi-microscopic global predictions based on sound and reliable nuclear models which, in turn, can compete with more phenomenological highly-parameterized models in the reproduction of experimental data. The latest developments made in deriving such microscopic models for practical applications are reviewed. It mainly concerns nuclear structure properties (masses, deformations, radii, etc.), level densities at the equilibrium deformation, {gamma}-ray strength, as well as fission barriers and level densities at the fission saddle points.

  5. Nuclear reactions for nucleosynthesis beyond Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Rauscher, Thomas

    2015-10-15

    Many more nuclear transitions have to be known in the determination of stellar reactivities for trans-iron nucleosynthesis than for reactions of light nuclei. This requires different theoretical and experimental approaches. Some of the issues specific for trans-iron nucleosynthesis are discussed.

  6. Continuum effects in nuclear transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, H. D.; Donangelo, R.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Pacheco, A. J.

    2007-02-12

    We develop a semiclassical calculation for nuclear transfer reactions where the continuum is treated in an exact way, and compare the results with those of a treatment in which the continuum is neglected. We conclude that the influence of the continuum is very important for weakly bound reactants.

  7. A Nuclear Reactions Primer with Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calle, Carlos I.; Roach, Jennifer A.

    1987-01-01

    Described is a microcomputer software program NUCLEAR REACTIONS designed for college level students and in use at Sweet Briar College (Sweet Briar, VA). The program is written in Microsoft Basic Version 2.1 for the Apple Macintosh Microcomputer. It introduces two conservation principles: (1) conservation of charge; and (2) conservation of nucleon…

  8. Nuclear Reactions Used For Superheavy Element Research

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, Mark A.

    2008-04-17

    Some of the most fascinating questions about the limits of nuclear stability are confronted in the heaviest nuclei. How many more new elements can be synthesized? What are the nuclear and chemical properties of these exotic nuclei? Does the 'Island of Stability' exist and can we ever explore the isotopes inhabiting that nuclear region? This paper will focus on the current experimental research on the synthesis and characterization of superheavy nuclei with Z>112 from the Dubna/Livermore collaboration. Reactions using {sup 48}Ca projectiles from the U400 cyclotron and actinide targets ({sup 233,238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 242,244}Pu, {sup 243}Am, {sup 245,248}Cm, {sup 249}Cf) have been investigated using the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator in Dubna over the last 8 years. In addition, several experiments have been performed to investigate the chemical properties of some of the observed longer-lived isotopes produced in these reactions. Some comments will be made on nuclear reactions used for the production of the heaviest elements. A summary of the current status of the upper end of the chart of nuclides will be presented.

  9. Nuclear reactions used for superheavy element research

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, M A

    2008-02-26

    Some of the most fascinating questions about the limits of nuclear stability are confronted in the heaviest nuclei. How many more new elements can be synthesized? What are the nuclear and chemical properties of these exotic nuclei? Does the 'Island of Stability' exist and can we ever explore the isotopes inhabiting that nuclear region? This paper will focus on the current experimental research on the synthesis and characterization of superheavy nuclei with Z > 112 from the Dubna/Livermore collaboration. Reactions using 48Ca projectiles from the U400 cyclotron and actinide targets ({sup 233,238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 242,244}Pu, {sup 243}Am, {sup 245,248}Cm, {sup 249}Cf) have been investigated using the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator in Dubna over the last 8 years. In addition, several experiments have been performed to investigate the chemical properties of some of the observed longer-lived isotopes produced in these reactions. Some comments will be made on nuclear reactions used for the production of the heaviest elements. A summary of the current status of the upper end of the chart of nuclides will be presented.

  10. Perspectives for photonuclear research at the Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipescu, D.; Anzalone, A.; Balabanski, D. L.; Belyshev, S. S.; Camera, F.; La Cognata, M.; Constantin, P.; Csige, L.; Cuong, P. V.; Cwiok, M.; Derya, V.; Dominik, W.; Gai, M.; Gales, S.; Gheorghe, I.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Mazzocchi, C.; Orlin, V. N.; Pietralla, N.; Sin, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Stopani, K. A.; Tesileanu, O.; Ur, C. A.; Ursu, I.; Utsunomiya, H.; Varlamov, V. V.; Weller, H. R.; Zamfir, N. V.; Zilges, A.

    2015-12-01

    The perspectives for photonuclear experiments at the new Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility are discussed in view of the need to accumulate novel and more precise nuclear data. The parameters of the ELI-NP gamma beam system are presented. The emerging experimental program, which will be realized at ELI-NP, is presented. Examples of day-one experiments with the nuclear resonance fluorescence technique, photonuclear reaction measurements, photofission experiments and studies of nuclear collective excitation modes and competition between various decay channels are discussed. The advantages which ELI-NP provides for all these experiments compared to the existing facilities are discussed.

  11. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs.

  12. Hadron Cancer Therapy: Role of Nuclear Reactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Chadwick, M. B.

    2000-06-20

    Recently it has become feasible to calculate energy deposition and particle transport in the body by proton and neutron radiotherapy beams, using Monte Carlo transport methods. A number of advances have made this possible, including dramatic increases in computer speeds, a better understanding of the microscopic nuclear reaction cross sections, and the development of methods to model the characteristics of the radiation emerging from the accelerator treatment unit. This paper describes the nuclear reaction mechanisms involved, and how the cross sections have been evaluated from theory and experiment, for use in computer simulations of radiation therapy. The simulations will allow the dose delivered to a tumor to be optimized, whilst minimizing the dos given to nearby organs at risk.

  13. Forging the link between nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickhoff, W. H.

    2016-06-01

    A review of the recent applications of the dispersive optical model (DOM) is presented. Emphasis is on the nonlocal implementation of the DOM that is capable of describing ground-state properties accurately when data like the nuclear charge density are available. The present understanding of the role of short- and long-range physics in determining proton properties near the Fermi energy for stable closed-shell nuclei has relied mostly on data from the (e, e' p) reaction. Hadronic tools to extract such spectroscopic information have been hampered by the lack of a consistent reaction description that provides unambiguous and undisputed results. The DOM, conceived by Claude Mahaux, provides a unified description of both elastic nucleon scattering and structure information related to single-particle properties below the Fermi energy. We have recently introduced a nonlocal dispersive optical potential for both the real and imaginary part. Nonlocal absorptive potentials yield equivalent elastic differential cross sections for 40Ca as compared to local ones but change the l-dependent absorption profile suggesting important consequences for the analysis of nuclear reactions. Below the Fermi energy, nonlocality is essential for an accurate representation of particle number and the nuclear charge density. Spectral properties implied by (e, e' p) and (p, 2p) reactions are correctly described, including the energy distribution of about 10% high-momentum protons obtained at Jefferson Lab. The nonlocal DOM allows a complete description of experimental data both above (up to 200 MeV) and below the Fermi energy in 40Ca. It is further demonstrated that elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering data constrain the spectral strength in the continuum of orbits that are nominally bound in the independent-particle model. Extension of this analysis to 48Ca allows a prediction of the neutron skin of this nucleus that is larger than most predictions made so far.

  14. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: nuclear structure; fusion reactions near and below the barrier; incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and instrumentation and analysis. (LSP).

  15. Nuclear Reaction Data on Titanium Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, S. Y.; Kawano, T.; Kahler, S.; Cowell, S.; Dashdorj, D.

    2008-04-17

    We evaluated the nuclear data on titanium isotopes, {sup 46-50}Ti. We used GNASH, a Hauser-Feshbach reaction model code, for the threshold reactions and CoH for the total and capture cross sections. While we calculated the transmission coefficients using well-known optical potentials for the GNASH calculation, we adjusted the level density and the pre-equilibrium parameters by taking into account the LANSCE/GEANIE experiment on {sup 48}Ti reaction cross sections as well as other experiments available for (n,p), (n,{alpha}), etc. The direct inelastic scattering was also included by using the coupled-channel calculation and the DWBA method. The coupled-channels potential was assumed to be similar to the spherical potential of Koning and Delaroche with proper deformation parameters. Meanwhile we investigated the resolved resonance parameters in the energy region below several hundred keV. In essence, we adopted the parameters from the Mughabghab's 2006 compilation, making some adjustments to mainly reproduce the reference thermal cross sections. This new evaluation was validated with the MCNP calculations of k-eff's on seven hard-spectrum criticality experiments that involve Ti as a reflector or moderator.

  16. Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Parameterization for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Jacob; Kozub, Raymond L.; Smith, Michael S.; Scott, Jason; Lingerfelt, Eric

    2004-10-01

    The knowledge of thermonuclear reaction rates is vital to simulate novae, supernovae, X-ray bursts, and other astrophysical events. To facilitate dissemination of this knowledge, a set of tools has been created for managing reaction rates, located at www.nucastrodata.org. One tool is a rate parameterizer, which provides a parameterization for nuclear reaction rate vs. temperature values in the most widely used functional form. Currently, the parameterizer uses the Levenberg-Marquardt method (LMM), which requires an initial estimate of the best-fit parameters. The initial estimate is currently provided randomly from a preselected pool. To improve the quality of fits, a new, active method of selecting parameters has been developed. The parameters of each set in the pool are altered for a few iterations to replicate the input data as closely as possible. Then, the set which most nearly matches the input data (based on chi squared) is used in the LMM as the initial estimate for the final fitting procedure. A description of the new, active algorithm and its performance will be presented. Supported by the U. S. Department of Energy.

  17. Towards Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceno, Raul

    2012-10-01

    In this talk I will motivate the evaluation of nuclear reactions cross sections from Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD) and discuss challenges associated with such calculations. In particular, I will explore the connection between the energy spectrum of a three-body system in a finite volume and infinite volume scattering matrix elements using an effective field theoretical approach. The implication of this formalism for studying systems composed of a particle and a bound-state below the bound-state break- up, as well as a trimer state will be discussed. I will show that one in fact recovers a Luscher-like quantization condition for sufficiently low-energy up to exponential corrections in the volume due to the size of the two-particle bound-state. I will briefly discuss the similarities of the three-body problem and that of two- body coupled-channels systems and will comment on challenges in applying the formalism above the inelastic threshold.

  18. Ion transport of Fr nuclear reaction products

    SciTech Connect

    Behr, J.A.; Cahn, S.B.; Dutta, S.B.

    1993-04-01

    Experiments planned for fundamental studies of radioactive atoms in magneto-optic traps require efficient deceleration and transport of nuclear reaction products to energies and locations where they can be trapped. The authors have built a low-energy ion transport system for Francium and other alkalis. A thick Au target is held on a W rod at 45{degrees} to the accelerator beam direction. The heavy-ion fusion reaction 115 MeV {sup 18}O + {sup 197}Au produces {sup 211,210,209}Fr recoil products which are stopped in the target. The target is heated to close to the melting point of Au to allow the Fr to diffuse to the surface, where it is ionized due to Au`s high work function, and is directly extracted by an electrode at 90{degrees} to the accelerator beam direction. The Fr is transported by electrostatic optics {approximately}1 m to a catcher viewed by an {alpha} detector: {ge}15% of the Fr produced in the target reaches the catcher. 2{times}10{sup 5} Fr/sec have been produced at the catcher, yielding at equilibrium a sample of 3x10{sup 7}Fr nuclei. This scheme physically decouples the target diffusion from the surface neutralization process, which can occur at a lower temperature more compatible with the neutral-atom trap.

  19. Reaction Rate Parameterization for Nuclear Astrophysics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. P.; Lingerfelt, E. J.; Smith, M. S.; Hix, W. R.; Bardayan, D. W.; Sharp, J. E.; Kozub, R. L.; Meyer, R. A.

    2004-11-01

    Libraries of thermonuclear reaction rates are used in element synthesis models of a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena, such as exploding stars and the inner workings of our sun. These computationally demanding models are more efficient when libraries, which may contain over 60000 rates and vary by 20 orders of magnitude, have a uniform parameterization for all rates. We have developed an on-line tool, hosted at www.nucastrodata.org, to obtain REACLIB parameters (F.-K. Thielemann et al., Adv. Nucl. Astrophysics 525, 1 (1987)) that represent reaction rates as a function of temperature. This helps to rapidly incorporate the latest nuclear physics results in astrophysics models. The tool uses numerous techniques and algorithms in a modular fashion to improve the quality of the fits to the rates. Features, modules, and additional applications of this tool will be discussed. * Managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. D.O.E. under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 + Supported by U.S. D.O.E. under Grant No. DE-FG02-96ER40955

  20. Identifying Understudied Nuclear Reactions by Text-mining the EXFOR Experimental Nuclear Reaction Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirdt, J. A.; Brown, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    The EXFOR library contains the largest collection of experimental nuclear reaction data available as well as the data's bibliographic information and experimental details. We text-mined the REACTION and MONITOR fields of the ENTRYs in the EXFOR library in order to identify understudied reactions and quantities. Using the results of the text-mining, we created an undirected graph from the EXFOR datasets with each graph node representing a single reaction and quantity and graph links representing the various types of connections between these reactions and quantities. This graph is an abstract representation of the connections in EXFOR, similar to graphs of social networks, authorship networks, etc. We use various graph theoretical tools to identify important yet understudied reactions and quantities in EXFOR. Although we identified a few cross sections relevant for shielding applications and isotope production, mostly we identified charged particle fluence monitor cross sections. As a side effect of this work, we learn that our abstract graph is typical of other real-world graphs.

  1. Identifying Understudied Nuclear Reactions by Text-mining the EXFOR Experimental Nuclear Reaction Library

    SciTech Connect

    Hirdt, J.A.; Brown, D.A.

    2016-01-15

    The EXFOR library contains the largest collection of experimental nuclear reaction data available as well as the data's bibliographic information and experimental details. We text-mined the REACTION and MONITOR fields of the ENTRYs in the EXFOR library in order to identify understudied reactions and quantities. Using the results of the text-mining, we created an undirected graph from the EXFOR datasets with each graph node representing a single reaction and quantity and graph links representing the various types of connections between these reactions and quantities. This graph is an abstract representation of the connections in EXFOR, similar to graphs of social networks, authorship networks, etc. We use various graph theoretical tools to identify important yet understudied reactions and quantities in EXFOR. Although we identified a few cross sections relevant for shielding applications and isotope production, mostly we identified charged particle fluence monitor cross sections. As a side effect of this work, we learn that our abstract graph is typical of other real-world graphs.

  2. Nuclear waste vitrification efficiency: cold cap reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Kruger, Albert A.; Pokorny, Richard

    2012-12-15

    The cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization are greatly affected by the rate of glass production. Various factors influence the performance of a waste-glass melter. One of the most significant, and also one of the least understood, is the process of batch melting. Studies are being conducted to gain fundamental understanding of the batch reactions, particularly those that influence the rate of melting, and models are being developed to link batch makeup and melter operation to the melting rate. Batch melting takes place within the cold cap, i.e., a batch layer floating on the surface of molten glass. The conversion of batch to glass consists of various chemical reactions, phase transitions, and diffusion-controlled processes. These include water evaporation (slurry feed contains as high as 60% water), gas evolution, the melting of salts, the formation of borate melt, reactions of borate melt with molten salts and with amorphous oxides (Fe2O3 and Al2O3), the formation of intermediate crystalline phases, the formation of a continuous glass-forming melt, the growth and collapse of primary foam, and the dissolution of residual solids. To this list we also need to add the formation of secondary foam that originates from molten glass but accumulates on the bottom of the cold cap. This study presents relevant data obtained for a high-level-waste melter feed and introduces a one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model of the cold cap as a step toward an advanced three-dimensional (3D) version for a complete model of the waste glass melter. The 1D model describes the batch-to-glass conversion within the cold cap as it progresses in a vertical direction. With constitutive equations and key parameters based on measured data, and simplified boundary conditions on the cold-cap interfaces with the glass melt and the plenum space of the melter, the model provides sensitivity analysis of the response of the cold cap to the batch makeup and melter conditions

  3. NUCLEAR WASTE VITRIFICATION EFFICIENCY COLD CAP REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; POKORNY R

    2011-07-29

    The cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization are greatly affected by the rate of glass production. Various factors influence the performance of a waste-glass melter. One of the most significant, and also one of the least understood, is the process of batch melting. Studies are being conducted to gain fundamental understanding of the batch reactions, particularly those that influence the rate of melting, and models are being developed to link batch makeup and melter operation to the melting rate. Batch melting takes place within the cold cap, i.e., a batch layer floating on the surface of molten glass. The conversion of batch to glass consists of various chemical reactions, phase transitions, and diffusion-controlled processes. These include water evaporation (slurry feed contains as high as 60% water), gas evolution, the melting of salts, the formation of borate melt, reactions of borate melt with molten salts and with amorphous oxides (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), the formation of intermediate crystalline phases, the formation of a continuous glass-forming melt, the growth and collapse of primary foam, and the dissolution of residual solids. To this list we also need to add the formation of secondary foam that originates from molten glass but accumulates on the bottom of the cold cap. This study presents relevant data obtained for a high-level-waste melter feed and introduces a one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model of the cold cap as a step toward an advanced three-dimensional (3D) version for a complete model of the waste glass melter. The 1D model describes the batch-to-glass conversion within the cold cap as it progresses in a vertical direction. With constitutive equations and key parameters based on measured data, and simplified boundary conditions on the cold-cap interfaces with the glass melt and the plenum space of the melter, the model provides sensitivity analysis of the response of the cold cap to the batch makeup

  4. EMPIRE: A Reaction Model Code for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, A.; Herman, M.; Capote, R.

    2014-06-01

    The correct modeling of abundances requires knowledge of nuclear cross sections for a variety of neutron, charged particle and γ induced reactions. These involve targets far from stability and are therefore difficult (or currently impossible) to measure. Nuclear reaction theory provides the only way to estimate values of such cross sections. In this paper we present application of the EMPIRE reaction code to nuclear astrophysics. Recent measurements are compared to the calculated cross sections showing consistent agreement for n-, p- and α-induced reactions of strophysical relevance.

  5. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon's mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

  6. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon`s mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

  7. Proof of Principle for Active Detection of Fissionable Material Using Intense, Pulsed-Bremsstrahlung-Induced Photofission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-07

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6770--14-9554 Proof of Principle for Active Detection of Fissionable Material Using...of Fissionable Material Using Intense, Pulsed-Bremsstrahlung-Induced Photofission R.J. Commisso, J.W. Schumer, R.J. Allen, D.D. Hinshelwood, S.L...induce photofission in fissile material . We are investigating the applicability of this mechanism, using photons from bremsstrahlung, for long-range

  8. Surrogate Nuclear Reactions - An Indirect Method for Determining Reaction Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J; Ahle, L; Bernstein, L; Burke, J; Church, J A; Dietrich, F; Forssen, C; Hoffman, R; Gueorguiev, V

    2005-03-23

    An indirect method for determining cross sections of reactions proceeding through a compound nucleus is presented. Some applications of the Surrogate nuclear reaction approach are considered and challenges that need to be addressed are outlined.

  9. Nuclear reaction modeling, verification experiments, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F.S.

    1995-10-01

    This presentation summarized the recent accomplishments and future promise of the neutron nuclear physics program at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scatter Center (MLNSC) and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility. The unique capabilities of the spallation sources enable a broad range of experiments in weapons-related physics, basic science, nuclear technology, industrial applications, and medical physics.

  10. Nuclear reactions and synthesis of new transuranium species

    SciTech Connect

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    In this short review, I shall describe the special aspects of heavy ion nuclear reaction mechanisms operative in the transuranium region, the role of new techniques, possible nuclear reactions for the production of additional transuranium elements and nuclear species and the importance of work in this region for the development of nuclear models and theoretical concepts. This discussion should make it clear that a continuing supply of leements and isotopes, some fo them relatively short-lived, produced by the HFIR-TRU facilities, will be a requirement for future synthesis of new elements and isotopes.

  11. Direct Reactions for Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Katherine Louise

    2014-12-18

    Direct reactions are powerful probes for studying the atomic nucleus. Modern direct reaction studies are illuminating both the fundamental nature of the nucleus and its role in nucleosynthetic processes occurring in the cosmos. This report covers experiments using knockout reactions on neutron-deficient fragmentation beams, transfer reactions on fission fragment beams, and theoretical sensitivity studies relating to the astrophysical r-process. Results from experiments on 108,106Sn at the NSCL, and on 131Sn at HRIBF are presented as well as the results from the nucleosynthesis study.

  12. Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hersman, F.W.; Dawson, J.F.; Heisenberg, J.H.; Calarco, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: giant resonance studies; deep inelastic scattering studies; high resolution nuclear structure work; and relativistic RPA; and field theory in the Schroedinger Representation.

  13. Nuclear quantum tunnelling in enzymatic reactions--an enzymologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Johannissen, Linus O; Hay, Sam; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2015-12-14

    Enzyme-catalysed H-transfer reactions are ubiquitous, yet fundamental details of these reactions remain unresolved. In this perspective, we discuss the roles of nuclear quantum tunnelling and (compressive) dynamics during these reactions. Evidence for the coupling of specific substrate and/or protein vibrations to the chemical coordinate is considered and a case is made for the combination of multiple experimental and computational/theoretical approaches when studying these reactions.

  14. Tests of a novel method to assay SNM using polarized photofission and its sensitivity in the presence of shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, J. M.; Ahmed, M. W.; Kafkarkou, A.; Kendellen, D. P.; Sikora, M. H.; Spraker, M. C.; Weller, H. R.; Zimmerman, W. R.

    2015-03-01

    A novel method to identify Special Nuclear Material was recently developed (Mueller et al., 2014) [1]. This method relies upon using a linearly polarized γ-ray beam to induce photofission of a sample and then comparing the prompt fission neutron yields in and out of the plane of beam polarization. The present paper will describe experimental tests of this new technique and assess its sensitivity in the presence of shielding. The capability of this technique to measure the enrichment of uranium was tested by using combinations of thin 235U and 238U foils of known enrichments. The sensitivity of this assay to shielding by lead, steel, and polyethylene was experimentally measured and simulated using GEANT4. These tests show that the measured asymmetry can indeed be used to determine the enrichment of materials composed of an admixture of 235U and 238U, and this asymmetry is relatively insensitive to moderate amounts of shielding.

  15. Lepton nonconserving (μ-,e+) reaction to individual nuclear states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittel, S.; Vergados, J. D.

    1981-11-01

    Branching ratios for the lepton-violating 40Ca(μ-,e+)40Ar(g.s.) reaction are calculated using a gauge model in which it is mediated by a Majorana neutrino. The predicted branching ratios to the ground state are fairly insensitive to the relevant nuclear structure information and are much smaller than previously calculated total rates. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 40Ca (μ-,e+)40Ar(g.s.) calculated branching ratio. Lepton conversion.

  16. Nuclear physics with advanced brilliant gamma beams at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ur, Călin A.; Filipescu, Dan; Gheorghe, Ioana; Iancu, Violeta; Suliman, Gabriel; Teşileanu, Ovidiu

    2016-01-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics facility is dedicated to nuclear physics studies with the use of extreme electromagnetic radiation. One of the main research system to be installed and operated in the facility is an outstanding high brilliance gamma beam system. The Gamma Beam System of ELI-NP will produce intense, quasi-monochromatic gamma beams via inverse Compton scattering of short laser pulses on relativistic electron beam pulses. The gamma beams available at ELI-NP will allow for the performance of photo-nuclear reactions aiming to reveal the intimate structure of the atomic nucleus. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, photo-fission, photo-disintegration reactions above the particle threshold will be used to study the dipole response of nuclei, the structure of the Pygmy resonances, nuclear processes relevant for astrophysics, production and study of exotic neutron-rich nuclei.

  17. NUCLEAR REACTION MODELING FOR RIA ISOL TARGET DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    S. MASHNIK; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    Los Alamos scientists are collaborating with researchers at Argonne and Oak Ridge on the development of improved nuclear reaction physics for modeling radionuclide production in ISOL targets. This is being done in the context of the MCNPX simulation code, which is a merger of MCNP and the LAHET intranuclear cascade code, and simulates both nuclear reaction cross sections and radiation transport in the target. The CINDER code is also used to calculate the time-dependent nuclear decays for estimating induced radioactivities. They give an overview of the reaction physics improvements they are addressing, including intranuclear cascade (INC) physics, where recent high-quality inverse-kinematics residue data from GSI have led to INC spallation and fission model improvements; and preequilibrium reactions important in modeling (p,xn) and (p,xnyp) cross sections for the production of nuclides far from stability.

  18. Photo-fission for the production of radioactive beams ALTO project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essabaa, S.; Arianer, J.; Ausset, P.; Bajeat, O.; Baronick, J. P.; Clapier, F.; Coacolo, L.; Donzaud, C.; Ducourtieux, M.; Galès, S.; Gardès, D.; Grialou, D.; Hosni, F.; Guillemaud-Mueller, D.; Ibrahim, F.; Junquera, T.; Lau, C.; Le Blanc, F.; Lefort, H.; Le Scornet, J. C.; Lesrel, J.; Mueller, A. C.; Obert, J.; Perru, O.; Potier, J. C.; Proust, J.; Pougheon, F.; Roussière, B.; Rouvière, N.; Sauvage, J.; Sorlin, O.; Tkatchenko, A.; Verney, D.; Waast, B.; Rinolfi, L.; Rossat, G.; Forkel-Wirth, D.; Muller, A.; Bienvenu, G.; Bourdon, J.-C.; Garvey, T.; Jacquemard, B.; Omeich, M.

    2003-05-01

    In order to probe neutron rich radioactive noble gases produced by photo-fission, a PARRNe-1 experiment (Production d'Atomes Radioactifs Riches en Neutrons) has been carried out at CERN. The incident electron beam of 50 MeV was delivered by the LIL machine: LEP Injector Linac. The experiment allowed us to compare under the same conditions two production methods of radioactive noble gases: fission induced by fast neutrons and photo-fission. The obtained results show that the use of the electrons is a promising mode to get intense neutron rich ion beams. After the success of this photo-fission experiment, a conceptual design for the installation at IPN Orsay of a 50 MeV electron accelerator close to the PARRNe-2 device has been worked out: ALTO Project. This work has started within a collaboration between IPNO, LAL (Laboratoire de l'Accélérateur Linéaire) and CERN groups.

  19. EXFOR SYSTEMS MANUAL NUCLEAR REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    EXFOR is an exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. This document has been written for use by the members of the Network and includes matters of procedure and protocol, as well as detailed rules for the compilation of data. Users may prefer to consult EXFOR Basics' for a brief description of the format.

  20. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The research program of our group touches five areas of nuclear physics: (1) Nuclear structure studies at high spin; (2) Studies at the interface between structure and reactions; (3) Production and study of hot nuclei; (4) Incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and (5) Development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in the above areas of research. The papers from these areas are discussed in this report.

  1. Coulomb and nuclear effects in breakup and reaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descouvemont, P.; Canto, L. F.; Hussein, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    We use a three-body continuum discretized coupled channel (CDCC) model to investigate Coulomb and nuclear effects in breakup and reaction cross sections. The breakup of the projectile is simulated by a finite number of square integrable wave functions. First we show that the scattering matrices can be split in a nuclear term and in a Coulomb term. This decomposition is based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation and requires the scattering wave functions. We present two different methods to separate both effects. Then, we apply this separation to breakup and reaction cross sections of 7Li+208Pb . For breakup, we investigate various aspects, such as the role of the α +t continuum, the angular-momentum distribution, and the balance between Coulomb and nuclear effects. We show that there is a large ambiguity in defining the Coulomb and nuclear breakup cross sections, since both techniques, although providing the same total breakup cross sections, strongly differ for the individual components. We suggest a third method which could be efficiently used to address convergence problems at large angular momentum. For reaction cross sections, interference effects are smaller, and the nuclear contribution is dominant above the Coulomb barrier. We also draw attention to different definitions of the reaction cross section which exist in the literature and which may induce small, but significant, differences in the numerical values.

  2. Towards many-body based nuclear reaction modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilaire, Stéphane; Goriely, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    The increasing need for cross sections far from the valley of stability poses a challenge for nuclear reaction models. So far, predictions of cross sections have relied on more or less phenomenological approaches, depending on parameters adjusted to available experimental data or deduced from systematic expressions. While such predictions are expected to be reliable for nuclei not too far from the experimentally known regions, it is clearly preferable to use more fundamental approaches, based on sound physical principles, when dealing with very exotic nuclei. Thanks to the high computer power available today, all the ingredients required to model a nuclear reaction can now be (and have been) microscopically (or semi-microscopically) determined starting from the information provided by a nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. This concerns nuclear masses, optical model potential, nuclear level densities, photon strength functions, as well as fission barriers. All these nuclear model ingredients, traditionally given by phenomenological expressions, now have a microscopic counterpart implemented in the TALYS nuclear reaction code. We are thus now able to perform fully microscopic cross section calculations. The quality of these ingredients and the impact of using them instead of the usually adopted phenomenological parameters will be discussed. Perspectives for the coming years will be drawn on the improvements one can expect.

  3. Public reactions to nuclear waste: Citizens' views of repository siting

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    This book presents revised and updated papers from a panel of social scientists, at the 1989 AAAS meetings, that examined the public's reactions to nuclear waste disposal and the repository siting process. The papers report the results of original empirical research on citizens' views of nuclear waste repository siting. Topics covered include the following: content analysis of public testimony; sources of public concern about nuclear waste disposal in Texas agricultural communities; local attitudes toward high-level waste repository at Hanford; perceived risk and attitudes toward nuclear wastes; attitudes of Nevada urban residents toward a nuclear waste repository; attitudes of rural community residents toward a nuclear waste respository. An introductory chapter provides background and context, and a concluding chapter summarizes the implications of the reports. Two additional chapters cover important features of high-level waste disposal: long term trends in public attitudes toward nuclear energy and nuclear waste policy and assessment of the effects on the Los Vegas convention business if a high-level nuclear waste depository were sited in Nevada.

  4. Physics with post-accelerated beams at ISOLDE: nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pietro, A.; Riisager, K.; Van Duppen, P.

    2017-04-01

    Nuclear-reaction studies have until now constituted a minor part of the physics program with post-accelerated beams at ISOLDE, mainly due to the maximum energy of REX-ISOLDE of around 3 MeV/u that limits reaction work to the mass region below A = 100. We give an overview of the current experimental status and of the physics results obtained so far. Finally, the improved conditions given by the HIE-ISOLDE upgrade are described.

  5. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  6. Towards a More Complete and Accurate Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Library (EXFOR): International Collaboration Between Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC)

    SciTech Connect

    Otuka, N.; Dupont, E.; Semkova, V.; Pritychenko, B.; Blokhin, A.I.; Aikawa, M.; Babykina, S.; Bossant, M.; Chen, G.; Dunaeva, S.; Forrest, R.A.; Fukahori, T.; Furutachi, N.; Ganesan, S.; Ge, Z.; Gritzay, O.O.; Herman, M.; Hlavač, S.; and others

    2014-06-15

    The International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC) coordinated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) successfully collaborates in the maintenance and development of the EXFOR library. As the scope of published data expands (e.g. to higher energy, to heavier projectile) to meet the needs of research and applications, it has become a challenging task to maintain both the completeness and accuracy of the EXFOR library. Evolution of the library highlighting recent developments is described.

  7. Towards a More Complete and Accurate Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Library (EXFOR). International Collaboration Between Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC)

    SciTech Connect

    Otuka, N.; Pritychenko, B.; Otuka, N.; Dupont, E.; Semkova, V.; Pritychenko, B.; Blokhin, A. I.; Aikawa, M.; Babykina, S.; Bossant, M.; Chen, G.; Dunaeva, S.; Forrest, R. A.; Fukahori, T.; Furutachi, N.; Ganesan, S.; Ge, Z.; Gritzay, O. O.; Herman, M.; Hlavac, S.; Kato, K.; Lalremruata, B.; Lee, Y. O.; Makinaga, A.; Matsumoto, K.; Mikhaylyukova, M.; Pikulina, G.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Saxena, A.; Schwerer, O.; Simakov, S. P.; Soppera, N.; Suzuki, R.; Takacs, S.; Tao, X.; Taova, S.; Tarkanyi, F.; Varlamov, V. V.; Wang, J.; Yang, S. C.; Zerkin, V.; Zhuang, Y.

    2014-06-01

    The International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC) coordinated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) successfully collaborates in the maintenance and development of the EXFOR library. Likewise, as the scope of published data expands (e.g. to higher energy, to heavier projectile) to meet the needs of research and applications, it has become a challenging task to maintain both the completeness and accuracy of the EXFOR library. Evolution of the library highlighting recent developments is described.

  8. Nuclear materials detection using high-energy γ-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklich, Bradley J.; Smith, Donald L.

    2005-12-01

    The FIGARO technique uses 6-7 MeV γ-rays produced in the 19F(p, αγ)16O reaction to detect materials used in nuclear weapons or associated with their production. These γ-rays induce neutron emission via the photoneutron and photofission processes in nuclear materials. Previous experiments have shown that FIGARO gives responses specific to nuclear materials with little or no response to common benign materials. The technique is also resistant to both photon and neutron shielding countermeasures. We present preliminary results from modeling studies of neutron detection rates with simulated air cargo and intermodal shipping containers. A general methodology to compare operating performance based on receiver-operator-characteristic curves is also discussed.

  9. A Laboratory Experiment on the Statistical Theory of Nuclear Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveland, Walter

    1971-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate laboratory experiment on the statistical theory of nuclear reactions. The experiment involves measuring the relative cross sections for formation of a nucleus in its meta stable excited state and its ground state by applying gamma-ray spectroscopy to an irradiated sample. Involves 3-4 hours of laboratory time plus…

  10. Indirect measurement of nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W. P.; Li, Z. H.; Bai, X. X.; Wang, Y. B.; Guo, B.; Lian, G.; Su, J.; Zeng, S.; Wang, B. X.; Yan, S. Q.; Li, Y. J.; Li, E. T.; Jin, S. J.

    2010-05-12

    Systematic indirect measurements of nuclear astrophysical reactions using the unstable ion beam facility GIRAFFE in CIAE were performed. We have measured the angular distributions of transfer reactions, such as {sup 8}Li(d,p){sup 9}Li, {sup 8}Li(d,n){sup 9}Be and {sup 8}Li(p,d){sup 7}Li in inverse kinematics, and derived the astrophysical S-factors or reaction rates for {sup 8}Li(n,gamma){sup 9}Li and {sup 8}Li(p,gamma){sup 9}Be by using asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) or spectroscopic factor methods.

  11. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions: A Millennium Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallove, Eugene F.

    2000-03-01

    This talk will summarize some of the more convincing recent experiments that show that helium-4, nuclear scale excess energy, tritium, low-level neutron production, and the transmutation of heavy elements can occur near room temperature in relatively simple systems. Despite inappropriate theory-based arguments against it and unethical attacks by people unfamiliar with the supporting experiments, the new field of solid state nuclear reactions is progressing. The physical theory behind the associated phenomena continues to be debated among theorists. The facts of the history of this scientific controversy suggest that it is inadvisable to rush to judgment against allegedly ``impossible" new phenomena when increasingly careful experiments have revealed new vistas in physics. Detailed discussion of evidence for solid state nuclear reactions is available elsewhere (http://www.infinite-energy.com). abstract document

  12. Nuclear fusion reaction rates for strongly coupled ionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Chugunov, A. I.; DeWitt, H. E.

    2009-07-15

    We analyze the effect of plasma screening on nuclear reaction rates in dense matter composed of atomic nuclei of one or two types. We perform semiclassical calculations of the Coulomb barrier penetrability taking into account a radial mean-field potential of plasma ions. The mean-field potential is extracted from the results of extensive Monte Carlo calculations of radial pair distribution functions of ions in binary ionic mixtures. We calculate the reaction rates in a wide range of plasma parameters and approximate these rates by an analytical expression that is expected to be applicable to multicomponent ion mixtures. Also, we analyze Gamow-peak energies of reacting ions in various nuclear burning regimes. For illustration, we study nuclear burning in {sup 12}C-{sup 16}O mixtures.

  13. High-power, photofission-inducing bremsstrahlung source for intense pulsed active detection of fissile material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zier, J. C.; Mosher, D.; Allen, R. J.; Commisso, R. J.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Jackson, S. L.; Murphy, D. P.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.

    2014-06-01

    Intense pulsed active detection (IPAD) is a promising technique for detecting fissile material to prevent the proliferation of special nuclear materials. With IPAD, fissions are induced in a brief, intense radiation burst and the resulting gamma ray or neutron signals are acquired during a short period of elevated signal-to-noise ratio. The 8 MV, 200 kA Mercury pulsed-power generator at the Naval Research Laboratory coupled to a high-power vacuum diode produces an intense 30 ns bremsstrahlung beam to study this approach. The work presented here reports on Mercury experiments designed to maximize the photofission yield in a depleted-uranium (DU) object in the bremsstrahlung far field by varying the anode-cathode (AK) diode gap spacing and by adding an inner-diameter-reducing insert in the outer conductor wall. An extensive suite of diagnostics was fielded to measure the bremsstrahlung beam and DU fission yield as functions of diode geometry. Delayed fission neutrons from the DU proved to be a valuable diagnostic for measuring bremsstrahlung photons above 5 MeV. The measurements are in broad agreement with particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations of electron dynamics and radiation transport. These show that with increasing AK gap, electron losses to the insert and outer conductor wall increase and that the electron angles impacting the bremsstrahlung converter approach normal incidence. The diode conditions for maximum fission yield occur when the gap is large enough to produce electron angles close to normal, yet small enough to limit electron losses.

  14. Effect of nuclear-reaction mechanisms on the population of excited nuclear states and isomeric ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, N. K.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental data on the cross sections for channels of fusion and transfer reactions induced by beams of radioactive halo nuclei and clustered and stable loosely bound nuclei were analyzed, and the results of this analysis were summarized. The interplay of the excitation of single-particle states in reaction-product nuclei and direct reaction channels was established for transfer reactions. Respective experiments were performed in stable (6Li) and radioactive (6He) beams of the DRIBs accelerator complex at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, and in deuteron and 3He beams of the U-120M cyclotron at the Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy Sciences of Czech Republic (Řež and Prague, Czech Republic). Data on subbarrier and near-barrier fusion reactions involving clustered and loosely bound light nuclei (6Li and 3He) can be described quite reliably within simple evaporation models with allowance for different reaction Q-values and couple channels. In reactions involving halo nuclei, their structure manifests itself most strongly in the region of energies below the Coulomb barrier. Neutron transfer occurs with a high probability in the interactions of all loosely bound nuclei with light and heavy stable nuclei at positive Q-values. The cross sections for such reactions and the respective isomeric ratios differ drastically for nucleon stripping and nucleon pickup mechanisms. This is due to the difference in the population probabilities for excited single-particle states.

  15. Penetration Factor for Nuclear Fusion Reaction in Nonthermal Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ki, Dai-Han; Jung, Young-Dae

    2011-02-01

    The nonthermal effects on the nuclear fusion reaction process are investigated in Lorentzian astrophysical plasmas. The closed expression of the classical turning point in Lorentzian plasmas is obtained by the Lambert W-function. Using the WKB analysis with the effective screening length, the closed expressions of the fusion penetration factor and the cross section for the nuclear fusion reaction in Lorentzian plasmas are obtained as functions of the spectral index, relative kinetic energy, and plasma parameters. It is shown that the nonthermal character of the Lorentzian plasma enhances the fusion penetration factor. In addition, the nonthermal effect on the penetration factor is found to be more significant in plasmas with higher densities. It would be expected that the fusion reaction rates of the p-p chain and the CNO cycle in nonthermal plasmas are always greater than those in thermal Maxwellian plasmas.

  16. Unified ab initio approaches to nuclear structure and reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Navratil, Petr; Quaglioni, Sofia; Hupin, Guillaume; ...

    2016-04-13

    The description of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the realistic interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. In addition to the complex nature of the nuclear forces, with two-, three- and possibly higher many-nucleon components, one faces the quantum-mechanical many-nucleon problem governed by an interplay between bound and continuum states. In recent years, significant progress has been made in ab initio nuclear structure and reaction calculations based on input from QCD-employing Hamiltonians constructed within chiral effective field theory. After a brief overview of the field, we focus on ab initio many-body approaches—built upon the no-core shell model—that are capable of simultaneously describing both bound and scattering nuclear states, and present results for resonances in light nuclei, reactions important for astrophysics and fusion research. In particular, we review recent calculations of resonances in the 6He halo nucleus, of five- and six-nucleon scattering, and an investigation of the role of chiral three-nucleon interactions in the structure of 9Be. Further, we discuss applications to the 7Bemore » $${({\\rm{p}},\\gamma )}^{8}{\\rm{B}}$$ radiative capture. Lastly, we highlight our efforts to describe transfer reactions including the 3H$${({\\rm{d}},{\\rm{n}})}^{4}$$He fusion.« less

  17. Sigma: Web Retrieval Interface for Nuclear Reaction Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B. Sonzogni, A.A.

    2008-12-15

    We present Sigma, a Web-rich application which provides user-friendly access in processing and plotting of the evaluated and experimental nuclear reaction data stored in the ENDF-6 and EXFOR formats. The main interface includes browsing using a periodic table and a directory tree, basic and advanced search capabilities, interactive plots of cross sections, angular distributions and spectra, comparisons between evaluated and experimental data, computations between different cross section sets. Interactive energy-angle, neutron cross section uncertainties plots and visualization of covariance matrices are under development. Sigma is publicly available at the National Nuclear Data Center website at (http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/sigma)

  18. Sigma: Web Retrieval Interface for Nuclear Reaction Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko,B.; Sonzogni, A.A.

    2008-06-24

    The authors present Sigma, a Web-rich application which provides user-friendly access in processing and plotting of the evaluated and experimental nuclear reaction data stored in the ENDF-6 and EXFOR formats. The main interface includes browsing using a periodic table and a directory tree, basic and advanced search capabilities, interactive plots of cross sections, angular distributions and spectra, comparisons between evaluated and experimental data, computations between different cross section sets. Interactive energy-angle, neutron cross section uncertainties plots and visualization of covariance matrices are under development. Sigma is publicly available at the National Nuclear Data Center website at www.nndc.bnl.gov/sigma.

  19. Direct reactions for nuclear structure required for fundamental symmetry tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, P. E.; Rand, E. T.; Diaz Varela, A.; Ball, G. C.; Bildstein, V.; Faestermann, T.; Hadinia, B.; Hertenberger, R.; Jamieson, D. S.; Jigmeddorj, B.; Leach, K. G.; Svensson, C. E.; Wirth, H.-F.

    2016-09-01

    A program of nuclear structure studies to support fundamental symmetry tests has been initiated. Motivated by the search for an electric dipole moment in 199Hg, the structure in the vicinity has been explored via direct reaction studies. To date, these have included the 198,200Hg(d, d') inelastic scattering reactions, with the aim to obtain information on the E2 and E3 strength distributions, and the 198Hg(d, p) and 200Hg(d, t) reactions to obtain information on the single-particle states in 199Hg. The studies using the 200Hg targets have been fully analyzed using the FRESCO reaction code yielding the E2 and E3 strength distribution to 4 MeV in excitation energy, and the (d, t) single- particle strength to over 3 MeV in excitation energy.

  20. Nuclear structure and reactions using lattice effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupak, Gautam

    2016-09-01

    Effective field theory (EFT) formulated on a space-time lattice provides a model-independent framework for ab initio nuclear structure and reaction calculations. The EFT interactions are rooted in quantum chromodynamics through low energy symmetry constraints. In this talk I present several recent developments in lattice EFT, in particular I present the so called adiabatic projection method that enables elastic and in-elastic reaction calculations. Bound state properties of atomic nuclei such as carbon and oxygen will also be presented. Partial support from US National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1307453 is acknowledged.

  1. A Transport Model for Nuclear Reactions Induced by Radioactive Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Das, Champak B.; Das Gupta, Subal; Gale, Charles; Ko, C.M.; Yong, G.-C.; Zuo Wei

    2005-10-14

    Major ingredients of an isospin and momentum dependent transport model for nuclear reactions induced by radioactive beams are outlined. Within the IBUU04 version of this model we study several experimental probes of the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, especially the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Comparing with the recent experimental data from NSCL/MSU on isospin diffusion, we found a nuclear symmetry energy of Esym({rho}) {approx_equal} 31.6({rho}/{rho}0)1.05 at subnormal densities. Predictions on several observables sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy at supranormal densities accessible at GSI and the planned Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) are also made.

  2. Nucleon Transfer Reactions in Few-Body Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deltuva, A.

    2017-03-01

    Three- and four-body scattering is described solving Faddeev-Yakubovsky or equivalent Alt-Grassberger-Sandhas integral equations for transition operators in momentum-space. Several realistic nuclear interaction models are used; the Coulomb force between charged particles is taken into account via the screening and renormalization method. Differential cross sections and spin observables for various nucleon transfer reactions are calculated and compared with experimental data.

  3. Rydberg phases of Hydrogen and low energy nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsson, Sveinn; Holmlid, Leif

    2016-03-01

    For over the last 26 years the science of cold fusion/LENR has been researched around the world with slow pace of progress. Modest quantity of excess heat and signatures of nuclear transmutation and helium production have been confirmed in experiments and theoretical work has only resulted in a large flora of inadequate theoretical scenarios. Here we review current state of research in Rydberg matter of Hydrogen that is showing strong signature of nuclear processes. In the presentation experimental behavior of Rydberg matter of hydrogen is described. An extensive collaboration effort of surface physics, catalysis, atomic physics, solid state physics, nuclear physics and quantum information is need to tackle the surprising experimental results that have so far been obtained. Rydberg matter of Hydrogen is the only known state of matter that is able to bring huge collection of protons to so short distances and for so long time that tunneling becomes a reasonable process for making low energy nuclear reactions. Nuclear quantum entanglement can also become realistic process at theses conditions.

  4. Visualized kinematics code for two-body nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. J.; Chae, K. Y.

    2016-05-01

    The one or few nucleon transfer reaction has been a great tool for investigating the single-particle properties of a nucleus. Both stable and exotic beams are utilized to study transfer reactions in normal and inverse kinematics, respectively. Because many energy levels of the heavy recoil from the two-body nuclear reaction can be populated by using a single beam energy, identifying each populated state, which is not often trivial owing to high level-density of the nucleus, is essential. For identification of the energy levels, a visualized kinematics code called VISKIN has been developed by utilizing the Java programming language. The development procedure, usage, and application of the VISKIN is reported.

  5. [Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions]. Progress summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The experimental goals are focused on developing an understanding of strong interactions and the structure of hadronic systems by determination of the electromagnetic response; these goals will be accomplished through coincidence detection of final states. Nuclear modeling objectives are to organize and interpret the data through a consistent description of a broad spectrum of reaction observables; calculations are performed in a nonrelativistic diagrammatic framework as well as a relativistic QHD approach. Work is described according to the following arrangement: direct knockout reactions (completion of {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p), {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}pp) progress, large acceptance detector physics simulations), giant resonance studies (intermediate-energy experiments with solid-state detectors, the third response function in {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}p{sub 0}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 0}), comparison of the {sup 12}C(e, e{prime}p{sub 0}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 3}) reactions, quadrupole strength in the {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}{alpha}{sub 0}) reaction, quadrupole strength in the {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}{alpha}) reaction, analysis of the {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}p{sub 1}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 3}) angular distributions, analysis of the {sup 40}Ca(e,e{prime}x) reaction at low q, analysis of the higher-q {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}x) data from Bates), models of nuclear structure (experimental work, Hartree-Fock calculations, phonon excitations in spherical nuclei, shell model calculations, variational methods for relativistic fields), and instrumentation development efforts (developments at CEBAF, CLAS contracts, BLAST developments).

  6. EMPIRE: Nuclear Reaction Model Code System for Data Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, M.; Capote, R.; Carlson, B. V.; Obložinský, P.; Sin, M.; Trkov, A.; Wienke, H.; Zerkin, V.

    2007-12-01

    EMPIRE is a modular system of nuclear reaction codes, comprising various nuclear models, and designed for calculations over a broad range of energies and incident particles. A projectile can be a neutron, proton, any ion (including heavy-ions) or a photon. The energy range extends from the beginning of the unresolved resonance region for neutron-induced reactions (∽ keV) and goes up to several hundred MeV for heavy-ion induced reactions. The code accounts for the major nuclear reaction mechanisms, including direct, pre-equilibrium and compound nucleus ones. Direct reactions are described by a generalized optical model (ECIS03) or by the simplified coupled-channels approach (CCFUS). The pre-equilibrium mechanism can be treated by a deformation dependent multi-step direct (ORION + TRISTAN) model, by a NVWY multi-step compound one or by either a pre-equilibrium exciton model with cluster emission (PCROSS) or by another with full angular momentum coupling (DEGAS). Finally, the compound nucleus decay is described by the full featured Hauser-Feshbach model with γ-cascade and width-fluctuations. Advanced treatment of the fission channel takes into account transmission through a multiple-humped fission barrier with absorption in the wells. The fission probability is derived in the WKB approximation within the optical model of fission. Several options for nuclear level densities include the EMPIRE-specific approach, which accounts for the effects of the dynamic deformation of a fast rotating nucleus, the classical Gilbert-Cameron approach and pre-calculated tables obtained with a microscopic model based on HFB single-particle level schemes with collective enhancement. A comprehensive library of input parameters covers nuclear masses, optical model parameters, ground state deformations, discrete levels and decay schemes, level densities, fission barriers, moments of inertia and γ-ray strength functions. The results can be converted into ENDF-6 formatted files using the

  7. Trojan Horse technique to measure nuclear astrophysics rearrangement reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitaleri, Claudio

    2013-03-01

    The knowledge of nucleosynthesis and of energy production in stars requires an increasingly precise measurement of nuclear fusion reactions at the Gamow energy. Because of the Coulomb barrier reaction cross sections in astrophysics cannot be accessed directly at ultra -low energies, unless very favorable conditions are met. Moreover, the energies characterizing nuclear processes in several astrophysical contexts are so low that the presence of atomic electrons must be taken into account. Theoretical extrapolations of available data are then needed to derive astrophysical S(E)-factors. To overcome these experimental difficulties the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been introduced. The method provides a valid alternative path to measure unscreened low-energy cross sections of reactions between charged particles, and to retrieve information on the electron screening potential when ultra-low energy direct measurements are available. While the theory has been discussed in detail in some theoretical works, present in the scientific literature, also in relation to different types of excitation functions (e.g. non-resonant and resonant), work on detailed methodology used to extract the events to be considered for the bare nucleus cross section measurements is still on going. In this work we will present some critical points in the application of THM that deserve to be discussed in more detail.

  8. Experimental Observation of Nuclear Reactions in Palladium and Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    J. Dufour; D. Murat; X. Dufour; J. Foos

    2001-11-12

    By submitting various metals (Pd, U) containing hydrogen (from 2000 to 700 000 atoms of hydrogen for 1 000 000 atoms of the host metal) to the combined action of electrical currents and magnetic fields, we have observed a sizeable exothermal effect (from 0.1 to 8 W for 500 mg of metal used). This effect is beyond experimental errors, the energy output being typically 130 to 250{percent} of the energy input and not of chemical origin (exothermal effect in the range of 7000 MJ/mol of metal in the case of palladium and of 60 MJ/mol in the case of uranium). New chemical species also appear in the processes metals. It has been shown by a QED calculation that resonances of long lifetime (s), nuclear dimensions (fm), and low energy of formation (eV) could exist. This concept seems to look like the 'shrunken hydrogen atoms' proposed by various authors. It is indeed very different in two ways (a) being a metastable state, it needs energy to be formed (a few eV) and reverts to normal hydrogen after a few seconds, liberating back its energy of formation (it is thus not the source of the energy observed); (b) its formation can be described as the electron spin/proton nuclear spin interaction becoming first order in the lattice environment (whereas it is third order in a normal hydrogen atom). Moreover, we consider that the hydrex cannot yield a neutron because this reaction is strongly endothermic. To explain our results, we put forward the following working hypothesis: In a metal lattice and under proper conditions, the formation of such resonances (metastable state) could be favored. We propose to call them HYDREX, and we assume that they are actually formed in cold fusion (CF) and low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) experiments. Once formed, a number of HYDREX could gather around a nucleus of the lattice to form a cluster of nuclear size and of very long life time compared to nuclear time (10{sup -22} s). In this cluster, nuclear rearrangements could take place, yielding

  9. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. In addition to storing the data and its bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  10. Ab Initio Calculations Of Nuclear Reactions And Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S.

    2014-05-05

    Our ultimate goal is to develop a fundamental theory and efficient computational tools to describe dynamic processes between nuclei and to use such tools toward supporting several DOE milestones by: 1) performing predictive calculations of difficult-to-measure landmark reactions for nuclear astrophysics, such as those driving the neutrino signature of our sun; 2) improving our understanding of the structure of nuclei near the neutron drip line, which will be the focus of the DOE’s Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being constructed at Michigan State University; but also 3) helping to reveal the true nature of the nuclear force. Furthermore, these theoretical developments will support plasma diagnostic efforts at facilities dedicated to the development of terrestrial fusion energy.

  11. Photon scattering on /sup 238/U and the interpretation of near-threshold photofission resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Birenbaum, Y.; Alarcon, R.; Hoblit, S.D.; Laszewski, R.M.; Nathan, A.M.

    1987-10-01

    Cross sections for photon elastic scattering have been measured for /sup 238/U between 4.8 and 6.4 MeV with an energy resolution of about 50 keV. These data have been used along with existing photofission data to infer the total photoabsorption cross section sigma/sub T/ and the fission transmission coefficient T/sub f/ below neutron threshold. We find that the inferred sigma/sub T/ varies smoothly with energy and generally follows the extrapolated tail of the giant dipole resonance, and that T/sub f/ shows a broad bump between 5.6 and 5.9 MeV. These results strongly support the contention that resonances seen in near-threshold photofission cross sections are due to the fission and not the photon channel .

  12. Exploratory study of fission product yield determination from photofission of Pu239 at 11 MeV with monoenergetic photons

    DOE PAGES

    Bhike, Megha; Tornow, W.; Krishichayan, -; ...

    2017-02-14

    Here, measurements of fission product yields play an important role for the understanding of fundamental aspects of the fission process. Recently, neutron-induced fission product-yield data of 239Pu at energies below 4 MeV revealed an unexpected energy dependence of certain fission fragments. In order to investigate whether this observation is prerogative to neutron-induced fission, a program has been initiated to measure fission product yields in photoinduced fission. Here we report on the first ever photofission product yield measurement with monoenergetic photons produced by Compton back-scattering of FEL photons. The experiment was performed at the High-Intensity Gamma-ray Source at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory on 239Pu at Eγmore » = 11 MeV. In this exploratory study the yield of eight fission products ranging from 91Sr to 143Ce has been obtained.« less

  13. A Nuclear Reaction Analysis study of fluorine uptake in flint

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jian-Yue; Weathers, D. L.; Picton, F.; Hughes, B. F.; Duggan, J. L.; McDaniel, F. D.; Matteson, S.

    1999-06-10

    Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) using the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 16}O resonance reaction is a powerful method of fluorine depth profiling. We have used this method to study the fluorine uptake phenomenon in mineral flint, which could potentially develop into a method of dating archeological flint artifacts. Flint samples cut with a rock saw were immersed in aqueous fluoride solutions for different times for the uptake study. The results suggest that fluorine uptake is not a simple phenomenon, but rather a combination of several simultaneous processes. Fluorine surface adsorption appears to play an important role in developing the fluorine profiles. The surface adsorption was affected by several parameters such as pH value and fluorine concentration in the solution, among others. The problem of surface charging for the insulator materials during ion bombardment is also reported.

  14. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Kucharik, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Bellutti, P.; Korn, G.

    2015-01-01

    The use of a low contrast nanosecond laser pulse with a relatively low intensity (3  ×  1016 W cm-2) allowed the enhancing of the yield of induced nuclear reactions in advanced solid targets. In particular the ‘ultraclean’ proton-boron fusion reaction, producing energetic alpha particles without neutron generation, was chosen. A spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon substrate was used as a target. A combination of the specific target composition and the laser pulse temporal shape allowed the enhancing of the yield of alpha particles up to 109 per steradian. This result can be ascribed to the interaction of the long-laser pre-pulse with the target and to the optimal target geometry and composition.

  15. Indirect measurements of nuclear astrophysics reactions at CIAE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Weiping; Li Zhihong; Bai Xixiang; Wang Youbao; Lian Gang; Guo Bing; Zeng Sheng; Yan Shengquan; Wang Baoxiang; Su Jun; Shu Nengchuan; Chen Yongshou

    2006-11-02

    This paper described the nuclear astrophysical studies using the unstable ion beam facility GIRAFFE, by indirect measurements. We measured the angular distributions for some single proton or neutron transfer reactions, such as 7Be(d,n)8B, 11C(d,n)12N, 8Li(d,n)9Be, 8Li(d,p)9Li and 13N(d,n)14O in inverse kinematics, and derived the astrophysical S-factors or reaction rates of 7Be(p,{gamma})8B, 11C(p,{gamma})12N, 8Li(n,{gamma})9Li, 13N(p,{gamma})14O by asymptotic normalization coefficient, spectroscopic factor, and R-matrix approach at astrophysically relevant energies.

  16. Secondary Nuclear Reactions in Magneto-Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    The goal of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) is to relax the extreme pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion by magnetizing the fuel. Understanding the level of magnetization at stagnation is critical for charting the performance of any MIF concept. We show here that the secondary nuclear reactions in magnetized deuterium plasma can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product (BR), the critical confinement parameter for MIF. The secondary neutron yields and spectra are examined and shown to be extremely sensitive to BR. In particular, embedded magnetic fields are shown to affect profoundly the isotropy of the secondary neutron spectra. Detailed modeling of these spectra along with the ratio of overall secondary to primary neutron yields is used to form the basis of a diagnostic technique used to infer BR at stagnation. Effects of gradients in density, temperature and magnetic field strength are examined, as well as other possible non-uniform fuel configurations. Computational results employing a fully kinetic treatment of charged reaction product transport and Monte Carlo treatment of secondary reactions are compared to results from recent experiments at Sandia National Laboratories' Z machine testing the MAGnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept. The technique reveals that the charged reaction products were highly magnetized in these experiments. Implications for eventual ignition-relevant experiments with deuterium-tritium fuel are discussed. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Nuclear Structure of 97Mo from the (d, p) Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, M. S.; Booth, W.

    The reaction 96Mo(d, p)97Mo has been studied at 12 MeV using the tandem Van de Graaff accelerator and a multi-channel magnetic spectrograph at the Atomic Weapon Research Establishment, Aldermaston, England. Angular distributions of protons are measured at 12 different angles from 5° to 87.5° at an interval of 7.5° and the reaction products are detected in nuclear emulsion plates. Thirty levels in the energy range from 0.000 to 2.458 MeV have been observed and absolute differential cross-sections for these levels have been measured. The data are analyzed in terms of the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) theory of the direct reactions, and spins, parities and spectroscopic factors are deduced for various levels. Ambiguity in the spin assignments of d5/2 and d3/2 which is allowed in ln = 2(d, p) transition is removed by using the corresponding L-value of the 95 Mo(t, p)97Mo reaction at Et = 12 MeV. Determined value of the sum of spectroscopic factors for transfers of d5/2 neutrons suggests configuration mixing in the ground state of 96Mo. The properties of the levels in 97Mo are compared with previous experimental results and theoretical predictions.

  18. Exchange-diffusion reactions in HfSiON during annealing studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis and narrow resonant nuclear reaction profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotti, L.; Bastos, K. P.; Soares, G. V.; Driemeier, C.; Pezzi, R. P.; Morais, J.; Baumvol, I. J. R.; Rotondaro, A. L. P.; Visokay, M. R.; Chambers, J. J.; Quevedo-Lopez, M.; Colombo, L.

    2004-11-01

    HfSiON films deposited on Si (001) by reactive sputtering were submitted to rapid thermal annealing at 1000°C in vacuum, N2 and O2 atmospheres. The stability of the dielectric was evaluated by measuring the atomic transport and exchange of the chemical species, using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis and narrow resonant nuclear reaction profiling. Annealing in O2 ambient reduced the N concentration mainly from near-surface regions where oxygen was incorporated in comparable amounts. Vacuum annealing, on the other hand, induced N loss preferentially from the Si/dielectric interface and O loss preferentially from near-surface regions. The results are explained in terms of exchange-diffusion reactions occurring in the HfSiON.

  19. Ab Initio Nuclear Structure and Reaction Calculations for Rare Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Draayer, Jerry P.

    2014-09-28

    We have developed a novel ab initio symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM), which has opened the intermediate-mass region for ab initio investigations, thereby providing an opportunity for first-principle symmetry-guided applications to nuclear structure and reactions for nuclear isotopes from the lightest p-shell systems to intermediate-mass nuclei. This includes short-lived proton-rich nuclei on the path of X-ray burst nucleosynthesis and rare neutron-rich isotopes to be produced by the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We have provided ab initio descriptions of high accuracy for low-lying (including collectivity-driven) states of isotopes of Li, He, Be, C, O, Ne, Mg, Al, and Si, and studied related strong- and weak-interaction driven reactions that are important, in astrophysics, for further understanding stellar evolution, X-ray bursts and triggering of s, p, and rp processes, and in applied physics, for electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments as well as for fusion ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  20. Redox reaction and foaming in nuclear waste glass melting

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    This document was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and is an attempt to analyze and estimate the effects of feed composition variables and reducing agent variables on the expected chemistry of reactions occurring in the cold cap and in the glass melt in the nuclear waste glass Slurry-fed, joule-heated melters as they might affect foaming during the glass-making process. Numerous redox reactions of waste glass components and potential feed additives, and the effects of other feed variables on these reactions are reviewed with regard to their potential effect on glass foaming. A major emphasis of this report is to examine the potential positive or negative aspects of adjusting feed with formic acid as opposed to other feed modification techniques including but not limited to use of other reducing agents. Feed modification techniques other than the use of reductants that should influence foaming behavior include control of glass melter feed pH through use of nitric acid. They also include partial replacement of sodium salts by lithium salts. This latter action (b) apparently lowers glass viscosity and raises surface tension. This replacement should decrease foaming by decreasing foam stability.

  1. Ab initio calculations of nuclear reactions important for astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, Petr; Dohet-Eraly, Jeremy; Calci, Angelo; Horiuchi, Wataru; Hupin, Guillaume; Quaglioni, Sofia

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, significant progress has been made in ab initio nuclear structure and reaction calculations based on input from QCD employing Hamiltonians constructed within chiral effective field theory. One of the newly developed approaches is the No-Core Shell Model with Continuum (NCSMC), capable of describing both bound and scattering states in light nuclei simultaneously. We will present NCSMC results for reactions important for astrophysics that are difficult to measure at relevant low energies, such as 3He(α,γ)7Be and 3H(α,γ)7Li and 11C(p,γ)12N radiative capture, as well as the 3H(d,n)4He fusion. We will also address prospects of calculating the 2H(α,γ)6Li capture reaction within the NCSMC formalism. Prepared in part by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Supported by the U.S. DOE, OS, NP, under Work Proposal No. SCW1158, and by the NSERC Grant No. SAPIN-2016-00033. TRIUMF receives funding from the NRC Canada.

  2. [Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions]. [Nuclear Physics Group, Univ. of New Hampshire

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The experimental goals are focused on developing an understanding of strong interactions and the structure of hadronic systems by determination of the electromagnetic response; these goals will be accomplished through coincidence detection of final states. Nuclear modeling objectives are to organize and interpret the data through a consistent description of a broad spectrum of reaction observables; calculations are performed in a nonrelativistic diagrammatic framework as well as a relativistic QHD approach. Work is described according to the following arrangement: direct knockout reactions (completion of [sup 16]O(e,e[prime]p), [sup 12]C(e,e[prime]pp) progress, large acceptance detector physics simulations), giant resonance studies (intermediate-energy experiments with solid-state detectors, the third response function in [sup 12]C(e,e[prime]p[sub 0]) and [sup 16]O(e,e[prime]p[sub 0]), comparison of the [sup 12]C(e, e[prime]p[sub 0]) and [sup 16]O(e,e[prime]p[sub 3]) reactions, quadrupole strength in the [sup 16]O(e,e[prime][alpha][sub 0]) reaction, quadrupole strength in the [sup 12]C(e,e[prime][alpha]) reaction, analysis of the [sup 12]C(e,e[prime]p[sub 1]) and [sup 16]O(e,e[prime]p[sub 3]) angular distributions, analysis of the [sup 40]Ca(e,e[prime]x) reaction at low q, analysis of the higher-q [sup 12]C(e,e[prime]x) data from Bates), models of nuclear structure (experimental work, Hartree-Fock calculations, phonon excitations in spherical nuclei, shell model calculations, variational methods for relativistic fields), and instrumentation development efforts (developments at CEBAF, CLAS contracts, BLAST developments).

  3. A study of heavy-heavy nuclear reactions. [nuclear research/nuclear particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the reaction products in high energy collisions and of the atmospheric transport of particles such as protons, neutrons and other nucleons. The magnetic moments of charmed baryons are examined. Total cross sections which are required for cosmic heavy ion transport and shielding studies are also examined.

  4. Screening in Low Energy Nuclear Reactions of Importance to Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.; Hora, Heinz; Luo, Nie

    2004-05-01

    Recent experiments in the LUNAR (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) project have shown anonymously high electron screening may occur during acceleration driven low energy (<400 kV) ion bombardment of solid targets [1]. These effects become particularly important for E/ Ue < 100 (here E= ion energy and Ue = electron-screening potential energy). Thus these effects become significant for the understanding of reactions involved in nucleosynthesis of the elements and the interpretation of astrophysical data [1]. Another example of the behavior is the surprising threshold behavior near 18 keV for deuterons stopping in 3He gas at energies below the Bragg peak [2]. As pointed out in ref [1], the theoretical explanation for these effects is still under debate. Several researchers have proposed variations of the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to explain these effects [3]. In this paper, we propose an alternate mechanism associated with electron charge accumulation around the target atoms arising from the solid-state structure of the host. This concept will be explained in terms of density functional calculations of charge density profiles in a target undergoing ion dynamic effects [4]. REFERENCES [1] F. Strieder, et al., Naturwissenschaften (2000)88:461-467 [2] A. Formicola, et al., (2000) Eur Phys J. A 8:443-446 [3] S. Typel and H H Wolter, (2000) Few-Body System 29:75-93 [4] G. Miley and H. Hora, (2000) Nuclear Reactions in Solids, APS mtg. Lansing, MI [5] G. Miley, A. Lipson, N. Luo, and H. Hora, (2003) IEEE NSS/MIC Conf., Portland, OR

  5. Vision of nuclear physics with photo-nuclear reactions by laser-driven γ beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Tajima, T.; Schreiber, J.; Barty, C. P. J.; Fujiwara, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2009-11-01

    A laser-accelerated dense electron sheet with an energy E=tilde{γ} mc^2 can be used as a relativistic mirror to coherently reflect a second laser with photon energy ħω, thus generating by the Doppler boost [A. Einstein, Annalen der Physik 17, 891 (1905); D. Habs et al., Appl. Phys. B 93, 349 (2008)] brilliant high-energy photon beams with hbarω^'=4tilde{γ}^2hbarω and short duration for many new nuclear physics experiments. While the shortest-lived atomic levels are in the atto-second range, nuclear levels can have lifetimes down to zeptoseconds. We discuss how the modulation of electron energies in phase-locked laser fields used for as-measurements [E. Goulielmakis et al., Science 317, 769 (2007)] can be carried over to the new direct measurement of fs-zs nuclear lifetimes by modulating the energies of accompanying conversion electrons or emitted protons. In the field of nuclear spectroscopy we discuss the new perspective as a function of increasing photon energy. In nuclear systems a much higher sensitivity is predicted to the time variation of fundamental constants compared to atomic systems [V. Flambaum, arXiv:nucl-th/0801.1994v1 (2008)]. For energies up to 50 keV Mössbauer-like recoilless absorption allows to produce nuclear bosonic ensembles with many delocalized coherent polaritons [G.V. Smirnov et al., Phys. Rev. A 71, 023804 (2005)] for the first time. Using the ( γ, n) reaction to produce cold, polarized neutrons with a focusing ellipsoidal device [P. Böni, Nucl. Instrum. Meth. A 586, 1 (2008); Ch. Schanzer et al., Nucl. Instrum. Meth. 529, 63 (2004)], brilliant cold polarized micro-neutron beams become available. The compact and relatively cheap laser-generated γ beams may serve for extended studies at university-based facilities.

  6. The US nuclear reaction data network. Summary of the first meeting, March 13 & 14 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The first meeting of the US Nuclear Reaction Data Network (USNRDN) was held at the Colorado School of Mines, March 13-14, 1996 chaired by F. Edward Cecil. The Agenda of the meeting is attached. The Network, its mission, products and services; related nuclear data and data networks, members, and organization are described in Attachment 1. The following progress reports from the members of the USNRDN were distributed prior to the meeting and are given as Attachment 2. (1) Measurements and Development of Analytic Techniques for Basic Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Applications; (2) Nuclear Reaction Data Activities at the National Nuclear Data Center; (3) Studies of nuclear reactions at very low energies; (4) Nuclear Reaction Data Activities, Nuclear Data Group; (5) Progress in Neutron Physics at Los Alamos - Experiments; (6) Nuclear Reaction Data Activities in Group T2; (7) Progress Report for the US Nuclear Reaction Data Network Meeting; (8) Nuclear Astrophysics Research Group (ORNL); (9) Progress Report from Ohio University; (10) Exciton Model Phenomenology; and (11) Progress Report for Coordination Meeting USNRDN.

  7. Computer subroutines for the estimation of nuclear reaction effects in proton-tissue-dose calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    Calculational methods for estimation of dose from external proton exposure of arbitrary convex bodies are briefly reviewed. All the necessary information for the estimation of dose in soft tissue is presented. Special emphasis is placed on retaining the effects of nuclear reaction, especially in relation to the dose equivalent. Computer subroutines to evaluate all of the relevant functions are discussed. Nuclear reaction contributions for standard space radiations are in most cases found to be significant. Many of the existing computer programs for estimating dose in which nuclear reaction effects are neglected can be readily converted to include nuclear reaction effects by use of the subroutines described herein.

  8. RIPL - Reference Input Parameter Library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Data Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capote, R.; Herman, M.; Obložinský, P.; Young, P. G.; Goriely, S.; Belgya, T.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Koning, A. J.; Hilaire, S.; Plujko, V. A.; Avrigeanu, M.; Bersillon, O.; Chadwick, M. B.; Fukahori, T.; Ge, Zhigang; Han, Yinlu; Kailas, S.; Kopecky, J.; Maslov, V. M.; Reffo, G.; Sin, M.; Soukhovitskii, E. Sh.; Talou, P.

    2009-12-01

    We describe the physics and data included in the Reference Input Parameter Library, which is devoted to input parameters needed in calculations of nuclear reactions and nuclear data evaluations. Advanced modelling codes require substantial numerical input, therefore the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked extensively since 1993 on a library of validated nuclear-model input parameters, referred to as the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL). A final RIPL coordinated research project (RIPL-3) was brought to a successful conclusion in December 2008, after 15 years of challenging work carried out through three consecutive IAEA projects. The RIPL-3 library was released in January 2009, and is available on the Web through http://www-nds.iaea.org/RIPL-3/. This work and the resulting database are extremely important to theoreticians involved in the development and use of nuclear reaction modelling (ALICE, EMPIRE, GNASH, UNF, TALYS) both for theoretical research and nuclear data evaluations. The numerical data and computer codes included in RIPL-3 are arranged in seven segments: MASSES contains ground-state properties of nuclei for about 9000 nuclei, including three theoretical predictions of masses and the evaluated experimental masses of Audi et al. (2003). DISCRETE LEVELS contains 117 datasets (one for each element) with all known level schemes, electromagnetic and γ-ray decay probabilities available from ENSDF in October 2007. NEUTRON RESONANCES contains average resonance parameters prepared on the basis of the evaluations performed by Ignatyuk and Mughabghab. OPTICAL MODEL contains 495 sets of phenomenological optical model parameters defined in a wide energy range. When there are insufficient experimental data, the evaluator has to resort to either global parameterizations or microscopic approaches. Radial density distributions to be used as input for microscopic calculations are stored in the MASSES segment. LEVEL DENSITIES contains

  9. Feasibility study of fissile mass quantification by photofission delayed gamma rays in radioactive waste packages using MCNPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Eric; Jallu, Fanny; Pérot, Bertrand; Plumeri, Stéphane

    2016-12-01

    The feasibility of fissile mass quantification in large, long-lived medium activity radioactive waste packages using photofission delayed gamma rays has been assessed with MCNPX. The detection limit achievable is lower than the expected uranium mass in these waste packages, but the important sensibility to the waste matrix density and sample localization imposes to get an accurate measurement of these parameters. An isotope discrimination method based on gamma-ray ratios has been evaluated showing that photofission delayed gamma rays can be used to measure the fissile mass as well as the total uranium mass.

  10. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging.

    PubMed

    Rose, P B; Erickson, A S; Mayer, M; Nattress, J; Jovanovic, I

    2016-04-18

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as "searching for a needle in a haystack" because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of active interrogation using an external radiation source. However, the similarity of these materials to shielding and the required radiation doses that may exceed regulatory limits prevent this method from being widely used in practice. We introduce a low-dose active detection technique, referred to as low-energy nuclear reaction imaging, which exploits the physics of interactions of multi-MeV monoenergetic photons and neutrons to simultaneously measure the material's areal density and effective atomic number, while confirming the presence of fissionable materials by observing the beta-delayed neutron emission. For the first time, we demonstrate identification and imaging of uranium with this novel technique using a simple yet robust source, setting the stage for its wide adoption in security applications.

  11. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.; Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-01-01

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as “searching for a needle in a haystack” because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of active interrogation using an external radiation source. However, the similarity of these materials to shielding and the required radiation doses that may exceed regulatory limits prevent this method from being widely used in practice. We introduce a low-dose active detection technique, referred to as low-energy nuclear reaction imaging, which exploits the physics of interactions of multi-MeV monoenergetic photons and neutrons to simultaneously measure the material’s areal density and effective atomic number, while confirming the presence of fissionable materials by observing the beta-delayed neutron emission. For the first time, we demonstrate identification and imaging of uranium with this novel technique using a simple yet robust source, setting the stage for its wide adoption in security applications. PMID:27087555

  12. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.; Mayer, M.; ...

    2016-04-18

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as “searching for a needle in a haystack” because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of active interrogation using an external radiation source. However, the similarity of these materials to shielding and the required radiation doses that may exceed regulatory limits prevent this method frommore » being widely used in practice. We introduce a low-dose active detection technique, referred to as low-energy nuclear reaction imaging, which exploits the physics of interactions of multi-MeV monoenergetic photons and neutrons to simultaneously measure the material’s areal density and effective atomic number, while confirming the presence of fissionable materials by observing the beta-delayed neutron emission. For the first time, we demonstrate identification and imaging of uranium with this novel technique using a simple yet robust source, setting the stage for its wide adoption in security applications.« less

  13. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.; Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-04-01

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as “searching for a needle in a haystack” because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of active interrogation using an external radiation source. However, the similarity of these materials to shielding and the required radiation doses that may exceed regulatory limits prevent this method from being widely used in practice. We introduce a low-dose active detection technique, referred to as low-energy nuclear reaction imaging, which exploits the physics of interactions of multi-MeV monoenergetic photons and neutrons to simultaneously measure the material’s areal density and effective atomic number, while confirming the presence of fissionable materials by observing the beta-delayed neutron emission. For the first time, we demonstrate identification and imaging of uranium with this novel technique using a simple yet robust source, setting the stage for its wide adoption in security applications.

  14. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.; Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-04-18

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as “searching for a needle in a haystack” because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of active interrogation using an external radiation source. However, the similarity of these materials to shielding and the required radiation doses that may exceed regulatory limits prevent this method from being widely used in practice. We introduce a low-dose active detection technique, referred to as low-energy nuclear reaction imaging, which exploits the physics of interactions of multi-MeV monoenergetic photons and neutrons to simultaneously measure the material’s areal density and effective atomic number, while confirming the presence of fissionable materials by observing the beta-delayed neutron emission. For the first time, we demonstrate identification and imaging of uranium with this novel technique using a simple yet robust source, setting the stage for its wide adoption in security applications.

  15. Nuclear-Pumped Lasers. [efficient conversion of energy liberated in nuclear reactions to coherent radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The state of the art in nuclear pumped lasers is reviewed. Nuclear pumped laser modeling, nuclear volume and foil excitation of laser plasmas, proton beam simulations, nuclear flashlamp excitation, and reactor laser systems studies are covered.

  16. Laser-initiated primary and secondary nuclear reactions in Boron-Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, C.; Baccou, C.; Yahia, V.; Neuville, C.; Rafelski, J.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams are a promising new approach to many applications, from medical radioisotopes to aneutronic energy production. We present results demonstrating the occurrence of secondary nuclear reactions, initiated by the primary nuclear reaction products, using multicomponent targets composed of either natural boron (B) or natural boron nitride (BN). The primary proton-boron reaction (p + 11B → 3 α + 8.7 MeV), is one of the most attractive aneutronic fusion reaction. We report radioactive decay signatures in targets irradiated at the Elfie laser facility by laser-accelerated particle beams which we interpret as due to secondary reactions induced by alpha (α) particles produced in the primary reactions. Use of a second nanosecond laser beam, adequately synchronized with the short laser pulse to produce a plasma target, further enhanced the reaction rates. High rates and chains of reactions are essential for most applications.

  17. Laser-initiated primary and secondary nuclear reactions in Boron-Nitride.

    PubMed

    Labaune, C; Baccou, C; Yahia, V; Neuville, C; Rafelski, J

    2016-02-17

    Nuclear reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams are a promising new approach to many applications, from medical radioisotopes to aneutronic energy production. We present results demonstrating the occurrence of secondary nuclear reactions, initiated by the primary nuclear reaction products, using multicomponent targets composed of either natural boron (B) or natural boron nitride (BN). The primary proton-boron reaction (p + (11)B → 3 α + 8.7 MeV), is one of the most attractive aneutronic fusion reaction. We report radioactive decay signatures in targets irradiated at the Elfie laser facility by laser-accelerated particle beams which we interpret as due to secondary reactions induced by alpha (α) particles produced in the primary reactions. Use of a second nanosecond laser beam, adequately synchronized with the short laser pulse to produce a plasma target, further enhanced the reaction rates. High rates and chains of reactions are essential for most applications.

  18. A new look at low-energy nuclear reaction research.

    PubMed

    Krivit, Steven B; Marwan, Jan

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a new look at low-energy nuclear reaction research, a field that has developed from one of the most controversial subjects in science, "cold fusion." Early in the history of this controversy, beginning in 1989, a strong polarity existed; many scientists fiercely defended the claim of new physical effects as well as a new process in which like-charged atomic nuclei overcome the Coulomb barrier at normal temperatures and pressures. Many other scientists considered the entire collection of physical observations-along with the hypothesis of a "cold fusion"--entirely a mistake. Twenty years later, some people who had dismissed the field in its entirety are considering the validity of at least some of the reported experimental phenomena. As well, some researchers in the field are wondering whether the underlying phenomena may be not a fusion process but a neutron capture/absorption process. In 2002, a related tabletop form of thermonuclear fusion was discovered in the field of acoustic inertial confinement fusion. We briefly review some of this work, as well.

  19. Nuclear structure and reaction studies at medium energies

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, G.W.; Ray, R.L.

    1990-10-01

    This document constitutes the (1988--1991) technical progress report for the ongoing medium energy physics research program supported by the US Department of Energy through special Research Grant FG05-88ER40444. The experiments discussed are conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The overall motivation for the work discussed in this document is driven by three main objectives: (1) provide hadron-nucleon and hadron-nucleus scattering data which serve to facilitate the study of effective two-body interactions, test (and possibly determine) nuclear structure, and help study reaction mechanisms and dynamics;(2) provide unique, first-of-a-kind exploratory'' hadron-nucleus scattering data in the hope that such data will lead to discovery of new phenomena and new physics; and (3) perform precision tests of fundamental interactions, such as rare decay searches, whose observation would imply fundamental new physics.

  20. Nuclear Reactions: Studying Peaceful Applications in the Middle and Secondary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski Sunal, Cynthia; Sunal, Dennis W.

    1999-01-01

    Asserts that students must learn about nuclear fission and fusion in the social studies curriculum to help them develop a foundation for considering the social issues associated with the everyday use of nuclear reactions. Gives background on the two types of reactions and provides three lessons for middle and secondary classrooms. (CMK)

  1. Effect of a strong magnetic field on the energy yield of nuclear reactions in dense nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sekerzhitskii, V.S.

    1995-01-01

    According to modern concepts, the electron-neutron-nuclear (Aen) phase of dense highly degenerate matter can be realized in the shells of neutron stars. This phase has relatively stable and absolutely stable states of thermodynamic equilibrium. Strong magnetic fields can exist in neutron stars. For this reason, analysis of their effect on the characteristics of the Aen phase is of great interest. It is specially important to study the influence of strong magnetic fields on the energy yield of nuclear reactions in dense nuclear matter because the transition to the absolute equilibrium state proceeds through these reactions.

  2. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the region of Iriduim and Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Kelley, K; Escher, J; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2008-02-26

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from osmium (Z = 76) to gold (Z = 79). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Ir and Au including reactions on isomeric targets.

  3. Analyzing velocity map images to distinguish the primary methyl photofragments from those produced upon C-Cl bond photofission in chloroacetone at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Alligood, Bridget W.; Straus, Daniel B.; Butler, Laurie J.

    2011-07-21

    We use a combination of crossed laser-molecular beam scattering experiments and velocity map imaging experiments to investigate the three primary photodissociation channels of chloroacetone at 193 nm: C-Cl bond photofission yielding CH{sub 3}C(O)CH{sub 2} radicals, C-C bond photofission yielding CH{sub 3}CO and CH{sub 2}Cl products, and C-CH{sub 3} bond photofission resulting in CH{sub 3} and C(O)CH{sub 2}Cl products. Improved analysis of data previously reported by our group quantitatively identifies the contribution of this latter photodissociation channel. We introduce a forward convolution procedure to identify the portion of the signal, derived from the methyl image, which results from a two-step process in which C-Cl bond photofission is followed by the dissociation of the vibrationally excited CH{sub 3}C(O)CH{sub 2} radicals to CH{sub 3}+ COCH{sub 2}. Subtracting this from the total methyl signal identifies the methyl photofragments that result from the CH{sub 3}+ C(O)CH{sub 2}Cl photofission channel. We find that about 89% of the chloroacetone molecules undergo C-Cl bond photofission to yield CH{sub 3}C(O)CH{sub 2} and Cl products; approximately 8% result in C-C bond photofission to yield CH{sub 3}CO and CH{sub 2}Cl products, and the remaining 2.6% undergo C-CH{sub 3} bond photofission to yield CH{sub 3} and C(O)CH{sub 2}Cl products.

  4. Nuclear reaction cross sections of exotic nuclei in the Glauber model for relativistic mean field densities

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, S. K.; Panda, R. N.; Arumugam, P.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2009-12-15

    We have calculated the total nuclear reaction cross sections of exotic nuclei in the framework of the Glauber model, using as inputs the standard relativistic mean field (RMF) densities and the densities obtained from the more recently developed effective-field-theory-motivated RMF (the E-RMF). Both light and heavy nuclei are taken as the representative targets, and the light neutron-rich nuclei as projectiles. We found the total nuclear reaction cross section to increase as a function of the mass number, for both the target and projectile nuclei. The differential nuclear elastic scattering cross sections are evaluated for some selected systems at various incident energies. We found a large dependence of the differential elastic scattering cross section on incident energy. Finally, we have applied the same formalism to calculate both the total nuclear reaction cross section and the differential nuclear elastic scattering cross section for the recently discussed superheavy nucleus with atomic number Z=122.

  5. The CCONE Code System and its Application to Nuclear Data Evaluation for Fission and Other Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, O. Iwamoto, N.; Kunieda, S.; Minato, F.; Shibata, K.

    2016-01-15

    A computer code system, CCONE, was developed for nuclear data evaluation within the JENDL project. The CCONE code system integrates various nuclear reaction models needed to describe nucleon, light charged nuclei up to alpha-particle and photon induced reactions. The code is written in the C++ programming language using an object-oriented technology. At first, it was applied to neutron-induced reaction data on actinides, which were compiled into JENDL Actinide File 2008 and JENDL-4.0. It has been extensively used in various nuclear data evaluations for both actinide and non-actinide nuclei. The CCONE code has been upgraded to nuclear data evaluation at higher incident energies for neutron-, proton-, and photon-induced reactions. It was also used for estimating β-delayed neutron emission. This paper describes the CCONE code system indicating the concept and design of coding and inputs. Details of the formulation for modelings of the direct, pre-equilibrium and compound reactions are presented. Applications to the nuclear data evaluations such as neutron-induced reactions on actinides and medium-heavy nuclei, high-energy nucleon-induced reactions, photonuclear reaction and β-delayed neutron emission are mentioned.

  6. The CCONE Code System and its Application to Nuclear Data Evaluation for Fission and Other Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, O.; Iwamoto, N.; Kunieda, S.; Minato, F.; Shibata, K.

    2016-01-01

    A computer code system, CCONE, was developed for nuclear data evaluation within the JENDL project. The CCONE code system integrates various nuclear reaction models needed to describe nucleon, light charged nuclei up to alpha-particle and photon induced reactions. The code is written in the C++ programming language using an object-oriented technology. At first, it was applied to neutron-induced reaction data on actinides, which were compiled into JENDL Actinide File 2008 and JENDL-4.0. It has been extensively used in various nuclear data evaluations for both actinide and non-actinide nuclei. The CCONE code has been upgraded to nuclear data evaluation at higher incident energies for neutron-, proton-, and photon-induced reactions. It was also used for estimating β-delayed neutron emission. This paper describes the CCONE code system indicating the concept and design of coding and inputs. Details of the formulation for modelings of the direct, pre-equilibrium and compound reactions are presented. Applications to the nuclear data evaluations such as neutron-induced reactions on actinides and medium-heavy nuclei, high-energy nucleon-induced reactions, photonuclear reaction and β-delayed neutron emission are mentioned.

  7. Applications of a superconducting solenoidal separator in the experimental investigation of nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinde, D. J.; Carter, I. P.; Dasgupta, M.; Simpson, E. C.; Cook, K. J.; Kalkal, Sunil; Luong, D. H.; Williams, E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes applications of a novel superconducting solenoidal separator, with magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla, for studies of nuclear reactions using the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility at the Australian National University.

  8. Helium mobility in SON68 borosilicate nuclear glass: A nuclear reaction analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bès, R.; Sauvage, T.; Peuget, S.; Haussy, J.; Chamssedine, F.; Oliviero, E.; Fares, T.; Vincent, L.

    2013-11-01

    The 3He behavior in the non active R7T7 type borosilicate glass called SON68 has been investigated using the implantation method to introduce helium in the material. Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) was performed to follow the helium concentration depth profile evolution as a function of annealing time and temperature. In addition, in situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been implemented to study the formation of helium bubbles during both implantation and annealing processes. Numerical modeling with two different approaches is proposed and discussed to investigate the helium mobility mechanisms. Our study reveals for helium incorporation by implantation at low temperature the presence of several helium populations with disparate diffusivities. The most mobile helium fraction would be attributed to atomic diffusion. The corresponding activation energy value (0.61 eV) extracted from Arrhenius graphs is in good agreement with literature data. The results also highlight that the damages associated to helium sursaturation are the source of small helium clusters formation, with a reduced mobility instead of the atomic mobility measured by the infusion technique. Small cavities that support this assumption have been observed by TEM at low temperature.

  9. Nuclear reaction rate uncertainties and the 22Ne( p,gamma)23Na reaction: Classical novae and globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Keegan John

    The overall theme of this thesis is the advancement of nuclear astrophysics via the analysis of stellar processes in the presence of varying levels of precision in the available nuclear data. With regard to classical novae, the level of mixing that occurs between the outer layers of the white dwarf core and the solar accreted material in oxygen-neon novae is presently undetermined by stellar models, but the nuclear data relevant to these explosive phenomena are fairly precise. This precision allowed for the identification of a series of elemental ratios indicative of the level of mixing occurring in novae. Direct comparisons of the modelled elemental ratios to observations showed that there is likely to be much less of this mixing than was previously assumed. Thus, our understanding of classical novae was altered via the investigation of the nuclear reactions relevant to this phenomenon. However, this level of experimental precision is rare and large nuclear reaction uncertainties can hinder our understanding of certain astrophysical phenomena. For example, it is commonly believed that uncertainties in the 22Ne(p,g)23Na reaction rate at temperatures relevant to thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars are largely responsible for our inability to explain the observed sodium-oxygen anti-correlation in globular clusters. With this motivation, resonances in the 22Ne(p,g) 23Na reaction at E_{c.m.} = 458, 417, 178, and 151 keV were measured. The direct-capture contribution was also measured at E_{lab} = 425 keV. It was determined that the 22Ne(p,g)23Na reaction rate in the astrophysically relevant temperature range is dominated by the resonances at 178 and 151 keV and that the total reaction rate is greater than the previously assumed rate by a factor of approximately ˜40 at 0.15 GK. This increased reaction rate impacts the expected nucleosynthesis that occurs in these stars and will shed light onto the origin of this anti-correlation as it is incorporated into

  10. Summary Report of the Workshop on The Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database

    SciTech Connect

    Semkova, V.; Pritychenko, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Workshop on the Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database (EXFOR) was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 6 to 10 October 2014. The workshop was organized to discuss various aspects of the EXFOR compilation process including compilation rules, different techniques for nuclear reaction data measurements, software developments, etc. A summary of the presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop is reported here.

  11. Nuclear Reactions and the ν p-Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, Carla; Hatcher, Daniel; Perdikakis, Georgios; Nikas, Stylianos

    In understanding the origin of the heavy elements, the "light heavy elements" pose a particular challenge: The two neutron-capture processes, r- and s-process, cannot explain the abundances patterns seen in very old galactic halo stars. A proposed solution to this problem is the ν p-process, which takes place in the strong neutrino-driven winds of core-collapse supernovae. In the ν p-process, a sequence of (n, p) and (p, γ ) reactions allows for the synthesis of elements with atomic numbers A > 64, which includes Sr, Y, Zr, and others possibly up to Sn. The relevant reaction rates are all based on statistical model predictions and carry some uncertainty. Here, the sensitivity of the final ν p-process abundance pattern on modifications of (n, p), (p, γ ), and (n, γ ) reactions are characterized. Only few reactions affect the final abundance pattern and hence warrant a more detailed study of the reaction rate.

  12. Quantitative rate determination by dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced NMR of a Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Haifeng; Lee, Youngbok; Hilty, Christian

    2010-11-01

    Emerging techniques for hyperpolarization of nuclear spins, foremost dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), lend unprecedented sensitivity to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Sufficient signal can be obtained from a single scan, and reactions even far from equilibrium can be studied in real-time. When following the progress of a reaction by nuclear magnetic resonance, however, spin relaxation occurs concomitantly with the reaction to alter resonance line intensities. Here, we present a model for accounting for spin-relaxation in such reactions studied by hyperpolarized NMR. The model takes into account auto- and cross-relaxation in dipole-dipole coupled spin systems and is therefore applicable to NMR of hyperpolarized protons, the most abundant NMR-active nuclei. Applied to the Diels-Alder reaction of 1,4-dipheneylbutadiene (DPBD) with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazole-3,5-dione (PTD), reaction rates could be obtained accurately and reproducibly. Additional parameters available from the same experiment include relaxation rates of the reaction product, which may yield further information about the molecular properties of the product. The method presented is also compatible with an experiment where a single spin in the reactant is labeled in its spin-state by a selective radio frequency pulse for subsequent tracking through the reaction, allowing the unambiguous identification of its position in the product molecule. In this case, the chemical shift specificity of high-resolution NMR can allow for the simultaneous determination of reaction rates and mechanistic information in one experiment.

  13. Cutaneous reactions in nuclear, biological and chemical warfare.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sandeep

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear, biological and chemical warfare have in recent times been responsible for an increasing number of otherwise rare dermatoses. Many nations are now maintaining overt and clandestine stockpiles of such arsenal. With increasing terrorist threats, these agents of mass destruction pose a risk to the civilian population. Nuclear and chemical attacks manifest immediately while biological attacks manifest later. Chemical and biological attacks pose a significant risk to the attending medical personnel. The large scale of anticipated casualties in the event of such an occurrence would need the expertise of all physicians, including dermatologists, both military and civilian. Dermatologists are uniquely qualified in this respect. This article aims at presenting a review of the cutaneous manifestations in nuclear, chemical and biological warfare and their management.

  14. Study of components and statistical reaction mechanism in simulation of nuclear process for optimized production of {sup 64}Cu and {sup 67}Ga medical radioisotopes using TALYS, EMPIRE and LISE++ nuclear reaction and evaporation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Nasrabadi, M. N. Sepiani, M.

    2015-03-30

    Production of medical radioisotopes is one of the most important tasks in the field of nuclear technology. These radioactive isotopes are mainly produced through variety nuclear process. In this research, excitation functions and nuclear reaction mechanisms are studied for simulation of production of these radioisotopes in the TALYS, EMPIRE and LISE++ reaction codes, then parameters and different models of nuclear level density as one of the most important components in statistical reaction models are adjusted for optimum production of desired radioactive yields.

  15. Exploratory study of fission product yield determination from photofission of 239Pu at 11 MeV with monoenergetic photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhike, Megha; Tornow, W.; Krishichayan, Tonchev, A. P.

    2017-02-01

    Measurements of fission product yields play an important role for the understanding of fundamental aspects of the fission process. Recently, neutron-induced fission product-yield data of 239Pu at energies below 4 MeV revealed an unexpected energy dependence of certain fission fragments. In order to investigate whether this observation is prerogative to neutron-induced fission, a program has been initiated to measure fission product yields in photoinduced fission. Here we report on the first ever photofission product yield measurement with monoenergetic photons produced by Compton back-scattering of FEL photons. The experiment was performed at the High-Intensity Gamma-ray Source at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory on 239Pu at Eγ=11 MeV. In this exploratory study the yield of eight fission products ranging from 91Sr to 143Ce has been obtained.

  16. Studies of nuclear reaction at very low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.

    1992-01-15

    The deuteron radiative capture reactions on {sup 2}H, {sup 6}Li and {sup 10}B have been measured between center of mass energies of 20 and 140 keV. Of note is the observation that the gamma ray-to-charged particle branching ratio for the DD reaction appears independent of energy down to a center of mass energy of 20 keV, consistent with some and contrary to other theoretical models. We have investigated the ratio of the reactions D(d,p)T and D(d,n){sup 3}He down to c.m. energies of 3 keV and the ratio of the reactions 6Li(d,p){sup 7}Li and {sup 6}LI(d,{alpha}){sup 4}He down to a c.m. energy of 19 keV. The DD reaction ratio is independent of energy while the (d,p) branch of the D-{sup 6}Li evinces a significant enhancement at the lowest measured energies. We have continued our investigation of charged particle production from deuterium-metal systems at a modest level of activity. Noteworthy in this investigation is the observation of 3 MeV protons from deuteron beam loaded Ti and LiD targets subjected to extreme thermal disequilibria. Significant facility improvements were realized during the most recent contract period. Specifically the downstream magnetic analysis system proposed to eliminate beam induced contaminants has been installed and thoroughly tested. This improvement should allow the D(a,{gamma}){sup 6}Li reaction to be measured in the coming contract period. A scattering chamber required for the measurement of the {sup 7}Li({sup 3}He,p){sup 9}Be reaction has been designed, fabricated and installed on the accelerator. A CAMAC based charged particle identification system has been assembled also for use in our proposed measurement of the {sup 7}Li({sup 3}He, p){sup 9}Be.

  17. Development of an inertial confinement fusion platform to study charged-particle-producing nuclear reactions relevant to nuclear astrophysics

    DOE PAGES

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Bacher, A.; ...

    2017-03-28

    Here, this paper describes the development of a platform to study astrophysically relevant nuclear reactions using inertial-confinement fusion implosions on the OMEGA and National Ignition Facility laser facilities, with a particular focus on optimizing the implosions to study charged-particle- producing reactions. Primary requirements on the platform are high yield, for high statistics in the fusion product measurements, combined with low areal density, to allow the charged fusion products to escape. This is optimally achieved with direct-drive exploding pusher implosions using thin-glass-shell capsules. Mitigation strategies to eliminate a possible target sheath potential which would accelerate the emitted ions are discussed. Themore » potential impact of kinetic effects on the implosions is also considered. The platform is initially employed to study the complementary T(t,2n)α, T(3He,np)α and 3He(3He,2p)α reactions. Proof-of-principle results from the first experiments demonstrating the ability to accurately measure the energy and yields of charged particles are presented. Lessons learned from these experiments will be used in studies of other reactions. Ultimately, the goals are to explore thermonuclear reaction rates and fundamental nuclear physics in stellarlike plasma environments, and to push this new frontier of nuclear astrophysics into unique regimes not reachable through existing platforms, with thermal ion velocity distributions, plasma screening, and low reactant energies.« less

  18. LDRD Final Report: Surrogate Nuclear Reactions and the Origin of the Heavy Elements (04-ERD-057)

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Bernstein, L A; Bleuel, D; Burke, J; Church, J A; Dietrich, F S; Forssen, C; Gueorguiev, V; Hoffman, R D

    2007-02-23

    Research carried out in the framework of the LDRD project ''Surrogate Nuclear Reactions and the Origin of the Heavy Elements'' (04-ERD-057) is summarized. The project was designed to address the challenge of determining cross sections for nuclear reactions involving unstable targets, with a particular emphasis on reactions that play a key role in the production of the elements between Iron and Uranium. This report reviews the motivation for the research, introduces the approach employed to address the problem, and summarizes the resulting scientific insights, technical findings, and related accomplishments.

  19. Neutron transfer reactions: Surrogates for neutron capture for basic and applied nuclear science

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, J. A.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, Steven D; Peters, W. A.; Adekola, Aderemi S; Allen, J.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Becker, J.; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Erikson, Luke; Gaddis, A. L.; Harlin, Christopher W; Hatarik, Robert; Howard, Joshua A; Jandel, M.; Johnson, Micah; Kapler, R.; Krolas, W.; Liang, J Felix; Livesay, Jake; Ma, Zhanwen; Matei, Catalin; Matthews, C.; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Patterson, N. P.; Paulauskas, Stanley; Pelham, T.; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, David C; Rogers, J.; Schmitt, Kyle; Shapira, Dan; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Sissom, D. J.; Smith, Michael Scott; Swan, T. P.; Thomas, J. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilson, Gemma L

    2009-04-01

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on {sup 130,132}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 75}As are discussed.

  20. Bimodality: a sign of critical behavior in nuclear reactions.

    PubMed

    Le Fèvre, A; Aichelin, J

    2008-02-01

    The recently discovered coexistence of multifragmentation and residue production for the same total transverse energy of light charged particles, which has been dubbed bimodality like it has been introduced in the framework of equilibrium thermodynamics, can be well reproduced in numerical simulations of heavy ion reactions. A detailed analysis shows that fluctuations (introduced by elementary nucleon-nucleon collisions) determine which of the exit states is realized. Thus, we can identify bifurcation in heavy ion reactions as a critical phenomenon. Also the scaling of the coexistence region with beam energy is well reproduced in these results from the quantum molecular dynamics simulation program.

  1. Neutrino nuclear responses for double beta decays and astro neutrinos by charge exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu

    2014-09-01

    Neutrino nuclear responses are crucial for neutrino studies in nuclei. Charge exchange reactions (CER) are shown to be used to study charged current neutrino nuclear responses associated with double beta decays(DBD)and astro neutrino interactions. CERs to be used are high energy-resolution (He3 ,t) reactions at RCNP, photonuclear reactions via IAR at NewSUBARU and muon capture reactions at MUSIC RCNP and MLF J-PARC. The Gamow Teller (GT) strengths studied by CERs reproduce the observed 2 neutrino DBD matrix elements. The GT and spin dipole (SD) matrix elements are found to be reduced much due to the nucleon spin isospin correlations and the non-nucleonic (delta isobar) nuclear medium effects. Impacts of the reductions on the DBD matrix elements and astro neutrino interactions are discussed.

  2. Probing the nuclear structure with heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Broglia, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclei display distortions in both ordinary space and in gauge space. It is suggested that it is possible to learn about the spatial distribution of the Nilsson orbitals and about the change of the pairing gap with the rotational frequency through the analysis of one- and two-nucleon transfer reactions induced in heavy-ion collisions.

  3. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. Progress report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1992-12-01

    The research program described touches five areas of nuclear physics: nuclear structure studies at high spin (hyperdeformation in the mass A {approx_equal} 182 region, structure of {sup 182}Hg and {sup 182}Au at high spin, a highly deformed band in {sup 136}Pm and the anomalous h{sub 11/2} proton crossing in the A{approximately}135 superdeformed region), studies at the interface between structure and reactions (population of entry states in heavy-ion fusion reactions, nuclear structure effects in proton evaporation spectra, nuclear structure- dependent entry state population by total spectroscopy, entrance channel effects in fusion near the barrier, lifetimes of subbarrier {alpha} particles by the atomic clock method), production and study of hot nuclei (the statistical model evaporation code EVAP, statistical emission of deuterons and tritons from highly excited compound nuclei, heavy-fragment emission as a probe of the thermal properties of highly excited compound nuclei, use of incoming-wave boundary condition transmission coefficients in the statistical model: implications in the particle evaporation spectra, study of transparency in the optical model), reaction mechanism studies (binary character of highly dissipative {sup 209}Bi + {sup 136}Xe collisions at E/A=28.2 MeV), and development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in these areas of research (including a 4{pi} channel selection device, a novel x-ray detector, and a simple channel-selecting detector).

  4. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. [Dept. of Chemistry, Washington Univ. , St. Louis, Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    The research program described touches five areas of nuclear physics: nuclear structure studies at high spin (hyperdeformation in the mass A [approx equal] 182 region, structure of [sup 182]Hg and [sup 182]Au at high spin, a highly deformed band in [sup 136]Pm and the anomalous h[sub 11/2] proton crossing in the A[approximately]135 superdeformed region), studies at the interface between structure and reactions (population of entry states in heavy-ion fusion reactions, nuclear structure effects in proton evaporation spectra, nuclear structure- dependent entry state population by total spectroscopy, entrance channel effects in fusion near the barrier, lifetimes of subbarrier [alpha] particles by the atomic clock method), production and study of hot nuclei (the statistical model evaporation code EVAP, statistical emission of deuterons and tritons from highly excited compound nuclei, heavy-fragment emission as a probe of the thermal properties of highly excited compound nuclei, use of incoming-wave boundary condition transmission coefficients in the statistical model: implications in the particle evaporation spectra, study of transparency in the optical model), reaction mechanism studies (binary character of highly dissipative [sup 209]Bi + [sup 136]Xe collisions at E/A=28.2 MeV), and development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in these areas of research (including a 4[pi] channel selection device, a novel x-ray detector, and a simple channel-selecting detector).

  5. Photonuclear reaction studies at HIγS: Developing the science of remote detection of nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, C. R.

    2014-11-02

    Development of gamma-ray beam interrogation technologies for remote detection of special nuclear materials and isotope analysis requires comprehensive databases of nuclear structure information and gamma-ray induced nuclear reaction observables. Relevant nuclear structure details include the energy, spin and parity of excited states that have significant probability for electromagnetic transition from the ground state, i.e, the angular momentum transferred in the reaction is Δl ≤ 2. This talk will report recent Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) measurements to identify and characterize new low-spin states in actinide nuclei at energies from 1 to 4 MeV, which is the energy range most important for remote analysis methods. Here, these measurements are carried out using the nearly mono-energetic linearly polarized gamma-ray beam at the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIγS) at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Also, studies of the (γ, n) reaction on a variety of nuclei with linearly polarized beams at HIγS indicate that this reaction might be used to discern between fissile and non-fissile materials. This work will be described. In addition, an overview will be given of a concept for a next generation laser Compton-backing scattering gamma-ray source to be implemented as an upgrade to increase the beam intensity at HIγS by more than an order of magnitude.

  6. Capture process in nuclear reactions with a quantum master equation

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.

    2009-09-15

    Projectile-nucleus capture by a target nucleus at bombarding energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier is treated with the reduced-density-matrix formalism. The effects of dissipation and fluctuations on the capture process are taken self-consistently into account within the quantum model suggested. The excitation functions for the capture in the reactions {sup 16}O, {sup 19}F, {sup 26}Mg, {sup 28}Si, {sup 32,34,36,38}S, {sup 40,48}Ca, {sup 50}Ti, {sup 52}Cr+{sup 208}Pb with spherical nuclei are calculated and compared with the experimental data. At bombarding energies about (15-25) MeV above the Coulomb barrier the maximum of capture cross section is revealed for the {sup 58}Ni+{sup 208}Pb reaction.

  7. Evaluation of Tungsten Nuclear Reaction Data with Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Trkov, A. Capote, R.; Kodeli, I.; Leal, L.

    2008-12-15

    As a follow-up of the work presented at the ND-2007 conference in Nice, additional fast reactor benchmarks were analyzed. Adjustment to the cross sections in the keV region was necessary. Evaluated neutron cross section data files for {sup 180,182,183,184,186}W isotopes were produced. Covariances were generated for all isotopes except {sup 180}W. In the resonance range the retro-active method was used. Above the resolved resonance range the covariance prior was generated by the Monte Carlo technique from nuclear model calculations with the Empire-II code. Experimental data were taken into account through the GANDR system using the generalized least-squares technique. Introducing experimental data results in relatively small changes in the cross sections, but greatly constrains the uncertainties. The covariance files are currently undergoing testing.

  8. Evaluation of Tungsten Nuclear Reaction Data with Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Trkov, A.; Capote, R.; Kodeli, I.; Leal, Luiz C.

    2008-12-01

    As a follow-up of the work presented at the ND-2007 conference in Nice, additional fast reactor benchmarks were analyzed. Adjustment to the cross sections in the keV region was necessary. Evaluated neutron cross section data files for 180,182,183,184,186W isotopes were produced. Covariances were generated for all isotopes except 180W. In the resonance range the retro-active method was used. Above the resolved resonance range the covariance prior was generated by the Monte Carlo technique from nuclear model calculations with the Empire-II code. Experimental data were taken into account through the GANDR system using the generalized least-squares technique. Introducing experimental data results in relatively small changes in the cross sections, but greatly constrains the uncertainties. The covariance files are currently undergoing testing.

  9. Mass and charge distributions in chlorine-induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, A.A.

    1991-12-31

    Projectile-like fragments were detected and characterized in terms of A, Z, and energy for the reactions {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca and {sup 209}Bi at E/A = 7.3 MeV, and {sup 35}Cl, on {sup 209}Bi at E/A = 15 MeV, at angles close to the grazing angle. Mass and charge distributions were generated in the N-Z plane as a function of energy loss, and have been parameterized in terms of their centroids, variances, and coefficients of correlation. Due to experimental problems, the mass resolution corresponding to the {sup 31}Cl on {sup 209}Bi reaction was very poor. This prompted the study and application of a deconvolution technique for peak enhancement. The drifts of the charge and mass centroids for the system {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca are consistent with a process of mass and charge equilibration mediated by nucleon exchange between the two partners, followed by evaporation. The asymmetric systems show a strong drift towards larger asymmetry, with the production of neutron-rich nuclei. It was concluded that this is indicative of a net transfer of protons from the light to the heavy partner, and a net flow of neutrons in the opposite direction. The variances for all systems increase with energy loss, as it would be expected from a nucleon exchange mechanism; however, the variances for the reaction {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca are higher than those expected from that mechanism. The coefficients of correlation indicate that the transfer of nucleons between projectile and target is correlated. The results were compared to the predictions of two current models based on a stochastic nucleon exchange mechanism. In general, the comparisons between experimental and predicted variances support this mechanism; however, the need for more realistic driving forces in the model calculations is indicated by the disagreement between predicted and experimental centroids.

  10. Study of nuclear reactions in laser plasmas at future ELI-NP facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzalone, G.; Altana, C.; Anzalone, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Lamia, L.; Mascali, D.; Muoio, A.; Negoita, F.; Odorici, F.; Petrascu, H.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tudisco, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this contribution we will present the future activities that our collaboration will carry out at ELI-NP (Extreme Light Infrastructure Nuclear Physics), the new multi peta-watt Laser facility, currently under construction at Bucharest (Romania). The activities concerns the study of nuclear reactions in laser plasmas. In this framework we proposed the construction of a new, general-purpose experimental set-up able to detect and identify neutrons and charged particles.

  11. Direct nuclear-pumped lasers using the He-3/n,p/H-3 reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J.; Jalufka, N. W.; Hohl, F.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of experimental results concerning a specific class of direct nuclear-pumped lasers classified as 'volumetric nuclear lasers'. In the considered laser system a fissioning gas, He-3, is mixed with the lasing gas to form a homogeneous mixture, resulting in uniform volume excitation. In typical volumetric nuclear lasers a fast-burst reactor is used as a source of neutrons which penetrate a polyethylene moderator. Here the fast neutrons are thermalized. After thermalization, neutrons scatter into the laser cell. Nuclear reactions produce a proton of 0.56 MeV and a tritium ion of 0.19. These ions produce secondary electrons which pump the laser medium creating a population inversion. The results reported demonstrate direct nuclear pumping of He-3-Ar, Xe, Kr, and Cl with the considered system.

  12. Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions of Protons in Host Metals at Picometre Distance

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich Hora; George H. Miley; Jak C. Kelly

    2000-11-12

    A review is given for the explanation of the measurements of Miley et al. of a fully reproducible generation of nuclei of the whole periodic table by protons in host metals during a several-weeks reaction. Similar low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) were observed by other groups. The fact that the heavy nuclides are not due to pollution can be seen from the fact that such very rare elements as thulium and terbium were detected by unique K-shell X-ray spectra. The nuclear reaction energy goes into the heavy nuclei as measured from much bigger traces in CR39 than from alphas. The fact that any reaction of the protons results in stable daughter nuclei is confirmed by the fact that the highest energy gain is resulting with stable reaction products. This has been explained in Ref. 2, and the energy gain for the heavy element generation by a compound reaction was discussed. The explanation is based on the model of the authors from 1989 to assume free motion of the protons contrary to localized crystalline states. A relation of the reaction time U on distance d of the reacting nuclei by a power law with an exponent 34.8 was derived. Based on few reproducible D-D reactions, a reaction time near the range of megaseconds and a reaction distance of nanometers was concluded. A splendid confirmation of the picometre-megasecond reactions was achieved by Li et al. from his direct quantum mechanical calculations of the hot fusion D-T reactions based on a one-step selective resonance tunneling model. Li et al. were able for the first time to derive the cross sections of the hot fusion. Li's application to picometre distance showed megasecond reaction times with no neutron or gamma emission. Because of the imaginary part in the Schroedinger potential, the problem of the level width is reduced by damping.

  13. Nuclear Reaction Data from Surrogate Measurements: A Consideration of (n,f) Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Lyles, B F

    2007-07-30

    A brief summary of the Surrogate reaction method, an indirect approach for determining compound-nuclear reaction cross sections, is presented. The possibilities for obtaining accurate (n,f) cross sections from Surrogate measurements that are analyzed in the Weisskopf-Ewing and Ratio approximations are considered. Theoretical studies and benchmark experiments that provide new insights into the validity and limitations of the Surrogate approach, are discussed.

  14. Tracking of Ions Produced at Near Barrier Energies in Nuclear Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Examples of detectors, presently in use, for tracking products from nuclear reactions induced by radioactive ion beams are described. A new tracking detector is being designed to study the binary products from reactions induced by heavy neutron-rich radioactive ion beams on heavy neutron-rich target nuclei. The motivation for such studies and the features designed to accomplish this goal will be presented.

  15. Cross Sections Calculations of ( d, t) Nuclear Reactions up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Yiğit, M.; Tanır, G.

    2013-04-01

    In nuclear fusion reactions two light atomic nuclei fuse together to form a heavier nucleus. Fusion power is the power generated by nuclear fusion processes. In contrast with fission power, the fusion reaction processes does not produce radioactive nuclides. The fusion will not produce CO2 or SO2. So the fusion energy will not contribute to environmental problems such as particulate pollution and excessive CO2 in the atmosphere. Fusion powered electricity generation was initially believed to be readily achievable, as fission power had been. However, the extreme requirements for continuous reactions and plasma containment led to projections being extended by several decades. In 2010, more than 60 years after the first attempts, commercial power production is still believed to be unlikely before 2050. Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, there is still a long way to go to penetrate commercial fusion reactors to the energy market. In the fusion reactor, tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. Therefore, for self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. Working out the systematics of ( d, t) nuclear reaction cross sections is of great importance for the definition of the excitation function character for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. Since the experimental data of charged particle induced reactions are scarce, self-consistent calculation and analyses using nuclear theoretical models are very important. In this study, ( d, t) cross sections for target nuclei 19F, 50Cr, 54Fe, 58Ni, 75As, 89Y, 90Zr, 107Ag, 127I, 197Au and 238U have been investigated up to 50 MeV deuteron energy. The excitation functions for ( d, t) reactions have been calculated by pre-equilibrium reaction mechanism. Calculation results have been also compared with the available measurements in

  16. Studies of exotic nuclear reactions at the RESOLUT facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo

    2016-09-01

    The RESOLUT facility at Florida State University's accelerator laboratory produces beams of short-lived nuclei using the in-flight method. Beams such as 6He, 7Be, 8Li, 8B, 17F, 19O, 18Ne and 25Al have been successfully used in experiments. The facility has been used to develop innovative experimental techniques, such as the low-energy neutron detector RESONEUT, and the active-target detector ANASEN, which has been developed as a collaboration between FSU and LSU. These detectors have been employed in direct and indirect reaction measurements with impact on astrophysics. An Indiana-University led campaign studying fusion cross sections of exotic nuclei at RESOLUT has also been successful. The results from these three recent RIB campaigns at RESOLUT will be summarized. This work was supported by NSF under Grants Nos. PHY-1401574, PHY-0820941 and PHY-1126345 and by DOE under Grant Nos. DE-FG02-02ER41220, DE-FG02-88ER-40404 and DE-FG02-96ER40978.

  17. Experimental Guidance of ISB Corrections via Direct Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, K. G.; Garrett, P. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bangay, J. C.; Bianco, L.; Demand, G. A.; Faestermann, T.; Finlay, P.; Green, K. L.; Hertenberger, R.; Kriicken, R.; Phillips, A. A.; Rand, E. T.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Svensson, C. E.; Towner, I. S.; Triambak, S.; Wirth, H.-F.; Wong, J.

    2011-09-01

    The most recent isospin-symmetry-breaking corrections, δc, of Towner and Hardy for superallowed Fermi β-decay transitions, have included the opening of specific core orbitals. This change has resulted in significant deviations in some of the δc factors from their previous calculations, and an improved agreement of the individual corrected Script Ft values with the overall world average of the 13 most precise cases. While this is consistent with the conserved-vector-current (CVC) hypothesis of the Standard Model, these new calculations must be thoroughly tested, and guidance must be given for the improvement of calculations for the upper-pf shell nuclei. Using the (d,t) reaction mechanism to probe the single neutron wavefunction overlap, information regarding the relevant shell-model configurations needed in the calculation can be determined. An experiment was therefore performed with a 22 MeV polarized deuterium beam from the MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerator in Munich, Germany. Using the Q3D magnetic spectrograph, and a cathode-strip focal-plane detector, outgoing tritons were analyzed at 9 angles between 10° and 60°, up to an excitation energy of 4.8 MeV. This proceeding reports the motivational and experimental details for the 64Zn(d,t)63Zn transfer work presented.

  18. The ``light-est'' of all Projectiles: Nuclear Structure Studies Using Photonuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietralla, Norbert

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear reactions induced by photons have had and continue to have a large impact on the course of nuclear physics. Photons interact purely electromagnetically with the atomic nucleus and induce minimal momentum transfer at given excitation energy. Photonuclear reaction processes can be expanded in terms of QED and photonuclear excitations are by far dominated by one-step processes. They allow for a model independent measurement of nuclear observables and, hence, for a clean characterization of effective nuclear forces. Apart from the pioneering photonuclear reactions by Bothe and Gentner in the 1930s, bremsstrahlung has been used most widely as an intense source of gamma-rays for photonuclear reactions from the 1940s until today. The nuclear dipole strength distribution has largely been mapped out at bremsstrahlung facilities. While the continuous-energy distribution of bremsstrahlung photons offers a complete view of the spectrum of photonuclear excitations, it suffers from a poor sensitivity to specific energy intervals. Intense, energy-tunable, quasi-monochromatic gamma-ray beams from laser-Compton backscattering processes have revolutionized the field of photonuclear reactions for the last ten years. A set of new techniques is under development and new information on fundamental nuclear modes, such as the IVGDR, IVGQR, Pygmy Dipole Resonance, and the Scissors Mode, has recently been obtained. We will attempt to give a brief overview of the state of the art and dare an outlook at the research opportunities at the next generation of gamma-ray facilities under construction in the U.S. and Europe. Supported by the DFG under grant No. SFB634.

  19. Financing new nuclear capacity: Will the ''nuclear renaissance'' Be a Self-Sustaining reaction?

    SciTech Connect

    George, Glenn R.

    2007-04-15

    Although EPAct offers a number of benefits for new nuclear capacity, a host of gaps remain, from the timing of capital formation to the residual risk that the actual cost of the first few plants will significantly exceed estimates. Securitization and related financial techniques could play a role in turning revenue streams into lumps of capital. (author)

  20. Assessment and Requirements of Nuclear Reaction Databases for GCR Transport in the Atmosphere and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Tripathi, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    The transport properties of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in the atmosphere, material structures, and human body (self-shielding) am of interest in risk assessment for supersonic and subsonic aircraft and for space travel in low-Earth orbit and on interplanetary missions. Nuclear reactions, such as knockout and fragmentation, present large modifications of particle type and energies of the galactic cosmic rays in penetrating materials. We make an assessment of the current nuclear reaction models and improvements in these model for developing required transport code data bases. A new fragmentation data base (QMSFRG) based on microscopic models is compared to the NUCFRG2 model and implications for shield assessment made using the HZETRN radiation transport code. For deep penetration problems, the build-up of light particles, such as nucleons, light clusters and mesons from nuclear reactions in conjunction with the absorption of the heavy ions, leads to the dominance of the charge Z = 0, 1, and 2 hadrons in the exposures at large penetration depths. Light particles are produced through nuclear or cluster knockout and in evaporation events with characteristically distinct spectra which play unique roles in the build-up of secondary radiation's in shielding. We describe models of light particle production in nucleon and heavy ion induced reactions and make an assessment of the importance of light particle multiplicity and spectral parameters in these exposures.

  1. Open problems in applying random-matrix theory to nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2014-09-01

    Problems in applying random-matrix theory (RMT) to nuclear reactions arise in two domains. To justify the approach, statistical properties of isolated resonances observed experimentally must agree with RMT predictions. That agreement is less striking than would be desirable. In the implementation of the approach, the range of theoretically predicted observables is too narrow.

  2. Cross-checking of Large Evaluated and Experimental Nuclear Reaction Databases

    SciTech Connect

    Zeydina, O.; Koning, A.J.; Soppera, N.; Raffanel, D.; Bossant, M.; Dupont, E.; Beauzamy, B.

    2014-06-15

    Automated methods are presented for the verification of large experimental and evaluated nuclear reaction databases (e.g. EXFOR, JEFF, TENDL). These methods allow an assessment of the overall consistency of the data and detect aberrant values in both evaluated and experimental databases.

  3. Refined scenario of standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis allowing for nonthermal nuclear reactions in the primordial plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Voronchev, Victor T.; Nakao, Yasuyuki; Nakamura, Makoto; Tsukida, Kazuki

    2012-11-12

    The standard scenario of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is generalized to take into account nonthermal nuclear reactions in the primordial plasma. These reactions are naturally triggered in the BBN epoch by fast particles generated in various exoergic processes. It is found that, although such particles can appreciably enhance the rates of some individual reactions, their influence on the whole process of element production is not significant. The nonthermal corrections to element abundances are obtained to be 0.1% ({sup 3}H), -0.03% ({sup 7}Li), and 0.34 %-0.63% (CNO group).

  4. Spectroscopic study of sub-barrier quasi-elastic nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pass, C.N.; Evans, P.M.; Smith, A.E.; Stuttge, L.; Betts, R.R.; Lilley, J.S.; Connell, K.A.; Simpson, J.; Smith, J.R.; James, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    The technique developed in this paper is particularly well suited to the detailed spectroscopic study of low energy quasi-elastic nuclear reactions and by overcoming the limitations of conventional procedure, the prospect of detailed studies of inclusive reaction mechanism may be realised. With only limited statistics we find evidence for strong multistep character in the transfer of a single nucleon from spherical vibrational target to spherical projectile nuclei. The suggestive measurements reported here may be made definitive through extended runs based on this technique and experiments planned for the future offer the real prospect of developing a quantified interpretation of the reaction process. 9 refs. 5 figs.

  5. Real-time electron dynamics simulation of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    Real-time electron dynamics of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion is calculated by three methods: the numerically exact propagation method, the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) method and the Ehrenfest method. We find that, as long as the nuclei move as localized wave packets, the TDH and Ehrenfest methods can reproduce the exact electron dynamics of a simple charge transfer reaction model containing two electrons qualitatively well, even when nonadiabatic transitions between adiabatic states occur. In particular, both methods can reproduce the cases where a complete two-electron transfer reaction occurs and those where it does not occur.

  6. Completing the nuclear reaction puzzle of the nucleosynthesis of 92Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveten, G. M.; Spyrou, A.; Schwengner, R.; Naqvi, F.; Larsen, A. C.; Eriksen, T. K.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Crespo Campo, L.; Guttormsen, M.; Giacoppo, F.; Görgen, A.; Hagen, T. W.; Hadynska-Klek, K.; Klintefjord, M.; Meyer, B. S.; Nyhus, H. T.; Renstrøm, T.; Rose, S. J.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T. G.

    2016-08-01

    One of the greatest questions for modern physics to address is how elements heavier than iron are created in extreme astrophysical environments. A particularly challenging part of that question is the creation of the so-called p -nuclei, which are believed to be mainly produced in some types of supernovae. The lack of needed nuclear data presents an obstacle in nailing down the precise site and astrophysical conditions. In this work, we present for the first time measurements on the nuclear level density and average γ strength function of 92Mo. State-of-the-art p -process calculations systematically underestimate the observed solar abundance of this isotope. Our data provide stringent constraints on the 91Nb(p ,γ )92Mo reaction rate, which is the last unmeasured reaction in the nucleosynthesis puzzle of 92Mo. Based on our results, we conclude that the 92Mo abundance anomaly is not due to the nuclear physics input to astrophysical model calculations.

  7. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions: Status at the Beginning of the New Millenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallove, Eugene F.

    2001-03-01

    This talk will summarize some of the more convincing recent experiments that show that ^4He,^3He (including impossible to explain changes in the ^4He/^3He isotopic ratio), nuclear scale excess energy, tritium, low-level neutron production, and the transmutation of heavy elements can occur near room temperature in relatively simple systems. Despite inappropriate theory-based arguments against it and unethical attacks by people unfamiliar with the supporting experiments, the new field of solid state nuclear reactions is progressing. The physical theory behind the associated phenomena continues to be debated among theorists. But progress is being made. The facts of the history of this scientific controversy suggest that it is inadvisable to rush to judgment against allegedly ``impossible" new phenomena when increasingly careful experiments have revealed new vistas in physics. Detailed discussion of evidence for solid state nuclear reactions is available

  8. Nuclear reaction uncertainties, massive gravitino decays and the cosmological lithium problem

    SciTech Connect

    Cyburt, Richard H.; Ellis, John; Fields, Brian D.; Luo, Feng; Olive, Keith A.; Spanos, Vassilis C. E-mail: john.ellis@cern.ch E-mail: fluo@physics.umn.edu E-mail: spanos@physics.umn.edu

    2010-10-01

    We consider the effects of uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates on the cosmological constraints on the decays of unstable particles during or after Big-Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). We identify the nuclear reactions due to non-thermal hadrons that are the most important in perturbing standard BBN, then quantify the uncertainties in these reactions and in the resulting light-element abundances. These results also indicate the key nuclear processes for which improved cross section data would allow different light-element abundances to be determined more accurately, thereby making possible more precise probes of BBN and evaluations of the cosmological constraints on unstable particles. Applying this analysis to models with unstable gravitinos decaying into neutralinos, we calculate the likelihood function for the light-element abundances measured currently, taking into account the current experimental errors in the determinations of the relevant nuclear reaction rates. We find a region of the gravitino mass and abundance in which the abundances of deuterium, {sup 4}He and {sup 7}Li may be fit with χ{sup 2} = 5.5, compared with χ{sup 2} = 31.7 if the effects of gravitino decays are unimportant. The best-fit solution is improved to χ{sup 2} ∼ 2.0 when the lithium abundance is taken from globular cluster data. Some such re-evaluation of the observed light-element abundances and/or nuclear reaction rates would be needed if this region of gravitino parameters is to provide a complete solution to the cosmological {sup 7}Li problem.

  9. Investigating resonances above and below the threshold in nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Kiss, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Spitaleri, C.; Trippella, O.

    2015-10-15

    Resonances in nuclear cross sections dramatically change their trends. Therefore, the presence of unexpected resonances might lead to unpredicted consequences on astrophysics and nuclear physics. In nuclear physics, resonances allow one to study states in the intermediate compound systems, to evaluate their cluster structure, for instance, especially in the energy regions approaching particle decay thresholds. In astrophysics, resonances might lead to changes in the nucleosynthesis flow, determining different isotopic compositions of the nuclear burning ashes. For these reasons, the Trojan Horse method has been modified to investigate resonant reactions. Thanks to this novel approach, for the first time normalization to direct data might be avoided. Moreover, in the case of sub threshold resonances, the Trojan Horse method modified to investigate resonances allows one to deduce the asymptotic normalization coefficient, showing the close connection between the two indirect approaches.

  10. Challenges in describing nuclear reactions outcomes at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, M.; Simpson, E. C.; Kalkal, S.; Cook, K. J.; Carter, I. P.; Hinde, D. J.; Luong, D. H.

    2017-01-01

    The properties of light nuclei such as 6Li, 7Li, 9Be and 12C, and their reaction outcomes are known to be strongly influenced by their underlying α-cluster structure. Reaction models do not yet exist to allow accurate predictions of outcomes following a collision of these nuclei with another nucleus. As a result, reaction models within GEANT, and nuclear fusion models do not accurately describe measured products or cross sections. Recent measurements at the Australian National University have shown new reaction modes that lead to breakup of 6Li, 7Li into lighter clusters, again presenting a further challenge to current models. The new observations and subsequent model developments will impact on accurate predictions of reaction outcomes of 12C - a three α-cluster nucleus – that is used in heavy ion therapy.

  11. An accurate analytic representation of the temperature dependence of nonresonant nuclear reaction rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2016-12-01

    There has been intense interest for several decades by different research groups to accurately model the temperature dependence of a large number of nuclear reaction rate coefficients for both light and heavy nuclides. The rate coefficient, k(T) , is given by the Maxwellian average of the reactive cross section expressed in terms of the astrophysical factor, S(E) , which for nonresonant reactions is generally written as a power series in the relative energy E. A computationally efficient algorithm for the temperature dependence of nuclear reaction rate coefficients is required for fusion reactor research and for models of nucleosynthesis and stellar evolution. In this paper, an accurate analytical expression for the temperature dependence of nuclear reaction rate coefficients is provided in terms of τ = 3(b / 2) 2/3 or equivalently, T - 1/3 , where b = B /√{kB T }, B is the Gamow factor and kB is the Boltzmann constant. The methodology is appropriate for all nonresonant nuclear reactions for which S(E) can be represented as a power series in E. The explicit expression for the rate coefficient versus temperature is derived with the asymptotic expansions of the moments of w(E) = exp(- E /kB T - B /√{ E }) in terms of τ. The zeroth order moment is the familiar Gaussian approximation to the rate coefficient. Results are reported for the representative reactions D(d, p)T, D(d, n)3He and 7Li(p, α) α and compared with several different fitting procedures reported in the literature.

  12. Unified ab initio approaches to nuclear structure and reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, Petr; Quaglioni, Sofia; Hupin, Guillaume; Romero-Redondo, Carolina; Calci, Angelo

    2016-04-13

    The description of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the realistic interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. In addition to the complex nature of the nuclear forces, with two-, three- and possibly higher many-nucleon components, one faces the quantum-mechanical many-nucleon problem governed by an interplay between bound and continuum states. In recent years, significant progress has been made in ab initio nuclear structure and reaction calculations based on input from QCD-employing Hamiltonians constructed within chiral effective field theory. After a brief overview of the field, we focus on ab initio many-body approaches—built upon the no-core shell model—that are capable of simultaneously describing both bound and scattering nuclear states, and present results for resonances in light nuclei, reactions important for astrophysics and fusion research. In particular, we review recent calculations of resonances in the 6He halo nucleus, of five- and six-nucleon scattering, and an investigation of the role of chiral three-nucleon interactions in the structure of 9Be. Further, we discuss applications to the 7Be ${({\\rm{p}},\\gamma )}^{8}{\\rm{B}}$ radiative capture. Lastly, we highlight our efforts to describe transfer reactions including the 3H${({\\rm{d}},{\\rm{n}})}^{4}$He fusion.

  13. Nonthermal nuclear reactions induced by fast α particles in the solar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronchev, Victor T.

    2015-02-01

    Nonthermal nuclear effects triggered in the solar carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle by fast α particles—products of the p p chain reactions—are examined. The main attention is paid to 8.674-MeV α particles generated in the 7Li(p ,α ) α reaction. Nonthermal characteristics of these α particles and their influence on some nuclear processes are determined. It is found that the α -particle effective temperature is at a level of 1.1 MeV and exceeds the solar core temperature by 3 orders of magnitude. These fast particles are able to significantly enhance some endoergic (α ,p ) reactions neglected in standard solar model calculations. In particular, they can substantially affect the balance of the p +17O⇄α +14N reactions due to an appreciable increase of the reverse reaction rate. It is shown that in the region R =0.08 -0.25 R⊙ the reverse α +14N reaction can block the forward p +17O reaction, thus preventing closing of the CNO-II cycle, and increase the 17O abundance by a factor of 2-155 depending on R . This indicates that the fast α particles produced in the p p cycle can distort running of the CNO cycle, making it essentially different in the inner and outer core regions.

  14. The Legnaro National Laboratories and the SPES facility: nuclear structure and reactions today and tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, Giacomo; Fiorentini, Gianni

    2016-11-01

    There is a very long tradition of studying nuclear structure and reactions at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italian Institute of Nuclear Physics). The wide expertise acquired in building and running large germanium arrays has made the laboratories one of the most advanced research centers in γ-ray spectroscopy. The ’gamma group’ has been deeply involved in all the national and international developments of the last 20 years and is currently one of the major contributors to the AGATA project, the first (together with its American counterpart GRETINA) γ-detector array based on γ-ray tracking. This line of research is expected to be strongly boosted by the coming into operation of the SPES radioactive ion beam project, currently under construction at LNL. In this report, written on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the Nobel prize awarded to Aage Bohr, Ben R Mottelson and Leo Rainwater and particularly focused on the physics of nuclear structure, we intend to summarize the different lines of research that have guided nuclear structure and reaction research at LNL in the last decades. The results achieved have paved the way for the present SPES facility, a new laboratories infrastructure producing and accelerating radioactive ion beams of fission fragments and other isotopes.

  15. Evaluated Nuclear (reaction) Data from the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The ENDF libraries are a collection of documented data evaluations stored in a defined computer-readable format that can be used as the main input to nuclear data processing programs. An evaluation is the process of analyzing experimentally measured cross-section data, combining them with the predictions of nuclear model calculations, and attempting to extract the true value of a cross section. Parameterization and reduction of the data to tabular form produces an evaluated data set. If a written description of the preparation of a unique data set from the data sources is available, the data set is referred to as a documented evaluation. The data sets contained on the ENDF/B library are those chosen by CSEWG from evaluations submitted for review. The choice is made on the basis of requirements for applications, conformance of the evaluation to the formats and procedures, and performance in testing. The data set that represents a particular material may change when (1) new significant experimental results become available, (2) integral tests show that the data give erroneous results, or (3) user's requirements indicate a need for more accurate data and/or better representations of the data for a particular material. New or revised data sets are included in new releases of the ENDF/B library. ENDF/B data sets are revised or replaced only after extensive review and testing. This allows them to be used as standard reference data during the lifetime of the particular ENDF/B version. (This information is copied from the ENDF- 6 Formats Manual, Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/B-VII, Document ENDF-102, Report BNL-NCS-44945-05-Rev.) The current version is ENDF/B VII.0, released in 2006. Users can search ENDF via specialized interfaces, browse sub-libraries or download them as zipped files. Data plots can be generated through the Sigma interface. The ENDF web page also provides access to covariance data processing and plots

  16. On fundamental quality of fission chain reaction to oppose rapid runaways of nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, G. G.; Shmelev, A. N.; Apse, V. A.; Kulikov, E. G.

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that the in-hour equation characterizes the barriers and resistibility of fission chain reaction (FCR) against rapid runaways in nuclear reactors. Traditionally, nuclear reactors are characterized by the presence of barriers based on delayed and prompt neutrons. A new barrier based on the reflector neutrons that can occur when the fast reactor core is surrounded by a weakly absorbing neutron reflector with heavy atomic weight was proposed. It has been shown that the safety of this fast reactor is substantially improved, and considerable elongation of prompt neutron lifetime "devalues" the role of delayed neutron fraction as the maximum permissible reactivity for the reactor safety.

  17. EXFOR basics: A short guide to the nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear data compilation centers. This format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  18. From simple to complex reactions: Nuclear collisions near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1992-12-01

    Collisions between two heavy nuclei produce a diverse spectrum of reaction modes which is much wider than that observed in light ion studies. For the latter case, two processes are observed: direct reactions and compound nucleus formation. Heavy ion reaction studies on the other hand have identified additional processes such as deep-inelastic scattering, incomplete fusion and quasi-fission reactions. While the boundaries between the various processes are usually not well defined, it is generally accepted that with increasing overlap of the two nuclei the interaction evolves from distant collisions where only elastic scattering and Coulomb excitation processes occur, through grazing-type collisions associated with quasi-elastic reactions to deep-inelastic and fusion-fission processes requiring a substantial nuclear overlap. Varying the bombarding energy is a convenient way to change the overlap of the two nuclei. Measurements of excitation functions can thus probe the onset and the interplay of the various reaction modes. Experiments at bombarding energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier are particularly suited for comparisons with theoretical predictions since the small number of degrees of freedom involved in the interaction greatly simplifies the calculations. In the first part of this contribution a short overview is given on the status of heavy ion reaction studies at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In the second part two experiments, one involving simple and the other studying complex reactions, are discussed in more detail.

  19. From simple to complex reactions: Nuclear collisions near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1992-01-01

    Collisions between two heavy nuclei produce a diverse spectrum of reaction modes which is much wider than that observed in light ion studies. For the latter case, two processes are observed: direct reactions and compound nucleus formation. Heavy ion reaction studies on the other hand have identified additional processes such as deep-inelastic scattering, incomplete fusion and quasi-fission reactions. While the boundaries between the various processes are usually not well defined, it is generally accepted that with increasing overlap of the two nuclei the interaction evolves from distant collisions where only elastic scattering and Coulomb excitation processes occur, through grazing-type collisions associated with quasi-elastic reactions to deep-inelastic and fusion-fission processes requiring a substantial nuclear overlap. Varying the bombarding energy is a convenient way to change the overlap of the two nuclei. Measurements of excitation functions can thus probe the onset and the interplay of the various reaction modes. Experiments at bombarding energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier are particularly suited for comparisons with theoretical predictions since the small number of degrees of freedom involved in the interaction greatly simplifies the calculations. In the first part of this contribution a short overview is given on the status of heavy ion reaction studies at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In the second part two experiments, one involving simple and the other studying complex reactions, are discussed in more detail.

  20. Experimental Observation of Nuclear Reactions in Palladium and Uranium - Possible Explanation by Hydrex Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, J.; Murat, D.; Dufour, X.; Foos, J

    2001-07-15

    Experiments with uranium are presented that show a highly exothermal reaction, which can only be of nuclear origin. One striking point of these results is that they clearly show that what is being observed is not some kind of fusion reaction of the deuterium present (only exceedingly small amounts of it are present). This is a strong indication that hydrogen can trigger nuclear reactions that seem to involve the nuclei of the lattice (which would yield a fission-like pattern of products). Confronted with a situation where some experiments in the field yield a fusion-like pattern of products (CF experiments) and others a fissionlike one (LENR experiments), one can reasonably wonder whether one is not observing two aspects of the same phenomenon. Thus, it is proposed to describe CF and LENR reactions as essentially the same phenomenon based on the possible existence of a still hypothetical proton/electron resonance, which would catalyze fissionlike reactions with a neutron sink. Finally, a series of experiments is proposed to assess this hypothesis.

  1. Interplay between compound and fragments aspects of nuclear fission and heavy-ion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, Peter; Iwamoto, A; Ichikawa, I

    2010-09-10

    The scission point in nuclear fission plays a special role where one-body system changes to two-body system. Inverse of this situation is realized in heavy-ion fusion reaction where two-body system changes to one body system. Among several peculiar phenomena expected to occur during this change, we focus our attention to the behavior of compound and fragments shell effects. Some aspects of the interplay between compound and fragments shell effect are discussed related to the topics of the fission valleys in the potential energy surface of actinide nuclei and the fusion-like trajectory found in the cold fusion reaction leading to superheavy nuclei.

  2. Future prospects of nuclear reactions induced by gamma-ray beams at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipescu, D.; Balabanski, D. L.; Camera, F.; Gheorghe, I.; Ghita, D.; Glodariu, T.; Kaur, J.; Ur, C. A.; Utsunomiya, H.; Varlamov, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The future prospects of photonuclear reactions studies at the new Extreme Light Infrastructure—Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility are discussed in view of the pursuit of investigating the electromagnetic response of nuclei using γ-ray beams of unprecedented energy resolution and intensity characteristics. We present here the features of the γ-ray beam source, the emerging ELI-NP experimental program involving photonuclear reactions cross section measurements and spectroscopy and angular measurements of γ-rays and neutrons along with the detection arrays currently under implementation.

  3. Level density inputs in nuclear reaction codes and the role of the spin cutoff parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; Burger, A.; Gorgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Massey, T. N.; Siem, S.

    2014-09-03

    Here, the proton spectrum from the 57Fe(α,p) reaction has been measured and analyzed with the Hauser-Feshbach model of nuclear reactions. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the best description is achieved with either Fermi-gas or constant temperature model functions obtained by fitting them to neutron resonance spacing and to discrete levels and using the spin cutoff parameter with much weaker excitation energy dependence than it is predicted by the Fermi-gas model.

  4. Level density inputs in nuclear reaction codes and the role of the spin cutoff parameter

    DOE PAGES

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; ...

    2014-09-03

    Here, the proton spectrum from the 57Fe(α,p) reaction has been measured and analyzed with the Hauser-Feshbach model of nuclear reactions. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the best description is achieved with either Fermi-gas or constant temperature model functions obtained by fitting them to neutron resonance spacing and to discrete levels and using the spin cutoff parameter with much weaker excitation energy dependence than it is predicted by the Fermi-gas model.

  5. Isospin aspects in nuclear reactions involving Ca beams at 25 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, I. Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Amorini, F.; Anzalone, A.; Auditore, L.; Berceanu, I.; Cardella, G.; Cavallaro, S.; Chatterjee, M. B.; Filippo, E. De; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Giuliani, G.; Geraci, E.; Grassi, L.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Han, J.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; and others

    2011-11-15

    Isospin dependence of dynamical and thermodynamical properties observed in reactions {sup 40}Ca+ {sup 40,48}Ca and {sup 40}Ca + {sup 46}Ti at 25 MeV/nucleon has been studied. We used the CHIMERA multi-detector array. Strong isospin effects are seen in the isotopic distributions of light nuclei and in the competition between different reaction mechanisms in semi-central collisions. We will show also preliminary results obtained in nuclear collision {sup 48}Ca + {sup 48}Ca at 25MeV/nucleon, having very high N/Z value in the entrance channel (N/Z = 1.4). The enhancement of evaporation residue production confirms the strong role played by the N/Z degree of freedom in nuclear dynamics.

  6. Applications of nuclear reaction analysis for determining hydrogen and deuterium distribution in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Altstetter, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ion beams for materials analysis has made a successful transition from the domain of the particle physicist to that of the materials scientist. The subcategory of this field, nuclear reaction analysis, is just now undergoing the transition, particularly in applications to hydrogen in materials. The materials scientist must locate the nearest accelerator, because now he will find that using it can solve mysteries that do not yield to other techniques. 9 figures

  7. Sparking fusion: A step toward laser-initiated nuclear fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, I.

    1996-10-19

    The fusion furnace at the sun`s core burns hydrogen to make helium. Each time two hydrogen nuclei, or protons, merge to create a deuterium nucleus, the process releases energy. A chain of additional energy-producing nuclear reactions then converts deuterium into helium. Because protons, with their like electric charges, naturally repel each other, high temperatures and tremendous pressures are needed to force them together closely enough to initiate and sustain the reactions. These mergers cost energy initially, but the return on that investment proves prodigious. On Earth, such an energy payoff has been achieved only in the uncontrolled fury of a detonated hydrogen bomb. The vision of harnessing and controlling nuclear fusion as a terrestrial energy source has yet to be fulfilled. The proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) represents an ambitious effort to use powerful lasers to deposit sufficient energy in a small capsule of nuclear fuel to trigger fusion. The main justification for the project is to ensure that a core group of physicists and engineers maintains its expertise in the physics of nuclear weapons. This article presents both the scientific and political sides of the NIF facility.

  8. Status of The Facility for Experiments of Nuclear Reactions in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longland, Richard; Kelley, John; Marshall, Caleb; Portillo, Federico; Setoodehnia, Kiana; Underwood, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    To make connections between observations of stellar atmospheres and the processes occurring deep inside stars, me must rely on accurate nuclear cross sections. Often, the Coulomb barrier makes these cross sections immeasurably small in the laboratory. Particle transfer reactions are one tool in our inventory that can be used to infer the necessary properties of nuclear reactions, thus opening an avenue to calculate their cross sections. Enge split-pole magnetic spectrographs are one tool in our inventory that have been used successfully to perform these experiments. However, after a rash of closures, there were no operational spectrographs of this kind in North America to provide these valuable capabilities. Over the last few years, we have revived the Enge split-pole spectrograph at TUNL. We have also upgraded much of the equipment, ranging from the data acquisition system to the control system and detector package. These upgrades have enabled a powerful, flexible, and modern facility - the Facility for Experiments of Nuclear Reactions in Stars (FENRIS). In this talk, I will present a status upgrade of FENRIS, highlighting our upgrades, capabilities, and first science results. I will also highlight future upgrade plans for the facility.

  9. Investigation of the α-particle induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    Cross-sections of alpha particle induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum have been studied in the frame of a systematic investigation of charged particle induced nuclear reactions on metals for different applications. The excitation functions of 93mTc, 93gTc(m+), 94mTc, 94gTc, 95mTc, 95gTc, 96gTc(m+), 99mTc, 93mMo, 99Mo(cum), 90Nb(m+), 94Ru, 95Ru,97Ru, 103Ru and 88Zr were measured up to 40 MeV alpha energy by using a stacked foil technique and activation method. The main goals of this work were to get experimental data for accelerator technology, for monitoring of alpha beam, for thin layer activation technique and for testing nuclear reaction theories. The experimental data were compared with critically analyzed published data and with the results of model calculations, obtained by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE and TALYS codes (TENDL-2011).

  10. Calculation of nuclear reaction cross sections on excited nuclei with the coupled-channels method

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, T.; Talou, P.; Lynn, J. E.; Chadwick, M. B.; Madland, D. G.

    2009-08-15

    We calculate nuclear cross sections on excited nuclei in the fast neutron energy range. We partition the whole process into two contributions: the direct reaction part and the compound nuclear reactions. A coupled-channels method is used for calculating the direct transition of the nucleus from the initial excited state, which is a member of the ground-state rotational band, to the final ground and excited low-lying levels. This process is strongly affected by the channel coupling. The compound nuclear reactions on the excited state are calculated with the statistical Hauser-Feshbach model, with the transmission coefficients obtained from the coupled-channels calculation. The calculations are performed for a strongly deformed nucleus {sup 169}Tm, and selected cross sections for the ground and first excited states are compared. The calculation is also made for actinides to investigate possible modification to the fission cross section when the target is excited. It is shown that both the level coupling for the entrance channel, and the different target spin, change the fission cross section.

  11. Lost alpha-particle diagnostics from a D-T plasma by using nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, Mamiko; Wada, Motoi; Isobe, Mitsutaka

    2014-08-21

    Among various methods proposed for alpha-particles loss measurement, we studied on those by measuring gamma rays of three cases, from (1) nuclear reactions induced by alpha particles, (2) those from short-life-time activities and (3) those from long-life-time activities induced by alpha particles. The time evolution of local alpha flux may possibly be measured by using the {sup 9}Be (a, n) {sup 12}C reaction (1). Using the same system, but with a target set up close to the first wall, activation measurement on site right after turning-off the discharge is possible (2). Nuclear reaction, {sup 25}Mg (a, p) {sup 28}Al, that produce radioisotopes of short lifetime of 2.2 minutes in one of the best candidates. As to the activation to a long lifetime (3), it is predicted that the gamma ray yield from {sup 19}F (a, n) {sup 22}Na reaction is enough for the measurement at the reactor site.

  12. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic Gif-type oxidation from nuclear inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, S.; Asthalter, T.; Rabe, V.; Laschat, S.

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) of synchrotron radiation, also known as nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), has been shown to provide valuable insights into metal-centered vibrations at Mössbauer-active nuclei. We present a study of the iron-centered vibrational density of states (VDOS) during the first step of the Gif-type oxidation of cyclohexene with a novel trinuclear Fe3(μ 3-O) complex as catalyst precursor. The experiments were carried out on shock-frozen solutions for different combinations of reactants: Fe3(μ 3-O) in pyridine solution, Fe3(μ 3-O) plus Zn/acetic acid in pyridine without and with addition of either oxygen or cyclohexene, and Fe3(μ 3-O)/Zn/acetic acid/pyridine/cyclohexene (reaction mixture) for reaction times of 1 min, 5 min, and 30 min. The projected VDOS of the Fe atoms was calculated on the basis of pseudopotential density functional calculations. Two possible reaction intermediates were identified as [Fe(III)(C5H5N)2(O2CCH3)2]+ and Fe(II)(C5H5N)4(O2CCH3)2, yielding evidence that NIS (NRVS) allows to identify the presence of iron-centered intermediates also in complex reaction mixtures.

  13. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.; Segal, M.N.; Hamm, R.W.; Adler, R.J.; Glatstein, E.

    1995-04-01

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use, innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction`s production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data are also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in `nested`-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output {sup 3}He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment.

  14. Charge-exchange reactions and nuclear matrix elements for {beta}{beta} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Frekers, D.

    2009-11-09

    Charge-exchange reactions of (n, p) and (p, n) type at intermediate energies are a powerful tool for the study of nuclear matrix element in {beta}{beta} decay. The present paper reviews some of the most recent experiments in this context. Here, the (n, p) type reactions are realized through (d, {sup 2}He), where {sup 2}He refers to two protons in a singlet {sup 1}S{sub 0} state and where both of these are momentum analyzed and detected by the same spectrometer and detector. These reactions have been developed and performed exclusively at KVI, Groningen (NL), using an incident deuteron energy of 183 MeV. Final state resolutions of about 100 keV have routinely been available. On the other hand, the ({sup 3}He, t) reaction is of (p, n) type and was developed at the RCNP facility in Osaka (JP). Measurements with an unprecedented high resolution of 30 keV at incident energies of 420 MeV are now readily possible. Using both reaction types one can extract the Gamow-Teller transition strengths B(GT{sup +}) and B(GT{sup -}), which define the two ''legs'' of the {beta}{beta} decay matrix elements for the 2v{beta}{beta} decay The high resolution available in both reactions allows a detailed insight into the excitations of the intermediate odd-odd nuclei and, as will be shown, some unexpected features are being unveiled.

  15. Advancing the Theory of Nuclear Reactions with Rare Isotopes: From the Laboratory to the Cosmos

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, Charlotte

    2015-06-01

    The mission of the TORUS Topical Collaboration is to develop new methods that will advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes by using three-body techniques to improve direct-reaction calculations, and, by using a new partial-fusion theory, to integrate descriptions of direct and compound-nucleus reactions. Ohio University concentrates its efforts on the first part of the mission. Since direct measurements are often not feasible, indirect methods, e.g. (d,p) reactions, should be used. Those (d,p) reactions may be viewed as three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. Faddeev equations in momentum space have a long tradition of utilizing separable interactions in order to arrive at sets of coupled integral equations in one variable. While there exist several separable representations for the nucleon-nucleon interaction, the optical potential between a neutron (proton) and a nucleus is not readily available in separable form. For this reason we first embarked in introducing a separable representation for complex phenomenological optical potentials of Woods-Saxon type.

  16. FIGARO : detecting nuclear materials using high-energy gamma rays for oxygen.

    SciTech Connect

    Michlich, B. J.; Smith, D. L.; Massey, T. N.; Ingram, D.; Fessler, A.

    2000-10-10

    Potential diversion of nuclear materials is a major international concern. Fissile (e.g., U, Pu) and other nuclear materials (e.g., D, Be) can be detected using 6-7 MeV gamma rays produced in the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction. These gamma rays will induce neutron emission via the photoneutron and photofission processes in nuclear materials. However, they are not energetic enough to generate significant numbers of neutrons from most common benign materials, thereby reducing the false alarm rate. Neutrons are counted using an array of BF3 counters in a polyethylene moderator. Experiments have shown a strong increase in neutron count rates for depleted uranium, Be, D{sub 2}O, and {sup 6}Li, and little or no increase for other materials (e.g., H{sub 2}O, SS, Cu, Al, C, {sup 7}Li). Gamma source measurements using solid targets of CaF{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} and a SF{sub 6} gas target show that proton accelerator of 3 MeV and 10-100 microampere average current could lead to acceptable detection sensitivity.

  17. Heavy-ion double charge exchange reactions: A tool toward 0 νββ nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Agodi, C.; Bondì, M.; Carbone, D.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.

    2015-11-01

    The knowledge of the nuclear matrix elements for the neutrinoless double beta decay is fundamental for neutrino physics. In this paper, an innovative technique to extract information on the nuclear matrix elements by measuring the cross section of a double charge exchange nuclear reaction is proposed. The basic point is that the initial- and final-state wave functions in the two processes are the same and the transition operators are similar. The double charge exchange cross sections can be factorized in a nuclear structure term containing the matrix elements and a nuclear reaction factor. First pioneering experimental results for the 40Ca(18O,18Ne)40Ar reaction at 270 MeV incident energy show that such cross section factorization reasonably holds for the crucial 0+ → 0+ transition to 40Args, at least at very forward angles.

  18. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S.; Gulino, M.; Tumino, A.; Lamia, L.

    2014-05-09

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 1 MeV or even < 10 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely, the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance.

  19. 3D reconstruction of nuclear reactions using GEM TPC with planar readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihałowicz, Jan Stefan

    2015-02-01

    The research program of the Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) laboratory under construction in Magurele, Romania facilities the need of developing a gaseous active-target detector providing 3D reconstruction of charged products of nuclear reactions induced by gamma beam. The monoenergetic, high-energy (Eγ > 19 MeV) gamma beam of intensity 1013γ/s allows studying nuclear reactions in astrophysics. A Time Projection Chamber with crossed strip readout (eTPC) is proposed as one of the imaging detectors. The special feature of the readout electrode structure is a 2D reconstruction based on the information read out simultaneously from three arrays of strips that form virtual pixels. It is expected to reach similar spatial resolution as for pixel readout at largely reduced cost of electronics. The paper presents the current progress and first results of the small scale prototype TPC which is a one of implementation steps towards eTPC detector proposed in the Technical Design Report of Charged Particles Detection at ELI-NP.

  20. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format. Revision 97/1

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1997-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Center Network. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility rather than optimization of data processing in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  1. 3D reconstruction of nuclear reactions using GEM TPC with planar readout

    SciTech Connect

    Bihałowicz, Jan Stefan

    2015-02-24

    The research program of the Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) laboratory under construction in Magurele, Romania facilities the need of developing a gaseous active-target detector providing 3D reconstruction of charged products of nuclear reactions induced by gamma beam. The monoenergetic, high-energy (E{sub γ} > 19 MeV) gamma beam of intensity 10{sup 13}γ/s allows studying nuclear reactions in astrophysics. A Time Projection Chamber with crossed strip readout (eTPC) is proposed as one of the imaging detectors. The special feature of the readout electrode structure is a 2D reconstruction based on the information read out simultaneously from three arrays of strips that form virtual pixels. It is expected to reach similar spatial resolution as for pixel readout at largely reduced cost of electronics. The paper presents the current progress and first results of the small scale prototype TPC which is a one of implementation steps towards eTPC detector proposed in the Technical Design Report of Charged Particles Detection at ELI-NP.

  2. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Tumino, A.

    2014-05-01

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 1 MeV or even < 10 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely, the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance.

  3. Compound-nuclear reaction cross sections via the Surrogate method: considering the underlying assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escher, Jutta; Dietrich, Frank

    2006-10-01

    The Surrogate Nuclear Reactions approach makes it possible to determine compound-nuclear reaction cross sections indirectly. The method has been employed to determine (n,f) cross sections for various actinides, including unstable species [1-4]; other, primarily neutron- induced, reactions are being considered also [5,6]. The extraction of the sought-after cross sections typically relies on approximations to the full Surrogate formalism [7]. This presentation will identify and critically examine the most significant assumptions underlying the experimental work carried out so far. Calculations that test the validity of the approximations employed will be presented. [1] J.D. Cramer and H.C. Britt, Nucl. Sci. and Eng. 41, 177(1970); H.C. Britt and J.B. Wilhelmy, ibid. 72, 222(1979) [2] M. Petit et al, Nucl. Phys. A735, 345(2004) [3] C. Plettner et al, Phys. Rev. C 71, 051602(2005); J. Burke et al, Phys. Rev. C. 73, 054604(2006) [4] W. Younes and H.C. Britt, Phys. Rev. C 67, 024610(2003); 68, 034610(2003) [5] L.A. Bernstein et al, AIP Conf. Proc. 769, 890(2005) [6] J. Escher et al, Nucl. Phys. A758, 43c(2005) [7] J. Escher and F.S. Dietrich, submitted (2006)

  4. Nuclear-Reaction-Based Radiation Source For Explosives-And SNM-Detection In Massive Cargo

    SciTech Connect

    Brandis, Michal; Dangendorf, Volker; Bromberger, Benjamin; Tittelmeier, Kai; Piel, Christian; Vartsky, David; Bar, Doron; Mardor, Israel; Mor, Ilan; Friedman, Eliahu; Goldberg, Mark B.

    2011-06-01

    An automatic, nuclear-reaction-based, few-view transmission radiography method and system concept is presented, that will simultaneously detect small, operationally-relevant quantities of chemical explosives and special nuclear materials (SNM) in objects up to the size of LD-3 aviation containers. Detection of all threat materials is performed via the {sup 11}B(d,n+{gamma}) reaction on thick, isotopically-enriched targets; SNM are primarily detected via Dual Discrete-Energy Radiography (DDER), using 15.11 MeV and 4.43 MeV {sup 12}C{gamma}-rays, whereas explosives are primarily detected via Fast Neutron Resonance Radiography (FNRR), employing the broad-energy neutron spectra produced in a thick {sup 11}B-target. To achieve a reasonable throughput of {approx}20 containers per hour, ns-pulsed deuteron beam of the order of 0.5 mA intensity at energies of 5-7 MeV is required. As a first step towards optimizing parameters and sensitivities of an operational system, the 0 deg. spectra and yields of both {gamma}-rays and neutrons in this reaction have been measured up to E{sub d} = 6.65 MeV.

  5. Oxygen determination in materials by 18O(p,αγ)15N nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Sunitha, Y.; Reddy, G. L. N.; Sukumar, A. A.; Ramana, J. V.; Sarkar, A.; Verma, Rakesh

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents a proton induced γ-ray emission method based on 18O(p,αγ)15N nuclear reaction to determine bulk oxygen in materials. The determination involves the measurement of 5.27 MeV γ-rays emitted following the de-excitation of 15N nuclei. A description of the energetics of the reaction is given to provide an insight into the origin of 5.27 MeV γ-rays. In addition, thick target γ-ray yields and the limits of detection are measured to ascertain the analytical potential of the reaction. The thick-target γ-ray yields are measured with a high purity germanium detector and a bismuth germanate detector at 0° as well as 90° angles in 3.0-4.2 MeV proton energy region. The best limit of detection of about 1.3 at.% is achieved at 4.2 MeV proton energy for measurements at 0° as well 90° angles with the bismuth germanate detector while the uncertainty in quantitative analysis is <8%. The reaction has a probing depth of several tens of microns. Interferences can arise from fluorine due to the occurrence of 19F(p,αγ)16O reaction that emits 6-7 MeV γ-rays. The analytical potential of the methodology is demonstrated by determining oxygen in several oxide as well as non-oxide materials.

  6. Advancing the Theory of Nuclear Reactions with Rare Isotopes. From the Laboratory to the Cosmos

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, Filomena

    2015-06-01

    The mission of the Topical Collaboration on the Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes (TORUS) was to develop new methods to advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes—particularly the (d,p) reaction in which a deuteron, composed of a proton and a neutron, transfers its neutron to an unstable nucleus. After benchmarking the state-of-the-art theories, the TORUS collaboration found that there were no exact methods to study (d,p) reactions involving heavy targets; the difficulty arising from the long-range nature of the well known, yet subtle, Coulomb force. To overcome this challenge, the TORUS collaboration developed a new theory where the complexity of treating the long-range Coulomb interaction is shifted to the calculation of so-called form-factors. An efficient implementation for the computation of these form factors was a major achievement of the TORUS collaboration. All the new machinery developed are essential ingredients to analyse (d,p) reactions involving heavy nuclei relevant for astrophysics, energy production, and stockpile stewardship.

  7. Low Energy Nuclear Reaction Aircraft- 2013 ARMD Seedling Fund Phase I Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Douglas P.; McDonald, Robert; Campbell, Robbie; Chase, Adam; Daniel, Jason; Darling, Michael; Green, Clayton; MacGregor, Collin; Sudak, Peter; Sykes, Harrison; Waddington, Michael; Fredericks, William J.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Martin, John G.; Moore, Mark D.; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Felder, James L.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    This report serves as the final written documentation for the Aeronautic Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) Seedling Fund's Low Energy Nuclear Reaction (LENR) Aircraft Phase I project. The findings presented include propulsion system concepts, synergistic missions, and aircraft concepts. LENR is a form of nuclear energy that potentially has over 4,000 times the energy density of chemical energy sources. It is not expected to have any harmful emissions or radiation which makes it extremely appealing. There is a lot of interest in LENR, but there are no proven theories. This report does not explore the feasibility of LENR. Instead, it assumes that a working system is available. A design space exploration shows that LENR can enable long range and high speed missions. Six propulsion concepts, six missions, and four aircraft concepts are presented. This report also includes discussion of several issues and concerns that were uncovered during the study and potential research areas to infuse LENR aircraft into NASA's aeronautics research.

  8. New exclusive CHIPS-TPT algorithms for simulation of neutron-nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosov, M.; Savin, D.

    2015-05-01

    The CHIPS-TPT physics library for simulation of neutron-nuclear reactions on the new exclusive level is being developed in CFAR VNIIA. The exclusive modeling conserves energy, momentum and quantum numbers in each neutron-nuclear interaction. The CHIPS-TPT algorithms are based on the exclusive CHIPS library, which is compatible with Geant4. Special CHIPS-TPT physics lists in the Geant4 format are provided. The calculation time for an exclusive CHIPS-TPT simulation is comparable to the time of the corresponding Geant4- HP simulation. In addition to the reduction of the deposited energy fluctuations, which is a consequence of the energy conservation, the CHIPS-TPT libraries provide a possibility of simulation of the secondary particles correlation, e.g. secondary gammas, and of the Doppler broadening of gamma lines in the spectrum, which can be measured by germanium detectors.

  9. Experimental cross-sections for proton-induced nuclear reactions on natMo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Červenák, Jaroslav; Lebeda, Ondřej

    2016-08-01

    In the framework of the Co-ordinated Research Project of the IAEA, we measured in detail cross-sections of the nuclear reactions natMo(p,x)93gTc, 93mTc, 93m+gTc, 94gTc, 94mTc, 95gTc, 95mTc, 96m+gTc, 97mTc, 99mTc, 90Mo, 93mMo, 99Mo, 88gNb, 88mNb, 89gNb, 89mNb, 90m+gNb, 90m+gNbcum, 91mNb, 92mNb, 95gNb, 95mNb, 95m+gNb, 96Nb, 97m+gNb, 88m+gZrcum and 89m+gZrcum in the energy range of 6.9-35.8 MeV. The data for formation of 97mTc, 88gNb, 88mNb and 89mNb are reported for the first time. The obtained results were compared to the prediction of the nuclear reaction model code TALYS adopted from the TENDL-2015 library and to the previously published cross-sections. The thick target yields for all the radionuclides were calculated from the measured data. We suggest recommended cross-sections and thick target yields for the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc, 100Mo(p,x)99Mo and natMo(p,x)96m+gTc nuclear reactions deduced from the selected experimental data.

  10. COMMENTS ON "A NEW LOOK AT LOW-ENERGY NUCLEAR REACTION RESEARCH"

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K.

    2009-12-30

    Cold fusion researchers have accumulated a large body of anomalous results over the last 20 years that they claim proves a new, mysterious nuclear reaction is active in systems they study. Krivit and Marwan give a brief and wholly positive view of this body of research. Unfortunately, cold fusion researchers routinely ignore conventional explanations of their observations, and claim much greater than real accuracy and precision for their techniques. This paper attempts to equally briefly address those aspects of the field with the intent of providing a balanced view of the field, and to establish some criteria for subsequent publications in this arena.

  11. Comments on "A new look at low-energy nuclear reaction research".

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Kirk L

    2010-09-01

    Cold fusion researchers have accumulated a large body of anomalous results over the last 20 years that they claim proves a new, mysterious nuclear reaction is active in systems they study. Krivit and Marwan (J. Environ. Monit., 2009, 11, 1731) give a brief and wholly positive view of this body of research. Unfortunately, cold fusion researchers routinely ignore conventional explanations of their observations, and claim much greater than the real accuracy and precision for their techniques. This paper attempts to equally briefly address those aspects of the field with the intent of providing a balanced view of the field, and to establish some criteria for subsequent publications in this arena.

  12. Study for Nuclear Structures of 22-35Na Isotopes via Measurements of Reaction Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shinji

    2014-09-01

    T. Ohtsubo, M. Nagashima, T. Ogura, Y. Shimbara (Grad. Sch. of Sc., Niigata Univ.), M.Takechi, H. Geissel, M. Winkler (GSI), D. Nishimura, T. Sumikama (Dept. of Phys., Tokyo Univ. of Sc.), M. Fukuda, M. Mihara, H. Uenishi (Dept. of Phys., Osaka Univ.), T. Kuboki, T. Suzuki, T. Yamaguchi, H. Furuki, C. S. Lee, K. Sato (Dept. of Phys., Saitama Univ.), A. Ozawa, H. Ohnishi, T. Moriguchi, S. Fukuda, Y. Ishibashi, D. Nagae, R. Nishikiori, T. Niwa (Inst. of Phys., Univ. of Tsukuba), N. Aoi (RCNP), Rui-Jiu Chen, N. Inabe, D. Kameda, T. Kubo, M. Lantz, T. Ohnishi, K. Okumura, H. Sakurai, H. Suzuki, H. Takeda, S. Takeuchi, K. Tanaka, Y. Yanagisawa (RIKEN), De-Qing Fang, Yu-Gang Ma (SINAP), T. Izumikawa (RI Ctr., Niigata Univ.), and S. Momota (Fac. of Engn., Kochi Univ. of Tech.) Reaction cross sections (σR) for 22-35Na isotopes have been measured at around 240 MeV/nucleon. The σR for 22-35Na were measured for the first time. Enhancement in cross sections is clearly observed from the systematics for stable nuclei, for isotopes with large mass numbers. These enhancement can be mainly ascribed to the nuclear deformation. We will discuss the nuclear structure (neutron skin, nuclear shell structure) for neutron-excess Na isotopes. T. Ohtsubo, M. Nagashima, T. Ogura, Y. Shimbara (Grad. Sch. of Sc., Niigata Univ.), M.Takechi, H. Geissel, M. Winkler (GSI), D. Nishimura, T. Sumikama (Dept. of Phys., Tokyo Univ. of Sc.), M. Fukuda, M. Mihara, H. Uenishi (Dept. of Phys., Osaka Univ.), T. Kuboki, T. Suzuki, T. Yamaguchi, H. Furuki, C. S. Lee, K. Sato (Dept. of Phys., Saitama Univ.), A. Ozawa, H. Ohnishi, T. Moriguchi, S. Fukuda, Y. Ishibashi, D. Nagae, R. Nishikiori, T. Niwa (Inst. of Phys., Univ. of Tsukuba), N. Aoi (RCNP), Rui-Jiu Chen, N. Inabe, D. Kameda, T. Kubo, M. Lantz, T. Ohnishi, K. Okumura, H. Sakurai, H. Suzuki, H. Takeda, S. Takeuchi, K. Tanaka, Y. Yanagisawa (RIKEN), De-Qing Fang, Yu-Gang Ma (SINAP), T. Izumikawa (RI Ctr., Niigata Univ.), and S. Momota (Fac. of Engn

  13. Nuclear reaction measurements on tissue-equivalent materials and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations for hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Napoli, M.; Romano, F.; D'Urso, D.; Licciardello, T.; Agodi, C.; Candiano, G.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Musumarra, A.; Pandola, L.; Scuderi, V.

    2014-12-01

    When a carbon beam interacts with human tissues, many secondary fragments are produced into the tumor region and the surrounding healthy tissues. Therefore, in hadrontherapy precise dose calculations require Monte Carlo tools equipped with complex nuclear reaction models. To get realistic predictions, however, simulation codes must be validated against experimental results; the wider the dataset is, the more the models are finely tuned. Since no fragmentation data for tissue-equivalent materials at Fermi energies are available in literature, we measured secondary fragments produced by the interaction of a 55.6 MeV u-1 12C beam with thick muscle and cortical bone targets. Three reaction models used by the Geant4 Monte Carlo code, the Binary Light Ions Cascade, the Quantum Molecular Dynamic and the Liege Intranuclear Cascade, have been benchmarked against the collected data. In this work we present the experimental results and we discuss the predictive power of the above mentioned models.

  14. Nuclear reaction measurements on tissue-equivalent materials and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations for hadrontherapy.

    PubMed

    De Napoli, M; Romano, F; D'Urso, D; Licciardello, T; Agodi, C; Candiano, G; Cappuzzello, F; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Musumarra, A; Pandola, L; Scuderi, V

    2014-12-21

    When a carbon beam interacts with human tissues, many secondary fragments are produced into the tumor region and the surrounding healthy tissues. Therefore, in hadrontherapy precise dose calculations require Monte Carlo tools equipped with complex nuclear reaction models. To get realistic predictions, however, simulation codes must be validated against experimental results; the wider the dataset is, the more the models are finely tuned.Since no fragmentation data for tissue-equivalent materials at Fermi energies are available in literature, we measured secondary fragments produced by the interaction of a 55.6 MeV u(-1) (12)C beam with thick muscle and cortical bone targets. Three reaction models used by the Geant4 Monte Carlo code, the Binary Light Ions Cascade, the Quantum Molecular Dynamic and the Liege Intranuclear Cascade, have been benchmarked against the collected data. In this work we present the experimental results and we discuss the predictive power of the above mentioned models.

  15. Nuclear fragmentation and charge-exchange reactions induced by pions in the Δ -resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of the nuclear fragmentations and the charge exchange reactions in pion-nucleus collisions near the Δ (1232) resonance energies has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics transport model. An isospin-, momentum-, and density-dependent pion-nucleon potential is implemented in the model, which influences the pion dynamics, in particular the kinetic energy spectra, but weakly impacts the fragmentation mechanism. The absorption process in pion-nucleon collisions to form the Δ (1232) resonance dominates the heating mechanism of the target nucleus. The excitation energy transferred to the target nucleus increases with the pion kinetic energy and is similar for both π-- and π+-induced reactions. The magnitude of fragmentation of the target nucleus weakly depends on the pion energy. The isospin ratio in the pion double-charge exchange is influenced by the isospin ingredient of target nucleus.

  16. Evolutionary implications of the new triple-α nuclear reaction rate for low mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotter, A.; Paxton, B.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Ogata et al. (2009, Progr. Theor. Phys., 122, 1055) presented a theoretical determination of the ^4He(αα,γ)12C, or triple-α, nuclear reaction rate. Their rate differs from the NACRE rate by many orders of magnitude at temperatures relevant for low mass stars. Aims: We explore the evolutionary implications of adopting the OKK triple-α reaction rate in low mass stars and compare the results with those obtained using the NACRE rate. Methods: The triple-α reaction rates are compared by following the evolution of stellar models at 1 and 1.5 M⊙ with Z = 0.0002 and Z = 0.02. Results: Results show that the OKK rate has severe consequences for the late stages of stellar evolution in low mass stars. Most notable is the shortening-or disappearance-of the red giant phase. Conclusions: The OKK triple-α reaction rate is incompatible with observations of extended red giant branches and He burning stars in old stellar systems.

  17. Polarization asymmetries in the 9Be(γ ,n0) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, J. M.; Ahmed, M. W.; Davis, B. J.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Myers, L. S.; Spraker, M. C.; Stave, S.; Tompkins, J. R.; Weller, H. R.; Zimmerman, W. R.

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of the 9Be (γ ,n0 ) reaction were performed using nearly 100% linearly polarized, high-intensity, and nearly monoenergetic γ -ray beams having energies between 5.5 and 15.5 MeV at the High Intensity γ -ray Source located at Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Eighteen liquid scintillator detectors were used to measure neutron yields parallel and perpendicular to the plane of beam polarization. Polarization asymmetries, which are the differences between yields observed in detectors located in-plane and out-of-plane divided by their sums, were measured for the neutrons which left the residual nucleus (8Be ) in its ground state, termed the n0 group. Asymmetries between 0.4 to 0.7 were discovered over this energy region in addition to a clear trend of increasing asymmetries with increasing beam energy. A prediction of the polarization asymmetry based on a pure E 1 direct capture model shows good agreement with the experimental measurements. These data and the prediction could be of interest for methods that rely on neutron measurements following photofission to identify the presence of special nuclear material.

  18. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Instrumentation for Real-time Enzymatic Reaction Rate Measurements by NMR.

    PubMed

    Balzan, Riccardo; Fernandes, Laetitia; Comment, Arnaud; Pidial, Laetitia; Tavitian, Bertrand; Vasos, Paul R

    2016-02-23

    The main limitation of NMR-based investigations is low sensitivity. This prompts for long acquisition times, thus preventing real-time NMR measurements of metabolic transformations. Hyperpolarization via dissolution DNP circumvents part of the sensitivity issues thanks to the large out-of-equilibrium nuclear magnetization stemming from the electron-to-nucleus spin polarization transfer. The high NMR signal obtained can be used to monitor chemical reactions in real time. The downside of hyperpolarized NMR resides in the limited time window available for signal acquisition, which is usually on the order of the nuclear spin longitudinal relaxation time constant, T1, or, in favorable cases, on the order of the relaxation time constant associated with the singlet-state of coupled nuclei, TLLS. Cellular uptake of endogenous molecules and metabolic rates can provide essential information on tumor development and drug response. Numerous previous hyperpolarized NMR studies have demonstrated the relevancy of pyruvate as a metabolic substrate for monitoring enzymatic activity in vivo. This work provides a detailed description of the experimental setup and methods required for the study of enzymatic reactions, in particular the pyruvate-to-lactate conversion rate in presence of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), by hyperpolarized NMR.

  19. Prompt gamma ray diagnostics and enhanced hadron-therapy using neutron-free nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffrida, L.; Margarone, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Picciotto, A.; Cuttone, G.; Korn, G.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a series of simulations about the potential use of Boron isotopes to trigger neutron-free (aneutronic) nuclear reactions in cancer cells through the interaction with an incoming energetic proton beam, thus resulting in the emission of characteristic prompt gamma radiation (429 keV, 718 keV and 1435 keV). Furthermore assuming that the Boron isotopes are absorbed in cancer cells, the three alpha-particles produced in each p-11B aneutronic nuclear fusion reactions can potentially result in the enhancement of the biological dose absorbed in the tumor region since these multi-MeV alpha-particles are stopped inside the single cancer cell, thus allowing to spare the surrounding tissues. Although a similar approach based on the use of 11B nuclei has been proposed in [Yoon et al. Applied Physics Letters 105, 223507 (2014)], our work demonstrate, using Monte Carlo simulations, the crucial importance of the use of 10B nuclei (in a solution containing also 11B) for the generation of prompt gamma-rays, which can be applied to medical imaging. In fact, we demonstrate that the use of 10B nuclei can enhance the intensity of the 718 keV gamma-ray peak more than 30 times compared to the solution containing only 11B nuclei. A detailed explanation of the origin of the different prompt gamma-rays, as well as of their application as real-time diagnostics during a potential cancer treatment, is here discussed.

  20. Unified description of structure and reactions: implementing the nuclear field theory program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broglia, R. A.; Bortignon, P. F.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Idini, A.; Potel, G.

    2016-06-01

    The modern theory of the atomic nucleus results from the merging of the liquid drop model of Niels Bohr and Fritz Kalckar, and of the shell model of Marie Goeppert Meyer and Hans Jensen. The first model contributed the concepts of collective excitations. The second, those of independent-particle motion. The unification of these apparently contradictory views in terms of the particle-vibration and particle-rotation couplings carried out by Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson has allowed for an ever more complete, accurate and detailed description of nuclear structure. Nuclear field theory (NFT), developed by the Copenhagen-Buenos Aires collaboration, provided a powerful quantal embodiment of this unification. Reactions are not only at the basis of quantum mechanics (statistical interpretation, Max Born), but also the specific tools to probe the atomic nucleus. It is then natural that NFT is being extended to deal with processes which involve the continuum in an intrinsic fashion, so as to be able to treat them on an equal footing with those associated with bound states (structure). As a result, spectroscopic studies of transfer to continuum states could eventually make use of the NFT rules, properly extended to take care of recoil effects. In the present contribution we review the implementation of the NFT program of structure and reactions, setting special emphasis on open problems and outstanding predictions.

  1. Compact Detection System for High Sensitivity Hydrogen Profiling of Materials by Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, Daniel Keith; Urban, Ben; Pacheco, Jose

    2009-03-10

    Hydrogen is a ubiquitous contaminant that is known to have dramatic effects on the electrical, chemical, and mechanical properties of many types of materials in even minute quantities. Thus, the detection of hydrogen in materials is of major importance. Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) is a powerful technique for nondestructive profiling hydrogen in materials. However, NRA has found only limited use in many applications because of poor sensitivity due to cosmic ray background (CSRB). Most attempts to eliminate CSRB to achieve ppm detection levels using higher energy nuclear reactions or tons of passive shielding are not compatible with commercial ion beam analysis space and equipment requirements Zimmerman, et al. have previously reported upon a coincidence detector that meets IBA space requirements and reduces the cosmic ray background, but the detector suffers from lower detection efficiency and small sample size. We have replaced the BGO well detector in the Zimmerman coincidence detection scheme with a larger Nal well detector and used faster timing electronics to produce a detector that can handle larger samples with higher detection efficiency, and still eliminate cosmic ray background.

  2. Carbon fragmentation measurements and validation of the Geant4 nuclear reaction models for hadrontherapy.

    PubMed

    De Napoli, M; Agodi, C; Battistoni, G; Blancato, A A; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Giacoppo, F; Morone, M C; Nicolosi, D; Pandola, L; Patera, V; Raciti, G; Rapisarda, E; Romano, F; Sardina, D; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Scuderi, V; Sfienti, C; Tropea, S

    2012-11-21

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary when using heavy-ion beams in hadrontherapy to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Moreover, they are also fundamental to validate and improve the Monte Carlo codes for their use in planning tumor treatments. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections are being measured, and in particular, to our knowledge, no double-differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in the literature. In this work, we have measured the double-differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the (12)C fragmentation at 62 A MeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before. In particular, we have compared the experimental data with the predictions of two Geant4 nuclear reaction models: the Binary Light Ions Cascade and the Quantum Molecular Dynamic. From the comparison, it has been observed that the Binary Light Ions Cascade approximates the angular distributions of the fragment production cross sections better than the Quantum Molecular Dynamic model. However, the discrepancies observed between the experimental data and the Monte Carlo simulations lead to the conclusion that the prediction capability of both models needs to be improved at intermediate energies.

  3. Carbon fragmentation measurements and validation of the Geant4 nuclear reaction models for hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Napoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Battistoni, G.; Blancato, A. A.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Giacoppo, F.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Pandola, L.; Patera, V.; Raciti, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Romano, F.; Sardina, D.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Scuderi, V.; Sfienti, C.; Tropea, S.

    2012-11-01

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary when using heavy-ion beams in hadrontherapy to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Moreover, they are also fundamental to validate and improve the Monte Carlo codes for their use in planning tumor treatments. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections are being measured, and in particular, to our knowledge, no double-differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in the literature. In this work, we have measured the double-differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the 12C fragmentation at 62 A MeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before. In particular, we have compared the experimental data with the predictions of two Geant4 nuclear reaction models: the Binary Light Ions Cascade and the Quantum Molecular Dynamic. From the comparison, it has been observed that the Binary Light Ions Cascade approximates the angular distributions of the fragment production cross sections better than the Quantum Molecular Dynamic model. However, the discrepancies observed between the experimental data and the Monte Carlo simulations lead to the conclusion that the prediction capability of both models needs to be improved at intermediate energies.

  4. PHASE-OTI: A pre-equilibrium model code for nuclear reactions calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmaghraby, Elsayed K.

    2009-09-01

    The present work focuses on a pre-equilibrium nuclear reaction code (based on the one, two and infinity hypothesis of pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions). In the PHASE-OTI code, pre-equilibrium decays are assumed to be single nucleon emissions, and the statistical probabilities come from the independence of nuclei decay. The code has proved to be a good tool to provide predictions of energy-differential cross sections. The probability of emission was calculated statistically using bases of hybrid model and exciton model. However, more precise depletion factors were used in the calculations. The present calculations were restricted to nucleon-nucleon interactions and one nucleon emission. Program summaryProgram title: PHASE-OTI Catalogue identifier: AEDN_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDN_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5858 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 149 405 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: Pentium 4 and Centrino Duo Operating system: MS Windows RAM: 128 MB Classification: 17.12 Nature of problem: Calculation of the differential cross section for nucleon induced nuclear reaction in the framework of pre-equilibrium emission model. Solution method: Single neutron emission was treated by assuming occurrence of the reaction in successive steps. Each step is called phase because of the phase transition nature of the theory. The probability of emission was calculated statistically using bases of hybrid model [1] and exciton model [2]. However, more precise depletion factor was used in the calculations. Exciton configuration used in the code is that described in earlier work [3]. Restrictions: The program is restricted to single nucleon emission and nucleon

  5. Extension of PENELOPE to protons: Simulation of nuclear reactions and benchmark with Geant4

    SciTech Connect

    Sterpin, E.; Sorriaux, J.; Vynckier, S.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Describing the implementation of nuclear reactions in the extension of the Monte Carlo code (MC) PENELOPE to protons (PENH) and benchmarking with Geant4.Methods: PENH is based on mixed-simulation mechanics for both elastic and inelastic electromagnetic collisions (EM). The adopted differential cross sections for EM elastic collisions are calculated using the eikonal approximation with the Dirac–Hartree–Fock–Slater atomic potential. Cross sections for EM inelastic collisions are computed within the relativistic Born approximation, using the Sternheimer–Liljequist model of the generalized oscillator strength. Nuclear elastic and inelastic collisions were simulated using explicitly the scattering analysis interactive dialin database for {sup 1}H and ICRU 63 data for {sup 12}C, {sup 14}N, {sup 16}O, {sup 31}P, and {sup 40}Ca. Secondary protons, alphas, and deuterons were all simulated as protons, with the energy adapted to ensure consistent range. Prompt gamma emission can also be simulated upon user request. Simulations were performed in a water phantom with nuclear interactions switched off or on and integral depth–dose distributions were compared. Binary-cascade and precompound models were used for Geant4. Initial energies of 100 and 250 MeV were considered. For cases with no nuclear interactions simulated, additional simulations in a water phantom with tight resolution (1 mm in all directions) were performed with FLUKA. Finally, integral depth–dose distributions for a 250 MeV energy were computed with Geant4 and PENH in a homogeneous phantom with, first, ICRU striated muscle and, second, ICRU compact bone.Results: For simulations with EM collisions only, integral depth–dose distributions were within 1%/1 mm for doses higher than 10% of the Bragg-peak dose. For central-axis depth–dose and lateral profiles in a phantom with tight resolution, there are significant deviations between Geant4 and PENH (up to 60%/1 cm for depth

  6. Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions Resulting as Picometer Interactions with Similarity to K-Shell Electron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.; Li, X. Z.; Kelly, J. C.; Osman, F.

    2006-02-01

    Since the appeal by Brian Josephson at the meeting of the Nobel Laureates July 2004, it seems to be indicated to summarize the following serious, reproducible and confirmed observations on reactions of protons or deuterons incorporated in host metals such as palladium. Some reflections to Rutherford's discovery of nuclear physics, the Cockroft-Oliphant discovery of anomalous low-energy fusion reactions and the chemist Hahn's discovery of fission had to be included. Using gaseous atmosphere or discharges between palladium targets, rather significant results were seen e.g. from the "life after death" heat production of such high values per host atom that only nuclear reactions can be involved. This supports the earlier evaluation of neutron generation in fully reversible experiments with gas discharges hinting that a reasonable screening effect - preferably in the swimming electron layer - may lead to reactions at nuclear distances d of picometers with reaction probability times U of about megaseconds similar to the K-shell capture radioactivity. Further electrolytic experiments led to low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) where the involvement of pollution could be excluded from the appearance of very seldom rare earth elements. A basically new theory for DD cross-sections is used to confirm the picometer-megasecond reactions of cold fusion. Other theoretical aspects are given from measured heavy element distributions similar to the standard abundance distribution, SAD, in the Universe with consequences on endothermic heavy nuclei generation, magic numbers and to quark-gluon plasmas.

  7. Study of Nuclear Reactions with 11C and 15O Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dongwon

    2007-05-14

    Nuclear reaction study with radioactive ion beams is one of the most exciting research topics in modern nuclear physics. The development of radioactive ion beams has allowed nuclear scientists and engineers to explore many unknown exotic nuclei far from the valley of nuclear stability, and to further our understanding of the evolution of the universe. The recently developed radioactive ion beam facility at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-inch cyclotron is denoted as BEARS and provides 11C, 14O and 15O radioactive ion beams of high quality. These moderate to high intensity, proton-rich radioactive ion beams have been used to explore the properties of unstable nuclei such as 12N and 15F. In this work, the proton capture reaction on 11C has been evaluated via the indirect d(11C, 12N)n transfer reaction using the inverse kinematics method coupled with the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient (ANC) theoretical approach. The total effective 12N → 11C+p ANC is found to be (C eff12N = 1.83 ± 0.27 fm-1. With the high 11C beam intensity available, our experiment showed excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and previous experimental studies. This study also indirectly confirmed that the 11C(p,γ) reaction is a key step in producing CNO nuclei in supermassive low-metallicity stars, bypassing the slow triple alpha process. The newly developed 15O radioactive ion beam at BEARS was used to study the poorly known level widths of 16F via the p(15O,15O)p reaction. Among the nuclei in the A=16, T=1 isobaric triad, many states in 16N and 16O have been well established, but less has been reported on 16F. Four states of 16F below 1 MeV have been identified experimentally: 0-, 1

  8. STARLIB: A Next-generation Reaction-rate Library for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallaska, A. L.; Iliadis, C.; Champange, A. E.; Goriely, S.; Starrfield, S.; Timmes, F. X.

    2013-07-01

    STARLIB is a next-generation, all-purpose nuclear reaction-rate library. For the first time, this library provides the rate probability density at all temperature grid points for convenient implementation in models of stellar phenomena. The recommended rate and its associated uncertainties are also included. Currently, uncertainties are absent from all other rate libraries, and, although estimates have been attempted in previous evaluations and compilations, these are generally not based on rigorous statistical definitions. A common standard for deriving uncertainties is clearly warranted. STARLIB represents a first step in addressing this deficiency by providing a tabular, up-to-date database that supplies not only the rate and its uncertainty but also its distribution. Because a majority of rates are lognormally distributed, this allows the construction of rate probability densities from the columns of STARLIB. This structure is based on a recently suggested Monte Carlo method to calculate reaction rates, where uncertainties are rigorously defined. In STARLIB, experimental rates are supplemented with: (1) theoretical TALYS rates for reactions for which no experimental input is available, and (2) laboratory and theoretical weak rates. STARLIB includes all types of reactions of astrophysical interest to Z = 83, such as (p, γ), (p, α), (α, n), and corresponding reverse rates. Strong rates account for thermal target excitations. Here, we summarize our Monte Carlo formalism, introduce the library, compare methods of correcting rates for stellar environments, and discuss how to implement our library in Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. We also present a method for accessing STARLIB on the Internet and outline updated Monte Carlo-based rates.

  9. STARLIB: A NEXT-GENERATION REACTION-RATE LIBRARY FOR NUCLEAR ASTROPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Sallaska, A. L.; Iliadis, C.; Champange, A. E.; Goriely, S.; Starrfield, S.; Timmes, F. X.

    2013-07-15

    STARLIB is a next-generation, all-purpose nuclear reaction-rate library. For the first time, this library provides the rate probability density at all temperature grid points for convenient implementation in models of stellar phenomena. The recommended rate and its associated uncertainties are also included. Currently, uncertainties are absent from all other rate libraries, and, although estimates have been attempted in previous evaluations and compilations, these are generally not based on rigorous statistical definitions. A common standard for deriving uncertainties is clearly warranted. STARLIB represents a first step in addressing this deficiency by providing a tabular, up-to-date database that supplies not only the rate and its uncertainty but also its distribution. Because a majority of rates are lognormally distributed, this allows the construction of rate probability densities from the columns of STARLIB. This structure is based on a recently suggested Monte Carlo method to calculate reaction rates, where uncertainties are rigorously defined. In STARLIB, experimental rates are supplemented with: (1) theoretical TALYS rates for reactions for which no experimental input is available, and (2) laboratory and theoretical weak rates. STARLIB includes all types of reactions of astrophysical interest to Z = 83, such as (p, {gamma}), (p, {alpha}), ({alpha}, n), and corresponding reverse rates. Strong rates account for thermal target excitations. Here, we summarize our Monte Carlo formalism, introduce the library, compare methods of correcting rates for stellar environments, and discuss how to implement our library in Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. We also present a method for accessing STARLIB on the Internet and outline updated Monte Carlo-based rates.

  10. (Studies of nuclear reaction at very low energies): Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.

    1988-12-14

    We summarize the accomplishments of the first full year's operation of the Colorado School of Mines low energy nuclear physics project utilizing the General Ionex Model 1545 low energy, high current particle accelerator. The projects which we have completed which were explicity included in the original contract proposal include the measurement of the gamma ray branching ratios of the p + /sup 6/Li, p + /sup 7/Li, and p + /sup 11/B reactions as well as the absolute yield of the reaction /sup 9/Be(p,..gamma..)/sup 10/B between proton laboratory energies of about 40 to 180 keV. in the course of these measurements we have demonstrated the associated gamma ray technique for Germanium detector efficiency calibration at gamma ray energies up to 12 MeV using very low energy proton beams. We have, in addition, pursued a fairly comprehensive investigation of an extremely interesting and totally surprising phenomenon in which we see a yield of the d-d fusion reaction during bombardment of deuterated polyethylene by light to medium ion and molecular beams which is greatly enhanced over the yield expected from a straight-forward secondary ion reaction calculation. This enhanced yield is seen to correlate with the beam line pressure, suggesting target heating effects to be the source of the enhancement. In conjunction with a parallel contract with the Applied Plasma Physics Program in the DOE Office of Fusion Energy, we have developed an eight channel fast gamma ray spectrometer utilizing the fluorocarbon liquid scintillator NE226. The system has been operated at total gamma ray count rates up to 2.5 MHz with good energy resolution and with no measured dead-time and acceptable levels of pulse pile-up.

  11. Feasibility study of nuclear transmutation by negative muon capture reaction using the PHITS code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Shin-ichiro; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Feasibility of nuclear transmutation of fission products in high-level radioactive waste by negative muon capture reaction is investigated using the Particle and Heave Ion Transport code System (PHITS). It is found that about 80 % of stopped negative muons contribute to transmute target nuclide into stable or short-lived nuclide in the case of 135Cs, which is one of the most important nuclide in the transmutation. The simulation result also indicates that the position of transmutation is controllable by changing the energy of incident negative muon. Based on our simulation, it takes approximately 8.5 × 108years to transmute 500 g of 135Cs by negative muon beam with the highest intensity currently available.

  12. Conversion of Nuclear Waste to Molten Glass: Cold-Cap Reactions in Crucible Tests

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel; Rice, Jarrett A.; ...

    2016-05-23

    The feed-to-glass conversion, which comprises complex chemical reactions and phase transitions, occurs in the cold cap during nuclear waste vitrification. Here, to investigate the conversion process, we analyzed heat-treated samples of a simulated high-level waste feed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, leaching tests, and residual anion analysis. Feed dehydration, gas evolution, and borate phase formation occurred at temperatures below 700°C before the emerging glass-forming melt was completely connected. Above 700°C, intermediate aluminosilicate phases and quartz particles gradually dissolved in the continuous borosilicate melt, which expanded with transient foam. Finally, knowledge of the chemistry and physics of feed-to-glass conversion willmore » help us control the conversion path by changing the melter feed makeup to maximize the glass production rate.« less

  13. Analysis of surface, subsurface, and bulk hydrogen in ZnO using nuclear reaction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Traeger, F.; Kauer, M.; Woell, Ch.; Rogalla, D.; Becker, H.-W.

    2011-08-15

    Hydrogen concentrations in ZnO single crystals exposing different surfaces have been determined to be in the range of (0.02-0.04) at.% with an error of {+-}0.01 at.% using nuclear reaction analysis. In the subsurface region, the hydrogen concentration has been determined to be higher by up to a factor of 10. In contrast to the hydrogen in the bulk, part of the subsurface hydrogen is less strongly bound, can be removed by heating to 550 deg. C, and reaccommodated by loading with atomic hydrogen. By exposing the ZnO(1010) surface to water above room temperature and to atomic hydrogen, respectively, hydroxylation with the same coverage of hydrogen is observed.

  14. Cyclotron production of I-123: An evaluation of the nuclear reactions which produce this isotope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sodd, V. J.; Scholz, K. L.; Blue, J. W.; Wellman, H. N.

    1970-01-01

    The use of the various nuclear reactions is described by which I-123,a low radiation dose radiopharmaceutical, can be cyclotron-produced. Methods of directly producing I-123 and those which indirectly produce the radionuclide through the beta (+) decay of its nautral precursor, Xe-123. It is impossible to separate from the radioiodine contaminants, notably I-124, which occur in the direct method. Thus, it is preferable to produce pure I-123 from Xe-123 which is easily separated from the radioiodines. Among the characteristics of I-123 is the capability of reducing the patient dose in a thyroid uptake measurement to a very small percentage of that delivered by the more commonly used I-131.

  15. Analysis of the Nuclear Structure of 186 Re Using Neutron-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matters, David; McClory, John; Carroll, James; Chiara, Chris; Fotiades, Nikolaos; Devlin, Matt; Nelson, Ron O.

    2015-04-01

    Evaluated nuclear structure data for 186 Re identifies the majority of spin-parity assignments as tentative, with approximate values associated with the energies of several levels and transitions. In particular, the absence of known transitions that feed the Jπ =8+ isomer motivates their discovery, which would have astrophysical implications and a potential application in the development of an isomer power source. Using the GErmanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE) spectrometer at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, the (n,2n γ) and (n,n' γ) reactions in a 99.52% enriched 187 Re target were used to measure γ-ray excitation functions in 186 Re and 187 Re, respectively. A preliminary analysis of the data obtained from the experiment reveals several new transitions in 186 Re and 187 Re.

  16. Harmonic oscillator representation in the theory of scattering and nuclear reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smirnov, Yuri F.; Shirokov, A. M.; Lurie, Yuri, A.; Zaitsev, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    The following questions, concerning the application of the harmonic oscillator representation (HOR) in the theory of scattering and reactions, are discussed: the formulation of the scattering theory in HOR; exact solutions of the free motion Schroedinger equation in HOR; separable expansion of the short range potentials and the calculation of the phase shifts; 'isolated states' as generalization of the Wigner-von Neumann bound states embedded in continuum; a nuclear coupled channel problem in HOR; and the description of true three body scattering in HOR. As an illustration the soft dipole mode in the (11)Li nucleus is considered in a frame of the (9)Li+n+n cluster model taking into account of three body continuum effects.

  17. Conversion of Nuclear Waste to Molten Glass: Cold-Cap Reactions in Crucible Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel; Rice, Jarrett A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2016-05-23

    The feed-to-glass conversion, which comprises complex chemical reactions and phase transitions, occurs in the cold cap during nuclear waste vitrification. Here, to investigate the conversion process, we analyzed heat-treated samples of a simulated high-level waste feed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, leaching tests, and residual anion analysis. Feed dehydration, gas evolution, and borate phase formation occurred at temperatures below 700°C before the emerging glass-forming melt was completely connected. Above 700°C, intermediate aluminosilicate phases and quartz particles gradually dissolved in the continuous borosilicate melt, which expanded with transient foam. Finally, knowledge of the chemistry and physics of feed-to-glass conversion will help us control the conversion path by changing the melter feed makeup to maximize the glass production rate.

  18. Tungsten fragmentation in nuclear reactions induced by high-energy cosmic-ray protons

    SciTech Connect

    Chechenin, N. G. Chuvilskaya, T. V.; Shirokova, A. A.; Kadmenskii, A. G.

    2015-01-15

    Tungsten fragmentation arising in nuclear reactions induced by cosmic-ray protons in space-vehicle electronics is considered. In modern technologies of integrated circuits featuring a three-dimensional layered architecture, tungsten is frequently used as a material for interlayer conducting connections. Within the preequilibrium model, tungsten-fragmentation features, including the cross sections for the elastic and inelastic scattering of protons of energy between 30 and 240 MeV; the yields of isotopes and isobars; their energy, charge, and mass distributions; and recoil energy spectra, are calculated on the basis of the TALYS and EMPIRE-II-19 codes. It is shown that tungsten fragmentation affects substantially forecasts of failures of space-vehicle electronics.

  19. Evidence for nuclear Landau-Zener effect: New resonance mechanism in heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Y.; Park, J.Y.

    1983-12-01

    Characteristic resonancelike peaks recently observed in the angle-integrated inelastic cross sections for the /sup 13/C-/sup 17/O system are understood in terms of the Landau-Zener excitation mechanism at energy level crossings. Angle-integrated inelastic cross sections estimated with the Landau-Zener formula show a series of resonancelike peaks as a function of incident energy, each of which is associated with a grazing angular momentum of the relative motion between nuclei. Simple expressions are given for resonance energies and ''widths'' of new ''resonances.'' This resonance mechanism is a new one, which has not been known in nuclear reactions nor in atomic collisions, although it is based on the well-known Landau-Zener promotion mechanism.

  20. Spin dipole nuclear matrix elements for double beta decay nuclei by charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.; Frekers, D.

    2016-11-01

    Spin dipole (SD) strengths for double beta-decay (DBD) nuclei were studied experimentally for the first time by using measured cross sections of (3He, t) charge-exchange reactions (CERs). Then SD nuclear matrix elements (NMEs) {M}α ({{SD}}) for low-lying 2- states were derived from the experimental SD strengths by referring to the experimental α = GT (Gamow-Teller) and α = F (Fermi) strengths. They are consistent with the empirical NMEs M({{SD}}) based on the quasi-particle model with the empirical effective SD coupling constant. The CERs are used to evaluate the SD NME, which is associated with one of the major components of the neutrino-less DBD NME.

  1. Exclusive CHIPS-TPT algorithms for simulation of neutron-nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosov, Mikhail; Savin, Dmitriy

    2016-09-01

    The CHIPS-TPT physics library for simulation of neutron-nuclear reactions on the new exclusive level is being developed in CFAR VNIIA. The exclusive modeling conserves energy, momentum and quantum numbers in each neutron-nuclear interaction. The CHIPS-TPT algorithms are based on the exclusive CHIPS library, which is compatible with Geant4. Special CHIPS-TPT physics lists in the Geant4 format are provided. The calculation time for an exclusive CHIPS-TPT simulation is comparable to the time of the corresponding inclusive Geant4-HP simulation and much faster for mono-isotopic simulations. In addition to the reduction of the deposited energy fluctuations, which is a consequence of the energy conservation, the CHIPS-TPT libraries provide a possibility of simulation of the secondary particles correlation, e.g. secondary gammas or n-γ correlations, and of the Doppler broadening of the γ-lines in the simulated spectra, which can be measured by germanium detectors.

  2. Characterization of a DNA uptake reaction through the nuclear membrane of isolated yeast nuclei. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, E.; Shakuto, S.; Miyakawa, T.; Fukui, S.

    1988-02-01

    Isolated yeast nuclei were able to incorporate /sup 3/H-labeled pJDB219 DNA in vitro in the presence of ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. The number of plasmid molecules incorporated into each nucleus was calculated to be 60 under the conditions we used. Enzyme-histochemical staining of the incorporated biotinylated pJDB219 with streptavidin-biotinylated-peroxidase complex indicated a uniform distribution of the incorporated plasmids within each nucleus. After intranuclear incorporation, substrate pJDB219 DNAs (open and closed circular forms) were changed to the linear form and were weakly digested over the longer incubation period (over 60 min). Facile release of the once-incorporated plasmid DNA was never observable; discharge of the incorporated (/sup 3/H)pJDB219 during a 60-min incubation was less than 5%. The addition of adenylyl-imidodiphosphate, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), or quercetin inhibited in vitro DNA uptake reaction. DCCD and quercetin inhibited the nuclear ATPase and apparent protein kinase, respectively; hence, the involvement of these enzymes in the nuclear DNA transport system was suggested.

  3. Uncertainty evaluation of nuclear reaction model parameters using integral and microscopic measurements. Covariances evaluation with CONRAD code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Saint Jean, C.; Habert, B.; Archier, P.; Noguere, G.; Bernard, D.; Tommasi, J.; Blaise, P.

    2010-10-01

    In the [eV;MeV] energy range, modelling of the neutron induced reactions are based on nuclear reaction models having parameters. Estimation of co-variances on cross sections or on nuclear reaction model parameters is a recurrent puzzle in nuclear data evaluation. Major breakthroughs were asked by nuclear reactor physicists to assess proper uncertainties to be used in applications. In this paper, mathematical methods developped in the CONRAD code[2] will be presented to explain the treatment of all type of uncertainties, including experimental ones (statistical and systematic) and propagate them to nuclear reaction model parameters or cross sections. Marginalization procedure will thus be exposed using analytical or Monte-Carlo solutions. Furthermore, one major drawback found by reactor physicist is the fact that integral or analytical experiments (reactor mock-up or simple integral experiment, e.g. ICSBEP, …) were not taken into account sufficiently soon in the evaluation process to remove discrepancies. In this paper, we will describe a mathematical framework to take into account properly this kind of information.

  4. Extracting nuclear sizes of medium to heavy nuclei from total reaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, W.; Hatakeyama, S.; Ebata, S.; Suzuki, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Background: Proton and neutron radii are fundamental quantities of atomic nuclei. To study the sizes of short-lived unstable nuclei, there is a need for an alternative to electron scattering. Purpose: The recent paper by Horiuchi et al. [Phys. Rev. C 89, 011601(R) (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.89.011601 proposed a possible way of extracting the matter and neutron-skin thickness of light- to medium-mass nuclei using total reaction cross section, σR. The analysis is extended to medium to heavy nuclei up to lead isotopes with due attention to Coulomb breakup contributions as well as density distributions improved by paring correlation. Methods: We formulate a quantitative calculation of σR based on the Glauber model including the Coulomb breakup. To substantiate the treatment of the Coulomb breakup, we also evaluate the Coulomb breakup cross section due to the electric dipole field in a canonical-basis-time-dependent-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory in the three-dimensional coordinate space. Results: We analyze σR's of 103 nuclei with Z =20 , 28, 40, 50, 70, and 82 incident on light targets, H,21, 4He, and 12C. Three kinds of Skyrme interactions are tested to generate those wave functions. To discuss possible uncertainty due to the Coulomb breakup, we examine its dependence on the target, the incident energy, and the Skyrme interaction. The proton is a most promising target for extracting the nuclear sizes as the Coulomb excitation can safely be neglected. We find that the so-called reaction radius, aR=√{σR/π } , for the proton target is very well approximated by a linear function of two variables, the matter radius and the skin thickness, in which three constants depend only on the incident energy. We quantify the accuracy of σR measurements needed to extract the nuclear sizes. Conclusions: The proton is the best target because, once the incident energy is set, its aR is very accurately determined by only the matter radius and neutron-skin thickness. If σR's at

  5. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. Progress report for the period September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1993-09-06

    This is a progress report on activities of the Washington University group in nuclear reaction studies for the period Sept 1, 1992 to Aug 31, 1993. This group has a research program which touches five areas of nuclear physics: nuclear structure studies at high spin; studies at the interface between structure and reactions; production and study of hot nuclei; reaction mechanism studies; development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in the above areas of research. Specific activities of the group include in part: superdeformation in {sup 82}Sr; structure of and identical bands in {sup 182}Hg and {sup 178}Pt; a highly deformed band in {sup 136}Pm; particle decay of the {sup 164}Yb compound nucleus; fusion reactions; proton evaporation; two-proton decay of {sup 12}O; modeling and theoretical studies; excited {sup 16}O disassembly into four alpha particles; {sup 209}Bi + {sup 136}Xe collisions at 28.2 MeV/amu; and development work on 4{pi} solid angle gamma detectors, and x-ray detectors.

  6. Nuclear attitudes and reactions: associations with depression, drug use, and quality of life

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, M.D.

    1986-05-01

    For 40 years the world has lived with the threat of nuclear war and, recently, with the possibility of nuclear power plant accidents. Although virtually every generation must confront various national or international crises, the threat of nuclear war is unprecedented in its destructive potential. This study is an attempt to assess attitudes and amount of distress associated with the ever-present threat of nuclear war and the possibility of accidents at nuclear power plants. The Nuclear Attitudes Questionnaire (NAQ) consists of 15 items and was administered to 722 young adults who have grown up in the nuclear age. The items were found to reflect four latent factors of nuclear concern, nuclear support, fear of the future, and nuclear denial, all of which in turn represent a second-order construct of nuclear anxiety. Women reported significantly more nuclear concern, less nuclear support, more fear of the future, and less nuclear denial than did men. In latent-variable models, nuclear anxiety was found to be significantly associated with less purpose in life, less life satisfaction, more powerlessness, more depression, and more drug use. It is concluded that the threat of nuclear war and accidents is significantly related to psychological distress and may disturb normal maturational development.

  7. EFFECTS OF PARTICLE EVAPORATION ON THE ANGULAR MOMENTUM OF THE EMITTING NUCLEUS FOR DEEP INELASTIC AND COMPOUND NUCLEAR REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, S.K.; Moretto, L.G.

    1980-09-01

    A model is developed which allows one to calculate analytically the angular momentum removed, and the angular momentum misalignment created by the evaporation of light particles from an excited nucleus. The mass, temperature, and angular momentum of the emitting nucleus are explicitly considered. The formalism applies equally well to heavy ion and compound nuclear reactions.

  8. Particle-gamma and particle-particle correlations in nuclear reactions using Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshback model

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick; Watanabe, Takehito; Chadwick, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for particle and {gamma}-ray emissions from an excited nucleus based on the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory are performed to obtain correlated information between emitted particles and {gamma}-rays. We calculate neutron induced reactions on {sup 51}V to demonstrate unique advantages of the Monte Carlo method. which are the correlated {gamma}-rays in the neutron radiative capture reaction, the neutron and {gamma}-ray correlation, and the particle-particle correlations at higher energies. It is shown that properties in nuclear reactions that are difficult to study with a deterministic method can be obtained with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Petawatt laser pulses for proton-boron high gain fusion with avalanche reactions excluding problems of nuclear radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich; Lalousis, Paraskevas; Giuffrida, Lorenzo; Margarone, Daniele; Korn, Georg; Eliezer, Shalom; Miley, George H.; Moustaizis, Stavros; Mourou, Gérard

    2015-05-01

    An alternative way may be possible for igniting solid density hydrogen-11B (HB11) fuel. The use of >petawatt-ps laser pulses from the non-thermal ignition based on ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks by the nonlinear (ponderomotive) force, has to be combined with the measured ultrahigh magnetic fields in the 10 kilotesla range for cylindrical trapping. The evaluation of measured alpha particles from HB11 reactions arrives at the conclusion that apart from the usual binary nuclear reactions, secondary reactions by an avalanche multiplication may cause the high gains, even much higher than from deuterium tritium fusion. This may be leading to a concept of clean economic power generation.

  10. On the implementation of a chain nuclear reaction of thermonuclear fusion on the basis of the p+11B process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, V. S.; Krainov, V. P.; Zagreev, B. V.; Matafonov, A. P.

    2015-07-01

    Various theoretical and experimental schemes for implementing a thermonuclear reactor on the basis of the p+11B reaction are considered. They include beam collisions, fusion in degenerate plasmas, ignition upon plasma acceleration by ponderomotive forces, and the irradiation of a solid-state target from 11B with a proton beam under conditions of a Coulomb explosion of hydrogen microdrops. The possibility of employing ultra-short high-intensity laser pulses to initiate the p+11B reaction under conditions far from thermodynamic equilibrium is discussed. This and some other weakly radioactive thermonuclear reactions are promising owing to their ecological cleanness—there are virtually no neutrons among fusion products. Nuclear reactions that follow the p+11B reaction may generate high-energy protons, sustaining a chain reaction, and this is an advantage of the p+11B option. The approach used also makes it possible to study nuclear reactions under conditions close to those in the early Universe or in the interior of stars.

  11. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]. [Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1993-02-01

    Completed work is summarized on the topics of excitation energy division in deep-inelastic reactions and the onset of multifragmentation in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV. Magnetic fields are being calculated for the PHOBOS detector system, a two-arm multiparticle spectrometer for studying low-transverse-momentum particles produced at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The Maryland Forward Array is being developed for detection of the reaction products from very peripheral collisions; it consists of two individual units of detectors: the annular silicon detector in front and the plastic phoswich detector at back.

  12. Change of Electroweak Nuclear Reaction Rates by CP- and Isospin Symmetry Breaking - A Model Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, Harald

    2006-09-01

    Based on the assumption that electroweak bosons, leptons and quarks possess a substructure of elementary fermionic constituents, in previous papers the effect of CP-symmetry breaking on the effective dynamics of these particles was calculated. Motivated by the phenomenological procedure in this paper, isospin symmetry breaking will be added and the physical consequences of these calculations will be discussed. The dynamical law of the fermionic constituents is given by a relativistically invariant nonlinear spinor field equation with local interaction, canonical quantization, selfregularization and probability interpretation. The corresponding effective dynamics is derived by algebraic weak mapping theorems. In contrast to the commonly applied modifications of the quark mass matrices, CP-symmetry breaking is introduced into this algebraic formalism by an inequivalent vacuum with respect to the CP-invariant case, represented by a modified spinor field propagator. This leads to an extension of the standard model as effective theory which contains besides the "electric" electroweak bosons additional "magnetic" electroweak bosons and corresponding interactions. If furthermore the isospin invariance of the propagator is broken too, it will be demonstrated in detail that in combination with CP-symmetry breaking this induces a considerable modification of electroweak nuclear reaction rates.

  13. Study of nuclear reactions producing 36Cl by micro-AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luís, H.; Jesus, A. P.; Fonseca, M.; Cruz, J.; Galaviz, D.; Franco, N.; Alves, E.

    2016-01-01

    36Cl is one of several short to medium lived isotopes (as compared to the earth age) whose abundances at the earlier solar system may help to clarify its formation process. There are two generally accepted possible models for the production of this radionuclide: it originated from the ejecta of a nearby supernova (where 36Cl was most probably produced in the s-process by neutron irradiation of 35Cl) and/or it was produced by in-situ irradiation of nebular dust by energetic particles (mostly, p, a, 3He -X-wind irradiation model). The objective of the present work is to measure the cross section of the 37Cl(p,d)36Cl and 35Cl(d,p)36Cl nuclear reactions, by measuring the 36Cl content of AgCl samples (previously bombarded with high energy protons and deuterons) with AMS, taking advantage of the very low detection limits of this technique for chlorine measurements. For that, the micro-AMS system of the LF1/ITN laboratory had to be optimized for chlorine measurements, as to our knowledge this type of measurements had never been performed in such a system (AMS with micro-beam). Here are presented the first results of these developments, namely the tests in terms of precision and reproducibility that were done by comparing AgCl blanks irradiated at the Portuguese National Reactor with standards produced by the dilution of the NIST SRM 4943 standard material.

  14. Melter Feed Reactions at T ≤ 700°C for Nuclear Waste Vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel R.; Rice, Jarrett A.; Riley, Brian J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2015-07-23

    Batch reactions and phase transitions in a nuclear waste feed heated at 5 K min-1 up to 600°C were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, and X-ray diffraction. Quenched samples were leached in deionized water at room temperature and 80°C to extract soluble salts and early glass-forming melt, respectively. To determine the content and composition of leachable phases, the leachates were analyzed by the inductively-coupled plasma spectroscopy. By ~400°C, gibbsite and borax lost water and converted to amorphous and intermediate crystalline phases. Between 400°C and 600°C, the sodium borate early glass-forming melt reacted with amorphous aluminum oxide and calcium oxide to form intermediate products containing Al and Ca. At ~600°C, half Na and B converted to the early glass-forming melt, and quartz began to dissolve in the melt.

  15. New supersonic gas jet target for low energy nuclear reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favela, F.; Acosta, L.; Andrade, E.; Araujo, V.; Huerta, A.; de Lucio, O. G.; Murillo, G.; Ortiz, M. E.; Policroniades, R.; Santa Rita, P.; Varela, A.; Chávez, E.

    2015-12-01

    A windowless supersonic gas jet target (SUGAR) has been put in operation recently in Mexico. It is the first target of its kind in the country and the region. New research opportunities become available with this facility through the study of the direct beam-gas interaction: nuclear physics and astrophysics, atomic physics, interaction of radiation with matter and other interdisciplinary applications. A general description of the apparatus and its commissioning is given here. Air, nitrogen and argon jets were produced. Proton and deuteron beams were used to measure key parameters of the system to compare with theoretical estimates. In addition, as a first study case, we present data from the 14N (d ,α )12C reaction, at center of mass energies between 1.9 and 3.0 MeV with an E-Δ E telescope detector at 35°. Excitation functions for several excited states were constructed and an 16O resonance at 22.72 MeV was confirmed.

  16. Monoenergetic proton emission from nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser-generated plasma.

    PubMed

    Torrisi, L; Cavallaro, S; Cutroneo, M; Giuffrida, L; Krasa, J; Margarone, D; Velyhan, A; Kravarik, J; Ullschmied, J; Wolowski, J; Szydlowski, A; Rosinski, M

    2012-02-01

    A 10(16) W∕cm(2) Asterix laser pulse intensity, 1315 nm at the fundamental frequency, 300 ps pulse duration, was employed at PALS laboratory of Prague, to irradiate thick and thin primary CD(2) targets placed inside a high vacuum chamber. The laser irradiation produces non-equilibrium plasma with deutons and carbon ions emission with energy of up to about 4 MeV per charge state, as measured by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques by using ion collectors and silicon carbide detectors. Accelerated deutons may induce high D-D cross section for fusion processes generating 3 MeV protons and 2.5 MeV neutrons, as measured by TOF analyses. In order to increase the mono-energetic proton yield, secondary CD(2) targets can be employed to be irradiated by the plasma-accelerated deutons. Experiments demonstrated that high intensity laser pulses can be employed to promote nuclear reactions from which characteristic ion streams may be developed. Results open new scenario for applications of laser-generated plasma to the fields of ion sources and ion accelerators.

  17. Deuteron Induced ( d,p) and ( d,2p) Nuclear Reactions up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiğit, M.; Tel, E.; Kara, A.

    2013-06-01

    Many studies have shown that the nuclear reactions of charged particles with nuclei are very important in many fields of nuclear physics. The interactions of deuterons with nuclei have been especially the subject of common research in the history of nuclear physics. Moreover, the knowledge of cross section for deuteron-nucleus interactions are required for various application such as space applications, accelerator driven sub-critical systems, nuclear medicine, nuclear fission reactors and controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors. Particularly, the future of controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors is largely dependent on the nuclear reaction cross section data and the selection of structural fusion materials. Finally, the reaction cross section data of deuteron induced reactions on fusion structural materials are of great importance for development and design of both experimental and commercial fusion devices. In this work, reaction model calculations of the cross sections of deuteron induced reactions on structural fusion materials such as Al ( Aluminium), Ti ( Titanium), Cu ( Copper), Ni ( Nickel), Co ( Cobalt), Fe ( Iron), Zr ( Zirconium), Hf ( Hafnium) and Ta ( Tantalum) have been investigated. The new calculations on the excitation functions of 27 Al( d,2p) 27 Mg, 47 Ti( d,2p) 47 Sc, 65 Cu( d,2p) 65 Ni, 58 Ni( d,2p) 58 Co, 59 Co( d,2p) 59 Fe, 58 Fe( d,p) 59 Fe, 96 Zr( d,p) 97 Zr, 180 Hf ( d,p) 181 Hf and 181 Ta( d,p) 182 Ta have been carried out for incident deuteron energies up to 50 MeV. In these calculations, the equilibrium and pre-equilibrium effects for ( d,p) and ( d,2p) reactions have been investigated. The equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing ( WE) Model. The pre-equilibrium calculations involve the new evaluated the Geometry Dependent Hybrid Model ( GDH) and Hybrid Model. In the calculations the program code ALICE/ASH was used. The calculated results are discussed and compared with the experimental data taken from the

  18. Applications of dynamic nuclear polarization to the study of reactions and reagents in organic and biomolecular chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Christian; Bowen, Sean

    2010-08-07

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is an important spectroscopic tool for the identification and structural characterization of molecules in chemistry and biochemistry. The most significant limitation of NMR compared to other spectroscopies is its relatively low sensitivity, which thus often requires long measurement times or large amounts of sample. A way of increasing sensitivity of single scan NMR spectra by several orders of magnitude is through hyperpolarization of nuclear spins. Dynamic nuclear polarization allows hyperpolarization of most spins in small molecules encountered in chemistry and biochemistry. NMR spectra of small amounts of samples from natural source, or from chemical synthesis can readily be acquired. Perhaps more interestingly, the availability of the entire hyperpolarized NMR signal in one single scan allows the measurement of transient processes in real time, if applied together with a stopped-flow technique. Through observation of chemical shift, different reactant and product species can be distinguished, and kinetics and mechanisms, for example in enzyme catalyzed reactions, can be elucidated. Real-time hyperpolarization-enhanced NMR is uniquely amenable to correlating atomic positions not only through space, but also over time between reactant and product species. Such correlations carry mechanistic information about a reaction, and can prove reaction pathways. Applications of this technique are emerging in different areas of chemistry concerned with rapid reactions, including not only enzymatic processes, but also chemical catalysis and protein folding.

  19. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemsitry in the region of Thulium, Lutetium, and Tantalum I. Results of Built in Spherical Symmetry in a Deformed Region

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R. D.

    2013-09-06

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from Terbium (Z = 65) to Rhenium (Z = 75). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Tm, Lu, and Ta including reactions on isomeric targets.

  20. Metabolites as biomarkers of adverse reactions following vaccination: A pilot study using nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics.

    PubMed

    McClenathan, Bruce M; Stewart, Delisha A; Spooner, Christina E; Pathmasiri, Wimal W; Burgess, Jason P; McRitchie, Susan L; Choi, Y Sammy; Sumner, Susan C J

    2017-03-01

    An Adverse Event Following Immunization (AEFI) is an adverse reaction to a vaccination that goes above and beyond the usual side effects associated with vaccinations. One serious AEFI related to the smallpox vaccine is myopericarditis. Metabolomics involves the study of the low molecular weight metabolite profile of cells, tissues, and biological fluids, and provides a functional readout of the phenotype. Metabolomics may help identify a particular metabolic signature in serum of subjects who are predisposed to developing AEFIs. The goal of this study was to identify metabolic markers that may predict the development of adverse events following smallpox vaccination. Serum samples were collected from military personnel prior to and following receipt of smallpox vaccine. The study population included five subjects who were clinically diagnosed with myopericarditis, 30 subjects with asymptomatic elevation of troponins, and 31 subjects with systemic symptoms following immunization, and 34 subjects with no AEFI, serving as controls. Two-hundred pre- and post-smallpox vaccination sera were analyzed by untargeted metabolomics using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Baseline (pre-) and post-vaccination samples from individuals who experienced clinically verified myocarditis or asymptomatic elevation of troponins were more metabolically distinguishable pre- and post-vaccination compared to individuals who only experienced systemic symptoms, or controls. Metabolomics profiles pre- and post-receipt of vaccine differed substantially when an AEFI resulted. This study is the first to describe pre- and post-vaccination metabolic profiles of subjects who developed an adverse event following immunization. The study demonstrates the promise of metabolites for determining mechanisms associated with subjects who develop AEFI and the potential to develop predictive biomarkers.

  1. Nuclear spectroscopy study of the isotopes populated via multinucleon transfer in the 90Zr + 208Pb reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ur, C. A.; Corradi, L.; Stefanini, A. M.; Behera, B. R.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Szilner, S.; Beghini, S.; Farnea, E.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Haas, F.; Pollarolo, G.

    2006-08-14

    The present work takes advantage of the multinucleon transfer mechanism between heavy reaction partners to study the population pattern of excited nuclear states in near spherical Zirconium isotopes following the 90Zr + 208Pb reaction at an energy closed to the Coulomb barrier. Both the projectile and the target are well known closed shell nuclei offering an optimum situation for clean experimental and theoretical conditions. Total kinetic energy loss (TKEL) distributions were compared with calculations performed with the GRAZING code. The ability to use the TKEL as a selection tool for the states at different excitation energies was shown.

  2. Lattice location of O18 in ion implanted Fe crystals by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, channeling and nuclear reaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vairavel, Mathayan; Sundaravel, Balakrishnan; Panigrahi, Binaykumar

    2016-09-01

    There are contradictory theoretical predictions of lattice location of oxygen interstitial atom at tetrahedral and octahedral interstices in bcc Fe. For validating these predictions, 300 keV O18 ions with fluence of 5 × 1015 ions/cm2 are implanted into bcc Fe single crystals at room temperature and annealed at 400 °C. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA)/channeling measurements are carried out with 850 keV protons. The lattice location of implanted O18 is analysed using the α-particles yield from O18(p,α)N15 nuclear reaction. The tilt angular scans of α-particle yield along <110> and <100> axial directions are performed at room temperature. Lattice location of O18 is found to be at tetrahedral interstitial site by comparing the experimental scan with simulated scans using FLUX7 software.

  3. Application of evolved gas analysis to cold-cap reactions of melter feeds for nuclear waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2014-04-30

    In the vitrification of nuclear wastes, the melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming and modifying additives) experiences multiple gas-evolving reactions in an electrical glass-melting furnace. We employed the thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TGA-GC-MS) combination to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Apart from identifying the gases evolved, we performed quantitative analysis relating the weighed sum of intensities of individual gases linearly proportional with the differential themogravimetry. The proportionality coefficients were obtained by three methods based on the stoichiometry, least squares, and calibration. The linearity was shown to be a good first-order approximation, in spite of the complicated overlapping reactions.

  4. Constraining the equation of state of nuclear matter from fusion hindrance in reactions leading to the production of superheavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselsky, M.; Klimo, J.; Ma, Yu-Gang; Souliotis, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    The mechanism of fusion hindrance, an effect preventing the synthesis of superheavy elements in the reactions of cold and hot fusion, is investigated using the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation, where Coulomb interaction is introduced. A strong sensitivity is observed both to the modulus of incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter, controlling the competition of surface tension and Coulomb repulsion, and to the stiffness of the density-dependence of symmetry energy, influencing the formation of the neck prior to scission. The experimental fusion probabilities were for the first time used to derive constraints on the nuclear equation of state. A strict constraint on the modulus of incompressibility of nuclear matter K0=240 -260 MeV is obtained while the stiff density-dependences of the symmetry energy (γ >1 ) are rejected.

  5. Post deposition annealing of Hf aluminate films on Si investigated by ion backscattering and nuclear reaction analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotti, L.; Pezzi, R. P.; Copel, M.; Baumvol, I. J. R.

    2008-04-01

    Layered Al2O3/HfO2 structures were deposited on Si by atomic layer deposition and the atomic transport during rapid thermal annealing was investigated by low energy ion scattering, medium energy ion scattering and narrow nuclear resonant reaction profiling. The structures were dissociated during annealing by different mechanisms, such as interdiffusion of the layers and metal loss from the dielectric. The possible detrimental effects on device electrical properties of the observed decomposition are discussed.

  6. Hybrid approach for including electronic and nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen transfer reactions in enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billeter, Salomon R.; Webb, Simon P.; Iordanov, Tzvetelin; Agarwal, Pratul K.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2001-04-01

    A hybrid approach for simulating proton and hydride transfer reactions in enzymes is presented. The electronic quantum effects are incorporated with an empirical valence bond approach. The nuclear quantum effects of the transferring hydrogen are included with a mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics method in which the hydrogen nucleus is described as a multidimensional vibrational wave function. The free energy profiles are obtained as functions of a collective reaction coordinate. A perturbation formula is derived to incorporate the vibrationally adiabatic nuclear quantum effects into the free energy profiles. The dynamical effects are studied with the molecular dynamics with quantum transitions (MDQT) surface hopping method, which incorporates nonadiabatic transitions among the adiabatic hydrogen vibrational states. The MDQT method is combined with a reactive flux approach to calculate the transmission coefficient and to investigate the real-time dynamics of reactive trajectories. This hybrid approach includes nuclear quantum effects such as zero point energy, hydrogen tunneling, and excited vibrational states, as well as the dynamics of the complete enzyme and solvent. The nuclear quantum effects are incorporated during the generation of the free energy profiles and dynamical trajectories rather than subsequently added as corrections. Moreover, this methodology provides detailed mechanistic information at the molecular level and allows the calculation of rates and kinetic isotope effects. An initial application of this approach to the enzyme liver alcohol dehydrogenase is also presented.

  7. Nuclear transparency in 90 °c.m. quasielastic A(p,2p) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aclander, J.; Alster, J.; Asryan, G.; Averiche, Y.; Barton, D. S.; Baturin, V.; Buktoyarova, N.; Bunce, G.; Carroll, A. S.; Christensen, N.; Courant, H.; Durrant, S.; Fang, G.; Gabriel, K.; Gushue, S.; Heller, K. J.; Heppelmann, S.; Kosonovsky, I.; Leksanov, A.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malki, A.; Mardor, I.; Mardor, Y.; Marshak, M. L.; Martel, D.; Minina, E.; Minor, E.; Navon, I.; Nicholson, H.; Ogawa, A.; Panebratsev, Y.; Piasetzky, E.; Roser, T.; Russell, J. J.; Schetkovsky, A.; Shimanskiy, S.; Shupe, M. A.; Sutton, S.; Tanaka, M.; Tang, A.; Tsetkov, I.; Watson, J.; White, C.; Wu, J.-Y.; Zhalov, D.

    2004-07-01

    We summarize the results of two experimental programs at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron of BNL to measure the nuclear transparency of nuclei measured in the A(p,2p) quasielastic scattering process near 90° in the pp center of mass. The incident momenta varied from 5.9 to 14.4 GeV/c , corresponding to 4.8< Q2 <12.7 (GeV/c)2 . Taking into account the motion of the target proton in the nucleus, the effective incident momenta extended from 5.0 to 15.8 GeV/c . First, we describe the measurements with the newer experiment, E850, which had more complete kinematic definition of quasielastic events. E850 covered a larger range of incident momenta, and thus provided more information regarding the nature of the energy dependence of the nuclear transparency. In E850 the angular dependence of the nuclear transparency near 90° and the nuclear transparency deuterons were studied. Second, we review the techniques used in an earlier experiment, E834, and show that the two experiments are consistent for the carbon data. E834 also determines the nuclear transparencies for lithium, aluminum, copper, and lead nuclei as well as for carbon. A determination of the ( π+ , π+ p) transparencies is also reported. We find for both E850 and E834 that the A(p,2p) nuclear transparency, unlike that for A(e, e' p) nuclear transparency, is incompatible with a constant value versus energy as predicted by Glauber calculations. The A(p,2p) nuclear transparency for carbon and aluminum increases by a factor of two between 5.9 and 9.5 GeV/c incident proton momentum. At its peak the A(p,2p) nuclear transparency is ˜80% of the constant A(e, e' p) nuclear transparency. Then the nuclear transparency falls back to a value at least as small as that at 5.9 GeV/c , and is compatible with the Glauber level again. This oscillating behavior is generally interpreted as an interplay between two components of the pN scattering amplitude; one short ranged and perturbative, and the other long ranged and

  8. Solving The Longstanding Problem Of Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions At the Highest Microscopic Level - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S.

    2016-09-22

    A 2011 DOE-NP Early Career Award (ECA) under Field Work Proposal (FWP) SCW1158 supported the project “Solving the Long-Standing Problem of Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions at the Highest Microscopic Level” in the five-year period from June 15, 2011 to June 14, 2016. This project, led by PI S. Quaglioni, aimed at developing a comprehensive and computationally efficient framework to arrive at a unified description of structural properties and reactions of light nuclei in terms of constituent protons and neutrons interacting through nucleon-nucleon (NN) and three-nucleon (3N) forces. Specifically, the project had three main goals: 1) arriving at the accurate predictions for fusion reactions that power stars and Earth-based fusion facilities; 2) realizing a comprehensive description of clustering and continuum effects in exotic nuclei, including light Borromean systems; and 3) achieving fundamental understanding of the role of the 3N force in nuclear reactions and nuclei at the drip line.

  9. Extension of activation cross section data of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on rhodium up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.

    2015-11-01

    In the frame of the systematical study of light ion induced nuclear reactions activation cross sections for deuteron induced reactions on monoisotopic 103Rh were extended to 50 MeV incident energy. Excitation functions were measured in the 49.8-36.6 MeV energy range for the 103Rh(d,xn)100,101Pd, 103Rh(d,pxn)99m,99g,100,101m,101g,102m,102gRh and 103Rh(d,x)97,103Ru reactions by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and off-line high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. The experimental results are compared to our previous results and to the theoretical predictions in the TENDL-2014 library (TALYS 1.6 code).

  10. A program in medium-energy nuclear physics. Progress report, September 1, 1992--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, B.L.; Dhuga, K.S.

    1998-06-01

    This report reviews progress on our nuclear-physics program for the last ten months, and includes as well copies of our publications and other reports for that time period. The structure of this report follows that of our 1992 Progress Report: Sec. II outlines our research activities aimed at future experiments at CEBAF, NIKHEF, and Bates; Sec. III gives results of our recent research activities at NIKHEF, LAMPF, and elsewhere; Sec. IV provides an update of our laboratory activities at GWU, including those at our new Nuclear Detector Laboratory at our Virginia Campus; and Sec. V is a list of our publications, proposals, and other reports. Copies of those on medium-energy nuclear physics are reproduced in the Appendix. The highlight of the year has been the approval by the NIKHEF and CEBAF PACs of all three of the proposals we have submitted. These are {open_quotes}Recoil Polarization of the Neutron in the Reactions {sup 3}He(e,e{prime}) and {sup 4}He(e,e{prime}n),{close_quotes} NIKHEF Proposal 93-09 {open_quotes}Photoreactions on {sup 3}He,{close_quotes} CEBAF Proposal 93-044, and {open_quotes}Photoabsorption and Photofission of Nuclei,{close_quotes} CEBAF Proposal 93-019. The NIKHEF experiment involves the use of the High-Acceptance Recoil Polarimeter (HARP) for detection and measurement of the polarization of the emitted neutron. We, together with our colleagues at Grenoble, are responsible for the design and construction of the wire chambers for this device; we have largely completed the design phase this part year. The CEBAF experiments involve the use of the Hall-B Photon Tagger for production of the monochromatic photon beam. We are responsible for the 432-scintillator focal-plane detector array for this device; again, most of the design work and some prototype testing have been completed this past year.

  11. A program in medium-energy nuclear physics. Progress report, September 1, 1992--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, B.L.; Dhuga, K.S.

    1993-08-01

    This report reviews progress on our nuclear-physics program for the last ten months, and includes as well copies of our publications and other reports for that time period. The structure of this report follows that of our 1992 Progress Report: Sec. II outlines our research activities aimed at future experiments at CEBAF, NIKHEF, and Bates; Sec. III gives results of our recent research activities at NIKHEF, LAMPF, and elsewhere; Sec. IV provides an update of our laboratory activities at GWU, including those at our new Nuclear Detector Laboratory at our Virginia Campus; and Sec. V is a list of our publications, proposals, and other reports. Copies of those on medium-energy nuclear physics are reproduced in the Appendix. The highlight of the year has been the approval by the NIKHEF and CEBAF PACs of all three of the proposals we have submitted. These are ``Recoil Polarization of the Neutron in the Reactions {sup 3}He(e,e{prime}n) and {sup 4}He(e,e{prime}n),`` NIKHEF Proposal 93-09, ``Photoreactions on {sup 3}He,`` CEBAF Proposal 93-044, and ``Photoabsorption and Photofission of Nuclei,`` CEBAF Proposal 93-019. The NIKHEF experiment involves the use of the High-Acceptance Recoil Polarimeter for detection and measurement of the polarization of the emitted neutron. We, together with our colleagues at Grenoble, are responsible for the design and construction of the wire chambers for this device; we have largely completed the design phase this past year. The CEBAF experiments involve the use of the Hall-B Photon Tagger for production of the monochromatic photon beam. We are responsible for the 432-scintillator focal-plane detector array for this device; again, most of the design work and some prototype testing have been completed this past year. In addition, we have continued to make progress on data analysis and publication of results of previous measurements at Bates, LAMPF, and NIKHEF.

  12. TORUS: Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes.Topical Collaboration for Nuclear Theory Project. Period: June 1, 2010 - May 31, 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Arbanas, Goran; Elster, Charlotte; Escher, Jutta; Nunes, Filomena; Thompson, Ian

    2015-08-28

    The work of this collaboration during its existence is summarized. The mission of the TORUS Topical Collaboration was to develop new methods that advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes by using three-body techniques to improve direct reaction calculations. This multi-institution collaborative effort was and remains directly relevant to three areas of interest: the properties of nuclei far from stability, microscopic studies of nuclear input parameters for astrophysics, and microscopic nuclear reaction theory. The TORUS project focused on understanding the details of (d,p) reactions for neutron transfer to heavier nuclei. The bulk of the work fell into three areas: coupled channel theory, modeling (d,p) reactions with a Faddeev-AGS approach, and capture reactions.

  13. Characterizing Neutron-Proton Equilibration in Nuclear Reactions with Subzeptosecond Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedele, A.; McIntosh, A. B.; Hagel, K.; Huang, M.; Heilborn, L.; Kohley, Z.; May, L. W.; McCleskey, E.; Youngs, M.; Zarrella, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2017-02-01

    We study neutron-proton equilibration in dynamically deformed atomic nuclei created in nuclear collisions. The two ends of the elongated nucleus are initially dissimilar in composition and equilibrate on a subzeptosecond time scale following first-order kinetics. We use angular momentum to relate the breakup orientation to the time scale of the breakup. The extracted rate constant is 3 zs-1 , which corresponds to a mean equilibration time of 0.3 zs. This technique enables new insight into the nuclear equation of state that governs many nuclear and astrophysical phenomena leading to the origin of the chemical elements.

  14. Photofission of {sup 238}U in the giant-resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhilavyan, L. Z. Nedorezov, V. G.

    2013-12-15

    Data on cross sections for the reaction {sup 238}U(γ,F) in the giant-resonance region were analyzed in connection with the preparation of new experiments aimed at studying {sup 238}U photofission—in particular, in beams of photons from in-flight positron annihilation on internal targets of positron storage rings. These data were taken from measurements also performed with annihilation photons but from positron beams external to the accelerators used. The procedures applied in such measurements and based both on processing the multiplicity of detected neutrons and on detecting fission fragments were also analyzed.

  15. Nuclear ADP-Ribosylation Reactions in Mammalian Cells: Where Are We Today and Where Are We Going?

    PubMed Central

    Hassa, Paul O.; Haenni, Sandra S.; Elser, Michael; Hottiger, Michael O.

    2006-01-01

    Since poly-ADP ribose was discovered over 40 years ago, there has been significant progress in research into the biology of mono- and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions. During the last decade, it became clear that ADP-ribosylation reactions play important roles in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inter- and intracellular signaling, transcriptional regulation, DNA repair pathways and maintenance of genomic stability, telomere dynamics, cell differentiation and proliferation, and necrosis and apoptosis. ADP-ribosylation reactions are phylogenetically ancient and can be classified into four major groups: mono-ADP-ribosylation, poly-ADP-ribosylation, ADP-ribose cyclization, and formation of O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. In the human genome, more than 30 different genes coding for enzymes associated with distinct ADP-ribosylation activities have been identified. This review highlights the recent advances in the rapidly growing field of nuclear mono-ADP-ribosylation and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions and the distinct ADP-ribosylating enzyme families involved in these processes, including the proposed family of novel poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-like mono-ADP-ribose transferases and the potential mono-ADP-ribosylation activities of the sirtuin family of NAD+-dependent histone deacetylases. A special focus is placed on the known roles of distinct mono- and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions in physiological processes, such as mitosis, cellular differentiation and proliferation, telomere dynamics, and aging, as well as “programmed necrosis” (i.e., high-mobility-group protein B1 release) and apoptosis (i.e., apoptosis-inducing factor shuttling). The proposed molecular mechanisms involved in these processes, such as signaling, chromatin modification (i.e., “histone code”), and remodeling of chromatin structure (i.e., DNA damage response, transcriptional regulation, and insulator function), are described. A potential cross talk between nuclear

  16. Defense Nuclear Agency Reaction Rate Handbook. Second Edition. Revision Number 7

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    the complete histories of large numbers of individual species as atmospheric constituents. Many computer codes exist which have been designed for...electronic state or vibrational mode, appropriate designations are appended to the appropriate species formula. Corresponding ground-state designations ...reaction. However, most reactions carry no state designations for any of the species involved. Species in these instances usually can be

  17. Studies of nuclear reactions relevant to stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis using ICF plasmas at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, Alex; Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Yongho; Hale, Gerry; Paris, Mark; McEvoy, Aaron; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Frenje, Johan; Li, Chikang; Seguin, Fredrick; Sio, Hong; Petrasso, Richard; McNabb, Dennis; Sayre, Dan; Pino, Jesse; Brune, Carl; Bacher, Andy; Forrest, Chad; Glebov, Vladimir; Stoeckl, Christian; Janezic, Roger; Sangster, Craig

    2015-10-01

    The 3He+3He, T+3He, and p + D reactions directly relevant to Stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) have been studied at the OMEGA laser facility using high-temperature low-density `exploding pusher' implosions. The advantage of using these plasmas is that they better mimic astrophysical systems than cold-target accelerator experiments. Measured proton spectra from the 3He3He reaction are used to constrain nuclear R-matrix modeling. The resulting T+3He gamma-ray data rule out an anomalously-high 6Li production during the Big Bang as an explanation to the high observed values in metal poor first generation stars. The proton spectrum from the T+3He reaction is also being used to constrain the R-matrix model. Recent experiments have probed the p + D reaction for the first time in a plasma; this reaction is relevant to energy production in protostars, brown dwarfs and at higher CM energies to BBN. This work was partially supported by the US DOE, NLUF, LLE, and GA.

  18. Studies of nuclear reactions relevant to stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis using ICF plasmas at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, Alex; Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Yongho; Hale, Gerry; Paris, Mark; McEvoy, Aaron; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Frenje, Johan; Li, Chikang; Seguin, Fredrick; Sio, Hong; Petrasso, Richard; McNabb, Dennis; Sayre, Dan; Pino, Jesse; Brune, Carl; Bacher, Andy; Forrest, Chad; Glebov, Vladimir; Stoeckl, Christian; Janezic, Roger; Sangster, Craig

    2015-11-01

    The 3He+3He, T+3He, and p +D reactions directly relevant to Stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) have been studied at the OMEGA laser facility using high-temperature low-density `exploding pusher' implosions. The advantage of using these plasmas is that they better mimic astrophysical systems than cold-target accelerator experiments. Measured proton spectra from the 3He3He reaction are used to constrain nuclear R-matrix modeling. The resulting T+3He gamma-ray data rule out an anomalously-high 6Li production during the Big Bang as an explanation to the high observed values in metal poor first generation stars. The proton spectrum from the T+3He reaction is also being used to constrain the R-matrix model. Recent experiments have probed the p +D reaction for the first time in a plasma; this reaction is relevant to energy production in protostars, brown dwarfs and at higher CM energies to BBN. This work was partially supported by the US DOE, NLUF, LLE, and GA.

  19. Measurements and analysis of alpha-induced reactions of importance for nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Messieres, Genevieve Escande

    2011-11-01

    Reactions during stellar helium burning are of primary importance for understanding nucleosynthesis. A detailed understanding of the critical reaction chain 4He(2alpha, gamma)12C( alpha, gamma)16O(alpha, gamma) 20Ne is necessary both because it is the primary energy source and because it determines the ratio of 12C to 16O produced, which in turn significantly effects subsequent nucleosynthesis. Also during Helium burning, the reactions 22Ne(alpha, n)25Mg and 22Ne(alpha, gamma )26Mg are crucial in determining the amount of neutrons available for the astrophysical s-process. This thesis presents new experimental results concerning the 16O(alpha, gamma) 20Ne, 22Ne(alpha, n)25Mg, and 22Ne(alpha, gamma)26Mg reaction rates. These results are then applied to the calculation of the associated stellar reaction rates in order to achieve better accuracy.

  20. Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions In Low-Temperature Dense Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kasagi, J.; Toriyabe, Y.; Yoshida, E.; Fang, K. H.; Yonemura, H.

    2010-06-01

    We report the Li+d reaction with liquid Li target and the D+D reaction in liquid Li with ultrasonic cavitation. The screening potential of the Li+d reaction has been deduce from the thick target yields of alpha particles emitted in the {sup 6}Li(d,alpha){sup 4} He reaction in the solid and liquid phase. The deduced screening potential for the liquid Li is about 180 eV larger than for the solid. This difference is considered to attributed to the effect of liquefied Li{sup +} ions. It is found out that the D+D reaction in liquid Li with ultrasonic cavitation is enhanced very much; the enhancement corresponds to effective energy increase of about 2000 eV.

  1. MCNPX simulations of the silicon carbide semiconductor detector response to fast neutrons from D-T nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačková, Katarína; Šagátová, Andrea; Zat'ko, Bohumír; Nečas, Vladimír; Solar, Michael; Granja, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) has been long recognized as a suitable semiconductor material for use in nuclear radiation detectors of high-energy charged particles, gamma rays, X-rays and neutrons. The nuclear interactions occurring in the semiconductor are complex and can be quantified using a Monte Carlo-based computer code. In this work, the MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) code was employed to support detector design and analysis. MCNPX is widely used to simulate interaction of radiation with matter and supports the transport of 34 particle types including heavy ions in broad energy ranges. The code also supports complex 3D geometries and both nuclear data tables and physics models. In our model, monoenergetic neutrons from D-T nuclear reaction were assumed as a source of fast neutrons. Their energy varied between 16 and 18.2 MeV, according to the accelerating voltage of the deuterons participating in D-T reaction. First, the simulations were used to calculate the optimum thickness of the reactive film composed of High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE), which converts neutral particles to charged particles and thusly enhancing detection efficiency. The dependency of the optimal thickness of the HDPE layer on the energy of the incident neutrons has been shown for the inspected energy range. Further, from the energy deposited by secondary charged particles and recoiled ions, the detector response was modeled and the effect of the conversion layer on detector response was demonstrated. The results from the simulations were compared with experimental data obtained for a detector covered by a 600 and 1300 μm thick conversion layer. Some limitations of the simulations using MCNPX code are also discussed.

  2. NUMEN Project @ LNS : Heavy ions double charge exchange reactions towards the 0νββ nuclear matrix element determination

    SciTech Connect

    Agodi, C. Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Colonna, M.; Cuttone, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Pandola, L.; Rifuggiato, D.; Tudisco, S.; Cappuzzello, F.; Greco, V.; Bonanno, D. L.; Bongiovanni, D. G.; Longhitano, F.; Branchina, V.; Foti, A.; Lo Presti, D.; Lanzalone, G.; and others

    2015-10-28

    In the NUMEN Project it is proposed an innovative technique to access the nuclear matrix elements entering in the expression of the life-time of the neutrinoless double beta decay, using relevant cross sections of double charge exchange reactions. A key aspect is the use of MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, for the detection of the ejectiles, and of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy-ion beams.

  3. Evaluation of nuclear reaction cross sections for optimization of production of the emerging diagnostic radionuclide ⁵⁵Co.

    PubMed

    Amjed, N; Hussain, M; Aslam, M N; Tárkányi, F; Qaim, S M

    2016-02-01

    The excitation functions of the (54)Fe(d,n)(55)Co, (56)Fe(p,2n)(55)Co and (58)Ni(p,α)(55)Co reactions were analyzed with relevance to the production of the β(+)-emitter (55)Co (T½=17.53 h), a promising cobalt radionuclide for PET imaging. The nuclear model codes ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE and TALYS were used to check the consistency of the experimental data. The statistically fitted excitation function was employed to calculate the integral yield of the product. The amounts of the radioactive impurities (56)Co and (57)Co were assessed. A comparison of the three investigated production routes is given.

  4. The role of nuclear reactions and {alpha}-particle transport in the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, Josselin; Cherfils-Clerouin, Catherine

    2008-10-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of the deceleration phase of inertial confinement capsules. The purpose is to obtain a zero-dimensional model that has the form of a closed system of ordinary differential equations for the main hydrodynamic quantities. The model takes into account the energy released by nuclear reactions, a nonlocal model for the {alpha}-particle energy deposition process, and radiation loss by electron bremsstrahlung. The asymptotic analysis is performed in the case of a strong temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity. We finally study the beginning of the expansion phase after stagnation to derive an ignition criterion.

  5. Heavy flavours production in quark-gluon plasma formed in high energy nuclear reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloskinski, J.

    1985-01-01

    Results on compression and temperatures of nuclear fireballs and on relative yield of strange and charmed hadrons are given . The results show that temperatures above 300 MeV and large compressions are unlikely achieved in average heavy ion collision. In consequence, thermal production of charm is low. Strange particle production is, however, substantial and indicates clear temperature - threshold behavior.

  6. Disassembly of hot nuclear matter formed in Au-induced reactions near the Fermi energy

    SciTech Connect

    Delis, D.N.

    1993-09-01

    Complex fragment emission has been studied in the 60 MeV/A {sup 197}Au + {sup 12}C, {sup 27}Al, {sup 51}V, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au reactions. Velocity spectra, angular distributions and cross sections have been constructed for each target from the inclusive data. Coincidence data including 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-fold events have also been examined. Furthermore neutron multiplicity distributions have been obtained for the above reactions by utilizing a novel neutron calorimetric approach.

  7. Measurement of Nuclear Reaction Q-values with High Accuracy: 7Li(p, n)7Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. E.; Barker, P. H.; Lovelock, D. M. J.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is described for the measurement of nuclear reaction Q-values with an accuracy of a few parts in 105, in which the ultimate reference is a one-volt standard. As a test of the technique the accurately known threshold energy of the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction, 1880.51 +/- 0.08 keV, has been remeasured. The value found using the present technique is 1880.443 +/- 0.020 keV, in good agreement with previous values. An attempt to see evidence for atomic excitation effects in the 27A1(p,n)27Si reaction is also discussed. This yielded a new value of 5803.73 +/- 0.12 keV for the threshold of this reaction, again in a good agreement with, but more accurate than, previous values. Further test measurements are summarized. The main application of the technique, in measurements related to the theory of weak interactions, is discussed briefly and the results obtained to date are presented.

  8. Reactivity of CHI3 with OH radicals: X-abstraction reaction pathways (X = H, I), atmospheric chemistry, and nuclear safety.

    PubMed

    Sudolská, Mária; Louis, Florent; Cernušák, Ivan

    2014-10-09

    The X-abstraction (X = H, I) pathways in the reaction of CHI3 with OH radical, a possible iodoform removal process relevant to the Earth's atmosphere and conditions prevailing in the case of a nuclear accident, have been studied applying highly correlated ab initio quantum chemistry methods and canonical transition-state theory to obtain reaction energy profiles and rate constants. Geometry optimizations of reactants, products, molecular complexes, and transition states determined at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory have been followed by DK-CCSD(T)/ANO-RCC single-point energy calculations. Further improvement of electronic energies has been achieved by applying spin-orbit coupling, corrections toward full configuration interaction, vibration contributions, and tunneling corrections. Calculated reaction enthalpies at 0 K are -108.2 and -5.1 kJ mol(-1) for the H- and I-abstraction pathways, respectively; the strongly exothermic H-abstraction pathway is energetically favored over the modestly exothermic I-abstraction one. The overall rate constant at 298 K based on our ab initio calculations is 4.90 × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), with the I-abstraction pathway being the major channel over the temperature range of 250-2000 K. The CHI3 atmospheric lifetime with respect to the removal reaction with OH radical is predicted to be about 6 h, very short compared to that of other halomethanes.

  9. Studies of nuclear reaction at very low energies. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.

    1992-01-15

    The deuteron radiative capture reactions on {sup 2}H, {sup 6}Li and {sup 10}B have been measured between center of mass energies of 20 and 140 keV. Of note is the observation that the gamma ray-to-charged particle branching ratio for the DD reaction appears independent of energy down to a center of mass energy of 20 keV, consistent with some and contrary to other theoretical models. We have investigated the ratio of the reactions D(d,p)T and D(d,n){sup 3}He down to c.m. energies of 3 keV and the ratio of the reactions 6Li(d,p){sup 7}Li and {sup 6}LI(d,{alpha}){sup 4}He down to a c.m. energy of 19 keV. The DD reaction ratio is independent of energy while the (d,p) branch of the D-{sup 6}Li evinces a significant enhancement at the lowest measured energies. We have continued our investigation of charged particle production from deuterium-metal systems at a modest level of activity. Noteworthy in this investigation is the observation of 3 MeV protons from deuteron beam loaded Ti and LiD targets subjected to extreme thermal disequilibria. Significant facility improvements were realized during the most recent contract period. Specifically the downstream magnetic analysis system proposed to eliminate beam induced contaminants has been installed and thoroughly tested. This improvement should allow the D(a,{gamma}){sup 6}Li reaction to be measured in the coming contract period. A scattering chamber required for the measurement of the {sup 7}Li({sup 3}He,p){sup 9}Be reaction has been designed, fabricated and installed on the accelerator. A CAMAC based charged particle identification system has been assembled also for use in our proposed measurement of the {sup 7}Li({sup 3}He, p){sup 9}Be.

  10. Helium diffusion coefficient measurements in R7T7 nuclear glass by 3He(d,α) 1H nuclear reaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamssedine, F.; Sauvage, T.; Peuget, S.; Fares, T.; Martin, G.

    2010-05-01

    The immobilization of fission products and minor actinides by vitrification is the reference process for industrial management of high-level radioactive wastes generated by spent fuel reprocessing. Radiation damage and radiogenic helium accumulation must be specifically studied to evaluate the effects of minor actinide alpha decay on the glass long-term behavior under repository conditions. A specific experimental study was conducted for a comprehensive evaluation of the behavior of helium and its diffusion mechanisms in borosilicate nuclear waste glass. Helium production was simulated by external implantation with 3He ions at a concentration (≈1 at.%) 30 times higher than obtained after 10,000 years of storage. Helium diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature were extracted from the depth profiles after annealing. The 3He(d,α) 1H nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) technique was successfully adopted for low-temperature in situ measurements of depth profiles. Its high depth resolution revealed helium mobility at temperatures as low as 253 K and the presence of a trapped helium fraction. The diffusion coefficients of un-trapped helium atoms follow an Arrhenius law between 253 K and 323 K. An activation energy of 0.55 ± 0.03 eV was determined, which is consistent with a process controlled by diffusion in the glass free volume.

  11. Experimental study to explore the 8Be-induced nuclear reaction via the Trojan horse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Qun-Gang; Li, Cheng-Bo; Zhou, Shu-Hua; Irgaziev, Bakhadir; Fu, Yuan-Yong; Spitaleri, Claudio; La Cognata, Marco; Zhou, Jing; Meng, Qiu-Ying; Lamia, Livio; Lattuada, Marcello

    2016-03-01

    To explore a possible indirect method for 8Be induced astrophysical reactions, the 8Be=(8Be+n ) cluster structure has been studied via the Trojan horse method. For the first time a 8Be nucleus having an ultrashort lifetime is studied by the Trojan horse method and a 9Be nucleus in the ground state is used for this purpose. The 9Be nucleus is assumed to have a (8Be+n ) cluster structure and used as a Trojan horse nucleus. The 8Be nucleus acts as a participant, while the neutron is a spectator to the virtual 8Be+d →α +6Li reaction via the 3-body reaction 8Be+d →α +6Li+n . The experimental neutron momentum distribution inside 9Be has been reconstructed. The agreement between the experimental momentum distribution and the theoretical one indicates that a (8Be+n ) cluster structure inside 9Be is very likely. Therefore, the experimental study of 8Be induced reactions, for example, the measurement of the 8Be+α →12C reaction proceeding through the Hoyle state, is possible.

  12. The Sky is NOT Falling: Regional Reaction to a Nuclear-Armed Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    remains perhaps the greatest hero that state has ever had, second only to Muhammad Ali Jinnah , Pakistan’s founding father.165 3. C2 Investigating how...States to Shah Muhammad Reza Pahlavi.29 These carried a back-door path to nuclear weapons for Iran. However, as was allegedly the case with Israel...on Israel, as outlined by Iranian Minister of Defense Admiral Ali Shamkhani: Iran’s defense strategy is based on safeguarding Iran’s territorial

  13. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results for direct reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tumino, A.; Gulino, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S.; Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Lamia, L.

    2014-05-09

    The Trojan Horse method is a powerful indirect technique to determine the astrophysical factor for binary rearrangement processes A+x→b+B at astrophysical energies by measuring the cross section for the Trojan Horse (TH) reaction A+a→B+b+s in quasi free kinematics. The Trojan Horse Method has been successfully applied to many reactions of astrophysical interest, both direct and resonant. In this paper, we will focus on direct sub-processes. The theory of the THM for direct binary reactions will be shortly presented based on a few-body approach that takes into account the off-energy-shell effects and initial and final state interactions. Examples of recent results will be presented to demonstrate how THM works experimentally.

  14. Sensitivity Analysis Applied to the Validation of the 10 B Capture Reaction in Nuclear Fuel Casks

    SciTech Connect

    Goluoglu, S

    2004-03-18

    Boron has commonly been used in nuclear fuel casks to ensure a sufficient margin of subcriticality. The amount of boron used in most casks far exceeds the amount of boron present in any of the available benchmark experiments. Such heavy loadings of boron in the casks may result in considerable spectral differences as compared to the benchmarks, resulting in boron sensitivities that are very different from those of the benchmarks. Before the calculations to determine the nuclear safety margin for various fuel loadings are deemed acceptable, as part of the safety basis, the computer code and cross sections must be validated against experimental benchmarks that cover the area of applicability of the proposed cask design. Therefore, this study was performed to determine if these available benchmarks can be used to validate a criticality code and neutron cross sections for the fuel casks. The sensitivity/uncertainty methodology has been applied to several application cask systems with different boron areal densities. Although, the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cask applications are not completely covered by the set of benchmarks that were used in this study with regard to the 10B capture cross section, the effect of this lack of coverage on the keff is minimal. Thus, the experimental biases are determined to be appropriate for the cask systems, and no additional bias (penalty) due to high boron loading need be imposed.

  15. Defense Nuclear Agency Reaction Rate Handbook. Second Edition. Revision Number 6

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-03-01

    257 (1972). 17-55. Gilmore, F. R., J. Quant. Spectry. Radiative Transfer S_t 369(1965). 17-56. Herzberg , G., Electronic Spectra of...1F»O •BBS • \\ CHAPTER 19 19. NEUTRAL REACTIONS Frederick Kaufman, University of Pittsburgh (Latest Revision 14 May 1975) o 19.1

  16. Kinetics and mechanisms of the reaction of air with nuclear grade graphites: IG-110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loren Fuller, E.; Okoh, Joseph M.

    1997-02-01

    The work presented in this report is part of an ongoing effort in the microgravimetric evaluation of the intrinsic reaction parameters for air reactions with graphite over the temperature range of 450 to 750°C. Earlier work in this laboratory addressed the oxidation/etching of H-451 graphite by oxygen and steam. This report addresses the air oxidation of the Japanese formulated material, IG-110. Fractal analysis showed that each cylinder was remarkably smooth, with an average value, D, the fractal dimension of 0.895. The activation energy, Ea, was determined to be 187.89 kJ/mol indicative of reactions occurring in the zone II kinetic regime and as a result of the porous nature of the cylinders. IG-110 is a microporous solid. The low initial reaction rate of 9.8×10 -5 at 0% burn-off and the high value (764.9) of Φ, the structural parameter confirm this. The maximum rate, 1.35×10 -3 g/m 2s, was measured at 34% burn-off. Reactions appeared to proceed in three stages and transition between them was smooth over the temperature range investigated. Both Ea and ln A did not vary with burn-off. The value of Δ S, the entropy of activation, was -41.4 eu, suggesting oxygen adsorption through an immobile transition state complex. Additional work is recommended to validate the predictions that will be made in relation to accident scenarios for reactors such as the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor where fine grained graphites such as IG-110 could be used in structural applications.

  17. Russian Military and Security Forces: A Postulated Reaction to a Nuclear Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, D

    2005-04-29

    In this paper, we will examine how Russia's military and security forces might react to the detonation of a 10-kiloton nuclear weapon placed next to the walls surrounding the Kremlin. At the time of this 'big bang,' Putin is situated outside Moscow and survives the explosion. No one claims responsibility for the detonation. No other information is known. Numerous variables will determine how events ultimately unfold and how the military and security forces will respond. Prior to examining these variables in greater detail, it is imperative to elucidate first what we mean by Russia's military and security forces.

  18. Influence of the hyper-terms in mass formulae on yield of hypernuclei in nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukcizmeci, N.; Botvina, A. S.; Ogul, R.

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, hypernuclear physics has attracted great interest in many fields of physics. One of the particular interest is the understanding of strange particles in baryonic matter, since many questions in heavy-ion physics, particle physics and astrophysics are related to the effect of strangeness in nuclear matter. The contribution of hyperons strongly influences the masses of neutron stars as well. In the past decade a considerable amount of spectroscopic information was accumulated experimentally on the Lambda hypernuclei. We compared different mass formulas for single and multiple Lambda hypernuclei.

  19. Colloid formation during waste form reaction: implications for nuclear waste disposal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, J. K.; Bradley, J.; Teetsov, A.; Bradley, C. R.; ten Brink, Marilyn Buchholtz

    1992-01-01

    Insoluble plutonium- and americium-bearing colloidal particles formed during simulated weathering of a high-level nuclear waste glass. Nearly 100 percent of the total plutonium and americium in test ground water was concentrated in these submicrometer particles. These results indicate that models of actinide mobility and repository integrity, which assume complete solubility of actinides in ground water, underestimate the potential for radionuclide release into the environment. A colloid-trapping mechanism may be necessary for a waste repository to meet long-term performance specifications.

  20. Studies of nuclear reactions at very low energies: Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.

    1988-02-08

    The main thrust of the research program was directed at the acquisition, installation and initial operation of the General Ionex Model 1545 charged particle accelerator which will be used in the subsequent reaction cross section measurements. The initial operation of the accelerator has been quite successful, with all of the crucial characteristics meeting or exceeding design specifications. We have made preliminary measurements of the reactions 12C(rho,..gamma..)13N/sup 11/B(rho,..gamma..)/sup 12/C, and D(rho,..gamma..)/sup 3/He as tests of total system integrity and have carried out studies of the interaction of proton and alpha particle beams with deuterated-polyethylene targets. 11 refs.

  1. Cyclotron production of I-123: An evaluation of the nuclear reactions which produce this isotope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sodd, V. J.; Scholz, K. L.; Blue, J. W.; Wellamn, H. N.

    1970-01-01

    The reactions studied which produce I-123 directly were Sb-121(He-4,2n) I-123, Sb-121(He-3,n) I-123, Te-122(d,n) I-123, Te-122(He-4,p2n) I-123, Te-122(He-3,pn) I-123, and Te-123(He-3,p2n) I-123. Reactions which produce I-123 indirectly through the positron decay of 2.1-hour Xe-123 were Te-122(He-4,3n) Xe-123, Te-122(He-3,2n) Xe-123 and Te-123(He-3,3n) Xe-123. Use of the gas flow I-123 cyclotron target assembly is recommended for the production of I-123 with radiochemical purity greater than 99.995%.

  2. Special features of isomeric ratios in nuclear reactions induced by various projectile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danagulyan, A. S.; Hovhannisyan, G. H.; Bakhshiyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, G. V.

    2016-05-01

    Calculations for ( p, n) and (α, p3 n) reactions were performed with the aid of the TALYS-1.4 code. Reactions in which the mass numbers of target and product nuclei were identical were examined in the range of A = 44-124. Excitation functions were obtained for product nuclei in ground and isomeric states, and isomeric ratios were calculated. The calculated data reflect well the dependence of the isomeric ratios on the projectile type. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data reveals, that, for some nuclei in a high-spin state, the calculated data fall greatly short of their experimental counterparts. These discrepancies may be due to the presence of high-spin yrast states and rotational bands in these nuclei. Calculations involving various level-density models included in the TALYS-1.4 code with allowance for the enhancement of collective effects do not remove the discrepancies in the majority of cases.

  3. Characterizing N-Z equilibration in nuclear reaction with sub-zeptosecond resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedele, Andrea; McIntosh, Alan; Manso Rodriguez, Alis; Heilborn, Lauren; May, Larry; Youngs, Michael; Zarrella, Andrew; Yennello, Sherry

    2016-09-01

    The process of neutron-proton (N-Z) equilibration is governed by the symmetry energy component of the nuclear equation of state. The extent of equilibration is governed by the contact time and the gradient of the potential driving the equilibration. We have examined correlations between the largest two fragments of the PLF* (both isotopically identified) produced in collisions of 70Zn +70Zn, 64Zn +64Zn and 64Ni +64Ni at 35A MeV. Using the rotation angle between the fragments as a clock, we observe the N-Z composition of the fragments evolve from initially dissimilar to converging exponentially, consistent with first-order kinetics. The rate constant is 3 zs-1, corresponding to a mean equilibration time of 0.3 zs. This technique enables new insight into the nuclear equation of state. This work was made possible by support from the DOE (DE-FG02-93ER40773) and the Robert A. Welch Foundation (A-1266).

  4. Generalization of classical mechanics for nuclear motions on nonadiabatically coupled potential energy surfaces in chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2007-10-18

    Classical trajectory study of nuclear motion on the Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces is now one of the standard methods of chemical dynamics. In particular, this approach is inevitable in the studies of large molecular systems. However, as soon as more than a single potential energy surface is involved due to nonadiabatic coupling, such a naive application of classical mechanics loses its theoretical foundation. This is a classic and fundamental issue in the foundation of chemistry. To cope with this problem, we propose a generalization of classical mechanics that provides a path even in cases where multiple potential energy surfaces are involved in a single event and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down. This generalization is made by diagonalization of the matrix representation of nuclear forces in nonadiabatic dynamics, which is derived from a mixed quantum-classical representation of the electron-nucleus entangled Hamiltonian [Takatsuka, K. J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124, 064111]. A manifestation of quantum fluctuation on a classical subsystem that directly contacts with a quantum subsystem is discussed. We also show that the Hamiltonian thus represented gives a theoretical foundation to examine the validity of the so-called semiclassical Ehrenfest theory (or mean-field theory) for electron quantum wavepacket dynamics, and indeed, it is pointed out that the electronic Hamiltonian to be used in this theory should be slightly modified.

  5. Status and perspective of FARCOS: A new correlator array for nuclear reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, E. V.; Acosta, L.; Auditore, L.; Boiano, C.; Cardella, G.; Castoldi, A.; D'Andrea, M.; Dell'aquila, D.; De Filippo, E.; De Luca, S.; Fichera, F.; Francalanza, L.; Giudice, N.; Gnoffo, B.; Grimaldi, A.; Guazzoni, C.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Minniti, T.; Norella, S.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Saccá, G.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of Heavy Ion reactions at Fermi energies requires an accurate measurement of observables, such as linear momentum and energy of the detected particles. In order to address this problem, dedicated and flexible correlator arrays are useful tools to be coupled with 4π detectors. One of these arrays is FARCOS, presently under construction at the INFN Sezione di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS).

  6. Understanding Fuel Magnetization and Mix Using Secondary Nuclear Reactions in Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, P. F.; Knapp, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Hahn, K. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Awe, T. J.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Lamppa, D. C.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Porter, J. L.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Ruiz, C. L.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Stygar, W. A.; Vesey, R. A.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetizing the fuel in inertial confinement fusion relaxes ignition requirements by reducing thermal conductivity and changing the physics of burn product confinement. Diagnosing the level of fuel magnetization during burn is critical to understanding target performance in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) implosions. In pure deuterium fusion plasma, 1.01 MeV tritons are emitted during deuterium-deuterium fusion and can undergo secondary deuterium-tritium reactions before exiting the fuel. Increasing the fuel magnetization elongates the path lengths through the fuel of some of the tritons, enhancing their probability of reaction. Based on this feature, a method to diagnose fuel magnetization using the ratio of overall deuterium-tritium to deuterium-deuterium neutron yields is developed. Analysis of anisotropies in the secondary neutron energy spectra further constrain the measurement. Secondary reactions also are shown to provide an upper bound for the volumetric fuel-pusher mix in MIF. The analysis is applied to recent MIF experiments [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.155003] on the Z Pulsed Power Facility, indicating that significant magnetic confinement of charged burn products was achieved and suggesting a relatively low-mix environment. Both of these are essential features of future ignition-scale MIF designs.

  7. Neutron Energy Spectra and Yields from the 7Li(p,n) Reaction for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessler, M.; Friedman, M.; Schmidt, S.; Shor, A.; Berkovits, D.; Cohen, D.; Feinberg, G.; Fiebiger, S.; Krása, A.; Paul, M.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Reifarth, R.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrons produced by the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction close to threshold are widely used to measure the cross section of s-process nucleosynthesis reactions. While experiments have been performed so far with Van de Graaff accelerators, the use of RF accelerators with higher intensities is planned to enable investigations on radioactive isotopes. In parallel, high-power Li targets for the production of high-intensity neutrons at stellar energies are developed at Goethe University (Frankfurt, Germany) and SARAF (Soreq NRC, Israel). However, such setups pose severe challenges for the measurement of the proton beam intensity or the neutron fluence. In order to develop appropriate methods, we studied in detail the neutron energy distribution and intensity produced by the thick-target 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction and compared them to state-of- the-art simulation codes. Measurements were performed with the bunched and chopped proton beam at the Van de Graaff facility of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) using the time-of-flight (TOF) technique with thin (1/8") and thick (1") detectors. The importance of detailed simulations of the detector structure and geometry for the conversion of TOF to a neutron energy is stressed. The measured neutron spectra are consistent with those previously reported and agree well with Monte Carlo simulations that include experimentally determined 7Li(p,n) cross sections, two-body kinematics and proton energy loss in the Li-target.

  8. Understanding fuel magnetization and mix using secondary nuclear reactions in magneto-inertial fusion.

    PubMed

    Schmit, P F; Knapp, P F; Hansen, S B; Gomez, M R; Hahn, K D; Sinars, D B; Peterson, K J; Slutz, S A; Sefkow, A B; Awe, T J; Harding, E; Jennings, C A; Chandler, G A; Cooper, G W; Cuneo, M E; Geissel, M; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Herrmann, M C; Hess, M H; Johns, O; Lamppa, D C; Martin, M R; McBride, R D; Porter, J L; Robertson, G K; Rochau, G A; Rovang, D C; Ruiz, C L; Savage, M E; Smith, I C; Stygar, W A; Vesey, R A

    2014-10-10

    Magnetizing the fuel in inertial confinement fusion relaxes ignition requirements by reducing thermal conductivity and changing the physics of burn product confinement. Diagnosing the level of fuel magnetization during burn is critical to understanding target performance in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) implosions. In pure deuterium fusion plasma, 1.01 MeV tritons are emitted during deuterium-deuterium fusion and can undergo secondary deuterium-tritium reactions before exiting the fuel. Increasing the fuel magnetization elongates the path lengths through the fuel of some of the tritons, enhancing their probability of reaction. Based on this feature, a method to diagnose fuel magnetization using the ratio of overall deuterium-tritium to deuterium-deuterium neutron yields is developed. Analysis of anisotropies in the secondary neutron energy spectra further constrain the measurement. Secondary reactions also are shown to provide an upper bound for the volumetric fuel-pusher mix in MIF. The analysis is applied to recent MIF experiments [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z Pulsed Power Facility, indicating that significant magnetic confinement of charged burn products was achieved and suggesting a relatively low-mix environment. Both of these are essential features of future ignition-scale MIF designs.

  9. Nuclear-reaction studies via the observation of unbound outgoing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bice, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the production of fast ..cap alpha..-particles in /sup 12/C induced reactions have been investigated for the /sup 12/C + /sup 208/Pb system at bombarding energies of E(/sup 12/C) = 132, 187 and 230 MeV. Absolute cross sections have been determined for the reactions /sup 208/Pb (/sup 12/C, /sup 8/Be (g.s.)), /sup 208/Pb(/sup 12/C, /sup 8/Be (2.94 MeV)) and /sup 208/Pb (/sup 12/C, /sup 12/C* ..-->.. ..cap alpha.. + /sup 8/Be) by double and triple coincidence measurements of the sequential decay ..cap alpha..-particles. Inclusive ..cap alpha..-particle production cross sections were also measured at E (/sup 12/C) = 187 MeV for comparison. It is found that the simple inelastic scattering process (/sup 12/C, /sup 12/C* ..-->.. ..cap alpha.. + /sup 8/Be) does not contribute significantly to the production of fast ..cap alpha..-particles but that the production of /sup 8/Be nuclei by projectile fragmentation is an important source of ..cap alpha..-particles. At the highest bombarding energy investigated (19 MeV/A) it appears that the /sup 12/C ..-->.. 3..cap alpha.. fragmentation reaction becomes more prominent at the expense of the /sup 12/C ..-->.. ..cap alpha.. + /sup 8/Be fragmentation channel. It is concluded that projectile spectroscopic properties and/or final state interactions are important in fragmentation reactions for these bombarding energies. In a kinematically complete experiment the direct and the sequential breakup channels of 10 MeV/A /sup 7/Li projectiles have been investigated with /sup 12/C and /sup 208/Pb targets. By appropriate arrangement of detector telescopes it was possible to define a kinematical window which allowed for the unambigious observation of both the direct (to the ..cap alpha..-t continuum) and the sequential components of a heavy-ion projectile breakup reaction. A semiclassical Monte Carlo type projectile breakup calculation was constructed which qualitatively reproduced the measured ..cap alpha

  10. Nuclear reaction measurements of 95 MeV/u 12C interactions on PMMA for hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunn, B.; Labalme, M.; Ban, G.; Chevallier, M.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Dauvergne, D.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Haas, F.; Guertin, A.; Lebhertz, D.; Le Foulher, F.; Pautard, C.; Ray, C.; Rousseau, M.; Salsac, M. D.; Stuttge, L.; Testa, E.; Testa, M.

    2011-11-01

    The ion dose deposition in tissues is characterized by a favorable depth dose profile (i.e. Bragg peak) and a small lateral spread. In order to keep these benefits of ions in cancer treatments, a very high accuracy is required on the dose deposition (±3%). For given target stoichiometry and geometry, the largest uncertainty on the physical dose deposition is due to the ion nuclear fragmentation. We have performed an experiment at GANIL with a 95 MeV/u 12C beam on thick tissue equivalent PMMA targets (thicknesses: 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mm). The main goals of this experiment are to provide experimental fragmentation data for benchmarking the physical models used for treatment planning. Production rates, energy and angular distributions of charged fragments have been measured. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of this experiment.

  11. Ab initio calculations of nuclear structure and reactions with chiral two- and three-nucleon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, Petr; Langhammer, Joachim; Hupin, Guillaume; Quaglioni, Sofia; Calci, Angelo; Roth, Robert; Soma, Vittorio; Cipollone, Andrea; Barbieri, Carlo; Duguet, T.

    2014-09-01

    The description of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the realistic interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. In recent years, a significant progress has been made in developing ab initio many-body approaches capable of describing both bound and scattering states in light and medium mass nuclei based on input from QCD employing Hamiltonians constructed within chiral effective field theory. We will present calculations of proton-10C scattering and resonances of the exotic nuclei 11N and 9He within the no-core shell model with continuum. Also, we will discuss calculations of binding and separation energies of neutron rich isotopes of Ar, K, Ca, Sc and Ti within the self-consistent Gorkov-Green's function approach. The description of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the realistic interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. In recent years, a significant progress has been made in developing ab initio many-body approaches capable of describing both bound and scattering states in light and medium mass nuclei based on input from QCD employing Hamiltonians constructed within chiral effective field theory. We will present calculations of proton-10C scattering and resonances of the exotic nuclei 11N and 9He within the no-core shell model with continuum. Also, we will discuss calculations of binding and separation energies of neutron rich isotopes of Ar, K, Ca, Sc and Ti within the self-consistent Gorkov-Green's function approach. Support from the NSERC Grant No. 401945-2011 is acknowledged. This work was prepared in part by the LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Effect of nuclear spin on chemical reactions and internal molecular rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Sterna, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    Part I of this dissertation is a study of the magnetic isotope effect, and results are presented for the separation of /sup 13/C and /sup 12/C isotopes. Two models are included in the theoretical treatment of the effect. In the first model the spin states evolve quantum mechanically, and geminate recombination is calculated by numerically integrating the collision probability times the probability the radical pair is in a singlet state. In the second model the intersystem crossing is treated via first-order rate constants which are average values of the hyperfine couplings. Using these rate constants and hydrodynamic diffusion equations, an analytical solution, which accounts for all collisions, is obtained for the geminate recombination. The two reactions studied are photolysis of benzophenone and toluene and the photolytic decomposition of dibenzylketone (1,3-diphenyl-2-propanone). No magnetic isotope effect was observed in the benzophenone reaction. /sup 13/C enrichment was observed for the dibenzylketone reaction, and this enrichment was substantially enhanced at intermediate viscosities and low temperatures. Part II of this dissertation is a presentation of theory and results for the use of Zeeman spin-lattice relaxation as a probe of methyl group rotation in the solid state. Experimental results are presented for the time and angular dependences of rotational polarization, the methyl group magnetic moment, and methyl-methyl steric interactions. The compounds studied are 2,6-dimethylphenol, methyl iodide, 1,4,5,8-tetramethylanthracene, 1,4,5,8-tetramethylnaphthalene, 1,2,4,5-tetramethylbenzene, and 2,3-dimethylmaleicanhydride.

  13. Theoretical nuclear reaction and structure studies using hyperons and photons. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cotanch, S.R.

    1998-12-31

    This report details research progress and results obtained during the ten period from June 1, 1988 through May 31, 1998. In compliance with grant requirements the Principal Investigator, Professor Stephen R. Cotanch, has conducted a research program addressing theoretical investigations of reactions involving hyperons and photons. The Principal Investigator has devoted to this program 50% of his time during the academic year and 100% of this time in the summer. Highlights of significant research results are briefly summarized in this report which respectively correspond to the three sub-programs of this project.

  14. Investigation of reflective electrochromic all-solid-state devices by Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bange, Klaus; Ottermann, Clemens R.; Wagner, Wolfgang; Rauch, Friedrich

    1990-08-01

    Electrochromic all-solid-state devices (ASSD) produced by reactive evaporation have been investigated by iaeans of reflectance measurements in the VIS/NIR range and cyclovoltammetry. Hydrogen depth proil were then by a NRA-technique employing the resonant reaction H( N, ar) C. Two different types of designs have been characterized. The electrochromic behaviour of ASSD's can not be described by models based on H transport for devices containing only W03 layers as active materials. Using NiOXH films as electrochromic substances, the injected/ejected charge corelates with changes in the H content.

  15. Nuclear structure of 126Te studied with the (n,/γ) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Egidy, T.; Doll, C.; Jolie, J.; Warr, N. V.; Kern, J.; Crittin, M.; Genilloud, L.

    2003-02-01

    The reaction 125Te(n, γ) 126Te has been measured at the neutron source SINQ of the Paul-Scherrer-Institut, Villigen, Switzerland. About 350 γ transitions have been placed in an extensive level scheme of 126Te with 83 levels, including many new ones. The neutron binding energy was determined to be 9113.69(8) keV. The thermal neutron capture cross section was found to be 1.09(17) barn. The level scheme is compared with IBM and particle-core coupling calculations.

  16. Chain Reaction: Avoiding a Nuclear Arms Race in the Middle East

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-27

    Sfmt 5012 NUCRPT.TXT sforel1 PsN: sforel1 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of...Operations and Reports , 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other...valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE FEB 2008 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Chain Reaction

  17. Nuclear excitation functions of proton-induced reactions (Ep = 35-90 MeV) from Fe, Cu, and Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Stephen A.; Ellison, Paul A.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; Nortier, Francois M.; Nickles, Robert J.; Engle, Jonathan W.

    2016-11-01

    Fe, Cu, and Al stacked foils were irradiated by 90 MeV protons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's Isotope Production Facility to measure nuclear cross sections for the production of medically relevant isotopes, such as 52gMn, 54Mn, 48Cr, 55Co, 58mCo and 57Ni. The decay of radioactive isotopes produced during irradiation was monitored using high-purity germanium gamma spectroscopy over the months following irradiation. Proton fluence was determined using the natAl(p,x)22Na, natCu(p,x)62Zn natCu(p,x)65Zn, and natCu(p,x)56Co monitor reactions. Calculated cross sections were compared against literature values and theoretical TALYS predictions. Notably this work includes the first reported independent cross section measurements of natCu(p,x)58mCo and natCu(p,x)58gCo.

  18. Nuclear reaction analysis for H, Li, Be, B, C, N, O and F with an RBS check

    DOE PAGES

    Lanford, W. A.; Parenti, M.; Nordell, B. J.; ...

    2015-11-12

    In this paper, 15N nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) for H is combined with 1.2 MeV deuteron (D) NRA which provides a simultaneous analysis for Li, Be, B, C, N, O and F. The energy dependence of the D NRA has been measured and used to correct for the D energy loss in film being analyzed. A 2 MeV He RBS measurement is made. Film composition is determined by a self-consistent analysis of the light element NRA data combined with an RBS analysis for heavy elements. This composition is used to simulate, with no adjustable parameters, the complete RBS spectrum. Finally,more » comparison of this simulated RBS spectrum with the measured spectrum provides a powerful check of the analysis.« less

  19. Nuclear reaction analysis for H, Li, Be, B, C, N, O and F with an RBS check

    SciTech Connect

    Lanford, W. A.; Parenti, M.; Nordell, B. J.; Paquette, M. M.; Caruso, A. N.; Mäntymäki, M.; Hämäläinen, J.; Ritala, M.; Klepper, K. B.; Miikkulainen, V.; Nilsen, O.; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Koh, D.; Banerjee, S. K.; Mays, E.; Bielefeld, J.; King, S. W.

    2015-11-12

    In this paper, 15N nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) for H is combined with 1.2 MeV deuteron (D) NRA which provides a simultaneous analysis for Li, Be, B, C, N, O and F. The energy dependence of the D NRA has been measured and used to correct for the D energy loss in film being analyzed. A 2 MeV He RBS measurement is made. Film composition is determined by a self-consistent analysis of the light element NRA data combined with an RBS analysis for heavy elements. This composition is used to simulate, with no adjustable parameters, the complete RBS spectrum. Finally, comparison of this simulated RBS spectrum with the measured spectrum provides a powerful check of the analysis.

  20. Evolution of nuclear shapes in odd-mass yttrium and niobium isotopes from lifetime measurements following fission reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, T. W.; Görgen, A.; Korten, W.; Grente, L.; Salsac, M.-D.; Farget, F.; Ragnarsson, I.; Braunroth, T.; Bruyneel, B.; Celikovic, I.; Clément, E.; de France, G.; Delaune, O.; Dewald, A.; Dijon, A.; Hackstein, M.; Jacquot, B.; Litzinger, J.; Ljungvall, J.; Louchart, C.; Michelagnoli, C.; Napoli, D. R.; Recchia, F.; Rother, W.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Sulignano, B.; Theisen, Ch.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.

    2017-03-01

    Lifetimes of excited states in 99Y,101Y,101Nb,103Nb, and 105Nb were measured in an experiment using the recoil distance Doppler shift method at GANIL (Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds). The neutron-rich nuclei were produced in fission reactions between a 238U beam and a 9Be target. Prompt γ rays were measured with the EXOGAM array and correlated with fission fragments that were identified in mass and atomic number with the VAMOS++ spectrometer. The measured lifetimes, together with branching ratios, provide B (M 1 ) and B (E 2 ) values for the strongly coupled rotational bands built on the [422 ] 5 /2+ ground state in the Y and Nb nuclei with neutron number N ≥60 . The comparison of the experimental results with triaxial particle-rotor calculations provides information about the evolution of the nuclear shape in this mass region.

  1. Non-ionic surfactant concentration profiles in undamaged and damaged hair fibres determined by scanning ion beam nuclear reaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenneson, P. M.; Clough, A. S.; Keddie, J. L.; Lu, J. R.; Meredith, P.

    1997-12-01

    Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) was used with a scanning MeV 3He ion microbeam to determine the extent of permeation and segregation of a deuterated non-ionic surfactant (dC 12E 5) into virgin (undamaged) and alkalinic perm damaged hair fibres. 2-D concentration maps show an accumulation of deuterated surfactant in the cortex and medulla of both the virgin and damaged hair. By normalising to the matrix carbon, surfactant levels in the damaged hair were found to be three times higher than in the undamaged hair. This is the first reported direct spatial evidence of the penetration of surfactant into the centre of hair fibres. Furthermore it is the first application of NRA to this type of complex biological matrix.

  2. Investigation of activation cross-section data of proton induced nuclear reactions on rhenium.

    PubMed

    Ditrói, F; Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Yamazaki, H; Baba, M; Mohammadi, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2013-07-01

    In the frame of systematic investigations of activation cross-section data for different applications the excitation functions of (nat)Re(p,x)(185)Os, (183m)Os, (183g)Os, (182)Os, (181m)Os, (186g)Re, (184m)Re, (184g)Re, (183)Re, (182m)Re, (182g)Re and (181g)Re reactions were measured up to 70MeV. The data for the (nat)Re(p,x) (183m)Os, (183g)Os, (182)Os, (181g)Os,(186g)Re, (184m)Re,(182m)Re, (182g)Re, and (181)Re reactions are reported for the first time. The activation method, the stacked foil irradiation technique and γ-spectroscopy for activity detection were used. The experimental data were compared with predictions of three theoretical codes. From the measured cross-section thick target integral yields were also calculated and presented.

  3. Refined Calculations of Secondary Nuclear Reactions in Magneto-Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, Paul; Knapp, Patrick; Hansen, Stephanie; Gomez, Matthew; Hahn, Kelly; Sinars, Daniel; Peterson, Kyle; Slutz, Stephen; Sefkow, Adam; Awe, Thomas; Harding, Eric; Jennings, Christopher

    2014-10-01

    Diagnosing the degree of magnetic flux compression at stagnation in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is critical for charting the performance of any MIF concept. In pure deuterium plasma, the transport of high-energy tritons produced by the aneutronic DD fusion reaction depends strongly on the magnetic field. The tritons probe and occasionally react with the fuel, emitting secondary DT neutrons. We show that the DT/DD neutron yield ratio and the secondary DT neutron spectra can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product (BR), the critical confinement parameter for MIF. The amount of fuel-pusher mix also can be constrained by secondary reactions. We discuss the sensitivity to plasma inhomogeneities of the calculations and outline methods to relate secondary yields to alpha particle energy deposition in ignition-relevant experiments employing DT fuel. We compare our calculations to recent tests of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept on the Z Pulsed Power Facility. Supported in part by the SNL Truman Fellowship, which is part of the LDRD Program, and sponsored by Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation) as Operator of SNL under its U.S. DoE Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-06-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used.

  5. Cross section measurement of the 159Tb(n, γ)Tb160 nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzysiuk, N.; Kadenko, I.; Gressier, V.; Koning, A. J.

    2015-04-01

    The cross section of the 159Tb(n, γ)Tb160 reaction was measured in four mono-energetic neutron fields of energy 3.7, 4.3, 5.4, and 6.85 MeV, respectively, with the activation technique applied to metal discs of natural composition. To ensure an acceptable precision of the results all major sources of uncertainties were taken into account. Calculations of detector efficiency, incident neutron spectrum and correction factors were performed with the Monte Carlo code (MCNPX), whereas theoretical excitation functions were calculated with the TALYS-1.2 code and compared to the experimental cross section values. This paper presents both measurements and calculation leading to the cross section values.

  6. Nuclear structure effects on heavy-ion reactions with microscopic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo-Phuoc, K.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.

    2016-09-01

    The self-consistent mean-field Hartree-Fock (HF) theory, both static and time-dependent (TDHF) versions, is used to study static and dynamic properties of fusion reactions between even 40-54Ca isotopes and 116Sn. The bare nucleus-nucleus potential, calculated with the frozen HF approach, is affected by the groundstate density of the nuclei. However, once dynamical effects are included, as in TDHF, the static effects on the barrier are essentially washed out. Dynamic properties of the nuclei, including low-lying vibrational modes, are calculated with TDHF and selectively used in coupled-channels calculations to identify which modes have the most effect on the TDHF fusion threshold. Vibrations cannot fully explain the difference between the static HF and TDHF fusion barriers trend so other dynamical effects such as transfer are considered.

  7. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in the regulation of nuclear functions.

    PubMed Central

    D'Amours, D; Desnoyers, S; D'Silva, I; Poirier, G G

    1999-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of proteins. During this process, molecules of ADP-ribose are added successively on to acceptor proteins to form branched polymers. This modification is transient but very extensive in vivo, as polymer chains can reach more than 200 units on protein acceptors. The existence of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymer was first reported nearly 40 years ago. Since then, the importance of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis has been established in many cellular processes. However, a clear and unified picture of the physiological role of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation still remains to be established. The total dependence of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis on DNA strand breaks strongly suggests that this post-translational modification is involved in the metabolism of nucleic acids. This view is also supported by the identification of direct protein-protein interactions involving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (113 kDa PARP), an enzyme catalysing the formation of poly(ADP-ribose), and key effectors of DNA repair, replication and transcription reactions. The presence of PARP in these multiprotein complexes, in addition to the actual poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of some components of these complexes, clearly supports an important role for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in DNA transactions. Accordingly, inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis by any of several approaches and the analysis of PARP-deficient cells has revealed that the absence of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation strongly affects DNA metabolism, most notably DNA repair. The recent identification of new poly(ADP-ribosyl)ating enzymes with distinct (non-standard) structures in eukaryotes and archaea has revealed a novel level of complexity in the regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism. PMID:10455009

  8. Nuclear transparency from quasielastic A(e,e'p) reactions up to Q{sup 2}=8.1 (GeV/c){sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Garrow, K; et. al.,

    2001-08-01

    The quasielastic (e,e'p) reaction was studied on targets of deuterium, carbon, and iron up to a value of momentum transfer Q{sup 2} of 8.1 (GeV/c){sup 2}. A nuclear transparency was determined by comparing the data to calculations in the Plane-Wave Impulse Approximation. The dependence of the nuclear transparency on Q{sup 2} and the mass number A was investigated in a search for the onset of the Color Transparency within our range of Q{sup 2}. A fit to the world's nuclear transparency data reflects the energy dependence of the free proton-nucleon cross section.

  9. Highly-focused boron implantation in diamond and imaging using the nuclear reaction 11B(p, α)8Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ynsa, M. D.; Ramos, M. A.; Skukan, N.; Torres-Costa, V.; Jakšić, M.

    2015-04-01

    Diamond is an especially attractive material because of its gemological value as well as its unique mechanical, chemical and physical properties. One of these properties is that boron-doped diamond is an electrically p-type semiconducting material at practically any boron concentration. This property makes it possible to use diamonds for multiple industrial and technological applications. Boron can be incorporated into pure diamond by different techniques including ion implantation. Although typical energies used to dope diamond by ion implantation are about 100 keV, implantations have also been performed with energies above MeV. In this work CMAM microbeam setup has been used to demonstrate capability to implant boron with high energies. An 8 MeV boron beam with a size of about 5 × 3 μm2 and a beam current higher than 500 pA has been employed while controlling the beam position and fluence at all irradiated areas. The subsequent mapping of the implanted boron in diamond has been obtained using the strong and broad nuclear reaction 11B(p, α)8Be at Ep = 660 keV. This reaction has a high Q-value (8.59 MeV for α0 and 5.68 MeV for α1) and thus is almost interference-free. The sensitivity of the technique is studied in this work.

  10. 200 and 300 MeV/nucleon nuclear reactions responsible for single-event effects in microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Jaederstroem, H.; Murin, Yu.; Babain, Yu.; Chubarov, M.; Pljuschev, V.; Zubkov, M.; Nomokonov, P.; Olsson, N.; Blomgren, J.; Tippawan, U.; Westerberg, L.; Golubev, P.; Jakobsson, B.; Geren, L.; Tegner, P.-E.; Zartova, I.; Budzanowski, A.; Czech, B.; Skwirczynska, I.; Kondratiev, V.

    2008-04-15

    An experimental study of nuclear reactions between {sup 28}Si nuclei at 200 and 300 MeV/nucleon and hydrogen or deuterium target nuclei was performed at the CELSIUS storage ring in Uppsala, Sweden, to collect information about the reactions responsible for single-event effects in microelectronics. Inclusive data on {sup 28}Si fragmentation, as well as data on correlations between recoils and spectator protons or {alpha} particles are compared to predictions from the Dubna cascade model and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute version of the quantum molecular dynamics model. The comparison shows satisfactory agreement for inclusive data except for He fragments where low-energy sub-barrier fragments and recoiling fragments with very large momenta are produced much more frequently than predicted. The yield of exclusive data are also severely underestimated by the models whereas the charge distributions of recoils in these correlations compare well. The observed enhancement in He emission, which may well be important for the description of single-event effects, is most likely to be attributed to {alpha} clustering in {sup 28}Si nuclei.

  11. Effects of nuclear orientation on fusion and fission process for reactions using actinide target nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, K.; Ikezoe, H.; Mitsuoka, S.; Nishinaka, I.; Makii, H.; Nagame, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohtsuki, T.; Hirose, K.; Hofmann, S.

    2010-04-30

    Fission fragment mass distributions in the reaction of {sup 30}Si+{sup 238}U were measured at the energies around the Coulomb barrier. At the above-barrier energies, the mass distribution showed Gaussian shape. At the sub-barrier energies, triple-humped distribution was observed, which consists of symmetric fission and asymmetric fission peaked at A{sub L}/A{sub H}approx =90/178. The asymmetric fission should be attributed to quasifission from the results of the measured evaporation residue (ER) cross-sections produced by {sup 30}Si+{sup 238}U. The cross-section for {sup 263}Sg at the above-barrier energy agree with the statistical model calculation which assumes that the measured fission cross-sections are equal to the fusion cross-sections, whereas the one for {sup 264}Sg measured at the sub-barrier energy is smaller than the calculation, indicating the presence for quasifission. We also report the results on the fragment mass distributions for {sup 36,34}S+{sup 238}U and {sup 40}Ar+{sup 238}U.

  12. A Large High Vacuum Reaction Chamber for Nuclear Physics Research at VECC, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Meena, J. K.; Ghosh, T. K.; Bhattacharjee, T.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Bhattacharya, C.; Rana, T. K.; Banerjee, K.; Mukherjee, G.; Banerjee, S. R.; Bandyopadhyay, D. L.; Ahammed, M.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2012-11-01

    A large, segmented, horizontal axis, reaction chamber (SHARC) has recently been fabricated, installed and integrated with the beam line in the VECC superconducting cyclotron (SCC) experimental area. It is a cylindrical, three segment, stainless steel chamber of length 2.2 m, diameter 1 m. Two pairs of parallel rails have been provided internally for placement of the target assembly and detector systems within the chamber. The whole target assembly can be placed anywhere on the rail to facilitate optimum flight path. The nominal vacuum of ~1×10-7 mbar has been obtained in ~8 hrs by means of two turbo molecular (1000 l/s) and two cryo pumps (2500 l/s) backed by mechanical pumps. The whole vacuum system as well as the target positioning (vertical and rotational movements) operations are fully automated with manual override option; both are monitored and controlled locally as well as remotely through the local and remote control units providing real time status display.

  13. The ({sup 18}O, {sup 16}O) reaction as a probe for nuclear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cappuzzello, F.; Bondì, M.; Nicolosi, D.; Tropea, S.; Agodi, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cunsolo, A.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.; De Napoli, M.; Linares, R.

    2014-11-11

    The response of nuclei to the ({sup 18}O, {sup 16}O) two-neutron transfer reaction at 84 MeV incident energy has been systematically studied at the Catania INFN-LNS laboratory. The experiments were performed using several solid targets from light ({sup 9}Be, {sup 11}B, {sup 12,13}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 28}Si) to heavy ones ({sup 58,64}Ni, {sup 120}Sn, {sup 208}Pb). The {sup 16}O ejectiles were detected at forward angles by the MAGNEX magnetic spectrometer. Exploiting the large momentum acceptance (−10%, +14%) and solid angle (50 msr) of the spectrometer, energy spectra were obtained with a relevant yield up to about 20 MeV excitation energy. The application of the powerful trajectory reconstruction technique did allow to get energy spectra with energy resolution of about 150 keV and angular distributions with angular resolution better than 0.3°. A common feature observed with light nuclei is the appearance of unknown resonant structures at high excitation energy. The strong population of these latter together with the measured width can reveal the excitation of a collective mode connected with the transfer of a pair.

  14. Model nitride irradiated nuclear fuel: production, reaction with water and dilution in nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Dvoeglazov, K.; Glushenkov, A.; Sharin, A.; Arseenkov, L.; Lobachev, E.; Davydov, A.; Chebotarev, A.

    2013-07-01

    Samples of the model nuclear fuel (MNF) were made from separately synthesized nitride powders uranium-plutonium, zirconium, lanthanum and metal additives of simulators (Mo, Pd, Rh, Ag) fission products. Synthesis of initial nitride components was carried out from individual oxides, using a carbo-thermal restoration method. From MNF samples baked at a temperature of 1750 C. degrees, were made ceramographic specimens which were investigated by a scanning electron microscope. The analysis showed that distribution of the MNF components and structure of the samples corresponds to distribution of these components in the irradiated nitride fuel. The samples of MNF of nitride fuel were used for carrying out researches on dissolution in water and nitric acid. Experiments on studying the interaction of MNF with water have been made at 20, 50 and 80 C. degrees. The speed of leaching has been determined by a way of measuring the activity of water (Bq/l) in time. It is shown that an increase of temperature leads to an increase of the speed of leaching of plutonium. The formation of a precipitation, allegedly polymeric forms of plutonium, has been observed. The estimated speed of leaching of plutonium from MNF in water at 80 C. degrees is -0,0064 μgPu/(mm{sup 2}*h). From elements of FP simulators, molybdenum appears to be the most significantly leached. The dissolution of MNF in nitric acid (7,8 and 9,4 mol/l) has been carried out at boiling temperature (106-109 C. degrees). During the process of dissolution, gases were emitted. The assessment of composition of the emitted gases has been carried out. During the filtering of the solutions a precipitate whose weight makes about 2% from the weight of initial fuel has been found. Precipitate represents small powder of metal with gray color. Precipitate was investigated by a scanning electron microscope. The analysis of ranges of absorption of solution showed that the Pu(VI) share to the general content of plutonium in solution can

  15. SU-E-T-236: Deconvolution of the Total Nuclear Cross-Sections of Therapeutic Protons and the Characterization of the Reaction Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, W.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The knowledge of the total nuclear cross-section Qtot(E) of therapeutic protons Qtot(E) provides important information in advanced radiotherapy with protons, such as the decrease of fluence of primary protons, the release of secondary particles (neutrons, protons, deuterons, etc.), and the production of nuclear fragments (heavy recoils), which usually undergo β+/− decay by emission of γ-quanta. Therefore determination of Qtot(E) is an important tool for sophisticated calculation algorithms of dose distributions. This cross-section can be determined by a linear combination of shifted Gaussian kernels and an error-function. The resonances resulting from deconvolutions in the energy space can be associated with typical nuclear reactions. Methods: The described method of the determination of Qtot(E) results from an extension of the Breit-Wigner formula and a rather extended version of the nuclear shell theory to include nuclear correlation effects, clusters and highly excited/virtually excited nuclear states. The elastic energy transfer of protons to nucleons (the quantum numbers of the target nucleus remain constant) can be removed by the mentioned deconvolution. Results: The deconvolution of the term related to the error-function of the type cerf*er((E-ETh)/σerf] is the main contribution to obtain various nuclear reactions as resonances, since the elastic part of energy transfer is removed. The nuclear products of various elements of therapeutic interest like oxygen, calcium are classified and calculated. Conclusions: The release of neutrons is completely underrated, in particular, for low-energy protons. The transport of seconary particles, e.g. cluster formation by deuterium, tritium and α-particles, show an essential contribution to secondary particles, and the heavy recoils, which create γ-quanta by decay reactions, lead to broadening of the scatter profiles. These contributions cannot be accounted for by one single Gaussian kernel for the

  16. Dipolar nuclear spin relaxation in liquids and plane fluids undergoing chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, P. H.

    We describe the correlated translational and rotational relative brownian motions of two reacting groups of atoms, alternatively bound and free, by the normalized solutions of a set of coupled diffusion equations. Under equilibrium conditions we calculate the spectral densities j(ω) characteristic of the fluctuations of the intermolecular dipolar coupling between spins of these diffusing groups of atoms. When ωτ << 1, where τ is the translational correlation time, the form of the spectral density j2(ω) in three-dimensional liquids is j2(0) - α3ω1/2. The coefficient α3 is independent of the molecular local order, of the diffusional rotation speed of the spin-carrying groups of atoms and of their association and dissociation rates. In plane fluids, when ωτ << 1, the spectral density j(0)(ω) may be written as -a2 ln (ωτ) where the dependence of a2 on the average relative distribution of the interacting spins varies with the rate of the chemical reactions. In both three- and two-dimensional fluids spectral densities show an ω-3/2 or ω-2 behaviour for ωτ >> 1 according to the magnitude of the association rate of the reacting groups of atoms. In liquid glycerol we analyse the low- and high-frequency limits of the experimental proton relaxation rate 1/T1 and 1/T1ρ measured by Harmon, Harmon and Burnett, and Lenk. We also discuss the proton spin-lattice relaxation times measured by Kleinberg and Silbernagel in layered intercalation compounds TiS2-NH3 and TaS2-NH3.

  17. Nuclear reaction analysis as a tool for the 3He thermal evolution in Li2TiO3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carella, E.; Sauvage, T.; Bès, R.; Courtois, B.; González, M.

    2014-08-01

    Li2TiO3 ceramic is one of the promising solid breeding candidates for fuel generation in deuterium-tritium Fusion reactors. The Tritium (T) release characteristics consist of a complex combination of gas diffusion stages inside the solid. Considering that this ceramic will produce high concentration of gaseous transmutation products (3H and 4He) when exposed to high-energy neutrons, there are considerable interests in studying 3He thermal evolution for the fundamental understanding of the light ion behavior in breeder blanket materials under reactor conditions. 3He atoms used to simulate the 4He incorporation were implanted by a 600 keV ion beam at a fluence of 1017 at/cm2 and the 3He(d,α)1H nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) technique was subsequently used to study depth profiles evolution after different thermal annealing treatments. The release experiments showed that 3He outgassing is not effective at room temperature, remaining quite negligible till 300 °C. After this temperature, the 3He content in the sample reduces steadily with increasing the annealing temperature, and less than 5% of the initial 3He concentration was found at 900 °C after an isochronal annealing, without significant depth-profile broadening. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies characterization highlight the microstructural changes of the implanted and annealed ceramic within the nuclear cascades zone. The correlation of results obtained by electron microscopy and NRA technique leads to the conclusion that the helium release is governed by a transport mechanism that involves rapid migration/diffusion through interconnected gas cavities and resulting microcracks before reaching grain boundaries and opened pores.

  18. Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions At The Highest Microscopic Level. Annual Continuation And Progress Report, August 15, 2014 -- August 14, 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, Sofia

    2015-03-19

    The aim of this project is to develop a comprehensive framework that will lead to a fundamental description of both structural properties and reactions of light nuclei in terms of constituent protons and neutrons interacting through nucleon-nucleon (NN) and three-nucleon (3N) forces. This project will provide the research community with the theoretical and computational tools what will enable: an accurate prediction for fusion reactions that power stars and Earth-based fusion facilities; an improved description of the spectroscopy of exotic nuclei, including light Borromean systems; and, a fundamental understanding of the three-nucleon force in nuclear reaction and nuclei at the drip line.

  19. On the implementation of a chain nuclear reaction of thermonuclear fusion on the basis of the p+{sup 11}B process

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, V. S.; Krainov, V. P.; Zagreev, B. V.; Matafonov, A. P.

    2015-07-15

    Various theoretical and experimental schemes for implementing a thermonuclear reactor on the basis of the p+{sup 11}B reaction are considered. They include beam collisions, fusion in degenerate plasmas, ignition upon plasma acceleration by ponderomotive forces, and the irradiation of a solid-state target from {sup 11}B with a proton beam under conditions of a Coulomb explosion of hydrogen microdrops. The possibility of employing ultra-short high-intensity laser pulses to initiate the p+{sup 11}B reaction under conditions far from thermodynamic equilibrium is discussed. This and some other weakly radioactive thermonuclear reactions are promising owing to their ecological cleanness—there are virtually no neutrons among fusion products. Nuclear reactions that follow the p+{sup 11}B reaction may generate high-energy protons, sustaining a chain reaction, and this is an advantage of the p+{sup 11}B option. The approach used also makes it possible to study nuclear reactions under conditions close to those in the early Universe or in the interior of stars.

  20. Detection of fast neutrons from D-T nuclear reaction using a 4H-SiC radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatko, Bohumir; Sagatova, Andrea; Sedlackova, Katarina; Necas, Vladimir; Dubecky, Frantisek; Solar, Michael; Granja, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    The particle detector based on a high purity epitaxial layer of 4H-SiC exhibits promising properties in detection of various types of ionizing radiation. Due to the wide band gap of 4H-SiC semiconductor material, the detector can reliably operate at room and also elevated temperatures. In this work we focused on detection of fast neutrons generated the by D-T (deuterium-tritium) nuclear reaction. The epitaxial layer with a thickness of 105 μm was used as a detection part. A circular Schottky contact of a Au/Ni double layer was evaporated on both sides of the detector material. The detector structure was characterized by current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements, at first. The results show very low current density (<0.1 nA/cm2) at room temperature and good homogeneity of free carrier concentration in the investigated depth. The fabricated detectors were tested for detection of fast neutrons generated by the D-T reaction. The energies of detected fast neutrons varied from 16.0 MeV to 18.3 MeV according to the acceleration potential of deuterons, which increased from 600 kV up to 2 MV. Detection of fast neutrons in the SiC detector is caused by the elastic and inelastic scattering on the silicon or carbide component of the detector material. Another possibility that increases the detection efficiency is the use of a conversion layer. In our measurements, we glued a HDPE (high density polyethylene) conversion layer on the detector Schottky contact to transform fast neutrons to protons. Hydrogen atoms contained in the conversion layer have a high probability of interaction with neutrons through elastic scattering. Secondary generated protons flying to the detector can be easily detected. The detection properties of detectors with and without the HDPE conversion layer were compared.

  1. Nuclear spin dependence of the reaction of H{sub 3}{sup +} with H{sub 2}. I. Kinetics and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, Kyle N.; Tom, Brian A.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2011-05-21

    The chemical reaction H{sub 3}{sup +}+ H{sub 2}{yields} H{sub 2}+H{sub 3}{sup +} is the simplest bimolecular reaction involving a polyatomic, yet is complex enough that exact quantum mechanical calculations to adequately model its dynamics are still unfeasible. In particular, the branching fractions for the ''identity,''''proton hop,'' and ''hydrogen exchange'' reaction pathways are unknown, and to date, experimental measurements of this process have been limited. In this work, the nuclear-spin-dependent steady-state kinetics of the H{sub 3}{sup +}+ H{sub 2} reaction is examined in detail, and employed to generate models of the ortho:para ratio of H{sub 3}{sup +} formed in plasmas of varying ortho:para H{sub 2} ratios. One model is based entirely on nuclear spin statistics, and is appropriate for temperatures high enough to populate a large number of H{sub 3}{sup +} rotational states. Efforts are made to include the influence of three-body collisions in this model by deriving nuclear spin product branching fractions for the H{sub 5}{sup +}+ H{sub 2} reaction. Another model, based on rate coefficients calculated using a microcanonical statistical approach, is appropriate for lower-temperature plasmas in which energetic considerations begin to compete with the nuclear spin branching fractions. These models serve as a theoretical framework for interpreting the results of laboratory studies on the reaction of H{sub 3}{sup +} with H{sub 2}.

  2. Measurement and verification of positron emitter nuclei generated at each treatment site by target nuclear fragment reactions in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi; Saijo, Nagahiro; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to verify the characteristics of the positron emitter nuclei generated at each treatment site by proton irradiation. Methods: Proton therapy using a beam on-line PET system mounted on a rotating gantry port (BOLPs-RGp), which the authors developed, is provided at the National Cancer Center Kashiwa, Japan. BOLPs-RGp is a monitoring system that can confirm the activity distribution of the proton irradiated volume by detection of a pair of annihilation gamma rays coincidentally from positron emitter nuclei generated by the target nuclear fragment reactions between irradiated proton nuclei and nuclei in the human body. Activity is measured from a start of proton irradiation to a period of 200 s after the end of the irradiation. The characteristics of the positron emitter nuclei generated in a patient's body were verified by the measurement of the activity distribution at each treatment site using BOLPs-RGp. Results: The decay curves for measured activity were able to be approximated using two or three half-life values regardless of the treatment site. The activity of half-life value of about 2 min was important for a confirmation of the proton irradiated volume. Conclusions: In each proton treatment site, verification of the characteristics of the generated positron emitter nuclei was performed by using BOLPs-RGp. For the monitoring of the proton irradiated volume, the detection of {sup 15}O generated in a human body was important.

  3. Rutherford backscattering and nuclear reaction analyses of hydrogen ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaida, T.; Kamioka, K.; Ida, T.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.; Kinomura, A.

    2014-08-01

    The origins of low resistivity in H ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals are studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) photoluminescence (PL), and Van der Pauw methods. The H-ion implantation (peak concentration: 1.45 × 1020 cm-3) into ZnO is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The resistivity decreases from 2.5 × 103 Ω cm for unimplanted ZnO to 6.5 Ω cm for as-implanted one. RBS measurements show that Zn interstitial as a shallow donor is not recognized in as-implanted samples. From photoluminescence measurements, the broad green band emission is observed in as-implanted samples. NRA measurements for as-implanted ZnO suggest the existence of the oxygen interstitial. The origins of the low resistivity in the as-implanted sample are attributed to both the H interstitial as a shallow donor and complex donor between H and disordered O. The activation energy of H related donors estimated from the temperature dependence of carrier concentration is 29 meV.

  4. Reaction System Design for NO2 Oxidation of Used Nuclear Fuel for the FY17 Hot Test

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jared A.; DelCul, Guillermo Daniel

    2016-08-25

    A dry pretreatment process based on the oxidation of used nuclear fuel to convert it to a fine powder is being studied for the removal and capture of tritium and iodine before subsequent processing. The process converts oxide fuel into a fine powder at low temperature using NO2/O2 mixtures. The form of the powder product can be selected to be U3O8, UO3, or a nitrate by adjusting the processing conditions. All the fundamental tenets of the process have been successfully demonstrated as a proof of principle, and many aspects have been corroborated multiple times at laboratory scale. The present thrust is to develop the process to a technology-readiness level sufficient to evaluate and estimate the cost of an engineeringscale implementation. A previous roadmap analysis of the implementation determined that the most desirable approach would be based on kilogram-scale experiments using real fuel in parallel with multi- Kg testing of prototype systems using surrogate material. Following the planned approach, kilogram-scale experiments will be conducted in FY 2017. This report describes the primary reaction system designs and the equipment that has been fabricated. Details related to instrumentation, data acquisition, and controls have been previously reported.

  5. Semi-insulating GaAs based detector of fast neutrons produced by D-T nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šagátová, A.; Kubanda, D.; Zat'ko, B.; Sedlačková, K.; Nečas, V.; Solar, M.; Granja, C.

    2016-12-01

    We have examined semi-insulating (SI) GaAs detectors with high density polyethylene (HDPE) conversion layer by a mono-energetic neutrons with kinetic energy of 16.755 MeV generated by a deuterium—tritium nuclear reaction. First, the influence of HDPE layer thickness on the relative detection efficiency of fast neutrons was studied. The MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-particle eXtended) code has been used to support the analysis of the experiment. The theoretical optimum thickness of the conversion layer was determined to 1.9 mm using the MCNPX code. The HDPE conversion layers of various thicknesses, in the range from 50 μ m to 3200 μ m, were glued on the top Schottky contact of SI GaAs detector in the experiment. The neutron detection efficiency was evaluated from measured spectra and compared to results from simulations. The experimental data showed very good agreement with simulation results. Then the effect of active detector thickness modified by detector reverse bias on neutron detection efficiency was studied. Finally, the effect of the angle of irradiation on neutron detection efficiency was evaluated exhibiting decreasing tendency with increasing deviation from perpendicular direction of impinging neutrons.

  6. Improved thermodynamics of the dense solar plasma and molecular-dynamics simulations of the nuclear-reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Dan

    available, there is no alternative source. The official OPAL tables, however, have disadvantages. First, they are inflexible regarding the chemical mix, which is set once and for all by the producers of the tables. Our equation of state will allow the user to choose, in principle, an arbitrary mix. Second, the OPAL tables by their very nature are limited by the errors of interpolation within tables. The second equation of state model is a density expansion based on the Feynman-Kac path-integral formalism. By making use of the equivalence of quantum Hamiltonian matrix and the classical action of closed and open filaments (paths), an analytic formalism of equation of state. Although the character of density expansion limits its application, the formalism can still be valid in most region in the Sun. Our work provides the link between the abstract theoretical formalism that was developed in the 1990s and a numerically smooth realization that can be used in solar and stellar models. Since it is so far the most exact and systematic approach for an EOS, it provides another way to study the influence of different very fine physical effects, despite considerable limitations in its domain of applicability. In the nuclear-reaction part of the thesis, we have used a molecular-dynamics method to simulate the motion of protons in a hydrogen plasma (which is a good approximation for this purpose). Quantum tunneling explains why nuclear fusion can occur in the first place, considering the "low" temperature in the solar core. It is well known that this tunneling is enhanced (which leads to higher nuclear reaction rates) in the presence of Coulomb screening. In the 1950, Salpeter formulated a theory based on the static-screened Coulomb potential, as derived by Debye and H=FCckel in the 1920s. As expected, Salpeter obtained enhanced reaction rates. But from our simulation, we confirmed the results of a recent controversy about the existence of a dynamic effect. Since the bulk of fusion

  7. Nuclear reactions with 11C and 14O radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fanqing

    2004-01-01

    Radioactive ion beams (RIBs) have been shown to be a useful tool for studying proton-rich nuclides near and beyond the proton dripline and for evaluating nuclear models. To take full advantage of RIBs, Elastic Resonance Scattering in Inverse Kinematics with Thick Targets (ERSIKTT), has proven to be a reliable experimental tool for investigations of proton unbound nuclei. Following several years of effort, Berkeley Experiments with Accelerated Radioactive Species (BEARS), a RIBs capability, has been developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. The current BEARS provides two RIBs: a 11C beam of up to 2x108 pps intensity on target and an 14O beam of up to 3x104 pps intensity. While the development of the 11C beam has been relatively easy, a number of challenges had to be overcome to obtain the 14O beam. The excellent 11C beam has been used to investigate several reactions. The first was the 197Au(11C,xn)208-xnAt reaction, which was used to measure excitation functions for the 4n to 8n exit channels. The measured cross sections were generally predicted quite well using the fusion-evaporation code HIVAP. Possible errors in the branching ratios of ?? decays from At isotopes as well as the presence of incomplete fusion reactions probably contribute to specific overpredictions. 15F has been investigated by the p(14O,p)14O reaction with the ERSIKTT technology. Several 14O+p runs have been performed. Excellent energy calibration was obtained using resonances from the p(14N,p)14N reaction in inverse kinematics, and comparing the results to those obtained earlier with normal kinematics. The differences between 14N+p and 14O+p in the stopping power function have been evaluated for better energy calibration. After careful calibration, the energy levels of 15F were

  8. Quantification of Hydrogen Concentrations in Surface and Interface Layers and Bulk Materials through Depth Profiling with Nuclear Reaction Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Markus; Ohno, Satoshi; Ogura, Shohei; Fukutani, Katsuyuki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-29

    Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) via the resonant (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C reaction is a highly effective method of depth profiling that quantitatively and non-destructively reveals the hydrogen density distribution at surfaces, at interfaces, and in the volume of solid materials with high depth resolution. The technique applies a (15)N ion beam of 6.385 MeV provided by an electrostatic accelerator and specifically detects the (1)H isotope in depths up to about 2 μm from the target surface. Surface H coverages are measured with a sensitivity in the order of ~10(13) cm(-2) (~1% of a typical atomic monolayer density) and H volume concentrations with a detection limit of ~10(18) cm(-3) (~100 at. ppm). The near-surface depth resolution is 2-5 nm for surface-normal (15)N ion incidence onto the target and can be enhanced to values below 1 nm for very flat targets by adopting a surface-grazing incidence geometry. The method is versatile and readily applied to any high vacuum compatible homogeneous material with a smooth surface (no pores). Electrically conductive targets usually tolerate the ion beam irradiation with negligible degradation. Hydrogen quantitation and correct depth analysis require knowledge of the elementary composition (besides hydrogen) and mass density of the target material. Especially in combination with ultra-high vacuum methods for in-situ target preparation and characterization, (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C NRA is ideally suited for hydrogen analysis at atomically controlled surfaces and nanostructured interfaces. We exemplarily demonstrate here the application of (15)N NRA at the MALT Tandem accelerator facility of the University of Tokyo to (1) quantitatively measure the surface coverage and the bulk concentration of hydrogen in the near-surface region of a H2 exposed Pd(110) single crystal, and (2) to determine the depth location and layer density of hydrogen near the interfaces of thin SiO2 films on Si(100).

  9. GCR Transport in the Brain: Assessment of Self-Shielding, Columnar Damage, and Nuclear Reactions on Cell Inactivation Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Atwell, W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badhwar, G. D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Radiation shield design is driven by the need to limit radiation risks while optimizing risk reduction with launch mass/expense penalties. Both limitation and optimization objectives require the development of accurate and complete means for evaluating the effectiveness of various shield materials and body-self shielding. For galactic cosmic rays (GCR), biophysical response models indicate that track structure effects lead to substantially different assessments of shielding effectiveness relative to assessments based on LET-dependent quality factors. Methods for assessing risk to the central nervous system (CNS) from heavy ions are poorly understood at this time. High-energy and charge (HZE) ion can produce tissue events resulting in damage to clusters of cells in a columnar fashion, especially for stopping heavy ions. Grahn (1973) and Todd (1986) have discussed a microlesion concept or model of stochastic tissue events in analyzing damage from HZE's. Some tissues, including the CNS, maybe sensitive to microlesion's or stochastic tissue events in a manner not illuminated by either conventional dosimetry or fluence-based risk factors. HZE ions may also produce important lateral damage to adjacent cells. Fluences of high-energy proton and alpha particles in the GCR are many times higher than HZE ions. Behind spacecraft and body self-shielding the ratio of protons, alpha particles, and neutrons to HZE ions increases several-fold from free-space values. Models of GCR damage behind shielding have placed large concern on the role of target fragments produced from tissue atoms. The self-shielding of the brain reduces the number of heavy ions reaching the interior regions by a large amount and the remaining light particle environment (protons, neutrons, deuterons. and alpha particles) may be the greatest concern. Tracks of high-energy proton produce nuclear reactions in tissue, which can deposit doses of more than 1 Gv within 5 - 10 cell layers. Information on rates of

  10. Excitation function and yield for the (103)Rh(d,2n)(103)Pd nuclear reaction: Optimization of the production of palladium-103.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Simone; Alí Santoro, María Del Carmen; Cotogno, Giulio; Duchemin, Charlotte; Haddad, Ferid; Holzwarth, Uwe; Groppi, Flavia

    2017-03-06

    Deuteron-induced nuclear reactions for the generation of (103)Pd were investigated using the stacked-foil activation technique on rhodium targets at deuteron energies up to Ed=33MeV. The excitation functions of the reactions (103)Rh(d,xn)(101,103)Pd, (103)Rh(d,x)(100g,cum,101m,g,102m,g)Rh and (103)Rh(d,2p)(103)Ru have been measured, and the Thick-Target Yield for (103)Pd has been calculated.

  11. Activation cross-sections of long lived products of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 50 MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Csikai, J; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2014-01-01

    Activation cross-sections for production of (162m,161,155)Ho, (165,159,157,155)Dy and (161,160,156,155)Tb radionuclides in deuteron induced nuclear reactions on elemental dysprosium were measured up to 50 MeV for practical application and the test of the predictive power of nuclear reaction model codes. A stacked-foil irradiation technique and off-line gamma-ray spectrometry were used to determine the activities. No earlier cross-section data were found in the literature. The experimental data are compared with the predictions of the ALICE-D, EMPIRE-D and TALYS codes. Integral production yields were calculated from the fitted experimental data.

  12. Role of nuclear dissipation and entrance channel mass asymmetry in pre-scission neutron multiplicity enhancement in fusion-fission reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Hardev; Sandal, Rohit; Behera, Bivash R.; Singh, Gulzar; Govil, I. M.; Golda, K. S.; Ranjeet,; Jhingan, Akhil; Singh, R. P.; Sugathan, P.; Chatterjee, M. B.; Datta, S. K.; Pal, Santanu; Viesti, G.

    2008-08-15

    Pre-scission neutron multiplicities are measured for {sup 12}C + {sup 204}Pb and {sup 19}F + {sup 197}Au reactions at laboratory energies of 75-95 MeV for the {sup 12}C beam and 98-118 MeV for the {sup 19}F beam. The chosen projectile-target combinations in the present study lie on either side of the Businaro-Gallone mass asymmetry ({alpha}{sub BG}) and populate the {sup 216}Ra compound nucleus. The dissipation strength is deduced after comparing the experimentally measured neutron yield with the statistical model predictions which contains the nuclear viscosity as a free parameter. Present results demonstrate the combined effects of entrance channel mass asymmetry and the dissipative property of nuclear matter on the pre-scission neutron multiplicity in fusion-fission reactions.

  13. Extension of the energy range of experimental activation cross-sections data of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on indium up to 50MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-11-01

    The energy range of our earlier measured activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on indium were extended from 40MeV up to 50MeV. The traditional stacked foil irradiation technique and non-destructive gamma spectrometry were used. No experimental data were found in literature for this higher energy range. Experimental cross-sections for the formation of the radionuclides (113,110)Sn, (116m,115m,114m,113m,111,110g,109)In and (115)Cd are reported in the 37-50MeV energy range, for production of (110)Sn and (110g,109)In these are the first measurements ever. The experimental data were compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS 1.6 nuclear model code as listed in the on-line library TENDL-2014.

  14. 15N electron nuclear double resonance of the primary donor cation radical P+.865 in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: additional evidence for the dimer model.

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, W; Isaacson, R A; Abresch, E C; Feher, G

    1984-01-01

    Four 15N hyperfine coupling constants, including signs, have been measured by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron nuclear nuclear triple resonance (TRIPLE) for the bacteriochlorophyll a radical cation, BChla+., in vitro and for the light-induced primary donor radical cation, P+.865, in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. A comparison of the data shows that the hyperfine coupling constants have the same sign in both radicals and are, on the average, smaller by a factor of 2 in P+.865. These results provide additional evidence that P+.865 is a bacteriochlorophyll dimer and are in contradiction with the monomer structure of P+.865 recently proposed by O'Malley and Babcock. The reduction factors of the individual 15N couplings, together with the evidence from proton ENDOR data and molecular orbital calculations, indicate a dimer structure in which only two rings (either I and I or III and III) of the bacteriochlorophyll macrocycles overlap. PMID:6096857

  15. Development of a high-density gas-jet target for nuclear astrophysics and reaction studies with rare isotope beams. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Uwe, Greife

    2014-08-12

    The purpose of this project was to develop a high-density gas jet target that will enable a new program of transfer reaction studies with rare isotope beams and targets of hydrogen and helium that is not currently possible and will have an important impact on our understanding of stellar explosions and of the evolution of nuclear shell structure away from stability. This is the final closeout report for the project.

  16. Investigation of activation cross-sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on natMo up to 40 MeV: New data and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárkányi, F.; Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Takács, S.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2012-06-01

    Cross-sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum have been studied in the frame of a systematic investigation of charged particle induced nuclear reactions on metals for different applications. The excitation functions of 93mTc, 93gTc(m+), 94mTc, 94gTc, 95mTc, 95gTc, 96gTc(m+), 99mTc, 90Mo(cum), 93mMo, 99Mo(cum), 90Nb(cum), 92mNb, 95mNb, 95gNb, 96Nb and 88Zr(cum), 89Zr(cum) were measured up to 40 MeV proton energy by a using stacked foil technique and activation method. The main goals of this work were to study the production possibility of the medically important 99mTc and its 99Mo parent nucleus, to get experimental data for accelerator technology, for monitoring of proton beam, for thin layer activation technique and for testing nuclear reaction theories. The experimental data were compared with critically analysed published data and with the results of model calculations, obtained by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and TALYS codes.

  17. Effects of deformations and orientations in the fission of the actinide nuclear system 254Fm* formed in the 11B + 243Am reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2012-12-01

    We have studied the decay of actinide nuclear system 254Fm* formed in 11B + 243Am reaction using the dynamical cluster decay model (DCM), with choices of spherical, quadrupole deformation β2 alone and higher multipole deformations β2-β4. For β2 deformations, the optimum orientations θiopt are used whereas for higher multipole deformations the compact orientations θic of decaying fragments are taken in to account. Besides static-β2 deformations, the effects of dynamical-β2 deformations are also explored. The calculated cross sections find excellent agreement with the available experimental data with spherical as well as deformed choices of fragmentations, enabling us to account for the role of important nuclear deformation effects in the 11B-induced nuclear reaction. Spontaneous decay of 254Fm with cold elongated configuration and optimum orientation is also worked out. The mass distributions of excited fermium isotopes in the neighborhood of 254Fm* are also explored. In addition, the roles of temperature, angular momentum, and fission fragment anisotropies are investigated in the context of the chosen reaction.

  18. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Polarization enhancement in &vec{d}(\\vec{p},\\vec{n})^{2};He reaction: nuclear teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamieh, S.

    2004-02-01

    I show that an experimental technique used in nuclear physics may be successfully applied to quantum teleportation (QT) of spin states of massive matter. A new non-local physical effect, the 'quantum-teleportation effect', is discovered for the nuclear polarization measurement. Enhancement of the neutron polarization is expected in the proposed experiment for QT that discriminates only one of the Bell states.

  19. Kinetics of Cold-Cap Reactions for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste Glass Based on Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry - Thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Pierce, David A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-12-03

    For vitrifying nuclear waste glass, the feed, a mixture of waste with glass-forming and modifying additives, is charged onto the cold cap that covers 90-100% of the melt surface. The cold cap consists of a layer of reacting molten glass floating on the surface of the melt in an all-electric, continuous glass melter. As the feed moves through the cold cap, it undergoes chemical reactions and phase transitions through which it is converted to molten glass that moves from the cold cap into the melt pool. The process involves a series of reactions that generate multiple gases and subsequent mass loss and foaming significantly influence the mass and heat transfers. The rate of glass melting, which is greatly influenced by mass and heat transfers, affects the vitrification process and the efficiency of the immobilization of nuclear waste. We studied the cold-cap reactions of a representative waste glass feed using both the simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and the thermogravimetry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TGA-GC-MS) as complementary tools to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Analyses from DSC-TGA and EGA on the cold-cap reactions provide a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model. It also helps to formulate melter feeds for higher production rate.

  20. Nuclear transfer reaction measurements at the ESR—for the investigation of the astrophysical 15O(α,γ)19Ne reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, D. T.; Woods, P. J.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Najafi, M. Ali; Bagchi, S.; Bishop, S.; Bo, M.; Brandau, C.; Davinson, T.; Dillmann, I.; Estrade, A.; Egelhof, P.; Evdokimov, A.; Gumberidze, A.; Heil, M.; Lederer, C.; Litvinov, S. A.; Lotay, G.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kiselev, O.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kröll, T.; Mahjour-Shafei, M.; Mutterer, M.; Nolden, F.; Petridis, N.; Popp, U.; Reifarth, R.; Rigollet, C.; Roy, S.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, Th; Streicher, B.; Trotsenko, S.; von Schmid, M.; Yan, X. L.; Zamora, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    Astrophysical x-ray bursts are thought to be a result of thermonuclear explosions on the atmosphere of an accreting neutron star. Between these bursts, energy is thought to be generated by the hot CNO cycles. The 15O(α,γ)19Ne reaction is one reaction that allows breakout from these CNO cycles and into the rp-process to fuel outbursts. The reaction is expected to be dominated by a single 3/2+ resonance at 4.033 MeV in 19Ne, however, limited information is available on this key state. This work reports on a pioneering study of the 20Ne(p,d)19Ne reaction, performed in inverse kinematics at the experimental storage ring (ESR) as a means of accessing the astrophysically important 4.033 MeV state in 19Ne. The unique, background free, high luminosity conditions of the storage ring were utilized for this, the first transfer reaction performed at the ESR. The results of this pioneering test experiment are presented along with suggestions for future measurements at storage ring facilities.

  1. Mass yield distributions of fission products from photo-fission of 238U induced by 11.5-17.3 MeV bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, H.; Carrel, Frédérick; Kim, G. N.; Laine, Frédéric; Sari, Adrien; Normand, S.; Goswami, A.

    2013-07-01

    The yields of various fission products in the 11.5, 13.4, 15.0 and 17.3 MeV bremsstrahlung-induced fission of 238U have been determined by recoil catcher and an off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique using the electron linac, SAPHIR at CEA, Saclay, France. The mass yield distributions were obtained from the fission product yields using charge-distribution corrections. The peak-to-valley ( P/ V ratio, average light mass (< A L>) and heavy mass (< A H>) and average number of neutrons (< v>) in the bremsstrahlung-induced fission of 238U at different excitation energies were obtained from the mass yield data. From the present and literature data in the 238U ( γ, f ) and 238U ( n, f ) reactions at various energies, the following observations were obtained: i) The mass yield distributions in the 238U ( γ, f ) reaction at various energies of the present work are double-humped, similar to those of the 238U ( n, f ) reaction of comparable excitation energy. ii) The yields of fission products for A = 133-134, A = 138-140, and A = 143-144 and their complementary products in the 238U ( γ, f) reaction are higher than other fission products due to the nuclear structure effect. iii) The yields of fission products for A = 133-134 and their complementary products are slightly higher in the 238U ( γ, f ) than in the 238U ( n, f ) , whereas for A = 138-140 and 143-144 and their complementary products are comparable. iv) With excitation energy, the increase of yields of symmetric products and the decrease of the peak-to-valley ( P/ V ratio in the 238U ( γ, f) reaction is similar to the 238U ( n, f) reaction. v) The increase of < v> with excitation energy is also similar between the 238U ( γ, f ) and 238U ( n, f) reactions. However, it is surprising to see that the < A L> and < A H> values with excitation energy behave entirely differently from the 238U ( γ, f ) and 238U ( n, f ) reactions.

  2. Excitation function of the alpha particle induced nuclear reactions on enriched 116Cd, production of the theranostic isotope 117mSn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Haba, H.; Komori, Y.; Aikawa, M.; Szűcs, Z.; Saito, M.

    2016-10-01

    117mSn is one of the radioisotopes can be beneficially produced through alpha particle irradiation. The targets were prepared by deposition of 116Cd metal onto high purity 12 μm thick Cu backing. The average deposited thickness was 21.9 μm. The beam energy was thoroughly measured by Time of Flight (TOF) methods and proved to be 51.2 MeV. For the experiment the well-established stacked foil technique was used. In addition to the Cd targets, Ti foils were also inserted into the stacks for energy and intensity monitoring. The Cu backings were also used for monitoring and as recoil catcher of the reaction products from the cadmium layer. The activities of the irradiated foils were measured with HPGe detector for gamma-ray spectrometry and cross section values were determined. As a result excitation functions for the formation of 117mSn, 117m,gIn, 116mIn, 115mIn and 115m,gCd from enriched 116Cd were deduced and compared with the available literature data and with the results of the nuclear reaction model code calculations EMPIRE 3.2 and TALYS 1.8. Yield curves were also deduced for the measured nuclear reactions and compared with the literature.

  3. A program in medium energy nuclear physics. Progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, B.L.; Dhuga, K.S.

    1995-10-01

    This progress report and continuation proposal summarizes our achievements for the period from July 1, 1994 to September 30, 1995 and requests continued funding for our program in experimental medium-energy nuclear physics. The focus of our program remains the understanding of the short-range part of the strong interaction in the nuclear medium. In the past year we have focused our attention ever more sharply on experiments with real tagged photons, and we have successfully defended two new experimental proposals: Photofission of Actinide and Preactinide Nuclei at SAL and Photoproduction of the {rho} Meson from the Proton with Linearly Polarized Photons at CEBAF. (We are co-spokespersons on two previously approved Hall-B experiments at CEBAF, Photoreactions on {sup 3}He and Photoabsorption and Photofission of Nuclei.) As part of the team that is instrumenting the Photon Tagger for Hall B; we report excellent progress on the focal-plane detector array that is being built at our Nuclear Detector Laboratory, as well as progress on our plans for instrumentation of a tagged polarized-photon beam using coherent bremsstrahlung. Also, we shall soon receive a large computer system (from the SSC) which will form the basis for our new Data Analysis Center, which, like the Nuclear Detector Laboratory, will be operated under the auspices of The George Washington University Center for Nuclear Studies. Finally, during the past year we have published six more papers on the results of our measurements of pion scattering at LAMPF and of electron scattering at NIKHEF and Bates, and we can report that nearly all of the remaining papers documenting this long series of measurements are in the pipeline.

  4. Studies of 3He+3He, T+3He, and p +D nuclear reactions relevant to stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis using ICF plasmas at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, Alex; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Frenje, Johan; Li, Chikang; Seguin, Fredrick; Sio, Hong; Rosenberg, Michael; Rinderknecht, Hans; Petrasso, Richard; Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Yong Ho; Hale, Gerry; McNabb, Dennis; Sayre, Dan; Pino, Jesse; Brune, Carl; Bacher, Andy; Forrest, Chad; Glebov, Vladimir; Stoeckl, Christian; Janezic, Roger; Sangster, Craig

    2014-10-01

    The 3He+3He, T+3He, and p +D reactions directly relevant to Stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) have been studied at the OMEGA laser facility using high-temperature low-density `exploding pusher' implosions. The advantage of using these plasmas is that they better mimic astrophysical systems than cold-target accelerator experiments. Measured proton spectra from the 3He3He reaction are used to constrain nuclear R-matrix modeling. The resulting T+3He γ-ray data rule out an anomalously-high 6Li production during BBN as an explanation to the high observed values in primordial material. The proton spectrum from the T+3He reaction is also being used to constrain the R-matrix model. Recent experiments have probed the p +D reaction for the first time in a plasma; this reaction is relevant to energy production in protostars, brown dwarfs and at higher CM energies to BBN. This work was partially supported by the US DOE, NLUF, LLE, and GA.

  5. Low-energy fission investigated in reactions of 750 AMeV238U-ions with Pb and Be targets. I. Nuclear charge distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, P.; Bernas, M.; Czajkowski, S.; Geissel, H.; Aumann, T.; Dessagne, Ph.; Donzaud, C.; Hanelt, E.; Heinz, A.; Hesse, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Miehe, Ch.; Münzenberg, G.; Pfützner, M.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Schwab, W.; Stéphan, C.; Sümmerer, K.; Tassan-Got, L.; Voss, B.

    1996-12-01

    Charge distributions of fragments from low energy nuclear fission are investigated in reactions of highly fissile238U projectiles at relativistic energies (750 A·MeV) with a heavy (Pb) and a light (Be) target. The fully stripped fission fragments are separated by the Fragment Separator (FRS). Their high kinetic energies in the laboratory system allow the identification of all atomic numbers by using Multiple-Sampling Ionization Chambers (MUSIC). The elemental distributions of fragments observed at larger magnetic rigidities than the238U projectiles show asymmetric break-up and odd-even effects. They indicate a low energy fission process, induced mainly by dissociation in the electro-magnetic field for the U/Pb-system, or by peripheral nuclear interactions for the U/Be-system.

  6. Nuclear Astrophysics at LNL: The 10B(p, α )7Be Reaction Studied at the AN2000 Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caciolli, Antonio

    The National Laboratory of Legnaro (LNL) has a wealth of experience in Nuclear Physics measurements. Recently a new effort to perform Nuclear Astrophysics studies has been initiated. This effort started with the collaboration of LNL with the LUNA (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) collaboration for the study of targets. In 2014 the study of 10B(p, α )7Be was performed in order to give a precise normalisation to the indirect measurements. As a matter of fact, a normalization problem was raised in previous works due to discrepancies in the results of different experimental datasets. At LNL the cross section was determined by measuring the activated samples at the low counting facility of the LNL laboratory. The analysis of that experiment is now complete and a detailed report of the obtained results will be presented in this contribution.

  7. Intermediate Nuclear Structure for 2v 2{beta} Decay of {sup 48}Ca Studied by (p, n) and (n, p) Reactions at 300 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, H.; Yako, K.

    2009-08-26

    Angular distributions of the double differential cross sections for the {sup 48}Ca(p,n) and the {sup 48}Ti(n,p) reactions were measured at 300 MeV. A multipole decomposition technique was applied to the spectra to extract the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition strengths. In the (n, p) spectrum beyond 8 MeV excitation energy extra B(GT{sup +}) strengths which are not predicted by the shell model calculation. This extra B(GT{sup +}) strengths significantly contribute to the nuclear matrix element of the 2v2{beta}-decay.

  8. Model for particle production in nuclear reactions at intermediate energies: Application to C-C collisions at 95 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudouet, J.; Durand, D.

    2016-07-01

    A model describing nuclear collisions at intermediate energies is presented and the results are compared with recently measured double differential cross sections in C-C reactions at 95 MeV/nucleon. Results show the key role played by geometrical effects and the memory of the entrance channel, in particular the momentum distributions of the two incoming nuclei. Special attention is paid to the description of processes occurring at midrapidity. To this end, a random particle production mechanism by means of a coalescence process in velocity space is considered in the overlap region of the two interacting nuclei.

  9. Polarization effects in the quasielastic ( p, 2 p) reaction with the nuclear S-Shell Protons at 1 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklukho, O. V.; Kisselev, A. Yu.; Aksenov, D. A.; Amalsky, G. M.; Andreev, V. A.; Evstiukhin, S. V.; Fedorov, O. Ya.; Gavrilov, G. E.; Izotov, A. A.; Kochenda, L. M.; Levchenko, M. P.; Maysuzenko, D. A.; Murzin, V. A.; Novinsky, D. V.; Prokofiev, A. N.; Shvedchikov, A. V.; Trautman, V. Yu.; Trush, S. I.; Zhdanov, A. A.

    2013-07-01

    The polarization of the secondary protons in the ( p, 2 p) reaction with the S-shell protons of nuclei 4He, 6Li, 12C, 28Si, 40Ca was measured at 1 GeV unpolarized proton beam. The spin correlation parameters C ij for the 4He and 12C targets also were for the first time obtained as well. The polarization measurements were performed by means of a two-arm magnetic spectrometer, each arm of which was equipped with the multiwire-proportional chamber polarimeter. This experiment was aimed to study a modification of the proton-proton scattering matrix in the nuclear medium.

  10. Evaluation of Carbon Interstitial in C-ion Implanted ZnO Bulk Single Crystals by a Nuclear Reaction Analysis Study: An Origin of Low Resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Izawa, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Oga, T.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.; Kinomura, A.

    2011-12-23

    Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) of carbon-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals (carbon concentration: 1.5x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}), in conjunction with the channeling technique, using the {sup 12}C(d,p){sup 13}C and {sup 16}O(d,p){sup 17}O reactions shows the presence of the interstitial carbon (C{sub i}) and the occupancy of substitute sites of oxygen atoms. These results suggest that the variation in resistivity from the order of 10{sup 4} {Omega}cm(for un-implanted samples) to that of 10 {Omega}cm (for as-implanted ones) is attributed to the C{sub i} and/or its complex defects, which would act as a shallow donor in ZnO.

  11. Excitation function for deuteron induced nuclear reactions on natural ytterbium for production of high specific activity 177g Lu in no-carrier-added form for metabolic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Simone; Groppi, Flavia; Gandini, Andrea; Gini, Luigi; Abbas, Kamel; Holzwarth, Uwe; Simonelli, Federica; Bonardi, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Deuteron-induced nuclear reactions for generation of no-carrier-added Lu radionuclides were investigated using the stacked-foil activation technique on natural Yb targets at energies up to E(d)=18.18 MeV. Excitation functions of the reactions (nat)Yb(d,xn)(169,170,171,172,173,174g,174m,176m,177g)Lu and (nat)Yb(d,pxn)(169,175,177)Yb have been measured, among them three ((169)Lu, (174m)Lu and (176m)Lu) are reported for the first time. The upper limit of the contamination from the long-lived metastable level (177m)Lu was evaluated too. Thick-target yields for all investigated radionuclides are calculated.

  12. Neutron-proton effective mass splitting in neutron-rich matter and its impacts on nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-An; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2015-04-01

    The neutron-proton effective mass splitting in neutron-rich nucleonic matter reflects the spacetime nonlocality of the isovector nuclear interaction. It affects the neutron/proton ratio during the earlier evolution of the Universe, cooling of proto-neutron stars, structure of rare isotopes and dynamics of heavy-ion collisions. While there is still no consensus on whether the neutron-proton effective mass splitting is negative, zero or positive and how it depends on the density as well as the isospin-asymmetry of the medium, significant progress has been made in recent years in addressing these issues. There are different kinds of nucleon effective masses. In this mini-review, we focus on the total effective masses often used in the non-relativistic description of nuclear dynamics. We first recall the connections among the neutron-proton effective mass splitting, the momentum dependence of the isovector potential and the density dependence of the symmetry energy. We then make a few observations about the progress in calculating the neutron-proton effective mass splitting using various nuclear many-body theories and its effects on the isospin-dependence of in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross-sections. Perhaps, our most reliable knowledge so far about the neutron-proton effective mass splitting at saturation density of nuclear matter comes from optical model analyses of huge sets of nucleon-nucleus scattering data accumulated over the last five decades. The momentum dependence of the symmetry potential from these analyses provide a useful boundary condition at saturation density for calibrating nuclear many-body calculations. Several observables in heavy-ion collisions have been identified as sensitive probes of the neutron-proton effective mass splitting in dense neutron-rich matter based on transport model simulations. We review these observables and comment on the latest experimental findings.

  13. Evaluation of nuclear reaction cross section data for the production of (87)Y and (88)Y via proton, deuteron and alpha-particle induced transmutations.

    PubMed

    Zaneb, H; Hussain, M; Amjad, N; Qaim, S M

    2016-06-01

    Proton, deuteron and alpha-particle induced reactions on (87,88)Sr, (nat)Zr and (85)Rb targets were evaluated for the production of (87,88)Y. The literature data were compared with nuclear model calculations using the codes ALICE-IPPE, TALYS 1.6 and EMPIRE 3.2. The evaluated cross sections were generated; therefrom thick target yields of (87,88)Y were calculated. Analysis of radio-yttrium impurities and yield showed that the (87)Sr(p, n)(87)Y and (88)Sr(p, n)(88)Y reactions are the best routes for the production of (87)Y and (88)Y respectively. The calculated yield for the (87)Sr(p, n)(87)Y reaction is 104 MBq/μAh in the energy range of 14→2.7MeV. Similarly, the calculated yield for the (88)Sr(p, n)(88)Y reaction is 3.2 MBq/μAh in the energy range of 15→7MeV.

  14. Following the Transient Reactions in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries Using In an In Situ Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jie; Hu, Jian Z.; Chen, Honghao; Vijayakumar, M.; Zheng, Jianming; Pan, Huilin; Walter, Eric D.; Hu, Mary Y.; Deng, Xuchu; Feng, Ju; Liaw, Bor Yann; Gu, Meng; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Dongping; Xu, Suochang; Wang, Chong M.; Liu, Jun

    2015-05-13

    Li-S batteries hold great potential for next-generation, large-format power source applications; yet, the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical reaction pathways remains lacking to enable their functionality as promised. Here, in situ NMR technique employing a specially designed cylindrical micro battery was used to monitor the chemical environments around Li+ ions during repetitive charge-discharge process and track the transient electrochemical and chemical reactions occurring in the whole Li-S system. The in situ NMR provides real time, quantitative information related to the temporal concentration variations of the polysulfides with various chain lengths, providing important clues for the reaction pathways during both discharge and charge processes. The in-situ technique also reveals that redox reactions may involve transient species that are difficult to detect in ex-situ NMR study. Intermediate species such as charged free radicals may play an important role in the formation of the polysulfide products. Additionally, in situ NMR measurement simultaneously reveals vital information on the 7Li chemical environments in the electrochemical and parasitic reactions on the lithium anode that promotes the understanding of the failure mechanism in the Li-S system. These new insights could help design effective strategies to accelerate the development of Li-S battery technology.

  15. Following the transient reactions in lithium-sulfur batteries using an in situ nuclear magnetic resonance technique.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jie; Hu, Jian Zhi; Chen, Honghao; Vijayakumar, M; Zheng, Jianming; Pan, Huilin; Walter, Eric D; Hu, Mary; Deng, Xuchu; Feng, Ju; Liaw, Bor Yann; Gu, Meng; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Lu, Dongping; Xu, Suochang; Wang, Chongmin; Liu, Jun

    2015-05-13

    A fundamental understanding of electrochemical reaction pathways is critical to improving the performance of Li-S batteries, but few techniques can be used to directly identify and quantify the reaction species during disharge/charge cycling processes in real time. Here, an in situ (7)Li NMR technique employing a specially designed cylindrical microbattery was used to probe the transient electrochemical and chemical reactions occurring during the cycling of a Li-S system. In situ NMR provides real time, semiquantitative information related to the temporal evolution of lithium polysulfide allotropes during both discharge/charge processes. This technique uniquely reveals that the polysulfide redox reactions involve charged free radicals as intermediate species that are difficult to detect in ex situ NMR studies. Additionally, it also uncovers vital information about the (7)Li chemical environments during the electrochemical and parasitic reactions on the Li metal anode. These new molecular-level insights about transient species and the associated anode failure mechanism are crucial to delineating effective strategies to accelerate the development of Li-S battery technologies.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Plutonium Content in Particles Collected from a Certified Reference Material by Total Nuclear Reaction Energy (Q Value) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croce, M. P.; Hoover, A. S.; Rabin, M. W.; Bond, E. M.; Wolfsberg, L. E.; Schmidt, D. R.; Ullom, J. N.

    2016-08-01

    Microcalorimeters with embedded radioisotopes are an emerging category of sensor with advantages over existing methods for isotopic analysis of trace-level nuclear materials. For each nuclear decay, the energy of all decay products captured by the absorber (alpha particles, gamma rays, X-rays, electrons, daughter nuclei, etc.) is measured in one pulse. For alpha-decaying isotopes, this gives a measurement of the total nuclear reaction energy (Q value) and the spectra consist of well-separated, narrow peaks. We have demonstrated a simple mechanical alloying process to create an absorber structure consisting of a gold matrix with small inclusions of a radioactive sample. This absorber structure provides an optimized energy thermalization environment, resulting in high-resolution spectra with minimal tailing. We have applied this process to the analysis of particles collected from the surface of a plutonium metal certified reference material (CRM-126A from New Brunswick Laboratory) and demonstrated isotopic analysis by microcalorimeter Q value spectroscopy. Energy resolution from the Gaussian component of a Bortels function fit was 1.3 keV FWHM at 5244 keV. The collected particles were integrated directly into the detector absorber without any chemical processing. The ^{238}Pu/^{239}Pu and ^{240}Pu/^{239}Pu mass ratios were measured and the results confirmed against the certificate of analysis for the reference material. We also demonstrated inter-element analysis capability by measuring the ^{241}Am/^{239}Pu mass ratio.

  17. One-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the reaction of phenyldichloroarsine with glutathione

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, K.; Adams, E.R.; O'Connor, R.J.; Chong, S.; McGown, E.L.

    1987-09-01

    /sup 14/C-labeled phenyldichloroarsine (PDA) enters the red blood cell and forms a 1:2 adduct with intracellular glutathione. Upon gel filtration of the hemolysate, (/sup 14/C)PDA was recovered with the glutathione-containing fractions. One-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to confirm the structure of the adduct and elucidate its stereochemistry, stability, and reactivity.

  18. The characteristics of neutrino-nuclear reactions at E{sub {nu}}= 1-3 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Agababyan, N. M.; Ammosov, V. V.; Atayan, M.; Grigoryan, N.; Gulkanyan, H.; Ivanilov, A.A.; Karamyan, Zh.; Korotkov, V. A.

    2007-11-15

    The characteristics of the charged-current neutrino-nuclear interactions are investigated for the first time at E{sub {nu}}= 1-3 GeV using the data obtained with SKAT propane-freon bubble chamber irradiated in the neutrino beam at the Serpukhov accelerator. The E{sub {nu}}dependence of the mean multiplicities of different types of secondary particles and their multiplicity, momentum, and angular distributions are measured.

  19. Excitation Functions of Helion-Induced Nuclear Reactions for the Production of the Medical Radioisotope 103Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skakun, Ye.; Qaim, S. M.

    2005-05-01

    Excitation functions were measured by the stacked-foil technique for the reactions 100Ru(α,n)103Pd, 101Ru(α,2n)103Pd, 101Ru(3He,n)103Pd, and 102Ru(3He,2n)103Pd for incident energies up to 25 and 34 MeV for α-particles and 3He ions, respectively. The integral thick target yields of the product radionuclide 103Pd calculated from the excitation functions of the above-named four reactions amount to 960, 1050, 50, and 725 KBq/μAh, respectively, at the maximum energy of the incident particle. The data are compared with the results of statistical model calculations and other charged particle induced reaction investigations.

  20. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1979-February 14, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, E.P.

    1980-02-01

    The program consists of six interrelated areas: (1) Reactions of iodine with alkenes and alkynes activated by radiative neutron capture and isomeric transition in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators, high pressure, and liquid systems. Special attention was given to the reactivity of excited complex formation and structural effects of electrophilic iodine attack on various pi-bond systems. (2) The gas-to-condensed phase transition in halogen high energy chemistry. Current interest involves the study of caging effects of an ice lattice on recombination reactions involving neutron-irradiated frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated organic and biochemical solutes in order to learn more about kinetic energy effects, halogen size, solute molecule size, steric effects and hydrogen bonding within an ice lattice cage. (3) Systematics of halogen hot atom reactions. The reactions of /sup 80m/Br, /sup 80/Br, /sup 82m/Br + /sup 82/Br, /sup 82/Br, /sup 82/Br, /sup 128/I, /sup 130/I, and /sup 130m/I + /sup 130/I activated by radiative neutron capture or isomeric transition in hydrocarbons and halo-substituted alkanes in low pressure and high pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators are currently being studied. (4) Mathematical and computer simulation studies of caging events within an ice lattice are being investigated. (5) At Brookhaven National Laboratory, cyclotron-produced chlorine and fluorine hot atoms substitution reactions with molecules possessing a single chiral center are under investigation to determine the role of hot atom kinetic energy, halogen atom, enantioner structure, steric effects and phase on the extent of substitution by retention of configuration or by Walden inversion. (6) The applications of high energy techniques and concepts to neutron activation analysis for trace element determinations in biological systems was continued.

  1. An Investigation of the 40Ar(n,p)40Cl Reaction Cross-Section below 50MeV at Crocker Nuclear Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Nicholas Ian

    Large underground liquid argon detectors are poised to detect neutrinos from the next galactic supernova. Liquid argon detectors are uniquely sensitive to the electron neutrino, thus giving them the capability to detect neutronization neutrinos for the first time. One background that may mimic the signal of this low-energy neutrino interaction in argon is the beta-decay of Cl-40 which is produced in argon by a fast neutron reaction. Previous measurements of this 40Ar+n->40Cl+p reaction cross section exist only below 15 MeV and the measurements differ by a factor of two. Using the U.C. Davis Crocker Nuclear Laboratory neutron beam this cross-section is determined by fitting to a parametrized model for neutron energies up to 50 MeV. Neutrons at this facility are generated from mono-energetic protons impinging on a thick beryllium target. Then, the neutrons that pass through the collimator are measured by time-of-flight and a fast-neutron activation technique. Using the neutron fluxes generated from five different proton energies, including 50 MeV protons, the 40Ar(n,p)40Cl reaction cross section is measured by irradiating liquid argon in each beam and counting the subsequent gammas from the Cl-40 decay in a high-purity germanium detector.

  2. Evidence for a base-pairing interaction between U6 small nuclear RNA and 5' splice site during the splicing reaction in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Sawa, H; Abelson, J

    1992-01-01

    U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is an essential factor in mRNA splicing. On the basis of the high conservation of its sequence, it has been proposed that U6 snRNA may function catalytically during the splicing reaction. If this is the case, it is likely that U6 snRNA interacts with the splice sites in the spliceosome to catalyze the reaction. We have used UV crosslinking to analyze the interactions of U6 snRNA with the splicing substrates during the yeast splicing reaction. Crosslinked products in which the central region of U6 snRNA was joined to the 5' splice site region of mRNA precursor and lariat intermediate were identified. The crosslinking sites were precisely located in one of these products. The results suggest a possible base-pairing interaction between U6 snRNA and the 5' splice site of the mRNA precursor. Images PMID:1333604

  3. One- and two-dimensional chemical exchange nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the creatine kinase catalyzed reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gober, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The equilibrium chemical exchange dynamics of the creatine kinase enzyme system were studied by one- and two-dimensional {sup 31}P NMR techniques. Pseudo-first-order reaction rate constants were measured by the saturation transfer method under an array of experimental conditions of pH and temperature. Quantitative one-dimensional spectra were collected under the same conditions in order to calculate the forward and reverse reaction rates, the K{sub eq}, the hydrogen ion stoichiometry, and the standard thermodynamic functions. The pure absorption mode in four quadrant two-dimensional chemical exchange experiment was employed so that the complete kinetic matrix showing all of the chemical exchange process could be realized.

  4. Experimental differential cross sections, level densities, and spin cutoffs as a testing ground for nuclear reaction codes

    DOE PAGES

    Voinov, Alexander V.; Grimes, Steven M.; Brune, Carl R.; ...

    2013-11-08

    Proton double-differential cross sections from 59Co(α,p)62Ni, 57Fe(α,p)60Co, 56Fe(7Li,p)62Ni, and 55Mn(6Li,p)60Co reactions have been measured with 21-MeV α and 15-MeV lithium beams. Cross sections have been compared against calculations with the empire reaction code. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the Gilbert and Cameron [A. Gilbert and A. G. W. Cameron, Can. J. Phys. 43, 1446 (1965)] level density model is best to reproduce experimental data. Level densities and spin cutoff parameters for 62Ni and 60Co above the excitation energy range of discrete levels (in continuum) have been obtained with a Monte Carlo technique. Furthermore,more » excitation energy dependencies were found to be inconsistent with the Fermi-gas model.« less

  5. Observation of Nuclear Scaling in the A(e,e{prime}) Reaction at x{sub B} > 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kim Egiyan; Natalya Dashyan; Misak Sargsian; Stepan Stepanyan; Lawrence Weinstein; et. al.

    2003-07-01

    The ratios of inclusive electron scattering cross sections of 4He, 12C, and 56Fe to 3He have been measured for the first time. It is shown that these ratios are independent of xB at Q2 > 1.4 GeV2 for xB > 1.5, where the inclusive cross section depends primarily on the high momentum components of the nuclear wave function. The observed scaling shows that the momentum distributions at high-momenta have the same shape for all nuclei and differ only by a scale factor. The observed onset of the scaling at Q2 > 1.4 GeV2 and xB > 1.5 is consistent with the kinematical expectation that two-nucleon short range correlations (SRC) dominate the nuclear wave function at pm300 MeV/c. The values of these ratios in the scaling region can be related to the relative probabilities of SRC in nuclei with A3. Our data, combined with calculations and other measurements of the 3He/deuterium ratio, demonstrate that for nuclei with A12 these probabilities are 4.9-5.9 times larger than in deuterium, while for 4He it is larger by a factor of about 3.8.

  6. Side feeding patterns and nuclear lifetime determinations by the Doppler shift attenuation method in (α,nγ) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihai, C.; Pasternak, A. A.; Filipescu, D.; Ivaşcu, M.; Bucurescu, D.; Căta-Danil, G.; Căta-Danil, I.; Deleanu, D.; Ghiţă, D.; Glodariu, T.; Lobach, Yu. N.; Mărginean, N.; Mărginean, R.; Negret, A.; Pascu, S.; Sava, T.; Stroe, L.; Suliman, G.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2010-03-01

    γ rays were measured at several angles in both singles and coincidence mode in the Sn119(α,nγ)Te122 reaction at 15 MeV on a thick target. Lifetimes of excited states in Te122 were determined from a Monte Carlo Doppler shift attenuation method (DSAM) analysis of the Doppler broadened lines shapes of γ rays de-exciting the levels. A comparison of several deduced lifetimes with recent results obtained with the (n,n') reaction allowed us to validate the choice of a parameter used to calculate the contribution of the side feeding times. The ingredients of the DSAM line-shape analysis (stopping power, description of instrumental line shapes, and side feeding evaluation) are presented in some detail. It is concluded that with proper treatment of side feeding, a DSAM line-shape analysis of peaks in singles or coincidence spectra obtained following the (α,nγ) reaction is able to provide rather accurate values for the lifetimes of levels with low and medium spins.

  7. Side feeding patterns and nuclear lifetime determinations by the Doppler shift attenuation method in ({alpha},n{gamma}) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mihai, C.; Filipescu, D.; Ivascu, M.; Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Cata-Danil, I.; Deleanu, D.; Ghita, D.; Glodariu, T.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Negret, A.; Pascu, S.; Sava, T.; Stroe, L.; Suliman, G.; Zamfir, N. V.; Pasternak, A. A.; Lobach, Yu. N.

    2010-03-15

    {gamma} rays were measured at several angles in both singles and coincidence mode in the {sup 119}Sn({alpha},n{gamma}){sup 122}Te reaction at 15 MeV on a thick target. Lifetimes of excited states in {sup 122}Te were determined from a Monte Carlo Doppler shift attenuation method (DSAM) analysis of the Doppler broadened lines shapes of {gamma} rays de-exciting the levels. A comparison of several deduced lifetimes with recent results obtained with the (n,n{sup '}) reaction allowed us to validate the choice of a parameter used to calculate the contribution of the side feeding times. The ingredients of the DSAM line-shape analysis (stopping power, description of instrumental line shapes, and side feeding evaluation) are presented in some detail. It is concluded that with proper treatment of side feeding, a DSAM line-shape analysis of peaks in singles or coincidence spectra obtained following the ({alpha},n{gamma}) reaction is able to provide rather accurate values for the lifetimes of levels with low and medium spins.

  8. Apparent Polyploidization after Gamma Irradiation: Pitfalls in the Use of Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) for the Estimation of Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Gene Copy Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Winnie W. Y.; Lake, Vanessa; Banos, Connie; Davies, Justin; Banati, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has been widely used to quantify changes in gene copy numbers after radiation exposure. Here, we show that gamma irradiation ranging from 10 to 100 Gy of cells and cell-free DNA samples significantly affects the measured qPCR yield, due to radiation-induced fragmentation of the DNA template and, therefore, introduces errors into the estimation of gene copy numbers. The radiation-induced DNA fragmentation and, thus, measured qPCR yield varies with temperature not only in living cells, but also in isolated DNA irradiated under cell-free conditions. In summary, the variability in measured qPCR yield from irradiated samples introduces a significant error into the estimation of both mitochondrial and nuclear gene copy numbers and may give spurious evidence for polyploidization. PMID:23722662

  9. Nuclear reaction analysis of Ge ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals: The evaluation of the displacement in oxygen lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamioka, K.; Oga, T.; Izawa, Y.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.; Kinomura, A.

    2014-08-01

    The displacement of oxygen lattices in Ge ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals is studied by nuclear reaction analysis (NAR), photoluminescence (PL), and Van der Pauw methods. The Ge ion-implantation (net concentration: 2.6 × 1020 cm-3) into ZnO is performed using a multiple-step energy. The high resistivity of ∼103 Ω cm in un-implanted samples remarkably decreased to ∼10-2 Ω cm after implanting Ge-ion and annealing subsequently. NRA measurements of as-implanted and annealed samples suggest the existence of the lattice displacement of O atoms acting as acceptor defects. As O related defects still remain after annealing, these defects are not attributed to the origin of the low resistivity in 800 and 1000 °C annealed ZnO.

  10. Calculation of (p,γ) and (p,α) nuclear reaction cross sections in stars up to 10 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, Eyyup; Sahan, Muhittin; Sarpun, Ismail Hakki; Okur, Sureyya Gulistan

    2016-11-01

    In Knowledge of the proton-proton (p-p) chain and CNO cycle are required for the evolution of main sequence stars during the early formation of the universe. In this study, we summarized the excitation functions of (p,γ) and (p,α) reactions for 7Be(p,γ)8B, 12C(p,γ)13N, 13C(p,γ)14N, 14N(p,γ)15O and 15N(p,α)15O in p-p chain and CNO cycle using EMPIRE and TALYS computer up to 10 MeV. The calculated data on nuclear fusion cross sections in hydrogen-burning stars were compared with theoretical TENDL-2014 and ENDF/B-VII data from EXFOR. The calculation results show closed agreement between the calculations and the data from literature.

  11. Thick target yield measurement of 211At through the nuclear reaction 209Bi(α, 2n)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfarano, A.; Abbas, K.; Holzwarth, U.; Bonardi, M.; Groppi, F.; Alfassi, Z.; Menapace, E.; Gibson, P. N.

    2006-05-01

    Radionuclide Therapy (RNT) and Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are potentially of great interest for cancer therapy. In many therapeutic applications alpha emitters should be much more effective than already-approved beta emitters due to the short range and high linear energy transfer of alpha particles. 213Bi is an important alpha emitter already used in clinical trials but the half-life of this radioisotope is short (46 minutes) and so its use is limited for certain therapies. 211At is potentially very interesting for medical purposes because of its longer half-life of 7.2 hours, and suitable decay scheme. We have studied the cyclotron-based production of 211At via the reaction 209Bi(α, 2n), this production route probably being the most promising in the long term. The energy dependence of thick target yields and the reaction cross sections for the production of 211At and 210At were determined and found to be in good agreement with literature. The best energy to produce 211At is 28-29 MeV. The possible production of the undesired, highly radiotoxic, and long-lived alpha-emitting 210Po (138.38 days), which is produced from decay of 210At, is also discussed.

  12. Extension of activation cross-section data of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on cadmium up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.

    2016-10-01

    The excitation functions for 109,110g,111m+g,113m,114m,115mIn, 107,109,115m,115gCd and 105g,106m,110g,111Ag are presented for stacked foil irradiations on natCd targets in the 49-33 MeV deuteron energy domain. Reduced uncertainty is obtained by determining incident particle flux and energy scale relative to re-measured monitor reactions natAl(d,x)22,24Na. The results were compared to our earlier studies on natCd and on enriched 112Cd targets. The merit of the values predicted by the TALYS 1.6 code (resulting from a weighted combination of reaction cross-section data on all stable Cd isotopes as available in the on-line libraries TENDL-2014 and TENDL-2015) is discussed. Influence on optimal production routes for several radionuclides with practical applications (111In, 114mIn, 115Cd, 109,107Cd….) is reviewed.

  13. Experimental differential cross sections, level densities, and spin cutoffs as a testing ground for nuclear reaction codes

    SciTech Connect

    Voinov, Alexander V.; Grimes, Steven M.; Brune, Carl R.; Burger, Alexander; Gorgen, Andreas; Guttormsen, Magne; Larsen, Ann -Cecilie; Massey, Thomas N.; Siem, Sunniva

    2013-11-08

    Proton double-differential cross sections from 59Co(α,p)62Ni, 57Fe(α,p)60Co, 56Fe(7Li,p)62Ni, and 55Mn(6Li,p)60Co reactions have been measured with 21-MeV α and 15-MeV lithium beams. Cross sections have been compared against calculations with the empire reaction code. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the Gilbert and Cameron [A. Gilbert and A. G. W. Cameron, Can. J. Phys. 43, 1446 (1965)] level density model is best to reproduce experimental data. Level densities and spin cutoff parameters for 62Ni and 60Co above the excitation energy range of discrete levels (in continuum) have been obtained with a Monte Carlo technique. Furthermore, excitation energy dependencies were found to be inconsistent with the Fermi-gas model.

  14. Semi-insulating GaAs detectors with HDPE layer for detection of fast neutrons from D-T nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagatova, Andrea; Zatko, Bohumir; Sedlackova, Katarina; Pavlovic, Marius; Necas, Vladimir; Fulop, Marko; Solar, Michael; Granja, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Bulk semi-insulating (SI) GaAs detectors optimized for fast-neutron detection were examined using mono-energetic neutrons. The detectors have an active area of 7.36 mm2 defined by a multi-pixel structure of a AuZn Schottky contact allowing a relatively high breakdown voltage (300 V) sufficient for full depletion of the detector structure. The Schottky contact is covered by a HDPE (high density polyethylene) conversion layer, where neutrons transfer their kinetic energy to hydrogen atoms through elastic nuclear collisions. The detectors were exposed to mono-energetic neutrons generated by a deuterium (D)-tritium (T) nuclear reaction at a Van de Graaff accelerator. Neutrons reached a kinetic energy of 16.8 MeV when deuterons were accelerated by 1 MV potential. The influence of the HDPE layer thickness on the detection efficiency of the fast neutrons was studied. The thickness of the conversion layer varied from 50 μm to 1300 μm. The increase of the HDPE layer thickness led to a higher detection efficiency due to higher conversion efficiency of the HDPE layer. The effect of the active detector thickness modified by the detector reverse bias voltage on the detection efficiency was also evaluated. By increasing the detector reverse voltage, the detector active volume expands to the depth and also to the sides, slightly increasing the neutron detection efficiency.

  15. Nuclear structure studies of 125Te with (n,γ), (d,p) and ( 3He,α) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honzátko, J.; Tomandl, I.; Bondarenko, V.; Bucurescu, D.; von Egidy, T.; Ott, J.; Schauer, W.; Wirth, H.-F.; Doll, C.; Gollwitzer, A.; Graw, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Valnion, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    Levels in 125Te were investigated in the range up to 3.3 MeV excitation energy by the (n,γ), (d,p) and ( 3He,α) reactions. Over 160 levels and about 360 γ-transitions were established, most for the first time. The states below 2.3 MeV with the most complete spectroscopic information were interpreted in terms of the interacting boson-fermion model (IBFM). Unitary treatment of both positive- and negative-parity states is achieved with the same model parameter close to the intermediate case between O(6) and U(5) limits. Excitation energies, electromagnetic transition rates, γ-branchings and spectroscopic factors are discussed in connection with the possible structures. A family of low-spin negative-parity states has been identified and understood by the IBFM proving their antialigned origin.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF INDIVIDUAL CHEMICAL REACTIONS CONSUMING ACID DURING NUCLEAR WASTE PROCESSING AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 136B

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Lambert, D.; Newell, J.; Stone, M.

    2009-09-02

    Conversion of legacy radioactive high-level waste at the Savannah River Site into a stable glass waste form involves a chemical pretreatment process to prepare the waste for vitrification. Waste slurry is treated with nitric and formic acids to achieve certain goals. The total quantity of acid added to a batch of waste slurry is constrained by the catalytic activity of trace noble metal fission products in the waste that can convert formic acid into hydrogen gas at many hundreds of times the radiolytic hydrogen generation rate. A large block of experimental process simulations were performed to characterize the chemical reactions that consume acid prior to hydrogen generation. The analysis led to a new equation for predicting the quantity of acid required to process a given volume of waste slurry.

  17. Probing the exotic structure of 8B by its elastic scattering and breakup reaction on nuclear targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanov, V. K.; Kadrev, D. N.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Spasova, K.

    2017-02-01

    The structure of the exotic 8B nucleus is studied by means of elastic scattering, as well as its breakup on nuclear targets. We present microscopic calculations of the optical potentials (OPs) and cross sections of elastic scattering of 8B on 12C, 58Ni, and 208Pb targets at energies 20 < E < 170 MeV. The density distributions of 8B obtained within the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) model and the three-cluster model (3CM) are used to construct the potentials. The real part of the hybrid OP is calculated using the folding model with the direct and exchange terms included, while the imaginary part is obtained on the base of the high-energy approximation (HEA) and also taken to be equal to the microscopic real part of the OP. In this model the only free parameters are the depths of the real and imaginary parts of OP obtained by fitting the elastic scattering experimental data. A dependence of their values on the model density of 8 B is found. In addition, the cluster model, in which 8B consists of a p-halo and the 7 Be core, is applied to calculate the breakup cross sections of the 8B nucleus on 9Be, 12C, and 197Au targets, as well as momentum distributions of 7Be fragments, and a comparison with the existing experimental data is made.

  18. Nuclear structures near and beyond the neutron drip line studied by breakup reactions at SAMURAI at RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takashi

    2013-10-01

    Some of the first results from kinematically complete measurements of breakup reactions on neutron-rich boron to oxygen isotopes, along and beyond the neutron drip line, are presented and discussed. These experiments were performed at the recently-commissioned large-acceptance multi-purpose spectrometer SAMURAI (Superconducting Analyser for MUlti-particles from Radio-Isotope Beam) at the new-generation RI beam facility, RIBF, at RIKEN. The experiments aimed at probing the two-neutron Borromean halo nuclei, 19B and 22C, and at exploring the heavy oxygen isotopes, 25,26O, which are beyond the neutron drip line. The study of 19B and 22C has been made primarily by the Coulomb breakup, which is sensitive to the halo states and associated two-neutron correlations. 22C has drawn much attention due to the possibility that it has the largest halo known. In addition, 22C may also exhibit features consistent with the new magic number N=16, as was recently suggested by our inclusive measurement of the momentum distribution of 20C following breakup on a C target. 25O and 26O have drawn much attention since these unbound nuclei may have keys to understand why the neutron drip line ends anomalously closer to the stability for oxygen isotopes. 25O and 26O have been produced by the proton removal reactions on 26F,27Ne, and 27F,28Ne, respectively, at 220-250 MeV/nucleon. Preliminary data are shown and discussed. Finally, some perspectives on future projects using the SAMURAI facility are presented.

  19. Depth profile of production yields of natPb(p, xn) 206,205,204,203,202,201Bi nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari Oranj, Leila; Jung, Nam-Suk; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Arim; Bae, Oryun; Lee, Hee-Seock

    2016-11-01

    Experimental and simulation studies on the depth profiles of production yields of natPb(p, xn) 206,205,204,203,202,201Bi nuclear reactions were carried out. Irradiation experiments were performed at the high-intensity proton linac facility (KOMAC) in Korea. The targets, irradiated by 100-MeV protons, were arranged in a stack consisting of natural Pb, Al, Au foils and Pb plates. The proton beam intensity was determined by activation analysis method using 27Al(p, 3p1n)24Na, 197Au(p, p1n)196Au, and 197Au(p, p3n)194Au monitor reactions and also by Gafchromic film dosimetry method. The yields of produced radio-nuclei in the natPb activation foils and monitor foils were measured by HPGe spectroscopy system. Monte Carlo simulations were performed by FLUKA, PHITS/DCHAIN-SP, and MCNPX/FISPACT codes and the calculated data were compared with the experimental results. A satisfactory agreement was observed between the present experimental data and the simulations.

  20. Experimental verification of proton beam monitoring in a human body by use of activity image of positron-emitting nuclei generated by nuclear fragmentation reaction.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Teiji; Miyatake, Aya; Inoue, Kazumasa; Gomi-Miyagishi, Tomoko; Kohno, Ryosuke; Kameoka, Satoru; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Ogino, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Proton therapy is a form of radiotherapy that enables concentration of dose on a tumor by use of a scanned or modulated Bragg peak. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate the proton-irradiated volume accurately. The proton-irradiated volume can be confirmed by detection of pair-annihilation gamma rays from positron-emitting nuclei generated by the nuclear fragmentation reaction of the incident protons on target nuclei using a PET apparatus. The activity of the positron-emitting nuclei generated in a patient was measured with a PET-CT apparatus after proton beam irradiation of the patient. Activity measurement was performed in patients with tumors of the brain, head and neck, liver, lungs, and sacrum. The 3-D PET image obtained on the CT image showed the visual correspondence with the irradiation area of the proton beam. Moreover, it was confirmed that there were differences in the strength of activity from the PET-CT images obtained at each irradiation site. The values of activity obtained from both measurement and calculation based on the reaction cross section were compared, and it was confirmed that the intensity and the distribution of the activity changed with the start time of the PET imaging after proton beam irradiation. The clinical use of this information about the positron-emitting nuclei will be important for promoting proton treatment with higher accuracy in the future.

  1. A solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance study of post-plasma reactions in organosilicone microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) coatings.

    PubMed

    Hall, Colin J; Ponnusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Murphy, Peter J; Lindberg, Mats; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Griesser, Hans J

    2014-06-11

    Plasma-polymerized organosilicone coatings can be used to impart abrasion resistance and barrier properties to plastic substrates such as polycarbonate. Coating rates suitable for industrial-scale deposition, up to 100 nm/s, can be achieved through the use of microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), with optimal process vapors such as tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO) and oxygen. However, it has been found that under certain deposition conditions, such coatings are subject to post-plasma changes; crazing or cracking can occur anytime from days to months after deposition. To understand the cause of the crazing and its dependence on processing plasma parameters, the effects of post-plasma reactions on the chemical bonding structure of coatings deposited with varying TMDSO-to-O2 ratios was studied with (29)Si and (13)C solid-state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) using both single-pulse and cross-polarization techniques. The coatings showed complex chemical compositions significantly altered from the parent monomer. (29)Si MAS NMR spectra revealed four main groups of resonance lines, which correspond to four siloxane moieties (i.e., mono (M), di (D), tri (T), and quaternary (Q)) and how they are bound to oxygen. Quantitative measurements showed that the ratio of TMDSO to oxygen could shift the chemical structure of the coating from 39% to 55% in Q-type bonds and from 28% to 16% for D-type bonds. Post-plasma reactions were found to produce changes in relative intensities of (29)Si resonance lines. The NMR data were complemented by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Together, these techniques have shown that the bonding environment of Si is drastically altered by varying the TMDSO-to-O2 ratio during PECVD, and that post-plasma reactions increase the cross-link density of the silicon-oxygen network. It appears that Si-H and Si-OH chemical groups are the most susceptible to post-plasma reactions. Coatings produced at a

  2. ANOMALOUS REACTION MEAN FREE PATHS OF NUCLEAR PROJECTILE FRAGMENTS FROM HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AT 2 AGeV

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlander, E.M.; Gimpel, R.W.; Heckman, H.H.; Karant, Y.J.; Judek, B.; Ganssauge, E.

    1982-08-01

    We present in detail the description and the analysis of two independent experiments using Bevalac beams of {sup 16}O and {sup 56}Fe. From their results it is concluded that the reaction mean free paths of relativistic projectile fragments, 3 {<=} Z {<=} 26, are shorter for a few centimeters after emission than at large distances where they are compatible with values predicted from experiments on beam nuclei. The probability that this effect is due to a statistical fluctuation is <10{sup -3}. The effect is enhanced in later generations of fragments, the correlation between successive generations suggesting a kind of "memory" for the anomaly. Various systematic and spurious effects as well as conventional explanations are discussed mainly on the basis of direct experimental observations internal to our data, and found not to explain our results. The data can be interpreted by the relatively rare occurrence of anomalous fragments that interact with an unexpectedly large cross section. The statistical methods used in the analysis of the observations are fully described.

  3. Nuclear orientation in the reaction S34+U238 and synthesis of the new isotope Hs268

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, K.; Hofmann, S.; Heßberger, F. P.; Ackermann, D.; Antalic, S.; Aritomo, Y.; Comas, V. F.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Gorshkov, A.; Graeger, R.; Hagino, K.; Heinz, S.; Heredia, J. A.; Hirose, K.; Ikezoe, H.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Mitsuoka, S.; Nagame, Y.; Nishinaka, I.; Ohtsuki, T.; Popeko, A. G.; Saro, S.; Schädel, M.; Türler, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Yakushev, A.; Yeremin, A. V.

    2010-08-01

    The synthesis of isotopes of the element hassium was studied using the reaction S34+U238→Hs272*. At a kinetic energy of 163.0 MeV in the center-of-mass system we observed one α-decay chain starting at the isotope Hs267. The cross section was 1.8-1.5+4.2 pb. At 152.0 MeV one decay of the new isotope Hs268 was observed. It decays with a half-life of 0.38-0.17+1.8 s by 9479±16 keV α-particle emission. Spontaneous fission of the daughter nucleus Sg264 was confirmed. The measured cross section was 0.54-0.45+1.3 pb. In-beam measurements of fission-fragment mass distributions were performed to obtain information on the fusion probability at various orientations of the deformed target nucleus. The distributions changed from symmetry to asymmetry when the beam energy was changed from above-barrier to sub-barrier values, indicating orientation effects on fusion and/or quasifission. It was found that the distribution of symmetric mass fragments originates not only from fusion-fission, but has a strong component from quasifission. The result was supported by a calculation based on a dynamical description using the Langevin equation, in which the mass distributions for fusion-fission and quasifission fragments were separately determined.

  4. Nuclear Structure and Quasi-Discrete Features populated in the 152,154Sm(p,t) Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humby, P.; Beausang, C. W.; Simon, A.; Cooper, N.; Wilson, E.; Gell, K.; Tarlow, T.; Vyas, G.; Ross, T. J.; Hughes, R. O.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; Koglin, J.; Ota, S.; Allmond, J. M.; McCleskey, M.; McCleskey, E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Chyzh, R.; Dag, M.

    2016-03-01

    The 152,154Sm(p,t) reactions were used to investigate large, narrow, quasi-discrete structures observed in the triton energy spectra at excitation energies of 2-3 MeV. The experiment utilized a 25 MeV proton beam from the K-150 cyclotron at the Cyclotron Institute of Texas A&M University and the outgoing charged particles and γ rays were detected using the STARLiTeR array. This consists of a highly segmented ΔE-E silicon telescope and six BGO shielded HPGe clover detectors. The angular distributions of the outgoing tritons populating the narrow structures are compared to those from both the population of low energy discrete states and the high energy continuum region. The fraction of strength in the structures accounted for by the observed discrete states and the total strength of the feature in neighboring isotopes are discussed. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy No. DE-FG02-05ER41379, DE-FG52-09NA29467 and DE-NA0001801, the National Science Foundation under PHY-130581, and by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Nuclear Structure of the Closed Subshell Nucleus 90Zr Studied with the (n,n'(gamma)) Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, P E; Younes, Y; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Baum, E M; DiPrete, D P; Gatenby, R A; Johnson, E L; McGrath, C A; Yates, S W; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R O; Brown, B A

    2003-06-12

    States in {sup 90}Zr have been observed with the (n,n{prime}{gamma}) reaction using both spallation and monoenergetic accelerator-produced neutrons. A scheme comprised of 81 levels and 157 transitions was constructed concentrating on levels below 5.6 MeV in excitation energy. Spins have been determined by considering data from all experimental studies performed for {sup 90}Zr. Lifetimes have been deduced using the Doppler-shift attenuation method for many of the states and transition rates have been obtained. A spherical shell-model interpretation in terms of particle-hole excitations assuming a {sup 88}Sr closed core is given. In some cases, enhancements in B(M1) and B(E2) values are observed that cannot be explained by assuming simple particle-hole excitations. Shell-model calculations using an extended f pg-shell model space reproduce the spectrum of excited states very well, and the gross features of the B(M1) and B(E2) transition rates. Transition rates for individual levels show discrepancies between calculations and experimental values.

  6. Effects of nuclear orientation on fusion and fission process for reactions using {sup 238}U target nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, K.; Ikezoe, H.; Mitsuoka, S.; Nishinaka, I.; Makii, H.; Nagame, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohtsuki, T.; Hirose, K.; Hofmann, S.

    2010-06-01

    Fission fragment mass distributions in the reaction of {sup 30}Si+{sup 238}U were measured at the energies around the Coulomb barrier. At the above-barrier energies, the mass distribution showed Gaussian shape. At the sub-barrier energies, asymmetric fission mode peaked at A{sub L}/A{sub H}approx =90/178 was observed. The asymmetric fission should be attributed to quasifission from the results of the measured evaporation residue (ER) cross-sections produced by {sup 30}Si+{sup 238}U. The cross-section for {sup 263}Sg at the above-barrier energy agree with the statistical model calculation which assumes that the measured fission cross-sections are equal to the fusion cross-sections, whereas the one for {sup 264}Sg measured at the sub-barrier energy is smaller than the calculation, indicating the presence for quasifission. The fragment mass distributions are compared to those for {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U and {sup 40}Ar+{sup 238}U.

  7. Maruhn-Greiner Maximum for Confirmation of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) via a Compound Nucleus with Double Magic Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich; Miley, George

    2007-03-01

    One of the most convincing facts about LENR due to deuterons (ds) or protons of very high concentration in host metals of palladium is the measurement of the large scale minimum in the reaction probability with product elements centered around the nucleon number A = 153. The local maximum was measured in this region is similar to fission of uranium at A = 119 where the local maximum follows the Maruhn-Greiner mechanism^1. We suggest this phenomenon can be explained by the strong screening of the Maxwellian ds on the degenerate rigid electron background within the swimming electrons at the metal surface or thin filem interfaces. The deuterons behave like neutrals at distances of above 2 picometers (pm) and form clusters due to soft attraction in the range of thermal energy; 10 pm diameter clusters can react over long time scales (10^6 s) with Pd leading to double magic number compound nuclei 306x126 decaying via fission to an A=153 element distribution. J. Maruhn et al, Phys. Rev. Letters 32, 548 (1974) H. Hora, G.H. Miley, CzechJ. Phys. 48, 1111 (1998)

  8. Nuclear quantum effect and H/D isotope effect on F + (H2O)n → FH + (H2O)n-1OH (n = 1-3) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udagawa, Taro; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2016-10-01

    Potential energy profiles for F + (H2O)n → FH + (H2O)n-1OH (n = 1-3) reactions, which are widely relevant to solvent effects on chemical reactions, have been investigated using the conventional quantum mechanical (QM) methods and our multicomponent QM (MC_QM) methods, which can take account of nuclear quantum effect of light nucleus, such as proton and deuteron. For these reactions, Li and co-workers [G. Li et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 11979 (2013)] reported that (i) for F + H2O → FH + OH reaction, MPW1K density functional gave the best barrier among 49 kinds of density functionals and (ii) the energy of transition state of F + (H2O)2 → FH + (H2O)OH reaction is lower than that of the separated reactant molecules by the contribution of the second water molecule using high-accuracy CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ calculations. We have found that ω B97XD density functional reasonably reproduces the CCSD(T) geometries well, whereas MPW1K was not suited for analyzing F + (H2O)2 → FH + (H2O)OH reaction. Our MC_QM calculations reveal that nuclear quantum nature of hydrogen nucleus lowers the activation barrier of the reactions. The H/D isotope effect on F + (H2O)n → FH + (H2O)n-1OH (n = 1-3) reactions was also investigated.

  9. Use of nuclear stiffness in search for a maximum hardness principle and for the softest states along the chemical reaction path: A new formula for the energy third derivative γ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordon, Piotr; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2007-06-01

    Nuclear stiffness, expressed as a hardness derivative, appears to be a good measure of the slope of global hardness. The authors analyze molecular states for which hardness has a maximum value. Maximum hardness principle (MHP) has been discussed. At the ground state hardness function does not obtain a maximum value versus spatial coordinates within a constant number of electrons (N), but is so within constant chemical potential (μ) constraint. The authors apply this feature to evaluate an energy third derivative (γ). MHP has been analyzed via symmetry considerations of nuclear stiffness and nuclear reactivity. Nuclear stiffness has been also applied to study the hardness profile for a chemical reaction. In this case, the authors seek molecular states for which hardness is at a minimum. They have examined systems for which they have recently obtained regional chemical potentials [P. Ordon and A. Tachibana, J. Mol. Model. 11, 312 (2005); J. Chem. Sci. 117, 583 (2005)]. The transition state is found not to be the softest along the chemical reaction path. Nuclear stiffness reflects well the softest conformation of a molecule, which has been found independently along the intrinsic reaction coordinate profile. Electronic energy-density [A. Tachibana, J. Mol. Mod. 11, 301 (2005)] has been used to visualize the reactivity difference between the softest state and the transition state.

  10. Extension of the energy range of the experimental activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 65MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-04-01

    Activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium were extended up to 65MeV by using stacked foil irradiation and gamma spectrometry experimental methods. Experimental cross-sections data for the formation of the radionuclides (159)Dy, (157)Dy, (155)Dy, (161)Tb, (160)Tb, (156)Tb, (155)Tb, (154m2)Tb, (154m1)Tb, (154g)Tb, (153)Tb, (152)Tb and (151)Tb are reported in the 36-65MeV energy range, and compared with an old dataset from 1964. The experimental data were also compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS nuclear reaction model code as listed in the latest on-line libraries TENDL 2013.

  11. Hyperfine and Nuclear Quadrupole Tensors of Nitrogen Donors in the QA Site of Bacterial Reaction Centers: Correlation of the Histidine Nδ Tensors with Hydrogen Bond Strength

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    X- and Q-band pulsed EPR spectroscopy was applied to study the interaction of the QA site semiquinone (SQA) with nitrogens from the local protein environment in natural abundance 14N and in 15N uniformly labeled photosynthetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole tensors for His-M219 Nδ and Ala-M260 peptide nitrogen (Np) were estimated through simultaneous simulation of the Q-band 15N Davies ENDOR, X- and Q-band 14,15N HYSCORE, and X-band 14N three-pulse ESEEM spectra, with support from DFT calculations. The hyperfine coupling constants were found to be a(14N) = 2.3 MHz, T = 0.3 MHz for His-M219 Nδ and a(14N) = 2.6 MHz, T = 0.3 MHz for Ala-M260 Np. Despite that His-M219 Nδ is established as the stronger of the two H-bond donors, Ala-M260 Np is found to have the larger value of a(14N). The nuclear quadrupole coupling constants were estimated as e2Qq/4h = 0.38 MHz, η = 0.97 and e2Qq/4h = 0.74 MHz, η = 0.59 for His-M219 Nδ and Ala-M260 Np, respectively. An analysis of the available data on nuclear quadrupole tensors for imidazole nitrogens found in semiquinone-binding proteins and copper complexes reveals these systems share similar electron occupancies of the protonated nitrogen orbitals. By applying the Townes–Dailey model, developed previously for copper complexes, to the semiquinones, we find the asymmetry parameter η to be a sensitive probe of the histidine Nδ–semiquinone hydrogen bond strength. This is supported by a strong correlation observed between η and the isotropic coupling constant a(14N) and is consistent with previous computational works and our own semiquinone-histidine model calculations. The empirical relationship presented here for a(14N) and η will provide an important structural characterization tool in future studies of semiquinone-binding proteins. PMID:25026433

  12. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  13. The role of nuclear reactions in the problem of 0νββ decay and the NUMEN project at INFN-LNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Agodi, C.; Bondì, M.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Foti, A.

    2015-07-01

    An innovative technique to access the nuclear matrix elements entering the expression of the life time of the double beta decay by relevant cross sections of double charge exchange reactions is proposed. The basic point is the coincidence of the initial and final state wave-functions in the two classes of processes and the similarity of the transition operators, which in both cases present a superposition of Fermi, Gamow-Teller and rank-two tensor components with a relevant implicit momentum transfer. First pioneering experimental results obtained at the INFN-LNS laboratory for the 40Ca(18O,18Ne)40Ar reaction at 270 MeV, give encouraging indication on the capability of the proposed technique to access relevant quantitative information. A key aspect of the project is the use of the K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS) for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy- ion beams and of the MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer for the detection of the ejectiles. The use of the high-order trajectory reconstruction technique, implemented in MAGNEX, allows to reach the high mass, angular and energy resolution required even at very low cross section. The LNS set-up is today an ideal one for this research even in a worldwide perspective. However a main limitation on the beam current delivered by the accelerator and the maximum rate accepted by the MAGNEX focal plane detector must be sensibly overcome in order to systematically provide accurate numbers to the neutrino physics community in all the studied cases. The upgrade of the LNS facilities in this view is part of this project.

  14. Mg segregation in Mg-rich Mg-Ni switchable mirror studied by Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, and nuclear reaction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiba, D.; Horikoshi, M.; Abe, S.; Ishii, S.

    2009-12-01

    Pd/Mg{sub 3.3}Ni films were prepared by dc sputtering deposition on three different substrates of glass, diamondlike carbon/Si, and Si. Hydrogenation and dehydrogenation cycles were performed on these samples simultaneously. The optical switching property due to the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation was monitored by the transmission of laser light via the glass substrate. The switching ability was totally lost after 120 cycles. We made comparative study of the composition change between the new (as-deposited) and old (after 120 switching cycles) samples by Rutherford backscattering (RBS), elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). From the RBS results we found out the segregation of a Mg layer between the Pd cap layer and the rest of the Mg-Ni layer. At the Pd/Mg interface in the old sample, thin MgO layer formed probably during the dehydrogenation process with O{sub 2}. ERDA showed that there is much hydrogen in the old sample. NRA displayed the depth profiles of hydrogen distribution in the old sample. It is revealed that much hydrogen is accumulated at the interface between the Pd cap layer and the segregated Mg layer. It can be concluded that the formations of oxide and hydride of the segregated Mg layer are the main reasons for the degradation of the Mg{sub 3.3}Ni switchable mirror.

  15. Mg segregation in Mg-rich Mg-Ni switchable mirror studied by Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, and nuclear reaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiba, D.; Horikoshi, M.; Abe, S.; Ishii, S.

    2009-12-01

    Pd/Mg3.3Ni films were prepared by dc sputtering deposition on three different substrates of glass, diamondlike carbon/Si, and Si. Hydrogenation and dehydrogenation cycles were performed on these samples simultaneously. The optical switching property due to the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation was monitored by the transmission of laser light via the glass substrate. The switching ability was totally lost after 120 cycles. We made comparative study of the composition change between the new (as-deposited) and old (after 120 switching cycles) samples by Rutherford backscattering (RBS), elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). From the RBS results we found out the segregation of a Mg layer between the Pd cap layer and the rest of the Mg-Ni layer. At the Pd/Mg interface in the old sample, thin MgO layer formed probably during the dehydrogenation process with O2. ERDA showed that there is much hydrogen in the old sample. NRA displayed the depth profiles of hydrogen distribution in the old sample. It is revealed that much hydrogen is accumulated at the interface between the Pd cap layer and the segregated Mg layer. It can be concluded that the formations of oxide and hydride of the segregated Mg layer are the main reasons for the degradation of the Mg3.3Ni switchable mirror.

  16. The Gas Motion Due To Non-Uniform Heating By 3He(n,p)3H Reactions In The Nuclear-Pumped3He -Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Cetin, Fuesun

    2007-04-23

    In the nuclear pumped-lasers, the passage of these energetic charged particles through gas results in a non-uniform volumetric energy deposition. This spatial non-uniformity induces a gas motion, which results in density and hence refractive index gradients that affects the laser's optical behaviour. The motion of 3He gas in a closed cavity is studied when it experiences transient and spatially non-uniform volumetric heating caused by the passage of 3He(n,p)3H reaction products. Gas motion is described by the radial velocity field of gas flow. Spatial and temporal variations of radial gas velocity are calculated for various tube parameters by using a dynamic energy deposition model. In the calculations, it is assumed that the laser tube is irradiated with neutrons from the pulse at a peak power of 1200 MW corresponding to a maximum thermal neutron flux of 8x1016 n / cm2sn in the central channel of ITU TRIGA Mark II Reactor. Results are examined.

  17. Channelling experiments on the lattice location of hydrogen in metals using the nuclear reaction 1H(11B, α)αα

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Eiichi

    1992-03-01

    In order to locate hydrogen dissolved in metals a nuclear reaction 1H(11B, α)αα was applied to a channelling method. As an example of this application the results of the following two experiments were briefly reported. (1) The lattice location of H in V was investigated under a <001> compressive stress of 7 kg/mm2 below the elastic limit. The configuration of hydrogen is extremely sensitive to compressive stress and changes from a tetrahedral (T) site to a diplaced-T or 4T configuration. On release of this stress the hydrogen atoms returned to T-sites. (2) To elucidate the mechanism of the enhancement of the terminal solubility for hydrogen (TSH) in Nb on alloying with undersized Mo atoms, the state of hydrogen was studied in Nb-based Nb-Mo dilute alloys. It was demonstrated that H atoms are trapped by Mo atoms and located at sites displaced from T-sites by about 0.6 Å. This result supports the trapping model for the enhancement of the TSH in the region of low Mo concentration.

  18. Determination of inverse electric field strength of Ta 218O 5 film produced in biological electrolytes using 18O(p, α) 15N nuclear reaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosu, Sylvanus N.

    2005-08-01

    A 18O(p, α) 15N nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) method was developed for the determination of inverse electric field strengths (also referred to as anodic constants) of Ta 2O 5 oxide films prepared in biological solutions (urine, blood plasma and serum). The results show that fresh biological electrolytes have inverse electric field strengths equal to 17.5 ± 1.2, 17.3 ± 1.2, 17.3 ± 0.8 Å/V for plasma, serum and urine, respectively compared to 16.2 ± 0.2 and 15.7 Å/V, for 3% ammonium citrate water and distilled water, respectively. The inverse electric field strength is shown to depend on the pH variation, the metal substrate and the electrolytic ionic concentration. Freezing or aging of the biological sample results in greater variation and reduction of solution pH. Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) analyses show no incorporation of ions of Z > 11.

  19. Treatment of continuum in nuclear reactions involving weakly bound systems. A simple model to test different prescriptions describing the coupling to continuum states

    SciTech Connect

    Dasso, C. H.; Vitturi, A.

    2009-03-04

    We exploit a model describing the break-up of weakly-bound nuclei that can be used as a laboratory for testing different prescriptions that have been advanced in the literature to take into account the near-by presence of continuum states. In the model we follow the evolution of a single particle wave function in one dimension, initially bound by a Woods-Saxon type potential and then perturbed by a time- and position-dependent external field. Proper choices of this potential can simulate the effect of the interaction between reaction partners in a nuclear collision. These processes generate inelastic excitation probabilities that--distributed over the bound and continuum states of the system--lead to either a partial or a total fragmentation of the final wave function. The comparison with the exact calculations shows that standard coupled channel descriptions based on discretization of the continuum can be accurate only when a proper choice is made of the number of discrete states, of the energy mesh and of the energy cutoff. This may imply, even in simplified cases, the use of a rather large (and unpracticable) number of channels. The use of a more restricted number of channels may lead to misleading results.

  20. Nuclear Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    This document is a report on a course in nuclear science for the high school curriculum. The course is designed to provide a basic but comprehensive understanding of the atom in the light of modern knowledge, and to show how people attempt to harness the tremendous energy liberated through fission and fusion reactions. The course crosses what are…

  1. A program in medium-energy nuclear physics. Progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, B.L.; Dhuga, K.S.

    1994-08-01

    This renewal proposal requests continued funding for our program in experimental medium-energy nuclear physics. The focus of our program remains the understanding of the short-range part of the strong interaction in the nuclear medium. In the past three years we have focused our attention ever more sharply on experiments with real tagged photons at CEBAF. We are part of the Hall-B Collaboration at CEBAF. We are co-spokespersons on two approved CEBAF experiments, Photoreactions on {sup 3}He and Photoabsorption and Photofission of Nuclei, and we are preparing another, Nondiffractive Photoproduction of the {rho} Meson with Linearly Polarized Photons, for presentation to the next CEBAF PAC. We are part of the team that is instrumenting the Photon Tagger and a high-energy tagged polarized-photon beam for Hall B; some of the instrumentation for these projects is being built at our Nuclear Detector Laboratory, under the auspices of The George Washington University Center for Nuclear Studies. Our recent measurements of pion scattering from {sup 3}H and {sup 3}He at LAMPF and of cluster knockout from few-body nuclei at NIKHEF have yielded very provocative results, showing the importance of the very light nuclei as a laboratory for quantifying important aspects of the nuclear many-body force. We look forward to expanding our studies of short-range forces in nuclei, particularly the very fight nuclei using electromagnetic probes and employing the extraordinary power of CEBAF and the CLAS.

  2. Basic Nuclear Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    Basic concepts of nuclear structures, radiation, nuclear reactions, and health physics are presented in this text, prepared for naval officers. Applications to the area of nuclear power are described in connection with pressurized water reactors, experimental boiling water reactors, homogeneous reactor experiments, and experimental breeder…

  3. Excitation functions of 124Te(d,xn)124,125I reactions from threshold up to 14 MeV: comparative evaluation of nuclear routes for the production of 124I.

    PubMed

    Bastian, T H; Coenen, H H; Qaim, S M

    2001-09-01

    Excitation functions of the nuclear reactions 124Te(d,xn)124-125I were measured from their respective thresholds up to 14.0 MeV via the stacked-foil technique. Thin samples were prepared by electrolytic deposition of 99.8% enriched 124Te on Ti-backing. The excitation function of the 124Te(d,n)125I reaction was measured for the first time. The present data for the 124Te(d,2n)124I reaction are by an order of magnitude higher than the literature experimental data but are in good agreement with the results of a hybrid model calculation. From the measured cross sections, integral yields of 124,125I were calculated. The energy range Ed = 14 --> 10 MeV appears to be the best compromise between 124I-yield and 1251-impurity. The calculated 124I-yield amounts to 17.5 MBq/microA h and the 125I-impurity to 1.7%. A critical evaluation of the three nuclear routes for the production of 124I, viz. 124Te(d,2n)-, 124Te(p,n)- and 125Te(p,2n)-processes, is given. The reaction studied in this work proved to be least suitable. The 124Te(p,n)-reaction gives 124I of the highest radionuclidic purity, and a small-sized cyclotron is adequate for production purposes. The 125Te(p,2n)-reaction is more suitable at a medium-sized cyclotron: the yield of 124I is four times higher than in the other two reactions but the level of 0.9% 125I-impurity is relatively high.

  4. Formation of correlated states and optimization of nuclear reactions for low-energy particles at nonresonant low-frequency modulation of a potential well

    SciTech Connect

    Vysotskii, V. I. Vysotskyy, M. V.

    2015-02-15

    A method for the formation of correlated coherent states of low-energy particles in a parabolic potential well owing to the full-scale low-frequency modulation ω(t) = ω{sub 0}sinΩt of the parameters of this well has been considered. It has been shown that such a modulation in the absence of a stochastic force acting on a particle results in the fast formation of correlated coherent states and in an increase in the correlation coefficient and transparency of the potential barrier to the limiting values vertical bar r(t) vertical bar {sub max} → 1 and D → 1. The presence of the stochastic force significantly affects the evolution of correlated coherent states, decreasing the rate of an increase in the correlation coefficient vertical bar r(t) vertical bar {sub max} (at Ω ≤ 10{sup −4}ω{sub 0}) and limiting it at the level vertical bar r(∞) vertical bar {sub max} < 1 (at Ω = (0.001–0.1)ω{sub 0}); vertical bar r(∞) vertical bar {sub max} increases with a decrease in the frequency of modulation and decreases with an increase in the intensity of the stochastic force. It has been shown that, at a realistic relation between the parameters, low-frequency modulation can ensure such vertical bar r vertical bar {sub max} value that the transparency of the potential barrier for low-energy particles increases by a factor of 10{sup 50}–10{sup 100} or larger. The mechanism of the formation of correlated coherent states for charged particles in a gas or a low-pressure plasma placed in a low-frequency magnetic field has been considered. We have determined the relation between the magnetic field strength and modulation frequency, as well as the relation between the temperature and density of the gas (plasma), at which the method under consideration can be used to optimize nuclear reactions at low energies.

  5. [The automated analysis of anti-nuclear antibodies using technique of indirect reaction of immunofluorescence with application of HEP-2-cells].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, E N; Verijnikova, J G; Novikov, A A; Baranov, A A; Abaitova, N E; Lapkina, N A; Roggenbuk, D; Nasonov, E L

    2015-03-01

    The identification of antinuclear antibodies in blood serum based on indirect reaction of immunofluorescence using cells of line HEp-2 (IRIF HEp-2)--a "golden standard" and key screening technique of laboratory diagnostic of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The automated systems of interpretation of samples offluorescence promote standardization and increase effectiveness of detection of content of antinuclear antibodies with IRIF HEp-2 technique. The study was organized to comparatively analyze automated and visual interpretation of results of IRIF HEp-2 in detection of content antinuclear antibodies in patients with rheumatic diseases. The level of antinuclear antibodies in blood serums of 1178 patients with rheumatic diseases was detected using IRIF HEp-2 technique. The results of IRIF HEp-2 were evaluated by visual microscopy and using automated platform "AKLIDES". The degree of consistency of positive/negative results of detection (k = 0.5), types (k = 0.7) and titers/intensity of fluorescence (k = 0.45) of antinuclear antibodies under automated and traditional interpretation of IRIF HEp-2 was "good". The discordance of positive/negative results of analysis of content of IRIF HEp-2 was established in 18.5% of patients. The automated technique more often detected homogeneous (37.6%) and speckled (32.3%) fluorescence of nucleus. At the same time, there were no differentiation of type of fluorescence in 21.4% of patients. The visual technique detected mixed type of fluorescence in blood serums of most of the patients (72.8%). The mixed fluorescence was identified by system "AKLIDES" as homogeneous (40.5%), speckled (32.7%), nucleolar (2.4%), centromeric (0.9%), undifferentiated (23.5%). Under visual analysis of samples of fluorescence with undifferentiated type of fluorescence was identified as mixed (79.8%), homogeneous (5.9%) and speckled (14.3%). The titers of antinuclear antibodies less than 1:160 associated with intensity of fluorescence 0/B±; 1:160-0, B

  6. Microbial activity in argillite waste storage cells for the deep geological disposal of French bituminous medium activity long lived nuclear waste: Impact on redox reaction kinetics and potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, A.; Leone, L.; Charlet, L.

    2009-04-01

    Micro-organisms are ubiquitous and display remarkable capabilities to adapt and survive in the most extreme environmental conditions. It has been recognized that microorganisms can survive in nuclear waste disposal facilities if the required major (P, N, K) and trace elements, a carbon and energy source as well as water are present. The space constraint is of particular interest as it has been shown that bacteria do not prosper in compacted clay. An evaluation of the different types of French medium and high level waste, in a clay-rich host rock storage environment at a depth between 500 and 600 m, has shown that the bituminous waste is the most likely candidate to accommodate significant microbial activity. The waste consists of a mixture of bitumen (source of bio-available organic matter and H2 as a consequence of its degradation and radiolysis) and nitrates and sulphates kept in a stainless steel container. The assumption, that microbes only have an impact on reaction kinetics needs to be reassessed in the case where nitrates and sulphates are present since both are known not to react at low temperatures without bacterial catalysis. The additional impact of both oxy-anions and their reduced species on redox conditions, radionuclide speciation and mobility gives this evaluation their particular relevance. Storage architecture proposes four primary waste containers positioned into armoured cement over packs and placed with others into the waste storage cell itself composed of a cement mantle enforcing the argillite host rock, the latter being characterized by an excavation damaged zone constricted both in space and in time and a pristine part of 60 m thickness. Bacterial activity within the waste and within the pristine argillite is disregarded because of the low water activity (< 0.7) and the lack of space, respectively. The most probable zones of microbial activity, those likely to develop sustainable biofilms are within the interface zones. A major restriction

  7. A classical approach in simple nuclear fusion reaction {sub 1}H{sup 2}+{sub 1}H{sup 3} using two-dimension granular molecular dynamics model

    SciTech Connect

    Viridi, S.; Kurniadi, R.; Waris, A.; Perkasa, Y. S.

    2012-06-06

    Molecular dynamics in 2-D accompanied by granular model provides an opportunity to investigate binding between nuclei particles and its properties that arises during collision in a fusion reaction. A fully classical approach is used to observe the influence of initial angle of nucleus orientation to the product yielded by the reaction. As an example, a simplest fusion reaction between {sub 1}H{sup 2} and {sub 1}H{sup 3} is observed. Several products of the fusion reaction have been obtained, even the unreported ones, including temporary {sub 2}He{sup 4} nucleus.

  8. Nuclear level densities in {sup 208}Bi and {sup 209}Po from the neutron spectra in the (p, n) reactions on {sup 208}Pb and {sup 209}Bi nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, B. V. Lychagin, A. A. Titarenko, N. N.; Demenkov, V. G.; Trykova, V. I.

    2010-07-15

    The spectra of neutrons from the (p, n) reactions on the {sup 208}Pb and {sup 209}Bi nuclei were measured in the proton-energy range 8-11 MeV. These measurements were performed by using a time-of-flight spectrometer of fast neutrons on the basis of the pulsed tandem accelerator EGP-15 of the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (Obninsk, Russian Federation). A high resolution and stability of the time-of-flight spectrometermade it possible to identify reliably low-lying discrete levels alongwith the continuum section of the neutron spectra. The measured data were analyzed on the basis of the statistical equilibrium and preequilibrium models of nuclear reactions. The respective calculations were performed by using the precise formalism of Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory together with the generalized model of a superfluid nucleus and the back-shifted Fermi gas model for the nuclear-level density. The nuclear-level densities in {sup 208}Bi and {sup 209}Po were determined along with their energy dependencies and model parameters. Our results are discussed together with available experimental data and recommendations of model systematics.

  9. New Non-Intrusive Inspection Technologies for Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledoux, Robert J.

    2015-10-01

    Comprehensive monitoring of the supply chain for nuclear materials has historically been hampered by non-intrusive inspection systems that have such large false alarm rates that they are impractical in the flow of commerce. Passport Systems, Inc. (Passport) has developed an active interrogation system which detects fissionable material, high Z material, and other contraband in land, sea and air cargo. Passport's design utilizes several detection modalities including high resolution imaging, passive radiation detection, effective-Z (EZ-3D™) anomaly detection, Prompt Neutrons from Photofission (PNPF), and Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) isotopic identification. These technologies combine to: detect fissionable, high-Z, radioactive and contraband materials, differentiate fissionable materials from high-Z shielding materials, and isotopically identify actinides, Special Nuclear Materials (SNM), and other contraband (e.g. explosives, drugs, nerve agents). Passport's system generates a 3-D image of the scanned object which contains information such as effective-Z and density, as well as a 2-D image and isotopic and fissionable information for regions of interest.

  10. Polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism analyses of nuclear and chloroplast DNA provide evidence for recombination, multiple introductions and nascent speciation in the Caulerpa taxifolia complex.

    PubMed

    Meusnier, I; Valero, M; Destombe, C; Godé, C; Desmarais, E; Bonhomme, F; Stam, W T; Olsen, J L

    2002-11-01

    Independent lines of evidence support an Australian origin for the Mediterranean populations of the tropical alga Caulerpa taxifolia. To complement previous biogeographical studies based on nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS), a new chloroplast marker was developed--the cp 16S rDNA intron-2. Sequence variability for both nuclear and chloroplast markers were assessed in 110 individuals using single strand conformation polymorphism. Comparison of intrapopulation genetic diversity between invasive Mediterranean and 'native' Australian populations revealed the occurrence of two divergent and widespread clades. The first clade grouped nontropical invasive populations with inshore-mainland populations from Australia, while the second clustered all offshore-island populations studied so far. Despite our finding of nine distinct nuclear and five distinct chloroplast profiles, a single nucleocytoplasmic combination was characteristic of the invasive populations and sexual reproduction was found to be very rare. C. taxifolia is clearly a complex of genetically and ecologically differentiated sibling species or subspecies.

  11. Nuclear Clusters in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Binh, Dam N.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, H.; Kahl, D.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Komatsubara, T.; Kato, S.; Khiem, Le H.

    2010-03-01

    The role of nuclear clustering is discussed for nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution with Cluster Nucleosynthesis Diagram (CND) proposed before. Special emphasis is placed on α-induced stellar reactions together with molecular states for O and C burning.

  12. Beyond transition state theory: accurate description of nuclear quantum effects on the rate and equilibrium constants of chemical reactions using Feynman path integrals.

    PubMed

    Vanícek, Jirí

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear tunneling and other nuclear quantum effects have been shown to play a significant role in molecules as large as enzymes even at physiological temperatures. I discuss how these quantum phenomena can be accounted for rigorously using Feynman path integrals in calculations of the equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects as well as of the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Because these calculations are extremely computationally demanding, special attention is devoted to increasing the computational efficiency by orders of magnitude by employing efficient path integral estimators.

  13. Distortion of bulk-ion distribution function due to nuclear elastic scattering and its effect on T(d,n){sup 4}He reaction rate coefficient in neutral-beam-injected deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, H.; Nakao, Y.

    2007-05-15

    An effect of nuclear elastic scattering on the rate coefficient of fusion reaction between field deuteron and triton in the presence of neutral beam injection heating is studied. Without assuming a Maxwellian for bulk-ion distribution function, the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck (BFP) equations for field (bulk) deuteron, field (bulk) triton, {alpha}-particle, and beam deuteron are simultaneously solved in an ITER-like deuterium-tritium thermonuclear plasma [R. Aymar, Fusion Eng. Des. 55, 107 (2001)]. The BFP calculation shows that enhancement of the reaction rate coefficient due to knock-on tail formation in fuel-ion distribution functions becomes appreciable, especially in the case of low-density operations.

  14. New measurements of excitation functions of 186W(p,x) nuclear reactions up to 65 MeV. Production of a 178W/178mTa generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárkányi, F.; Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.

    2017-01-01

    New experimental excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natW are presented in the 32-65 MeV energy range. The cross-sections for natW(p,xn)186,184m,184g,183, 182m,182g,181Re, natW(p,x)178W, natW(p,x)183,182, 180m, 177,176,175Ta, 175Hf and 177Lu were measured via an activation method by using a stacked-foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. The results were compared with predicted values obtained with the nuclear reaction code TALYS (results taken from the TENDL 2014 and TENDL 2015 on-line libraries). Production routes of the medically relevant radionuclides 186Re, the 178W → 178Ta generator and 181W are discussed.

  15. Talk About Nuclear Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremlett, Lewis

    1976-01-01

    Presents an overview of the relation of nuclear power to human health and the environment, and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of nuclear power as an energy source urging technical educators to inculcate an awareness of the problems associated with the production of energy. Describes the fission reaction process, the hazards of…

  16. Photoneutron Reactions in Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Hiroaki

    Photoneutron reactions are discussed in the context of nucleosynthesis with emphasis on a unified understanding of (γ, n) and (n, γ) reactions for heavy nuclei through the γ-ray strength function and a revisit to explosive nucleosynthesis of 9Be through the reciprocity theorem. The role of photonuclear reactions in nucleosynthesis is supplemented by the photonuclear data project (IAEA-CRP F42032) and will be strengthened in the Extreme Light Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) in the future.

  17. Stellar reaction rate for {sup 22}Mg+p->{sup 23}Al from the asymptotic normalization coefficient in the mirror nuclear system {sup 22}Ne+n->{sup 23}Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Abdullah, T.; Carstoiu, F.; Chen, X.; Clark, H. L.; Fu, C.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Lui, Y.-W.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Tabacaru, G.; Tokimoto, Y.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.

    2010-03-15

    The production of {sup 22}Na in ONe novae can be influenced by the {sup 22}Mg(p,gamma){sup 23}Al reaction. To investigate this reaction rate at stellar energies, we have determined the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) for {sup 22}Mg+p->{sup 23}Al through measurements of the ANCs in the mirror nuclear system {sup 22}Ne+n->{sup 23}Ne. The peripheral neutron-transfer reactions {sup 13}C({sup 12}C,{sup 13}C){sup 12}C and {sup 13}C({sup 22}Ne,{sup 23}Ne){sup 12}C were studied. The identical entrance and exit channels of the first reaction make it possible to extract independently the ground-state ANC in {sup 13}C. Our experiment gives C{sub p{sub 1/2}}{sup 2}({sup 13}C)=2.24+-0.11 fm{sup -1}, which agrees with the value obtained from several previous measurements. The weighted average for all the obtained C{sub p{sub 1/2}}{sup 2} is 2.31+-0.08 fm{sup -1}. This value is adopted to be used in obtaining the ANCs in {sup 23}Ne. The differential cross sections for the reaction {sup 13}C({sup 22}Ne,{sup 23}Ne){sup 12}C leading to the J{sup {pi}}=5/2{sup +} and 1/2{sup +} states in {sup 23}Ne have been measured at 12 MeV/u. Optical model parameters for use in the DWBA calculations were obtained from measurements of the elastic scatterings {sup 22}Ne+{sup 13}C and {sup 22}Ne+{sup 12}C. The extracted ANC for the ground state in {sup 23}Ne, C{sub d{sub 5/2}}{sup 2}=0.86+-0.08+-0.12 fm{sup -1}, is converted to its corresponding value in {sup 23}Al using mirror symmetry to give C{sub d{sub 5/2}}{sup 2}({sup 23}Al)=(4.63+-0.77)x10{sup 3} fm{sup -1}. The astrophysical S factor S(0) for the {sup 22}Mg(p,gamma) reaction was determined to be 0.96+-0.11 keV b. The consequences for nuclear astrophysics are discussed.

  18. Observation of anomalous reaction mean free paths of nuclear-projectile fragments in research emulsion from 2 A GeV heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Karant, Y.J.

    1981-07-01

    From an analysis of 1460 projectile fragment collisions in nuclear research emulsion exposed to 2.1 A GeV /sup 16/O and 1.9 A GeV /sup 56/Fe at the Bevalac, evidence is presented for the existence of an anomalously short interaction mean free path of projectile fragments for the first several cm after emission. The result is significant to beyond the 3 standard deviation confidence level.

  19. NUCLEAR ASTROPHYSICS PROJECT WITH A NEW LOW-ENERGY RIB SEPARATOR CRIB:. Study of a Critical Stellar Reaction 15O(α,γ)19Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Michimasa, S.; Teranishi, T.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Fulop, Z.; Liu, X.; Kumagai, K.; Abe, K.; Yun, C. C.; Watanabe, S.; Yamazaki, N.; Ohshiro, Y.; Kurokawa, M.; Strasser, P.; Hahn, K. I.; Kishida, T.; Imai, N.; Kato, S.; Fuchi, Y.; Tanaka, M. H.

    2003-04-01

    One of the critical stellar reactions for the onset of explosive hydrogen burning, 15O(α,γ)19Ne, is discussed with our recent experimental effort and a new possibility in our new RIB project. This reaction was investigated experimentally by indirect methods. Single particle nature of the threshold states was studied by the analog reactions, (d,t) and (d,3He) on 20Ne. The α-branching ratios for some states were also measured by a coincidence measurement of a triton and α from 19F(3He,t)19Ne*(α)15O(g.s.). Experimental plan for the problem was also discussed that uses a new low-energy RIB facility at CNS, called CRIB, which will come into operation soon.

  20. Properties of carbon-based structures synthesized in nuclear reactions induced by bremsstrahlung γ quanta with threshold energy of 10 MeV at helium pressure of 1.1 kbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didyk, A. Yu.; Wiśniewski, R.

    2016-07-01

    Helium gas with an initial pressure of about 1.1 kbar inside a high-pressure chamber (HeHPC) has been irradiated by bremsstrahlung γ quanta with a threshold energy of 10 MeV for 1.0 × 105 s produced by an electron-beam current of 22-24 μA. After opening the HeHPC, the residual pressure of helium is equal to 430 bar. Synthesized black foils with a variety of other objects are found inside the HeHPC. They are located on the inner surfaces of the reaction chamber made of high-purity copper (99.99%), the entrance the window of γ quanta made of beryllium bronze and a copper container of nuclear and chemical reaction products. Elemental analysis with the use of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microprobe analysis has revealed that the foils contain predominantly carbon and small quantities of other elements from carbon to iron. The results are in good agreement with the cycle of investigations of the authors devoted to the γ-quanta irradiation of dense hydrogen and helium gases in the presence (absence) of metals in a reaction chamber.

  1. Photonuclear and radiative-capture reaction rates for nuclear astrophysics and transmutation: 92-100Mo, 88Sr, 90Zr, and 139La

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, M.; Frauendorf, S.; Kämpfer, B.; Schwengner, R.; Wiescher, M.

    2012-06-01

    Experimental photoabsorption cross sections for the nuclei 92,94,96,98,100Mo, 88Sr, 90Zr, and 139La are used as an input for calculations of (γ,n), (γ,p), and (γ,α), as well as (n,γ), (p,γ), and (α,γ) cross sections and reaction rates at energies and temperatures relevant for nucleosynthesis network models and transmutation projects. The calculations are performed with the statistical-model code talys. The results are compared with those obtained by using different analytic standard parametrizations of γ-ray strength functions implemented in talys and with an energy-damped double-Lorentzian model. The radiative capture reaction cross sections are enhanced by the pygmy resonances in 88Sr, 90Zr, and 139La.

  2. Random-test multipole analysis of two-body (γ,p) and (γ,n) reactions of 4He nuclear disintegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhno, Yu. P.; Dogyust, I. V.; Gorbenko, E. S.; Lyakhno, V. Yu.; Zub, S. S.

    2007-01-01

    The angular dependence of azimuthal asymmetry of cross sections for the 4He( γ→,p)T and 4He( γ→,n) 3He reactions was measured at linearly polarized photon energies of 40, 60 and 80 MeV. With the data obtained as the basis and using the previously measured differential cross sections, a multipole analysis of the reactions was performed in the E1, E2 and M1 approximation. The cross sections for the multipole transition and their errors were estimated by multiply solving the set of equations that relate the Legendre coefficients to the multipole amplitude moduli. Cross sections for spin S=1 transitions of the final-state particles were determined.

  3. Random-matrix approach to the statistical compound nuclear reaction at low energies using the Monte-Carlo technique [PowerPoint

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko

    2015-11-10

    This theoretical treatment of low-energy compound nucleus reactions begins with the Bohr hypothesis, with corrections, and various statistical theories. The author investigates the statistical properties of the scattering matrix containing a Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble (GOE) Hamiltonian in the propagator. The following conclusions are reached: For all parameter values studied, the numerical average of MC-generated cross sections coincides with the result of the Verbaarschot, Weidenmueller, Zirnbauer triple-integral formula. Energy average and ensemble average agree reasonably well when the width I is one or two orders of magnitude larger than the average resonance spacing d. In the strong-absorption limit, the channel degree-of-freedom ν a is 2. The direct reaction increases the inelastic cross sections while the elastic cross section is reduced.

  4. Nuclear Science References Database

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B.; Běták, E.; Singh, B.; Totans, J.

    2014-06-15

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center (http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr)

  5. Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.D.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  6. Resource Letter FNP-1: Frontiers of nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsch, G. F.

    2004-08-01

    This Resource Letter provides a bibliography of the current research activities in nuclear physics and also a guide for finding useful nuclear data. The major areas included are nuclear structure and reactions, symmetry tests, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear theory, high-density matter, and nuclear instrumentation.

  7. In honour of N. Yngve Öhrn: surveying proton cancer therapy reactions with Öhrn's electron nuclear dynamics method. Aqueous clusters radiolysis and DNA-base damage by proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mclaurin, Patrick M.; Privett, Austin J.; Stopera, Christopher; Grimes, Thomas V.; Perera, Ajith; Morales, Jorge A.

    2015-02-01

    Proton cancer therapy (PCT) utilises high-energy H+ projectiles to cure cancer. PCT healing arises from its DNA damage in cancerous cells, which is mostly inflicted by the products from PCT water radiolysis reactions. While clinically established, a complete microscopic understanding of PCT remains elusive. To help in the microscopic elucidation of PCT, Professor Öhrn's simplest-level electron nuclear dynamics (SLEND) method is herein applied to H+ + (H2O)3-4 and H+ + DNA-bases at ELab = 1.0 keV. These are two types of computationally feasible prototypes to study water radiolysis reactions and H+-induced DNA damage, respectively. SLEND is a time-dependent, variational, non-adiabatic and direct-dynamics method that adopts a nuclear classical-mechanics description and an electronic single-determinantal wavefunction. Additionally, our SLEND + effective-core-potential method is herein employed to simulate some computationally demanding PCT reactions. Due to these attributes, SLEND proves appropriate for the simulation of various types of PCT reactions accurately and feasibly. H+ + (H2O)3-4 simulations reveal two main processes: H+ projectile scattering and the simultaneous formation of H and OH fragments; the latter process is quantified through total integrals cross sections. H+ + DNA-base simulations reveal atoms and groups displacements, ring openings and base-to-proton electron transfers as predominant damage processes. The authors warmly dedicate this SLEND investigation in honour of Professor N. Yngve Öhrn on the occasion of his 80th birthday celebration during the 54th Sanibel Symposium in St. Simons' Island, Georgia, on February 16-21, 2014. Associate Professor Jorge A. Morales was a former chemistry PhD student under the mentorship of Professor Öhrn and Dr Ajith Perera took various quantum chemistry courses taught by Professor Öhrn during his chemistry PhD studies. Both Jorge and Ajith look back to those great times of their scientific formation under

  8. Undesirable nuclear reactions and induced radioactivity as a result of the use of the high-energy therapeutic beams generated by medical linacs.

    PubMed

    Konefal, Adam; Polaczek-Grelik, Kinga; Zipper, Wiktor

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of undesirable photonuclear, electronuclear and neutron capture reactions taking place in the treatment room during emission of the typical high-energy therapeutic beams from two different medical accelerators, i.e. Primus Siemens and Varian Clinac-2300, is presented. The radioisotopes (187)W, (56)Mn, (28)Al, (57)Ni, (38)Cl, (57)Co and (19)Au and the neutron activation of (1)H were identified as a consequence of these reactions. Moreover, the increased photon fluence rate behind the door of the accelerator bunker in the operator console room was observed during emission of the 20 MV X-rays from the Varian Clinac-2300 as well as in the case of the 15 MV X-ray beam from the Primus Siemens. No increased radiation was observed during the 6 MV X-ray beam emission. The performed measurements produced evidences on the presence of neutrons in the operator console room during emission of the 15 MV X-ray beam from the Primus Siemens as well as the 20 MV X-rays and the 22 MeV electrons from the Varian Clinac-2300 accelerator.

  9. Nuclear rights - nuclear wrongs

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, E.F.; Miller, F.D.; Paul, J.; Ahrens, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. The titles are: Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War; The International Defense of Liberty; Two Concepts of Deterrence; Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control; Ethical Issues for the 1980s; The Moral Status of Nuclear Deterrent Threats; Optimal Deterrence; Morality and Paradoxical Deterrence; Immoral Risks: A Deontological Critique of Nuclear Deterrence; No War Without Dictatorship, No Peace Without Democracy: Foreign Policy as Domestic Politics; Marxism-Leninism and its Strategic Implications for the United States; Tocqueveille War.

  10. Nuclear Submarines and Aircraft Carriers | Radiation ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2016-02-23

    Nuclear submarines and aircraft carriers are powered by onboard nuclear reactors. Heat from the nuclear reaction makes the steam needed to power the submarine. When a nuclear vessel is taken out of service, its radioactive parts are disposed of and monitored.

  11. Nuclear Astrophysics at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Reifarth, R.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R.C.; Kronenberg, A.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Rundberg, R.S.; Schwantes, J.M.; Ullmann, J.L.; Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.; Alpizar-Vicente, A.; Hatarik, R.; Greife, U.

    2005-05-24

    One of the most interesting nuclear physics challenges is obtaining a detailed understanding of the nucleosynthesis processes of the elements. Knowledge about the stellar sites, and how they are governed by stellar evolution and cosmology are crucial in understanding the overall picture. Information on reaction rates for neutron- and charged-particle-induced reactions have a direct impact on existing stellar models. Except for the stable isotopes, very few neutron-induced reactions in the energy range of interest have been measured to date. DANCE measurements on stable and unstable isotopes will provide many of the missing key reactions that are needed to understand the nucleosynthesis of the heavy elements.

  12. Radiative capture reactions in astrophysics

    DOE PAGES

    Brune, Carl R.; Davids, Barry

    2015-08-07

    Here, the radiative capture reactions of greatest importance in nuclear astrophysics are identified and placed in their stellar contexts. Recent experimental efforts to estimate their thermally averaged rates are surveyed.

  13. Nuclear theory progress report, April 1991--April 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This report discusses research in nuclear theory on the following topics: nuclear astrophysics; quantum chromodynamics; quark matter; symmetry breaking; heavy ion reactions; hadronic form factors; neutrino processes; nuclear structure; weak interaction physics; and other related topics. (LSP)

  14. Nuclear theory progress report, April 1991--April 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research in nuclear theory on the following topics: nuclear astrophysics; quantum chromodynamics; quark matter; symmetry breaking; heavy ion reactions; hadronic form factors; neutrino processes; nuclear structure; weak interaction physics; and other related topics. (LSP)

  15. Propagation and Interactions of Ultrahigh Power Light: Relativistic Nonlinear Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT ...to photonuclear physics. The photofission threshold of actinides is ~6 MeV while the threshold for (, n) reactions is ~8 MeV. The increase in... actinides with laser-driven x-rays,” Bulletin of the American Physical Society, Annual Meeting of the Division of Nuclear Physics 58 (2013). 7. S

  16. Tailoring medium energy proton beam to induce low energy nuclear reactions in ⁸⁶SrCl₂ for production of PET radioisotope ⁸⁶Y.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Dmitri G; Mausner, Leonard F; Pile, Philip

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports results of experiments at Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) aiming to investigate effective production of positron emitting radioisotope (86)Y by the low energy (86)Sr(p,n) reaction. BLIP is a facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory designed for the proton irradiation of the targets for isotope production at high and intermediate proton energies. The proton beam is delivered by the Linear Accelerator (LINAC) whose incident energy is tunable from 200 to 66 MeV in approximately 21 MeV increments. The array was designed to ensure energy degradation from 66 MeV down to less than 20 MeV. Aluminum slabs were used to degrade the proton energy down to the required range. The production yield of (86)Y (1.2+/-0.1 mCi (44.4+/-3.7) MBq/μAh) and ratio of radioisotopic impurities was determined by assaying an aliquot of the irradiated (86)SrCl2 solution by gamma spectroscopy. The analysis of energy dependence of the (86)Y production yield and the ratios of radioisotopic impurities has been used to adjust degrader thickness. Experimental data showed substantial discrepancies in actual energy propagation compared to energy loss calculations.

  17. NEUTRONIC REACTION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1963-09-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described for breeding fissionable material, including a heat-exchange tank, a high- and a low-pressure chamber therein, heat- exchange tubes connecting these chambers, a solution of U/sup 233/ in heavy water in a reaction container within the tank, a slurry of thorium dioxide in heavy water in a second container surrounding the first container, an inlet conduit including a pump connecting the low pressure chamber to the reaction container, an outlet conduit connecting the high pressure chamber to the reaction container, and means of removing gaseous fission products released in both chambers. (AEC)

  18. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  19. Nuclear orientation in the reaction {sup 34}S+{sup 238}U and synthesis of the new isotope {sup 268}Hs

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, K.; Ikezoe, H.; Mitsuoka, S.; Nagame, Y.; Nishinaka, I.; Hofmann, S.; Hessberger, F. P.; Ackermann, D.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Heinz, S.; Heredia, J. A.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Schaedel, M.; Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Aritomo, Y.

    2010-08-15

    The synthesis of isotopes of the element hassium was studied using the reaction {sup 34}S+{sup 238}U{yields}{sup 272}Hs{sup *}. At a kinetic energy of 163.0 MeV in the center-of-mass system we observed one {alpha}-decay chain starting at the isotope {sup 267}Hs. The cross section was 1.8{sub -1.5}{sup +4.2} pb. At 152.0 MeV one decay of the new isotope {sup 268}Hs was observed. It decays with a half-life of 0.38{sub -0.17}{sup +1.8} s by 9479{+-}16 keV {alpha}-particle emission. Spontaneous fission of the daughter nucleus {sup 264}Sg was confirmed. The measured cross section was 0.54{sub -0.45}{sup +1.3} pb. In-beam measurements of fission-fragment mass distributions were performed to obtain information on the fusion probability at various orientations of the deformed target nucleus. The distributions changed from symmetry to asymmetry when the beam energy was changed from above-barrier to sub-barrier values, indicating orientation effects on fusion and/or quasifission. It was found that the distribution of symmetric mass fragments originates not only from fusion-fission, but has a strong component from quasifission. The result was supported by a calculation based on a dynamical description using the Langevin equation, in which the mass distributions for fusion-fission and quasifission fragments were separately determined.

  20. ({sup 3}He,t) reaction on the double {beta} decay nucleus {sup 48}Ca and the importance of nuclear matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Grewe, E.-W.; Frekers, D.; Rakers, S.; Baeumer, C.; Dohmann, H.; Thies, J.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Botha, N. T.; Fujita, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Negret, A.; Popescu, L.; Neveling, R.

    2007-11-15

    High-resolution ({sup 3}He,t) measurements on the double {beta}-decay ({beta}{beta}) nucleus {sup 48}Ca have been performed at RCNP (Osaka, Japan) to determine Gamow-Teller (GT{sup -}) transitions to the nucleus {sup 48}Sc, which represents the intermediate nucleus in the second-order perturbative description of the {beta}{beta} decay. At a bombarding energy of E{sub {sup 3}He}=420 MeV an excitation energy resolution of 40 keV was achieved. The measurements were performed at two angle positions of the Grand Raiden Spectrometer (GRS): 0 deg. and 2.5 deg. The results of both settings were combined to achieve angular distributions, by which the character of single transitions could be determined. To characterize the different multipoles, theoretical angular distributions for states with J{sup {pi}}=1{sup +},2{sup +},2{sup -}, and 3{sup +} were calculated using the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) Code DW81. The GT{sup -} strength was extracted up to E{sub x}=7 MeV and combined with corresponding GT{sup +} strength deduced from the {sup 48}Ti(d,{sup 2}He){sup 48}Sc data to calculate the low-energy part of the {beta}{beta}-decay matrix element for the {sup 48}Ca 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay. We show that after applying trivial momentum corrections to the ({sup 3}He,t) spectrum, the two reaction probes (p,n) and ({sup 3}He,t) reveal a spectral response to an impressively high degree of similarity in the region of low momentum transfer.

  1. Challenges in nuclear structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-08-01

    The goal of nuclear structure theory is to build a comprehensive microscopic framework in which properties of nuclei and extended nuclear matter, and nuclear reactions and decays can all be consistently described. Due to novel theoretical concepts, breakthroughs in the experimentation with rare isotopes, increased exchange of ideas across different research areas, and the progress in computer technologies and numerical algorithms, nuclear theorists have been quite successful in solving various bits and pieces of the nuclear many-body puzzle and the prospects are exciting. This article contains a brief, personal perspective on the status of the field.

  2. Panel report: nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Joseph A; Hartouni, Edward P

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear science is at the very heart of the NNSA program. The energy produced by nuclear processes is central to the NNSA mission, and nuclear reactions are critical in many applications, including National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsules, energy production, weapons, and in global threat reduction. Nuclear reactions are the source of energy in all these applications, and they can also be crucial in understanding and diagnosing the complex high-energy environments integral to the work of the NNSA. Nuclear processes are complex quantum many-body problems. Modeling and simulation of nuclear reactions and their role in applications, coupled tightly with experiments, have played a key role in NNSA's mission. The science input to NNSA program applications has been heavily reliant on experiment combined with extrapolations and physical models 'just good enough' to provide a starting point to extensive engineering that generated a body of empirical information. This body of information lacks the basic science underpinnings necessary to provide reliable extrapolations beyond the domain in which it was produced and for providing quantifiable error bars. Further, the ability to perform additional engineering tests is no longer possible, especially those tests that produce data in the extreme environments that uniquely characterize these applications. The end of testing has required improvements to the predictive capabilities of codes simulating the reactions and associated applications for both well known and well characterized cases as well as incompletely known cases. Developments in high performance computing, computational physics, applied mathematics and nuclear theory have combined to make spectacular advances in the theory of fission, fusion and nuclear reactions. Current research exploits these developments in a number of Office of Science and NNSA programs, and in joint programs such as the SciDAC (Science Discovery through Advanced Computing) that supports the

  3. Nuclear Cluster Aspects in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, Shigeru

    2010-03-01

    The role of nuclear clustering is discussed for nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution with Cluster Nucleosynthesis Diagram (CND) proposed before. Special emphasis is placed on α-induced stellar reactions together with molecular states for O and C burning.

  4. Isosinglet approximation for nonelastic reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Group theoretic relations are derived between different combinations of projectile and secondary particles which appear to have a broad range of application in spacecraft shielding or radiation damage studies. These relations are used to reduce the experimental effort required to obtain nuclear reaction data for transport calculations. Implications for theoretical modeling are also noted, especially for heavy-heavy reactions.

  5. Towards a Conceptual Diagnostic Survey in Nuclear Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohnle, Antje; Mclean, Stewart; Aliotta, Marialuisa

    2011-01-01

    Understanding students' prior beliefs in nuclear physics is a first step towards improving nuclear physics instruction. This paper describes the development of a diagnostic survey in nuclear physics covering the areas of radioactive decay, binding energy, properties of the nuclear force and nuclear reactions, that was administered to students at…

  6. Selected topics in nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2013-06-10

    In this lectures after a brief introduction to stellar reaction rates and its implementation in nuclear networks, I discuss the nuclear physics aspects of core collapse supernova and explosive nucleosynthesis and their significance for the production of heavy elements by the rapid neutron capture process and potentially also by the recently discovered {nu}p process.

  7. Nuclear pumped gas laser research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, K.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear pumping of lasers by fission-fragments from nuclear chain reactions is discussed. Application of the newly developed lasers to spacecraft propulsion or onboard power, to lunar bases for industrial processing, and to earth for utilization of power without pollution and hazards is envisioned. Emphasis is placed on the process by which the fission-fragement kinetic energy is converted into laser light.

  8. Controlled Nuclear Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasstone, Samuel

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Importance of Fusion Energy; Conditions for Nuclear Fusion; Thermonuclear Reactions in Plasmas; Plasma Confinement by Magnetic Fields; Experiments With Plasmas; High-Temperature…

  9. Nuclear Power in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, John W.

    1983-01-01

    Energy consumption in Japan has grown at a faster rate than in any other major industrial country. To maintain continued prosperity, the government has embarked on a crash program for nuclear power. Current progress and issues/reactions to the plan are discussed. (JN)

  10. Nuclear fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Armijo, Joseph S.; Coffin, Jr., Louis F.

    1980-04-29

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has an improved composite cladding comprised of a moderate purity metal barrier of zirconium metallurgically bonded on the inside surface of a zirconium alloy tube. The metal barrier forms a shield between the alloy tube and a core of nuclear fuel material enclosed in the composite cladding. There is a gap between the cladding and the core. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 30 percent of the thickness of the composite cladding and has low neutron absorption characteristics. The metal barrier serves as a preferential reaction site for gaseous impurities and fission products and protects the alloy tube from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. Methods of manufacturing the composite cladding are also disclosed.

  11. Nuclear fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Armijo, Joseph S.; Coffin, Jr., Louis F.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has a composite cladding having a substrate and a metal barrier metallurgically bonded on the inside surface of the substrate so that the metal barrier forms a shield between the substrate and the nuclear fuel material held within the cladding. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 30 percent of the thickness of the cladding and is comprised of a low neutron absorption metal of substantially pure zirconium. The metal barrier serves as a preferential reaction site for gaseous impurities and fission products and protects the substrate from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. The substrate of the composite cladding is selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably is a zirconium alloy. Methods of manufacturing the composite cladding are also disclosed.

  12. On the use of the (π-,K0) reaction on nuclear targets for the precise determination of the lifetime of the hydrogen hyperisotopes and other neutron-rich Λ-hypernuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnello, M.; Botta, E.; Bressani, T.; Bufalino, S.; Feliciello, A.

    2016-10-01

    Recent results reported by experiments with relativistic (heavy) ions have raised again the question whether the lifetime of H3Λ is very close to the lifetime of the free Λ hyperon. An updated careful analysis of all the existing experimental data shows that it is not, contrary to theoretical calculations. A similar conclusion can be drawn for the neighbor H4Λ. A clear cut high precision measurement performed with the straightforward method of time delay spectra is however lacking and it is eagerly needed. The idea of using the (π- ,K0) charge-exchange associated production reaction on targets of liquid 3,4He is discussed. A possible realization exploiting a large part of existing facilities at J-PARC is presented. A measurement with a 5% precision seems within reach with a modest effort and in a reasonable amount of time. The same set-up would also serve very well for the measurement of the lifetime of several neutron-rich Λ-hypernuclei of the p-shell, in particular of B12Λ. More importantly, the Weak Decay partial widths Γπ-, Γp and Γπ0 could be simultaneously determined in order to confirm their predicted strong variation with mass number, A, due to nuclear structure effects.

  13. Evaluated Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    Oblozinsky, P.; Oblozinsky,P.; Herman,M.; Mughabghab,S.F.

    2010-10-01

    This chapter describes the current status of evaluated nuclear data for nuclear technology applications. We start with evaluation procedures for neutron-induced reactions focusing on incident energies from the thermal energy up to 20 MeV, though higher energies are also mentioned. This is followed by examining the status of evaluated neutron data for actinides that play dominant role in most of the applications, followed by coolants/moderators, structural materials and fission products. We then discuss neutron covariance data that characterize uncertainties and correlations. We explain how modern nuclear evaluated data libraries are validated against an extensive set of integral benchmark experiments. Afterwards, we briefly examine other data of importance for nuclear technology, including fission yields, thermal neutron scattering and decay data. A description of three major evaluated nuclear data libraries is provided, including the latest version of the US library ENDF/B-VII.0, European JEFF-3.1 and Japanese JENDL-3.3. A brief introduction is made to current web retrieval systems that allow easy access to a vast amount of up-to-date evaluated nuclear data for nuclear technology applications.

  14. Perspectives of Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faessler, Amand

    2003-04-01

    The organizers of this meeting have asked me to present perspectives of nuclear physics. This means to identify the areas where nuclear physics will be expanding in the next future. In six chapters a short overview of these areas will be given, where I expect that nuclear physics will develop quite fast: (1) Quantum Chromodynamics and effective field theories in the confinement region. (2) Nuclear structure at the limits. (3) High energy heavy ion collisions. (4) Nuclear astrophysics. (5) Neutrino physics. (6) Test of physics beyond the standard model by rare processes. After a survey over these six points I will pick out a few topics where I will go more in details. There is no time to give for all six points detailed examples. I shall discuss the following examples of the six topics mentionned above: (1) The perturbative chiral quark model and the nucleon Σ-term. (2) VAMPIR (Variation After Mean field Projection In Realistic model spaces and with realistic forces) as an example of the nuclear structure renaissance. (3) Measurement of important astrophysical nuclear reactions in the Gamow peak. (4) The solar neutrino problem. As examples for testing new physics beyond the standard model by rare processes I had prepared to speak about the measurement of the electric neutron dipole moment and of the neutrinoless double beta decay. But the time is limited and so I have to skip these points, although they are extremely interesting.

  15. Nuclear Reactions and Stellar Evolution: Unified Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, W.; Strother, T.

    2007-10-26

    Motivated by the success of kinetic theory in the description of observables in intermediate and high energy heavy ion collisions, we use kinetic theory to model the dynamics of collapsing iron cores in type II supernova explosions. The algorithms employed to model the collapse, some preliminary results and predictions, and the future of the code are discussed.

  16. Theory of Nuclear Reactions with RIBs

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaccorso, Angela

    2010-11-24

    This is a review of the basic formalism for the high energy scattering and the eikonal approximation and of some of the methods to obtain the optical potentials necessary in breakup calculations. We make also the connection to the surface imaginary part of the optical potential for halo and weakly bound nuclei. Semiclassical reductions of the DWBA approximation for inclusive and exclusive breakup are then presented. Methods to study resonances at threshold in unbound nuclei and the relation to R-matrix theory are finally introduced.

  17. Nuclear Chemistry: Include It in Your Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwood, Charles H.; Sheline, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the topics that might be included in a nuclear chemistry section are explored. Offers radioactivity, closed shells in nuclei, energy of nuclear processes, nuclear reactions, and fission and fusion as topics of interest. Provided are ideas and examples for each. (MVL)

  18. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  19. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  20. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)