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Sample records for nuclear reactions induced

  1. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  2. A Transport Model for Nuclear Reactions Induced by Radioactive Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Das, Champak B.; Das Gupta, Subal; Gale, Charles; Ko, C.M.; Yong, G.-C.; Zuo Wei

    2005-10-14

    Major ingredients of an isospin and momentum dependent transport model for nuclear reactions induced by radioactive beams are outlined. Within the IBUU04 version of this model we study several experimental probes of the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, especially the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Comparing with the recent experimental data from NSCL/MSU on isospin diffusion, we found a nuclear symmetry energy of Esym({rho}) {approx_equal} 31.6({rho}/{rho}0)1.05 at subnormal densities. Predictions on several observables sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy at supranormal densities accessible at GSI and the planned Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) are also made.

  3. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: nuclear structure; fusion reactions near and below the barrier; incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and instrumentation and analysis. (LSP).

  4. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the region of Iriduim and Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Kelley, K; Escher, J; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2008-02-26

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from osmium (Z = 76) to gold (Z = 79). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Ir and Au including reactions on isomeric targets.

  5. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The research program of our group touches five areas of nuclear physics: (1) Nuclear structure studies at high spin; (2) Studies at the interface between structure and reactions; (3) Production and study of hot nuclei; (4) Incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and (5) Development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in the above areas of research. The papers from these areas are discussed in this report.

  6. Mass and charge distributions in chlorine-induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, A.A.

    1991-12-31

    Projectile-like fragments were detected and characterized in terms of A, Z, and energy for the reactions {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca and {sup 209}Bi at E/A = 7.3 MeV, and {sup 35}Cl, on {sup 209}Bi at E/A = 15 MeV, at angles close to the grazing angle. Mass and charge distributions were generated in the N-Z plane as a function of energy loss, and have been parameterized in terms of their centroids, variances, and coefficients of correlation. Due to experimental problems, the mass resolution corresponding to the {sup 31}Cl on {sup 209}Bi reaction was very poor. This prompted the study and application of a deconvolution technique for peak enhancement. The drifts of the charge and mass centroids for the system {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca are consistent with a process of mass and charge equilibration mediated by nucleon exchange between the two partners, followed by evaporation. The asymmetric systems show a strong drift towards larger asymmetry, with the production of neutron-rich nuclei. It was concluded that this is indicative of a net transfer of protons from the light to the heavy partner, and a net flow of neutrons in the opposite direction. The variances for all systems increase with energy loss, as it would be expected from a nucleon exchange mechanism; however, the variances for the reaction {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca are higher than those expected from that mechanism. The coefficients of correlation indicate that the transfer of nucleons between projectile and target is correlated. The results were compared to the predictions of two current models based on a stochastic nucleon exchange mechanism. In general, the comparisons between experimental and predicted variances support this mechanism; however, the need for more realistic driving forces in the model calculations is indicated by the disagreement between predicted and experimental centroids.

  7. Real-time electron dynamics simulation of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    Real-time electron dynamics of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion is calculated by three methods: the numerically exact propagation method, the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) method and the Ehrenfest method. We find that, as long as the nuclei move as localized wave packets, the TDH and Ehrenfest methods can reproduce the exact electron dynamics of a simple charge transfer reaction model containing two electrons qualitatively well, even when nonadiabatic transitions between adiabatic states occur. In particular, both methods can reproduce the cases where a complete two-electron transfer reaction occurs and those where it does not occur.

  8. Investigation of the α-particle induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    Cross-sections of alpha particle induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum have been studied in the frame of a systematic investigation of charged particle induced nuclear reactions on metals for different applications. The excitation functions of 93mTc, 93gTc(m+), 94mTc, 94gTc, 95mTc, 95gTc, 96gTc(m+), 99mTc, 93mMo, 99Mo(cum), 90Nb(m+), 94Ru, 95Ru,97Ru, 103Ru and 88Zr were measured up to 40 MeV alpha energy by using a stacked foil technique and activation method. The main goals of this work were to get experimental data for accelerator technology, for monitoring of alpha beam, for thin layer activation technique and for testing nuclear reaction theories. The experimental data were compared with critically analyzed published data and with the results of model calculations, obtained by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE and TALYS codes (TENDL-2011).

  9. Nuclear excitation and precompound nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    De, A.; Ray, S.; Ghosh, S.K.

    1988-06-01

    The angular distribution of nucleons emitted in nucleon-induced precompound nuclear reactions are calculated taking into account the effect of excitation on the kinematics of nucleon-nucleon scattering inside the target-plus-projectile system. The results are compared with quantum mechanical calculations and those of reaction models based on a pure nucleon-nucleon collision picture.

  10. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.; Segal, M.N.; Hamm, R.W.; Adler, R.J.; Glatstein, E.

    1995-04-01

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use, innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction`s production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data are also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in `nested`-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output {sup 3}He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment.

  11. Nuclear fragmentation and charge-exchange reactions induced by pions in the Δ -resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of the nuclear fragmentations and the charge exchange reactions in pion-nucleus collisions near the Δ (1232) resonance energies has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics transport model. An isospin-, momentum-, and density-dependent pion-nucleon potential is implemented in the model, which influences the pion dynamics, in particular the kinetic energy spectra, but weakly impacts the fragmentation mechanism. The absorption process in pion-nucleon collisions to form the Δ (1232) resonance dominates the heating mechanism of the target nucleus. The excitation energy transferred to the target nucleus increases with the pion kinetic energy and is similar for both π-- and π+-induced reactions. The magnitude of fragmentation of the target nucleus weakly depends on the pion energy. The isospin ratio in the pion double-charge exchange is influenced by the isospin ingredient of target nucleus.

  12. Analysis of the Nuclear Structure of 186 Re Using Neutron-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matters, David; McClory, John; Carroll, James; Chiara, Chris; Fotiades, Nikolaos; Devlin, Matt; Nelson, Ron O.

    2015-04-01

    Evaluated nuclear structure data for 186 Re identifies the majority of spin-parity assignments as tentative, with approximate values associated with the energies of several levels and transitions. In particular, the absence of known transitions that feed the Jπ =8+ isomer motivates their discovery, which would have astrophysical implications and a potential application in the development of an isomer power source. Using the GErmanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE) spectrometer at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, the (n,2n γ) and (n,n' γ) reactions in a 99.52% enriched 187 Re target were used to measure γ-ray excitation functions in 186 Re and 187 Re, respectively. A preliminary analysis of the data obtained from the experiment reveals several new transitions in 186 Re and 187 Re.

  13. Tungsten fragmentation in nuclear reactions induced by high-energy cosmic-ray protons

    SciTech Connect

    Chechenin, N. G. Chuvilskaya, T. V.; Shirokova, A. A.; Kadmenskii, A. G.

    2015-01-15

    Tungsten fragmentation arising in nuclear reactions induced by cosmic-ray protons in space-vehicle electronics is considered. In modern technologies of integrated circuits featuring a three-dimensional layered architecture, tungsten is frequently used as a material for interlayer conducting connections. Within the preequilibrium model, tungsten-fragmentation features, including the cross sections for the elastic and inelastic scattering of protons of energy between 30 and 240 MeV; the yields of isotopes and isobars; their energy, charge, and mass distributions; and recoil energy spectra, are calculated on the basis of the TALYS and EMPIRE-II-19 codes. It is shown that tungsten fragmentation affects substantially forecasts of failures of space-vehicle electronics.

  14. Indirect Methods for Nuclear Reaction Data

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Dietrich, F S

    2005-11-18

    Several indirect approaches for obtaining reaction cross sections are briefly reviewed. The Surrogate Nuclear Reactions method, which aims at determining cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions, is discussed in some detail. The validity of the Weisskopf-Ewing approximation in the Surrogate approach is studied for the example of neutron-induced fission of an actinide nucleus.

  15. Monoenergetic proton emission from nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser-generated plasma.

    PubMed

    Torrisi, L; Cavallaro, S; Cutroneo, M; Giuffrida, L; Krasa, J; Margarone, D; Velyhan, A; Kravarik, J; Ullschmied, J; Wolowski, J; Szydlowski, A; Rosinski, M

    2012-02-01

    A 10(16) W∕cm(2) Asterix laser pulse intensity, 1315 nm at the fundamental frequency, 300 ps pulse duration, was employed at PALS laboratory of Prague, to irradiate thick and thin primary CD(2) targets placed inside a high vacuum chamber. The laser irradiation produces non-equilibrium plasma with deutons and carbon ions emission with energy of up to about 4 MeV per charge state, as measured by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques by using ion collectors and silicon carbide detectors. Accelerated deutons may induce high D-D cross section for fusion processes generating 3 MeV protons and 2.5 MeV neutrons, as measured by TOF analyses. In order to increase the mono-energetic proton yield, secondary CD(2) targets can be employed to be irradiated by the plasma-accelerated deutons. Experiments demonstrated that high intensity laser pulses can be employed to promote nuclear reactions from which characteristic ion streams may be developed. Results open new scenario for applications of laser-generated plasma to the fields of ion sources and ion accelerators.

  16. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. Progress report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1992-12-01

    The research program described touches five areas of nuclear physics: nuclear structure studies at high spin (hyperdeformation in the mass A {approx_equal} 182 region, structure of {sup 182}Hg and {sup 182}Au at high spin, a highly deformed band in {sup 136}Pm and the anomalous h{sub 11/2} proton crossing in the A{approximately}135 superdeformed region), studies at the interface between structure and reactions (population of entry states in heavy-ion fusion reactions, nuclear structure effects in proton evaporation spectra, nuclear structure- dependent entry state population by total spectroscopy, entrance channel effects in fusion near the barrier, lifetimes of subbarrier {alpha} particles by the atomic clock method), production and study of hot nuclei (the statistical model evaporation code EVAP, statistical emission of deuterons and tritons from highly excited compound nuclei, heavy-fragment emission as a probe of the thermal properties of highly excited compound nuclei, use of incoming-wave boundary condition transmission coefficients in the statistical model: implications in the particle evaporation spectra, study of transparency in the optical model), reaction mechanism studies (binary character of highly dissipative {sup 209}Bi + {sup 136}Xe collisions at E/A=28.2 MeV), and development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in these areas of research (including a 4{pi} channel selection device, a novel x-ray detector, and a simple channel-selecting detector).

  17. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. [Dept. of Chemistry, Washington Univ. , St. Louis, Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    The research program described touches five areas of nuclear physics: nuclear structure studies at high spin (hyperdeformation in the mass A [approx equal] 182 region, structure of [sup 182]Hg and [sup 182]Au at high spin, a highly deformed band in [sup 136]Pm and the anomalous h[sub 11/2] proton crossing in the A[approximately]135 superdeformed region), studies at the interface between structure and reactions (population of entry states in heavy-ion fusion reactions, nuclear structure effects in proton evaporation spectra, nuclear structure- dependent entry state population by total spectroscopy, entrance channel effects in fusion near the barrier, lifetimes of subbarrier [alpha] particles by the atomic clock method), production and study of hot nuclei (the statistical model evaporation code EVAP, statistical emission of deuterons and tritons from highly excited compound nuclei, heavy-fragment emission as a probe of the thermal properties of highly excited compound nuclei, use of incoming-wave boundary condition transmission coefficients in the statistical model: implications in the particle evaporation spectra, study of transparency in the optical model), reaction mechanism studies (binary character of highly dissipative [sup 209]Bi + [sup 136]Xe collisions at E/A=28.2 MeV), and development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in these areas of research (including a 4[pi] channel selection device, a novel x-ray detector, and a simple channel-selecting detector).

  18. Nonthermal nuclear reactions induced by fast α particles in the solar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronchev, Victor T.

    2015-02-01

    Nonthermal nuclear effects triggered in the solar carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle by fast α particles—products of the p p chain reactions—are examined. The main attention is paid to 8.674-MeV α particles generated in the 7Li(p ,α ) α reaction. Nonthermal characteristics of these α particles and their influence on some nuclear processes are determined. It is found that the α -particle effective temperature is at a level of 1.1 MeV and exceeds the solar core temperature by 3 orders of magnitude. These fast particles are able to significantly enhance some endoergic (α ,p ) reactions neglected in standard solar model calculations. In particular, they can substantially affect the balance of the p +17O⇄α +14N reactions due to an appreciable increase of the reverse reaction rate. It is shown that in the region R =0.08 -0.25 R⊙ the reverse α +14N reaction can block the forward p +17O reaction, thus preventing closing of the CNO-II cycle, and increase the 17O abundance by a factor of 2-155 depending on R . This indicates that the fast α particles produced in the p p cycle can distort running of the CNO cycle, making it essentially different in the inner and outer core regions.

  19. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]. [Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1993-02-01

    Completed work is summarized on the topics of excitation energy division in deep-inelastic reactions and the onset of multifragmentation in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV. Magnetic fields are being calculated for the PHOBOS detector system, a two-arm multiparticle spectrometer for studying low-transverse-momentum particles produced at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The Maryland Forward Array is being developed for detection of the reaction products from very peripheral collisions; it consists of two individual units of detectors: the annular silicon detector in front and the plastic phoswich detector at back.

  20. Future prospects of nuclear reactions induced by gamma-ray beams at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipescu, D.; Balabanski, D. L.; Camera, F.; Gheorghe, I.; Ghita, D.; Glodariu, T.; Kaur, J.; Ur, C. A.; Utsunomiya, H.; Varlamov, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The future prospects of photonuclear reactions studies at the new Extreme Light Infrastructure—Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility are discussed in view of the pursuit of investigating the electromagnetic response of nuclei using γ-ray beams of unprecedented energy resolution and intensity characteristics. We present here the features of the γ-ray beam source, the emerging ELI-NP experimental program involving photonuclear reactions cross section measurements and spectroscopy and angular measurements of γ-rays and neutrons along with the detection arrays currently under implementation.

  1. Deuteron Induced ( d,p) and ( d,2p) Nuclear Reactions up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiğit, M.; Tel, E.; Kara, A.

    2013-06-01

    Many studies have shown that the nuclear reactions of charged particles with nuclei are very important in many fields of nuclear physics. The interactions of deuterons with nuclei have been especially the subject of common research in the history of nuclear physics. Moreover, the knowledge of cross section for deuteron-nucleus interactions are required for various application such as space applications, accelerator driven sub-critical systems, nuclear medicine, nuclear fission reactors and controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors. Particularly, the future of controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors is largely dependent on the nuclear reaction cross section data and the selection of structural fusion materials. Finally, the reaction cross section data of deuteron induced reactions on fusion structural materials are of great importance for development and design of both experimental and commercial fusion devices. In this work, reaction model calculations of the cross sections of deuteron induced reactions on structural fusion materials such as Al ( Aluminium), Ti ( Titanium), Cu ( Copper), Ni ( Nickel), Co ( Cobalt), Fe ( Iron), Zr ( Zirconium), Hf ( Hafnium) and Ta ( Tantalum) have been investigated. The new calculations on the excitation functions of 27 Al( d,2p) 27 Mg, 47 Ti( d,2p) 47 Sc, 65 Cu( d,2p) 65 Ni, 58 Ni( d,2p) 58 Co, 59 Co( d,2p) 59 Fe, 58 Fe( d,p) 59 Fe, 96 Zr( d,p) 97 Zr, 180 Hf ( d,p) 181 Hf and 181 Ta( d,p) 182 Ta have been carried out for incident deuteron energies up to 50 MeV. In these calculations, the equilibrium and pre-equilibrium effects for ( d,p) and ( d,2p) reactions have been investigated. The equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing ( WE) Model. The pre-equilibrium calculations involve the new evaluated the Geometry Dependent Hybrid Model ( GDH) and Hybrid Model. In the calculations the program code ALICE/ASH was used. The calculated results are discussed and compared with the experimental data taken from the

  2. Extension of activation cross section data of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on rhodium up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.

    2015-11-01

    In the frame of the systematical study of light ion induced nuclear reactions activation cross sections for deuteron induced reactions on monoisotopic 103Rh were extended to 50 MeV incident energy. Excitation functions were measured in the 49.8-36.6 MeV energy range for the 103Rh(d,xn)100,101Pd, 103Rh(d,pxn)99m,99g,100,101m,101g,102m,102gRh and 103Rh(d,x)97,103Ru reactions by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and off-line high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. The experimental results are compared to our previous results and to the theoretical predictions in the TENDL-2014 library (TALYS 1.6 code).

  3. Experimental cross-sections for proton-induced nuclear reactions on natMo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Červenák, Jaroslav; Lebeda, Ondřej

    2016-08-01

    In the framework of the Co-ordinated Research Project of the IAEA, we measured in detail cross-sections of the nuclear reactions natMo(p,x)93gTc, 93mTc, 93m+gTc, 94gTc, 94mTc, 95gTc, 95mTc, 96m+gTc, 97mTc, 99mTc, 90Mo, 93mMo, 99Mo, 88gNb, 88mNb, 89gNb, 89mNb, 90m+gNb, 90m+gNbcum, 91mNb, 92mNb, 95gNb, 95mNb, 95m+gNb, 96Nb, 97m+gNb, 88m+gZrcum and 89m+gZrcum in the energy range of 6.9-35.8 MeV. The data for formation of 97mTc, 88gNb, 88mNb and 89mNb are reported for the first time. The obtained results were compared to the prediction of the nuclear reaction model code TALYS adopted from the TENDL-2015 library and to the previously published cross-sections. The thick target yields for all the radionuclides were calculated from the measured data. We suggest recommended cross-sections and thick target yields for the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc, 100Mo(p,x)99Mo and natMo(p,x)96m+gTc nuclear reactions deduced from the selected experimental data.

  4. Surrogate Nuclear Reactions using STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Church, J A; Ahle, L; Cooper, J R; Hoffman, R D; Moody, K; Punyon, J; Schiller, A; Algin, E; Plettner, C; Ai, H; Beausang, C W; Casten, R F; Hughes, R; Ricard-McCutchan, E; Meyer, D; Ressler, J J; Caggiano, J A; Zamfir, N V; Amro, H; Heinz, A; Fallon, P; McMahan, M A; Macchiavelli, A O; Phair, L W

    2004-10-26

    The results from two surrogate reaction experiments using the STARS (Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies) spectrometer are presented. The surrogate method involves measuring the particle and/or {gamma}-ray decay probabilities of excited nuclei populated via a direct reaction. These probabilities can then be used to deduce neutron-induced reaction cross sections that lead to the same compound nuclei. In the first experiment STARS coupled to the GAMMASPHERE {gamma}-ray spectrometer successfully reproduce surrogate (n,{gamma}), (n,n'{gamma}) and (n,2n{gamma}) cross sections on {sup 155,156}Gd using Gd {sup 3}He-induced reactions. In the second series of experiments an energetic deuteron beam from the ESTU tandem at the Wright Nuclear Structure Lab at Yale University was used to obtain the ratio of fission probabilities for {sup 238}U/ {sup 236}U and {sup 237}U/ {sup 239}U populated using the {sup 236,238}U(d,d'f) and {sup 236,238}U(d,pf) reactions. Results from these experiments are presented and the implications for the surrogate reaction technique are discussed.

  5. Experimental study to explore the 8Be-induced nuclear reaction via the Trojan horse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Qun-Gang; Li, Cheng-Bo; Zhou, Shu-Hua; Irgaziev, Bakhadir; Fu, Yuan-Yong; Spitaleri, Claudio; La Cognata, Marco; Zhou, Jing; Meng, Qiu-Ying; Lamia, Livio; Lattuada, Marcello

    2016-03-01

    To explore a possible indirect method for 8Be induced astrophysical reactions, the 8Be=(8Be+n ) cluster structure has been studied via the Trojan horse method. For the first time a 8Be nucleus having an ultrashort lifetime is studied by the Trojan horse method and a 9Be nucleus in the ground state is used for this purpose. The 9Be nucleus is assumed to have a (8Be+n ) cluster structure and used as a Trojan horse nucleus. The 8Be nucleus acts as a participant, while the neutron is a spectator to the virtual 8Be+d →α +6Li reaction via the 3-body reaction 8Be+d →α +6Li+n . The experimental neutron momentum distribution inside 9Be has been reconstructed. The agreement between the experimental momentum distribution and the theoretical one indicates that a (8Be+n ) cluster structure inside 9Be is very likely. Therefore, the experimental study of 8Be induced reactions, for example, the measurement of the 8Be+α →12C reaction proceeding through the Hoyle state, is possible.

  6. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemsitry in the region of Thulium, Lutetium, and Tantalum I. Results of Built in Spherical Symmetry in a Deformed Region

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R. D.

    2013-09-06

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from Terbium (Z = 65) to Rhenium (Z = 75). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Tm, Lu, and Ta including reactions on isomeric targets.

  7. Transfer reactions in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, D. W.

    2016-08-01

    To a high degree many aspects of the large-scale behavior of objects in the Universe are governed by the underlying nuclear physics. In fact the shell structure of nuclear physics is directly imprinted into the chemical abundances of the elements. The tranquility of the night sky is a direct result of the relatively slow rate of nuclear reactions that control and determines a star’s fate. Understanding the nuclear structure and reaction rates between nuclei is vital to understanding our Universe. Nuclear-transfer reactions make accessible a wealth of knowledge from which we can extract much of the required nuclear physics information. A review of transfer reactions for nuclear astrophysics is presented with an emphasis on the experimental challenges and opportunities for future development.

  8. Nuclear reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ``hot`` nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ``flow`` measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study {sup 40}Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs.

  9. Measurements and analysis of alpha-induced reactions of importance for nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Messieres, Genevieve Escande

    2011-11-01

    Reactions during stellar helium burning are of primary importance for understanding nucleosynthesis. A detailed understanding of the critical reaction chain 4He(2alpha, gamma)12C( alpha, gamma)16O(alpha, gamma) 20Ne is necessary both because it is the primary energy source and because it determines the ratio of 12C to 16O produced, which in turn significantly effects subsequent nucleosynthesis. Also during Helium burning, the reactions 22Ne(alpha, n)25Mg and 22Ne(alpha, gamma )26Mg are crucial in determining the amount of neutrons available for the astrophysical s-process. This thesis presents new experimental results concerning the 16O(alpha, gamma) 20Ne, 22Ne(alpha, n)25Mg, and 22Ne(alpha, gamma)26Mg reaction rates. These results are then applied to the calculation of the associated stellar reaction rates in order to achieve better accuracy.

  10. Disassembly of hot nuclear matter formed in Au-induced reactions near the Fermi energy

    SciTech Connect

    Delis, D.N.

    1993-09-01

    Complex fragment emission has been studied in the 60 MeV/A {sup 197}Au + {sup 12}C, {sup 27}Al, {sup 51}V, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au reactions. Velocity spectra, angular distributions and cross sections have been constructed for each target from the inclusive data. Coincidence data including 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-fold events have also been examined. Furthermore neutron multiplicity distributions have been obtained for the above reactions by utilizing a novel neutron calorimetric approach.

  11. Special features of isomeric ratios in nuclear reactions induced by various projectile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danagulyan, A. S.; Hovhannisyan, G. H.; Bakhshiyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, G. V.

    2016-05-01

    Calculations for ( p, n) and (α, p3 n) reactions were performed with the aid of the TALYS-1.4 code. Reactions in which the mass numbers of target and product nuclei were identical were examined in the range of A = 44-124. Excitation functions were obtained for product nuclei in ground and isomeric states, and isomeric ratios were calculated. The calculated data reflect well the dependence of the isomeric ratios on the projectile type. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data reveals, that, for some nuclei in a high-spin state, the calculated data fall greatly short of their experimental counterparts. These discrepancies may be due to the presence of high-spin yrast states and rotational bands in these nuclei. Calculations involving various level-density models included in the TALYS-1.4 code with allowance for the enhancement of collective effects do not remove the discrepancies in the majority of cases.

  12. Investigation of activation cross-section data of proton induced nuclear reactions on rhenium.

    PubMed

    Ditrói, F; Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Yamazaki, H; Baba, M; Mohammadi, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2013-07-01

    In the frame of systematic investigations of activation cross-section data for different applications the excitation functions of (nat)Re(p,x)(185)Os, (183m)Os, (183g)Os, (182)Os, (181m)Os, (186g)Re, (184m)Re, (184g)Re, (183)Re, (182m)Re, (182g)Re and (181g)Re reactions were measured up to 70MeV. The data for the (nat)Re(p,x) (183m)Os, (183g)Os, (182)Os, (181g)Os,(186g)Re, (184m)Re,(182m)Re, (182g)Re, and (181)Re reactions are reported for the first time. The activation method, the stacked foil irradiation technique and γ-spectroscopy for activity detection were used. The experimental data were compared with predictions of three theoretical codes. From the measured cross-section thick target integral yields were also calculated and presented.

  13. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-02-01

    One of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, quantum chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three-nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between LQCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from LQCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  14. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculationsmore » of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.« less

  15. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  16. Molecular screening in nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetinovic, A.; Lipoglavsek, M.; Markelj, S.; Vesic, J.

    2015-12-01

    The dependence of electron screening in nuclear reactions on projectile or target atomic number has been studied by bombarding different hydrogen-containing targets with beams of 7Li , 11B , and 19F . The largest electron screening potentials were obtained in a graphite target containing hydrogen as an impurity. Some measured potentials are almost two orders of magnitude above the theoretical predictions. To explain the measurements, a new concept of electron screening is introduced.

  17. Nuclear Reactions for Astrophysics and Other Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Scielzo, N D; Ressler, J J

    2011-03-01

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions are required for many applications. The surrogate nuclear reactions method provides an indirect approach for determining cross sections for reactions on unstable isotopes, which are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise. Current implementations of the method provide useful cross sections for (n,f) reactions, but need to be improved upon for applications to capture reactions.

  18. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. Progress report for the period September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1993-09-06

    This is a progress report on activities of the Washington University group in nuclear reaction studies for the period Sept 1, 1992 to Aug 31, 1993. This group has a research program which touches five areas of nuclear physics: nuclear structure studies at high spin; studies at the interface between structure and reactions; production and study of hot nuclei; reaction mechanism studies; development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in the above areas of research. Specific activities of the group include in part: superdeformation in {sup 82}Sr; structure of and identical bands in {sup 182}Hg and {sup 178}Pt; a highly deformed band in {sup 136}Pm; particle decay of the {sup 164}Yb compound nucleus; fusion reactions; proton evaporation; two-proton decay of {sup 12}O; modeling and theoretical studies; excited {sup 16}O disassembly into four alpha particles; {sup 209}Bi + {sup 136}Xe collisions at 28.2 MeV/amu; and development work on 4{pi} solid angle gamma detectors, and x-ray detectors.

  19. EMPIRE: A Reaction Model Code for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, A.; Herman, M.; Capote, R.

    2014-06-01

    The correct modeling of abundances requires knowledge of nuclear cross sections for a variety of neutron, charged particle and γ induced reactions. These involve targets far from stability and are therefore difficult (or currently impossible) to measure. Nuclear reaction theory provides the only way to estimate values of such cross sections. In this paper we present application of the EMPIRE reaction code to nuclear astrophysics. Recent measurements are compared to the calculated cross sections showing consistent agreement for n-, p- and α-induced reactions of strophysical relevance.

  20. Investigation of activation cross-sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on natMo up to 40 MeV: New data and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárkányi, F.; Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Takács, S.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2012-06-01

    Cross-sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum have been studied in the frame of a systematic investigation of charged particle induced nuclear reactions on metals for different applications. The excitation functions of 93mTc, 93gTc(m+), 94mTc, 94gTc, 95mTc, 95gTc, 96gTc(m+), 99mTc, 90Mo(cum), 93mMo, 99Mo(cum), 90Nb(cum), 92mNb, 95mNb, 95gNb, 96Nb and 88Zr(cum), 89Zr(cum) were measured up to 40 MeV proton energy by a using stacked foil technique and activation method. The main goals of this work were to study the production possibility of the medically important 99mTc and its 99Mo parent nucleus, to get experimental data for accelerator technology, for monitoring of proton beam, for thin layer activation technique and for testing nuclear reaction theories. The experimental data were compared with critically analysed published data and with the results of model calculations, obtained by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and TALYS codes.

  1. Activation cross-sections of long lived products of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 50 MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Csikai, J; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2014-01-01

    Activation cross-sections for production of (162m,161,155)Ho, (165,159,157,155)Dy and (161,160,156,155)Tb radionuclides in deuteron induced nuclear reactions on elemental dysprosium were measured up to 50 MeV for practical application and the test of the predictive power of nuclear reaction model codes. A stacked-foil irradiation technique and off-line gamma-ray spectrometry were used to determine the activities. No earlier cross-section data were found in the literature. The experimental data are compared with the predictions of the ALICE-D, EMPIRE-D and TALYS codes. Integral production yields were calculated from the fitted experimental data.

  2. Extension of the energy range of experimental activation cross-sections data of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on indium up to 50MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-11-01

    The energy range of our earlier measured activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on indium were extended from 40MeV up to 50MeV. The traditional stacked foil irradiation technique and non-destructive gamma spectrometry were used. No experimental data were found in literature for this higher energy range. Experimental cross-sections for the formation of the radionuclides (113,110)Sn, (116m,115m,114m,113m,111,110g,109)In and (115)Cd are reported in the 37-50MeV energy range, for production of (110)Sn and (110g,109)In these are the first measurements ever. The experimental data were compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS 1.6 nuclear model code as listed in the on-line library TENDL-2014.

  3. Excitation Functions of Helion-Induced Nuclear Reactions for the Production of the Medical Radioisotope 103Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skakun, Ye.; Qaim, S. M.

    2005-05-01

    Excitation functions were measured by the stacked-foil technique for the reactions 100Ru(α,n)103Pd, 101Ru(α,2n)103Pd, 101Ru(3He,n)103Pd, and 102Ru(3He,2n)103Pd for incident energies up to 25 and 34 MeV for α-particles and 3He ions, respectively. The integral thick target yields of the product radionuclide 103Pd calculated from the excitation functions of the above-named four reactions amount to 960, 1050, 50, and 725 KBq/μAh, respectively, at the maximum energy of the incident particle. The data are compared with the results of statistical model calculations and other charged particle induced reaction investigations.

  4. Nuclear excitation functions of proton-induced reactions (Ep = 35-90 MeV) from Fe, Cu, and Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Stephen A.; Ellison, Paul A.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; Nortier, Francois M.; Nickles, Robert J.; Engle, Jonathan W.

    2016-11-01

    Fe, Cu, and Al stacked foils were irradiated by 90 MeV protons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's Isotope Production Facility to measure nuclear cross sections for the production of medically relevant isotopes, such as 52gMn, 54Mn, 48Cr, 55Co, 58mCo and 57Ni. The decay of radioactive isotopes produced during irradiation was monitored using high-purity germanium gamma spectroscopy over the months following irradiation. Proton fluence was determined using the natAl(p,x)22Na, natCu(p,x)62Zn natCu(p,x)65Zn, and natCu(p,x)56Co monitor reactions. Calculated cross sections were compared against literature values and theoretical TALYS predictions. Notably this work includes the first reported independent cross section measurements of natCu(p,x)58mCo and natCu(p,x)58gCo.

  5. Nuclear reaction inputs based on effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilaire, S.; Goriely, S.; Péru, S.; Dubray, N.; Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E.

    2016-11-01

    Extensive nuclear structure studies have been performed for decades using effective interactions as sole input. They have shown a remarkable ability to describe rather accurately many types of nuclear properties. In the early 2000s, a major effort has been engaged to produce nuclear reaction input data out of the Gogny interaction, in order to challenge its quality also with respect to nuclear reaction observables. The status of this project, well advanced today thanks to the use of modern computers as well as modern nuclear reaction codes, is reviewed and future developments are discussed.

  6. Nuclear Reaction Data File for Astrophysics (NRDF/A) in Hokkaido University Nuclear Reaction Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katō, Kiyoshi; Kimura, Masaaki; Furutachi, Naoya; Togashi, Tomoaki; Makinaga, Ayano; Otuka, Naohiko

    2010-06-01

    The activities of the Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Centre is explained. The main task of the centre is data compilation of Japanese nuclear reaction data in collaboration of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres. As one of recent activities, preparation of a new database (NRDF/A) and evaluation of astronuclear reaction data are reported. Collaboration in the nuclear data activities among Asian countries is proposed.

  7. Excitation function for deuteron induced nuclear reactions on natural ytterbium for production of high specific activity 177g Lu in no-carrier-added form for metabolic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Simone; Groppi, Flavia; Gandini, Andrea; Gini, Luigi; Abbas, Kamel; Holzwarth, Uwe; Simonelli, Federica; Bonardi, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Deuteron-induced nuclear reactions for generation of no-carrier-added Lu radionuclides were investigated using the stacked-foil activation technique on natural Yb targets at energies up to E(d)=18.18 MeV. Excitation functions of the reactions (nat)Yb(d,xn)(169,170,171,172,173,174g,174m,176m,177g)Lu and (nat)Yb(d,pxn)(169,175,177)Yb have been measured, among them three ((169)Lu, (174m)Lu and (176m)Lu) are reported for the first time. The upper limit of the contamination from the long-lived metastable level (177m)Lu was evaluated too. Thick-target yields for all investigated radionuclides are calculated.

  8. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.; Doyle, Barney L.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  9. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  10. Evaluation of nuclear reaction cross section data for the production of (87)Y and (88)Y via proton, deuteron and alpha-particle induced transmutations.

    PubMed

    Zaneb, H; Hussain, M; Amjad, N; Qaim, S M

    2016-06-01

    Proton, deuteron and alpha-particle induced reactions on (87,88)Sr, (nat)Zr and (85)Rb targets were evaluated for the production of (87,88)Y. The literature data were compared with nuclear model calculations using the codes ALICE-IPPE, TALYS 1.6 and EMPIRE 3.2. The evaluated cross sections were generated; therefrom thick target yields of (87,88)Y were calculated. Analysis of radio-yttrium impurities and yield showed that the (87)Sr(p, n)(87)Y and (88)Sr(p, n)(88)Y reactions are the best routes for the production of (87)Y and (88)Y respectively. The calculated yield for the (87)Sr(p, n)(87)Y reaction is 104 MBq/μAh in the energy range of 14→2.7MeV. Similarly, the calculated yield for the (88)Sr(p, n)(88)Y reaction is 3.2 MBq/μAh in the energy range of 15→7MeV.

  11. Supernova shock revival by nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamrua, Ko; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei; Nishimura, Nobuya

    2012-11-12

    We performed hydrodynamic simulations of core collapse and bounce for a progenitor model with 15.0 solar mass, using ZEUS-MP code in axi-symmetric coordinate. Our numerical code is equipped with a nuclear reaction network including 13 alpha nuclei form {sup 4}He to {sup 56}Ni to investigate the potential role played by nuclear reactions in reviving a stalled shock wave at the central region of core-collapse supernovae. We found that the energy released by nuclear reactions is significantly helpful in accelerating shock waves and is able to produce energetic explosion even if inputted neutrino luminosity is low.

  12. EXFOR Library of Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The EXFOR library contains an extensive compilation of experimental nuclear reaction data up to 1 GeV. Neutron reactions have been compiled systematically since the discovery of the neutron, while charged particle(up to carbon) and photon reactions have been covered less extensively. Files contain nuclear reaction data such as cross sections, spectra, angular distributions, polarizations, etc, along with information on experimental technique, error analysis, and applied standards. Numerous search parameters include: target, beam, product, experimental method, and even author and publication names. The library contains data from more than 20,000 experiments. (Specialized Interface)

  13. Nuclear phenomena in low-energy nuclear reaction research.

    PubMed

    Krivit, Steven B

    2013-09-01

    This is a comment on Storms E (2010) Status of Cold Fusion, Naturwissenschaften 97:861-881. This comment provides the following remarks to other nuclear phenomena observed in low-energy nuclear reactions aside from helium-4 make significant contributions to the overall energy balance; and normal hydrogen, not just heavy hydrogen, produces excess heat.

  14. Public reactions to nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlap, R.E.; Kraft, M.E.; Rosa, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    For many scientists, engineers, and regulators, the public controversy over siting a repository for high-level nuclear wastes exemplifies the clash between rational scientific judgment and irrational public attitudes. Even many who are more sympathetic to public concerns about risk and management believe the controversy is exacerbated by incompatibilities between good science and public participation in regulatory decision-making. Understanding the incompatibilities, however, is crucial to managing science and technology in a democratic society and provides an important motivation to study the relationship between public opinion and nuclear waste policy. In this book, Dunlap and his colleagues present a solid base of empirical research on the subject, and the strength of the collection is the careful unraveling of social factors and context to explain the overwhelmingly negative public view of nuclear waste and its management.

  15. Experimental nuclear reaction data collection EXFOR

    SciTech Connect

    Semkova, V.; Otuka, N.; Simakov, S. P.; Zerkin, V.

    2011-07-01

    The International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC) constitutes a worldwide cooperation of 14 nuclear data centres. The main activity of the NRDC Network is collection and compilation of experimental nuclear reaction cross section data and the related bibliographic information in the EXFOR and CINDA databases as well as dissemination of nuclear reaction data and associated documentation to users. The database contains information and numerical data from more than about 19000 experiments consisting of more than 140000 datasets. EXFOR is kept up to date by constantly adding newly published experimental information. Tools developed for data dissemination utilise modern database technologies with fast online capabilities over the Internet. Users are provided with sophisticated search options, a user-friendly retrieval interface for downloading data in different formats, and additional output options such as improved data plotting capabilities. The present status of the EXFOR database will be presented together with the latest development for data access and retrieval. (authors)

  16. Nuclear chain reaction: forty years later

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    The proceedings from a 1982 symposium 40 years after the first controlled nuclear chain reaction took place in Chicago covers four sessions and public discussion. The session covered the history of the chain reaction; peaceful uses in technology, medicine, and biological science; peaceful uses in power generation; and nuclear weapons control. Among the speakers were Eugene Wigner, Glenn Seaborg, Alvin Weinberg, and others who participated in the first chain reaction experiments. The proceedings reflect differences of opinion among the scientists as well as the general public. References, slides, and tables used to illustrate the individual talks are included with the papers.

  17. NUCLEAR REACTION MODELING FOR RIA ISOL TARGET DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    S. MASHNIK; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    Los Alamos scientists are collaborating with researchers at Argonne and Oak Ridge on the development of improved nuclear reaction physics for modeling radionuclide production in ISOL targets. This is being done in the context of the MCNPX simulation code, which is a merger of MCNP and the LAHET intranuclear cascade code, and simulates both nuclear reaction cross sections and radiation transport in the target. The CINDER code is also used to calculate the time-dependent nuclear decays for estimating induced radioactivities. They give an overview of the reaction physics improvements they are addressing, including intranuclear cascade (INC) physics, where recent high-quality inverse-kinematics residue data from GSI have led to INC spallation and fission model improvements; and preequilibrium reactions important in modeling (p,xn) and (p,xnyp) cross sections for the production of nuclides far from stability.

  18. MEANS FOR TERMINATING NUCLEAR REACTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, C.M.

    1959-02-17

    An apparatus is presented for use in a reactor of the heterogeneous, fluid cooled type for the purpose of quickly terminating the reaction, the coolant being circulated through coolant tubes extending through the reactor core. Several of the tubes in the critical region are connected through valves to a tank containing a poisoning fluid having a high neutron capture crosssection and to a reservoir. When it is desired to quickly terminate the reaction, the valves are operated to permit the flow of the poisoning fluid through these particular tubes and into the reservoir while normal coolant is being circulated through the remaining tubes. The apparatus is designed to prevent contamination of the primary coolant by the poisoning fluid.

  19. Generation of Gravitational Waves with Nuclear Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, Giorgio; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.

    2006-01-20

    The problem of efficient generation of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) and pulses of Gravitational Radiation might find a reasonably simple solution by employing nuclear matter, especially isomers. A fissioning isomer not only rotates at extremely high frequency ({approx} 3.03x1024 s-1), but is also highly deformed in the first stages of fission (the nucleus is rotating and made asymmetric 'before' fission). Thus one achieves significant impulsive forces (e.g., 3.67x108 N) acting over extremely short time spans (e.g., 3.3x10-22 s). Alternatively, a pulsed particle beam, which could include antimatter, could trigger nuclear reactions and build up a coherent GW as the particles move through a target mass. The usual difficulty with HFGWs generated by nuclear reactions is the small dimensions of their nuclear-reaction volumes, that is, the small moment of inertia and submicroscopic radii of gyration (e.g., 10-16 m) of the nuclear-mass system. Such a difficulty is overcome by utilizing clusters of nuclear material, whose nuclear reactions are in synchronization (through the use of a computer controlled logic system) and are at a large distance apart, e.g., meters, kilometers, etc. The effective radius of gyration of the overall nuclear mass system is enormous and if the quadrupole formalism holds even approximately, then significant HFGW is generated, for example up to 8.5x1010 W to 1.64x1025 W bursts for the transient asymmetrical spinning nucleus case. In this preliminary analysis, possible conceptual designs of reactors suitable for the generation of HFGWs are discussed as well as applications to space technology. In an optimized dual-beam design, GW amplitudes on the order of A {approx} 0.005 are theoretically achieved in the laboratory, which might have interesting general-relativity and nuclear-physics consequences.

  20. Nuclear excitations and reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Fallieros, S.; Levin, F.S.

    1990-08-01

    The main theme of this report is the study and interpretation of the sequence of events that occur during the collisions of nuclear particles. Some of the processes discussed in parts A and B involve short range interactions; others involve interactions of long range. In most of part A one of the particles in the initial or in the final state (or in both) is a photon, which serves as a probe of the second particle, which may be a nucleus, a proton, a pion or any other hadron. The complexity of the processes taking place during the collisions makes it necessary to simplify some aspects of the physical problem. This leads to the introduction of modals which are used to describe a limited number of features in as much detail as possible. The main interest is the understanding of the hadronic excitations which result from the absorption of a photon and the determination of the fundamental structure constants of the target particle. In part B, all the particles are hadrons. The purpose here is to develop and apply optimal quantal methods appropriate for describing the interacting systems. Of particular interest are three-particle collision systems in which the final state consists of three free particles. Part B also considers the process of nuclear fusion as catalyzed by bound muons.

  1. Multilayer Network Analysis of Nuclear Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liang; Ma, Yu-Gang; Chen, Qu; Han, Ding-Ding

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear reaction network is usually studied via precise calculation of differential equation sets, and much research interest has been focused on the characteristics of nuclides, such as half-life and size limit. In this paper, however, we adopt the methods from both multilayer and reaction networks, and obtain a distinctive view by mapping all the nuclear reactions in JINA REACLIB database into a directed network with 4 layers: neutron, proton, 4He and the remainder. The layer names correspond to reaction types decided by the currency particles consumed. This combined approach reveals that, in the remainder layer, the β-stability has high correlation with node degree difference and overlapping coefficient. Moreover, when reaction rates are considered as node strength, we find that, at lower temperatures, nuclide half-life scales reciprocally with its out-strength. The connection between physical properties and topological characteristics may help to explore the boundary of the nuclide chart. PMID:27558995

  2. Extension of activation cross-section data of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on cadmium up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.

    2016-10-01

    The excitation functions for 109,110g,111m+g,113m,114m,115mIn, 107,109,115m,115gCd and 105g,106m,110g,111Ag are presented for stacked foil irradiations on natCd targets in the 49-33 MeV deuteron energy domain. Reduced uncertainty is obtained by determining incident particle flux and energy scale relative to re-measured monitor reactions natAl(d,x)22,24Na. The results were compared to our earlier studies on natCd and on enriched 112Cd targets. The merit of the values predicted by the TALYS 1.6 code (resulting from a weighted combination of reaction cross-section data on all stable Cd isotopes as available in the on-line libraries TENDL-2014 and TENDL-2015) is discussed. Influence on optimal production routes for several radionuclides with practical applications (111In, 114mIn, 115Cd, 109,107Cd….) is reviewed.

  3. Experimental cross-sections for proton induced nuclear reactions on mercury up to 65 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Szücs, Z.; Brezovcsik, K.

    2016-07-01

    Cross-sections for formation of activation products induced by protons on natural mercury targets were measured. Results for 196m,196g,197g(cum), 198m,198g,199g(cum), 200g(cum), 201,202Tl, 194g(cum), 195g(cum), 196g(cum), 198m,199g(cum) Au and 195m,197m,203Hg are presented up to 65 MeV incident particle energy, many of these for the first time. The experimental data are compared with literature values and with the predictions of the TALYS 1.6 code (results taken from TENDL-2015 on-line library), thick target yields were derived and possible applications in biomedical sciences are discussed.

  4. Global Microscopic Models for Nuclear Reaction Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2005-05-24

    Important effort has been devoted in the last decades to measuring reaction cross sections. Despite such effort, many nuclear applications still require the use of theoretical predictions to estimate experimentally unknown cross sections. Most of the nuclear ingredients in the calculations of reaction cross sections need to be extrapolated in an energy and/or mass domain out of reach of laboratory simulations. In addition, some applications often involve a large number of unstable nuclei, so that only global approaches can be used. For these reasons, when the nuclear ingredients to the reaction models cannot be determined from experimental data, it is highly recommended to consider preferentially microscopic or semi-microscopic global predictions based on sound and reliable nuclear models which, in turn, can compete with more phenomenological highly-parameterized models in the reproduction of experimental data. The latest developments made in deriving such microscopic models for practical applications are reviewed. It mainly concerns nuclear structure properties (masses, deformations, radii, etc.), level densities at the equilibrium deformation, {gamma}-ray strength, as well as fission barriers and level densities at the fission saddle points.

  5. Nuclear reactions for nucleosynthesis beyond Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Rauscher, Thomas

    2015-10-15

    Many more nuclear transitions have to be known in the determination of stellar reactivities for trans-iron nucleosynthesis than for reactions of light nuclei. This requires different theoretical and experimental approaches. Some of the issues specific for trans-iron nucleosynthesis are discussed.

  6. Continuum effects in nuclear transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, H. D.; Donangelo, R.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Pacheco, A. J.

    2007-02-12

    We develop a semiclassical calculation for nuclear transfer reactions where the continuum is treated in an exact way, and compare the results with those of a treatment in which the continuum is neglected. We conclude that the influence of the continuum is very important for weakly bound reactants.

  7. A Nuclear Reactions Primer with Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calle, Carlos I.; Roach, Jennifer A.

    1987-01-01

    Described is a microcomputer software program NUCLEAR REACTIONS designed for college level students and in use at Sweet Briar College (Sweet Briar, VA). The program is written in Microsoft Basic Version 2.1 for the Apple Macintosh Microcomputer. It introduces two conservation principles: (1) conservation of charge; and (2) conservation of nucleon…

  8. Neutron-induced reaction studies using stored ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glorius, Jan; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Reifarth, René

    2015-11-01

    Storage rings provide unique possibilities for investigations of nuclear reactions. Radioactive ions can be stored if the ring is connected to an appropriate facility and reaction studies are feasible at low beam intensities because of the recycling of beam particles. Using gas jet or droplet targets, charged particle-induced reactions on short-lived isotopes can be studied in inverse kinematics. In such a system a high-flux reactor could serve as a neutron target extending the experimental spectrum to neutron-induced reactions. Those could be studied over a wide energy range covering the research fields of nuclear astrophysics and reactor safety, transmutation of nuclear waste and fusion.

  9. Nuclear Reactions Used For Superheavy Element Research

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, Mark A.

    2008-04-17

    Some of the most fascinating questions about the limits of nuclear stability are confronted in the heaviest nuclei. How many more new elements can be synthesized? What are the nuclear and chemical properties of these exotic nuclei? Does the 'Island of Stability' exist and can we ever explore the isotopes inhabiting that nuclear region? This paper will focus on the current experimental research on the synthesis and characterization of superheavy nuclei with Z>112 from the Dubna/Livermore collaboration. Reactions using {sup 48}Ca projectiles from the U400 cyclotron and actinide targets ({sup 233,238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 242,244}Pu, {sup 243}Am, {sup 245,248}Cm, {sup 249}Cf) have been investigated using the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator in Dubna over the last 8 years. In addition, several experiments have been performed to investigate the chemical properties of some of the observed longer-lived isotopes produced in these reactions. Some comments will be made on nuclear reactions used for the production of the heaviest elements. A summary of the current status of the upper end of the chart of nuclides will be presented.

  10. Nuclear reactions used for superheavy element research

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, M A

    2008-02-26

    Some of the most fascinating questions about the limits of nuclear stability are confronted in the heaviest nuclei. How many more new elements can be synthesized? What are the nuclear and chemical properties of these exotic nuclei? Does the 'Island of Stability' exist and can we ever explore the isotopes inhabiting that nuclear region? This paper will focus on the current experimental research on the synthesis and characterization of superheavy nuclei with Z > 112 from the Dubna/Livermore collaboration. Reactions using 48Ca projectiles from the U400 cyclotron and actinide targets ({sup 233,238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 242,244}Pu, {sup 243}Am, {sup 245,248}Cm, {sup 249}Cf) have been investigated using the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator in Dubna over the last 8 years. In addition, several experiments have been performed to investigate the chemical properties of some of the observed longer-lived isotopes produced in these reactions. Some comments will be made on nuclear reactions used for the production of the heaviest elements. A summary of the current status of the upper end of the chart of nuclides will be presented.

  11. Coulomb and nuclear effects in breakup and reaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descouvemont, P.; Canto, L. F.; Hussein, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    We use a three-body continuum discretized coupled channel (CDCC) model to investigate Coulomb and nuclear effects in breakup and reaction cross sections. The breakup of the projectile is simulated by a finite number of square integrable wave functions. First we show that the scattering matrices can be split in a nuclear term and in a Coulomb term. This decomposition is based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation and requires the scattering wave functions. We present two different methods to separate both effects. Then, we apply this separation to breakup and reaction cross sections of 7Li+208Pb . For breakup, we investigate various aspects, such as the role of the α +t continuum, the angular-momentum distribution, and the balance between Coulomb and nuclear effects. We show that there is a large ambiguity in defining the Coulomb and nuclear breakup cross sections, since both techniques, although providing the same total breakup cross sections, strongly differ for the individual components. We suggest a third method which could be efficiently used to address convergence problems at large angular momentum. For reaction cross sections, interference effects are smaller, and the nuclear contribution is dominant above the Coulomb barrier. We also draw attention to different definitions of the reaction cross section which exist in the literature and which may induce small, but significant, differences in the numerical values.

  12. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs.

  13. Effect of nuclear-reaction mechanisms on the population of excited nuclear states and isomeric ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, N. K.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental data on the cross sections for channels of fusion and transfer reactions induced by beams of radioactive halo nuclei and clustered and stable loosely bound nuclei were analyzed, and the results of this analysis were summarized. The interplay of the excitation of single-particle states in reaction-product nuclei and direct reaction channels was established for transfer reactions. Respective experiments were performed in stable (6Li) and radioactive (6He) beams of the DRIBs accelerator complex at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, and in deuteron and 3He beams of the U-120M cyclotron at the Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy Sciences of Czech Republic (Řež and Prague, Czech Republic). Data on subbarrier and near-barrier fusion reactions involving clustered and loosely bound light nuclei (6Li and 3He) can be described quite reliably within simple evaporation models with allowance for different reaction Q-values and couple channels. In reactions involving halo nuclei, their structure manifests itself most strongly in the region of energies below the Coulomb barrier. Neutron transfer occurs with a high probability in the interactions of all loosely bound nuclei with light and heavy stable nuclei at positive Q-values. The cross sections for such reactions and the respective isomeric ratios differ drastically for nucleon stripping and nucleon pickup mechanisms. This is due to the difference in the population probabilities for excited single-particle states.

  14. Extension of the energy range of the experimental activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 65MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-04-01

    Activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium were extended up to 65MeV by using stacked foil irradiation and gamma spectrometry experimental methods. Experimental cross-sections data for the formation of the radionuclides (159)Dy, (157)Dy, (155)Dy, (161)Tb, (160)Tb, (156)Tb, (155)Tb, (154m2)Tb, (154m1)Tb, (154g)Tb, (153)Tb, (152)Tb and (151)Tb are reported in the 36-65MeV energy range, and compared with an old dataset from 1964. The experimental data were also compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS nuclear reaction model code as listed in the latest on-line libraries TENDL 2013.

  15. Hadron Cancer Therapy: Role of Nuclear Reactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Chadwick, M. B.

    2000-06-20

    Recently it has become feasible to calculate energy deposition and particle transport in the body by proton and neutron radiotherapy beams, using Monte Carlo transport methods. A number of advances have made this possible, including dramatic increases in computer speeds, a better understanding of the microscopic nuclear reaction cross sections, and the development of methods to model the characteristics of the radiation emerging from the accelerator treatment unit. This paper describes the nuclear reaction mechanisms involved, and how the cross sections have been evaluated from theory and experiment, for use in computer simulations of radiation therapy. The simulations will allow the dose delivered to a tumor to be optimized, whilst minimizing the dos given to nearby organs at risk.

  16. Forging the link between nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickhoff, W. H.

    2016-06-01

    A review of the recent applications of the dispersive optical model (DOM) is presented. Emphasis is on the nonlocal implementation of the DOM that is capable of describing ground-state properties accurately when data like the nuclear charge density are available. The present understanding of the role of short- and long-range physics in determining proton properties near the Fermi energy for stable closed-shell nuclei has relied mostly on data from the (e, e' p) reaction. Hadronic tools to extract such spectroscopic information have been hampered by the lack of a consistent reaction description that provides unambiguous and undisputed results. The DOM, conceived by Claude Mahaux, provides a unified description of both elastic nucleon scattering and structure information related to single-particle properties below the Fermi energy. We have recently introduced a nonlocal dispersive optical potential for both the real and imaginary part. Nonlocal absorptive potentials yield equivalent elastic differential cross sections for 40Ca as compared to local ones but change the l-dependent absorption profile suggesting important consequences for the analysis of nuclear reactions. Below the Fermi energy, nonlocality is essential for an accurate representation of particle number and the nuclear charge density. Spectral properties implied by (e, e' p) and (p, 2p) reactions are correctly described, including the energy distribution of about 10% high-momentum protons obtained at Jefferson Lab. The nonlocal DOM allows a complete description of experimental data both above (up to 200 MeV) and below the Fermi energy in 40Ca. It is further demonstrated that elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering data constrain the spectral strength in the continuum of orbits that are nominally bound in the independent-particle model. Extension of this analysis to 48Ca allows a prediction of the neutron skin of this nucleus that is larger than most predictions made so far.

  17. Excitation function of the alpha particle induced nuclear reactions on enriched 116Cd, production of the theranostic isotope 117mSn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Haba, H.; Komori, Y.; Aikawa, M.; Szűcs, Z.; Saito, M.

    2016-10-01

    117mSn is one of the radioisotopes can be beneficially produced through alpha particle irradiation. The targets were prepared by deposition of 116Cd metal onto high purity 12 μm thick Cu backing. The average deposited thickness was 21.9 μm. The beam energy was thoroughly measured by Time of Flight (TOF) methods and proved to be 51.2 MeV. For the experiment the well-established stacked foil technique was used. In addition to the Cd targets, Ti foils were also inserted into the stacks for energy and intensity monitoring. The Cu backings were also used for monitoring and as recoil catcher of the reaction products from the cadmium layer. The activities of the irradiated foils were measured with HPGe detector for gamma-ray spectrometry and cross section values were determined. As a result excitation functions for the formation of 117mSn, 117m,gIn, 116mIn, 115mIn and 115m,gCd from enriched 116Cd were deduced and compared with the available literature data and with the results of the nuclear reaction model code calculations EMPIRE 3.2 and TALYS 1.8. Yield curves were also deduced for the measured nuclear reactions and compared with the literature.

  18. Vibrational excitation induces double reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Lim, Tingbin; Ning, Zhanyu; Polanyi, John C

    2014-12-23

    Electron-induced reaction at metal surfaces is currently the subject of extensive study. Here, we broaden the range of experimentation to a comparison of vibrational excitation with electronic excitation, for reaction of the same molecule at the same clean metal surface. In a previous study of electron-induced reaction by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we examined the dynamics of the concurrent breaking of the two C-I bonds of ortho-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). The energy of the incident electron was near the electronic excitation threshold of E0=1.0 eV required to induce this single-electron process. STM has been employed in the present work to study the reaction dynamics at the substantially lower incident electron energies of 0.3 eV, well below the electronic excitation threshold. The observed increase in reaction rate with current was found to be fourth-order, indicative of multistep reagent vibrational excitation, in contrast to the first-order rate dependence found earlier for electronic excitation. The change in mode of excitation was accompanied by altered reaction dynamics, evidenced by a different pattern of binding of the chemisorbed products to the copper surface. We have modeled these altered reaction dynamics by exciting normal modes of vibration that distort the C-I bonds of the physisorbed reagent. Using the same ab initio ground potential-energy surface as in the prior work on electronic excitation, but with only vibrational excitation of the physisorbed reagent in the asymmetric stretch mode of C-I bonds, we obtained the observed alteration in reaction dynamics.

  19. Nuclear Reaction Data on Titanium Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, S. Y.; Kawano, T.; Kahler, S.; Cowell, S.; Dashdorj, D.

    2008-04-17

    We evaluated the nuclear data on titanium isotopes, {sup 46-50}Ti. We used GNASH, a Hauser-Feshbach reaction model code, for the threshold reactions and CoH for the total and capture cross sections. While we calculated the transmission coefficients using well-known optical potentials for the GNASH calculation, we adjusted the level density and the pre-equilibrium parameters by taking into account the LANSCE/GEANIE experiment on {sup 48}Ti reaction cross sections as well as other experiments available for (n,p), (n,{alpha}), etc. The direct inelastic scattering was also included by using the coupled-channel calculation and the DWBA method. The coupled-channels potential was assumed to be similar to the spherical potential of Koning and Delaroche with proper deformation parameters. Meanwhile we investigated the resolved resonance parameters in the energy region below several hundred keV. In essence, we adopted the parameters from the Mughabghab's 2006 compilation, making some adjustments to mainly reproduce the reference thermal cross sections. This new evaluation was validated with the MCNP calculations of k-eff's on seven hard-spectrum criticality experiments that involve Ti as a reflector or moderator.

  20. Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Parameterization for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Jacob; Kozub, Raymond L.; Smith, Michael S.; Scott, Jason; Lingerfelt, Eric

    2004-10-01

    The knowledge of thermonuclear reaction rates is vital to simulate novae, supernovae, X-ray bursts, and other astrophysical events. To facilitate dissemination of this knowledge, a set of tools has been created for managing reaction rates, located at www.nucastrodata.org. One tool is a rate parameterizer, which provides a parameterization for nuclear reaction rate vs. temperature values in the most widely used functional form. Currently, the parameterizer uses the Levenberg-Marquardt method (LMM), which requires an initial estimate of the best-fit parameters. The initial estimate is currently provided randomly from a preselected pool. To improve the quality of fits, a new, active method of selecting parameters has been developed. The parameters of each set in the pool are altered for a few iterations to replicate the input data as closely as possible. Then, the set which most nearly matches the input data (based on chi squared) is used in the LMM as the initial estimate for the final fitting procedure. A description of the new, active algorithm and its performance will be presented. Supported by the U. S. Department of Energy.

  1. Laser-initiated primary and secondary nuclear reactions in Boron-Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, C.; Baccou, C.; Yahia, V.; Neuville, C.; Rafelski, J.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams are a promising new approach to many applications, from medical radioisotopes to aneutronic energy production. We present results demonstrating the occurrence of secondary nuclear reactions, initiated by the primary nuclear reaction products, using multicomponent targets composed of either natural boron (B) or natural boron nitride (BN). The primary proton-boron reaction (p + 11B → 3 α + 8.7 MeV), is one of the most attractive aneutronic fusion reaction. We report radioactive decay signatures in targets irradiated at the Elfie laser facility by laser-accelerated particle beams which we interpret as due to secondary reactions induced by alpha (α) particles produced in the primary reactions. Use of a second nanosecond laser beam, adequately synchronized with the short laser pulse to produce a plasma target, further enhanced the reaction rates. High rates and chains of reactions are essential for most applications.

  2. Laser-initiated primary and secondary nuclear reactions in Boron-Nitride.

    PubMed

    Labaune, C; Baccou, C; Yahia, V; Neuville, C; Rafelski, J

    2016-02-17

    Nuclear reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams are a promising new approach to many applications, from medical radioisotopes to aneutronic energy production. We present results demonstrating the occurrence of secondary nuclear reactions, initiated by the primary nuclear reaction products, using multicomponent targets composed of either natural boron (B) or natural boron nitride (BN). The primary proton-boron reaction (p + (11)B → 3 α + 8.7 MeV), is one of the most attractive aneutronic fusion reaction. We report radioactive decay signatures in targets irradiated at the Elfie laser facility by laser-accelerated particle beams which we interpret as due to secondary reactions induced by alpha (α) particles produced in the primary reactions. Use of a second nanosecond laser beam, adequately synchronized with the short laser pulse to produce a plasma target, further enhanced the reaction rates. High rates and chains of reactions are essential for most applications.

  3. Spallation-induced fission reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlliure, J.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    During the last decade spallation-induced fission reactions have received particular attention because of their impact in the design of spallation-neutron sources or radioactive beam facilities, but also in the understanding of the fission process at high excitation energy. In this paper, we review the main progress brought by modern experimental techniques, in particular those based in the inverse kinematic, as well as the achievements in modelling these reactions. We will also address future possibilities for improving the investigation of fission dynamics.

  4. Towards Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceno, Raul

    2012-10-01

    In this talk I will motivate the evaluation of nuclear reactions cross sections from Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD) and discuss challenges associated with such calculations. In particular, I will explore the connection between the energy spectrum of a three-body system in a finite volume and infinite volume scattering matrix elements using an effective field theoretical approach. The implication of this formalism for studying systems composed of a particle and a bound-state below the bound-state break- up, as well as a trimer state will be discussed. I will show that one in fact recovers a Luscher-like quantization condition for sufficiently low-energy up to exponential corrections in the volume due to the size of the two-particle bound-state. I will briefly discuss the similarities of the three-body problem and that of two- body coupled-channels systems and will comment on challenges in applying the formalism above the inelastic threshold.

  5. Exchange-diffusion reactions in HfSiON during annealing studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis and narrow resonant nuclear reaction profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotti, L.; Bastos, K. P.; Soares, G. V.; Driemeier, C.; Pezzi, R. P.; Morais, J.; Baumvol, I. J. R.; Rotondaro, A. L. P.; Visokay, M. R.; Chambers, J. J.; Quevedo-Lopez, M.; Colombo, L.

    2004-11-01

    HfSiON films deposited on Si (001) by reactive sputtering were submitted to rapid thermal annealing at 1000°C in vacuum, N2 and O2 atmospheres. The stability of the dielectric was evaluated by measuring the atomic transport and exchange of the chemical species, using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis and narrow resonant nuclear reaction profiling. Annealing in O2 ambient reduced the N concentration mainly from near-surface regions where oxygen was incorporated in comparable amounts. Vacuum annealing, on the other hand, induced N loss preferentially from the Si/dielectric interface and O loss preferentially from near-surface regions. The results are explained in terms of exchange-diffusion reactions occurring in the HfSiON.

  6. The CCONE Code System and its Application to Nuclear Data Evaluation for Fission and Other Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, O. Iwamoto, N.; Kunieda, S.; Minato, F.; Shibata, K.

    2016-01-15

    A computer code system, CCONE, was developed for nuclear data evaluation within the JENDL project. The CCONE code system integrates various nuclear reaction models needed to describe nucleon, light charged nuclei up to alpha-particle and photon induced reactions. The code is written in the C++ programming language using an object-oriented technology. At first, it was applied to neutron-induced reaction data on actinides, which were compiled into JENDL Actinide File 2008 and JENDL-4.0. It has been extensively used in various nuclear data evaluations for both actinide and non-actinide nuclei. The CCONE code has been upgraded to nuclear data evaluation at higher incident energies for neutron-, proton-, and photon-induced reactions. It was also used for estimating β-delayed neutron emission. This paper describes the CCONE code system indicating the concept and design of coding and inputs. Details of the formulation for modelings of the direct, pre-equilibrium and compound reactions are presented. Applications to the nuclear data evaluations such as neutron-induced reactions on actinides and medium-heavy nuclei, high-energy nucleon-induced reactions, photonuclear reaction and β-delayed neutron emission are mentioned.

  7. The CCONE Code System and its Application to Nuclear Data Evaluation for Fission and Other Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, O.; Iwamoto, N.; Kunieda, S.; Minato, F.; Shibata, K.

    2016-01-01

    A computer code system, CCONE, was developed for nuclear data evaluation within the JENDL project. The CCONE code system integrates various nuclear reaction models needed to describe nucleon, light charged nuclei up to alpha-particle and photon induced reactions. The code is written in the C++ programming language using an object-oriented technology. At first, it was applied to neutron-induced reaction data on actinides, which were compiled into JENDL Actinide File 2008 and JENDL-4.0. It has been extensively used in various nuclear data evaluations for both actinide and non-actinide nuclei. The CCONE code has been upgraded to nuclear data evaluation at higher incident energies for neutron-, proton-, and photon-induced reactions. It was also used for estimating β-delayed neutron emission. This paper describes the CCONE code system indicating the concept and design of coding and inputs. Details of the formulation for modelings of the direct, pre-equilibrium and compound reactions are presented. Applications to the nuclear data evaluations such as neutron-induced reactions on actinides and medium-heavy nuclei, high-energy nucleon-induced reactions, photonuclear reaction and β-delayed neutron emission are mentioned.

  8. Ion transport of Fr nuclear reaction products

    SciTech Connect

    Behr, J.A.; Cahn, S.B.; Dutta, S.B.

    1993-04-01

    Experiments planned for fundamental studies of radioactive atoms in magneto-optic traps require efficient deceleration and transport of nuclear reaction products to energies and locations where they can be trapped. The authors have built a low-energy ion transport system for Francium and other alkalis. A thick Au target is held on a W rod at 45{degrees} to the accelerator beam direction. The heavy-ion fusion reaction 115 MeV {sup 18}O + {sup 197}Au produces {sup 211,210,209}Fr recoil products which are stopped in the target. The target is heated to close to the melting point of Au to allow the Fr to diffuse to the surface, where it is ionized due to Au`s high work function, and is directly extracted by an electrode at 90{degrees} to the accelerator beam direction. The Fr is transported by electrostatic optics {approximately}1 m to a catcher viewed by an {alpha} detector: {ge}15% of the Fr produced in the target reaches the catcher. 2{times}10{sup 5} Fr/sec have been produced at the catcher, yielding at equilibrium a sample of 3x10{sup 7}Fr nuclei. This scheme physically decouples the target diffusion from the surface neutralization process, which can occur at a lower temperature more compatible with the neutral-atom trap.

  9. Reaction Rate Parameterization for Nuclear Astrophysics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. P.; Lingerfelt, E. J.; Smith, M. S.; Hix, W. R.; Bardayan, D. W.; Sharp, J. E.; Kozub, R. L.; Meyer, R. A.

    2004-11-01

    Libraries of thermonuclear reaction rates are used in element synthesis models of a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena, such as exploding stars and the inner workings of our sun. These computationally demanding models are more efficient when libraries, which may contain over 60000 rates and vary by 20 orders of magnitude, have a uniform parameterization for all rates. We have developed an on-line tool, hosted at www.nucastrodata.org, to obtain REACLIB parameters (F.-K. Thielemann et al., Adv. Nucl. Astrophysics 525, 1 (1987)) that represent reaction rates as a function of temperature. This helps to rapidly incorporate the latest nuclear physics results in astrophysics models. The tool uses numerous techniques and algorithms in a modular fashion to improve the quality of the fits to the rates. Features, modules, and additional applications of this tool will be discussed. * Managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. D.O.E. under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 + Supported by U.S. D.O.E. under Grant No. DE-FG02-96ER40955

  10. EMPIRE: Nuclear Reaction Model Code System for Data Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, M.; Capote, R.; Carlson, B. V.; Obložinský, P.; Sin, M.; Trkov, A.; Wienke, H.; Zerkin, V.

    2007-12-01

    EMPIRE is a modular system of nuclear reaction codes, comprising various nuclear models, and designed for calculations over a broad range of energies and incident particles. A projectile can be a neutron, proton, any ion (including heavy-ions) or a photon. The energy range extends from the beginning of the unresolved resonance region for neutron-induced reactions (∽ keV) and goes up to several hundred MeV for heavy-ion induced reactions. The code accounts for the major nuclear reaction mechanisms, including direct, pre-equilibrium and compound nucleus ones. Direct reactions are described by a generalized optical model (ECIS03) or by the simplified coupled-channels approach (CCFUS). The pre-equilibrium mechanism can be treated by a deformation dependent multi-step direct (ORION + TRISTAN) model, by a NVWY multi-step compound one or by either a pre-equilibrium exciton model with cluster emission (PCROSS) or by another with full angular momentum coupling (DEGAS). Finally, the compound nucleus decay is described by the full featured Hauser-Feshbach model with γ-cascade and width-fluctuations. Advanced treatment of the fission channel takes into account transmission through a multiple-humped fission barrier with absorption in the wells. The fission probability is derived in the WKB approximation within the optical model of fission. Several options for nuclear level densities include the EMPIRE-specific approach, which accounts for the effects of the dynamic deformation of a fast rotating nucleus, the classical Gilbert-Cameron approach and pre-calculated tables obtained with a microscopic model based on HFB single-particle level schemes with collective enhancement. A comprehensive library of input parameters covers nuclear masses, optical model parameters, ground state deformations, discrete levels and decay schemes, level densities, fission barriers, moments of inertia and γ-ray strength functions. The results can be converted into ENDF-6 formatted files using the

  11. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Kucharik, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Bellutti, P.; Korn, G.

    2015-01-01

    The use of a low contrast nanosecond laser pulse with a relatively low intensity (3  ×  1016 W cm-2) allowed the enhancing of the yield of induced nuclear reactions in advanced solid targets. In particular the ‘ultraclean’ proton-boron fusion reaction, producing energetic alpha particles without neutron generation, was chosen. A spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon substrate was used as a target. A combination of the specific target composition and the laser pulse temporal shape allowed the enhancing of the yield of alpha particles up to 109 per steradian. This result can be ascribed to the interaction of the long-laser pre-pulse with the target and to the optimal target geometry and composition.

  12. Identifying Understudied Nuclear Reactions by Text-mining the EXFOR Experimental Nuclear Reaction Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirdt, J. A.; Brown, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    The EXFOR library contains the largest collection of experimental nuclear reaction data available as well as the data's bibliographic information and experimental details. We text-mined the REACTION and MONITOR fields of the ENTRYs in the EXFOR library in order to identify understudied reactions and quantities. Using the results of the text-mining, we created an undirected graph from the EXFOR datasets with each graph node representing a single reaction and quantity and graph links representing the various types of connections between these reactions and quantities. This graph is an abstract representation of the connections in EXFOR, similar to graphs of social networks, authorship networks, etc. We use various graph theoretical tools to identify important yet understudied reactions and quantities in EXFOR. Although we identified a few cross sections relevant for shielding applications and isotope production, mostly we identified charged particle fluence monitor cross sections. As a side effect of this work, we learn that our abstract graph is typical of other real-world graphs.

  13. Identifying Understudied Nuclear Reactions by Text-mining the EXFOR Experimental Nuclear Reaction Library

    SciTech Connect

    Hirdt, J.A.; Brown, D.A.

    2016-01-15

    The EXFOR library contains the largest collection of experimental nuclear reaction data available as well as the data's bibliographic information and experimental details. We text-mined the REACTION and MONITOR fields of the ENTRYs in the EXFOR library in order to identify understudied reactions and quantities. Using the results of the text-mining, we created an undirected graph from the EXFOR datasets with each graph node representing a single reaction and quantity and graph links representing the various types of connections between these reactions and quantities. This graph is an abstract representation of the connections in EXFOR, similar to graphs of social networks, authorship networks, etc. We use various graph theoretical tools to identify important yet understudied reactions and quantities in EXFOR. Although we identified a few cross sections relevant for shielding applications and isotope production, mostly we identified charged particle fluence monitor cross sections. As a side effect of this work, we learn that our abstract graph is typical of other real-world graphs.

  14. Nuclear waste vitrification efficiency: cold cap reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Kruger, Albert A.; Pokorny, Richard

    2012-12-15

    The cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization are greatly affected by the rate of glass production. Various factors influence the performance of a waste-glass melter. One of the most significant, and also one of the least understood, is the process of batch melting. Studies are being conducted to gain fundamental understanding of the batch reactions, particularly those that influence the rate of melting, and models are being developed to link batch makeup and melter operation to the melting rate. Batch melting takes place within the cold cap, i.e., a batch layer floating on the surface of molten glass. The conversion of batch to glass consists of various chemical reactions, phase transitions, and diffusion-controlled processes. These include water evaporation (slurry feed contains as high as 60% water), gas evolution, the melting of salts, the formation of borate melt, reactions of borate melt with molten salts and with amorphous oxides (Fe2O3 and Al2O3), the formation of intermediate crystalline phases, the formation of a continuous glass-forming melt, the growth and collapse of primary foam, and the dissolution of residual solids. To this list we also need to add the formation of secondary foam that originates from molten glass but accumulates on the bottom of the cold cap. This study presents relevant data obtained for a high-level-waste melter feed and introduces a one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model of the cold cap as a step toward an advanced three-dimensional (3D) version for a complete model of the waste glass melter. The 1D model describes the batch-to-glass conversion within the cold cap as it progresses in a vertical direction. With constitutive equations and key parameters based on measured data, and simplified boundary conditions on the cold-cap interfaces with the glass melt and the plenum space of the melter, the model provides sensitivity analysis of the response of the cold cap to the batch makeup and melter conditions

  15. NUCLEAR WASTE VITRIFICATION EFFICIENCY COLD CAP REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; POKORNY R

    2011-07-29

    The cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization are greatly affected by the rate of glass production. Various factors influence the performance of a waste-glass melter. One of the most significant, and also one of the least understood, is the process of batch melting. Studies are being conducted to gain fundamental understanding of the batch reactions, particularly those that influence the rate of melting, and models are being developed to link batch makeup and melter operation to the melting rate. Batch melting takes place within the cold cap, i.e., a batch layer floating on the surface of molten glass. The conversion of batch to glass consists of various chemical reactions, phase transitions, and diffusion-controlled processes. These include water evaporation (slurry feed contains as high as 60% water), gas evolution, the melting of salts, the formation of borate melt, reactions of borate melt with molten salts and with amorphous oxides (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), the formation of intermediate crystalline phases, the formation of a continuous glass-forming melt, the growth and collapse of primary foam, and the dissolution of residual solids. To this list we also need to add the formation of secondary foam that originates from molten glass but accumulates on the bottom of the cold cap. This study presents relevant data obtained for a high-level-waste melter feed and introduces a one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model of the cold cap as a step toward an advanced three-dimensional (3D) version for a complete model of the waste glass melter. The 1D model describes the batch-to-glass conversion within the cold cap as it progresses in a vertical direction. With constitutive equations and key parameters based on measured data, and simplified boundary conditions on the cold-cap interfaces with the glass melt and the plenum space of the melter, the model provides sensitivity analysis of the response of the cold cap to the batch makeup

  16. Neutrino-induced reactions on nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallmeister, K.; Mosel, U.; Weil, J.

    2016-09-01

    Background: Long-baseline experiments such as the planned deep underground neutrino experiment (DUNE) require theoretical descriptions of the complete event in a neutrino-nucleus reaction. Since nuclear targets are used this requires a good understanding of neutrino-nucleus interactions. Purpose: Develop a consistent theory and code framework for the description of lepton-nucleus interactions that can be used to describe not only inclusive cross sections, but also the complete final state of the reaction. Methods: The Giessen-Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) implementation of quantum-kinetic transport theory is used, with improvements in its treatment of the nuclear ground state and of 2p2h interactions. For the latter an empirical structure function from electron scattering data is used as a basis. Results: Results for electron-induced inclusive cross sections are given as a necessary check for the overall quality of this approach. The calculated neutrino-induced inclusive double-differential cross sections show good agreement data from neutrino and antineutrino reactions for different neutrino flavors at MiniBooNE and T2K. Inclusive double-differential cross sections for MicroBooNE, NOvA, MINERvA, and LBNF/DUNE are given. Conclusions: Based on the GiBUU model of lepton-nucleus interactions a good theoretical description of inclusive electron-, neutrino-, and antineutrino-nucleus data over a wide range of energies, different neutrino flavors, and different experiments is now possible. Since no tuning is involved this theory and code should be reliable also for new energy regimes and target masses.

  17. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon's mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

  18. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon`s mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

  19. Surrogate Nuclear Reactions - An Indirect Method for Determining Reaction Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J; Ahle, L; Bernstein, L; Burke, J; Church, J A; Dietrich, F; Forssen, C; Hoffman, R; Gueorguiev, V

    2005-03-23

    An indirect method for determining cross sections of reactions proceeding through a compound nucleus is presented. Some applications of the Surrogate nuclear reaction approach are considered and challenges that need to be addressed are outlined.

  20. Nuclear reaction modeling, verification experiments, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F.S.

    1995-10-01

    This presentation summarized the recent accomplishments and future promise of the neutron nuclear physics program at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scatter Center (MLNSC) and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility. The unique capabilities of the spallation sources enable a broad range of experiments in weapons-related physics, basic science, nuclear technology, industrial applications, and medical physics.

  1. Nuclear reactions and synthesis of new transuranium species

    SciTech Connect

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    In this short review, I shall describe the special aspects of heavy ion nuclear reaction mechanisms operative in the transuranium region, the role of new techniques, possible nuclear reactions for the production of additional transuranium elements and nuclear species and the importance of work in this region for the development of nuclear models and theoretical concepts. This discussion should make it clear that a continuing supply of leements and isotopes, some fo them relatively short-lived, produced by the HFIR-TRU facilities, will be a requirement for future synthesis of new elements and isotopes.

  2. Direct Reactions for Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Katherine Louise

    2014-12-18

    Direct reactions are powerful probes for studying the atomic nucleus. Modern direct reaction studies are illuminating both the fundamental nature of the nucleus and its role in nucleosynthetic processes occurring in the cosmos. This report covers experiments using knockout reactions on neutron-deficient fragmentation beams, transfer reactions on fission fragment beams, and theoretical sensitivity studies relating to the astrophysical r-process. Results from experiments on 108,106Sn at the NSCL, and on 131Sn at HRIBF are presented as well as the results from the nucleosynthesis study.

  3. Neutron transfer reactions: Surrogates for neutron capture for basic and applied nuclear science

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, J. A.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, Steven D; Peters, W. A.; Adekola, Aderemi S; Allen, J.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Becker, J.; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Erikson, Luke; Gaddis, A. L.; Harlin, Christopher W; Hatarik, Robert; Howard, Joshua A; Jandel, M.; Johnson, Micah; Kapler, R.; Krolas, W.; Liang, J Felix; Livesay, Jake; Ma, Zhanwen; Matei, Catalin; Matthews, C.; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Patterson, N. P.; Paulauskas, Stanley; Pelham, T.; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, David C; Rogers, J.; Schmitt, Kyle; Shapira, Dan; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Sissom, D. J.; Smith, Michael Scott; Swan, T. P.; Thomas, J. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilson, Gemma L

    2009-04-01

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on {sup 130,132}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 75}As are discussed.

  4. Tracking of Ions Produced at Near Barrier Energies in Nuclear Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Examples of detectors, presently in use, for tracking products from nuclear reactions induced by radioactive ion beams are described. A new tracking detector is being designed to study the binary products from reactions induced by heavy neutron-rich radioactive ion beams on heavy neutron-rich target nuclei. The motivation for such studies and the features designed to accomplish this goal will be presented.

  5. Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hersman, F.W.; Dawson, J.F.; Heisenberg, J.H.; Calarco, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: giant resonance studies; deep inelastic scattering studies; high resolution nuclear structure work; and relativistic RPA; and field theory in the Schroedinger Representation.

  6. Nuclear quantum tunnelling in enzymatic reactions--an enzymologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Johannissen, Linus O; Hay, Sam; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2015-12-14

    Enzyme-catalysed H-transfer reactions are ubiquitous, yet fundamental details of these reactions remain unresolved. In this perspective, we discuss the roles of nuclear quantum tunnelling and (compressive) dynamics during these reactions. Evidence for the coupling of specific substrate and/or protein vibrations to the chemical coordinate is considered and a case is made for the combination of multiple experimental and computational/theoretical approaches when studying these reactions.

  7. Lepton nonconserving (μ-,e+) reaction to individual nuclear states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittel, S.; Vergados, J. D.

    1981-11-01

    Branching ratios for the lepton-violating 40Ca(μ-,e+)40Ar(g.s.) reaction are calculated using a gauge model in which it is mediated by a Majorana neutrino. The predicted branching ratios to the ground state are fairly insensitive to the relevant nuclear structure information and are much smaller than previously calculated total rates. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 40Ca (μ-,e+)40Ar(g.s.) calculated branching ratio. Lepton conversion.

  8. Measuring Neutron-Induced Reaction Cross Sections without Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, L. A.; Schiller, A.; Cooper, J. R.; Hoffman, R. D.; McMahan, M. A.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Mitchell, G.; Tavukcu, E.; Guttormsen, M.

    2003-04-01

    Neutron-induced reactions on radioactive nuclei play a significant role in nuclear astrophysics and many other applied nuclear physics topics. However, the majority of these cross sections are impossible to measure due to the high-background of the targets and the low-intensity of neutron beams. We have explored the possibility of using charged-particle transfer reactions to form the same "pre-compound" nucleus as one formed in a neutron-induced reaction in order to measure the relative decay probabilities of the nucleus as a function of energy. Multiplying these decay probabilities by the neutron absorption cross section will then produce the equivalent neutron-induced reaction cross section. In this presentation I will explore the validity of this "surrogate reaction" technique by comparing results from the recent 157Gd(3He,axng)156-xGd experiment using STARS (Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies) at GAMMASPHERE with reaction model calculations for the 155Gd(n,xng)156-xGd. This work was funded by the US Department of Energy under contracts number W-7405-ENG-48 (LLNL), AC03-76SF00098 (LBNL) and the Norwegian Research Council (Oslo).

  9. On reaction mechanisms involved in the deuteron–induced surrogate reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Mănăilescu, C.

    2015-02-24

    An extended analysis of the nuclear reaction mechanisms involved within deuteron interaction with nuclei, namely the breakup, stripping, pick-up, pre-equilibrium emission, and evaporation from fully equilibrated compound nucleus, is presented in order to highlight the importance of the direct mechanisms still neglected in the analysis of deuteron-induced surrogate reactions. Particularly, the dominance of the breakup mechanism at low energies around the Coulomb barrier should be considered in the case of (d,x) surrogate reactions on actinide target nuclei.

  10. Modeling Proton- and Light Ion-Induced Reactions at Low Energies in the MARS15 Code

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I. L.; Mokhov, N. V.; Gudima, K. K.

    2015-04-25

    An implementation of both ALICE code and TENDL evaluated nuclear data library in order to describe nuclear reactions induced by low-energy projectiles in the Monte Carlo code MARS15 is presented. Comparisons between results of modeling and experimental data on reaction cross sections and secondary particle distributions are shown.

  11. EXFOR SYSTEMS MANUAL NUCLEAR REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    EXFOR is an exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. This document has been written for use by the members of the Network and includes matters of procedure and protocol, as well as detailed rules for the compilation of data. Users may prefer to consult EXFOR Basics' for a brief description of the format.

  12. Undesirable nuclear reactions and induced radioactivity as a result of the use of the high-energy therapeutic beams generated by medical linacs.

    PubMed

    Konefal, Adam; Polaczek-Grelik, Kinga; Zipper, Wiktor

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of undesirable photonuclear, electronuclear and neutron capture reactions taking place in the treatment room during emission of the typical high-energy therapeutic beams from two different medical accelerators, i.e. Primus Siemens and Varian Clinac-2300, is presented. The radioisotopes (187)W, (56)Mn, (28)Al, (57)Ni, (38)Cl, (57)Co and (19)Au and the neutron activation of (1)H were identified as a consequence of these reactions. Moreover, the increased photon fluence rate behind the door of the accelerator bunker in the operator console room was observed during emission of the 20 MV X-rays from the Varian Clinac-2300 as well as in the case of the 15 MV X-ray beam from the Primus Siemens. No increased radiation was observed during the 6 MV X-ray beam emission. The performed measurements produced evidences on the presence of neutrons in the operator console room during emission of the 15 MV X-ray beam from the Primus Siemens as well as the 20 MV X-rays and the 22 MeV electrons from the Varian Clinac-2300 accelerator.

  13. Experiments on nuclear fission induced by radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Skobelev, N.K.

    1994-07-01

    The cross sections of {sup 209}Bi nuclear fission induced by secondary beams of {sup 6}He and {sup 4}He are measured under identical conditions. The experimental data are in good agreement with earlier results on the fission cross section of the {sup 4}He + {sup 209}Bi reaction. The measured values of the cross section of {sup 209}Bi fission induced by {sup 6}He ions are much higher than the cross sections of fission induced by {alpha}-particles. It is found that the fission threshold for the {sup 6}He + {sup 209}Bi reaction is shifted as compared to that of the {sup 4}He + {sup 209}Bi reaction. Various factors that can be responsible for the observed peculiarities in the {sup 209}Bi fission induced by the {sup 6}He ions are analyzed. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Towards many-body based nuclear reaction modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilaire, Stéphane; Goriely, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    The increasing need for cross sections far from the valley of stability poses a challenge for nuclear reaction models. So far, predictions of cross sections have relied on more or less phenomenological approaches, depending on parameters adjusted to available experimental data or deduced from systematic expressions. While such predictions are expected to be reliable for nuclei not too far from the experimentally known regions, it is clearly preferable to use more fundamental approaches, based on sound physical principles, when dealing with very exotic nuclei. Thanks to the high computer power available today, all the ingredients required to model a nuclear reaction can now be (and have been) microscopically (or semi-microscopically) determined starting from the information provided by a nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. This concerns nuclear masses, optical model potential, nuclear level densities, photon strength functions, as well as fission barriers. All these nuclear model ingredients, traditionally given by phenomenological expressions, now have a microscopic counterpart implemented in the TALYS nuclear reaction code. We are thus now able to perform fully microscopic cross section calculations. The quality of these ingredients and the impact of using them instead of the usually adopted phenomenological parameters will be discussed. Perspectives for the coming years will be drawn on the improvements one can expect.

  15. Public reactions to nuclear waste: Citizens' views of repository siting

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    This book presents revised and updated papers from a panel of social scientists, at the 1989 AAAS meetings, that examined the public's reactions to nuclear waste disposal and the repository siting process. The papers report the results of original empirical research on citizens' views of nuclear waste repository siting. Topics covered include the following: content analysis of public testimony; sources of public concern about nuclear waste disposal in Texas agricultural communities; local attitudes toward high-level waste repository at Hanford; perceived risk and attitudes toward nuclear wastes; attitudes of Nevada urban residents toward a nuclear waste repository; attitudes of rural community residents toward a nuclear waste respository. An introductory chapter provides background and context, and a concluding chapter summarizes the implications of the reports. Two additional chapters cover important features of high-level waste disposal: long term trends in public attitudes toward nuclear energy and nuclear waste policy and assessment of the effects on the Los Vegas convention business if a high-level nuclear waste depository were sited in Nevada.

  16. Reactions Induced by Platelet Transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Kiefel, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Summary Platelet transfusions play a central role in therapeutic regimens for patients with hematologic/oncologic diseases who develop severe thrombocytopenia either in the course of their disease or following cytostatic therapy. Like other blood components, platelet transfusions have achieved a high degree of safety as far as transmission of viral diseases is concerned. However, transfusion of platelet concentrates is accompanied by a high frequency of febrile and anaphylactoid reactions. In rare cases, recipients of platelet concentrates are threatened by severe reactions as septic complications due to bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates, transfusion-related acute lung injury and severe anaphylactic episodes. PMID:21512624

  17. Laser-induced tissue reactions and dermatology.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rebecca J; Taylor, Brent R; Engelman, Dendy E

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of laser tissue reactions and tissue properties allows the practitioner to tailor a treatment to an individual patient's need and goals. A laser's power, spot size and pulse duration may be manipulated to yield different tissue reactions. Five tissue reactions, each the result of varying laser pulse durations and energy densities, may be achieved. They are photochemical, photothermal, photoablation, plasma-induced ablation and photomechanical. Of these, photothermal reactions are most utilized in dermatology. When higher powered pulses are applied, tissue often undergoes multiple reactions simultaneously. An understanding of these reactions allows their effects to be predicted. In this chapter, the various reactions are reviewed, and the reactions caused by many of the most commonly used lasers in dermatology are discussed.

  18. Physics with post-accelerated beams at ISOLDE: nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pietro, A.; Riisager, K.; Van Duppen, P.

    2017-04-01

    Nuclear-reaction studies have until now constituted a minor part of the physics program with post-accelerated beams at ISOLDE, mainly due to the maximum energy of REX-ISOLDE of around 3 MeV/u that limits reaction work to the mass region below A = 100. We give an overview of the current experimental status and of the physics results obtained so far. Finally, the improved conditions given by the HIE-ISOLDE upgrade are described.

  19. Towards a More Complete and Accurate Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Library (EXFOR): International Collaboration Between Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC)

    SciTech Connect

    Otuka, N.; Dupont, E.; Semkova, V.; Pritychenko, B.; Blokhin, A.I.; Aikawa, M.; Babykina, S.; Bossant, M.; Chen, G.; Dunaeva, S.; Forrest, R.A.; Fukahori, T.; Furutachi, N.; Ganesan, S.; Ge, Z.; Gritzay, O.O.; Herman, M.; Hlavač, S.; and others

    2014-06-15

    The International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC) coordinated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) successfully collaborates in the maintenance and development of the EXFOR library. As the scope of published data expands (e.g. to higher energy, to heavier projectile) to meet the needs of research and applications, it has become a challenging task to maintain both the completeness and accuracy of the EXFOR library. Evolution of the library highlighting recent developments is described.

  20. Towards a More Complete and Accurate Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Library (EXFOR). International Collaboration Between Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC)

    SciTech Connect

    Otuka, N.; Pritychenko, B.; Otuka, N.; Dupont, E.; Semkova, V.; Pritychenko, B.; Blokhin, A. I.; Aikawa, M.; Babykina, S.; Bossant, M.; Chen, G.; Dunaeva, S.; Forrest, R. A.; Fukahori, T.; Furutachi, N.; Ganesan, S.; Ge, Z.; Gritzay, O. O.; Herman, M.; Hlavac, S.; Kato, K.; Lalremruata, B.; Lee, Y. O.; Makinaga, A.; Matsumoto, K.; Mikhaylyukova, M.; Pikulina, G.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Saxena, A.; Schwerer, O.; Simakov, S. P.; Soppera, N.; Suzuki, R.; Takacs, S.; Tao, X.; Taova, S.; Tarkanyi, F.; Varlamov, V. V.; Wang, J.; Yang, S. C.; Zerkin, V.; Zhuang, Y.

    2014-06-01

    The International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC) coordinated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) successfully collaborates in the maintenance and development of the EXFOR library. Likewise, as the scope of published data expands (e.g. to higher energy, to heavier projectile) to meet the needs of research and applications, it has become a challenging task to maintain both the completeness and accuracy of the EXFOR library. Evolution of the library highlighting recent developments is described.

  1. Tailoring medium energy proton beam to induce low energy nuclear reactions in ⁸⁶SrCl₂ for production of PET radioisotope ⁸⁶Y.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Dmitri G; Mausner, Leonard F; Pile, Philip

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports results of experiments at Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) aiming to investigate effective production of positron emitting radioisotope (86)Y by the low energy (86)Sr(p,n) reaction. BLIP is a facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory designed for the proton irradiation of the targets for isotope production at high and intermediate proton energies. The proton beam is delivered by the Linear Accelerator (LINAC) whose incident energy is tunable from 200 to 66 MeV in approximately 21 MeV increments. The array was designed to ensure energy degradation from 66 MeV down to less than 20 MeV. Aluminum slabs were used to degrade the proton energy down to the required range. The production yield of (86)Y (1.2+/-0.1 mCi (44.4+/-3.7) MBq/μAh) and ratio of radioisotopic impurities was determined by assaying an aliquot of the irradiated (86)SrCl2 solution by gamma spectroscopy. The analysis of energy dependence of the (86)Y production yield and the ratios of radioisotopic impurities has been used to adjust degrader thickness. Experimental data showed substantial discrepancies in actual energy propagation compared to energy loss calculations.

  2. Photonuclear reaction studies at HIγS: Developing the science of remote detection of nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, C. R.

    2014-11-02

    Development of gamma-ray beam interrogation technologies for remote detection of special nuclear materials and isotope analysis requires comprehensive databases of nuclear structure information and gamma-ray induced nuclear reaction observables. Relevant nuclear structure details include the energy, spin and parity of excited states that have significant probability for electromagnetic transition from the ground state, i.e, the angular momentum transferred in the reaction is Δl ≤ 2. This talk will report recent Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) measurements to identify and characterize new low-spin states in actinide nuclei at energies from 1 to 4 MeV, which is the energy range most important for remote analysis methods. Here, these measurements are carried out using the nearly mono-energetic linearly polarized gamma-ray beam at the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIγS) at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Also, studies of the (γ, n) reaction on a variety of nuclei with linearly polarized beams at HIγS indicate that this reaction might be used to discern between fissile and non-fissile materials. This work will be described. In addition, an overview will be given of a concept for a next generation laser Compton-backing scattering gamma-ray source to be implemented as an upgrade to increase the beam intensity at HIγS by more than an order of magnitude.

  3. A Laboratory Experiment on the Statistical Theory of Nuclear Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveland, Walter

    1971-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate laboratory experiment on the statistical theory of nuclear reactions. The experiment involves measuring the relative cross sections for formation of a nucleus in its meta stable excited state and its ground state by applying gamma-ray spectroscopy to an irradiated sample. Involves 3-4 hours of laboratory time plus…

  4. Indirect measurement of nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W. P.; Li, Z. H.; Bai, X. X.; Wang, Y. B.; Guo, B.; Lian, G.; Su, J.; Zeng, S.; Wang, B. X.; Yan, S. Q.; Li, Y. J.; Li, E. T.; Jin, S. J.

    2010-05-12

    Systematic indirect measurements of nuclear astrophysical reactions using the unstable ion beam facility GIRAFFE in CIAE were performed. We have measured the angular distributions of transfer reactions, such as {sup 8}Li(d,p){sup 9}Li, {sup 8}Li(d,n){sup 9}Be and {sup 8}Li(p,d){sup 7}Li in inverse kinematics, and derived the astrophysical S-factors or reaction rates for {sup 8}Li(n,gamma){sup 9}Li and {sup 8}Li(p,gamma){sup 9}Be by using asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) or spectroscopic factor methods.

  5. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions: A Millennium Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallove, Eugene F.

    2000-03-01

    This talk will summarize some of the more convincing recent experiments that show that helium-4, nuclear scale excess energy, tritium, low-level neutron production, and the transmutation of heavy elements can occur near room temperature in relatively simple systems. Despite inappropriate theory-based arguments against it and unethical attacks by people unfamiliar with the supporting experiments, the new field of solid state nuclear reactions is progressing. The physical theory behind the associated phenomena continues to be debated among theorists. The facts of the history of this scientific controversy suggest that it is inadvisable to rush to judgment against allegedly ``impossible" new phenomena when increasingly careful experiments have revealed new vistas in physics. Detailed discussion of evidence for solid state nuclear reactions is available elsewhere (http://www.infinite-energy.com). abstract document

  6. Nuclear fusion reaction rates for strongly coupled ionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Chugunov, A. I.; DeWitt, H. E.

    2009-07-15

    We analyze the effect of plasma screening on nuclear reaction rates in dense matter composed of atomic nuclei of one or two types. We perform semiclassical calculations of the Coulomb barrier penetrability taking into account a radial mean-field potential of plasma ions. The mean-field potential is extracted from the results of extensive Monte Carlo calculations of radial pair distribution functions of ions in binary ionic mixtures. We calculate the reaction rates in a wide range of plasma parameters and approximate these rates by an analytical expression that is expected to be applicable to multicomponent ion mixtures. Also, we analyze Gamow-peak energies of reacting ions in various nuclear burning regimes. For illustration, we study nuclear burning in {sup 12}C-{sup 16}O mixtures.

  7. Penetration Factor for Nuclear Fusion Reaction in Nonthermal Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ki, Dai-Han; Jung, Young-Dae

    2011-02-01

    The nonthermal effects on the nuclear fusion reaction process are investigated in Lorentzian astrophysical plasmas. The closed expression of the classical turning point in Lorentzian plasmas is obtained by the Lambert W-function. Using the WKB analysis with the effective screening length, the closed expressions of the fusion penetration factor and the cross section for the nuclear fusion reaction in Lorentzian plasmas are obtained as functions of the spectral index, relative kinetic energy, and plasma parameters. It is shown that the nonthermal character of the Lorentzian plasma enhances the fusion penetration factor. In addition, the nonthermal effect on the penetration factor is found to be more significant in plasmas with higher densities. It would be expected that the fusion reaction rates of the p-p chain and the CNO cycle in nonthermal plasmas are always greater than those in thermal Maxwellian plasmas.

  8. The ``light-est'' of all Projectiles: Nuclear Structure Studies Using Photonuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietralla, Norbert

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear reactions induced by photons have had and continue to have a large impact on the course of nuclear physics. Photons interact purely electromagnetically with the atomic nucleus and induce minimal momentum transfer at given excitation energy. Photonuclear reaction processes can be expanded in terms of QED and photonuclear excitations are by far dominated by one-step processes. They allow for a model independent measurement of nuclear observables and, hence, for a clean characterization of effective nuclear forces. Apart from the pioneering photonuclear reactions by Bothe and Gentner in the 1930s, bremsstrahlung has been used most widely as an intense source of gamma-rays for photonuclear reactions from the 1940s until today. The nuclear dipole strength distribution has largely been mapped out at bremsstrahlung facilities. While the continuous-energy distribution of bremsstrahlung photons offers a complete view of the spectrum of photonuclear excitations, it suffers from a poor sensitivity to specific energy intervals. Intense, energy-tunable, quasi-monochromatic gamma-ray beams from laser-Compton backscattering processes have revolutionized the field of photonuclear reactions for the last ten years. A set of new techniques is under development and new information on fundamental nuclear modes, such as the IVGDR, IVGQR, Pygmy Dipole Resonance, and the Scissors Mode, has recently been obtained. We will attempt to give a brief overview of the state of the art and dare an outlook at the research opportunities at the next generation of gamma-ray facilities under construction in the U.S. and Europe. Supported by the DFG under grant No. SFB634.

  9. Unified ab initio approaches to nuclear structure and reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Navratil, Petr; Quaglioni, Sofia; Hupin, Guillaume; ...

    2016-04-13

    The description of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the realistic interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. In addition to the complex nature of the nuclear forces, with two-, three- and possibly higher many-nucleon components, one faces the quantum-mechanical many-nucleon problem governed by an interplay between bound and continuum states. In recent years, significant progress has been made in ab initio nuclear structure and reaction calculations based on input from QCD-employing Hamiltonians constructed within chiral effective field theory. After a brief overview of the field, we focus on ab initio many-body approaches—built upon the no-core shell model—that are capable of simultaneously describing both bound and scattering nuclear states, and present results for resonances in light nuclei, reactions important for astrophysics and fusion research. In particular, we review recent calculations of resonances in the 6He halo nucleus, of five- and six-nucleon scattering, and an investigation of the role of chiral three-nucleon interactions in the structure of 9Be. Further, we discuss applications to the 7Bemore » $${({\\rm{p}},\\gamma )}^{8}{\\rm{B}}$$ radiative capture. Lastly, we highlight our efforts to describe transfer reactions including the 3H$${({\\rm{d}},{\\rm{n}})}^{4}$$He fusion.« less

  10. Report of the Workshop on Light Particle-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The study meeting on light particle (mass number = 3 - 11) induced reaction was held for three days from 5-7 Dec. 1991 at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. This book records the reports based on the lectures presented at the meeting. In the new facility of the RCNP, the experiment on the nuclear reaction using 400 MeV polarized protons and 200 MeV polarized deuterons is about to begin. When the acceleration of polarized He-3 beam which is being developed becomes feasible, by combining it with the high resolution spectrometer GRAND RAIDEN, it is expected that the unique, high accuracy research using the polarized He-3 having intermediate energy (540 MeV) becomes possible. At this time, by focusing attention to what new physics is developed by the nuclear reaction induced by the composite particles having the intermediate energy of mass number 3 - 11, this study meeting was planned and held. As the result, 29 lectures collected were to cover wide fields, and active discussion was carried out.

  11. Sigma: Web Retrieval Interface for Nuclear Reaction Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B. Sonzogni, A.A.

    2008-12-15

    We present Sigma, a Web-rich application which provides user-friendly access in processing and plotting of the evaluated and experimental nuclear reaction data stored in the ENDF-6 and EXFOR formats. The main interface includes browsing using a periodic table and a directory tree, basic and advanced search capabilities, interactive plots of cross sections, angular distributions and spectra, comparisons between evaluated and experimental data, computations between different cross section sets. Interactive energy-angle, neutron cross section uncertainties plots and visualization of covariance matrices are under development. Sigma is publicly available at the National Nuclear Data Center website at (http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/sigma)

  12. Sigma: Web Retrieval Interface for Nuclear Reaction Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko,B.; Sonzogni, A.A.

    2008-06-24

    The authors present Sigma, a Web-rich application which provides user-friendly access in processing and plotting of the evaluated and experimental nuclear reaction data stored in the ENDF-6 and EXFOR formats. The main interface includes browsing using a periodic table and a directory tree, basic and advanced search capabilities, interactive plots of cross sections, angular distributions and spectra, comparisons between evaluated and experimental data, computations between different cross section sets. Interactive energy-angle, neutron cross section uncertainties plots and visualization of covariance matrices are under development. Sigma is publicly available at the National Nuclear Data Center website at www.nndc.bnl.gov/sigma.

  13. Collective effects in deuteron induced reactions of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canbula, Bora

    2017-01-01

    Cross sections of 27 Al (d,x)22 Na , 27 Al (d,x)24 Na , and 27 Al (d,x)27 Mg reactions are calculated by using TALYS 1.6 computer code with different nuclear level density models, which are composite Gilbert-Cameron model, back-shifted Fermi gas model, generalized superfluid model, and recently proposed collective semi-classical Fermi gas model in the energy range of 3-180 MeV. The results are compared with the experimental data taken from EXFOR library. In these deuteron induced reactions, collective effects are investigated by means of nuclear level density models. Collective semi-classical Fermi gas model including the collective effects via the level density parameter represents the best agreement with the experimental data compared to the other level density models, especially in the low deuteron bombarding energies where the collective effects dominate.

  14. Direct reactions for nuclear structure required for fundamental symmetry tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, P. E.; Rand, E. T.; Diaz Varela, A.; Ball, G. C.; Bildstein, V.; Faestermann, T.; Hadinia, B.; Hertenberger, R.; Jamieson, D. S.; Jigmeddorj, B.; Leach, K. G.; Svensson, C. E.; Wirth, H.-F.

    2016-09-01

    A program of nuclear structure studies to support fundamental symmetry tests has been initiated. Motivated by the search for an electric dipole moment in 199Hg, the structure in the vicinity has been explored via direct reaction studies. To date, these have included the 198,200Hg(d, d') inelastic scattering reactions, with the aim to obtain information on the E2 and E3 strength distributions, and the 198Hg(d, p) and 200Hg(d, t) reactions to obtain information on the single-particle states in 199Hg. The studies using the 200Hg targets have been fully analyzed using the FRESCO reaction code yielding the E2 and E3 strength distribution to 4 MeV in excitation energy, and the (d, t) single- particle strength to over 3 MeV in excitation energy.

  15. Nuclear structure and reactions using lattice effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupak, Gautam

    2016-09-01

    Effective field theory (EFT) formulated on a space-time lattice provides a model-independent framework for ab initio nuclear structure and reaction calculations. The EFT interactions are rooted in quantum chromodynamics through low energy symmetry constraints. In this talk I present several recent developments in lattice EFT, in particular I present the so called adiabatic projection method that enables elastic and in-elastic reaction calculations. Bound state properties of atomic nuclei such as carbon and oxygen will also be presented. Partial support from US National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1307453 is acknowledged.

  16. Nucleon Transfer Reactions in Few-Body Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deltuva, A.

    2017-03-01

    Three- and four-body scattering is described solving Faddeev-Yakubovsky or equivalent Alt-Grassberger-Sandhas integral equations for transition operators in momentum-space. Several realistic nuclear interaction models are used; the Coulomb force between charged particles is taken into account via the screening and renormalization method. Differential cross sections and spin observables for various nucleon transfer reactions are calculated and compared with experimental data.

  17. Cross Sections Calculations of ( d, t) Nuclear Reactions up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Yiğit, M.; Tanır, G.

    2013-04-01

    In nuclear fusion reactions two light atomic nuclei fuse together to form a heavier nucleus. Fusion power is the power generated by nuclear fusion processes. In contrast with fission power, the fusion reaction processes does not produce radioactive nuclides. The fusion will not produce CO2 or SO2. So the fusion energy will not contribute to environmental problems such as particulate pollution and excessive CO2 in the atmosphere. Fusion powered electricity generation was initially believed to be readily achievable, as fission power had been. However, the extreme requirements for continuous reactions and plasma containment led to projections being extended by several decades. In 2010, more than 60 years after the first attempts, commercial power production is still believed to be unlikely before 2050. Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, there is still a long way to go to penetrate commercial fusion reactors to the energy market. In the fusion reactor, tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. Therefore, for self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. Working out the systematics of ( d, t) nuclear reaction cross sections is of great importance for the definition of the excitation function character for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. Since the experimental data of charged particle induced reactions are scarce, self-consistent calculation and analyses using nuclear theoretical models are very important. In this study, ( d, t) cross sections for target nuclei 19F, 50Cr, 54Fe, 58Ni, 75As, 89Y, 90Zr, 107Ag, 127I, 197Au and 238U have been investigated up to 50 MeV deuteron energy. The excitation functions for ( d, t) reactions have been calculated by pre-equilibrium reaction mechanism. Calculation results have been also compared with the available measurements in

  18. EXFOR basics: A short guide to the nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear data compilation centers. This format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  19. Rydberg phases of Hydrogen and low energy nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsson, Sveinn; Holmlid, Leif

    2016-03-01

    For over the last 26 years the science of cold fusion/LENR has been researched around the world with slow pace of progress. Modest quantity of excess heat and signatures of nuclear transmutation and helium production have been confirmed in experiments and theoretical work has only resulted in a large flora of inadequate theoretical scenarios. Here we review current state of research in Rydberg matter of Hydrogen that is showing strong signature of nuclear processes. In the presentation experimental behavior of Rydberg matter of hydrogen is described. An extensive collaboration effort of surface physics, catalysis, atomic physics, solid state physics, nuclear physics and quantum information is need to tackle the surprising experimental results that have so far been obtained. Rydberg matter of Hydrogen is the only known state of matter that is able to bring huge collection of protons to so short distances and for so long time that tunneling becomes a reasonable process for making low energy nuclear reactions. Nuclear quantum entanglement can also become realistic process at theses conditions.

  20. Assessment and Requirements of Nuclear Reaction Databases for GCR Transport in the Atmosphere and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Tripathi, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    The transport properties of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in the atmosphere, material structures, and human body (self-shielding) am of interest in risk assessment for supersonic and subsonic aircraft and for space travel in low-Earth orbit and on interplanetary missions. Nuclear reactions, such as knockout and fragmentation, present large modifications of particle type and energies of the galactic cosmic rays in penetrating materials. We make an assessment of the current nuclear reaction models and improvements in these model for developing required transport code data bases. A new fragmentation data base (QMSFRG) based on microscopic models is compared to the NUCFRG2 model and implications for shield assessment made using the HZETRN radiation transport code. For deep penetration problems, the build-up of light particles, such as nucleons, light clusters and mesons from nuclear reactions in conjunction with the absorption of the heavy ions, leads to the dominance of the charge Z = 0, 1, and 2 hadrons in the exposures at large penetration depths. Light particles are produced through nuclear or cluster knockout and in evaporation events with characteristically distinct spectra which play unique roles in the build-up of secondary radiation's in shielding. We describe models of light particle production in nucleon and heavy ion induced reactions and make an assessment of the importance of light particle multiplicity and spectral parameters in these exposures.

  1. Visualized kinematics code for two-body nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. J.; Chae, K. Y.

    2016-05-01

    The one or few nucleon transfer reaction has been a great tool for investigating the single-particle properties of a nucleus. Both stable and exotic beams are utilized to study transfer reactions in normal and inverse kinematics, respectively. Because many energy levels of the heavy recoil from the two-body nuclear reaction can be populated by using a single beam energy, identifying each populated state, which is not often trivial owing to high level-density of the nucleus, is essential. For identification of the energy levels, a visualized kinematics code called VISKIN has been developed by utilizing the Java programming language. The development procedure, usage, and application of the VISKIN is reported.

  2. [Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions]. Progress summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The experimental goals are focused on developing an understanding of strong interactions and the structure of hadronic systems by determination of the electromagnetic response; these goals will be accomplished through coincidence detection of final states. Nuclear modeling objectives are to organize and interpret the data through a consistent description of a broad spectrum of reaction observables; calculations are performed in a nonrelativistic diagrammatic framework as well as a relativistic QHD approach. Work is described according to the following arrangement: direct knockout reactions (completion of {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p), {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}pp) progress, large acceptance detector physics simulations), giant resonance studies (intermediate-energy experiments with solid-state detectors, the third response function in {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}p{sub 0}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 0}), comparison of the {sup 12}C(e, e{prime}p{sub 0}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 3}) reactions, quadrupole strength in the {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}{alpha}{sub 0}) reaction, quadrupole strength in the {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}{alpha}) reaction, analysis of the {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}p{sub 1}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 3}) angular distributions, analysis of the {sup 40}Ca(e,e{prime}x) reaction at low q, analysis of the higher-q {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}x) data from Bates), models of nuclear structure (experimental work, Hartree-Fock calculations, phonon excitations in spherical nuclei, shell model calculations, variational methods for relativistic fields), and instrumentation development efforts (developments at CEBAF, CLAS contracts, BLAST developments).

  3. Probing the nuclear structure with heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Broglia, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclei display distortions in both ordinary space and in gauge space. It is suggested that it is possible to learn about the spatial distribution of the Nilsson orbitals and about the change of the pairing gap with the rotational frequency through the analysis of one- and two-nucleon transfer reactions induced in heavy-ion collisions.

  4. Trojan Horse technique to measure nuclear astrophysics rearrangement reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitaleri, Claudio

    2013-03-01

    The knowledge of nucleosynthesis and of energy production in stars requires an increasingly precise measurement of nuclear fusion reactions at the Gamow energy. Because of the Coulomb barrier reaction cross sections in astrophysics cannot be accessed directly at ultra -low energies, unless very favorable conditions are met. Moreover, the energies characterizing nuclear processes in several astrophysical contexts are so low that the presence of atomic electrons must be taken into account. Theoretical extrapolations of available data are then needed to derive astrophysical S(E)-factors. To overcome these experimental difficulties the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been introduced. The method provides a valid alternative path to measure unscreened low-energy cross sections of reactions between charged particles, and to retrieve information on the electron screening potential when ultra-low energy direct measurements are available. While the theory has been discussed in detail in some theoretical works, present in the scientific literature, also in relation to different types of excitation functions (e.g. non-resonant and resonant), work on detailed methodology used to extract the events to be considered for the bare nucleus cross section measurements is still on going. In this work we will present some critical points in the application of THM that deserve to be discussed in more detail.

  5. Experimental Observation of Nuclear Reactions in Palladium and Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    J. Dufour; D. Murat; X. Dufour; J. Foos

    2001-11-12

    By submitting various metals (Pd, U) containing hydrogen (from 2000 to 700 000 atoms of hydrogen for 1 000 000 atoms of the host metal) to the combined action of electrical currents and magnetic fields, we have observed a sizeable exothermal effect (from 0.1 to 8 W for 500 mg of metal used). This effect is beyond experimental errors, the energy output being typically 130 to 250{percent} of the energy input and not of chemical origin (exothermal effect in the range of 7000 MJ/mol of metal in the case of palladium and of 60 MJ/mol in the case of uranium). New chemical species also appear in the processes metals. It has been shown by a QED calculation that resonances of long lifetime (s), nuclear dimensions (fm), and low energy of formation (eV) could exist. This concept seems to look like the 'shrunken hydrogen atoms' proposed by various authors. It is indeed very different in two ways (a) being a metastable state, it needs energy to be formed (a few eV) and reverts to normal hydrogen after a few seconds, liberating back its energy of formation (it is thus not the source of the energy observed); (b) its formation can be described as the electron spin/proton nuclear spin interaction becoming first order in the lattice environment (whereas it is third order in a normal hydrogen atom). Moreover, we consider that the hydrex cannot yield a neutron because this reaction is strongly endothermic. To explain our results, we put forward the following working hypothesis: In a metal lattice and under proper conditions, the formation of such resonances (metastable state) could be favored. We propose to call them HYDREX, and we assume that they are actually formed in cold fusion (CF) and low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) experiments. Once formed, a number of HYDREX could gather around a nucleus of the lattice to form a cluster of nuclear size and of very long life time compared to nuclear time (10{sup -22} s). In this cluster, nuclear rearrangements could take place, yielding

  6. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. In addition to storing the data and its bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  7. Ab Initio Calculations Of Nuclear Reactions And Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S.

    2014-05-05

    Our ultimate goal is to develop a fundamental theory and efficient computational tools to describe dynamic processes between nuclei and to use such tools toward supporting several DOE milestones by: 1) performing predictive calculations of difficult-to-measure landmark reactions for nuclear astrophysics, such as those driving the neutrino signature of our sun; 2) improving our understanding of the structure of nuclei near the neutron drip line, which will be the focus of the DOE’s Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being constructed at Michigan State University; but also 3) helping to reveal the true nature of the nuclear force. Furthermore, these theoretical developments will support plasma diagnostic efforts at facilities dedicated to the development of terrestrial fusion energy.

  8. A Nuclear Reaction Analysis study of fluorine uptake in flint

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jian-Yue; Weathers, D. L.; Picton, F.; Hughes, B. F.; Duggan, J. L.; McDaniel, F. D.; Matteson, S.

    1999-06-10

    Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) using the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 16}O resonance reaction is a powerful method of fluorine depth profiling. We have used this method to study the fluorine uptake phenomenon in mineral flint, which could potentially develop into a method of dating archeological flint artifacts. Flint samples cut with a rock saw were immersed in aqueous fluoride solutions for different times for the uptake study. The results suggest that fluorine uptake is not a simple phenomenon, but rather a combination of several simultaneous processes. Fluorine surface adsorption appears to play an important role in developing the fluorine profiles. The surface adsorption was affected by several parameters such as pH value and fluorine concentration in the solution, among others. The problem of surface charging for the insulator materials during ion bombardment is also reported.

  9. Indirect measurements of nuclear astrophysics reactions at CIAE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Weiping; Li Zhihong; Bai Xixiang; Wang Youbao; Lian Gang; Guo Bing; Zeng Sheng; Yan Shengquan; Wang Baoxiang; Su Jun; Shu Nengchuan; Chen Yongshou

    2006-11-02

    This paper described the nuclear astrophysical studies using the unstable ion beam facility GIRAFFE, by indirect measurements. We measured the angular distributions for some single proton or neutron transfer reactions, such as 7Be(d,n)8B, 11C(d,n)12N, 8Li(d,n)9Be, 8Li(d,p)9Li and 13N(d,n)14O in inverse kinematics, and derived the astrophysical S-factors or reaction rates of 7Be(p,{gamma})8B, 11C(p,{gamma})12N, 8Li(n,{gamma})9Li, 13N(p,{gamma})14O by asymptotic normalization coefficient, spectroscopic factor, and R-matrix approach at astrophysically relevant energies.

  10. Systemic immunotoxicity reactions induced by adjuvanted vaccines.

    PubMed

    Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Portuondo, Deivys; Pérez, O; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2014-05-01

    Vaccine safety is a topic of concern for the treated individual, the family, the health care personnel, and the others involved in vaccination programs as recipients or providers. Adjuvants are necessary components to warrant the efficacy of vaccines, however the overstimulation of the immune system is also associated with adverse effects. Local reactions are the most frequent manifestation of toxicity induced by adjuvanted vaccines and, with the exception of the acute phase response (APR), much less is known about the systemic reactions that follow vaccination. Their low frequency or subclinical expression meant that this matter has been neglected. In this review, various systemic reactions associated with immune stimulation will be addressed, including: APR, hypersensitivity, induction or worsening of autoimmune diseases, modification of hepatic metabolism and vascular leak syndrome (VLS), with an emphasis on the mechanism involved. Finally, the authors analyze the current focus of discussion about vaccine safety and opportunities to improve the design of new adjuvanted vaccines in the future.

  11. Secondary Nuclear Reactions in Magneto-Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    The goal of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) is to relax the extreme pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion by magnetizing the fuel. Understanding the level of magnetization at stagnation is critical for charting the performance of any MIF concept. We show here that the secondary nuclear reactions in magnetized deuterium plasma can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product (BR), the critical confinement parameter for MIF. The secondary neutron yields and spectra are examined and shown to be extremely sensitive to BR. In particular, embedded magnetic fields are shown to affect profoundly the isotropy of the secondary neutron spectra. Detailed modeling of these spectra along with the ratio of overall secondary to primary neutron yields is used to form the basis of a diagnostic technique used to infer BR at stagnation. Effects of gradients in density, temperature and magnetic field strength are examined, as well as other possible non-uniform fuel configurations. Computational results employing a fully kinetic treatment of charged reaction product transport and Monte Carlo treatment of secondary reactions are compared to results from recent experiments at Sandia National Laboratories' Z machine testing the MAGnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept. The technique reveals that the charged reaction products were highly magnetized in these experiments. Implications for eventual ignition-relevant experiments with deuterium-tritium fuel are discussed. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Spin distribution in neutron induced preequilibrium reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Kawano, T; Chadwick, M; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R O; Mitchell, G E; Garrett, P E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Macri, R; Younes, W

    2005-10-04

    The preequilibrium reaction mechanism makes an important contribution to neutron-induced reactions above E{sub n} {approx} 10 MeV. The preequilibrium process has been studied exclusively via the characteristic high energy neutrons produced at bombarding energies greater than 10 MeV. They are expanding the study of the preequilibrium reaction mechanism through {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Cross-section measurements were made of prompt {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy (E{sub n} = 1 to 250 MeV) on a {sup 48}Ti sample. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the large-scale Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. The {gamma}-ray excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections taking into account the dead-time correction, target thickness, detector efficiency and neutron flux (monitored with an in-line fission chamber). Residual state population was predicted using the GNASH reaction code, enhanced for preequilibrium. The preequilibrium reaction spin distribution was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshback, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK). The multistep direct part of the FKK theory was calculated for a one-step process. The FKK preequilibrium spin distribution was incorporated into the GNASH calculations and the {gamma}-ray production cross sections were calculated and compared with experimental data. The difference in the partial {gamma}-ray cross sections using spin distributions with and without preequilibrium effects is significant.

  13. Nuclear Structure of 97Mo from the (d, p) Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, M. S.; Booth, W.

    The reaction 96Mo(d, p)97Mo has been studied at 12 MeV using the tandem Van de Graaff accelerator and a multi-channel magnetic spectrograph at the Atomic Weapon Research Establishment, Aldermaston, England. Angular distributions of protons are measured at 12 different angles from 5° to 87.5° at an interval of 7.5° and the reaction products are detected in nuclear emulsion plates. Thirty levels in the energy range from 0.000 to 2.458 MeV have been observed and absolute differential cross-sections for these levels have been measured. The data are analyzed in terms of the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) theory of the direct reactions, and spins, parities and spectroscopic factors are deduced for various levels. Ambiguity in the spin assignments of d5/2 and d3/2 which is allowed in ln = 2(d, p) transition is removed by using the corresponding L-value of the 95 Mo(t, p)97Mo reaction at Et = 12 MeV. Determined value of the sum of spectroscopic factors for transfers of d5/2 neutrons suggests configuration mixing in the ground state of 96Mo. The properties of the levels in 97Mo are compared with previous experimental results and theoretical predictions.

  14. Fluid transport in reaction induced fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulven, Ole Ivar; Sun, WaiChing; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2015-04-01

    The process of fracture formation due to a volume increasing chemical reaction has been studied in a variety of different settings, e.g. weathering of dolerites by Røyne et al. te{royne}, serpentinization and carbonation of peridotite by Rudge et al. te{rudge} and replacement reactions in silica-poor igneous rocks by Jamtveit et al. te{jamtveit}. It is generally assumed that fracture formation will increase the net permeability of the rock, and thus increase the reactant transport rate and subsequently the total rate of material conversion, as summarised by Kelemen et al. te{kelemen}. Ulven et al. te{ulven_1} have shown that for fluid-mediated processes the ratio between chemical reaction rate and fluid transport rate in bulk rock controls the fracture pattern formed, and Ulven et al. te{ulven_2} have shown that instantaneous fluid transport in fractures lead to a significant increase in the total rate of the volume expanding process. However, instantaneous fluid transport in fractures is clearly an overestimate, and achievable fluid transport rates in fractures have apparently not been studied in any detail. Fractures cutting through an entire domain might experience relatively fast advective reactant transport, whereas dead-end fractures will be limited to diffusion of reactants in the fluid, internal fluid mixing in the fracture or capillary flow into newly formed fractures. Understanding the feedback process between fracture formation and permeability changes is essential in assessing industrial scale CO2 sequestration in ultramafic rock, but little is seemingly known about how large the permeability change will be in reaction-induced fracturing. In this work, we study the feedback between fracture formation during volume expansion and fluid transport in different fracture settings. We combine a discrete element model (DEM) describing a volume expanding process and the related fracture formation with different models that describe the fluid transport in the

  15. Ab Initio Nuclear Structure and Reaction Calculations for Rare Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Draayer, Jerry P.

    2014-09-28

    We have developed a novel ab initio symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM), which has opened the intermediate-mass region for ab initio investigations, thereby providing an opportunity for first-principle symmetry-guided applications to nuclear structure and reactions for nuclear isotopes from the lightest p-shell systems to intermediate-mass nuclei. This includes short-lived proton-rich nuclei on the path of X-ray burst nucleosynthesis and rare neutron-rich isotopes to be produced by the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We have provided ab initio descriptions of high accuracy for low-lying (including collectivity-driven) states of isotopes of Li, He, Be, C, O, Ne, Mg, Al, and Si, and studied related strong- and weak-interaction driven reactions that are important, in astrophysics, for further understanding stellar evolution, X-ray bursts and triggering of s, p, and rp processes, and in applied physics, for electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments as well as for fusion ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  16. Lost alpha-particle diagnostics from a D-T plasma by using nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, Mamiko; Wada, Motoi; Isobe, Mitsutaka

    2014-08-21

    Among various methods proposed for alpha-particles loss measurement, we studied on those by measuring gamma rays of three cases, from (1) nuclear reactions induced by alpha particles, (2) those from short-life-time activities and (3) those from long-life-time activities induced by alpha particles. The time evolution of local alpha flux may possibly be measured by using the {sup 9}Be (a, n) {sup 12}C reaction (1). Using the same system, but with a target set up close to the first wall, activation measurement on site right after turning-off the discharge is possible (2). Nuclear reaction, {sup 25}Mg (a, p) {sup 28}Al, that produce radioisotopes of short lifetime of 2.2 minutes in one of the best candidates. As to the activation to a long lifetime (3), it is predicted that the gamma ray yield from {sup 19}F (a, n) {sup 22}Na reaction is enough for the measurement at the reactor site.

  17. Studies of nuclear reaction at very low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.

    1992-01-15

    The deuteron radiative capture reactions on {sup 2}H, {sup 6}Li and {sup 10}B have been measured between center of mass energies of 20 and 140 keV. Of note is the observation that the gamma ray-to-charged particle branching ratio for the DD reaction appears independent of energy down to a center of mass energy of 20 keV, consistent with some and contrary to other theoretical models. We have investigated the ratio of the reactions D(d,p)T and D(d,n){sup 3}He down to c.m. energies of 3 keV and the ratio of the reactions 6Li(d,p){sup 7}Li and {sup 6}LI(d,{alpha}){sup 4}He down to a c.m. energy of 19 keV. The DD reaction ratio is independent of energy while the (d,p) branch of the D-{sup 6}Li evinces a significant enhancement at the lowest measured energies. We have continued our investigation of charged particle production from deuterium-metal systems at a modest level of activity. Noteworthy in this investigation is the observation of 3 MeV protons from deuteron beam loaded Ti and LiD targets subjected to extreme thermal disequilibria. Significant facility improvements were realized during the most recent contract period. Specifically the downstream magnetic analysis system proposed to eliminate beam induced contaminants has been installed and thoroughly tested. This improvement should allow the D(a,{gamma}){sup 6}Li reaction to be measured in the coming contract period. A scattering chamber required for the measurement of the {sup 7}Li({sup 3}He,p){sup 9}Be reaction has been designed, fabricated and installed on the accelerator. A CAMAC based charged particle identification system has been assembled also for use in our proposed measurement of the {sup 7}Li({sup 3}He, p){sup 9}Be.

  18. Redox reaction and foaming in nuclear waste glass melting

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    This document was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and is an attempt to analyze and estimate the effects of feed composition variables and reducing agent variables on the expected chemistry of reactions occurring in the cold cap and in the glass melt in the nuclear waste glass Slurry-fed, joule-heated melters as they might affect foaming during the glass-making process. Numerous redox reactions of waste glass components and potential feed additives, and the effects of other feed variables on these reactions are reviewed with regard to their potential effect on glass foaming. A major emphasis of this report is to examine the potential positive or negative aspects of adjusting feed with formic acid as opposed to other feed modification techniques including but not limited to use of other reducing agents. Feed modification techniques other than the use of reductants that should influence foaming behavior include control of glass melter feed pH through use of nitric acid. They also include partial replacement of sodium salts by lithium salts. This latter action (b) apparently lowers glass viscosity and raises surface tension. This replacement should decrease foaming by decreasing foam stability.

  19. Ab initio calculations of nuclear reactions important for astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, Petr; Dohet-Eraly, Jeremy; Calci, Angelo; Horiuchi, Wataru; Hupin, Guillaume; Quaglioni, Sofia

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, significant progress has been made in ab initio nuclear structure and reaction calculations based on input from QCD employing Hamiltonians constructed within chiral effective field theory. One of the newly developed approaches is the No-Core Shell Model with Continuum (NCSMC), capable of describing both bound and scattering states in light nuclei simultaneously. We will present NCSMC results for reactions important for astrophysics that are difficult to measure at relevant low energies, such as 3He(α,γ)7Be and 3H(α,γ)7Li and 11C(p,γ)12N radiative capture, as well as the 3H(d,n)4He fusion. We will also address prospects of calculating the 2H(α,γ)6Li capture reaction within the NCSMC formalism. Prepared in part by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Supported by the U.S. DOE, OS, NP, under Work Proposal No. SCW1158, and by the NSERC Grant No. SAPIN-2016-00033. TRIUMF receives funding from the NRC Canada.

  20. Properties of carbon-based structures synthesized in nuclear reactions induced by bremsstrahlung γ quanta with threshold energy of 10 MeV at helium pressure of 1.1 kbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didyk, A. Yu.; Wiśniewski, R.

    2016-07-01

    Helium gas with an initial pressure of about 1.1 kbar inside a high-pressure chamber (HeHPC) has been irradiated by bremsstrahlung γ quanta with a threshold energy of 10 MeV for 1.0 × 105 s produced by an electron-beam current of 22-24 μA. After opening the HeHPC, the residual pressure of helium is equal to 430 bar. Synthesized black foils with a variety of other objects are found inside the HeHPC. They are located on the inner surfaces of the reaction chamber made of high-purity copper (99.99%), the entrance the window of γ quanta made of beryllium bronze and a copper container of nuclear and chemical reaction products. Elemental analysis with the use of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microprobe analysis has revealed that the foils contain predominantly carbon and small quantities of other elements from carbon to iron. The results are in good agreement with the cycle of investigations of the authors devoted to the γ-quanta irradiation of dense hydrogen and helium gases in the presence (absence) of metals in a reaction chamber.

  1. Competing reaction channels in IR-laser-induced unimolecular reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    The competing reaction channels in the unimolecular decomposition of two molecules, formaldehyde and tetralin were studied. A TEA CO/sub 2/ laser was used as the excitation source in all experiments. The dissociation of D/sub 2/CO was studied by infrared multiphoton dissociation (MPD) and the small-molecule nature of formaldehyde with regard to MPD was explored. The effect of collisions in MPD were probed by the pressure dependence of the MPD yield and ir fluorescence from multiphoton excited D/sub 2/CO. MPD yield shows a near cubic dependence in pure D/sub 2/CO which is reduced to a 1.7 power dependence when 15 torr of NO is added. The peak amplitude of 5 ..mu..m ir fluorescence from D/sub 2/CO is proportional to the square of the D/sub 2/CO pressure in pure D/sub 2/CO or in the presence of 50 torr of Ar. Results are explained in terms of bottlenecks to excitation at the v = 1 level which are overcome by a combination of vibrational energy transfer and rotational relaxation. The radical/molecule branching ratio in D/sub 2/CO MPD was 0.10 +- 0.02 at a fluence of 125 J/cm/sup 2/ at 946.0 cm/sup -1/. The barrier height to molecular dissociation was calculated to be 3.6 +- 2.0 kcal/mole below the radical threshold or 85.0 +- 3.0 kcal/mole above the ground state of D/sub 2/CO. In H/sub 2/CO, this corresponds to 2.5 +- 2.0 kcal/mole below the radical threshold or 83.8 +- 3.0 kcal/mole above the ground state. Comparison with uv data indicate that RRKM theory is an acceptable description of formaldehyde dissociation in the 5 to 10 torr pressure range. The unimolecular decomposition of tetralin was studied by MPD and SiF/sub 4/ - sensitized pyrolysis. Both techniques induce decomposition without the interference of catalytic surfaces. Ethylene loss is identified as the lowest energy reaction channel. Dehydrogenation is found to result from step-wise H atom loss. Isomerization via disproportionation is also identified as a primary reaction channel.

  2. [Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions]. [Nuclear Physics Group, Univ. of New Hampshire

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The experimental goals are focused on developing an understanding of strong interactions and the structure of hadronic systems by determination of the electromagnetic response; these goals will be accomplished through coincidence detection of final states. Nuclear modeling objectives are to organize and interpret the data through a consistent description of a broad spectrum of reaction observables; calculations are performed in a nonrelativistic diagrammatic framework as well as a relativistic QHD approach. Work is described according to the following arrangement: direct knockout reactions (completion of [sup 16]O(e,e[prime]p), [sup 12]C(e,e[prime]pp) progress, large acceptance detector physics simulations), giant resonance studies (intermediate-energy experiments with solid-state detectors, the third response function in [sup 12]C(e,e[prime]p[sub 0]) and [sup 16]O(e,e[prime]p[sub 0]), comparison of the [sup 12]C(e, e[prime]p[sub 0]) and [sup 16]O(e,e[prime]p[sub 3]) reactions, quadrupole strength in the [sup 16]O(e,e[prime][alpha][sub 0]) reaction, quadrupole strength in the [sup 12]C(e,e[prime][alpha]) reaction, analysis of the [sup 12]C(e,e[prime]p[sub 1]) and [sup 16]O(e,e[prime]p[sub 3]) angular distributions, analysis of the [sup 40]Ca(e,e[prime]x) reaction at low q, analysis of the higher-q [sup 12]C(e,e[prime]x) data from Bates), models of nuclear structure (experimental work, Hartree-Fock calculations, phonon excitations in spherical nuclei, shell model calculations, variational methods for relativistic fields), and instrumentation development efforts (developments at CEBAF, CLAS contracts, BLAST developments).

  3. Theory of photon and electron induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Onley, D.S.; Wright, L.E.

    1992-01-01

    During the first year and half of the current grant from the Department of Energy we have made considerable progress on the following aspects of the general investigation of electron and photon induced reactions: (1) photo- and electro-production of mesons; (2) Coulomb distortion effects on (e,e{prime}{gamma}) and (e,e{prime}) and (e,e{prime}p) in the quasi-elastic region, (3) studies involving the relativistic shell model, and (4) quark models. We will report on each of these developments in this paper.

  4. A study of heavy-heavy nuclear reactions. [nuclear research/nuclear particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the reaction products in high energy collisions and of the atmospheric transport of particles such as protons, neutrons and other nucleons. The magnetic moments of charmed baryons are examined. Total cross sections which are required for cosmic heavy ion transport and shielding studies are also examined.

  5. Screening in Low Energy Nuclear Reactions of Importance to Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.; Hora, Heinz; Luo, Nie

    2004-05-01

    Recent experiments in the LUNAR (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) project have shown anonymously high electron screening may occur during acceleration driven low energy (<400 kV) ion bombardment of solid targets [1]. These effects become particularly important for E/ Ue < 100 (here E= ion energy and Ue = electron-screening potential energy). Thus these effects become significant for the understanding of reactions involved in nucleosynthesis of the elements and the interpretation of astrophysical data [1]. Another example of the behavior is the surprising threshold behavior near 18 keV for deuterons stopping in 3He gas at energies below the Bragg peak [2]. As pointed out in ref [1], the theoretical explanation for these effects is still under debate. Several researchers have proposed variations of the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to explain these effects [3]. In this paper, we propose an alternate mechanism associated with electron charge accumulation around the target atoms arising from the solid-state structure of the host. This concept will be explained in terms of density functional calculations of charge density profiles in a target undergoing ion dynamic effects [4]. REFERENCES [1] F. Strieder, et al., Naturwissenschaften (2000)88:461-467 [2] A. Formicola, et al., (2000) Eur Phys J. A 8:443-446 [3] S. Typel and H H Wolter, (2000) Few-Body System 29:75-93 [4] G. Miley and H. Hora, (2000) Nuclear Reactions in Solids, APS mtg. Lansing, MI [5] G. Miley, A. Lipson, N. Luo, and H. Hora, (2003) IEEE NSS/MIC Conf., Portland, OR

  6. Vision of nuclear physics with photo-nuclear reactions by laser-driven γ beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Tajima, T.; Schreiber, J.; Barty, C. P. J.; Fujiwara, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2009-11-01

    A laser-accelerated dense electron sheet with an energy E=tilde{γ} mc^2 can be used as a relativistic mirror to coherently reflect a second laser with photon energy ħω, thus generating by the Doppler boost [A. Einstein, Annalen der Physik 17, 891 (1905); D. Habs et al., Appl. Phys. B 93, 349 (2008)] brilliant high-energy photon beams with hbarω^'=4tilde{γ}^2hbarω and short duration for many new nuclear physics experiments. While the shortest-lived atomic levels are in the atto-second range, nuclear levels can have lifetimes down to zeptoseconds. We discuss how the modulation of electron energies in phase-locked laser fields used for as-measurements [E. Goulielmakis et al., Science 317, 769 (2007)] can be carried over to the new direct measurement of fs-zs nuclear lifetimes by modulating the energies of accompanying conversion electrons or emitted protons. In the field of nuclear spectroscopy we discuss the new perspective as a function of increasing photon energy. In nuclear systems a much higher sensitivity is predicted to the time variation of fundamental constants compared to atomic systems [V. Flambaum, arXiv:nucl-th/0801.1994v1 (2008)]. For energies up to 50 keV Mössbauer-like recoilless absorption allows to produce nuclear bosonic ensembles with many delocalized coherent polaritons [G.V. Smirnov et al., Phys. Rev. A 71, 023804 (2005)] for the first time. Using the ( γ, n) reaction to produce cold, polarized neutrons with a focusing ellipsoidal device [P. Böni, Nucl. Instrum. Meth. A 586, 1 (2008); Ch. Schanzer et al., Nucl. Instrum. Meth. 529, 63 (2004)], brilliant cold polarized micro-neutron beams become available. The compact and relatively cheap laser-generated γ beams may serve for extended studies at university-based facilities.

  7. The US nuclear reaction data network. Summary of the first meeting, March 13 & 14 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The first meeting of the US Nuclear Reaction Data Network (USNRDN) was held at the Colorado School of Mines, March 13-14, 1996 chaired by F. Edward Cecil. The Agenda of the meeting is attached. The Network, its mission, products and services; related nuclear data and data networks, members, and organization are described in Attachment 1. The following progress reports from the members of the USNRDN were distributed prior to the meeting and are given as Attachment 2. (1) Measurements and Development of Analytic Techniques for Basic Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Applications; (2) Nuclear Reaction Data Activities at the National Nuclear Data Center; (3) Studies of nuclear reactions at very low energies; (4) Nuclear Reaction Data Activities, Nuclear Data Group; (5) Progress in Neutron Physics at Los Alamos - Experiments; (6) Nuclear Reaction Data Activities in Group T2; (7) Progress Report for the US Nuclear Reaction Data Network Meeting; (8) Nuclear Astrophysics Research Group (ORNL); (9) Progress Report from Ohio University; (10) Exciton Model Phenomenology; and (11) Progress Report for Coordination Meeting USNRDN.

  8. Reaction induced fractures in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulven, Ole Ivar; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2014-05-01

    The process of fracture formation due to volume changing processes has been studied numerically in a variety of different settings, e.g. fracture initiation in general volume increasing reactions by Ulven et al.[4], weathering of dolerites by Røyne et al.[2], and volume reduction during chemical decomposition prosesses by Malthe-Sørenssen et al.[1]. Common to many previous works is that the simulations were performed in a 2D setting, due to computational limitations. Fractures observed both in field studies and in experiments are in many cases three dimensional. It remains an open question in what cases the simplification to 2D systems is applicable, and when a full 3D simulation is necessary. In this study, we use a newly developed 3D code combining elements from the discrete element model (DEM) with elements from Peridynamics[3]. We study fracture formation in fully three dimensional simulations, and compare them with simulation results from 2D DEM, thus gaining insight in both qualitative and quantitative differences between results from 2D and 3D simulations. References [1] Malthe-Sørenssen, A., Jamtveit, B., and Meakin, P., 'Fracture Patterns Generated by Diffusion Controlled Volume Changing Reactions,' Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 2006, pp. 245501-1 - 245501-4. [2] Røyne, A., Jamtveit, B., and Malthe-Sørenssen, A., 'Controls on rock weathering rates by reaction-induced hierarchial fracturing,' Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 275, 2008, pp. 364 - 369. [3] Silling, S. A., 'Reformulation of elasticity theory for discontinuities and long-range forces,' J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 48, Issue 1, 2000, pp. 175 - 209 [4] Ulven, O. I., Storheim, H., Austrheim, H., and Malthe-Sørenssen, A., 'Fracture Initiation During Volume Increasing Reactions in Rocks and Applications for CO2 Sequestration', Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 389C, 2014, pp. 132 - 142.

  9. Computer subroutines for the estimation of nuclear reaction effects in proton-tissue-dose calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    Calculational methods for estimation of dose from external proton exposure of arbitrary convex bodies are briefly reviewed. All the necessary information for the estimation of dose in soft tissue is presented. Special emphasis is placed on retaining the effects of nuclear reaction, especially in relation to the dose equivalent. Computer subroutines to evaluate all of the relevant functions are discussed. Nuclear reaction contributions for standard space radiations are in most cases found to be significant. Many of the existing computer programs for estimating dose in which nuclear reaction effects are neglected can be readily converted to include nuclear reaction effects by use of the subroutines described herein.

  10. RIPL - Reference Input Parameter Library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Data Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capote, R.; Herman, M.; Obložinský, P.; Young, P. G.; Goriely, S.; Belgya, T.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Koning, A. J.; Hilaire, S.; Plujko, V. A.; Avrigeanu, M.; Bersillon, O.; Chadwick, M. B.; Fukahori, T.; Ge, Zhigang; Han, Yinlu; Kailas, S.; Kopecky, J.; Maslov, V. M.; Reffo, G.; Sin, M.; Soukhovitskii, E. Sh.; Talou, P.

    2009-12-01

    We describe the physics and data included in the Reference Input Parameter Library, which is devoted to input parameters needed in calculations of nuclear reactions and nuclear data evaluations. Advanced modelling codes require substantial numerical input, therefore the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked extensively since 1993 on a library of validated nuclear-model input parameters, referred to as the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL). A final RIPL coordinated research project (RIPL-3) was brought to a successful conclusion in December 2008, after 15 years of challenging work carried out through three consecutive IAEA projects. The RIPL-3 library was released in January 2009, and is available on the Web through http://www-nds.iaea.org/RIPL-3/. This work and the resulting database are extremely important to theoreticians involved in the development and use of nuclear reaction modelling (ALICE, EMPIRE, GNASH, UNF, TALYS) both for theoretical research and nuclear data evaluations. The numerical data and computer codes included in RIPL-3 are arranged in seven segments: MASSES contains ground-state properties of nuclei for about 9000 nuclei, including three theoretical predictions of masses and the evaluated experimental masses of Audi et al. (2003). DISCRETE LEVELS contains 117 datasets (one for each element) with all known level schemes, electromagnetic and γ-ray decay probabilities available from ENSDF in October 2007. NEUTRON RESONANCES contains average resonance parameters prepared on the basis of the evaluations performed by Ignatyuk and Mughabghab. OPTICAL MODEL contains 495 sets of phenomenological optical model parameters defined in a wide energy range. When there are insufficient experimental data, the evaluator has to resort to either global parameterizations or microscopic approaches. Radial density distributions to be used as input for microscopic calculations are stored in the MASSES segment. LEVEL DENSITIES contains

  11. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging.

    PubMed

    Rose, P B; Erickson, A S; Mayer, M; Nattress, J; Jovanovic, I

    2016-04-18

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as "searching for a needle in a haystack" because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of active interrogation using an external radiation source. However, the similarity of these materials to shielding and the required radiation doses that may exceed regulatory limits prevent this method from being widely used in practice. We introduce a low-dose active detection technique, referred to as low-energy nuclear reaction imaging, which exploits the physics of interactions of multi-MeV monoenergetic photons and neutrons to simultaneously measure the material's areal density and effective atomic number, while confirming the presence of fissionable materials by observing the beta-delayed neutron emission. For the first time, we demonstrate identification and imaging of uranium with this novel technique using a simple yet robust source, setting the stage for its wide adoption in security applications.

  12. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.; Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-01-01

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as “searching for a needle in a haystack” because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of active interrogation using an external radiation source. However, the similarity of these materials to shielding and the required radiation doses that may exceed regulatory limits prevent this method from being widely used in practice. We introduce a low-dose active detection technique, referred to as low-energy nuclear reaction imaging, which exploits the physics of interactions of multi-MeV monoenergetic photons and neutrons to simultaneously measure the material’s areal density and effective atomic number, while confirming the presence of fissionable materials by observing the beta-delayed neutron emission. For the first time, we demonstrate identification and imaging of uranium with this novel technique using a simple yet robust source, setting the stage for its wide adoption in security applications. PMID:27087555

  13. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.; Mayer, M.; ...

    2016-04-18

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as “searching for a needle in a haystack” because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of active interrogation using an external radiation source. However, the similarity of these materials to shielding and the required radiation doses that may exceed regulatory limits prevent this method frommore » being widely used in practice. We introduce a low-dose active detection technique, referred to as low-energy nuclear reaction imaging, which exploits the physics of interactions of multi-MeV monoenergetic photons and neutrons to simultaneously measure the material’s areal density and effective atomic number, while confirming the presence of fissionable materials by observing the beta-delayed neutron emission. For the first time, we demonstrate identification and imaging of uranium with this novel technique using a simple yet robust source, setting the stage for its wide adoption in security applications.« less

  14. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.; Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-04-01

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as “searching for a needle in a haystack” because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of active interrogation using an external radiation source. However, the similarity of these materials to shielding and the required radiation doses that may exceed regulatory limits prevent this method from being widely used in practice. We introduce a low-dose active detection technique, referred to as low-energy nuclear reaction imaging, which exploits the physics of interactions of multi-MeV monoenergetic photons and neutrons to simultaneously measure the material’s areal density and effective atomic number, while confirming the presence of fissionable materials by observing the beta-delayed neutron emission. For the first time, we demonstrate identification and imaging of uranium with this novel technique using a simple yet robust source, setting the stage for its wide adoption in security applications.

  15. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.; Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-04-18

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as “searching for a needle in a haystack” because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of active interrogation using an external radiation source. However, the similarity of these materials to shielding and the required radiation doses that may exceed regulatory limits prevent this method from being widely used in practice. We introduce a low-dose active detection technique, referred to as low-energy nuclear reaction imaging, which exploits the physics of interactions of multi-MeV monoenergetic photons and neutrons to simultaneously measure the material’s areal density and effective atomic number, while confirming the presence of fissionable materials by observing the beta-delayed neutron emission. For the first time, we demonstrate identification and imaging of uranium with this novel technique using a simple yet robust source, setting the stage for its wide adoption in security applications.

  16. 3D reconstruction of nuclear reactions using GEM TPC with planar readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihałowicz, Jan Stefan

    2015-02-01

    The research program of the Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) laboratory under construction in Magurele, Romania facilities the need of developing a gaseous active-target detector providing 3D reconstruction of charged products of nuclear reactions induced by gamma beam. The monoenergetic, high-energy (Eγ > 19 MeV) gamma beam of intensity 1013γ/s allows studying nuclear reactions in astrophysics. A Time Projection Chamber with crossed strip readout (eTPC) is proposed as one of the imaging detectors. The special feature of the readout electrode structure is a 2D reconstruction based on the information read out simultaneously from three arrays of strips that form virtual pixels. It is expected to reach similar spatial resolution as for pixel readout at largely reduced cost of electronics. The paper presents the current progress and first results of the small scale prototype TPC which is a one of implementation steps towards eTPC detector proposed in the Technical Design Report of Charged Particles Detection at ELI-NP.

  17. 3D reconstruction of nuclear reactions using GEM TPC with planar readout

    SciTech Connect

    Bihałowicz, Jan Stefan

    2015-02-24

    The research program of the Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) laboratory under construction in Magurele, Romania facilities the need of developing a gaseous active-target detector providing 3D reconstruction of charged products of nuclear reactions induced by gamma beam. The monoenergetic, high-energy (E{sub γ} > 19 MeV) gamma beam of intensity 10{sup 13}γ/s allows studying nuclear reactions in astrophysics. A Time Projection Chamber with crossed strip readout (eTPC) is proposed as one of the imaging detectors. The special feature of the readout electrode structure is a 2D reconstruction based on the information read out simultaneously from three arrays of strips that form virtual pixels. It is expected to reach similar spatial resolution as for pixel readout at largely reduced cost of electronics. The paper presents the current progress and first results of the small scale prototype TPC which is a one of implementation steps towards eTPC detector proposed in the Technical Design Report of Charged Particles Detection at ELI-NP.

  18. Nuclear-Pumped Lasers. [efficient conversion of energy liberated in nuclear reactions to coherent radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The state of the art in nuclear pumped lasers is reviewed. Nuclear pumped laser modeling, nuclear volume and foil excitation of laser plasmas, proton beam simulations, nuclear flashlamp excitation, and reactor laser systems studies are covered.

  19. Studies of alpha-induced astrophysical reactions at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.

    2010-08-12

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Using the RI beams at CRIB, many measurements on proton alpha resonance scatterings, ({alpha},p) reactions, and others were performed in recent years mainly for studying astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among them, the results on the {sup 7}Li+{alpha} resonance scatterings are presented.

  20. Compound-nuclear reaction cross sections via the Surrogate method: considering the underlying assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escher, Jutta; Dietrich, Frank

    2006-10-01

    The Surrogate Nuclear Reactions approach makes it possible to determine compound-nuclear reaction cross sections indirectly. The method has been employed to determine (n,f) cross sections for various actinides, including unstable species [1-4]; other, primarily neutron- induced, reactions are being considered also [5,6]. The extraction of the sought-after cross sections typically relies on approximations to the full Surrogate formalism [7]. This presentation will identify and critically examine the most significant assumptions underlying the experimental work carried out so far. Calculations that test the validity of the approximations employed will be presented. [1] J.D. Cramer and H.C. Britt, Nucl. Sci. and Eng. 41, 177(1970); H.C. Britt and J.B. Wilhelmy, ibid. 72, 222(1979) [2] M. Petit et al, Nucl. Phys. A735, 345(2004) [3] C. Plettner et al, Phys. Rev. C 71, 051602(2005); J. Burke et al, Phys. Rev. C. 73, 054604(2006) [4] W. Younes and H.C. Britt, Phys. Rev. C 67, 024610(2003); 68, 034610(2003) [5] L.A. Bernstein et al, AIP Conf. Proc. 769, 890(2005) [6] J. Escher et al, Nucl. Phys. A758, 43c(2005) [7] J. Escher and F.S. Dietrich, submitted (2006)

  1. A new look at low-energy nuclear reaction research.

    PubMed

    Krivit, Steven B; Marwan, Jan

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a new look at low-energy nuclear reaction research, a field that has developed from one of the most controversial subjects in science, "cold fusion." Early in the history of this controversy, beginning in 1989, a strong polarity existed; many scientists fiercely defended the claim of new physical effects as well as a new process in which like-charged atomic nuclei overcome the Coulomb barrier at normal temperatures and pressures. Many other scientists considered the entire collection of physical observations-along with the hypothesis of a "cold fusion"--entirely a mistake. Twenty years later, some people who had dismissed the field in its entirety are considering the validity of at least some of the reported experimental phenomena. As well, some researchers in the field are wondering whether the underlying phenomena may be not a fusion process but a neutron capture/absorption process. In 2002, a related tabletop form of thermonuclear fusion was discovered in the field of acoustic inertial confinement fusion. We briefly review some of this work, as well.

  2. Nuclear structure and reaction studies at medium energies

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, G.W.; Ray, R.L.

    1990-10-01

    This document constitutes the (1988--1991) technical progress report for the ongoing medium energy physics research program supported by the US Department of Energy through special Research Grant FG05-88ER40444. The experiments discussed are conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The overall motivation for the work discussed in this document is driven by three main objectives: (1) provide hadron-nucleon and hadron-nucleus scattering data which serve to facilitate the study of effective two-body interactions, test (and possibly determine) nuclear structure, and help study reaction mechanisms and dynamics;(2) provide unique, first-of-a-kind exploratory'' hadron-nucleus scattering data in the hope that such data will lead to discovery of new phenomena and new physics; and (3) perform precision tests of fundamental interactions, such as rare decay searches, whose observation would imply fundamental new physics.

  3. Oxygen determination in materials by 18O(p,αγ)15N nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Sunitha, Y.; Reddy, G. L. N.; Sukumar, A. A.; Ramana, J. V.; Sarkar, A.; Verma, Rakesh

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents a proton induced γ-ray emission method based on 18O(p,αγ)15N nuclear reaction to determine bulk oxygen in materials. The determination involves the measurement of 5.27 MeV γ-rays emitted following the de-excitation of 15N nuclei. A description of the energetics of the reaction is given to provide an insight into the origin of 5.27 MeV γ-rays. In addition, thick target γ-ray yields and the limits of detection are measured to ascertain the analytical potential of the reaction. The thick-target γ-ray yields are measured with a high purity germanium detector and a bismuth germanate detector at 0° as well as 90° angles in 3.0-4.2 MeV proton energy region. The best limit of detection of about 1.3 at.% is achieved at 4.2 MeV proton energy for measurements at 0° as well 90° angles with the bismuth germanate detector while the uncertainty in quantitative analysis is <8%. The reaction has a probing depth of several tens of microns. Interferences can arise from fluorine due to the occurrence of 19F(p,αγ)16O reaction that emits 6-7 MeV γ-rays. The analytical potential of the methodology is demonstrated by determining oxygen in several oxide as well as non-oxide materials.

  4. Particle-gamma and particle-particle correlations in nuclear reactions using Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshback model

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick; Watanabe, Takehito; Chadwick, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for particle and {gamma}-ray emissions from an excited nucleus based on the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory are performed to obtain correlated information between emitted particles and {gamma}-rays. We calculate neutron induced reactions on {sup 51}V to demonstrate unique advantages of the Monte Carlo method. which are the correlated {gamma}-rays in the neutron radiative capture reaction, the neutron and {gamma}-ray correlation, and the particle-particle correlations at higher energies. It is shown that properties in nuclear reactions that are difficult to study with a deterministic method can be obtained with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. Nuclear Reactions: Studying Peaceful Applications in the Middle and Secondary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski Sunal, Cynthia; Sunal, Dennis W.

    1999-01-01

    Asserts that students must learn about nuclear fission and fusion in the social studies curriculum to help them develop a foundation for considering the social issues associated with the everyday use of nuclear reactions. Gives background on the two types of reactions and provides three lessons for middle and secondary classrooms. (CMK)

  6. Uncertainty evaluation of nuclear reaction model parameters using integral and microscopic measurements. Covariances evaluation with CONRAD code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Saint Jean, C.; Habert, B.; Archier, P.; Noguere, G.; Bernard, D.; Tommasi, J.; Blaise, P.

    2010-10-01

    In the [eV;MeV] energy range, modelling of the neutron induced reactions are based on nuclear reaction models having parameters. Estimation of co-variances on cross sections or on nuclear reaction model parameters is a recurrent puzzle in nuclear data evaluation. Major breakthroughs were asked by nuclear reactor physicists to assess proper uncertainties to be used in applications. In this paper, mathematical methods developped in the CONRAD code[2] will be presented to explain the treatment of all type of uncertainties, including experimental ones (statistical and systematic) and propagate them to nuclear reaction model parameters or cross sections. Marginalization procedure will thus be exposed using analytical or Monte-Carlo solutions. Furthermore, one major drawback found by reactor physicist is the fact that integral or analytical experiments (reactor mock-up or simple integral experiment, e.g. ICSBEP, …) were not taken into account sufficiently soon in the evaluation process to remove discrepancies. In this paper, we will describe a mathematical framework to take into account properly this kind of information.

  7. Effect of a strong magnetic field on the energy yield of nuclear reactions in dense nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sekerzhitskii, V.S.

    1995-01-01

    According to modern concepts, the electron-neutron-nuclear (Aen) phase of dense highly degenerate matter can be realized in the shells of neutron stars. This phase has relatively stable and absolutely stable states of thermodynamic equilibrium. Strong magnetic fields can exist in neutron stars. For this reason, analysis of their effect on the characteristics of the Aen phase is of great interest. It is specially important to study the influence of strong magnetic fields on the energy yield of nuclear reactions in dense nuclear matter because the transition to the absolute equilibrium state proceeds through these reactions.

  8. Epidemiology of cutaneous drug-induced reactions.

    PubMed

    Naldi, L; Crotti, S

    2014-04-01

    Cutaneous reactions represent in many surveillance systems, the most frequent adverse events attributable to drugs. The spectrum of clinical manifestations is wide and virtually encompasses any known dermatological disease. The introduction of biological agents and so-called targeted therapies has further enlarged the number of reaction patterns especially linked with cytokine release or in balance. The frequency and clinical patterns of cutaneous reactions are influenced by drug use, prevalence of specific conditions (e.g., HIV infection) and pharmacogenetic traits of a population, and they may vary greatly among the different populations around the world. Studies of reaction rates in cohorts of hospitalized patients revealed incidence rates ranging from, 1 out 1000 to 2 out 100 of all hospitalized patients. For drugs such as aminopenicillines and sulfamides the incidence of skin reactions is in the order of 3-5 cases out of 100 exposed people. Although the majority of cutaneous reactions are mild and self-limiting, there are reactions such as Stevens Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) which are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Surveillance systems routed on sound epidemiologic methodology, are needed to raise signals and to assess risks associated with specific reactions and drug exposures. Identification of risk factors for adverse reactions and appropriate genetic screening of groups at higher risk may improve the outcomes of skin reactions.

  9. Differences between Drug-Induced and Contrast Media-Induced Adverse Reactions Based on Spontaneously Reported Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Suh, JinUk; Yang, MyungSuk; Kang, WonKu; Kim, EunYoung

    2015-01-01

    Objective We analyzed differences between spontaneously reported drug-induced (not including contrast media) and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Methods Adverse drug reactions reported by an in-hospital pharmacovigilance center (St. Mary’s teaching hospital, Daejeon, Korea) from 2010–2012 were classified as drug-induced or contrast media-induced. Clinical patterns, frequency, causality, severity, Schumock and Thornton’s preventability, and type A/B reactions were recorded. The trends among causality tools measuring drug and contrast-induced adverse reactions were analyzed. Results Of 1,335 reports, 636 drug-induced and contrast media-induced adverse reactions were identified. The prevalence of spontaneously reported adverse drug reaction-related admissions revealed a suspected adverse drug reaction-reporting rate of 20.9/100,000 (inpatient, 0.021%) and 3.9/100,000 (outpatients, 0.004%). The most common adverse drug reaction-associated drug classes included nervous system agents and anti-infectives. Dermatological and gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions were most frequently and similarly reported between drug and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Compared to contrast media-induced adverse reactions, drug-induced adverse reactions were milder, more likely to be preventable (9.8% vs. 1.1%, p < 0.001), and more likely to be type A reactions (73.5% vs. 18.8%, p < 0.001). Females were over-represented among drug-induced adverse reactions (68.1%, p < 0.001) but not among contrast media-induced adverse reactions (56.6%, p = 0.066). Causality patterns differed between the two adverse reaction classes. The World Health Organization–Uppsala Monitoring Centre causality evaluation and Naranjo algorithm results significantly differed from those of the Korean algorithm version II (p < 0.001). Conclusions We found differences in sex, preventability, severity, and type A/B reactions between spontaneously reported drug and contrast media-induced adverse

  10. Pediatric bupropion-induced serum sicknesslike reaction.

    PubMed

    Hack, Sabine

    2004-01-01

    This reports the first 2 cases of serum sicknesslike reaction to bupropion in children (age 12 and 14). Serum sicknesslike reactions are an example of immune-complex medicated disease. The cardinal symptoms of serum sickness are fever, lymphadenopathy, arthralgias or arthritis, and urticaria. Symptoms usually resolve without long-term sequela following discontinuation of the exogenous antigen. It is likely that serum sicknesslike reactions to bupropion are either relatively rare or underrecognized and underreported. Between May 1998 and May 2001, GlaxoSmith Kline received 172 reports of seizures (a well-known adverse drug reaction) and only 37 reports of serum sicknesslike reactions (Wooltorton 2002). We do not know if children and adolescents are more prone than adults to develop serum sicknesslike reactions to bupropion. Luckily, the reported cases of serum sicknesslike reactions to bupropion have not caused irreversible morbidity or mortality. Nevertheless, the symptoms are painful, temporarily disfiguring and disabling, and warrant prompt medical attention. Parents and patients should be educated about this potential side effect at the onset of treatment, because symptoms are similar to many infectious childhood illnesses, and the treatment of serum sicknesslike reactions to bupropion should include the discontinuation of bupropion.

  11. Electron-induced hydration of an alkene: alternative reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Warneke, Jonas; Wang, Ziyan; Swiderek, Petra; Bredehöft, Jan Hendrik

    2015-03-27

    Electron-induced reactions in condensed mixtures of ethylene and water lead to the synthesis of ethanol, as shown by post-irradiation thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). Interestingly, this synthesis is not only induced by soft electron impact ionization similar to a previously observed electron-induced hydroamination but also, at low electron energy, by electron attachment to ethylene and a subsequent acid/base reaction with water.

  12. Nuclear reaction cross sections of exotic nuclei in the Glauber model for relativistic mean field densities

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, S. K.; Panda, R. N.; Arumugam, P.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2009-12-15

    We have calculated the total nuclear reaction cross sections of exotic nuclei in the framework of the Glauber model, using as inputs the standard relativistic mean field (RMF) densities and the densities obtained from the more recently developed effective-field-theory-motivated RMF (the E-RMF). Both light and heavy nuclei are taken as the representative targets, and the light neutron-rich nuclei as projectiles. We found the total nuclear reaction cross section to increase as a function of the mass number, for both the target and projectile nuclei. The differential nuclear elastic scattering cross sections are evaluated for some selected systems at various incident energies. We found a large dependence of the differential elastic scattering cross section on incident energy. Finally, we have applied the same formalism to calculate both the total nuclear reaction cross section and the differential nuclear elastic scattering cross section for the recently discussed superheavy nucleus with atomic number Z=122.

  13. α and 2 p 2 n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions on 60Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; Nelson, R. O.; Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.

    2015-06-01

    Background: The cross sections for populating the residual nucleus in the reaction ZAX(n,x) Z -2 A -4Y exhibit peaks as a function of incident neutron energy corresponding to the (n ,n'α ) reaction and, at higher energy, to the (n ,2 p 3 n ) reaction. The relative magnitudes of these peaks vary with the Z of the target nucleus. Purpose: Study fast neutron-induced reactions on 60Ni. Locate experimentally the nuclear charge region along the line of stability where the cross sections for α emission and for 2 p 2 n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions are comparable as a further test of reaction models. Methods: Data were taken by using the Germanium Array for Neutron-Induced Excitations. The broad-spectrum pulsed neutron beam of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's Weapons Neutron Research facility provided neutrons in the energy range from 1 to 250 MeV. The time-of-flight technique was used to determine the incident-neutron energies. Results: Absolute partial cross sections for production of seven discrete Fe γ rays populated in 60Ni (n ,α /2 p x n γ ) reactions with 2 ≤x ≤5 were measured for neutron energies 1 MeVinduced reactions on stable targets via α emission at the peak of the (n ,α ) and (n ,n'α ) reactions is comparable to that for 2 p 2 n and 2 p 3 n emission at higher incident energies in the nuclear charge region around Fe.

  14. Erythropoietin-induced iritis-like reaction.

    PubMed

    Beiran, I; Krasnitz, I; Mezer, E; Meyer, E; Miller, B

    1996-01-01

    The present report describes an iritis-like reaction found in 13 patients treated with recombinant human erythropoietin (Eprex), a drug given to hemodialysis patients for their chronic anemia. Among 120 patients being treated by hemodialysis in two centers affiliated with our medical center, ten out of 30 Eprex-treated patients but none of 90 not being treated with Eprex developed this reaction. The observations described support a causal relation between Eprex treatment and the iritis-like reaction. Further investigative effort is needed to establish the mechanism.

  15. Applications of a superconducting solenoidal separator in the experimental investigation of nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinde, D. J.; Carter, I. P.; Dasgupta, M.; Simpson, E. C.; Cook, K. J.; Kalkal, Sunil; Luong, D. H.; Williams, E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes applications of a novel superconducting solenoidal separator, with magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla, for studies of nuclear reactions using the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility at the Australian National University.

  16. Helium mobility in SON68 borosilicate nuclear glass: A nuclear reaction analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bès, R.; Sauvage, T.; Peuget, S.; Haussy, J.; Chamssedine, F.; Oliviero, E.; Fares, T.; Vincent, L.

    2013-11-01

    The 3He behavior in the non active R7T7 type borosilicate glass called SON68 has been investigated using the implantation method to introduce helium in the material. Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) was performed to follow the helium concentration depth profile evolution as a function of annealing time and temperature. In addition, in situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been implemented to study the formation of helium bubbles during both implantation and annealing processes. Numerical modeling with two different approaches is proposed and discussed to investigate the helium mobility mechanisms. Our study reveals for helium incorporation by implantation at low temperature the presence of several helium populations with disparate diffusivities. The most mobile helium fraction would be attributed to atomic diffusion. The corresponding activation energy value (0.61 eV) extracted from Arrhenius graphs is in good agreement with literature data. The results also highlight that the damages associated to helium sursaturation are the source of small helium clusters formation, with a reduced mobility instead of the atomic mobility measured by the infusion technique. Small cavities that support this assumption have been observed by TEM at low temperature.

  17. Reactions of buffers in cyanogen bromide-induced ligations.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Heike; Gerlach, Claudia; Richert, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    Rapid, template-directed ligation reactions between a phosphate-terminated oligonucleotide and an unphosphorylated reaction partner may be induced by cyanogen bromide (BrCN). Frequently, however, the reaction is low yielding, and even a large excess of the condensing agent can fail to induce quantitative conversions. In this study, we used BrCN to induce chemical primer extension reactions. Here, we report that buffers containing hydroxyl groups react with short oligodeoxynucleotides in the presence of BrCN. One stable adduct between HEPBS buffer and cytosine was characterized by mass spectrometry and NMR after HPLC purification, indicating that a side reaction occurred at this nucleobase. Further, a first example of a primer extension reaction between an unmodified oligodeoxynucleotide as primer and dGMP is reported. Together, our results shed light on the potency, as well as the drawbacks of BrCN as a highly reactive condensing reagent for the ligation of unmodified nucleic acids.

  18. Nuclear reaction rate uncertainties and the 22Ne( p,gamma)23Na reaction: Classical novae and globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Keegan John

    The overall theme of this thesis is the advancement of nuclear astrophysics via the analysis of stellar processes in the presence of varying levels of precision in the available nuclear data. With regard to classical novae, the level of mixing that occurs between the outer layers of the white dwarf core and the solar accreted material in oxygen-neon novae is presently undetermined by stellar models, but the nuclear data relevant to these explosive phenomena are fairly precise. This precision allowed for the identification of a series of elemental ratios indicative of the level of mixing occurring in novae. Direct comparisons of the modelled elemental ratios to observations showed that there is likely to be much less of this mixing than was previously assumed. Thus, our understanding of classical novae was altered via the investigation of the nuclear reactions relevant to this phenomenon. However, this level of experimental precision is rare and large nuclear reaction uncertainties can hinder our understanding of certain astrophysical phenomena. For example, it is commonly believed that uncertainties in the 22Ne(p,g)23Na reaction rate at temperatures relevant to thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars are largely responsible for our inability to explain the observed sodium-oxygen anti-correlation in globular clusters. With this motivation, resonances in the 22Ne(p,g) 23Na reaction at E_{c.m.} = 458, 417, 178, and 151 keV were measured. The direct-capture contribution was also measured at E_{lab} = 425 keV. It was determined that the 22Ne(p,g)23Na reaction rate in the astrophysically relevant temperature range is dominated by the resonances at 178 and 151 keV and that the total reaction rate is greater than the previously assumed rate by a factor of approximately ˜40 at 0.15 GK. This increased reaction rate impacts the expected nucleosynthesis that occurs in these stars and will shed light onto the origin of this anti-correlation as it is incorporated into

  19. Summary Report of the Workshop on The Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database

    SciTech Connect

    Semkova, V.; Pritychenko, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Workshop on the Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database (EXFOR) was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 6 to 10 October 2014. The workshop was organized to discuss various aspects of the EXFOR compilation process including compilation rules, different techniques for nuclear reaction data measurements, software developments, etc. A summary of the presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop is reported here.

  20. PHASE-OTI: A pre-equilibrium model code for nuclear reactions calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmaghraby, Elsayed K.

    2009-09-01

    The present work focuses on a pre-equilibrium nuclear reaction code (based on the one, two and infinity hypothesis of pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions). In the PHASE-OTI code, pre-equilibrium decays are assumed to be single nucleon emissions, and the statistical probabilities come from the independence of nuclei decay. The code has proved to be a good tool to provide predictions of energy-differential cross sections. The probability of emission was calculated statistically using bases of hybrid model and exciton model. However, more precise depletion factors were used in the calculations. The present calculations were restricted to nucleon-nucleon interactions and one nucleon emission. Program summaryProgram title: PHASE-OTI Catalogue identifier: AEDN_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDN_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5858 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 149 405 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: Pentium 4 and Centrino Duo Operating system: MS Windows RAM: 128 MB Classification: 17.12 Nature of problem: Calculation of the differential cross section for nucleon induced nuclear reaction in the framework of pre-equilibrium emission model. Solution method: Single neutron emission was treated by assuming occurrence of the reaction in successive steps. Each step is called phase because of the phase transition nature of the theory. The probability of emission was calculated statistically using bases of hybrid model [1] and exciton model [2]. However, more precise depletion factor was used in the calculations. Exciton configuration used in the code is that described in earlier work [3]. Restrictions: The program is restricted to single nucleon emission and nucleon

  1. Nuclear Reactions and the ν p-Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, Carla; Hatcher, Daniel; Perdikakis, Georgios; Nikas, Stylianos

    In understanding the origin of the heavy elements, the "light heavy elements" pose a particular challenge: The two neutron-capture processes, r- and s-process, cannot explain the abundances patterns seen in very old galactic halo stars. A proposed solution to this problem is the ν p-process, which takes place in the strong neutrino-driven winds of core-collapse supernovae. In the ν p-process, a sequence of (n, p) and (p, γ ) reactions allows for the synthesis of elements with atomic numbers A > 64, which includes Sr, Y, Zr, and others possibly up to Sn. The relevant reaction rates are all based on statistical model predictions and carry some uncertainty. Here, the sensitivity of the final ν p-process abundance pattern on modifications of (n, p), (p, γ ), and (n, γ ) reactions are characterized. Only few reactions affect the final abundance pattern and hence warrant a more detailed study of the reaction rate.

  2. Quantitative rate determination by dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced NMR of a Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Haifeng; Lee, Youngbok; Hilty, Christian

    2010-11-01

    Emerging techniques for hyperpolarization of nuclear spins, foremost dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), lend unprecedented sensitivity to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Sufficient signal can be obtained from a single scan, and reactions even far from equilibrium can be studied in real-time. When following the progress of a reaction by nuclear magnetic resonance, however, spin relaxation occurs concomitantly with the reaction to alter resonance line intensities. Here, we present a model for accounting for spin-relaxation in such reactions studied by hyperpolarized NMR. The model takes into account auto- and cross-relaxation in dipole-dipole coupled spin systems and is therefore applicable to NMR of hyperpolarized protons, the most abundant NMR-active nuclei. Applied to the Diels-Alder reaction of 1,4-dipheneylbutadiene (DPBD) with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazole-3,5-dione (PTD), reaction rates could be obtained accurately and reproducibly. Additional parameters available from the same experiment include relaxation rates of the reaction product, which may yield further information about the molecular properties of the product. The method presented is also compatible with an experiment where a single spin in the reactant is labeled in its spin-state by a selective radio frequency pulse for subsequent tracking through the reaction, allowing the unambiguous identification of its position in the product molecule. In this case, the chemical shift specificity of high-resolution NMR can allow for the simultaneous determination of reaction rates and mechanistic information in one experiment.

  3. Cutaneous reactions in nuclear, biological and chemical warfare.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sandeep

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear, biological and chemical warfare have in recent times been responsible for an increasing number of otherwise rare dermatoses. Many nations are now maintaining overt and clandestine stockpiles of such arsenal. With increasing terrorist threats, these agents of mass destruction pose a risk to the civilian population. Nuclear and chemical attacks manifest immediately while biological attacks manifest later. Chemical and biological attacks pose a significant risk to the attending medical personnel. The large scale of anticipated casualties in the event of such an occurrence would need the expertise of all physicians, including dermatologists, both military and civilian. Dermatologists are uniquely qualified in this respect. This article aims at presenting a review of the cutaneous manifestations in nuclear, chemical and biological warfare and their management.

  4. Study of components and statistical reaction mechanism in simulation of nuclear process for optimized production of {sup 64}Cu and {sup 67}Ga medical radioisotopes using TALYS, EMPIRE and LISE++ nuclear reaction and evaporation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Nasrabadi, M. N. Sepiani, M.

    2015-03-30

    Production of medical radioisotopes is one of the most important tasks in the field of nuclear technology. These radioactive isotopes are mainly produced through variety nuclear process. In this research, excitation functions and nuclear reaction mechanisms are studied for simulation of production of these radioisotopes in the TALYS, EMPIRE and LISE++ reaction codes, then parameters and different models of nuclear level density as one of the most important components in statistical reaction models are adjusted for optimum production of desired radioactive yields.

  5. Ofloxacin Induced Cutaneous Reactions in Children.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Yerramalli Roja; Mishra, Sailen Kumar; Rath, Bandana; Rath, Saroj Sekhar

    2015-06-01

    Cutaneous adverse effects to antimicrobials are a major health problem. Though majority of them are mild and self-limiting, severe variants like Steven Johnson Syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are not uncommon. Ofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone widely used for the treatment of urinary tract infections, acute bacterial diarrheas, enteric fever, STDs and other soft tissue infections either as a single drug or in combination with other drugs. Earlier a case of mucocutaneous maculopapular rash with oral ofloxacin and was reported in an adult. In the present hospital set up there were few reports of such reactions to adults. Here we report three different variants of reactions associated with oral ofloxacin in chlidren. Early detection of cutaneous lesions and immediate withdrawal of the offending drug can prevent progression of such reactions to their severe variants as well as morbidity and mortality.

  6. Artificial Force Induced Reaction Method for Systematic Determination of Complex Reaction Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sameera, W M C; Kumar Sharma, Akhilesh; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, computational studies are very important for the elucidation of reaction mechanisms and selectivity of complex reactions. However, traditional computational methods usually require an estimated reaction path, mainly driven by limited experimental implications, intuition, and assumptions of stationary points. However, the artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method in the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) strategy can be used for unbiased and automatic reaction path searches for complex reactions. In this account, we highlight applications of the AFIR method to a variety of reactions (organic, organometallic, enzymatic, and photochemical) of complex molecular systems. In addition, the AFIR method has been successfully used to rationalise the origin of stereo- and regioselectivity. The AFIR method can be applied from small to large molecular systems, and will be a very useful tool for the study of complex molecular problems in many areas of chemistry, biology, and material sciences.

  7. Development of an inertial confinement fusion platform to study charged-particle-producing nuclear reactions relevant to nuclear astrophysics

    DOE PAGES

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Bacher, A.; ...

    2017-03-28

    Here, this paper describes the development of a platform to study astrophysically relevant nuclear reactions using inertial-confinement fusion implosions on the OMEGA and National Ignition Facility laser facilities, with a particular focus on optimizing the implosions to study charged-particle- producing reactions. Primary requirements on the platform are high yield, for high statistics in the fusion product measurements, combined with low areal density, to allow the charged fusion products to escape. This is optimally achieved with direct-drive exploding pusher implosions using thin-glass-shell capsules. Mitigation strategies to eliminate a possible target sheath potential which would accelerate the emitted ions are discussed. Themore » potential impact of kinetic effects on the implosions is also considered. The platform is initially employed to study the complementary T(t,2n)α, T(3He,np)α and 3He(3He,2p)α reactions. Proof-of-principle results from the first experiments demonstrating the ability to accurately measure the energy and yields of charged particles are presented. Lessons learned from these experiments will be used in studies of other reactions. Ultimately, the goals are to explore thermonuclear reaction rates and fundamental nuclear physics in stellarlike plasma environments, and to push this new frontier of nuclear astrophysics into unique regimes not reachable through existing platforms, with thermal ion velocity distributions, plasma screening, and low reactant energies.« less

  8. LDRD Final Report: Surrogate Nuclear Reactions and the Origin of the Heavy Elements (04-ERD-057)

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Bernstein, L A; Bleuel, D; Burke, J; Church, J A; Dietrich, F S; Forssen, C; Gueorguiev, V; Hoffman, R D

    2007-02-23

    Research carried out in the framework of the LDRD project ''Surrogate Nuclear Reactions and the Origin of the Heavy Elements'' (04-ERD-057) is summarized. The project was designed to address the challenge of determining cross sections for nuclear reactions involving unstable targets, with a particular emphasis on reactions that play a key role in the production of the elements between Iron and Uranium. This report reviews the motivation for the research, introduces the approach employed to address the problem, and summarizes the resulting scientific insights, technical findings, and related accomplishments.

  9. Direct measurements of astrophysically important α-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Melina

    2016-03-01

    Understanding stellar evolution is one of the primary objectives of nuclear astrophysics. Reaction rates involving α-particles are often key nuclear physics inputs in stellar models. For instance, there are numerous (α , p) reactions fundamental for the understanding of X-ray bursts and the production of 44Ti in core-collapse supernovae. Furthermore, some (α , n) reactions are considered as one of the main neutron sources in the s-process. However, direct measurements of these reactions at relevant astrophysical energies are experimentally challenging because of their small cross section and intensity limitation of radioactive beams. The active target system MUSIC offers a unique opportunity to study (α , p) and (α , n) reactions because its segmented anode allows the investigation of a large energy range in the excitation function with a single measurement. Recent results on the direct measurement of (α , n) and (α , p) measurements in the MUSIC detector will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract Number DE-AC02-06CH11357. This research used resources of ANL's ATLAS facility, which is a DOE Office of Science User.

  10. Bimodality: a sign of critical behavior in nuclear reactions.

    PubMed

    Le Fèvre, A; Aichelin, J

    2008-02-01

    The recently discovered coexistence of multifragmentation and residue production for the same total transverse energy of light charged particles, which has been dubbed bimodality like it has been introduced in the framework of equilibrium thermodynamics, can be well reproduced in numerical simulations of heavy ion reactions. A detailed analysis shows that fluctuations (introduced by elementary nucleon-nucleon collisions) determine which of the exit states is realized. Thus, we can identify bifurcation in heavy ion reactions as a critical phenomenon. Also the scaling of the coexistence region with beam energy is well reproduced in these results from the quantum molecular dynamics simulation program.

  11. Neutrino nuclear responses for double beta decays and astro neutrinos by charge exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu

    2014-09-01

    Neutrino nuclear responses are crucial for neutrino studies in nuclei. Charge exchange reactions (CER) are shown to be used to study charged current neutrino nuclear responses associated with double beta decays(DBD)and astro neutrino interactions. CERs to be used are high energy-resolution (He3 ,t) reactions at RCNP, photonuclear reactions via IAR at NewSUBARU and muon capture reactions at MUSIC RCNP and MLF J-PARC. The Gamow Teller (GT) strengths studied by CERs reproduce the observed 2 neutrino DBD matrix elements. The GT and spin dipole (SD) matrix elements are found to be reduced much due to the nucleon spin isospin correlations and the non-nucleonic (delta isobar) nuclear medium effects. Impacts of the reductions on the DBD matrix elements and astro neutrino interactions are discussed.

  12. Field-resolved measurement of reaction-induced spectral densities by polarizability response spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Andrew M.; Nome, Rene A.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2007-11-01

    The experimental design and theoretical description of a novel five-pulse laser spectroscopy is presented with an application to a pyridinium charge transfer complex in acetonitrile and methanol. In field-resolved polarizability response spectroscopy (PORS), an electronically resonant laser pulse first excites a solvated chromophore (reactant) and off-resonant Raman spectra of the resulting nuclear motions are measured as a function of the reaction time. The present apparatus differs from our earlier design by performing the Raman probe measurement (with fixed pulse delays) in the frequency domain. In addition, the full electric fields of the signals are measured by spectral interferometry to separate nonresonant and Raman responses. Our theoretical model shows how the PORS signal arises from nuclear motions that are displaced/driven by the photoinduced reaction. The field-resolved off-resonant (of the solute's electronic transitions) probing favors detection of solvent (as opposed to solute) dynamics coupled to the reaction. The sign of the signal represents the relative strengths of polarization responses associated with the ground and photoexcited solutions. Signatures of nonresonant and PORS signal contributions to the experimental results are analyzed with numerical calculations based on a theoretical model we have developed for reaction-induced PORS. Our model identifies two mechanisms of PORS signal generation: (i) structural relaxation induced resonance; (ii) dephasing induced resonance. In the charge transfer reaction investigated, the solvent-dependent and time-evolving (solvent) polarizability spectral density (PSD) is readily obtained. The general trend of an initial broadband inertial nuclear response followed by a decrease in the linewidth of the PSD establishes that the measured PSD is inconsistent with the approximation of a linear response. Furthermore, the explicit time evolution of the PSD is important for properly describing solvent control of

  13. Laser-induced reactions in energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Ping

    1999-07-01

    Several energetic materials have been investigated under shock wave loading, heating, and photodissociation. This dissertation highlights some efforts to understand energetic material from an angle of basic physical processes and elementary chemical reactions. The first series of experiments was performed to study laser-generated shock waves in energetic materials. Shock waves are generated by pulsed laser vaporization of thin aluminum films. The rapidly expanding aluminum plasma launches a shock wave into the adjacent layer of energetic material, initiating chemical reactions. The shock velocity has been measured by a velocity interferometer. Shock pressures as high as 8 GPa have been generated in this manner. A simple model is proposed to predict laser-generated shock pressure. Several energetic materials have been studied under laser- generated shock wave. The second series of experiments was conducted to study thermal decomposition and photodissociation of energetic materials. Glycidyl azide polymer (GAP) and poly(glycidyl nitrate) (PGN) have been investigated by pulsed infrared laser pyrolysis and ultraviolet laser photolysis of thin films at 17-77 K. Reactions are monitored by transmission infrared spectroscopy. Photolysis of GAP at 266 nm shows that the initial reaction steps are elimination of molecular nitrogen with subsequent formation of imines. Thermal decomposition of GAP by infrared laser pyrolysis reveals products similar to the UV experiments after warming. Laser pyrolysis of PGN indicated that the main steps of decomposition are elimination of NO2 and CH2O from the nitrate ester functional group. It seems that the initial thermal decomposition mechanism of GAP and PGN are the same from heating rate of several degrees per second to 107 oC/s. The third series of experiments is about detailed study of photodissociation mechanism of methyl nitrate. Photodissociation of methyl nitrate isolated in an argon matrix at 17 K has been investigated by 266 nm

  14. Computational Catalysis Using the Artificial Force Induced Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Sameera, W M C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-04-19

    The artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method in the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) strategy is an automatic approach to explore all important reaction paths of complex reactions. Most traditional methods in computational catalysis require guess reaction paths. On the other hand, the AFIR approach locates local minima (LMs) and transition states (TSs) of reaction paths without a guess, and therefore finds unanticipated as well as anticipated reaction paths. The AFIR method has been applied for multicomponent organic reactions, such as the aldol reaction, Passerini reaction, Biginelli reaction, and phase-transfer catalysis. In the presence of several reactants, many equilibrium structures are possible, leading to a number of reaction pathways. The AFIR method in the GRRM strategy determines all of the important equilibrium structures and subsequent reaction paths systematically. As the AFIR search is fully automatic, exhaustive trial-and-error and guess-and-check processes by the user can be eliminated. At the same time, the AFIR search is systematic, and therefore a more accurate and comprehensive description of the reaction mechanism can be determined. The AFIR method has been used for the study of full catalytic cycles and reaction steps in transition metal catalysis, such as cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation and iron-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond formation reactions in aqueous media. Some AFIR applications have targeted the selectivity-determining step of transition-metal-catalyzed asymmetric reactions, including stereoselective water-tolerant lanthanide Lewis acid-catalyzed Mukaiyama aldol reactions. In terms of establishing the selectivity of a reaction, systematic sampling of the transition states is critical. In this direction, AFIR is very useful for performing a systematic and automatic determination of TSs. In the presence of a comprehensive description of the transition states, the selectivity of the reaction can be calculated more accurately

  15. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of α-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Szúcs, Z.

    2005-05-01

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to Eα=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi(α,2n)211At, 209Bi(α,3n)210At, 209Bi(α,x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  16. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of {alpha}-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanne, A.; Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S.; Szucs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to E{alpha}=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi({alpha},2n)211At, 209Bi({alpha},3n)210At, 209Bi({alpha},x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  17. Nuclear spin-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in molecules.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li-juan; Vaara, Juha

    2013-05-28

    In nuclear magneto-optic spectroscopy, effects of nuclear magnetization are detected in light passing through a sample containing spin-polarized nuclei. An optical analogue of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift has been predicted and observed in the nuclear spin optical rotation of linearly polarized light propagating parallel to the nuclear magnetization. A recently proposed magneto-optic analogue of the NMR spin-spin coupling, the nuclear spin-induced Cotton-Mouton (NSCM) effect entails an ellipticity induced to linearly polarized light when passing through a medium with the nuclear spins polarized in a direction perpendicular to the light beam. Here we present a first-principles electronic structure formulation of NSCM in terms of response theory as well as ab initio and density-functional theory calculations for small molecules. The roles of basis set (we use completeness-optimized sets), electron correlation, and relativistic effects are discussed. It is found that the explicitly temperature-dependent contribution to NSCM, arising from the partial orientation of the molecules due to the nuclear magnetization, typically dominates the effect. This part of NSCM is proportional to the tensor product of molecular polarizability and the NMR direct dipolar coupling tensor. Hence, NSCM provides a means of investigating the dipolar coupling and, thus, molecular structure in a formally isotropic medium. Overall ellipticities of the order of magnitude of 10(-8)...10(-7) rad/(M cm) are predicted for fully polarized nuclei. These should be detectable with modern instrumentation in the Voigt setup.

  18. Capture process in nuclear reactions with a quantum master equation

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.

    2009-09-15

    Projectile-nucleus capture by a target nucleus at bombarding energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier is treated with the reduced-density-matrix formalism. The effects of dissipation and fluctuations on the capture process are taken self-consistently into account within the quantum model suggested. The excitation functions for the capture in the reactions {sup 16}O, {sup 19}F, {sup 26}Mg, {sup 28}Si, {sup 32,34,36,38}S, {sup 40,48}Ca, {sup 50}Ti, {sup 52}Cr+{sup 208}Pb with spherical nuclei are calculated and compared with the experimental data. At bombarding energies about (15-25) MeV above the Coulomb barrier the maximum of capture cross section is revealed for the {sup 58}Ni+{sup 208}Pb reaction.

  19. Noise-induced transition in human reaction times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2016-09-01

    The human reaction/response time can be defined as the time elapsed from the onset of stimulus presentation until a response occurs in many sensory and cognitive processes. A reaction time model based on Piéron’s law is investigated. The model shows a noise-induced transition in the moments of reaction time distributions due to the presence of strong additive noise. The model also demonstrates that reaction times do not follow fluctuation scaling between the mean and the variance but follow a generalized version between the skewness and the kurtosis. The results indicate that noise-induced transitions in the moments govern fluctuations in sensory-motor transformations and open an insight into the macroscopic effects of noise in human perception and action. The conditions that lead to extreme reaction times are discussed based on the transfer of information in neurons.

  20. On laser-induced harpooning reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, J.

    1980-05-01

    In the present paper, the switching of chemical reactivity by a nonresonant laser field in simple gas-phase collisions of the type A + BC to AB + C is discussed in terms of a second-order optical/collision perturbation. A simple expression relating laser-induced harpooning cross sections to the laser power density is derived and is applied to Hg/Cl2 collisions.

  1. The Liège Intranuclear Cascade model - Towards a unified description of nuclear reactions induced by nucleons and light ions from a few MeV to a few GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugnon, Joseph; Boudard, Alain; David, Jean-Christophe; Leray, Sylvie; Mancusi, Davide

    2014-03-01

    The predictive power of the last version INCL4.6 of the Liège Intranuclear Cascade model for spallation is reviewed. The good results obtained both at low and high energy extend the domain of validity of the model and allow the description of spallation reactions, except the coherent processes, by a unique model from a few MeV to a few GeV incident energy.

  2. Cinnamon-induced Oral Mucosal Contact Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Vivas, Ana P. M; Migliari, Dante A

    2015-01-01

    Contact stomatitis associated with consumption of cinnamon flavoring agents is a relatively uncommon disorder. Of relevance, both clinical features and the histopathologic findings of this condition are nonspecific, and, more importantly, may resemble some other inflammatory oral mucosa disorders, eventually making diagnosis difficult. Usually a patient exhibits a combination of white and erythematous patches of abrupt onset, accompanied by a burning sensation. To shed some light on this subject, a case of a 64-year-old woman with hypersensitivity contact reaction on the oral mucosa due to cinnamon mints is presented, with emphasis on differential diagnosis and the process for confirmation of the diagnosis. The treatment consists of discontinuing the use of cinnamon products. Clinicians will be able to recognize this disorder following a careful clinical examination and detailed history. This recognition is important in order to avoid invasive and expensive diagnostic procedures. PMID:26312097

  3. Evaluation of Tungsten Nuclear Reaction Data with Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Trkov, A. Capote, R.; Kodeli, I.; Leal, L.

    2008-12-15

    As a follow-up of the work presented at the ND-2007 conference in Nice, additional fast reactor benchmarks were analyzed. Adjustment to the cross sections in the keV region was necessary. Evaluated neutron cross section data files for {sup 180,182,183,184,186}W isotopes were produced. Covariances were generated for all isotopes except {sup 180}W. In the resonance range the retro-active method was used. Above the resolved resonance range the covariance prior was generated by the Monte Carlo technique from nuclear model calculations with the Empire-II code. Experimental data were taken into account through the GANDR system using the generalized least-squares technique. Introducing experimental data results in relatively small changes in the cross sections, but greatly constrains the uncertainties. The covariance files are currently undergoing testing.

  4. Evaluation of Tungsten Nuclear Reaction Data with Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Trkov, A.; Capote, R.; Kodeli, I.; Leal, Luiz C.

    2008-12-01

    As a follow-up of the work presented at the ND-2007 conference in Nice, additional fast reactor benchmarks were analyzed. Adjustment to the cross sections in the keV region was necessary. Evaluated neutron cross section data files for 180,182,183,184,186W isotopes were produced. Covariances were generated for all isotopes except 180W. In the resonance range the retro-active method was used. Above the resolved resonance range the covariance prior was generated by the Monte Carlo technique from nuclear model calculations with the Empire-II code. Experimental data were taken into account through the GANDR system using the generalized least-squares technique. Introducing experimental data results in relatively small changes in the cross sections, but greatly constrains the uncertainties. The covariance files are currently undergoing testing.

  5. Mass and charge distributions in chlorine-induced nuclear reactions. [[sup 35]Cl at E/A = 15 MeV, [sup 37]Cl at E/A = 7. 3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    Projectile-like fragments were detected and characterized in terms of A, Z, and energy for the reactions [sup 37]Cl on [sup 40]Ca and [sup 209]Bi at E/A = 7.3 MeV, and [sup 35]Cl, on [sup 209]Bi at E/A = 15 MeV, at angles close to the grazing angle. Mass and charge distributions were generated in the N-Z plane as a function of energy loss, and have been parameterized in terms of their centroids, variances, and coefficients of correlation. Due to experimental problems, the mass resolution corresponding to the [sup 31]Cl on [sup 209]Bi reaction was very poor. This prompted the study and application of a deconvolution technique for peak enhancement. The drifts of the charge and mass centroids for the system [sup 37]Cl on [sup 40]Ca are consistent with a process of mass and charge equilibration mediated by nucleon exchange between the two partners, followed by evaporation. The asymmetric systems show a strong drift towards larger asymmetry, with the production of neutron-rich nuclei. It was concluded that this is indicative of a net transfer of protons from the light to the heavy partner, and a net flow of neutrons in the opposite direction. The variances for all systems increase with energy loss, as it would be expected from a nucleon exchange mechanism; however, the variances for the reaction [sup 37]Cl on [sup 40]Ca are higher than those expected from that mechanism. The coefficients of correlation indicate that the transfer of nucleons between projectile and target is correlated. The results were compared to the predictions of two current models based on a stochastic nucleon exchange mechanism. In general, the comparisons between experimental and predicted variances support this mechanism; however, the need for more realistic driving forces in the model calculations is indicated by the disagreement between predicted and experimental centroids.

  6. Study of nuclear reactions in laser plasmas at future ELI-NP facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzalone, G.; Altana, C.; Anzalone, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Lamia, L.; Mascali, D.; Muoio, A.; Negoita, F.; Odorici, F.; Petrascu, H.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tudisco, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this contribution we will present the future activities that our collaboration will carry out at ELI-NP (Extreme Light Infrastructure Nuclear Physics), the new multi peta-watt Laser facility, currently under construction at Bucharest (Romania). The activities concerns the study of nuclear reactions in laser plasmas. In this framework we proposed the construction of a new, general-purpose experimental set-up able to detect and identify neutrons and charged particles.

  7. Continuum effects in transfer reactions induced by heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, H.D.; Donangelo, R.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Pacheco, A.J.

    2006-02-15

    In the usual treatment of transfer nuclear reactions, the continuum states of the transferred particle are neglected. Here we perform a semiclassical calculation that treats the continuum in an exact way. For comparison purposes, we perform a second calculation in which the continuum is completely disregarded. The results of these two calculations indicates that the influence of the continuum states may be very important in systems with weakly bound reactants.

  8. Transient nuclear Prospero induces neural progenitor quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Sen-Lin; Doe, Chris Q

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells can self-renew, differentiate, or enter quiescence. Understanding how stem cells switch between these states is highly relevant for stem cell-based therapeutics. Drosophila neural progenitors (neuroblasts) have been an excellent model for studying self-renewal and differentiation, but quiescence remains poorly understood. In this study, we show that when neuroblasts enter quiescence, the differentiation factor Prospero is transiently detected in the neuroblast nucleus, followed by the establishment of a unique molecular profile lacking most progenitor and differentiation markers. The pulse of low level nuclear Prospero precedes entry into neuroblast quiescence even when the timing of quiescence is advanced or delayed by changing temporal identity factors. Furthermore, loss of Prospero prevents entry into quiescence, whereas a pulse of low level nuclear Prospero can drive proliferating larval neuroblasts into quiescence. We propose that Prospero levels distinguish three progenitor fates: absent for self-renewal, low for quiescence, and high for differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03363.001 PMID:25354199

  9. Direct nuclear-pumped lasers using the He-3/n,p/H-3 reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J.; Jalufka, N. W.; Hohl, F.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of experimental results concerning a specific class of direct nuclear-pumped lasers classified as 'volumetric nuclear lasers'. In the considered laser system a fissioning gas, He-3, is mixed with the lasing gas to form a homogeneous mixture, resulting in uniform volume excitation. In typical volumetric nuclear lasers a fast-burst reactor is used as a source of neutrons which penetrate a polyethylene moderator. Here the fast neutrons are thermalized. After thermalization, neutrons scatter into the laser cell. Nuclear reactions produce a proton of 0.56 MeV and a tritium ion of 0.19. These ions produce secondary electrons which pump the laser medium creating a population inversion. The results reported demonstrate direct nuclear pumping of He-3-Ar, Xe, Kr, and Cl with the considered system.

  10. Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions of Protons in Host Metals at Picometre Distance

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich Hora; George H. Miley; Jak C. Kelly

    2000-11-12

    A review is given for the explanation of the measurements of Miley et al. of a fully reproducible generation of nuclei of the whole periodic table by protons in host metals during a several-weeks reaction. Similar low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) were observed by other groups. The fact that the heavy nuclides are not due to pollution can be seen from the fact that such very rare elements as thulium and terbium were detected by unique K-shell X-ray spectra. The nuclear reaction energy goes into the heavy nuclei as measured from much bigger traces in CR39 than from alphas. The fact that any reaction of the protons results in stable daughter nuclei is confirmed by the fact that the highest energy gain is resulting with stable reaction products. This has been explained in Ref. 2, and the energy gain for the heavy element generation by a compound reaction was discussed. The explanation is based on the model of the authors from 1989 to assume free motion of the protons contrary to localized crystalline states. A relation of the reaction time U on distance d of the reacting nuclei by a power law with an exponent 34.8 was derived. Based on few reproducible D-D reactions, a reaction time near the range of megaseconds and a reaction distance of nanometers was concluded. A splendid confirmation of the picometre-megasecond reactions was achieved by Li et al. from his direct quantum mechanical calculations of the hot fusion D-T reactions based on a one-step selective resonance tunneling model. Li et al. were able for the first time to derive the cross sections of the hot fusion. Li's application to picometre distance showed megasecond reaction times with no neutron or gamma emission. Because of the imaginary part in the Schroedinger potential, the problem of the level width is reduced by damping.

  11. Locomotion of electrocatalytic nanomotors due to reaction induced charge autoelectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J. L.; Wheat, P. M.; Posner, J. D.

    2010-06-01

    Bimetallic rod-shaped nanomotors swim autonomously in hydrogen peroxide solutions. Here, we present a scaling analysis, computational simulations, and experimental data that show that the nanomotor locomotion is driven by fluid slip around the nanomotor surface due to electrical body forces. The body forces are generated by a coupling of charge density and electric fields induced by electrochemical reactions occurring on the nanomotor surface. We describe the dependence of nanomotor motion on the nanomotor surface potential and reaction-driven flux.

  12. Deuterium separation by infrared-induced addition reaction

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1977-01-01

    A method for deuterium enrichment by the infrared-induced addition reaction of a deuterium halide with an unsaturated aliphatic compound. A gaseous mixture of a hydrogen halide feedstock and an unsaturated aliphatic compound, particularly an olefin, is irradiated to selectively vibrationally excite the deuterium halide contained therein. The excited deuterium halide preferentially reacts with the unsaturated aliphatic compound to produce a deuterated addition product which is removed from the reaction mixture.

  13. Nuclear Reaction Data from Surrogate Measurements: A Consideration of (n,f) Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Lyles, B F

    2007-07-30

    A brief summary of the Surrogate reaction method, an indirect approach for determining compound-nuclear reaction cross sections, is presented. The possibilities for obtaining accurate (n,f) cross sections from Surrogate measurements that are analyzed in the Weisskopf-Ewing and Ratio approximations are considered. Theoretical studies and benchmark experiments that provide new insights into the validity and limitations of the Surrogate approach, are discussed.

  14. Studies of exotic nuclear reactions at the RESOLUT facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo

    2016-09-01

    The RESOLUT facility at Florida State University's accelerator laboratory produces beams of short-lived nuclei using the in-flight method. Beams such as 6He, 7Be, 8Li, 8B, 17F, 19O, 18Ne and 25Al have been successfully used in experiments. The facility has been used to develop innovative experimental techniques, such as the low-energy neutron detector RESONEUT, and the active-target detector ANASEN, which has been developed as a collaboration between FSU and LSU. These detectors have been employed in direct and indirect reaction measurements with impact on astrophysics. An Indiana-University led campaign studying fusion cross sections of exotic nuclei at RESOLUT has also been successful. The results from these three recent RIB campaigns at RESOLUT will be summarized. This work was supported by NSF under Grants Nos. PHY-1401574, PHY-0820941 and PHY-1126345 and by DOE under Grant Nos. DE-FG02-02ER41220, DE-FG02-88ER-40404 and DE-FG02-96ER40978.

  15. Experimental Guidance of ISB Corrections via Direct Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, K. G.; Garrett, P. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bangay, J. C.; Bianco, L.; Demand, G. A.; Faestermann, T.; Finlay, P.; Green, K. L.; Hertenberger, R.; Kriicken, R.; Phillips, A. A.; Rand, E. T.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Svensson, C. E.; Towner, I. S.; Triambak, S.; Wirth, H.-F.; Wong, J.

    2011-09-01

    The most recent isospin-symmetry-breaking corrections, δc, of Towner and Hardy for superallowed Fermi β-decay transitions, have included the opening of specific core orbitals. This change has resulted in significant deviations in some of the δc factors from their previous calculations, and an improved agreement of the individual corrected Script Ft values with the overall world average of the 13 most precise cases. While this is consistent with the conserved-vector-current (CVC) hypothesis of the Standard Model, these new calculations must be thoroughly tested, and guidance must be given for the improvement of calculations for the upper-pf shell nuclei. Using the (d,t) reaction mechanism to probe the single neutron wavefunction overlap, information regarding the relevant shell-model configurations needed in the calculation can be determined. An experiment was therefore performed with a 22 MeV polarized deuterium beam from the MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerator in Munich, Germany. Using the Q3D magnetic spectrograph, and a cathode-strip focal-plane detector, outgoing tritons were analyzed at 9 angles between 10° and 60°, up to an excitation energy of 4.8 MeV. This proceeding reports the motivational and experimental details for the 64Zn(d,t)63Zn transfer work presented.

  16. Dynamics of synchrotron VUV-induced intracluster reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, J.R.

    1993-12-01

    Photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) using the tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation available at the National Synchrotron Light Source is being exploited to study photoionization-induced reactions in small van der Waals mixed complexes. The information gained includes the observation and classification of reaction paths, the measurement of onsets, and the determination of relative yields of competing reactions. Additional information is obtained by comparison of the properties of different reacting systems. Special attention is given to finding unexpected features, and most of the reactions investigated to date display such features. However, understanding these reactions demands dynamical information, in addition to what is provided by PIMS. Therefore the program has been expanded to include the measurement of kinetic energy release distributions.

  17. Financing new nuclear capacity: Will the ''nuclear renaissance'' Be a Self-Sustaining reaction?

    SciTech Connect

    George, Glenn R.

    2007-04-15

    Although EPAct offers a number of benefits for new nuclear capacity, a host of gaps remain, from the timing of capital formation to the residual risk that the actual cost of the first few plants will significantly exceed estimates. Securitization and related financial techniques could play a role in turning revenue streams into lumps of capital. (author)

  18. Cross Sections for Neutron-induced Reactions on Actinide Targets Extracted from Surrogate Experiments: A Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Lesher, S R; Scielzo, N D; Thompson, I J; Younes, W

    2009-10-01

    The Surrogate nuclear reactions method, an indirect approach for determining cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions involving difficult-to-measure targets, is reviewed. Focusing on cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on actinides, we review the successes of past and present applications of the method and assess its uncertainties and limitations. The approximations used in the analyses of most experiments work reasonably well for (n,f) cross sections for neutron energies above 1-2 MeV, but lead to discrepancies for low-energy (n,f) reactions, as well as for (n,{gamma}) applications. Correcting for some of the effects neglected in the approximate analyses leads to improved (n,f) results. We outline steps that will further improve the accuracy and reliability of the Surrogate method and extend its applicability to reactions that cannot be approached with the present implementation of the method.

  19. Optically induced dynamic nuclear spin polarisation in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, Jochen; Schwartz, Ilai; Chen, Qiong; Schulze-Sünninghausen, David; Carl, Patrick; Höfer, Peter; Retzker, Alexander; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Isoya, Junichi; Luy, Burkhard; Plenio, Martin B.; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depends strongly on nuclear spin polarisation and, motivated by this observation, dynamical nuclear spin polarisation has recently been applied to enhance MRI protocols (Kurhanewicz et al 2011 Neoplasia 13 81). Nuclear spins associated with the 13C carbon isotope (nuclear spin I = 1/2) in diamond possess uniquely long spin lattice relaxation times (Reynhardt and High 2011 Prog. Nucl. Magn. Reson. Spectrosc. 38 37). If they are present in diamond nanocrystals, especially when strongly polarised, they form a promising contrast agent for MRI. Current schemes for achieving nuclear polarisation, however, require cryogenic temperatures. Here we demonstrate an efficient scheme that realises optically induced 13C nuclear spin hyperpolarisation in diamond at room temperature and low ambient magnetic field. Optical pumping of a nitrogen-vacancy centre creates a continuously renewable electron spin polarisation which can be transferred to surrounding 13C nuclear spins. Importantly for future applications we also realise polarisation protocols that are robust against an unknown misalignment between magnetic field and crystal axis.

  20. Change of Electroweak Nuclear Reaction Rates by CP- and Isospin Symmetry Breaking - A Model Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, Harald

    2006-09-01

    Based on the assumption that electroweak bosons, leptons and quarks possess a substructure of elementary fermionic constituents, in previous papers the effect of CP-symmetry breaking on the effective dynamics of these particles was calculated. Motivated by the phenomenological procedure in this paper, isospin symmetry breaking will be added and the physical consequences of these calculations will be discussed. The dynamical law of the fermionic constituents is given by a relativistically invariant nonlinear spinor field equation with local interaction, canonical quantization, selfregularization and probability interpretation. The corresponding effective dynamics is derived by algebraic weak mapping theorems. In contrast to the commonly applied modifications of the quark mass matrices, CP-symmetry breaking is introduced into this algebraic formalism by an inequivalent vacuum with respect to the CP-invariant case, represented by a modified spinor field propagator. This leads to an extension of the standard model as effective theory which contains besides the "electric" electroweak bosons additional "magnetic" electroweak bosons and corresponding interactions. If furthermore the isospin invariance of the propagator is broken too, it will be demonstrated in detail that in combination with CP-symmetry breaking this induces a considerable modification of electroweak nuclear reaction rates.

  1. Neutron-induced reactions and secondary-ion mass spectrometry: complementary tools for depth profiling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, G.; Fleming, R.; Simons, D.; Newbury, D.

    1982-01-01

    The technique of neutron depth profiling is based upon inducing nuclear reactions by bombardment with low-energy neutrons. The nuclear reactions result in the emission of high-energy alpha particles or protons. The energy spectrum of the emitted particles is used to derive a depth distribution by transforming the energy loss into an equivalent depth by stopping-power calculations. Depth profiles of bismuth distributions in silicon and tin have been measured by both neutron depth profiling and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Information from both techniques can be used synergistically to aid in a full characterization of the depth distribution.

  2. Nuclear spin-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Li-juan; Vaara, Juha

    2013-05-01

    In nuclear magneto-optic spectroscopy, effects of nuclear magnetization are detected in light passing through a sample containing spin-polarized nuclei. An optical analogue of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift has been predicted and observed in the nuclear spin optical rotation of linearly polarized light propagating parallel to the nuclear magnetization. A recently proposed magneto-optic analogue of the NMR spin-spin coupling, the nuclear spin-induced Cotton-Mouton (NSCM) effect entails an ellipticity induced to linearly polarized light when passing through a medium with the nuclear spins polarized in a direction perpendicular to the light beam. Here we present a first-principles electronic structure formulation of NSCM in terms of response theory as well as ab initio and density-functional theory calculations for small molecules. The roles of basis set (we use completeness-optimized sets), electron correlation, and relativistic effects are discussed. It is found that the explicitly temperature-dependent contribution to NSCM, arising from the partial orientation of the molecules due to the nuclear magnetization, typically dominates the effect. This part of NSCM is proportional to the tensor product of molecular polarizability and the NMR direct dipolar coupling tensor. Hence, NSCM provides a means of investigating the dipolar coupling and, thus, molecular structure in a formally isotropic medium. Overall ellipticities of the order of magnitude of 10-8…10-7 rad/(M cm) are predicted for fully polarized nuclei. These should be detectable with modern instrumentation in the Voigt setup.

  3. Nuclear-induced XeBr/asterisk/ photolytic laser model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Parameters for a photolytically pumped alkyl iodide lasant gas by the nuclear-induced XeBr excimer fluorescence are calculated according to a detailed kinetic model. High gain on the atomic iodine 2P1/2 state is estimated and 100-mJ pulses with an average power output on the order of 1 kW appear possible.

  4. Open problems in applying random-matrix theory to nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2014-09-01

    Problems in applying random-matrix theory (RMT) to nuclear reactions arise in two domains. To justify the approach, statistical properties of isolated resonances observed experimentally must agree with RMT predictions. That agreement is less striking than would be desirable. In the implementation of the approach, the range of theoretically predicted observables is too narrow.

  5. Cross-checking of Large Evaluated and Experimental Nuclear Reaction Databases

    SciTech Connect

    Zeydina, O.; Koning, A.J.; Soppera, N.; Raffanel, D.; Bossant, M.; Dupont, E.; Beauzamy, B.

    2014-06-15

    Automated methods are presented for the verification of large experimental and evaluated nuclear reaction databases (e.g. EXFOR, JEFF, TENDL). These methods allow an assessment of the overall consistency of the data and detect aberrant values in both evaluated and experimental databases.

  6. Refined scenario of standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis allowing for nonthermal nuclear reactions in the primordial plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Voronchev, Victor T.; Nakao, Yasuyuki; Nakamura, Makoto; Tsukida, Kazuki

    2012-11-12

    The standard scenario of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is generalized to take into account nonthermal nuclear reactions in the primordial plasma. These reactions are naturally triggered in the BBN epoch by fast particles generated in various exoergic processes. It is found that, although such particles can appreciably enhance the rates of some individual reactions, their influence on the whole process of element production is not significant. The nonthermal corrections to element abundances are obtained to be 0.1% ({sup 3}H), -0.03% ({sup 7}Li), and 0.34 %-0.63% (CNO group).

  7. Spectroscopic study of sub-barrier quasi-elastic nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pass, C.N.; Evans, P.M.; Smith, A.E.; Stuttge, L.; Betts, R.R.; Lilley, J.S.; Connell, K.A.; Simpson, J.; Smith, J.R.; James, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    The technique developed in this paper is particularly well suited to the detailed spectroscopic study of low energy quasi-elastic nuclear reactions and by overcoming the limitations of conventional procedure, the prospect of detailed studies of inclusive reaction mechanism may be realised. With only limited statistics we find evidence for strong multistep character in the transfer of a single nucleon from spherical vibrational target to spherical projectile nuclei. The suggestive measurements reported here may be made definitive through extended runs based on this technique and experiments planned for the future offer the real prospect of developing a quantified interpretation of the reaction process. 9 refs. 5 figs.

  8. Completing the nuclear reaction puzzle of the nucleosynthesis of 92Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveten, G. M.; Spyrou, A.; Schwengner, R.; Naqvi, F.; Larsen, A. C.; Eriksen, T. K.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Crespo Campo, L.; Guttormsen, M.; Giacoppo, F.; Görgen, A.; Hagen, T. W.; Hadynska-Klek, K.; Klintefjord, M.; Meyer, B. S.; Nyhus, H. T.; Renstrøm, T.; Rose, S. J.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T. G.

    2016-08-01

    One of the greatest questions for modern physics to address is how elements heavier than iron are created in extreme astrophysical environments. A particularly challenging part of that question is the creation of the so-called p -nuclei, which are believed to be mainly produced in some types of supernovae. The lack of needed nuclear data presents an obstacle in nailing down the precise site and astrophysical conditions. In this work, we present for the first time measurements on the nuclear level density and average γ strength function of 92Mo. State-of-the-art p -process calculations systematically underestimate the observed solar abundance of this isotope. Our data provide stringent constraints on the 91Nb(p ,γ )92Mo reaction rate, which is the last unmeasured reaction in the nucleosynthesis puzzle of 92Mo. Based on our results, we conclude that the 92Mo abundance anomaly is not due to the nuclear physics input to astrophysical model calculations.

  9. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions: Status at the Beginning of the New Millenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallove, Eugene F.

    2001-03-01

    This talk will summarize some of the more convincing recent experiments that show that ^4He,^3He (including impossible to explain changes in the ^4He/^3He isotopic ratio), nuclear scale excess energy, tritium, low-level neutron production, and the transmutation of heavy elements can occur near room temperature in relatively simple systems. Despite inappropriate theory-based arguments against it and unethical attacks by people unfamiliar with the supporting experiments, the new field of solid state nuclear reactions is progressing. The physical theory behind the associated phenomena continues to be debated among theorists. But progress is being made. The facts of the history of this scientific controversy suggest that it is inadvisable to rush to judgment against allegedly ``impossible" new phenomena when increasingly careful experiments have revealed new vistas in physics. Detailed discussion of evidence for solid state nuclear reactions is available

  10. Tween-80 and impurity induce anaphylactoid reaction in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Lao, Qiao-Cong; Yu, Hang-Ping; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Hong-Cui; Luan, Lin; Sun, Hui-Min; Li, Chun-Qi

    2015-03-01

    A number of recent reports suspected that Tween-80 in injectable medicines, including traditional Chinese medicine injections could cause life-threatening anaphylactoid reaction, but no sound conclusion was drawn. A drug-induced anaphylactoid reaction is hard to be assayed in vitro and in conventional animal models. In this study, we developed a microplate-based quantitative in vivo zebrafish assay for assessing anaphylactoid reaction and live whole zebrafish mast cell tryptase activity was quantitatively measured at a wavelength of 405 nm using N-benzoyl-dl-arginine p-nitroanilide as a substrate. We assessed 10 batches of Tween-80 solutions from various national and international suppliers and three Tween-80 impurities (ethylene glycol, 2-chloroethanol and hydrogen peroxide) in this model and found that three batches of Tween-80 (nos 2, 20080709 and 20080616) and one Tween-80 impurity, hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), induced anaphylactoid reactions in zebrafish. Furthermore, we found that H2 O2 residue and peroxide value were much higher in Tween-80 samples 2, 20080709 and 20080616. These findings suggest that H2 O2 residue in combination with oxidized fatty acid residues (measured as peroxide value) or more likely the oxidized fatty acid residues in Tween-80 samples, but not Tween-80 itself, may induce anaphylactoid reaction. High-throughput zebrafish tryptase assay developed in this report could be used for assessing safety of Tween-80-containing injectable medicines and potentially for screening novel mast cell-modulating drugs.

  11. Nuclear reaction uncertainties, massive gravitino decays and the cosmological lithium problem

    SciTech Connect

    Cyburt, Richard H.; Ellis, John; Fields, Brian D.; Luo, Feng; Olive, Keith A.; Spanos, Vassilis C. E-mail: john.ellis@cern.ch E-mail: fluo@physics.umn.edu E-mail: spanos@physics.umn.edu

    2010-10-01

    We consider the effects of uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates on the cosmological constraints on the decays of unstable particles during or after Big-Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). We identify the nuclear reactions due to non-thermal hadrons that are the most important in perturbing standard BBN, then quantify the uncertainties in these reactions and in the resulting light-element abundances. These results also indicate the key nuclear processes for which improved cross section data would allow different light-element abundances to be determined more accurately, thereby making possible more precise probes of BBN and evaluations of the cosmological constraints on unstable particles. Applying this analysis to models with unstable gravitinos decaying into neutralinos, we calculate the likelihood function for the light-element abundances measured currently, taking into account the current experimental errors in the determinations of the relevant nuclear reaction rates. We find a region of the gravitino mass and abundance in which the abundances of deuterium, {sup 4}He and {sup 7}Li may be fit with χ{sup 2} = 5.5, compared with χ{sup 2} = 31.7 if the effects of gravitino decays are unimportant. The best-fit solution is improved to χ{sup 2} ∼ 2.0 when the lithium abundance is taken from globular cluster data. Some such re-evaluation of the observed light-element abundances and/or nuclear reaction rates would be needed if this region of gravitino parameters is to provide a complete solution to the cosmological {sup 7}Li problem.

  12. Investigating resonances above and below the threshold in nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Kiss, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Spitaleri, C.; Trippella, O.

    2015-10-15

    Resonances in nuclear cross sections dramatically change their trends. Therefore, the presence of unexpected resonances might lead to unpredicted consequences on astrophysics and nuclear physics. In nuclear physics, resonances allow one to study states in the intermediate compound systems, to evaluate their cluster structure, for instance, especially in the energy regions approaching particle decay thresholds. In astrophysics, resonances might lead to changes in the nucleosynthesis flow, determining different isotopic compositions of the nuclear burning ashes. For these reasons, the Trojan Horse method has been modified to investigate resonant reactions. Thanks to this novel approach, for the first time normalization to direct data might be avoided. Moreover, in the case of sub threshold resonances, the Trojan Horse method modified to investigate resonances allows one to deduce the asymptotic normalization coefficient, showing the close connection between the two indirect approaches.

  13. Challenges in describing nuclear reactions outcomes at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, M.; Simpson, E. C.; Kalkal, S.; Cook, K. J.; Carter, I. P.; Hinde, D. J.; Luong, D. H.

    2017-01-01

    The properties of light nuclei such as 6Li, 7Li, 9Be and 12C, and their reaction outcomes are known to be strongly influenced by their underlying α-cluster structure. Reaction models do not yet exist to allow accurate predictions of outcomes following a collision of these nuclei with another nucleus. As a result, reaction models within GEANT, and nuclear fusion models do not accurately describe measured products or cross sections. Recent measurements at the Australian National University have shown new reaction modes that lead to breakup of 6Li, 7Li into lighter clusters, again presenting a further challenge to current models. The new observations and subsequent model developments will impact on accurate predictions of reaction outcomes of 12C - a three α-cluster nucleus – that is used in heavy ion therapy.

  14. An accurate analytic representation of the temperature dependence of nonresonant nuclear reaction rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2016-12-01

    There has been intense interest for several decades by different research groups to accurately model the temperature dependence of a large number of nuclear reaction rate coefficients for both light and heavy nuclides. The rate coefficient, k(T) , is given by the Maxwellian average of the reactive cross section expressed in terms of the astrophysical factor, S(E) , which for nonresonant reactions is generally written as a power series in the relative energy E. A computationally efficient algorithm for the temperature dependence of nuclear reaction rate coefficients is required for fusion reactor research and for models of nucleosynthesis and stellar evolution. In this paper, an accurate analytical expression for the temperature dependence of nuclear reaction rate coefficients is provided in terms of τ = 3(b / 2) 2/3 or equivalently, T - 1/3 , where b = B /√{kB T }, B is the Gamow factor and kB is the Boltzmann constant. The methodology is appropriate for all nonresonant nuclear reactions for which S(E) can be represented as a power series in E. The explicit expression for the rate coefficient versus temperature is derived with the asymptotic expansions of the moments of w(E) = exp(- E /kB T - B /√{ E }) in terms of τ. The zeroth order moment is the familiar Gaussian approximation to the rate coefficient. Results are reported for the representative reactions D(d, p)T, D(d, n)3He and 7Li(p, α) α and compared with several different fitting procedures reported in the literature.

  15. Mechanisms of shock-induced reactions in high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Jeffrey J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which shock waves initiate chemical reactions in explosives is key to understanding their unique and defining property: the ability to undergo rapid explosive decomposition in response to mechanical stimulus. Although shock-induced reactions in explosives have been studied experimentally and computationally for decades, the nature of even the first chemical reactions that occur in response to shock remain elusive. To predictively understand how explosives respond to shock, the detailed sequence of events that occurs - mechanical deformation, energy transfer, bond breakage, and first chemical reactions - must be understood at the quantum-mechanical level. This paper reviews recent work in this field and ongoing experimental and theoretical work at Sandia National Laboratories in this important area of explosive science.

  16. High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, Giorgio; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.

    2007-01-30

    Nuclear fusion is a process in which nuclei, having a total initial mass, combine to produce a single nucleus, having a final mass less than the total initial mass. Below a given atomic number the process is exothermic; that is, since the final mass is less than the combined initial mass and the mass deficit is converted into energy by the nuclear fusion. On Earth nuclear fusion does not happen spontaneously because electrostatic barriers prevent the phenomenon. To induce controlled, industrial scale, nuclear fusion, only a few methods have been discovered that look promising, but net positive energy production is not yet possible because of low overall efficiency of the systems. In this paper we propose that an intense burst of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) could be focused or beamed to a target mass composed of appropriate fuel or target material to efficiently rearrange the atomic or nuclear structure of the target material with consequent nuclear fusion. Provided that efficient generation of HFGW can be technically achieved, the proposed fusion reactor could become a viable solution for the energy needs of mankind and alternatively a process for beaming energy to produce a source of fusion energy remotely - even inside solid materials.

  17. Photo-induced chemical reaction of trans-resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Shi, Meng; Ye, Jian-Hui; Zheng, Xin-Qiang; Lu, Jian-Liang; Liang, Yue-Rong

    2015-03-15

    Photo-induced chemical reaction of trans-resveratrol has been studied. UV B, liquid state and sufficient exposure time are essential conditions to the photochemical change of trans-resveratrol. Three principal compounds, cis-resveratrol, 2,4,6-phenanthrenetriol and 2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5,6-benzofurandione, were successively generated in the reaction solution of trans-resveratrol (0.25 mM, 100% ethanol) under 100 μW cm(-2) UV B radiation for 4h. cis-Resveratrol, originated from isomerization of trans-resveratrol, resulted in 2,4,6-phenanthrenetriol through photocyclisation reaction meanwhile loss of 2 H. 2,4,6-Phenanthrenetriol played a role of photosensitizer producing singlet oxygen in the reaction pathway. The singlet oxygen triggered [4+2] cycloaddition reaction of trans-resveratrol, and then resulted in the generation of 2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5,6-benzofurandione through photorearrangement and oxidation reaction. The singlet oxygen reaction was closely related to the substrate concentration of trans-resveratrol in solution.

  18. Unified ab initio approaches to nuclear structure and reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, Petr; Quaglioni, Sofia; Hupin, Guillaume; Romero-Redondo, Carolina; Calci, Angelo

    2016-04-13

    The description of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the realistic interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. In addition to the complex nature of the nuclear forces, with two-, three- and possibly higher many-nucleon components, one faces the quantum-mechanical many-nucleon problem governed by an interplay between bound and continuum states. In recent years, significant progress has been made in ab initio nuclear structure and reaction calculations based on input from QCD-employing Hamiltonians constructed within chiral effective field theory. After a brief overview of the field, we focus on ab initio many-body approaches—built upon the no-core shell model—that are capable of simultaneously describing both bound and scattering nuclear states, and present results for resonances in light nuclei, reactions important for astrophysics and fusion research. In particular, we review recent calculations of resonances in the 6He halo nucleus, of five- and six-nucleon scattering, and an investigation of the role of chiral three-nucleon interactions in the structure of 9Be. Further, we discuss applications to the 7Be ${({\\rm{p}},\\gamma )}^{8}{\\rm{B}}$ radiative capture. Lastly, we highlight our efforts to describe transfer reactions including the 3H${({\\rm{d}},{\\rm{n}})}^{4}$He fusion.

  19. The Legnaro National Laboratories and the SPES facility: nuclear structure and reactions today and tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, Giacomo; Fiorentini, Gianni

    2016-11-01

    There is a very long tradition of studying nuclear structure and reactions at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italian Institute of Nuclear Physics). The wide expertise acquired in building and running large germanium arrays has made the laboratories one of the most advanced research centers in γ-ray spectroscopy. The ’gamma group’ has been deeply involved in all the national and international developments of the last 20 years and is currently one of the major contributors to the AGATA project, the first (together with its American counterpart GRETINA) γ-detector array based on γ-ray tracking. This line of research is expected to be strongly boosted by the coming into operation of the SPES radioactive ion beam project, currently under construction at LNL. In this report, written on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the Nobel prize awarded to Aage Bohr, Ben R Mottelson and Leo Rainwater and particularly focused on the physics of nuclear structure, we intend to summarize the different lines of research that have guided nuclear structure and reaction research at LNL in the last decades. The results achieved have paved the way for the present SPES facility, a new laboratories infrastructure producing and accelerating radioactive ion beams of fission fragments and other isotopes.

  20. Nuclear ADP-Ribosylation Reactions in Mammalian Cells: Where Are We Today and Where Are We Going?

    PubMed Central

    Hassa, Paul O.; Haenni, Sandra S.; Elser, Michael; Hottiger, Michael O.

    2006-01-01

    Since poly-ADP ribose was discovered over 40 years ago, there has been significant progress in research into the biology of mono- and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions. During the last decade, it became clear that ADP-ribosylation reactions play important roles in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inter- and intracellular signaling, transcriptional regulation, DNA repair pathways and maintenance of genomic stability, telomere dynamics, cell differentiation and proliferation, and necrosis and apoptosis. ADP-ribosylation reactions are phylogenetically ancient and can be classified into four major groups: mono-ADP-ribosylation, poly-ADP-ribosylation, ADP-ribose cyclization, and formation of O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. In the human genome, more than 30 different genes coding for enzymes associated with distinct ADP-ribosylation activities have been identified. This review highlights the recent advances in the rapidly growing field of nuclear mono-ADP-ribosylation and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions and the distinct ADP-ribosylating enzyme families involved in these processes, including the proposed family of novel poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-like mono-ADP-ribose transferases and the potential mono-ADP-ribosylation activities of the sirtuin family of NAD+-dependent histone deacetylases. A special focus is placed on the known roles of distinct mono- and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions in physiological processes, such as mitosis, cellular differentiation and proliferation, telomere dynamics, and aging, as well as “programmed necrosis” (i.e., high-mobility-group protein B1 release) and apoptosis (i.e., apoptosis-inducing factor shuttling). The proposed molecular mechanisms involved in these processes, such as signaling, chromatin modification (i.e., “histone code”), and remodeling of chromatin structure (i.e., DNA damage response, transcriptional regulation, and insulator function), are described. A potential cross talk between nuclear

  1. Systematic measurements of proton-induced reactions on enriched molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamere, Edward; Gilardy, Gwenaelle; Meisel, Zach; Moran, Michael; Seymore, Christopher; Skulski, Michael; Simonetti, Antonio; Couder, Manoel

    2016-09-01

    Between 2008 and 2010, shortages in the world-wide supply of Mo highlighted weaknesses in the current fission-based production method of mTc, a critical medical isotope. This crisis sparked interest in developing the direct production of mTc from proton-induced reactions on enriched Mo targets as an alternative. One complication with this method is that mTc must be chemically extracted from the irradiated target. Therefore, radiopharmaceuticals produced from proton bombardment will contain a mixture of all Tc-species with open production channels, affecting radiochemical purity, specific activity and total production yield of mTc-factors critical for the feasibility of this production method. Reactions on trace impurities in the enriched targets have been shown to impact these factors dramatically. Precise cross-section measurements for all Mo +p reactions that lead to Tc or Mo species are required for proper assessment of this production technique. Cross-section measurements for the main reaction of interest, mTc(p,2n), have been performed in recent years, however, other reactions producing Tc have been mostly neglected. We will introduce a systematic study of proton-induced reactionson 92, 94-98, 100 Mo currently being performed at Notre Dame. Preliminary results will be presented. NRC-HQ-12-G-38-0073.

  2. Evaluated Nuclear (reaction) Data from the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The ENDF libraries are a collection of documented data evaluations stored in a defined computer-readable format that can be used as the main input to nuclear data processing programs. An evaluation is the process of analyzing experimentally measured cross-section data, combining them with the predictions of nuclear model calculations, and attempting to extract the true value of a cross section. Parameterization and reduction of the data to tabular form produces an evaluated data set. If a written description of the preparation of a unique data set from the data sources is available, the data set is referred to as a documented evaluation. The data sets contained on the ENDF/B library are those chosen by CSEWG from evaluations submitted for review. The choice is made on the basis of requirements for applications, conformance of the evaluation to the formats and procedures, and performance in testing. The data set that represents a particular material may change when (1) new significant experimental results become available, (2) integral tests show that the data give erroneous results, or (3) user's requirements indicate a need for more accurate data and/or better representations of the data for a particular material. New or revised data sets are included in new releases of the ENDF/B library. ENDF/B data sets are revised or replaced only after extensive review and testing. This allows them to be used as standard reference data during the lifetime of the particular ENDF/B version. (This information is copied from the ENDF- 6 Formats Manual, Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/B-VII, Document ENDF-102, Report BNL-NCS-44945-05-Rev.) The current version is ENDF/B VII.0, released in 2006. Users can search ENDF via specialized interfaces, browse sub-libraries or download them as zipped files. Data plots can be generated through the Sigma interface. The ENDF web page also provides access to covariance data processing and plots

  3. Oral Muscle Relaxant May Induce Immediate Allergic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Gyu-Young; Hwang, Eui Kyung; Moon, Jae-Young; Ye, Young-Min; Shim, Jae-Jeong; Kang, Kyung-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Eperisone and afloqualone act by relaxing both skeletal and vascular smooth muscles to improve circulation and suppress pain reflex. These drugs are typically prescribed with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as painkillers. However, there have been no reports on serious adverse reactions to oral muscle relaxants; and this is the first report to describe three allergic reactions caused by eperisone and afloqualone. All three patients had histories of allergic reactions after oral intake of multiple painkillers, including oral muscle relaxants and NSAIDs, for chronic muscle pain. An open-label oral challenge test was performed with each drug to confirm which drugs caused the systemic reactions. All patients experienced the same reactions within one hour after oral intake of eperisone or afloqualone. The severity of these reactions ranged from laryngeal edema to hypotension. To confirm that the systemic reaction was caused by eperisone or afloqualone, skin prick testing and intradermal skin tests were performed with eperisone or afloqualone extract in vivo, and basophil activity tests were performed after stimulation with these drugs in vitro. In one patient with laryngeal edema, the intradermal test with afloqualone extract had a positive result, and CD63 expression levels on basophils increased in a dose-dependent manner by stimulation with afloqualone. We report three allergic reactions caused by oral muscle relaxants that might be mediated by non-immunoglobulin E-mediated responses. Since oral muscle relaxants such as eperisone and afloqualone are commonly prescribed for chronic muscle pain and can induce severe allergic reactions, we should prescribe them carefully. PMID:22665359

  4. On fundamental quality of fission chain reaction to oppose rapid runaways of nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, G. G.; Shmelev, A. N.; Apse, V. A.; Kulikov, E. G.

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that the in-hour equation characterizes the barriers and resistibility of fission chain reaction (FCR) against rapid runaways in nuclear reactors. Traditionally, nuclear reactors are characterized by the presence of barriers based on delayed and prompt neutrons. A new barrier based on the reflector neutrons that can occur when the fast reactor core is surrounded by a weakly absorbing neutron reflector with heavy atomic weight was proposed. It has been shown that the safety of this fast reactor is substantially improved, and considerable elongation of prompt neutron lifetime "devalues" the role of delayed neutron fraction as the maximum permissible reactivity for the reactor safety.

  5. Calcium-regulated nuclear enzymes: potential mediators of phytochrome-induced changes in nuclear metabolism?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium ions have been proposed to serve as important regulatory elements in stimulus-response coupling for phytochrome responses. An important test of this hypothesis will be to identify specific targets of calcium action that are required for some growth or development process induced by the photoactivated form of phytochrome (Pfr). Initial studies have revealed that there are at least two enzymes in pea nuclei that are stimulated by Pfr in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion, a calmodulin-regulated nucleoside triphosphatase and a calmodulin-independent but Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase. The nucleoside triphosphatase appears to be associated with the nuclear envelope, while the protein kinase co-purifies with a nuclear fraction highly enriched for chromatin. This short review summarizes the latest findings on these enzymes and relates them to what is known about Pfr-regulated nuclear metabolism.

  6. From simple to complex reactions: Nuclear collisions near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1992-12-01

    Collisions between two heavy nuclei produce a diverse spectrum of reaction modes which is much wider than that observed in light ion studies. For the latter case, two processes are observed: direct reactions and compound nucleus formation. Heavy ion reaction studies on the other hand have identified additional processes such as deep-inelastic scattering, incomplete fusion and quasi-fission reactions. While the boundaries between the various processes are usually not well defined, it is generally accepted that with increasing overlap of the two nuclei the interaction evolves from distant collisions where only elastic scattering and Coulomb excitation processes occur, through grazing-type collisions associated with quasi-elastic reactions to deep-inelastic and fusion-fission processes requiring a substantial nuclear overlap. Varying the bombarding energy is a convenient way to change the overlap of the two nuclei. Measurements of excitation functions can thus probe the onset and the interplay of the various reaction modes. Experiments at bombarding energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier are particularly suited for comparisons with theoretical predictions since the small number of degrees of freedom involved in the interaction greatly simplifies the calculations. In the first part of this contribution a short overview is given on the status of heavy ion reaction studies at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In the second part two experiments, one involving simple and the other studying complex reactions, are discussed in more detail.

  7. From simple to complex reactions: Nuclear collisions near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1992-01-01

    Collisions between two heavy nuclei produce a diverse spectrum of reaction modes which is much wider than that observed in light ion studies. For the latter case, two processes are observed: direct reactions and compound nucleus formation. Heavy ion reaction studies on the other hand have identified additional processes such as deep-inelastic scattering, incomplete fusion and quasi-fission reactions. While the boundaries between the various processes are usually not well defined, it is generally accepted that with increasing overlap of the two nuclei the interaction evolves from distant collisions where only elastic scattering and Coulomb excitation processes occur, through grazing-type collisions associated with quasi-elastic reactions to deep-inelastic and fusion-fission processes requiring a substantial nuclear overlap. Varying the bombarding energy is a convenient way to change the overlap of the two nuclei. Measurements of excitation functions can thus probe the onset and the interplay of the various reaction modes. Experiments at bombarding energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier are particularly suited for comparisons with theoretical predictions since the small number of degrees of freedom involved in the interaction greatly simplifies the calculations. In the first part of this contribution a short overview is given on the status of heavy ion reaction studies at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In the second part two experiments, one involving simple and the other studying complex reactions, are discussed in more detail.

  8. A systematic review of drug induced ocular reactions in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, J; Harvey, J

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To conduct a systematic review of drug induced adverse ocular effects in diabetes to determine if this approach identified any previously unrecognised adverse drug effects; to make a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of this approach in identifying adverse drug reactions; and to assess the current accessibility of this information to prescribing physicians.
METHODS—Literature search of online biomedical databases. The search strategy linked eye disorders with adverse drug reactions and diabetes. Source journals were classified as medical, pharmaceutical, diabetes related, or ophthalmological. It was determined whether the reactions identified were recorded in drug datasheets and the British National Formulary.
RESULTS—63 references fulfilled the selection criteria, of which 45 were considered to be relevant to the study. The majority of these were case reports but cross sectional surveys, case-control and cohort studies, and review articles were also identified. 61% of the reactions were not recorded in the British National Formulary and 41% were not recorded in the datasheets. 55% appeared in specialist ophthalmology journals.
CONCLUSIONS—This is a feasible approach to the identification of adverse drug reactions. Adverse reactions not listed in the most commonly used reference sources were found. The majority were published in specialist ophthalmology journals which might not be seen by prescribing physicians.

 PMID:10655188

  9. Chemical memory reactions induced bursting dynamics in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tianhai

    2013-01-01

    Memory is a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems in which the present system state is not entirely determined by the current conditions but also depends on the time evolutionary path of the system. Specifically, many memorial phenomena are characterized by chemical memory reactions that may fire under particular system conditions. These conditional chemical reactions contradict to the extant stochastic approaches for modeling chemical kinetics and have increasingly posed significant challenges to mathematical modeling and computer simulation. To tackle the challenge, I proposed a novel theory consisting of the memory chemical master equations and memory stochastic simulation algorithm. A stochastic model for single-gene expression was proposed to illustrate the key function of memory reactions in inducing bursting dynamics of gene expression that has been observed in experiments recently. The importance of memory reactions has been further validated by the stochastic model of the p53-MDM2 core module. Simulations showed that memory reactions is a major mechanism for realizing both sustained oscillations of p53 protein numbers in single cells and damped oscillations over a population of cells. These successful applications of the memory modeling framework suggested that this innovative theory is an effective and powerful tool to study memory process and conditional chemical reactions in a wide range of complex biological systems.

  10. Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals. II. Finite temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Duke, D.; Carr, H.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of induced nuclear fission for a broad range of neutron energies could help resolve fundamental science issues, such as the formation of elements in the universe, but could have also a large impact on societal applications in energy production or nuclear waste management. The goal of this paper is to set up the foundations of a microscopic theory to study the static aspects of induced fission as a function of the excitation energy of the incident neutron, from thermal to fast neutrons. To account for the high excitation energy of the compound nucleus, we employ a statistical approach based on finite temperature nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy densities, which we benchmark on the 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction. We compute the evolution of the least-energy fission pathway across multidimensional potential energy surfaces with up to five collective variables as a function of the nuclear temperature and predict the evolution of both the inner and the outer fission barriers as a function of the excitation energy of the compound nucleus. We show that the coupling to the continuum induced by the finite temperature is negligible in the range of neutron energies relevant for many applications of neutron-induced fission. We prove that the concept of quantum localization introduced recently can be extended to T >0 , and we apply the method to study the interaction energy and total kinetic energy of fission fragments as a function of the temperature for the most probable fission. While large uncertainties in theoretical modeling remain, we conclude that a finite temperature nuclear density functional may provide a useful framework to obtain accurate predictions of fission fragment properties.

  11. Effects of Induced Surface Tension in Nuclear and Hadron Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagun, V. V.; Bugaev, K. A.; Ivanytskyi, A. I.; Oliinychenko, D. R.; Mishustin, I. N.

    2017-03-01

    Short range particle repulsion is rather important property of the hadronic and nuclear matter equations of state. We present a novel equation of state which is based on the virial expansion for the multicomponent mixtures with hard-core repulsion. In addition to the hard-core repulsion taken into account by the proper volumes of particles, this equation of state explicitly contains the surface tension which is induced by another part of the hard-core repulsion between particles. At high densities the induced surface tension vanishes and the excluded volume treatment of hard-core repulsion is switched to its proper volume treatment. Possible applications of this equation of state to a description of hadronic multiplicities measured in A+A collisions, to an investigation of the nuclear matter phase diagram properties and to the neutron star interior modeling are discussed.

  12. Experimental Observation of Nuclear Reactions in Palladium and Uranium - Possible Explanation by Hydrex Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, J.; Murat, D.; Dufour, X.; Foos, J

    2001-07-15

    Experiments with uranium are presented that show a highly exothermal reaction, which can only be of nuclear origin. One striking point of these results is that they clearly show that what is being observed is not some kind of fusion reaction of the deuterium present (only exceedingly small amounts of it are present). This is a strong indication that hydrogen can trigger nuclear reactions that seem to involve the nuclei of the lattice (which would yield a fission-like pattern of products). Confronted with a situation where some experiments in the field yield a fusion-like pattern of products (CF experiments) and others a fissionlike one (LENR experiments), one can reasonably wonder whether one is not observing two aspects of the same phenomenon. Thus, it is proposed to describe CF and LENR reactions as essentially the same phenomenon based on the possible existence of a still hypothetical proton/electron resonance, which would catalyze fissionlike reactions with a neutron sink. Finally, a series of experiments is proposed to assess this hypothesis.

  13. Polarized nuclear target based on parahydrogen induced polarization

    SciTech Connect

    D. Budker, M.P. Ledbetter, S. Appelt, L.S. Bouchard, B. Wojtsekhowski

    2012-12-01

    We discuss a novel concept of a polarized nuclear target for accelerator fixed-target scattering experiments, which is based on parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). One may be able to reach a 33% free-proton polarization in the ethane molecule. The potential advantages of such a target include operation at zero magnetic field, fast ({approx}100 HZ) polarization oscillation (akin to polarization reversal), and operation with large intensity of an electron beam.

  14. Induced Stokes or anti-Stokes nuclear transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Eliezer, S. |; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Velarde, G.

    1995-11-01

    It is suggested that laser-generated soft x rays can be used to induce Stokes or anti-Stokes nuclear transitions. Isomeric transitions in {sup 99}Tc and {sup 179}Hf are considered as Stokes and anti-Stokes transitions, respectively. It is shown that success of the proposed scheme may open the way for a gamma-ray laser. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Interplay between compound and fragments aspects of nuclear fission and heavy-ion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, Peter; Iwamoto, A; Ichikawa, I

    2010-09-10

    The scission point in nuclear fission plays a special role where one-body system changes to two-body system. Inverse of this situation is realized in heavy-ion fusion reaction where two-body system changes to one body system. Among several peculiar phenomena expected to occur during this change, we focus our attention to the behavior of compound and fragments shell effects. Some aspects of the interplay between compound and fragments shell effect are discussed related to the topics of the fission valleys in the potential energy surface of actinide nuclei and the fusion-like trajectory found in the cold fusion reaction leading to superheavy nuclei.

  16. Level density inputs in nuclear reaction codes and the role of the spin cutoff parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; Burger, A.; Gorgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Massey, T. N.; Siem, S.

    2014-09-03

    Here, the proton spectrum from the 57Fe(α,p) reaction has been measured and analyzed with the Hauser-Feshbach model of nuclear reactions. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the best description is achieved with either Fermi-gas or constant temperature model functions obtained by fitting them to neutron resonance spacing and to discrete levels and using the spin cutoff parameter with much weaker excitation energy dependence than it is predicted by the Fermi-gas model.

  17. Level density inputs in nuclear reaction codes and the role of the spin cutoff parameter

    DOE PAGES

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; ...

    2014-09-03

    Here, the proton spectrum from the 57Fe(α,p) reaction has been measured and analyzed with the Hauser-Feshbach model of nuclear reactions. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the best description is achieved with either Fermi-gas or constant temperature model functions obtained by fitting them to neutron resonance spacing and to discrete levels and using the spin cutoff parameter with much weaker excitation energy dependence than it is predicted by the Fermi-gas model.

  18. Ofloxacin Induced Angioedema: A Rare Adverse Drug Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sankalp; Kumar, Raj; Wani, Umar Rasool

    2016-01-01

    The Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) to a commonly prescribed anti-microbial can pose a major public health problem. The authors report a rare case of 24-year-old young lady who presented with angioedema of lips after ingestion of Ofloxacin, prescribed to her for treatment of loose motions. Fluoroquinolones are widely prescribed antibiotics for various disease conditions. The history, clinical examination and normal laboratory parameters led to the diagnosis of ofloxacin induced hypersensitivity reaction and the patient was successfully treated with corticosteroids and antihistamines. The hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones are rare with an incidence of 0.4% to 2%. The pharmacovigilance program and self-reporting of all the ADR’s by the health care workers can help in ensuring the judicious use of the drug, drug safety and thus decrease the associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:28050397

  19. Photo-induced electron-transfer reactions in heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. M.

    1981-11-01

    The conversion of solar energy into chemical energy was pursued by two approaches. One is the photo-induced electron transfer reactions in heterogeneous media, and the other is the photo-decomposition of water with liquid-junction solar cells. Photo-induced electron-transfer reactions in heterogeneous media with colloidal silica or poly-acrylate were studied by flash photolysis. In an effort to illustrate that small band-gap semiconductors can be protected from photo-corrosion through surface modification, the surface of polycrystalline ZnO was chemically coated with zinc phthalocyanine and the electron-transfer process across the coated ZnO-electrolyte interface was studied by photo-electrochemical techniques.

  20. Dynamical isospin effects in nucleon-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ou Li; Li Zhuxia; Wu Xizhen

    2008-10-15

    The isospin effects in proton-induced reactions on isotopes of {sup 112-132}Sn and the corresponding {beta}-stable isobars are studied by means of the improved quantum molecular dynamics model and some sensitive probes for the density dependence of the symmetry energy at subnormal densities are proposed. The beam energy range is chosen to be 100-300 MeV. Our study shows that the system size dependence of the reaction cross sections for p+{sup 112-132}Sn deviates from the Carlson's empirical expression obtained by fitting the reaction cross sections for proton on nuclei along the {beta}-stability line and sensitively depends on the stiffness of the symmetry energy. We also find that the angular distribution of elastic scattering for p+{sup 132}Sn at large impact parameters is very sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy, which is uniquely due to the effect of the symmetry potential with no mixture of the effect from the isospin dependence of the nucleon-nucleon cross sections. The isospin effects in neutron-induced reactions are also studied and it is found that the effects are just opposite to that in proton-induced reactions. We find that the difference between the peaks of the angular distributions of elastic scattering for p+{sup 132}Sn and n+{sup 132}Sn at E{sub p,n}=100 MeV and b=7.5 fm is positive for soft symmetry energy U{sub sym}{sup sf} and negative for super-stiff symmetry energy U{sub sym}{sup nlin} and close to zero for linear density dependent symmetry energy U{sub sym}{sup lin}, which seems very useful for constraining the density dependence of the symmetry energy at subnormal densities.

  1. Isospin aspects in nuclear reactions involving Ca beams at 25 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, I. Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Amorini, F.; Anzalone, A.; Auditore, L.; Berceanu, I.; Cardella, G.; Cavallaro, S.; Chatterjee, M. B.; Filippo, E. De; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Giuliani, G.; Geraci, E.; Grassi, L.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Han, J.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; and others

    2011-11-15

    Isospin dependence of dynamical and thermodynamical properties observed in reactions {sup 40}Ca+ {sup 40,48}Ca and {sup 40}Ca + {sup 46}Ti at 25 MeV/nucleon has been studied. We used the CHIMERA multi-detector array. Strong isospin effects are seen in the isotopic distributions of light nuclei and in the competition between different reaction mechanisms in semi-central collisions. We will show also preliminary results obtained in nuclear collision {sup 48}Ca + {sup 48}Ca at 25MeV/nucleon, having very high N/Z value in the entrance channel (N/Z = 1.4). The enhancement of evaporation residue production confirms the strong role played by the N/Z degree of freedom in nuclear dynamics.

  2. Applications of nuclear reaction analysis for determining hydrogen and deuterium distribution in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Altstetter, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ion beams for materials analysis has made a successful transition from the domain of the particle physicist to that of the materials scientist. The subcategory of this field, nuclear reaction analysis, is just now undergoing the transition, particularly in applications to hydrogen in materials. The materials scientist must locate the nearest accelerator, because now he will find that using it can solve mysteries that do not yield to other techniques. 9 figures

  3. Sparking fusion: A step toward laser-initiated nuclear fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, I.

    1996-10-19

    The fusion furnace at the sun`s core burns hydrogen to make helium. Each time two hydrogen nuclei, or protons, merge to create a deuterium nucleus, the process releases energy. A chain of additional energy-producing nuclear reactions then converts deuterium into helium. Because protons, with their like electric charges, naturally repel each other, high temperatures and tremendous pressures are needed to force them together closely enough to initiate and sustain the reactions. These mergers cost energy initially, but the return on that investment proves prodigious. On Earth, such an energy payoff has been achieved only in the uncontrolled fury of a detonated hydrogen bomb. The vision of harnessing and controlling nuclear fusion as a terrestrial energy source has yet to be fulfilled. The proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) represents an ambitious effort to use powerful lasers to deposit sufficient energy in a small capsule of nuclear fuel to trigger fusion. The main justification for the project is to ensure that a core group of physicists and engineers maintains its expertise in the physics of nuclear weapons. This article presents both the scientific and political sides of the NIF facility.

  4. Status of The Facility for Experiments of Nuclear Reactions in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longland, Richard; Kelley, John; Marshall, Caleb; Portillo, Federico; Setoodehnia, Kiana; Underwood, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    To make connections between observations of stellar atmospheres and the processes occurring deep inside stars, me must rely on accurate nuclear cross sections. Often, the Coulomb barrier makes these cross sections immeasurably small in the laboratory. Particle transfer reactions are one tool in our inventory that can be used to infer the necessary properties of nuclear reactions, thus opening an avenue to calculate their cross sections. Enge split-pole magnetic spectrographs are one tool in our inventory that have been used successfully to perform these experiments. However, after a rash of closures, there were no operational spectrographs of this kind in North America to provide these valuable capabilities. Over the last few years, we have revived the Enge split-pole spectrograph at TUNL. We have also upgraded much of the equipment, ranging from the data acquisition system to the control system and detector package. These upgrades have enabled a powerful, flexible, and modern facility - the Facility for Experiments of Nuclear Reactions in Stars (FENRIS). In this talk, I will present a status upgrade of FENRIS, highlighting our upgrades, capabilities, and first science results. I will also highlight future upgrade plans for the facility.

  5. Calculation of nuclear reaction cross sections on excited nuclei with the coupled-channels method

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, T.; Talou, P.; Lynn, J. E.; Chadwick, M. B.; Madland, D. G.

    2009-08-15

    We calculate nuclear cross sections on excited nuclei in the fast neutron energy range. We partition the whole process into two contributions: the direct reaction part and the compound nuclear reactions. A coupled-channels method is used for calculating the direct transition of the nucleus from the initial excited state, which is a member of the ground-state rotational band, to the final ground and excited low-lying levels. This process is strongly affected by the channel coupling. The compound nuclear reactions on the excited state are calculated with the statistical Hauser-Feshbach model, with the transmission coefficients obtained from the coupled-channels calculation. The calculations are performed for a strongly deformed nucleus {sup 169}Tm, and selected cross sections for the ground and first excited states are compared. The calculation is also made for actinides to investigate possible modification to the fission cross section when the target is excited. It is shown that both the level coupling for the entrance channel, and the different target spin, change the fission cross section.

  6. Deuteron-induced reactions on Ni isotopes up to 60 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Šimečková, E.; Fischer, U.; Mrázek, J.; Novak, J.; Štefánik, M.; Costache, C.; Avrigeanu, V.

    2016-07-01

    Background: The high complexity of the deuteron-nucleus interaction from the deuteron weak binding energy of 2.224 MeV is also related to a variety of reactions induced by the deuteron-breakup (BU) nucleons. Thus, specific noncompound processes as BU and direct reactions (DR) make the deuteron-induced reactions so different from reactions with other incident particles. The scarce consideration of only pre-equilibrium emission (PE) and compound-nucleus (CN) mechanisms led to significant discrepancies with experimental results so that recommended reaction cross sections of high-priority elements as, e.g., Ni have mainly been obtained by fit of the data. Purpose: The unitary and consistent BU and DR account in deuteron-induced reactions on natural nickel may take advantage of an extended database for this element, including new accurate measurements of particular reaction cross sections. Method: The activation cross sections of 64,61,60Cu, Ni,5765, and 55,56,57,58,59m,60Co nuclei for deuterons incident on natural Ni at energies up to 20 MeV, were measured by the stacked-foil technique and high-resolution gamma spectrometry using U-120M cyclotron of CANAM, NPI CAS. Then, within an extended analysis of deuteron interactions with Ni isotopes up to 60 MeV, all processes from elastic scattering until the evaporation from fully equilibrated compound system have been taken into account while an increased attention is paid especially to the BU and DR mechanisms. Results: The deuteron activation cross-section analysis, completed by consideration of the PE and CN contributions corrected for decrease of the total-reaction cross section from the leakage of the initial deuteron flux towards BU and DR processes, is proved satisfactory for the first time to all available data. Conclusions: The overall agreement of the measured data and model calculations validates the description of nuclear mechanisms taken into account for deuteron-induced reactions on Ni, particularly the BU and

  7. Electron flux in molecules induced by nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Michihiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2009-07-01

    As a general tool for analysis of chemical reactions from the view point of electron wavepacket dynamics, electron flux within a molecule is numerically realized in terms of physically time-dependent electronic wavefunctions given by the semiclassical Ehrenfest theory. These wavefunctions are synchronized with real time motion of molecular nuclei through the nuclear kinematic coupling (nonadiabatic elements). Since the standard quantum flux gives only a null field for a real-valued electronic eigenfunction, we extend the definition of flux such that the essential information of dynamical flow of electrons can be retrieved even from adiabatic electronic wavefunctions calculated in the scheme of the so-called ab initio molecular dynamics.

  8. Effect of dexmedetomidine priming on convulsion reaction induced by lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-Feng; Luo, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Wei-Cheng; Hou, Ben-Chao; Huang, Jian; Zhan, Yan-Ping; Chen, Shi-Biao

    2016-10-01

    To study the effect of dexmedetomidine priming on convulsion reaction induced by lidocaine.The New Zealand white rabbits were applied for the mechanism study of dexmedetomidine priming for preventing convulsion reaction induced by lidocaine. The influence of dexmedetomidine priming with different doses on the time for convulsion occurrence and the duration time of convulsion induced by lidocaine, as well as contents of excitatory amino acids (aspartate [Asp], glutamate [Glu]) and inhibitory amino acids (glycine [Gly], γ-aminobutyric acid [GABA]) in the brain tissue were investigated.With 3 and 5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine priming, the occurrence times of convulsion were prolonged from 196 seconds to 349 and 414 seconds, respectively. With dexmedetomidine priming, the contents of excitatory amino acids (Asp, Glu) were much reduced at occurrence time of convulsion comparing with that without dexmedetomidine priming, while content of inhibitory amino acids Gly was much enhanced.The application of dexmedetomidine before local anesthetics can improve intoxication dose threshold of the lidocaine, delay occurrence of the convulsion, and helped for the recovery of convulsion induced by lidocaine. The positive effect of dexmedetomidine on preventing convulsion would owe to not only the inhibition of excitatory amino acids (Asp, Glu), but also the promotion of inhibitory amino acids Gly secretion.

  9. Effect of dexmedetomidine priming on convulsion reaction induced by lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi-Feng; Luo, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Wei-Cheng; Hou, Ben-Chao; Huang, Jian; Zhan, Yan-Ping; Chen, Shi-Biao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To study the effect of dexmedetomidine priming on convulsion reaction induced by lidocaine. The New Zealand white rabbits were applied for the mechanism study of dexmedetomidine priming for preventing convulsion reaction induced by lidocaine. The influence of dexmedetomidine priming with different doses on the time for convulsion occurrence and the duration time of convulsion induced by lidocaine, as well as contents of excitatory amino acids (aspartate [Asp], glutamate [Glu]) and inhibitory amino acids (glycine [Gly], γ-aminobutyric acid [GABA]) in the brain tissue were investigated. With 3 and 5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine priming, the occurrence times of convulsion were prolonged from 196 seconds to 349 and 414 seconds, respectively. With dexmedetomidine priming, the contents of excitatory amino acids (Asp, Glu) were much reduced at occurrence time of convulsion comparing with that without dexmedetomidine priming, while content of inhibitory amino acids Gly was much enhanced. The application of dexmedetomidine before local anesthetics can improve intoxication dose threshold of the lidocaine, delay occurrence of the convulsion, and helped for the recovery of convulsion induced by lidocaine. The positive effect of dexmedetomidine on preventing convulsion would owe to not only the inhibition of excitatory amino acids (Asp, Glu), but also the promotion of inhibitory amino acids Gly secretion. PMID:27787355

  10. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic Gif-type oxidation from nuclear inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, S.; Asthalter, T.; Rabe, V.; Laschat, S.

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) of synchrotron radiation, also known as nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), has been shown to provide valuable insights into metal-centered vibrations at Mössbauer-active nuclei. We present a study of the iron-centered vibrational density of states (VDOS) during the first step of the Gif-type oxidation of cyclohexene with a novel trinuclear Fe3(μ 3-O) complex as catalyst precursor. The experiments were carried out on shock-frozen solutions for different combinations of reactants: Fe3(μ 3-O) in pyridine solution, Fe3(μ 3-O) plus Zn/acetic acid in pyridine without and with addition of either oxygen or cyclohexene, and Fe3(μ 3-O)/Zn/acetic acid/pyridine/cyclohexene (reaction mixture) for reaction times of 1 min, 5 min, and 30 min. The projected VDOS of the Fe atoms was calculated on the basis of pseudopotential density functional calculations. Two possible reaction intermediates were identified as [Fe(III)(C5H5N)2(O2CCH3)2]+ and Fe(II)(C5H5N)4(O2CCH3)2, yielding evidence that NIS (NRVS) allows to identify the presence of iron-centered intermediates also in complex reaction mixtures.

  11. Bayesian Evaluation Including Covariance Matrices of Neutron-induced Reaction Cross Sections of {sup 181}Ta

    SciTech Connect

    Leeb, H. Schnabel, G.; Srdinko, Th.; Wildpaner, V.

    2015-01-15

    A new evaluation of neutron-induced reactions on {sup 181}Ta using a consistent procedure based on Bayesian statistics is presented. Starting point of the evaluation is the description of nuclear reactions via nuclear models implemented in TALYS 1.4. A retrieval of experimental data was performed and covariance matrices of the experiments were generated from an extensive study of the corresponding literature. All reaction channels required for a transport file up to 200 MeV have been considered and the covariance matrices of cross section uncertainties for the most important channels are determined. The evaluation has been performed in one step including all available experimental data. A comparison of the evaluated cross sections and spectra with experimental data and available evaluations is performed. In general the evaluated cross section reflect our best knowledge and give a fair description of the observables. However, there are few deviations from expectation which clearly indicate the impact of the prior and the need to account for model defects. Using the results of the evaluation a complete ENDF-file similarly to those of the TENDL library is generated.

  12. Charge-exchange reactions and nuclear matrix elements for {beta}{beta} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Frekers, D.

    2009-11-09

    Charge-exchange reactions of (n, p) and (p, n) type at intermediate energies are a powerful tool for the study of nuclear matrix element in {beta}{beta} decay. The present paper reviews some of the most recent experiments in this context. Here, the (n, p) type reactions are realized through (d, {sup 2}He), where {sup 2}He refers to two protons in a singlet {sup 1}S{sub 0} state and where both of these are momentum analyzed and detected by the same spectrometer and detector. These reactions have been developed and performed exclusively at KVI, Groningen (NL), using an incident deuteron energy of 183 MeV. Final state resolutions of about 100 keV have routinely been available. On the other hand, the ({sup 3}He, t) reaction is of (p, n) type and was developed at the RCNP facility in Osaka (JP). Measurements with an unprecedented high resolution of 30 keV at incident energies of 420 MeV are now readily possible. Using both reaction types one can extract the Gamow-Teller transition strengths B(GT{sup +}) and B(GT{sup -}), which define the two ''legs'' of the {beta}{beta} decay matrix elements for the 2v{beta}{beta} decay The high resolution available in both reactions allows a detailed insight into the excitations of the intermediate odd-odd nuclei and, as will be shown, some unexpected features are being unveiled.

  13. Advancing the Theory of Nuclear Reactions with Rare Isotopes: From the Laboratory to the Cosmos

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, Charlotte

    2015-06-01

    The mission of the TORUS Topical Collaboration is to develop new methods that will advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes by using three-body techniques to improve direct-reaction calculations, and, by using a new partial-fusion theory, to integrate descriptions of direct and compound-nucleus reactions. Ohio University concentrates its efforts on the first part of the mission. Since direct measurements are often not feasible, indirect methods, e.g. (d,p) reactions, should be used. Those (d,p) reactions may be viewed as three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. Faddeev equations in momentum space have a long tradition of utilizing separable interactions in order to arrive at sets of coupled integral equations in one variable. While there exist several separable representations for the nucleon-nucleon interaction, the optical potential between a neutron (proton) and a nucleus is not readily available in separable form. For this reason we first embarked in introducing a separable representation for complex phenomenological optical potentials of Woods-Saxon type.

  14. Production and decay of baryonic resonances in pion induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przygoda, Witold

    2016-11-01

    Pion induced reactions give unique opportunities for an unambiguous description of baryonic resonances and their coupling channels. A systematic energy scan and high precision data, in conjunction with a partial wave analysis, allow for the study of the excitation function of the various contributions. A review of available world data unravels strong need for modern facilities delivering measurements with a pion beam. Recently, HADES collaboration collected data in pion-induced reactions on light (12C) and heavy (74W) nuclei at a beam momentum of 1.7 GeV/c dedicated to strangeness production. It was followed by a systematic scan at four different pion beam momenta (0.656, 0.69, 0.748 and 0.8 GeV/c) in π- - p reaction in order to tackle the role of N(1520) resonance in conjunction with the intermediate ρ production. First results on exclusive channels with one pion (π- p) and two pions (nπ+π-, pπ-π0) in the final state are discussed.

  15. Radiation induced dissolution of UO 2 based nuclear fuel - A critical review of predictive modelling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Trygve E.; Shoesmith, David W.; Jonsson, Mats

    2012-01-01

    Radiation induced dissolution of uranium dioxide (UO 2) nuclear fuel and the consequent release of radionuclides to intruding groundwater are key-processes in the safety analysis of future deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel. For several decades, these processes have been studied experimentally using both spent fuel and various types of simulated spent fuels. The latter have been employed since it is difficult to draw mechanistic conclusions from real spent nuclear fuel experiments. Several predictive modelling approaches have been developed over the last two decades. These models are largely based on experimental observations. In this work we have performed a critical review of the modelling approaches developed based on the large body of chemical and electrochemical experimental data. The main conclusions are: (1) the use of measured interfacial rate constants give results in generally good agreement with experimental results compared to simulations where homogeneous rate constants are used; (2) the use of spatial dose rate distributions is particularly important when simulating the behaviour over short time periods; and (3) the steady-state approach (the rate of oxidant consumption is equal to the rate of oxidant production) provides a simple but fairly accurate alternative, but errors in the reaction mechanism and in the kinetic parameters used may not be revealed by simple benchmarking. It is essential to use experimentally determined rate constants and verified reaction mechanisms, irrespective of whether the approach is chemical or electrochemical.

  16. Excitation function and yield for the (103)Rh(d,2n)(103)Pd nuclear reaction: Optimization of the production of palladium-103.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Simone; Alí Santoro, María Del Carmen; Cotogno, Giulio; Duchemin, Charlotte; Haddad, Ferid; Holzwarth, Uwe; Groppi, Flavia

    2017-03-06

    Deuteron-induced nuclear reactions for the generation of (103)Pd were investigated using the stacked-foil activation technique on rhodium targets at deuteron energies up to Ed=33MeV. The excitation functions of the reactions (103)Rh(d,xn)(101,103)Pd, (103)Rh(d,x)(100g,cum,101m,g,102m,g)Rh and (103)Rh(d,2p)(103)Ru have been measured, and the Thick-Target Yield for (103)Pd has been calculated.

  17. Heavy-ion double charge exchange reactions: A tool toward 0 νββ nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Agodi, C.; Bondì, M.; Carbone, D.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.

    2015-11-01

    The knowledge of the nuclear matrix elements for the neutrinoless double beta decay is fundamental for neutrino physics. In this paper, an innovative technique to extract information on the nuclear matrix elements by measuring the cross section of a double charge exchange nuclear reaction is proposed. The basic point is that the initial- and final-state wave functions in the two processes are the same and the transition operators are similar. The double charge exchange cross sections can be factorized in a nuclear structure term containing the matrix elements and a nuclear reaction factor. First pioneering experimental results for the 40Ca(18O,18Ne)40Ar reaction at 270 MeV incident energy show that such cross section factorization reasonably holds for the crucial 0+ → 0+ transition to 40Args, at least at very forward angles.

  18. Electrokinetic locomotion due to Reaction Induced Charge Auto-Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Jeffrey; Posner, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    Synthetic nanomotors, like their biological counterparts, propel themselves through aqueous solutions by harvesting chemical energy from their local environment and converting it to mechanical energy. We study bimetallic rod-shaped particles which move autonomously by catalytically decomposing hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. We present a scaling analysis and computational simulations that describe the locomotion of bimetallic rod-shaped motors in hydrogen peroxide solutions due to reaction-induced charge auto-electrophoresis. The model shows that the locomotion results from electrical body forces in the surrounding fluid, which are generated by a coupling of an asymmetric dipolar charge density distribution and the electric field it generates. The simulations make the predictions, in agreement with experiment, that the rods' velocity depends linearly on both the surface charge and reaction rate.

  19. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S.; Gulino, M.; Tumino, A.; Lamia, L.

    2014-05-09

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 1 MeV or even < 10 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely, the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance.

  20. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format. Revision 97/1

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1997-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Center Network. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility rather than optimization of data processing in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  1. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Tumino, A.

    2014-05-01

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 1 MeV or even < 10 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely, the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance.

  2. Establishing a theory for deuteron induced surrogate reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Potel, G.; Nunes, F. M.; Thompson, I. J.

    2015-09-18

    Background: Deuteron-induced reactions serve as surrogates for neutron capture into compound states. Although these reactions are of great applicability, no theoretical efforts have been invested in this direction over the last decade. Purpose: The goal of this work is to establish on firm grounds a theory for deuteron-induced neutron-capture reactions. This includes formulating elastic and inelastic breakup in a consistent manner. Method: We describe this process both in post- and prior-form distorted wave Born approximation following previous works and discuss the differences in the formulation. While the convergence issues arising in the post formulation can be overcome in the prior formulation, in this case one still needs to take into account additional terms due to nonorthogonality. Results: We apply our method to the Nb93(d,p)X at Ed=15 and 25 MeV and are able to obtain a good description of the data. We then look at the various partial wave contributions, as well as elastic versus inelastic contributions. We also connect our formulation with transfer to neutron bound states.Conclusions: Our calculations demonstrate that the nonorthogonality term arising in the prior formulation is significant and is at the heart of the long-standing controversy between the post and the prior formulations of the theory. We also show that the cross sections for these reactions are angular-momentum dependent and therefore the commonly used Weisskopf limit is inadequate. We finally make important predictions for the relative contributions of elastic breakup and nonelastic breakup and call for elastic-breakup measurements to further constrain our model.

  3. Establishing a theory for deuteron induced surrogate reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Potel, G.; Nunes, F. M.; Thompson, I. J.

    2015-09-18

    Background: Deuteron-induced reactions serve as surrogates for neutron capture into compound states. Although these reactions are of great applicability, no theoretical efforts have been invested in this direction over the last decade. Purpose: The goal of this work is to establish on firm grounds a theory for deuteron-induced neutron-capture reactions. This includes formulating elastic and inelastic breakup in a consistent manner. Method: We describe this process both in post- and prior-form distorted wave Born approximation following previous works and discuss the differences in the formulation. While the convergence issues arising in the post formulation can be overcome in the priormore » formulation, in this case one still needs to take into account additional terms due to nonorthogonality. Results: We apply our method to the Nb93(d,p)X at Ed=15 and 25 MeV and are able to obtain a good description of the data. We then look at the various partial wave contributions, as well as elastic versus inelastic contributions. We also connect our formulation with transfer to neutron bound states.Conclusions: Our calculations demonstrate that the nonorthogonality term arising in the prior formulation is significant and is at the heart of the long-standing controversy between the post and the prior formulations of the theory. We also show that the cross sections for these reactions are angular-momentum dependent and therefore the commonly used Weisskopf limit is inadequate. We finally make important predictions for the relative contributions of elastic breakup and nonelastic breakup and call for elastic-breakup measurements to further constrain our model.« less

  4. Spin Modes, Neutrino-Induced Reactions and Nucleosynthesis in Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio; Otsuka, Takaharu; Honma, Michio; Higashiyama, Koji

    2008-11-11

    Recent advances in shell model calculations of spin modes in nuclei with the use of new shell model Hamiltonians are discussed. Important roles of tensor interaction in shell evolutions toward drip-lines are pointed out. Electromagnetic transitions in exotic carbon isotopes are investigated. Anomalous supressions of transition strengths in the isotopes are found to be rather well explained. Neutrino-induced reactions on {sup 56}Fe and {sup 56}Ni are studied, and implications on production yields of heavy elements in stars are discussed.

  5. Nuclear-Reaction-Based Radiation Source For Explosives-And SNM-Detection In Massive Cargo

    SciTech Connect

    Brandis, Michal; Dangendorf, Volker; Bromberger, Benjamin; Tittelmeier, Kai; Piel, Christian; Vartsky, David; Bar, Doron; Mardor, Israel; Mor, Ilan; Friedman, Eliahu; Goldberg, Mark B.

    2011-06-01

    An automatic, nuclear-reaction-based, few-view transmission radiography method and system concept is presented, that will simultaneously detect small, operationally-relevant quantities of chemical explosives and special nuclear materials (SNM) in objects up to the size of LD-3 aviation containers. Detection of all threat materials is performed via the {sup 11}B(d,n+{gamma}) reaction on thick, isotopically-enriched targets; SNM are primarily detected via Dual Discrete-Energy Radiography (DDER), using 15.11 MeV and 4.43 MeV {sup 12}C{gamma}-rays, whereas explosives are primarily detected via Fast Neutron Resonance Radiography (FNRR), employing the broad-energy neutron spectra produced in a thick {sup 11}B-target. To achieve a reasonable throughput of {approx}20 containers per hour, ns-pulsed deuteron beam of the order of 0.5 mA intensity at energies of 5-7 MeV is required. As a first step towards optimizing parameters and sensitivities of an operational system, the 0 deg. spectra and yields of both {gamma}-rays and neutrons in this reaction have been measured up to E{sub d} = 6.65 MeV.

  6. Induced starburst and nuclear activity: Faith, facts, and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlosman, Isaac

    1990-01-01

    The problem of the origin of starburst and nuclear (nonstellar) activity in galaxies is reviewed. A physical understanding of the mechanism(s) that induce both types of activity requires one to address the following issues: (1) what is the source of fuel that powers starbursts and active galactic nuclei; and (2) how is it channeled towards the central regions of host galaxies? As a possible clue, the author examines the role of non-axisymmetric perturbations of galactic disks and analyzes their potential triggers. Global gravitational instabilities in the gas on scales approx. 100 pc appear to be crucial for fueling the active galactic nuclei.

  7. Possible nuclear decay of bismuth induced by a mechanical impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marakhtanov, M. K.

    2016-09-01

    It is experimentally shown that the metallic dust after the inertial explosion induced by the impact of a metallic bismuth striker on a fixed steel barrier contains platinum and boron, which were absent before the explosion. The existence of platinum and boron is qualitatively determined. The emission of single 8-MeV α particles is also detected from the metallic dust that forms at the site of the impact interaction of bismuth with steel. Both effects point to possible nuclear decay of bismuth due to the energy of a mechanical impact.

  8. Advancing the Theory of Nuclear Reactions with Rare Isotopes. From the Laboratory to the Cosmos

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, Filomena

    2015-06-01

    The mission of the Topical Collaboration on the Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes (TORUS) was to develop new methods to advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes—particularly the (d,p) reaction in which a deuteron, composed of a proton and a neutron, transfers its neutron to an unstable nucleus. After benchmarking the state-of-the-art theories, the TORUS collaboration found that there were no exact methods to study (d,p) reactions involving heavy targets; the difficulty arising from the long-range nature of the well known, yet subtle, Coulomb force. To overcome this challenge, the TORUS collaboration developed a new theory where the complexity of treating the long-range Coulomb interaction is shifted to the calculation of so-called form-factors. An efficient implementation for the computation of these form factors was a major achievement of the TORUS collaboration. All the new machinery developed are essential ingredients to analyse (d,p) reactions involving heavy nuclei relevant for astrophysics, energy production, and stockpile stewardship.

  9. Theoretical cross section calculations of medical 13N and 18F radioisotope using alpha induced reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılınç, F.; Karpuz, N.; ćetin, B.

    2017-02-01

    In medical physics, radionuclides are needed to diagnose functional disorders of organs and to diagnose and treat many diseases. Nuclear reactions are significant for the productions of radionuclides. It is important to analyze the cross sections for much different energy. In this study, reactional cross sections calculations on 13N, 18F radioisotopes are with TALYS 1.6 nuclear reaction simulation code. Cross sections calculated and experimental data taken from EXFOR library were compared

  10. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements for Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parzuchowski, Kristen; Singh, Jaideep; Wenzl, Jennifer; Frisbie, Dustin; Johnson, Maegan

    2016-09-01

    We propose a new highly selective detector to measure rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. Our primary interest is the 22Ne(α , n) 25Mg reaction, which is a primary source of neutrons for the s-process. Our proposed detector, in conjunction with a recoil separator, captures the recoil products resulting from the reaction in a cryogenically frozen thin film of solid neon. The fluorescence spectra of the captured atoms is shifted from the absorption spectra by hundreds of nanometers. This allows for the optical detection of individual fluorescence photons against a background of intense excitation light. We will describe our initial studies of laser-induced fluorescence of Yb and Mg in solid Ne. Neon is an attractive medium because it is optically transparent and provides efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. Yb is used as a test atom because of its similar atomic structure to Mg and much brighter fluorescence signal. This work is supported by funds from Michigan State University.

  11. Low Energy Nuclear Reaction Aircraft- 2013 ARMD Seedling Fund Phase I Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Douglas P.; McDonald, Robert; Campbell, Robbie; Chase, Adam; Daniel, Jason; Darling, Michael; Green, Clayton; MacGregor, Collin; Sudak, Peter; Sykes, Harrison; Waddington, Michael; Fredericks, William J.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Martin, John G.; Moore, Mark D.; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Felder, James L.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    This report serves as the final written documentation for the Aeronautic Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) Seedling Fund's Low Energy Nuclear Reaction (LENR) Aircraft Phase I project. The findings presented include propulsion system concepts, synergistic missions, and aircraft concepts. LENR is a form of nuclear energy that potentially has over 4,000 times the energy density of chemical energy sources. It is not expected to have any harmful emissions or radiation which makes it extremely appealing. There is a lot of interest in LENR, but there are no proven theories. This report does not explore the feasibility of LENR. Instead, it assumes that a working system is available. A design space exploration shows that LENR can enable long range and high speed missions. Six propulsion concepts, six missions, and four aircraft concepts are presented. This report also includes discussion of several issues and concerns that were uncovered during the study and potential research areas to infuse LENR aircraft into NASA's aeronautics research.

  12. New exclusive CHIPS-TPT algorithms for simulation of neutron-nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosov, M.; Savin, D.

    2015-05-01

    The CHIPS-TPT physics library for simulation of neutron-nuclear reactions on the new exclusive level is being developed in CFAR VNIIA. The exclusive modeling conserves energy, momentum and quantum numbers in each neutron-nuclear interaction. The CHIPS-TPT algorithms are based on the exclusive CHIPS library, which is compatible with Geant4. Special CHIPS-TPT physics lists in the Geant4 format are provided. The calculation time for an exclusive CHIPS-TPT simulation is comparable to the time of the corresponding Geant4- HP simulation. In addition to the reduction of the deposited energy fluctuations, which is a consequence of the energy conservation, the CHIPS-TPT libraries provide a possibility of simulation of the secondary particles correlation, e.g. secondary gammas, and of the Doppler broadening of gamma lines in the spectrum, which can be measured by germanium detectors.

  13. Nuclear glutathione S-transferase pi prevents apoptosis by reducing the oxidative stress-induced formation of exocyclic DNA products.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Kensaku; Goto, Shinji; Okunaga, Tomohiro; Ihara, Yoshito; Tsuji, Kentaro; Kawai, Yoshichika; Uchida, Koji; Osawa, Toshihiko; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Kondo, Takahito

    2004-12-01

    We previously found that nuclear glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTpi) accumulates in cancer cells resistant to anticancer drugs, suggesting that it has a role in the acquisition of resistance to anticancer drugs. In the present study, the effect of oxidative stress on the nuclear translocation of GSTpi and its role in the protection of DNA from damage were investigated. In human colonic cancer HCT8 cells, the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced increase in nuclear condensation, the population of sub-G(1) peak, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells were observed in cells pretreated with edible mushroom lectin, an inhibitor of the nuclear transport of GSTpi. The DNA damage and the formation of lipid peroxide were dependent on the dose of H(2)O(2) and the incubation time. Immunological analysis showed that H(2)O(2) induced the nuclear accumulation of GSTpi but not of glutathione peroxidase. Formation of the 7-(2-oxo-hepyl)-substituted 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine adduct by the reaction of 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE) with 2'-deoxyguanosine was inhibited by GSTpi in the presence of glutathione. The conjugation product of 4-oxo-2-nonenal, a lipid aldehyde of 13-HPODE, with GSH in the presence of GSTpi, was identified by LS/MS. These results suggested that nuclear GSTpi prevents H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage by scavenging the formation of lipid-peroxide-modified DNA.

  14. COMMENTS ON "A NEW LOOK AT LOW-ENERGY NUCLEAR REACTION RESEARCH"

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K.

    2009-12-30

    Cold fusion researchers have accumulated a large body of anomalous results over the last 20 years that they claim proves a new, mysterious nuclear reaction is active in systems they study. Krivit and Marwan give a brief and wholly positive view of this body of research. Unfortunately, cold fusion researchers routinely ignore conventional explanations of their observations, and claim much greater than real accuracy and precision for their techniques. This paper attempts to equally briefly address those aspects of the field with the intent of providing a balanced view of the field, and to establish some criteria for subsequent publications in this arena.

  15. Comments on "A new look at low-energy nuclear reaction research".

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Kirk L

    2010-09-01

    Cold fusion researchers have accumulated a large body of anomalous results over the last 20 years that they claim proves a new, mysterious nuclear reaction is active in systems they study. Krivit and Marwan (J. Environ. Monit., 2009, 11, 1731) give a brief and wholly positive view of this body of research. Unfortunately, cold fusion researchers routinely ignore conventional explanations of their observations, and claim much greater than the real accuracy and precision for their techniques. This paper attempts to equally briefly address those aspects of the field with the intent of providing a balanced view of the field, and to establish some criteria for subsequent publications in this arena.

  16. Determination of the nuclear-induced electrical conductivity in a nuclear-driven MHD device

    SciTech Connect

    Bitteker, L.

    1994-06-01

    The continual need for more efficient energy conversion techniques for space, sea, and terrestrial systems has renewed interest in nuclear-driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion. The concept of nuclear-driven MHD energy conversion utilizes a flow seeded with a neutron absorbing species. The energy released in neutron absorption or fission processes is used to ionize the flow and enhance electrical conductivity. Research into the use of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He mixtures in the 1960`s and 1970`s suggested the enhancement is insufficient for MHD purposes. However, new calculations suggest a region of conditions not previously considered may provide significant conductivity enhancement. Specifically, at densities less than standard atmospheric density and neutron flux greater than 1{times}10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}s, conductivity greater than 10 mho/m may be achievable. These calculations also suggest conductivity`s of several hundred mho/m may be possible for an achievable range of conditions. Additionally, the nuclear-induced conductivity is strongly density dependent and weakly temperature dependent. Therefore, higher flow velocities, and hence higher power densities than those used in traditional MHD channels utilizing thermal ionization are possible. In order to confirm these promising calculations, a series of experiments has been proposed.

  17. Study for Nuclear Structures of 22-35Na Isotopes via Measurements of Reaction Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shinji

    2014-09-01

    T. Ohtsubo, M. Nagashima, T. Ogura, Y. Shimbara (Grad. Sch. of Sc., Niigata Univ.), M.Takechi, H. Geissel, M. Winkler (GSI), D. Nishimura, T. Sumikama (Dept. of Phys., Tokyo Univ. of Sc.), M. Fukuda, M. Mihara, H. Uenishi (Dept. of Phys., Osaka Univ.), T. Kuboki, T. Suzuki, T. Yamaguchi, H. Furuki, C. S. Lee, K. Sato (Dept. of Phys., Saitama Univ.), A. Ozawa, H. Ohnishi, T. Moriguchi, S. Fukuda, Y. Ishibashi, D. Nagae, R. Nishikiori, T. Niwa (Inst. of Phys., Univ. of Tsukuba), N. Aoi (RCNP), Rui-Jiu Chen, N. Inabe, D. Kameda, T. Kubo, M. Lantz, T. Ohnishi, K. Okumura, H. Sakurai, H. Suzuki, H. Takeda, S. Takeuchi, K. Tanaka, Y. Yanagisawa (RIKEN), De-Qing Fang, Yu-Gang Ma (SINAP), T. Izumikawa (RI Ctr., Niigata Univ.), and S. Momota (Fac. of Engn., Kochi Univ. of Tech.) Reaction cross sections (σR) for 22-35Na isotopes have been measured at around 240 MeV/nucleon. The σR for 22-35Na were measured for the first time. Enhancement in cross sections is clearly observed from the systematics for stable nuclei, for isotopes with large mass numbers. These enhancement can be mainly ascribed to the nuclear deformation. We will discuss the nuclear structure (neutron skin, nuclear shell structure) for neutron-excess Na isotopes. T. Ohtsubo, M. Nagashima, T. Ogura, Y. Shimbara (Grad. Sch. of Sc., Niigata Univ.), M.Takechi, H. Geissel, M. Winkler (GSI), D. Nishimura, T. Sumikama (Dept. of Phys., Tokyo Univ. of Sc.), M. Fukuda, M. Mihara, H. Uenishi (Dept. of Phys., Osaka Univ.), T. Kuboki, T. Suzuki, T. Yamaguchi, H. Furuki, C. S. Lee, K. Sato (Dept. of Phys., Saitama Univ.), A. Ozawa, H. Ohnishi, T. Moriguchi, S. Fukuda, Y. Ishibashi, D. Nagae, R. Nishikiori, T. Niwa (Inst. of Phys., Univ. of Tsukuba), N. Aoi (RCNP), Rui-Jiu Chen, N. Inabe, D. Kameda, T. Kubo, M. Lantz, T. Ohnishi, K. Okumura, H. Sakurai, H. Suzuki, H. Takeda, S. Takeuchi, K. Tanaka, Y. Yanagisawa (RIKEN), De-Qing Fang, Yu-Gang Ma (SINAP), T. Izumikawa (RI Ctr., Niigata Univ.), and S. Momota (Fac. of Engn

  18. Nuclear reaction measurements on tissue-equivalent materials and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations for hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Napoli, M.; Romano, F.; D'Urso, D.; Licciardello, T.; Agodi, C.; Candiano, G.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Musumarra, A.; Pandola, L.; Scuderi, V.

    2014-12-01

    When a carbon beam interacts with human tissues, many secondary fragments are produced into the tumor region and the surrounding healthy tissues. Therefore, in hadrontherapy precise dose calculations require Monte Carlo tools equipped with complex nuclear reaction models. To get realistic predictions, however, simulation codes must be validated against experimental results; the wider the dataset is, the more the models are finely tuned. Since no fragmentation data for tissue-equivalent materials at Fermi energies are available in literature, we measured secondary fragments produced by the interaction of a 55.6 MeV u-1 12C beam with thick muscle and cortical bone targets. Three reaction models used by the Geant4 Monte Carlo code, the Binary Light Ions Cascade, the Quantum Molecular Dynamic and the Liege Intranuclear Cascade, have been benchmarked against the collected data. In this work we present the experimental results and we discuss the predictive power of the above mentioned models.

  19. Nuclear reaction measurements on tissue-equivalent materials and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations for hadrontherapy.

    PubMed

    De Napoli, M; Romano, F; D'Urso, D; Licciardello, T; Agodi, C; Candiano, G; Cappuzzello, F; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Musumarra, A; Pandola, L; Scuderi, V

    2014-12-21

    When a carbon beam interacts with human tissues, many secondary fragments are produced into the tumor region and the surrounding healthy tissues. Therefore, in hadrontherapy precise dose calculations require Monte Carlo tools equipped with complex nuclear reaction models. To get realistic predictions, however, simulation codes must be validated against experimental results; the wider the dataset is, the more the models are finely tuned.Since no fragmentation data for tissue-equivalent materials at Fermi energies are available in literature, we measured secondary fragments produced by the interaction of a 55.6 MeV u(-1) (12)C beam with thick muscle and cortical bone targets. Three reaction models used by the Geant4 Monte Carlo code, the Binary Light Ions Cascade, the Quantum Molecular Dynamic and the Liege Intranuclear Cascade, have been benchmarked against the collected data. In this work we present the experimental results and we discuss the predictive power of the above mentioned models.

  20. Stress-induced nuclear export of 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hanaka, Hiromi; Shimizu, Takao; Izumi, Takashi . E-mail: takizumi@med.gunma-u.ac.jp

    2005-12-09

    A key enzyme for leukotriene biosynthesis is 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), which we found is exported from the nucleus when p38 MAPK is activated. CHO-K1 cells stably express green fluorescent protein-5-lipoxygenase fusion protein (GFP-5LO), which is located predominantly in the nucleus, and is exported by anisomycin, hydrogen peroxide, and sorbitol, with activation of p38 MAPK. SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, and Leptomycin B, an inhibitor of the nuclear export, blocked the anisomycin-induced export of GFP-5LO. When HEK293 cells were transformed with plasmids for wild-type GFP-5LO, GFP-5LO-S271A or GFP-5LO-S271E mutants, most wild-type GFP-5LO and GFP-5LO-S271A localized in the nucleus, but GFP-5LO-S271E localized in the cytosol. Thus, phosphorylation at Ser-271 of 5-LO is important for its export. Endogenous 5-LO in RBL cells stimulated with anisomycin was also exported from the nucleus. These results suggest that the nuclear export of 5-LO depends on the stress-induced activation of the p38 MAPK pathway.

  1. Detection of Special Nuclear Material from Delayed Neutron Emission Induced by a Dual-Particle Monoenergetic Source

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Michael F.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I

    2016-06-30

    Detection of unique signatures of special nuclear materials is critical for their interdiction in a variety of nuclear security and nonproliferation scenarios. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from fission of uranium induced in dual-particle active interrogation based on the 11B(d,n gamma)12C nuclear reaction. Majority of the fissions are attributed to fast fission induced by the incident quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. A Li-doped glass–polymer composite scintillation neutron detector, which displays excellent neutron/γ discrimination at low energies, was used in the measurements, along with a recoil-based liquid scintillation detector. Time- dependent buildup and decay of delayed neutron emission from 238U were measured between the interrogating beam pulses and after the interrogating beam was turned off, respectively. Characteristic buildup and decay time profiles were compared to the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups, finding a good agreement between the measurement and nuclear data. This method is promising for detecting fissile and fissionable materials in cargo scanning applications and can be readily integrated with transmission radiography using low-energy nuclear reaction sources.

  2. Detection of special nuclear material from delayed neutron emission induced by a dual-particle monoenergetic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-06-01

    Detection of unique signatures of special nuclear materials is critical for their interdiction in a variety of nuclear security and nonproliferation scenarios. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from fission of uranium induced in dual-particle active interrogation based on the 11B(d,n γ)12C nuclear reaction. Majority of the fissions are attributed to fast fission induced by the incident quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. A Li-doped glass-polymer composite scintillation neutron detector, which displays excellent neutron/γ discrimination at low energies, was used in the measurements, along with a recoil-based liquid scintillation detector. Time-dependent buildup and decay of delayed neutron emission from 238U were measured between the interrogating beam pulses and after the interrogating beam was turned off, respectively. Characteristic buildup and decay time profiles were compared to the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups, finding a good agreement between the measurement and nuclear data. This method is promising for detecting fissile and fissionable materials in cargo scanning applications and can be readily integrated with transmission radiography using low-energy nuclear reaction sources.

  3. Evolutionary implications of the new triple-α nuclear reaction rate for low mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotter, A.; Paxton, B.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Ogata et al. (2009, Progr. Theor. Phys., 122, 1055) presented a theoretical determination of the ^4He(αα,γ)12C, or triple-α, nuclear reaction rate. Their rate differs from the NACRE rate by many orders of magnitude at temperatures relevant for low mass stars. Aims: We explore the evolutionary implications of adopting the OKK triple-α reaction rate in low mass stars and compare the results with those obtained using the NACRE rate. Methods: The triple-α reaction rates are compared by following the evolution of stellar models at 1 and 1.5 M⊙ with Z = 0.0002 and Z = 0.02. Results: Results show that the OKK rate has severe consequences for the late stages of stellar evolution in low mass stars. Most notable is the shortening-or disappearance-of the red giant phase. Conclusions: The OKK triple-α reaction rate is incompatible with observations of extended red giant branches and He burning stars in old stellar systems.

  4. 15N electron nuclear double resonance of the primary donor cation radical P+.865 in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: additional evidence for the dimer model.

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, W; Isaacson, R A; Abresch, E C; Feher, G

    1984-01-01

    Four 15N hyperfine coupling constants, including signs, have been measured by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron nuclear nuclear triple resonance (TRIPLE) for the bacteriochlorophyll a radical cation, BChla+., in vitro and for the light-induced primary donor radical cation, P+.865, in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. A comparison of the data shows that the hyperfine coupling constants have the same sign in both radicals and are, on the average, smaller by a factor of 2 in P+.865. These results provide additional evidence that P+.865 is a bacteriochlorophyll dimer and are in contradiction with the monomer structure of P+.865 recently proposed by O'Malley and Babcock. The reduction factors of the individual 15N couplings, together with the evidence from proton ENDOR data and molecular orbital calculations, indicate a dimer structure in which only two rings (either I and I or III and III) of the bacteriochlorophyll macrocycles overlap. PMID:6096857

  5. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Instrumentation for Real-time Enzymatic Reaction Rate Measurements by NMR.

    PubMed

    Balzan, Riccardo; Fernandes, Laetitia; Comment, Arnaud; Pidial, Laetitia; Tavitian, Bertrand; Vasos, Paul R

    2016-02-23

    The main limitation of NMR-based investigations is low sensitivity. This prompts for long acquisition times, thus preventing real-time NMR measurements of metabolic transformations. Hyperpolarization via dissolution DNP circumvents part of the sensitivity issues thanks to the large out-of-equilibrium nuclear magnetization stemming from the electron-to-nucleus spin polarization transfer. The high NMR signal obtained can be used to monitor chemical reactions in real time. The downside of hyperpolarized NMR resides in the limited time window available for signal acquisition, which is usually on the order of the nuclear spin longitudinal relaxation time constant, T1, or, in favorable cases, on the order of the relaxation time constant associated with the singlet-state of coupled nuclei, TLLS. Cellular uptake of endogenous molecules and metabolic rates can provide essential information on tumor development and drug response. Numerous previous hyperpolarized NMR studies have demonstrated the relevancy of pyruvate as a metabolic substrate for monitoring enzymatic activity in vivo. This work provides a detailed description of the experimental setup and methods required for the study of enzymatic reactions, in particular the pyruvate-to-lactate conversion rate in presence of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), by hyperpolarized NMR.

  6. Prompt gamma ray diagnostics and enhanced hadron-therapy using neutron-free nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffrida, L.; Margarone, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Picciotto, A.; Cuttone, G.; Korn, G.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a series of simulations about the potential use of Boron isotopes to trigger neutron-free (aneutronic) nuclear reactions in cancer cells through the interaction with an incoming energetic proton beam, thus resulting in the emission of characteristic prompt gamma radiation (429 keV, 718 keV and 1435 keV). Furthermore assuming that the Boron isotopes are absorbed in cancer cells, the three alpha-particles produced in each p-11B aneutronic nuclear fusion reactions can potentially result in the enhancement of the biological dose absorbed in the tumor region since these multi-MeV alpha-particles are stopped inside the single cancer cell, thus allowing to spare the surrounding tissues. Although a similar approach based on the use of 11B nuclei has been proposed in [Yoon et al. Applied Physics Letters 105, 223507 (2014)], our work demonstrate, using Monte Carlo simulations, the crucial importance of the use of 10B nuclei (in a solution containing also 11B) for the generation of prompt gamma-rays, which can be applied to medical imaging. In fact, we demonstrate that the use of 10B nuclei can enhance the intensity of the 718 keV gamma-ray peak more than 30 times compared to the solution containing only 11B nuclei. A detailed explanation of the origin of the different prompt gamma-rays, as well as of their application as real-time diagnostics during a potential cancer treatment, is here discussed.

  7. Unified description of structure and reactions: implementing the nuclear field theory program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broglia, R. A.; Bortignon, P. F.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Idini, A.; Potel, G.

    2016-06-01

    The modern theory of the atomic nucleus results from the merging of the liquid drop model of Niels Bohr and Fritz Kalckar, and of the shell model of Marie Goeppert Meyer and Hans Jensen. The first model contributed the concepts of collective excitations. The second, those of independent-particle motion. The unification of these apparently contradictory views in terms of the particle-vibration and particle-rotation couplings carried out by Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson has allowed for an ever more complete, accurate and detailed description of nuclear structure. Nuclear field theory (NFT), developed by the Copenhagen-Buenos Aires collaboration, provided a powerful quantal embodiment of this unification. Reactions are not only at the basis of quantum mechanics (statistical interpretation, Max Born), but also the specific tools to probe the atomic nucleus. It is then natural that NFT is being extended to deal with processes which involve the continuum in an intrinsic fashion, so as to be able to treat them on an equal footing with those associated with bound states (structure). As a result, spectroscopic studies of transfer to continuum states could eventually make use of the NFT rules, properly extended to take care of recoil effects. In the present contribution we review the implementation of the NFT program of structure and reactions, setting special emphasis on open problems and outstanding predictions.

  8. Compact Detection System for High Sensitivity Hydrogen Profiling of Materials by Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, Daniel Keith; Urban, Ben; Pacheco, Jose

    2009-03-10

    Hydrogen is a ubiquitous contaminant that is known to have dramatic effects on the electrical, chemical, and mechanical properties of many types of materials in even minute quantities. Thus, the detection of hydrogen in materials is of major importance. Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) is a powerful technique for nondestructive profiling hydrogen in materials. However, NRA has found only limited use in many applications because of poor sensitivity due to cosmic ray background (CSRB). Most attempts to eliminate CSRB to achieve ppm detection levels using higher energy nuclear reactions or tons of passive shielding are not compatible with commercial ion beam analysis space and equipment requirements Zimmerman, et al. have previously reported upon a coincidence detector that meets IBA space requirements and reduces the cosmic ray background, but the detector suffers from lower detection efficiency and small sample size. We have replaced the BGO well detector in the Zimmerman coincidence detection scheme with a larger Nal well detector and used faster timing electronics to produce a detector that can handle larger samples with higher detection efficiency, and still eliminate cosmic ray background.

  9. Carbon fragmentation measurements and validation of the Geant4 nuclear reaction models for hadrontherapy.

    PubMed

    De Napoli, M; Agodi, C; Battistoni, G; Blancato, A A; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Giacoppo, F; Morone, M C; Nicolosi, D; Pandola, L; Patera, V; Raciti, G; Rapisarda, E; Romano, F; Sardina, D; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Scuderi, V; Sfienti, C; Tropea, S

    2012-11-21

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary when using heavy-ion beams in hadrontherapy to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Moreover, they are also fundamental to validate and improve the Monte Carlo codes for their use in planning tumor treatments. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections are being measured, and in particular, to our knowledge, no double-differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in the literature. In this work, we have measured the double-differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the (12)C fragmentation at 62 A MeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before. In particular, we have compared the experimental data with the predictions of two Geant4 nuclear reaction models: the Binary Light Ions Cascade and the Quantum Molecular Dynamic. From the comparison, it has been observed that the Binary Light Ions Cascade approximates the angular distributions of the fragment production cross sections better than the Quantum Molecular Dynamic model. However, the discrepancies observed between the experimental data and the Monte Carlo simulations lead to the conclusion that the prediction capability of both models needs to be improved at intermediate energies.

  10. Carbon fragmentation measurements and validation of the Geant4 nuclear reaction models for hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Napoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Battistoni, G.; Blancato, A. A.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Giacoppo, F.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Pandola, L.; Patera, V.; Raciti, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Romano, F.; Sardina, D.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Scuderi, V.; Sfienti, C.; Tropea, S.

    2012-11-01

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary when using heavy-ion beams in hadrontherapy to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Moreover, they are also fundamental to validate and improve the Monte Carlo codes for their use in planning tumor treatments. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections are being measured, and in particular, to our knowledge, no double-differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in the literature. In this work, we have measured the double-differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the 12C fragmentation at 62 A MeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before. In particular, we have compared the experimental data with the predictions of two Geant4 nuclear reaction models: the Binary Light Ions Cascade and the Quantum Molecular Dynamic. From the comparison, it has been observed that the Binary Light Ions Cascade approximates the angular distributions of the fragment production cross sections better than the Quantum Molecular Dynamic model. However, the discrepancies observed between the experimental data and the Monte Carlo simulations lead to the conclusion that the prediction capability of both models needs to be improved at intermediate energies.

  11. Extension of PENELOPE to protons: Simulation of nuclear reactions and benchmark with Geant4

    SciTech Connect

    Sterpin, E.; Sorriaux, J.; Vynckier, S.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Describing the implementation of nuclear reactions in the extension of the Monte Carlo code (MC) PENELOPE to protons (PENH) and benchmarking with Geant4.Methods: PENH is based on mixed-simulation mechanics for both elastic and inelastic electromagnetic collisions (EM). The adopted differential cross sections for EM elastic collisions are calculated using the eikonal approximation with the Dirac–Hartree–Fock–Slater atomic potential. Cross sections for EM inelastic collisions are computed within the relativistic Born approximation, using the Sternheimer–Liljequist model of the generalized oscillator strength. Nuclear elastic and inelastic collisions were simulated using explicitly the scattering analysis interactive dialin database for {sup 1}H and ICRU 63 data for {sup 12}C, {sup 14}N, {sup 16}O, {sup 31}P, and {sup 40}Ca. Secondary protons, alphas, and deuterons were all simulated as protons, with the energy adapted to ensure consistent range. Prompt gamma emission can also be simulated upon user request. Simulations were performed in a water phantom with nuclear interactions switched off or on and integral depth–dose distributions were compared. Binary-cascade and precompound models were used for Geant4. Initial energies of 100 and 250 MeV were considered. For cases with no nuclear interactions simulated, additional simulations in a water phantom with tight resolution (1 mm in all directions) were performed with FLUKA. Finally, integral depth–dose distributions for a 250 MeV energy were computed with Geant4 and PENH in a homogeneous phantom with, first, ICRU striated muscle and, second, ICRU compact bone.Results: For simulations with EM collisions only, integral depth–dose distributions were within 1%/1 mm for doses higher than 10% of the Bragg-peak dose. For central-axis depth–dose and lateral profiles in a phantom with tight resolution, there are significant deviations between Geant4 and PENH (up to 60%/1 cm for depth

  12. Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions Resulting as Picometer Interactions with Similarity to K-Shell Electron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.; Li, X. Z.; Kelly, J. C.; Osman, F.

    2006-02-01

    Since the appeal by Brian Josephson at the meeting of the Nobel Laureates July 2004, it seems to be indicated to summarize the following serious, reproducible and confirmed observations on reactions of protons or deuterons incorporated in host metals such as palladium. Some reflections to Rutherford's discovery of nuclear physics, the Cockroft-Oliphant discovery of anomalous low-energy fusion reactions and the chemist Hahn's discovery of fission had to be included. Using gaseous atmosphere or discharges between palladium targets, rather significant results were seen e.g. from the "life after death" heat production of such high values per host atom that only nuclear reactions can be involved. This supports the earlier evaluation of neutron generation in fully reversible experiments with gas discharges hinting that a reasonable screening effect - preferably in the swimming electron layer - may lead to reactions at nuclear distances d of picometers with reaction probability times U of about megaseconds similar to the K-shell capture radioactivity. Further electrolytic experiments led to low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) where the involvement of pollution could be excluded from the appearance of very seldom rare earth elements. A basically new theory for DD cross-sections is used to confirm the picometer-megasecond reactions of cold fusion. Other theoretical aspects are given from measured heavy element distributions similar to the standard abundance distribution, SAD, in the Universe with consequences on endothermic heavy nuclei generation, magic numbers and to quark-gluon plasmas.

  13. Multi-strangeness production in hadron induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitanos, T.; Moustakidis, Ch.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Lenske, H.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss in detail the formation and propagation of multi-strangeness particles in reactions induced by hadron beams relevant for the forthcoming experiments at FAIR. We focus the discussion on the production of the decuplet-particle Ω and study for the first time the production and propagation mechanism of this heavy hyperon inside hadronic environments. The transport calculations show the possibility of Ω-production in the forthcoming P ‾ANDA-experiment, which can be achieved with measurable probabilities using high-energy secondary Ξ-beams. We predict cross sections for Ω-production. The theoretical results are important in understanding the hyperon-nucleon and, in particular, the hyperon-hyperon interactions also in the high-strangeness sector. We emphasize the importance of our studies for the research plans at FAIR.

  14. Laser induced sonofusion: A new road toward thermonuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Gheshlaghi, Maryam

    2016-03-01

    The Possibility of the laser assisted sonofusion is studied via single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) in Deuterated acetone (C3D6O) using quasi-adiabatic and hydro-chemical simulations at the ambient temperatures of 0 and -28.5 °C. The interior temperature of the produced bubbles in Deuterated acetone is 1.6 × 106 K in hydro-chemical model and it is reached up to 1.9 × 106 K in the laser induced SBSL bubbles. Under these circumstances, temperature up to 107 K can be produced in the center of the bubble in which the thermonuclear D-D fusion reactions are promising under the controlled conditions.

  15. UV-induced reaction kinetics of dilinoleoylphosphatidylethanolamine monolayers.

    PubMed Central

    Viitala, T; Peltonen, J

    1999-01-01

    The UV-induced reactivity of dilinoleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DLiPE) Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films has been studied by in situ measurements of the changes in the mean molecular area, UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Optimum orientation and packing density of the DLiPE molecules in the monolayer were achieved by adding uranyl acetate to the subphase. A first-order reaction kinetic model was successfully fitted to the experimental reaction kinetics data obtained at a surface pressure of 30 mN/m. Topographical studies of LB films by AFM were performed on bilayer structures as a function of subphase composition and UV irradiation time. The orientational effect of the uranyl ions on the monolayer molecules was observed as an enhanced homogeneity of the freshly prepared monomeric LB films. However, the long-term stability of these films proved to be bad; clear reorganization and loss of a true monolayer structure were evidenced by the AFM images. This instability was inhibited for the UV-irradiated films, indicating that the UV irradiation gave rise to a cross-linked structure. PMID:10233096

  16. In-medium modifications of the pipi interaction in photon-induced reactions.

    PubMed

    Messchendorp, J G; Janssen, S; Kotulla, M; Ahrens, J; Annand, J R H; Beck, R; Bloch, F; Caselotti, G; Fog, L; Hornidge, D; Krusche, B; Langgärtner, W; McGeorge, J C; MacGregor, I J D; Mengel, K; Metag, V; Novotny, R; Owens, R O; Pfeiffer, M; Sack, S; Sanderson, R; Schadmand, S

    2002-11-25

    Differential cross sections of the reactions (gamma,pi(0)pi(0)) and (gamma,pi(0)pi(+/-)) have been measured for several nuclei (1H,12C, and (nat)Pb) at an incident-photon energy of E(gamma)=400-460 MeV at the tagged-photon facility at MAMI-B using the TAPS spectrometer. A significant nuclear-mass dependence of the pipi invariant-mass distribution is found in the pi(0)pi(0) channel. This dependence is not observed in the pi(0)pi(+/-) channel and is consistent with an in-medium modification of the pipi interaction in the I=J=0 channel. The data are compared to pi-induced measurements and to calculations within a chiral-unitary approach.

  17. Neutron- and proton-induced reactions for analysis of bioenvironmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Spyrou, N.M.; Altaf, W.J.; Khrbish, Y.S. )

    1988-01-01

    The study of the elemental composition of bioenvironmental samples is of continuing interest in a wide variety of medical and environmental investigations, be it as environmental monitors or as indicators of the state of health and disease of an individual or a population. Nuclear activation methods play an important role in these studies as research tools and in certain cases are employed as rapid, routine analytical techniques. Although the authors have been using instrumental neutron activation analysis as the main technique for obtaining information about elemental composition and concentration, they have also developed techniques, for further or complementary analysis, in which proton-induced reactions have been exploited. Two recent studies, in which the composition of human lung tissue and the elemental concentration in plant samples were determined, have been selected as illustrations of the techniques employed.

  18. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Emerging Techniques for Nuclear Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji Woong

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction of four transcription factors, Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, can successfully reprogram somatic cells into embryonic stem (ES)-like cells. These cells, which are referred to as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, closely resemble embryonic stem cells in genomic, cell biologic, and phenotypic characteristics, and the creation of these special cells was a major triumph in cell biology. In contrast to pluripotent stem cells generated by somatic cell nuclear-transfer (SCNT) or ES cells derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of the blastocyst, direct reprogramming provides a convenient and reliable means of generating pluripotent stem cells. iPS cells have already shown incredible potential for research and for therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine within just a few years of their discovery. In this review, current techniques of generating iPS cells and mechanisms of nuclear reprogramming are reviewed, and the potential for therapeutic applications is discussed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1799–1820. PMID:21194386

  19. Gamma radiation induced changes in nuclear waste glass containing Eu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, M.; Kadam, R. M.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.; Tomar, B. S.; Godbole, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    Gamma radiation induced changes were investigated in sodium-barium borosilicate glasses containing Eu. The glass composition was similar to that of nuclear waste glasses used for vitrifying Trombay research reactor nuclear waste at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. Photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques were used to study the speciation of the rare earth (RE) ion in the matrix before and after gamma irradiation. Judd-Ofelt ( J- O) analyses of the emission spectra were done before and after irradiation. The spin counting technique was employed to quantify the number of defect centres formed in the glass at the highest gamma dose studied. PL data suggested the stabilisation of the trivalent RE ion in the borosilicate glass matrix both before and after irradiation. It was also observed that, the RE ion distributes itself in two different environments in the irradiated glass. From the EPR data it was observed that, boron oxygen hole centre based radicals are the predominant defect centres produced in the glass after irradiation along with small amount of E’ centres. From the spin counting studies the concentration of defect centres in the glass was calculated to be 350 ppm at 900 kGy. This indicated the fact that bulk of the glass remained unaffected after gamma irradiation up to 900 kGy.

  20. Studies of nuclear reaction at very low energies. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.

    1992-01-15

    The deuteron radiative capture reactions on {sup 2}H, {sup 6}Li and {sup 10}B have been measured between center of mass energies of 20 and 140 keV. Of note is the observation that the gamma ray-to-charged particle branching ratio for the DD reaction appears independent of energy down to a center of mass energy of 20 keV, consistent with some and contrary to other theoretical models. We have investigated the ratio of the reactions D(d,p)T and D(d,n){sup 3}He down to c.m. energies of 3 keV and the ratio of the reactions 6Li(d,p){sup 7}Li and {sup 6}LI(d,{alpha}){sup 4}He down to a c.m. energy of 19 keV. The DD reaction ratio is independent of energy while the (d,p) branch of the D-{sup 6}Li evinces a significant enhancement at the lowest measured energies. We have continued our investigation of charged particle production from deuterium-metal systems at a modest level of activity. Noteworthy in this investigation is the observation of 3 MeV protons from deuteron beam loaded Ti and LiD targets subjected to extreme thermal disequilibria. Significant facility improvements were realized during the most recent contract period. Specifically the downstream magnetic analysis system proposed to eliminate beam induced contaminants has been installed and thoroughly tested. This improvement should allow the D(a,{gamma}){sup 6}Li reaction to be measured in the coming contract period. A scattering chamber required for the measurement of the {sup 7}Li({sup 3}He,p){sup 9}Be reaction has been designed, fabricated and installed on the accelerator. A CAMAC based charged particle identification system has been assembled also for use in our proposed measurement of the {sup 7}Li({sup 3}He, p){sup 9}Be.

  1. Active Target-Time Projection Chambers for Reactions Induced by Rare Isotope Beams: Physics and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittig, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Weakly bound nuclear systems can be considered to represent a good testing-ground of our understanding of non-perturbative quantum systems. Great progress in experimental sensitivity has been attained by increase in rare isotope beam intensities and by the development of new high efficiency detectors. It is now possible to study reactions leading to bound and unbound states in systems with very unbalanced neutron to proton ratios. Application of Active Target-Time Projection Chambers to this domain of physics will be illustrated by experiments performed with existing detectors. The NSCL is developing an Active Target-Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC) to be used to study reactions induced by rare isotope beams at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Facility (NSCL) and at the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The AT-TPC counter gas acts as both a target and detector, allowing investigations of fusion, isobaric analog states, cluster structure of light nuclei and transfer reactions to be conducted without significant loss in resolution due to the thickness of the target. The high efficiency and low threshold of the AT-TPC will allow investigations of fission barriers and giant resonances with fast fragmentation rare isotope beams. This detector type needs typically a large number of electronic channels (order of magnitude 10,000) and a high speed DAQ. A reduced size prototype detector with prototype electronics has been realized and used in several experiments. A short description of other detectors of this type under development will be given.

  2. Detecting special nuclear material using muon-induced neutron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guardincerri, Elena; Bacon, Jeffrey; Borozdin, Konstantin; Matthew Durham, J.; Fabritius, Joseph, II; Hecht, Adam; Milner, Edward C.; Miyadera, Haruo; Morris, Christopher L.; Perry, John; Poulson, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The penetrating ability of cosmic ray muons makes them an attractive probe for imaging dense materials. Here, we describe experimental results from a new technique that uses neutrons generated by cosmic-ray muons to identify the presence of special nuclear material (SNM). Neutrons emitted from SNM are used to tag muon-induced fission events in actinides and laminography is used to form images of the stopping material. This technique allows the imaging of SNM-bearing objects tagged using muon tracking detectors located above or to the side of the objects, and may have potential applications in warhead verification scenarios. During the experiment described here we did not attempt to distinguish the type or grade of the SNM.

  3. Study of Nuclear Reactions with 11C and 15O Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dongwon

    2007-05-14

    Nuclear reaction study with radioactive ion beams is one of the most exciting research topics in modern nuclear physics. The development of radioactive ion beams has allowed nuclear scientists and engineers to explore many unknown exotic nuclei far from the valley of nuclear stability, and to further our understanding of the evolution of the universe. The recently developed radioactive ion beam facility at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-inch cyclotron is denoted as BEARS and provides 11C, 14O and 15O radioactive ion beams of high quality. These moderate to high intensity, proton-rich radioactive ion beams have been used to explore the properties of unstable nuclei such as 12N and 15F. In this work, the proton capture reaction on 11C has been evaluated via the indirect d(11C, 12N)n transfer reaction using the inverse kinematics method coupled with the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient (ANC) theoretical approach. The total effective 12N → 11C+p ANC is found to be (C eff12N = 1.83 ± 0.27 fm-1. With the high 11C beam intensity available, our experiment showed excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and previous experimental studies. This study also indirectly confirmed that the 11C(p,γ) reaction is a key step in producing CNO nuclei in supermassive low-metallicity stars, bypassing the slow triple alpha process. The newly developed 15O radioactive ion beam at BEARS was used to study the poorly known level widths of 16F via the p(15O,15O)p reaction. Among the nuclei in the A=16, T=1 isobaric triad, many states in 16N and 16O have been well established, but less has been reported on 16F. Four states of 16F below 1 MeV have been identified experimentally: 0-, 1

  4. Homocysteine-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells coincides with nuclear NOX2 and peri-nuclear NOX4 activity.

    PubMed

    Sipkens, Jessica A; Hahn, Nynke; van den Brand, Carlien S; Meischl, Christof; Cillessen, Saskia A G M; Smith, Desirée E C; Juffermans, Lynda J M; Musters, René J P; Roos, Dirk; Jakobs, Cornelis; Blom, Henk J; Smulders, Yvo M; Krijnen, Paul A J; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Rauwerda, Jan A; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Niessen, Hans W M

    2013-11-01

    Apoptosis of endothelial cells related to homocysteine (Hcy) has been reported in several studies. In this study, we evaluated whether reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing signaling pathways contribute to Hcy-induced apoptosis induction, with specific emphasis on NADPH oxidases. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with 0.01-2.5 mM Hcy. We determined the effect of Hcy on caspase-3 activity, annexin V positivity, intracellular NOX1, NOX2, NOX4, and p47(phox) expression and localization, nuclear nitrotyrosine accumulation, and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m). Hcy induced caspase-3 activity and apoptosis; this effect was concentration dependent and maximal after 6-h exposure to 2.5 mM Hcy. It was accompanied by a significant increase in ΔΨ m. Cysteine was inactive on these parameters excluding a reactive thiol group effect. Hcy induced an increase in cellular NOX2, p47(phox), and NOX4, but not that of NOX1. 3D digital imaging microscopy followed by image deconvolution analysis showed nuclear accumulation of NOX2 and p47(phox) in endothelial cells exposed to Hcy, but not in control cells, which coincided with accumulation of nuclear nitrotyrosine residues. Furthermore, Hcy enhanced peri-nuclear localization of NOX4 coinciding with accumulation of peri-nuclear nitrotyrosine residues, a reflection of local ROS production. p47(phox) was also increased in the peri-nuclear region. The Hcy-induced increase in caspase-3 activity was prevented by DPI and apocynin, suggesting involvement of NOX activity. The data presented in this article reveal accumulation of nuclear NOX2 and peri-nuclear NOX4 accumulation as potential source of ROS production in Hcy-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells.

  5. Expanded cumuli induce acrosome reaction in boar sperm.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, M; Lucidi, P; Barboni, B

    1998-12-01

    The authors investigated acrosomal changes occurring in boar sperm that interact with the expanded cumulus matrix surrounding ovulated pig oocytes. Samples of washed boar sperm obtained from six donors were incubated for 4 hr under capacitating conditions and exposed either to solubilized zonae pellucidae (ZP) or solubilized expanded pig cumuli (SEC) obtained from IVM oocytes. Alternatively, hyaluronic acid, laminin, or fibronectin, components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) were added to capacitated sperm. Acrosomal integrity was evaluated 1 hr later by using FITC-PSA staining. Solubilized cumuli induced acrosome reaction (AR) in a dose-dependent manner with a saturating effect exerted at 2.5 SEC/50 microl. Both 500 nM fibronectin and 500 nM laminin stimulated acrosomal exocytosis, the latter being more effective and inducing saturating levels of AR. By contrast, hyaluronic acid did not affect acrosomal status. Preincubation with anti-laminin antibodies completely prevented the inducing activity of SEC without affecting the activity of solubilized ZP. Consistent with these data, the integrin VLA-6, a receptor with high affinity for laminin, was detected by immunoblotting on the plasma membrane of capacitated boar spermatozoa. In addition, its immunoneutralization, obtained with the preincubation of capacitated sperm with the antibody raised against the alpha chain of VLA-6 integrin, prevented AR upon exposure to laminin or SEC (10.7+/-3.2 and 10.2+/-1.0% respectively), while the samples retained their responsiveness to ZP (29.6+/-1.2%). The results demonstrate that the interaction between laminin, entrapped in the expanded cumuli, and specific integrins present on the sperm membrane can initiate AR, thus taking part in the process of sperm-egg recognition.

  6. Nuclear Clusters in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Binh, Dam N.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, H.; Kahl, D.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Komatsubara, T.; Kato, S.; Khiem, Le H.

    2010-03-01

    The role of nuclear clustering is discussed for nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution with Cluster Nucleosynthesis Diagram (CND) proposed before. Special emphasis is placed on α-induced stellar reactions together with molecular states for O and C burning.

  7. Effects of deformations and orientations in the fission of the actinide nuclear system 254Fm* formed in the 11B + 243Am reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2012-12-01

    We have studied the decay of actinide nuclear system 254Fm* formed in 11B + 243Am reaction using the dynamical cluster decay model (DCM), with choices of spherical, quadrupole deformation β2 alone and higher multipole deformations β2-β4. For β2 deformations, the optimum orientations θiopt are used whereas for higher multipole deformations the compact orientations θic of decaying fragments are taken in to account. Besides static-β2 deformations, the effects of dynamical-β2 deformations are also explored. The calculated cross sections find excellent agreement with the available experimental data with spherical as well as deformed choices of fragmentations, enabling us to account for the role of important nuclear deformation effects in the 11B-induced nuclear reaction. Spontaneous decay of 254Fm with cold elongated configuration and optimum orientation is also worked out. The mass distributions of excited fermium isotopes in the neighborhood of 254Fm* are also explored. In addition, the roles of temperature, angular momentum, and fission fragment anisotropies are investigated in the context of the chosen reaction.

  8. STARLIB: A Next-generation Reaction-rate Library for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallaska, A. L.; Iliadis, C.; Champange, A. E.; Goriely, S.; Starrfield, S.; Timmes, F. X.

    2013-07-01

    STARLIB is a next-generation, all-purpose nuclear reaction-rate library. For the first time, this library provides the rate probability density at all temperature grid points for convenient implementation in models of stellar phenomena. The recommended rate and its associated uncertainties are also included. Currently, uncertainties are absent from all other rate libraries, and, although estimates have been attempted in previous evaluations and compilations, these are generally not based on rigorous statistical definitions. A common standard for deriving uncertainties is clearly warranted. STARLIB represents a first step in addressing this deficiency by providing a tabular, up-to-date database that supplies not only the rate and its uncertainty but also its distribution. Because a majority of rates are lognormally distributed, this allows the construction of rate probability densities from the columns of STARLIB. This structure is based on a recently suggested Monte Carlo method to calculate reaction rates, where uncertainties are rigorously defined. In STARLIB, experimental rates are supplemented with: (1) theoretical TALYS rates for reactions for which no experimental input is available, and (2) laboratory and theoretical weak rates. STARLIB includes all types of reactions of astrophysical interest to Z = 83, such as (p, γ), (p, α), (α, n), and corresponding reverse rates. Strong rates account for thermal target excitations. Here, we summarize our Monte Carlo formalism, introduce the library, compare methods of correcting rates for stellar environments, and discuss how to implement our library in Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. We also present a method for accessing STARLIB on the Internet and outline updated Monte Carlo-based rates.

  9. STARLIB: A NEXT-GENERATION REACTION-RATE LIBRARY FOR NUCLEAR ASTROPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Sallaska, A. L.; Iliadis, C.; Champange, A. E.; Goriely, S.; Starrfield, S.; Timmes, F. X.

    2013-07-15

    STARLIB is a next-generation, all-purpose nuclear reaction-rate library. For the first time, this library provides the rate probability density at all temperature grid points for convenient implementation in models of stellar phenomena. The recommended rate and its associated uncertainties are also included. Currently, uncertainties are absent from all other rate libraries, and, although estimates have been attempted in previous evaluations and compilations, these are generally not based on rigorous statistical definitions. A common standard for deriving uncertainties is clearly warranted. STARLIB represents a first step in addressing this deficiency by providing a tabular, up-to-date database that supplies not only the rate and its uncertainty but also its distribution. Because a majority of rates are lognormally distributed, this allows the construction of rate probability densities from the columns of STARLIB. This structure is based on a recently suggested Monte Carlo method to calculate reaction rates, where uncertainties are rigorously defined. In STARLIB, experimental rates are supplemented with: (1) theoretical TALYS rates for reactions for which no experimental input is available, and (2) laboratory and theoretical weak rates. STARLIB includes all types of reactions of astrophysical interest to Z = 83, such as (p, {gamma}), (p, {alpha}), ({alpha}, n), and corresponding reverse rates. Strong rates account for thermal target excitations. Here, we summarize our Monte Carlo formalism, introduce the library, compare methods of correcting rates for stellar environments, and discuss how to implement our library in Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. We also present a method for accessing STARLIB on the Internet and outline updated Monte Carlo-based rates.

  10. (Studies of nuclear reaction at very low energies): Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.

    1988-12-14

    We summarize the accomplishments of the first full year's operation of the Colorado School of Mines low energy nuclear physics project utilizing the General Ionex Model 1545 low energy, high current particle accelerator. The projects which we have completed which were explicity included in the original contract proposal include the measurement of the gamma ray branching ratios of the p + /sup 6/Li, p + /sup 7/Li, and p + /sup 11/B reactions as well as the absolute yield of the reaction /sup 9/Be(p,..gamma..)/sup 10/B between proton laboratory energies of about 40 to 180 keV. in the course of these measurements we have demonstrated the associated gamma ray technique for Germanium detector efficiency calibration at gamma ray energies up to 12 MeV using very low energy proton beams. We have, in addition, pursued a fairly comprehensive investigation of an extremely interesting and totally surprising phenomenon in which we see a yield of the d-d fusion reaction during bombardment of deuterated polyethylene by light to medium ion and molecular beams which is greatly enhanced over the yield expected from a straight-forward secondary ion reaction calculation. This enhanced yield is seen to correlate with the beam line pressure, suggesting target heating effects to be the source of the enhancement. In conjunction with a parallel contract with the Applied Plasma Physics Program in the DOE Office of Fusion Energy, we have developed an eight channel fast gamma ray spectrometer utilizing the fluorocarbon liquid scintillator NE226. The system has been operated at total gamma ray count rates up to 2.5 MHz with good energy resolution and with no measured dead-time and acceptable levels of pulse pile-up.

  11. Prm3p is a pheromone-induced peripheral nuclear envelope protein required for yeast nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shu; Tobery, Cynthia E; Rose, Mark D

    2009-05-01

    Nuclear membrane fusion is the last step in the mating pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We adapted a bioinformatics approach to identify putative pheromone-induced membrane proteins potentially required for nuclear membrane fusion. One protein, Prm3p, was found to be required for nuclear membrane fusion; disruption of PRM3 caused a strong bilateral defect, in which nuclear congression was completed but fusion did not occur. Prm3p was localized to the nuclear envelope in pheromone-responding cells, with significant colocalization with the spindle pole body in zygotes. A previous report, using a truncated protein, claimed that Prm3p is localized to the inner nuclear envelope. Based on biochemistry, immunoelectron microscopy and live cell microscopy, we find that functional Prm3p is a peripheral membrane protein exposed on the cytoplasmic face of the outer nuclear envelope. In support of this, mutations in a putative nuclear localization sequence had no effect on full-length protein function or localization. In contrast, point mutations and deletions in the highly conserved hydrophobic carboxy-terminal domain disrupted both protein function and localization. Genetic analysis, colocalization, and biochemical experiments indicate that Prm3p interacts directly with Kar5p, suggesting that nuclear membrane fusion is mediated by a protein complex.

  12. Pressure-induced metathesis reaction to sequester Cs.

    PubMed

    Im, Junhyuck; Seoung, Donghoon; Lee, Seung Yeop; Blom, Douglas A; Vogt, Thomas; Kao, Chi-Chang; Lee, Yongjae

    2015-01-06

    We report here a pressure-driven metathesis reaction where Ag-exchanged natrolite (Ag16Al16Si24O80·16H2O, Ag-NAT) is pressurized in an aqueous CsI solution, resulting in the exchange of Ag(+) by Cs(+) in the natrolite framework forming Cs16Al16Si24O80·16H2O (Cs-NAT-I) and, above 0.5 GPa, its high-pressure polymorph (Cs-NAT-II). During the initial cation exchange, the precipitation of AgI occurs. Additional pressure and heat at 2 GPa and 160 °C transforms Cs-NAT-II to a pollucite-related, highly dense, and water-free triclinic phase with nominal composition CsAlSi2O6. At ambient temperature after pressure release, the Cs remains sequestered in a now monoclinic pollucite phase at close to 40 wt % and a favorably low Cs leaching rate under back-exchange conditions. This process thus efficiently combines the pressure-driven separation of Cs and I at ambient temperature with the subsequent sequestration of Cs under moderate pressures and temperatures in its preferred waste form suitable for long-term storage at ambient conditions. The zeolite pollucite CsAlSi2O6·H2O has been identified as a potential host material for nuclear waste remediation of anthropogenic (137)Cs due to its chemical and thermal stability, low leaching rate, and the large amount of Cs it can contain. The new water-free pollucite phase we characterize during our process will not display radiolysis of water during longterm storage while maintaining the Cs content and low leaching rate.

  13. Feasibility study of nuclear transmutation by negative muon capture reaction using the PHITS code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Shin-ichiro; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Feasibility of nuclear transmutation of fission products in high-level radioactive waste by negative muon capture reaction is investigated using the Particle and Heave Ion Transport code System (PHITS). It is found that about 80 % of stopped negative muons contribute to transmute target nuclide into stable or short-lived nuclide in the case of 135Cs, which is one of the most important nuclide in the transmutation. The simulation result also indicates that the position of transmutation is controllable by changing the energy of incident negative muon. Based on our simulation, it takes approximately 8.5 × 108years to transmute 500 g of 135Cs by negative muon beam with the highest intensity currently available.

  14. Conversion of Nuclear Waste to Molten Glass: Cold-Cap Reactions in Crucible Tests

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel; Rice, Jarrett A.; ...

    2016-05-23

    The feed-to-glass conversion, which comprises complex chemical reactions and phase transitions, occurs in the cold cap during nuclear waste vitrification. Here, to investigate the conversion process, we analyzed heat-treated samples of a simulated high-level waste feed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, leaching tests, and residual anion analysis. Feed dehydration, gas evolution, and borate phase formation occurred at temperatures below 700°C before the emerging glass-forming melt was completely connected. Above 700°C, intermediate aluminosilicate phases and quartz particles gradually dissolved in the continuous borosilicate melt, which expanded with transient foam. Finally, knowledge of the chemistry and physics of feed-to-glass conversion willmore » help us control the conversion path by changing the melter feed makeup to maximize the glass production rate.« less

  15. Analysis of surface, subsurface, and bulk hydrogen in ZnO using nuclear reaction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Traeger, F.; Kauer, M.; Woell, Ch.; Rogalla, D.; Becker, H.-W.

    2011-08-15

    Hydrogen concentrations in ZnO single crystals exposing different surfaces have been determined to be in the range of (0.02-0.04) at.% with an error of {+-}0.01 at.% using nuclear reaction analysis. In the subsurface region, the hydrogen concentration has been determined to be higher by up to a factor of 10. In contrast to the hydrogen in the bulk, part of the subsurface hydrogen is less strongly bound, can be removed by heating to 550 deg. C, and reaccommodated by loading with atomic hydrogen. By exposing the ZnO(1010) surface to water above room temperature and to atomic hydrogen, respectively, hydroxylation with the same coverage of hydrogen is observed.

  16. Cyclotron production of I-123: An evaluation of the nuclear reactions which produce this isotope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sodd, V. J.; Scholz, K. L.; Blue, J. W.; Wellman, H. N.

    1970-01-01

    The use of the various nuclear reactions is described by which I-123,a low radiation dose radiopharmaceutical, can be cyclotron-produced. Methods of directly producing I-123 and those which indirectly produce the radionuclide through the beta (+) decay of its nautral precursor, Xe-123. It is impossible to separate from the radioiodine contaminants, notably I-124, which occur in the direct method. Thus, it is preferable to produce pure I-123 from Xe-123 which is easily separated from the radioiodines. Among the characteristics of I-123 is the capability of reducing the patient dose in a thyroid uptake measurement to a very small percentage of that delivered by the more commonly used I-131.

  17. Harmonic oscillator representation in the theory of scattering and nuclear reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smirnov, Yuri F.; Shirokov, A. M.; Lurie, Yuri, A.; Zaitsev, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    The following questions, concerning the application of the harmonic oscillator representation (HOR) in the theory of scattering and reactions, are discussed: the formulation of the scattering theory in HOR; exact solutions of the free motion Schroedinger equation in HOR; separable expansion of the short range potentials and the calculation of the phase shifts; 'isolated states' as generalization of the Wigner-von Neumann bound states embedded in continuum; a nuclear coupled channel problem in HOR; and the description of true three body scattering in HOR. As an illustration the soft dipole mode in the (11)Li nucleus is considered in a frame of the (9)Li+n+n cluster model taking into account of three body continuum effects.

  18. Conversion of Nuclear Waste to Molten Glass: Cold-Cap Reactions in Crucible Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel; Rice, Jarrett A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2016-05-23

    The feed-to-glass conversion, which comprises complex chemical reactions and phase transitions, occurs in the cold cap during nuclear waste vitrification. Here, to investigate the conversion process, we analyzed heat-treated samples of a simulated high-level waste feed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, leaching tests, and residual anion analysis. Feed dehydration, gas evolution, and borate phase formation occurred at temperatures below 700°C before the emerging glass-forming melt was completely connected. Above 700°C, intermediate aluminosilicate phases and quartz particles gradually dissolved in the continuous borosilicate melt, which expanded with transient foam. Finally, knowledge of the chemistry and physics of feed-to-glass conversion will help us control the conversion path by changing the melter feed makeup to maximize the glass production rate.

  19. Evidence for nuclear Landau-Zener effect: New resonance mechanism in heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Y.; Park, J.Y.

    1983-12-01

    Characteristic resonancelike peaks recently observed in the angle-integrated inelastic cross sections for the /sup 13/C-/sup 17/O system are understood in terms of the Landau-Zener excitation mechanism at energy level crossings. Angle-integrated inelastic cross sections estimated with the Landau-Zener formula show a series of resonancelike peaks as a function of incident energy, each of which is associated with a grazing angular momentum of the relative motion between nuclei. Simple expressions are given for resonance energies and ''widths'' of new ''resonances.'' This resonance mechanism is a new one, which has not been known in nuclear reactions nor in atomic collisions, although it is based on the well-known Landau-Zener promotion mechanism.

  20. Spin dipole nuclear matrix elements for double beta decay nuclei by charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.; Frekers, D.

    2016-11-01

    Spin dipole (SD) strengths for double beta-decay (DBD) nuclei were studied experimentally for the first time by using measured cross sections of (3He, t) charge-exchange reactions (CERs). Then SD nuclear matrix elements (NMEs) {M}α ({{SD}}) for low-lying 2- states were derived from the experimental SD strengths by referring to the experimental α = GT (Gamow-Teller) and α = F (Fermi) strengths. They are consistent with the empirical NMEs M({{SD}}) based on the quasi-particle model with the empirical effective SD coupling constant. The CERs are used to evaluate the SD NME, which is associated with one of the major components of the neutrino-less DBD NME.

  1. Nonequilibrium nuclear polarization and induced hyperfine and dipolar magnetic fields in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ţifrea, Ionel; Flatté, Michael E.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) caused by hyperfine coupling between nonequilibrium electronic spins and nuclear spins in semiconductor nanostructures. We derive the time and position dependence of the resulting hyperfine and dipolar magnetic fields. In GaAs quantum wells the induced nuclear spin polarization greatly exceeds the polarization of the electronic system that causes the DNP. The induced magnetic fields vary between tens of tesla for the electronic hyperfine field acting on nuclei, to hundreds of gauss for the nuclear hyperfine field acting on electrons, to a few gauss for the induced nuclear dipolar fields that act on both nuclei and electrons. The field strengths should be measurable via optically induced nuclear magnetic resonance or time-resolved Faraday rotation experiments. We discuss the implications of our calculations for low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures.

  2. Exclusive CHIPS-TPT algorithms for simulation of neutron-nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosov, Mikhail; Savin, Dmitriy

    2016-09-01

    The CHIPS-TPT physics library for simulation of neutron-nuclear reactions on the new exclusive level is being developed in CFAR VNIIA. The exclusive modeling conserves energy, momentum and quantum numbers in each neutron-nuclear interaction. The CHIPS-TPT algorithms are based on the exclusive CHIPS library, which is compatible with Geant4. Special CHIPS-TPT physics lists in the Geant4 format are provided. The calculation time for an exclusive CHIPS-TPT simulation is comparable to the time of the corresponding inclusive Geant4-HP simulation and much faster for mono-isotopic simulations. In addition to the reduction of the deposited energy fluctuations, which is a consequence of the energy conservation, the CHIPS-TPT libraries provide a possibility of simulation of the secondary particles correlation, e.g. secondary gammas or n-γ correlations, and of the Doppler broadening of the γ-lines in the simulated spectra, which can be measured by germanium detectors.

  3. Characterization of a DNA uptake reaction through the nuclear membrane of isolated yeast nuclei. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, E.; Shakuto, S.; Miyakawa, T.; Fukui, S.

    1988-02-01

    Isolated yeast nuclei were able to incorporate /sup 3/H-labeled pJDB219 DNA in vitro in the presence of ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. The number of plasmid molecules incorporated into each nucleus was calculated to be 60 under the conditions we used. Enzyme-histochemical staining of the incorporated biotinylated pJDB219 with streptavidin-biotinylated-peroxidase complex indicated a uniform distribution of the incorporated plasmids within each nucleus. After intranuclear incorporation, substrate pJDB219 DNAs (open and closed circular forms) were changed to the linear form and were weakly digested over the longer incubation period (over 60 min). Facile release of the once-incorporated plasmid DNA was never observable; discharge of the incorporated (/sup 3/H)pJDB219 during a 60-min incubation was less than 5%. The addition of adenylyl-imidodiphosphate, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), or quercetin inhibited in vitro DNA uptake reaction. DCCD and quercetin inhibited the nuclear ATPase and apparent protein kinase, respectively; hence, the involvement of these enzymes in the nuclear DNA transport system was suggested.

  4. Nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons within a microscopic transport approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of the Lanzhou quantum molecular-dynamics transport model, the nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons has been investigated thoroughly. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing the primary fragments in phase space. The secondary decay process of the fragments is described by a well-known statistical code. It is found that the localized energy released in antibaryon-baryon annihilation is deposited in a nucleus mainly via pion-nucleon collisions, which leads to the emissions of pre-equilibrium particles, fission, evaporation of nucleons, light fragments, etc. The strangeness exchange reactions dominate the hyperon production. The averaged mass loss increases with the mass number of target nucleus. A bump structure in the domain of intermediate mass for heavy targets appears owing to the contribution of fission fragments.

  5. Study of activation cross-sections of deuteron induced reactions on rhodium up to 40 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.; Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2011-09-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of the activation cross-sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions, excitation functions of the 103Rh(d,x) 100,101,103Pd, 100g,101m,101g,102m,102gRh and 103gRu reactions were determined up to 40 MeV. Cross-sections were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. Excitation functions of the contributing reactions were calculated using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and TALYS codes. From the measured cross-section data integral production yields were calculated and compared with experimental integral yield data reported in the literature. From the measured cross-sections and previous data, activation curves were deduced to support thin layer activation (TLA) on rhodium and Rh containing alloys.

  6. Extracting nuclear sizes of medium to heavy nuclei from total reaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, W.; Hatakeyama, S.; Ebata, S.; Suzuki, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Background: Proton and neutron radii are fundamental quantities of atomic nuclei. To study the sizes of short-lived unstable nuclei, there is a need for an alternative to electron scattering. Purpose: The recent paper by Horiuchi et al. [Phys. Rev. C 89, 011601(R) (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.89.011601 proposed a possible way of extracting the matter and neutron-skin thickness of light- to medium-mass nuclei using total reaction cross section, σR. The analysis is extended to medium to heavy nuclei up to lead isotopes with due attention to Coulomb breakup contributions as well as density distributions improved by paring correlation. Methods: We formulate a quantitative calculation of σR based on the Glauber model including the Coulomb breakup. To substantiate the treatment of the Coulomb breakup, we also evaluate the Coulomb breakup cross section due to the electric dipole field in a canonical-basis-time-dependent-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory in the three-dimensional coordinate space. Results: We analyze σR's of 103 nuclei with Z =20 , 28, 40, 50, 70, and 82 incident on light targets, H,21, 4He, and 12C. Three kinds of Skyrme interactions are tested to generate those wave functions. To discuss possible uncertainty due to the Coulomb breakup, we examine its dependence on the target, the incident energy, and the Skyrme interaction. The proton is a most promising target for extracting the nuclear sizes as the Coulomb excitation can safely be neglected. We find that the so-called reaction radius, aR=√{σR/π } , for the proton target is very well approximated by a linear function of two variables, the matter radius and the skin thickness, in which three constants depend only on the incident energy. We quantify the accuracy of σR measurements needed to extract the nuclear sizes. Conclusions: The proton is the best target because, once the incident energy is set, its aR is very accurately determined by only the matter radius and neutron-skin thickness. If σR's at

  7. Temperature-induced gene expression associated with different thermal reaction norms for growth rate.

    PubMed

    Ellers, Jacintha; Mariën, Janine; Driessen, Gerard; van Straalen, Nico M

    2008-03-15

    Although nearly all organisms are subject to fluctuating temperature regimes in their natural habitat, little is known about the genetics underlying the response to thermal conditions, and even less about the genetic differences that cause individual variation in thermal response. Here, we aim to elucidate possible pathways involved in temperature-induced phenotypic plasticity of growth rate. Our model organism is the collembolan Orchesella cincta that occurs in a wide variety of habitats and is known to be adapted to local thermal conditions. Because sequence information is lacking in O. cincta, we constructed cDNA libraries enriched for temperature-responsive genes using suppression subtractive hybridization. We compared gene expression of O. cincta with steep thermal reaction norms (high plasticity) to those with flat thermal reaction norms (low plasticity) for juvenile growth after exposure to a temperature switch composed of a cooling or a warming treatment. Using suppression subtractive hybridization, we found differential expression of ten nuclear genes, including several genes involved in energy metabolism, such as pantothenate kinase and carbonic anhydrase. In addition, seven mitochondrial genes were found in the cloned subtracted library, but further analysis showed this was caused by allelic variation in mitochondrial genes in our founder population, and that a specific haplotype was associated with high thermal responsiveness. Future work will focus on candidate genes from pathways such as the oxidative phosphorylation and biosynthesis of coenzyme A which are possibly involved in thermal responsiveness of juvenile growth rate.

  8. Nuclear attitudes and reactions: associations with depression, drug use, and quality of life

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, M.D.

    1986-05-01

    For 40 years the world has lived with the threat of nuclear war and, recently, with the possibility of nuclear power plant accidents. Although virtually every generation must confront various national or international crises, the threat of nuclear war is unprecedented in its destructive potential. This study is an attempt to assess attitudes and amount of distress associated with the ever-present threat of nuclear war and the possibility of accidents at nuclear power plants. The Nuclear Attitudes Questionnaire (NAQ) consists of 15 items and was administered to 722 young adults who have grown up in the nuclear age. The items were found to reflect four latent factors of nuclear concern, nuclear support, fear of the future, and nuclear denial, all of which in turn represent a second-order construct of nuclear anxiety. Women reported significantly more nuclear concern, less nuclear support, more fear of the future, and less nuclear denial than did men. In latent-variable models, nuclear anxiety was found to be significantly associated with less purpose in life, less life satisfaction, more powerlessness, more depression, and more drug use. It is concluded that the threat of nuclear war and accidents is significantly related to psychological distress and may disturb normal maturational development.

  9. Low-energy fission investigated in reactions of 750 AMeV238U-ions with Pb and Be targets. I. Nuclear charge distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, P.; Bernas, M.; Czajkowski, S.; Geissel, H.; Aumann, T.; Dessagne, Ph.; Donzaud, C.; Hanelt, E.; Heinz, A.; Hesse, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Miehe, Ch.; Münzenberg, G.; Pfützner, M.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Schwab, W.; Stéphan, C.; Sümmerer, K.; Tassan-Got, L.; Voss, B.

    1996-12-01

    Charge distributions of fragments from low energy nuclear fission are investigated in reactions of highly fissile238U projectiles at relativistic energies (750 A·MeV) with a heavy (Pb) and a light (Be) target. The fully stripped fission fragments are separated by the Fragment Separator (FRS). Their high kinetic energies in the laboratory system allow the identification of all atomic numbers by using Multiple-Sampling Ionization Chambers (MUSIC). The elemental distributions of fragments observed at larger magnetic rigidities than the238U projectiles show asymmetric break-up and odd-even effects. They indicate a low energy fission process, induced mainly by dissociation in the electro-magnetic field for the U/Pb-system, or by peripheral nuclear interactions for the U/Be-system.

  10. EFFECTS OF PARTICLE EVAPORATION ON THE ANGULAR MOMENTUM OF THE EMITTING NUCLEUS FOR DEEP INELASTIC AND COMPOUND NUCLEAR REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, S.K.; Moretto, L.G.

    1980-09-01

    A model is developed which allows one to calculate analytically the angular momentum removed, and the angular momentum misalignment created by the evaporation of light particles from an excited nucleus. The mass, temperature, and angular momentum of the emitting nucleus are explicitly considered. The formalism applies equally well to heavy ion and compound nuclear reactions.

  11. Petawatt laser pulses for proton-boron high gain fusion with avalanche reactions excluding problems of nuclear radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich; Lalousis, Paraskevas; Giuffrida, Lorenzo; Margarone, Daniele; Korn, Georg; Eliezer, Shalom; Miley, George H.; Moustaizis, Stavros; Mourou, Gérard

    2015-05-01

    An alternative way may be possible for igniting solid density hydrogen-11B (HB11) fuel. The use of >petawatt-ps laser pulses from the non-thermal ignition based on ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks by the nonlinear (ponderomotive) force, has to be combined with the measured ultrahigh magnetic fields in the 10 kilotesla range for cylindrical trapping. The evaluation of measured alpha particles from HB11 reactions arrives at the conclusion that apart from the usual binary nuclear reactions, secondary reactions by an avalanche multiplication may cause the high gains, even much higher than from deuterium tritium fusion. This may be leading to a concept of clean economic power generation.

  12. Mechanisms of laser induced reactions in opaque heterogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, F.

    1993-11-01

    The technique of laser flash photolysis has been applied to both heterogeneous and homogeneous samples in order to increase understanding of the mechanisms of laser induced reactions at surfaces. Nanosecond diffuse reflectance laser flash photolysis has been used to study triplet state absorption and fluorescence emission of monomers and dimers of acridine orange and other dyes which are shown to aggregate when adsorbed on microcrystalline cellulose and on other surfaces. The properties of excited states within dyed fabrics have been evaluated in several cases. The mechanism of the yellowing of thermomechanical paper pulp has also been investigated and transients studied on nanosecond timescales for the first time. Triplet-triplet energy transfer from benzophenone to oxazine dyes, from eosin to anthracene, and from anthracene to azomethine dyes has been studied on both cellulose and silica surfaces. This work demonstrates the occurrence of energy transfer by static and dynamic mechanisms depending on both the nature of the surface and the adsorbed species. The first picosecond studies exciting directly into the charge transfer absorption bands of aromatic hydrocarbon/oxygen complexes formed in the presence of high pressures of oxygen have been carried out to demonstrate the role of charge-transfer interactions in determining the singlet oxygen formation efficiencies during quenching of electronically excited states by molecular oxygen. Nanosecond laser excitation of a series of naphthalene and anthracene derivatives in the presence and absence of oxygen has clearly demonstrated for the first time the importance of charge transfer interactions in determining oxygen quenching constants and singlet oxygen formation efficiencies.

  13. Persistent Skin Reactions and Aluminium Hypersensitivity Induced by Childhood Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Salik, Elaha; Løvik, Ida; Andersen, Klaus E; Bygum, Anette

    2016-11-02

    There is increasing awareness of reactions to vaccination that include persistent skin reactions. We present here a retrospective investigation of long-lasting skin reactions and aluminium hypersensitivity in children, based on medical records and questionnaires sent to the parents. In the 10-year period 2003 to 2013 we identified 47 children with persistent skin reactions caused by childhood vaccinations. Most patients had a typical presentation of persisting pruritic subcutaneous nodules. Five children had a complex diagnostic process involving paediatricians, orthopaedics and plastic surgeons. Two patients had skin biopsies performed from their skin lesions, and 2 patients had the nodules surgically removed. Forty-two children had a patch-test performed with 2% aluminium chloride hexahydrate in petrolatum and 39 of them (92%) had a positive reaction. The persistent skin reactions were treated with potent topical corticosteroids and disappeared slowly. Although we advised families to continue vaccination of their children, one-third of parents omitted or postponed further vaccinations.

  14. Identification of MHC Haplotypes Associated with Drug-induced Hypersensitivity Reactions in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Whritenour, Jessica; Sanford, Jonathan C; Houle, Christopher; Adkins, Karissa K

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions can significantly impact drug development and use. Studies to understand risk factors for drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions have identified genetic association with specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. Interestingly, drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions can occur in nonhuman primates; however, association between drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles has not been described. In this study, tissue samples were collected from 62 cynomolgus monkeys from preclinical studies in which 9 animals had evidence of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Microsatellite analysis was used to determine MHC haplotypes for each animal. A total of 7 haplotypes and recombinant MHC haplotypes were observed, with distribution frequency comparable to known MHC I allele frequency in cynomolgus monkeys. Genetic association analysis identified alleles from the M3 haplotype of the MHC I B region (B*011:01, B*075:01, B*079:01, B*070:02, B*098:05, and B*165:01) to be significantly associated (χ(2) test for trend, p < 0.05) with occurrence of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Sequence similarity from alignment of alleles in the M3 haplotype B region and HLA alleles associated with drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions in humans was 86% to 93%. These data demonstrate that MHC alleles in cynomolgus monkeys are associated with drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions, similar to HLA alleles in humans.

  15. On the implementation of a chain nuclear reaction of thermonuclear fusion on the basis of the p+11B process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, V. S.; Krainov, V. P.; Zagreev, B. V.; Matafonov, A. P.

    2015-07-01

    Various theoretical and experimental schemes for implementing a thermonuclear reactor on the basis of the p+11B reaction are considered. They include beam collisions, fusion in degenerate plasmas, ignition upon plasma acceleration by ponderomotive forces, and the irradiation of a solid-state target from 11B with a proton beam under conditions of a Coulomb explosion of hydrogen microdrops. The possibility of employing ultra-short high-intensity laser pulses to initiate the p+11B reaction under conditions far from thermodynamic equilibrium is discussed. This and some other weakly radioactive thermonuclear reactions are promising owing to their ecological cleanness—there are virtually no neutrons among fusion products. Nuclear reactions that follow the p+11B reaction may generate high-energy protons, sustaining a chain reaction, and this is an advantage of the p+11B option. The approach used also makes it possible to study nuclear reactions under conditions close to those in the early Universe or in the interior of stars.

  16. Proteomic analysis of cellular response induced by boron neutron capture reaction in human squamous cell carcinoma SAS cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Itoh, Tasuku; Imamichi, Shoji; Kikuhara, Sota; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Hirai, Takahisa; Saito, Soichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Minoru; Murakami, Yasufumi; Baiseitov, Diaz; Berikkhanova, Kulzhan; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Imahori, Yoshio; Itami, Jun; Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2015-12-01

    To understand the mechanism of cell death induced by boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR), we performed proteome analyses of human squamous tumor SAS cells after BNCR. Cells were irradiated with thermal neutron beam at KUR after incubation under boronophenylalanine (BPA)(+) and BPA(-) conditions. BNCR mainly induced typical apoptosis in SAS cells 24h post-irradiation. Proteomic analysis in SAS cells suggested that proteins functioning in endoplasmic reticulum, DNA repair, and RNA processing showed dynamic changes at early phase after BNCR and could be involved in the regulation of cellular response to BNCR. We found that the BNCR induces fragments of endoplasmic reticulum-localized lymphoid-restricted protein (LRMP). The fragmentation of LRMP was also observed in the rat tumor graft model 20 hours after BNCT treatment carried out at the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. These data suggest that dynamic changes of LRMP could be involved during cellular response to BNCR.

  17. Evaluation of excitation functions of proton and deuteron induced reactions on enriched tellurium isotopes with special relevance to the production of iodine-124.

    PubMed

    Aslam, M N; Sudár, S; Hussain, M; Malik, A A; Shah, H A; Qaim, S M

    2010-09-01

    Cross-section data for the production of medically important radionuclide (124)I via five proton and deuteron induced reactions on enriched tellurium isotopes were evaluated. The nuclear model codes, STAPRE, EMPIRE and TALYS, were used for consistency checks of the experimental data. Recommended excitation functions were derived using a well-defined statistical procedure. Therefrom integral yields were calculated. The various production routes of (124)I were compared. Presently the (124)Te(p,n)(124)I reaction is the method of choice; however, the (125)Te(p,2n)(124)I reaction also appears to have great potential.

  18. An Improved Reaction Rate Formulation for Charged-Particle Induced Thermonuclear Reaction of {sup 2}H(d,{gamma}){sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Azni Abdul; Yusof, Norhasliza; Idris, Mahirah; Kassim, Hasan Abu

    2011-03-30

    The reaction rate formula utilized in compilations such as the Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of Reaction Rates (NACRE) uses low energy approximation due to temperatures in stars are in the region of a few keVs. Most nuclear reaction experiments were done in MeV range and the interior temperatures of massive stars are {approx}10{sup 9} K. Hence an improved formulation for calculating the nuclear reaction rate that is applicable to high temperatures is discussed in this work. The exact tunneling probability that is applicable for all energies is obtained by solving the Schroedinger equation. This yields an enhanced expression for the astrophysical S-factor for calculating the thermonuclear reaction rate at high temperature. The thermonuclear reaction rate from this work is applied to the {sup 2}H(d,{gamma}){sup 4}He reaction and is compared with the NACRE compilation. This improved reaction rate can be included in the nuclear reaction network in a Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) code or a stellar nuclear network code.

  19. Nuclear-reaction studies via the observation of unbound outgoing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bice, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the production of fast ..cap alpha..-particles in /sup 12/C induced reactions have been investigated for the /sup 12/C + /sup 208/Pb system at bombarding energies of E(/sup 12/C) = 132, 187 and 230 MeV. Absolute cross sections have been determined for the reactions /sup 208/Pb (/sup 12/C, /sup 8/Be (g.s.)), /sup 208/Pb(/sup 12/C, /sup 8/Be (2.94 MeV)) and /sup 208/Pb (/sup 12/C, /sup 12/C* ..-->.. ..cap alpha.. + /sup 8/Be) by double and triple coincidence measurements of the sequential decay ..cap alpha..-particles. Inclusive ..cap alpha..-particle production cross sections were also measured at E (/sup 12/C) = 187 MeV for comparison. It is found that the simple inelastic scattering process (/sup 12/C, /sup 12/C* ..-->.. ..cap alpha.. + /sup 8/Be) does not contribute significantly to the production of fast ..cap alpha..-particles but that the production of /sup 8/Be nuclei by projectile fragmentation is an important source of ..cap alpha..-particles. At the highest bombarding energy investigated (19 MeV/A) it appears that the /sup 12/C ..-->.. 3..cap alpha.. fragmentation reaction becomes more prominent at the expense of the /sup 12/C ..-->.. ..cap alpha.. + /sup 8/Be fragmentation channel. It is concluded that projectile spectroscopic properties and/or final state interactions are important in fragmentation reactions for these bombarding energies. In a kinematically complete experiment the direct and the sequential breakup channels of 10 MeV/A /sup 7/Li projectiles have been investigated with /sup 12/C and /sup 208/Pb targets. By appropriate arrangement of detector telescopes it was possible to define a kinematical window which allowed for the unambigious observation of both the direct (to the ..cap alpha..-t continuum) and the sequential components of a heavy-ion projectile breakup reaction. A semiclassical Monte Carlo type projectile breakup calculation was constructed which qualitatively reproduced the measured ..cap alpha

  20. [Adverse cutaneous reactions induced by exposure to woods].

    PubMed

    Chomiczewska-Skóra, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    Various adverse cutaneous reactions may occur as a result of exposure to wood dust or solid woods. These include allergic contact dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis and, more rarely, contact urticaria, photoallergic and phototoxic reactions. Also cases of erythema multiforme-like reactions have been reported. Contact dermatitis, both allergic and irritant, is most frequently provoked by exotic woods, e.g. wood of the Dalbergia spp., Machaerium scleroxylon or Tectona grandis. Cutaneous reactions are usually associated with manual or machine woodworking, in occupational setting or as a hobby. As a result of exposure to wood dust, airborne contact dermatitis is often diagnosed. Cases of allergic contact dermatitis due to solid woods of finished articles as jewelry or musical instruments have also been reported. The aim of the paper is to present various adverse skin reactions related to exposure to woods, their causal factors and sources of exposure, based on the review of literature.

  1. Study of nuclear reactions producing 36Cl by micro-AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luís, H.; Jesus, A. P.; Fonseca, M.; Cruz, J.; Galaviz, D.; Franco, N.; Alves, E.

    2016-01-01

    36Cl is one of several short to medium lived isotopes (as compared to the earth age) whose abundances at the earlier solar system may help to clarify its formation process. There are two generally accepted possible models for the production of this radionuclide: it originated from the ejecta of a nearby supernova (where 36Cl was most probably produced in the s-process by neutron irradiation of 35Cl) and/or it was produced by in-situ irradiation of nebular dust by energetic particles (mostly, p, a, 3He -X-wind irradiation model). The objective of the present work is to measure the cross section of the 37Cl(p,d)36Cl and 35Cl(d,p)36Cl nuclear reactions, by measuring the 36Cl content of AgCl samples (previously bombarded with high energy protons and deuterons) with AMS, taking advantage of the very low detection limits of this technique for chlorine measurements. For that, the micro-AMS system of the LF1/ITN laboratory had to be optimized for chlorine measurements, as to our knowledge this type of measurements had never been performed in such a system (AMS with micro-beam). Here are presented the first results of these developments, namely the tests in terms of precision and reproducibility that were done by comparing AgCl blanks irradiated at the Portuguese National Reactor with standards produced by the dilution of the NIST SRM 4943 standard material.

  2. Melter Feed Reactions at T ≤ 700°C for Nuclear Waste Vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel R.; Rice, Jarrett A.; Riley, Brian J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2015-07-23

    Batch reactions and phase transitions in a nuclear waste feed heated at 5 K min-1 up to 600°C were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, and X-ray diffraction. Quenched samples were leached in deionized water at room temperature and 80°C to extract soluble salts and early glass-forming melt, respectively. To determine the content and composition of leachable phases, the leachates were analyzed by the inductively-coupled plasma spectroscopy. By ~400°C, gibbsite and borax lost water and converted to amorphous and intermediate crystalline phases. Between 400°C and 600°C, the sodium borate early glass-forming melt reacted with amorphous aluminum oxide and calcium oxide to form intermediate products containing Al and Ca. At ~600°C, half Na and B converted to the early glass-forming melt, and quartz began to dissolve in the melt.

  3. New supersonic gas jet target for low energy nuclear reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favela, F.; Acosta, L.; Andrade, E.; Araujo, V.; Huerta, A.; de Lucio, O. G.; Murillo, G.; Ortiz, M. E.; Policroniades, R.; Santa Rita, P.; Varela, A.; Chávez, E.

    2015-12-01

    A windowless supersonic gas jet target (SUGAR) has been put in operation recently in Mexico. It is the first target of its kind in the country and the region. New research opportunities become available with this facility through the study of the direct beam-gas interaction: nuclear physics and astrophysics, atomic physics, interaction of radiation with matter and other interdisciplinary applications. A general description of the apparatus and its commissioning is given here. Air, nitrogen and argon jets were produced. Proton and deuteron beams were used to measure key parameters of the system to compare with theoretical estimates. In addition, as a first study case, we present data from the 14N (d ,α )12C reaction, at center of mass energies between 1.9 and 3.0 MeV with an E-Δ E telescope detector at 35°. Excitation functions for several excited states were constructed and an 16O resonance at 22.72 MeV was confirmed.

  4. Evaluation on thermal explosion induced by slightly exothermic interface reaction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ma-Hong; Li, Yong-Fu; Sun, Jin-Hua; Hasegawa, Kazutoshi

    2004-09-10

    An asphalt-salt mixture (ASM), which once caused a fire and explosion in a reprocessing plant, was prepared by imitating the real bituminization process of waste on a lab scale to evaluate its actual thermal hazards. Heat flux reaction calorimeters were used to measure the release of heat for the simulated ASM at a constant heating rate and at a constant temperature, respectively. Experimental results show that the reaction in the ASM below about 250 degrees C is a slightly exothermic interface reaction between the asphalt and the salt particles contained in the asphalt, and that the heat release rate increases sharply above about 250 degrees C due to melting of the salt particles. The reaction rates were formulated on the basis of an assumed reaction model, and the kinetic parameters were determined. Using the model with the kinetic parameters, temperature changes with time and drum-radius axes for the ASM-filled drum were numerically simulated assuming a one-dimensional infinite cylinder system, where the drum was being cooled at an ambient temperature of 50 degrees C. The minimum filling temperature, at which the runaway reaction (MFTRR) can occur for the simulated ASM in the drum is about 194 degrees C. Furthermore, a very good linear correlation exists between this MFTRR and the initial radius of salt particles formed in the bituminization product. The critical filling temperature to the runaway reaction is about 162 degrees C for the asphalt-salt mixture, containing zero-size salt particles, filled in the same drum at an ambient temperature of 50 degrees C. Thus, the runaway reaction will never occur in the drum filled with the asphalt-salt mixture under the conditions of the filling temperature below 162 degrees C and a constant ambient temperature of 50 degrees C. As a consequence, the ASM explosion occurred in the reprocessing plant likely was due to a slightly exothermically reaction and self heating.

  5. Alpha-induced reaction studies using low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hu, J.; Kubono, S.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.

    2012-11-12

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Studies on proton and alpha resonance scatterings, ({alpha}, p) reactions, and other types of measurements ({beta}-decay lifetimes etc.) have been performed using RI beams at CRIB, motivated by interests on astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among the studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Li+{alpha}/{sup 7}Be+{alpha} resonant scatterings are presented.

  6. Apparent Polyploidization after Gamma Irradiation: Pitfalls in the Use of Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) for the Estimation of Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Gene Copy Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Winnie W. Y.; Lake, Vanessa; Banos, Connie; Davies, Justin; Banati, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has been widely used to quantify changes in gene copy numbers after radiation exposure. Here, we show that gamma irradiation ranging from 10 to 100 Gy of cells and cell-free DNA samples significantly affects the measured qPCR yield, due to radiation-induced fragmentation of the DNA template and, therefore, introduces errors into the estimation of gene copy numbers. The radiation-induced DNA fragmentation and, thus, measured qPCR yield varies with temperature not only in living cells, but also in isolated DNA irradiated under cell-free conditions. In summary, the variability in measured qPCR yield from irradiated samples introduces a significant error into the estimation of both mitochondrial and nuclear gene copy numbers and may give spurious evidence for polyploidization. PMID:23722662

  7. Radiotherapy-induced skin reactions: assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Glover, Deborah; Harmer, Victoria

    Radiotherapy, the use of high-energy rays to either kill cancer cells or treat some benign tumours, is undoubtedly a positive intervention. However, as the primary mode of action in radiotherapy treatment is the killing of cells to prevent replication, other non-cancerous cells may be affected. For example, up to 85% of patients will experience some form of skin reaction, which will range from local erythema to moist desquamation. Such reactions are not only distressing and painful for the patient, if severe enough, they may warrant a halt in treatment. This article outlines the aims and nature of radiotherapy, and then discusses the aetiology of skin reactions, risk factors for reaction, and assessment tools. Management interventions will also be shown, with emphasis on silicone dressings.

  8. Applications of dynamic nuclear polarization to the study of reactions and reagents in organic and biomolecular chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Christian; Bowen, Sean

    2010-08-07

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is an important spectroscopic tool for the identification and structural characterization of molecules in chemistry and biochemistry. The most significant limitation of NMR compared to other spectroscopies is its relatively low sensitivity, which thus often requires long measurement times or large amounts of sample. A way of increasing sensitivity of single scan NMR spectra by several orders of magnitude is through hyperpolarization of nuclear spins. Dynamic nuclear polarization allows hyperpolarization of most spins in small molecules encountered in chemistry and biochemistry. NMR spectra of small amounts of samples from natural source, or from chemical synthesis can readily be acquired. Perhaps more interestingly, the availability of the entire hyperpolarized NMR signal in one single scan allows the measurement of transient processes in real time, if applied together with a stopped-flow technique. Through observation of chemical shift, different reactant and product species can be distinguished, and kinetics and mechanisms, for example in enzyme catalyzed reactions, can be elucidated. Real-time hyperpolarization-enhanced NMR is uniquely amenable to correlating atomic positions not only through space, but also over time between reactant and product species. Such correlations carry mechanistic information about a reaction, and can prove reaction pathways. Applications of this technique are emerging in different areas of chemistry concerned with rapid reactions, including not only enzymatic processes, but also chemical catalysis and protein folding.

  9. [DRUG INDUCED EXANTHEMA AND SEVERE CUTANEOUS DRUG REACTIONS].

    PubMed

    Bensaïd, Benoît; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Lebrun-Vignes, Bénédicte; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2015-09-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) are delayed hypersensivities. Their clinical presentation and severity are very diverse ranging from the frequent and benign exanthemas to the rare but severe CADR involving deep organs in the case of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or leading to skin bulla and epidermal detachment in toxic epidermal necrolysis. The main differential diagnoses are infections, especially viral ones, which could give clinical symptoms identical to those occurring in CADR.

  10. Nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase is required for graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Valdepeñas, Carmen; Casanova, Lucía; Colmenero, Isabel; Arriero, Mar; González, África; Lozano, Nieves; González-Vicent, Marta; Díaz, Miguel A.; Madero, Luís; Fresno, Manuel; Ramírez, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Background Donor T lymphocytes are directly responsible for graft-versus-host disease. Molecules important in T-cell function may, therefore, be appropriate targets for graft-versus-host disease therapy and/or prophylaxis. Here we analyzed whether nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase might have a role in graft-versus-host disease. Design and Methods We studied the expression of nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase in human samples from patients with graft-versus-host disease. We also explored the effect of nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase in a murine model of graft-versus-host disease using donor cells from aly/aly mice (deficient in nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase) and C57BL/6 mice (control). Results We detected expression of nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase in T-lymphocytes in the pathological lesions of patients with acute graft-versus-host disease. Mice transplanted with aly/aly T lymphocytes did not develop graft-versus-host disease at all, while mice receiving C57BL/6 cells died of a lethal form of the disease. Deficiency of nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase did not affect the engrafting ability of donor T cells, but severely impaired their expansion capacity early after transplantation, and aly/aly T cells showed a higher proportion of apoptosis than did C57BL/6 T cells. Effector T lymphocytes were the T-cell subset most affected by nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase deficiency. We also detected lower amounts of inflammatory cytokines in the serum of mice receiving aly/aly T cells than in the serum of mice receiving C57BL/6 T cells. Conclusions Our results show that nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase has a role in graft-versus-host disease by maintaining the viability of activated alloreactive T lymphocytes. PMID:20823135

  11. Perspective: Vibrational-induced steric effects in bimolecular reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kopin

    2015-02-01

    The concept of preferred collision geometry in a bimolecular reaction is at the heart of reaction dynamics. Exemplified by a series of crossed molecular beam studies on the reactions of a C-H stretch-excited CHD3(v1 = 1) with F, Cl, and O(3P) atoms, two types of steric control of chemical reactivity will be highlighted. A passive control is governed in a reaction with strong anisotropic entry valley that can significantly steer the incoming trajectories. This disorientation effect is illustrated by the F and O(3P) + CHD3(v1 = 1) reactions. In the former case, the long-range anisotropic interaction acts like an optical "negative" lens by deflecting the trajectories away from the favored transition-state geometry, and thus inhibiting the bond rupture of the stretch-excited CHD3. On the contrary, the interaction between O(3P) and CHD3(v1 = 1) behaves as a "positive" lens by funneling the large impact-parameter collisions into the cone of acceptance, and thereby enhances the reactivity. As for reactions with relatively weak anisotropic interactions in the entry valley, an active control can be performed by exploiting the polarization property of the infrared excitation laser to polarize the reactants in space, as demonstrated in the reaction of Cl with a pre-aligned CHD3(v1 = 1) reactant. A simpler case, the end-on versus side-on collisions, will be elucidated for demonstrating a means to disentangle the impact-parameter averaging. A few general remarks about some closely related issues, such as mode-, bond-selectivity, and Polanyi's rules, are made.

  12. Perspective: Vibrational-induced steric effects in bimolecular reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kopin

    2015-02-28

    The concept of preferred collision geometry in a bimolecular reaction is at the heart of reaction dynamics. Exemplified by a series of crossed molecular beam studies on the reactions of a C–H stretch-excited CHD{sub 3}(v{sub 1} = 1) with F, Cl, and O({sup 3}P) atoms, two types of steric control of chemical reactivity will be highlighted. A passive control is governed in a reaction with strong anisotropic entry valley that can significantly steer the incoming trajectories. This disorientation effect is illustrated by the F and O({sup 3}P) + CHD{sub 3}(v{sub 1} = 1) reactions. In the former case, the long-range anisotropic interaction acts like an optical “negative” lens by deflecting the trajectories away from the favored transition-state geometry, and thus inhibiting the bond rupture of the stretch-excited CHD{sub 3}. On the contrary, the interaction between O({sup 3}P) and CHD{sub 3}(v{sub 1} = 1) behaves as a “positive” lens by funneling the large impact-parameter collisions into the cone of acceptance, and thereby enhances the reactivity. As for reactions with relatively weak anisotropic interactions in the entry valley, an active control can be performed by exploiting the polarization property of the infrared excitation laser to polarize the reactants in space, as demonstrated in the reaction of Cl with a pre-aligned CHD{sub 3}(v{sub 1} = 1) reactant. A simpler case, the end-on versus side-on collisions, will be elucidated for demonstrating a means to disentangle the impact-parameter averaging. A few general remarks about some closely related issues, such as mode-, bond-selectivity, and Polanyi’s rules, are made.

  13. Metabolites as biomarkers of adverse reactions following vaccination: A pilot study using nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics.

    PubMed

    McClenathan, Bruce M; Stewart, Delisha A; Spooner, Christina E; Pathmasiri, Wimal W; Burgess, Jason P; McRitchie, Susan L; Choi, Y Sammy; Sumner, Susan C J

    2017-03-01

    An Adverse Event Following Immunization (AEFI) is an adverse reaction to a vaccination that goes above and beyond the usual side effects associated with vaccinations. One serious AEFI related to the smallpox vaccine is myopericarditis. Metabolomics involves the study of the low molecular weight metabolite profile of cells, tissues, and biological fluids, and provides a functional readout of the phenotype. Metabolomics may help identify a particular metabolic signature in serum of subjects who are predisposed to developing AEFIs. The goal of this study was to identify metabolic markers that may predict the development of adverse events following smallpox vaccination. Serum samples were collected from military personnel prior to and following receipt of smallpox vaccine. The study population included five subjects who were clinically diagnosed with myopericarditis, 30 subjects with asymptomatic elevation of troponins, and 31 subjects with systemic symptoms following immunization, and 34 subjects with no AEFI, serving as controls. Two-hundred pre- and post-smallpox vaccination sera were analyzed by untargeted metabolomics using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Baseline (pre-) and post-vaccination samples from individuals who experienced clinically verified myocarditis or asymptomatic elevation of troponins were more metabolically distinguishable pre- and post-vaccination compared to individuals who only experienced systemic symptoms, or controls. Metabolomics profiles pre- and post-receipt of vaccine differed substantially when an AEFI resulted. This study is the first to describe pre- and post-vaccination metabolic profiles of subjects who developed an adverse event following immunization. The study demonstrates the promise of metabolites for determining mechanisms associated with subjects who develop AEFI and the potential to develop predictive biomarkers.

  14. Population of Nuclei Via 7Li-Induced Binary Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Rodney M.; Phair, Larry W.; Descovich, M.; Cromaz, Mario; Deleplanque, M.A.; Fall on, Paul; Lee, I-Yang; Macchiavelli, A.O.; McMahan, Margaret A.; Moretto, Luciano G.; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E.; Sinha,Shrabani; Stephens, Frank S.; Ward, David; Wiedeking, Mathis

    2005-08-08

    The authors have investigated the population of nuclei formed in binary reactions involving {sup 7}Li beams on targets of {sup 160}Gd and {sup 184}W. The {sup 7}Li + {sup 184}W data were taken in the first experiment using the LIBERACE Ge-array in combination with the STARS Si {Delta}E-E telescope system at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. By using the Wilczynski binary transfer model, in combination with a standard evaporation model, they are able to reproduce the experimental results. This is a useful method for predicting the population of neutron-rich heavy nuclei formed in binary reactions involving beams of weakly bound nuclei formed in binary reactions involving beams of weakly bound nuclei and will be of use in future spectroscopic studies.

  15. (α, γ) reaction induced background events for rare event experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Ashok; Zhang, Chao; Mei, Dongming

    2016-09-01

    We report an observation of (α, γ) reaction at the Soudan mine. With a 12-Liter scintillation neutron detector at Soudan mine for about 5 years of data taking, we have observed (α, γ) reaction, which can generate potential background events for dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. We have simulated the alpha flux from radon decay using the measured radon concentration in Soudan mine. The convolution of the alpha flux and the cross-section of (α, γ) allows us to determine the rate of high energy gamma from (α, γ) reaction. This rate is compared to the measured event rate. We demonstrate that the modulation of (α, γ) event rate has similar pattern as the radon modulation observed independently in Soudan mine. This work is supported by NSF in part by the NSF PHY-0758120, DOE Grant DE-FG02-10ER46709, and the State of South Dakota.

  16. Nuclear spectroscopy study of the isotopes populated via multinucleon transfer in the 90Zr + 208Pb reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ur, C. A.; Corradi, L.; Stefanini, A. M.; Behera, B. R.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Szilner, S.; Beghini, S.; Farnea, E.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Haas, F.; Pollarolo, G.

    2006-08-14

    The present work takes advantage of the multinucleon transfer mechanism between heavy reaction partners to study the population pattern of excited nuclear states in near spherical Zirconium isotopes following the 90Zr + 208Pb reaction at an energy closed to the Coulomb barrier. Both the projectile and the target are well known closed shell nuclei offering an optimum situation for clean experimental and theoretical conditions. Total kinetic energy loss (TKEL) distributions were compared with calculations performed with the GRAZING code. The ability to use the TKEL as a selection tool for the states at different excitation energies was shown.

  17. Physiological Environment Induces Quick Response – Slow Exhaustion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hiroi, Noriko; Lu, James; Iba, Keisuke; Tabira, Akito; Yamashita, Shuji; Okada, Yasunori; Flamm, Christoph; Oka, Kotaro; Köhler, Gottfried; Funahashi, Akira

    2011-01-01

    In vivo environments are highly crowded and inhomogeneous, which may affect reaction processes in cells. In this study we examined the effects of intracellular crowding and an inhomogeneity on the behavior of in vivo reactions by calculating the spectral dimension (ds), which can be translated into the reaction rate function. We compared estimates of anomaly parameters obtained from fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) data with fractal dimensions derived from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image analysis. FCS analysis indicated that the anomalous property was linked to physiological structure. Subsequent TEM analysis provided an in vivo illustration; soluble molecules likely percolate between intracellular clusters, which are constructed in a self-organizing manner. We estimated a cytoplasmic spectral dimension ds to be 1.39 ± 0.084. This result suggests that in vivo reactions initially run faster than the same reactions in a homogeneous space; this conclusion is consistent with the anomalous character indicated by FCS analysis. We further showed that these results were compatible with our Monte-Carlo simulation in which the anomalous behavior of mobile molecules correlates with the intracellular environment, leading to description as a percolation cluster, as demonstrated using TEM analysis. We confirmed by the simulation that the above-mentioned in vivo like properties are different from those of homogeneously concentrated environments. Additionally, simulation results indicated that crowding level of an environment might affect diffusion rate of reactant. Such knowledge of the spatial information enables us to construct realistic models for in vivo diffusion and reaction systems. PMID:21960972

  18. Lattice location of O18 in ion implanted Fe crystals by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, channeling and nuclear reaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vairavel, Mathayan; Sundaravel, Balakrishnan; Panigrahi, Binaykumar

    2016-09-01

    There are contradictory theoretical predictions of lattice location of oxygen interstitial atom at tetrahedral and octahedral interstices in bcc Fe. For validating these predictions, 300 keV O18 ions with fluence of 5 × 1015 ions/cm2 are implanted into bcc Fe single crystals at room temperature and annealed at 400 °C. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA)/channeling measurements are carried out with 850 keV protons. The lattice location of implanted O18 is analysed using the α-particles yield from O18(p,α)N15 nuclear reaction. The tilt angular scans of α-particle yield along <110> and <100> axial directions are performed at room temperature. Lattice location of O18 is found to be at tetrahedral interstitial site by comparing the experimental scan with simulated scans using FLUX7 software.

  19. Application of evolved gas analysis to cold-cap reactions of melter feeds for nuclear waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2014-04-30

    In the vitrification of nuclear wastes, the melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming and modifying additives) experiences multiple gas-evolving reactions in an electrical glass-melting furnace. We employed the thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TGA-GC-MS) combination to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Apart from identifying the gases evolved, we performed quantitative analysis relating the weighed sum of intensities of individual gases linearly proportional with the differential themogravimetry. The proportionality coefficients were obtained by three methods based on the stoichiometry, least squares, and calibration. The linearity was shown to be a good first-order approximation, in spite of the complicated overlapping reactions.

  20. Measurement of neutron-induced reactions on 242mAm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C.-Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Dance Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Neutron-induced reaction cross sections of 242mAm were measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. A new neutron-capture cross section was determined relative to a simultaneous measurement of the well-known 242mAm(n,f) cross section. The (n, γ) cross section was measured from thermal to an incident energy of 1 eV. Our new 242mAm fission cross section was normalized to ENDF/B-VII.1 and agreed well with the (n,f) cross section reported in the literature from thermal energy to 1 keV. The capture-to-fission ratio was determined from thermal energy to En = 0.1 eV, and it was found to be (n, γ)/(n,f) = 26(4)% compared to 19% from ENDF/B-VII.1. Our latest results will be reported. US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and Los Alamos National Security, LLC Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396 and U.S. DOE/NNSA Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development.

  1. Constraining the equation of state of nuclear matter from fusion hindrance in reactions leading to the production of superheavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselsky, M.; Klimo, J.; Ma, Yu-Gang; Souliotis, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    The mechanism of fusion hindrance, an effect preventing the synthesis of superheavy elements in the reactions of cold and hot fusion, is investigated using the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation, where Coulomb interaction is introduced. A strong sensitivity is observed both to the modulus of incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter, controlling the competition of surface tension and Coulomb repulsion, and to the stiffness of the density-dependence of symmetry energy, influencing the formation of the neck prior to scission. The experimental fusion probabilities were for the first time used to derive constraints on the nuclear equation of state. A strict constraint on the modulus of incompressibility of nuclear matter K0=240 -260 MeV is obtained while the stiff density-dependences of the symmetry energy (γ >1 ) are rejected.

  2. Nuclear Cluster Aspects in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, Shigeru

    2010-03-01

    The role of nuclear clustering is discussed for nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution with Cluster Nucleosynthesis Diagram (CND) proposed before. Special emphasis is placed on α-induced stellar reactions together with molecular states for O and C burning.

  3. Post deposition annealing of Hf aluminate films on Si investigated by ion backscattering and nuclear reaction analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotti, L.; Pezzi, R. P.; Copel, M.; Baumvol, I. J. R.

    2008-04-01

    Layered Al2O3/HfO2 structures were deposited on Si by atomic layer deposition and the atomic transport during rapid thermal annealing was investigated by low energy ion scattering, medium energy ion scattering and narrow nuclear resonant reaction profiling. The structures were dissociated during annealing by different mechanisms, such as interdiffusion of the layers and metal loss from the dielectric. The possible detrimental effects on device electrical properties of the observed decomposition are discussed.

  4. Low-energy deuteron-induced reactions on 93Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Bém, P.; Fischer, U.; Honusek, M.; Koning, A. J.; Mrázek, J.; Šimečková, E.; Štefánik, M.; Závorka, L.

    2013-07-01

    The activation cross sections of (d,p), (d,2n), (d,2np+nd+t), (d,2nα), and (d,pα) reactions on 93Nb were measured in the energy range from 1 to 20 MeV using the stacked-foil technique. Then, within a simultaneous analysis of elastic scattering and reaction data, the available elastic-scattering data analysis was carried out in order to obtain the optical potential for reaction cross-section calculations. Particular attention was paid to the description of the breakup mechanism and direct reaction stripping and pick-up, followed by pre-equilibrium and compound-nucleus calculations. The measured cross sections as well as all available deuteron activation data of 93Nb were compared with results of local model calculations carried out using the codes fresco and stapre-h and both default and particular predictions of the code talys-1.4 and tendl-2012-evaluated data.

  5. Pulmonary reactions caused by welding-induced decomposed trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoegren, B.P.; Plato, N.; Alexandersson, R.; Eklund, A.; Falkenberg, C. )

    1991-01-01

    This is the report of a welder who performed argon-shielded electric arc welding in an atmosphere containing trichloroethylene. He developed immediate respiratory symptoms, pulmonary edema 12 hours after exposure, and recurring dyspnea ten days after exposure. These pulmonary reactions might be explained by inhalation of decomposition products of trichloroethylene such as dichloroacetyl chloride and phosgene.

  6. Hybrid approach for including electronic and nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen transfer reactions in enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billeter, Salomon R.; Webb, Simon P.; Iordanov, Tzvetelin; Agarwal, Pratul K.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2001-04-01

    A hybrid approach for simulating proton and hydride transfer reactions in enzymes is presented. The electronic quantum effects are incorporated with an empirical valence bond approach. The nuclear quantum effects of the transferring hydrogen are included with a mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics method in which the hydrogen nucleus is described as a multidimensional vibrational wave function. The free energy profiles are obtained as functions of a collective reaction coordinate. A perturbation formula is derived to incorporate the vibrationally adiabatic nuclear quantum effects into the free energy profiles. The dynamical effects are studied with the molecular dynamics with quantum transitions (MDQT) surface hopping method, which incorporates nonadiabatic transitions among the adiabatic hydrogen vibrational states. The MDQT method is combined with a reactive flux approach to calculate the transmission coefficient and to investigate the real-time dynamics of reactive trajectories. This hybrid approach includes nuclear quantum effects such as zero point energy, hydrogen tunneling, and excited vibrational states, as well as the dynamics of the complete enzyme and solvent. The nuclear quantum effects are incorporated during the generation of the free energy profiles and dynamical trajectories rather than subsequently added as corrections. Moreover, this methodology provides detailed mechanistic information at the molecular level and allows the calculation of rates and kinetic isotope effects. An initial application of this approach to the enzyme liver alcohol dehydrogenase is also presented.

  7. Unexpected death due to cefuroxime-induced disulfiram-like reaction

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongmei; Zhang, Ji; Ren, Liang; Liu, Qian; Zhu, Shaohua

    2013-01-01

    Cefuoxime, a second-generation cephalosporin, is used in the treatment of Gram-positive infections. Here, we report a case cefuroxime-induced disulfiram-like reaction which led to sudden death of the patient. PMID:24014919

  8. Suppression of nuclear spin bath fluctuations in self-assembled quantum dots induced by inhomogeneous strain.

    PubMed

    Chekhovich, E A; Hopkinson, M; Skolnick, M S; Tartakovskii, A I

    2015-02-23

    Interaction with nuclear spins leads to decoherence and information loss in solid-state electron-spin qubits. One particular, ineradicable source of electron decoherence arises from decoherence of the nuclear spin bath, driven by nuclear-nuclear dipolar interactions. Owing to its many-body nature nuclear decoherence is difficult to predict, especially for an important class of strained nanostructures where nuclear quadrupolar effects have a significant but largely unknown impact. Here, we report direct measurement of nuclear spin bath coherence in individual self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots: spin-echo coherence times in the range 1.2-4.5 ms are found. Based on these values, we demonstrate that strain-induced quadrupolar interactions make nuclear spin fluctuations much slower compared with lattice-matched GaAs/AlGaAs structures. Our findings demonstrate that quadrupolar effects can potentially be used to engineer optically active III-V semiconductor spin-qubits with a nearly noise-free nuclear spin bath, previously achievable only in nuclear spin-0 semiconductors, where qubit network interconnection and scaling are challenging.

  9. Nuclear transparency in 90 °c.m. quasielastic A(p,2p) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aclander, J.; Alster, J.; Asryan, G.; Averiche, Y.; Barton, D. S.; Baturin, V.; Buktoyarova, N.; Bunce, G.; Carroll, A. S.; Christensen, N.; Courant, H.; Durrant, S.; Fang, G.; Gabriel, K.; Gushue, S.; Heller, K. J.; Heppelmann, S.; Kosonovsky, I.; Leksanov, A.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malki, A.; Mardor, I.; Mardor, Y.; Marshak, M. L.; Martel, D.; Minina, E.; Minor, E.; Navon, I.; Nicholson, H.; Ogawa, A.; Panebratsev, Y.; Piasetzky, E.; Roser, T.; Russell, J. J.; Schetkovsky, A.; Shimanskiy, S.; Shupe, M. A.; Sutton, S.; Tanaka, M.; Tang, A.; Tsetkov, I.; Watson, J.; White, C.; Wu, J.-Y.; Zhalov, D.

    2004-07-01

    We summarize the results of two experimental programs at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron of BNL to measure the nuclear transparency of nuclei measured in the A(p,2p) quasielastic scattering process near 90° in the pp center of mass. The incident momenta varied from 5.9 to 14.4 GeV/c , corresponding to 4.8< Q2 <12.7 (GeV/c)2 . Taking into account the motion of the target proton in the nucleus, the effective incident momenta extended from 5.0 to 15.8 GeV/c . First, we describe the measurements with the newer experiment, E850, which had more complete kinematic definition of quasielastic events. E850 covered a larger range of incident momenta, and thus provided more information regarding the nature of the energy dependence of the nuclear transparency. In E850 the angular dependence of the nuclear transparency near 90° and the nuclear transparency deuterons were studied. Second, we review the techniques used in an earlier experiment, E834, and show that the two experiments are consistent for the carbon data. E834 also determines the nuclear transparencies for lithium, aluminum, copper, and lead nuclei as well as for carbon. A determination of the ( π+ , π+ p) transparencies is also reported. We find for both E850 and E834 that the A(p,2p) nuclear transparency, unlike that for A(e, e' p) nuclear transparency, is incompatible with a constant value versus energy as predicted by Glauber calculations. The A(p,2p) nuclear transparency for carbon and aluminum increases by a factor of two between 5.9 and 9.5 GeV/c incident proton momentum. At its peak the A(p,2p) nuclear transparency is ˜80% of the constant A(e, e' p) nuclear transparency. Then the nuclear transparency falls back to a value at least as small as that at 5.9 GeV/c , and is compatible with the Glauber level again. This oscillating behavior is generally interpreted as an interplay between two components of the pN scattering amplitude; one short ranged and perturbative, and the other long ranged and

  10. Population of Nuclei Via 7Li-Induced Binary Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R M; Phair, L W; Descovich, M; Cromaz, M; Deleplanque, M A; Fallon, P; Lee, I Y; Macchiavelli, A O; McMahan, M A; Moretto, L G; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E; Sinha, S; Stephens, F S; Ward, D; Wiedeking, M; Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Church, J A

    2005-08-09

    The authors have investigated the population of nuclei formed in binary reactions involving {sup 7}Li beams on targets of {sup 160}Gd and {sup 184}W. The {sup 7}Li + {sup 184}W data were taken in the first experiment using the LIBERACE Ge-array in combination with the STARS Si {Delta}E-E telescope system at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. By using the Wilczynski binary transfer model, in combination with a standard evaporation model, they are able to reproduce the experimental results. This is a useful method for predicting the population of neutron-rich heavy nuclei formed in binary reactions involving beams of weakly bound nuclei and will be of use in future spectroscopic studies.

  11. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirauchi, Ken-Ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the `cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets.

  12. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction.

    PubMed

    Hirauchi, Ken-Ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-08-26

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the 'cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets.

  13. Multimodal Fission in Heavy-Ion Induced Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovskiy, I. V.; Bogachev, A. A.; Iitkis, M. G.; Iitkis, J. M.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Dorvaux, O.; Rowley, N.; Schmitt, Ch.; Stuttge, L.

    2006-08-14

    Mass, energy and folding angle distributions of the fission fragments as well as multiplicities of neutron and gamma-quanta emissions accompanying the fission process were measured for fission of 226Th, 227Pa and 234Pu compound nuclei produced in reactions with 18O and 26Mg projectiles over a wide energy range. Data were analyzed with respect to the presence of fission modes. Asymmetric fission was observed even at very high initial excitation for all the measured systems. The so-called fission mode S1 (caused by the proton shell Z{approx}50 and neutron shell N{approx}82 in heavy fragment) was found to be dominant in asymmetric fission of 234Pu. Reactions with not full linear momentum transfer were observed in the folding spectra for all the measured systems.

  14. Low and medium energy deuteron-induced reactions on {sup 63,65}Cu nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Simeckova, E.; Bem, P.; Honusek, M.; Stefanik, M.; Fischer, U.; Simakov, S. P.; Forrest, R. A.; Koning, A. J.; Sublet, J.-C.; Avrigeanu, M.; Roman, F. L.; Avrigeanu, V.

    2011-07-15

    The activation cross sections of (d,p), (d,2n), (d,3n), and (d,2p) reactions on {sup 63,65}Cu were measured in the energy range from 4 to 20 MeV using the stacked-foil technique. Then, following the available elastic-scattering data analysis that provided the optical potential for reaction cross-section calculations, an increased effort was devoted to the breakup mechanism, direct reaction stripping, and pre-equilibrium and compound-nucleus cross-section calculations, corrected for the breakup and stripping decrease of the total reaction cross section. The overall agreement between the measured and calculated deuteron activation cross sections proves the correctness of the nuclear mechanism account, next to the simultaneous analysis of the elastic-scattering and reaction data.

  15. Robotic reactions: delay-induced patterns in autonomous vehicle systems.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Gábor; Moehlis, Jeff; Bullo, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Fundamental design principles are presented for vehicle systems governed by autonomous cruise control devices. By analyzing the corresponding delay differential equations, it is shown that for any car-following model short-wavelength oscillations can appear due to robotic reaction times, and that there are tradeoffs between the time delay and the control gains. The analytical findings are demonstrated on an optimal velocity model using numerical continuation and numerical simulation.

  16. Shock-Induced Chemical Reactions in Condensed Matter.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    Technical, 4/1/78 - 6/30/82 Matter 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMUER(e) George E. Duvall, Principal Investigator...CHEMICAL REACTIONS IN CONDENSED MATTER George E. Duvall, Principal Investigator Stephen A. Sheffield* Kendal M. OgilvieT 4 C. Robert Wilson Paul...Temperture," in Sixth Symposium (International on Detonation (Office of Naval Research, Arlington, 1976), ACR-Z21, p. 36. 24. G. Gamow , "Tentative

  17. Scaling laws in {sup 3}He induced nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect

    Rubehn, T.; Jing, K.X.; Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Tso, K.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1996-12-01

    Fission excitation functions of compound nuclei in a mass region where shell effects are expected to be very strong are shown to scale exactly according to the transition state prediction once these shell effects are accounted for. Furthermore, the method applied in this paper allows for the model-independent determination of the nuclear shell effects. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Intensive Nuclear War Education: Inducing Attitude and Behavior Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayton, Daniel M., II

    Nuclear war education has become a topic of concern among educators who, on one side, see it as an essential component of undergraduate education or, on the other, see it as political indoctrination dominated by direct and indirect Soviet interests. This study assessed the affective impact of an intensive (eight hours per day for five straight…

  19. Diethyl pyrocarbonate reaction with the lactose repressor protein affects both inducer and DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, C.F.; Matthews, K.S.

    1988-04-05

    Modification of the lactose repressor protein of Escherichia coli with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DPC) results in decreased inducer binding as well as operator and nonspecific DNA binding. Spectrophotometric measurements indicated a maximum of three histidines per subunit was modified, and quantitation of lysine residues with trinitrobenzenesulfonate revealed the modification of one lysine residue. The loss of DNA binding, both operator and nonspecific, was correlated with histidine modification; removal of the carbethoxy groups from the histidines by hydroxylamine was accompanied by significant recovery of DNA binding function. The presence of inducing sugars during the DPC reaction had no effect on histidine modification or the loss of DNA binding activity. In contrast, inducer binding was not recovered upon reversal of the histidine modification. However, the presence of inducer during reaction protected lysine from reaction and also prevented the decrease in inducer binding; these results indicate that reaction of the lysine residue(s) may correlate to the loss of sugar binding activity. Since no difference in incorporation of radiolabeled carbethoxy was observed following reaction with diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence or absence of inducer, the reagent appears to function as a catalyst in the modification of the lysine. The formation of an amide bond between the affected lysine and a nearby carboxylic acid moiety provides a possible mechanism for the activity loss. Reaction of the isolated NH2-terminal domain resulted in loss of DNA binding with modification of the single histidine at position 29. Results from the modification of core domain paralleled observations with intact repressor.

  20. Solving The Longstanding Problem Of Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions At the Highest Microscopic Level - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S.

    2016-09-22

    A 2011 DOE-NP Early Career Award (ECA) under Field Work Proposal (FWP) SCW1158 supported the project “Solving the Long-Standing Problem of Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions at the Highest Microscopic Level” in the five-year period from June 15, 2011 to June 14, 2016. This project, led by PI S. Quaglioni, aimed at developing a comprehensive and computationally efficient framework to arrive at a unified description of structural properties and reactions of light nuclei in terms of constituent protons and neutrons interacting through nucleon-nucleon (NN) and three-nucleon (3N) forces. Specifically, the project had three main goals: 1) arriving at the accurate predictions for fusion reactions that power stars and Earth-based fusion facilities; 2) realizing a comprehensive description of clustering and continuum effects in exotic nuclei, including light Borromean systems; and 3) achieving fundamental understanding of the role of the 3N force in nuclear reactions and nuclei at the drip line.

  1. COP1 is required for UV-B-induced nuclear accumulation of the UVR8 photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ruohe; Skvortsova, Mariya Y; Loubéry, Sylvain; Ulm, Roman

    2016-07-26

    The UV-B photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) promotes UV-B acclimation and tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana UVR8 localizes to both cytosol and nucleus, but its main activity is assumed to be nuclear. UV-B photoreception stimulates nuclear accumulation of UVR8 in a presently unknown manner. Here, we show that CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) is required for UV-B-induced nuclear accumulation of UVR8, but bypassing the COP1 requirement for UVR8 nuclear accumulation did not rescue the cop1 mutant UV-B phenotype. Using a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-based fusion protein system to conditionally localize GR-UVR8 to the nucleus, we have demonstrated that both photoactivation and nuclear localization of UVR8 are required for UV-B-induced photomorphogenic responses. In contrast, there was no UV-B response when UV-B-activated UVR8 was artificially retained in the cytosol. In agreement with a predominantly nuclear activity, constitutively active UVR8(W285A) accumulated in the nucleus also in the absence of UV-B. Furthermore, GR-COP1 expression lines suggested that UV-B-activated UVR8 can be coimported into the nucleus by COP1. Our data strongly support localization of UVR8 signaling in the nucleus and a dual role for COP1 in the regulation of UV-B-induced UVR8 nuclear accumulation and in UVR8-mediated UV-B signaling.

  2. New excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, E.; Duchemin, C.; Guertin, A.; Haddad, F.; Michel, N.; Métivier, V.

    2016-09-01

    New excitation functions for proton induced nuclear reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper were measured, using the stacked-foil technique and gamma spectrometry, up to 70 MeV. The experimental cross sections were measured using the Ti-nat(p,x) V-48, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-57 and Cu-nat(p,x) Zn-62,Co-56 monitor reactions recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), depending on the investigated energy range. Data have been extracted for the Ti-nat(p,x) Sc-43,44m,46,47,48, V-48, K-42,43, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-56,57, Co-55,56,57,58, Mn-52,54, Cu-nat(p,x) Cu-61,64, Ni-57, Co-56,57,58,60, Zn-62,65, Mn-54 reactions. Our results are discussed and compared to the existing ones as well as with the TALYS code version 1.6 calculations using default models. Our experimental data are in overall good agreement with the literature. TALYS is able to reproduce, in most cases, the experimental trend. Our new experimental results allow to expand our knowledge on these excitation functions, to confirm the existing trends and to give additional values on a large energy range. This work is in line with the new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) launched by the IAEA to expand the database of monitor reactions.

  3. AIRE-induced apoptosis is associated with nuclear translocation of stress sensor protein GAPDH

    SciTech Connect

    Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Kisand, Kai; Maslovskaja, Julia; Laan, Martti; Peterson, Paert

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE induces apoptosis in epithelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CARD domain of AIRE is sufficient for apoptosis induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE induced apoptosis involves GAPDH translocation to the nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deprenyl inhibits AIRE induced apoptosis. -- Abstract: AIRE (Autoimmune Regulator) has a central role in the transcriptional regulation of self-antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells, which is necessary for negative selection of autoreactive T cells. Recent data have shown that AIRE can also induce apoptosis, which may be linked to cross-presentation of these self-antigens. Here we studied AIRE-induced apoptosis using AIRE over-expression in a thymic epithelial cell line as well as doxycycline-inducible HEK293 cells. We show that the HSR/CARD domain in AIRE together with a nuclear localization signal is sufficient to induce apoptosis. In the nuclei of AIRE-positive cells, we also found an increased accumulation of a glycolytic enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAPDH) reflecting cellular stress and apoptosis. Additionally, AIRE-induced apoptosis was inhibited with an anti-apoptotic agent deprenyl that blocks GAPDH nitrosylation and nuclear translocation. We propose that the AIRE-induced apoptosis pathway is associated with GAPDH nuclear translocation and induction of NO-induced cellular stress in AIRE-expressing cells.

  4. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S.; Mok, Tony S.K.; Warner, Timothy D.; Underwood, Malcolm J.; Chen, George G.

    2009-10-15

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB{sub 2}) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB{sub 2} but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  5. TORUS: Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes.Topical Collaboration for Nuclear Theory Project. Period: June 1, 2010 - May 31, 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Arbanas, Goran; Elster, Charlotte; Escher, Jutta; Nunes, Filomena; Thompson, Ian

    2015-08-28

    The work of this collaboration during its existence is summarized. The mission of the TORUS Topical Collaboration was to develop new methods that advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes by using three-body techniques to improve direct reaction calculations. This multi-institution collaborative effort was and remains directly relevant to three areas of interest: the properties of nuclei far from stability, microscopic studies of nuclear input parameters for astrophysics, and microscopic nuclear reaction theory. The TORUS project focused on understanding the details of (d,p) reactions for neutron transfer to heavier nuclei. The bulk of the work fell into three areas: coupled channel theory, modeling (d,p) reactions with a Faddeev-AGS approach, and capture reactions.

  6. Systematic review of NSAID-induced adverse reactions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Tetsuya; Ochi, Takahiro; Sugano, Kentaro; Uemura, Shinichi; Makuch, Robert W

    2003-06-01

    Abstract A systematic review of randomized controlled clinical trials of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients was conducted to evaluate the risk of NSAID-induced adverse reactions. Double-blind, randomized, controlled trials with 6-week treatments for RA patients were included in the study. The endpoints for the analysis included any adverse reactions, digestive adverse reactions, and upper gastrointestinal (GI) adverse reactions. A fixed-effect model was used for estimation of the risk. Time-to-event analysis of the incidence of adverse reactions was also conducted. A total of 28 trials was included for the analysis, and a total of 30 NSAIDs were used in the trials. The proportion of patients who experienced any adverse reaction was as follows: piroxicam 18.9% (3 trials), diclofenac 18.8% (4 trials), indomethacin 22.1% (14 trials), and aspirin 25.0% (4 trials). The proportion of patients who experienced digestive adverse reactions was as follows: piroxicam 10.2%, diclofenac 10.6%, indomethacin 13.1%, and aspirin 14.1%. Most withdrawals due to adverse reaction occurred during the first 3 weeks after administration of the NSAID. Although the risk of NSAID-induced adverse reaction was different from drug to drug, the risk of adverse reaction was clinically significant.

  7. Characterizing Neutron-Proton Equilibration in Nuclear Reactions with Subzeptosecond Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedele, A.; McIntosh, A. B.; Hagel, K.; Huang, M.; Heilborn, L.; Kohley, Z.; May, L. W.; McCleskey, E.; Youngs, M.; Zarrella, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2017-02-01

    We study neutron-proton equilibration in dynamically deformed atomic nuclei created in nuclear collisions. The two ends of the elongated nucleus are initially dissimilar in composition and equilibrate on a subzeptosecond time scale following first-order kinetics. We use angular momentum to relate the breakup orientation to the time scale of the breakup. The extracted rate constant is 3 zs-1 , which corresponds to a mean equilibration time of 0.3 zs. This technique enables new insight into the nuclear equation of state that governs many nuclear and astrophysical phenomena leading to the origin of the chemical elements.

  8. Kinetics of Reactions of Monomeric Nitrosomethane Induced by Flash Photolysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozubek, H.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the kinetics of dimerization of nitrosamine induced by a flash of light is measured. The experiment can be performed with a commercial ultraviolet-VIS spetrophotometer with easy to make modifications. The experiment demonstrates a flash photolysis system not always available in university chemistry laboratories.…

  9. α scattering and α -induced reaction cross sections of 64Zn at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornelas, A.; Mohr, P.; Gyürky, Gy.; Elekes, Z.; Fülöp, Zs.; Halász, Z.; Kiss, G. G.; Somorjai, E.; Szücs, T.; Takács, M. P.; Galaviz, D.; Güray, R. T.; Korkulu, Z.; Özkan, N.; Yalçın, C.

    2016-11-01

    Background: α -nucleus potentials play an essential role for the calculation of α -induced reaction cross sections at low energies in the statistical model. Uncertainties of these calculations are related to ambiguities in the adjustment of the potential parameters to experimental elastic scattering angular distributions and to the energy dependence of the effective α -nucleus potentials. Purpose: The present work studies the total reaction cross section σreac of α -induced reactions at low energies which can be determined from the elastic scattering angular distribution or from the sum over the cross sections of all open nonelastic channels. Method: Elastic and inelastic 64Zn(α ,α )64Zn angular distributions were measured at two energies around the Coulomb barrier, at 12.1 and 16.1 MeV. Reaction cross sections of the (α ,γ ) , (α ,n ) , and (α ,p ) reactions were measured at the same energies using the activation technique. The contributions of missing nonelastic channels were estimated from statistical model calculations. Results: The total reaction cross sections from elastic scattering and from the sum of the cross sections over all open nonelastic channels agree well within the uncertainties. This finding confirms the consistency of the experimental data. At the higher energy of 16.1 MeV, the predicted significant contribution of compound-inelastic scattering to the total reaction cross section is confirmed experimentally. As a by-product it is found that most recent global α -nucleus potentials are able to describe the reaction cross sections for 64Zn around the Coulomb barrier. Conclusions: Total reaction cross sections of α -induced reactions can be well determined from elastic scattering angular distributions. The present study proves experimentally that the total cross section from elastic scattering is identical to the sum of nonelastic reaction cross sections. Thus, the statistical model can reliably be used to distribute the total reaction

  10. Suppression of nuclear spin bath fluctuations in self-assembled quantum dots induced by inhomogeneous strain

    PubMed Central

    Chekhovich, E.A.; Hopkinson, M.; Skolnick, M.S.; Tartakovskii, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Interaction with nuclear spins leads to decoherence and information loss in solid-state electron-spin qubits. One particular, ineradicable source of electron decoherence arises from decoherence of the nuclear spin bath, driven by nuclear–nuclear dipolar interactions. Owing to its many-body nature nuclear decoherence is difficult to predict, especially for an important class of strained nanostructures where nuclear quadrupolar effects have a significant but largely unknown impact. Here, we report direct measurement of nuclear spin bath coherence in individual self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots: spin-echo coherence times in the range 1.2–4.5 ms are found. Based on these values, we demonstrate that strain-induced quadrupolar interactions make nuclear spin fluctuations much slower compared with lattice-matched GaAs/AlGaAs structures. Our findings demonstrate that quadrupolar effects can potentially be used to engineer optically active III-V semiconductor spin-qubits with a nearly noise-free nuclear spin bath, previously achievable only in nuclear spin-0 semiconductors, where qubit network interconnection and scaling are challenging. PMID:25704639

  11. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction

    PubMed Central

    Hirauchi, Ken-ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the ‘cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets. PMID:27562366

  12. Theoretical cross sections of tantalum on neutron induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddik, Tarik

    2016-11-01

    Neutron-induced cross-sections for the stable isotope 181Ta, in the energy region up to 20 MeV have been calculated. Statistical model calculations, based on the Hauser-Feshbach formalism, have been carried out using the TALYS-1.0 and were compared with available experimental data in the literature and with ENDF/B-VII, T = 300 K; JENDL-3.3, T = 300 K and JEFF-3.1, T = 300 K evaluated libraries.

  13. TANGRA-Setup for the Investigation of Nuclear Fission Induced by 14.1 MeV Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskov, I. N.; Kopatch, Yu. N.; Bystritsky, V. M.; Skoy, V. R.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Noy, R. Capote; Sedyshev, P. V.; Grozdanov, D. N.; Ivanov, I. Zh.; Aleksakhin, V. Yu.; Bogolubov, E. P.; Barmakov, Yu. N.; Khabarov, S. V.; Krasnoperov, A. V.; Krylov, A. R.; Obhođaš, J.; Pikelner, L. B.; Rapatskiy, V. L.; Rogachev, A. V.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Ryzhkov, V. I.; Sadovsky, A. B.; Salmin, R. A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Slepnev, V. M.; Sudac, D.; Tarasov, O. G.; Valković, V.; Yurkov, D. I.; Zamyatin, N. I.; Zeynalov, Sh. S.; Zontikov, A. O.; Zubarev, E. V.

    The new experimental setup TANGRA (Tagged Neutrons & Gamma Rays), for the investigation of neutron induced nuclear reactions, e.g. (n,xn'), (n,xn'γ), (n,γ), (n,f), on a number of important isotopes for nuclear science and engineering (235,238U, 237Np, 239Pu, 244,245,248Cm) is under construction and being tested at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (FLNP) of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna. The TANGRA setup consists of: a portable neutron generator ING-27, with a 64-pixel Si charge-particle detector incorporated into its vacuum chamber for registering of α-particles formed in the T(d, n)4He reaction, as a source of 14.1 MeV steady-state neutrons radiation with an intensity of ∼5x107n/s; a combined iron (Fe), borated polyethylene (BPE) and lead (Pb) compact shielding-collimator; a reconfigurable multi-detector (neutron plus gamma ray detecting system); a fast computer with 2 (x16 channels) PCI-E 100 MHz ADC cards for data acquisition and hard disk storage; Linux ROOT data acquisition, visualization and analysis software. The signals from the α-particle detector are used to 'tag' the neutrons with the coincident α-particles. Counting the coincidences between the α-particle and the reaction-product detectors in a 20ns time-interval improves the effect/background-ratio by a factor of ∼200 as well as the accuracy in the neutron flux determination, which decreases noticeably the overall experimental data uncertainty.

  14. Neutron-induced reactions in the hohlraum to study reaction in flight neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, M. S.; Elliott, S. R.; Guiseppe, V.; Kidd, M.; Rundberg, B.; Tybo, J.

    2013-04-01

    We are currently developing the physics necessary to measure the Reaction In Flight (RIF) neutron flux from a NIF capsule. A measurement of the RIF neutron flux from a NIF capsule could be used to deduce the stopping power in the cold fuel of the NIF capsule. A foil irradiated at the Omega laser at LLE was counted at the LANL low-background counting facility at WIPP. The estimated production rate of 195Au was just below our experimental sensitivity. We have made several improvements to our counting facility in recent months. These improvements are designed to increase our sensitivity, and include installing two new low-background detectors, and taking steps to reduce noise in the signals.

  15. Optogenetic Control of Nuclear Protein Import in Living Cells Using Light-Inducible Nuclear Localization Signals (LINuS).

    PubMed

    Wehler, Pierre; Niopek, Dominik; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2016-06-02

    Many biological processes are regulated by the timely import of specific proteins into the nucleus. The ability to spatiotemporally control the nuclear import of proteins of interest therefore allows study of their role in a given biological process as well as controlling this process in space and time. The light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) was developed based on a natural plant photoreceptor that reversibly triggers the import of proteins of interest into the nucleus with blue light. Each LINuS is a small, genetically encoded domain that is fused to the protein of interest at the N or C terminus. These protocols describe how to carry out initial microscopy-based screening to assess which LINuS variant works best with a protein of interest. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Analysis & Test of Reaction Wheel Induced Micro-Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runte, Torben; Brito, Miguel; Bourne, Duncan M.; Mariani, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Microvibrations are a major disturbance source of the pointing stability for high-precision Spacecraft. These undesirable mechanical vibrations are generated by active mechanisms and transferred via the Spacecraft structure.Throughout OHB System's design of Spacecraft platforms for Spacecraft missions with high precision pointing performance, Reaction Wheels (RWs) have been identified as the most dominant source of microvibrations in Spacecraft platforms. The RW perturbations consist of numerous harmonic components whose frequencies and amplitudes depend on the wheel speed and the ball bearing characteristics of each unit. This paper focuses on the analysis methodology used to estimate the disturbance caused by these units, its transmission via the Spacecraft structure and its verification by measurement.

  17. Induced Magnetic Field Due to Reaction Wheel Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudney, M. A.; Kapfunde, G.; Trougnou, L.

    2016-05-01

    In situ magnetic field measurements are of critical importance to unanswered questions on the inner heliosphere, such as: how the corona and solar wind are accelerated and heated; how the solar magnetic field evolves over a solar cycle; and how this field links into space. However, accurate spacecraft magnetometer measurements require reliable in-flight calibration. The magnetic interference caused by reaction wheels on magnetometer measurements in space is well known, and a common mitigation method is to use magnetic shielding. However, the presence of high-permeability material in-flight has the side-effect of distorting the true ambient field. We present a theoretical analysis of this distortion, and suggest a transfer function that can be used to recover the ambient field from the distorted dataset. Experimental measurements on a shield prototype for the Solar Orbiter mission agree with predictions to within an order of magnitude, demonstrating a distortion of approximately 1 part in 104.

  18. Hybrid isolation of micro vibrations induced by reaction wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Oen; Park, Geeyong; Han, Jae-Hung

    2016-02-01

    As the technology for precision satellite payloads continues to advance, the requirements for the pointing stability of the satellites are becoming extremely high. In many situations, even small amplitude disturbances generated by the onboard components may cause serious degradation in the performance of high precision payloads. In such situations, vibration isolators can be installed to reduce the vibration transmission. In this work, a hybrid vibration isolator comprising passive and active components is proposed to provide an effective solution to the vibration problems caused by the reaction wheel disturbances. Firstly, mathematical modeling and experimental study of a single axis vibration isolator having high damping and high roll-off rate for the high frequency region and active components that enhance isolation performance for narrow frequency bands are presented. This concept is then extended to multi-axis by forming Stewart platform and the performance is experimentally verified. The tests on a flexible testbed show effective vibration isolation by the proposed vibration isolator.

  19. Experimental evidence of reaction-induced fracturing during olivine carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenlu; Fusseis, Florian; Lisabeth, Harrison; Xing, Tiange; Xiao, Xianghui; De Andrade, Vincent; Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Mineral carbonation, a process that binds CO2 in the form of carbonates by silicate weathering, is widespread on the Earth's surface. Because of the abundance of silicate rocks and the permanence of the carbonated solids, sequestering CO2 via mineral carbonation has generated lots of interests. However, it is unclear how the fluid-rock reaction proceeds to completion in spite of an increasing solid volume. We conducted a mineral carbonation experiment in which a sintered olivine aggregate reacted with a sodium bicarbonate solution at reservoir conditions. Time-resolved synchrotron X-ray microtomographic images show cracks in polygonal patterns arising in the surface layers and propagating into the interior of the olivine aggregate. The nanotomography data reveal that the incipient cracks intersect at right angles. We infer that stretching due to nonuniform volume expansion generates polygonal cracking of the surfaces. Our data shed new lights on the processes that control hydration and carbonation of peridotite.

  20. Pion-induced nucleon knockout reactions on 16O and 18O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasetzky, E.; Altman, A.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Yavin, A. I.; Ashery, D.; Bertl, W.; Felawka, L.; Walter, H. K.; Schlepütz, F. W.; Powers, K. J.; Winter, R. G.; Pluym, J. V. D.

    1982-12-01

    The (π+, π+p), (π-, π-p), and (π-, π-n) reactions on 16O and 18O were studied at 165 MeV by coincidence measurements of the outgoing particles. The cross sections for the (π-, π-n) reaction is larger on 18O than on 16O, whereas those for the (π+, π+p) and the (π-, π-p) reactions are smaller, most likely because of the coupling between the absorption and the scattering channels. NUCLEAR REACTIONS (π+/-, π+/-p) (π-, π-n) coin. Measurements on 16O18O E=165 MeV; deduced coupling between the absorption and the scattering channels.

  1. Photo-induced chaos in the Briggs-Rauscher reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Noriaki; Hanazaki, Ichiro

    1998-07-01

    Discovery of the photo-induced chaos in the Briggs-Rauscher system is reported. The chaotic oscillations were observed between the large- and the small-amplitude simple oscillatory states existent in low and high light intensity regions, respectively. Period-doubling sequence from the large-amplitude oscillations to the chaos was observed. Deterministic nature of the chaos was confirmed by the next-amplitude return map. The stretching and folding mechanism of the trajectories was revealed through the three-dimensional attractor reconstructed via the singular value decomposition method. The chemical origin of the photoinduced chaos is discussed based on the photoautocatalysis of HIO2.

  2. Electronically induced surface reactions: Evolution, concepts, and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, Dietrich

    2012-09-07

    This is a personal account of the development of the title subject which is the broader field encompassing surface photochemistry. It describes the early times when the main interest centered on desorption induced by slow electrons, follows its evolution in experiment (use of synchrotron radiation and connections to electron spectroscopies; use of lasers) and mechanisms, and briefly mentions the many different subfields that have evolved. It discusses some practically important aspects and applications and ends with an account of an evolving new subfield, the application to photochemistry on nanoparticles.

  3. Defense Nuclear Agency Reaction Rate Handbook. Second Edition. Revision Number 7

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    the complete histories of large numbers of individual species as atmospheric constituents. Many computer codes exist which have been designed for...electronic state or vibrational mode, appropriate designations are appended to the appropriate species formula. Corresponding ground-state designations ...reaction. However, most reactions carry no state designations for any of the species involved. Species in these instances usually can be

  4. Studies of nuclear reactions relevant to stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis using ICF plasmas at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, Alex; Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Yongho; Hale, Gerry; Paris, Mark; McEvoy, Aaron; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Frenje, Johan; Li, Chikang; Seguin, Fredrick; Sio, Hong; Petrasso, Richard; McNabb, Dennis; Sayre, Dan; Pino, Jesse; Brune, Carl; Bacher, Andy; Forrest, Chad; Glebov, Vladimir; Stoeckl, Christian; Janezic, Roger; Sangster, Craig

    2015-10-01

    The 3He+3He, T+3He, and p + D reactions directly relevant to Stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) have been studied at the OMEGA laser facility using high-temperature low-density `exploding pusher' implosions. The advantage of using these plasmas is that they better mimic astrophysical systems than cold-target accelerator experiments. Measured proton spectra from the 3He3He reaction are used to constrain nuclear R-matrix modeling. The resulting T+3He gamma-ray data rule out an anomalously-high 6Li production during the Big Bang as an explanation to the high observed values in metal poor first generation stars. The proton spectrum from the T+3He reaction is also being used to constrain the R-matrix model. Recent experiments have probed the p + D reaction for the first time in a plasma; this reaction is relevant to energy production in protostars, brown dwarfs and at higher CM energies to BBN. This work was partially supported by the US DOE, NLUF, LLE, and GA.

  5. Studies of nuclear reactions relevant to stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis using ICF plasmas at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, Alex; Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Yongho; Hale, Gerry; Paris, Mark; McEvoy, Aaron; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Frenje, Johan; Li, Chikang; Seguin, Fredrick; Sio, Hong; Petrasso, Richard; McNabb, Dennis; Sayre, Dan; Pino, Jesse; Brune, Carl; Bacher, Andy; Forrest, Chad; Glebov, Vladimir; Stoeckl, Christian; Janezic, Roger; Sangster, Craig

    2015-11-01

    The 3He+3He, T+3He, and p +D reactions directly relevant to Stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) have been studied at the OMEGA laser facility using high-temperature low-density `exploding pusher' implosions. The advantage of using these plasmas is that they better mimic astrophysical systems than cold-target accelerator experiments. Measured proton spectra from the 3He3He reaction are used to constrain nuclear R-matrix modeling. The resulting T+3He gamma-ray data rule out an anomalously-high 6Li production during the Big Bang as an explanation to the high observed values in metal poor first generation stars. The proton spectrum from the T+3He reaction is also being used to constrain the R-matrix model. Recent experiments have probed the p +D reaction for the first time in a plasma; this reaction is relevant to energy production in protostars, brown dwarfs and at higher CM energies to BBN. This work was partially supported by the US DOE, NLUF, LLE, and GA.

  6. Constitutive and ligand-induced nuclear localization of oxytocin receptor.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Conan G; Bussolati, Gianni; Bosco, Martino; Kimura, Tadashi; Pizzorno, Marie C; Chernin, Mitchell I; Cassoni, Paola; Novak, Josef F

    2007-01-01

    Oxytocin receptor (OTR) is a membrane protein known to mediate oxytocin (OT) effects, in both normal and neoplastic cells. We report here that human osteosarcoma (U2OS, MG63, OS15 and SaOS2), breast cancer (MCF7), and primary human fibroblastic cells (HFF) all exhibit OTR not only on the cell membrane, but also in the various nuclear compartments including the nucleolus. Both an OTR-GFP fusion protein and the native OTR appear to be localized to the nucleus as detected by transfection and/or confocal immunofluorescence, respectively. Treatment with oxytocin causes internalization of OTR and the resulting vesicles accumulate in the vicinity of the nucleus and some of the perinuclear OTR enters the nucleus. Western blots indicate that OTR in the nucleus and on the plasma membrane are likely to be the same biochemical and immunological entities. It appears that OTR is first visible in the nucleoli and subsequently disperses within the nucleus into 4-20 spots while some of the OTR diffuses throughout the nucleoplasm. The behaviour and kinetics of OTR-GFP and OTR are different, indicating interference by GFP in both OTR entrance into the nucleus and subsequent relocalization of OTR within the nucleus. There are important differences among the tested cells, such as the requirement of a ligand for transfer of OTR in nuclei. A constitutive internalization of OTR was found only in osteosarcoma cells, while the nuclear localization in all other tested cells was dependent on ligand binding. The amount of OTR-positive material within and in the vicinity of the nucleus increased following a treatment with oxytocin in both constitutive and ligand-dependent type of cells. The evidence of OTR compartmentalization at the cell nucleus (either ligand-dependent or constitutive) in different cell types suggests still unknown biological functions of this protein or its ligand and adds this G-protein-coupled receptor to other heptahelical receptors displaying this atypical and unexpected

  7. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2014-12-22

    Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependent pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. As a result, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.

  8. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    DOE PAGES

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; ...

    2014-12-22

    Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependentmore » pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. As a result, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.« less

  9. Nuclear dynamical deformation induced hetero- and euchromatin positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awazu, Akinori

    2015-09-01

    We studied the role of active deformation dynamics in cell nuclei in chromatin positioning. Model chains containing two types of regions, with high (euchromatic) or low (heterochromatic) mobility, were confined in a pulsating container simulating a nucleus showing dynamic deformations. Brownian dynamic simulations show that the positioning of low mobility regions changes from sites near the periphery to the center if the affinity between these regions and the container periphery disappears. The former and latter positionings are similar to the "conventional" and "inverted" chromatin positionings in nuclei of normal differentiated cells and cells lacking Lamin-related proteins. Additionally, nuclear dynamical deformation played essential roles in "inverted" chromatin positioning.

  10. Nuclear Membranes ETB Receptors Mediate ET-1-induced Increase of Nuclear Calcium in Human Left Ventricular Endocardial Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Jules, Farah; Avedanian, Levon; Al-Khoury, Johny; Keita, Ramatoulaye; Normand, Alexandre; Bkaily, Ghassan; Jacques, Danielle

    2015-07-01

    In fetal human left ventricular endocardial endothelial cells (EECLs), both plasma membrane (PM) ET(A)R and ET(B)R were reported to mediate ET-1-induced increase of intracellular calcium [Ca](i); however, this effect was mediated by ET(A)R in right EECs (EECRs). In this study, we verified whether, as for the PM, nuclear membranes (NMs) ET-1 receptors activation in EECLs and EECRs induce an increase of nuclear calcium ([Ca](n)) and if this effect is mediated through the same receptor type as in PM. Using a plasmalemma-perforated technique and 3D confocal microscopy, our results showed that, as in PM intact cells, superfusion of nuclei of both cell types with cytosolic ET-1 induced a concentration-dependent sustained increase of [Ca](n). In EECRs, the ET(A)R antagonist prevented the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) without affecting EECLs. However, in both cell types, the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) was prevented by the ETBR antagonist. In conclusion, both NMs' ET(A)R and ET(B)R mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) in EECRs. In contrast, only NMs' ET(B)R activation mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 in EECLs. Hence, the type of NMs' receptors mediating the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) are different from those of PM mediating the increase in [Ca](i).

  11. Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions In Low-Temperature Dense Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kasagi, J.; Toriyabe, Y.; Yoshida, E.; Fang, K. H.; Yonemura, H.

    2010-06-01

    We report the Li+d reaction with liquid Li target and the D+D reaction in liquid Li with ultrasonic cavitation. The screening potential of the Li+d reaction has been deduce from the thick target yields of alpha particles emitted in the {sup 6}Li(d,alpha){sup 4} He reaction in the solid and liquid phase. The deduced screening potential for the liquid Li is about 180 eV larger than for the solid. This difference is considered to attributed to the effect of liquefied Li{sup +} ions. It is found out that the D+D reaction in liquid Li with ultrasonic cavitation is enhanced very much; the enhancement corresponds to effective energy increase of about 2000 eV.

  12. Artificial Force Induced Reaction (AFIR) Method for Exploring Quantum Chemical Potential Energy Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Satoshi; Harabuchi, Yu; Takagi, Makito; Taketsugu, Tetsuya; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-10-01

    In this account, a technical overview of the artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method is presented. The AFIR method is one of the automated reaction-path search methods developed by the authors, and has been applied extensively to a variety of chemical reactions, such as organocatalysis, organometallic catalysis, and photoreactions. There are two modes in the AFIR method, i.e., a multicomponent mode and a single-component mode. The former has been applied to bimolecular and multicomponent reactions and the latter to unimolecular isomerization and dissociation reactions. Five numerical examples are presented for an Aldol reaction, a Claisen rearrangement, a Co-catalyzed hydroformylation, a fullerene structure search, and a nonradiative decay path search in an electronically excited naphthalene molecule. Finally, possible applications of the AFIR method are discussed.

  13. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  14. Slow slip generated by dehydration reaction coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Teruo; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-10-01

    Sustained slow slip, which is a distinctive feature of slow slip events (SSEs), is investigated theoretically, assuming a fault embedded within a fluid-saturated 1D thermo-poro-elastic medium. The object of study is specifically SSEs occurring at the down-dip edge of seismogenic zone in hot subduction zones, where mineral dehydrations (antigorite, lawsonite, chlorite, and glaucophane) are expected to occur near locations where deep slow slip events are observed. In the modeling, we introduce dehydration reactions, coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization, and slip evolution is assumed to interact with fluid pressure change through Coulomb's frictional stress. Our calculations show that sustained slow slip events occur when the dehydration reaction is coupled with slip-induced dilatancy. Specifically, slow slip is favored by a low initial stress drop, an initial temperature of the medium close to that of the dehydration reaction equilibrium temperature, a low permeability, and overall negative volume change associated with the reaction (i.e., void space created by the reaction larger than the space occupied by the fluid released). Importantly, if we do not assume slip-induced dilatancy, slip is accelerated with time soon after the slip onset even if the dehydration reaction is assumed. This suggests that slow slip is sustained for a long time at hot subduction zones because dehydration reaction is coupled with slip-induced dilatancy. Such slip-induced dilatancy may occur at the down-dip edge of seismogenic zone at hot subduction zones because of repetitive occurrence of dehydration reaction there.

  15. MCNPX simulations of the silicon carbide semiconductor detector response to fast neutrons from D-T nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačková, Katarína; Šagátová, Andrea; Zat'ko, Bohumír; Nečas, Vladimír; Solar, Michael; Granja, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) has been long recognized as a suitable semiconductor material for use in nuclear radiation detectors of high-energy charged particles, gamma rays, X-rays and neutrons. The nuclear interactions occurring in the semiconductor are complex and can be quantified using a Monte Carlo-based computer code. In this work, the MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) code was employed to support detector design and analysis. MCNPX is widely used to simulate interaction of radiation with matter and supports the transport of 34 particle types including heavy ions in broad energy ranges. The code also supports complex 3D geometries and both nuclear data tables and physics models. In our model, monoenergetic neutrons from D-T nuclear reaction were assumed as a source of fast neutrons. Their energy varied between 16 and 18.2 MeV, according to the accelerating voltage of the deuterons participating in D-T reaction. First, the simulations were used to calculate the optimum thickness of the reactive film composed of High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE), which converts neutral particles to charged particles and thusly enhancing detection efficiency. The dependency of the optimal thickness of the HDPE layer on the energy of the incident neutrons has been shown for the inspected energy range. Further, from the energy deposited by secondary charged particles and recoiled ions, the detector response was modeled and the effect of the conversion layer on detector response was demonstrated. The results from the simulations were compared with experimental data obtained for a detector covered by a 600 and 1300 μm thick conversion layer. Some limitations of the simulations using MCNPX code are also discussed.

  16. Nuclear Astrophysics at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Reifarth, R.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R.C.; Kronenberg, A.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Rundberg, R.S.; Schwantes, J.M.; Ullmann, J.L.; Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.; Alpizar-Vicente, A.; Hatarik, R.; Greife, U.

    2005-05-24

    One of the most interesting nuclear physics challenges is obtaining a detailed understanding of the nucleosynthesis processes of the elements. Knowledge about the stellar sites, and how they are governed by stellar evolution and cosmology are crucial in understanding the overall picture. Information on reaction rates for neutron- and charged-particle-induced reactions have a direct impact on existing stellar models. Except for the stable isotopes, very few neutron-induced reactions in the energy range of interest have been measured to date. DANCE measurements on stable and unstable isotopes will provide many of the missing key reactions that are needed to understand the nucleosynthesis of the heavy elements.

  17. NUMEN Project @ LNS : Heavy ions double charge exchange reactions towards the 0νββ nuclear matrix element determination

    SciTech Connect

    Agodi, C. Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Colonna, M.; Cuttone, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Pandola, L.; Rifuggiato, D.; Tudisco, S.; Cappuzzello, F.; Greco, V.; Bonanno, D. L.; Bongiovanni, D. G.; Longhitano, F.; Branchina, V.; Foti, A.; Lo Presti, D.; Lanzalone, G.; and others

    2015-10-28

    In the NUMEN Project it is proposed an innovative technique to access the nuclear matrix elements entering in the expression of the life-time of the neutrinoless double beta decay, using relevant cross sections of double charge exchange reactions. A key aspect is the use of MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, for the detection of the ejectiles, and of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy-ion beams.

  18. Evaluation of nuclear reaction cross sections for optimization of production of the emerging diagnostic radionuclide ⁵⁵Co.

    PubMed

    Amjed, N; Hussain, M; Aslam, M N; Tárkányi, F; Qaim, S M

    2016-02-01

    The excitation functions of the (54)Fe(d,n)(55)Co, (56)Fe(p,2n)(55)Co and (58)Ni(p,α)(55)Co reactions were analyzed with relevance to the production of the β(+)-emitter (55)Co (T½=17.53 h), a promising cobalt radionuclide for PET imaging. The nuclear model codes ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE and TALYS were used to check the consistency of the experimental data. The statistically fitted excitation function was employed to calculate the integral yield of the product. The amounts of the radioactive impurities (56)Co and (57)Co were assessed. A comparison of the three investigated production routes is given.

  19. The role of nuclear reactions and {alpha}-particle transport in the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, Josselin; Cherfils-Clerouin, Catherine

    2008-10-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of the deceleration phase of inertial confinement capsules. The purpose is to obtain a zero-dimensional model that has the form of a closed system of ordinary differential equations for the main hydrodynamic quantities. The model takes into account the energy released by nuclear reactions, a nonlocal model for the {alpha}-particle energy deposition process, and radiation loss by electron bremsstrahlung. The asymptotic analysis is performed in the case of a strong temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity. We finally study the beginning of the expansion phase after stagnation to derive an ignition criterion.

  20. Investigation of excitation functions of alpha induced reactions on natXe: Production of the therapeutic radioisotope 131Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárkányi, F.; Hermanne, A.; Király, B.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Sonck, M.; Kovalev, S. F.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2009-03-01

    Excitation functions were measured for alpha-particle induced nuclear reactions on natural xenon leading to the formation of the radionuclides 129m(rel),129g,131m,131mg,133m,135m,137m,139cumBa and 129cum,130mg,132,134m,135m,136mg,138mgCs from the respective thresholds up to 40 MeV. No earlier experimental cross section data were found in the literature. The experimental data were compared to and analyzed with the results of the theoretical model code ALICE-IPPE. The feasibility of the production of the therapeutic radioisotope 131Cs by using gas target technology was investigated. Comparison of reactor and cyclotron production routes of 131Cs was given.

  1. Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals: Static potential energy surfaces and fission fragment properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Duke, D.; Carr, H.; Knoll, A.

    2014-11-01

    Eighty years after its experimental discovery, a description of induced nuclear fission based solely on the interactions between neutrons and protons and quantum many-body methods still poses formidable challenges. The goal of this paper is to contribute to the development of a predictive microscopic framework for the accurate calculation of static properties of fission fragments for hot fission and thermal or slow neutrons. To this end, we focus on the 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction and employ nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy densities. Potential energy surfaces are computed at the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximation with up to five collective variables. We find that the triaxial degree of freedom plays an important role, both near the fission barrier and at scission. The impact of the parametrization of the Skyrme energy density and the role of pairing correlations on deformation properties from the ground state up to scission are also quantified. We introduce a general template for the quantitative description of fission fragment properties. It is based on the careful analysis of scission configurations, using both advanced topological methods and recently proposed quantum many-body techniques. We conclude that an accurate prediction of fission fragment properties at low incident neutron energies, although technologically demanding, should be within the reach of current nuclear density functional theory.

  2. Neutron-induced transmutation reactions in 237Np, 238Pu, and 239Pu at the massive natural uranium spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavorka, L.; Adam, J.; Baldin, A. A.; Caloun, P.; Chilap, V. V.; Furman, W. I.; Kadykov, M. G.; Khushvaktov, J.; Pronskikh, V. S.; Solnyshkin, A. A.; Sotnikov, V.; Stegailov, V. I.; Suchopar, M.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V. M.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.; Voronko, V.; Vrzalova, J.

    2015-04-01

    Transmutation reactions in the 237Np, 238Pu, and 239Pu samples were investigated in the neutron field generated inside a massive (m = 512 kg) natural uranium spallation target. The uranium target assembly QUINTA was irradiated with the deuteron beams of kinetic energy 2, 4, and 8 GeV provided by the Nuclotron accelerator at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna. The neutron-induced transmutation of the actinide samples was measured off-line by implementing methods of gamma-ray spectrometry with HPGe detectors. Results of measurement are expressed in the form of both the individual reaction rates and average fission transmutation rates. For the purpose of validation of radiation transport programs, the experimental results were compared with simulations of neutron production and distribution performed by the MCNPX 2.7 and MARS15 codes employing the INCL4-ABLA physics models and LAQGSM event generator, respectively. In general, a good agreement between the experimental and calculated reaction rates was found in the whole interval of provided beam energies.

  3. Saw palmetto extract induces nuclear heterogeneity in mice.

    PubMed

    Trinachartvanit, Wachareeporn; Francis, Bettina M; Rayburn, A Lane

    2009-01-01

    Saw palmetto (SW), a phytotherapeutic compound used in the treatment of prostate disease, was examined for potential nuclear effects. SW extract was incorporated into a complete casein-based semisynthetic rodent chow at 0%, 0.1% and 1% SW. SW was fed to mice for 6 weeks, after which the mice received a single i/p injection of either the known genotoxic agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in saline or just saline. Forty-eight hours after injection, blood and bone marrow were collected for flow cytometric analysis. A significant effect of MMS was observed in both male and female mice with respect to: an increase in nuclear heterogeneity in bone marrow cells as measured by the coefficient of variation of the G1 peak in a flow histogram (6.32 versus 4.8 in male mice, 7.0 versus 4.9 in female mice) and an increase in the number of micronucleated blood cells (3.4% versus 0.56% male mice, 3.1% versus 0.6 in female mice) indicating a positive genotoxic response. SW also appears to increase the heterogeneity of bone marrow nuclei in a dose dependent manner (0-5.1%, 0.1-5.5% and 1-5.7% in male mice, 0-5.7%, 0.1-6.0% and 1-6.2% in female mice) without a concomitant increase in blood cell micronuclei. These results indicate that SW is not genotoxic with respect to physical DNA damage and that the changes observed in the bone marrow are due to chromatin conformation modifications in the nuclei of in vivo treated mouse cells.

  4. Heavy flavours production in quark-gluon plasma formed in high energy nuclear reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloskinski, J.

    1985-01-01

    Results on compression and temperatures of nuclear fireballs and on relative yield of strange and charmed hadrons are given . The results show that temperatures above 300 MeV and large compressions are unlikely achieved in average heavy ion collision. In consequence, thermal production of charm is low. Strange particle production is, however, substantial and indicates clear temperature - threshold behavior.

  5. Pressure induced reactions amongst calcium aluminate hydrate phases

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Ju-hyuk; Oh, Jae Eun; Balonis, Magdalena; Glasser, Fredrik P.; Clark, Simon M.; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2011-06-15

    The compressibilities of two AFm phases (straetlingite and calcium hemicarboaluminate hydrate) and hydrogarnet were obtained up to 5 GPa by using synchrotron high-pressure X-ray powder diffraction with a diamond anvil cell. The AFm phases show abrupt volume contraction regardless of the molecular size of the pressure-transmitting media. This volume discontinuity could be associated to a structural transition or to the movement of the weakly bound interlayer water molecules in the AFm structure. The experimental results seem to indicate that the pressure-induced dehydration is the dominant mechanism especially with hygroscopic pressure medium. The Birch-Murnaghan equation of state was used to compute the bulk modulus of the minerals. Due to the discontinuity in the pressure-volume diagram, a two stage bulk modulus of each AFm phase was calculated. The abnormal volume compressibility for the AFm phases caused a significant change to their bulk modulus. The reliability of this experiment is verified by comparing the bulk modulus of hydrogarnet with previous studies.

  6. [X-ray irradiation induces apoptosis of mouse GC1 sperm cells via nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor].

    PubMed

    Yang, Huiying; Ding, Jingbin; Wang, Zhijun; Ding, Juan; Xia, Xinshe; Zhao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Objective To study the effect of X-ray irradiation on the localization of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) in mouse GC1 sperm cells. Methods After GC1 cells were treated with 0, 3, 6 and 9 Gy X irradiation, BrdU incorporation assay was performed to detect the proliferation of GC1 cells. Forty-eight hours after irradiation, the nuclear condensation was observed by DAPI staining. The subcellular localization of AIF was showed using the immunofluorescence staining, both in the whole cell extracts and in nuclear extracts, and the expression levels of AIF were detected using Western blot analysis. Results With the increase of X-ray irradiation dose, the proliferation of GC1 cells significantly decreased, and the activity of cells was weakened. After 6 Gy irradiation, in nuclear extracts, but not in the whole cell extracts, the protein AIF was upregulated significantly. It meant the nuclear translocation of protein AIF. Conclusion X-ray irradiation induces the apoptosis of mouse GC1 sperm cells, meanwhile, the nuclear translocation of AIF occurs.

  7. Radiation induced redox reactions and fragmentation of constituent ions in ionic liquids. 1. Anions.

    PubMed

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Marin, Timothy W; Chemerisov, Sergey D; Wishart, James F

    2011-04-14

    Room temperature ionic liquids (IL) find increasing use for the replacement of organic solvents in practical applications, including their use in solar cells and electrolytes for metal deposition, and as extraction solvents for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The radiation stability of ILs is an important concern for some of these applications, as previous studies suggested extensive fragmentation of the constituent ions upon irradiation. In the present study, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used to identify fragmentation pathways for constituent anions in ammonium, phosphonium, and imidazolium ILs. Many of these detrimental reactions are initiated by radiation-induced redox processes involving these anions. Scission of the oxidized anions is the main fragmentation pathway for the majority of the practically important anions; (internal) proton transfer involving the aliphatic arms of these anions is a competing reaction. For perfluorinated anions, fluoride loss following dissociative electron attachment to the anion can be even more prominent than this oxidative fragmentation. Bond scission in the anion was also observed for NO(3)(-) and B(CN)(4)(-) anions and indirectly implicated for BF(4)(-) and PF(6)(-) anions. Among small anions, CF(3)SO(3)(-) and N(CN)(2)(-) are the most stable. Among larger anions, the derivatives of benzoate and imide anions were found to be relatively stable. This stability is due to suppression of the oxidative fragmentation. For benzoates, this is a consequence of the extensive sharing of unpaired electron density by the π-system in the corresponding neutral radical; for the imides, this stability could be the consequence of N-N σ(2)σ(*1) bond formation involving the parent anion. While fragmentation does not occur for these "exceptional" anions, H atom addition and electron attachment are prominent. Among the typically used constituent anions, aliphatic carboxylates were found to be the least

  8. Radiation induced redox reactions and fragmentation of constituent ions in ionic liquids. I. Anions.

    SciTech Connect

    Shkrob, I. A.; Marin, T.; Chemerisov, S.; Wishart, J.

    2011-04-14

    Room temperature ionic liquids (IL) find increasing use for the replacement of organic solvents in practical applications, including their use in solar cells and electrolytes for metal deposition, and as extraction solvents for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The radiation stability of ILs is an important concern for some of these applications, as previous studies suggested extensive fragmentation of the constituent ions upon irradiation. In the present study, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used to identify fragmentation pathways for constituent anions in ammonium, phosphonium, and imidazolium ILs. Many of these detrimental reactions are initiated by radiation-induced redox processes involving these anions. Scission of the oxidized anions is the main fragmentation pathway for the majority of the practically important anions; (internal) proton transfer involving the aliphatic arms of these anions is a competing reaction. For perfluorinated anions, fluoride loss following dissociative electron attachment to the anion can be even more prominent than this oxidative fragmentation. Bond scission in the anion was also observed for NO{sub 3}{sup -} and B(CN){sub 4}{sup -} anions and indirectly implicated for BF{sub 4}{sup -} and PF{sub 6}{sup -} anions. Among small anions, CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}{sup -} and N(CN){sub 2}{sup -} are the most stable. Among larger anions, the derivatives of benzoate and imide anions were found to be relatively stable. This stability is due to suppression of the oxidative fragmentation. For benzoates, this is a consequence of the extensive sharing of unpaired electron density by the {pi}-system in the corresponding neutral radical; for the imides, this stability could be the consequence of N-N {sigma}{sup 2}{sigma}*{sup 1} bond formation involving the parent anion. While fragmentation does not occur for these 'exceptional' anions, H atom addition and electron attachment are prominent. Among the typically used

  9. The Clinical Course of a Drug-induced Acute Dystonic Reaction in the Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Marano, Massimo; di Biase, Lazzaro; Salomone, Gaetano; Di Santo, Alessandro; Montiroli, Annalisa; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute dystonic reactions following the administration of safe, reliable drugs can occur and must be promptly recognized and treated in the emergency room. Phenomenology Shown The entire clinical course of an acute dystonic reaction due to metoclopramide, from early motor signs to full-blown clinical symptoms and resolution. Educational Value Providing elements for early recognition of a drug-induced movement disorder phenomenology. PMID:28105387

  10. Nitric oxide induces thioredoxin-1 nuclear translocation: Possible association with the p21Ras survival pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Roberto J.; Yodoi, J.; Debbas, V.; Laurindo, Francisco R.; Stern, A.; Monteiro, Hugo P. . E-mail: hpmonte@uol.com.br

    2006-10-06

    One of the major redox-regulating molecules with thiol reducing activity is thioredoxin-1 (TRX-1). TRX-1 is a multifunctional protein that exists in the extracellular millieu, cytoplasm, and nucleus, and has a distinct role in each environment. It is well known that TRX-1 promptly migrates to the nuclear compartment in cells exposed to oxidants. However, the intracellular location of TRX-1 in cells exposed to nitrosothiols has not been investigated. Here, we demonstrated that the exposure of HeLa cells to increasing concentrations of the nitrosothiol S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) promoted TRX-1 nuclear accumulation. The SNAP-induced TRX-1 translocation to the nucleus was inhibited by FPTIII, a selective inhibitor of p21Ras. Furthermore, TRX-1 migration was attenuated in cells stably transfected with NO insensitive p21Ras (p21{sup RasC118S}). Downstream to p21Ras, the MAP Kinases ERK1/2 were activated by SNAP under conditions that promote TRX-1 nuclear translocation. Inhibition of MEK prevented SNAP-stimulated ERK1/2 activation and TRX-1 nuclear migration. In addition, cells treated with p21Ras or MEK inhibitor showed increased susceptibility to cell death induced by SNAP. In conclusion, our observations suggest that the nuclear translocation of TRX-1 is induced by SNAP involving p21Ras survival pathway.

  11. Measurement of Nuclear Reaction Q-values with High Accuracy: 7Li(p, n)7Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. E.; Barker, P. H.; Lovelock, D. M. J.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is described for the measurement of nuclear reaction Q-values with an accuracy of a few parts in 105, in which the ultimate reference is a one-volt standard. As a test of the technique the accurately known threshold energy of the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction, 1880.51 +/- 0.08 keV, has been remeasured. The value found using the present technique is 1880.443 +/- 0.020 keV, in good agreement with previous values. An attempt to see evidence for atomic excitation effects in the 27A1(p,n)27Si reaction is also discussed. This yielded a new value of 5803.73 +/- 0.12 keV for the threshold of this reaction, again in a good agreement with, but more accurate than, previous values. Further test measurements are summarized. The main application of the technique, in measurements related to the theory of weak interactions, is discussed briefly and the results obtained to date are presented.

  12. Reactivity of CHI3 with OH radicals: X-abstraction reaction pathways (X = H, I), atmospheric chemistry, and nuclear safety.

    PubMed

    Sudolská, Mária; Louis, Florent; Cernušák, Ivan

    2014-10-09

    The X-abstraction (X = H, I) pathways in the reaction of CHI3 with OH radical, a possible iodoform removal process relevant to the Earth's atmosphere and conditions prevailing in the case of a nuclear accident, have been studied applying highly correlated ab initio quantum chemistry methods and canonical transition-state theory to obtain reaction energy profiles and rate constants. Geometry optimizations of reactants, products, molecular complexes, and transition states determined at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory have been followed by DK-CCSD(T)/ANO-RCC single-point energy calculations. Further improvement of electronic energies has been achieved by applying spin-orbit coupling, corrections toward full configuration interaction, vibration contributions, and tunneling corrections. Calculated reaction enthalpies at 0 K are -108.2 and -5.1 kJ mol(-1) for the H- and I-abstraction pathways, respectively; the strongly exothermic H-abstraction pathway is energetically favored over the modestly exothermic I-abstraction one. The overall rate constant at 298 K based on our ab initio calculations is 4.90 × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), with the I-abstraction pathway being the major channel over the temperature range of 250-2000 K. The CHI3 atmospheric lifetime with respect to the removal reaction with OH radical is predicted to be about 6 h, very short compared to that of other halomethanes.

  13. Systematic trends in photonic reagent induced reactions in a homologous chemical family.

    PubMed

    Tibbetts, Katharine Moore; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel

    2013-08-29

    The growing use of ultrafast laser pulses to induce chemical reactions prompts consideration of these pulses as "photonic reagents" in analogy to chemical reagents. This work explores the prospect that photonic reagents may affect systematic trends in dissociative ionization reactions of a homologous family of halomethanes, much as systematic outcomes are often observed for reactions between homologous families of chemical reagents and chemical substrates. The experiments in this work with photonic reagents of varying pulse energy and linear spectral chirp reveal systematic correlations between observable ion yields and the following set of natural variables describing the substrate molecules: the ionization energy of the parent molecule, the appearance energy of each fragment ion, and the relative strength of carbon-halogen bonds in molecules containing two different halogens. The results suggest that reactions induced by photonic reagents exhibit systematic behavior analogous to that observed in reactions driven by chemical reagents, which provides a basis to consider empirical "rules" for predicting the outcomes of photonic reagent induced reactions.

  14. Online monitoring of chemical reactions by polarization-induced electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-09-21

    Polarization-induced electrospray ionization (PI-ESI) is a simple technique for instant generation of gas-phase ions directly from a microliter-sized droplet for mass spectrometric analysis. A sample droplet was placed over a dielectric substrate and in proximity (2-3 mm) to the inlet of a mass spectrometer. Owing to the polarization effect induced by the high electric field provided by the mass spectrometer, the droplet was polarized and the electrospray was generated from the apex of the droplet. The polarization-induced electrospray could last for tens of seconds, which was sufficiently long to monitor fast reactions occurring within few seconds. Thus, we demonstrated the feasibility of using the droplet-based PI-ESI MS for the online monitoring of fast reactions by simply mixing two droplets (5-10 μL) containing reactants on a dielectric substrate placed in front of a mass spectrometer applied with a high voltage (-4500 V). Schiff base reactions and oxidation reactions that can generate intermediates/products within a few seconds were selected as the model reactions. The ionic reaction species generated from intermediates and products can be simultaneously monitored by PI-ESI MS in real time. We also used this approach to selectively detect acetone from a urine sample, in which acetone was derivatized in situ. In addition, the possibility of using this approach for quantitative analysis of acetone from urine samples was examined.

  15. Helium diffusion coefficient measurements in R7T7 nuclear glass by 3He(d,α) 1H nuclear reaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamssedine, F.; Sauvage, T.; Peuget, S.; Fares, T.; Martin, G.

    2010-05-01

    The immobilization of fission products and minor actinides by vitrification is the reference process for industrial management of high-level radioactive wastes generated by spent fuel reprocessing. Radiation damage and radiogenic helium accumulation must be specifically studied to evaluate the effects of minor actinide alpha decay on the glass long-term behavior under repository conditions. A specific experimental study was conducted for a comprehensive evaluation of the behavior of helium and its diffusion mechanisms in borosilicate nuclear waste glass. Helium production was simulated by external implantation with 3He ions at a concentration (≈1 at.%) 30 times higher than obtained after 10,000 years of storage. Helium diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature were extracted from the depth profiles after annealing. The 3He(d,α) 1H nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) technique was successfully adopted for low-temperature in situ measurements of depth profiles. Its high depth resolution revealed helium mobility at temperatures as low as 253 K and the presence of a trapped helium fraction. The diffusion coefficients of un-trapped helium atoms follow an Arrhenius law between 253 K and 323 K. An activation energy of 0.55 ± 0.03 eV was determined, which is consistent with a process controlled by diffusion in the glass free volume.

  16. Prophylaxis and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Salvo, N.; Barnes, E.; van Draanen, J.; Stacey, E.; Mitera, G.; Breen, D.; Giotis, A.; Czarnota, G.; Pang, J.; De Angelis, C.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a common treatment for cancer patients. One of the most common side effects of radiation is acute skin reaction (radiation dermatitis) that ranges from a mild rash to severe ulceration. Approximately 85% of patients treated with radiation therapy will experience a moderate-to-severe skin reaction. Acute radiation-induced skin reactions often lead to itching and pain, delays in treatment, and diminished aesthetic appearance—and subsequently to a decrease in quality of life. Surveys have demonstrated that a wide variety of topical, oral, and intravenous agents are used to prevent or to treat radiation-induced skin reactions. We conducted a literature review to identify trials that investigated products for the prophylaxis and management of acute radiation dermatitis. Thirty-nine studies met the pre-defined criteria, with thirty-three being categorized as prophylactic trials and six as management trials. For objective evaluation of skin reactions, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria and the U.S. National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria were the most commonly used tools (65% of the studies). Topical corticosteroid agents were found to significantly reduce the severity of skin reactions; however, the trials of corticosteroids evaluated various agents, and no clear indication about a preferred corticosteroid has emerged. Amifostine and oral enzymes were somewhat effective in preventing radiation-induced skin reactions in phase ii and phase iii trials respectively; further large randomized controlled trials should be undertaken to better investigate those products. Biafine cream (Ortho–McNeil Pharmaceuticals, Titusville, NJ, U.S.A.) was found not to be superior to standard regimes in the prevention of radiation-induced skin reactions (n = 6). In conclusion, the evidence is insufficient to support the use of a particular agent for the prevention and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions. Future trials should focus

  17. The Status of Cross Section Measurements for Neutron-induced Reactions Needed for Cosmic Ray Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Cosmic ray interactions with lunar rocks and meteorites produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. Advances in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) allow production rates to be measured routinely in well-documented lunar rocks and meteorites. These measurements are analyzed using theoretical models to learn about the object itself and the history of the cosmic rays that fell on it. Good cross section measurements are essential input to the theoretical calculations. Most primary cosmic ray particles are protons so reliable cross sections for proton-induced reactions are essential. A cross section is deemed accurate if measurements made by different experimenters using different techniques result in consistent values. Most cross sections for proton induced reactions are now well measured. However, good cross section measurements for neutron-induced reactions are still needed. These cross sections are required to fully account for all galactic cosmic ray interactions at depth in an extraterrestrial object. When primary galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles interact with an object many secondary neutrons are produced, which also initiate spallation reactions. Thus, the total GCR contribution to the overall cosmogenic nuclide archive has to include the contribution from the secondary neutron interactions. Few relevant cross section measurements have been reported for neutron-induced reactions at neutron energies greater than approximately 20 MeV. The status of the cross section measurements using quasi-monoenergetic neutron energies at iThemba LABS, South Africa and white neutron beams at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), Los Alamos are reported here.

  18. From cloned frogs to patient matched stem cells: induced pluripotency or somatic cell nuclear transfer?

    PubMed

    Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Byrne, James; Egli, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear transfer has seen a remarkable comeback in the past few years. Three groups have independently reported the derivation of stem cell lines by somatic cell nuclear transfer, from either adult, neonatal or fetal cells. Though the ability of human oocytes to reprogram somatic cells to stem cells had long been anticipated, success did not arrive on a straightforward path. Little was known about human oocyte biology, and nuclear transfer protocols developed in animals required key changes to become effective with human eggs. By overcoming these challenges, human nuclear transfer research has contributed to a greater understanding of oocyte biology, provided a point of reference for the comparison of induced pluripotent stem cells, and delivered a method for the generation of personalized stem cells with therapeutic potential.

  19. Neutron-induced reactions on AlF3 studied using the optical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Lv, Cui-Juan; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Hong-Wei; Zuo, Jia-Xu

    2015-08-01

    Neutron-induced reactions on 27Al and 19F nuclei are investigated using the optical model implemented in the TALYS 1.4 toolkit. Incident neutron energies in a wide range from 0.1 keV to 30 MeV are calculated. The cross sections for the main channels (n, np), (n, p), (n, α), (n, 2n), and (n, γ) and the total reaction cross section (n, tot) of the reactions are obtained. When the default parameters in TALYS 1.4 are adopted, the calculated results agree with the measured results. Based on the calculated results for the n + 27Al and n + 19F reactions, the results of the n + 27Al19F reactions are predicted. These results are useful both for the design of thorium-based molten salt reactors and for neutron activation analysis techniques.

  20. Cetirizine-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis: a serious reaction to a commonly used drug.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Ahmed H; Tefft, Kimberly; Fraga, Garth R; Liu, Deede Y

    2014-05-16

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is an abrupt cutaneous adverse reaction usually in response to medications. It is generally a self-limiting disease if diagnosed promptly and the offending agent discontinued. Cetirizine, a commonly used anti-histamine medication for the treatment of allergic diseases has few reported side effects and is normally well-tolerated and effective. Herein, the first reported case of cetirizine induced AGEP is presented, followed by a discussion of the clinical and pathological aspects of this adverse cutaneous reaction to a widely used drug. Awareness of this reaction is vital owing to the extensive use of cetirizine and the importance of drug cessation once the reaction is identified. Lastly, other pustular cutaneous reactions may present similarly and therefore accurate identification of this disease can prevent unnecessary diagnostic testing.

  1. Effect of divalent ions in acrosome reaction induced by glycosamineglycans in porcine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Delgado, N M; Carranco, A; Merchant, H; Reyes, R

    1985-01-01

    Magnesium, calcium, and zinc at the concentration of 10 microM are capable of inducing a "true" acrosome reaction in the pig spermatozoa judged by the criteria of the fusion of the acrosome and the plasmatic membrane at the anterior region or the sperm nucleus. The optimal percent of acrosome reaction reached by any of the ions tested as a whole was 50%. When glycosamineglycan sulfate (GAGs) plus 10 microM of Mg++, Ca++, or Zn++ was added, they reach to 70-80% of acrosome reaction. At the electrom microscope, thin sections taken from pig spermatozoa treated with ions, GAGs, or ion + GAGs under optimal experimental conditions revealed the same pattern of acrosomal reaction. Results suggest the important role that divalent cations play in general in the induction of the acrosome reaction and question the so-called essential role of calcium ions.

  2. Regulation of the Drosophila hypoxia-inducible factor alpha Sima by CRM1-dependent nuclear export.

    PubMed

    Romero, Nuria M; Irisarri, Maximiliano; Roth, Peggy; Cauerhff, Ana; Samakovlis, Christos; Wappner, Pablo

    2008-05-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-alpha) proteins are regulated by oxygen levels through several different mechanisms that include protein stability, transcriptional coactivator recruitment, and subcellular localization. It was previously reported that these transcription factors are mainly nuclear in hypoxia and cytoplasmic in normoxia, but so far the molecular basis of this regulation is unclear. We show here that the Drosophila melanogaster HIF-alpha protein Sima shuttles continuously between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We identified the relevant nuclear localization signal and two functional nuclear export signals (NESs). These NESs are in the Sima basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain and promote CRM1-dependent nuclear export. Site-directed mutagenesis of either NES provoked Sima nuclear retention and increased transcriptional activity, suggesting that nuclear export contributes to Sima regulation. The identified NESs are conserved and probably functional in the bHLH domains of several bHLH-PAS proteins. We propose that rapid nuclear export of Sima regulates the duration of cellular responses to hypoxia.

  3. Nuclear-Spin-Induced Circular Dichroism in the Infrared Region for Liquids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Yao, Guo-hua; Zhang, Zhen-lin; Liu, Fan-chen; Chen, Dong-ming

    2015-06-22

    Recently, the nuclear-spin-induced optical rotation (NSOR) and circular dichroism (NSCD) for liquids were discovered and extensively studied and developed. However, so far, nuclear-spin-induced magnetic circular dichroism in the IR region (IR-NSCD) has not been explored, even though all polyatomic molecules exhibit extensive IR spectra. Herein, IR-NSCD is proposed and discussed theoretically. The results indicate that in favorable conditions the IR-NSCD angle may be much larger than the NSOR angle in the UV/Vis region due to a vibrational resonance effect and can be measurable by using the NSOR experiment scheme. IR-NSCD can automatically combine and give NMR spectra and IRCD spectra of the nuclear spin prepolarized samples in liquids, which, in principle, could be developed to become a unique, novel analytical tool.

  4. Rhodamine B induces long nucleoplasmic bridges and other nuclear anomalies in Allium cepa root tip cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dehong; Bai, Bing; Jiang, Donghua; Shi, Lin; Cheng, Shunchang; Tao, Dongbing; Ji, Shujuan

    2014-03-01

    The cytogenetic toxicity of rhodamine B on root tip cells of Allium cepa was investigated. A. cepa were cultured in water (negative control), 10 ppm methyl methanesulfonate (positive control), and three concentrations of rhodamine B (200, 100, and 50 ppm) for 7 days. Rhodamine B inhibited mitotic activity; increased nuclear anomalies, including micronuclei, nuclear buds, and bridged nuclei; and induced oxidative stress in A. cepa root tissues. Furthermore, a substantial amount of long nucleoplasmic bridges were entangled together, and some nuclei were simultaneously linked to several other nuclei and to nuclear buds with nucleoplasmic bridges in rhodamine B-treated cells. In conclusion, rhodamine B induced cytogenetic effects in A. cepa root tip cells, which suggests that the A. cepa root is an ideal model system for detecting cellular interactions.

  5. The Sky is NOT Falling: Regional Reaction to a Nuclear-Armed Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    remains perhaps the greatest hero that state has ever had, second only to Muhammad Ali Jinnah , Pakistan’s founding father.165 3. C2 Investigating how...States to Shah Muhammad Reza Pahlavi.29 These carried a back-door path to nuclear weapons for Iran. However, as was allegedly the case with Israel...on Israel, as outlined by Iranian Minister of Defense Admiral Ali Shamkhani: Iran’s defense strategy is based on safeguarding Iran’s territorial

  6. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results for direct reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tumino, A.; Gulino, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S.; Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Lamia, L.

    2014-05-09

    The Trojan Horse method is a powerful indirect technique to determine the astrophysical factor for binary rearrangement processes A+x→b+B at astrophysical energies by measuring the cross section for the Trojan Horse (TH) reaction A+a→B+b+s in quasi free kinematics. The Trojan Horse Method has been successfully applied to many reactions of astrophysical interest, both direct and resonant. In this paper, we will focus on direct sub-processes. The theory of the THM for direct binary reactions will be shortly presented based on a few-body approach that takes into account the off-energy-shell effects and initial and final state interactions. Examples of recent results will be presented to demonstrate how THM works experimentally.

  7. Sensitivity Analysis Applied to the Validation of the 10 B Capture Reaction in Nuclear Fuel Casks

    SciTech Connect

    Goluoglu, S

    2004-03-18

    Boron has commonly been used in nuclear fuel casks to ensure a sufficient margin of subcriticality. The amount of boron used in most casks far exceeds the amount of boron present in any of the available benchmark experiments. Such heavy loadings of boron in the casks may result in considerable spectral differences as compared to the benchmarks, resulting in boron sensitivities that are very different from those of the benchmarks. Before the calculations to determine the nuclear safety margin for various fuel loadings are deemed acceptable, as part of the safety basis, the computer code and cross sections must be validated against experimental benchmarks that cover the area of applicability of the proposed cask design. Therefore, this study was performed to determine if these available benchmarks can be used to validate a criticality code and neutron cross sections for the fuel casks. The sensitivity/uncertainty methodology has been applied to several application cask systems with different boron areal densities. Although, the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cask applications are not completely covered by the set of benchmarks that were used in this study with regard to the 10B capture cross section, the effect of this lack of coverage on the keff is minimal. Thus, the experimental biases are determined to be appropriate for the cask systems, and no additional bias (penalty) due to high boron loading need be imposed.

  8. Defense Nuclear Agency Reaction Rate Handbook. Second Edition. Revision Number 6

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-03-01

    257 (1972). 17-55. Gilmore, F. R., J. Quant. Spectry. Radiative Transfer S_t 369(1965). 17-56. Herzberg , G., Electronic Spectra of...1F»O •BBS • \\ CHAPTER 19 19. NEUTRAL REACTIONS Frederick Kaufman, University of Pittsburgh (Latest Revision 14 May 1975) o 19.1

  9. Kinetics and mechanisms of the reaction of air with nuclear grade graphites: IG-110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loren Fuller, E.; Okoh, Joseph M.

    1997-02-01

    The work presented in this report is part of an ongoing effort in the microgravimetric evaluation of the intrinsic reaction parameters for air reactions with graphite over the temperature range of 450 to 750°C. Earlier work in this laboratory addressed the oxidation/etching of H-451 graphite by oxygen and steam. This report addresses the air oxidation of the Japanese formulated material, IG-110. Fractal analysis showed that each cylinder was remarkably smooth, with an average value, D, the fractal dimension of 0.895. The activation energy, Ea, was determined to be 187.89 kJ/mol indicative of reactions occurring in the zone II kinetic regime and as a result of the porous nature of the cylinders. IG-110 is a microporous solid. The low initial reaction rate of 9.8×10 -5 at 0% burn-off and the high value (764.9) of Φ, the structural parameter confirm this. The maximum rate, 1.35×10 -3 g/m 2s, was measured at 34% burn-off. Reactions appeared to proceed in three stages and transition between them was smooth over the temperature range investigated. Both Ea and ln A did not vary with burn-off. The value of Δ S, the entropy of activation, was -41.4 eu, suggesting oxygen adsorption through an immobile transition state complex. Additional work is recommended to validate the predictions that will be made in relation to accident scenarios for reactors such as the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor where fine grained graphites such as IG-110 could be used in structural applications.

  10. Pharmacogenomics of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions: challenges, opportunities and clinical implementation.

    PubMed

    Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Puangpetch, Apichaya; Medhasi, Sadeep; Tassaneeyakul, Wichittra

    2014-06-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions affect many patients leading to a variety of clinical manifestations, mainly the cutaneous adverse reactions ranging from milder skin reactions to severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs). Hypersensitivity reactions are unpredictable and are thought to have an underlying genetic etiology, as suggested by case reports. With the scientific knowledge of pharmacogenomics and the evidence based on the genomic testing, it is possible to identify genetic predisposing factors for these serious adverse reactions and personalize drug therapy. The most significant genetic associations have been identified in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encoded for human leukocyte antigens (HLA) alleles. Drugs associated with hypersensitivity reactions with strong genetic predisposing factors include abacavir, nevirapine, carbamazepine, and allopurinol. In this review, strong genetic associations of drug-induced SCARs are highlighted so as to improve drug safety and help to select optimal drugs for individual patients. Further investigation, however, is essential for the characterization of other genes involved in the hypersensitivity reactions with the use of several genetic strategies and technologies.

  11. Thermally-induced amphibole reaction rim development: EBSD insights into microlite orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Sarah; Lavallée, Yan; Larsen, Jessica; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2014-05-01

    Amphibole is an important mineral present in many calc-alkaline volcanic deposits. A hydrous phase, volcanic amphibole is only stable at pressures greater than 100 MPa (approx. 4 km), temperature less than ~860-870 oC, and in melts containing at least 4 wt % H2O. When removed from their thermal and barometric stability field, amphiboles decompose to form aggregate rims of anhydrous minerals. The thickness, texture, and mineralogy of these rims are thought to be reflective of the process driving amphibole disequilibrium (e.g. heating, decompression, etc). However, significant overlap in rim thicknesses and microlite textures means that distinguishing between processes it not simple. This study employed backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to examine both experimental heating-indced amphibole reaction rims and natural amphibole reaction rim from Augustine Volcano. We collected crystal orientation maps of amphibole reaction rims to investigate if different types of disequilibrium produce different patterns of microlite orientation. We identified two types of reaction rim: Type 1- reaction rim microlites are generally oriented at random and share little or no systematic relationship with the crystallographic orientation of the host amphibole, and; Type 2- reaction rim microlites exhibit a topotactic relationship with the host amphibole (they share the same crystallographic orientation). Experimentally produced heating reaction rims are without exception Type 2. However the natural reaction rims are evenly distributed between Types 1 and 2. Further experimental data on decompression induced reaction rim formation is needed to investigate if Type 1 reaction rims resemble the breakdown of amphibole due to decompression. If so, reaction rim microlite orientation could provide a clear method for distinguishing between heating and decompression processes in amphibole bearing magmas.

  12. Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM: a negative activation enthalpy reaction.

    PubMed

    Meliga, Stefano C; Farrugia, William; Ramsland, Paul A; Falconer, Robert J

    2013-01-17

    Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM cryoglobulin isolated from a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia was observed to have a negative activation enthalpy. The rate of the reaction increased, as the temperature decreased. Differential scanning calorimetry of the monoclonal IgM showed precipitation as an inverted peak during a downward temperature scan. The transition temperature was between 14 and 15 °C and was possibly concentration dependent. At temperatures below the transition the precipitation was best described by second-order kinetics. The difference in change in enthalpy between precipitation and disassociation suggests that cold-induced precipitation had a fast precipitation stage followed by a slower consolidation reaction. Negligible curvature of the Eyring plot suggested the precipitation reaction was dominated by van der Waal forces and hydrogen bonding. Conversely, during an upward temperature scan, disassociation was observed as a positive enthalpy peak. This reaction had two stages, a reaction undoing consolidation followed by heat-induced disassociation that had first-order kinetics.

  13. Death Inducer-Obliterator 1 Triggers Apoptosis after Nuclear Translocation and Caspase Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    García-Domingo, David; Ramírez, Dorian; González de Buitrago, Gonzalo; Martínez-A, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    Death inducer-obliterator 1 (DIO-1) is a gene that is upregulated early in apoptosis. Here we report that in healthy cells, the DIO-1 gene product was located in the cytoplasm, where it formed oligomers. After interleukin-3 starvation or c-Myc-induced apoptosis in serum-free conditions, DIO-1 translocated to the nucleus, where it upregulated caspase levels and activity. A nuclear localization signal deletion mutant (DIO-1ΔNLS) was unable to translocate to the nuclear compartment in the absence of interleukin-3 and failed to upregulate procaspase levels or trigger cell death. In addition, cells stably expressing DIO-1ΔNLS were protected from apoptosis induced by interleukin-3 withdrawal. These results indicate that DIO-1 has a relevant role in regulating the early stages of cell death. PMID:12697821

  14. Russian Military and Security Forces: A Postulated Reaction to a Nuclear Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, D

    2005-04-29

    In this paper, we will examine how Russia's military and security forces might react to the detonation of a 10-kiloton nuclear weapon placed next to the walls surrounding the Kremlin. At the time of this 'big bang,' Putin is situated outside Moscow and survives the explosion. No one claims responsibility for the detonation. No other information is known. Numerous variables will determine how events ultimately unfold and how the military and security forces will respond. Prior to examining these variables in greater detail, it is imperative to elucidate first what we mean by Russia's military and security forces.

  15. Influence of the hyper-terms in mass formulae on yield of hypernuclei in nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukcizmeci, N.; Botvina, A. S.; Ogul, R.

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, hypernuclear physics has attracted great interest in many fields of physics. One of the particular interest is the understanding of strange particles in baryonic matter, since many questions in heavy-ion physics, particle physics and astrophysics are related to the effect of strangeness in nuclear matter. The contribution of hyperons strongly influences the masses of neutron stars as well. In the past decade a considerable amount of spectroscopic information was accumulated experimentally on the Lambda hypernuclei. We compared different mass formulas for single and multiple Lambda hypernuclei.

  16. Colloid formation during waste form reaction: implications for nuclear waste disposal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, J. K.; Bradley, J.; Teetsov, A.; Bradley, C. R.; ten Brink, Marilyn Buchholtz

    1992-01-01

    Insoluble plutonium- and americium-bearing colloidal particles formed during simulated weathering of a high-level nuclear waste glass. Nearly 100 percent of the total plutonium and americium in test ground water was concentrated in these submicrometer particles. These results indicate that models of actinide mobility and repository integrity, which assume complete solubility of actinides in ground water, underestimate the potential for radionuclide release into the environment. A colloid-trapping mechanism may be necessary for a waste repository to meet long-term performance specifications.

  17. Studies of nuclear reactions at very low energies: Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.

    1988-02-08

    The main thrust of the research program was directed at the acquisition, installation and initial operation of the General Ionex Model 1545 charged particle accelerator which will be used in the subsequent reaction cross section measurements. The initial operation of the accelerator has been quite successful, with all of the crucial characteristics meeting or exceeding design specifications. We have made preliminary measurements of the reactions 12C(rho,..gamma..)13N/sup 11/B(rho,..gamma..)/sup 12/C, and D(rho,..gamma..)/sup 3/He as tests of total system integrity and have carried out studies of the interaction of proton and alpha particle beams with deuterated-polyethylene targets. 11 refs.

  18. Cyclotron production of I-123: An evaluation of the nuclear reactions which produce this isotope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sodd, V. J.; Scholz, K. L.; Blue, J. W.; Wellamn, H. N.

    1970-01-01

    The reactions studied which produce I-123 directly were Sb-121(He-4,2n) I-123, Sb-121(He-3,n) I-123, Te-122(d,n) I-123, Te-122(He-4,p2n) I-123, Te-122(He-3,pn) I-123, and Te-123(He-3,p2n) I-123. Reactions which produce I-123 indirectly through the positron decay of 2.1-hour Xe-123 were Te-122(He-4,3n) Xe-123, Te-122(He-3,2n) Xe-123 and Te-123(He-3,3n) Xe-123. Use of the gas flow I-123 cyclotron target assembly is recommended for the production of I-123 with radiochemical purity greater than 99.995%.

  19. Role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) in programmed nuclear death during conjugation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Programmed nuclear death (PND), which is also referred to as nuclear apoptosis, is a remarkable process that occurs in ciliates during sexual reproduction (conjugation). In Tetrahymena thermophila, when the new macronucleus differentiates, the parental macronucleus is selectively eliminated from the cytoplasm of the progeny, concomitant with apoptotic nuclear events. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are not well understood. The parental macronucleus is engulfed by a large autophagosome, which contains numerous mitochondria that have lost their membrane potential. In animals, mitochondrial depolarization precedes apoptotic cell death, which involves DNA fragmentation and subsequent nuclear degradation. Results We focused on the role of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) during PND in Tetrahymena. The disruption of AIF delays the normal progression of PND, specifically, nuclear condensation and kilobase-size DNA fragmentation. AIF is localized in Tetrahymena mitochondria and is released into the macronucleus prior to nuclear condensation. In addition, AIF associates and co-operates with the mitochondrial DNase to facilitate the degradation of kilobase-size DNA, which is followed by oligonucleosome-size DNA laddering. Conclusions Our results suggest that Tetrahymena AIF plays an important role in the degradation of DNA at an early stage of PND, which supports the notion that the mitochondrion-initiated apoptotic DNA degradation pathway is widely conserved among eukaryotes. PMID:20146827

  20. Characterizing N-Z equilibration in nuclear reaction with sub-zeptosecond resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedele, Andrea; McIntosh, Alan; Manso Rodriguez, Alis; Heilborn, Lauren; May, Larry; Youngs, Michael; Zarrella, Andrew; Yennello, Sherry

    2016-09-01

    The process of neutron-proton (N-Z) equilibration is governed by the symmetry energy component of the nuclear equation of state. The extent of equilibration is governed by the contact time and the gradient of the potential driving the equilibration. We have examined correlations between the largest two fragments of the PLF* (both isotopically identified) produced in collisions of 70Zn +70Zn, 64Zn +64Zn and 64Ni +64Ni at 35A MeV. Using the rotation angle between the fragments as a clock, we observe the N-Z composition of the fragments evolve from initially dissimilar to converging exponentially, consistent with first-order kinetics. The rate constant is 3 zs-1, corresponding to a mean equilibration time of 0.3 zs. This technique enables new insight into the nuclear equation of state. This work was made possible by support from the DOE (DE-FG02-93ER40773) and the Robert A. Welch Foundation (A-1266).