Science.gov

Sample records for nuclear rna polymerases

  1. Persistent nuclear actin filaments inhibit transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Serebryannyy, Leonid A; Parilla, Megan; Annibale, Paolo; Cruz, Christina M; Laster, Kyle; Gratton, Enrico; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Kosak, Steven T; Gottardi, Cara J; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2016-09-15

    Actin is abundant in the nucleus and it is clear that nuclear actin has important functions. However, mystery surrounds the absence of classical actin filaments in the nucleus. To address this question, we investigated how polymerizing nuclear actin into persistent nuclear actin filaments affected transcription by RNA polymerase II. Nuclear filaments impaired nuclear actin dynamics by polymerizing and sequestering nuclear actin. Polymerizing actin into stable nuclear filaments disrupted the interaction of actin with RNA polymerase II and correlated with impaired RNA polymerase II localization, dynamics, gene recruitment, and reduced global transcription and cell proliferation. Polymerizing and crosslinking nuclear actin in vitro similarly disrupted the actin-RNA-polymerase-II interaction and inhibited transcription. These data rationalize the general absence of stable actin filaments in mammalian somatic nuclei. They also suggest a dynamic pool of nuclear actin is required for the proper localization and activity of RNA polymerase II.

  2. Persistent nuclear actin filaments inhibit transcription by RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Serebryannyy, Leonid A.; Parilla, Megan; Cruz, Christina M.; Laster, Kyle; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Kosak, Steven T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Actin is abundant in the nucleus and it is clear that nuclear actin has important functions. However, mystery surrounds the absence of classical actin filaments in the nucleus. To address this question, we investigated how polymerizing nuclear actin into persistent nuclear actin filaments affected transcription by RNA polymerase II. Nuclear filaments impaired nuclear actin dynamics by polymerizing and sequestering nuclear actin. Polymerizing actin into stable nuclear filaments disrupted the interaction of actin with RNA polymerase II and correlated with impaired RNA polymerase II localization, dynamics, gene recruitment, and reduced global transcription and cell proliferation. Polymerizing and crosslinking nuclear actin in vitro similarly disrupted the actin–RNA-polymerase-II interaction and inhibited transcription. These data rationalize the general absence of stable actin filaments in mammalian somatic nuclei. They also suggest a dynamic pool of nuclear actin is required for the proper localization and activity of RNA polymerase II. PMID:27505898

  3. Transcription termination by nuclear RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Patricia; Manley, James L.

    2009-01-01

    Gene transcription in the cell nucleus is a complex and highly regulated process. Transcription in eukaryotes requires three distinct RNA polymerases, each of which employs its own mechanisms for initiation, elongation, and termination. Termination mechanisms vary considerably, ranging from relatively simple to exceptionally complex. In this review, we describe the present state of knowledge on how each of the three RNA polymerases terminates and how mechanisms are conserved, or vary, from yeast to human. PMID:19487567

  4. Nuclear import of RNA polymerase II is coupled with nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the RNA polymerase II-associated protein 2.

    PubMed

    Forget, Diane; Lacombe, Andrée-Anne; Cloutier, Philippe; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Blanchette, Mathieu; Coulombe, Benoit

    2013-08-01

    The RNA polymerase II (RNAP II)-associated protein (RPAP) 2 has been discovered through its association with various subunits of RNAP II in affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry experiments. Here, we show that RPAP2 is a mainly cytoplasmic protein that shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. RPAP2 shuttling is tightly coupled with nuclear import of RNAP II, as RPAP2 silencing provokes abnormal accumulation of RNAP II in the cytoplasmic space. Most notably, RPAP4/GPN1 silencing provokes the retention of RPAP2 in the nucleus. Our results support a model in which RPAP2 enters the nucleus in association with RNAP II and returns to the cytoplasm in association with the GTPase GPN1/RPAP4. Although binding of RNAP II to RPAP2 is mediated by an N-terminal domain (amino acids 1-170) that contains a nuclear retention domain, and binding of RPAP4/GPN1 to RPAP2 occurs through a C-terminal domain (amino acids 156-612) that has a dominant cytoplasmic localization domain. In conjunction with previously published data, our results have important implications, as they indicate that RPAP2 controls gene expression by two distinct mechanisms, one that targets RNAP II activity during transcription and the other that controls availability of RNAP II in the nucleus.

  5. Accurate and efficient RNA polymerase II transcription with a soluble nuclear fraction derived from Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Kamakaka, R T; Tyree, C M; Kadonaga, J T

    1991-01-01

    We describe the preparation and biochemical properties of a soluble nuclear fraction derived from Drosophila embryos. This extract, which can be easily prepared in 2.5 hr, is capable of accurate and efficient RNA polymerase II transcription of a variety of diverse genes from both Drosophila and mammals. With the relatively strong promoter of the Drosophila Krüppel gene, it is possible to achieve 20% template usage in a single round of transcription, which is considerably higher than the template usage of approximately 3% seen with standard nuclear extracts. Further, although U small nuclear RNA genes are refractory to transcription with HeLa transcription extracts, the soluble nuclear fraction transcribes a U1 small nuclear RNA gene from Drosophila. Moreover, transcriptional activation by sequence-specific activators can be attained in vitro with the soluble nuclear fraction. The overall transcriptional efficiency appears limited to 0.45 transcript per template of DNA per 30 min, but the mechanism of limitation is not known. The soluble nuclear fraction, which was developed to recreate the environment within the nucleus, should be useful when high efficiencies of RNA polymerase II transcription are desired. Images PMID:1992453

  6. Influenza polymerase encoding mRNAs utilize atypical mRNA nuclear export.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Sean; Bui, Steven; Perez, Veronica; Mohammad, Adeba; Medina-Ramirez, Hilario; Newcomb, Laura L

    2014-08-28

    Influenza is a segmented negative strand RNA virus. Each RNA segment is encapsulated by influenza nucleoprotein and bound by the viral RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) to form viral ribonucleoproteins responsible for RNA synthesis in the nucleus of the host cell. Influenza transcription results in spliced mRNAs (M2 and NS2), intron-containing mRNAs (M1 and NS1), and intron-less mRNAs (HA, NA, NP, PB1, PB2, and PA), all of which undergo nuclear export into the cytoplasm for translation. Most cellular mRNA nuclear export is Nxf1-mediated, while select mRNAs utilize Crm1. Here we inhibited Nxf1 and Crm1 nuclear export prior to infection with influenza A/Udorn/307/1972(H3N2) virus and analyzed influenza intron-less mRNAs using cellular fractionation and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). We examined direct interaction between Nxf1 and influenza intron-less mRNAs using immuno purification of Nxf1 and RT-PCR of associated RNA. Inhibition of Nxf1 resulted in less influenza intron-less mRNA export into the cytoplasm for HA and NA influenza mRNAs in both human embryonic kidney cell line (293 T) and human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A549). However, in 293 T cells no change was observed for mRNAs encoding the components of the viral ribonucleoproteins; NP, PA, PB1, and PB2, while in A549 cells, only PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNAs, encoding the RdRP, remained unaffected; NP mRNA was reduced in the cytoplasm. In A549 cells NP, NA, HA, mRNAs were found associated with Nxf1 but PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNAs were not. Crm1 inhibition also resulted in no significant difference in PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNA nuclear export. These results further confirm Nxf1-mediated nuclear export is functional during the influenza life cycle and hijacked for select influenza mRNA nuclear export. We reveal a cell type difference for Nxf1-mediated nuclear export of influenza NP mRNA, a reminder that cell type can influence molecular mechanisms. Importantly, we

  7. Archaebacterial DNA-dependent RNA polymerases testify to the evolution of the eukaryotic nuclear genome.

    PubMed Central

    Pühler, G; Leffers, H; Gropp, F; Palm, P; Klenk, H P; Lottspeich, F; Garrett, R A; Zillig, W

    1989-01-01

    Genes for DNA-dependent RNA polymerase components B, A, and C from the archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and for components B", B', A, and C from the archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium were cloned and sequenced. They are organized in gene clusters in the order above, which corresponds to the order of the homologous rpoB and rpoC genes in the corresponding operon of the Escherichia coli genome. Derived amino acid sequences of archaebacterial components A and C were aligned with each other and with the sequences of corresponding (largest) subunits from the archaebacterium Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, with sequences of various eukaryotic nuclear RNA polymerases I, II, and III, and with the sequence of the beta' component from E. coli polymerase. The archaebacterial genes for component A are homologous to about the first two-thirds of genes for the eukaryotic component A and the eubacterial component beta', and the archaebacterial genes for component C are homologous to the last third of the genes for the eukaryotic component A and the eubacterial component beta'. Unrooted phylogenetic dendrograms derived from both distance matrix and parsimony analyses show the archaebacteria are a coherent group closely related to the eukaryotic nuclear RNA polymerase II and/or III lineages. The eukaryotic polymerase I lineage appears to arise separately from a bifurcation with the eubacterial beta' component lineage. PMID:2499884

  8. T7-RNA Polymerase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    T7-RNA Polymerase grown on STS-81. Structure-Function Relationships of RNA Polymerase: DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is the key enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of RNA, a process known as transcription. Principal Investigator's include Dr. Dan Carter, Dr. B.C. Wang, and Dr. John Rose of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  9. T7-RNA Polymerase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    T7-RNA Polymerase grown on STS-81. Structure-Function Relationships of RNA Polymerase: DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is the key enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of RNA, a process known as transcription. Principal Investigator's include Dr. Dan Carter, Dr. B.C. Wang, and Dr. John Rose of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  10. Protein kinase A regulates RNA polymerase III transcription through the nuclear localization of Maf1

    PubMed Central

    Moir, Robyn D.; Lee, JaeHoon; Haeusler, Rebecca A.; Desai, Neelam; Engelke, David R.; Willis, Ian M.

    2006-01-01

    Maf1 is an essential and specific mediator of transcriptional repression in the RNA polymerase (pol) III system. Maf1-dependent repression occurs in response to a wide range of conditions, suggesting that the protein itself is targeted by the major nutritional and stress-signaling pathways. We show that Maf1 is a substrate for cAMP-dependent PKA in vitro and is differentially phosphorylated on PKA sites in vivo under normal versus repressing conditions. PKA activity negatively regulates Maf1 function because strains with unregulated high PKA activity block repression of pol III transcription in vivo, and strains lacking all PKA activity are hyperrepressible. Nuclear accumulation of Maf1 is required for transcriptional repression and is regulated by two nuclear localization sequences in the protein. An analysis of PKA phosphosite mutants shows that the localization of Maf1 is affected via the N-terminal nuclear localization sequence. In particular, mutations that prevent phosphorylation at PKA consensus sites promote nuclear accumulation of Maf1 without inducing repression. These results indicate that negative regulation of Maf1 by PKA is achieved by inhibiting its nuclear import and suggest that a PKA-independent activation step is required for nuclear Maf1 to function in the repression of pol III transcription. Finally, we report a previously undescribed phenotype for Maf1 in tRNA gene-mediated silencing of nearby RNA pol II transcription. PMID:17005718

  11. Human GTPases associate with RNA polymerase II to mediate its nuclear import.

    PubMed

    Carré, Clément; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2011-10-01

    Small GTPases share a biochemical mechanism and act as binary molecular switches. One important function of small GTPases in the cell is nucleocytoplasmic transport of both proteins and RNA. Here, we show the stable association of human GPN1 and GPN3, small GTPases related to Ran, with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) isolated from either the cytoplasmic or nuclear fraction. GPN1 and GPN3 directly interact with RNAPII subunit 7 (RPB7)/RPB4 and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII. Depletion of GPN1 or GPN3 using small interfering RNAs led to decreased RNAPII levels in the nucleus and an accumulation of this enzyme in the cytoplasm of human cells. Furthermore, isolation of a GPN1/GPN3/RNAPII complex from stable cell lines expressing a dominant negative GPN1 harboring mutations in the GTP-binding pocket demonstrated a role for these proteins in nuclear import of RNAPII. Thus, GPN1/GPN3 define a new family of small GTPases that are specialized for the transport of RNA polymerase II into the nucleus.

  12. Distinct molecular structures of nuclear class I, II, and III DNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Sklar, V E; Schwartz, L B; Roeder, R G

    1975-01-01

    Class III RNA polymerases purified from the murine plasmacytoma MOPC 315 and from Xenopus laevis ovaries were compared. The subunit structures of the chromatographically distinct murine enzymes IIIA and IIIB were indistinguishable and were remarkably similar to that of the amphibian enzyme III. The plasmacytoma class III RNA polymerases were also compared with purified plasmacytoma RNA polymerases I and II. Sedimentation studies indicated that RNA polymerase III si significantly larger than RNA polymerase II, which is slightly larger than RNA polymerase I. Structural analyses showed that the molecular weights of the large subunits present in the class III enzymes (138,000 and 155,000) differ from those of the class II enzymes (140,000 and either 170,000, 205,000, or 240,000) and from those of the class I enzymes (117,000 and 195,000). Some low-molecular-weight subunits are also unique to each enzyme class. These results clearly distinguish the class I, II, and III enzymes on a structural basis. In addition, polypeptides of molecular weight 29,000 and 19,000 were found in all enzyme classes, a polypeptide of molecular weight 52,000 was found only in class I and III enzymes, and a polypeptide of molecular weight 41,000 was found only in class II and III enzymes. These findings are discussed in terms of the function and regulation of the RNA polymerases.

  13. Different pathways for the nuclear import of yeast RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Navarro, Natalia; Estruch, Francisco

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that RNA polymerase II (Pol II) has to be fully assembled before being imported into the nucleus, while other reports indicate a distinct mechanism to import large and small subunits. In yeast, Iwr1 binds to the holoenzyme assembled in the cytoplasm and directs its nuclear entry. However, as IWR1 is not an essential gene, Iwr1-independent pathway(s) for the nuclear import of Pol II must exist. In this paper, we investigate the transport into the nucleus of several large and small Pol II subunits in the mutants of genes involved in Pol II biogenesis. We also analyse subcellular localization in the presence of drugs that can potentially affect Pol II nuclear import. Our results show differences in the cellular distribution between large and small subunits when Pol II biogenesis was impaired. Our data suggest that, in addition to the fully assembled holoenzyme, Pol II subunits can be imported to the nucleus, either independently or as partial assemblies, through different pathways, including passive diffusion for the small subunits.

  14. Molecular characterization of a positively photoregulated nuclear gene for a chloroplast RNA polymerase sigma factor in Cyanidium caldarium.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, B; Troxler, R F

    1996-01-01

    We have cloned the gene for a putative chloroplast RNA polymerase sigma factor from the unicellular rhodophyte Cyanidium caldarium. This gene contains an open reading frame encoding a protein of 609 amino acids with domains highly homologous to all four conserved regions found in bacterial and cyanobacterial sigma 70-type subunits. When Southern blots of genomic DNA were hybridized to the "rpoD box" oligonucleotide probe, up to six hybridizing hands were observed. Transcripts of the sigma factor gene were undetectable in RNA from dark-grown cells but were abundant in the poly(A)+ fraction of RNA from illuminated cells. The sigma factor gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and antibodies against the expressed sigma factor fusion protein cross-reacted with a 55-kDa protein in partially purified chloroplast RNA polymerase. Antibodies directed against a cyanobacterial RNA polymerase sigma factor also cross-reacted with a 55-kDa protein in the same enzyme preparation. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that this enzyme preparation contains proteins with the same molecular weights as the alpha, beta, beta', and beta" subunits of chloroplast RNA polymerase in higher plants. This study identifies a gene for a plastid RNA polymerase sigma factor and indicates that there may be a family of nuclear-encoded sigma factors that recognize promoters in subsets of plastid genes and regulate differential gene expression at the transcriptional level. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:8622935

  15. Archaeal RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Akira; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The recently solved X-ray crystal structures of archaeal RNA polymerase allows a structural comparison of the transcription machinery among all three domains of life. Archaeal transcription is very simple and all components, including the structures of general transcription factors and RNA polymerase, are highly conserved in eukaryotes. Therefore, it could be a new model for dissection of the eukaryotic transcription apparatus. The archaeal RNA polymerase structure also provides a framework for addressing the functional role that Fe–S clusters play within the transcription machinery of archaea and eukaryotes. A comparison between bacterial and archaeal open complex models reveals likely key motifs of archaeal RNA polymerase for DNA unwinding during the open complex formation. PMID:19880312

  16. Transcription by RNA polymerases I and III

    PubMed Central

    Paule, Marvin R.; White, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    The task of transcribing nuclear genes is shared between three RNA polymerases in eukaryotes: RNA polymerase (pol) I synthesises the large rRNA, pol II synthesises mRNA and pol III synthesises tRNA and 5S rRNA. Although pol II has received most attention, pol I and pol III are together responsible for the bulk of transcriptional activity. This survey will summarise what is known about the process of transcription by pol I and pol III, how it happens and the proteins involved. Attention will be drawn to the similarities between the three nuclear RNA polymerase systems and also to their differences. PMID:10684922

  17. Influenza A Virus Polymerase Recruits the RNA Helicase DDX19 to Promote the Nuclear Export of Viral mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Diot, Cédric; Fournier, Guillaume; Dos Santos, Mélanie; Magnus, Julie; Komarova, Anastasia; van der Werf, Sylvie; Munier, Sandie; Naffakh, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing the knowledge of host factors that are required for efficient influenza A virus (IAV) replication is essential to address questions related to pathogenicity and to identify targets for antiviral drug development. Here we focused on the interplay between IAV and DExD-box RNA helicases (DDX), which play a key role in cellular RNA metabolism by remodeling RNA-RNA or RNA-protein complexes. We performed a targeted RNAi screen on 35 human DDX proteins to identify those involved in IAV life cycle. DDX19 was a major hit. In DDX19-depleted cells the accumulation of viral RNAs and proteins was delayed, and the production of infectious IAV particles was strongly reduced. We show that DDX19 associates with intronless, unspliced and spliced IAV mRNAs and promotes their nuclear export. In addition, we demonstrate an RNA-independent association between DDX19 and the viral polymerase, that is modulated by the ATPase activity of DDX19. Our results provide a model in which DDX19 is recruited to viral mRNAs in the nucleus of infected cells to enhance their nuclear export. Information gained from this virus-host interaction improves the understanding of both the IAV replication cycle and the cellular function of DDX19. PMID:27653209

  18. RNA Polymerase in Mumps Virion

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jacqueline P.; Northrop, Robert L.

    1974-01-01

    Mumps virions of the Enders' strain were examined for polymerase activity in vitro. An RNA-dependent RNA polymerase was found to be associated with the virion. The general properties of the reaction appear to be similar to those described for other paramyxoviruses. PMID:4836602

  19. Base-pair-resolution genome-wide mapping of active RNA polymerases using precision nuclear run-on (PRO-seq).

    PubMed

    Mahat, Dig Bijay; Kwak, Hojoong; Booth, Gregory T; Jonkers, Iris H; Danko, Charles G; Patel, Ravi K; Waters, Colin T; Munson, Katie; Core, Leighton J; Lis, John T

    2016-08-01

    We provide a protocol for precision nuclear run-on sequencing (PRO-seq) and its variant, PRO-cap, which map the location of active RNA polymerases (PRO-seq) or transcription start sites (TSSs) (PRO-cap) genome-wide at high resolution. The density of RNA polymerases at a particular genomic locus directly reflects the level of nascent transcription at that region. Nuclei are isolated from cells and, under nuclear run-on conditions, transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerases incorporate one or, at most, a few biotin-labeled nucleotide triphosphates (biotin-NTPs) into the 3' end of nascent RNA. The biotin-labeled nascent RNA is used to prepare sequencing libraries, which are sequenced from the 3' end to provide high-resolution positional information for the RNA polymerases. PRO-seq provides much higher sensitivity than ChIP-seq, and it generates a much larger fraction of usable sequence reads than ChIP-seq or NET-seq (native elongating transcript sequencing). Similarly to NET-seq, PRO-seq maps the RNA polymerase at up to base-pair resolution with strand specificity, but unlike NET-seq it does not require immunoprecipitation. With the protocol provided here, PRO-seq (or PRO-cap) libraries for high-throughput sequencing can be generated in 4-5 working days. The method has been applied to human, mouse, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans cells and, with slight modifications, to yeast.

  20. Base-Pair Resolution Genome-Wide Mapping Of Active RNA polymerases using Precision Nuclear Run-On (PRO-seq)

    PubMed Central

    Mahat, Dig Bijay; Kwak, Hojoong; Booth, Gregory T.; Jonkers, Iris H.; Danko, Charles G.; Patel, Ravi K.; Waters, Colin T.; Munson, Katie; Core, Leighton J.; Lis, John T.

    2017-01-01

    We provide a protocol for precision nuclear run-on sequencing (PRO-seq) and its variant, PRO-cap, which map the location of active RNA polymerases (PRO-seq) or transcription start sites (TSSs) (PRO-cap) genome-wide at high resolution. The density of RNA polymerases at a particular genomic locus directly reflects the level of nascent transcription at that region. Nuclei are isolated from cells and, under nuclear run-on conditions, transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerases incorporate one or, at most, a few biotin-labeled nucleotide triphosphates (biotin-NTPs) into the 3′ end of nascent RNA. The biotin-labeled nascent RNA is used to prepare sequencing libraries, which are sequenced from the 3′ end to provide high-resolution positional information for the RNA polymerases. PRO-seq provides much higher sensitivity than ChIP-seq, and it generates a much larger fraction of usable sequence reads than ChIP-seq or NET-seq (native elongating transcript sequencing). Similarly to NET-seq, PRO-seq maps the RNA polymerase at up to base-pair resolution with strand specificity, but unlike NET-seq it does not require immunoprecipitation. With the protocol provided here, PRO-seq (or PRO-cap) libraries for high-throughput sequencing can be generated in 4–5 working days. The method has been applied to human, mouse, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans cells and, with slight modifications, to yeast. PMID:27442863

  1. The Gpn3 Q279* cancer-associated mutant inhibits Gpn1 nuclear export and is deficient in RNA polymerase II nuclear targeting.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Camacho, Angel A; Méndez-Hernández, Lucía E; Lara Chacón, Bárbara; Peña-Gómez, Sonia G; Romero, Violeta; González-González, Rogelio; Guerra-Moreno, José A; Robledo-Rivera, Angélica Y; Sánchez-Olea, Roberto; Calera, Mónica R

    2017-09-23

    Gpn3 is required for RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) nuclear targeting. Here, we investigated the effect of a cancer-associated Q279* nonsense mutation in Gpn3 cellular function. Employing RNAi, we replaced endogenous Gpn3 by wt or Q279* RNAi-resistant Gpn3R in epithelial model cells. RNAPII nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity are markedly decreased in cells expressing only Gpn3R Q279*. Wild-type Gpn3R localizes to the cytoplasm but a fraction of Gpn3R Q279* enters the cell nucleus and inhibits Gpn1-EYFP nuclear export. This property and the transcriptional deficit in Gpn3R Q279*-expressing cells requires a PDZ-binding motif generated by the Q279* mutation. We conclude that this PDZ-binding motif resulting from the Q279* mutation causes Gpn3 nuclear entry, inhibits Gpn1 nuclear export and Gpn3-mediated RNAPII nuclear targeting. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Chloroplast RNA polymerases: Role in chloroplast biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Börner, Thomas; Aleynikova, Anastasia Yu; Zubo, Yan O; Kusnetsov, Victor V

    2015-09-01

    Plastid genes are transcribed by two types of RNA polymerase in angiosperms: the bacterial type plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) and one (RPOTp in monocots) or two (RPOTp and RPOTmp in dicots) nuclear-encoded RNA polymerase(s) (NEP). PEP is a bacterial-type multisubunit enzyme composed of core subunits (coded for by the plastid rpoA, rpoB, rpoC1 and rpoC2 genes) and additional protein factors (sigma factors and polymerase associated protein, PAPs) encoded in the nuclear genome. Sigma factors are required by PEP for promoter recognition. Six different sigma factors are used by PEP in Arabidopsis plastids. NEP activity is represented by phage-type RNA polymerases. Only one NEP subunit has been identified, which bears the catalytic activity. NEP and PEP use different promoters. Many plastid genes have both PEP and NEP promoters. PEP dominates in the transcription of photosynthesis genes. Intriguingly, rpoB belongs to the few genes transcribed exclusively by NEP. Both NEP and PEP are active in non-green plastids and in chloroplasts at all stages of development. The transcriptional activity of NEP and PEP is affected by endogenous and exogenous factors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Multisubunit RNA Polymerases IV and V: Purveyors of Non-Coding RNA for Plant Gene Silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2011-08-01

    In all eukaryotes, nuclear DNA-dependent RNA polymerases I, II and III synthesize the myriad RNAs that are essential for life. Remarkably, plants have evolved two additional multisubunit RNA polymerases, RNA polymerases IV and V, which orchestrate non-coding RNA-mediated gene silencing processes affecting development, transposon taming, antiviral defence and allelic crosstalk. Biochemical details concerning the templates and products of RNA polymerases IV and V are lacking. However, their subunit compositions reveal that they evolved as specialized forms of RNA polymerase II, which provides the unique opportunity to study the functional diversification of a eukaryotic RNA polymerase family.

  4. The chromatin remodelling complex WSTF-SNF2h interacts with nuclear myosin 1 and has a role in RNA polymerase I transcription.

    PubMed

    Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Fomproix, Nathalie; Cavellán, Erica; Voit, Renate; Reimer, Georg; Krüger, Tim; Thyberg, Johan; Scheer, Ulrich; Grummt, Ingrid; Farrants, Ann-Kristin Ostlund

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear actin and myosin 1 (NM1) are key regulators of gene transcription. Here, we show by biochemical fractionation of nuclear extracts, protein-protein interaction studies and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays that NM1 is part of a multiprotein complex that contains WICH, a chromatin remodelling complex containing WSTF (Williams syndrome transcription factor) and SNF2h. NM1, WSTF and SNF2h were found to be associated with RNA polymerase I (Pol I) and ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA). RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NM1 and WSTF reduced pre-rRNA synthesis in vivo, and antibodies to WSTF inhibited Pol I transcription on pre-assembled chromatin templates but not on naked DNA. The results indicate that NM1 cooperates with WICH to facilitate transcription on chromatin.

  5. The chromatin remodelling complex WSTF–SNF2h interacts with nuclear myosin 1 and has a role in RNA polymerase I transcription

    PubMed Central

    Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Fomproix, Nathalie; Cavellán, Erica; Voit, Renate; Reimer, Georg; Krüger, Tim; Thyberg, Johan; Scheer, Ulrich; Grummt, Ingrid; Östlund Farrants, Ann-Kristin

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear actin and myosin 1 (NM1) are key regulators of gene transcription. Here, we show by biochemical fractionation of nuclear extracts, protein–protein interaction studies and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays that NM1 is part of a multiprotein complex that contains WICH, a chromatin remodelling complex containing WSTF (Williams syndrome transcription factor) and SNF2h. NM1, WSTF and SNF2h were found to be associated with RNA polymerase I (Pol I) and ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA). RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NM1 and WSTF reduced pre-rRNA synthesis in vivo, and antibodies to WSTF inhibited Pol I transcription on pre-assembled chromatin templates but not on naked DNA. The results indicate that NM1 cooperates with WICH to facilitate transcription on chromatin. PMID:16514417

  6. A Conserved Nuclear Cyclophilin Is Required for Both RNA Polymerase II Elongation and Co-transcriptional Splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jeong H.; Rechsteiner, Andreas; Strome, Susan; Kelly, William G.

    2016-01-01

    The elongation phase of transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) involves numerous events that are tightly coordinated, including RNA processing, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. RNA splicing factors are associated with elongating Pol II, and the interdependent coupling of splicing and elongation has been documented in several systems. Here we identify a conserved, multi-domain cyclophilin family member, SIG-7, as an essential factor for both normal transcription elongation and co-transcriptional splicing. In embryos depleted for SIG-7, RNA levels for over a thousand zygotically expressed genes are substantially reduced, Pol II becomes significantly reduced at the 3’ end of genes, marks of transcription elongation are reduced, and unspliced mRNAs accumulate. Our findings suggest that SIG-7 plays a central role in both Pol II elongation and co-transcriptional splicing and may provide an important link for their coordination and regulation. PMID:27541139

  7. Alphavirus polymerase and RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Maija K; Hellström, Kirsi; Ahola, Tero

    2017-01-16

    Alphaviruses are typically arthropod-borne, and many are important pathogens such as chikungunya virus. Alphaviruses encode four nonstructural proteins (nsP1-4), initially produced as a polyprotein P1234. nsP4 is the core RNA-dependent RNA polymerase but all four nsPs are required for RNA synthesis. The early replication complex (RC) formed by the polyprotein P123 and nsP4 synthesizes minus RNA strands, and the late RC composed of fully processed nsP1-nsP4 is responsible for the production of genomic and subgenomic plus strands. Different parts of nsP4 recognize the promoters for minus and plus strands but the binding also requires the other nsPs. The alphavirus polymerase has been purified and is capable of de novo RNA synthesis only in the presence of the other nsPs. The purified nsP4 also has terminal adenylyltransferase activity, which may generate the poly(A) tail at the 3' end of the genome. Membrane association of the nsPs is vital for replication, and alphaviruses induce membrane invaginations called spherules, which form a microenvironment for RNA synthesis by concentrating replication components and protecting double-stranded RNA intermediates. The RCs isolated as crude membrane preparations are active in RNA synthesis in vitro, but high-resolution structure of the RC has not been achieved, and thus the arrangement of viral and possible host components remains unknown. For some alphaviruses, Ras-GTPase-activating protein (Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain)-binding proteins (G3BPs) and amphiphysins have been shown to be essential for RNA replication and are present in the RCs. Host factors offer an additional target for antivirals, as only few alphavirus polymerase inhibitors have been described.

  8. CA150, a nuclear protein associated with the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme, is involved in Tat-activated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Suñé, C; Hayashi, T; Liu, Y; Lane, W S; Young, R A; Garcia-Blanco, M A

    1997-01-01

    Maximal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gene expression requires specific cellular factors in addition to the virus-encoded trans-activator protein Tat and the RNA element TAR. We developed a functional assay, based on transcriptional activation in vitro, to identify these cellular factors. Here, we describe the purification and molecular cloning of CA150, a nuclear protein that is associated with the human RNA polymerase II holoenzyme and is involved in Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcriptional activation. The sequence of CA150 contains an extensive glutamine- and alanine-rich repeat that is found in transcriptional modulators such as GAL11 and SSN6 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zeste in Drosophila melanogaster. Immunodepletion of CA150 abolished Tat trans activation in vitro. Moreover, overexpression of a mutant CA150 protein specifically and dramatically decreased Tat-mediated activation of the HIV-1 promoter in vivo, strongly suggesting a role for CA150 in HIV-1 gene regulation. Immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that both CA150 and Tat associate with the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme. Furthermore, we found that functional Tat associates with the holoenzyme whereas activation-deficient Tat mutants do not. Thus, we propose that Tat action is transduced via an RNA polymerase II holoenzyme that contains CA150. PMID:9315662

  9. Exploiting polymerase promiscuity: A simple colorimetric RNA polymerase assay.

    PubMed

    Vassiliou, W; Epp, J B; Wang, B B; Del Vecchio, A M; Widlanski, T; Kao, C C

    2000-09-01

    We developed a convenient colorimetric assay for monitoring RNA synthesis from DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (DdRp) and viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp). ATP and GTP with a p-nitrophenyl moiety attached to the gamma-phosphate were synthesized (PNP-NTPs). These PNP-NTPs can be used for RNA synthesis by several RNA polymerases, including the RdRps from brome mosaic virus and bovine viral diarrhea virus and the DdRps from bacteriophage T7 and SP6. When the polymerase reactions were performed in the presence of alkaline phosphatase, which digests the p-nitrophenylpyrophosphate side-product of phosphoryl transfer to the chromogenic p-nitrophenylate, an increase in absorbence at 405 nm was observed. These nucleotide analogues were used in continuous colorimetric monitoring of polymerase activity. Furthermore, the PNP-NTPs were found to be stable and utilized by RNA polymerases in the presence of human plasma. This simple colorimetric polymerase assay can be performed in a standard laboratory spectrophotometer and will be useful in screens for inhibitors of viral RNA synthesis.

  10. RNA Polymerase III Accurately Initiates Transcription from RNA Polymerase II Promoters in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Duttke, Sascha H. C.

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, there are three major RNA polymerases (Pol) in the nucleus, which are commonly described as transcribing non-overlapping subsets of genes. Structural studies have highlighted a conserved core shared among all three transcription systems. Initiation of human Pol III from TATA box-containing Pol II promoters under conditions with impaired Pol II transcription activity have been described previously. RNA polymerase III and Pol II were found to co-localize at the promoters of the c-myc gene and the RPPH1 sRNA in vivo. Here, I report that Pol III can, like Pol II, initiate transcription from most tested Pol II core promoters when assayed with crude human nuclear extracts (HSK, SNF, or Dignam). Both polymerases often initiate from the same transcription start site, and depend on a TATA box or AT-rich region but not the downstream promoter element (DPE) or the motif ten element (MTE). Moderate (∼2-fold) changes in the ratio of DNA template to nuclear extract were sufficient to change Pol II-mediated transcription to a mixture of Pol II- and Pol III-, or to a solely Pol III-dependent initiation of transcription from Pol II promoters. Polymerase specificity is thus not fixed but a variable that depends on the properties of the promoter and the transcription conditions. These findings provide functional evidence for a close similarity between the Pol II and Pol III transcription complexes, and additionally explain previous controversies in the literature. PMID:24917680

  11. Disengaging polymerase: Terminating RNA polymerase II transcription in budding yeast☆

    PubMed Central

    Mischo, Hannah E.; Proudfoot, Nick J.

    2013-01-01

    Termination of transcription by RNA polymerase II requires two distinct processes: The formation of a defined 3′ end of the transcribed RNA, as well as the disengagement of RNA polymerase from its DNA template. Both processes are intimately connected and equally pivotal in the process of functional messenger RNA production. However, research in recent years has elaborated how both processes can additionally be employed to control gene expression in qualitative and quantitative ways. This review embraces these new findings and attempts to paint a broader picture of how this final step in the transcription cycle is of critical importance to many aspects of gene regulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA polymerase II Transcript Elongation. PMID:23085255

  12. The RNA polymerase II elongation complex.

    PubMed

    Aso, T; Conaway, J W; Conaway, R C

    1995-11-01

    The initiation stage of transcription by RNA polymerase II has long been regarded as the primary site for regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Nevertheless, a growing body of evidence reveals that the RNA polymerase II elongation complex is also a major target for regulation. Biochemical studies are implicating an increasing number of transcription factors in the regulation of elongation, and these transcription factors are being found to function by a diverse collection of mechanisms. Moreover, unexpected features of the structure and catalytic mechanism of RNA polymerase II are forcing a reconsideration of long-held views on the mechanics of some of the most basic aspects of polymerase function. In this review, we will describe recent insights into the structures and functions of RNA polymerase II and the transcription factors that control its activity during the elongation stage of eukaryotic messenger RNA synthesis.

  13. RNA Polymerases of Maize. Purification and Molecular Structure of DNA-dependent RNA Polymerase II*

    PubMed Central

    Mullinix, Kathleen P.; Strain, Gustave C.; Bogorad, Lawrence

    1973-01-01

    Nuclear DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II has been purified from leaves of Zea mays by a new procedure that improves enzyme stability and thus permits more manipulation during purification. The purification procedure includes a heating step, gel filtration on Sepharose 6B and 4B, and chromatography on DEAE- and DNA-celluloses. This method of purification yields an enzyme that exhibits maximal activity when denatured DNA is used as a template. Electrophoresis of highly purified enzyme on polyacrylamide gels containing sodium dodecyl sulfate indicates that maize RNA polymerase IIa is composed of several polypeptide subunits. The most highly purified preparations contain polypeptides with molecular weights of 200,000, 160,000, 35,000, 25,000, 20,000, and 17,000. Images PMID:4525172

  14. RNA binding and replication by the poliovirus RNA polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Oberste, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    RNA binding and RNA synthesis by the poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase were studied in vitro using purified polymerase. Templates for binding and RNA synthesis studies were natural RNAs, homopolymeric RNAs, or subgenomic poliovirus-specific RNAs synthesized in vitro from cDNA clones using SP6 or T7 RNA polymerases. The binding of the purified polymerase to poliovirion and other RNAs was studied using a protein-RNA nitrocellulose filter binding assay. A cellular poly(A)-binding protein was found in the viral polymerase preparations, but was easily separated from the polymerase by chromatography on poly(A) Sepharose. The binding of purified polymerase to {sup 32}P-labeled ribohomopolymeric RNAs was examined, and the order of binding observed was poly(G) >>> poly(U) > poly(C) > poly(A). The K{sub a} for polymerase binding to poliovirion RNA and to a full-length negative strand transcript was about 1 {times} 10{sup 9} M{sup {minus}1}. The polymerase binds to a subgenomic RNAs which contain the 3{prime} end of the genome with a K{sub a} similar to that for virion RNA, but binds less well to 18S rRNA, globin mRNA, and subgenomic RNAs which lack portions of the 3{prime} noncoding region.

  15. The cellular factor TRP-185 regulates RNA polymerase II binding to HIV-1 TAR RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wu-Baer, F; Lane, W S; Gaynor, R B

    1995-01-01

    Activation of HIV-1 gene expression by the transactivator Tat is dependent on an RNA regulatory element located downstream of the transcription initiation site known as TAR. To characterize cellular factors that bind to TAR RNA and are involved in the regulation of HIV-1 transcription, HeLa nuclear extract was fractionated and RNA gel-retardation analysis was performed. This analysis indicated that only two cellular factors, RNA polymerase II and the previously characterized TAR RNA loop binding protein TRP-185, were capable of binding specifically to TAR RNA. To elucidate the function of TRP-185, it was purified from HeLa nuclear extract, amino acid microsequence analysis was performed and a cDNA encoding TRP-185 was isolated. TRP-185 is a novel protein of 1621 amino acids which contains a leucine zipper and potentially a novel RNA binding motif. In gel-retardation assays, the binding of both recombinant TRP-185 and RNA polymerase II was dependent on the presence of an additional group of proteins designated cellular cofactors. Both the TAR RNA loop and bulge sequences were critical for RNA polymerase II binding, while TRP-185 binding was dependent only on TAR RNA loop sequences. Since binding of TRP-185 and RNA polymerase II to TAR RNA was found to be mutually exclusive, our results suggest that TRP-185 may function either alone or in conjunction with Tat to disengage RNA polymerase II which is stalled upon binding to nascently synthesized TAR RNA during transcriptional elongation. Images PMID:8846792

  16. RNA polymerase gene, microorganism having said gene and the production of RNA polymerase by the use of said microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Kotani, Hirokazu; Hiraoka, Nobutsugu; Obayashi, Akira

    1991-01-01

    SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase is produced by cultivating a new microorganism (particularly new strains of Escherichia coli) harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene and recovering SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase from the culture broth. SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene is provided as are new microorganisms harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene.

  17. RNA polymerase II transcription: structure and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Bushnell, David A; Kornberg, Roger D

    2013-01-01

    A minimal RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcription system comprises the polymerase and five general transcription factors (GTFs) TFIIB, -D, -E, -F, and -H. The addition of Mediator enables a response to regulatory factors. The GTFs are required for promoter recognition and the initiation of transcription. Following initiation, pol II alone is capable of RNA transcript elongation and of proofreading. Structural studies reviewed here reveal roles of GTFs in the initiation process and shed light on the transcription elongation mechanism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Polymerase II Transcript Elongation.

  18. Norovirus proteinase-polymerase and polymerase are both active forms of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Babu, Vijay; Uche, Uzo; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Green, Kim Y

    2005-02-01

    In vitro mapping studies of the MD145 norovirus (Caliciviridae) ORF1 polyprotein identified two stable cleavage products containing the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains: ProPol (a precursor comprised of both the proteinase and polymerase) and Pol (the mature polymerase). The goal of this study was to identify the active form (or forms) of the norovirus polymerase. The recombinant ProPol (expressed as Pro(-)Pol with an inactivated proteinase domain to prevent autocleavage) and recombinant Pol were purified after synthesis in bacteria and shown to be active RdRp enzymes. In addition, the mutant His-E1189A-ProPol protein (with active proteinase but with the natural ProPol cleavage site blocked) was active as an RdRp, confirming that the norovirus ProPol precursor could possess two enzymatic activities simultaneously. The effects of several UTP analogs on the RdRp activity of the norovirus and feline calicivirus Pro(-)Pol enzymes were compared and found to be similar. Our data suggest that the norovirus ProPol is a bifunctional enzyme during virus replication. The availability of this recombinant ProPol enzyme might prove useful in the development of antiviral drugs for control of the noroviruses associated with acute gastroenteritis.

  19. Norovirus Proteinase-Polymerase and Polymerase Are Both Active Forms of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Babu, Vijay; Uche, Uzo; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.; Green, Kim Y.

    2005-01-01

    In vitro mapping studies of the MD145 norovirus (Caliciviridae) ORF1 polyprotein identified two stable cleavage products containing the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains: ProPol (a precursor comprised of both the proteinase and polymerase) and Pol (the mature polymerase). The goal of this study was to identify the active form (or forms) of the norovirus polymerase. The recombinant ProPol (expressed as Pro−Pol with an inactivated proteinase domain to prevent autocleavage) and recombinant Pol were purified after synthesis in bacteria and shown to be active RdRp enzymes. In addition, the mutant His-E1189A-ProPol protein (with active proteinase but with the natural ProPol cleavage site blocked) was active as an RdRp, confirming that the norovirus ProPol precursor could possess two enzymatic activities simultaneously. The effects of several UTP analogs on the RdRp activity of the norovirus and feline calicivirus Pro−Pol enzymes were compared and found to be similar. Our data suggest that the norovirus ProPol is a bifunctional enzyme during virus replication. The availability of this recombinant ProPol enzyme might prove useful in the development of antiviral drugs for control of the noroviruses associated with acute gastroenteritis. PMID:15681440

  20. RNA polymerase IV functions in paramutation in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Erhard, Karl F; Stonaker, Jennifer L; Parkinson, Susan E; Lim, Jana P; Hale, Christopher J; Hollick, Jay B

    2009-02-27

    Plants have distinct RNA polymerase complexes (Pol IV and Pol V) with largely unknown roles in maintaining small RNA-associated gene silencing. Curiously, the eudicot Arabidopsis thaliana is not affected when either function is lost. By use of mutation selection and positional cloning, we showed that the largest subunit of the presumed maize Pol IV is involved in paramutation, an inherited epigenetic change facilitated by an interaction between two alleles, as well as normal maize development. Bioinformatics analyses and nuclear run-on transcription assays indicate that Pol IV does not engage in the efficient RNA synthesis typical of the three major eukaryotic DNA-dependent RNA polymerases. These results indicate that Pol IV employs abnormal RNA polymerase activities to achieve genome-wide silencing and that its absence affects both maize development and heritable epigenetic changes.

  1. Functional oligomerization of poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Pata, J D; Schultz, S C; Kirkegaard, K

    1995-01-01

    Using a hairpin primer/template RNA derived from sequences present at the 3' end of the poliovirus genome, we investigated the RNA-binding and elongation activities of highly purified poliovirus 3D polymerase. We found that surprisingly high polymerase concentrations were required for efficient template utilization. Binding of template RNAs appeared to be the primary determinant of efficient utilization because binding and elongation activities correlated closely. Using a three-filter binding assay, polymerase binding to RNA was found to be highly cooperative with respect to polymerase concentration. At pH 5.5, where binding was most cooperative, a Hill coefficient of 5 was obtained, indicating that several polymerase molecules interact to retain the 110-nt RNA in a filter-bound complex. Chemical crosslinking with glutaraldehyde demonstrated physical polymerase-polymerase interactions, supporting the cooperative binding data. We propose a model in which poliovirus 3D polymerase functions both as a catalytic polymerase and as a cooperative single-stranded RNA-binding protein during RNA-dependent RNA synthesis. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 PMID:7489508

  2. RNA Polymerase II Transcription: Structure and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Bushnell, David A.; Kornberg, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    A minimal RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcription system comprises the polymerase and five general transcription factors (GTFs) TFIIB, -D, -E, -F, and -H. The addition of Mediator enables a response to regulatory factors. The GTFs are required for promoter recognition and the initiation of transcription. Following initiation, pol II alone is capable of RNA transcript elongation and of proofreading. Structural studies reviewed here reveal roles of GTFs in the initiation process and shed light on the transcription elongation mechanism. PMID:23000482

  3. Npa3/ScGpn1 carboxy-terminal tail is dispensable for cell viability and RNA polymerase II nuclear targeting but critical for microtubule stability and function.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Serrano, Gehenna; Castanedo, Leonardo; Cristóbal-Mondragón, Gema R; Montalvo-Arredondo, Javier; Riego-Ruíz, Lina; DeLuna, Alexander; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Castaño, Irene; Calera, Mónica R; Sánchez-Olea, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    Genetic deletion of the essential GTPase Gpn1 or replacement of the endogenous gene by partial loss of function mutants in yeast is associated with multiple cellular phenotypes, including in all cases a marked cytoplasmic retention of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Global inhibition of RNAPII-mediated transcription due to malfunction of Gpn1 precludes the identification and study of other cellular function(s) for this GTPase. In contrast to the single Gpn protein present in Archaea, eukaryotic Gpn1 possesses an extension of approximately 100 amino acids at the C-terminal end of the GTPase domain. To determine the importance of this C-terminal extension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gpn1, we generated yeast strains expressing either C-terminal truncated (gpn1ΔC) or full-length ScGpn1. We found that ScGpn1ΔC was retained in the cell nucleus, an event physiologically relevant as gpn1ΔC cells contained a higher nuclear fraction of the RNAPII CTD phosphatase Rtr1. gpn1ΔC cells displayed an increased size, a delay in mitosis exit, and an increased sensitivity to the microtubule polymerization inhibitor benomyl at the cell proliferation level and two cellular events that depend on microtubule function: RNAPII nuclear targeting and vacuole integrity. These phenotypes were not caused by inhibition of RNAPII, as in gpn1ΔC cells RNAPII nuclear targeting and transcriptional activity were unaffected. These data, combined with our description here of a genetic interaction between GPN1 and BIK1, a microtubule plus-end tracking protein with a mitotic function, strongly suggest that the ScGpn1 C-terminal tail plays a critical role in microtubule dynamics and mitotic progression in an RNAPII-independent manner.

  4. RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Activity in Influenza Virions

    PubMed Central

    Penhoet, Edward; Miller, Henry; Doyle, Michael; Blatti, Stanley

    1971-01-01

    An RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity has been detected in purified preparations of influenza virus. In contrast to the replicase activity induced in influenza-infected cells, the virion-associated enzyme has an absolute requirement for Mn++. Most of the RNA synthesized in vitro is complementary to virion RNA. PMID:5288388

  5. Free RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Michael; Dennis, Patrick P; Ehrenberg, Mans; Bremer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    The frequencies of transcription initiation of regulated and constitutive genes depend on the concentration of free RNA polymerase holoenzyme [Rf] near their promoters. Although RNA polymerase is largely confined to the nucleoid, it is difficult to determine absolute concentrations of [Rf] at particular locations within the nucleoid structure. However, relative concentrations of free RNA polymerase at different growth rates, [Rf]rel, can be estimated from the activities of constitutive promoters. Previous studies indicated that the rrnB P2 promoter is constitutive and that [Rf]rel in the vicinity of rrnB P2 increases with increasing growth rate. Recently it has become possible to directly visualize Rf in growing Escherichia coli cells. Here we examine some of the important issues relating to gene expression based on these new observations. We conclude that: (i) At a growth rate of 2 doublings/h, there are about 1000 free and 2350 non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules per average cell (12 and 28%, respectively, of 8400 total) which are in rapid equilibrium. (ii) The reversibility of the non-specific binding generates more than 1000 free RNA polymerase molecules every second in the immediate vicinity of the DNA. Of these, most rebind non-specifically to the DNA within a few ms; the frequency of non-specific binding is at least two orders of magnitude greater than specific binding and transcript initiation. (iii) At a given amount of RNA polymerase per cell, [Rf] and the density of non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules along the DNA both vary reciprocally with the amount of DNA in the cell. (iv) At 2 doublings/h an E. coli cell contains, on the average, about 1 non-specifically bound RNA polymerase per 9 kbp of DNA and 1 free RNA polymerase per 20 kbp of DNA. However some DNA regions (i.e. near active rRNA operons) may have significantly higher than average [Rf].

  6. Amplification of RNA by an RNA polymerase ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Horning, David P.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2016-01-01

    In all extant life, genetic information is stored in nucleic acids that are replicated by polymerase proteins. In the hypothesized RNA world, before the evolution of genetically encoded proteins, ancestral organisms contained RNA genes that were replicated by an RNA polymerase ribozyme. In an effort toward reconstructing RNA-based life in the laboratory, in vitro evolution was used to improve dramatically the activity and generality of an RNA polymerase ribozyme by selecting variants that can synthesize functional RNA molecules from an RNA template. The improved polymerase ribozyme is able to synthesize a variety of complex structured RNAs, including aptamers, ribozymes, and, in low yield, even tRNA. Furthermore, the polymerase can replicate nucleic acids, amplifying short RNA templates by more than 10,000-fold in an RNA-catalyzed form of the PCR. Thus, the two prerequisites of Darwinian life—the replication of genetic information and its conversion into functional molecules—can now be accomplished with RNA in the complete absence of proteins. PMID:27528667

  7. Analyses of promoter-proximal pausing by RNA polymerase II on the hsp70 heat shock gene promoter in a Drosophila nuclear extract.

    PubMed Central

    Li, B; Weber, J A; Chen, Y; Greenleaf, A L; Gilmour, D S

    1996-01-01

    Analyses of Drosophila cells have revealed that RNA polymerase II is paused in a region 20 to 40 nucleotides downstream from the transcription start site of the hsp70 heat shock gene when the gene is not transcriptionally active. We have developed a cell-free system that reconstitutes this promoter-proximal pausing. The paused polymerase has been detected by monitoring the hyperreactivity of thymines in the transcription bubble toward potassium permanganate. The pattern of permanganate reactivity for the hsp70 promoter in the reconstituted system matches the pattern found on the promoter after it has been introduced back into files by P-element-mediated transposition. Matching patterns of permanganate reactivity are also observed for a non-heat shock promoter, the histone H3 promoter. Further analysis of the hsp70 promoter in the reconstituted system reveals that pausing does not depend on sequence-specific interactions located immediately downstream from the pause site. Sequences upstream from the TATA box influence the recruitment of polymerase rather than the efficiency of pausing. Kinetic analysis indicates that the polymerase rapidly enters the paused state and remains stably in this state for at least 25 min. Further analysis shows that the paused polymerase will initially resume elongation when Sarkosyl is added but loses this capacity within minutes of pausing. Using an alpha-amanitin-resistant polymerase, we provide evidence that promoter-proximal pausing does not require the carboxy-terminal domain of the polymerase. PMID:8816456

  8. The bacterial enhancer-dependent RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Darbari, Vidya C.; Glyde, Robert; Zhang, Xiaodong; Buck, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Transcription initiation is highly regulated in bacterial cells, allowing adaptive gene regulation in response to environment cues. One class of promoter specificity factor called sigma54 enables such adaptive gene expression through its ability to lock the RNA polymerase down into a state unable to melt out promoter DNA for transcription initiation. Promoter DNA opening then occurs through the action of specialized transcription control proteins called bacterial enhancer-binding proteins (bEBPs) that remodel the sigma54 factor within the closed promoter complexes. The remodelling of sigma54 occurs through an ATP-binding and hydrolysis reaction carried out by the bEBPs. The regulation of bEBP self-assembly into typically homomeric hexamers allows regulated gene expression since the self-assembly is required for bEBP ATPase activity and its direct engagement with the sigma54 factor during the remodelling reaction. Crystallographic studies have now established that in the closed promoter complex, the sigma54 factor occupies the bacterial RNA polymerase in ways that will physically impede promoter DNA opening and the loading of melted out promoter DNA into the DNA-binding clefts of the RNA polymerase. Large-scale structural re-organizations of sigma54 require contact of the bEBP with an amino-terminal glutamine and leucine-rich sequence of sigma54, and lead to domain movements within the core RNA polymerase necessary for making open promoter complexes and synthesizing the nascent RNA transcript. PMID:27789741

  9. Structural biology of bacterial RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Katsuhiko S

    2015-05-11

    Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477-42485), an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank), describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  10. Structural Biology of Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Katsuhiko S.

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477–42485), an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank), describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription. PMID:25970587

  11. Interstitial contacts in an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase lattice

    PubMed Central

    Tellez, Andres B.; Wang, Jing; Tanner, Elizabeth J.; Spagnolo, Jeannie F.; Kirkegaard, Karla; Bullitt, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic activities can be facilitated by ordered enzymatic arrays that co-localize and orient enzymes and their substrates. The purified RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from poliovirus self-assembles to form two-dimensional lattices, possibly facilitating the assembly of viral RNA replication complexes on the cytoplasmic face of intracellular membranes. Creation of a two-dimensional lattice requires at least two different molecular contacts between polymerase molecules. One set of polymerase contacts, between the ‘thumb’ domain of one polymerase and the back of the ‘palm’ domain of another, has been previously defined. To identify the second interface needed for lattice formation and to test its function in viral RNA synthesis, a hybrid approach of both electron microscopic and biochemical evaluation of wild-type and mutant viral polymerases was used to evaluate computationally generated models of this second interface. A unique solution satisfied all constraints and predicted a two-dimensional structure formed from antiparallel arrays of polymerase fibers that use contacts from the flexible amino-terminal region of the protein. Enzymes that contained mutations in this newly defined interface did not form lattices and altered the structure of wild-type lattices. When reconstructed into virus, mutations that disrupt lattice assembly exhibited growth defects, synthetic lethality, or both, supporting the function of the oligomeric lattice in infected cells. Understanding the structure of polymerase lattices within the multimeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex should faciliate antiviral drug design and provide a precedent for other positive-strand RNA viruses. PMID:21839092

  12. Regulation through the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel

    PubMed Central

    Symersky, Jindrich; Perederina, Anna; Vassylyeva, Marina N.; Svetlov, Vladimir; Artsimovitch, Irina; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.

    2006-01-01

    Gre factors enhance the intrinsic endonucleolytic activity of RNA polymerase to rescue arrested transcription complexes and are thought to confer the high fidelity and processivity of RNA synthesis. The Gre factors insert the extended α-helical coiled-coil domains into the RNA polymerase secondary channel to position two invariant acidic residues at the coiled-coil tip near the active site to stabilize the catalytic metal ion. Gfh1, a GreA homolog from Thermus thermophilus, inhibits rather than activates RNA cleavage. Here we report the structure of the T. thermophilus Gfh1 at 2.4 Å resolution revealing a two-domain architecture closely resembling that of GreA. However, the interdomain orientation is strikingly distinct (~162° rotation) between the two proteins. In contrast to GreA, which has two acidic residues on a well fixed self-stabilized α-turn, the tip of the Gfh1 coiled-coil is flexible and contains four acidic residues. This difference is likely the key to the Gre functional diversity, while Gfh1 inhibits exo- and endonucleolytic cleavage, RNA synthesis, and pyrophosphorolysis, GreA enhances only the endonucleolytic cleavage. We propose that Gfh1 acidic residues stabilize the RNA polymerase active center in a catalytically inactive configuration through Mg2+-mediated interactions. The excess of the acidic residues and inherent flexibility of the coiled-coil tip might allow Gfh1 to adjust its activity to structurally distinct substrates, thereby inhibiting diverse catalytic reactions of RNA polymerase. PMID:16298991

  13. EGO-1, a Putative RNA-Directed RNA Polymerase, Promotes Germline Proliferation in Parallel With GLP-1/Notch Signaling and Regulates the Spatial Organization of Nuclear Pore Complexes and Germline P Granules in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Vought, Valarie E.; Ohmachi, Mitsue; Lee, Min-Ho; Maine, Eleanor M.

    2005-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans EGO-1, a putative cellular RNA-directed RNA polymerase, promotes several aspects of germline development, including proliferation, meiosis, and gametogenesis, and ensures a robust response to RNA interference. In C. elegans, GLP-1/Notch signaling from the somatic gonad maintains a population of proliferating germ cells, while entry of germ cells into meiosis is triggered by the GLD-1 and GLD-2 pathways. GLP-1 signaling prevents germ cells from entering meiosis by inhibiting GLD-1 and GLD-2 activity. We originally identified the ego-1 gene on the basis of a genetic interaction with glp-1. Here, we investigate the role of ego-1 in germline proliferation. Our data indicate that EGO-1 does not positively regulate GLP-1 protein levels or GLP-1 signaling activity. Moreover, GLP-1 signaling does not positively regulate EGO-1 activity. EGO-1 does not inhibit expression of GLD-1 protein in the distal germline. Instead, EGO-1 acts in parallel with GLP-1 signaling to influence the proliferation vs. meiosis fate choice. Moreover, EGO-1 and GLD-1 act in parallel to ensure germline health. Finally, the size and distribution of nuclear pore complexes and perinuclear P granules are altered in the absence of EGO-1, effects that disrupt germ cell biology per se and probably limit germline growth. PMID:15911573

  14. A Cross-chiral RNA Polymerase Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Sczepanski, Jonathan T.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    Thirty years ago it was shown that the non-enzymatic, template-directed polymerization of activated mononucleotides proceeds readily in a homochiral system, but is severely inhibited by the presence of the opposing enantiomer.1 This finding poses a severe challenge for the spontaneous emergence of RNA-based life, and has led to the suggestion that either RNA was preceded by some other genetic polymer that is not subject to chiral inhibition2 or chiral symmetry was broken through chemical processes prior to the origin of RNA-based life.3,4 Once an RNA enzyme arose that could catalyze the polymerization of RNA, it would have been possible to distinguish among the two enantiomers, enabling RNA replication and RNA-based evolution to occur. It is commonly thought that the earliest RNA polymerase and its substrates would have been of the same handedness, but this is not necessarily the case. Replicating D-and L-RNA molecules may have emerged together, based on the ability of structured RNAs of one handedness to catalyze the templated polymerization of activated mononucleotides of the opposite handedness. Such a cross-chiral RNA polymerase has now been developed using in vitro evolution. The D-RNA enzyme, consisting of 83 nucleotides, catalyzes the joining of L-mono- or oligonucleotide substrates on a complementary L-RNA template, and similarly for the L-enzyme with D-substrates and a D-template. Chiral inhibition is avoided because the 106-fold rate acceleration of the enzyme only pertains to cross-chiral substrates. The enzyme's activity is sufficient to generate full-length copies of its enantiomer through the templated joining of 11 component oligonucleotides. PMID:25363769

  15. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L-like (hnRNPLL) and elongation factor, RNA polymerase II, 2 (ELL2) are regulators of mRNA processing in plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Micah J.; Äijö, Tarmo; Chang, Xing; Gagnon, John; Pape, Utz J.; Anantharaman, Vivek; Aravind, L.; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Oberdoerffer, Shalini; Liu, X. Shirley; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Rao, Anjana

    2012-01-01

    B cells and plasma cells possess distinct RNA processing environments that respectively promote the expression of membrane-associated Ig by B cells versus the secretion of Ig by plasma cells. Through a combination of transcriptional profiling and screening using a lentiviral short-hairpin RNA interference library, we show that both the splicing factor hnRNPLL and the transcription elongation factor ELL2 modulate the ratio of secreted versus membrane-encoding Ighg2b transcripts in MPC11 plasmacytoma cell lines. hnRNPLL and ELL2 are both highly expressed in primary plasma cells relative to B cells, but hnRNPLL binds Ighg2b mRNA transcripts and promotes an increase in levels of the membrane-encoding Ighg2b isoform at the expense of the secreted Ighg2b isoform, whereas ELL2 counteracts this effect and drives Ig secretion by increasing the frequency of the secreted Ighg2b isoform. As in T cells, hnRNPLL also alters the splicing pattern of mRNA encoding the adhesion receptor CD44, promoting exon inclusion, and decreasing the overall level of CD44 expression. Further characterization of ELL2-dependent transcription by RNA-Seq revealed that ∼12% of transcripts expressed by plasma cells were differentially processed because of the activities of ELL2, including B-cell maturation antigen BCMA, a receptor with a defined role in plasma cell survival. Taken together, our data identify hnRNPLL and ELL2 as regulators of pre-mRNA processing in plasma cells. PMID:22991471

  16. 7SK small nuclear RNA, a multifunctional transcriptional regulatory RNA with gene-specific features.

    PubMed

    Egloff, Sylvain; Studniarek, Cécilia; Kiss, Tamás

    2017-08-18

    The 7SK small nuclear RNA is a multifunctional transcriptional regulatory RNA that controls the nuclear activity of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), specifically targets P-TEFb to the promoter regions of selected protein-coding genes and promotes transcription of RNA polymerase II-specific spliceosomal small nuclear RNA genes.

  17. Origin and Evolution of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Savio T; Dos Santos Junior, Ariosvaldo P; Rêgo, Thais G; José, Marco V

    2017-01-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) are very ancient enzymes and are essential for all viruses with RNA genomes. We reconstruct the origin and evolution of this polymerase since the initial stages of the origin of life. The origin of the RdRp was traced back from tRNA ancestors. At the origin of the RdRp the most ancient part of the protein is the cofactor-binding site that had the capacity of binding to simple molecules as magnesium, calcium, and ribonucleotides. Our results suggest that RdRp originated from junctions of proto-tRNAs that worked as the first genes at the emergence of the primitive translation system, where the RNA was the informational molecule. The initial domain, worked as a building block for the emergence of the fingers and thumb domains. From the ancestral RdRp, we could establish the evolutionary stages of viral evolution from a rooted ancestor to modern viruses. It was observed that the selective pressure under the RdRp was the organization and functioning of the genome, where RNA double-stranded and RNA single-stranded virus formed a separate group. We propose an evolutionary route to the polymerases and the results suggest an ancient scenario for the origin of RNA viruses.

  18. Association of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase with the nuclear matrix: the role of intermolecular disulfide bond formation, RNA retention, and cell type.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, S H; Brunet, G; Talbot, B; Lamarr, D; Dumas, C; Shaper, J H; Poirier, G

    1991-02-01

    The recovery of the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (pADPRp) in the nuclease- and 1.6 M NaCl-resistant nuclear subfraction prepared from a number of different sources was assessed by Western blotting. When rat liver nuclei were treated with DNase I and RNase A followed by 1.6 M NaCl, approximately 10% of the nuclear pADPRp was recovered in the sedimentable fraction. The proportion of pADPRp recovered with the residual fraction decreased to less than 5% of the total nuclear polymerase when nuclei were prepared in the presence of the sulfhydryl blocking reagent iodoacetamide and increased to approximately 50% of the total nuclear pADPRp when nuclei were treated with the sulfhydryl cross-linking reagent sodium tetrathionate (NaTT) prior to fractionation. To determine whether this effect of disulfide bond formation was unique to rat liver nuclei, nuclear matrix/cytoskeleton structures were prepared in situ by sequentially treating monolayers of tissue culture cells with Nonidet-P40, DNase I and RNase A, and 1.6 M NaCl (S.H. Kaufmann and J.H. Shaper (1991) Exp. Cell Res. 192, 511-523). When nuclear monolayers were prepared from HTC rat hepatoma cells, CaLu-1 human lung carcinoma cells, and CHO hamster ovary cells in the absence of NaTT, pADPRp was undetectable in the nuclease- and 1.6 M NaCl-resistant fraction. In contrast, when nuclear monolayers were isolated in the presence of NaTT, from 5% (CaLu-1) to 26% (HTC cells) of the total nuclear pADPRp was recovered with the nuclease- and salt-resistant fraction. Examination of these residual structures by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nonreducing conditions suggested that pADPRp was present as a component of disulfide cross-linked complexes. Further analysis by immunofluorescence revealed that the pADPRp was diffusely distributed throughout the CaLu-1 or CHO nuclear matrix. In addition, when matrices were prepared in the absence of RNase A, pADPRp was also observed in the residual nucleoli. These

  19. RNA Polymerase II Collision Interrupts Convergent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, David J.; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Antisense noncoding transcripts, genes-within-genes, and convergent gene pairs are prevalent among eukaryotes. The existence of such transcription units raises the question of what happens when RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules collide head-to-head. Here we use a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches in yeast to show that polymerases transcribing opposite DNA strands cannot bypass each other. RNAPII stops but does not dissociate upon head-to-head collision in vitro, suggesting that opposing polymerases represent insurmountable obstacles for each other. Head-to-head collision in vivo also results in RNAPII stopping, and removal of collided RNAPII from the DNA template can be achieved via ubiquitylation-directed proteolysis. Indeed, in cells lacking efficient RNAPII polyubiquitylation, the half-life of collided polymerases increases, so that they can be detected between convergent genes. These results provide insight into fundamental mechanisms of gene traffic control and point to an unexplored effect of antisense transcription on gene regulation via polymerase collision. PMID:23041286

  20. A movie of RNA polymerase II transcription.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Alan C M; Cramer, Patrick

    2012-06-22

    We provide here a molecular movie that captures key aspects of RNA polymerase II initiation and elongation. To create the movie, we combined structural snapshots of the initiation-elongation transition and of elongation, including nucleotide addition, translocation, pausing, proofreading, backtracking, arrest, reactivation, and inhibition. The movie reveals open questions about the mechanism of transcription and provides a useful teaching tool. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The architecture of RNA polymerase fidelity.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Craig D

    2010-06-22

    The basis for transcriptional fidelity by RNA polymerase is not understood, but the 'trigger loop', a conserved structural element that is rearranged in the presence of correct substrate nucleotides, is thought to be critical. A study just published in BMC Biology sheds new light on the ways in which the trigger loop may promote selection of correct nucleotide triphosphate substrates. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/54.

  2. RNA polymerase: the vehicle of transcription.

    PubMed

    Borukhov, Sergei; Nudler, Evgeny

    2008-03-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is the principal enzyme of gene expression and regulation for all three divisions of life: Eukaryota, Archaea and Bacteria. Recent progress in the structural and biochemical characterization of RNAP illuminates this enzyme as a flexible, multifunctional molecular machine. During each step of the transcription cycle, RNAP undergoes elaborate conformational changes. As many fundamental and previously mysterious aspects of how RNAP works begin to be understood, this enzyme reveals intriguing similarities to man-made engineered devices. These resemblances can be found in the mechanics of RNAP-DNA complex formation, in RNA chain initiation and in the elongation processes. Here we highlight recent advances in understanding RNAP function and regulation.

  3. RNA polymerase errors cause splicing defects and can be regulated by differential expression of RNA polymerase subunits.

    PubMed

    Carey, Lucas B

    2015-12-10

    Errors during transcription may play an important role in determining cellular phenotypes: the RNA polymerase error rate is >4 orders of magnitude higher than that of DNA polymerase and errors are amplified >1000-fold due to translation. However, current methods to measure RNA polymerase fidelity are low-throughout, technically challenging, and organism specific. Here I show that changes in RNA polymerase fidelity can be measured using standard RNA sequencing protocols. I find that RNA polymerase is error-prone, and these errors can result in splicing defects. Furthermore, I find that differential expression of RNA polymerase subunits causes changes in RNA polymerase fidelity, and that coding sequences may have evolved to minimize the effect of these errors. These results suggest that errors caused by RNA polymerase may be a major source of stochastic variability at the level of single cells.

  4. RNA polymerase errors cause splicing defects and can be regulated by differential expression of RNA polymerase subunits

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Lucas B

    2015-01-01

    Errors during transcription may play an important role in determining cellular phenotypes: the RNA polymerase error rate is >4 orders of magnitude higher than that of DNA polymerase and errors are amplified >1000-fold due to translation. However, current methods to measure RNA polymerase fidelity are low-throughout, technically challenging, and organism specific. Here I show that changes in RNA polymerase fidelity can be measured using standard RNA sequencing protocols. I find that RNA polymerase is error-prone, and these errors can result in splicing defects. Furthermore, I find that differential expression of RNA polymerase subunits causes changes in RNA polymerase fidelity, and that coding sequences may have evolved to minimize the effect of these errors. These results suggest that errors caused by RNA polymerase may be a major source of stochastic variability at the level of single cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09945.001 PMID:26652005

  5. The RNA polymerase I transcription machinery.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jackie; Zomerdijk, Joost C B M

    2006-01-01

    The rRNAs constitute the catalytic and structural components of the ribosome, the protein synthesis machinery of cells. The level of rRNA synthesis, mediated by Pol I (RNA polymerase I), therefore has a major impact on the life and destiny of a cell. In order to elucidate how cells achieve the stringent control of Pol I transcription, matching the supply of rRNA to demand under different cellular growth conditions, it is essential to understand the components and mechanics of the Pol I transcription machinery. In this review, we discuss: (i) the molecular composition and functions of the Pol I enzyme complex and the two main Pol I transcription factors, SL1 (selectivity factor 1) and UBF (upstream binding factor); (ii) the interplay between these factors during pre-initiation complex formation at the rDNA promoter in mammalian cells; and (iii) the cellular control of the Pol I transcription machinery.

  6. Solving the RNA polymerase I structural puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Morcillo, María; Taylor, Nicholas M. I.; Gruene, Tim; Legrand, Pierre; Rashid, Umar J.; Ruiz, Federico M.; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Müller, Christoph W.; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    Details of the RNA polymerase I crystal structure determination provide a framework for solution of the structures of other multi-subunit complexes. Simple crystallographic experiments are described to extract relevant biological information such as the location of the enzyme active site. Knowing the structure of multi-subunit complexes is critical to understand basic cellular functions. However, when crystals of these complexes can be obtained they rarely diffract beyond 3 Å resolution, which complicates X-ray structure determination and refinement. The crystal structure of RNA polymerase I, an essential cellular machine that synthesizes the precursor of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus of eukaryotic cells, has recently been solved. Here, the crucial steps that were undertaken to build the atomic model of this multi-subunit enzyme are reported, emphasizing how simple crystallographic experiments can be used to extract relevant biological information. In particular, this report discusses the combination of poor molecular replacement and experimental phases, the application of multi-crystal averaging and the use of anomalous scatterers as sequence markers to guide tracing and to locate the active site. The methods outlined here will likely serve as a reference for future structural determination of large complexes at low resolution.

  7. Evidence that sigma factors are components of chloroplast RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Troxler, R F; Zhang, F; Hu, J; Bogorad, L

    1994-01-01

    Plastid genes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase(s), which have been incompletely characterized and have been examined in a limited number of species. Plastid genomes contain rpoA, rpoB, rpoC1, and rpoC2 coding for alpha, beta, beta', and beta" RNA polymerase subunits that are homologous to the alpha, beta, and beta' subunits that constitute the core moiety of RNA polymerase in bacteria. However, genes with homology to sigma subunits in bacteria have not been found in plastid genomes. An antibody directed against the principal sigma subunit of RNA polymerase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was used to probe western blots of purified chloroplast RNA polymerase from maize, rice, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and Cyanidium caldarium. Chloroplast RNA polymerase from maize and rice contained an immunoreactive 64-kD protein. Chloroplast RNA polymerase from C. reinhardtii contained immunoreactive 100- and 82-kD proteins, and chloroplast RNA polymerase from C. caldarium contained an immunoreactive 32-kD protein. The elution profile of enzyme activity of both algal chloroplast RNA polymerases coeluted from DEAE with the respective immunoreactive proteins, indicating that they are components of the enzyme. These results provide immunological evidence for sigma-like factors in chloroplast RNA polymerase in higher plants and algae. PMID:8159791

  8. FACT facilitates chromatin transcription by RNA polymerases I and III

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Joanna L; Tan, Bertrand C-M; Panov, Kostya I; Panova, Tatiana B; Andersen, Jens S; Owen-Hughes, Tom A; Russell, Jackie; Lee, Sheng-Chung; Zomerdijk, Joost C B M

    2009-01-01

    Efficient transcription elongation from a chromatin template requires RNA polymerases (Pols) to negotiate nucleosomes. Our biochemical analyses demonstrate that RNA Pol I can transcribe through nucleosome templates and that this requires structural rearrangement of the nucleosomal core particle. The subunits of the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription), SSRP1 and Spt16, co-purify and co-immunoprecipitate with mammalian Pol I complexes. In cells, SSRP1 is detectable at the rRNA gene repeats. Crucially, siRNA-mediated repression of FACT subunit expression in cells results in a significant reduction in 47S pre-rRNA levels, whereas synthesis of the first 40 nt of the rRNA is not affected, implying that FACT is important for Pol I transcription elongation through chromatin. FACT also associates with RNA Pol III complexes, is present at the chromatin of genes transcribed by Pol III and facilitates their transcription in cells. Our findings indicate that, beyond the established role in Pol II transcription, FACT has physiological functions in chromatin transcription by all three nuclear RNA Pols. Our data also imply that local chromatin dynamics influence transcription of the active rRNA genes by Pol I and of Pol III-transcribed genes. PMID:19214185

  9. Conformational flexibility of bacterial RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Darst, Seth A.; Opalka, Natacha; Chacon, Pablo; Polyakov, Andrey; Richter, Catherine; Zhang, Gongyi; Wriggers, Willy

    2002-01-01

    The structure of Escherichia coli core RNA polymerase (RNAP) was determined by cryo-electron microscopy and image processing of helical crystals to a nominal resolution of 15 Å. Because of the high sequence conservation between the core RNAP subunits, we were able to interpret the E. coli structure in relation to the high-resolution x-ray structure of Thermus aquaticus core RNAP. A very large conformational change of the T. aquaticus RNAP x-ray structure, corresponding to opening of the main DNA/RNA channel by nearly 25 Å, was required to fit the E. coli map. This finding reveals, at least partially, the range of conformational flexibility of the RNAP, which is likely to have functional implications for the initiation of transcription, where the DNA template must be loaded into the channel. PMID:11904365

  10. Transcription factors that influence RNA polymerases I and II: To what extent is mechanism of action conserved?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinfeng; Najmi, Saman M; Schneider, David A

    2017-02-01

    In eukaryotic cells, nuclear RNA synthesis is accomplished by at least three unique, multisubunit RNA polymerases. The roles of these enzymes are generally partitioned into the synthesis of the three major classes of RNA: rRNA, mRNA, and tRNA for RNA polymerases I, II, and III respectively. Consistent with their unique cellular roles, each enzyme has a complement of specialized transcription factors and enzymatic properties. However, not all transcription factors have evolved to affect only one eukaryotic RNA polymerase. In fact, many factors have been shown to influence the activities of multiple nuclear RNA polymerases. This review focuses on a subset of these factors, specifically addressing the mechanisms by which these proteins influence RNA polymerases I and II.

  11. Archaeal RNA polymerase and transcription regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Sung-Hoon; Reichlen, Matthew J.; Tajiri, Momoko; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of transcription by cellular RNA polymerases (RNAPs), high resolution X-ray crystal structures together with structure-guided biochemical, biophysical and genetics studies are essential. The recently-solved X-ray crystal structures of archaeal RNA polymerase (RNAP) allow a structural comparison of the transcription machinery among all three domains of life. The archaea were once thought of closely related to bacteria, but they are now considered to be more closely related to the eukaryote at the molecular level than bacteria. According to these structures, the archaeal transcription apparatus, which includes RNAP and general transcription factors, is similar to the eukaryotic transcription machinery. Yet, the transcription regulators, activators and repressors, encoded by archaeal genomes are closely related to bacterial factors. Therefore, archaeal transcription appears to possess an intriguing hybrid of eukaryotic-type transcription apparatus and bacterial-like regulatory mechanisms. Elucidating the transcription mechanism in archaea, which possesses a combination of bacterial and eukaryotic transcription mechanisms that are commonly regarded as separate and mutually exclusive, can provide data that will bring basic transcription mechanisms across all three domains of life. PMID:21250781

  12. Structure-Function Relationships Among RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kenneth K.-S.; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.

    2008-01-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) play key roles in viral transcription and genome replication, as well as epigenetic and post-transcriptional control of cellular gene expression. In this article, we review the crystallographic, biochemical, and molecular genetic data available for viral RdRPs that have led to a detailed description of substrate and cofactor binding, fidelity of nucleotide selection and incorporation, and catalysis. It is likely that the cellular RdRPs will share some of the basic structural and mechanistic principles gleaned from studies of viral RdRPs. Therefore, studies of the viral RdRP establish a framework for the study of cellular RdRPs, an important yet understudied class of nucleic acid polymerases. PMID:18268843

  13. Ratcheting of RNA polymerase toward structural principles of RNA polymerase operations

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Shun-ichi; Murayama, Yuko; Svetlov, Vladimir; Nudler, Evgeny; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) performs various tasks during transcription by changing its conformational states, which are gradually becoming clarified. A recent study focusing on the conformational transition of RNAP between the ratcheted and tight forms illuminated the structural principles underlying its functional operations. PMID:26226152

  14. RNA polymerase activity in purified virions of avian reticuloendotheliosis viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, S; Temin, H M

    1976-01-01

    An RNA polymerase activity that synthesizes a U-rich RNA hydrogen bonded to a large viral RNA molecule was found in the cores of virions of avian reticuloendotheliosis viruses (REV). The RNA polymerase activity was separable from the DNA polymerase activity of REV virions. The 5'-terminus of the newly synthesized RNA was A. In addition, a tRNA nucleotidyl transferase activity, which added -CpCpA ends to tRNA, appears to be present in the REV virions. Images PMID:183017

  15. Subunit Compositions of the RNA-Silencing Enzymes Pol IV and Pol V Reveal Their Origins as Specialized Forms of RNA Polymerase II

    SciTech Connect

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, J. R.; Wierzbicki, A. T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Zhu, J. K.; Hagen, G.; Guilfoyle, T. J.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2009-01-30

    In addition to RNA polymerases I, II and III, which are multi-subunit RNA polymerases found in all eukaryotes, plants have catalytic subunits for two additional nuclear RNA polymerases, abbreviated as Pol IV and Pol V (formerly Pol IVa and Pol IVb, respectively). Pol IV and Pol V play non-redundant roles in siRNA-directed DNA methylation and gene silencing pathways.

  16. Temperature-Sensitive Mutants in the Influenza A Virus RNA Polymerase: Alterations in the PA Linker Reduce Nuclear Targeting of the PB1-PA Dimer and Result in Viral Attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Bruno; Sausset, Alix; Munier, Sandie; Ghounaris, Alexandre; Naffakh, Nadia; Le Goffic, Ronan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The influenza virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase catalyzes genome replication and transcription within the cell nucleus. Efficient nuclear import and assembly of the polymerase subunits PB1, PB2, and PA are critical steps in the virus life cycle. We investigated the structure and function of the PA linker (residues 197 to 256), located between its N-terminal endonuclease domain and its C-terminal structured domain that binds PB1, the polymerase core. Circular dichroism experiments revealed that the PA linker by itself is structurally disordered. A large series of PA linker mutants exhibited a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype (reduced viral growth at 39.5°C versus 37°C/33°C), suggesting an alteration of folding kinetic parameters. The ts phenotype was associated with a reduced efficiency of replication/transcription of a pseudoviral reporter RNA in a minireplicon assay. Using a fluorescent-tagged PB1, we observed that ts and lethal PA mutants did not efficiently recruit PB1 to reach the nucleus at 39.5°C. A protein complementation assay using PA mutants, PB1, and β-importin IPO5 tagged with fragments of the Gaussia princeps luciferase showed that increasing the temperature negatively modulated the PA-PB1 and the PA-PB1-IPO5 interactions or complex stability. The selection of revertant viruses allowed the identification of different types of compensatory mutations located in one or the other of the three polymerase subunits. Two ts mutants were shown to be attenuated and able to induce antibodies in mice. Taken together, our results identify a PA domain critical for PB1-PA nuclear import and that is a “hot spot” to engineer ts mutants that could be used to design novel attenuated vaccines. IMPORTANCE By targeting a discrete domain of the PA polymerase subunit of influenza virus, we were able to identify a series of 9 amino acid positions that are appropriate to engineer temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants. This is the first time that a large

  17. RNA polymerase backtracking in gene regulation and genome instability.

    PubMed

    Nudler, Evgeny

    2012-06-22

    RNA polymerase is a ratchet machine that oscillates between productive and backtracked states at numerous DNA positions. Since its first description 15 years ago, backtracking--the reversible sliding of RNA polymerase along DNA and RNA--has been implicated in many critical processes in bacteria and eukaryotes, including the control of transcription elongation, pausing, termination, fidelity, and genome instability.

  18. The punctilious RNA polymerase II core promoter.

    PubMed

    Vo Ngoc, Long; Wang, Yuan-Liang; Kassavetis, George A; Kadonaga, James T

    2017-07-01

    The signals that direct the initiation of transcription ultimately converge at the core promoter, which is the gateway to transcription. Here we provide an overview of the RNA polymerase II core promoter in bilateria (bilaterally symmetric animals). The core promoter is diverse in terms of its composition and function yet is also punctilious, as it acts with strict rules and precision. We additionally describe an expanded view of the core promoter that comprises the classical DNA sequence motifs, sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors, chromatin signals, and DNA structure. This model may eventually lead to a more unified conceptual understanding of the core promoter. © 2017 Vo ngoc et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Basic mechanism of transcription by RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Svetlov, Vladimir; Nudler, Evgeny

    2012-01-01

    RNA polymerase II-like enzymes carry out transcription of genomes in Eukaryota, Archaea, and some viruses. They also exhibit fundamental similarity to RNA polymerases from bacteria, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. In this review we take an inventory of recent studiesilluminating different steps of basic transcription mechanism, likely common for most multi-subunit RNA polymerases. Through the amalgamation of structural and computational chemistry data we attempt to highlight the most feasible reaction pathway for the two-metal nucleotidyl transfer mechanism, and to evaluate the way catalysis can be linked to translocation in the mechano-chemical cycle catalyzed by RNA polymerase II. PMID:22982365

  20. A genetic analysis of Plasmodium falciparum RNA polymerase II subunits in yeast.

    PubMed

    Hazoume, Adonis; Naderi, Kambiz; Candolfi, Ermanno; Kedinger, Claude; Chatton, Bruno; Vigneron, Marc

    2011-04-01

    RNA polymerase II is an essential nuclear multi subunit enzyme that transcribes nearly the whole genome. Its inhibition by the alpha-amanitin toxin leads to cell death. The enzyme of Plasmodium falciparum remains poorly characterized. Using a complementation assay in yeast as a genetic test, we demonstrate that five Plasmodium putative RNA polymerase subunits are indeed functional in vivo. The active site of this enzyme is built from the two largest subunits. Using site directed mutagenesis we were able to modify the active site of the yeast RNA polymerase II so as to introduce Plasmodium or human structural motifs. The resulting strains allow the screening of chemical libraries for potential specific inhibitors.

  1. Novel layers of RNA polymerase III control affecting tRNA gene transcription in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Leśniewska, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcribes a limited set of short genes in eukaryotes producing abundant small RNAs, mostly tRNA. The originally defined yeast Pol III transcriptome appears to be expanding owing to the application of new methods. Also, several factors required for assembly and nuclear import of Pol III complex have been identified recently. Models of Pol III based on cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of distinct Pol III conformations reveal unique features distinguishing Pol III from other polymerases. Novel concepts concerning Pol III functioning involve recruitment of general Pol III-specific transcription factors and distinctive mechanisms of transcription initiation, elongation and termination. Despite the short length of Pol III transcription units, mapping of transcriptionally active Pol III with nucleotide resolution has revealed strikingly uneven polymerase distribution along all genes. This may be related, at least in part, to the transcription factors bound at the internal promoter regions. Pol III uses also a specific negative regulator, Maf1, which binds to polymerase under stress conditions; however, a subset of Pol III genes is not controlled by Maf1. Among other RNA polymerases, Pol III machinery represents unique features related to a short transcript length and high transcription efficiency. PMID:28228471

  2. Novel layers of RNA polymerase III control affecting tRNA gene transcription in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Leśniewska, Ewa; Boguta, Magdalena

    2017-02-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcribes a limited set of short genes in eukaryotes producing abundant small RNAs, mostly tRNA. The originally defined yeast Pol III transcriptome appears to be expanding owing to the application of new methods. Also, several factors required for assembly and nuclear import of Pol III complex have been identified recently. Models of Pol III based on cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of distinct Pol III conformations reveal unique features distinguishing Pol III from other polymerases. Novel concepts concerning Pol III functioning involve recruitment of general Pol III-specific transcription factors and distinctive mechanisms of transcription initiation, elongation and termination. Despite the short length of Pol III transcription units, mapping of transcriptionally active Pol III with nucleotide resolution has revealed strikingly uneven polymerase distribution along all genes. This may be related, at least in part, to the transcription factors bound at the internal promoter regions. Pol III uses also a specific negative regulator, Maf1, which binds to polymerase under stress conditions; however, a subset of Pol III genes is not controlled by Maf1. Among other RNA polymerases, Pol III machinery represents unique features related to a short transcript length and high transcription efficiency.

  3. Solving the RNA polymerase I structural puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Morcillo, María; Taylor, Nicholas M. I.; Gruene, Tim; Legrand, Pierre; Rashid, Umar J.; Ruiz, Federico M.; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Müller, Christoph W.; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the structure of multi-subunit complexes is critical to understand basic cellular functions. However, when crystals of these complexes can be obtained they rarely diffract beyond 3 Å resolution, which complicates X-ray structure determination and refinement. The crystal structure of RNA polymerase I, an essential cellular machine that synthesizes the precursor of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus of eukaryotic cells, has recently been solved. Here, the crucial steps that were undertaken to build the atomic model of this multi-subunit enzyme are reported, emphasizing how simple crystallographic experiments can be used to extract relevant biological information. In particular, this report discusses the combination of poor molecular replacement and experimental phases, the application of multi-crystal averaging and the use of anomalous scatterers as sequence markers to guide tracing and to locate the active site. The methods outlined here will likely serve as a reference for future structural determination of large complexes at low resolution. PMID:25286842

  4. Global analysis of transcriptionally engaged yeast RNA polymerase III reveals extended tRNA transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Turowski, Tomasz W.; Leśniewska, Ewa; Delan-Forino, Clementine; Sayou, Camille; Boguta, Magdalena; Tollervey, David

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) synthesizes a range of highly abundant small stable RNAs, principally pre-tRNAs. Here we report the genome-wide analysis of nascent transcripts attached to RNAPIII under permissive and restrictive growth conditions. This revealed strikingly uneven polymerase distributions across transcription units, generally with a predominant 5′ peak. This peak was higher for more heavily transcribed genes, suggesting that initiation site clearance is rate-limiting during RNAPIII transcription. Down-regulation of RNAPIII transcription under stress conditions was found to be uneven; a subset of tRNA genes showed low response to nutrient shift or loss of the major transcription regulator Maf1, suggesting potential “housekeeping” roles. Many tRNA genes were found to generate long, 3′-extended forms due to read-through of the canonical poly(U) terminators. The degree of read-through was anti-correlated with the density of U-residues in the nascent tRNA, and multiple, functional terminators can be located far downstream. The steady-state levels of 3′-extended pre-tRNA transcripts are low, apparently due to targeting by the nuclear surveillance machinery, especially the RNA binding protein Nab2, cofactors for the nuclear exosome, and the 5′-exonuclease Rat1. PMID:27206856

  5. Nidovirus RNA polymerases: Complex enzymes handling exceptional RNA genomes.

    PubMed

    Posthuma, Clara C; Te Velthuis, Aartjan J W; Snijder, Eric J

    2017-02-06

    Coronaviruses and arteriviruses are distantly related human and animal pathogens that belong to the order Nidovirales. Nidoviruses are characterized by their polycistronic plus-stranded RNA genome, the production of subgenomic mRNAs and the conservation of a specific array of replicase domains, including key RNA-synthesizing enzymes. Coronaviruses (26-34 kilobases) have the largest known RNA genomes and their replication presumably requires a processive RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and enzymatic functions that suppress the consequences of the typically high error rate of viral RdRps. The arteriviruses have significantly smaller genomes and form an intriguing package with the coronaviruses to analyse viral RdRp evolution and function. The RdRp domain of nidoviruses resides in a cleavage product of the replicase polyprotein named non-structural protein (nsp) 12 in coronaviruses and nsp9 in arteriviruses. In all nidoviruses, the C-terminal RdRp domain is linked to a conserved N-terminal domain, which has been coined NiRAN (nidovirus RdRp-associated nucleotidyl transferase). Although no structural information is available, the functional characterization of the nidovirus RdRp and the larger enzyme complex of which it is part, has progressed significantly over the past decade. In coronaviruses several smaller, non-enzymatic nsps were characterized that direct RdRp function, while a 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity in nsp14 was implicated in fidelity. In arteriviruses, the nsp1 subunit was found to maintain the balance between genome replication and subgenomic mRNA production. Understanding RdRp behaviour and interactions during RNA synthesis and subsequent processing will be key to rationalising the evolutionary success of nidoviruses and the development of antiviral strategies.

  6. Transcriptional proofreading in dense RNA polymerase traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Mamata; Klumpp, Stefan

    2011-12-01

    The correction of errors during transcription involves the diffusive backward translocation (backtracking) of RNA polymerases (RNAPs) on the DNA. A trailing RNAP on the same template can interfere with backtracking as it progressively restricts the space that is available for backward translocation and thereby ratchets the backtracked RNAP forward. We analyze the resulting negative impact on proofreading theoretically using a driven lattice gas model of transcription under conditions of dense RNAP traffic. The fraction of errors that are corrected is calculated exactly for the case of a single RNAP; for multi-RNAP transcription, we use simulations and an analytical approximation and find a decrease with increasing traffic density. Moreover, we ask how the parameters of the system have to be set to keep down the impact of the interference of a trailing RNAP. Our analysis uncovers a surprisingly simple picture of the design of the error correction system: its efficiency is essentially determined by the rate for the initial backtracking step, while the value of the cleavage rate ensures that the correction mechanism remains efficient at high transcription rates. Finally, we argue that our analysis can also be applied to cases with transcription-translation coupling where the leading ribosome on the transcript assumes the role of the trailing RNAP.

  7. Selenotrisulfide inhibits initiation by RNA polymerase II but not elongation

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, G.D.; Falvey, D.

    1989-03-01

    We previously reported that RNA polymerase II (purified from wheat germ) is inhibited by selenotrisulfides, the products of the reaction of selenite with sulfhydryl compounds. We have now found that the initiation stage of the reaction is inhibited by selenotrisulfide but the elongation stage of the reaction is not. The actual start of the RNA chain is not inhibited by the selenotrisulfide, but rather the formation of the enzyme-DNA binary complex. Selenotrisulfide has a similar differential effect on initiation and elongation by RNA polymerase II from HeLa cells; in contrast, with E. coli RNA polymerase, it inhibits elongation as well.

  8. Characterization of four nuclear-encoded plastid RNA polymerase sigma factor genes in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha: blue-light- and multiple stress-responsive SIG5 was acquired early in the emergence of terrestrial plants.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Takehiko; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Hanaoka, Mitsumasa; Tanaka, Kan

    2013-10-01

    The plastids of plant cells each contain their own genome, and a bacterial-type RNA polymerase called plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase (PEP) is involved in transcription of this genome. While the catalytic core subunits are encoded by the plastid genome, the specificity subunit of PEP, sigma, is generally encoded by the nuclear genome and imported into plastids from the cytoplasm after translation. In this study, we identified and analyzed four sigma factor genes from the nuclear genome of a liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that three of the four genes were orthologous to vascular plant genes and thus they were named MpSIG1, MpSIG2 and MpSIG5. The remaining gene was named MpSIGX. The gene products were predicted to localize to the plastid, and this prediction was experimentally demonstrated by expressing yellow fluorescent protein fusion genes in vivo. As with SIG5 genes of other plant species, expression of MpSIG5 was induced by blue-light irradiation and also under various stress conditions, indicating that the regulatory mechanism responsible is conserved among divergent plant species. However, while the major role of SIG5 in vascular plants is to repair the damaged PSII reaction center through psbD gene transcription, the relevant blue-light-responsive promoter (psbD-BLRP) was not found in M. polymorpha and psbD transcript accumulation did not occur in conjunction with MpSIG5 induction. Thus, the physiological role of SIG5 is probably divergent among plant phyla.

  9. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Aravind, L

    2008-01-01

    Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases. This article was reviewed by Eugene Koonin and Mark Ragan. PMID:18834537

  10. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Aravind, L

    2008-10-04

    Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases.

  11. Understanding the Molecular Basis of RNA Polymerase II Transcription.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Su; Wang, Dong

    2013-06-01

    Synthetic nucleic acid analogues have profoundly advanced our knowledge of DNA and RNA, as well as the complex biological processes that involve nucleic acids. As a pivotal enzyme, eukaryotic RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is responsible for transcribing DNA into messenger RNA, which serves as a template to direct protein synthesis. Chemically modified nucleic acid analogues have greatly facilitated the structural elucidation of RNA Pol II elongation complex and understanding the key chemical interactions governing RNA Pol II transcriptional fidelity. This review addresses major progress in RNA polymerase II mechanistic studies using modified nucleic acid analogues in recent years.

  12. Multisubunit RNA Polymerase Cleavage Factors Modulate the Kinetics and Energetics of Nucleotide Incorporation: An RNA Polymerase I Case Study.

    PubMed

    Appling, Francis D; Schneider, David A; Lucius, Aaron L

    2017-10-11

    All cellular RNA polymerases are influenced by protein factors that stimulate RNA polymerase-catalyzed cleavage of the nascent RNA. Despite divergence in amino acid sequence, these so-called "cleavage factors" appear to share a common mechanism of action. Cleavage factors associate with the polymerase through a conserved structural element of the polymerase known as the secondary channel or pore. This mode of association enables the cleavage factor to reach through the secondary channel into the polymerase active site to reorient the active site divalent metal ions. This reorientation converts the polymerase active site into a nuclease active site. Interestingly, eukaryotic RNA polymerases I and III (Pols I and III, respectively) have incorporated their cleavage factors as bona fide subunits known as A12.2 and C11, respectively. Although it is clear that A12.2 and C11 dramatically stimulate the polymerase's cleavage activity, it is not known if or how these subunits affect the polymerization mechanism. In this work we have used transient-state kinetic techniques to characterize a Pol I isoform lacking A12.2. Our data clearly demonstrate that the A12.2 subunit profoundly affects the kinetics and energetics of the elementary steps of Pol I-catalyzed nucleotide incorporation. Given the high degree of conservation between polymerase-cleavage factor interactions, these data indicate that cleavage factor-modulated nucleotide incorporation mechanisms may be common to all cellular RNA polymerases.

  13. Template-free generation of RNA species that replicate with bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Biebricher, C K; Luce, R

    1996-01-01

    A large variety of different RNA species that are replicated by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from bacteriophage T7 have been generated by incubating high concentrations of this enzyme with substrate for extended time periods. The products differed from sample to sample in molecular weight and sequence, their chain lengths ranging from 60 to 120. The mechanism of autocatalytic amplification of RNA by T7 RNA polymerase proved to be analogous to that observed with viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (replicases): only single-stranded templates are accepted and complementary replica strands are synthesized. With enzyme in excess, exponential growth was observed; linear growth resulted when the enzyme was saturated by RNA template. The plus strands, present at 90% of the replicating RNA species, were found to have GG residues at both termini. Consensus sequences were not found among the sequences of the replicating RNA species. The secondary structures of all species sequenced turned out to be hairpins. The RNA species were specifically replicated by T7 RNA polymerase; they were not accepted as templates by the RNA polymerases from Escherichia coli or bacteriophage SP6 or by Qbeta replicase; T3 RNA polymerase was partially active. Template-free production of RNA was completely suppressed by addition of DNA to the incubation mixture. When both DNA and RNA templates were present, transcription and replication competed, but T7 RNA polymerase preferred DNA as a template. No replicating RNA species were detected in vivo in cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase. Images PMID:8670848

  14. In-ice evolution of RNA polymerase ribozyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Attwater, James; Wochner, Aniela; Holliger, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of molecular self-replication have the potential to shed light upon the origins of life. In particular, self-replication through RNA-catalysed templated RNA synthesis is thought to have supported a primordial ‘RNA World’. However, existing polymerase ribozymes lack the capacity to synthesise RNAs approaching their own size. Here we report the in vitro evolution of such catalysts directly in the RNA-stabilising medium of water-ice, which yielded RNA polymerase ribozymes specifically adapted to sub-zero temperatures and able to synthesise RNA in ices at temperatures as low as −19°C. Combination of cold-adaptive mutations with a previously described 5′ extension operating at ambient temperatures enabled the design of a first polymerase ribozyme capable of catalysing the accurate synthesis of an RNA sequence longer than itself (adding up to 206 nucleotides), an important stepping stone towards RNA self-replication. PMID:24256864

  15. RNA polymerase II transcription on the fast lane.

    PubMed

    Marcello, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II is the process that copies DNA into RNA leading to the expression of a specific gene. Averaged estimates of polymerase elongation rates in mammalian cells have been shown to vary between 1 and 4 kilobases per minute. However, recent advances in live cell imaging allowed direct measurements of RNA biogenesis from a single gene exceeded 50 kb·min(-1) . This unexpected finding opens novel and intriguing perspectives on the control of metazoan transcription.

  16. Dysregulation of RNA polymerase I transcription during disease.

    PubMed

    Hannan, K M; Sanij, E; Rothblum, L I; Hannan, R D; Pearson, R B

    2013-01-01

    Transcription of the ribosomal RNA genes by the dedicated RNA polymerase I enzyme and subsequent processing of the ribosomal RNA are fundamental control steps in the synthesis of functional ribosomes. Dysregulation of Pol I transcription and ribosome biogenesis is linked to the etiology of a broad range of human diseases. Diseases caused by loss of function mutations in the molecular constituents of the ribosome, or factors intimately associated with RNA polymerase I transcription and processing are collectively termed ribosomopathies. Ribosomopathies are generally rare and treatment options are extremely limited tending to be more palliative than curative. Other more common diseases are associated with profound changes in cellular growth such as cardiac hypertrophy, atrophy or cancer. In contrast to ribosomopathies, altered RNA polymerase I transcriptional activity in these diseases largely results from dysregulated upstream oncogenic pathways or by direct modulation by oncogenes or tumor suppressors at the level of the RNA polymerase I transcription apparatus itself. Ribosomopathies associated with mutations in ribosomal proteins and ribosomal RNA processing or assembly factors have been covered by recent excellent reviews. In contrast, here we review our current knowledge of human diseases specifically associated with dysregulation of RNA polymerase I transcription and its associated regulatory apparatus, including some cases where this dysregulation is directly causative in disease. We will also provide insight into and discussion of possible therapeutic approaches to treat patients with dysregulated RNA polymerase I transcription. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Transcription by Odd Pols. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cloning the Horse RNA Polymerase I Promoter and Its Application to Studying Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; He, Dong; Wang, Zengchao; Ou, Shudan; Yuan, Rong; Li, Shoujun

    2016-05-31

    An influenza virus polymerase reconstitution assay based on the human, dog, or chicken RNA polymerase I (PolI) promoter has been developed and widely used to study the polymerase activity of the influenza virus in corresponding cell types. Although it is an important member of the influenza virus family and has been known for sixty years, no studies have been performed to clone the horse PolI promoter or to study the polymerase activity of equine influenza virus (EIV) in horse cells. In our study, the horse RNA PolI promoter was cloned from fetal equine lung cells. Using the luciferase assay, it was found that a 500 bp horse RNA PolI promoter sequence was required for efficient transcription. Then, using the developed polymerase reconstitution assay based on the horse RNA PolI promoter, the polymerase activity of two EIV strains was compared, and equine myxovirus resistance A protein was identified as having the inhibiting EIV polymerase activity function in horse cells. Our study enriches our knowledge of the RNA PolI promoter of eukaryotic species and provides a useful tool for the study of influenza virus polymerase activity in horse cells.

  18. Human DNA polymerase η accommodates RNA for strand extension.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Egli, Martin; Guengerich, F Peter

    2017-09-26

    Ribonucleotides are the natural analogs of deoxyribonucleotides, which can be misinserted by DNA polymerases, leading to the most abundant DNA lesions in genomes. During replication, DNA polymerases tolerate patches of ribonucleotides on the parental strands to different extents. The majority of human DNA polymerases have been reported to misinsert ribonucleotides into genomes. However, only PrimPol, DNA polymerase alpha, telomerase, and the mitochondrial DNA polymerase hpol gamma have been shown to tolerate an entire RNA strand. Y-family DNA polymerase eta] (hpol eta) is known for translesion synthesis opposite the UV-induced DNA lesion cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and was recently found to incorporate ribonucleotides into DNA. Here, we report that hpol eta is able to bind DNA/DNA, RNA/DNA, and DNA/RNA duplexes with similar affinities. In addition, hpol eta--as well as another Y-family DNA polymerase, hpol kappa--accommodates RNA as one of the two strands during primer extension, mainly by inserting dNMPs opposite unmodified templates or DNA lesions such as 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine or CPD, even in the presence of an equal amount of the DNA/DNA substrate. The discovery of this RNA accommodating ability of hpol eta redefines the traditional concept of human DNA polymerases and indicates potential new functions of hpol eta in vivo. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Optical tweezers studies of transcription by eukaryotic RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Lisica, Ana; Grill, Stephan W

    2017-02-21

    Transcription is the first step in the expression of genetic information and it is carried out by large macromolecular enzymes called RNA polymerases. Transcription has been studied for many years and with a myriad of experimental techniques, ranging from bulk studies to high-resolution transcript sequencing. In this review, we emphasise the advantages of using single-molecule techniques, particularly optical tweezers, to study transcription dynamics. We give an overview of the latest results in the single-molecule transcription field, focusing on transcription by eukaryotic RNA polymerases. Finally, we evaluate recent quantitative models that describe the biophysics of RNA polymerase translocation and backtracking dynamics.

  20. The RNA polymerase II CTD coordinates transcription and RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Hsin, Jing-Ping; Manley, James L.

    2012-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (CTD) of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit consists of multiple heptad repeats (consensus Tyr1–Ser2–Pro3–Thr4–Ser5–Pro6–Ser7), varying in number from 26 in yeast to 52 in vertebrates. The CTD functions to help couple transcription and processing of the nascent RNA and also plays roles in transcription elongation and termination. The CTD is subject to extensive post-translational modification, most notably phosphorylation, during the transcription cycle, which modulates its activities in the above processes. Therefore, understanding the nature of CTD modifications, including how they function and how they are regulated, is essential to understanding the mechanisms that control gene expression. While the significance of phosphorylation of Ser2 and Ser5 residues has been studied and appreciated for some time, several additional modifications have more recently been added to the CTD repertoire, and insight into their function has begun to emerge. Here, we review findings regarding modification and function of the CTD, highlighting the important role this unique domain plays in coordinating gene activity. PMID:23028141

  1. The RNA processing exosome is linked to elongating RNA polymerase II in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Andrulis, Erik D; Werner, Janis; Nazarian, Arpi; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Lis, John T

    The RNA polymerase II elongation complex contains several factors that facilitate transcription elongation and catalyse the processing of precursor messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs). The conserved elongation factor Spt6 is recruited rapidly and robustly to sites of active transcription. Here we show that Drosophila Spt6 (dSpt6) co-purifies with the exosome, a complex of 3' to 5' exoribonucleases that is implicated in the processing of structural RNA and in the degradation of improperly processed pre-mRNA. Immunoprecipitation assays of Drosophila nuclear extracts show that the exosome also associates with the elongation factor dSpt5 and RNA polymerase II. In vivo, exosome subunits colocalize with dSpt6 at transcriptionally active loci on polytene chromosomes during normal development and are strongly recruited to heat-shock loci on gene induction. At higher resolution, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis shows that the exosome is recruited to transcriptionally active units of heat-shock genes. These data provide a physical basis for the hypothesis that exosome-mediated pre-mRNA surveillance accompanies transcription elongation.

  2. relA-dependent RNA polymerase activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ryals, J; Bremer, H

    1982-01-01

    Parameters relating to RNA synthesis were measured after a temperature shift from 30 to 42 degrees C, in a relA+ and relA- isogenic pair of Escherichia coli strains containing a temperature-sensitive valyl tRNA synthetase. The following results were obtained: (i) the rRNA chain growth rate increased 2-fold in both strains; (ii) newly synthesized rRNA became unstable in both strains; (iii) the stable RNA gene activity (rRNA and tRNA, measured as stable RNA synthesis rate relative to the total instantaneous rate of RNA synthesis) decreased 1.7-fold in the relA+ strain and increased 1.9-fold in the relA mutant; and (iv) the RNA polymerase activity (measured by the percentage of total RNA polymerase enzyme active in transcription an any instant) decreased from 20 to 3.6% in the relA+ strain and remained unchanged (or increased at most to 22%) in the relA mutant. It is suggested that both rRNA gene activity and the RNA polymerase activity depend on the intracellular concentration of guanosine tetraphosphate, whereas the altered chain elongation rate and stability of rRNA are temperature or amino acid starvation effects, respectively, without involvement of relA function. PMID:6174501

  3. The C-terminal domain-phosphorylated IIO form of RNA polymerase II is associated with the transcription repressor NC2 (Dr1/DRAP1) and is required for transcription activation in human nuclear extracts.

    PubMed

    Castaño, E; Gross, P; Wang, Z; Roeder, R G; Oelgeschläger, T

    2000-06-20

    Activation of class II gene transcription may involve alleviation of transcription repression as well as stimulation of the assembly and function of the general RNA polymerase (RNAP) II transcription machinery. Here, we investigated whether activator-reversible transcription repression by NC2 (Dr1/DRAP1) contributes to maximum induction levels in unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts. Surprisingly, we found that depletion of NC2 does not significantly affect basal transcription, but dramatically reduces activated transcription. Immunoblot analyses revealed that the loss of activator function coincides with selective removal of the C-terminal domain (CTD)-hyperphosphorylated RNAP IIO along with NC2. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments with purified factors confirmed that NC2 interacts with RNAP IIO, but not with the unphosphorylated or hypophosphorylated RNAP IIA or CTD-less RNAP IIB forms. Finally, we demonstrate that, in contrast to previously published observations in cell-free systems reconstituted with purified factors, only the CTD-phosphorylated form of RNAP II can mediate activator function in the context of unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts. These findings reveal an unexpected link between NC2 and transcription activation and suggest that regulation of RNAP II transcription through reversible CTD phosphorylation might be more complex than previously proposed.

  4. DNA wrapping in transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Coulombe, B

    1999-01-01

    The DNA wrapping model of transcription stipulates that DNA bending and wrapping around RNA polymerase causes an unwinding of the DNA helix at the enzyme catalytic center that stimulates strand separation prior to initiation and during transcript elongation. Recent experiments with mammalian RNA polymerase II indicate the significance of DNA bending and wrapping in transcriptional mechanisms. These findings have important implications in our understanding of the role of the general transcription factors in transcriptional initiation and the mechanisms underlying transcriptional regulation.

  5. On the evolution of the single-subunit RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Cermakian, N; Ikeda, T M; Miramontes, P; Lang, B F; Gray, M W; Cedergren, R

    1997-12-01

    Many eukaryotic nuclear genomes as well as mitochondrial plasmids contain genes displaying evident sequence similarity to those encoding the single-subunit RNA polymerase (ssRNAP) of bacteriophage T7 and its relatives. We have collected and aligned these ssRNAP sequences and have constructed unrooted phylogenetic trees that demonstrate the separation of ssRNAPs into three well-defined and nonoverlapping clusters (phage-encoded, nucleus-encoded, and plasmid-encoded). Our analyses indicate that these three subfamiles of T7-like RNAPs shared a common ancestor; however, the order in which the groups diverged cannot be inferred from available data. On the basis of structural similarities and mutational data, we suggest that the ancestral ssRNAP gene may have arisen via duplication and divergence of a DNA polymerase or reverse transcriptase gene. Considering the current phylogenetic distribution of ssRNAP sequences, we further suggest that the origin of the ancestral ssRNAP gene closely paralleled in time the introduction of mitochondria into eukaryotic cells through a eubacterial endosymbiosis.

  6. RNA Polymerase III Regulates Cytosolic RNA:DNA Hybrids and Intracellular MicroRNA Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Christine Xing'er; Kobiyama, Kouji; Shen, Yu J.; LeBert, Nina; Ahmad, Shandar; Khatoo, Muznah; Aoshi, Taiki; Gasser, Stephan; Ishii, Ken J.

    2015-01-01

    RNA:DNA hybrids form in the nuclei and mitochondria of cells as transcription-induced R-loops or G-quadruplexes, but exist only in the cytosol of virus-infected cells. Little is known about the existence of RNA:DNA hybrids in the cytosol of virus-free cells, in particular cancer or transformed cells. Here, we show that cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids are present in various human cell lines, including transformed cells. Inhibition of RNA polymerase III (Pol III), but not DNA polymerase, abrogated cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids. Cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids bind to several components of the microRNA (miRNA) machinery-related proteins, including AGO2 and DDX17. Furthermore, we identified miRNAs that are specifically regulated by Pol III, providing a potential link between RNA:DNA hybrids and the miRNA machinery. One of the target genes, exportin-1, is shown to regulate cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids. Taken together, we reveal previously unknown mechanism by which Pol III regulates the presence of cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids and miRNA biogenesis in various human cells. PMID:25623070

  7. Visualization of Single Molecules of RNA Polymerase Sliding along DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabata, Hiroyuki; Kurosawa, Osamu; Arai, Ichiro; Washizu, Masao; Margarson, Stefanie A.; Glass, Robert E.; Shimamoto, Nobuo

    1993-12-01

    Transcription requires that RNA polymerase binds to promoters buried in nonspecific sites on DNA. The search for promoters may be facilitated if the polymerase slides along the molecule of DNA. Single molecules of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase were visualized, and their movements on immobilized bacteriophage λ and T7 DNAs were examined. Deviating from drifts by bulk flow, about 40 percent of the enzyme molecules moved along the extended DNA. The results provide direct evidence for sliding as a mechanism for relocation of the enzyme on DNA.

  8. Mutational studies of archaeal RNA polymerase and analysis of hybrid RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Thomm, Michael; Reich, Christoph; Grünberg, Sebastian; Naji, Souad

    2009-02-01

    The recent success in reconstitution of RNAPs (RNA polymerases) from hyperthermophilic archaea from bacterially expressed purified subunits opens the way for detailed structure-function analyses of multisubunit RNAPs. The archaeal enzyme shows close structural similarity to eukaryotic RNAP, particularly to polymerase II, and can therefore be used as model for analyses of the eukaryotic transcriptional machinery. The cleft loops in the active centre of RNAP were deleted and modified to unravel their function in interaction with nucleic acids during transcription. The rudder, lid and fork 2 cleft loops were required for promoter-directed initiation and elongation, the rudder was essential for open complex formation. Analyses of transcripts from heteroduplex templates containing stable open complexes revealed that bubble reclosure is required for RNA displacement during elongation. Archaeal transcription systems contain, besides the orthologues of the eukaryotic transcription factors TBP (TATA-box-binding protein) and TF (transcription factor) IIB, an orthologue of the N-terminal part of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic TFIIE, called TFE, whose function is poorly understood. Recent analyses revealed that TFE is involved in open complex formation and, in striking contrast with eukaryotic TFIIE, is also present in elongation complexes. Recombinant archaeal RNAPs lacking specific subunits were used to investigate the functions of smaller subunits. These studies revealed that the subunits P and H, the orthologues of eukaryotic Rpb12 and Rpb5, were not required for RNAP assembly. Subunit P was essential for open complex formation, and the DeltaH enzyme was greatly impaired in all assays, with the exception of promoter recruitment. Recent reconstitution studies indicate that Rpb12 and Rpb5 can be incorporated into archaeal RNAP and can complement for the function of the corresponding archaeal subunit in in vitro transcription assays.

  9. CDK9-dependent RNA polymerase II pausing controls transcription initiation.

    PubMed

    Gressel, Saskia; Schwalb, Björn; Decker, Tim Michael; Qin, Weihua; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Eick, Dirk; Cramer, Patrick

    2017-10-10

    Gene transcription can be activated by decreasing the duration of RNA polymerase II pausing in the promoter-proximal region, but how this is achieved remains unclear. Here we use a 'multi-omics' approach to demonstrate that the duration of polymerase pausing generally limits the productive frequency of transcription initiation in human cells ('pause-initiation limit'). We further engineer a human cell line to allow for specific and rapid inhibition of the P-TEFb kinase CDK9, which is implicated in polymerase pause release. CDK9 activity decreases the pause duration but also increases the productive initiation frequency. This shows that CDK9 stimulates release of paused polymerase and activates transcription by increasing the number of transcribing polymerases and thus the amount of mRNA synthesized per time. CDK9 activity is also associated with long-range chromatin interactions, suggesting that enhancers can influence the pause-initiation limit to regulate transcription.

  10. Targeting mitochondrial RNA polymerase in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bralha, Fernando N.; Liyanage, Sanduni U.; Hurren, Rose; Wang, Xiaoming; Son, Meong Hi; Fung, Thomas A.; Chingcuanco, Francine B.; Tung, Aveline Y. W.; Andreazza, Ana C.; Psarianos, Pamela; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Salmena, Leonardo; Laposa, Rebecca R.

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells have high oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial mass and low respiratory chain spare reserve capacity. We reasoned that targeting the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT), which indirectly controls oxidative phosphorylation, represents a therapeutic strategy for AML. POLRMT-knockdown OCI-AML2 cells exhibited decreased mitochondrial gene expression, decreased levels of assembled complex I, decreased levels of mitochondrially-encoded Cox-II and decreased oxidative phosphorylation. POLRMT-knockdown cells exhibited an increase in complex II of the electron transport chain, a complex comprised entirely of subunits encoded by nuclear genes, and POLRMT-knockdown cells were resistant to a complex II inhibitor theonyltrifluoroacetone. POLRMT-knockdown cells showed a prominent increase in cell death. Treatment of OCI-AML2 cells with 10-50 μM 2-C-methyladenosine (2-CM), a chain terminator of mitochondrial transcription, reduced mitochondrial gene expression and oxidative phosphorylation, and increased cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of normal human hematopoietic cells with 2-CM at concentrations of up to 100 μMdid not alter clonogenic growth, suggesting a therapeutic window. In an OCI-AML2 xenograft model, treatment with 2-CM (70 mg/kg, i.p., daily) decreased the volume and mass of tumours to half that of vehicle controls. 2-CM did not cause toxicity to major organs. Overall, our results in a preclinical model contribute to the functional validation of the utility of targeting the mitochondrial RNA polymerase as a therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:26484416

  11. RNA polymerase II pauses at the 5 prime end of the transcriptionally induced Drosophila hsp70 gene

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, T.; Lis, J.T. )

    1991-10-01

    An RNA polymerase II molecule is associated with the 5{prime} end of the Drosophila melanogaster hsp70 gene under non-heat shock conditions. This polymerase is engaged in transcription but has paused, or arrested, after synthesizing about 25 nucleotides. Resumption of elongation by this paused polymerase appears to be the rate-limiting step in hsp70 transcription in uninduced cells. Here the authors report results of nuclear run-on assays that measure the distribution of elongating and paused RNA polymerase molecules on the hsp70 gene in induced cells. Pausing of polymerase was detected at the 5{prime} end of hsp70 was transcribed approximately five times during the 25-min heat shock that they used. Therefore, once the hsp70 gene is induced to an intermediate level, initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase II remains more rapid than the resumption of elongation by a paused polymerase molecule.

  12. Evolution of tertiary structure of viral RNA dependent polymerases.

    PubMed

    Černý, Jiří; Černá Bolfíková, Barbora; Valdés, James J; Grubhoffer, Libor; Růžek, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Viral RNA dependent polymerases (vRdPs) are present in all RNA viruses; unfortunately, their sequence similarity is too low for phylogenetic studies. Nevertheless, vRdP protein structures are remarkably conserved. In this study, we used the structural similarity of vRdPs to reconstruct their evolutionary history. The major strength of this work is in unifying sequence and structural data into a single quantitative phylogenetic analysis, using powerful a Bayesian approach. The resulting phylogram of vRdPs demonstrates that RNA-dependent DNA polymerases (RdDPs) of viruses within Retroviridae family cluster in a clearly separated group of vRdPs, while RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) of dsRNA and +ssRNA viruses are mixed together. This evidence supports the hypothesis that RdRPs replicating +ssRNA viruses evolved multiple times from RdRPs replicating +dsRNA viruses, and vice versa. Moreover, our phylogram may be presented as a scheme for RNA virus evolution. The results are in concordance with the actual concept of RNA virus evolution. Finally, the methods used in our work provide a new direction for studying ancient virus evolution.

  13. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity associated with the yeast viral p91/20S RNA ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed Central

    García-Cuéllar, M P; Esteban, R; Fujimura, T

    1997-01-01

    20S RNA is a noninfectious viral single-stranded RNA found in most laboratory strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. 20S RNA encodes a protein of 91 kDa (p91) that contains the common motifs found among RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from RNA viruses. p91 and 20S RNA are noncovalently associated in vivo, forming a ribonucleoprotein complex. We detected an RNA polymerase activity in p91/20S RNA complexes isolated by high-speed centrifugation. The activity was not inhibited by actinomycin D nor alpha-amanitin. The majority of the in vitro products was 20S RNA and the rest was the complementary strands of 20S RNA. Because the extracts were prepared from cells accumulating 20S RNA over its complementary strands, these in vitro products reflect the corresponding activities in vivo. When the p91/20S RNA complexes were subjected to sucrose gradient centrifugation, the polymerase activity cosedimented with the complexes. Furthermore, an RNA polymerase activity was detected in the complex by an antibody-linked polymerase assay using anti-p91 antiserum, suggesting that p91 is present in the active RNA polymerase machinery. These results together indicate that p91 is the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase or a subunit thereof responsible for 20S RNA replication. PMID:8990396

  14. Continuous in vitro evolution of bacteriophage RNA polymerase promoters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, R. R.; Banerji, A.; Joyce, G. F.

    1994-01-01

    Rapid in vitro evolution of bacteriophage T7, T3, and SP6 RNA polymerase promoters was achieved by a method that allows continuous enrichment of DNAs that contain functional promoter elements. This method exploits the ability of a special class of nucleic acid molecules to replicate continuously in the presence of both a reverse transcriptase and a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Replication involves the synthesis of both RNA and cDNA intermediates. The cDNA strand contains an embedded promoter sequence, which becomes converted to a functional double-stranded promoter element, leading to the production of RNA transcripts. Synthetic cDNAs, including those that contain randomized promoter sequences, can be used to initiate the amplification cycle. However, only those cDNAs that contain functional promoter sequences are able to produce RNA transcripts. Furthermore, each RNA transcript encodes the RNA polymerase promoter sequence that was responsible for initiation of its own transcription. Thus, the population of amplifying molecules quickly becomes enriched for those templates that encode functional promoters. Optimal promoter sequences for phage T7, T3, and SP6 RNA polymerase were identified after a 2-h amplification reaction, initiated in each case with a pool of synthetic cDNAs encoding greater than 10(10) promoter sequence variants.

  15. Continuous in vitro evolution of bacteriophage RNA polymerase promoters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, R. R.; Banerji, A.; Joyce, G. F.

    1994-01-01

    Rapid in vitro evolution of bacteriophage T7, T3, and SP6 RNA polymerase promoters was achieved by a method that allows continuous enrichment of DNAs that contain functional promoter elements. This method exploits the ability of a special class of nucleic acid molecules to replicate continuously in the presence of both a reverse transcriptase and a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Replication involves the synthesis of both RNA and cDNA intermediates. The cDNA strand contains an embedded promoter sequence, which becomes converted to a functional double-stranded promoter element, leading to the production of RNA transcripts. Synthetic cDNAs, including those that contain randomized promoter sequences, can be used to initiate the amplification cycle. However, only those cDNAs that contain functional promoter sequences are able to produce RNA transcripts. Furthermore, each RNA transcript encodes the RNA polymerase promoter sequence that was responsible for initiation of its own transcription. Thus, the population of amplifying molecules quickly becomes enriched for those templates that encode functional promoters. Optimal promoter sequences for phage T7, T3, and SP6 RNA polymerase were identified after a 2-h amplification reaction, initiated in each case with a pool of synthetic cDNAs encoding greater than 10(10) promoter sequence variants.

  16. Nuclear RNA Isolation and Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Navroop K; Mitchell, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Most transcriptome studies involve sequencing and quantification of steady-state mRNA by isolating and sequencing poly (A) RNA. Although this type of sequencing data is informative to determine steady-state mRNA levels it does not provide information on transcriptional output and thus may not always reflect changes in transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Furthermore, sequencing poly (A) RNA may miss transcribed regions of the genome not usually modified by polyadenylation which includes many long noncoding RNAs. Here, we describe nuclear-RNA sequencing (nucRNA-seq) which investigates the transcriptional landscape through sequencing and quantification of nuclear RNAs which are both unspliced and spliced transcripts for protein-coding genes and nuclear-retained long noncoding RNAs.

  17. Backtracking dynamics of RNA polymerase: pausing and error correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Mamata; Klumpp, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerases is frequently interrupted by pauses. One mechanism of such pauses is backtracking, where the RNA polymerase translocates backward with respect to both the DNA template and the RNA transcript, without shortening the transcript. Backtracked RNA polymerases move in a diffusive fashion and can return to active transcription either by diffusive return to the position where backtracking was initiated or by cleaving the transcript. The latter process also provides a mechanism for proofreading. Here we present some exact results for a kinetic model of backtracking and analyse its impact on the speed and the accuracy of transcription. We show that proofreading through backtracking is different from the classical (Hopfield-Ninio) scheme of kinetic proofreading. Our analysis also suggests that, in addition to contributing to the accuracy of transcription, backtracking may have a second effect: it attenuates the slow down of transcription that arises as a side effect of discriminating between correct and incorrect nucleotides based on the stepping rates.

  18. RNA footprint mapping of RNA polymerase II molecules stalled in the intergenic region of polyomavirus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Brabant, F; Acheson, N H

    1995-01-01

    RNA polymerase II molecules that transcribe the late strand of the 5.3-kb circular polyomavirus genome stall just upstream of the DNA replication origin, in a region containing multiple binding sites for polyomavirus large T antigen. Stalling of RNA polymerases depends on the presence of functional large T antigen and on the integrity of large T antigen binding site A. To gain insight into the interaction between DNA-bound large T antigen and RNA polymerase II, we mapped the position of stalled RNA polymerases by analyzing nascent RNA chains associated with these polymerases. Elongation of RNA in vitro, followed by hybridization with a nested set of DNA fragments extending progressively farther into the stalling region, allowed localization of the 3' end of the nascent RNA to a position 5 to 10 nucleotides upstream of binding site A. Ribonuclease treatment of nascent RNAs on viral transcription complexes, followed by in vitro elongation and hybridization, allowed localization of the distal end of stalled RNA polymerases to a position 40 nucleotides upstream of binding site A. This RNA footprint shows that elongating RNA polymerases stall at a site very close to the position of DNA-bound large T antigen and that they protect approximately 30 nucleotides of nascent RNA against ribonuclease digestion. PMID:7769704

  19. A transcribing RNA polymerase molecule survives DNA replication without aborting its growing RNA chain.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Wong, M L; Alberts, B

    1994-10-25

    We have demonstrated elsewhere that a precisely placed, stalled Escherichia coli RNA polymerase ternary transcription complex (polymerase-RNA-DNA) stays on the DNA template after passage of a DNA replication fork. Moreover, the bypassed complex remains competent to resume elongation of its bound RNA chain. But the simplicity of our experimental system left several important questions unresolved: in particular, might the observation be relevant only to the particular ternary complex that we studied, and can the finding be generalized to a transcribing instead of a stalled RNA polymerase? To address these issues, we have created three additional ternary transcription complexes and examined their fates after passage of a replication fork. In addition, we have examined the fate of moving RNA polymerase molecules during DNA replication. The results suggest that our previous finding applies to all transcription intermediates of the E. coli RNA polymerase.

  20. Molecular architecture of the vesicular stomatitis virus RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Rahmeh, Amal A.; Schenk, Andreas D.; Danek, Eric I.; Kranzusch, Philip J.; Liang, Bo; Walz, Thomas; Whelan, Sean P. J.

    2010-01-01

    Nonsegmented negative-strand (NNS) RNA viruses initiate infection by delivering into the host cell a highly specialized RNA synthesis machine comprising the genomic RNA completely encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein and associated with the viral polymerase. The catalytic core of this protein–RNA complex is a 250-kDa multifunctional large (L) polymerase protein that contains enzymatic activities for nucleotide polymerization as well as for each step of mRNA cap formation. Working with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a prototype of NNS RNA viruses, we used negative stain electron microscopy (EM) to obtain a molecular view of L, alone and in complex with the viral phosphoprotein (P) cofactor. EM analysis, combined with proteolytic digestion and deletion mapping, revealed the organization of L into a ring domain containing the RNA polymerase and an appendage of three globular domains containing the cap-forming activities. The capping enzyme maps to a globular domain, which is juxtaposed to the ring, and the cap methyltransferase maps to a more distal and flexibly connected globule. Upon P binding, L undergoes a significant rearrangement that may reflect an optimal positioning of its functional domains for transcription. The structural map of L provides new insights into the interrelationship of its various domains, and their rearrangement on P binding that is likely important for RNA synthesis. Because the arrangement of conserved regions involved in catalysis is homologous, the structural insights obtained for VSV L likely extend to all NNS RNA viruses. PMID:21041632

  1. Molecular architecture of the vesicular stomatitis virus RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Rahmeh, Amal A; Schenk, Andreas D; Danek, Eric I; Kranzusch, Philip J; Liang, Bo; Walz, Thomas; Whelan, Sean P J

    2010-11-16

    Nonsegmented negative-strand (NNS) RNA viruses initiate infection by delivering into the host cell a highly specialized RNA synthesis machine comprising the genomic RNA completely encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein and associated with the viral polymerase. The catalytic core of this protein-RNA complex is a 250-kDa multifunctional large (L) polymerase protein that contains enzymatic activities for nucleotide polymerization as well as for each step of mRNA cap formation. Working with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a prototype of NNS RNA viruses, we used negative stain electron microscopy (EM) to obtain a molecular view of L, alone and in complex with the viral phosphoprotein (P) cofactor. EM analysis, combined with proteolytic digestion and deletion mapping, revealed the organization of L into a ring domain containing the RNA polymerase and an appendage of three globular domains containing the cap-forming activities. The capping enzyme maps to a globular domain, which is juxtaposed to the ring, and the cap methyltransferase maps to a more distal and flexibly connected globule. Upon P binding, L undergoes a significant rearrangement that may reflect an optimal positioning of its functional domains for transcription. The structural map of L provides new insights into the interrelationship of its various domains, and their rearrangement on P binding that is likely important for RNA synthesis. Because the arrangement of conserved regions involved in catalysis is homologous, the structural insights obtained for VSV L likely extend to all NNS RNA viruses.

  2. Synthesis of 2′-Fluoro RNA by Syn5 RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bin; Hernandez, Alfredo; Tan, Min; Wollenhaupt, Jan; Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    2015-01-01

    The substitution of 2′-fluoro for 2′-hydroxyl moieties in RNA substantially improves the stability of RNA. RNA stability is a major issue in RNA research and applications involving RNA. We report that the RNA polymerase from the marine cyanophage Syn5 has an intrinsic low discrimination against the incorporation of 2′-fluoro dNMPs during transcription elongation. The presence of both magnesium and manganese ions at high concentrations further reduce this discrimination without decreasing the efficiency of incorporation. We have constructed a Syn5 RNA polymerase in which tyrosine 564 is replaced with phenylalanine (Y564F) that further decreases the discrimination against 2′-fluoro-dNTPs during RNA synthesis. Sequence elements in DNA templates that affect the yield of RNA and incorporation of 2′-fluoro-dNMPs by Syn5 RNA polymerase have been identified. PMID:25897116

  3. Malondialdehyde adducts in DNA arrest transcription by T7 RNA polymerase and mammalian RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Cline, Susan D; Riggins, James N; Tornaletti, Silvia; Marnett, Lawrence J; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2004-05-11

    Malondialdehyde, a genotoxic byproduct of lipid peroxidation, reacts with guanine in DNA to form pyrimido[1,2-alpha]purin-10(3H)one (M(1)dG), the first endogenous DNA lesion found to be a target of nucleotide excision repair enzymes. A subpathway of nucleotide excision repair, transcription-coupled repair, is thought to occur when RNA polymerase (RNAP) is arrested at damage in transcribed DNA strands and might function for efficient removal of M(1)dG in active genes. Results presented here show that M(1)dG and its stable, exocyclic analog 1,N(2)-propanodeoxyguanine (PdG), arrest translocation of T7 RNAP and mammalian RNAPII when located in the transcribed strand of a DNA template. M(1)dG paired with thymine is exocyclic and poses a stronger block to transcription than the acyclic N(2)-(3-oxo-1-propenyl)-dG, formed upon cytosine-catalyzed opening of M(1)dG in duplex DNA. PdG is a complete block to RNAPII regardless of base pairing. The elongation factor TFIIS (SII) induces reversal and RNA transcript cleavage by RNAPII arrested at PdG. Thus, arrested RNAPII complexes may be stable at M(1)dG in cells and may resume transcription once the offending adduct is removed. The conclusion from this work is that malondialdehyde adducts in the transcribed strand of expressed genes are strong blocks to RNAPs and are targets for cellular transcription-coupled repair. If so, then M(1)dG, already known to be highly mutagenic in human cells, also may contribute to apoptosis in the developing tissues of individuals with Cockayne's syndrome, a hereditary disorder characterized by transcription-coupled repair deficiency.

  4. Control of Transcriptional Elongation by RNA Polymerase II: A Retrospective.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Kris; Bentley, David L

    2012-01-01

    The origins of our current understanding of control of transcription elongation lie in pioneering experiments that mapped RNA polymerase II on viral and cellular genes. These studies first uncovered the surprising excess of polymerase molecules that we now know to be situated at the at the 5' ends of most genes in multicellular organisms. The pileup of pol II near transcription start sites reflects a ubiquitous bottle-neck that limits elongation right at the start of the transcription elongation. Subsequent seminal work identified conserved protein factors that positively and negatively control the flux of polymerase through this bottle-neck, and make a major contribution to control of gene expression.

  5. A structural and primary sequence comparison of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Bruenn, Jeremy A.

    2003-01-01

    A systematic bioinformatic approach to identifying the evolutionarily conserved regions of proteins has verified the universality of a newly described conserved motif in RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (motif F). In combination with structural comparisons, this approach has defined two regions that may be involved in unwinding double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) for transcription. One of these is the N-terminal portion of motif F and the second is a large insertion in motif F present in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of some dsRNA viruses. PMID:12654997

  6. Conditions for Using DNA Polymerase I as an RNA-Dependent DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, S. C.; Kacian, D. L.; Spiegelman, S.

    1974-01-01

    Conditions are described for using Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I for synthesizing complementary DNA copies of natural RNA molecules, which are suitable for use in hybridization experiments. The molar ratio of enzyme to template is critical; below a certain level, synthesis is not observed. Hybrids formed with the complementary DNA are of comparable specificity and stability to those formed with complementary DNAs synthesized by viral RNA-directed DNA polymerase. Synthesis of dA-dT polymers, a common occurrence with this enzyme, can be eliminated by including distamycin in the reaction mixture. PMID:4133845

  7. Direct Characterization of Transcription Elongation by RNA Polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Ucuncuoglu, Suleyman; Engel, Krysta L; Purohit, Prashant K; Dunlap, David D; Schneider, David A; Finzi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcribes ribosomal DNA and is responsible for more than 60% of transcription in a growing cell. Despite this fundamental role that directly impacts cell growth and proliferation, the kinetics of transcription by Pol I are poorly understood. This study provides direct characterization of S. Cerevisiae Pol I transcription elongation using tethered particle microscopy (TPM). Pol I was shown to elongate at an average rate of approximately 20 nt/s. However, the maximum speed observed was, in average, about 60 nt/s, comparable to the rate calculated based on the in vivo number of active genes, the cell division rate and the number of engaged polymerases observed in EM images. Addition of RNA endonucleases to the TPM elongation assays enhanced processivity. Together, these data suggest that additional transcription factors contribute to efficient and processive transcription elongation by RNA polymerase I in vivo.

  8. Direct Characterization of Transcription Elongation by RNA Polymerase I

    PubMed Central

    Ucuncuoglu, Suleyman; Engel, Krysta L.; Purohit, Prashant K.; Dunlap, David D.; Schneider, David A.

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcribes ribosomal DNA and is responsible for more than 60% of transcription in a growing cell. Despite this fundamental role that directly impacts cell growth and proliferation, the kinetics of transcription by Pol I are poorly understood. This study provides direct characterization of S. Cerevisiae Pol I transcription elongation using tethered particle microscopy (TPM). Pol I was shown to elongate at an average rate of approximately 20 nt/s. However, the maximum speed observed was, in average, about 60 nt/s, comparable to the rate calculated based on the in vivo number of active genes, the cell division rate and the number of engaged polymerases observed in EM images. Addition of RNA endonucleases to the TPM elongation assays enhanced processivity. Together, these data suggest that additional transcription factors contribute to efficient and processive transcription elongation by RNA polymerase I in vivo. PMID:27455049

  9. Modulation of RNA polymerase assembly dynamics in transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gorski, Stanislaw A.; Snyder, Sara K.; John, Sam; Grummt, Ingrid; Misteli, Tom

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of transcription factors with target genes is highly dynamic. Whether the dynamic nature of these interactions is merely an intrinsic property of transcriptions factors or serves a regulatory role is unknown. Here, we have used single cell fluorescence imaging combined with computational modeling and chromatin immunoprecipitation to analyze transcription complex dynamics in gene regulation during the cell cycle in living cells. We demonstrate a link between the dynamics of RNA polymerase I (RNA pol I) assembly and transcriptional output. We show that transcriptional upregulation is accompanied by prolonged retention of RNA pol I components at the promoter, resulting in longer promoter dwell time, and an increase in the steady state population of assembling polymerase. As a consequence, polymerase assembly efficiency, and ultimately, an rate of entry into processive elongation are elevated. Our results show that regulation of rDNA transcription in vivo occurs via modulation of the efficiency of transcription complex subunit capture and assembly. PMID:18498750

  10. Structural Basis of RNA Polymerase I Transcription Initiation.

    PubMed

    Engel, Christoph; Gubbey, Tobias; Neyer, Simon; Sainsbury, Sarah; Oberthuer, Christiane; Baejen, Carlo; Bernecky, Carrie; Cramer, Patrick

    2017-03-23

    Transcription initiation at the ribosomal RNA promoter requires RNA polymerase (Pol) I and the initiation factors Rrn3 and core factor (CF). Here, we combine X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to obtain a molecular model for basal Pol I initiation. The three-subunit CF binds upstream promoter DNA, docks to the Pol I-Rrn3 complex, and loads DNA into the expanded active center cleft of the polymerase. DNA unwinding between the Pol I protrusion and clamp domains enables cleft contraction, resulting in an active Pol I conformation and RNA synthesis. Comparison with the Pol II system suggests that promoter specificity relies on a distinct "bendability" and "meltability" of the promoter sequence that enables contacts between initiation factors, DNA, and polymerase.

  11. Nuclear Export of Messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Katahira, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Transport of messenger RNA (mRNA) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is an essential step of eukaryotic gene expression. In the cell nucleus, a precursor mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps, including capping at the 5' ends, splicing and cleavage/polyadenylation at the 3' ends. During this process, the mRNA associates with a wide variety of proteins, forming a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particle. Association with factors involved in nuclear export also occurs during transcription and processing, and thus nuclear export is fully integrated into mRNA maturation. The coupling between mRNA maturation and nuclear export is an important mechanism for providing only fully functional and competent mRNA to the cytoplasmic translational machinery, thereby ensuring accuracy and swiftness of gene expression. This review describes the molecular mechanism of nuclear mRNA export mediated by the principal transport factors, including Tap-p15 and the TREX complex. PMID:25836925

  12. Conformational selection and induced fit for RNA polymerase and RNA/DNA hybrid backtracked recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Ye, Wei; Yang, Jingxu; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase catalyzes transcription with a high fidelity. If DNA/RNA mismatch or DNA damage occurs downstream, a backtracked RNA polymerase can proofread this situation. However, the backtracked mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we have performed multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid to study backtracked recognition. MD simulations at room temperature suggest that specific electrostatic interactions play key roles in the backtracked recognition between the polymerase and DNA/RNA hybrid. Kinetics analysis at high temperature shows that bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid unfold via a two-state process. Both kinetics and free energy landscape analyses indicate that bound DNA/RNA hybrid folds in the order of DNA/RNA contracting, the tertiary folding and polymerase binding. The predicted Φ-values suggest that C7, G9, dC12, dC15, and dT16 are key bases for the backtracked recognition of DNA/RNA hybrid. The average RMSD values between the bound structures and the corresponding apo ones and Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) P-test analyses indicate that the recognition between DNA/RNA hybrid and polymerase might follow an induced fit mechanism for DNA/RNA hybrid and conformation selection for polymerase. Furthermore, this method could be used to relative studies of specific recognition between nucleic acid and protein. PMID:26594643

  13. Poliovirus Polymerase Leu420 Facilitates RNA Recombination and Ribavirin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Brian J.; Peersen, Olve B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA recombination is important in the formation of picornavirus species groups and the ongoing evolution of viruses within species groups. In this study, we examined the structure and function of poliovirus polymerase, 3Dpol, as it relates to RNA recombination. Recombination occurs when nascent RNA products exchange one viral RNA template for another during RNA replication. Because recombination is a natural aspect of picornavirus replication, we hypothesized that some features of 3Dpol may exist, in part, to facilitate RNA recombination. Furthermore, we reasoned that alanine substitution mutations that disrupt 3Dpol-RNA interactions within the polymerase elongation complex might increase and/or decrease the magnitudes of recombination. We found that an L420A mutation in 3Dpol decreased the frequency of RNA recombination, whereas alanine substitutions at other sites in 3Dpol increased the frequency of recombination. The 3Dpol Leu420 side chain interacts with a ribose in the nascent RNA product 3 nucleotides from the active site of the polymerase. Notably, the L420A mutation that reduced recombination also rendered the virus more susceptible to inhibition by ribavirin, coincident with the accumulation of ribavirin-induced G→A and C→U mutations in viral RNA. We conclude that 3Dpol Leu420 is critically important for RNA recombination and that RNA recombination contributes to ribavirin resistance. IMPORTANCE Recombination contributes to the formation of picornavirus species groups and the emergence of circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs). The recombinant viruses that arise in nature are occasionally more fit than either parental strain, especially when the two partners in recombination are closely related, i.e., members of characteristic species groups, such as enterovirus species groups A to H or rhinovirus species groups A to C. Our study shows that RNA recombination requires conserved features of the viral polymerase. Furthermore, a

  14. The human RNA polymerase II interacts with the terminal stem-loop regions of the hepatitis delta virus RNA genome

    SciTech Connect

    Greco-Stewart, Valerie S.; Miron, Paul; Abrahem, Abrahem; Pelchat, Martin . E-mail: mpelchat@uottawa.ca

    2007-01-05

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is an RNA virus that depends on DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) for its transcription and replication. While it is generally accepted that RNAP II is involved in HDV replication, its interaction with HDV RNA requires confirmation. A monoclonal antibody specific to the carboxy terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNAP II was used to establish the association of RNAP II with both polarities of HDV RNA in HeLa cells. Co-immunoprecipitations using HeLa nuclear extract revealed that RNAP II interacts with HDV-derived RNAs at sites located within the terminal stem-loop domains of both polarities of HDV RNA. Analysis of these regions revealed a strong selection to maintain a rod-like conformation and demonstrated several conserved features. These results provide the first direct evidence of an association between human RNAP II and HDV RNA and suggest two transcription start sites on both polarities of HDV RNA.

  15. [Influence of temperature on the preferential extraction of RNA polymerase I from hepatic nuclei of the rat].

    PubMed

    Zoncheddu, A; Accomando, R; Pertica, M; Orunesu, M

    1979-11-15

    RNA polymerase I has been extracted from rat liver nuclei by three consecutive washings at 0 degrees C with a medium of relatively low ionic strength (0.15 M KCl) containing Mg++ rather than by incubating the organelles at 37 degrees C in the same medium, as originally proposed by Chesterton and Butterworth. The modified technique, which has the advantage of preventing a temperature-mediated conversion of form IB to IA, gives similar yields of RNA polymerase I and retains the capacity of preferentially extracting the enzyme with respect to the other forms of nuclear RNA polymerase.

  16. Stochastic resetting in backtrack recovery by RNA polymerases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, Édgar; Lisica, Ana; Sánchez-Taltavull, Daniel; Grill, Stephan W.

    2016-06-01

    Transcription is a key process in gene expression, in which RNA polymerases produce a complementary RNA copy from a DNA template. RNA polymerization is frequently interrupted by backtracking, a process in which polymerases perform a random walk along the DNA template. Recovery of polymerases from the transcriptionally inactive backtracked state is determined by a kinetic competition between one-dimensional diffusion and RNA cleavage. Here we describe backtrack recovery as a continuous-time random walk, where the time for a polymerase to recover from a backtrack of a given depth is described as a first-passage time of a random walker to reach an absorbing state. We represent RNA cleavage as a stochastic resetting process and derive exact expressions for the recovery time distributions and mean recovery times from a given initial backtrack depth for both continuous and discrete-lattice descriptions of the random walk. We show that recovery time statistics do not depend on the discreteness of the DNA lattice when the rate of one-dimensional diffusion is large compared to the rate of cleavage.

  17. Selective repression of SINE transcription by RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Dhaval; Vavrova-Anderson, Jana; Oler, Andrew J; Cairns, Bradley R; White, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    A million copies of the Alu short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) are scattered throughout the human genome, providing ∼11% of our total DNA. SINEs spread by retrotransposition, using a transcript generated by RNA polymerase (pol) III from an internal promoter. Levels of these pol III-dependent Alu transcripts are far lower than might be expected from the abundance of the template. This was believed to reflect transcriptional suppression through DNA methylation, denying pol III access to most SINEs through chromatin-mediated effects. Contrary to expectations, our recent study found no evidence that methylation of SINE DNA reduces its occupancy or expression by pol III. However, histone H3 associated with SINEs is prominently methylated on lysine 9, a mark that correlates with transcriptional silencing. The SUV39 methyltransferases that deposit this mark can be found at many SINEs. Furthermore, a selective inhibitor of SUV39 stimulates pol III recruitment to these loci, as well as SINE expression. These data suggest that methylation of histone H3 rather than DNA may mediate repression of SINE transcription by pol III, at least under the conditions we studied.

  18. New insight into role of myosin motors for activation of RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Sarshad, Aishe A; Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2014-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, actin and myosin are emerging as essential regulators of nuclear function. At gene level, they regulate chromatin and modulate RNA polymerase transcription, and at the RNA level, they are involved in the metabolism of ribonucleoprotein complexes. Furthermore, actin and myosin are involved in maintaining the structure of cell nucleus by mediating chromatin movement and by interacting with components of the nuclear lamina. This plethora of functions is now supported by evidence that nuclear actin polymerizes just like the cytoplasmic actin fraction. Based on these considerations, we now hypothesize that the nuclear myosin forms function as actin-based motors. In this chapter, our goal is to start from the knowledge acquired in the cytoplasmic field to explore how nuclear myosin functions in gene transcription. One of the pressing issues discussed here is whether nuclear myosin produces local tension or functions as transporters. Based on two current models reported in the literature, we discuss the topology of the actin-based nuclear myosin 1 motor and how it is believed to facilitate propulsion of the RNA polymerase machinery while maintaining chromatin that is compatible with transcription. These mechanisms will be placed in the context of cell cycle progression. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Influenza virus RNA polymerase: insights into the mechanisms of viral RNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    te Velthuis, Aartjan J.W.; Fodor, Ervin

    2016-01-01

    The genome of influenza viruses consists of multiple segments of single stranded negative-sense RNA. Each of these segments is bound by the heterotrimeric viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and multiple copies of nucleoprotein, forming viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complexes. It is in the context of these vRNPs that the viral RNA polymerase carries out transcription of viral genes and replication of the viral RNA genome. In this Review, we discuss our current knowledge of the structure of the influenza virus RNA polymerase, how it carries out transcription and replication, and how its activities are modulated by viral and host factors. Furthermore, we discuss how advances in our understanding of polymerase function could help identifying new antiviral targets. PMID:27396566

  20. Enzymatic and nonenzymatic functions of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases within oligomeric arrays

    PubMed Central

    Spagnolo, Jeannie F.; Rossignol, Evan; Bullitt, Esther; Kirkegaard, Karla

    2010-01-01

    Few antivirals are effective against positive-strand RNA viruses, primarily because the high error rate during replication of these viruses leads to the rapid development of drug resistance. One of the favored current targets for the development of antiviral compounds is the active site of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. However, like many subcellular processes, replication of the genomes of all positive-strand RNA viruses occurs in highly oligomeric complexes on the cytosolic surfaces of the intracellular membranes of infected host cells. In this study, catalytically inactive polymerases were shown to participate productively in functional oligomer formation and catalysis, as assayed by RNA template elongation. Direct protein transduction to introduce either active or inactive polymerases into cells infected with mutant virus confirmed the structural role for polymerase molecules during infection. Therefore, we suggest that targeting the active sites of polymerase molecules is not likely to be the best antiviral strategy, as inactivated polymerases do not inhibit replication of other viruses in the same cell and can, in fact, be useful in RNA replication complexes. On the other hand, polymerases that could not participate in functional RNA replication complexes were those that contained mutations in the amino terminus, leading to altered contacts in the folded polymerase and mutations in a known polymerase–polymerase interaction in the two-dimensional protein lattice. Thus, the functional nature of multimeric arrays of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase supplies a novel target for antiviral compounds and provides a new appreciation for enzymatic catalysis on membranous surfaces within cells. PMID:20051491

  1. Micro-RNA quantification using DNA polymerase and pyrophosphate quantification.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsiang-Ping; Hsiao, Yi-Ling; Pan, Hung-Yin; Huang, Chih-Hung; Hou, Shao-Yi

    2011-12-15

    A rapid quantification method for micro-RNA based on DNA polymerase activity and pyrophosphate quantification has been developed. The tested micro-RNA serves as the primer, unlike the DNA primer in all DNA sequencing methods, and the DNA probe serves as the template for DNA replication. After the DNA synthesis, the pyrophosphate detection and quantification indicate the existence and quantity of the tested miRNA. Five femtomoles of the synthetic RNA could be detected. In 20-100 μg RNA samples purified from SiHa cells, the measurement was done using the proposed assay in which hsa-miR-16 and hsa-miR-21 are 0.34 fmol/μg RNA and 0.71 fmol/μg RNA, respectively. This simple and inexpensive assay takes less than 5 min after total RNA purification and preparation. The quantification is not affected by the pre-miRNA which cannot serve as the primer for the DNA synthesis in this assay. This assay is general for the detection of the target RNA or DNA with a known matched DNA template probe, which could be widely used for detection of small RNA, messenger RNA, RNA viruses, and DNA. Therefore, the method could be widely used in RNA and DNA assays.

  2. Recent highlights of RNA-polymerase-II-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Sims, Robert J; Mandal, Subhrangsu S; Reinberg, Danny

    2004-06-01

    Considerable advances into the basis of RNA-polymerase-II-mediated transcriptional regulation have recently emerged. Biochemical, genetic and structural studies have contributed to novel insights into transcription, as well as the functional significance of covalent histone modifications. New details regarding transcription elongation through chromatin have further defined the mechanism behind this action, and identified how chromatin structure may be maintained after RNAP II traverses a nucleosome. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes, along with histone chaperone complexes, were recently discovered to facilitate histone exchange. In addition, it has become increasingly clear that transcription by RNA polymerase II extends beyond RNA synthesis, towards a more active role in mRNA maturation, surveillance and export to the cytoplasm.

  3. Single-molecule tracking of mRNA exiting from RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Andrecka, Joanna; Lewis, Robert; Brückner, Florian; Lehmann, Elisabeth; Cramer, Patrick; Michaelis, Jens

    2008-01-08

    Single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer was used to track RNA exiting from RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in elongation complexes. Measuring the distance between the RNA 5' end and three known locations within the elongation complex allows us determine its position by means of triangulation. RNA leaves the polymerase active center cleft via the previously proposed exit tunnel and then disengages from the enzyme surface. When the RNA reaches lengths of 26 and 29 nt, its 5' end associates with Pol II at the base of the dock domain. Because the initiation factor TFIIB binds to the dock domain and exit tunnel, exiting RNA may prevent TFIIB reassociation during elongation. RNA further extends toward the linker connecting to the polymerase C-terminal repeat domain (CTD), which binds the 5'-capping enzyme and other RNA processing factors.

  4. Structural basis of RNA polymerase II backtracking, arrest and reactivation.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Alan C M; Cramer, Patrick

    2011-03-10

    During gene transcription, RNA polymerase (Pol) II moves forwards along DNA and synthesizes messenger RNA. However, at certain DNA sequences, Pol II moves backwards, and such backtracking can arrest transcription. Arrested Pol II is reactivated by transcription factor IIS (TFIIS), which induces RNA cleavage that is required for cell viability. Pol II arrest and reactivation are involved in transcription through nucleosomes and in promoter-proximal gene regulation. Here we present X-ray structures at 3.3 Å resolution of an arrested Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol II complex with DNA and RNA, and of a reactivation intermediate that additionally contains TFIIS. In the arrested complex, eight nucleotides of backtracked RNA bind a conserved 'backtrack site' in the Pol II pore and funnel, trapping the active centre trigger loop and inhibiting mRNA elongation. In the reactivation intermediate, TFIIS locks the trigger loop away from backtracked RNA, displaces RNA from the backtrack site, and complements the polymerase active site with a basic and two acidic residues that may catalyse proton transfers during RNA cleavage. The active site is demarcated from the backtrack site by a 'gating tyrosine' residue that probably delimits backtracking. These results establish the structural basis of Pol II backtracking, arrest and reactivation, and provide a framework for analysing gene regulation during transcription elongation.

  5. Nucleosomes inhibit both transcriptional initiation and elongation by RNA polymerase III in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Morse, R H

    1989-01-01

    To examine the effect of nucleosomes on in vitro transcription, purified chicken erythrocyte core histones and plasmid DNA bearing the Xenopus 5S RNA gene were assembled into nucleosomes and used as templates for transcription in a Xenopus oocyte nuclear extract. Plasmids having a nucleosome incorporating a specific region of the gene were selected by treating the reconstituted molecules with restriction endonucleases. In this way, it was shown that a nucleosome on or close to the internal control region of the 5S RNA gene inhibits transcription. Furthermore, experiments with 5S maxigenes showed that RNA polymerase III, in contrast to SP6 RNA polymerase, will not transcribe through a nucleosome in vitro. Images PMID:2792088

  6. RNA-dependent DNA-polymerase activity in human milk.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, E S; Ryan, S M; Mann, E

    1975-08-01

    A simple method is described for testing milk specimens from nursing mothers for the presence of RNA-dependent DNA-polymerase activity. Positive results were obtained in five of 137 women (3.6%) without a family history of breast cancer, and in six of 31 women (19.3%) with a family history of breast cancer.

  7. Transcription rate of RNA polymerase under rotary torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiryu, H.

    2004-04-01

    We investigated the transcription rates of RNA polymerases that were subjected to rotational drag. By combining chemical kinetics with mechanical equations, we derived formulas for the transcription rate in the case where the torque was caused by the hydrodynamic drag to DNA rotation.

  8. The Continuing SAGA of TFIID and RNA Polymerase II Transcription.

    PubMed

    Taatjes, Dylan J

    2017-10-05

    Using improved techniques, Baptista et al. (2017) and Warfield et al. (2017) revisit fundamental questions about SAGA and TFIID function in yeast. They conclude that each complex independently contributes to the expression of all genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Ribosome Holds the RNA Polymerase on Track in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Klaholz, Bruno P

    2017-09-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology comprises two fundamental mechanistic steps of gene expression (transcription and translation), which, in bacteria, are coupled. A recent study provides structural insights into a supercomplex between the RNA polymerase and the ribosome, thus highlighting the synergy between two key macromolecular machineries in the cell. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Viral RNA-directed RNA polymerases use diverse mechanisms to promote recombination between RNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Chetverin, Alexander B; Kopein, Damir S; Chetverina, Helena V; Demidenko, Alexander A; Ugarov, Victor I

    2005-03-11

    An earlier developed purified cell-free system was used to explore the potential of two RNA-directed RNA polymerases (RdRps), Qbeta phage replicase and the poliovirus 3Dpol protein, to promote RNA recombination through a primer extension mechanism. The substrates of recombination were fragments of complementary strands of a Qbeta phage-derived RNA, such that if aligned at complementary 3'-termini and extended using one another as a template, they would produce replicable molecules detectable as RNA colonies grown in a Qbeta replicase-containing agarose. The results show that while 3Dpol efficiently extends the aligned fragments to produce the expected homologous recombinant sequences, only nonhomologous recombinants are generated by Qbeta replicase at a much lower yield and through a mechanism not involving the extension of RNA primers. It follows that the mechanisms of RNA recombination by poliovirus and Qbeta RdRps are quite different. The data favor an RNA transesterification reaction catalyzed by a conformation acquired by Qbeta replicase during RNA synthesis and provide a likely explanation for the very low frequency of homologous recombination in Qbeta phage.

  11. Searching for nuclear export elements in hepatitis D virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Natália; Cunha, Celso

    2013-08-12

    To search for the presence of cis elements in hepatitis D virus (HDV) genomic and antigenomic RNA capable of promoting nuclear export. We made use of a well characterized chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase reporter system based on plasmid pDM138. Twenty cDNA fragments corresponding to different HDV genomic and antigenomic RNA sequences were inserted in plasmid pDM138, and used in transfection experiments in Huh7 cells. The relative amounts of HDV RNA in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions were then determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Northern blotting. The secondary structure of the RNA sequences that displayed nuclear export ability was further predicted using a web interface. Finally, the sensitivity to leptomycin B was assessed in order to investigate possible cellular pathways involved in HDV RNA nuclear export. Analysis of genomic RNA sequences did not allow identifying an unequivocal nuclear export element. However, two regions were found to promote the export of reporter mRNAs with efficiency higher than the negative controls albeit lower than the positive control. These regions correspond to nucleotides 266-489 and 584-920, respectively. In addition, when analyzing antigenomic RNA sequences a nuclear export element was found in positions 214-417. Export mediated by the nuclear export element of HDV antigenomic RNA is sensitive to leptomycin B suggesting a possible role of CRM1 in this transport pathway. A cis-acting nuclear export element is present in nucleotides 214-417 of HDV antigenomic RNA.

  12. Transcription termination by the eukaryotic RNA polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G.; Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III transcribes a multitude of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes as well as other small RNA genes distributed through the genome. By being sequence-specific, precise and efficient, transcription termination by pol III not only defines the 3′ end of the nascent RNA which directs subsequent association with the stabilizing La protein, it also prevents transcription into downstream DNA and promotes efficient recycling. Each of the RNA polymerases appears to have evolved unique mechanisms to initiate the process of termination in response to different types of termination signals. However, in eukaryotes much less is known about the final stage of termination, destabilization of the elongation complex with release of the RNA and DNA from the polymerase active center. By comparison to pols I & II, pol III exhibits the most direct coupling of the initial and final stages of termination, both of which occur at a short oligo(dT) tract on the non-template strand (dA on the template) of the DNA. While pol III termination is autonomous involving the core subunits C2 and probably C1, it also involves subunits C11, C37 and C53, which act on the pol III catalytic center and exhibit homology to the pol II elongation factor TFIIS, and TFIIFα/β respectively. Here we compile knowledge of pol III termination and associate mutations that affect this process with structural elements of the polymerase that illustrate the importance of C53/37 both at its docking site on the pol III lobe and in the active center. The models suggest that some of these features may apply to the other eukaryotic pols. PMID:23099421

  13. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Hijacks RNA Polymerase II To Create a Viral Transcriptional Factory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Christopher Phillip; Lyu, Yuanzhi; Chuang, Frank; Nakano, Kazushi; Izumiya, Chie; Jin, Di; Campbell, Mel; Izumiya, Yoshihiro

    2017-06-01

    Locally concentrated nuclear factors ensure efficient binding to DNA templates, facilitating RNA polymerase II recruitment and frequent reutilization of stable preinitiation complexes. We have uncovered a mechanism for effective viral transcription by focal assembly of RNA polymerase II around Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genomes in the host cell nucleus. Using immunofluorescence labeling of latent nuclear antigen (LANA) protein, together with fluorescence in situ RNA hybridization (RNA-FISH) of the intron region of immediate early transcripts, we visualized active transcription of viral genomes in naturally infected cells. At the single-cell level, we found that not all episomes were uniformly transcribed following reactivation stimuli. However, those episomes that were being transcribed would spontaneously aggregate to form transcriptional "factories," which recruited a significant fraction of cellular RNA polymerase II. Focal assembly of "viral transcriptional factories" decreased the pool of cellular RNA polymerase II available for cellular gene transcription, which consequently impaired cellular gene expression globally, with the exception of selected ones. The viral transcriptional factories localized with replicating viral genomic DNAs. The observed colocalization of viral transcriptional factories with replicating viral genomic DNA suggests that KSHV assembles an "all-in-one" factory for both gene transcription and DNA replication. We propose that the assembly of RNA polymerase II around viral episomes in the nucleus may be a previously unexplored aspect of KSHV gene regulation by confiscation of a limited supply of RNA polymerase II in infected cells.IMPORTANCE B cells infected with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) harbor multiple copies of the KSHV genome in the form of episomes. Three-dimensional imaging of viral gene expression in the nucleus allows us to study interactions and changes in the physical distribution of

  14. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Hijacks RNA Polymerase II To Create a Viral Transcriptional Factory

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Christopher Phillip; Lyu, Yuanzhi; Chuang, Frank; Nakano, Kazushi; Izumiya, Chie; Jin, Di; Campbell, Mel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Locally concentrated nuclear factors ensure efficient binding to DNA templates, facilitating RNA polymerase II recruitment and frequent reutilization of stable preinitiation complexes. We have uncovered a mechanism for effective viral transcription by focal assembly of RNA polymerase II around Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genomes in the host cell nucleus. Using immunofluorescence labeling of latent nuclear antigen (LANA) protein, together with fluorescence in situ RNA hybridization (RNA-FISH) of the intron region of immediate early transcripts, we visualized active transcription of viral genomes in naturally infected cells. At the single-cell level, we found that not all episomes were uniformly transcribed following reactivation stimuli. However, those episomes that were being transcribed would spontaneously aggregate to form transcriptional “factories,” which recruited a significant fraction of cellular RNA polymerase II. Focal assembly of “viral transcriptional factories” decreased the pool of cellular RNA polymerase II available for cellular gene transcription, which consequently impaired cellular gene expression globally, with the exception of selected ones. The viral transcriptional factories localized with replicating viral genomic DNAs. The observed colocalization of viral transcriptional factories with replicating viral genomic DNA suggests that KSHV assembles an “all-in-one” factory for both gene transcription and DNA replication. We propose that the assembly of RNA polymerase II around viral episomes in the nucleus may be a previously unexplored aspect of KSHV gene regulation by confiscation of a limited supply of RNA polymerase II in infected cells. IMPORTANCE B cells infected with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) harbor multiple copies of the KSHV genome in the form of episomes. Three-dimensional imaging of viral gene expression in the nucleus allows us to study interactions and changes in the

  15. RNA cleavage and chain elongation by Escherichia coli DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in a binary enzyme.RNA complex.

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, C R; Solow-Cordero, D E; Chamberlin, M J

    1994-01-01

    In the absence of DNA, Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.6) can bind RNA to form an equimolar binary complex with the concomitant release of the sigma factor. We show now that E. coli RNA polymerase binds at a region near the 3' terminus of the RNA and that an RNA in such RNA.RNA polymerase complexes undergoes reactions previously thought to be unique to nascent RNA in ternary complexes with DNA. These include GreA/GreB-dependent cleavage of the RNA and elongation by 3'-terminal addition of NMP from NTP. Both of these reactions are inhibited by rifampicin. Hence, by several criteria, the RNA in binary complexes is bound to the polymerase in a manner quite similar to that in ternary complexes. These findings can be explained by a model for the RNA polymerase ternary complex in which the RNA is bound at the 3' terminus through two protein binding sites located up to 10 nt apart. In this model, the stability of RNA binding to the polymerase in the ternary complex is due primarily to its interaction with the protein. Images PMID:7513426

  16. Eucaryotic RNA polymerase conditional mutant that rapidly ceases mRNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Nonet, M; Scafe, C; Sexton, J; Young, R

    1987-01-01

    We have isolated a yeast conditional mutant which rapidly ceases synthesis of mRNA when subjected to the nonpermissive temperature. This mutant (rpb1-1) was constructed by replacing the wild-type chromosomal copy of the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II with one mutagenized in vitro. The rapid cessation of mRNA synthesis in vivo and the lack of RNA polymerase II activity in crude extracts indicate that the mutant possesses a functionally defective, rather than an assembly-defective, RNA polymerase II. The shutdown in mRNA synthesis in the rpb1-1 mutant has pleiotropic effects on the synthesis of other RNAs and on the heat shock response. This mutant provides direct evidence that the RPB1 protein has a functional role in mRNA synthesis. Images PMID:3299050

  17. Influenza virion RNA-dependent RNA polymerase: stimulation by guanosine and related compounds.

    PubMed Central

    McGeoch, D; Kitron, N

    1975-01-01

    The activity of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of several influenza viruses is stimulated by guanosine. Depending upon the virus strain used, the stimulation of initial reaction rate is up to 10-fold. 5'-GMP, 3',5'-cyclic GMP, and 5'-GDP show lesser stimulation effects. No other nucleosides of 5'-NMPs stimulate, but the dinucleoside monophosphates GpG and GpC show large stimulations. We present evidence that the stimulation represents preferential initiation of genome complementary RNA chains with guanosine: (i) [3-H] guanosine is incorporated specifically at the 5'terminus of RNA in polymerase reaction mixes in vitro. (ii) This incorporation reaction has several properties similar to those of the virion polymerase elongation reaction. (iii) RNA made in the stimulated reaction behaves as complementary RNA in annealing kinetic studies, as does RNA labeled with [3-H]guanosine. PMID:163915

  18. Regulating RNA polymerase pausing and transcription elongation in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Irene M; Waterfall, Joshua J; Core, Leighton J; Munroe, Robert J; Schimenti, John; Lis, John T

    2011-04-01

    Transitions between pluripotent stem cells and differentiated cells are executed by key transcription regulators. Comparative measurements of RNA polymerase distribution over the genome's primary transcription units in different cell states can identify the genes and steps in the transcription cycle that are regulated during such transitions. To identify the complete transcriptional profiles of RNA polymerases with high sensitivity and resolution, as well as the critical regulated steps upon which regulatory factors act, we used genome-wide nuclear run-on (GRO-seq) to map the density and orientation of transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerases in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In both cell types, progression of a promoter-proximal, paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) into productive elongation is a rate-limiting step in transcription of ∼40% of mRNA-encoding genes. Importantly, quantitative comparisons between cell types reveal that transcription is controlled frequently at paused Pol II's entry into elongation. Furthermore, "bivalent" ESC genes (exhibiting both active and repressive histone modifications) bound by Polycomb group complexes PRC1 (Polycomb-repressive complex 1) and PRC2 show dramatically reduced levels of paused Pol II at promoters relative to an average gene. In contrast, bivalent promoters bound by only PRC2 allow Pol II pausing, but it is confined to extremely 5' proximal regions. Altogether, these findings identify rate-limiting targets for transcription regulation during cell differentiation.

  19. Single molecule studies of RNA polymerase II transcription in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Abigail E; Goodrich, James A; Kugel, Jennifer F

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNA transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) is the first step in gene expression and a key determinant of cellular regulation. Elucidating the mechanism by which RNAP II synthesizes RNA is therefore vital to determining how genes are controlled under diverse biological conditions. Significant advances in understanding RNAP II transcription have been achieved using classical biochemical and structural techniques; however, aspects of the transcription mechanism cannot be assessed using these approaches. The application of single-molecule techniques to study RNAP II transcription has provided new insight only obtainable by studying molecules in this complex system one at a time. PMID:25764112

  20. Single molecule studies of RNA polymerase II transcription in vitro.

    PubMed

    Horn, Abigail E; Goodrich, James A; Kugel, Jennifer F

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNA transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) is the first step in gene expression and a key determinant of cellular regulation. Elucidating the mechanism by which RNAP II synthesizes RNA is therefore vital to determining how genes are controlled under diverse biological conditions. Significant advances in understanding RNAP II transcription have been achieved using classical biochemical and structural techniques; however, aspects of the transcription mechanism cannot be assessed using these approaches. The application of single-molecule techniques to study RNAP II transcription has provided new insight only obtainable by studying molecules in this complex system one at a time.

  1. A movie of the RNA polymerase nucleotide addition cycle.

    PubMed

    Brueckner, Florian; Ortiz, Julio; Cramer, Patrick

    2009-06-01

    During gene transcription, RNA polymerase (Pol) passes through repetitive cycles of adding a nucleotide to the growing mRNA chain. Here we obtained a movie of the nucleotide addition cycle by combining structural information on different functional states of the Pol II elongation complex (EC). The movie illustrates the two-step loading of the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate, closure of the active site for catalytic nucleotide incorporation, and the presumed two-step translocation of DNA and RNA, which is accompanied by coordinated conformational changes in the polymerase bridge helix and trigger loop. The movie facilitates teaching and a mechanistic analysis of transcription and can be downloaded from http://www.lmb.uni-muenchen.de/cramer/pr-materials.

  2. Fast transcription rates of RNA polymerase II in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Maiuri, Paolo; Knezevich, Anna; De Marco, Alex; Mazza, Davide; Kula, Anna; McNally, Jim G; Marcello, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Averaged estimates of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) elongation rates in mammalian cells have been shown to range between 1.3 and 4.3 kb min−1. In this work, nascent RNAs from an integrated human immunodeficiency virus type 1-derived vector were detectable at the single living cell level by fluorescent RNA tagging. At steady state, a constant number of RNAs was measured corresponding to a minimal density of polymerases with negligible fluctuations over time. Recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching was complete within seconds, indicating a high rate of RNA biogenesis. The calculated transcription rate above 50 kb min−1 points towards a wide dynamic range of RNAPII velocities in living cells. PMID:22015688

  3. Nuclear RNA sequencing of the mouse erythroid cell transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jennifer A; Clay, Ieuan; Umlauf, David; Chen, Chih-Yu; Moir, Catherine A; Eskiw, Christopher H; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Chakalova, Lyubomira; Nagano, Takashi; Fraser, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In addition to protein coding genes a substantial proportion of mammalian genomes are transcribed. However, most transcriptome studies investigate steady-state mRNA levels, ignoring a considerable fraction of the transcribed genome. In addition, steady-state mRNA levels are influenced by both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, and thus do not provide a clear picture of transcriptional output. Here, using deep sequencing of nuclear RNAs (nucRNA-Seq) in parallel with chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) of active RNA polymerase II, we compared the nuclear transcriptome of mouse anemic spleen erythroid cells with polymerase occupancy on a genome-wide scale. We demonstrate that unspliced transcripts quantified by nucRNA-seq correlate with primary transcript frequencies measured by RNA FISH, but differ from steady-state mRNA levels measured by poly(A)-enriched RNA-seq. Highly expressed protein coding genes showed good correlation between RNAPII occupancy and transcriptional output; however, genome-wide we observed a poor correlation between transcriptional output and RNAPII association. This poor correlation is due to intergenic regions associated with RNAPII which correspond with transcription factor bound regulatory regions and a group of stable, nuclear-retained long non-coding transcripts. In conclusion, sequencing the nuclear transcriptome provides an opportunity to investigate the transcriptional landscape in a given cell type through quantification of unspliced primary transcripts and the identification of nuclear-retained long non-coding RNAs.

  4. Functional Diversification of Maize RNA Polymerase IV and V subtypes via Alternative Catalytic Subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Brower-Toland, Brent; Krieger, Elysia K.; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Irsigler, Andre; LaRue, Huachun; Brzeski, Jan; Mcginnis, Karen A.; Ivashuta, Sergey; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Chandler, Vicki L.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2014-10-01

    Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic ana- lyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two sub- types of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis.

  5. Interactions between the human RNA polymerase II subunits.

    PubMed

    Acker, J; de Graaff, M; Cheynel, I; Khazak, V; Kedinger, C; Vigneron, M

    1997-07-04

    As an initial approach to characterizing the molecular structure of the human RNA polymerase II (hRPB), we systematically investigated the protein-protein contacts that the subunits of this enzyme may establish with each other. To this end, we applied a glutathione S-transferase-pulldown assay to extracts from Sf9 insect cells, which were coinfected with all possible combinations of recombinant baculoviruses expressing hRPB subunits, either as untagged polypeptides or as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins. This is the first comprehensive study of interactions between eukaryotic RNA polymerase subunits; among the 116 combinations of hRPB subunits tested, 56 showed significant to strong interactions, whereas 60 were negative. Within the intricate network of interactions, subunits hRPB3 and hRPB5 play a central role in polymerase organization. These subunits, which are able to homodimerize and to interact, may constitute the nucleation center for polymerase assembly, by providing a large interface to most of the other subunits.

  6. Subunit Compositions of the RNA-Silencing Enzymes Pol IV and Pol V Reveal Their Origins as Specialized Forms of RNA Polymerase II

    SciTech Connect

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, J. R.; Wierzbicki, A. T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hagen, Gretchen; Guilfoyle, Thomas J.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2009-01-30

    In addition to RNA polymerases I, II, and III, the essential RNA polymerases present in all eukaryotes, plants have two additional nuclear RNA polymerases, abbreviated as Pol IV and Pol V, that play nonredundant roles in siRNA-directed DNA methylation and gene silencing. We show that Arabidopsis Pol IV and Pol V are composed of subunits that are paralogous or identical to the 12 subunits of Pol II. Four subunits of Pol IV are distinct from their Pol II paralogs, six subunits of Pol V are distinct from their Pol II paralogs, and four subunits differ between Pol IV and Pol V. Importantly, the subunit differences occur in key positions relative to the template entry and RNA exit paths. Our findings support the hypothesis that Pol IV and Pol V are Pol II-like enzymes that evolved specialized roles in the production of noncoding transcripts for RNA silencing and genome defense.

  7. Structural Basis of Transcription Initiation by Bacterial RNA Polymerase Holoenzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Ritwika S.; Warner, Brittany A.; Molodtsov, Vadim; Pupov, Danil; Esyunina, Daria; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme containing σ factor initiates transcription at specific promoter sites by de novo RNA priming, the first step of RNA synthesis where RNAP accepts two initiating ribonucleoside triphosphates (iNTPs) and performs the first phosphodiester bond formation. We present the structure of de novo transcription initiation complex that reveals unique contacts of the iNTPs bound at the transcription start site with the template DNA and also with RNAP and demonstrate the importance of these contacts for transcription initiation. To get further insight into the mechanism of RNA priming, we determined the structure of initially transcribing complex of RNAP holoenzyme with 6-mer RNA, obtained by in crystallo transcription approach. The structure highlights RNAP-RNA contacts that stabilize the short RNA transcript in the active site and demonstrates that the RNA 5′-end displaces σ region 3.2 from its position near the active site, which likely plays a key role in σ ejection during the initiation-to-elongation transition. Given the structural conservation of the RNAP active site, the mechanism of de novo RNA priming appears to be conserved in all cellular RNAPs. PMID:24973216

  8. Structural basis of transcription initiation by bacterial RNA polymerase holoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Basu, Ritwika S; Warner, Brittany A; Molodtsov, Vadim; Pupov, Danil; Esyunina, Daria; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey; Murakami, Katsuhiko S

    2014-08-29

    The bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme containing σ factor initiates transcription at specific promoter sites by de novo RNA priming, the first step of RNA synthesis where RNAP accepts two initiating ribonucleoside triphosphates (iNTPs) and performs the first phosphodiester bond formation. We present the structure of de novo transcription initiation complex that reveals unique contacts of the iNTPs bound at the transcription start site with the template DNA and also with RNAP and demonstrate the importance of these contacts for transcription initiation. To get further insight into the mechanism of RNA priming, we determined the structure of initially transcribing complex of RNAP holoenzyme with 6-mer RNA, obtained by in crystallo transcription approach. The structure highlights RNAP-RNA contacts that stabilize the short RNA transcript in the active site and demonstrates that the RNA 5'-end displaces σ region 3.2 from its position near the active site, which likely plays a key role in σ ejection during the initiation-to-elongation transition. Given the structural conservation of the RNAP active site, the mechanism of de novo RNA priming appears to be conserved in all cellular RNAPs. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Functional state of rat liver RNA polymerase IA and IB.

    PubMed

    Zoncheddu, A; Accomando, R; Pertica, M; Orunesu, M

    1979-01-01

    Phosphocellulose chromatography has been employed to characterize RNA polymerase I present in two different functional states in rat liver cells. The actively transcribing enzyme solubilized from nuclei appears to belong both to the IA and IB classes, whereas the non-transcribing enzyme present in the cytoplasmic fraction has been found to belong only to the IA class. Indirect and direct evidence indicates, however, that in isolated nuclei only the IB form is to be regarded as the physiological form of the enzyme, the IA form arising as a procedural artefact during the extraction process. It may, therefore, be concluded that rat liver IA and IB RNA polymerase are to be strictly regarded as the non-transcribing and transcribing form of the enzyme, respectively.

  10. A heteromeric transcription factor required for mammalian RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, S; Tanaka, Y; Kawaguchi, T; Nagaoka, T; Weissman, S M; Yasukochi, Y

    1990-01-01

    A general transcription factor, FC, essential for specific initiation of in vitro transcription by mammalian RNA polymerase II was identified and a procedure developed to purify it to near homogeneity from HeLa cell nuclei. Purified FC is composed of two polypeptides of apparent molecular masses 80 kDa and 30 kDa, on SDS-PAGE, and has a native size of 280 kDa estimated by gel filtration column. Both polypeptides were shown to be essential for reconstituting in vitro transcription activity. Biochemical analysis showed that the 80 kDa and 30 kDa components were present in a 1:1 molar ratio. FC was also demonstrated to interact directly or indirectly with purified RNA polymerase II. Similarities between FC and transcription factors reported by others from human, rat or Drosophila cells are discussed. Images PMID:2395645

  11. Structure and function of the bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase (or, the virtues of simplicity).

    PubMed

    McAllister, W T

    1993-01-01

    A consideration of the properties of a number of mutants of T7 RNA polymerase, together with emerging structural information (Sousa et al., 1993) allows an interpretation of the the mechanics of transcription by this relatively simple RNA polymerase. Evidence indicating features in common with other nucleotide polymerases (such as DNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases) is reviewed.

  12. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of the influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Thomas M; te Velthuis, Aartjan JW

    2014-01-01

    The influenza A virus causes a highly contagious respiratory disease that significantly impacts our economy and health. Its replication and transcription is catalyzed by the viral RNA polymerase. This enzyme is also crucial for the virus, because it is involved in the adaptation of zoonotic strains. It is thus of major interest for the development of antiviral therapies and is being intensively studied. In this article, we will discuss recent advances that have improved our knowledge of the structure of the RNA polymerase and how mutations in the polymerase help the virus to spread effectively among new hosts. PMID:25431616

  13. RNA Nuclear Export: From Neurological Disorders to Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2017-01-01

    The presence of a nuclear envelope, also known as nuclear membrane, defines the structural framework of all eukaryotic cells by separating the nucleus, which contains the genetic material, from the cytoplasm where the synthesis of proteins takes place. Translation of proteins in Eukaryotes is thus dependent on the active transport of DNA-encoded RNA molecules through pores embedded within the nuclear membrane. Several mechanisms are involved in this process generally referred to as RNA nuclear export or nucleocytoplasmic transport of RNA. The regulated expression of genes requires the nuclear export of protein-coding messenger RNA molecules (mRNAs) as well as non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) together with proteins and pre-assembled ribosomal subunits. The nuclear export of mRNAs is intrinsically linked to the co-transcriptional processing of nascent transcripts synthesized by the RNA polymerase II. This functional coupling is essential for the survival of cells allowing for timely nuclear export of fully processed transcripts, which could otherwise cause the translation of abnormal proteins such as the polymeric repeat proteins produced in some neurodegenerative diseases. Alterations of the mRNA nuclear export pathways can also lead to genome instability and to various forms of cancer. This chapter will describe the molecular mechanisms driving the nuclear export of RNAs with a particular emphasis on mRNAs. It will also review their known alterations in neurological disorders and cancer, and the recent opportunities they offer for the potential development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  14. Nuclear networking fashions pre-messenger RNA and primary microRNA transcripts for function

    PubMed Central

    Pawlicki, Jan M.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2010-01-01

    The expression of protein-coding genes is enhanced by the exquisite coupling of transcription by RNA polymerase II with pre-messenger RNA processing reactions, such as 5′-end capping, splicing and 3′-end formation. Integration between cotranscriptional processing events extends beyond the nucleus, as proteins that bind cotranscriptionally can affect the localization, translation and degradation of the mature messenger RNA. MicroRNAs are RNA polymerase II transcripts with crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression. Recent data demonstrate that processing of primary microRNA transcripts might be yet another cotranscriptional event that is woven into this elaborate nuclear network. This review discusses the extensive molecular interactions that couple the earliest steps in gene expression and therefore influence the final fate and function of the mature messenger RNA or microRNA produced. PMID:20004579

  15. Transcription by RNA polymerase III: insights into mechanism and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Turowski, Tomasz W.; Tollervey, David

    2016-01-01

    The highly abundant, small stable RNAs that are synthesized by RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) have key functional roles, particularly in the protein synthesis apparatus. Their expression is metabolically demanding, and is therefore coupled to changing demands for protein synthesis during cell growth and division. Here, we review the regulatory mechanisms that control the levels of RNAPIII transcripts and discuss their potential physiological relevance. Recent analyses have revealed differential regulation of tRNA expression at all steps on its biogenesis, with significant deregulation of mature tRNAs in cancer cells. PMID:27911719

  16. Structural basis of transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Sarah; Bernecky, Carrie; Cramer, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Transcription of eukaryotic protein-coding genes commences with the assembly of a conserved initiation complex, which consists of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the general transcription factors, at promoter DNA. After two decades of research, the structural basis of transcription initiation is emerging. Crystal structures of many components of the initiation complex have been resolved, and structural information on Pol II complexes with general transcription factors has recently been obtained. Although mechanistic details await elucidation, available data outline how Pol II cooperates with the general transcription factors to bind to and open promoter DNA, and how Pol II directs RNA synthesis and escapes from the promoter.

  17. Fitness-compensatory mutations in rifampicin-resistant RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Brandis, Gerrit; Wrande, Marie; Liljas, Lars; Hughes, Diarmaid

    2012-07-01

    Mutations in rpoB (RNA polymerase β-subunit) can cause high-level resistance to rifampicin, an important first-line drug against tuberculosis. Most rifampicin-resistant (Rif(R)) mutants selected in vitro have reduced fitness, and resistant clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis frequently carry multiple mutations in RNA polymerase genes. This supports a role for compensatory evolution in global epidemics of drug-resistant tuberculosis but the significance of secondary mutations outside rpoB has not been demonstrated or quantified. Using Salmonella as a model organism, and a previously characterized Rif(R) mutation (rpoB R529C) as a starting point, independent lineages were evolved with selection for improved growth in the presence and absence of rifampicin. Compensatory mutations were identified in every lineage and were distributed between rpoA, rpoB and rpoC. Resistance was maintained in all strains showing that increased fitness by compensatory mutation was more likely than reversion. Genetic reconstructions demonstrated that the secondary mutations were responsible for increasing growth rate. Many of the compensatory mutations in rpoA and rpoC individually caused small but significant reductions in susceptibility to rifampicin, and some compensatory mutations in rpoB individually caused high-level resistance. These findings show that mutations in different components of RNA polymerase are responsible for fitness compensation of a Rif(R) mutant.

  18. Nascent transcription affected by RNA polymerase IV in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Erhard, Karl F; Talbot, Joy-El R B; Deans, Natalie C; McClish, Allison E; Hollick, Jay B

    2015-04-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3'-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance.

  19. Mechanism of histone survival during transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Kulaeva, Olga I; Studitsky, Vasily M

    2010-01-01

    This work is related to and stems from our recent NSMB paper, "Mechanism of chromatin remodeling and recovery during passage of RNA polymerase II" (December 2009). Synopsis. Recent genomic studies from many laboratories have suggested that nucleosomes are not displaced from moderately transcribed genes. Furthermore, histones H3/H4 carrying the primary epigenetic marks are not displaced or exchanged (in contrast to H2A/H2B histones) during moderate transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in vivo. These exciting observations suggest that the large molecule of Pol II passes through chromatin structure without even transient displacement of H3/H4 histones. The most recent analysis of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-type mechanism of chromatin remodeling in vitro (described in our NSMB 2009 paper) suggests that nucleosome survival is tightly coupled with formation of a novel intermediate: a very small intranucleosomal DNA loop (Ø-loop) containing transcribing Pol II. In the submitted manuscript we critically evaluate one of the key predictions of this model: the lack of even transient displacement of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription in vitro. The data suggest that, indeed, histones H3/H4 are not displaced during Pol II transcription in vitro. These studies are directly connected with the observation in vivo on the lack of exchange of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription.

  20. Nascent Transcription Affected by RNA Polymerase IV in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Erhard, Karl F.; Talbot, Joy-El R. B.; Deans, Natalie C.; McClish, Allison E.; Hollick, Jay B.

    2015-01-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3ʹ-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance. PMID:25653306

  1. Favipiravir (T-705), a novel viral RNA polymerase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Yousuke; Gowen, Brian B.; Takahashi, Kazumi; Shiraki, Kimiyasu; Smee, Donald F.; Barnard, Dale L.

    2013-01-01

    Favipiravir (T-705; 6-fluoro-3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxamide) is an antiviral drug that selectively inhibits the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza virus. It is phosphoribosylated by cellular enzymes to its active form, favipiravir-ribofuranosyl-5′-triphosphate (RTP). Its antiviral effect is attenuated by the addition of purine nucleic acids, indicating the viral RNA polymerase mistakenly recognizes favipiravir-RTP as a purine nucleotide. Favipiravir is active against a broad range of influenza viruses, including A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H5N1) and the recently emerged A(H7N9) avian virus. It also inhibits influenza strains resistant to current antiviral drugs, and shows a synergistic effect in combination with oseltamivir, thereby expanding influenza treatment options. A Phase III clinical evaluation of favipiravir for influenza therapy has been completed in Japan and two Phase II studies have been completed in the United States. In addition to its anti-influenza activity, favipiravir blocks the replication of many other RNA viruses, including arenaviruses (Junin, Machupo and Pichinde); phleboviruses (Rift Valley fever, sandfly fever and Punta Toro); hantaviruses (Maporal, Dobrava, and Prospect Hill); flaviviruses (yellow fever and West Nile); enteroviruses (polio- and rhinoviruses); an alphavirus, Western equine encephalitis virus; a paramyxovirus, respiratory syncytial virus; and noroviruses. With its unique mechanism of action and broad range of antiviral activity, favipiravir is a promising drug candidate for influenza and many other RNA viral diseases for which there are no approved therapies. PMID:24084488

  2. Favipiravir (T-705), a novel viral RNA polymerase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Yousuke; Gowen, Brian B; Takahashi, Kazumi; Shiraki, Kimiyasu; Smee, Donald F; Barnard, Dale L

    2013-11-01

    Favipiravir (T-705; 6-fluoro-3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxamide) is an antiviral drug that selectively inhibits the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza virus. It is phosphoribosylated by cellular enzymes to its active form, favipiravir-ribofuranosyl-5'-triphosphate (RTP). Its antiviral effect is attenuated by the addition of purine nucleic acids, indicating the viral RNA polymerase mistakenly recognizes favipiravir-RTP as a purine nucleotide. Favipiravir is active against a broad range of influenza viruses, including A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H5N1) and the recently emerged A(H7N9) avian virus. It also inhibits influenza strains resistant to current antiviral drugs, and shows a synergistic effect in combination with oseltamivir, thereby expanding influenza treatment options. A Phase III clinical evaluation of favipiravir for influenza therapy has been completed in Japan and two Phase II studies have been completed in the United States. In addition to its anti-influenza activity, favipiravir blocks the replication of many other RNA viruses, including arenaviruses (Junin, Machupo and Pichinde); phleboviruses (Rift Valley fever, sandfly fever and Punta Toro); hantaviruses (Maporal, Dobrava, and Prospect Hill); flaviviruses (yellow fever and West Nile); enteroviruses (polio- and rhinoviruses); an alphavirus, Western equine encephalitis virus; a paramyxovirus, respiratory syncytial virus; and noroviruses. With its unique mechanism of action and broad range of antiviral activity, favipiravir is a promising drug candidate for influenza and many other RNA viral diseases for which there are no approved therapies.

  3. B2 RNA and 7SK RNA, RNA polymerase III transcripts, have a cap-like structure at their 5' end.

    PubMed Central

    Shumyatsky, G P; Tillib, S V; Kramerov, D A

    1990-01-01

    We found that hydrolysates of poly(A)+ RNA from Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells which were transcribed by RNA polymerase III contained an unusual component designated as X. It was part of B2 RNA representing a transcript of B2 retroposon, typical of rodents. The component X possesses a cap-like structure, xppp5'G, where x has a non-nucleotide structure. About half of all B2 RNAs contained this group at the 5' end. Previously, Epstein et al. (1) detected a similar structure at the 5' end of small nuclear U6 RNA. Later, Singh and Reddy (2) showed methyl to be the blocking group in the component x of U6 RNA. Besides B2 RNA, we found 5' ends containing methyl groups in 7SK RNA. Images PMID:1700854

  4. Multifunctionality of a Picornavirus Polymerase Domain: Nuclear Localization Signal and Nucleotide Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; de la Higuera, Ignacio; Caridi, Flavia; Sánchez-Aparicio, María Teresa; Moreno, Elena; Perales, Celia; Singh, Kamalendra; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Sobrino, Francisco; Domingo, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The N-terminal region of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 3D polymerase contains the sequence MRKTKLAPT (residues 16 to 24) that acts as a nuclear localization signal. A previous study showed that substitutions K18E and K20E diminished the transport to the nucleus of 3D and 3CD and severely impaired virus infectivity. These residues have also been implicated in template binding, as seen in the crystal structures of different 3D-RNA elongation complexes. Here, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of different mutant polymerases harboring substitutions at residues 18 and 20, in particular, K18E, K18A, K20E, K20A, and the double mutant K18A K20A (KAKA). All mutant enzymes exhibit low RNA binding activity, low processivity, and alterations in nucleotide recognition, including increased incorporation of ribavirin monophosphate (RMP) relative to the incorporation of cognate nucleotides compared with the wild-type enzyme. The structural analysis shows an unprecedented flexibility of the 3D mutant polymerases, including both global rearrangements of the closed-hand architecture and local conformational changes at loop β9-α11 (within the polymerase motif B) and at the template-binding channel. Specifically, in 3D bound to RNA, both K18E and K20E induced the opening of new pockets in the template channel where the downstream templating nucleotide at position +2 binds. The comparisons of free and RNA-bound enzymes suggest that the structural rearrangements may occur in a concerted mode to regulate RNA replication, processivity, and fidelity. Thus, the N-terminal region of FMDV 3D that acts as a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and in template binding is also involved in nucleotide recognition and can affect the incorporation of nucleotide analogues. IMPORTANCE The study documents multifunctionality of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) located at the N-terminal region of the foot-and-mouth disease viral polymerase (3D). Amino acid

  5. Quantifying the influence of 5'-RNA modifications on RNA polymerase I activity.

    PubMed

    Appling, Francis D; Lucius, Aaron L; Schneider, David A

    2017-09-01

    For ensemble and single-molecule analyses of transcription, the use of synthetic transcription elongation complexes has been a versatile and powerful tool. However, structural analyses demonstrate that short RNA substrates, often employed in these assays, would occupy space within the RNA polymerase. Most commercial RNA oligonucleotides do not carry a 5'-triphosphate as would be present on a natural, de novo synthesized RNA. To examine the effects of 5'-moities on transcription kinetics, we measured nucleotide addition and 3'-dinucleotide cleavage by eukaryotic RNA polymerase I using 5'-hydroxyl and 5'-triphosphate RNA substrates. We found that 5' modifications had no discernable effect on the kinetics of nucleotide addition; however, we observed clear, but modest, effects on the rate of backtracking and/or dinucleotide cleavage. These data suggest that the 5'-end may influence RNA polymerase translocation, consistent with previous prokaryotic studies, and these findings may have implications on kinetic barriers that confront RNA polymerases during the transition from initiation to elongation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Comparative overview of RNA polymerase II and III transcription cycles, with focus on RNA polymerase III termination and reinitiation.

    PubMed

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G; Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase (RNAP) III transcribes hundreds of genes for tRNAs and 5S rRNA, among others, which share similar promoters and stable transcription initiation complexes (TIC), which support rapid RNAP III recycling. In contrast, RNAP II transcribes a large number of genes with highly variable promoters and interacting factors, which exert fine regulatory control over TIC lability and modifications of RNAP II at different transitional points in the transcription cycle. We review data that illustrate a relatively smooth continuity of RNAP III initiation-elongation-termination and reinitiation toward its function to produce high levels of tRNAs and other RNAs that support growth and development.

  7. Structural basis for transcription elongation by bacterial RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Vassylyev, Dmitry G; Vassylyeva, Marina N; Perederina, Anna; Tahirov, Tahir H; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2007-07-12

    The RNA polymerase elongation complex (EC) is both highly stable and processive, rapidly extending RNA chains for thousands of nucleotides. Understanding the mechanisms of elongation and its regulation requires detailed information about the structural organization of the EC. Here we report the 2.5-A resolution structure of the Thermus thermophilus EC; the structure reveals the post-translocated intermediate with the DNA template in the active site available for pairing with the substrate. DNA strand separation occurs one position downstream of the active site, implying that only one substrate at a time can specifically bind to the EC. The upstream edge of the RNA/DNA hybrid stacks on the beta'-subunit 'lid' loop, whereas the first displaced RNA base is trapped within a protein pocket, suggesting a mechanism for RNA displacement. The RNA is threaded through the RNA exit channel, where it adopts a conformation mimicking that of a single strand within a double helix, providing insight into a mechanism for hairpin-dependent pausing and termination.

  8. Regulation of mammalian ribosomal gene transcription by RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Grummt, I

    1999-01-01

    All cells, from prokaryotes to vertebrates, synthesize vast amounts of ribosomal RNA to produce the several million new ribosomes per generation that are required to maintain the protein synthetic capacity of the daughter cells. Ribosomal gene (rDNA) transcription is governed by RNA polymerase I (Pol I) assisted by a dedicated set of transcription factors that mediate the specificity of transcription and are the targets of the pleiotrophic pathways the cell uses to adapt rRNA synthesis to cell growth. In the past few years we have begun to understand the specific functions of individual factors involved in rDNA transcription and to elucidate on a molecular level how transcriptional regulation is achieved. This article reviews our present knowledge of the molecular mechanism of rDNA transcriptional regulation.

  9. Enhancement of RNA Polymerase Activity by a Factor Released by Auxin from Plasma Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, James W.; Cherry, Joe H.; Morré, D. James; Lembi, Carole A.

    1972-01-01

    Using recently developed techniques for solubilization of RNA polymerase from soybean chromatin and isolation of plasma membrane fractions from plants we can show the presence of a transcriptional factor specifically released from the membranes by auxin, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. The nonauxin, 3,5-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, does not release the factor, but subsequent exposure of the membranes to auxin results in its release. Factor activity could not be demonstrated in fractions devoid of plasma membranes. The presence of a regulatory factor for RNA polymerase associated with plant plasma membrane and specifically released by auxin provides a mechanism whereby both rapid growth responses and delayed nuclear changes could be derived from a common auxin receptor site associated with plasma membrane. Images PMID:4508307

  10. SINE transcription by RNA polymerase III is suppressed by histone methylation but not by DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Dhaval; Vavrova-Anderson, Jana; Oler, Andrew J; Cowling, Victoria H; Cairns, Bradley R; White, Robert J

    2015-03-23

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs), such as Alu, spread by retrotransposition, which requires their transcripts to be copied into DNA and then inserted into new chromosomal sites. This can lead to genetic damage through insertional mutagenesis and chromosomal rearrangements between non-allelic SINEs at distinct loci. SINE DNA is heavily methylated and this was thought to suppress its accessibility and transcription, thereby protecting against retrotransposition. Here we provide several lines of evidence that methylated SINE DNA is occupied by RNA polymerase III, including the use of high-throughput bisulphite sequencing of ChIP DNA. We find that loss of DNA methylation has little effect on accessibility of SINEs to transcription machinery or their expression in vivo. In contrast, a histone methyltransferase inhibitor selectively promotes SINE expression and occupancy by RNA polymerase III. The data suggest that methylation of histones rather than DNA plays a dominant role in suppressing SINE transcription.

  11. SINE transcription by RNA polymerase III is suppressed by histone methylation but not by DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Dhaval; Vavrova-Anderson, Jana; Oler, Andrew J.; Cowling, Victoria H.; Cairns, Bradley R.; White, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs), such as Alu, spread by retrotransposition, which requires their transcripts to be copied into DNA and then inserted into new chromosomal sites. This can lead to genetic damage through insertional mutagenesis and chromosomal rearrangements between non-allelic SINEs at distinct loci. SINE DNA is heavily methylated and this was thought to suppress its accessibility and transcription, thereby protecting against retrotransposition. Here we provide several lines of evidence that methylated SINE DNA is occupied by RNA polymerase III, including the use of high-throughput bisulphite sequencing of ChIP DNA. We find that loss of DNA methylation has little effect on accessibility of SINEs to transcription machinery or their expression in vivo. In contrast, a histone methyltransferase inhibitor selectively promotes SINE expression and occupancy by RNA polymerase III. The data suggest that methylation of histones rather than DNA plays a dominant role in suppressing SINE transcription. PMID:25798578

  12. Dynamics of bridge helix bending in RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhan-Feng; Fu, Yi-Ben; Wang, Peng-Ye; Xie, Ping

    2017-04-01

    One of critical issues for RNA polymerase is how the enzyme translocates along the DNA substrate during transcription elongation cycle. Comparisons of the structure of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) with that of bacterial enzyme have suggested that the transition of the bridge helix (BH) from straight to flipped-out conformations facilitates the translocation of upstream DNA-RNA hybrid. However, the flipped-out conformation of BH in Pol II has not been observed up to now and the detailed mechanism of how the BH facilitating upstream hybrid translocation still remains obscure. Here we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study the transition dynamics of BH in Pol II. Two different flipped-out conformations (termed as F1 and F2) are derived from our simulation trajectories, both of which could contribute to upstream hybrid translocation. In particular, the structure of BH in F2 conformation shows nearly identical to that observed in free bacterial enzyme, showing the existence of the flipped-out conformation in Pol II. Analysis of hydrogen bonds and salt bridge formed intra BH in different conformations indicates that the flipped-out conformations are more unstable than the straight conformation. Moreover, a detailed understanding of how the transition of BH conformations facilitating upstream hybrid translocation is given. Proteins 2017; 85:614-629. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Giardia lamblia RNA polymerase II: amanitin-resistant transcription.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, Vishwas; McArthur, Andrew G; Sogin, Mitchell L; Adam, Rodney D

    2003-07-25

    Giardia lamblia is an early branching eukaryote, and although distinctly eukaryotic in its cell and molecular biology, transcription and translation in G. lamblia demonstrate important differences from these processes in higher eukaryotes. The cyclic octapeptide amanitin is a relatively selective inhibitor of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and is commonly used to study RNAP II transcription. Therefore, we measured the sensitivity of G. lamblia RNAP II transcription to alpha-amanitin and found that unlike most other eukaryotes, RNAP II transcription in Giardia is resistant to 1 mg/ml amanitin. In contrast, 50 microg/ml amanitin inhibits 85% of RNAP III transcription activity using leucyl-tRNA as a template. To better understand transcription in G. lamblia, we identified 10 of the 12 known eukaryotic rpb subunits, including all 10 subunits that are required for viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The amanitin motif (amanitin binding site) of Rpb1 from G. lamblia has amino acid substitutions at six highly conserved sites that have been associated with amanitin resistance in other organisms. These observations of amanitin resistance of Giardia RNA polymerase II support previous proposals of the mechanism of amanitin resistance in other organisms and provide a molecular framework for the development of novel drugs with selective activity against G. lamblia.

  14. SAGA Is a General Cofactor for RNA Polymerase II Transcription.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Tiago; Grünberg, Sebastian; Minoungou, Nadège; Koster, Maria J E; Timmers, H T Marc; Hahn, Steve; Devys, Didier; Tora, László

    2017-10-05

    Prior studies suggested that SAGA and TFIID are alternative factors that promote RNA polymerase II transcription, with about 10% of genes in S. cerevisiae dependent on SAGA. We reassessed the role of SAGA by mapping its genome-wide location and role in global transcription in budding yeast. We find that SAGA maps to the UAS elements of most genes, overlapping with Mediator binding and irrespective of previous designations of SAGA- or TFIID-dominated genes. Disruption of SAGA through mutation or rapid subunit depletion reduces transcription from nearly all genes, measured by newly synthesized RNA. We also find that the acetyltransferase Gcn5 synergizes with Spt3 to promote global transcription and that Spt3 functions to stimulate TBP recruitment at all tested genes. Our data demonstrate that SAGA acts as a general cofactor required for essentially all RNA polymerase II transcription and is not consistent with the previous classification of SAGA- and TFIID-dominated genes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evolution of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Stiller, John W.; Hall, Benjamin D.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years a great deal of biochemical and genetic research has focused on the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit (RPB1) of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II. This strongly conserved domain of tandemly repeated heptapeptides has been linked functionally to important steps in the initiation and processing of mRNA transcripts in both animals and fungi. Although they are absolutely required for viability in these organisms, C-terminal tandem repeats do not occur in RPB1 sequences from diverse eukaryotic taxa. Here we present phylogenetic analyses of RPB1 sequences showing that canonical CTD heptads are strongly conserved in only a subset of eukaryotic groups, all apparently descended from a single common ancestor. Moreover, eukaryotic groups in which the most complex patterns of ontogenetic development occur are descended from this CTD-containing ancestor. Consistent with the results of genetic and biochemical investigations of CTD function, these analyses suggest that the enhanced control over RNA polymerase II transcription conveyed by acquired CTD/protein interactions was an important step in the evolution of intricate patterns of gene expression that are a hallmark of large, developmentally complex eukaryotic organisms. PMID:11972039

  16. RNA polymerase and the ribosome: the close relationship.

    PubMed

    McGary, Katelyn; Nudler, Evgeny

    2013-04-01

    In bacteria transcription and translation are linked in time and space. When coupled to RNA polymerase (RNAP), the translating ribosome ensures transcriptional processivity by preventing RNAP backtracking. Recent advances in the field have characterized important linker proteins that bridge the gap between transcription and translation: In particular, the NusE(S10):NusG complex and the NusG homolog, RfaH. The direct link between the moving ribosome and RNAP provides a basis for maintaining genomic integrity while enabling efficient transcription and timely translation of various genes within the bacterial cell. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Procedure for purifying RNA polymerase II from human placenta].

    PubMed

    Kandyba, L V; Matsanova, V R; Shamovskiĭ, I V; Raĭt, V K

    1994-12-01

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerase IIB having a specific activity of 320 u./mg has been isolated from the term placenta homogenate using extraction performed at 4-6 degrees C in the presence of 75 mM ammonium sulfate and 1.5% nonidet P40, fractionation on DEAE-cellulose DE 23, desalting and heparin-agarose chromatography, resulting in 330-fold purification and a 18% yield. Technical details have been determined which are of crucial importance for reproducibility of affinity chromatography. The possibility of proteolysis of the IIc subunit during enzyme purification has been demonstrated.

  18. Hinge action versus grip in translocation by RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Nedialkov, Yuri A; Opron, Kristopher; Caudill, Hailey L; Assaf, Fadi; Anderson, Amanda J; Cukier, Robert I; Wei, Guowei; Burton, Zachary F

    2017-08-30

    Based on molecular dynamics simulations and functional studies, a conformational mechanism is posited for forward translocation by RNA polymerase (RNAP). In a simulation of a ternary elongation complex, the clamp and downstream cleft were observed to close. Hinges within the bridge helix and trigger loop supported generation of translocation force against the RNA-DNA hybrid resulting in opening of the furthest upstream i-8 RNA-DNA bp, establishing conditions for RNAP sliding. The β flap tip helix and the most N-terminal β' Zn finger engage the RNA, indicating a path of RNA threading out of the exit channel. Because the β flap tip connects to the RNAP active site through the β subunit double-Ψ-β-barrel and the associated sandwich barrel hybrid motif (also called the flap domain), the RNAP active site is coupled to the RNA exit channel and to the translocation of RNA-DNA. Using an exonuclease III assay to monitor translocation of RNAP elongation complexes, we show that K(+) and Mg(2+) and also an RNA 3'-OH or a 3'-H2 affect RNAP sliding. Because RNAP grip to template suggests a sticky translocation mechanism, and because grip is enhanced by increasing K(+) and Mg(2+)concentration, biochemical assays are consistent with a conformational change that drives forward translocation as observed in simulations. Mutational analysis of the bridge helix indicates that 778-GARKGL-783 (Escherichia coli numbering) is a homeostatic hinge that undergoes multiple bends to compensate for complex conformational dynamics during phosphodiester bond formation and translocation.

  19. Polycistronic RNA polymerase II expression vectors for RNA interference based on BIC/miR-155

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kwan-Ho; Hart, Christopher C.; Al-Bassam, Sarmad; Avery, Adam; Taylor, Jennifer; Patel, Paresh D.; Vojtek, Anne B.; Turner, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Vector-based RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a valuable tool for analysis of gene function. We have developed new RNA polymerase II expression vectors for RNAi, designated SIBR vectors, based upon the non-coding RNA BIC. BIC contains the miR-155 microRNA (miRNA) precursor, and we find that expression of a short region of the third exon of mouse BIC is sufficient to produce miR-155 in mammalian cells. The SIBR vectors use a modified miR-155 precursor stem–loop and flanking BIC sequences to express synthetic miRNAs complementary to target RNAs. Like RNA polymerase III driven short hairpin RNA vectors, the SIBR vectors efficiently reduce target mRNA and protein expression. The synthetic miRNAs can be expressed from an intron, allowing coexpression of a marker or other protein with the miRNAs. In addition, intronic expression of a synthetic miRNA from a two intron vector enhances RNAi. A SIBR vector can express two different miRNAs from a single transcript for effective inhibition of two different target mRNAs. Furthermore, at least eight tandem copies of a synthetic miRNA can be expressed in a polycistronic transcript to increase the inhibition of a target RNA. The SIBR vectors are flexible tools for a variety of RNAi applications. PMID:16614444

  20. Structural insights into transcription initiation by yeast RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Sadian, Yashar; Tafur, Lucas; Kosinski, Jan; Jakobi, Arjen J; Wetzel, Rene; Buczak, Katarzyna; Hagen, Wim Jh; Beck, Martin; Sachse, Carsten; Müller, Christoph W

    2017-09-15

    In eukaryotic cells, RNA polymerase I (Pol I) synthesizes precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) that is subsequently processed into mature rRNA. To initiate transcription, Pol I requires the assembly of a multi-subunit pre-initiation complex (PIC) at the ribosomal RNA promoter. In yeast, the minimal PIC includes Pol I, the transcription factor Rrn3, and Core Factor (CF) composed of subunits Rrn6, Rrn7, and Rrn11. Here, we present the cryo-EM structure of the 18-subunit yeast Pol I PIC bound to a transcription scaffold. The cryo-EM map reveals an unexpected arrangement of the DNA and CF subunits relative to Pol I. The upstream DNA is positioned differently than in any previous structures of the Pol II PIC. Furthermore, the TFIIB-related subunit Rrn7 also occupies a different location compared to the Pol II PIC although it uses similar interfaces as TFIIB to contact DNA. Our results show that although general features of eukaryotic transcription initiation are conserved, Pol I and Pol II use them differently in their respective transcription initiation complexes. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  1. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Davanloo, Parichehre; Rosenberg, Alan H.; Moffatt, Barbara A.; Dunn, John J.

    1999-02-09

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the R7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties. T7 RNA polymerase is also used in a system for selective, high-level synthesis of RNAs and proteins in suitable host cells.

  2. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Davanloo, Parichehre; Rosenberg, Alan H.; Moffatt, Barbara A.; Dunn, John J.

    1990-01-01

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the T7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties. T7 RNA polymerase is also used in a system for selective, high-level synthesis of RNAs and proteins in suitable host cells.

  3. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Davanloo, Parichehre; Rosenberg, Alan H.; Moffatt, Barbara A.; Dunn, John J.

    1997-12-02

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the R7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties. T7 RNA polymerase is also used in a system for selective, high-level synthesis of RNAs and proteins in suitable host cells.

  4. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Davanloo, P.; Rosenberg, A.H.; Moffatt, B.A.; Dunn, J.J.

    1997-12-02

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the R7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties. T7 RNA polymerase is also used in a system for selective, high-level synthesis of RNAs and proteins in suitable host cells. 10 figs.

  5. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Davanloo, P.; Rosenberg, A.H.; Moffatt, B.A.; Dunn, J.J.

    1999-02-09

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the R7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties. T7 RNA polymerase is also used in a system for selective, high-level synthesis of RNAs and proteins in suitable host cells. 10 figs.

  6. Regulation of the Nucleolar DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase by Amino Acids in Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Franze-Fernández, M. T.; Pogo, A. O.

    1971-01-01

    Experiments were performed to ascertain the degree to which the amount of amino acids might be one of the regulatory factors that control the activity of the nucleolar RNA polymerase. Assays of the enzymatic activity were done with isolated nuclei from cells incubated with low and high concentrations of amino acids. Soon after the cells were exposed to a medium enriched in amino acids, a rapid increase of nucleolar RNA polymerase activity occurred. A similar result was obtained in cells incubated with lower concentrations of amino acids. However, the rate of ribosomal RNA synthesized was regularly much higher in cells incubated in a medium enriched with amino acids than in a medium low in amino acids. Apparently, the amino acids only controlled ribosomal RNA synthesis. Thus, neither maturation, processing, and transport of nuclear precursors into cytoplasmic ribosomal RNA, nor the synthesis of rapidly labeled RNA was affected. PMID:4108870

  7. RNA polymerase active center: the molecular engine of transcription.

    PubMed

    Nudler, Evgeny

    2009-01-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a complex molecular machine that governs gene expression and its regulation in all cellular organisms. To accomplish its function of accurately producing a full-length RNA copy of a gene, RNAP performs a plethora of chemical reactions and undergoes multiple conformational changes in response to cellular conditions. At the heart of this machine is the active center, the engine, which is composed of distinct fixed and moving parts that serve as the ultimate acceptor of regulatory signals and as the target of inhibitory drugs. Recent advances in the structural and biochemical characterization of RNAP explain the active center at the atomic level and enable new approaches to understanding the entire transcription mechanism, its exceptional fidelity and control.

  8. Prokaryotic histone-like protein interacting with RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Lathe, R; Buc, H; Lecocq, J P; Bautz, E K

    1980-01-01

    firA mutation of Escherichia coli can render RNA synthesis thermosensitive and confer abnormal sensitivity to rifampicin, an antibiotic that specifically inhibits the activity of RNA polymerase. We previously described the cloning of a chromosomal HindIII fragment containing the firA gene, and we now present strong evidence that the product of this gene is a 17,000-dalton polypeptide which, by various criteria, closely resembles the eukaryotic histones. This protein forms the largest of a unique set of three abundant histone-like proteins (HLP) found in E. coli and is hence referred to as HLPI. We discuss possible routes by which these proteins might affect transcription. Images PMID:6447875

  9. RNA polymerase III under control: repression and de-repression.

    PubMed

    Boguta, Magdalena; Graczyk, Damian

    2011-09-01

    The synthesis of tRNA by yeast RNA polymerase III (Pol III) is regulated in response to changing environmental conditions. This control is mediated by Maf1, the global negative regulator of Pol III transcription conserved from yeast to humans. Details regarding the molecular basis of Pol III repression by Maf1 are now emerging from recently reported structural and biochemical data on Pol III and Maf1. Efficient Pol III transcription, following the shift of cells from a non-fermentable carbon source to glucose, requires phosphorylation of Maf1. One of the newly identified Maf1 kinases is the chromatin-bound casein kinase II (CK2). Current studies have allowed us to propose an innovative mechanism of Pol III regulation. We suggest that CK2-mediated phosphorylation of Maf1, occurring directly on tDNA chromatin, controls Pol III recycling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. RNA polymerase structure and function at lac operon.

    PubMed

    Borukhov, Sergei; Lee, Jookyung

    2005-06-01

    Transcription of E. coli lac operon by RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a classic example of how the basic functions of this enzyme, specifically the ability to recognize/bind promoters, melt the DNA and initiate RNA synthesis, is positively regulated by transcription activators, such as cyclic AMP-receptor protein, CRP, and negatively regulated by lac-repressor, LacI. In this review, we discuss the recent progress in structural and biochemical studies of RNAP and its binary and ternary complexes with CRP and lac promoter. With structural information now available for RNAP and models of binary and ternary elongation complexes, the interaction between these factors and RNAP can be modeled, and possible molecular mechanisms of their action can be inferred.

  11. RNAi: Mammalian oocytes do it without RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    STEIN, PAULA; SVOBODA, PETR; ANGER, MARTIN; SCHULTZ, RICHARD M.

    2003-01-01

    Studies in mutant organisms deficient in RNA interference (RNAi) and related post-transcriptional gene silencing implicated a role for a single class of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp). Nevertheless, sequence homologs to these RdRps have not been found in coelomate organisms such as Drosophila or mammals. This lack of homologous sequences does not exclude that an RdRp functions in RNAi in these organisms because an RdRp could be acquired by horizontal transfer from an RNA virus. In fact, such a sequence is found in mice (Aquarius) and we observe that it is expressed in mouse oocytes and early embryos, which exhibit RNAi. We report here that cordycepin, an inhibitor of RNA synthesis, does not prevent Mos double-strand RNA (dsRNA) to target endogenous Mos mRNA in mouse oocytes and that targeting a chimeric Mos–EGFP mRNA with dsRNA to EGFP does not reduce the endogenous Mos mRNA, but does target the chimeric mRNA. These results indicate that an RdRp is not involved in dsRNA-mediated mRNA degradation in mammalian oocytes, and possibly in mammals in general, and therefore that only homologous sequences to the dsRNA are targeted for degradation. PMID:12554861

  12. Rtp1p is a karyopherin-like protein required for RNA polymerase II biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Navarro, Natalia; Peiró-Chova, Lorena; Rodriguez-Navarro, Susana; Polaina, Julio; Estruch, Francisco

    2013-05-01

    The assembly and nuclear transport of RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) are processes that require the participation of many auxiliary factors. In a yeast genetic screen, we identified a previously uncharacterized gene, YMR185w (renamed RTP1), which encodes a protein required for the nuclear import of RNA pol II. Using protein affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry, we identified interactions between Rtp1p and members of the R2TP complex. Rtp1p also interacts, to a different extent, with several RNA pol II subunits. The pattern of interactions is compatible with a role for Rtp1p as an assembly factor that participates in the formation of the Rpb2/Rpb3 subassembly complex and its binding to the Rpb1p-containing subcomplex. Besides, Rtp1p has a molecular architecture characteristic of karyopherins, composed of HEAT repeats, and is able to interact with phenylalanine-glycine-containing nucleoporins. Our results define Rtp1p as a new component of the RNA pol II biogenesis machinery that plays roles in subunit assembly and likely in transport through the nuclear pore complex.

  13. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Dubendorff, J.W.

    1998-11-03

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods. 12 figs.

  14. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Dubendorff, J.W.

    1998-10-20

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods. 12 figs.

  15. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Dubendorff, John W.

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods.

  16. Coupling of RNA Polymerase II Transcription Elongation with Pre-mRNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Saldi, Tassa; Cortazar, Michael A; Sheridan, Ryan M; Bentley, David L

    2016-06-19

    Pre-mRNA maturation frequently occurs at the same time and place as transcription by RNA polymerase II. The co-transcriptionality of mRNA processing has permitted the evolution of mechanisms that functionally couple transcription elongation with diverse events that occur on the nascent RNA. This review summarizes the current understanding of the relationship between transcriptional elongation through a chromatin template and co-transcriptional splicing including alternative splicing decisions that affect the expression of most human genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic exploration of interactive domains in RNA polymerase II subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C; Okamura, S; Young, R

    1990-01-01

    The two large subunits of RNA polymerase II, RPB1 and RPB2, contain regions of extensive homology to the two large subunits of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. These homologous regions may represent separate protein domains with unique functions. We investigated whether suppressor genetics could provide evidence for interactions between specific segments of RPB1 and RPB2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A plasmid shuffle method was used to screen thoroughly for mutations in RPB2 that suppress a temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb1-1, which is located in region H of RPB1. All six RPB2 mutations that suppress rpb1-1 were clustered in region I of RPB2. The location of these mutations and the observation that they were allele specific for suppression of rpb1-1 suggests an interaction between region H of RPB1 and region I of RPB2. A similar experiment was done to isolate and map mutations in RPB1 that suppress a temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb2-2, which occurs in region I of RPB2. These suppressor mutations were not clustered in a particular region. Thus, fine structure suppressor genetics can provide evidence for interactions between specific segments of two proteins, but the results of this type of analysis can depend on the conditional mutation to be suppressed. Images PMID:2183012

  18. High Fidelity of Yellow Fever Virus RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Pugachev, Konstantin V.; Guirakhoo, Farshad; Ocran, Simeon W.; Mitchell, Fred; Parsons, Megan; Penal, Caroline; Girakhoo, Soheila; Pougatcheva, Svetlana O.; Arroyo, Juan; Trent, Dennis W.; Monath, Thomas P.

    2004-01-01

    Three consecutive plaque purifications of four chimeric yellow fever virus-dengue virus (ChimeriVax-DEN) vaccine candidates against dengue virus types 1 to 4 were performed. The genome of each candidate was sequenced by the consensus approach after plaque purification and additional passages in cell culture. Our data suggest that the nucleotide sequence error rate for SP6 RNA polymerase used in the in vitro transcription step to initiate virus replication was as high as 1.34 × 10−4 per copied nucleotide and that the error rate of the yellow fever virus RNA polymerase employed by the chimeras for genome replication in infected cells was as low as 1.9 × 10−7 to 2.3 × 10−7. Clustering of beneficial mutations that accumulated after multiple virus passages suggests that the N-terminal part of the prM protein, a specific site in the middle of the E protein, and the NS4B protein may be essential for nucleocapsid-envelope interaction during flavivirus assembly. PMID:14694136

  19. Guanosine tetraphosphate as a global regulator of bacterial RNA synthesis: a model involving RNA polymerase pausing and queuing.

    PubMed

    Bremer, H; Ehrenberg, M

    1995-05-17

    A recently reported comparison of stable RNA (rRNA, tRNA) and mRNA synthesis rates in ppGpp-synthesizing and ppGpp-deficient (delta relA delta spoT) bacteria has suggested that ppGpp inhibits transcription initiation from stable RNA promoters, as well as synthesis of (bulk) mRNA. Inhibition of stable RNA synthesis occurs mainly during slow growth of bacteria when cytoplasmic levels of ppGpp are high. In contrast, inhibition of mRNA occurs mainly during fast growth when ppGpp levels are low, and it is associated with a partial inactivation of RNA polymerase. To explain these observations it has been proposed that ppGpp causes transcriptional pausing and queuing during the synthesis of mRNA. Polymerase queuing requires high rates of transcription initiation in addition to polymerase pausing, and therefore high concentrations of free RNA polymerase. These conditions are found in fast growing bacteria. Furthermore, the RNA polymerase queues lead to a promoter blocking when RNA polymerase molecules stack up from the pause site back to the (mRNA) promoter. This occurs most frequently at pause sites close to the promoter. Blocking of mRNA promoters diverts RNA polymerase to stable RNA promoters. In this manner ppGpp could indirectly stimulate synthesis of stable RNA at high growth rates. In the present work a mathematical analysis, based on the theory of queuing, is presented and applied to the global control of transcription in bacteria. This model predicts the in vivo distribution of RNA polymerase over stable RNA and mRNA genes for both ppGpp-synthesizing and ppGpp-deficient bacteria in response to different environmental conditions. It also shows how small changes in basal ppGpp concentrations can produce large changes in the rate of stable RNA synthesis.

  20. Positive modulation of RNA polymerase III transcription by ribosomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dieci, Giorgio; Carpentieri, Andrea; Amoresano, Angela; Ottonello, Simone

    2009-02-06

    A yeast nuclear fraction of unknown composition, named TFIIIE, was reported previously to enhance transcription of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes in vitro. We show that TFIIIE activity co-purifies with a specific subset of ribosomal proteins (RPs) which, as revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, generally interact with tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, but not with a Pol II-specific promoter. Only Rpl6Ap and Rpl6Bp, among the tested RPs, were found associated to a TATA-containing tRNA{sup Ile}(TAT) gene. The RPL6A gene also emerged as a strong multicopy suppressor of a conditional mutation in the basal transcription factor TFIIIC, while RPL26A and RPL14A behaved as weak suppressors. The data delineate a novel extra-ribosomal role for one or a few RPs which, by influencing 5S rRNA and tRNA synthesis, could play a key role in the coordinate regulation of the different sub-pathways required for ribosome biogenesis and functionality.

  1. Real-time dynamics of RNA Polymerase II clustering in live human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisse, Ibrahim

    2014-03-01

    Transcription is the first step in the central dogma of molecular biology, when genetic information encoded on DNA is made into messenger RNA. How this fundamental process occurs within living cells (in vivo) is poorly understood,[1] despite extensive biochemical characterizations with isolated biomolecules (in vitro). For high-order organisms, like humans, transcription is reported to be spatially compartmentalized in nuclear foci consisting of clusters of RNA Polymerase II, the enzyme responsible for synthesizing all messenger RNAs. However, little is known of when these foci assemble or their relative stability. We developed an approach based on photo-activation localization microscopy (PALM) combined with a temporal correlation analysis, which we refer to as tcPALM. The tcPALM method enables the real-time characterization of biomolecular spatiotemporal organization, with single-molecule sensitivity, directly in living cells.[2] Using tcPALM, we observed that RNA Polymerase II clusters form transiently, with an average lifetime of 5.1 (+/- 0.4) seconds. Stimuli affecting transcription regulation yielded orders of magnitude changes in the dynamics of the polymerase clusters, implying that clustering is regulated and plays a role in the cells ability to effect rapid response to external signals. Our results suggest that the transient crowding of enzymes may aid in rate-limiting steps of genome regulation.

  2. Distinct transcriptional responses of RNA polymerases I, II and III to aptamers that bind TBP

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaochun; Shi, Hua; Lis, John T.

    2005-01-01

    The TATA-binding protein (TBP) is a general factor that is involved in transcription by all three types of nuclear RNA polymerase. To delineate the roles played by the DNA-binding surface of TBP in these transcription reactions, we used a set of RNA aptamers directed against TBP and examined their ability to perturb transcription in vitro by the different RNA polymerases. Distinct responses to the TBP aptamers were observed for transcription by different types of polymerase at either the initiation, reinitiation or both stages of the transcription cycle. We further probed the TBP interactions in the TFIIIB•DNA complex to elucidate the mechanism for the different sensitivity of Pol III dependent transcription before and after preinitiation complex (PIC) formation. Lastly, the aptamers were employed to measure the time required for Pol III PIC formation in vitro. This approach can be generalized to define the involvement of a particular region on the surface of a protein at particular stages in a biological process. PMID:15701755

  3. Improved crystallization of the coxsackievirus B3 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Jabafi, Ilham; Selisko, Barbara; Coutard, Bruno; De Palma, Armando M.; Neyts, Johan; Egloff, Marie-Pierre; Grisel, Sacha; Dalle, Karen; Campanacci, Valerie; Spinelli, Silvia; Cambillau, Christian; Canard, Bruno; Gruez, Arnaud

    2007-06-01

    The first crystal of a coxsackievirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is reported. The Picornaviridae virus family contains a large number of human pathogens such as poliovirus, hepatitis A virus and rhinoviruses. Amongst the viruses belonging to the genus Enterovirus, several serotypes of coxsackievirus coexist for which neither vaccine nor therapy is available. Coxsackievirus B3 is involved in the development of acute myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy and is thought to be an important cause of sudden death in young adults. Here, the first crystal of a coxsackievirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is reported. Standard crystallization methods yielded crystals that were poorly suited to X-ray diffraction studies, with one axis being completely disordered. Crystallization was improved by testing crystallization solutions from commercial screens as additives. This approach yielded crystals that diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution and that were suitable for structure determination.

  4. Characterization of new RNA polymerase III and RNA polymerase II transcriptional promoters in the Bovine Leukemia Virus genome

    PubMed Central

    Van Driessche, Benoit; Rodari, Anthony; Delacourt, Nadège; Fauquenoy, Sylvain; Vanhulle, Caroline; Burny, Arsène; Rohr, Olivier; Van Lint, Carine

    2016-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus latency is a viral strategy used to escape from the host immune system and contribute to tumor development. However, a highly expressed BLV micro-RNA cluster has been reported, suggesting that the BLV silencing is not complete. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo recruitment of RNA polymerase III to the BLV miRNA cluster both in BLV-latently infected cell lines and in ovine BLV-infected primary cells, through a canonical type 2 RNAPIII promoter. Moreover, by RPC6-knockdown, we showed a direct functional link between RNAPIII transcription and BLV miRNAs expression. Furthermore, both the tumor- and the quiescent-related isoforms of RPC7 subunits were recruited to the miRNA cluster. We showed that the BLV miRNA cluster was enriched in positive epigenetic marks. Interestingly, we demonstrated the in vivo recruitment of RNAPII at the 3′LTR/host genomic junction, associated with positive epigenetic marks. Functionally, we showed that the BLV LTR exhibited a strong antisense promoter activity and identified cis-acting elements of an RNAPII-dependent promoter. Finally, we provided evidence for an in vivo collision between RNAPIII and RNAPII convergent transcriptions. Our results provide new insights into alternative ways used by BLV to counteract silencing of the viral 5′LTR promoter. PMID:27545598

  5. The uncoupling of catalysis and translocation in the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Shu, Bo; Gong, Peng

    2017-03-01

    The nucleotide addition cycle of nucleic acid polymerases includes two major events: the pre-chemistry active site closure leading to the addition of one nucleotide to the product chain; the post-chemistry translocation step moving the polymerase active site one position downstream on its template. In viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs), structural and biochemical evidences suggest that these two events are not tightly coupled, unlike the situation observed in A-family polymerases such as the bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Recently, an RdRP translocation intermediate crystal structure of enterovirus 71 shed light on how translocation may be controlled by elements within RdRP catalytic motifs, and a series of poliovirus apo RdRP crystal structures explicitly suggest that a motif B loop may assist the movement of the template strand in late stages of transcription. Implications of RdRP catalysis-translocation uncoupling and the remaining challenges to further elucidate RdRP translocation mechanism are also discussed.

  6. Efficient expression of a protein coding gene under the control of an RNA polymerase I promoter.

    PubMed

    Palmer, T D; Miller, A D; Reeder, R H; McStay, B

    1993-07-25

    In mammalian cells, RNA polymerase I transcripts are uncapped and retain a polyphosphate 5' terminus. It is probably for this reason that they are poorly translated as messenger RNA. We show in this report that insertion of an Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) into the 5' leader of an RNA polymerase I transcript overcomes the block to translation, presumably by substituting for the 5' trimethyl G cap. Addition of an SV40 polyA addition signal also enhances protein production from the RNA polymerase I transcript. RNA Polymerase I driven expression vectors containing both elements produce protein at levels comparable to that produced from RNA polymerase II driven expression vectors which utilize a retroviral LTR. RNA Polymerase I driven expression vectors may have a variety of uses both for basic research and for practical expression of recombinant proteins.

  7. Comparative overview of RNA polymerase II and III transcription cycles, with focus on RNA polymerase III termination and reinitiation

    PubMed Central

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G; Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase (RNAP) III transcribes hundreds of genes for tRNAs and 5S rRNA, among others, which share similar promoters and stable transcription initiation complexes (TIC), which support rapid RNAP III recycling. In contrast, RNAP II transcribes a large number of genes with highly variable promoters and interacting factors, which exert fine regulatory control over TIC lability and modifications of RNAP II at different transitional points in the transcription cycle. We review data that illustrate a relatively smooth continuity of RNAP III initiation-elongation-termination and reinitiation toward its function to produce high levels of tRNAs and other RNAs that support growth and development. PMID:25764110

  8. A phosphorylation pattern-recognizing antibody specifically reacts to RNA polymerase II bound to exons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jungwon; Lee, Jong-Hyuk; Park, Sunyoung; Yoon, Soomin; Yoon, Aerin; Hwang, Do B; Lee, Hwa K; Kim, Min S; Lee, Yujean; Yang, Won J; Youn, Hong-Duk; Kim, Hyori; Chung, Junho

    2016-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II is an unusual series of repeated residues appended to the C-terminus of the largest subunit and serves as a flexible binding scaffold for numerous nuclear factors. The binding of these factors is determined by the phosphorylation patterns on the repeats in the domain. In this study, we generated a synthetic antibody library by replacing the third heavy chain complementarity-determining region of an anti-HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) antibody (trastuzumab) with artificial sequences of 7–18 amino-acid residues. From this library, antibodies were selected that were specific to serine phosphopeptides that represent typical phosphorylation patterns on the functional unit (YSPTSPS)2 of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD). Antibody clones pCTD-1stS2 and pCTD-2ndS2 showed specificity for peptides with phosphoserine at the second residues of the first or second heptamer repeat, respectively. Additional clones specifically reacted to peptides with phosphoserine at the fifth serine of the first repeat (pCTD-1stS5), the seventh residue of the first repeat and fifth residue of the second repeat (pCTD-S7S5) or the seventh residue of either the first or second repeat (pCTD-S7). All of these antibody clones successfully reacted to RNA polymerase II in immunoblot analysis. Interestingly, pCTD-2ndS2 precipitated predominately RNA polymerase II from the exonic regions of genes in genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analysis, which suggests that the phosphoserine at the second residue of the second repeat of the functional unit (YSPTSPS)2 is a mediator of exon definition. PMID:27857068

  9. Extranuclear gene expression in yeast: evidence for a plasmid-encoded RNA polymerase of unique structure.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D W; Meacock, P A

    1988-01-01

    Strains of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that produce killer-toxin have been found to contain two linear dsDNA plasmids, k1 (8.9 Kb) and k2 (13.4 Kb). The four transcribed open reading frames of plasmid k1 contain no recognisable yeast nuclear expression signals. Moreover, a toxin subunit gene fused with the lacZ gene of Escherichia coli is not detectably expressed when introduced to K.lactis or Saccharomyces cerevisiae on a nuclear vector, even when native k1 and k2 are present in the cell. This and other evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that k1 and k2 reside in an extranuclear location, and do not utilise the nuclear RNA polymerases I, II or III for transcription of their genes. Sequencing of plasmid k2, which is thought to encode factors necessary for the maintenance or expression of k1, reveals an open reading frame predicted to encode a 974 amino acid polypeptide with homology to several DNA-directed RNA polymerases. We suggest that this is a component of a novel plasmid-specific extranuclear gene expression system. PMID:3138657

  10. Organization, Function, and Therapeutic Targeting of the Morbillivirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Sourimant, Julien; Plemper, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    The morbillivirus genus comprises major human and animal pathogens, including the highly contagious measles virus. Morbilliviruses feature single stranded negative sense RNA genomes that are wrapped by a plasma membrane-derived lipid envelope. Genomes are encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein forming ribonucleoprotein complexes, and only the encapsidated RNA is transcribed and replicated by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). In this review, we discuss recent breakthroughs towards the structural and functional understanding of the morbillivirus polymerase complex. Considering the clinical burden imposed by members of the morbillivirus genus, the development of novel antiviral therapeutics is urgently needed. The viral polymerase complex presents unique structural and enzymatic properties that can serve as attractive candidates for druggable targets. We evaluate distinct strategies for therapeutic intervention and examine how high-resolution insight into the organization of the polymerase complex may pave the path towards the structure-based design and optimization of next-generation RdRp inhibitors. PMID:27626440

  11. Polyadenylylated nuclear RNA encoded by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, R; Lin, S F; Gradoville, L; Miller, G

    1996-01-01

    A newly recognized gamma herpesvirus known as Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) is present in Kaposi sarcomas and body-cavity-based lymphomas. Here we identify a novel abundant 1.2-kb RNA, polyadenylated nuclear RNA (PAN RNA), encoded by the virus. The majority of cDNAs produced from poly(A)-selected RNA isolated from a human body cavity lymphoma cell line 48 hr after butyrate induction of KSHV lytic replication represented PAN RNA. Within PAN RNA were two 9 and 16 nt stretches with 89% and 94% identity to U1 RNA. A third stretch of 14 nt was 93% complementary to U1. The 5' upstream region of PAN RNA contained both proximal and distal sequence elements characteristic of regulatory regions of U snRNAs, whereas the 3' end was polyadenylylated. PAN RNA was transcribed by RNA polymerase II, lacked a trimethylguanosine cap, and did not associate with polyribosomes. PAN RNA formed a speckled pattern in the nucleus typical of U snRNAs and colocalized with Sm protein. Therefore, PAN represents a new type of RNA, possessing features of both U snRNA and mRNA. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8876232

  12. Transcriptional bypass of regioisomeric ethylated thymidine lesions by T7 RNA polymerase and human RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    You, Changjun; Wang, Pengcheng; Dai, Xiaoxia; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-01-01

    Alkylative damage to DNA can be induced by environmental chemicals, endogenous metabolites and some commonly prescribed chemotherapeutic agents. The regioisomeric N3-, O2- and O4-ethylthymidine (N3-, O2- and O4-EtdT, respectively) represent an important class of ethylated DNA lesions. Using nonreplicative double-stranded vectors containing an N3-EtdT, O2-EtdT or O4-EtdT at a defined site in the template strand, herein we examined the effects of these lesions on DNA transcription mediated by single-subunit T7 RNA polymerase or multisubunit human RNA polymerase II in vitro and in human cells. We found that O4-EtdT is highly mutagenic and exclusively induces the misincorporation of guanine opposite the lesion, whereas N3-EtdT and O2-EtdT display promiscuous miscoding properties during transcription. In addition, N3-EtdT and O2-EtdT were found to inhibit strongly DNA transcription in vitro and in certain human cells. Moreover, N3-EtdT, but not O2-EtdT or O4-EtdT, is an efficient substrate for transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair. These findings provide new important insights into how these alkylated DNA lesions compromise the flow of genetic information, which may help to understand the risk of these lesions in living cells. PMID:25404131

  13. Lysines in the RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Contribute to TAF15 Fibril Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Janke, Abigail M; Seo, Da Hee; Rahmanian, Vahid; Conicella, Alexander E; Mathews, Kaylee L; Burke, Kathleen A; Mittal, Jeetain; Fawzi, Nicolas L

    2017-10-11

    Many cancer-causing chromosomal translocations result in transactivating protein products encoding FET family (FUS, EWSR1, TAF15) low-complexity (LC) domains fused to a DNA binding domain from one of several transcription factors. Recent work demonstrates that higher-order assemblies of FET LC domains bind the carboxy-terminal domain of the large subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II CTD), suggesting FET oncoproteins may mediate aberrant transcriptional activation by recruiting RNA polymerase II to promoters of target genes. Here we use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and hydrogel fluorescence microscopy localization and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to visualize atomic details of a model of this process, interactions of RNA pol II CTD with high-molecular weight TAF15 LC assemblies. We report NMR resonance assignments of the intact degenerate repeat half of human RNA pol II CTD alone and verify its predominant intrinsic disorder by molecular simulation. By measuring NMR spin relaxation and dark-state exchange saturation transfer, we characterize the interaction of RNA pol II CTD with amyloid-like hydrogel fibrils of TAF15 and hnRNP A2 LC domains and observe that heptads far from the acidic C-terminal tail of RNA pol II CTD bind TAF15 fibrils most avidly. Mutation of CTD lysines in heptad position 7 to consensus serines reduced the overall level of TAF15 fibril binding, suggesting that electrostatic interactions contribute to complex formation. Conversely, mutations of position 7 asparagine residues and truncation of the acidic tail had little effect. Thus, weak, multivalent interactions between TAF15 fibrils and heptads throughout RNA pol II CTD collectively mediate complex formation.

  14. Structure of a bacterial RNA polymerase holoenzyme open promoter complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Brian; Feklistov, Andrey; Lass-Napiorkowska, Agnieszka; Landick, Robert; Darst, Seth A.

    2015-09-08

    Initiation of transcription is a primary means for controlling gene expression. In bacteria, the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme binds and unwinds promoter DNA, forming the transcription bubble of the open promoter complex (RPo). We have determined crystal structures, refined to 4.14 Å-resolution, of RPo containing Thermus aquaticus RNAP holoenzyme and promoter DNA that includes the full transcription bubble. The structures, combined with biochemical analyses, reveal key features supporting the formation and maintenance of the double-strand/single-strand DNA junction at the upstream edge of the -10 element where bubble formation initiates. The results also reveal RNAP interactions with duplex DNA just upstream of the -10 element and potential protein/DNA interactions that direct the DNA template strand into the RNAP active site. Additionally a RNA primer to yield a 4 base-pair post-translocated RNA:DNA hybrid mimics an initially transcribing complex at the point where steric clash initiates abortive initiation and σA dissociation.

  15. Structure of a bacterial RNA polymerase holoenzyme open promoter complex

    DOE PAGES

    Bae, Brian; Feklistov, Andrey; Lass-Napiorkowska, Agnieszka; ...

    2015-09-08

    Initiation of transcription is a primary means for controlling gene expression. In bacteria, the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme binds and unwinds promoter DNA, forming the transcription bubble of the open promoter complex (RPo). We have determined crystal structures, refined to 4.14 Å-resolution, of RPo containing Thermus aquaticus RNAP holoenzyme and promoter DNA that includes the full transcription bubble. The structures, combined with biochemical analyses, reveal key features supporting the formation and maintenance of the double-strand/single-strand DNA junction at the upstream edge of the -10 element where bubble formation initiates. The results also reveal RNAP interactions with duplex DNA just upstreammore » of the -10 element and potential protein/DNA interactions that direct the DNA template strand into the RNAP active site. Additionally a RNA primer to yield a 4 base-pair post-translocated RNA:DNA hybrid mimics an initially transcribing complex at the point where steric clash initiates abortive initiation and σA dissociation.« less

  16. The RNA polymerase flow model of gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Edri, Shlomit; Gazit, Eran; Cohen, Eyal; Tuller, Tamir

    2014-02-01

    Gene expression is a fundamental cellular process by which proteins are synthesized based on the information coded in the genes. The two major steps of this process are the transcription of the DNA segment corresponding to a gene to mRNA molecules and the translation of the mRNA molecules to proteins by the ribosome. Thus, understanding, modeling and engineering the different stages of this process have both important biotechnological applications and contributions to basic life science. In previous studies we have introduced the Homogenous Ribosome Flow Model (HRFM) and demonstrated its advantages in analyses of the translation process. In this study we introduce the RNA Polymerase Flow Model (RPFM), a non trivial extension of the HRFM, which also includes a backward flow and can be used for modeling transcription and maybe other similar processes. We compare the HRFM and the RPFM in the three regimes of the transcription process: rate limiting initiation, rate limiting elongation and rate limiting termination via a simulative and analytical analysis. In addition, based on experimental data, we show that RPFM is a better choice for modeling transcription process.

  17. Millisecond dynamics of RNA polymerase II translocation at atomic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Weiss, Dahlia R.; Pardo Avila, Fátima; Da, Lin-Tai; Levitt, Michael; Wang, Dong; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-01-01

    Transcription is a central step in gene expression, in which the DNA template is processively read by RNA polymerase II (Pol II), synthesizing a complementary messenger RNA transcript. At each cycle, Pol II moves exactly one register along the DNA, a process known as translocation. Although X-ray crystal structures have greatly enhanced our understanding of the transcription process, the underlying molecular mechanisms of translocation remain unclear. Here we use sophisticated simulation techniques to observe Pol II translocation on a millisecond timescale and at atomistic resolution. We observe multiple cycles of forward and backward translocation and identify two previously unidentified intermediate states. We show that the bridge helix (BH) plays a key role accelerating the translocation of both the RNA:DNA hybrid and transition nucleotide by directly interacting with them. The conserved BH residues, Thr831 and Tyr836, mediate these interactions. To date, this study delivers the most detailed picture of the mechanism of Pol II translocation at atomic level. PMID:24753580

  18. Impact of template backbone heterogeneity on RNA polymerase II transcription

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Lu; Chong, Jenny; Huang, Xuhui; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the sugar component (ribose or deoxyribose) and the nature of the phosphodiester linkage (3′-5′ or 2′-5′ orientation) have been a challenge for genetic information transfer from the very beginning of evolution. RNA polymerase II (pol II) governs the transcription of DNA into precursor mRNA in all eukaryotic cells. How pol II recognizes DNA template backbone (phosphodiester linkage and sugar) and whether it tolerates the backbone heterogeneity remain elusive. Such knowledge is not only important for elucidating the chemical basis of transcriptional fidelity but also provides new insights into molecular evolution. In this study, we systematically and quantitatively investigated pol II transcriptional behaviors through different template backbone variants. We revealed that pol II can well tolerate and bypass sugar heterogeneity sites at the template but stalls at phosphodiester linkage heterogeneity sites. The distinct impacts of these two backbone components on pol II transcription reveal the molecular basis of template recognition during pol II transcription and provide the evolutionary insight from the RNA world to the contemporary ‘imperfect’ DNA world. In addition, our results also reveal the transcriptional consequences from ribose-containing genomic DNA. PMID:25662224

  19. Structural basis of transcription: separation of RNA from DNA by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Westover, Kenneth D; Bushnell, David A; Kornberg, Roger D

    2004-02-13

    The structure of an RNA polymerase II-transcribing complex has been determined in the posttranslocation state, with a vacancy at the growing end of the RNA-DNA hybrid helix. At the opposite end of the hybrid helix, the RNA separates from the template DNA. This separation of nucleic acid strands is brought about by interaction with a set of proteins loops in a strand/loop network. Formation of the network must occur in the transition from abortive initiation to promoter escape.

  20. Crystal structure of Zika virus NS5 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Andre S; Lima, Gustavo M A; Oliveira, Ketllyn I Z; Torres, Naiara U; Maluf, Fernando V; Guido, Rafael V C; Oliva, Glaucius

    2017-03-27

    The current Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak became a global health threat of complex epidemiology and devastating neurological impacts, therefore requiring urgent efforts towards the development of novel efficacious and safe antiviral drugs. Due to its central role in RNA viral replication, the non-structural protein 5 (NS5) RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp) is a prime target for drug discovery. Here we describe the crystal structure of the recombinant ZIKV NS5 RdRp domain at 1.9 Å resolution as a platform for structure-based drug design strategy. The overall structure is similar to other flaviviral homologues. However, the priming loop target site, which is suitable for non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitor design, shows significant differences in comparison with the dengue virus structures, including a tighter pocket and a modified local charge distribution.

  1. Crystal structure of Zika virus NS5 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Andre S.; Lima, Gustavo M. A.; Oliveira, Ketllyn I. Z.; Torres, Naiara U.; Maluf, Fernando V.; Guido, Rafael V. C.; Oliva, Glaucius

    2017-01-01

    The current Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak became a global health threat of complex epidemiology and devastating neurological impacts, therefore requiring urgent efforts towards the development of novel efficacious and safe antiviral drugs. Due to its central role in RNA viral replication, the non-structural protein 5 (NS5) RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp) is a prime target for drug discovery. Here we describe the crystal structure of the recombinant ZIKV NS5 RdRp domain at 1.9 Å resolution as a platform for structure-based drug design strategy. The overall structure is similar to other flaviviral homologues. However, the priming loop target site, which is suitable for non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitor design, shows significant differences in comparison with the dengue virus structures, including a tighter pocket and a modified local charge distribution. PMID:28345596

  2. Defining the status of RNA polymerase at promoters.

    PubMed

    Core, Leighton J; Waterfall, Joshua J; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Fargo, David C; Kwak, Hojoong; Adelman, Karen; Lis, John T

    2012-10-25

    Recent genome-wide studies in metazoans have shown that RNA polymerase II (Pol II) accumulates to high densities on many promoters at a rate-limited step in transcription. However, the status of this Pol II remains an area of debate. Here, we compare quantitative outputs of a global run-on sequencing assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing assays and demonstrate that the majority of the Pol II on Drosophila promoters is transcriptionally engaged; very little exists in a preinitiation or arrested complex. These promoter-proximal polymerases are inhibited from further elongation by detergent-sensitive factors, and knockdown of negative elongation factor, NELF, reduces their levels. These results not only solidify the notion that pausing occurs at most promoters, but demonstrate that it is the major rate-limiting step in early transcription at these promoters. Finally, the divergent elongation complexes seen at mammalian promoters are far less prevalent in Drosophila, and this specificity in orientation correlates with directional core promoter elements, which are abundant in Drosophila.

  3. How slow RNA polymerase II elongation favors alternative exon skipping.

    PubMed

    Dujardin, Gwendal; Lafaille, Celina; de la Mata, Manuel; Marasco, Luciano E; Muñoz, Manuel J; Le Jossic-Corcos, Catherine; Corcos, Laurent; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2014-05-22

    Splicing is functionally coupled to transcription, linking the rate of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) elongation and the ability of splicing factors to recognize splice sites (ss) of various strengths. In most cases, slow Pol II elongation allows weak splice sites to be recognized, leading to higher inclusion of alternative exons. Using CFTR alternative exon 9 (E9) as a model, we show here that slowing down elongation can also cause exon skipping by promoting the recruitment of the negative factor ETR-3 onto the UG-repeat at E9 3' splice site, which displaces the constitutive splicing factor U2AF65 from the overlapping polypyrimidine tract. Weakening of E9 5' ss increases ETR-3 binding at the 3' ss and subsequent E9 skipping, whereas strengthening of the 5' ss usage has the opposite effect. This indicates that a delay in the cotranscriptional emergence of the 5' ss promotes ETR-3 recruitment and subsequent inhibition of E9 inclusion.

  4. Structural basis of transcription by bacterial and eukaryotic RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Shun-ichi; Tagami, Shunsuke; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2012-02-01

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) is responsible for cellular gene transcription. Although crystallographic studies on prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNAPs have elucidated the basic RNAP architectures, the structural details of many essential events during transcription initiation, elongation, and termination are still largely unknown. Recent crystallographic studies on a bacterial RNAP and yeast RNAP II have revealed different RNAP structural states from that of the normal transcribing complex, as well as the basis of transcription factor functions, advancing our understanding of transcription. These studies have highlighted unexpected similarities in many fundamental aspects of transcription mechanisms between the bacterial and eukaryotic transcription machineries. Remarkable differences also exist between the bacterial and eukaryotic transcription systems, suggesting directions for future studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. TFIIB-related Factors in RNA Polymerase I Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Bruce A.; Hahn, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerases (Pol) I, II, III and archaeal Pol use a related set of general transcription factors to recognize promoter sequences, recruit Pol to promoters and to function at key points in the transcription initiation mechanism. The TFIIB-like general transcription factors (GTFs) function during several important and conserved steps in the initiation pathway for Pol II, III, and archaeal Pol. Until recently, the mechanism of Pol I initiation seemed unique, since it appeared to lack a GTF paralogous to the TFIIB-like proteins. The surprising recent discovery of TFIIB-related Pol I general factors in yeast and humans highlights the evolutionary conservation of transcription initiation mechanisms for all eukaryotic and archaeal Pols. These findings reveal new roles for the function of the Pol I GTFs and insight into the function of TFIIB-related factors. Models for Pol I transcription initiation are reexamined in light of these recent findings. PMID:22960599

  6. Cooperation between translating ribosomes and RNA polymerase in transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Proshkin, Sergey; Rahmouni, A Rachid; Mironov, Alexander; Nudler, Evgeny

    2010-04-23

    During transcription of protein-coding genes, bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) is closely followed by a ribosome that translates the newly synthesized transcript. Our in vivo measurements show that the overall elongation rate of transcription is tightly controlled by the rate of translation. Acceleration and deceleration of a ribosome result in corresponding changes in the speed of RNAP. Moreover, we found an inverse correlation between the number of rare codons in a gene, which delay ribosome progression, and the rate of transcription. The stimulating effect of a ribosome on RNAP is achieved by preventing its spontaneous backtracking, which enhances the pace and also facilitates readthrough of roadblocks in vivo. Such a cooperative mechanism ensures that the transcriptional yield is always adjusted to translational needs at different genes and under various growth conditions.

  7. Tagetitoxin Inhibits RNA Polymerase through Trapping of the Trigger Loop*

    PubMed Central

    Artsimovitch, Irina; Svetlov, Vladimir; Nemetski, Sondra Maureen; Epshtein, Vitaly; Cardozo, Timothy; Nudler, Evgeny

    2011-01-01

    Tagetitoxin (Tgt) inhibits multisubunit chloroplast, bacterial, and some eukaryotic RNA polymerases (RNAPs). A crystallographic structure of Tgt bound to bacterial RNAP apoenzyme shows that Tgt binds near the active site but does not explain why Tgt acts only at certain sites. To understand the Tgt mechanism, we constructed a structural model of Tgt bound to the transcription elongation complex. In this model, Tgt interacts with the β′ subunit trigger loop (TL), stabilizing it in an inactive conformation. We show that (i) substitutions of the Arg residue of TL contacted by Tgt confer resistance to inhibitor; (ii) Tgt inhibits RNAP translocation, which requires TL movements; and (iii) paused complexes and a “slow” enzyme, in which the TL likely folds into an altered conformation, are resistant to Tgt. Our studies highlight the role of TL as a target through which accessory proteins and antibiotics can alter the elongation complex dynamics. PMID:21976682

  8. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 in potato (Solanum tuberosum) and its relationship to other plant RNA-dependent RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Lydia J. R.; Brockington, Samuel F.; Murphy, Alex M.; Pate, Adrienne E.; Gruden, Kristina; MacFarlane, Stuart A.; Palukaitis, Peter; Carr, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) catalyze synthesis of double-stranded RNAs that can serve to initiate or amplify RNA silencing. Arabidopsis thaliana has six RDR genes; RDRs 1, 2 and 6 have roles in anti-viral RNA silencing. RDR6 is constitutively expressed but RDR1 expression is elevated following plant treatment with defensive phytohormones. RDR1 also contributes to basal virus resistance. RDR1 has been studied in several species including A. thaliana, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), N. benthamiana, N. attenuata and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) but not to our knowledge in potato (S. tuberosum). StRDR1 was identified and shown to be salicylic acid-responsive. StRDR1 transcript accumulation decreased in transgenic potato plants constitutively expressing a hairpin construct and these plants were challenged with three viruses: potato virus Y, potato virus X, and tobacco mosaic virus. Suppression of StRDR1 gene expression did not increase the susceptibility of potato to these viruses. Phylogenetic analysis of RDR genes present in potato and in a range of other plant species identified a new RDR gene family, not present in potato and found only in Rosids (but apparently lost in the Rosid A. thaliana) for which we propose the name RDR7. PMID:26979928

  9. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 in potato (Solanum tuberosum) and its relationship to other plant RNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Lydia J R; Brockington, Samuel F; Murphy, Alex M; Pate, Adrienne E; Gruden, Kristina; MacFarlane, Stuart A; Palukaitis, Peter; Carr, John P

    2016-03-16

    Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) catalyze synthesis of double-stranded RNAs that can serve to initiate or amplify RNA silencing. Arabidopsis thaliana has six RDR genes; RDRs 1, 2 and 6 have roles in anti-viral RNA silencing. RDR6 is constitutively expressed but RDR1 expression is elevated following plant treatment with defensive phytohormones. RDR1 also contributes to basal virus resistance. RDR1 has been studied in several species including A. thaliana, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), N. benthamiana, N. attenuata and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) but not to our knowledge in potato (S. tuberosum). StRDR1 was identified and shown to be salicylic acid-responsive. StRDR1 transcript accumulation decreased in transgenic potato plants constitutively expressing a hairpin construct and these plants were challenged with three viruses: potato virus Y, potato virus X, and tobacco mosaic virus. Suppression of StRDR1 gene expression did not increase the susceptibility of potato to these viruses. Phylogenetic analysis of RDR genes present in potato and in a range of other plant species identified a new RDR gene family, not present in potato and found only in Rosids (but apparently lost in the Rosid A. thaliana) for which we propose the name RDR7.

  10. The Crystal Structure of a Cardiovirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Reveals an Unusual Conformation of the Polymerase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Vives-Adrian, Laia; Lujan, Celia; Oliva, Baldo; van der Linden, Lonneke; Selisko, Barbara; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is a member of the Cardiovirus genus within the large Picornaviridae family, which includes a number of important human and animal pathogens. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) 3Dpol is a key enzyme for viral genome replication. In this study, we report the X-ray structures of two different crystal forms of the EMCV RdRp determined at 2.8- and 2.15-Å resolution. The in vitro elongation and VPg uridylylation activities of the purified enzyme have also been demonstrated. Although the overall structure of EMCV 3Dpol is shown to be similar to that of the known RdRps of other members of the Picornaviridae family, structural comparisons show a large reorganization of the active-site cavity in one of the crystal forms. The rearrangement affects mainly motif A, where the conserved residue Asp240, involved in ribonucleoside triphosphate (rNTP) selection, and its neighbor residue, Phe239, move about 10 Å from their expected positions within the ribose binding pocket toward the entrance of the rNTP tunnel. This altered conformation of motif A is stabilized by a cation-π interaction established between the aromatic ring of Phe239 and the side chain of Lys56 within the finger domain. Other contacts, involving Phe239 and different residues of motif F, are also observed. The movement of motif A is connected with important conformational changes in the finger region flanked by residues 54 to 63, harboring Lys56, and in the polymerase N terminus. The structures determined in this work provide essential information for studies on the cardiovirus RNA replication process and may have important implications for the development of new antivirals targeting the altered conformation of motif A. IMPORTANCE The Picornaviridae family is one of the largest virus families known, including many important human and animal pathogens. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) 3Dpol is a key enzyme for picornavirus genome replication and a validated

  11. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Davanloo, P.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1984-03-30

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the T7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties.

  12. Identification of previously unrecognized common elements in eukaryotic promoters. A ribosomal RNA gene initiator element for RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Radebaugh, C A; Gong, X; Bartholomew, B; Paule, M R

    1997-02-07

    A new ribosomal RNA promoter element with a functional role similar to the RNA polymerase II initiator (Inr) was identified. This sequence, which we dub the ribosomal Inr (rInr) is unusually conserved, even in normally divergent RNA polymerase I promoters. It functions in the recruitment of the fundamental, TATA-binding protein (TBP)-containing transcription factor, TIF-IB. All upstream elements of the exceptionally strong Acanthamoeba castellanii ribosomal RNA core promoter, to within 6 base pairs of the transcription initiation site (tis), can be deleted without loss of specific transcription initiation. Thus, the A. castellanii promoter can function in a manner similar to RNA polymerase II TATA-less promoters. Sequence-specific photo-cross-linking localizes a 96-kDa subunit of TIF-IB and the second largest RNA polymerase I subunit (A133) to the rInr sequence. A185 also photo-cross-links when polymerase is stalled at +7.

  13. [The multifunctional RNA polymerase L protein of non-segmented negative strand RNA viruses catalyzes unique mRNA capping].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    Non-segmented negative strand RNA viruses belonging to the Mononegavirales order possess RNA-dependent RNA polymerase L proteins within viral particles. The L protein is a multifunctional enzyme catalyzing viral RNA synthesis and processing (i.e., mRNA capping, cap methylation, and polyadenylation). Using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a prototypic model virus, we have shown that the L protein catalyzes the unconventional mRNA capping reaction, which is strikingly different from the eukaryotic reaction. Furthermore, co-transcriptional pre-mRNA capping with the VSV L protein was found to be required for accurate stop?start transcription to synthesize full-length mRNAs in vitro and virus propagation in host cells. This article provides a review of historical and present studies leading to the elucidation of the molecular mechanism of VSV mRNA capping.

  14. TATA elements direct bi-directional transcription by RNA polymerases II and III.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, W; Wong, J M; Bateman, E

    1996-01-01

    Eukaryotic promoter elements specify the direction and efficiency of transcription, as well as the type of RNA polymerase to be used. One such element, the TATA box, is thought to participate in determining the direction of transcription and can function within promoters for RNA polymerase II or III, depending on the sequence context. In this report the ability of four different TATA boxes to support transcription in vitro was determined. It was found that TATA elements are not directional. However, they support transcription by RNA polymerases II and III. An upstream activating sequence was found to stimulate downstream transcription by RNA polymerase II and to inhibit upstream transcription by RNA polymerases II and III. Thus a promoter necessarily consists of a TATA element and upstream sequences in order to specify the direction of transcription and the type of polymerase to be used. PMID:8604352

  15. Transcription by single molecules of RNA polymerase observed by light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Dorothy A.; Gelles, Jeff; Sheetz, Michael P.; Landick, Robert

    1991-08-01

    THE kinetics of transcription by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase relate directly to the regulation of transcription and to the properties of processive enzymes in general1, but analysis of RNA polymerase movement along the DNA template has so far been limited to the study of populations of enzyme molecules. The ability to view nanometre-sized particles with the light microscope2,3 suggested a method of monitoring transcription by individual RNA polymerase molecules. We describe here the behaviour of 40-nm-diameter particles of colloidal gold attached to the ends of DNA molecules being transcribed by RNA polymerase immobilized on a glass surface. The tethered gold particles are released from the surface at times after addition of nucleoside triphosphates that are consistent with the kinetics of transcription by RNA polymerase in solution. Analysis of the brownian motion of the gold particles enabled us to measure the movement along the template DNA of individual polymerase molecules.

  16. The interaction of RNA polymerase and lac repressor with the lac control region.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, A; Galas, D J

    1979-01-01

    We have examined the interactions of lac repressor and RNA polymerase with the DNA of the lac control region, using a method for direct visualization of the regions of DNA protected by proteins from DNAase attack. The repressor protects the operator essentially as reported by Gilbert and Maxam (1) with some small modifications. However, the evidence reported here concerning the binding of RNA polymerase to the DNA of the promoter mutant UV5 indicates that : 1) the RNA polymerase molecule binds asymmetrically to the promoter DNA, 2) RNA polymerase protects DNA sequences to within a few bases of the CAP binding site, suggesting direct interaction between polymerase and the CAP protein at this site, 3) RNA polymerase still binds to the promoter when repressor is bound to the operator, but fails to form the same extensive complex. Images PMID:370784

  17. Conserved functions of the trigger loop and Gre factors in RNA cleavage by bacterial RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Miropolskaya, Nataliya; Esyunina, Daria; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2017-02-27

    RNA cleavage by RNA polymerase (RNAP) is the central step in co-transcriptional RNA proofreading. Bacterial RNAPs were proposed to rely on the same mobile element of the active site, the trigger loop (TL), for both nucleotide addition and RNA cleavage. RNA cleavage can also be stimulated by universal Gre factors, which should replace the TL to get access to the RNAP active site. The contributions of the TL and Gre factors to RNA cleavage reportedly vary between RNAPs from different bacterial species and, probably, different types of transcription complexes. Here, by comparing RNAPs from Escherichia coli (Eco), Deinococcus radiodurans (Dra) and Thermus aquaticus (Taq) we show that the functions of the TL and Gre factors in RNA cleavage are conserved in various species, with important variations which may be related to extremophilic adaptation. Deletions of the TL strongly impair intrinsic RNA cleavage by all three RNAPs and eliminate the inter-species differences in the reaction rates. GreA factors activate RNA cleavage by wild-type RNAPs to similar levels. The rates of GreA-dependent cleavage are lower for ΔTL RNAP variants, suggesting that the TL contributes to the Gre function. Finally, neither the TL nor GreA can efficiently activate RNA cleavage in certain types of backtracked transcription complexes suggesting that these complexes adopt a catalytically inactive conformation probably important for transcription regulation.

  18. Initiation of RNA Polymerization and Polymerase Encapsidation by a Small dsRNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yusong R.; Toh, Yukimatsu; Poranen, Minna M.; Tao, Yizhi J.

    2016-01-01

    During the replication cycle of double-stranded (ds) RNA viruses, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) replicates and transcribes the viral genome from within the viral capsid. How the RdRP molecules are packaged within the virion and how they function within the confines of an intact capsid are intriguing questions with answers that most likely vary across the different dsRNA virus families. In this study, we have determined a 2.4 Å resolution structure of an RdRP from the human picobirnavirus (hPBV). In addition to the conserved polymerase fold, the hPBV RdRP possesses a highly flexible 24 amino acid loop structure located near the C-terminus of the protein that is inserted into its active site. In vitro RNA polymerization assays and site-directed mutagenesis showed that: (1) the hPBV RdRP is fully active using both ssRNA and dsRNA templates; (2) the insertion loop likely functions as an assembly platform for the priming nucleotide to allow de novo initiation; (3) RNA transcription by the hPBV RdRP proceeds in a semi-conservative manner; and (4) the preference of virus-specific RNA during transcription is dictated by the lower melting temperature associated with the terminal sequences. Co-expression of the hPBV RdRP and the capsid protein (CP) indicated that, under the conditions used, the RdRP could not be incorporated into the recombinant capsids in the absence of the viral genome. Additionally, the hPBV RdRP exhibited higher affinity towards the conserved 5’-terminal sequence of the viral RNA, suggesting that the RdRP molecules may be encapsidated through their specific binding to the viral RNAs during assembly. PMID:27078841

  19. An autoradiographic demonstration of nuclear DNA replication by DNA polymerase alpha and of mitochondrial DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Geuskens, M; Hardt, N; Pedrali-Noy, G; Spadari, S

    1981-01-01

    The incorporation of thymidine into the DNA of eukaryotic cells is markedly depressed, but not completely inhibited, by aphidicolin, a highly specific inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha. An electron microscope autoradiographic analysis of the synthesis of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in vivo in Concanavalin A stimulated rabbit spleen lymphocytes and in Hamster cell cultures, in the absence and in the presence of aphidicolin, revealed that aphidicolin inhibits the nuclear but not the mitochondrial DNA replication. We therefore conclude that DNA polymerase alpha performs the synchronous bidirectional replication of nuclear DNA and that DNA polymerase gamma, the only DNA polymerase present in the mitochondria, performs the "strand displacement" DNA synthesis of these organelles. Images PMID:6262734

  20. Bacterial RNA polymerase can retain σ70 throughout transcription.

    PubMed

    Harden, Timothy T; Wells, Christopher D; Friedman, Larry J; Landick, Robert; Hochschild, Ann; Kondev, Jane; Gelles, Jeff

    2016-01-19

    Production of a messenger RNA proceeds through sequential stages of transcription initiation and transcript elongation and termination. During each of these stages, RNA polymerase (RNAP) function is regulated by RNAP-associated protein factors. In bacteria, RNAP-associated σ factors are strictly required for promoter recognition and have historically been regarded as dedicated initiation factors. However, the primary σ factor in Escherichia coli, σ(70), can remain associated with RNAP during the transition from initiation to elongation, influencing events that occur after initiation. Quantitative studies on the extent of σ(70) retention have been limited to complexes halted during early elongation. Here, we used multiwavelength single-molecule fluorescence-colocalization microscopy to observe the σ(70)-RNAP complex during initiation from the λ PR' promoter and throughout the elongation of a long (>2,000-nt) transcript. Our results provide direct measurements of the fraction of actively transcribing complexes with bound σ(70) and the kinetics of σ(70) release from actively transcribing complexes. σ(70) release from mature elongation complexes was slow (0.0038 s(-1)); a substantial subpopulation of elongation complexes retained σ(70) throughout transcript elongation, and this fraction depended on the sequence of the initially transcribed region. We also show that elongation complexes containing σ(70) manifest enhanced recognition of a promoter-like pause element positioned hundreds of nucleotides downstream of the promoter. Together, the results provide a quantitative framework for understanding the postinitiation roles of σ(70) during transcription.

  1. Rat1p maintains RNA polymerase II CTD phosphorylation balance

    PubMed Central

    Jimeno-González, Silvia; Schmid, Manfred; Malagon, Francisco; Haaning, Line Lindegaard; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2014-01-01

    In S. cerevisiae, the 5′-3′ exonuclease Rat1p partakes in transcription termination. Although Rat1p-mediated RNA degradation has been suggested to play a role for this activity, the exact mechanisms by which Rat1p helps release RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) from the DNA template are poorly understood. Here we describe a function of Rat1p in regulating phosphorylation levels of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest RNAPII subunit, Rpb1p, during transcription elongation. The rat1-1 mutant exhibits highly elevated levels of CTD phosphorylation as well as RNAPII distribution and transcription termination defects. These phenotypes are all rescued by overexpression of the CTD phosphatase Fcp1p, suggesting a functional relationship between the absence of Rat1p activity, elevated CTD phosphorylation, and transcription defects. We also demonstrate that rat1-1 cells display increased RNAPII transcription kinetics, a feature that may contribute to the cellular phenotypes of the mutant. Consistently, the rat1-1 allele is synthetic lethal with the rpb1-E1103G mutation, causing increased RNAPII speed, and is suppressed by the rpb2-10 mutation, causing slowed transcription. Thus, Rat1p plays more complex roles in controlling transcription than previously thought. PMID:24501251

  2. Rpb4/7 facilitates RNA polymerase II CTD dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Allepuz-Fuster, Paula; Martínez-Fernández, Verónica; Garrido-Godino, Ana I.; Alonso-Aguado, Sergio; Hanes, Steven D.; Navarro, Francisco; Calvo, Olga

    2014-01-01

    The Rpb4 and Rpb7 subunits of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) participate in a variety of processes from transcription, DNA repair, mRNA export and decay, to translation regulation and stress response. However, their mechanism(s) of action remains unclear. Here, we show that the Rpb4/7 heterodimer in Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a key role in controlling phosphorylation of the carboxy terminal domain (CTD) of the Rpb1 subunit of RNAPII. Proper phosphorylation of the CTD is critical for the synthesis and processing of RNAPII transcripts. Deletion of RPB4, and mutations that disrupt the integrity of Rpb4/7 or its recruitment to the RNAPII complex, increased phosphorylation of Ser2, Ser5, Ser7 and Thr4 within the CTD. RPB4 interacted genetically with genes encoding CTD phosphatases (SSU72, FCP1), CTD kinases (KIN28, CTK1, SRB10) and a prolyl isomerase that targets the CTD (ESS1). We show that Rpb4 is important for Ssu72 and Fcp1 phosphatases association, recruitment and/or accessibility to the CTD, and that this correlates strongly with Ser5P and Ser2P levels, respectively. Our data also suggest that Fcp1 is the Thr4P phosphatase in yeast. Based on these and other results, we suggest a model in which Rpb4/7 helps recruit and potentially stimulate the activity of CTD-modifying enzymes, a role that is central to RNAPII function. PMID:25416796

  3. Structural basis of initial RNA polymerase II transcription.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Alan C M; Sainsbury, Sarah; Cramer, Patrick

    2011-11-04

    During transcription initiation by RNA polymerase (Pol) II, a transient open promoter complex (OC) is converted to an initially transcribing complex (ITC) containing short RNAs, and to a stable elongation complex (EC). We report structures of a Pol II-DNA complex mimicking part of the OC, and of complexes representing minimal ITCs with 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 nucleotide (nt) RNAs, with and without a non-hydrolyzable nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) in the insertion site +1. The partial OC structure reveals that Pol II positions the melted template strand opposite the active site. The ITC-mimicking structures show that two invariant lysine residues anchor the 3'-proximal phosphate of short RNAs. Short DNA-RNA hybrids adopt a tilted conformation that excludes the +1 template nt from the active site. NTP binding induces complete DNA translocation and the standard hybrid conformation. Conserved NTP contacts indicate a universal mechanism of NTP selection. The essential residue Q1078 in the closed trigger loop binds the NTP 2'-OH group, explaining how the trigger loop couples catalysis to NTP selection, suppressing dNTP binding and DNA synthesis.

  4. Coliphage HK022 Nun protein inhibits RNA polymerase translocation

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, Christal L.; Kireeva, Maria L.; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Kashlev, Mikhail; Gottesman, Max

    2014-01-01

    The Nun protein of coliphage HK022 arrests RNA polymerase (RNAP) in vivo and in vitro at pause sites distal to phage λ N-Utilization (nut) site RNA sequences. We tested the activity of Nun on ternary elongation complexes (TECs) assembled with templates lacking the λ nut sequence. We report that Nun stabilizes both translocation states of RNAP by restricting lateral movement of TEC along the DNA register. When Nun stabilized TEC in a pretranslocated register, immediately after NMP incorporation, it prevented binding of the next NTP and stimulated pyrophosphorolysis of the nascent transcript. In contrast, stabilization of TEC by Nun in a posttranslocated register allowed NTP binding and nucleotidyl transfer but inhibited pyrophosphorolysis and the next round of forward translocation. Nun binding to and action on the TEC requires a 9-bp RNA–DNA hybrid. We observed a Nun-dependent toe print upstream to the TEC. In addition, mutations in the RNAP β′ subunit near the upstream end of the transcription bubble suppress Nun binding and arrest. These results suggest that Nun interacts with RNAP near the 5′ edge of the RNA–DNA hybrid. By stabilizing translocation states through restriction of TEC lateral mobility, Nun represents a novel class of transcription arrest factors. PMID:24853501

  5. Functional Evolution in Orthologous Cell-encoded RNA-dependent RNA Polymerases*

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xinlei; Hamid, Fursham M.; El Sahili, Abbas; Darwis, Dina Amallia; Wong, Yee Hwa; Bhushan, Shashi; Makeyev, Eugene V.; Lescar, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Many eukaryotic organisms encode more than one RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) that probably emerged as a result of gene duplication. Such RdRP paralogs often participate in distinct RNA silencing pathways and show characteristic repertoires of enzymatic activities in vitro. However, to what extent members of individual paralogous groups can undergo functional changes during speciation remains an open question. We show that orthologs of QDE-1, an RdRP component of the quelling pathway in Neurospora crassa, have rapidly diverged in evolution at the amino acid sequence level. Analyses of purified QDE-1 polymerases from N. crassa (QDE-1Ncr) and related fungi, Thielavia terrestris (QDE-1Tte) and Myceliophthora thermophila (QDE-1Mth), show that all three enzymes can synthesize RNA, but the precise modes of their action differ considerably. Unlike their QDE-1Ncr counterpart favoring processive RNA synthesis, QDE-1Tte and QDE-1Mth produce predominantly short RNA copies via primer-independent initiation. Surprisingly, a 3.19 Å resolution crystal structure of QDE-1Tte reveals a quasisymmetric dimer similar to QDE-1Ncr. Further electron microscopy analyses confirm that QDE-1Tte occurs as a dimer in solution and retains this status upon interaction with a template. We conclude that divergence of orthologous RdRPs can result in functional innovation while retaining overall protein fold and quaternary structure. PMID:26907693

  6. Crystal structure of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from influenza C virus

    PubMed Central

    Hengrung, Narin; El Omari, Kamel; Martin, Itziar Serna; Vreede, Frank T.; Cusack, Stephen; Rambo, Robert P.; Vonrhein, Clemens; Bricogne, Gérard; Stuart, David I.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Fodor, Ervin

    2016-01-01

    Negative-sense RNA viruses, such as influenza, encode large, multidomain RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that can both transcribe and replicate the viral RNA genome1. In influenza virus, the polymerase (FluPol) is composed of three polypeptides: PB1, PB2 and PA/P3. PB1 houses the polymerase active site, whereas PB2 and PA/P3 contain, respectively, cap-binding and endonuclease domains required for transcription initiation by cap-snatching2. Replication occurs through de novo initiation and involves a complementary RNA intermediate. Currently available structures of the influenza A and B virus polymerases include promoter RNA (the 5′ and 3′ termini of viral genome segments), showing FluPol in transcription pre-initiation states3,4. Here we report the structure of apo-FluPol from an influenza C virus, solved by X-ray crystallography to 3.9 Å, revealing a new ‘closed’ conformation. The apo-FluPol forms a compact particle with PB1 at its centre, capped on one face by PB2 and clamped between the two globular domains of P3. Notably, this structure is radically different from those of promoter-bound FluPols3,4. The endonuclease domain of P3 and the domains within the carboxy-terminal two-thirds of PB2 are completely rearranged. The cap-binding site is occluded by PB2, resulting in a conformation that is incompatible with transcription initiation. Thus, our structure captures FluPol in a closed, transcription pre-activation state. This reveals the conformation of newly made apo-FluPol in an infected cell, but may also apply to FluPol in the context of a non-transcribing ribonucleoprotein complex. Comparison of the apo-FluPol structure with those of promoter-bound FluPols allows us to propose a mechanism for FluPol activation. Our study demonstrates the remarkable flexibility of influenza virus RNA polymerase, and aids our understanding of the mechanisms controlling transcription and genome replication. PMID:26503046

  7. Structural basis for proteolysis-dependent activation of the poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Aaron A; Peersen, Olve B

    2004-01-01

    The active RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of poliovirus, 3Dpol, is generated by cleavage of the 3CDpro precursor protein, a protease that has no polymerase activity despite containing the entire polymerase domain. By intentionally disrupting a known and persistent crystal packing interaction, we have crystallized the poliovirus polymerase in a new space group and solved the complete structure of the protein at 2.0 Å resolution. It shows that the N-terminus of fully processed 3Dpol is buried in a surface pocket where it makes hydrogen bonds that act to position Asp238 in the active site. Asp238 is an essential residue that selects for the 2′ OH group of substrate rNTPs, as shown by a 2.35 Å structure of a 3Dpol–GTP complex. Mutational, biochemical, and structural data further demonstrate that 3Dpol activity is exquisitely sensitive to mutations at the N-terminus. This sensitivity is the result of allosteric effects where the structure around the buried N-terminus directly affects the positioning of Asp238 in the active site. PMID:15306852

  8. RNase-like domain in DNA-directed RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, T; Go, M

    1991-01-01

    DNA-directed RNA polymerase is responsible for gene expression. Despite its importance, many details of its function and higher-order structure still remain unknown. We report here a local sequence similarity between the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and bacterial RNases Ba (barnase), Bi, and St. The most remarkable similarity is that the catalytic sites of the RNases are shared with the eukaryotic RNA polymerase II subunits of Drosophila melanogaster and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several amino acids conserved among the RNases and the RNase-like domains of the RNA polymerase subunits are located in the neighborhood of the catalytic sites of barnase, whose three-dimensional structure has been resolved. This observation suggests the functional importance of the RNase-like domain of the RNA polymerase subunits and indicates that the RNase-like domain may have RNase activity. The location of the RNase-like domain relative to the region necessary for RNA polymerization is similar to the relative proximity of 5'----3' or 3'----5' exonuclease and the region of polymerase activity of DNA polymerase I. The RNase-like domain might work in proofreading, as in RNA-directed RNA polymerase of influenza virus, or it may contribute to RNA binding through an unknown function. Images PMID:1924368

  9. 6S RNA Mimics B-Form DNA to Regulate Escherichia coli RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Chen, James; Wassarman, Karen M; Feng, Shili; Leon, Katherine; Feklistov, Andrey; Winkelman, Jared T; Li, Zongli; Walz, Thomas; Campbell, Elizabeth A; Darst, Seth A

    2017-10-04

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) regulate gene expression in all organisms. Bacterial 6S RNAs globally regulate transcription by binding RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme and competing with promoter DNA. Escherichia coli (Eco) 6S RNA interacts specifically with the housekeeping σ(70)-holoenzyme (Eσ(70)) and plays a key role in the transcriptional reprogramming upon shifts between exponential and stationary phase. Inhibition is relieved upon 6S RNA-templated RNA synthesis. We report here the 3.8 Å resolution structure of a complex between 6S RNA and Eσ(70) determined by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy and validation of the structure using footprinting and crosslinking approaches. Duplex RNA segments have A-form C3' endo sugar puckers but widened major groove widths, giving the RNA an overall architecture that mimics B-form promoter DNA. Our results help explain the specificity of Eco 6S RNA for Eσ(70) and show how an ncRNA can mimic B-form DNA to directly regulate transcription by the DNA-dependent RNAP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional diversification of maize RNA polymerase IV and V subtypes via alternative catalytic subunits

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Brower-Toland, Brent; Krieger, Elysia K.; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Irsigler, Andre; LaRue, Huachun; Brzeski, Jan; McGinnis, Karen; Ivashuta, Sergey; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Chandler, Vicki L.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA Polymerases IV and V are non-essential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their twelve subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic analyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits, but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second-subunits, which are non-redundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two subtypes of Pol IV, and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis. PMID:25284785

  11. Functional diversification of maize RNA polymerase IV and V subtypes via alternative catalytic subunits

    DOE PAGES

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Brower-Toland, Brent; Krieger, Elysia K.; ...

    2014-10-02

    Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic analyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yieldsmore » at least two sub-types of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis.« less

  12. Characterization of a nuclear localization signal in the foot-and-mouth disease virus polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Aparicio, Maria Teresa; Rosas, Maria Flora; Sobrino, Francisco

    2013-09-15

    We have experimentally tested whether the MRKTKLAPT sequence in FMDV 3D protein (residues 16 to 24) can act as a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Mutants with substitutions in two basic residues within this sequence, K18E and K20E, were generated. A decreased nuclear localization was observed in transiently expressed 3D and its precursor 3CD, suggesting a role of K18 and K20 in nuclear targeting. Fusion of MRKTKLAPT to the green fluorescence protein (GFP) increased the nuclear localization of GFP, which was not observed when GFP was fused to the 3D mutated sequences. These results indicate that the sequence MRKTKLAPT can be functionally considered as a NLS. When introduced in a FMDV full length RNA replacements K18E and K20E led to production of revertant viruses that replaced the acidic residues introduced (E) by K, suggesting that the presence of lysins at positions 18 and 20 of 3D is essential for virus multiplication. - Highlights: • The FMDV 3D polymerase contains a nuclear localization signal. • Replacements K18E and K20E decrease nuclear localization of 3D and its precursor 3CD. • Fusion of the MRKTKLAPT 3D motif to GFP increases the nuclear localization of GFP. • Replacements K18E and K20E abolish the ability of MRKTKLAPT to relocate GFP. • RNAs harboring replacements K18E and K20E lead to recovery of revertant FMDVs.

  13. RNA polymerase activities associated with mirex-induced adaptive liver growth

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbrough, J.D.; Grimley, J.M.

    1986-03-01

    Chromatin-bound poly(d(A-T)) dependent RNA polymerase II and I plus III activities were measured in intact and adrenalectomized mirex-dosed rats. In intact mirex-dosed rats there was a 92% decrease in hepatic chromatin-bound RNA polymerase II activity 36 hrs post mirex dose. Chromatin-bound RNA polymerase I plus II activity increased with time post mirex dose: 70% at 12 hrs; 99% at 36 hrs, and 179% at 48 hrs. Adrenalectomy (ADX) reduced chromatin-bound RNA polymerase II activity by 45%. Contrary to the intact response, there was no change in chromatin-bound polymerase II activity in ADX mirex dosed rats. There was a marked change in the composition of total chromatin-bound RNA polymerases with time following the mirex dose. By 36 hrs post mirex dose, chromatin-bound RNA polymerase I plus III was 98% of the total. The sequence of events that occur in mirex-induced adaptive liver growth include: a 70-80% increase in relative liver weight at 72 hrs; a 48 hr peak in (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into DNA; a significant reduction in chromatin-bound RNA polymerase II activity at 37 hrs; and significant increases in polymerase I plus III activity (from 24-48 hrs post mirex dose).

  14. Phosphorylation at the N-terminal finger subdomain of a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sergio; Figueroa, Daniella; Correa, Simón; Díaz, Ariel; Aguayo, Daniel; Villanueva, Rodrigo A

    2015-10-09

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV), named NS5B, is phosphorylated by the cellular protein kinase C-related kinase 2 (PRK2) at two serine residues (Ser29 and Ser42) of the finger subdomain (genotype 1b). Herein, using bioinformatics, we selected four potential phosphorylation residues (Ser46, Ser76, Ser96 and Ser112) of NS5B (genotype 2a) for study. Whereas the NS5B Ser46D and Ser76D substitutions seemed to improve polymerase activity, the Ser96D mutation decreased colony formation efficiency. Active WT NS5B was utilized in in vitro kinase assays, and phosphopeptides were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the data indicated that both the NS5B Ser29 and Ser76 residues resulted phosphorylated. Thus, as Ser76 is absolutely conserved across HCV genotypes, our results confirmed the relevance of these sites for both genotypes and suggested that Ser76 becomes phosphorylated by a cellular kinase different from PRK2. By molecular dynamic simulations, we show that new interactions between space-adjacent amino acid chains could be established by the presence of a di-anionic phosphate group on the analyzed serines to possibly modify RNA polymerase activity. Together, our data present novel evidence on the complex regulation at the finger subdomain of HCV NS5B via phosphorylation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases of Picornaviruses: From the Structure to Regulatory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; Ferrero, Diego; Verdaguer, Núria

    2015-01-01

    RNA viruses typically encode their own RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) to ensure genome replication within the infected cells. RdRP function is critical not only for the virus life cycle but also for its adaptive potential. The combination of low fidelity of replication and the absence of proofreading and excision activities within the RdRPs result in high mutation frequencies that allow these viruses a rapid adaptation to changing environments. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about structural and functional aspects on RdRP catalytic complexes, focused mainly in the Picornaviridae family. The structural data currently available from these viruses provided high-resolution snapshots for a range of conformational states associated to RNA template-primer binding, rNTP recognition, catalysis and chain translocation. As these enzymes are major targets for the development of antiviral compounds, such structural information is essential for the design of new therapies. PMID:26258787

  16. RNA Polymerase II cluster dynamics predict mRNA output in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won-Ki; Jayanth, Namrata; English, Brian P; Inoue, Takuma; Andrews, J Owen; Conway, William; Grimm, Jonathan B; Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Lavis, Luke D; Lionnet, Timothée; Cisse, Ibrahim I

    2016-01-01

    Protein clustering is a hallmark of genome regulation in mammalian cells. However, the dynamic molecular processes involved make it difficult to correlate clustering with functional consequences in vivo. We developed a live-cell super-resolution approach to uncover the correlation between mRNA synthesis and the dynamics of RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) clusters at a gene locus. For endogenous β-actin genes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we observe that short-lived (~8 s) Pol II clusters correlate with basal mRNA output. During serum stimulation, a stereotyped increase in Pol II cluster lifetime correlates with a proportionate increase in the number of mRNAs synthesized. Our findings suggest that transient clustering of Pol II may constitute a pre-transcriptional regulatory event that predictably modulates nascent mRNA output. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13617.001 PMID:27138339

  17. 6S RNA-dependent inhibition of RNA polymerase is released by RNA-dependent synthesis of small de novo products.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Reinhild; Neusser, Thomas; Wagner, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    6S RNA from Escherichia coli is known to bind to RNA polymerase, preventing interaction with many promoters during stationary growth. The resulting repression is released under conditions of nutritional upshift, when the growth situation improves. 6S RNA, which binds to the active site of RNA polymerase, has the particularly interesting feature to act as a template, causing the transcription of defined de novo RNAs (dnRNA) that are complementary to a specific sequence region of the 6S RNA. We analyzed the conditions of dnRNA synthesis and determined their effect on the 6S RNA-mediated inhibition of RNA polymerase in vitro and in vivo. Upon nutritional upshift the RNA polymerase/6S RNA complex induces the rapid synthesis of dnRNAs, which form stable hybrids with the 6S RNA template. The resulting structural change destabilizes the inactivated RNA polymerase complex, causing sigma subunit release. Both dnRNA and 6S RNA are rapidly degraded after complex disintegration. Experiments using the transcriptional inhibitor rifampicin demonstrate that active transcription is required for the disintegration of the RNA polymerase/6S RNA complex. Our results support the conclusion that 6S RNA not only inhibits transcription during stationary growth but also enables cells to resume rapid growth after starvation and help to escape from stationary phase.

  18. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase pausing and dislodgement of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Adam C; Egan, J Barry; Shearwin, Keith E

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional interference is the in cis suppression of one transcriptional process by another. Mathematical modeling shows that promoter occlusion by elongating RNA polymerases cannot produce strong interference. Interference may instead be generated by (1) dislodgement of slow-to-assemble pre-initiation complexes and transcription factors and (2) prolonged occlusion by paused RNA polymerases.

  19. Selective in vitro transcription by purified yeast RNA polymerase II on cloned 2 micron DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ballario, P; Buongiorno-Nardelli, M; Carnevali, F; Di Mauro, E; Pedone, F

    1981-01-01

    The in vitro transcription properties of purified yeast RNA polymerase II have been analyzed on prokaryotic plasmids (pBR322 and pBR313) and chimaeric plasmids bearing yeast 2 micron sequences (BTYP 1, BTYH 2 and BTYH 3). Conditions for selective transcription of the 2 micron DNA sequences in chimaeric plasmids have been determined. pBR322 and pBR313 are not transcribed by the purified RNA polymerase II when not bearing eukaryotic inserts. We show that the agarose gel electrophoretic analysis of ternary transcription complexes allows the localization of nascent RNA chains. The RNA produced has been visualized by electron microscopy (nascent RNA hybridization loops) and by gel electrophoretic analysis. All the observed properties are shared by RNA polymerase II purified by a conventional method (1) and by a rapid alternative procedure described herein. The peculiar properties of a partially purified form of RNA polymerase II are reported. Images PMID:7029462

  20. mRNA decapping factors and the exonuclease Xrn2 function in widespread premature termination of RNA polymerase II transcription.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Kris; Kim, Hyunmin; Erickson, Benjamin; Glover-Cutter, Kira; Kim, Soojin; Fong, Nova; Kiemele, Lauren; Hansen, Kirk; Davis, Richard; Lykke-Andersen, Jens; Bentley, David L

    2012-05-11

    We report a function of human mRNA decapping factors in control of transcription by RNA polymerase II. Decapping proteins Edc3, Dcp1a, and Dcp2 and the termination factor TTF2 coimmunoprecipitate with Xrn2, the nuclear 5'-3' exonuclease "torpedo" that facilitates transcription termination at the 3' ends of genes. Dcp1a, Xrn2, and TTF2 localize near transcription start sites (TSSs) by ChIP-seq. At genes with 5' peaks of paused pol II, knockdown of decapping or termination factors Xrn2 and TTF2 shifted polymerase away from the TSS toward upstream and downstream distal positions. This redistribution of pol II is similar in magnitude to that caused by depletion of the elongation factor Spt5. We propose that coupled decapping of nascent transcripts and premature termination by the "torpedo" mechanism is a widespread mechanism that limits bidirectional pol II elongation. Regulated cotranscriptional decapping near promoter-proximal pause sites followed by premature termination could control productive pol II elongation.

  1. Antibacterial Nucleoside-Analog Inhibitor of Bacterial RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Maffioli, Sonia I; Zhang, Yu; Degen, David; Carzaniga, Thomas; Del Gatto, Giancarlo; Serina, Stefania; Monciardini, Paolo; Mazzetti, Carlo; Guglierame, Paola; Candiani, Gianpaolo; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Facchetti, Giuseppe; Kaltofen, Petra; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Dehò, Gianni; Donadio, Stefano; Ebright, Richard H

    2017-06-15

    Drug-resistant bacterial pathogens pose an urgent public-health crisis. Here, we report the discovery, from microbial-extract screening, of a nucleoside-analog inhibitor that inhibits bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) and exhibits antibacterial activity against drug-resistant bacterial pathogens: pseudouridimycin (PUM). PUM is a natural product comprising a formamidinylated, N-hydroxylated Gly-Gln dipeptide conjugated to 6'-amino-pseudouridine. PUM potently and selectively inhibits bacterial RNAP in vitro, inhibits bacterial growth in culture, and clears infection in a mouse model of Streptococcus pyogenes peritonitis. PUM inhibits RNAP through a binding site on RNAP (the NTP addition site) and mechanism (competition with UTP for occupancy of the NTP addition site) that differ from those of the RNAP inhibitor and current antibacterial drug rifampin (Rif). PUM exhibits additive antibacterial activity when co-administered with Rif, exhibits no cross-resistance with Rif, and exhibits a spontaneous resistance rate an order-of-magnitude lower than that of Rif. PUM is a highly promising lead for antibacterial therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nucleosome Positioning and NDR Structure at RNA Polymerase III Promoters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbo, Alexandra Søgaard; Lay, Fides D.; Jones, Peter A.; Liang, Gangning; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2017-02-01

    Chromatin is structurally involved in the transcriptional regulation of all genes. While the nucleosome positioning at RNA polymerase II (pol II) promoters has been extensively studied, less is known about the chromatin structure at pol III promoters in human cells. We use a high-resolution analysis to show substantial differences in chromatin structure of pol II and pol III promoters, and between subtypes of pol III genes. Notably, the nucleosome depleted region at the transcription start site of pol III genes extends past the termination sequences, resulting in nucleosome free gene bodies. The +1 nucleosome is located further downstream than at pol II genes and furthermore displays weak positioning. The variable position of the +1 location is seen not only within individual cell populations and between cell types, but also between different pol III promoter subtypes, suggesting that the +1 nucleosome may be involved in the transcriptional regulation of pol III genes. We find that expression and DNA methylation patterns correlate with distinct accessibility patterns, where DNA methylation associates with the silencing and inaccessibility at promoters. Taken together, this study provides the first high-resolution map of nucleosome positioning and occupancy at human pol III promoters at specific loci and genome wide.

  3. RNA polymerase II kinetics in polo polyadenylation signal selection

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Pedro A B; Henriques, Telmo; Freitas, Marta O; Martins, Torcato; Domingues, Rita G; Wyrzykowska, Paulina S; Coelho, Paula A; Carmo, Alexandre M; Sunkel, Claudio E; Proudfoot, Nicholas J; Moreira, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Regulated alternative polyadenylation is an important feature of gene expression, but how gene transcription rate affects this process remains to be investigated. polo is a cell-cycle gene that uses two poly(A) signals in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) to produce alternative messenger RNAs that differ in their 3′UTR length. Using a mutant Drosophila strain that has a lower transcriptional elongation rate, we show that transcription kinetics can determine alternative poly(A) site selection. The physiological consequences of incorrect polo poly(A) site choice are of vital importance; transgenic flies lacking the distal poly(A) signal cannot produce the longer transcript and die at the pupa stage due to a failure in the proliferation of the precursor cells of the abdomen, the histoblasts. This is due to the low translation efficiency of the shorter transcript produced by proximal poly(A) site usage. Our results show that correct polo poly(A) site selection functions to provide the correct levels of protein expression necessary for histoblast proliferation, and that the kinetics of RNA polymerase II have an important role in the mechanism of alternative polyadenylation. PMID:21602789

  4. Recombinant Thermus aquaticus RNA Polymerase for Structural Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Juznedelov,K.; Lamour, V.; Patikoglou, G.; Chlenov, M.; Darst, S.; Severinov, K.

    2006-01-01

    Advances in the structural biology of bacterial transcription have come from studies of RNA polymerases (RNAPs) from the thermophilic eubacteria Thermus aquaticus (Taq) and Thermus thermophilus (Tth). These structural studies have been limited by the fact that only endogenous Taq or Tth RNAP, laboriously purified from large quantities of Taq or Tth cell paste and offering few options for genetic modification, is suitable for structural studies. Recombinant systems for the preparation of Taq RNAP by co-overexpression and assembly in the heterologous host, Escherichia coli, have been described, but these did not yield enzyme suitable for crystallographic studies. Here we describe recombinant systems for the preparation of Taq RNAP harboring full or partial deletions of the Taq {beta}' non-conserved domain (NCD), yielding enzyme suitable for crystallographic studies. This opens the way for structural studies of genetically manipulated enzymes, allowing the preparation of more crystallizable enzymes and facilitating detailed structure/function analysis. Characterization of the Taq{beta}'NCD deletion mutants generated in this study showed that the {beta}'NCD is important for the efficient binding of the s subunit, confirming previous hypotheses. Finally, preliminary structural analysis (at 4.1 Angstroms resolution) of one of the recombinant mutants revealed a previously unobserved conformation of the {beta}-flap, further defining the range of conformations accessible to this flexible structural element.

  5. Retinoblastoma protein disrupts interactions required for RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, J E; Brown, T R; Allison, S J; Scott, P H; White, R J

    2000-12-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (RB) has been shown to suppress RNA polymerase (Pol) III transcription in vivo (R. J. White, D. Trouche, K. Martin, S. P. Jackson, and T. Kouzarides, Nature 382:88-90, 1996). This regulation involves interaction with TFIIIB, a multisubunit factor that is required for the expression of all Pol III templates (C. G. C. Larminie, C. A. Cairns, R. Mital, K. Martin, T. Kouzarides, S. P. Jackson, and R. J. White, EMBO J. 16:2061-2071, 1997; W.-M. Chu, Z. Wang, R. G. Roeder, and C. W. Schmid, J. Biol. Chem. 272:14755-14761, 1997). However, it has not been established why RB binding to TFIIIB results in transcriptional repression. For several Pol II-transcribed genes, RB has been shown to inhibit expression by recruiting histone deacetylases, which are thought to decrease promoter accessibility. We present evidence that histone deacetylases exert a negative effect on Pol III activity in vivo. However, RB remains able to regulate Pol III transcription in the presence of the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A. Instead, RB represses by disrupting interactions between TFIIIB and other components of the basal Pol III transcription apparatus. Recruitment of TFIIIB to most class III genes requires its binding to TFIIIC2, but this can be blocked by RB. In addition, RB disrupts the interaction between TFIIIB and Pol III that is essential for transcription. The ability of RB to inhibit these key interactions can explain its action as a potent repressor of class III gene expression.

  6. Nucleosome Positioning and NDR Structure at RNA Polymerase III Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Helbo, Alexandra Søgaard; Lay, Fides D.; Jones, Peter A.; Liang, Gangning; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin is structurally involved in the transcriptional regulation of all genes. While the nucleosome positioning at RNA polymerase II (pol II) promoters has been extensively studied, less is known about the chromatin structure at pol III promoters in human cells. We use a high-resolution analysis to show substantial differences in chromatin structure of pol II and pol III promoters, and between subtypes of pol III genes. Notably, the nucleosome depleted region at the transcription start site of pol III genes extends past the termination sequences, resulting in nucleosome free gene bodies. The +1 nucleosome is located further downstream than at pol II genes and furthermore displays weak positioning. The variable position of the +1 location is seen not only within individual cell populations and between cell types, but also between different pol III promoter subtypes, suggesting that the +1 nucleosome may be involved in the transcriptional regulation of pol III genes. We find that expression and DNA methylation patterns correlate with distinct accessibility patterns, where DNA methylation associates with the silencing and inaccessibility at promoters. Taken together, this study provides the first high-resolution map of nucleosome positioning and occupancy at human pol III promoters at specific loci and genome wide. PMID:28176797

  7. Cloning, soluble expression, and purification of the RNA polymerase II subunit RPB5 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Gaurav; Ghosh, Arabinda; Chinta, Ramesh; Akhtar, Sohail; Tripathi, Timir

    2015-01-01

    We report the molecular cloning, expression, and single-step homogeneous purification of RNA polymerase II subunit RPB5 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. RPB5 is a 210 amino acid nuclear protein that functions as the fifth largest subunit of polymerase II and plays a central role in transcription. The gene that codes for RPB5 was generated by amplification by polymerase chain reaction. It was then inserted in the expression vector pET28a(+) under the transcriptional control of the bacteriophage T7 promoter and lac operator. BL21(DE3) Escherichia coli strain transformed with the rpb5 expression vector pET28a(+)-rpb5 accumulates large amounts of a soluble protein of about 30 kDa (25 kDa plus 5 kDa double His6-Tag at N and C-terminal). The protein was purified to homogeneity using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. RPB5 recombinant protein was further confirmed by immunoblotting with anti-His antibody. In this study, the expression and purification procedures have provided a simple and efficient method to obtain pure RPB5 in large quantities. This will provide an opportunity to study the role of S. cerevisiae RPB5 in gene expression and transcription regulation. Furthermore, it can provide additional knowledge of the interaction partners of RPB5 during various steps of transcription and gene expression.

  8. RNA polymerase supply and flux through the lac operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sendy, Bandar; Lee, David J.; Bryant, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation, followed by quantification of immunoprecipitated DNA, can be used to measure RNA polymerase binding to any DNA segment in Escherichia coli. By calibrating measurements against the signal from a single RNA polymerase bound at a single promoter, we can calculate both promoter occupancy levels and the flux of transcribing RNA polymerase through transcription units. Here, we have applied the methodology to the E. coli lactose operon promoter. We confirm that promoter occupancy is limited by recruitment and that the supply of RNA polymerase to the lactose operon promoter depends on its location in the E. coli chromosome. Measurements of RNA polymerase binding to DNA segments within the lactose operon show that flux of RNA polymerase through the operon is low, with, on average, over 18 s elapsing between the passage of transcribing polymerases. Similar low levels of flux were found when semi-synthetic promoters were used to drive transcript initiation, even when the promoter elements were changed to ensure full occupancy of the promoter by RNA polymerase. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672157

  9. RNA polymerase supply and flux through the lac operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sendy, Bandar; Lee, David J; Busby, Stephen J W; Bryant, Jack A

    2016-11-05

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation, followed by quantification of immunoprecipitated DNA, can be used to measure RNA polymerase binding to any DNA segment in Escherichia coli By calibrating measurements against the signal from a single RNA polymerase bound at a single promoter, we can calculate both promoter occupancy levels and the flux of transcribing RNA polymerase through transcription units. Here, we have applied the methodology to the E. coli lactose operon promoter. We confirm that promoter occupancy is limited by recruitment and that the supply of RNA polymerase to the lactose operon promoter depends on its location in the E. coli chromosome. Measurements of RNA polymerase binding to DNA segments within the lactose operon show that flux of RNA polymerase through the operon is low, with, on average, over 18 s elapsing between the passage of transcribing polymerases. Similar low levels of flux were found when semi-synthetic promoters were used to drive transcript initiation, even when the promoter elements were changed to ensure full occupancy of the promoter by RNA polymerase.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'.

  10. BC1 RNA: transcriptional analysis of a neural cell-specific RNA polymerase III transcript.

    PubMed Central

    Martignetti, J A; Brosius, J

    1995-01-01

    Rodent BC1 RNA represents the first example of a neural cell-specific RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription product. By developing a rat brain in vitro system capable of supporting Pol III-directed transcription, we showed that the rat BC1 RNA intragenic promoter elements, comprising an A box element and a variant B box element, as well as its upstream region, containing octamer-binding consensus sequences and functional TATA and proximal sequence element sites, are necessary for transcription. The BC1 B box, lacking the invariant A residue found in the consensus B boxes of tRNAs, represents a functionally related and possibly distinct promoter element. The transcriptional activity of the BC1 B box element is greatly increased, in both a BC1 RNA and a chimeric tRNA(Leu) gene construct, when the BC1 5' flanking region is present and is appropriately spaced. Moreover, a tRNA consensus B-box sequence can efficiently replace the BC1 B box only if the BC1 upstream region is removed. These interactions, identified only in a homologous in vitro system, between upstream Pol II and intragenic Pol III promoters suggest a mechanism by which the tissue-specific BC1 RNA gene and possibly other Pol III-transcribed genes can be regulated. PMID:7862155

  11. Lineage-specific variations in the trigger loop modulate RNA proofreading by bacterial RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Esyunina, Daria; Turtola, Matti; Pupov, Danil; Bass, Irina; Klimašauskas, Saulius; Belogurov, Georgiy; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    RNA cleavage by bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) has been implicated in transcriptional proofreading and reactivation of arrested transcription elongation complexes but its molecular mechanism is less understood than the mechanism of nucleotide addition, despite both reactions taking place in the same active site. RNAP from the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is characterized by highly efficient intrinsic RNA cleavage in comparison with Escherichia coli RNAP. We find that the enhanced RNA cleavage activity largely derives from amino acid substitutions in the trigger loop (TL), a mobile element of the active site involved in various RNAP activities. The differences in RNA cleavage between these RNAPs disappear when the TL is deleted, or in the presence of GreA cleavage factors, which replace the TL in the active site. We propose that the TL substitutions modulate the RNA cleavage activity by altering the TL folding and its contacts with substrate RNA and that the resulting differences in transcriptional proofreading may play a role in bacterial stress adaptation. PMID:26733581

  12. Purification of sea-urchin RNA polymerase II. Characterization by template requirements and sensitivity to inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ballario, P; Di Mauro, E; Giuliani, C; Pedone, F

    1980-04-01

    The purification of RNA polymerase II from gastrulae of Paracentrotus lividus is described. The enzyme obtained is homogeneous as judged by electrophoresis under non-denaturing conditions. It is able to transcribe both native high-Mr P. lividus DNA and Psammechinus miliaris h22 histone DNA, although single-stranded and nicked DNAs are better templates. P. lividus RNA polymerase II forms with homologous native DNA stable binary complexes that are able to initiate RNA chains after exposure to heparin. Heparin-resistant complexes do not form on nicks of DNA molecules. Sensitivity of sea-urchin RNA polymerase II to rifamycin derivatives and alpha-amanitin has been determined.

  13. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription

    PubMed Central

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription. PMID:25764111

  14. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription.

  15. Plastid RNA polymerases: orchestration of enzymes with different evolutionary origins controls chloroplast biogenesis during the plant life cycle.

    PubMed

    Pfannschmidt, Thomas; Blanvillain, Robert; Merendino, Livia; Courtois, Florence; Chevalier, Fabien; Liebers, Monique; Grübler, Björn; Hommel, Elisabeth; Lerbs-Mache, Silva

    2015-12-01

    Chloroplasts are the sunlight-collecting organelles of photosynthetic eukaryotes that energetically drive the biosphere of our planet. They are the base for all major food webs by providing essential photosynthates to all heterotrophic organisms including humans. Recent research has focused largely on an understanding of the function of these organelles, but knowledge about the biogenesis of chloroplasts is rather limited. It is known that chloroplasts develop from undifferentiated precursor plastids, the proplastids, in meristematic cells. This review focuses on the activation and action of plastid RNA polymerases, which play a key role in the development of new chloroplasts from proplastids. Evolutionarily, plastids emerged from the endosymbiosis of a cyanobacterium-like ancestor into a heterotrophic eukaryote. As an evolutionary remnant of this process, they possess their own genome, which is expressed by two types of plastid RNA polymerase, phage-type and prokaryotic-type RNA polymerase. The protein subunits of these polymerases are encoded in both the nuclear and plastid genomes. Their activation and action therefore require a highly sophisticated regulation that controls and coordinates the expression of the components encoded in the plastid and nucleus. Stoichiometric expression and correct assembly of RNA polymerase complexes is achieved by a combination of developmental and environmentally induced programmes. This review highlights the current knowledge about the functional coordination between the different types of plastid RNA polymerases and provides working models of their sequential expression and function for future investigations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Long non-coding RNA produced by RNA polymerase V determines boundaries of heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Gudrun; Sethuraman, Shriya; Rowley, M Jordan; Krzyszton, Michal; Rothi, M Hafiz; Bouzit, Lilia; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T

    2016-10-25

    RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing is a conserved process where small RNAs target transposons and other sequences for repression by establishing chromatin modifications. A central element of this process are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), which in Arabidopsis thaliana are produced by a specialized RNA polymerase known as Pol V. Here we show that non-coding transcription by Pol V is controlled by preexisting chromatin modifications located within the transcribed regions. Most Pol V transcripts are associated with AGO4 but are not sliced by AGO4. Pol V-dependent DNA methylation is established on both strands of DNA and is tightly restricted to Pol V-transcribed regions. This indicates that chromatin modifications are established in close proximity to Pol V. Finally, Pol V transcription is preferentially enriched on edges of silenced transposable elements, where Pol V transcribes into TEs. We propose that Pol V may play an important role in the determination of heterochromatin boundaries.

  17. Spontaneous cleavage of RNA in ternary complexes of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase and its significance for the mechanism of transcription.

    PubMed

    Surratt, C K; Milan, S C; Chamberlin, M J

    1991-09-15

    Ternary complexes of RNA polymerase, bearing the nascent RNA transcript, are intermediates in the synthesis of all RNAs and are regulatory targets of factors that control RNA chain elongation and termination. To study the catalytic and regulatory properties of RNA polymerases during elongation, we have developed methods for the preparation of these intermediates halted at defined positions along a DNA template. To our surprise, some of these halted complexes undergo a reaction in which the RNA transcript is cleaved up to 10 nucleotides from its 3'-terminal growing point. The 5'-terminal fragment, bearing a free 3'-OH residue, remains bound to the RNA polymerase-DNA complex and can resume elongation, whereas the 3'-terminal oligonucleotide of 2-10 nucleotides, bearing a 5'-phosphate, is released. RNA cleavage occurs only in the ternary complex and requires a divalent metal ion such as Mg2+. Since RNA polymerases are believed to have a single catalytic site for nucleotide addition, this reaction is unlikely to be due to hydrolysis catalyzed by this site comparable to the 3'----5' exonuclease activity associated with the catalytic center found for some DNA polymerases. Nor is this reaction easily explained by models for transcription elongation that postulate a 12-base-pair DNA.RNA hybrid as intermediate. Instead, we suggest that this is an unusual kind of protein-facilitated reaction in which tight binding of the RNA product to the enzyme strains the RNA phosphodiester linkage, resulting in cleavage of the RNA well away from the catalytic center. By this model, the nascent RNA enters a product binding site beginning 3 or 4 nucleotides from the growing point at the 3' terminus. This RNA binding site extends for up to 16 nucleotides along the protein surface. The stress brought about by this binding appears to vary considerably for different ternary complexes and may play a role in driving the translocation of the RNA polymerase along the DNA.

  18. RNA Polymerase Activity and Specific RNA Structure Are Required for Efficient HCV Replication in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Date, Tomoko; Akazawa, Daisuke; Tian, Xiao; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Kato, Takanobu; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizokami, Masashi; Wakita, Takaji; Toyoda, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that the NS3 helicase (N3H) and NS5B-to-3′X (N5BX) regions are important for the efficient replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) strain JFH-1 and viral production in HuH-7 cells. In the current study, we investigated the relationships between HCV genome replication, virus production, and the structure of N5BX. We found that the Q377R, A450S, S455N, R517K, and Y561F mutations in the NS5B region resulted in up-regulation of J6CF NS5B polymerase activity in vitro. However, the activation effects of these mutations on viral RNA replication and virus production with JFH-1 N3H appeared to differ. In the presence of the N3H region and 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of JFH-1, A450S, R517K, and Y561F together were sufficient to confer HCV genome replication activity and virus production ability to J6CF in cultured cells. Y561F was also involved in the kissing-loop interaction between SL3.2 in the NS5B region and SL2 in the 3′X region. We next analyzed the 3′ structure of HCV genome RNA. The shorter polyU/UC tracts of JFH-1 resulted in more efficient RNA replication than J6CF. Furthermore, 9458G in the JFH-1 variable region (VR) was responsible for RNA replication activity because of its RNA structures. In conclusion, N3H, high polymerase activity, enhanced kissing-loop interactions, and optimal viral RNA structure in the 3′UTR were required for J6CF replication in cultured cells. PMID:20442786

  19. Transcript cleavage by RNA polymerase II arrested by a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer in the DNA template.

    PubMed

    Donahue, B A; Yin, S; Taylor, J S; Reines, D; Hanawalt, P C

    1994-08-30

    A current model for transcription-coupled DNA repair is that RNA polymerase, arrested at a DNA lesion, directs the repair machinery to the transcribed strand of an active gene. To help elucidate this role of RNA polymerase, we constructed DNA templates containing the major late promoter of adenovirus and a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) at a specific site. CPDs, the predominant DNA lesions formed by ultraviolet radiation, are good substrates for transcription-coupled repair. A CPD located on the transcribed strand of the template was a strong block to polymerase movement, whereas a CPD located on the nontranscribed strand had no effect on transcription. Furthermore, the arrested polymerase shielded the CPD from recognition by photolyase, a bacterial DNA repair protein. Transcription elongation factor SII (also called TFIIS) facilitates read-through of a variety of transcriptional pause sites by a process in which RNA polymerase II cleaves the nascent transcript before elongation resumes. We show that SII induces nascent transcript cleavage by RNA polymerase II stalled at a CPD. However, this cleavage does not remove the arrested polymerase from the site of the DNA lesion, nor does it facilitate translesional bypass by the polymerase. The arrested ternary complex is stable and competent to resume elongation, demonstrating that neither the polymerase nor the RNA product dissociates from the DNA template.

  20. The actinobacterial transcription factor RbpA binds to the principal sigma subunit of RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Tabib-Salazar, Aline; Liu, Bing; Doughty, Philip; Lewis, Richard A; Ghosh, Somadri; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Simpson, Peter J; O'Dwyer, Kathleen; Matthews, Steve J; Paget, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    RbpA is a small non-DNA-binding transcription factor that associates with RNA polymerase holoenzyme and stimulates transcription in actinobacteria, including Streptomyces coelicolor and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. RbpA seems to show specificity for the vegetative form of RNA polymerase as opposed to alternative forms of the enzyme. Here, we explain the basis of this specificity by showing that RbpA binds directly to the principal σ subunit in these organisms, but not to more diverged alternative σ factors. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that, although differing in their requirement for structural zinc, the RbpA orthologues from S. coelicolor and M. tuberculosis share a common structural core domain, with extensive, apparently disordered, N- and C-terminal regions. The RbpA-σ interaction is mediated by the C-terminal region of RbpA and σ domain 2, and S. coelicolor RbpA mutants that are defective in binding σ are unable to stimulate transcription in vitro and are inactive in vivo. Given that RbpA is essential in M. tuberculosis and critical for growth in S. coelicolor, these data support a model in which RbpA plays a key role in the σ cycle in actinobacteria.

  1. Old drug, new target: ellipticines selectively inhibit RNA polymerase I transcription.

    PubMed

    Andrews, William J; Panova, Tatiana; Normand, Christophe; Gadal, Olivier; Tikhonova, Irina G; Panov, Konstantin I

    2013-02-15

    Transcription by RNA polymerase I (Pol-I) is the main driving force behind ribosome biogenesis, a fundamental cellular process that requires the coordinated transcription of all three nuclear polymerases. Increased Pol-I transcription and the concurrent increase in ribosome biogenesis has been linked to the high rates of proliferation in cancers. The ellipticine family contains a number of potent anticancer therapeutic agents, some having progressed to stage I and II clinical trials; however, the mechanism by which many of the compounds work remains unclear. It has long been thought that inhibition of Top2 is the main reason behind the drugs antiproliferative effects. Here we report that a number of the ellipticines, including 9-hydroxyellipticine, are potent and specific inhibitors of Pol-I transcription, with IC(50) in vitro and in cells in the nanomolar range. Essentially, the drugs did not affect Pol-II and Pol-III transcription, demonstrating a high selectivity. We have shown that Pol-I inhibition occurs by a p53-, ATM/ATR-, and Top2-independent mechanism. We discovered that the drug influences the assembly and stability of preinitiation complexes by targeting the interaction between promoter recognition factor SL1 and the rRNA promoter. Our findings will have an impact on the design and development of novel therapeutic agents specifically targeting ribosome biogenesis.

  2. When transcription goes on Holliday: Double Holliday junctions block RNA polymerase II transcription in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pipathsouk, Anne; Belotserkovskii, Boris P; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2017-02-01

    Non-canonical DNA structures can obstruct transcription. This transcription blockage could have various biological consequences, including genomic instability and gratuitous transcription-coupled repair. Among potential structures causing transcription blockage are Holliday junctions (HJs), which can be generated as intermediates in homologous recombination or during processing of stalled replication forks. Of particular interest is the double Holliday junction (DHJ), which contains two HJs. Topological considerations impose the constraint that the total number of helical turns in the DNA duplexes between the junctions cannot be altered as long as the flanking DNA duplexes are intact. Thus, the DHJ structure should strongly resist transient unwinding during transcription; consequently, it is predicted to cause significantly stronger blockage than single HJ structures. The patterns of transcription blockage obtained for RNA polymerase II transcription in HeLa cell nuclear extracts were in accordance with this prediction. However, we did not detect transcription blockage with purified T7 phage RNA polymerase; we discuss a possible explanation for this difference. In general, our findings implicate naturally occurring Holliday junctions in transcription arrest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Recessive mutations in POLR1C cause a leukodystrophy by impairing biogenesis of RNA polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Thiffault, Isabelle; Wolf, Nicole I.; Forget, Diane; Guerrero, Kether; Tran, Luan T.; Choquet, Karine; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Poitras, Christian; Brais, Bernard; Yoon, Grace; Sztriha, Laszlo; Webster, Richard I.; Timmann, Dagmar; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Seeger, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Alíz; Máté, Adrienn; Goizet, Cyril; Fung, Eva; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Fribourg, Sébastien; Vanderver, Adeline; Simons, Cas; Taft, Ryan J.; Yates III, John R.; Coulombe, Benoit; Bernard, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    A small proportion of 4H (Hypomyelination, Hypodontia and Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism) or RNA polymerase III (POLR3)-related leukodystrophy cases are negative for mutations in the previously identified causative genes POLR3A and POLR3B. Here we report eight of these cases carrying recessive mutations in POLR1C, a gene encoding a shared POLR1 and POLR3 subunit, also mutated in some Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) cases. Using shotgun proteomics and ChIP sequencing, we demonstrate that leukodystrophy-causative mutations, but not TCS mutations, in POLR1C impair assembly and nuclear import of POLR3, but not POLR1, leading to decreased binding to POLR3 target genes. This study is the first to show that distinct mutations in a gene coding for a shared subunit of two RNA polymerases lead to selective modification of the enzymes' availability leading to two different clinical conditions and to shed some light on the pathophysiological mechanism of one of the most common hypomyelinating leukodystrophies, POLR3-related leukodystrophy. PMID:26151409

  4. Distribution of different phosphorylated forms of RNA polymerase II in relation to Cajal and PML bodies in human cells: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Xie, Sheila Q; Pombo, Ana

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian nucleus is a highly organised organelle that contains many subcompartments with roles in DNA replication and repair, gene expression and RNA processing. Cajal and promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) bodies are discrete nuclear structures with specific molecular signatures. RNA polymerase II and many transcription factors have been identified within these compartments by immunofluorescence microscopy, suggesting a role in polymerase II assembly or transcriptional activity. Here, we have examined the presence of different phosphorylated forms of polymerase II and newly made RNA in Cajal and PML bodies using high-resolution imaging of ultrathin cryosections (approximately 120 nm thick) with fluorescence and electron microscopes. We show that Cajal bodies contain polymerase II phosphorylated on Ser5, and not the Ser2-phosphorylated (active) form or newly made RNA. The presence of polymerase II in the absence of transcriptional activity suggests that Cajal bodies have roles in polymerase assembly or transport, but not in gene transcription. PML bodies contain no detectable polymerase II or nascent RNA in HeLa cells, at the resolution achieved by electron microscopy, but are often surrounded by these markers at distances>25 nm. These results support the view that although PML bodies are present in transcriptionally active areas of the nucleus, they are not generally sites of polymerase II assembly, transport or activity.

  5. The second-largest subunit of the poxvirus RNA polymerase is similar to the corresponding subunits of procaryotic and eucaryotic RNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, D D; Pickup, D J

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized the poxvirus gene encoding the second-largest subunit of the viral DNA-dependent RNA polymerase. This gene, designated rpo132, is located in the HindIII A fragment of the DNA of the Brighton Red strain of cowpox virus. A similar gene is located in the corresponding position in the HindIII A fragment of the DNA of the Western Reserve strain of vaccinia virus. The rpo132 gene is transcribed throughout the viral multiplication cycle. It has two transcriptional start sites; one is operative at late times only, and the other (80 base pairs downstream) is operative both at early times and at late times. Neither early nor late transcripts originating from the latter RNA start site contain long 5'-terminal poly(A) sequences. The rpo132 gene has the capacity to encode primary gene products of two types. The RNA transcripts whose 5' ends correspond to the early RNA start site can encode a 133-kilodalton (kDa) protein. The RNA transcripts whose 5' ends correspond to the early RNA start site can encode a 132-kDa protein. Transcripts of the latter type are more abundant, suggesting that the 132-kDa protein is the major primary product of this gene. The predicted amino acid sequences of both gene products share extensive similarities with the amino acid sequences of the second-largest subunits of the following enzymes: the RNA polymerase of Escherichia coli, the RNA polymerase II of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the RNA polymerase II of Drosophila melanogaster. This result provides further evidence of relatedness between multisubunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerases. Images PMID:2915377

  6. Ms1, a novel sRNA interacting with the RNA polymerase core in mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Jirát Matějčková, Jitka; Šiková, Michaela; Pospíšil, Jiří; Halada, Petr; Pánek, Josef; Krásný, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are molecules essential for a number of regulatory processes in the bacterial cell. Here we characterize Ms1, a sRNA that is highly expressed in Mycobacterium smegmatis during stationary phase of growth. By glycerol gradient ultracentrifugation, RNA binding assay, and RNA co-immunoprecipitation, we show that Ms1 interacts with the RNA polymerase (RNAP) core that is free of the primary sigma factor (σA) or any other σ factor. This contrasts with the situation in most other species where it is 6S RNA that interacts with RNAP and this interaction requires the presence of σA. The difference in the interaction of the two types of sRNAs (Ms1 or 6S RNA) with RNAP possibly reflects the difference in the composition of the transcriptional machinery between mycobacteria and other species. Unlike Escherichia coli, stationary phase M. smegmatis cells contain relatively few RNAP molecules in complex with σA. Thus, Ms1 represents a novel type of small RNAs interacting with RNAP. PMID:25217589

  7. Histones are required for transcription of yeast rRNA genes by RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Tongaonkar, Prasad; French, Sarah L; Oakes, Melanie L; Vu, Loan; Schneider, David A; Beyer, Ann L; Nomura, Masayasu

    2005-07-19

    Nucleosomes and their histone components have generally been recognized to act negatively on transcription. However, purified upstream activating factor (UAF), a transcription initiation factor required for RNA polymerase (Pol) I transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, contains histones H3 and H4 and four nonhistone protein subunits. Other studies have shown that histones H3 and H4 are associated with actively transcribed rRNA genes. To examine their functional role in Pol I transcription, we constructed yeast strains in which synthesis of H3 is achieved from the glucose-repressible GAL10 promoter. We found that partial depletion of H3 (approximately 50% depletion) resulted in a strong inhibition (>80%) of Pol I transcription. A combination of biochemical analysis and electron microscopic (EM) analysis of Miller chromatin spreads indicated that initiation and elongation steps and rRNA processing were compromised upon histone depletion. A clear decrease in relative amounts of UAF, presumably caused by reduced stability, was also observed under the conditions of H3 depletion. Therefore, the observed inhibition of initiation can be explained, in part, by the decrease in UAF concentration. In addition, the EM results suggested that the defects in rRNA transcript elongation and processing may be a result of loss of histones from rRNA genes rather than (or in addition to) an indirect consequence of effects of histone depletion on expression of other genes. Thus, these results show functional importance of histones associated with actively transcribed rRNA genes.

  8. Structural Analysis of Monomeric RNA-Dependent Polymerases: Evolutionary and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Jácome, Rodrigo; Becerra, Arturo; Ponce de León, Samuel; Lazcano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures of monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases of more than 20 different viruses are available in the Protein Data Bank. They all share the characteristic right-hand shape of DNA- and RNA polymerases formed by the fingers, palm and thumb subdomains, and, in many cases, “fingertips” that extend from the fingers towards the thumb subdomain, giving the viral enzyme a closed right-hand appearance. Six conserved structural motifs that contain key residues for the proper functioning of the enzyme have been identified in all these RNA-dependent polymerases. These enzymes share a two divalent metal-ion mechanism of polymerization in which two conserved aspartate residues coordinate the interactions with the metal ions to catalyze the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. The recent availability of crystal structures of polymerases of the Orthomyxoviridae and Bunyaviridae families allowed us to make pairwise comparisons of the tertiary structures of polymerases belonging to the four main RNA viral groups, which has led to a phylogenetic tree in which single-stranded negative RNA viral polymerases have been included for the first time. This has also allowed us to use a homology-based structural prediction approach to develop a general three-dimensional model of the Ebola virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Our model includes several of the conserved structural motifs and residues described in other viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that define the catalytic and highly conserved palm subdomain, as well as portions of the fingers and thumb subdomains. The results presented here help to understand the current use and apparent success of antivirals, i.e. Brincidofovir, Lamivudine and Favipiravir, originally aimed at other types of polymerases, to counteract the Ebola virus infection. PMID:26397100

  9. Episodic adaptive diversification of classical swine fever virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5B.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yang, Zexiao

    2015-12-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the pathogen that causes a highly infectious disease of pigs and has led to disastrous losses to pig farms and related industries. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) NS5B is a central component of the replicase complex (RC) in some single-stranded RNA viruses, including CSFV. On the basis of genetic variation, the CSFV RdRps could be clearly divided into 2 major groups and a minor group, which is consistent with the phylogenetic relationships and virulence diversification of the CSFV isolates. However, the adaptive signature underlying such an evolutionary profile of the polymerase and the virus is still an interesting open question. We analyzed the evolutionary trajectory of the CSFV RdRps over different timescales to evaluate the potential adaptation. We found that adaptive selection has driven the diversification of the RdRps between, but not within, CSFV major groups. Further, the major adaptive divergence-related sites are located in the surfaces relevant to the interaction with other component(s) of RC and the entrance and exit of the template-binding channel. These results might shed some light on the nature of the RdRp in virulence diversification of CSFV groups.

  10. The conserved protein Seb1 drives transcription termination by binding RNA polymerase II and nascent RNA.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Sina; Renner, Max; Watts, Beth R; Adams, Oliver; Huseyin, Miles; Baejen, Carlo; El Omari, Kamel; Kilchert, Cornelia; Heo, Dong-Hyuk; Kecman, Tea; Cramer, Patrick; Grimes, Jonathan M; Vasiljeva, Lidia

    2017-04-03

    Termination of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription is an important step in the transcription cycle, which involves the dislodgement of polymerase from DNA, leading to release of a functional transcript. Recent studies have identified the key players required for this process and showed that a common feature of these proteins is a conserved domain that interacts with the phosphorylated C-terminus of Pol II (CTD-interacting domain, CID). However, the mechanism by which transcription termination is achieved is not understood. Using genome-wide methods, here we show that the fission yeast CID-protein Seb1 is essential for termination of protein-coding and non-coding genes through interaction with S2-phosphorylated Pol II and nascent RNA. Furthermore, we present the crystal structures of the Seb1 CTD- and RNA-binding modules. Unexpectedly, the latter reveals an intertwined two-domain arrangement of a canonical RRM and second domain. These results provide important insights into the mechanism underlying eukaryotic transcription termination.

  11. The identification of a novel role for BRCA1 in regulating RNA polymerase I transcription

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Rebecca; D'Costa, Zenobia; Ray, Swagat; Gorski, Julia; Harkin, D. Paul; Mullan, Paul; Panov, Konstantin I.

    2016-01-01

    The unrestrained proliferation of cancer cells requires a high level of ribosome biogenesis. The first stage of ribosome biogenesis is the transcription of the large ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs); the structural and functional components of the ribosome. Transcription of rRNA is carried out by RNA polymerase I (Pol-I) and its associated holoenzyme complex. Here we report that BRCA1, a nuclear phosphoprotein, and a known tumour suppressor involved in variety of cellular processes such as DNA damage response, transcriptional regulation, cell cycle control and ubiquitylation, is associated with rDNA repeats, in particular with the regulatory regions of the rRNA gene. We demonstrate that BRCA1 interacts directly with the basal Pol-I transcription factors; upstream binding factor (UBF), selectivity factor-1 (SL1) as well as interacting with RNA Pol-I itself. We show that in response to DNA damage, BRCA1 occupancy at the rDNA repeat is decreased and the observed BRCA1 interactions with the Pol-I transcription machinery are weakened. We propose, therefore, that there is a rDNA associated fraction of BRCA1 involved in DNA damage dependent regulation of Pol-I transcription, regulating the stability and formation of the Pol-I holoenzyme during initiation and/or elongation in response to DNA damage. PMID:27589844

  12. Inhibition of RNA binding to hepatitis C virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase: a new mechanism for antiviral intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed-Belkacem, Abdelhakim; Guichou, Jean-François; Brillet, Rozenn; Ahnou, Nazim; Hernandez, Eva; Pallier, Coralie; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is a key target for antiviral intervention. The goal of this study was to identify the binding site and unravel the molecular mechanism by which natural flavonoids efficiently inhibit HCV RdRp. Screening identified the flavonol quercetagetin as the most potent inhibitor of HCV RdRp activity. Quercetagetin was found to inhibit RdRp through inhibition of RNA binding to the viral polymerase, a yet unknown antiviral mechanism. X-ray crystallographic structure analysis of the RdRp-quercetagetin complex identified quercetagetin's binding site at the entrance of the RNA template tunnel, confirming its original mode of action. This antiviral mechanism was associated with a high barrier to resistance in both site-directed mutagenesis and long-term selection experiments. In conclusion, we identified a new mechanism for non-nucleoside inhibition of HCV RdRp through inhibition of RNA binding to the enzyme, a mechanism associated with broad genotypic activity and a high barrier to resistance. Our results open the way to new antiviral approaches for HCV and other viruses that use an RdRp based on RNA binding inhibition, that could prove to be useful in human, animal or plant viral infections. PMID:25053847

  13. Transcription inactivation through local refolding of the RNA polymerase structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belogurov, Georgiy A.; Vassylyeva, Marina N.; Sevostyanova, Anastasiya; Appleman, James R.; Xiang, Alan X.; Lira, Ricardo; Webber, Stephen E.; Klyuyev, Sergiy; Nudler, Evgeny; Artsimovitch, Irina; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.

    2009-02-12

    Structural studies of antibiotics not only provide a shortcut to medicine allowing for rational structure-based drug design, but may also capture snapshots of dynamic intermediates that become 'frozen' after inhibitor binding. Myxopyronin inhibits bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) by an unknown mechanism. Here we report the structure of dMyx - a desmethyl derivative of myxopyronin B - complexed with a Thermus thermophilus RNAP holoenzyme. The antibiotic binds to a pocket deep inside the RNAP clamp head domain, which interacts with the DNA template in the transcription bubble. Notably, binding of dMyx stabilizes refolding of the {beta}'-subunit switch-2 segment, resulting in a configuration that might indirectly compromise binding to, or directly clash with, the melted template DNA strand. Consistently, footprinting data show that the antibiotic binding does not prevent nucleation of the promoter DNA melting but instead blocks its propagation towards the active site. Myxopyronins are thus, to our knowledge, a first structurally characterized class of antibiotics that target formation of the pre-catalytic transcription initiation complex - the decisive step in gene expression control. Notably, mutations designed in switch-2 mimic the dMyx effects on promoter complexes in the absence of antibiotic. Overall, our results indicate a plausible mechanism of the dMyx action and a stepwise pathway of open complex formation in which core enzyme mediates the final stage of DNA melting near the transcription start site, and that switch-2 might act as a molecular checkpoint for DNA loading in response to regulatory signals or antibiotics. The universally conserved switch-2 may have the same role in all multisubunit RNAPs.

  14. Retinoblastoma Protein Disrupts Interactions Required for RNA Polymerase III Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, Josephine E.; Brown, Timothy R. P.; Allison, Simon J.; Scott, Pamela H.; White, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (RB) has been shown to suppress RNA polymerase (Pol) III transcription in vivo (R. J. White, D. Trouche, K. Martin, S. P. Jackson, and T. Kouzarides, Nature 382:88–90, 1996). This regulation involves interaction with TFIIIB, a multisubunit factor that is required for the expression of all Pol III templates (C. G. C. Larminie, C. A. Cairns, R. Mital, K. Martin, T. Kouzarides, S. P. Jackson, and R. J. White, EMBO J. 16:2061–2071, 1997; W.-M. Chu, Z. Wang, R. G. Roeder, and C. W. Schmid, J. Biol. Chem. 272:14755–14761, 1997). However, it has not been established why RB binding to TFIIIB results in transcriptional repression. For several Pol II-transcribed genes, RB has been shown to inhibit expression by recruiting histone deacetylases, which are thought to decrease promoter accessibility. We present evidence that histone deacetylases exert a negative effect on Pol III activity in vivo. However, RB remains able to regulate Pol III transcription in the presence of the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A. Instead, RB represses by disrupting interactions between TFIIIB and other components of the basal Pol III transcription apparatus. Recruitment of TFIIIB to most class III genes requires its binding to TFIIIC2, but this can be blocked by RB. In addition, RB disrupts the interaction between TFIIIB and Pol III that is essential for transcription. The ability of RB to inhibit these key interactions can explain its action as a potent repressor of class III gene expression. PMID:11094071

  15. The plant RNA polymerase II elongation complex: a hub coordinating transcript elongation and mRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Grasser, Marion; Grasser, Klaus D

    2017-09-08

    Characterisation of the Arabidopsis RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) elongation complex revealed an assembly of a conserved set of transcript elongation factors associated with chromatin remodellers, histone modifiers as well as with various pre-mRNA splicing and polyadenylation factors. Therefore, transcribing RNAPII streamlines the processes of mRNA synthesis and processing in plants.

  16. Chromatin-dependent regulation of RNA polymerases II and III activity throughout the transcription cycle.

    PubMed

    Jordán-Pla, Antonio; Gupta, Ishaan; de Miguel-Jiménez, Lola; Steinmetz, Lars M; Chávez, Sebastián; Pelechano, Vicent; Pérez-Ortín, José E

    2015-01-01

    The particular behaviour of eukaryotic RNA polymerases along different gene regions and amongst distinct gene functional groups is not totally understood. To cast light onto the alternative active or backtracking states of RNA polymerase II, we have quantitatively mapped active RNA polymerases at a high resolution following a new biotin-based genomic run-on (BioGRO) technique. Compared with conventional profiling with chromatin immunoprecipitation, the analysis of the BioGRO profiles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that RNA polymerase II has unique activity profiles at both gene ends, which are highly dependent on positioned nucleosomes. This is the first demonstration of the in vivo influence of positioned nucleosomes on transcription elongation. The particular features at the 5' end and around the polyadenylation site indicate that this polymerase undergoes extensive specific-activity regulation in the initial and final transcription elongation phases. The genes encoding for ribosomal proteins show distinctive features at both ends. BioGRO also provides the first nascentome analysis for RNA polymerase III, which indicates that transcription of tRNA genes is poorly regulated at the individual copy level. The present study provides a novel perspective of the transcription cycle that incorporates inactivation/reactivation as an important aspect of RNA polymerase dynamics.

  17. Immunochemical and molecular characterization of anti-RNA polymerase I autoantibodies produced by tight skin mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, S; Muryoi, T; Saitoh, Y; Brumeanu, T D; Bona, C A; Kasturi, K N

    1993-01-01

    Autoantibodies against nuclear proteins like RNA polymerase I (RNA pol I) are produced in a number of rheumatic autoimmune diseases. Production of antibodies specific for the 190-kD subunit of RNA pol I appears to be characteristic in the patients with systemic sclerosis. Previous investigations have shown that the tight skin (TSK) mouse is an experimental model for systemic sclerosis. In the present study we show that the TSK mice produce high titers of anti-RNA pol I antibodies, both of IgM and IgG classes. To characterize the immunochemical properties of these antibodies we obtained a large panel of hybridomas from these mice. Analysis of these hybridomas revealed that clonal frequency of autoreactive B cells specific for RNA pol I are higher in the TSK mice that in the controls. mAbs obtained from the TSK mice were specific for the 190-kD subunit and cross-reacted with Escherichia coli and phage T7 RNA polymerases (155-, 150-, and 107-kD polypeptides). We have also demonstrated that these antibodies bind better to the phosphorylated enzymes. The anti-RNA pol I mAbs were divided into three groups in terms of their functional property. The first group of antibodies increased the catalytic activity of the enzyme whereas the antibodies of the second group inhibited the enzymatic activity. Competitive inhibition RIAs showed that these two groups of antibodies bound to distinct epitopes. The third group of antibodies was neutral and had no activity on the enzyme function. These results suggest that TSK mouse anti-RNA pol I antibodies recognize three or more conserved epitopes. To understand the molecular basis of the generation of such autoreactive antibodies we analyzed their V gene repertoire. Northern analysis of RNAs of 14 TSK hybridomas showed that the VH genes encoding these antibodies were mainly from VH J558 family. It is possible that these genes were derived from a single germline gene or from a set of related genes of a single subgroup. Images PMID:8349828

  18. Polyadenylation of RNA transcribed from mammalian SINEs by RNA polymerase III: Complex requirements for nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed

    Borodulina, Olga R; Golubchikova, Julia S; Ustyantsev, Ilia G; Kramerov, Dmitri A

    2016-02-01

    It is generally accepted that only transcripts synthesized by RNA polymerase II (e.g., mRNA) were subject to AAUAAA-dependent polyadenylation. However, we previously showed that RNA transcribed by RNA polymerase III (pol III) from mouse B2 SINE could be polyadenylated in an AAUAAA-dependent manner. Many species of mammalian SINEs end with the pol III transcriptional terminator (TTTTT) and contain hexamers AATAAA in their A-rich tail. Such SINEs were united into Class T(+), whereas SINEs lacking the terminator and AATAAA sequences were classified as T(-). Here we studied the structural features of SINE pol III transcripts that are necessary for their polyadenylation. Eight and six SINE families from classes T(+) and T(-), respectively, were analyzed. The replacement of AATAAA with AACAAA in T(+) SINEs abolished the RNA polyadenylation. Interestingly, insertion of the polyadenylation signal (AATAAA) and pol III transcription terminator in T(-) SINEs did not result in polyadenylation. The detailed analysis of three T(+) SINEs (B2, DIP, and VES) revealed areas important for the polyadenylation of their pol III transcripts: the polyadenylation signal and terminator in A-rich tail, β region positioned immediately downstream of the box B of pol III promoter, and τ region located upstream of the tail. In DIP and VES (but not in B2), the τ region is a polypyrimidine motif which is also characteristic of many other T(+) SINEs. Most likely, SINEs of different mammals acquired these structural features independently as a result of parallel evolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Distinct Mechanism Evolved for Mycobacterial RNA Polymerase and Topoisomerase I Protein-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Banda, Srikanth; Cao, Nan; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2017-09-15

    We report here a distinct mechanism of interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis that has evolved independently from the previously characterized interaction between bacterial topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase. Bacterial DNA topoisomerase I is responsible for preventing the hyper-negative supercoiling of genomic DNA. The association of topoisomerase I with RNA polymerase during transcription elongation could efficiently relieve transcription-driven negative supercoiling. Our results demonstrate a direct physical interaction between the C-terminal domains of topoisomerase I (TopoI-CTDs) and the β' subunit of RNA polymerase of M. smegmatis in the absence of DNA. The TopoI-CTDs in mycobacteria are evolutionarily unrelated in amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure to the TopoI-CTD found in the majority of bacterial species outside Actinobacteria, including Escherichia coli. The functional interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase has evolved independently in mycobacteria and E. coli, with distinctively different structural elements of TopoI-CTD utilized for this protein-protein interaction. Zinc ribbon motifs in E. coli TopoI-CTD are involved in the interaction with RNA polymerase. For M. smegmatis TopoI-CTD, a 27-amino-acid tail that is rich in basic residues at the C-terminal end is responsible for the interaction with RNA polymerase. Overexpression of recombinant TopoI-CTD in M. smegmatis competed with the endogenous topoisomerase I for protein-protein interactions with RNA polymerase. The TopoI-CTD overexpression resulted in decreased survival following treatment with antibiotics and hydrogen peroxide, supporting the importance of the protein-protein interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase during stress response of mycobacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. RAP30/74: a general initiation factor that binds to RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Z F; Killeen, M; Sopta, M; Ortolan, L G; Greenblatt, J

    1988-01-01

    We have previously shown by affinity chromatography that RAP30 and RAP74 are the mammalian proteins that have the highest affinity for RNA polymerase II. Here we show that RAP30 binds to RAP74 and that the RAP30-RAP74 complex (RAP30/74) is required for accurate initiation by RNA polymerase II. RAP30/74 is required for accurate transcription from the following promoters: the adenovirus major late promoter, the long terminal repeat of human immunodeficiency virus, P2 of the human c-myc gene, the mouse beta maj-globin promoter (all of which have TATA boxes), and the mouse dihydrofolate reductase promoter (which lacks a TATA box). RAP30/74 is not required for initiation by RNA polymerase III at the adenovirus virus-associated RNA promoters. Therefore, RAP30/74 is a general initiation factor that binds to RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:3380090

  1. Purification of an RNA polymerase II transcript release factor from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Xie, Z; Price, D H

    1996-05-10

    Factor 2 was previously identified in Drosophila Kc cell nuclear extract (KcN) as an activity suppressing the appearance of long transcripts (Price, D. H., Sluder, A. E., and Greenleaf, A. L. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 3244-3255). A 154-kDa protein with factor 2 activity was purified to apparent homogeneity from KcN. An immobilized template assay indicated that factor 2 caused the release of transcripts by RNA polymerase II in an ATP-dependent manner. Some early elongation complexes were resistant to factor 2 action but became sensitive after treatment with 1 M KCl. In the absence of factor 2, transcription complexes still exhibited a low degree of processivity suggesting that factor 2 was only partially responsible for abortive elongation.

  2. Precise Maps of RNA Polymerase Reveal How Promoters Direct Initiation and Pausing

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hojoong; Fuda, Nicholas J.; Core, Leighton J.; Lis, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription regulation occurs frequently through promoter-associated pausing of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). We developed a Precision nuclear Run-On and sequencing assay (PRO-seq) to map the genome-wide distribution of transcriptionally-engaged Pol II at base-pair resolution. Pol II accumulates immediately downstream of promoters, at intron-exon junctions that are efficiently used for splicing, and over 3' poly-adenylation sites. Focused analyses of promoters reveal that pausing is not fixed relative to initiation sites nor is it specified directly by the position of a particular core promoter element or the first nucleosome. Core promoter elements function beyond initiation, and when optimally positioned they act collectively to dictate the position and strength of pausing. We test this ‘Complex Interaction’ model with insertional mutagenesis of the Drosophila Hsp70 core promoter. PMID:23430654

  3. Upstream Binding of Idling RNA Polymerase Modulates Transcription Initiation from a Nearby Promoter*

    PubMed Central

    Gerganova, Veneta; Maurer, Sebastian; Stoliar, Liubov; Japaridze, Aleksandre; Dietler, Giovanni; Nasser, William; Kutateladze, Tamara; Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial gene regulatory regions often demonstrate distinctly organized arrays of RNA polymerase binding sites of ill-defined function. Previously we observed a module of closely spaced polymerase binding sites upstream of the canonical promoter of the Escherichia coli fis operon. FIS is an abundant nucleoid-associated protein involved in adjusting the chromosomal DNA topology to changing cellular physiology. Here we show that simultaneous binding of the polymerase at the canonical fis promoter and an upstream transcriptionally inactive site stabilizes a RNAP oligomeric complex in vitro. We further show that modulation of the upstream binding of RNA polymerase affects the fis promoter activity both in vivo and in vitro. The effect of the upstream RNA polymerase binding on the fis promoter activity depends on the spatial arrangement of polymerase binding sites and DNA supercoiling. Our data suggest that a specific DNA geometry of the nucleoprotein complex stabilized on concomitant binding of RNA polymerase molecules at the fis promoter and the upstream region acts as a topological device regulating the fis transcription. We propose that transcriptionally inactive RNA polymerase molecules can act as accessory factors regulating the transcription initiation from a nearby promoter. PMID:25648898

  4. In vivo analysis of the stability and transport of nuclear poly(A)+ RNA

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the distribution of poly(A)+ RNA in the mammalian cell nucleus and its transport through nuclear pores by fluorescence and electron microscopic in situ hybridization. Poly(A)+ RNA was detected in the nucleus as a speckled pattern which includes interchromatin granule clusters and perichromatin fibrils. When cells are fractionated by detergent and salt extraction as well as DNase I digestion, the majority of the nuclear poly(A)+ RNA was found to remain associated with the nonchromatin RNP-enriched fraction of the nucleus. After inhibition of RNA polymerase II transcription for 5-10 h, a stable population of poly(A)+ RNA remained in the nucleus and was reorganized into fewer and larger interchromatin granule clusters along with pre- mRNA splicing factors. This stable population of nuclear RNA may play an important role in nuclear function. Furthermore, we have observed that, in actively transcribing cells, the regions of poly(A)+ RNA which reached the nuclear pore complexes appeared as narrow concentrations of RNA suggesting a limited or directed pathway of movement. All of the observed nuclear pores contained poly(A)+ RNA staining suggesting that they are all capable of exporting RNA. In addition, we have directly visualized, for the first time in mammalian cells, the transport of poly(A)+ RNA through the nuclear pore complexes. PMID:7519622

  5. De Novo Initiation of RNA Synthesis by the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase (NS5B) of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Guangxiang; Hamatake, Robert K.; Mathis, Danielle M.; Racela, Jason; Rigat, Karen L.; Lemm, Julie; Colonno, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B protein possesses an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity, a major function responsible for replication of the viral RNA genome. To further characterize the RdRp activity, NS5B proteins were expressed from recombinant baculoviruses, purified to near homogeneity, and examined for their ability to synthesize RNA in vitro. As a result, a highly active NS5B RdRp (1b-42), which contains an 18-amino acid C-terminal truncation resulting from a newly created stop codon, was identified among a number of independent isolates. The RdRp activity of the truncated NS5B is comparable to the activity of the full-length protein and is 20 times higher in the presence of Mn2+ than in the presence of Mg2+. When a 384-nucleotide RNA was used as the template, two major RNA products were synthesized by 1b-42. One is a complementary RNA identical in size to the input RNA template (monomer), while the other is a hairpin dimer RNA synthesized by a “copy-back” mechanism. Substantial evidence derived from several experiments demonstrated that the RNA monomer was synthesized through de novo initiation by NS5B rather than by a terminal transferase activity. Synthesis of the RNA monomer requires all four ribonucleotides. The RNA monomer product was verified to be the result of de novo RNA synthesis, as two expected RNA products were generated from monomer RNA by RNase H digestion. In addition, modification of the RNA template by the addition of the chain terminator cordycepin at the 3′ end did not affect synthesis of the RNA monomer but eliminated synthesis of the self-priming hairpin dimer RNA. Moreover, synthesis of RNA on poly(C) and poly(U) homopolymer templates by 1b-42 NS5B did not require the oligonucleotide primer at high concentrations (≥50 μM) of GTP and ATP, further supporting a de novo initiation mechanism. These findings suggest that HCV NS5B is able to initiate RNA synthesis de novo. PMID:10623748

  6. DNA-dependent RNA polymerase subunits encoded within the vaccinia virus genome.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, E V; Puckett, C; Moss, B

    1987-01-01

    Antiserum to a multisubunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from vaccinia virions was prepared to carry out genetic studies. This antiserum selectively inhibited the activity of the viral polymerase but had no effect on calf thymus RNA polymerase II. The specificity of the antiserum was further demonstrated by immunoprecipitation of RNA polymerase subunits from dissociated virus particles. The presence in vaccinia virus-infected cells of mRNA that encodes the polymerase subunits was determined by in vitro translation. Immunoprecipitable polypeptides with Mrs of about 135,000, 128,000, 36,000, 34,000, 31,000, 23,000, 21,000, 20,000, and 17,000 were made when early mRNA was added to reticulocyte extracts. The subunits were encoded within the vaccinia virus genome, as demonstrated by translation of early mRNA that hybridized to vaccinia virus DNA. The locations of the subunit genes were determined initially by hybridization of RNA to a series of overlapping 40-kilobase-pair DNA fragments that were cloned in a cosmid vector. Further mapping was achieved with cloned HindIII restriction fragments. Results of these studies indicated that RNA polymerase subunit genes are transcribed early in infection and are distributed within the highly conserved central portion of the poxvirus genome in HindIII fragments E, J, H, D, and A. Images PMID:3033308

  7. Metabolism and expression of RNA polymerase II transcripts in Influenza virus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Katze, M.G.; Krug, R.M.

    1984-10-01

    Influenza virus infection has adverse effects on the metabolism of two representative RNA polymerase II transcripts in chicken embryo fibroblasts, those coding for BETA-actin and for avian leukosis virus (ALV) proteins. Proviral ALV DNA was integrated into host cell DNA by prior infection with ALV. By S1 endonuclease assay, it was confirmed that nuclear ALV transcripts disappeared very early after infection, already decreasing ca. 80% by 1 h postinfection. A plausible explanation for this nuclear degradation is that the viral cap-dependent endonuclease in the nucleas cleaves the 5' ends of new polymerase II transcripts, rendering the resulting decapped RNAs susceptible to hydrolysis by cellular nucleases. Similar stability of cytoplasmic host cell mRNAs was observed in infected HeLa cells, in which the levels of actin mRNA and two HeLa cell mRNAs (pHe 7 and pHe 28) remained at undiminished levels for 3 h of infection and decreased only slightly by 4.5 h postinfection. The cytoplamic actin and pHe 7 mRNAs isolated from infected HeLa cells were shown to be translated in reticulocyte extracts in biro, indicating that host mRNAs were not inactivated by a virus-induced modification. Despite the continued presence of high levels of functional host cell mRNAs, host cell protein synthesis was effectively shut off by about 3 h postinfection in both chicken embryo fibroblasts and HeLa cells. These results are consistent with the establishment of an influenza virus-specific translational system that selectively translates viral and not host mRNAs.

  8. RNA as an RNA Polymerase: Net Elongation of an RNA Primer Catalyzed by the Tetrahymena Ribozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Michael D.; Cech, Thomas R.

    1988-03-01

    A catalytic RNA (ribozyme) derived from an intervening sequence (IVS) RNA of Tetrahymena thermophila will catalyze an RNA polymerization reaction in which pentacytidylic acid (C5) is extended by the successive addition of mononucleotides derived from a guanylyl-(3', 5')-nucleotide (GpN). Cytidines or uridines are added to C5 to generate chain lengths of 10 to 11 nucleotides, with longer products being generated at greatly reduced efficiency. The reaction is analogous to that catalyzed by a replicase with C5 acting as the primer, GpNs as the nucleoside triphosphates, and a sequence in the ribozyme providing a template. The demonstration that an RNA enzyme can catalyze net elongation of an RNA primer supports theories of prebiotic RNA self-replication.

  9. Potent non-nucleoside inhibitors of the measles virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex.

    PubMed

    Sun, Aiming; Yoon, Jeong-Joong; Yin, Yan; Prussia, Andrew; Yang, Yutao; Min, Jaeki; Plemper, Richard K; Snyder, James P

    2008-07-10

    Measles virus (MV) is one of the most infectious pathogens known. In spite of the existence of a vaccine, approximately 350000 deaths/year result from MV or associated complications. Antimeasles compounds could conceivably diminish these statistics and provide a therapy that complements vaccine treatment. We recently described a high-throughput screening hit compound 1 (16677) against MV-infected cells with the capacity to eliminate viral reproduction at 250 nM by inhibiting the action of the virus's RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex (RdRp). The compound, 1-methyl-3-(trifluoromethyl)- N-[4-sulfonylphenyl]-1 H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide, 1 carries a critical CF 3 moiety on the 1,2-pyrazole ring. Elaborating on the preliminary structure-activity (SAR) study, the present work presents the synthesis and SAR of a much broader range of low nanomolar nonpeptidic MV inhibitors and speculates on the role of the CF 3 functionality.

  10. In Vitro Assays for RNA Binding and Protein Priming of Hepatitis B Virus Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Clark, Daniel N; Jones, Scott A; Hu, Jianming

    2017-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) polymerase synthesizes the viral DNA genome from the pre-genomic RNA (pgRNA) template through reverse transcription. Initiation of viral DNA synthesis is accomplished via a novel protein priming mechanism, so named because the polymerase itself acts as a primer, whereby the initiating nucleotide becomes covalently linked to a tyrosine residue on the viral polymerase. Protein priming, in turn, depends on specific recognition of the packaging signal on pgRNA called epsilon. These early events in viral DNA synthesis can now be dissected in vitro as described here.The polymerase is expressed in mammalian cells and purified by immunoprecipitation. The purified protein is associated with host cell factors, is enzymatically active, and its priming activity is epsilon dependent. A minimal epsilon RNA construct from pgRNA is co-expressed with the polymerase in cells. This RNA binds to and co-immunoprecipitates with the polymerase. Modifications can be made to either the epsilon RNA or the polymerase protein by manipulating the expression plasmids. Also, the priming reaction itself can be modified to assay for the initiation or subsequent DNA synthesis during protein priming, the susceptibility of the polymerase to chemical inhibitors, and the precise identification of the DNA products upon their release from the polymerase. The identity of associated host factors can also be evaluated. This protocol closely mirrors our current understanding of the RNA binding and protein priming steps of the HBV replication cycle, and it is amenable to modification. It should therefore facilitate both basic research and drug discovery.

  11. Rbs1, a new protein implicated in RNA polymerase III biogenesis in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Małgorzata; Makała, Ewa; Płonka, Marta; Bazan, Rafał; Gewartowski, Kamil; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Boguta, Magdalena

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) complex assembly and its transport to the nucleus. We demonstrate that a missense cold-sensitive mutation, rpc128-1007, in the sequence encoding the C-terminal part of the second largest Pol III subunit, C128, affects the assembly and stability of the enzyme. The cellular levels and nuclear concentration of selected Pol III subunits were decreased in rpc128-1007 cells, and the association between Pol III subunits as evaluated by coimmunoprecipitation was also reduced. To identify the proteins involved in Pol III assembly, we performed a genetic screen for suppressors of the rpc128-1007 mutation and selected the Rbs1 gene, whose overexpression enhanced de novo tRNA transcription in rpc128-1007 cells, which correlated with increased stability, nuclear concentration, and interaction of Pol III subunits. The rpc128-1007 rbs1Δ double mutant shows a synthetic growth defect, indicating that rpc128-1007 and rbs1Δ function in parallel ways to negatively regulate Pol III assembly. Rbs1 physically interacts with a subset of Pol III subunits, AC19, AC40, and ABC27/Rpb5. Additionally, Rbs1 interacts with the Crm1 exportin and shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus. We postulate that Rbs1 binds to the Pol III complex or subcomplex and facilitates its translocation to the nucleus. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Acetylation of RNA polymerase II regulates growth-factor-induced gene transcription in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Sebastian; Herker, Eva; Itzen, Friederike; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Kaehlcke, Katrin; Cho, Sungyoo; Pollard, Katherine S; Capra, John A; Schnölzer, Martina; Cole, Philip A; Geyer, Matthias; Bruneau, Benoit G; Adelman, Karen; Ott, Melanie

    2013-11-07

    Lysine acetylation regulates transcription by targeting histones and nonhistone proteins. Here we report that the central regulator of transcription, RNA polymerase II, is subject to acetylation in mammalian cells. Acetylation occurs at eight lysines within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest polymerase subunit and is mediated by p300/KAT3B. CTD acetylation is specifically enriched downstream of the transcription start sites of polymerase-occupied genes genome-wide, indicating a role in early stages of transcription initiation or elongation. Mutation of lysines or p300 inhibitor treatment causes the loss of epidermal growth-factor-induced expression of c-Fos and Egr2, immediate-early genes with promoter-proximally paused polymerases, but does not affect expression or polymerase occupancy at housekeeping genes. Our studies identify acetylation as a new modification of the mammalian RNA polymerase II required for the induction of growth factor response genes.

  13. Looking for inhibitors of the dengue virus NS5 RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase using a molecular docking approach

    PubMed Central

    Galiano, Vicente; Garcia-Valtanen, Pablo; Micol, Vicente; Encinar, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The dengue virus (DENV) nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) contains both an N-terminal methyltransferase domain and a C-terminal RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domain. Polymerase activity is responsible for viral RNA synthesis by a de novo initiation mechanism and represents an attractive target for antiviral therapy. The incidence of DENV has grown rapidly and it is now estimated that half of the human population is at risk of becoming infected with this virus. Despite this, there are no effective drugs to treat DENV infections. The present in silico study aimed at finding new inhibitors of the NS5 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of the four serotypes of DENV. We used a chemical library comprising 372,792 nonnucleotide compounds (around 325,319 natural compounds) to perform molecular docking experiments against a binding site of the RNA template tunnel of the virus polymerase. Compounds with high negative free energy variation (ΔG <−10.5 kcal/mol) were selected as putative inhibitors. Additional filters for favorable druggability and good absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity were applied. Finally, after the screening process was completed, we identified 39 compounds as lead DENV polymerase inhibitor candidates. Potentially, these compounds could act as efficient DENV polymerase inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27784988

  14. Looking for inhibitors of the dengue virus NS5 RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase using a molecular docking approach.

    PubMed

    Galiano, Vicente; Garcia-Valtanen, Pablo; Micol, Vicente; Encinar, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The dengue virus (DENV) nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) contains both an N-terminal methyltransferase domain and a C-terminal RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domain. Polymerase activity is responsible for viral RNA synthesis by a de novo initiation mechanism and represents an attractive target for antiviral therapy. The incidence of DENV has grown rapidly and it is now estimated that half of the human population is at risk of becoming infected with this virus. Despite this, there are no effective drugs to treat DENV infections. The present in silico study aimed at finding new inhibitors of the NS5 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of the four serotypes of DENV. We used a chemical library comprising 372,792 nonnucleotide compounds (around 325,319 natural compounds) to perform molecular docking experiments against a binding site of the RNA template tunnel of the virus polymerase. Compounds with high negative free energy variation (ΔG <-10.5 kcal/mol) were selected as putative inhibitors. Additional filters for favorable druggability and good absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity were applied. Finally, after the screening process was completed, we identified 39 compounds as lead DENV polymerase inhibitor candidates. Potentially, these compounds could act as efficient DENV polymerase inhibitors in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Distinct regulation of alternative polyadenylation and gene expression by nuclear poly(A) polymerases.

    PubMed

    Li, Weimin; Li, Wencheng; Laishram, Rakesh S; Hoque, Mainul; Ji, Zhe; Tian, Bin; Anderson, Richard A

    2017-09-06

    Polyadenylation of nascent RNA by poly(A) polymerase (PAP) is important for 3' end maturation of almost all eukaryotic mRNAs. Most mammalian genes harbor multiple polyadenylation sites (PASs), leading to expression of alternative polyadenylation (APA) isoforms with distinct functions. How poly(A) polymerases may regulate PAS usage and hence gene expression is poorly understood. Here, we show that the nuclear canonical (PAPα and PAPγ) and non-canonical (Star-PAP) PAPs play diverse roles in PAS selection and gene expression. Deficiencies in the PAPs resulted in perturbations of gene expression, with Star-PAP impacting lowly expressed mRNAs and long-noncoding RNAs to the greatest extent. Importantly, different PASs of a gene are distinctly regulated by different PAPs, leading to widespread relative expression changes of APA isoforms. The location and surrounding sequence motifs of a PAS appear to differentiate its regulation by the PAPs. We show Star-PAP-specific PAS usage regulates the expression of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor EIF4A1, the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and the long non-coding RNA NEAT1. The Star-PAP-mediated APA of PTEN is essential for DNA damage-induced increase of PTEN protein levels. Together, our results reveal a PAS-guided and PAP-mediated paradigm for gene expression in response to cellular signaling cues. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Complete replication in vitro of tobacco mosaic virus RNA by a template-dependent, membrane-bound RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Osman, T A; Buck, K W

    1996-01-01

    A crude membrane-bound RNA polymerase, obtained by differential centrifugation of extracts of tomato leaves infected with tobacco mosaic tobamovirus (tomato strain L) TMV-L), was purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Removal of the endogenous RNA template with micrococcal nuclease rendered the polymerase template dependent and template specific. The polymerase was primer independent and able to initiate RNA synthesis on templates containing the 3'-terminal sequences of the TMV-L positive or negative strands. TMV-vulgare RNA was a less efficient template, while RNAs of cucumber mosaic cucumovirus and red clover necrotic mosaic dianthovirus, or 5'-terminal sequences of TMV-L positive or negative strands, did not act as templates for the polymerase. A main product of the reaction with TMV-L genomic RNA as a template, carried out in the presence of [alpha-32P]UTP, was genomic-length single-stranded RNA. This was shown to be the positive strand and uniformly labelled along its length, demonstrating complete replication of TMV-L RNA. Genomic-length double-stranded RNA, labelled in both strands, and small amounts of RNAs corresponding to the single- and double-stranded forms of the coat protein subgenomic mRNA were also formed. Antibodies to N-terminal and C-terminal portions of the 126-kDa protein detected the 126-kDa protein and the 183-kDa readthrough protein in purified RNA polymerase preparations, whereas antibodies to the readthrough portion of the 183-kDa protein detected only the 183-kDa protein. All three antibodies inhibited the template-dependent RNA polymerase, but none of them had any effect on the template-bound enzyme. PMID:8709249

  17. Structure of influenza A polymerase bound to the viral RNA promoter.

    PubMed

    Pflug, Alexander; Guilligay, Delphine; Reich, Stefan; Cusack, Stephen

    2014-12-18

    The influenza virus polymerase transcribes or replicates the segmented RNA genome (viral RNA) into viral messenger RNA or full-length copies. To initiate RNA synthesis, the polymerase binds to the conserved 3' and 5' extremities of the viral RNA. Here we present the crystal structure of the heterotrimeric bat influenza A polymerase, comprising subunits PA, PB1 and PB2, bound to its viral RNA promoter. PB1 contains a canonical RNA polymerase fold that is stabilized by large interfaces with PA and PB2. The PA endonuclease and the PB2 cap-binding domain, involved in transcription by cap-snatching, form protrusions facing each other across a solvent channel. The 5' extremity of the promoter folds into a compact hook that is bound in a pocket formed by PB1 and PA close to the polymerase active site. This structure lays the basis for an atomic-level mechanistic understanding of the many functions of influenza polymerase, and opens new opportunities for anti-influenza drug design.

  18. Poliovirus RNA polymerase: in vitro enzymatic activities, fidelity of replication, and characterization of a temperature-sensitive RNA-negative mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, M.A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The in vitro activities of the purified poliovirus RNA polymerase were investigated in this study. The polymerase was shown to be a strict RNA dependent RNA polymerase. It only copied RNA templates but used either a DNA or RNA primer to initiate RNA synthesis. Partially purified polymerase has some DNA polymerase activities. Additional purification of the enzyme and studies with a mutant poliovirus RNA polymerase indicated that the DNA polymerase activities were due to a cellular polymerase. The fidelity of RNA replication in vitro by the purified poliovirus RNA polymerase was studied by measuring the rate of misincorporation of noncomplementary ribonucleotide monophosphates on synthetic homopolymeric RNA templates. The results showed that the ratio of noncomplementary to complementary ribonucleotides incorporated was 1-5 x 10/sup -3/. The viral polymerase of a poliovirus temperature sensitive RNA-negative mutant, Ts 10, was isolated. This study confirmed that the mutant was viable 33/sup 0/, but was RNA negative at 39/sup 0/. Characterization of the Ts 10 polymerase showed it was significantly more sensitive to heat inactivation than was the old-type polymerase. Highly purified poliovirions were found to contain several noncapsid proteins. At least two of these proteins were labeled by (/sup 35/S)methionine infected cells and appeared to be virally encoded proteins. One of these proteins was immunoprecipitated by anti-3B/sup vpg/ antiserum. This protein had the approximate Mr = 50,000 and appeared to be one of the previously identified 3B/sup vpg/ precursor proteins.

  19. Molecular structure of yeast RNA polymerase III: demonstration of the tripartite transcriptive system in lower eukaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, P; Hager, G L; Weinberg, F; Rutter, W J

    1976-01-01

    Homogeneous RNA polymerase III (RNA nucleotidyltransferase III) has been obtained from yeast. The subunit composition of the enzyme was examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The enzyme is composed of 12 putative subunits with molecular weights 160,000, 128,000, 82,000, 41,000, 40,500, 37,000, 34,000, 28,000, 24,000, 20,000, 14,500, and 11,000. The high-molecular-weight subunits and several of the smaller subunits of yeast RNA polymerase III are clearly different from those of enzymes I and II, indicating a distinct molecular structure. However, the molecular weights of some of the small subunits (41,000, 28,000, 24,000, and 14,500) appear to be identical to those of polymerases I and II. Thus, it is possible that the three classes of enzymes in yeast have some common subunits. As in other eukaryotes, yeast polymerase II is inhibited by relatively low concentrations of alpha-amanitin; however, contrary to what has been found in higher eukaryotes, yeast polymerase III is resistant (up to 2 mg/ml) to alpha-amanitin, while yeast polymerase I is sensitive to high concentrations of the drug (50% inhibition at 0.3 mg/ml). These results establish the existence of RNA polymerase III in yeast and provide a structural basis for the discrimination of the three functional polymerases in eukaryotes. Images PMID:772675

  20. Molecular structure of yeast RNA polymerase III: demonstration of the tripartite transcriptive system in lower eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, P; Hager, G L; Weinberg, F; Rutter, W J

    1976-04-01

    Homogeneous RNA polymerase III (RNA nucleotidyltransferase III) has been obtained from yeast. The subunit composition of the enzyme was examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The enzyme is composed of 12 putative subunits with molecular weights 160,000, 128,000, 82,000, 41,000, 40,500, 37,000, 34,000, 28,000, 24,000, 20,000, 14,500, and 11,000. The high-molecular-weight subunits and several of the smaller subunits of yeast RNA polymerase III are clearly different from those of enzymes I and II, indicating a distinct molecular structure. However, the molecular weights of some of the small subunits (41,000, 28,000, 24,000, and 14,500) appear to be identical to those of polymerases I and II. Thus, it is possible that the three classes of enzymes in yeast have some common subunits. As in other eukaryotes, yeast polymerase II is inhibited by relatively low concentrations of alpha-amanitin; however, contrary to what has been found in higher eukaryotes, yeast polymerase III is resistant (up to 2 mg/ml) to alpha-amanitin, while yeast polymerase I is sensitive to high concentrations of the drug (50% inhibition at 0.3 mg/ml). These results establish the existence of RNA polymerase III in yeast and provide a structural basis for the discrimination of the three functional polymerases in eukaryotes.

  1. Multiple isoelectric forms of poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase: Evidence for phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Ransone, L.J.; Dasgupta, A. )

    1989-11-01

    Poliovirus-specific RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (3Dpol) was purified to apparent homogeneity. A single polypeptide of an apparent molecular weight of 63,000 catalyzes the synthesis of dimeric and monomeric RNA products in response to the poliovirion RNA template. Analysis of purified 3Dpol by two-dimensional electrophoresis showed multiple forms of 3Dpol, suggesting posttranslational modification of the protein in virus-infected cells. The two major forms of 3Dpol appear to have approximate pI values of 7.1 and 7.4. Incubation of purified 3Dpol with calf intestinal phosphatase resulted in almost complete disappearance of the pI 7.1 form and a concomitant increase in the intensity of the pI 7.4 form of 3Dpol. Addition of 32P-labeled Pi during infection of HeLa cells with poliovirus resulted in specific labeling of 3Dpol and 3CD, a viral protein which contains the entire 3Dpol sequence. Both 3Dpol and 3CD appear to be phosphorylated at serine residues. Ribosomal salt washes prepared from both mock- and poliovirus-infected cells contain phosphatases capable of dephosphorylating quantitatively the phosphorylated form (pI 7.1) of 3Dpol.

  2. Imaging RNA polymerase III transcription using a photostable RNA-fluorophore complex.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenjiao; Filonov, Grigory S; Kim, Hyaeyeong; Hirsch, Markus; Li, Xing; Moon, Jared D; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2017-09-25

    Quantitative measurement of transcription rates in live cells is important for revealing mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. This is particularly challenging when measuring the activity of RNA polymerase III (Pol III), which transcribes growth-promoting small RNAs. To address this issue, we developed Corn, a genetically encoded fluorescent RNA reporter suitable for quantifying RNA transcription in cells. Corn binds and induces fluorescence of 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene-imidazolinone-2-oxime, which resembles the fluorophore found in red fluorescent protein (RFP). Notably, Corn shows high photostability, enabling quantitative fluorescence imaging of mTOR-dependent Pol III transcription. We found that, unlike actinomycin D, mTOR inhibitors resulted in heterogeneous transcription suppression in individual cells. Quantitative imaging of Corn-tagged Pol III transcript levels revealed distinct Pol III transcription 'trajectories' elicited by mTOR inhibition. Together, these studies provide an approach for quantitative measurement of Pol III transcription by direct imaging of Pol III transcripts containing a photostable RNA-fluorophore complex.

  3. Behavior of T7 RNA polymerase and mammalian RNA polymerase II at site-specific cisplatin adducts in the template DNA.

    PubMed

    Tornaletti, Silvia; Patrick, Steve M; Turchi, John J; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2003-09-12

    Transcription-coupled DNA repair is dedicated to the removal of DNA lesions from transcribed strands of expressed genes. RNA polymerase arrest at a lesion has been proposed as a sensitive signal for recruitment of repair enzymes to the lesion site. To understand how initiation of transcription-coupled repair may occur, we have characterized the properties of the transcription complex when it encounters a lesion in its path. Here we have compared the effect of cisplatin-induced intrastrand cross-links on transcription elongation by T7 RNA polymerase and mammalian RNA polymerase II. We found that a single cisplatin 1,2-d(GG) intrastrand cross-link or a single cisplatin 1,3-d(GTG) intrastrand cross-link is a strong block to both polymerases. Furthermore, the efficiency of the block at a cisplatin 1,2-d(GG) intrastrand cross-link was similar in several different nucleotide sequence contexts. Interestingly, some blockage was also observed when the single cisplatin 1,3-d(GTG) intrastrand cross-link was located in the non-transcribed strand. Transcription complexes arrested at the cisplatin adducts were substrates for the transcript cleavage reaction mediated by the elongation factor TFIIS, indicating that the RNA polymerase II complexes arrested at these lesions are not released from template DNA. Addition of TFIIS yielded a population of transcripts up to 30 nucleotides shorter than those arrested at the lesion. In the presence of nucleoside triphosphates, these shortened transcripts could be re-elongated up to the site of the lesion, indicating that the arrested complexes are stable and competent to resume elongation. These results show that cisplatin-induced lesions in the transcribed DNA strand constitute a strong physical barrier to RNA polymerase progression, and they support current models of transcription arrest and initiation of transcription-coupled repair.

  4. Analysis of Ribonucleotide 5'-Triphosphate Analogs as Potential Inhibitors of Zika Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase by Using Nonradioactive Polymerase Assays.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gaofei; Bluemling, Gregory R; Collop, Paul; Hager, Michael; Kuiper, Damien; Gurale, Bharat P; Painter, George R; De La Rosa, Abel; Kolykhalov, Alexander A

    2017-03-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging human pathogen that is spreading rapidly through the Americas and has been linked to the development of microcephaly and to a dramatically increased number of Guillain-Barré syndrome cases. Currently, no vaccine or therapeutic options for the prevention or treatment of ZIKV infections exist. In the study described in this report, we expressed, purified, and characterized full-length nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) and the NS5 polymerase domain (NS5pol) of ZIKV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Using purified NS5, we developed an in vitro nonradioactive primer extension assay employing a fluorescently labeled primer-template pair. Both purified NS5 and NS5pol can carry out in vitro RNA-dependent RNA synthesis in this assay. Our results show that Mn(2+) is required for enzymatic activity, while Mg(2+) is not. We found that ZIKV NS5 can utilize single-stranded DNA but not double-stranded DNA as a template or a primer to synthesize RNA. The assay was used to compare the efficiency of incorporation of analog 5'-triphosphates by the ZIKV polymerase and to calculate their discrimination versus that of natural ribonucleotide triphosphates (rNTPs). The 50% inhibitory concentrations for analog rNTPs were determined in an alternative nonradioactive coupled-enzyme assay. We determined that, in general, 2'-C-methyl- and 2'-C-ethynyl-substituted analog 5'-triphosphates were efficiently incorporated by the ZIKV polymerase and were also efficient chain terminators. Derivatives of these molecules may serve as potential antiviral compounds to be developed to combat ZIKV infection. This report provides the first characterization of ZIKV polymerase and demonstrates the utility of in vitro polymerase assays in the identification of potential ZIKV inhibitors.

  5. Analysis of Ribonucleotide 5′-Triphosphate Analogs as Potential Inhibitors of Zika Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase by Using Nonradioactive Polymerase Assays

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Gaofei; Bluemling, Gregory R.; Collop, Paul; Hager, Michael; Kuiper, Damien; Gurale, Bharat P.; Painter, George R.; De La Rosa, Abel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging human pathogen that is spreading rapidly through the Americas and has been linked to the development of microcephaly and to a dramatically increased number of Guillain-Barré syndrome cases. Currently, no vaccine or therapeutic options for the prevention or treatment of ZIKV infections exist. In the study described in this report, we expressed, purified, and characterized full-length nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) and the NS5 polymerase domain (NS5pol) of ZIKV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Using purified NS5, we developed an in vitro nonradioactive primer extension assay employing a fluorescently labeled primer-template pair. Both purified NS5 and NS5pol can carry out in vitro RNA-dependent RNA synthesis in this assay. Our results show that Mn2+ is required for enzymatic activity, while Mg2+ is not. We found that ZIKV NS5 can utilize single-stranded DNA but not double-stranded DNA as a template or a primer to synthesize RNA. The assay was used to compare the efficiency of incorporation of analog 5′-triphosphates by the ZIKV polymerase and to calculate their discrimination versus that of natural ribonucleotide triphosphates (rNTPs). The 50% inhibitory concentrations for analog rNTPs were determined in an alternative nonradioactive coupled-enzyme assay. We determined that, in general, 2′-C-methyl- and 2′-C-ethynyl-substituted analog 5′-triphosphates were efficiently incorporated by the ZIKV polymerase and were also efficient chain terminators. Derivatives of these molecules may serve as potential antiviral compounds to be developed to combat ZIKV infection. This report provides the first characterization of ZIKV polymerase and demonstrates the utility of in vitro polymerase assays in the identification of potential ZIKV inhibitors. PMID:27993851

  6. Use of DNA, RNA, and Chimeric Templates by a Viral RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase: Evolutionary Implications for the Transition from the RNA to the DNA World

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Robert W.; Bellon, Laurent; Beigelman, Leonid; Kao, C. Cheng

    1999-01-01

    All polynucleotide polymerases have a similar structure and mechanism of catalysis, consistent with their evolution from one progenitor polymerase. Viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) are expected to have properties comparable to those from this progenitor and therefore may offer insight into the commonalities of all classes of polymerases. We examined RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus RdRp on DNA, RNA, and hybrid templates and found that precise initiation of RNA synthesis can take place from all of these templates. Furthermore, initiation can take place from either internal or penultimate initiation sites. Using a template competition assay, we found that the BMV RdRp interacts with DNA only three- to fourfold less well than it interacts with RNA. Moreover, a DNA molecule with a ribonucleotide at position −11 relative to the initiation nucleotide was able to interact with RdRp at levels comparable to that observed with RNA. These results suggest that relatively few conditions were needed for an ancestral RdRp to replicate DNA genomes. PMID:10400735

  7. Physical and functional association of RNA polymerase II and the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Gillette, Thomas G.; Gonzalez, Fernando; Delahodde, Agnes; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Kodadek, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies from a number of laboratories have revealed a surprising number of connections between RNA polymerase II transcription and the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. We now find yet another intersection of these pathways by showing that the 26S proteasome associates with regions of the GAL1, GAL10, and HSP82 genes, including the 3′ ends, in a transcription-dependent fashion. The appearance of the proteasome on these inducible genes correlates with both the accumulation of transcripts and the buildup of RNA polymerase II complexes in the same region. Furthermore, the 26S proteasome and RNA polymerase II coimmunoprecipitate, and inhibition of 26S proteolytic activity leads to increased read through of a transcription termination site. We suggest that the proteasome is generally recruited to the DNA at sites of stalled RNA polymerase and may act to resolve these complexes. PMID:15069196

  8. Termination of Transcription of Short Noncoding RNAs by RNA Polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Karen M; Reines, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The RNA polymerase II transcription cycle is often divided into three major stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. Research over the last decade has blurred these divisions and emphasized the tightly regulated transitions that occur as RNA polymerase II synthesizes a transcript from start to finish. Transcription termination, the process that marks the end of transcription elongation, is regulated by proteins that interact with the polymerase, nascent transcript, and/or chromatin template. The failure to terminate transcription can cause accumulation of aberrant transcripts and interfere with transcription at downstream genes. Here, we review the mechanism, regulation, and physiological impact of a termination pathway that targets small noncoding transcripts produced by RNA polymerase II. We emphasize the Nrd1-Nab3-Sen1 pathway in yeast, in which the process has been extensively studied. The importance of understanding small RNA termination pathways is underscored by the need to control noncoding transcription in eukaryotic genomes.

  9. Syntheses of novel myxopyronin B analogs as potential inhibitors of bacterial RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Lira, Ricardo; Xiang, Alan X; Doundoulakis, Thomas; Biller, William T; Agrios, Konstantinos A; Simonsen, Klaus B; Webber, Stephen E; Sisson, Wes; Aust, Robert M; Shah, Amit M; Showalter, Richard E; Banh, Virginia N; Steffy, Kevin R; Appleman, James R

    2007-12-15

    Based upon observations from our initial findings, additional myxopyronin B analogs have been prepared and tested for in vitro inhibitory activity against DNA-dependent RNA polymerase and antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

  10. Substitution of Ribonucleotides in the T7 RNA Polymerase Promoter Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinness, Kathleen E.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2001-01-01

    A systematic analysis was carried out to examine the effects of ribonucleotide substitution at various locations within the promoter element for T7 RNA polymerase. Ribonucleotides could be introduced at most positions without significantly decreasing transcription efficiency. A critical window of residues that were intolerant of RNA substitution was defined for both the non-template and template strands of the promoter. These residues are involved in important contacts with the AT-rich recognition loop, specificity loop, and P-intercalating hairpin of the polymerase. These results highlight the malleability of T7 RNA polymerase in recognizing its promoter element and suggest that promoters with altered backbone conformations may be used in molecular biology applications that employ T7 RNA polymerase for in vitro transcription.

  11. Monitoring translocation of multisubunit RNA polymerase along the DNA with fluorescent base analogues.

    PubMed

    Malinen, Anssi M; Turtola, Matti; Belogurov, Georgiy A

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a direct fluorescence method that reports real-time occupancies of the pre- and post-translocated state of multisubunit RNA polymerase. In a stopped-flow setup, this method is capable of resolving a single base-pair translocation motion of RNA polymerase in real time. In a conventional spectrofluorometer, this method can be employed for studies of the time-averaged distribution of RNA polymerase on the DNA template. This method utilizes commercially available base analogue fluorophores integrated into template DNA strand in place of natural bases. We describe two template DNA strand designs where translocation of RNA polymerase from a pre-translocation to a post-translocation state results in disruption of stacking interactions of fluorophore with neighboring bases, with a concomitant large increase in fluorescence intensity.

  12. Structural basis of transcription: nucleotide selection by rotation in the RNA polymerase II active center.

    PubMed

    Westover, Kenneth D; Bushnell, David A; Kornberg, Roger D

    2004-11-12

    Binding of a ribonucleoside triphosphate to an RNA polymerase II transcribing complex, with base pairing to the template DNA, was revealed by X-ray crystallography. Binding of a mismatched nucleoside triphosphate was also detected, but in an adjacent site, inverted with respect to the correctly paired nucleotide. The results are consistent with a two-step mechanism of nucleotide selection, with initial binding to an entry (E) site beneath the active center in an inverted orientation, followed by rotation into the nucleotide addition (A) site for pairing with the template DNA. This mechanism is unrelated to that of single subunit RNA polymerases and so defines a new paradigm for the large, multisubunit enzymes. Additional findings from these studies include a third nucleotide binding site that may define the length of backtracked RNA; DNA double helix unwinding in advance of the polymerase active center; and extension of the diffraction limit of RNA polymerase II crystals to 2.3 A.

  13. Termination of Transcription of Short Noncoding RNAs by RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Karen M.; Reines, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The RNA polymerase II transcription cycle is often divided into three major stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. Research over the last decade has blurred these divisions and emphasized the tightly regulated transitions that occur as RNA polymerase II synthesizes a transcript from start to finish. Transcription termination, the process that marks the end of transcription elongation, is regulated by proteins that interact with the polymerase, nascent transcript, and/or chromatin template. The failure to terminate transcription can cause accumulation of aberrant transcripts and interfere with transcription at downstream genes. Here, we review the mechanism, regulation, and physiological impact of a termination pathway that targets small noncoding transcripts produced by RNA polymerase II. We emphasize the Nrd1–Nab3–Sen1 pathway in yeast, in which the process has been extensively studied. The importance of understanding small RNA termination pathways is underscored by the need to control noncoding transcription in eukaryotic genomes. PMID:25747400

  14. Substitution of Ribonucleotides in the T7 RNA Polymerase Promoter Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinness, Kathleen E.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2001-01-01

    A systematic analysis was carried out to examine the effects of ribonucleotide substitution at various locations within the promoter element for T7 RNA polymerase. Ribonucleotides could be introduced at most positions without significantly decreasing transcription efficiency. A critical window of residues that were intolerant of RNA substitution was defined for both the non-template and template strands of the promoter. These residues are involved in important contacts with the AT-rich recognition loop, specificity loop, and P-intercalating hairpin of the polymerase. These results highlight the malleability of T7 RNA polymerase in recognizing its promoter element and suggest that promoters with altered backbone conformations may be used in molecular biology applications that employ T7 RNA polymerase for in vitro transcription.

  15. Sequence and analysis of the gene for bacteriophage T3 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, N J; Bailey, J N; Cleaves, G R; Dembinski, D R; Gocke, C R; Joliffe, L K; MacWright, R S; McAllister, W T

    1985-01-01

    The RNA polymerases encoded by bacteriophages T3 and T7 have similar structures, but exhibit nearly exclusive template specificities. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the region of T3 DNA that encodes the T3 RNA polymerase (the gene 1.0 region), and have compared this sequence with the corresponding region of T7 DNA. The predicted amino acid sequence of the T3 RNA polymerase exhibits very few changes when compared to the T7 enzyme (82% of the residues are identical). Significant differences appear to cluster in three distinct regions in the amino-terminal half of the protein. Analysis of the data from both enzymes suggests features that may be important for polymerase function. In particular, a region that differs between the T3 and T7 enzymes exhibits significant homology to the bi-helical domain that is common to many sequence-specific DNA binding proteins. The region that flanks the structural gene contains a number of regulatory elements including: a promoter for the E. coli RNA polymerase, a potential processing site for RNase III and a promoter for the T3 polymerase. The promoter for the T3 RNA polymerase is located only 12 base pairs distal to the stop codon for the structural gene. PMID:3903658

  16. RNA polymerase II subunit RPB3 is an essential component of the mRNA transcription apparatus.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, P; Young, R A

    1989-01-01

    To improve our understanding of RNA polymerase II, the gene that encodes its third-largest subunit, RPB3, was isolated from a lambda gt11 DNA library by using antibody probes. The RPB3 DNA sequence predicts a 318-amino-acid protein whose sequence was confirmed, in part, by microsequence analysis of the gel-purified RNA polymerase II subunit. RPB3 was found to be an essential single-copy gene that is tightly linked to HIS6 on chromosome IX. An RPB3 temperature-sensitive mutant that arrested growth after three to four generations at the restrictive temperature was isolated. When the mutant was shifted to the restrictive temperature, RNA polymerase II could no longer assemble, previously assembled functional enzyme was depleted, and mRNA levels were consequently reduced. These results demonstrate that RPB3 is an essential component of the mRNA transcription apparatus. Finally, the RPB3 protein is similar in sequence and length to RPC5, a subunit common to RNA polymerases I and III, suggesting that these subunits may play similar roles in RNA polymerases I, II, and III. Images PMID:2685562

  17. Efficient Interaction between Arenavirus Nucleoprotein (NP) and RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase (L) Is Mediated by the Virus Nucleocapsid (NP-RNA) Template.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Masaharu; Ngo, Nhi; Cubitt, Beatrice; de la Torre, Juan C

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we document that efficient interaction between arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L protein), the two trans-acting viral factors required for both virus RNA replication and gene transcription, requires the presence of virus-specific RNA sequences located within the untranslated 5' and 3' termini of the viral genome.

  18. A Dual Interface Determines the Recognition of RNA Polymerase II by RNA Capping Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Man-Hee; Meyer, Peter A.; Gu, Meigang; Ye, Ping; Zhang, Mincheng; Kaplan, Craig D.; Lima, Christopher D.; Fu, Jianhua

    2010-01-01

    RNA capping enzyme (CE) is recruited specifically to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription sites to facilitate cotranscriptional 5′-capping of pre-mRNA and other Pol II transcripts. The current model to explain this specific recruitment of CE to Pol II as opposed to Pol I and Pol III rests on the interaction between CE and the phosphorylated C-terminal domain (CTD) of Pol II largest subunit Rpb1 and more specifically between the CE nucleotidyltransferase domain and the phosphorylated CTD. Through biochemical and diffraction analyses, we demonstrate the existence of a distinctive stoichiometric complex between CE and the phosphorylated Pol II (Pol IIO). Analysis of the complex revealed an additional and unexpected polymerase-CE interface (PCI) located on the multihelical Foot domain of Rpb1. We name this interface PCI1 and the previously known nucleotidyltransferase/phosphorylated CTD interface PCI2. Although PCI1 and PCI2 individually contribute to only weak interactions with CE, a dramatically stabilized and stoichiometric complex is formed when PCI1 and PCI2 are combined in cis as they occur in an intact phosphorylated Pol II molecule. Disrupting either PCI1 or PCI2 by alanine substitution or deletion diminishes CE association with Pol II and causes severe growth defects in vivo. Evidence from manipulating PCI1 indicates that the Foot domain contributes to the specificity in CE interaction with Pol II as opposed to Pol I and Pol III. Our results indicate that the dual interface based on combining PCI1 and PCI2 is required for directing CE to Pol II elongation complexes. PMID:20720002

  19. Altered promoter selection by a novel form of Bacillus subtilis RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Jaehning, J A; Wiggs, J L; Chamberlin, M J

    1979-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis RNA polymerase holoenzyme prepared by several standard methods utilizes bacteriophage T7 DeltaD111 DNA as an efficient template. The major RNA products are specific transcripts from T7 promoters A(1) and C; these promoters are also efficiently utilized by RNA polymerases purified from a wide range of other bacterial species [Wiggs, J., Bush, J. & Chamberlin, M. (1979) Cell 16, 97-109]. In contrast, B. subtilis RNA polymerase preparations purified by a modification of the method of Burgess and Jendrisak (designated fraction 5) utilize T7 DeltaD111 promoters A(1) and C and an additional promoter site, J, which has been located at 90.6% on the standard T7 physical map. This promoter is not used by B. subtilis core RNA polymerase or by RNA polymerase from any other bacterial species we have tested. Sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of fraction 5 RNA polymerase shows that it contains B. subtilis components sigma and delta and a polypeptide of M(r) 92,000 in addition to the B. subtilis beta, beta', and alpha subunits. Chromatography of fraction 5 on single-stranded DNA-cellulose gives an enzyme fraction, Bs I, that is indistinguishable from B. subtilis RNA polymerase holoenzyme both in its peptide composition (betabeta'alpha(2)sigma) and in the selective transcription of only T7 RNAs A(1) and C. Chromatography of fraction 5 on phosphocellulose yields an enzyme fraction, Bs II, devoid of sigma subunit but containing the M(r) 92,000 peptide and traces of delta. This fraction synthesizes predominantly T7 J RNA in vitro together with traces of T7 A(1) and C RNAs. Hence, B. subtilis RNA polymerase fraction Bs II appears to contain a form of RNA polymerase that can transcribe selectively without detectable amounts of B. subtilis sigma subunit and that utilizes a promoter site not used by other known bacterial RNA polymerases. The structural basis for this specificity is not yet known.

  20. Head-on collision between a DNA replication apparatus and RNA polymerase transcription complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Alberts, B M

    1995-02-24

    An in vitro system reconstituted from purified proteins has been used to examine what happens when the DNA replication apparatus of bacteriophage T4 collides with an Escherichia coli RNA polymerase ternary transcription complex that is poised to move in the direction opposite to that of the moving replication fork. In the absence of a DNA helicase, the replication fork stalls for many minutes after its encounter with the RNA polymerase. However, when the T4 gene 41 DNA helicase is present, the replication fork passes the RNA polymerase after a pause of a few seconds. This brief pause is longer than the pause observed for a codirectional collision between the same two polymerases, suggesting that there is an inherent disadvantage to having replication and transcription directions oriented head to head. As for a codirectional collision, the RNA polymerase remains competent to resume faithful RNA chain elongation after the DNA replication fork passes; most strikingly, the RNA polymerase has switched from its original template strand to use the newly synthesized daughter DNA strand as the template.

  1. Temperature-sensitive RNA polymerase II mutations in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    PubMed Central

    Ingles, C. James

    1978-01-01

    Mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell lines temperature-sensitive (TS) for growth and containing TS mutations in RNA polymerase II (nucleosidetriphosphate:RNA nucleotidyltransferase, EC 2.7.7.6) have been isolated. Wild-type cells were treated with the mutagen N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and a population of cells possessing mutations in RNA polymerase II was initially selected by isolating α-amanitin-resistant clones at 34°. Of 168 such α-amanitin-resistant isolates screened for temperature sensitivity, nine were TS for growth at 39.5°. By examining the behavior of the α-amanitin resistance of these TS cell lines in somatic cell hybrids, the TS mutation in a number of them was shown to be in RNA polymerase II. Hybrid cells obtained by the fusion of the TS and α-amanitin-resistant cells with cells possessing α-amanitin-sensitive polymerase II grew at both 34° and 39.5°; the TS mutations were recessive. At 34° all the hybrids were α-amanitin-resistant and possessed a mixture of α-amanitin-resistant and sensitive polymerase II. At 39.5° the α-amanitin-resistant polymerase II activities in hybrids of four of the TS cell lines were lost; these four lines were α-amanitin-sensitive and possessed only α-amanitin-sensitive polymerase II. Temperature-insensitive revertants of two of these mutants were isolated. Reversion of the TS phenotype for mutants TsAmaR-1 and TsAmaR-8 was accompanied by an alteration in the level of α-amanitin resistance of the RNA polymerase II activities in the revertant cells. Together these data provide convincing evidence that TS mutations in RNA polymerase II can be coselected with α-amanitin resistance. PMID:272657

  2. Heat shock 70 protein interaction with Turnip mosaic virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase within virus-induced membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Dufresne, Philippe J.; Thivierge, Karine; Cotton, Sophie; Beauchemin, Chantal; Ide, Christine; Ubalijoro, Eliane; Laliberte, Jean-Francois Fortin, Marc G.

    2008-04-25

    Tandem affinity purification was used in Arabidopsis thaliana to identify cellular interactors of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). The heat shock cognate 70-3 (Hsc70-3) and poly(A)-binding (PABP) host proteins were recovered and shown to interact with the RdRp in vitro. As previously shown for PABP, Hsc70-3 was redistributed to nuclear and membranous fractions in infected plants and both RdRp interactors were co-immunoprecipitated from a membrane-enriched extract using RdRp-specific antibodies. Fluorescently tagged RdRp and Hsc70-3 localized to the cytoplasm and the nucleus when expressed alone or in combination in Nicotiana benthamiana. However, they were redistributed to large perinuclear ER-derived vesicles when co-expressed with the membrane binding 6K-VPg-Pro protein of TuMV. The association of Hsc70-3 with the RdRp could possibly take place in membrane-derived replication complexes. Thus, Hsc70-3 and PABP2 are potentially integral components of the replicase complex and could have important roles to play in the regulation of potyviral RdRp functions.

  3. Altering the interaction between σ70 and RNA polymerase generates complexes with distinct transcription-elongation properties

    PubMed Central

    Berghöfer-Hochheimer, Yvonne; Lu, Chi Zen; Gross, Carol A.

    2005-01-01

    We compare the elongation behavior of native Escherichia coli RNA polymerase holoenzyme assembled in vivo, holoenzyme reconstituted from σ70 and RNA polymerase in vitro, and holoenzyme with a specific alteration in the interface between σ70 and RNA polymerase. Elongating RNA polymerase from each holoenzyme has distinguishable properties, some of which cannot be explained by differential retention or rebinding of σ70 during elongation, or by differential presence of elongation factors. We suggest that interactions between RNA polymerase and σ70 may influence the ensemble of conformational states adopted by RNA polymerase during initiation. These states, in turn, may affect the conformational states adopted by the elongating enzyme, thereby physically and functionally imprinting RNA polymerase. PMID:15650048

  4. Structural explanation for the role of Mn2+ in the activity of ϕ6 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Poranen, Minna M.; Salgado, Paula S.; Koivunen, Minni R. L.; Wright, Sam; Bamford, Dennis H.; Stuart, David I.; Grimes, Jonathan M.

    2008-01-01

    The biological role of manganese (Mn2+) has been a long-standing puzzle, since at low concentrations it activates several polymerases whilst at higher concentrations it inhibits. Viral RNA polymerases possess a common architecture, reminiscent of a closed right hand. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of bacteriophage ϕ6 is one of the best understood examples of this important class of polymerases. We have probed the role of Mn2+ by biochemical, biophysical and structural analyses of the wild-type enzyme and of a mutant form with an altered Mn2+-binding site (E491 to Q). The E491Q mutant has much reduced affinity for Mn2+, reduced RNA binding and a compromised elongation rate. Loss of Mn2+ binding structurally stabilizes the enzyme. These data and a re-examination of the structures of other viral RNA polymerases clarify the role of manganese in the activation of polymerization: Mn2+ coordination of a catalytic aspartate is necessary to allow the active site to properly engage with the triphosphates of the incoming NTPs. The structural flexibility caused by Mn2+ is also important for the enzyme dynamics, explaining the requirement for manganese throughout RNA polymerization. PMID:18940872

  5. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase: Addressing Zika outbreak by a phylogeny-based drug target study.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Preyesh; Lin, Sheng-Xiang

    2017-06-21

    Since the first major outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) in 2007, ZIKV is spreading explosively through South and Central America, and recent reports in highly populated developing countries alarm the possibility of a more catastrophic outbreak. ZIKV infection in pregnant women leads to embryonic microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults. At present, there is limited understanding of the infectious mechanism, and no approved therapy has been reported. Despite the withdrawal of public health emergency, the WHO still considers the ZIKV as a highly significant and long-term public health challenge that the situation has to be addressed rapidly. Non-structural protein 5 is essential for capping and replication of viral RNA and comprises a methyltransferase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain. We used molecular modeling to obtain the structure of ZIKV RdRp, and by molecular docking and phylogeny analysis, we here demonstrate the potential sites for drug screening. Two metal binding sites and an NS3-interacting region in ZIKV RdRp are demonstrated as potential drug screening sites. The docked structures reveal a remarkable degree of conservation at the substrate binding site and the potential drug screening sites. A phylogeny-based approach is provided for an emergency preparedness, where similar class of ligands could target phylogenetically related proteins. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Long non-coding RNA produced by RNA polymerase V determines boundaries of heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Böhmdorfer, Gudrun; Sethuraman, Shriya; Rowley, M Jordan; Krzyszton, Michal; Rothi, M Hafiz; Bouzit, Lilia; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T

    2016-01-01

    RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing is a conserved process where small RNAs target transposons and other sequences for repression by establishing chromatin modifications. A central element of this process are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), which in Arabidopsis thaliana are produced by a specialized RNA polymerase known as Pol V. Here we show that non-coding transcription by Pol V is controlled by preexisting chromatin modifications located within the transcribed regions. Most Pol V transcripts are associated with AGO4 but are not sliced by AGO4. Pol V-dependent DNA methylation is established on both strands of DNA and is tightly restricted to Pol V-transcribed regions. This indicates that chromatin modifications are established in close proximity to Pol V. Finally, Pol V transcription is preferentially enriched on edges of silenced transposable elements, where Pol V transcribes into TEs. We propose that Pol V may play an important role in the determination of heterochromatin boundaries. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19092.001 PMID:27779094

  7. Basic Mechanisms in RNA Polymerase I Transcription of the Ribosomal RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, Sarah J.; Zomerdijk, Joost C. B. M.

    2013-01-01

    RNA Polymerase (Pol) I produces ribosomal (r)RNA, an essential component of the cellular protein synthetic machinery that drives cell growth, underlying many fundamental cellular processes. Extensive research into the mechanisms governing transcription by Pol I has revealed an intricate set of control mechanisms impinging upon rRNA production. Pol I-specific transcription factors guide Pol I to the rDNA promoter and contribute to multiple rounds of transcription initiation, promoter escape, elongation and termination. In addition, many accessory factors are now known to assist at each stage of this transcription cycle, some of which allow the integration of transcriptional activity with metabolic demands. The organisation and accessibility of rDNA chromatin also impinge upon Pol I output, and complex mechanisms ensure the appropriate maintenance of the epigenetic state of the nucleolar genome and its effective transcription by Pol I. The following review presents our current understanding of the components of the Pol I transcription machinery, their functions and regulation by associated factors, and the mechanisms operating to ensure the proper transcription of rDNA chromatin. The importance of such stringent control is demonstrated by the fact that deregulated Pol I transcription is a feature of cancer and other disorders characterised by abnormal translational capacity. PMID:23150253

  8. Norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase: A computational study of metal-binding preferences.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Md Munan; Bhattacharjee, Nicholus; Feliks, Mikolaj; Ng, Kenneth K-S; Field, Martin J

    2017-04-06

    Norovirus (NV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) is essential for replicating the genome of the virus, which makes this enzyme a key target for the development of antiviral agents against NV gastroenteritis. In this work, a complex of NV RdRP bound to manganese ions and an RNA primer-template duplex was investigated using X-ray crystallography and hybrid quantum chemical/molecular mechanical simulations. Experimentally, the complex crystallized in a tetragonal crystal form. The nature of the primer/template duplex binding in the resulting structure indicates that the complex is a closed back-tracked state of the enzyme, in which the 3'-end of the primer occupies the position expected for the post-incorporated nucleotide before translocation. Computationally, it is found that the complex can accept a range of divalent metal cations without marked distortions in the active site structure. The highest binding energy is for copper, followed closely by manganese and iron, and then by zinc, nickel and cobalt. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. RNA editing by T7 RNA polymerase bypasses InDel mutations causing unexpected phenotypic changes

    PubMed Central

    Wons, Ewa; Furmanek-Blaszk, Beata; Sektas, Marian

    2015-01-01

    DNA-dependent T7 RNA polymerase (T7 RNAP) is the most powerful tool for both gene expression and in vitro transcription. By using a Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) approach we have analyzed the polymorphism of a T7 RNAP-generated mRNA pool of the mboIIM2 gene. We find that the enzyme displays a relatively high level of template-dependent transcriptional infidelity. The nucleotide misincorporations and multiple insertions in A/T-rich tracts of homopolymers in mRNA (0.20 and 0.089%, respectively) cause epigenetic effects with significant impact on gene expression that is disproportionally high to their frequency of appearance. The sequence-dependent rescue of single and even double InDel frameshifting mutants and wild-type phenotype recovery is observed as a result. As a consequence, a heterogeneous pool of functional and non-functional proteins of almost the same molecular mass is produced where the proteins are indistinguishable from each other upon ordinary analysis. We suggest that transcriptional infidelity as a general feature of the most effective RNAPs may serve to repair and/or modify a protein function, thus increasing the repertoire of phenotypic variants, which in turn has a high evolutionary potential. PMID:25824942

  10. Comparative analysis of RNA silencing suppression activities between viral suppressors and an endogenous plant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Han, Kyoung-Sik; Park, Han-Yong; Choi, Seung-Kook

    2012-06-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved system that functions as an antiviral mechanism in eukaryotes, including higher plants. To counteract this, several plant viruses express silencing suppressors that inhibit RNA silencing in host plants. Here, we show that both 2b protein from peanut stunt virus (PSV) and a hairpin construct (designated hp-RDR6) that silences endogenous RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) strongly suppress RNA silencing. The Agrobacterium infiltration system was used to demonstrate that both PSV 2b and hp-RDR6 suppressed local RNA silencing as strongly as helper component (HC-Pro) from potato virus Y (PVY) and P19 from tomato bush stunt virus (TBSV). The 2b protein from PSV eliminated the small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) associated with RNA silencing and prevented systemic silencing, similar to 2b protein from cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). On the other hand, hp-RDR6 suppressed RNA silencing by inhibiting the generation of secondary siRNAs. The small coat protein (SCP) of squash mosaic virus (SqMV) also displayed weak suppression activity of RNA silencing. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer was used to investigate whether viral silencing suppressors or hp-RDR6 enhanced accumulations of green fluorescence protein (GFP) and β-glucuronidase (GUS) as markers of expression in leaf tissues of Nicotina benthamiana. Expression of both GFP and GUS was significantly enhanced in the presence of PSV 2b or CMV 2b, compared to no suppression or the weak SqMV SCP suppressor. Co-expression with hp-RDR6 also significantly increased the expression of GFP and GUS to levels similar to those induced by PVY HC-Pro and TBSV P19.

  11. The action of actinomycin D on the transcription of T7 coliphage DNA by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Flamée, P A

    1985-09-01

    An actinomycin D molecule bound to DNA sometimes stops the synthesis of RNA by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. However, quite often, the bound antibiotic is released before the RNA polymerase detaches from the template DNA, so that the enzyme can resume, without interruption, the synthesis of the RNA chain.

  12. Epigenetic regulation of noncoding RNA transcription by mammalian RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Lyul; Lee, Yeon-Su; Kunkeaw, Nawapol; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, In-Hoo; Lee, Yong Sun

    2017-02-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) synthesizes a range of medium-sized noncoding RNAs (collectively 'Pol III genes') whose early established biological roles were so essential that they were considered 'housekeeping genes'. Besides these fundamental functions, diverse unconventional roles of mammalian Pol III genes have recently been recognized and their expression must be exquisitely controlled. In this review, we summarize the epigenetic regulation of Pol III genes by chromatin structure, histone modification and CpG DNA methylation. We also recapitulate the association between dysregulation of Pol III genes and diseases such as cancer and neurological disorders. Additionally, we will discuss why in-depth molecular studies of Pol III genes have not been attempted and how nc886, a Pol III gene, may resolve this issue.

  13. The non-coding B2 RNA binds to the DNA cleft and active site region of RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Ponicsan, Steven L.; Houel, Stephane; Old, William M.; Ahn, Natalie G.; Goodrich, James A.; Kugel, Jennifer F.

    2013-01-01

    The B2 family of short interspersed elements is transcribed into non-coding RNA by RNA polymerase III. The ~180 nt B2 RNA has been shown to potently repress mRNA transcription by binding tightly to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and assembling with it into complexes on promoter DNA, where it keeps the polymerase from properly engaging the promoter DNA. Mammalian Pol II is a ~500 kD complex that contains 12 different protein subunits, providing many possible surfaces for interaction with B2 RNA. We found that the carboxy-terminal domain of the largest Pol II subunit was not required for B2 RNA to bind Pol II and repress transcription in vitro. To identify the surface on Pol II to which the minimal functional region of B2 RNA binds, we coupled multi-step affinity purification, reversible formaldehyde crosslinking, peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry, and analysis of peptide enrichment. The Pol II peptides most highly recovered after crosslinking to B2 RNA mapped to the DNA binding cleft and active site region of Pol II. These studies determine the location of a defined nucleic acid binding site on a large, native, multi-subunit complex and provide insight into the mechanism of transcriptional repression by B2 RNA. PMID:23416138

  14. Identification of four conserved motifs among the RNA-dependent polymerase encoding elements.

    PubMed Central

    Poch, O; Sauvaget, I; Delarue, M; Tordo, N

    1989-01-01

    Four consensus sequences are conserved with the same linear arrangement in RNA-dependent DNA polymerases encoded by retroid elements and in RNA-dependent RNA polymerases encoded by plus-, minus- and double-strand RNA viruses. One of these motifs corresponds to the YGDD span previously described by Kamer and Argos (1984). These consensus sequences altogether lead to 4 strictly and 18 conservatively maintained amino acids embedded in a large domain of 120 to 210 amino acids. As judged from secondary structure predictions, each of the 4 motifs, which may cooperate to form a well-ordered domain, places one invariant amino acid in or proximal to turn structures that may be crucial for their correct positioning in a catalytic process. We suggest that this domain may constitute a prerequisite 'polymerase module' implicated in template seating and polymerase activity. At the evolutionary level, the sequence similarities, gap distribution and distances between each motif strongly suggest that the ancestral polymerase module was encoded by an individual genetic element which was most closely related to the plus-strand RNA viruses and the non-viral retroposons. This polymerase module gene may have subsequently propagated in the viral kingdom by distinct gene set recombination events leading to the wide viral variety observed today. Images PMID:2555175

  15. Cytoplasmic viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase disrupts the intracellular splicing machinery by entering the nucleus and interfering with Prp8.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen-Chin; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Lin, Jing-Yi; Huang, Peng-Nien; Huang, Yi; Liu, Hsuan; Arnold, Jamine J; Chen, Shu-Jen; Wang, Robert Yung-Liang; Cameron, Craig E; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2014-06-01

    The primary role of cytoplasmic viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is viral genome replication in the cellular cytoplasm. However, picornaviral RdRp denoted 3D polymerase (3D(pol)) also enters the host nucleus, where its function remains unclear. In this study, we describe a novel mechanism of viral attack in which 3D(pol) enters the nucleus through the nuclear localization signal (NLS) and targets the pre-mRNA processing factor 8 (Prp8) to block pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA synthesis. The fingers domain of 3D(pol) associates with the C-terminal region of Prp8, which contains the Jab1/MPN domain, and interferes in the second catalytic step, resulting in the accumulation of the lariat form of the splicing intermediate. Endogenous pre-mRNAs trapped by the Prp8-3D(pol) complex in enterovirus-infected cells were identified and classed into groups associated with cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Our results suggest that picornaviral RdRp disrupts pre-mRNA splicing processes, that differs from viral protease shutting off cellular transcription and translation which contributes to the pathogenesis of viral infection.

  16. Cytoplasmic Viral RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Disrupts the Intracellular Splicing Machinery by Entering the Nucleus and Interfering with Prp8

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yen-Chin; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Lin, Jing-Yi; Huang, Peng-Nien; Huang, Yi; Liu, Hsuan; Arnold, Jamine J.; Chen, Shu-Jen; Wang, Robert Yung-Liang; Cameron, Craig E.; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2014-01-01

    The primary role of cytoplasmic viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is viral genome replication in the cellular cytoplasm. However, picornaviral RdRp denoted 3D polymerase (3Dpol) also enters the host nucleus, where its function remains unclear. In this study, we describe a novel mechanism of viral attack in which 3Dpol enters the nucleus through the nuclear localization signal (NLS) and targets the pre-mRNA processing factor 8 (Prp8) to block pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA synthesis. The fingers domain of 3Dpol associates with the C-terminal region of Prp8, which contains the Jab1/MPN domain, and interferes in the second catalytic step, resulting in the accumulation of the lariat form of the splicing intermediate. Endogenous pre-mRNAs trapped by the Prp8-3Dpol complex in enterovirus-infected cells were identified and classed into groups associated with cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Our results suggest that picornaviral RdRp disrupts pre-mRNA splicing processes, that differs from viral protease shutting off cellular transcription and translation which contributes to the pathogenesis of viral infection. PMID:24968230

  17. Canonical Poly(A) Polymerase Activity Promotes the Decay of a Wide Variety of Mammalian Nuclear RNAs.

    PubMed

    Bresson, Stefan M; Hunter, Olga V; Hunter, Allyson C; Conrad, Nicholas K

    2015-10-01

    The human nuclear poly(A)-binding protein PABPN1 has been implicated in the decay of nuclear noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). In addition, PABPN1 promotes hyperadenylation by stimulating poly(A)-polymerases (PAPα/γ), but this activity has not previously been linked to the decay of endogenous transcripts. Moreover, the mechanisms underlying target specificity have remained elusive. Here, we inactivated PAP-dependent hyperadenylation in cells by two independent mechanisms and used an RNA-seq approach to identify endogenous targets. We observed the upregulation of various ncRNAs, including snoRNA host genes, primary miRNA transcripts, and promoter upstream antisense RNAs, confirming that hyperadenylation is broadly required for the degradation of PABPN1-targets. In addition, we found that mRNAs with retained introns are susceptible to PABPN1 and PAPα/γ-mediated decay (PPD). Transcripts are targeted for degradation due to inefficient export, which is a consequence of reduced intron number or incomplete splicing. Additional investigation showed that a genetically-encoded poly(A) tail is sufficient to drive decay, suggesting that degradation occurs independently of the canonical cleavage and polyadenylation reaction. Surprisingly, treatment with transcription inhibitors uncouples polyadenylation from decay, leading to runaway hyperadenylation of nuclear decay targets. We conclude that PPD is an important mammalian nuclear RNA decay pathway for the removal of poorly spliced and nuclear-retained transcripts.

  18. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 from Nicotiana tabacum suppresses RNA silencing and enhances viral infection in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ying, Xiao-Bao; Dong, Li; Zhu, Hui; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Du, Quan-Sheng; Lv, Dian-Qiu; Fang, Yuan-Yuan; Garcia, Juan Antonio; Fang, Rong-Xiang; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2010-04-01

    Endogenous eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) produce double-stranded RNA intermediates in diverse processes of small RNA synthesis in RNA silencing pathways. RDR6 is required in plants for posttranscriptional gene silencing induced by sense transgenes (S-PTGS) and has an important role in amplification of antiviral silencing. Whereas RDR1 is also involved in antiviral defense in plants, this does not necessarily proceed through triggering silencing. In this study, we show that Nicotiana benthamiana transformed with RDR1 from Nicotiana tabacum (Nt-RDR1 plants) exhibits hypersusceptibility to Plum pox potyvirus and other viruses, resembling RDR6-silenced (RDR6i) N. benthamiana. Analysis of transient induction of RNA silencing in N. benthamiana Nt-RDR1 and RDR6i plants revealed that Nt-RDR1 possesses silencing suppression activity. We found that Nt-RDR1 does not interfere with RDR6-dependent siRNA accumulation but turns out to suppress RDR6-dependent S-PTGS. Our results, together with previously published data, suggest that RDR1 might have a dual role, contributing, on one hand, to salicylic acid-mediated antiviral defense, and suppressing, on the other hand, the RDR6-mediated antiviral RNA silencing. We propose a scenario in which the natural loss-of-function variant of RDR1 in N. benthamiana may be the outcome of selective pressure to maintain a high RDR6-dependent antiviral defense, which would be required to face the hypersensitivity of this plant to a large number of viruses.

  19. The Werner Syndrome Protein Is Involved in RNA Polymerase II Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Balajee, Adayabalam S.; Machwe, Amrita; May, Alfred; Gray, Matthew D.; Oshima, Junko; Martin, George M.; Nehlin, Jan O.; Brosh, Robert; Orren, David K.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    1999-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a human progeroid syndrome characterized by the early onset of a large number of clinical features associated with the normal aging process. The complex molecular and cellular phenotypes of WS involve characteristic features of genomic instability and accelerated replicative senescence. The gene involved (WRN) was recently cloned, and its gene product (WRNp) was biochemically characterized as a helicase. Helicases play important roles in a variety of DNA transactions, including DNA replication, transcription, repair, and recombination. We have assessed the role of the WRN gene in transcription by analyzing the efficiency of basal transcription in WS lymphoblastoid cell lines that carry homozygous WRN mutations. Transcription was measured in permeabilized cells by [3H]UTP incorporation and in vitro by using a plasmid template containing the RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II)–dependent adenovirus major late promoter. With both of these approaches, we find that the transcription efficiency in different WS cell lines is reduced to 40–60% of the transcription in cells from normal individuals. This defect can be complemented by the addition of normal cell extracts to the chromatin of WS cells. Addition of purified wild-type WRNp but not mutated WRNp to the in vitro transcription assay markedly stimulates RNA pol II–dependent transcription carried out by nuclear extracts. A nonhelicase domain (a direct repeat of 27 amino acids) also appears to have a role in transcription enhancement, as revealed by a yeast hybrid–protein reporter assay. This is further supported by the lack of stimulation of transcription when mutant WRNp lacking this domain was added to the in vitro assay. We have thus used several approaches to show a role for WRNp in RNA pol II transcription, possibly as a transcriptional activator. A deficit in either global or regional transcription in WS cells may be a primary molecular defect responsible for the WS clinical phenotype

  20. Discrete promoter elements affect specific properties of RNA polymerase II transcription complexes

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, John W.; Kopytek, Stephan J.; Peterson, David O.

    2000-01-01

    The frequency of transcription initiation at specific RNA polymerase II promoters is, in many cases, related to the ability of the promoter to recruit the transcription machinery to a specific site. However, there may also be functional differences in the properties of assembled transcription complexes that are promoter-specific or regulator-dependent and affect their activity. Transcription complexes formed on variants of the adenovirus major late (AdML) promoter were found to differ in several ways. Mutations in the initiator element increased the sarkosyl sensitivity of the rate of elongation and decreased the rate of early steps in initiation as revealed by a sarkosyl challenge assay that exploited the resistance of RNA synthesis to high concentrations of sarkosyl after formation of one or two phospho­diester bonds. Similar, but clearly distinct, effects were also observed after deletion of the binding site for upstream stimulatory factor from the AdML promoter. In contrast, deletion of binding sites for nuclear factor 1 and Oct-1, as well as mutations in the recognition sequence for initiation site binding protein, were without apparent effect on transcription complexes on templates containing the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter. PMID:10908329

  1. Discrete promoter elements affect specific properties of RNA polymerase II transcription complexes.

    PubMed

    Steinke, J W; Kopytek, S J; Peterson, D O

    2000-07-15

    The frequency of transcription initiation at specific RNA polymerase II promoters is, in many cases, related to the ability of the promoter to recruit the transcription machinery to a specific site. However, there may also be functional differences in the properties of assembled transcription complexes that are promoter-specific or regulator-dependent and affect their activity. Transcription complexes formed on variants of the adenovirus major late (AdML) promoter were found to differ in several ways. Mutations in the initiator element increased the sarkosyl sensitivity of the rate of elongation and decreased the rate of early steps in initiation as revealed by a sarkosyl challenge assay that exploited the resistance of RNA synthesis to high concentrations of sarkosyl after formation of one or two phospho-diester bonds. Similar, but clearly distinct, effects were also observed after deletion of the binding site for upstream stimulatory factor from the AdML promoter. In contrast, deletion of binding sites for nuclear factor 1 and Oct-1, as well as mutations in the recognition sequence for initiation site binding protein, were without apparent effect on transcription complexes on templates containing the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter.

  2. CTCF Regulates Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency Transcription by Nucleosome Displacement and RNA Polymerase Programming

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyosun; Sung, Gi-Ho

    2013-01-01

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) has been implicated in various aspects of viral and host chromatin organization and transcriptional control. We showed previously that CTCF binds to a cluster of three sites in the first intron of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) multicistronic latency-associated transcript that encodes latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), viral cyclin (vCyclin), vFLIP, viral microRNAs, and kaposin. We show here that these CTCF binding sites regulate mRNA production, RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) programming, and nucleosome organization of the KSHV latency transcript control region. We also show that KSHV bacmids lacking these CTCF binding sites have elevated and altered ratios of spliced latency transcripts. CTCF binding site mutations altered RNAPII and RNAPII-accessory factor interactions with the latency control region. CTCF binding sites were required for the in vitro recruitment of RNAPII to the latency control region, suggesting that direct interactions between CTCF and RNAPII contribute to transcription regulation. Histone modifications in the latency control region were also altered by mutations in the CTCF binding sites. Finally, we show that CTCF binding alters the regular phasing of nucleosomes in the latency gene transcript and intron, suggesting that nucleosome positioning can be an underlying biochemical mechanism of CTCF function. We propose that RNAPII interactions and nucleosome displacement serve as a biochemical basis for programming RNAPII in the KSHV transcriptional control region. PMID:23192870

  3. dsRNA interference on expression of a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene of Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhong-Hua; Gao, Kun; Hou, Cheng-Xiang; Wu, Ping; Qin, Guang-Xing; Geng, Tao; Guo, Xi-Jie

    2015-07-01

    Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV) is one of the major viral pathogens in silkworm. Its infection often results in significant losses to sericulture. Studies have demonstrated that RNAi is one of the important anti-viral mechanisms in organisms. In this study, three dsRNAs targeting the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP) gene of BmCPV were designed and synthesized with 2'-F modification to explore their interference effects on BmCPV replication in silkworm larvae. The results showed that injecting dsRNA in the dosage of 4-6 ng per mg body weight into the 5th instar larvae can interfere with the BmCPV-RDRP expression by 93% after virus infection and by 99.9% before virus infection. In addition, the expression of two viral structural protein genes (genome RNA segments 1 and 5) was also decreased with the decrease of RDRP expression, suggesting that RNAi interference of BmCPV-RDRP expression could affect viral replication. The study provides an effective method for investigating virus replication as well as the virus-host interactions in the silkworm larvae using dsRNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Increased levels of rat liver RNA polymerase I(A) and I(B) following the administration of triiodothyronine.

    PubMed

    Zoncheddu, A; Accomando, R; Pertica, M; Carlini, A; Orunesu, M

    1981-06-15

    The levels of the transcribing RNA polymerase I(B) in the nucleus and of the non-transcribing RNA polymerase I(A) in the cytoplasm are both approximately doubled 24 h after a single i.p. injection of triiodothyronine into thyroidectomized rats. This suggests that the triiodothyronine-induced stimulation of ribosomal RNA synthesis is associated with an increase in the total RNA polymerase I content of rat liver cells.

  5. A Template RNA Entry Channel in the Fingers Domain of the Poliovirus Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Kortus, Matthew G.; Kempf, Brian J.; Haworth, Kevin G.; Barton, David J.; Peersen, Olve B.

    2012-01-01

    Positive-strand RNA viruses within the Picornaviridae family express an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (3Dpol) that is required for viral RNA replication. Structures of 3Dpol from poliovirus, coxsackievirus, human rhinoviruses, and other picornaviruses reveal a putative template RNA entry channel on the surface of the enzyme fingers domain. Basic amino acids and tyrosine residues along this entry channel are predicted to form ionic and base stacking interactions with the viral RNA template as it enters the polymerase active site. We generated a xseries of alanine substitution mutation sat these residues in the poliovirus polymerase and assayed their effects on template RNA binding, RNA synthesis initiation, rates of RNA elongation, elongation complex stability, and virus growth. The results show that basic residues K125, R128, and R188 are important for template RNA binding while tyrosines Y118 and Y148 are required for efficient initiation of RNA synthesis and for elongation complex stability. Alanine substitutions of tyrosines 118 and 148 at the tip of the 3Dpol pinky finger drastically decreased the rate of initiation as well as elongation complex stability, but without affecting template RNA binding or RNA elongation rates. Viable poliovirus was recovered from HeLa cells transfected with mutant RNAs; however, mutations that dramatically inhibited template RNA binding (K125A-K126A and R188A), RNA synthesis initiation (Y118A, Y148A), or elongation complex stability (Y118A, Y148A) were not stably maintained in progeny virus. These data identify key residues within the template RNA entry channel and begin to define their distinct mechanistic roles within RNA elongation complexes. PMID:22321798

  6. New insights into the promoterless transcription of DNA coligo templates by RNA polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Lama, Lodoe; Seidl, Christine I; Ryan, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Chemically synthesized DNA can carry small RNA sequence information but converting that information into small RNA is generally thought to require large double-stranded promoters in the context of plasmids, viruses and genes. We previously found evidence that circularized oligodeoxynucleotides (coligos) containing certain sequences and secondary structures can template the synthesis of small RNA by RNA polymerase III in vitro and in human cells. By using immunoprecipitated RNA polymerase III we now report corroborating evidence that this enzyme is the sole polymerase responsible for coligo transcription. The immobilized polymerase enabled experiments showing that coligo transcripts can be formed through transcription termination without subsequent 3′ end trimming. To better define the determinants of productive transcription, a structure-activity relationship study was performed using over 20 new coligos. The results show that unpaired nucleotides in the coligo stem facilitate circumtranscription, but also that internal loops and bulges should be kept small to avoid secondary transcription initiation sites. A polymerase termination sequence embedded in the double-stranded region of a hairpin-encoding coligo stem can antagonize transcription. Using lessons learned from new and old coligos, we demonstrate how to convert poorly transcribed coligos into productive templates. Our findings support the possibility that coligos may prove useful as chemically synthesized vectors for the ectopic expression of small RNA in human cells. PMID:25764216

  7. Identification of distinct biological functions for four 3′-5′ RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yicheng; Abad, Maria G.; Olson, Erik D.; Carrillo, Elisabeth Y.; Jackman, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    The superfamily of 3′-5′ polymerases synthesize RNA in the opposite direction to all other DNA/RNA polymerases, and its members include eukaryotic tRNAHis guanylyltransferase (Thg1), as well as Thg1-like proteins (TLPs) of unknown function that are broadly distributed, with family members in all three domains of life. Dictyostelium discoideum encodes one Thg1 and three TLPs (DdiTLP2, DdiTLP3 and DdiTLP4). Here, we demonstrate that depletion of each of the genes results in a significant growth defect, and that each protein catalyzes a unique biological reaction, taking advantage of specialized biochemical properties. DdiTLP2 catalyzes a mitochondria-specific tRNAHis maturation reaction, which is distinct from the tRNAHis maturation reaction typically catalyzed by Thg1 enzymes on cytosolic tRNA. DdiTLP3 catalyzes tRNA repair during mitochondrial tRNA 5′-editing in vivo and in vitro, establishing template-dependent 3′-5′ polymerase activity of TLPs as a bona fide biological activity for the first time since its unexpected discovery more than a decade ago. DdiTLP4 is cytosolic and, surprisingly, catalyzes robust 3′-5′ polymerase activity on non-tRNA substrates, strongly implying further roles for TLP 3′-5′ polymerases in eukaryotes. PMID:27484477

  8. New insights into the promoterless transcription of DNA coligo templates by RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed

    Lama, Lodoe; Seidl, Christine I; Ryan, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Chemically synthesized DNA can carry small RNA sequence information but converting that information into small RNA is generally thought to require large double-stranded promoters in the context of plasmids, viruses and genes. We previously found evidence that circularized oligodeoxynucleotides (coligos) containing certain sequences and secondary structures can template the synthesis of small RNA by RNA polymerase III in vitro and in human cells. By using immunoprecipitated RNA polymerase III we now report corroborating evidence that this enzyme is the sole polymerase responsible for coligo transcription. The immobilized polymerase enabled experiments showing that coligo transcripts can be formed through transcription termination without subsequent 3' end trimming. To better define the determinants of productive transcription, a structure-activity relationship study was performed using over 20 new coligos. The results show that unpaired nucleotides in the coligo stem facilitate circumtranscription, but also that internal loops and bulges should be kept small to avoid secondary transcription initiation sites. A polymerase termination sequence embedded in the double-stranded region of a hairpin-encoding coligo stem can antagonize transcription. Using lessons learned from new and old coligos, we demonstrate how to convert poorly transcribed coligos into productive templates. Our findings support the possibility that coligos may prove useful as chemically synthesized vectors for the ectopic expression of small RNA in human cells.

  9. ECHO-liveFISH: in vivo RNA labeling reveals dynamic regulation of nuclear RNA foci in living tissues

    PubMed Central

    Oomoto, Ikumi; Suzuki-Hirano, Asuka; Umeshima, Hiroki; Han, Yong-Woon; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Carlton, Peter; Harada, Yoshie; Kengaku, Mineko; Okamoto, Akimitsu; Shimogori, Tomomi; Wang, Dan Ohtan

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the dynamic organization of nuclear RNA foci is important for understanding and manipulating these functional sites of gene expression in both physiological and pathological states. However, such studies have been difficult to establish in vivo as a result of the absence of suitable RNA imaging methods. Here, we describe a high-resolution fluorescence RNA imaging method, ECHO-liveFISH, to label endogenous nuclear RNA in living mice and chicks. Upon in vivo electroporation, exciton-controlled sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes revealed focally concentrated endogenous 28S rRNA and U3 snoRNA at nucleoli and poly(A) RNA at nuclear speckles. Time-lapse imaging reveals steady-state stability of these RNA foci and dynamic dissipation of 28S rRNA concentrations upon polymerase I inhibition in native brain tissue. Confirming the validity of this technique in a physiological context, the in vivo RNA labeling did not interfere with the function of target RNA nor cause noticeable cytotoxicity or perturbation of cellular behavior. PMID:26101260

  10. Structural basis of transcription: mismatch-specific fidelity mechanisms and paused RNA polymerase II with frayed RNA.

    PubMed

    Sydow, Jasmin F; Brueckner, Florian; Cheung, Alan C M; Damsma, Gerke E; Dengl, Stefan; Lehmann, Elisabeth; Vassylyev, Dmitry; Cramer, Patrick

    2009-06-26

    We show that RNA polymerase (Pol) II prevents erroneous transcription in vitro with different strategies that depend on the type of DNARNA base mismatch. Certain mismatches are efficiently formed but impair RNA extension. Other mismatches allow for RNA extension but are inefficiently formed and efficiently proofread by RNA cleavage. X-ray analysis reveals that a TU mismatch impairs RNA extension by forming a wobble base pair at the Pol II active center that dissociates the catalytic metal ion and misaligns the RNA 3' end. The mismatch can also stabilize a paused state of Pol II with a frayed RNA 3' nucleotide. The frayed nucleotide binds in the Pol II pore either parallel or perpendicular to the DNA-RNA hybrid axis (fraying sites I and II, respectively) and overlaps the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) site, explaining how it halts transcription during proofreading, before backtracking and RNA cleavage.

  11. In Vitro Synthesis of Rous Sarcoma Virus-Specific RNA is Catalyzed by a DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Rymo, L.; Parsons, J. T.; Coffin, J. M.; Weissmann, C.

    1974-01-01

    Synthesis of Rous sarcoma virus RNA was examined in vitro with a new assay for radioactive virus-specific RNA. Nuclei from infected and uninfected cells were incubated with ribonucleoside [α-32P]triphosphates, Mn++, Mg++ and (NH4)2SO4. Incorporation into total and viral RNA proceeded with similar kinetics for up to 25 min at 37°. About 0.5% of the RNA synthesized by the infected system was scored as virus-specific, compared to 0.03% of the RNA from the uninfected system and 0.005% of the RNA synthesized by monkey kidney cell nuclei. Preincubation with DNase or actinomycin D completely suppressed total and virus-specific RNA synthesis. α-Amanitin, a specific inhibitor of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II, completely inhibited virus-specific RNA synthesis, while reducing total RNA synthesis by only 50%. We conclude that tumor virus-specific RNA is synthesized on a DNA template, most probably by the host's RNA polymerase II. PMID:4368801

  12. Methyl mercury stimulates chain elongation by purified HeLa RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, G D; Ducote, J

    1988-11-01

    Methyl mercury (MeHg) inhibited the overall RNA synthetic reaction of HeLa RNA polymerase II. However, when RNA chain initiation was allowed to occur in its absence, MeHg stimulated the rate of the subsequent elongation stage of the reaction. Chain elongation with both double-stranded and single-stranded DNA templates was stimulated. This stimulatory effect was specific for MeHg; both p-hydroxymercuribenzoate and HgCl2 inhibited chain elongation (to about the same degree as they inhibited the overall reaction). The stimulatory effect was also specific for the HeLa polymerase; with Escherichia coli RNA polymerase, MeHg inhibited elongation (to the same degree as it inhibited the overall reaction).

  13. Integrity of SRP RNA is ensured by La and the nuclear RNA quality control machinery.

    PubMed

    Leung, Eileen; Schneider, Claudia; Yan, Fu; Mohi-El-Din, Hatem; Kudla, Grzegorz; Tuck, Alex; Wlotzka, Wiebke; Doronina, Victoria A; Bartley, Ralph; Watkins, Nicholas J; Tollervey, David; Brown, Jeremy D

    2014-01-01

    The RNA component of signal recognition particle (SRP) is transcribed by RNA polymerase III, and most steps in SRP biogenesis occur in the nucleolus. Here, we examine processing and quality control of the yeast SRP RNA (scR1). In common with other pol III transcripts, scR1 terminates in a U-tract, and mature scR1 retains a U4-5 sequence at its 3' end. In cells lacking the exonuclease Rex1, scR1 terminates in a longer U5-6 tail that presumably represents the primary transcript. The 3' U-tract of scR1 is protected from aberrant processing by the La homologue, Lhp1 and overexpressed Lhp1 apparently competes with both the RNA surveillance system and SRP assembly factors. Unexpectedly, the TRAMP and exosome nuclear RNA surveillance complexes are also implicated in protecting the 3' end of scR1, which accumulates in the nucleolus of cells lacking the activities of these complexes. Misassembled scR1 has a primary degradation pathway in which Rrp6 acts early, followed by TRAMP-stimulated exonuclease degradation by the exosome. We conclude that the RNA surveillance machinery has key roles in both SRP biogenesis and quality control of the RNA, potentially facilitating the decision between these alternative fates.

  14. Multiple states of stalled T7 RNA polymerase at DNA lesions generated by platinum anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yongwon; Lippard, Stephen J

    2003-12-26

    Transcription inhibition by DNA adducts of cisplatin is considered to be one of the major routes by which this anticancer drug kills cancer cells. Stalled RNA polymerases at platinum-DNA lesions evoke various cellular responses such as nucleotide excision repair, polymerase degradation, and apoptosis. T7 RNA polymerase and site-specifically platinated DNA templates immobilized on a solid support were used to study stalled transcription elongation complexes. In vitro transcription studies were performed in both a promoter-dependent and -independent manner. An elongation complex is strongly blocked by cisplatin 1,2-intrastrand d(GpG) and 1,3-intrastrand d(GpTpG) cross-links located on the template strand. Polymerase action is inhibited at multiple sites in the vicinity of the platinum lesion, the nature of which can be altered by the choice and concentration of NTPs. The [(1R,2R-diaminocyclohexane)Pt]2+ DNA adducts formed by oxaliplatin, which carries a stereochemically more demanding spectator ligand than the ammine groups in cisplatin, also strongly block the polymerase with measurable differences compared with cis-[(NH3)2Pt]2+ lesions. Elongation complexes stopped at sites of platinum damage were isolated and characterized. The stalled polymerase can be dissociated from the DNA by subsequent polymerases initiated from the same template. We also discovered that a polymerase stalled at the platinum-DNA lesion can resume transcription after the platinum adduct is chemically removed from the template.

  15. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of Citrus tristeza virus forms oligomers.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Bayram

    2013-12-01

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) from Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) were tagged with HA and FLAG epitopes. Differentially tagged proteins were expressed either individually or concomitantly in Escherichia coli. Immunoprecipitation of the expressed proteins with anti-FLAG antibody followed by Western blot with anti-HA antibody demonstrated that molecules of RdRp from CTV interact to form oligomers. Yeast two-hybrid assays showed that molecules of RdRp interact in eukaryotic cells. Co-immunoprecipitation with anti-FLAG antibody of truncated HA-tagged RdRps (RdRpΔ1-166-HA, RdRpΔ1-390-HA, RdRp1-169-HA) co-expressed with full-length RdRp-FLAG showed that only RdRp1-169-HA interacted with the full-length FLAG-RdRp. Yeast two-hybrid assays with truncated RdRp constructs confirmed that the oligomerization site resides in the N-terminal region and that the first 169 aa of CTV RdRp are necessary and sufficient for oligomerization both in bacterial and yeast cells. Development of control strategies targeting viral RdRp oligomer formation may inhibit virus replication and prove useful in control of CTV. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Activation and reactivation of the RNA polymerase II trigger loop for intrinsic RNA cleavage and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Čabart, Pavel; Jin, Huiyan; Li, Liangtao; Kaplan, Craig D

    2014-01-01

    In addition to RNA synthesis, multisubunit RNA polymerases (msRNAPs) support enzymatic reactions such as intrinsic transcript cleavage. msRNAP active sites from different species appear to exhibit differential intrinsic transcript cleavage efficiency and have likely evolved to allow fine-tuning of the transcription process. Here we show that a single amino-acid substitution in the trigger loop (TL) of Saccharomyces RNAP II, Rpb1 H1085Y, engenders a gain of intrinsic cleavage activity where the substituted tyrosine appears to participate in acid-base chemistry at alkaline pH for both intrinsic cleavage and nucleotidyl transfer. We extensively characterize this TL substitution for each of these reactions by examining the responses RNAP II enzymes to catalytic metals, altered pH, and factor inputs. We demonstrate that TFIIF stimulation of the first phosphodiester bond formation by RNAP II requires wild type TL function and that H1085Y substitution within the TL compromises or alters RNAP II responsiveness to both TFIIB and TFIIF. Finally, Mn2+ stimulation of H1085Y RNAP II reveals possible allosteric effects of TFIIB on the active center and cooperation between TFIIB and TFIIF. PMID:25764335

  17. Potent Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors of the Measles Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Aiming; Yoon, Jeong-Joong; Yin, Yan; Prussia, Andrew; Yang, Yutao; Min, Jaeki; Plemper, Richard K.; Snyder, James P.

    2008-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) is one of the most infectious pathogens known. In spite of the existence of a vaccine, approximately 350,000 deaths/year result from MV or associated complications. Anti-measles compounds could conceivably diminish these statistics and provide a therapy that complements vaccine treatment. We recently described a high-throughput screening hit compound 1 (16677) against MV-infected cells with the capacity to eliminate viral reproduction at 250 nM by inhibiting the action of the virus’s RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex (RdRp). The compound, 1-methyl-3-(trifluoromethyl)-N-[4-sulfonylphenyl]-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide, carries a critical CF3 moiety on the 1,2-pyrazole ring. Elaborating on the preliminary structure-activity (SAR) study, the present work presents the synthesis and SAR of a much broader range of low nanomolar non-peptidic MV inhibitors and speculates on the role of the CF3 functionality.1 PMID:18529043

  18. Transcription of ribosomal RNA: the role of antitermination of RNA polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, Stefan; Hwa, Terry

    2007-03-01

    The genes encoding ribosomal RNA are transcribed at high rates of 1-2 transcripts per second. These high transcription rates are crucial to maintain the large concentration of ribosomes necessary in fast growing bacteria. To understand how transcription is regulated under these conditions, we developed a model for the traffic of transcribing RNA polymerases (RNAP). Our simulations show that the transcription rate is limited by the elongation stage of transcription rather than by transcript initiation. The maximal transcription rate is severly impaired by RNAP pausing with pause durations in the second range which is ubiquitous under single-molecule conditions. We propose that ribosomal antitermination reduces pauses and thereby increases the transcription rate. This idea is in quantitative agreement with the observed increase of the elongation rate due to antitermination and predicts a two-fold increase of the transcription rate. Antitermination must be highly efficient, since incomplete antitermination with only a few percent of non-antiterminated, i.e. slow, RNAPs completely abolishes its effect. This result suggests that rho-dependent termination may selectively terminate slow RNAPs.

  19. Crystal Structure of Complete Rhinovirus RNA Polymerase Suggests Front Loading of Protein Primer

    PubMed Central

    Appleby, Todd C.; Luecke, Hartmut; Shim, Jae Hoon; Wu, Jim Z.; Cheney, I. Wayne; Zhong, Weidong; Vogeley, Lutz; Hong, Zhi; Yao, Nanhua

    2005-01-01

    Picornaviruses utilize virally encoded RNA polymerase and a uridylylated protein primer to ensure replication of the entire viral genome. The molecular details of this mechanism are not well understood due to the lack of structural information. We report the crystal structure of human rhinovirus 16 3D RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (HRV16 3Dpol) at a 2.4-Å resolution, representing the first complete polymerase structure from the Picornaviridae family. HRV16 3Dpol shares the canonical features of other known polymerase structures and contains an N-terminal region that tethers the fingers and thumb subdomains, forming a completely encircled active site cavity which is accessible through a small tunnel on the backside of the molecule. The small thumb subdomain contributes to the formation of a large cleft on the front face of the polymerase which also leads to the active site. The cleft appears large enough to accommodate a template:primer duplex during RNA elongation or a protein primer during the uridylylation stage of replication initiation. Based on the structural features of HRV16 3Dpo1 and the catalytic mechanism known for all polymerases, a front-loading model for uridylylation is proposed. PMID:15596823

  20. RNA polymerase and transcription elongation factor Spt4/5 complex structure

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Brianna J.; Bose, Daniel; Baker, Kevin J.; Yusoff, Zahirah M.; Zhang, Xiaodong; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.

    2011-01-01

    Spt4/5 in archaea and eukaryote and its bacterial homolog NusG is the only elongation factor conserved in all three domains of life and plays many key roles in cotranscriptional regulation and in recruiting other factors to the elongating RNA polymerase. Here, we present the crystal structure of Spt4/5 as well as the structure of RNA polymerase-Spt4/5 complex using cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction and single particle analysis. The Spt4/5 binds in the middle of RNA polymerase claw and encloses the DNA, reminiscent of the DNA polymerase clamp and ring helicases. The transcription elongation complex model reveals that the Spt4/5 is an upstream DNA holder and contacts the nontemplate DNA in the transcription bubble. These structures reveal that the cellular RNA polymerases also use a strategy of encircling DNA to enhance its processivity as commonly observed for many nucleic acid processing enzymes including DNA polymerases and helicases. PMID:21187417

  1. In vitro transcription of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 is RNA polymerase II dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Lenzmeier, B A; Nyborg, J K

    1997-01-01

    The HTLV-1 promoter directs RNA polymerase II transcription of viral genomic RNA in vivo. However, it has been reported that in vitro, a unique RNA polymerase, with characteristics of RNA polymerases II and III, is capable of HTLV-1 transcription (G. Piras, F. Kashanchi, M. F. Radonovich, J. F. Duvall, and J. N. Brady, J. Virol. 68:6170-6179, 1994). To further characterize the polymerase involved in HTLV-1 transcription in vitro, runoff transcription assays were performed with a variety of extracts and RNA polymerase inhibitors. Under all in vitro reaction conditions tested, RNA polymerase II appeared to be the only polymerase capable of correct transcriptional initiation from the HTLV-1 promoter. Synthesis of the specific HTLV-1 RNA transcript showed sensitivities to the RNA polymerase inhibitors tagetitoxin and alpha-amanitin that are consistent with RNA polymerase II transcription. Together, these data indicate that in vitro, as in vivo, the HTLV-1 promoter directs transcription by RNA polymerase II. PMID:9032404

  2. RNA catalyzes nuclear pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Fica, Sebastian M.; Tuttle, Nicole; Novak, Thaddeus; Li, Nan-Sheng; Lu, Jun; Koodathingal, Prakash; Dai, Qing; Staley, Jonathan P.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In nuclear pre-messenger RNA splicing, introns are excised by the spliceosome, a multi-megadalton machine composed of both proteins and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). Over thirty years ago, following the discovery of self-splicing group II intron RNAs, the snRNAs were hypothesized to catalyze splicing. However, no definitive evidence for a role of either RNA or protein in catalysis by the spliceosome has been reported to date. By using metal rescue strategies, here we show that the U6 snRNA catalyzes both splicing reactions by positioning divalent metals that stabilize the leaving groups during each reaction. Strikingly, all of the U6 catalytic metal ligands we identified correspond to the ligands observed to position catalytic, divalent metals in crystal structures of a group II intron RNA. These findings indicate that group II introns and the spliceosome share common catalytic mechanisms, and likely common evolutionary origins. Our results demonstrate that RNA mediates catalysis within the spliceosome. PMID:24196718

  3. RNA polymerase activity associated with bacteriophage phi 6.

    PubMed

    Van Etten, J L; Vidaver, A K; Koski, R K; Semancik, J S

    1973-09-01

    The Pseudomonas phaseolicola bacteriophage phi6 incorporated labeled UTP into an acid-insoluble precipitate. Incorporation was dependent on the presence of manganese acetate, ATP, GTP, CTP, and a short heat treatment of the phage; the reaction was stimulated by NH(4)Cl. The substitution of (14)C-ATP, -CTP or -GTP for UTP, together with the appropriate unlabeled ribonucleoside triphosphates, disclosed that CMP was incorporated to the greatest extent followed by GMP, UMP, and AMP. Radioactive RNAs formed by the reaction were resistant to RNases A and T(1) in high salt but susceptible to these nucleases in low salt. The labeled RNA co-sedimented and co-electrophoresed with phi6 double-stranded (ds) RNA. However, the distribution of the radioactivity into the three ds-RNA components varied depending on the (14)C-ribonucleoside triphosphate used in the reaction. The incorporation of UMP was primarily into the two smaller ds-RNA segments, GMP primarily into the large ds-RNA segment, and CMP and AMP were about equally distributed into all three ds-RNA segments.

  4. Altered minor-groove hydrogen bonds in DNA block transcription elongation by T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Tanasova, Marina; Goeldi, Silvan; Meyer, Fabian; Hanawalt, Philip C; Spivak, Graciela; Sturla, Shana J

    2015-05-26

    DNA transcription depends upon the highly efficient and selective function of RNA polymerases (RNAPs). Modifications in the template DNA can impact the progression of RNA synthesis, and a number of DNA adducts, as well as abasic sites, arrest or stall transcription. Nonetheless, data are needed to understand why certain modifications to the structure of DNA bases stall RNA polymerases while others are efficiently bypassed. In this study, we evaluate the impact that alterations in dNTP/rNTP base-pair geometry have on transcription. T7 RNA polymerase was used to study transcription over modified purines and pyrimidines with altered H-bonding capacities. The results suggest that introducing wobble base-pairs into the DNA:RNA heteroduplex interferes with transcriptional elongation and stalls RNA polymerase. However, transcriptional stalling is not observed if mismatched base-pairs do not H-bond. Together, these studies show that RNAP is able to discriminate mismatches resulting in wobble base-pairs, and suggest that, in cases of modifications with minor steric impact, DNA:RNA heteroduplex geometry could serve as a controlling factor for initiating transcription-coupled DNA repair. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-09-16

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3'-5' exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5'-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities.

  6. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities

    PubMed Central

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C.; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J.; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3′-5′ exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5′-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  7. Rifampicin-resistance, rpoB polymorphism and RNA polymerase genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Alifano, Pietro; Palumbo, Carla; Pasanisi, Daniela; Talà, Adelfia

    2015-05-20

    Following its introduction in 1967, rifampicin has become a mainstay of therapy in the treatment of tuberculosis, leprosy and many other widespread diseases. Its potent antibacterial activity is due to specific inhibition of bacterial RNA polymerase. However, resistance to rifampicin was reported shortly after its introduction in the medical practice. Studies in the model organism Escherichia coli helped to define the molecular mechanism of rifampicin-resistance demonstrating that resistance is mostly due to chromosomal mutations in rpoB gene encoding the RNA polymerase β chain. These studies also revealed the amazing potential of the molecular genetics to elucidate the structure-function relationships in bacterial RNA polymerase. The scope of this paper is to illustrate how rifampicin-resistance has been recently exploited to better understand the regulatory mechanisms that control bacterial cell physiology and virulence, and how this information has been used to maneuver, on a global scale, gene expression in bacteria of industrial interest. In particular, we reviewed recent literature regarding: (i) the effects of rpoB mutations conferring rifampicin-resistance on transcription dynamics, bacterial fitness, physiology, metabolism and virulence; (ii) the occurrence in nature of "mutant-type" or duplicated rifampicin-resistant RNA polymerases; and (iii) the RNA polymerase genetic engineering method for strain improvement and drug discovery.

  8. Purification and Subunit Structure of DNA-dependent RNA Polymerase III from Wheat Germ 1

    PubMed Central

    Jendrisak, Jerry

    1981-01-01

    A rapid and simple, large-scale method for the purification of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase III (EC 2.7.7.6) from wheat germ is presented. The method involves enzyme extraction at low ionic strength, polyethyleneimine fractionation, (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, and chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B, DEAE-cellulose, and heparin agarose. Milligram quantities of highly purified enzyme can be obtained from kilogram quantities of starting material in 2 to 3 days. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicates that RNA polymerase III contains 14 subunits with molecular weights of: 150,000; 130,000; 94,000; 55,000; 38,000; 30,000; 28,000; 25,000; 24,500; 20,500; 20,000; 19,500; 17,800; and 17,000. Subunit structure comparison of wheat germ RNA polymerases I, II, and III indicates that all three enzymes may contain common subunits with molecular weights 20,000, 17,800, and 17,000. In addition, RNA polymerases II and III may contain a common subunit with a molecular weight of 25,000, and RNA polymerases I and III may contain a common subunit with a molecular weight of 38,000. Images PMID:16661690

  9. RNA Primer Extension Hinders DNA Synthesis by Escherichia coli Mutagenic DNA Polymerase IV.

    PubMed

    Tashjian, Tommy F; Lin, Ida; Belt, Verena; Cafarelli, Tiziana M; Godoy, Veronica G

    2017-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the highly conserved DNA damage regulated dinB gene encodes DNA Polymerase IV (DinB), an error prone specialized DNA polymerase with a central role in stress-induced mutagenesis. Since DinB is the DNA polymerase with the highest intracellular concentrations upon induction of the SOS response, further regulation must exist to maintain genomic stability. Remarkably, we find that DinB DNA synthesis is inherently poor when using an RNA primer compared to a DNA primer, while high fidelity DNA polymerases are known to have no primer preference. Moreover, we show that the poor DNA synthesis from an RNA primer is conserved in DNA polymerase Kappa, the human DinB homolog. The activity of DinB is modulated by interactions with several other proteins, one of which is the equally evolutionarily conserved recombinase RecA. This interaction is known to positively affect DinB's fidelity on damaged templates. We find that upon interaction with RecA, DinB shows a significant reduction in DNA synthesis when using an RNA primer. Furthermore, with DinB or DinB:RecA a robust pause, sequence and lesion independent, occurs only when RNA is used as a primer. The robust pause is likely to result in abortive DNA synthesis when RNA is the primer. These data suggest a novel mechanism to prevent DinB synthesis when it is not needed despite its high concentrations, thus protecting genome stability.

  10. RNA Primer Extension Hinders DNA Synthesis by Escherichia coli Mutagenic DNA Polymerase IV

    PubMed Central

    Tashjian, Tommy F.; Lin, Ida; Belt, Verena; Cafarelli, Tiziana M.; Godoy, Veronica G.

    2017-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the highly conserved DNA damage regulated dinB gene encodes DNA Polymerase IV (DinB), an error prone specialized DNA polymerase with a central role in stress-induced mutagenesis. Since DinB is the DNA polymerase with the highest intracellular concentrations upon induction of the SOS response, further regulation must exist to maintain genomic stability. Remarkably, we find that DinB DNA synthesis is inherently poor when using an RNA primer compared to a DNA primer, while high fidelity DNA polymerases are known to have no primer preference. Moreover, we show that the poor DNA synthesis from an RNA primer is conserved in DNA polymerase Kappa, the human DinB homolog. The activity of DinB is modulated by interactions with several other proteins, one of which is the equally evolutionarily conserved recombinase RecA. This interaction is known to positively affect DinB’s fidelity on damaged templates. We find that upon interaction with RecA, DinB shows a significant reduction in DNA synthesis when using an RNA primer. Furthermore, with DinB or DinB:RecA a robust pause, sequence and lesion independent, occurs only when RNA is used as a primer. The robust pause is likely to result in abortive DNA synthesis when RNA is the primer. These data suggest a novel mechanism to prevent DinB synthesis when it is not needed despite its high concentrations, thus protecting genome stability. PMID:28298904

  11. Topoisomerase IIα promotes activation of RNA polymerase I transcription by facilitating pre-initiation complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Swagat; Panova, Tatiana; Miller, Gail; Volkov, Arsen; Porter, Andrew C. G.; Russell, Jackie; Panov, Konstantin I.; Zomerdijk, Joost C. B. M.

    2013-01-01

    Type II DNA topoisomerases catalyse DNA double-strand cleavage, passage and re-ligation to effect topological changes. There is considerable interest in elucidating topoisomerase II roles, particularly as these proteins are targets for anti-cancer drugs. Here we uncover a role for topoisomerase IIα in RNA polymerase I-directed ribosomal RNA gene transcription, which drives cell growth and proliferation and is upregulated in cancer cells. Our data suggest that topoisomerase IIα is a component of the initiation-competent RNA polymerase Iβ complex and interacts directly with RNA polymerase I-associated transcription factor RRN3, which targets the polymerase to promoter-bound SL1 in pre-initiation complex formation. In cells, activation of rDNA transcription is reduced by inhibition or depletion of topoisomerase II, and this is accompanied by reduced transient double-strand DNA cleavage in the rDNA-promoter region and reduced pre-initiation complex formation. We propose that topoisomerase IIα functions in RNA polymerase I transcription to produce topological changes at the rDNA promoter that facilitate efficient de novo pre-initiation complex formation. PMID:23511463

  12. Structure of a transcribing RNA polymerase II-DSIF complex reveals a multidentate DNA-RNA clamp.

    PubMed

    Bernecky, Carrie; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Cramer, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    During transcription, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) associates with the conserved elongation factor DSIF. DSIF renders the elongation complex stable and functions during Pol II pausing and RNA processing. We combined cryo-EM and X-ray crystallography to determine the structure of the mammalian Pol II-DSIF elongation complex at a nominal resolution of 3.4 Å. Human DSIF has a modular structure with two domains forming a DNA clamp, two domains forming an RNA clamp, and one domain buttressing the RNA clamp. The clamps maintain the transcription bubble, position upstream DNA, and retain the RNA transcript in the exit tunnel. The mobile C-terminal region of DSIF is located near exiting RNA, where it can recruit factors for RNA processing. The structure provides insight into the roles of DSIF during mRNA synthesis.

  13. Transcription elongation. Heterogeneous tracking of RNA polymerase and its biological implications.

    PubMed

    Imashimizu, Masahiko; Shimamoto, Nobuo; Oshima, Taku; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of transcription elongation via pausing of RNA polymerase has multiple physiological roles. The pausing mechanism depends on the sequence heterogeneity of the DNA being transcribed, as well as on certain interactions of polymerase with specific DNA sequences. In order to describe the mechanism of regulation, we introduce the concept of heterogeneity into the previously proposed alternative models of elongation, power stroke and Brownian ratchet. We also discuss molecular origins and physiological significances of the heterogeneity.

  14. Novel application of Phi29 DNA polymerase: RNA detection and analysis in vitro and in situ by target RNA-primed RCA

    PubMed Central

    Lagunavicius, Arunas; Merkiene, Egle; Kiveryte, Zivile; Savaneviciute, Agne; Zimbaite-Ruskuliene, Vilma; Radzvilavicius, Tomas; Janulaitis, Arvydas

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel Phi29 DNA polymerase application in RCA-based target RNA detection and analysis. The 3′→5′ RNase activity of Phi29 DNA polymerase converts target RNA into a primer and the polymerase uses this newly generated primer for RCA initiation. Therefore, using target RNA-primed RCA, padlock probes may be targeted to inner RNA sequences and their peculiarities can be analyzed directly. We demonstrate that the exoribonucleolytic activity of Phi29 DNA polymerase can be successfully applied in vitro and in situ. These findings expand the potential for detection and analysis of RNA sequences distanced from 3′-end. PMID:19244362

  15. Stability of the mitochondrial genome requires an amino-terminal domain of yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanhong; Shadel, Gerald S.

    1999-01-01

    Mitochondrial RNA (mtRNA) polymerases are related to bacteriophage RNA polymerases, but contain a unique amino-terminal extension of unknown origin and function. In addition to harboring mitochondrial targeting information, we show here that the amino-terminal extension of yeast mtRNA polymerase is required for a mtDNA maintenance function that is separable from the known RNA polymerization activity of the enzyme. Deletion of 185 N-terminal amino acids from the enzyme results in a temperature-sensitive mitochondrial petite phenotype, characterized by increased instability and eventual loss of the mitochondrial genome. Mitochondrial transcription initiation in vivo is largely unaffected by this mutation and expression of just the amino-terminal portion of the protein in trans partially suppresses the mitochondrial defect, indicating that the amino-terminal extension of the enzyme harbors an independent functional domain that is required for mtDNA replication and/or stability. These results suggest that amino-terminal extensions present in mtRNA polymerases comprise functional domains that couple additional activities to the transcription process in mitochondria. PMID:10393945

  16. Relatedness of archaebacterial RNA polymerase core subunits to their eubacterial and eukaryotic equivalents.

    PubMed Central

    Berghöfer, B; Kröckel, L; Körtner, C; Truss, M; Schallenberg, J; Klein, A

    1988-01-01

    The sequence of the genes encoding the four largest subunits of the RNA polymerase of the archaebacterium Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum was determined and putative translation signals were identified. The genes are more strongly homologous to eukaryotic than to eubacterial RNA polymerase genes. Analysis of the polypeptide sequences revealed colinearity of two pairs of adjacent archaebacterial genes encoding the B" and B' or A and C genes, respectively, with two eubacterial and two eukaryotic genes each encoding the two largest RNA polymerase subunits. This difference in sequence organization is discussed in terms of gene fusion in the course of evolution. The degree of conservation is much higher between the archaebacterial and the eukaryotic polypeptides than between the archaebacterial and the eubacterial enzyme. Putative functional domains were identified in two of the subunits of the archaebacterial enzyme. PMID:2843811

  17. Transcriptional bursting is intrinsically caused by interplay between RNA polymerases on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Keisuke; Iwaki, Mitsuhiro; Yanagida, Toshio

    2016-12-01

    Cell-to-cell variability plays a critical role in cellular responses and decision-making in a population, and transcriptional bursting has been broadly studied by experimental and theoretical approaches as the potential source of cell-to-cell variability. Although molecular mechanisms of transcriptional bursting have been proposed, there is little consensus. An unsolved key question is whether transcriptional bursting is intertwined with many transcriptional regulatory factors or is an intrinsic characteristic of RNA polymerase on DNA. Here we design an in vitro single-molecule measurement system to analyse the kinetics of transcriptional bursting. The results indicate that transcriptional bursting is caused by interplay between RNA polymerases on DNA. The kinetics of in vitro transcriptional bursting is quantitatively consistent with the gene-nonspecific kinetics previously observed in noisy gene expression in vivo. Our kinetic analysis based on a cellular automaton model confirms that arrest and rescue by trailing RNA polymerase intrinsically causes transcriptional bursting.

  18. [Cancers associated with systemic sclerosis involving anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies].

    PubMed

    Monfort, J-B; Mathian, A; Amoura, Z; Francès, C; Barbaud, A; Senet, P

    2017-09-13

    The incidence of cancer is increased in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Further, recent studies have also shown that the presence of anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies is associated with a higher incidence of cancer in this population. Herein we present the cases of two men aged 56 and 23 years presenting SSc without anti-Scl70 or anti-centromere antibodies but with anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies. Clinical symptoms led us to prescribe more laboratory exams and both patients were diagnosed with cancer of the nasopharyngeal area. Anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies are useful for SSc diagnosis in patients without anti-centromere or anti-Scl70 antibodies. Their presence must lead physicians to screen for associated cancer, even in the absence of clinical signs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Relationship of CDK-activating kinase and RNA polymerase II CTD kinase TFIIH/TFIIK.

    PubMed

    Feaver, W J; Svejstrup, J Q; Henry, N L; Kornberg, R D

    1994-12-16

    KIN28, a member of the p34cdc2/CDC28 family of protein kinases, is identified as a subunit of yeast RNA polymerase transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) on the basis of sequence determination, immunological reactivity, and copurification. KIN28 is, moreover, one of three subunits of TFIIK, a subassembly of TFIIH with protein kinase activity directed toward the C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Itself a phosphoprotein, KIN28 interacts specifically with the two largest subunits of RNA polymerase II. Previous work of others points to two further associations: KIN28 interacts in vivo with the cyclin CCL1, and KIN28 and CCL1 are homologous to human MO15 and cyclin H, which form the cyclin-dependent kinase-activating kinase (CAK). We show that human CAK possesses the CTD kinase activity characteristic of TFIIH.

  20. Transcriptional bursting is intrinsically caused by interplay between RNA polymerases on DNA

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Keisuke; Iwaki, Mitsuhiro; Yanagida, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Cell-to-cell variability plays a critical role in cellular responses and decision-making in a population, and transcriptional bursting has been broadly studied by experimental and theoretical approaches as the potential source of cell-to-cell variability. Although molecular mechanisms of transcriptional bursting have been proposed, there is little consensus. An unsolved key question is whether transcriptional bursting is intertwined with many transcriptional regulatory factors or is an intrinsic characteristic of RNA polymerase on DNA. Here we design an in vitro single-molecule measurement system to analyse the kinetics of transcriptional bursting. The results indicate that transcriptional bursting is caused by interplay between RNA polymerases on DNA. The kinetics of in vitro transcriptional bursting is quantitatively consistent with the gene-nonspecific kinetics previously observed in noisy gene expression in vivo. Our kinetic analysis based on a cellular automaton model confirms that arrest and rescue by trailing RNA polymerase intrinsically causes transcriptional bursting. PMID:27924870

  1. Single molecule imaging of RNA polymerase II using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodin, Thor; Fu, Jianhua; Umemura, Kazuo; Gad, Mohammed; Jarvis, Suzi; Ishikawa, Mitsuru

    2003-03-01

    An atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of the shape, orientation and surface topology of RNA polymerase II supported on silanized freshly cleaved mica was made. The overall aim is to define the molecular topology of RNA polymerase II in appropriate fluids to help clarify the relationship of conformational features to biofunctionality. A Nanoscope III atomic force microscope was used in the tapping mode with oxide-sharpened (8-10 nm) Si 3N 4 probes in aqueous zinc chloride buffer. The main structural features observed by AFM were compared to those derived from electron-density plots based on X-ray crystallographic studies. The conformational features included a bilobal silhouette with an inverted umbrella-shaped crater connected to a reaction site. These studies provide a starting point for constructing a 3D-AFM profiling analysis of proteins such as RNA polymerase complexes.

  2. The Streptomyces galP1 promoter has a novel RNA polymerase recognition sequence and is transcribed by a new form of RNA polymerase in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Brawner, M E; Mattern, S G; Babcock, M J; Westpheling, J

    1997-01-01

    We report the identification of DNA sequences that determine the activity of the Streptomyces galP1 promoter and a new form of RNA polymerase holoenzyme that recognizes these sequences in vitro. Base substitutions were introduced throughout the galP1 promoter region, and bases at positions -34, -36, and -11 with respect to the transcription start site were shown to be required for promoter function. These bases correspond in their positions to regions known to be important for RNA polymerase binding in several classes of eubacterial promoters, but the sequences themselves are not similar to those previously described. The -35 region of the galP1 promoter consists of six G residues, and base changes in this G hexamer had a dramatic effect on promoter activity. By using galP1-containing DNA template, a new RNA polymerase activity was purified from Streptomyces. Holoenzyme reconstitution experiments identified a new sigma factor that directs galP1 transcription in vitro. DNase I protection experiments identified a binding site for this new holoenzyme immediately upstream of the galP1 transcription start site. PMID:9150217

  3. Transcription Processing at 1,N2-ethenoguanine by Human RNA Polymerase II and Bacteriophage T7 RNA Polymerase†

    PubMed Central

    Dimitri, Alexandra; Goodenough, Angela K.; Guengerich, F. Peter; Broyde, Suse; Scicchitano, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The DNA lesion 1,N2-ethenoguanine is formed endogenously as a byproduct of lipid peroxidation or by reaction with epoxides that result from the metabolism of the industrial pollutant vinyl chloride, a known human carcinogen. DNA replication past 1,N2-ethenoguanine and site specific mutagenesis studies in mammalian cells have established the highly mutagenic and genotoxic properties of the damaged base. However, there is as yet no information on the processing of this lesion during transcription. Here, we report the results of transcription past a site specifically modified 1,N2-ethenoguanine DNA template. This lesion contains an exocyclic ring obstructing the Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding edge of guanine. Our results show that 1,N2-ethenoguanine acts as a partial block to the bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, which allows nucleotide incorporation in the growing RNA with the selectivity A > G > (C = −1 deletion) >> U. In contrast, 1,N2-ethenoguanine poses an absolute block to human RNA polymerase II elongation, and nucleotide incorporation opposite the lesion is not observed. Computer modeling studies show that the more open active site of T7 RNA polymerase allows lesion bypass when the 1,N2-ethenoguanine adopts the syn conformation. This orientation places the exocylic ring in a collision free empty pocket of the polymerase, and the observed base incorporation preferences are in agreement with hydrogen bonding possibilities between the incoming nucleotides and the Hoogsteen edge of the lesion. On the other hand, in the more crowded active site of the human RNA polymerase II, the modeling studies show that both syn and anti conformations of the 1,N2-ethenoguanine are sterically impermissible. Polymerase stalling is currently believed to trigger the transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair machinery. Thus, our data suggest that this repair pathway likely is engaged in the clearance of the 1,N2-ethenoguanine from actively transcribed DNA. PMID

  4. Structural basis of transcription: RNA polymerase II at 2.8 angstrom resolution.

    PubMed

    Cramer, P; Bushnell, D A; Kornberg, R D

    2001-06-08

    Structures of a 10-subunit yeast RNA polymerase II have been derived from two crystal forms at 2.8 and 3.1 angstrom resolution. Comparison of the structures reveals a division of the polymerase into four mobile modules, including a clamp, shown previously to swing over the active center. In the 2.8 angstrom structure, the clamp is in an open state, allowing entry of straight promoter DNA for the initiation of transcription. Three loops extending from the clamp may play roles in RNA unwinding and DNA rewinding during transcription. A 2.8 angstrom difference Fourier map reveals two metal ions at the active site, one persistently bound and the other possibly exchangeable during RNA synthesis. The results also provide evidence for RNA exit in the vicinity of the carboxyl-terminal repeat domain, coupling synthesis to RNA processing by enzymes bound to this domain.

  5. The RNA polymerase trigger loop functions in all three phases of the transcription cycle

    PubMed Central

    Fouqueau, Thomas; Zeller, Mirijam E.; Cheung, Alan C.; Cramer, Patrick; Thomm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The trigger loop (TL) forms a conserved element in the RNA polymerase active centre that functions in the elongation phase of transcription. Here, we show that the TL also functions in transcription initiation and termination. Using recombinant variants of RNA polymerase from Pyrococcus furiosus and a reconstituted transcription system, we demonstrate that the TL is essential for initial RNA synthesis until a complete DNA–RNA hybrid is formed. The archaeal TL is further important for transcription fidelity during nucleotide incorporation, but not for RNA cleavage during proofreading. A conserved glutamine residue in the TL binds the 2’-OH group of the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) to discriminate NTPs from dNTPs. The TL also prevents aberrant transcription termination at non-terminator sites. PMID:23737452

  6. Structure of Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase in Complex with Primer-Template RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, Ralph T.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Murakami, Eisuke; Lam, Angela M.; Grice, Rena L.; Du, Jinfa; Sofia, Michael J.; Furman, Philip A.; Otto, Michael J.

    2012-08-01

    The replication of the hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome is accomplished by the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), for which mechanistic understanding and structure-guided drug design efforts have been hampered by its propensity to crystallize in a closed, polymerization-incompetent state. The removal of an autoinhibitory {beta}-hairpin loop from genotype 2a HCV NS5B increases de novo RNA synthesis by >100-fold, promotes RNA binding, and facilitated the determination of the first crystallographic structures of HCV polymerase in complex with RNA primer-template pairs. These crystal structures demonstrate the structural realignment required for primer-template recognition and elongation, provide new insights into HCV RNA synthesis at the molecular level, and may prove useful in the structure-based design of novel antiviral compounds. Additionally, our approach for obtaining the RNA primer-template-bound structure of HCV polymerase may be generally applicable to solving RNA-bound complexes for other viral RdRps that contain similar regulatory {beta}-hairpin loops, including bovine viral diarrhea virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus.

  7. Structure of Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase in Complex with Primer-Template RNA

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Eisuke; Lam, Angela M.; Grice, Rena L.; Du, Jinfa; Sofia, Michael J.; Furman, Philip A.; Otto, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The replication of the hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome is accomplished by the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), for which mechanistic understanding and structure-guided drug design efforts have been hampered by its propensity to crystallize in a closed, polymerization-incompetent state. The removal of an autoinhibitory β-hairpin loop from genotype 2a HCV NS5B increases de novo RNA synthesis by >100-fold, promotes RNA binding, and facilitated the determination of the first crystallographic structures of HCV polymerase in complex with RNA primer-template pairs. These crystal structures demonstrate the structural realignment required for primer-template recognition and elongation, provide new insights into HCV RNA synthesis at the molecular level, and may prove useful in the structure-based design of novel antiviral compounds. Additionally, our approach for obtaining the RNA primer-template-bound structure of HCV polymerase may be generally applicable to solving RNA-bound complexes for other viral RdRps that contain similar regulatory β-hairpin loops, including bovine viral diarrhea virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus. PMID:22496223

  8. The human interferon-regulated ISG95 protein interacts with RNA polymerase II and shows methyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haline-Vaz, Thais; Lima Silva, Tereza Cristina; Zanchin, Nilson I.T.

    2008-08-08

    A major mechanism of cellular resistance to viral invasion involves genes from the interferon signaling pathway, called ISGs (interferon stimulated genes). Global transcriptional profiling studies have linked increased expression of ISG95 (KIAA0082) to response to interferon treatment and viral infection, suggesting that it may be part of the cellular defense against viral replication. In this work, we show that the ISG95 promoter can drive interferon-induced transcription of a reporter gene in Vero cells. Recombinant ISG95 shows RNA- and S-adenosyl-methionine binding and protein methyltransferase activity in vitro. ISG95 interacts with the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, which is consistent with its nuclear localization and with the predicted function of the WW domain found in the C-terminal region of ISG95. The results presented in this work indicate that ISG95 is part of the interferon response pathway and functions in the pre-mRNA processing events mediated by the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II.

  9. Synergistic experimental/computational studies on arylazoenamine derivatives that target the bovine viral diarrhea virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Giliberti, Gabriele; Ibba, Cristina; Marongiu, Esther; Loddo, Roberta; Tonelli, Michele; Boido, Vito; Laurini, Erik; Posocco, Paola; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Pricl, Sabrina

    2010-08-15

    Starting from a series of arylazoenamine derivatives, shown to be selectively and potently active against the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), we developed a hierarchical combined experimental/molecular modeling strategy to explore the drug leads for the BVDV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Accordingly, BVDV mutants resistant to lead compounds in our series were isolated, and the mutant residues on the viral molecular target, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, were identified. Docking procedures upon previously identified pharmacophoric constraints and actual mutational data were carried out, and the binding affinity of all active compounds for the RdRp was estimated. Given the excellent agreement between in silico and in vitro data, this procedure is currently being employed in the design a new series of more selective and potent BVDV inhibitors.

  10. Structure and Function of the N-Terminal Domain of the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Shihong; Ogino, Minako; Luo, Ming

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses have various mechanisms to duplicate their genomes and produce virus-specific mRNAs. Negative-strand RNA viruses encode their own polymerases to perform each of these processes. For the nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses, the polymerase is comprised of the large polymerase subunit (L) and the phosphoprotein (P). L proteins from members of the Rhabdoviridae, Paramyxoviridae, and Filoviridae share sequence and predicted secondary structure homology. Here, we present the structure of the N-terminal domain (conserved region I) of the L protein from a rhabdovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, at 1.8-Å resolution. The strictly and strongly conserved residues in this domain cluster in a single area of the protein. Serial mutation of these residues shows that many of the amino acids are essential for viral transcription but not for mRNA capping. Three-dimensional alignments show that this domain shares structural homology with polymerases from other viral families, including segmented negative-strand RNA and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses. IMPORTANCE Negative-strand RNA viruses include a diverse set of viral families that infect animals and plants, causing serious illness and economic impact. The members of this group of viruses share a set of functionally conserved proteins that are essential to their replication cycle. Among this set of proteins is the viral polymerase, which performs a unique set of reactions to produce genome- and subgenome-length RNA transcripts. In this article, we study the polymerase of vesicular stomatitis virus, a member of the rhabdoviruses, which has served in the past as a model to study negative-strand RNA virus replication. We have identified a site in the N-terminal domain of the polymerase that is essential to viral transcription and that shares sequence homology with members of the paramyxoviruses and the filoviruses. Newly identified sites such as that described here could prove to be useful targets in the

  11. Increased expression of LD1 genes transcribed by RNA polymerase I in Leishmania donovani as a result of duplication into the rRNA gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Lodes, M.J.; Merlin, G.; DeVos, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report investigates the duplication of two LD1 genes into the rRNA locus and the resultant transcription by RNA polymerase I, which has a faster transcription rate than that of RNA polymerase II. This was conducted using a 2.2-Mb chromosome in Leishmania donovani. 55 refs., 6 figs.

  12. A Novel Role for Cet1p mRNA 5′-Triphosphatase in Promoter Proximal Accumulation of RNA Polymerase II in Saccharomyces cerevisiase

    PubMed Central

    Lahudkar, Shweta; Durairaj, Geetha; Uprety, Bhawana; Bhaumik, Sukesh R.

    2014-01-01

    Yeast mRNA 5′-triphosphatase, Cet1p, recognizes phosphorylated-RNA polymerase II as a component of capping machinery via Ceg1p for cotranscriptional formation of mRNA cap structure that recruits cap-binding complex (CBC) and protects mRNA from exonucleases. Here, we show that the accumulation of RNA polymerase II at the promoter proximal site of ADH1 is significantly enhanced in the absence of Cet1p. Similar results are also found at other genes. Cet1p is recruited to the 5′ end of the coding sequence, and its absence impairs mRNA capping, and hence CBC recruitment. However, such an impaired recruitment of CBC does not enhance promoter proximal accumulation of RNA polymerase II. Thus, Cet1p specifically lowers the accumulation of RNA polymerase II at the promoter proximal site independently of mRNA cap structure or CBC. Further, we show that Cet1p’s N-terminal domain, which is not involved in mRNA capping, decreases promoter proximal accumulation of RNA polymerase II. An accumulation of RNA polymerase II at the promoter proximal site in the absence of Cet1p’s N-terminal domain is correlated with reduced transcription. Collectively, our results demonstrate a novel role of Cet1p in regulation of promoter proximal accumulation of RNA polymerase II independently of mRNA capping activity, and hence transcription in vivo. PMID:24172134

  13. RNA Polymerase Collision versus DNA Structural Distortion: Twists and Turns Can Cause Break Failure.

    PubMed

    Pannunzio, Nicholas R; Lieber, Michael R

    2016-05-05

    The twisting of DNA due to the movement of RNA polymerases is the basis of numerous classic experiments in molecular biology. Recent mouse genetic models indicate that chromosomal breakage is common at sites of transcriptional turbulence. Two key studies on this point mapped breakpoints to sites of either convergent or divergent transcription but arrived at different conclusions as to which is more detrimental and why. The issue hinges on whether DNA strand separation is the basis for the chromosomal instability or collision of RNA polymerases.

  14. Conditional mutations occur predominantly in highly conserved residues of RNA polymerase II subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Scafe, C; Martin, C; Nonet, M; Podos, S; Okamura, S; Young, R A

    1990-01-01

    Conditional mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II large subunit, RPB1, were obtained by introducing a mutagenized RPB1 plasmid into yeast cells, selecting for loss of the wild-type RPB1 gene, and screening the cells for heat or cold sensitivity. Sequence analysis of 10 conditional RPB1 mutations and 10 conditional RPB2 mutations revealed that the amino acid residues altered by these distinct mutations are nearly always invariant among eucaryotic RPB1 and RPB2 homologs. These results suggest that RNA polymerase mutants might be obtained in other eucaryotic organisms by alteration of these invariant residues. Images PMID:2406567

  15. Co-evolution of RNA polymerase with RbpA in the phylum Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Abhinav; Adithi, V.R.; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2012-01-01

    The role of RbpA in the backdrop of M. smegmatis showed that it rescues mycobacterial RNA polymerase from rifampicin-mediated inhibition (Dey et al., 2010; Dey et al., 2011). Paget and co-workers (Paget et al., 2001; Newell et al., 2006) have revealed that RbpA homologs occur exclusively in actinobacteria. Newell et al. (2006) showed that MtbRbpA, when complemented in a ∆rbpA mutant of S. coelicolor, showed a low recovery of MIC (from 0.75 to 2 μg/ml) as compared to complementation by native RbpA of S. coelicolor (MIC increases from 0.75 to 11 μg/ml). Our studies on MsRbpA show that it is a differential marker for M. smegmatis RNA polymerase as compared to E. coli RNA polymerase at IC50 levels of rifampicin. A recent sequence-based analysis by Lane and Darst (2010) has shown that RNA polymerases from Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria have had a divergent evolution. E. coli is a representative of Proteobacteria and M. smegmatis is an Actinobacterium. RbpA has an exclusive occurrence in Actinobacteria. Since protein–protein interactions might not be conserved across different species, therefore, the probable reason for the indifference of MsRbpA toward E. coli RNA polymerase could be the lineage-specific differences between actinobacterial and proteobacterial RNA polymerases. These observations led us to ask the question as to whether the evolution of RbpA in Actinobacteria followed the same route as that of RNA polymerase subunits from actinobacterial species. We show that the exclusivity of RbpA in Actinobacteria and the unique evolution of RNA polymerase in this phylum share a co-evolutionary link. We have addressed this issue by a blending of experimental and bioinformatics based approaches. They comprise of induction of bacterial cultures coupled to rifampicin-tolerance, transcription assays and statistical comparison of phylogenetic trees for different pairs of proteins in actinobacteria. PMID:27896048

  16. T7 RNA polymerase elongation complex structure and movement.

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Sousa, R

    2000-10-27

    We have characterized T7RNAP elongation complexes (ECs) halted at different positions on a single template using a combination of digestion with exonuclease III, lambda exonuclease, RNAse T1, and treatment with KMnO(4). Our results indicate that the transcription bubble is approximately nine bases long and that the RNA:DNA hybrid is 7-8 bp in size. An additional four to six bases of RNA immediately 5' to the hybrid interact with the RNAP, probably with a site on the N-terminal domain. When ECs with transcripts of different length were probed in the presence or absence of the incoming NTP we found that the position of the EC on the template and the RNA shifted downstream upon NTP binding. NTP binding also restricted the lateral mobility of the complex on the template. Our results indicate that, in the absence of bound NTP, the RNAP is relatively free to slide on the template around a position that usually lies one to two bases upstream of the position from which NTP binding and bond formation occur. NTP binding stabilizes the RNAP in the post-translocated position and keeps it from sliding upstream, either due directly to RNAP:NTP:template interactions, or to an isomerization which causes the fingers subdomain of the RNAP to clamp down on the downstream end of the template strand.

  17. Assembly of RNA polymerase II preinitiation complexes before assembly of nucleosomes allows efficient initiation of transcription on nucleosomal templates

    SciTech Connect

    Knezetic, J.A.; Jacob, G.A.; Luse, D.S.

    1988-08-01

    The authors have previously shown that assembly of nucleosomes on the DNA template blocks transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II in vitro. In the studies reported here, they demonstrate that assembly of a complete RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex before nucleosome assembly results in nucleosomal templates which support initiation in vitro as efficiently as naked DNA. Control experiments prove that the observations are not the result of slow displacemnt of nucleosomes by the transcription machinery during chromatin assembly, nor are they an artifact of inefficient nucleosome deposition on templates already bearing an RNA polymerase. Thus, the RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex appears to be resistant to disruption by subsequent nucleosome assembly.

  18. Species-specificity of rRNA gene transcription in plants manifested as a switch in RNA polymerase specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Doelling, J H; Pikaard, C S

    1996-01-01

    Rapid evolution of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene promoters often prevents their recognition in a foreign species. Unlike animal systems, we show that foreign plant rRNA gene promoters are recognized in an alien species, but tend to program transcription by a different polymerase. In plants, RNA polymerase I transcripts initiate at a TATATA element (+1 is underlined) important for promoter strength and start-site selection. However, transcripts initiate from +32 following transfection of a tomato promoter into Arabidopsis. The rRNA gene promoter of a more closely related species, Brassica oleracea, programs both +1 and +29 transcription. A point mutation at +2 improving the identity between the Brassica and Arabidopsis promoters increases +1 transcription, indicating a role for the initiator element in species-specificity. Brassica +29 transcripts can be translated to express a luciferase reporter gene, implicating RNA polymerase II. TATA mutations that disrupt TATA-binding protein (TBP) interactions inhibit +29 transcription and luciferase expression. Co-expressed TBP proteins bearing compensatory mutations restore +29 transcription and luciferase activity, suggesting a direct TBP-TATA interaction. Importantly, +1 transcription is unaffected by the TATA mutations, suggesting that in the context of pol I recognition, the TATA-containing initiator element serves a function other than TBP binding. PMID:8972859

  19. Space constrained homology modelling: the paradigm of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of dengue (type II) virus.

    PubMed

    Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Kontopoulos, Dimitrios Georgios; Kossida, Sophia

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure is more conserved than sequence in nature. In this direction we developed a novel methodology that significantly improves conventional homology modelling when sequence identity is low, by taking into consideration 3D structural features of the template, such as size and shape. Herein, our new homology modelling approach was applied to the homology modelling of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of dengue (type II) virus. The RdRp of dengue was chosen due to the low sequence similarity shared between the dengue virus polymerase and the available templates, while purposely avoiding to use the actual X-ray structure that is available for the dengue RdRp. The novel approach takes advantage of 3D space corresponding to protein shape and size by creating a 3D scaffold of the template structure. The dengue polymerase model built by the novel approach exhibited all features of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and was almost identical to the X-ray structure of the dengue RdRp, as opposed to the model built by conventional homology modelling. Therefore, we propose that the space-aided homology modelling approach can be of a more general use to homology modelling of enzymes sharing low sequence similarity with the template structures.

  20. Escherichia coli RNA polymerase is the target of the cyclopeptide antibiotic microcin J25.

    PubMed

    Delgado, M A; Rintoul, M R; Farías, R N; Salomón, R A

    2001-08-01

    Escherichia coli microcin J25 (MccJ25) is a plasmid-encoded, cyclic peptide antibiotic consisting of 21 unmodified amino acid residues. It is primarily active on gram-negative bacteria related to the producer strain, inducing cell filamentation in an SOS-independent way. A mutation causing resistance to MccJ25 was isolated. Genetic analysis indicated that it resided in the rpoC gene, encoding the beta' subunit of RNA polymerase, at 90 min on the E. coli genetic map. The mutation was genetically crossed on to a plasmid containing the wild-type rpoC gene. The presence of the recombinant plasmid conferred complete resistance to otherwise sensitive strains. Nucleotide sequencing of the plasmid-borne, mutant rpoC gene revealed a ACC (Thr)-to-ATC (Ile) change at codon 931, within homology block G, an evolutionarily conserved region in the large subunits of all RNA polymerases. MccJ25 decreased RNA synthesis both in vivo and in vitro. These results point to the RNA polymerase as the target of microcin action. We favor the possibility that the filamentous phenotype induced by MccJ25 results from impaired transcription of genes coding for cell division proteins. As far as we know, MccJ25 is the first peptide antibiotic shown to affect RNA polymerase.

  1. Direct measurement of the poliovirus RNA polymerase error frequency in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.D.; Stokes, M.A.M.; Flanegan, J.B. )

    1988-02-01

    The fidelity of RNA replication by the poliovirus-RNA-dependent RNA polymerase was examined by copying homopolymeric RNA templates in vitro. The poliovirus RNA polymerase was extensively purified and used to copy poly(A), poly(C), or poly(I) templates with equimolar concentrations of noncomplementary and complementary ribonucleotides. The error frequency was expressed as the amount of a noncomplementary nucleotide incorporated divided by the total amount of complementary and noncomplementary nucleotide incorporated. The polymerase error frequencies were very high, depending on the specific reaction conditions. The activity of the polymerase on poly(U) and poly(G) was too low to measure error frequencies on these templates. A fivefold increase in the error frequency was observed when the reaction conditions were changed from 3.0 mM Mg{sup 2+} (pH 7.0) to 7.0 mM Mg{sup 2+} (pH 8.0). This increase in the error frequency correlates with an eightfold increase in the elongation rate that was observed under the same conditions in a previous study.

  2. RNAs nonspecifically inhibit RNA polymerase II by preventing binding to the DNA template

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Dave A.; Kaplan, Craig D.; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Murakami, Kenji; Andrews, Philip C.; Engelke, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Many RNAs are known to act as regulators of transcription in eukaryotes, including certain small RNAs that directly inhibit RNA polymerases both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We have examined the potential for a variety of RNAs to directly inhibit transcription by yeast RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and find that unstructured RNAs are potent inhibitors of purified yeast Pol II. Inhibition by RNA is achieved by blocking binding of the DNA template and requires binding of the RNA to Pol II prior to open complex formation. RNA is not able to displace a DNA template that is already stably bound to Pol II, nor can RNA inhibit elongating Pol II. Unstructured RNAs are more potent inhibitors than highly structured RNAs and can also block specific transcription initiation in the presence of basal transcription factors. Crosslinking studies with ultraviolet light show that unstructured RNA is most closely associated with the two large subunits of Pol II that comprise the template binding cleft, but the RNA has contacts in a basic residue channel behind the back wall of the active site. These results are distinct from previous observations of specific inhibition by small, structured RNAs in that they demonstrate a sensitivity of the holoenzyme to inhibition by unstructured RNA products that bind to a surface outside the DNA cleft. These results are discussed in terms of the need to prevent inhibition by RNAs, either though sequestration of nascent RNA or preemptive interaction of Pol II with the DNA template. PMID:24614752

  3. RNAs nonspecifically inhibit RNA polymerase II by preventing binding to the DNA template.

    PubMed

    Pai, Dave A; Kaplan, Craig D; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Murakami, Kenji; Andrews, Philip C; Engelke, David R

    2014-05-01

    Many RNAs are known to act as regulators of transcription in eukaryotes, including certain small RNAs that directly inhibit RNA polymerases both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We have examined the potential for a variety of RNAs to directly inhibit transcription by yeast RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and find that unstructured RNAs are potent inhibitors of purified yeast Pol II. Inhibition by RNA is achieved by blocking binding of the DNA template and requires binding of the RNA to Pol II prior to open complex formation. RNA is not able to displace a DNA template that is already stably bound to Pol II, nor can RNA inhibit elongating Pol II. Unstructured RNAs are more potent inhibitors than highly structured RNAs and can also block specific transcription initiation in the presence of basal transcription factors. Crosslinking studies with ultraviolet light show that unstructured RNA is most closely associated with the two large subunits of Pol II that comprise the template binding cleft, but the RNA has contacts in a basic residue channel behind the back wall of the active site. These results are distinct from previous observations of specific inhibition by small, structured RNAs in that they demonstrate a sensitivity of the holoenzyme to inhibition by unstructured RNA products that bind to a surface outside the DNA cleft. These results are discussed in terms of the need to prevent inhibition by RNAs, either though sequestration of nascent RNA or preemptive interaction of Pol II with the DNA template.

  4. Mutations Affecting RNA Polymerase I-Stimulated Exchange and Rdna Recombination in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Y. H.; Keil, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    HOT1 is a cis-acting recombination-stimulatory sequence isolated from the rDNA repeat unit of yeast. The ability of HOT1 to stimulate mitotic exchange appears to depend on its ability to promote high levels of RNA polymerase I transcription. A qualitative colony color sectoring assay was developed to screen for trans-acting mutations that alter the activity of HOT1. Both hypo-recombination and hyper-recombination mutants were isolated. Genetic analysis of seven HOT1 recombination mutants (hrm) that decrease HOT1 activity shows that they behave as recessive nuclear mutations and belong to five linkage groups. Three of these mutations, hrm1, hrm2, and hrm3, also decrease rDNA exchange but do not alter recombination in the absence of HOT1. Another mutation, hrm4, decreases HOT1-stimulated recombination but does not affect rDNA recombination or exchange in the absence of HOT1. Two new alleles of RAD52 were also isolated using this screen. With regard to HOT1 activity, rad52 is epistatic to all four hrm mutations indicating that the products of the HRM genes and of RAD52 mediate steps in the same recombination pathway. Finding mutations that decrease both the activity of HOT1 and exchange in the rDNA supports the hypothesis that HOT1 plays a role in rDNA recombination. PMID:2016045

  5. Study of RNA Polymerase II Clustering inside Live-Cell Nuclei Using Bayesian Nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuanze; Wei, Mian; Zheng, M Mocarlo; Zhao, Jiaxi; Hao, Huiwen; Chang, Lei; Xi, Peng; Sun, Yujie

    2016-02-23

    Nanoscale spatiotemporal clustering of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) plays an important role in transcription regulation. However, dynamics of individual Pol II clusters in live-cell nuclei has not been measured directly, prohibiting in-depth understanding of their working mechanisms. In this work, we studied the dynamics of Pol II clustering using Bayesian nanoscopy in live mammalian cell nuclei. With 50 nm spatial resolution and 4 s temporal resolution, Bayesian nanoscopy allows direct observation of the assembly and disassembly dynamics of individual Pol II clusters. The results not only provide quantifications of Pol II clusters but also shed light on the understanding of cluster formation and regulation. Our study suggests that transcription factories form on-demand and recruit Pol II molecules in their pre-elongation phase. The assembly and disassembly of individual Pol II clusters take place asynchronously. Overall, the methods developed herein are also applicable to studying a wide realm of real-time nanometer-scale nuclear processes in live cells.

  6. Transcription of potato spindle tuber viroid by RNA polymerase II starts in the left terminal loop

    SciTech Connect

    Kolonko, Nadine; Bannach, Oliver; Aschermann, Katja; Hu, Kang-Hong; Moors, Michaela; Schmitz, Michael; Steger, Gerhard; Riesner, Detlev . E-mail: riesner@biophys.uni-duesseldorf.de

    2006-04-10

    Viroids are single-stranded, circular RNAs of 250 to 400 bases, that replicate autonomously in their host plants but do not code for a protein. Viroids of the family Pospiviroidae, of which potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) is the type strain, are replicated by the host's DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II in the nucleus. To analyze the initiation site of transcription from the (+)-stranded circles into (-)-stranded replication intermediates, we used a nuclear extract from a non-infected cell culture of the host plant S. tuberosum. The (-)-strands, which were de novo-synthesized in the extract upon addition of circular (+)-PSTVd, were purified by affinity chromatography. This purification avoided contamination by host nucleic acids that had resulted in a misassignment of the start site in an earlier study. Primer-extension analysis of the de novo-synthesized (-)-strands revealed a single start site located in the hairpin loop of the left terminal region in circular PSTVd's secondary structure. This start site is supported further by analysis of the infectivity and replication behavior of site-directed mutants in planta.

  7. Mass spectrometry and biochemical analysis of RNA polymerase II: targeting by protein phosphatase-1

    PubMed Central

    Jerebtsova, Marina; Klotchenko, Sergei A.; Artamonova, Tatiana O.; Ammosova, Tatiana; Washington, Kareem; Egorov, Vladimir V.; Shaldzhyan, Aram A.; Sergeeva, Maria V.; Zatulovskiy, Evgeny A.; Temkina, Olga A.; Petukhov, Mikhail G.; Vasin, Andrei V.; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail A.; Orlov, Yuri N.

    2011-01-01

    Transcription of eukaryotic genes is regulated by phosphorylation of serine residues of heptapeptide repeats of the carboxyterminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). We previously reported that protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) dephosphorylates RNAPII CTD in vitro and inhibition of nuclear PP1-blocked viral transcription. In this article, we analyzed the targeting of RNAPII by PP1 using biochemical and mass spectrometry analysis of RNAPII-associated regulatory subunits of PP1. Immunoblotting showed that PP1 co-elutes with RNAPII. Mass spectrometry approach showed the presence of U2 snRNP. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis points to NIPP1 and PNUTS as candidate regulatory subunits. Because NIPP1 was previously shown to target PP1 to U2 snRNP, we analyzed the effect of NIPP1 on RNAPII phosphorylation in cultured cells. Expression of mutant NIPP1 promoted RNAPII phosphorylation suggesting that the deregulation of cellular NIPP1/PP1 holoenzyme affects RNAPII phosphorylation and pointing to NIPP1 as a potential regulatory factor in RNAPII-mediated transcription. PMID:20941529

  8. Transcription of potato spindle tuber viroid by RNA polymerase II starts in the left terminal loop.

    PubMed

    Kolonko, Nadine; Bannach, Oliver; Aschermann, Katja; Hu, Kang-Hong; Moors, Michaela; Schmitz, Michael; Steger, Gerhard; Riesner, Detlev

    2006-04-10

    Viroids are single-stranded, circular RNAs of 250 to 400 bases, that replicate autonomously in their host plants but do not code for a protein. Viroids of the family Pospiviroidae, of which potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) is the type strain, are replicated by the host's DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II in the nucleus. To analyze the initiation site of transcription from the (+)-stranded circles into (-)-stranded replication intermediates, we used a nuclear extract from a non-infected cell culture of the host plant S. tuberosum. The (-)-strands, which were de novo-synthesized in the extract upon addition of circular (+)-PSTVd, were purified by affinity chromatography. This purification avoided contamination by host nucleic acids that had resulted in a misassignment of the start site in an earlier study. Primer-extension analysis of the de novo-synthesized (-)-strands revealed a single start site located in the hairpin loop of the left terminal region in circular PSTVd's secondary structure. This start site is supported further by analysis of the infectivity and replication behavior of site-directed mutants in planta.

  9. Evidence implicating Ku antigen as a structural factor in RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Bertinato, Jesse; Tomlinson, Julianna J; Schild-Poulter, Caroline; Haché, Robert J G

    2003-01-02

    Ku antigen is an abundant nuclear protein with multiple functions that depend mainly on Ku's prolific and highly verstatile interactions with DNA. We have shown previously that the direct binding of Ku in vitro to negative regulatory element 1 (NRE1), a transcriptional regulatory element in the long terminal repeat of mouse mammary tumour virus, correlates with the regulation of viral transcription by Ku. In this study, we have sought to explore the interaction of Ku with NRE1 in vivo in yeast one-hybrid experiments. Unexpectedly, we observed that human Ku70 carrying a transcriptional activation domain from the yeast Gal4 protein induced transcription of yeast reporter genes pleiotrophically, independent of NRE1, promoter, reporter gene and chromosomal location. Ku80 with the same activation domain had no effect on transcription when expressed alone, but reconstituted activation when co-expressed with native human Ku70. The requirements for transcriptional activation by Ku-Gal4 activation domain proteins correlated with previous descriptions of the requirements for DNA sequence-independent DNA binding by Ku, but were distinct from determinants for DNA-end binding by a truncated Ku heterodimer determined recently by crystallography. These results suggest a preferential targeting of Ku to transcriptionally active chromatin that indicate a possible function for Ku within the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme.

  10. Abnormal rapid non-linear RNA production induced by T7 RNA polymerase in the absence of an exogenous DNA template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakimoto, Y.; Fujinuma, A.; Fujita, S.; Kikuchi, Y.; Umekage, S.

    2015-02-01

    Although recombinant T7 RNA polymerase is commonly used for in vitro RNA synthesis, several reports have pointed out that T7 RNA polymerase can also induce RNA-directed RNA polymerization or replication. In addition, here we show a new aberrant transcription when using T7 RNA polymerase. This polymerization was observed in the presence of both ribonucleotides and a purchasable T7 RNA polymerase, Thermo T7 RNA polymerase, as well as in the absence of an exogenous DNA template. This cryptic RNA production was detectable after several hours of incubation and was inhibited by adding DNase I. These findings suggested that some contaminated DNA along with the Thermo stable T7 RNA polymerase could be used as template DNA. However, to our surprise, RNA production showed a rapid non-linear increase. This finding strongly indicated that a self-replication cycle emerged from the RNA-directed polymerization or replication by T7 RNA polymerase, triggering the abnormal explosive increase.

  11. SIRT1 inhibits EV71 genome replication and RNA translation by interfering with the viral polymerase and 5'UTR RNA.

    PubMed

    Han, Yang; Wang, Lvyin; Cui, Jin; Song, Yu; Luo, Zhen; Chen, Junbo; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Fang; Ho, Wenzhe; Liu, Yingle; Wu, Kailang; Wu, Jianguo

    2016-12-15

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) possesses a single-stranded positive RNA genome that contains a single open reading frame (ORF) flanked by a 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) and a polyadenylated 3'UTR. Here, we demonstrated that EV71 activates the production of silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1), a histone deacetylase (HDAC). EV71 further stimulates SIRT1 sumoylation and deacetylase activity, and enhances SIRT1 translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. More interestingly, activated SIRT1 subsequently binds with the EV71 3D(pol) protein (a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, RdRp) to repress the acetylation and RdRp activity of 3D(pol), resulting in the attenuation of viral genome replication. Moreover, SIRT1 interacts with the cloverleaf structure of the EV71 RNA 5'UTR to inhibit viral RNA transcription, and binds to the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of the EV71 5'UTR to attenuate viral RNA translation. Thus, EV71 stimulates SIRT1 production and activity, which in turn represses EV71 genome replication by inhibiting viral polymerase, and attenuates EV71 RNA transcription and translation by interfering with viral RNA. These results uncover a new function of SIRT1 and reveal a new mechanism underlying the regulation of EV71 replication. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Pause & go: from the discovery of RNA polymerase pausing to its functional implications.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Andreas; Landry, Heather M; Churchman, L Stirling

    2017-03-28

    The synthesis of nascent RNA is a discontinuous process in which phases of productive elongation by RNA polymerase are interrupted by frequent pauses. Transcriptional pausing was first observed decades ago, but was long considered to be a special feature of transcription at certain genes. This view was challenged when studies using genome-wide approaches revealed that RNA polymerase II pauses at promoter-proximal regions in large sets of genes in Drosophila and mammalian cells. High-resolution genomic methods uncovered that pausing is not restricted to promoters, but occurs globally throughout gene-body regions, implying the existence of key-rate limiting steps in nascent RNA synthesis downstream of transcription initiation. Here, we outline the experimental breakthroughs that led to the discovery of pervasive transcriptional pausing, discuss its emerging roles and regulation, and highlight the importance of pausing in human development and disease.

  13. Production of RNA by a polymerase protein encapsulated within phospholipid vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Breaker, R. R.; Joyce, G. F.; Deamer, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    Catalyzed polymerization reactions represent a primary anabolic activity of all cells. It can be assumed that early cells carried out such reactions, in which macromolecular catalysts were encapsulated within some type of boundary membrane. In the experiments described here, we show that a template-independent RNA polymerase (polynucleotide phosphorylase) can be encapsulated in dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles without substrate. When the substrate adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was provided externally, long-chain RNA polymers were synthesized within the vesicles. Substrate flux was maximized by maintaining the vesicles at the phase transition temperature of the component lipid. A protease was introduced externally as an additional control. Free enzyme was inactivated under identical conditions. RNA products were visualized in situ by ethidium bromide fluorescence. The products were harvested from the liposomes, radiolabeled, and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Encapsulated catalysts represent a model for primitive cellular systems in which an RNA polymerase was entrapped within a protected microenvironment.

  14. Structural basis of transcription: backtracked RNA polymerase II at 3.4 angstrom resolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Bushnell, David A; Huang, Xuhui; Westover, Kenneth D; Levitt, Michael; Kornberg, Roger D

    2009-05-29

    Transcribing RNA polymerases oscillate between three stable states, two of which, pre- and posttranslocated, were previously subjected to x-ray crystal structure determination. We report here the crystal structure of RNA polymerase II in the third state, the reverse translocated, or "backtracked" state. The defining feature of the backtracked structure is a binding site for the first backtracked nucleotide. This binding site is occupied in case of nucleotide misincorporation in the RNA or damage to the DNA, and is termed the "P" site because it supports proofreading. The predominant mechanism of proofreading is the excision of a dinucleotide in the presence of the elongation factor SII (TFIIS). Structure determination of a cocrystal with TFIIS reveals a rearrangement whereby cleavage of the RNA may take place.

  15. Production of RNA by a polymerase protein encapsulated within phospholipid vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Breaker, R. R.; Joyce, G. F.; Deamer, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    Catalyzed polymerization reactions represent a primary anabolic activity of all cells. It can be assumed that early cells carried out such reactions, in which macromolecular catalysts were encapsulated within some type of boundary membrane. In the experiments described here, we show that a template-independent RNA polymerase (polynucleotide phosphorylase) can be encapsulated in dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles without substrate. When the substrate adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was provided externally, long-chain RNA polymers were synthesized within the vesicles. Substrate flux was maximized by maintaining the vesicles at the phase transition temperature of the component lipid. A protease was introduced externally as an additional control. Free enzyme was inactivated under identical conditions. RNA products were visualized in situ by ethidium bromide fluorescence. The products were harvested from the liposomes, radiolabeled, and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Encapsulated catalysts represent a model for primitive cellular systems in which an RNA polymerase was entrapped within a protected microenvironment.

  16. RIG-I-dependent sensing of poly(dA:dT) through the induction of an RNA polymerase III-transcribed RNA intermediate.

    PubMed

    Ablasser, Andrea; Bauernfeind, Franz; Hartmann, Gunther; Latz, Eicke; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Hornung, Veit

    2009-10-01

    RNA is sensed by Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and TLR8 or by the RNA helicases LGP2, Mda5 and RIG-I to trigger antiviral responses. Much less is known about sensors for DNA. Here we identify a novel DNA-sensing pathway involving RNA polymerase III and RIG-I. In this pathway, AT-rich double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) served as a template for RNA polymerase III and was transcribed into double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) containing a 5'-triphosphate moiety. Activation of RIG-I by this dsRNA induced production of type I interferon and activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB. This pathway was important in the sensing of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNAs, which were transcribed by RNA polymerase III and then triggered RIG-I activation. Thus, RNA polymerase III and RIG-I are pivotal in sensing viral DNA.

  17. Transcriptional termination in mammals: Stopping the RNA polymerase II juggernaut

    PubMed Central

    Proudfoot, Nick J.

    2016-01-01

    Terminating transcription is a highly intricate process for mammalian protein-coding genes. First, the chromatin template slows down transcription at the gene end. Then, the transcript is cleaved at the poly(A) signal to release the messenger RNA.The remaining transcript is selectively unraveled and degraded. This induces critical conformational changes in the heart of the enzyme that trigger termination. Termination can also occur at variable positions along the gene and so prevent aberrant transcript formation or intentionally make different transcripts.These may form multiple messenger RNAs with altered regulatory properties or encode different proteins. Finally, termination can be perturbed to achieve particular cellular needs or blocked in cancer or virally infected cells. In such cases, failure to terminate transcription can spell disaster for the cell. PMID:27284201

  18. Photobleaching reveals complex effects of inhibitors on transcribing RNA polymerase II in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fromaget, Maud; Cook, Peter R. . E-mail: peter.cook@path.ox.ac.uk

    2007-08-15

    RNA polymerase II transcribes most eukaryotic genes. Photobleaching studies have revealed that living Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the catalytic subunit of the polymerase tagged with the green fluorescent protein contain a large rapidly exchanging pool of enzyme, plus a smaller engaged fraction; genetic complementation shows this tagged polymerase to be fully functional. We investigated how transcriptional inhibitors - some of which are used therapeutically - affect the engaged fraction in living cells using fluorescence loss in photobleaching; all were used at concentrations that have reversible effects. Various kinase inhibitors (roscovitine, DRB, KM05283, alsterpaullone, isoquinolinesulfonamide derivatives H-7, H-8, H-89, H-9), proteasomal inhibitors (lactacystin, MG132), and an anti-tumour agent (cisplatin) all reduced the engaged fraction; an intercalator (actinomycin D), two histone deacetylase inhibitors (trichostatin A, sodium butyrate), and irradiation with ultra-violet light all increased it. The polymerase proves to be both a sensitive sensor and effector of the response to these inhibitors.

  19. The Choice of Alternative 5' Splice Sites in Influenza Virus M1 mRNA is Regulated by the Viral Polymerase Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Shin-Ru; Nemeroff, Martin E.; Krug, Robert M.

    1995-07-01

    The influenza virus M1 mRNA has two alternative 5' splice sites: a distal 5' splice site producing mRNA_3 that has the coding potential for 9 amino acids and a proximal 5' splice site producing M2 mRNA encoding the essential M2 ion-channel protein. Only mRNA_3 was made in uninfected cells transfected with DNA expressing M1 mRNA. Similarly, using nuclear extracts from uninfected cells, in vitro splicing of M1 mRNA yielded only mRNA_3. Only when the mRNA_3 5' splice site was inactivated by mutation was M2 mRNA made in uninfected cells and in uninfected cell extracts. In influenza virus-infected cells, M2 mRNA was made, but only after a delay, suggesting that newly synthesized viral gene product(s) were needed to activate the M2 5' splice site. We present strong evidence that these gene products are the complex of the three polymerase proteins, the same complex that functions in the transcription and replication of the viral genome. Gel shift experiments showed that the viral polymerase complex bound to the 5' end of the viral M1 mRNA in a sequence-specific and cap-dependent manner. During in vitro splicing catalyzed by uninfected cell extracts, the binding of the viral polymerase complex blocked the mRNA_3 5' splice site, resulting in the switch to the M2 mRNA 5' splice site and the production of M2 mRNA.

  20. Enhanced detection of RNA by MMLV reverse transcriptase coupled with thermostable DNA polymerase and DNA/RNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Okano, Hiroyuki; Katano, Yuta; Baba, Misato; Fujiwara, Ayako; Hidese, Ryota; Fujiwara, Shinsuke; Yanagihara, Itaru; Hayashi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Kenji; Takita, Teisuke; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Detection of mRNA is a valuable method for monitoring the specific gene expression. In this study, we devised a novel cDNA synthesis method using three enzymes, the genetically engineered thermostable variant of reverse transcriptase (RT), MM4 (E286R/E302K/L435R/D524A) from Moloney murine leukemia virus (MMLV), the genetically engineered variant of family A DNA polymerase with RT activity, K4polL329A from thermophilic Thermotoga petrophila K4, and the DNA/RNA helicase Tk-EshA from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. By optimizing assay conditions for three enzymes using Taguchi's method, 100 to 1000-fold higher sensitivity was achieved for cDNA synthesis than conventional assay condition using only RT. Our results suggest that DNA polymerase with RT activity and DNA/RNA helicase are useful to increase the sensitivity of cDNA synthesis.

  1. The Human Nuclear Poly(A)-Binding Protein Promotes RNA Hyperadenylation and Decay

    PubMed Central

    Bresson, Stefan M.; Conrad, Nicholas K.

    2013-01-01

    Control of nuclear RNA stability is essential for proper gene expression, but the mechanisms governing RNA degradation in mammalian nuclei are poorly defined. In this study, we uncover a mammalian RNA decay pathway that depends on the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein (PABPN1), the poly(A) polymerases (PAPs), PAPα and PAPγ, and the exosome subunits RRP6 and DIS3. Using a targeted knockdown approach and nuclear RNA reporters, we show that PABPN1 and PAPα, redundantly with PAPγ, generate hyperadenylated decay substrates that are recognized by the exosome and degraded. Poly(A) tail extension appears to be necessary for decay, as cordycepin treatment or point mutations in the PAP-stimulating domain of PABPN1 leads to the accumulation of stable transcripts with shorter poly(A) tails than controls. Mechanistically, these data suggest that PABPN1-dependent promotion of PAP activity can stimulate nuclear RNA decay. Importantly, efficiently exported RNAs are unaffected by this decay pathway, supporting an mRNA quality control function for this pathway. Finally, analyses of both bulk poly(A) tails and specific endogenous transcripts reveals that a subset of nuclear RNAs are hyperadenylated in a PABPN1-dependent fashion, and this hyperadenylation can be either uncoupled or coupled with decay. Our results highlight a complex relationship between PABPN1, PAPα/γ, and nuclear RNA decay, and we suggest that these activities may play broader roles in the regulation of human gene expression. PMID:24146636

  2. Antibiotics GE23077, novel inhibitors of bacterial RNA polymerase. Part 3: Chemical derivatization.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Riccardo; Granata, Giorgio; Maffioli, Sonia I; Serina, Stefania; Brunati, Cristina; Sosio, Margherita; Marazzi, Alessandra; Vannini, Alfredo; Patel, Dinesh; White, Richard; Ciabatti, Romeo

    2005-08-15

    GE23077 is a novel RNA polymerase inhibitor that is isolated from the fermentation broth of an Actinomadura sp. It is a cyclic heptapeptide complex made up of four factors, differing in the structure of acyl group connected to the side chain of an alpha,beta-diaminopropanoic acid moiety and in the configuration of the stereocenter of an alpha-amino-malonic acid residue. Although GE23077 shows strong inhibitory activity on both Rifampicin-sensitive and -resistant polymerases, it exhibits poor antimicrobial activity. The most reasonable explanation for this property has been based on the lack of penetration of the molecule across the bacterial membrane, owing to its strong hydrophilic character. To improve penetration, several parts of the molecule were accordingly modified with the aim of altering the physico-chemical properties of GE23077. The current SAR study has identified moieties important for RNA polymerase activity.

  3. Purification and properties of poliovirus RNA polymerase expressed in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Plotch, S.J.; Palant, O.; Gluzman, Y.

    1989-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding the RNA polymerase of poliovirus has been expressed in Escherichia coli under the transcriptional control of a T7 bacteriophage promoter. This poliovirus enzyme was designed to contain only a single additional amino acid, the N-terminal methionine. The recombinant enzyme has been purified to near homogeneity, and polyclonal antibodies have been prepared against it. The enzyme exhibits poly(A)-dependent oligo(U)-primed ply(U) polymerase activity as well as RNA polymerase activity. In the presence of an oligo(U) primer, the enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of a full-length copy of either poliovirus or globin RNA templates. In the absence of added primer, RNA products up to twice the length of the template are synthesized. When incubated in the presence of a single nucleoside triphosphate, (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)UTP, the enzyme catalyzes the incorporation of radioactive label into template RNA. These results are discussed in light of previously proposed models of poliovirus RNA synthesis in vitro.

  4. Unusual organization of a developmentally regulated mitochondrial RNA polymerase (TBMTRNAP) gene in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Sandra L.; Koslowsky, Donna J.

    2009-01-01

    We report here the characterization of a developmentally regulated mitochondrial RNA polymerase transcript in the parasitic protozoan, Trypanosoma brucei. The 3822 bp protein-coding region of the T. brucei mitochondrial RNA polymerase (TBMTRNAP) gene is predicted to encode a 1274 amino acid polypeptide, the carboxyl-terminal domain of which exhibits 29–37% identity with the mitochondrial RNA polymerases from other organisms in the molecular databases. Interestingly, the TBMTRNAP mRNA is one of several mature mRNA species post-transcriptionally processed from a stable, polycistronic precursor. Alternative polyadenylation of the TBMTRNAP mRNA produces two mature transcripts that differ by 500 nt and that show stage-specific differences in abundance during the T. brucei life cycle. This alternative polyadenylation event appears to be accompanied by the alternative splicing of a high abundance, non-coding downstream transcript of unknown function. Our finding that the TBMTRNAP gene is transcribed into two distinct mRNAs subject to differential regulation during the T. brucei life cycle suggests that mitochondrial differentiation might be achieved in part through the regulated expression of this gene. PMID:11470527

  5. Molecular phylogeny of Fusarium inferred from partial RNA polymerase II gene sequences

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Currently there are no robust phylogenetic hypotheses for Fusarium based on large-scale sampling across the breadth of this important group of mycotoxigenic phytopathogens. Nucleotide variation within the second largest RNA polymerase subunit (RPB2) protein-coding gene, however, has clearly demonst...

  6. A novel conformation of RNA polymerase sheds light on the mechanism of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tagami, Shunsuke; Sekine, Shun-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Transcription is a complicated, multistep process requiring stringent control. Its accuracy may be achieved in part by the conformational changes of RNA polymerase (RNAP). Here, we discuss the functional relevance of the recently reported conformational changes of RNAP, which may affect transcription control, RNAP translocation and transcription termination. PMID:21922057

  7. Myxopyronin B analogs as inhibitors of RNA polymerase, synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Doundoulakis, Thomas; Xiang, Alan X; Lira, Ricardo; Agrios, Konstantinos A; Webber, Stephen E; Sisson, Wes; Aust, Robert M; Shah, Amit M; Showalter, Richard E; Appleman, James R; Simonsen, Klaus B

    2004-11-15

    A series of myxopyronin B analogs has been prepared via a convergent synthetic route and were tested for in vitro inhibitory activity against DNA-dependent RNA polymerase and antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus. The parent lead compound proved to be very sensitive to even small changes. Only the achiral desmethyl myxopyronin B (1a) provided enhanced potency.

  8. Inhibition of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase of Rous sarcoma virus by thiosemicarbazones and several cations.

    PubMed

    Levinson, W; Faras, A; Woodson, B; Jackson, J; Bishop, J M

    1973-01-01

    The RNA-dependent DNA polymerase of Rous sarcoma virus is inhibited by N-methyl isatin beta-thiosemicarbazone and by thiosemicarbazide, but not by semicarbazide. These inhibitors also inactivate, upon contact with the virion, the transforming ability of Rous sarcoma virus. Sulfhydryl donors, such as 2-mercapto-ethanol, can prevent these effects. The RNA-directed activity of the purified polymerase is inhibited to a greater degree than is the DNA-directed activity. Two cations, Cu(++) and Hg(++), can inhibit RNA-dependent DNA polymerase and inactivate the transforming ability of the virus. Synergism between N-methyl isatin beta-thiosemicarbazone and Cu(++) occurs, since treatment of the virus with a low dose of either N-methyl isatin beta-thiosemicarbazone or Cu(++) has little effect; however, when the two compounds are mixed together, significant inactivation occurs. This observation supports the hypothesis that the antiviral action of thiosemicarbazones is a function of their ability to act as a ligand for metallic ions. Several cations (Ag(+), Co(++), Zn(++), Cd(++), and Ni(++)) significantly inactivate the RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, but have little effect on the transforming ability. In view of this result, the conclusion that the enzyme activity is required for transformation remains open to question.

  9. Snapshots of a viral RNA polymerase switching gears from transcription initiation to elongation.

    PubMed

    Theis, Karsten

    2013-12-01

    During transcription initiation, RNA polymerase binds tightly to the promoter DNA defining the start of transcription, transcribes comparatively slowly, and frequently releases short transcripts (3-8 nucleotides) in a process called abortive cycling. Transitioning to elongation, the second phase of transcription, the polymerase dissociates from the promoter while RNA synthesis continues. Elongation is characterized by higher rates of transcription and tight binding to the RNA transcript. The RNA polymerase from enterophage T7 (T7 RNAP) has been used as a model to understand the mechanism of transcription in general, and the transition from initiation to elongation specifically. This single-subunit enzyme undergoes dramatic conformational changes during this transition to support the changing requirements of nucleic acid interactions while continuously maintaining polymerase function. Crystal structures, available of multiple stages of the initiation complex and of the elongation complex, combined with biochemical and biophysical data, offer molecular detail of the transition. Some of the crystal structures contain a variant of T7 RNAP where proline 266 is substituted by leucine. This variant shows less abortive products and altered timing of transition, and is a valuable tool to study these processes. The structural transitions from early to late initiation are well understood and are consistent with solution data. The timing of events and the structural intermediates in the transition from late initiation to elongation are less well understood, but the available data allows one to formulate testable models of the transition to guide further research.

  10. Falling for the dark side of transcription: Nab2 fosters RNA polymerase III transcription

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, L. Maximilian; Sträßer, Katja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) synthesizes diverse, small, non-coding RNAs with many important roles in the cellular metabolism. One of the open questions of RNAPIII transcription is whether and how additional factors are involved. Recently, Nab2 was identified as the first messenger ribonucleoprotein particle (mRNP) biogenesis factor with a function in RNAPIII transcription. PMID:27049816

  11. Mutations in the three largest subunits of yeast RNA polymerase II that affect enzyme assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, P A; Young, R A

    1991-01-01

    Mutations in the three largest subunits of yeast RNA polymerase II (RPB1, RPB2, and RPB3) were investigated for their effects on RNA polymerase II structure and assembly. Among 23 temperature-sensitive mutations, 6 mutations affected enzyme assembly, as assayed by immunoprecipitation of epitope-tagged subunits. In all six assembly mutants, RNA polymerase II subunits synthesized at the permissive temperature were incorporated into stably assembled, immunoprecipitable enzyme and remained stably associated when cells were shifted to the nonpermissive temperature, whereas subunits synthesized at the nonpermissive temperature were not incorporated into a completely assembled enzyme. The observation that subunit subcomplexes accumulated in assembly-mutant cells at the nonpermissive temperature led us to investigate whether these subcomplexes were assembly intermediates or merely byproducts of mutant enzyme instability. The time course of assembly of RPB1, RPB2, and RPB3 was investigated in wild-type cells and subsequently in mutant cells. Glycerol gradient fractionation of extracts of cells pulse-labeled for various times revealed that a subcomplex of RPB2 and RPB3 appears soon after subunit synthesis and can be chased into fully assembled enzyme. The RPB2-plus-RPB3 subcomplexes accumulated in all RPB1 assembly mutants at the nonpermissive temperature but not in an RPB2 or RPB3 assembly mutant. These data indicate that RPB2 and RPB3 form a complex that subsequently interacts with RPB1 during the assembly of RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:1715023

  12. Structural basis of transcription: an RNA polymerase II-TFIIB cocrystal at 4.5 Angstroms.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, David A; Westover, Kenneth D; Davis, Ralph E; Kornberg, Roger D

    2004-02-13

    The structure of the general transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) in a complex with RNA polymerase II reveals three features crucial for transcription initiation: an N-terminal zinc ribbon domain of TFIIB that contacts the "dock" domain of the polymerase, near the path of RNA exit from a transcribing enzyme; a "finger" domain of TFIIB that is inserted into the polymerase active center; and a C-terminal domain, whose interaction with both the polymerase and with a TATA box-binding protein (TBP)-promoter DNA complex orients the DNA for unwinding and transcription. TFIIB stabilizes an early initiation complex, containing an incomplete RNA-DNA hybrid region. It may interact with the template strand, which sets the location of the transcription start site, and may interfere with RNA exit, which leads to abortive initiation or promoter escape. The trajectory of promoter DNA determined by the C-terminal domain of TFIIB traverses sites of interaction with TFIIE, TFIIF, and TFIIH, serving to define their roles in the transcription initiation process.

  13. A synthetic growth switch based on controlled expression of RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Izard, Jérôme; Gomez Balderas, Cindy D C; Ropers, Delphine; Lacour, Stephan; Song, Xiaohu; Yang, Yifan; Lindner, Ariel B; Geiselmann, Johannes; de Jong, Hidde

    2015-11-23

    The ability to control growth is essential for fundamental studies of bacterial physiology and biotechnological applications. We have engineered an Escherichia coli strain in which the transcription of a key component of the gene expression machinery, RNA polymerase, is under the control of an inducible promoter. By changing the inducer concentration in the medium, we can adjust the RNA polymerase concentration and thereby switch bacterial growth between zero and the maximal growth rate supported by the medium. We show that our synthetic growth switch functions in a medium-independent and reversible way, and we provide evidence that the switching phenotype arises from the ultrasensitive response of the growth rate to the concentration of RNA polymerase. We present an application of the growth switch in which both the wild-type E. coli strain and our modified strain are endowed with the capacity to produce glycerol when growing on glucose. Cells in which growth has been switched off continue to be metabolically active and harness the energy gain to produce glycerol at a twofold higher yield than in cells with natural control of RNA polymerase expression. Remarkably, without any further optimization, the improved yield is close to the theoretical maximum computed from a flux balance model of E. coli metabolism. The proposed synthetic growth switch is a promising tool for gaining a better understanding of bacterial physiology and for applications in synthetic biology and biotechnology. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  14. Selective Degradation of Host RNA Polymerase II Transcripts by Influenza A Virus PA-X Host Shutoff Protein

    PubMed Central

    Larkins-Ford, Jonah; McCormick, Craig; Gaglia, Marta M.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) inhibit host gene expression by a process known as host shutoff. Host shutoff limits host innate immune responses and may also redirect the translation apparatus to the production of viral proteins. Multiple IAV proteins regulate host shutoff, including PA-X, a ribonuclease that remains incompletely characterized. We report that PA-X selectively targets host RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcribed mRNAs, while sparing products of Pol I and Pol III. Interestingly, we show that PA-X can also target Pol II-transcribed RNAs in the nucleus, including non-coding RNAs that are not destined to be translated, and reporter transcripts with RNA hairpin structures that block ribosome loading. Transcript degradation likely occurs in the nucleus, as PA-X is enriched in the nucleus and its nuclear localization correlates with reduction in target RNA levels. Complete degradation of host mRNAs following PA-X-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage is dependent on the host 5’->3’-exonuclease Xrn1. IAV mRNAs are structurally similar to host mRNAs, but are synthesized and modified at the 3’ end by the action of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex. Infection of cells with wild-type IAV or a recombinant PA-X-deficient virus revealed that IAV mRNAs resist PA-X-mediated degradation during infection. At the same time, loss of PA-X resulted in changes in the synthesis of select viral mRNAs and a decrease in viral protein accumulation. Collectively, these results significantly advance our understanding of IAV host shutoff, and suggest that the PA-X causes selective degradation of host mRNAs by discriminating some aspect of Pol II-dependent RNA biogenesis in the nucleus. PMID:26849127

  15. Oncogenic EWS-Fli1 interacts with hsRPB7, a subunit of human RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Petermann, R; Mossier, B M; Aryee, D N; Khazak, V; Golemis, E A; Kovar, H

    1998-08-06

    As a result of the t(11;22)(q24;q12) chromosomal translocation characterizing the Ewing family of tumors (ET), the amino terminal portion of EWS, an RNA binding protein of unknown function, is fused to the DNA-binding domain of the ets transcription factor Fli1. The hybrid EWS-Fli1 protein acts as a strong transcriptional activator and, in contrast to wildtype Fli1, is a potent transforming agent. Similar rearrangements involving EWS or the highly homologous TLS with various transcription factors have been found in several types of human tumors. Employing yeast two-hybrid cloning we isolated the seventh largest subunit of human RNA polymerase II (hsRPB7) as a protein that specifically interacts with the amino terminus of EWS. This association was confirmed by in vitro immunocoprecipitation. In nuclear extracts, hsRPB7 was found to copurify with EWS-Fli1 but not with Fli1. Overexpression of recombinant hsRPB7 specifically increased gene activation by EWS-chimeric transcription factors. Replacement of the EWS portion by hsRPB7 in the oncogenic fusion protein restored the transactivating potential of the chimera. Our results suggest that the interaction of the amino terminus of EWS with hsRPB7 contributes to the transactivation function of EWS-Fli1 and, since hsRPB7 has characteristics of a regulatory subunit of RNA polymerase II, may influence promoter selectivity.

  16. A role for the Cajal-body-associated SUMO isopeptidase USPL1 in snRNA transcription mediated by RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Hutten, Saskia; Chachami, Georgia; Winter, Ulrike; Melchior, Frauke; Lamond, Angus I.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cajal bodies are nuclear structures that are involved in biogenesis of snRNPs and snoRNPs, maintenance of telomeres and processing of histone mRNA. Recently, the SUMO isopeptidase USPL1 was identified as a component of Cajal bodies that is essential for cellular growth and Cajal body integrity. However, a cellular function for USPL1 is so far unknown. Here, we use RNAi-mediated knockdown in human cells in combination with biochemical and fluorescence microscopy approaches to investigate the function of USPL1 and its link to Cajal bodies. We demonstrate that levels of snRNAs transcribed by RNA polymerase (RNAP) II are reduced upon knockdown of USPL1 and that downstream processes such as snRNP assembly and pre-mRNA splicing are compromised. Importantly, we find that USPL1 associates directly with U snRNA loci and that it interacts and colocalises with components of the Little Elongation Complex, which is involved in RNAPII-mediated snRNA transcription. Thus, our data indicate that USPL1 plays a key role in RNAPII-mediated snRNA transcription. PMID:24413172

  17. A role for the Cajal-body-associated SUMO isopeptidase USPL1 in snRNA transcription mediated by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Hutten, Saskia; Chachami, Georgia; Winter, Ulrike; Melchior, Frauke; Lamond, Angus I

    2014-03-01

    Cajal bodies are nuclear structures that are involved in biogenesis of snRNPs and snoRNPs, maintenance of telomeres and processing of histone mRNA. Recently, the SUMO isopeptidase USPL1 was identified as a component of Cajal bodies that is essential for cellular growth and Cajal body integrity. However, a cellular function for USPL1 is so far unknown. Here, we use RNAi-mediated knockdown in human cells in combination with biochemical and fluorescence microscopy approaches to investigate the function of USPL1 and its link to Cajal bodies. We demonstrate that levels of snRNAs transcribed by RNA polymerase (RNAP) II are reduced upon knockdown of USPL1 and that downstream processes such as snRNP assembly and pre-mRNA splicing are compromised. Importantly, we find that USPL1 associates directly with U snRNA loci and that it interacts and colocalises with components of the Little Elongation Complex, which is involved in RNAPII-mediated snRNA transcription. Thus, our data indicate that USPL1 plays a key role in RNAPII-mediated snRNA transcription.