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Sample records for nuclear transcription factor-kappab

  1. Nuclear transport and transcription.

    PubMed

    Komeili, A; O'Shea, E K

    2000-06-01

    The compartmentalization of DNA in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells establishes a connection between the nuclear transport machinery and the transcriptional apparatus. General transcription factors, as well as specific transcriptional activators and repressors, such as p53 and NF-AT, need to be imported into the nucleus following their translation. In addition, nuclear transport plays a crucial role in regulating the activity of many transcription factors.

  2. Transcriptional regulation at the yeast nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Steglich, Babett; Sazer, Shelley; Ekwall, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The spatial organization of the genome inside the nucleus affects many nuclear processes, such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and gene transcription. In metazoans, the nuclear periphery harbors mainly repressed genes that associate with the nuclear lamina. This review discusses how peripheral positioning is connected to transcriptional regulation in yeasts. Tethering of reporter genes to the nuclear envelope was found to result in transcriptional silencing. Similarly, repression of the silent mating type loci and subtelomeric genes is influenced by their position close to the nuclear envelope. In contrast, active genes are bound by nucleoporins and inducible genes associate with the nuclear pore complex upon activation. Taken together, these results portray the nuclear envelope as a platform for transcriptional regulation, both through activation at nuclear pores and silencing at the nuclear envelope. PMID:24021962

  3. Nuclear Actin in Development and Transcriptional Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Misu, Shinji; Takebayashi, Marina; Miyamoto, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Actin is a highly abundant protein in eukaryotic cells and dynamically changes its polymerized states with the help of actin-binding proteins. Its critical function as a constituent of cytoskeleton has been well-documented. Growing evidence demonstrates that actin is also present in nuclei, referred to as nuclear actin, and is involved in a number of nuclear processes, including transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. The contribution of nuclear actin to transcriptional regulation can be explained by its direct interaction with transcription machineries and chromatin remodeling factors and by controlling the activities of transcription factors. In both cases, polymerized states of nuclear actin affect the transcriptional outcome. Nuclear actin also plays an important role in activating strongly silenced genes in somatic cells for transcriptional reprogramming. When these nuclear functions of actin are considered, it is plausible to speculate that nuclear actin is also implicated in embryonic development, in which numerous genes need to be activated in a well-coordinated manner. In this review, we especially focus on nuclear actin's roles in transcriptional activation, reprogramming and development, including stem cell differentiation and we discuss how nuclear actin can be an important player in development and cell differentiation.

  4. Nuclear Actin in Development and Transcriptional Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Misu, Shinji; Takebayashi, Marina; Miyamoto, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Actin is a highly abundant protein in eukaryotic cells and dynamically changes its polymerized states with the help of actin-binding proteins. Its critical function as a constituent of cytoskeleton has been well-documented. Growing evidence demonstrates that actin is also present in nuclei, referred to as nuclear actin, and is involved in a number of nuclear processes, including transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. The contribution of nuclear actin to transcriptional regulation can be explained by its direct interaction with transcription machineries and chromatin remodeling factors and by controlling the activities of transcription factors. In both cases, polymerized states of nuclear actin affect the transcriptional outcome. Nuclear actin also plays an important role in activating strongly silenced genes in somatic cells for transcriptional reprogramming. When these nuclear functions of actin are considered, it is plausible to speculate that nuclear actin is also implicated in embryonic development, in which numerous genes need to be activated in a well-coordinated manner. In this review, we especially focus on nuclear actin’s roles in transcriptional activation, reprogramming and development, including stem cell differentiation and we discuss how nuclear actin can be an important player in development and cell differentiation. PMID:28326098

  5. Sumoylation and transcription regulation at nuclear pores.

    PubMed

    Texari, Lorane; Stutz, Françoise

    2015-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that besides promoters, enhancers, and epigenetic modifications, nuclear organization is another parameter contributing to optimal control of gene expression. Although differences between species exist, the influence of gene positioning on expression seems to be a conserved feature from yeast to Drosophila and mammals. The nuclear periphery is one of the nuclear compartments implicated in gene regulation. It consists of the nuclear envelope (NE) and the nuclear pore complexes (NPC), which have distinct roles in the control of gene expression. The NPC has recently been shown to tether proteins involved in the sumoylation pathway. Here, we will focus on the importance of gene positioning and NPC-linked sumoylation/desumoylation in transcription regulation. We will mainly discuss observations made in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model system and highlight potential parallels in metazoan species.

  6. Co-transcriptional nuclear actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2013-01-01

    Actin is a key player for nuclear structure and function regulating both chromosome organization and gene activity. In the cell nucleus actin interacts with many different proteins. Among these proteins several studies have identified classical nuclear factors involved in chromatin structure and function, transcription and RNA processing as well as proteins that are normally involved in controlling the actin cytoskeleton. These discoveries have raised the possibility that nuclear actin performs its multi task activities through tight interactions with different sets of proteins. This high degree of promiscuity in the spectrum of protein-to-protein interactions correlates well with the conformational plasticity of actin and the ability to undergo regulated changes in its polymerization states. Several of the factors involved in controlling head-to-tail actin polymerization have been shown to be in the nucleus where they seem to regulate gene activity. By focusing on the multiple tasks performed by actin and actin-binding proteins, possible models of how actin dynamics controls the different phases of the RNA polymerase II transcription cycle are being identified. PMID:23138849

  7. Nuclear Pore Complexes: A Scaffold Regulating Developmental Transcription?

    PubMed

    Satomura, Atsushi; Brickner, Jason H

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) have a conserved, but poorly understood, role in transcriptional regulation. Recently, in Developmental Cell, Raices et al. argued that tissue-specific nuclear pore proteins (Nups) act as scaffolds that recruit the transcription factor Mef2C to the NPC, promoting transcription of NPC-associated genes during muscle development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Spliceosome twin introns in fungal nuclear transcripts.

    PubMed

    Flipphi, Michel; Fekete, Erzsébet; Ag, Norbert; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Karaffa, Levente

    2013-08-01

    The spliceosome is an RNA/protein complex, responsible for intron excision from eukaryotic nuclear transcripts. In bacteria, mitochondria and plastids, intron excision does not involve the spliceosome, but occurs through mechanisms dependent on intron RNA secondary and tertiary structure. For group II/III chloroplast introns, "twintrons" (introns within introns) have been described. The excision of the external intron, and thus proper RNA maturation, necessitates prior removal of the internal intron, which interrupts crucial sequences of the former. We have here predicted analogous instances of spliceosomal twintrons ("stwintrons") in filamentous fungi. In two specific cases, where the internal intron interrupts the donor of the external intron after the first or after the second nucleotide, respectively, we show that intermediates with the sequence predicted by the "stwintron" hypothesis, are produced in the splicing process. This implies that two successive rounds of RNA scanning by the spliceosome are necessary to produce the mature mRNA. The phylogenetic distributions of the stwintrons we have identified suggest that they derive from "late" events, subsequent to the appearance of the host intron. They may well not be limited to fungal nuclear transcripts, and their generation and eventual disappearance in the evolutionary process are relevant to hypotheses of intron origin and alternative splicing.

  9. Persistent nuclear actin filaments inhibit transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Serebryannyy, Leonid A; Parilla, Megan; Annibale, Paolo; Cruz, Christina M; Laster, Kyle; Gratton, Enrico; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Kosak, Steven T; Gottardi, Cara J; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2016-09-15

    Actin is abundant in the nucleus and it is clear that nuclear actin has important functions. However, mystery surrounds the absence of classical actin filaments in the nucleus. To address this question, we investigated how polymerizing nuclear actin into persistent nuclear actin filaments affected transcription by RNA polymerase II. Nuclear filaments impaired nuclear actin dynamics by polymerizing and sequestering nuclear actin. Polymerizing actin into stable nuclear filaments disrupted the interaction of actin with RNA polymerase II and correlated with impaired RNA polymerase II localization, dynamics, gene recruitment, and reduced global transcription and cell proliferation. Polymerizing and crosslinking nuclear actin in vitro similarly disrupted the actin-RNA-polymerase-II interaction and inhibited transcription. These data rationalize the general absence of stable actin filaments in mammalian somatic nuclei. They also suggest a dynamic pool of nuclear actin is required for the proper localization and activity of RNA polymerase II.

  10. Persistent nuclear actin filaments inhibit transcription by RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Serebryannyy, Leonid A.; Parilla, Megan; Cruz, Christina M.; Laster, Kyle; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Kosak, Steven T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Actin is abundant in the nucleus and it is clear that nuclear actin has important functions. However, mystery surrounds the absence of classical actin filaments in the nucleus. To address this question, we investigated how polymerizing nuclear actin into persistent nuclear actin filaments affected transcription by RNA polymerase II. Nuclear filaments impaired nuclear actin dynamics by polymerizing and sequestering nuclear actin. Polymerizing actin into stable nuclear filaments disrupted the interaction of actin with RNA polymerase II and correlated with impaired RNA polymerase II localization, dynamics, gene recruitment, and reduced global transcription and cell proliferation. Polymerizing and crosslinking nuclear actin in vitro similarly disrupted the actin–RNA-polymerase-II interaction and inhibited transcription. These data rationalize the general absence of stable actin filaments in mammalian somatic nuclei. They also suggest a dynamic pool of nuclear actin is required for the proper localization and activity of RNA polymerase II. PMID:27505898

  11. Integration of light and photoperiodic signaling in transcriptional nuclear foci

    PubMed Central

    Kaiserli, Eirini; Paldi, Katalin; O'Donnell, Liz; Batalov, Olga; Pedmale, Ullas V.; Nusinow, Dmitri A.; Kay, Steve A.; Chory, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Summary Light regulates major plant developmental transitions by orchestrating a series of nuclear events. This study uncovers the molecular function of the natural variant, TZP (Tandem Zinc-finger-Plus3), as a novel signal integrator of light and photoperiodic pathways in transcriptional nuclear foci. We report that TZP acts as a positive regulator of photoperiodic flowering via physical interactions with the red-light receptor phytochrome B (phyB). We demonstrate that TZP localizes in dynamic nuclear domains regulated by light quality and photoperiod. This study shows that phyB is indispensible not only for localizing TZP to transcriptionally active nuclear photobodies, but also for recruiting TZP on the promoter of the floral inducer FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). Our findings signify a unique transcriptional regulatory role to the highly enigmatic plant nuclear photobodies, where TZP directly activates FT gene expression and promotes flowering. PMID:26555051

  12. Transcription termination by nuclear RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Patricia; Manley, James L.

    2009-01-01

    Gene transcription in the cell nucleus is a complex and highly regulated process. Transcription in eukaryotes requires three distinct RNA polymerases, each of which employs its own mechanisms for initiation, elongation, and termination. Termination mechanisms vary considerably, ranging from relatively simple to exceptionally complex. In this review, we describe the present state of knowledge on how each of the three RNA polymerases terminates and how mechanisms are conserved, or vary, from yeast to human. PMID:19487567

  13. Nuclear transcription is essential for specification of mammalian replication origins.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Daniela S

    2006-07-01

    I have demonstrated that nuclear transcription modulates the distribution of replication origins along mammalian chromosomes. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to transcription inhibitors in early G1 phase and replication origin sites in the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene locus were mapped several hours later. DNA within nuclei prepared from control and transcription-deficient G1-phase cells was replicated with similar efficiencies when introduced into Xenopus egg extracts. Replication initiated in the intergenic region within control late-G1 nuclei, but randomly within transcriptionally repressed nuclei. Random initiation was not a consequence of inability to produce an essential protein(s), since initiation was site-specific within cells exposed to the translation inhibitor cycloheximide during the same interval of G1 phase. Furthermore, in vivo inhibition of transcription within late-G1-phase cells reduced the frequency of usage of pre-established DHFR replication origin sites. Transcription rates in the DHFR domain were very low and did not change throughout G1 phase. This implies that, although ongoing nuclear transcription is required, local expression of the genes in the DHFR locus alone is not sufficient to create a site-specific replication initiation pattern. I conclude that epigenetic factors, including general nuclear transcription, play a role in replication origin selection in mammalian nuclei.

  14. The murine Sry gene encodes a nuclear transcriptional activator

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, R.A.; Ostrer, H.

    1994-09-01

    The Sry gene functions as a genetic switch in gonadal ridge initiating testis determination. The murine Sry and human SRY open reading frames (ORF) share a conserved 79 amino acid motif, the HMG-box, that binds DNA. Outside this region the two genes share no additional homology. These studies were undertaken to determine whether the Sry/SRY genes encode nuclear transcriptional regulators. As judged by the accumulation of lacZ-SRY hybrid proteins in the nucleus, both the human and murine SRY ORFs contain a nuclear localization signal. The murine Sry HMG-box selectively binds the sequence NACAAT in vitro when presented with a random pool of oligonucleotides and binds AACAAT with the highest affinity. The murine Sry ORF, when expressed in HeLa cells, activates transcription of a reporter gene containing multiple copies of the AACAAT binding site. Activation was observed for a GAL4-responsive gene when the murine Sry ORF was linked to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. Using this system, the activation function was mapped to a C-terminal glutamine/histidine-rich domain. In addition, LexA-Sry fusion genes activated a LexA-responsive gene in yeast. In contrast, a GAL4-human SRY fusion gene did not cause transcriptional activation. These studies suggest that both the human and mouse SRY ORFs encode nuclear, DNA-binding proteins, and that the mouse Sry ORF can function as a transcriptional activator with separable DNA-binding and activator domains.

  15. Negative transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) by nuclear TFAM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Jin; Kang, Young Cheol; Park, Wook-Ha; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Pak, Youngmi Kim

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • TFAM localizes in nuclei and mitochondria of neuronal cells. • Nuclear TFAM does not bind the Tfam promoter. • Nuclear TFAM reduced the Tfam promoter activity via suppressing NRF-1 activity. • A novel self-negative feedback regulation of Tfam gene expression is explored. • FAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations. - Abstract: The nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is synthesized in cytoplasm and transported into mitochondria. TFAM enhances both transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA. It is unclear, however, whether TFAM plays a role in regulating nuclear gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that TFAM was localized to the nucleus and mitochondria by immunostaining, subcellular fractionation, and TFAM-green fluorescent protein hybrid protein studies. In HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells, human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed human Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondria targeting sequence-deficient hTFAM also repressed Tfam promoter activity to the same degree as hTFAM. It indicated that nuclear hTFAM suppressed Tfam expression without modulating mitochondrial activity. The repression required for nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), but hTFAM did not bind to the NRF-1 binding site of its promoter. TFAM was co-immunoprecipitated with NRF-1. Taken together, we suggest that nuclear TFAM down-regulate its own gene expression as a NRF-1 repressor, showing that TFAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations.

  16. 7SK small nuclear RNA, a multifunctional transcriptional regulatory RNA with gene-specific features.

    PubMed

    Egloff, Sylvain; Studniarek, Cécilia; Kiss, Tamás

    2017-08-18

    The 7SK small nuclear RNA is a multifunctional transcriptional regulatory RNA that controls the nuclear activity of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), specifically targets P-TEFb to the promoter regions of selected protein-coding genes and promotes transcription of RNA polymerase II-specific spliceosomal small nuclear RNA genes.

  17. RNA transcription modulates phase transition-driven nuclear body assembly

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Joel; Weber, Stephanie C.; Vaidya, Nilesh; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear bodies are RNA and protein-rich, membraneless organelles that play important roles in gene regulation. The largest and most well-known nuclear body is the nucleolus, an organelle whose primary function in ribosome biogenesis makes it key for cell growth and size homeostasis. The nucleolus and other nuclear bodies behave like liquid-phase droplets and appear to condense from the nucleoplasm by concentration-dependent phase separation. However, nucleoli actively consume chemical energy, and it is unclear how such nonequilibrium activity might impact classical liquid–liquid phase separation. Here, we combine in vivo and in vitro experiments with theory and simulation to characterize the assembly and disassembly dynamics of nucleoli in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. In addition to classical nucleoli that assemble at the transcriptionally active nucleolar organizing regions, we observe dozens of “extranucleolar droplets” (ENDs) that condense in the nucleoplasm in a transcription-independent manner. We show that growth of nucleoli and ENDs is consistent with a first-order phase transition in which late-stage coarsening dynamics are mediated by Brownian coalescence and, to a lesser degree, Ostwald ripening. By manipulating C. elegans cell size, we change nucleolar component concentration and confirm several key model predictions. Our results show that rRNA transcription and other nonequilibrium biological activity can modulate the effective thermodynamic parameters governing nucleolar and END assembly, but do not appear to fundamentally alter the passive phase separation mechanism. PMID:26351690

  18. A histone chaperone, DEK, transcriptionally coactivates a nuclear receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sawatsubashi, Shun; Murata, Takuya; Lim, Jinseon; Fujiki, Ryoji; Ito, Saya; Suzuki, Eriko; Tanabe, Masahiko; Zhao, Yue; Kimura, Shuhei; Fujiyama, Sally; Ueda, Takashi; Umetsu, Daiki; Ito, Takashi; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Kato, Shigeaki

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin reorganization is essential for transcriptional control by sequence-specific transcription factors. However, the molecular link between transcriptional control and chromatin reconfiguration remains unclear. By colocalization of the nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR) on the ecdysone-induced puff in the salivary gland, Drosophila DEK (dDEK) was genetically identified as a coactivator of EcR in both insect cells and intact flies. Biochemical purification and characterization of the complexes containing fly and human DEKs revealed that DEKs serve as histone chaperones via phosphorylation by forming complexes with casein kinase 2. Consistent with the preferential association of the DEK complex with histones enriched in active epigenetic marks, dDEK facilitated H3.3 assembly during puff formation. In some human myeloid leukemia patients, DEK was fused to CAN by chromosomal translocation. This mutation significantly reduced formation of the DEK complex, which is required for histone chaperone activity. Thus, the present study suggests that at least one histone chaperone can be categorized as a type of transcriptional coactivator for nuclear receptors. PMID:20040570

  19. Nuclear actin-binding proteins as modulators of gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Gettemans, Jan; Van Impe, Katrien; Delanote, Veerle; Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joël; De Corte, Veerle

    2005-10-01

    Dynamic transformations in the organization of the cellular microfilament system are the driving force behind fundamental biological processes such as cellular motility, cytokinesis, wound healing and secretion. Eukaryotic cells express a plethora of actin-binding proteins (ABPs) allowing cells to control the organization of the actin cytoskeleton in a flexible manner. These structural proteins were, not surprisingly, originally described as (major) constituents of the cytoplasm. However, in recent years, there has been a steady flow of reports detailing not only translocation of ABPs into and out of the nucleus but also describing their role in the nuclear compartment. This review focuses on recent developments pertaining to nucleocytoplasmic transport of ABPs, including their mode of translocation and nuclear function. In particular, evidence that structurally and functionally unrelated cytoplasmic ABPs regulate transcription activation by various nuclear (steroid hormone) receptors is steadily accruing. Furthermore, the recent finding that actin is a necessary component of the RNA polymerase II-containing preinitiation complex opens up new opportunities for nuclear ABPs in gene transcription regulation.

  20. Reshaping the transcriptional frontier: epigenetics and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Long, Charles R; Westhusin, Mark E; Golding, Michael C

    2014-02-01

    Somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) experiments have paved the way to the field of cellular reprogramming. The demonstrated ability to clone over 20 different species to date has proven that the technology is robust but very inefficient, and is prone to developmental anomalies. Yet, the offspring from cloned animals exhibit none of the abnormalities of their parents, suggesting the low efficiency and high developmental mortality are epigenetic in origin. The epigenetic barriers to reprogramming somatic cells into a totipotent embryo capable of developing into a viable offspring are significant and varied. Despite their intimate relationship, chromatin structure and transcription are often not uniformly reprogramed after nuclear transfer, and many cloned embryos develop gene expression profiles that are hybrids between the donor cell and an embryonic blastomere. Recent advances in cellular reprogramming suggest that alteration of donor-cell chromatin structure towards that found in an normal embryo is actually the rate-limiting step in successful development of SCNT embryos. Here we review the literature relevant to the transformation of a somatic-cell nucleus into an embryo capable of full-term development. Interestingly, while resetting somatic transcription and associated epigenetic marks are absolutely required for development of SCNT embryos, life does not demand perfection.

  1. Nuclear Receptor PXR, transcriptional circuits and metabolic relevance

    PubMed Central

    Ihunnah, Chibueze A.; Jiang, Mengxi; Xie, Wen

    2011-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) is a ligand activated transcription factor that belongs to the nuclear hormone receptor (NR) superfamily. PXR is highly expressed in the liver and intestine, but low levels of expression have also been found in many other tissues. PXR plays an integral role in xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolism by regulating the expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters, as well as genes implicated in the metabolism of endobiotics. PXR exerts its transcriptional regulation by binding to its DNA response elements as a heterodimer with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) and recruitment of a host of coactivators. The biological and physiological implications of PXR activation are broad, ranging from drug metabolism and drug-drug interactions to the homeostasis of numerous endobiotics, such as glucose, lipids, steroids, bile acids, bilirubin, retinoic acid, and bone minerals. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview on the transcriptional circuits and metabolic relevance controlled by PXR. PMID:21295138

  2. Multiple nuclear localization signals function in the nuclear import of the transcription factor Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Theodore, Melanie; Kawai, Yumiko; Yang, Jianqi; Kleshchenko, Yuliya; Reddy, Sekhar P; Villalta, Fernando; Arinze, Ifeanyi J

    2008-04-04

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mediates the transcriptional response of cells to oxidative stress and is translocated into the nucleus following, or concomitant with, its activation by electrophiles or reactive oxygen species. The mechanism of its translocation into the nucleus is not entirely elucidated. Here we have identified two novel nuclear localization signal (NLS) motifs in murine Nrf2, one located near the N-terminal region (amino acid residues 42-53) and the other (residues 587-593) located near the C-terminal region. Imaging of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Nrf2 revealed that mutation(s) in any of these sequences resulted in decreased nuclear fluorescence intensity compared with the wild-type Nrf2 when Nrf2 activation was induced with the electrophile tert-butylhydroquinone. The mutations also impaired Nrf2-induced transactivation of antioxidant response element-driven reporter gene expression to the same extent as the Nrf2 construct bearing mutation in a previously identified bipartite NLS that maps at residues 494-511. When linked to GFP or to GFP-PEPCK-C each of the novel NLS motifs was sufficient to drive nuclear translocation of the fusion proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that importins alpha5 and beta1 associate with Nrf2, an interaction that was blocked by the nuclear import inhibitor SN50. SN50 also blocked tert-butylhydroquinone-induced nuclear fluorescence of GFP-Nrf2 in cells transfected with wild-type GFP-Nrf2. Overall these results reveal that multiple NLS motifs in Nrf2 function in its nuclear translocation in response to pro-oxidant stimuli and that the importin alpha-beta heterodimer nuclear import receptor system plays a critical role in the import process.

  3. Nuclear actin and actin-binding proteins in the regulation of transcription and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bin; Han, Mei; Bernier, Michel; Wen, Jin-kun

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear actin is involoved in transcription of all three RNA polymerases, chromatin remodeling, and formation of hnRNP complexes as well as recruitment of histone modifier to the active gene. In addition, actin-binding proteins (ABPs) control actin nucleation, bundling, filament capping, fragmentation, and monomer availability in the cytoplasm. In recent years, more and more attention is on the role of actin and ABPs in the modulation of the subcellular localization of transcriptional regulators. This review focuses on the recent developments about transcription and transcriptional regulation by nuclear actin, regulation of muscle-specific gene expression, nuclear receptor and transcription complexes by ABPs. Among them, STARS and ABLIM regulate actin dynamics and SRF-dependent muscle-specific gene expression. Functionally and structurally unrelated cytoplasmic ABPs interact cooperatively with nuclear receptor and regulate its transactivation. Furthermore, ABPs also participate in the formation of transcription complexes. PMID:19459931

  4. The Nuclear Exosome and Adenylation Regulate Post-Transcriptional Tethering of Yeast GAL genes to the Nuclear Periphery

    PubMed Central

    Vodala, Sadanand; Abruzzi, Katharine Compton; Rosbash, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Some activated yeast genes, including GAL genes, associate with and remain tethered to the nuclear periphery even after transcriptional shutoff. To identify factors that affect GAL gene-nuclear periphery association after transcriptional shutoff, we designed a plasmid-based visual screen. Although many factors affected tethering during transcription, only a few specifically affected post-transcriptional tethering. Two of these, Rrp6p and Lrp1p, are nuclear exosome components with known roles in retaining RNA near transcription sites (dot RNA). Further experiments showed that an exosome mutation coupled with transcriptional shutoff leads to a post-transcriptional increase in polyadenylated GAL1 3′ ends, which accompanies a loss of unadenylated (pA-) GAL1 RNA, a loss of post-transcriptional gene-periphery tethering as well as a decrease in dot RNA levels. This suggests that the exosome inhibits adenylation of some GAL1 transcripts, which results in the accumulation of pA-RNA adjacent to the GAL1 gene. We propose that this dot RNA, probably via RNP proteins, is an important component of the physical tether that links the GAL1 gene to the nuclear periphery. PMID:18614049

  5. Accurate and efficient RNA polymerase II transcription with a soluble nuclear fraction derived from Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Kamakaka, R T; Tyree, C M; Kadonaga, J T

    1991-01-01

    We describe the preparation and biochemical properties of a soluble nuclear fraction derived from Drosophila embryos. This extract, which can be easily prepared in 2.5 hr, is capable of accurate and efficient RNA polymerase II transcription of a variety of diverse genes from both Drosophila and mammals. With the relatively strong promoter of the Drosophila Krüppel gene, it is possible to achieve 20% template usage in a single round of transcription, which is considerably higher than the template usage of approximately 3% seen with standard nuclear extracts. Further, although U small nuclear RNA genes are refractory to transcription with HeLa transcription extracts, the soluble nuclear fraction transcribes a U1 small nuclear RNA gene from Drosophila. Moreover, transcriptional activation by sequence-specific activators can be attained in vitro with the soluble nuclear fraction. The overall transcriptional efficiency appears limited to 0.45 transcript per template of DNA per 30 min, but the mechanism of limitation is not known. The soluble nuclear fraction, which was developed to recreate the environment within the nucleus, should be useful when high efficiencies of RNA polymerase II transcription are desired. Images PMID:1992453

  6. The Arabidopsis thaliana Nuclear Factor Y Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hang; Wu, Di; Kong, Fanying; Lin, Ke; Zhang, Haishen; Li, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) is an evolutionarily conserved trimeric transcription factor complex present in nearly all eukaryotes. The heterotrimeric NF-Y complex consists of three subunits, NF-YA, NF-YB, and NF-YC, and binds to the CCAAT box in the promoter regions of its target genes to regulate their expression. Yeast and mammal genomes generally have single genes with multiple splicing isoforms that encode each NF-Y subunit. By contrast, plant genomes generally have multi-gene families encoding each subunit and these genes are differentially expressed in various tissues or stages. Therefore, different subunit combinations can lead to a wide variety of NF-Y complexes in various tissues, stages, and growth conditions, indicating the potentially diverse functions of this complex in plants. Indeed, many recent studies have proved that the NF-Y complex plays multiple essential roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. In this review, we highlight recent progress on NF-Y in Arabidopsis thaliana, including NF-Y protein structure, heterotrimeric complex formation, and the molecular mechanism by which NF-Y regulates downstream target gene expression. We then focus on its biological functions and underlying molecular mechanisms. Finally, possible directions for future research on NF-Y are also presented. PMID:28119722

  7. The Arabidopsis thaliana Nuclear Factor Y Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hang; Wu, Di; Kong, Fanying; Lin, Ke; Zhang, Haishen; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) is an evolutionarily conserved trimeric transcription factor complex present in nearly all eukaryotes. The heterotrimeric NF-Y complex consists of three subunits, NF-YA, NF-YB, and NF-YC, and binds to the CCAAT box in the promoter regions of its target genes to regulate their expression. Yeast and mammal genomes generally have single genes with multiple splicing isoforms that encode each NF-Y subunit. By contrast, plant genomes generally have multi-gene families encoding each subunit and these genes are differentially expressed in various tissues or stages. Therefore, different subunit combinations can lead to a wide variety of NF-Y complexes in various tissues, stages, and growth conditions, indicating the potentially diverse functions of this complex in plants. Indeed, many recent studies have proved that the NF-Y complex plays multiple essential roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. In this review, we highlight recent progress on NF-Y in Arabidopsis thaliana, including NF-Y protein structure, heterotrimeric complex formation, and the molecular mechanism by which NF-Y regulates downstream target gene expression. We then focus on its biological functions and underlying molecular mechanisms. Finally, possible directions for future research on NF-Y are also presented.

  8. Nuclear import of a lipid-modified transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhaber, Birgit; Sammer, Michaela; Lua, Wai Heng; Benetka, Wolfgang; Liew, Lai Ling; Yu, Weimiao; Lee, Hwee Kuan; Koranda, Manfred; Adhikari, Sharmila

    2011-01-01

    Lipid-modified transcription factors (TFs) are biomolecular oddities, since their reduced mobility and membrane attachment appear to contradict nuclear import required for their gene-regulatory function. NFAT5 isoform a (selected from an in silico screen for predicted lipid-modified TFs) is shown to contribute about half of all endogenous expression of human NFAT5 isoforms in the isotonic state. Wild-type NFAT5a protein is, indeed, myristoylated and palmitoylated on its transport to the plasmalemma via the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi. In contrast, its lipid anchor-deficient mutants as well as isoforms NFAT5b/c are diffusely localized in the cytoplasm without preference to vesicular structures. Quantitative/live microscopy shows the plasma membrane-bound fraction of NFAT5a moving into the nucleus upon osmotic stress despite the lipid anchoring. The mobilization mechanism is not based on proteolytic processing of the lipid-anchored N terminus but appears to involve reversible palmitoylation. Thus, NFAT5a is an example of TFs immobilized with lipid anchors at cyotoplasmic membranes in the resting state and that, nevertheless, can translocate into the nucleus upon signal induction. PMID:22071693

  9. Nur77 forms novel nuclear structures upon DNA damage that cause transcriptional arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Leseleuc, Louis de; Denis, Francois . E-mail: francois.denis@iaf.inrs.ca

    2006-05-15

    The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 has been implicated in both growth and apoptosis, and its function and activity can be modulated by cellular redistribution. Green fluorescent protein-tagged Nur77 was used to evaluate the role of Nur77 intracellular redistribution in response to genotoxic stress. Selected DNA damaging agents and transcription inhibition lead to rapid redistribution of Nur77 into nuclear structures distinct from conventional nuclear bodies. These nuclear bodies formed transiently were tightly bound to the nuclear matrix and conditions that lead to their appearance were associated with Nur77 transcriptional inhibition. The formation of Nur77 nuclear bodies might be involved in programmed cell death modulation upon exposure to DNA damaging agents that inhibit transcription by sequestrating this proapoptotic factor in dense nuclear structures.

  10. Endothelial nuclear lamina is not required for glucocorticoid receptor nuclear import but does affect receptor-mediated transcription activation.

    PubMed

    Nayebosadri, Arman; Ji, Julie Y

    2013-08-01

    The lamina serves to maintain the nuclear structure and stiffness while acting as a scaffold for heterochromatin and many transcriptional proteins. Its role in endothelial mechanotransduction, specifically how nuclear mechanics impact gene regulation under shear stress, is not fully understood. In this study, we successfully silenced lamin A/C in bovine aortic endothelial cells to determine its role in both glucocorticoid receptor (GR) nuclear translocation and glucocorticoid response element (GRE) transcriptional activation in response to dexamethasone and shear stress. Nuclear translocation of GR, an anti-inflammatory nuclear receptor, in response to dexamethasone or shear stress (5, 10, and 25 dyn/cm(2)) was observed via time-lapse cell imaging and quantified using a Bayesian image analysis algorithm. Transcriptional activity of the GRE promoter was assessed using a dual-luciferase reporter plasmid. We found no dependence on nuclear lamina for GR translocation from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. However, the absence of lamin A/C led to significantly increased expression of luciferase under dexamethasone and shear stress induction as well as changes in histone protein function. PCR results for NF-κB inhibitor alpha (NF-κBIA) and dual specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1) genes further supported our luciferase data with increased expression in the absence of lamin. Our results suggest that absence of lamin A/C does not hinder passage of GR into the nucleus, but nuclear lamina is important to properly regulate GRE transcription. Nuclear lamina, rather than histone deacetylase (HDAC), is a more significant mediator of shear stress-induced transcriptional activity, while dexamethasone-initiated transcription is more HDAC dependent. Our findings provide more insights into the molecular pathways involved in nuclear mechanotransduction.

  11. Endothelial nuclear lamina is not required for glucocorticoid receptor nuclear import but does affect receptor-mediated transcription activation

    PubMed Central

    Nayebosadri, Arman

    2013-01-01

    The lamina serves to maintain the nuclear structure and stiffness while acting as a scaffold for heterochromatin and many transcriptional proteins. Its role in endothelial mechanotransduction, specifically how nuclear mechanics impact gene regulation under shear stress, is not fully understood. In this study, we successfully silenced lamin A/C in bovine aortic endothelial cells to determine its role in both glucocorticoid receptor (GR) nuclear translocation and glucocorticoid response element (GRE) transcriptional activation in response to dexamethasone and shear stress. Nuclear translocation of GR, an anti-inflammatory nuclear receptor, in response to dexamethasone or shear stress (5, 10, and 25 dyn/cm2) was observed via time-lapse cell imaging and quantified using a Bayesian image analysis algorithm. Transcriptional activity of the GRE promoter was assessed using a dual-luciferase reporter plasmid. We found no dependence on nuclear lamina for GR translocation from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. However, the absence of lamin A/C led to significantly increased expression of luciferase under dexamethasone and shear stress induction as well as changes in histone protein function. PCR results for NF-κB inhibitor alpha (NF-κBIA) and dual specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1) genes further supported our luciferase data with increased expression in the absence of lamin. Our results suggest that absence of lamin A/C does not hinder passage of GR into the nucleus, but nuclear lamina is important to properly regulate GRE transcription. Nuclear lamina, rather than histone deacetylase (HDAC), is a more significant mediator of shear stress-induced transcriptional activity, while dexamethasone-initiated transcription is more HDAC dependent. Our findings provide more insights into the molecular pathways involved in nuclear mechanotransduction. PMID:23703529

  12. The transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B and cancer.

    PubMed

    Escárcega, R O; Fuentes-Alexandro, S; García-Carrasco, M; Gatica, A; Zamora, A

    2007-03-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) in 1986, many studies have been conducted showing the link between the NF-kappaB signalling pathway and control of the inflammatory response. Today it is well known that control of the inflammatory response and apoptosis is closely related to the activation of NF-kappaB. Three NF-kappaB activation pathways exist. The first (the classical pathway) is normally triggered in response to microbial and viral infections or exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines that activate the tripartite IKK complex, leading to phosphorylation-induced IkappaB degradation and depends mainly on IKKbeta activity. The second (the alternative pathway), leads to selective activation of p52:RelB dimers by inducing the processing of the NF-kappaB2/p100 precursor protein, which mostly occurs as a heterodimer with RelB in the cytoplasm. This pathway is triggered by certain members of the tumour necrosis factor cytokine family, through selective activation of IKKalpha homodimers by the upstream kinase NIK. The third pathway is named CK2 and is IKK independent. NF-kappaB acts through the transcription of anti-apoptotic proteins, leading to increased proliferation of cells and tumour growth. It is also known that some drugs act directly in the inhibition of NF-kappaB, thus producing regulation of apoptosis; some examples are aspirin and corticosteroids. Here we review the role of NF-kappaB in the control of apoptosis, its link to oncogenesis, the evidence of several studies that show that NF-kappaB activation is closely related to different cancers, and finally the potential target of NF-kappaB as cancer therapy.

  13. Murine leukemia virus uses TREX components for efficient nuclear export of unspliced viral transcripts.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Toshie; Tonne, Jason M; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2014-03-10

    Previously we reported that nuclear export of both unspliced and spliced murine leukemia virus (MLV) transcripts depends on the nuclear export factor (NXF1) pathway. Although the mRNA export complex TREX, which contains Aly/REF, UAP56, and the THO complex, is involved in the NXF1-mediated nuclear export of cellular mRNAs, its contribution to the export of MLV mRNA transcripts remains poorly understood. Here, we studied the involvement of TREX components in the export of MLV transcripts. Depletion of UAP56, but not Aly/REF, reduced the level of both unspliced and spliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, depletion of THO components, including THOC5 and THOC7, affected only unspliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the RNA immunoprecipitation assay showed that only the unspliced viral transcript interacted with THOC5. These results imply that MLV requires UAP56, THOC5 and THOC7, in addition to NXF1, for nuclear export of viral transcripts. Given that naturally intronless mRNAs, but not bulk mRNAs, require THOC5 for nuclear export, it is plausible that THOC5 plays a key role in the export of unspliced MLV transcripts.

  14. Nuclear proteins and prolactin-induced annexin Icp35 gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y H; Horseman, N D

    1992-03-01

    Annexin Icp35 is the major PRL-stimulated gene in the pigeon cropsac. The regulation of its promoter has been studied by in vitro assays for nuclear protein binding and transcription. Proteins present in nuclear extracts of PRL-stimulated, but not control, pigeon cropsac contained factors which specifically bound to sequences within 73 base pairs upstream of the cp35 transcription start point. The binding of some of the factors was localized to a region between -32 and -73 by gel-shift assays. Cell-free transcription was used to determine whether the cp35 promoter could be influenced by factors present in cropsac nuclear extract. HeLa cell nuclear extract transcribed the cp35 gene at a basal rate. Transcription of the cp35 gene, but not adml, was synergistically enhanced by nuclear extract from PRL-stimulated cropsac. Nuclear extract from unstimulated pigeon cropsacs did not stimulate either cp35 or adml transcription. A template from which sequences upstream of the cp35 gene TATA box were deleted was transcribed by HeLa cell extract but unaffected by any cropsac factors. These results demonstrate that PRL can cause the expression of one or more nuclear factors that bind to 5'-flanking DNA of cp35 and activate the gene's transcription.

  15. Nuclear gadgets in mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription.

    PubMed

    Clayton, D A

    1991-03-01

    In mammalian mitochondrial DNA, activation of the light-strand promoter mediates both priming of leading-strand replication and initiation of light-strand transcription. Accurate and efficient transcription requires at least two proteins: mitochondrial RNA polymerase and a separable transcription factor that can function across species boundaries. Subsequently, primer RNAs are cleaved by a site-specific ribonucleoprotein endoribonuclease that recognizes short, highly conserved sequence elements in the RNA substrate.

  16. Nuclear Matrix protein SMAR1 represses HIV-1 LTR mediated transcription through chromatin remodeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenath, Kadreppa; Pavithra, Lakshminarasimhan; Singh, Sandeep; Sinha, Surajit; Dash, Prasanta K.; Siddappa, Nagadenahalli B.; Ranga, Udaykumar; Mitra, Debashis; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2010-04-25

    Nuclear Matrix and MARs have been implicated in the transcriptional regulation of host as well as viral genes but their precise role in HIV-1 transcription remains unclear. Here, we show that > 98% of HIV sequences contain consensus MAR element in their promoter. We show that SMAR1 binds to the LTR MAR and reinforces transcriptional silencing by tethering the LTR MAR to nuclear matrix. SMAR1 associated HDAC1-mSin3 corepressor complex is dislodged from the LTR upon cellular activation by PMA/TNFalpha leading to an increase in the acetylation and a reduction in the trimethylation of histones, associated with the recruitment of RNA Polymerase II on the LTR. Overexpression of SMAR1 lead to reduction in LTR mediated transcription, both in a Tat dependent and independent manner, resulting in a decreased virion production. These results demonstrate the role of SMAR1 in regulating viral transcription by alternative compartmentalization of LTR between the nuclear matrix and chromatin.

  17. A binding site for the transcription factor Grainyhead/Nuclear transcription factor-1 contributes to regulation of the Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Y; Yamagishi, M; Nishimoto, Y; Taguchi, O; Matsukage, A; Yamaguchi, M

    1999-12-03

    The Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter contains multiple transcriptional regulatory elements, including upstream regulatory element (URE), DNA replication-related element, E2F recognition sites, and three common regulatory factor for DNA replication and DNA replication-related element-binding factor genes recognition sites. In nuclear extracts of Drosophila embryos, we detected a protein factor, the URE-binding factor (UREF), that recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-AAACCAGTTGGCA located within URE. Analyses in Drosophila Kc cells and transgenic flies revealed that the UREF-binding site plays an important role in promoter activity both in cultured cells and in living flies. A yeast one-hybrid screen using URE as a bait allowed isolation of a cDNA encoding a transcription factor, Grainyhead/nuclear transcription factor-1 (GRH/NTF-1). The nucleotide sequence required for binding to GRH was indistinguishable from that for UREF detected in embryo nuclear extracts. Furthermore, a specific antibody to GRH reacted with UREF in embryo nuclear extracts. From these results we conclude that GRH is identical to UREF. Although GRH has been thought to be involved in regulation of differentiation-related genes, this study demonstrates, for the first time, involvement of a GRH-binding site in regulation of the DNA replication-related proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene.

  18. Nuclear stability and transcriptional directionality separate functionally distinct RNA species.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Robin; Refsing Andersen, Peter; Valen, Eivind; Core, Leighton J; Bornholdt, Jette; Boyd, Mette; Heick Jensen, Torben; Sandelin, Albin

    2014-11-12

    Mammalian genomes are pervasively transcribed, yielding a complex transcriptome with high variability in composition and cellular abundance. Although recent efforts have identified thousands of new long non-coding (lnc) RNAs and demonstrated a complex transcriptional repertoire produced by protein-coding (pc) genes, limited progress has been made in distinguishing functional RNA from spurious transcription events. This is partly due to present RNA classification, which is typically based on technical rather than biochemical criteria. Here we devise a strategy to systematically categorize human RNAs by their sensitivity to the ribonucleolytic RNA exosome complex and by the nature of their transcription initiation. These measures are surprisingly effective at correctly classifying annotated transcripts, including lncRNAs of known function. The approach also identifies uncharacterized stable lncRNAs, hidden among a vast majority of unstable transcripts. The predictive power of the approach promises to streamline the functional analysis of known and novel RNAs.

  19. Nuclear actin activates human transcription factor genes including the OCT4 gene.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; Tokunaga, Makio; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    RNA microarray analyses revealed that nuclear actin activated many human transcription factor genes including OCT4, which is required for gene reprogramming. Oct4 is known to be activated by nuclear actin in Xenopus oocytes. Our findings imply that this process of OCT4 activation is conserved in vertebrates and among cell types and could be used for gene reprogramming of human cells.

  20. Bmal1 is a direct transcriptional target of the orphan nuclear receptor, NR2F1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Orphan nuclear receptor NR2F1 (also known as COUP-TFI, Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter Transcription Factor I) is a highly conserved member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. NR2F1 plays a critical role during embryonic development, particularly in the central and peripheral nervous systems a...

  1. Murine leukemia virus uses NXF1 for nuclear export of spliced and unspliced viral transcripts.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Toshie; Davila, Jaime I; Malcolm, Jessica A; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A; Tonne, Jason M; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2014-04-01

    Intron-containing mRNAs are subject to restricted nuclear export in higher eukaryotes. Retroviral replication requires the nucleocytoplasmic transport of both spliced and unspliced RNA transcripts, and RNA export mechanisms of gammaretroviruses are poorly characterized. Here, we report the involvement of the nuclear export receptor NXF1/TAP in the nuclear export of gammaretroviral RNA transcripts. We identified a conserved cis-acting element in the pol gene of gammaretroviruses, including murine leukemia virus (MLV) and xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMRV), named the CAE (cytoplasmic accumulation element). The CAE enhanced the cytoplasmic accumulation of viral RNA transcripts and the expression of viral proteins without significantly affecting the stability, splicing, or translation efficiency of the transcripts. Insertion of the CAE sequence also facilitated Rev-independent HIV Gag expression. We found that the CAE sequence interacted with NXF1, whereas disruption of NXF1 ablated CAE function. Thus, the CAE sequence mediates the cytoplasmic accumulation of gammaretroviral transcripts in an NXF1-dependent manner. Disruption of NXF1 expression impaired cytoplasmic accumulations of both spliced and unspliced RNA transcripts of XMRV and MLV, resulting in their nuclear retention or degradation. Thus, our results demonstrate that gammaretroviruses use NXF1 for the cytoplasmic accumulation of both spliced and nonspliced viral RNA transcripts. Murine leukemia virus (MLV) has been studied as one of the classic models of retrovirology. Although unspliced host messenger RNAs are rarely exported from the nucleus, MLV actively exports unspliced viral RNAs to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive studies, how MLV achieves this difficult task has remained a mystery. Here, we have studied the RNA export mechanism of MLV and found that (i) the genome contains a sequence which supports the efficient nuclear export of viral RNAs, (ii) the cellular factor NXF1 is involved in the

  2. Transcription factories and nuclear organization of the genome.

    PubMed

    Eskiw, C H; Cope, N F; Clay, I; Schoenfelder, S; Nagano, T; Fraser, P

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic compartmental organization of the transcriptional machinery in mammalian nuclei places particular constraints on the spatial organization of the genome. The clustering of active RNA polymerase I transcription units from several chromosomes at nucleoli is probably the best-characterized and universally accepted example. RNA polymerase II localization in mammalian nuclei occurs in distinct concentrated foci that are several-fold fewer in number compared to the number of active genes and transcription units. Individual transcribed genes cluster at these shared transcription factories in a nonrandom manner, preferentially associating with heterologous, coregulated genes. We suggest that the three-dimensional (3D) conformation and relative arrangement of chromosomes in the nucleus has a major role in delivering tissue-specific gene-expression programs.

  3. Protein kinase A regulates RNA polymerase III transcription through the nuclear localization of Maf1

    PubMed Central

    Moir, Robyn D.; Lee, JaeHoon; Haeusler, Rebecca A.; Desai, Neelam; Engelke, David R.; Willis, Ian M.

    2006-01-01

    Maf1 is an essential and specific mediator of transcriptional repression in the RNA polymerase (pol) III system. Maf1-dependent repression occurs in response to a wide range of conditions, suggesting that the protein itself is targeted by the major nutritional and stress-signaling pathways. We show that Maf1 is a substrate for cAMP-dependent PKA in vitro and is differentially phosphorylated on PKA sites in vivo under normal versus repressing conditions. PKA activity negatively regulates Maf1 function because strains with unregulated high PKA activity block repression of pol III transcription in vivo, and strains lacking all PKA activity are hyperrepressible. Nuclear accumulation of Maf1 is required for transcriptional repression and is regulated by two nuclear localization sequences in the protein. An analysis of PKA phosphosite mutants shows that the localization of Maf1 is affected via the N-terminal nuclear localization sequence. In particular, mutations that prevent phosphorylation at PKA consensus sites promote nuclear accumulation of Maf1 without inducing repression. These results indicate that negative regulation of Maf1 by PKA is achieved by inhibiting its nuclear import and suggest that a PKA-independent activation step is required for nuclear Maf1 to function in the repression of pol III transcription. Finally, we report a previously undescribed phenotype for Maf1 in tRNA gene-mediated silencing of nearby RNA pol II transcription. PMID:17005718

  4. Telomere-surrounding regions are transcription-permissive 3D nuclear compartments in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Quina, Ana Sofia; Parreira, Leonor . E-mail: lparreir@igc.gulbenkian.pt

    2005-07-01

    Positioning of genes relative to nuclear heterochromatic compartments is thought to help regulate their transcriptional activity. Given that human subtelomeric regions are rich in highly expressed genes, we asked whether human telomeres are related to transcription-permissive nuclear compartments. To address this question, we investigated in the nuclei of normal human lymphocytes the spatial relations of two constitutively expressed genes (ACTB and RARA) and three nuclear transcripts (ACTB, IL2RA and TCRB) to telomeres and centromeres, as a function of gene activity and transcription levels. We observed that genes and gene transcripts locate close to telomere clusters and away from chromocenters upon activation of transcription. These findings, together with the observation that SC35 domains, which are enriched in pre-mRNA processing factors, are in close proximity to telomeres, indicate that telomere-neighboring regions are permissive to gene expression in human cells. Therefore, the associations of telomeres observed in the interphase nucleus might contribute, as opposed to chromocenters, for the establishment of transcription-permissive 3D nuclear compartments.

  5. The WSTF-SNF2h chromatin remodeling complex interacts with several nuclear proteins in transcription.

    PubMed

    Cavellán, Erica; Asp, Patrik; Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Farrants, Ann-Kristin Ostlund

    2006-06-16

    The WSTF (Williams syndrome transcription factor) protein is involved in vitamin D-mediated transcription and replication as a component of two distinct ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes, WINAC and WICH, respectively. We show here that the WICH complex (WSTF-SNF2h) interacts with several nuclear proteins as follows: Sf3b155/SAP155, RNA helicase II/Gualpha, Myb-binding protein 1a, CSB, the proto-oncogene Dek, and nuclear myosin 1 in a large 3-MDa assembly, B-WICH, during active transcription. B-WICH also contains RNAs, 45 S rRNA, 5 S rRNA, 7SL RNA, and traces of the U2 small nuclear RNA. The core proteins, WSTF, SNF2h, and nuclear myosin 1, are associated with the RNA polymerase III genes 5 S rRNA genes and 7SL, and post-transcriptional silencing of WSTF reduces the levels of these transcripts. Our results show that a WSTF-SNF2h assembly is involved in RNA polymerase III transcription, and we suggest that WSTF-SNF2h-NM1 forms a platform in transcription while providing chromatin remodeling.

  6. Nuclear receptors and transcription factors in the development of fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Vluggens, Aurore; Reddy, Janardan K

    2012-12-01

    Liver regulates certain key aspects of lipid metabolism including de novo lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and lipoprotein uptake and secretion. Disturbances in these hepatic functions can contribute to the development of fatty liver disease. An understanding of the regulatory mechanisms influencing hepatic lipid homeostasis and systemic energy balance is therefore of paramount importance in gaining insights that might be useful in the management of fatty liver disease. In this regard, emerging evidence indicates that certain members of the nuclear receptor superfamily and some key transcription coactivators function as intracellular sensors to orchestrate hepatic lipid metabolism. Dysregulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcriptional signaling and perturbations in the levels of their cognate endogenous ligands play a prominent role in the development of fatty liver disease. The potential of nuclear receptors, transcription coactivators as well as enzymes that participate in the synthesis and degradation of endogenous nuclear receptor ligands, as effective therapeutic targets for fatty liver disease needs evaluation.

  7. Rho, nuclear actin, and actin-binding proteins in the regulation of transcription and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rajakylä, Eeva Kaisa; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is one of the main targets of Rho GTPases, which act as molecular switches on many signaling pathways. During the past decade, actin has emerged as an important regulator of gene expression. Nuclear actin plays a key role in transcription, chromatin remodeling, and pre-mRNA processing. In addition, the “status” of the actin cytoskeleton is used as a signaling intermediate by at least the MKL1-SRF and Hippo-pathways, which culminate in the transcriptional regulation of cytoskeletal and growth-promoting genes, respectively. Rho GTPases may therefore regulate gene expression by controlling either cytoplasmic or nuclear actin dynamics. Although the regulation of nuclear actin polymerization is still poorly understood, many actin-binding proteins, which are downstream effectors of Rho, are found in the nuclear compartment. In this review, we discuss the possible mechanisms and key proteins that may mediate the transcriptional regulation by Rho GTPases through actin. PMID:24603113

  8. Transcriptional coordination of hepatic autophagy by nutrient-sensing nuclear receptor PPARα and FXR

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are in general ligand-dependent transcription factors that control a variety of mammalian physiologies including development, differentiation, proliferation, and homeostasis. Recent studies have found that two nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and farnesoid x receptor, responding to fasting or feeding state, respectively are able to regulate autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involved in lysosomal degradation. In this review, we discuss the role of these nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors in an aspect of transcriptional regulation of autophagy, and how these nuclear receptor-driven transcriptional programs integrate lipophagy, a lipid autophagy with fatty acid oxidation to coordinate hepatic lipid metabolism in the fasted state of the liver. PMID:28164071

  9. Transcriptional coordination of hepatic autophagy by nutrient-sensing nuclear receptor PPARα and FXR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Man

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear receptors are in general ligand-dependent transcription factors that control a variety of mammalian physiologies including development, differentiation, proliferation, and homeostasis. Recent studies have found that two nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and farnesoid x receptor, responding to fasting or feeding state, respectively are able to regulate autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involved in lysosomal degradation. In this review, we discuss the role of these nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors in an aspect of transcriptional regulation of autophagy, and how these nuclear receptor-driven transcriptional programs integrate lipophagy, a lipid autophagy with fatty acid oxidation to coordinate hepatic lipid metabolism in the fasted state of the liver.

  10. GATA transcription factors associate with a novel class of nuclear bodies in erythroblasts and megakaryocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Elefanty, A G; Antoniou, M; Custodio, N; Carmo-Fonseca, M; Grosveld, F G

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear distribution of GATA transcription factors in murine haemopoietic cells was examined by indirect immunofluorescence. Specific bright foci of GATA-1 fluorescence were observed in erythroleukaemia cells and primary murine erythroblasts and megakaryocytes, in addition to diffuse nucleoplasmic localization. These foci, which were preferentially found adjacent to nucleoli or at the nuclear periphery, did not represent sites of active transcription or binding of GATA-1 to consensus sites in the beta-globin loci. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated the presence of intensely labelled structures likely to represent the GATA-1 foci seen by immunofluorescence. The GATA-1 nuclear bodies differed from previously described nuclear structures and there was no co-localization with nuclear antigens involved in RNA processing or other ubiquitous (Spl, c-Jun and TBP) or haemopoietic (NF-E2) transcription factors. Interestingly, GATA-2 and GATA-3 proteins also localized to the same nuclear bodies in cell lines co-expressing GATA-1 and -2 or GATA-1 and -3 gene products. This pattern of distribution is, thus far, unique to the GATA transcription factors and suggests a protein-protein interaction with other components of the nuclear bodies via the GATA zinc finger domain. Images PMID:8617207

  11. Piwi interacts with chromatin at nuclear pores and promiscuously binds nuclear transcripts in Drosophila ovarian somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ilyin, Artem A.; Doronin, Semen A.; Olenkina, Oxana M.; Mikhaleva, Elena A.; Yakushev, Evgeny Y.; Abramov, Yuri A.; Belyakin, Stepan N.; Ivankin, Anton V.; Pindyurin, Alexey V.; Gvozdev, Vladimir A.; Klenov, Mikhail S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Piwi in a complex with Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) triggers transcriptional silencing of transposable elements (TEs) in Drosophila ovaries, thus ensuring genome stability. To do this, Piwi must scan the nascent transcripts of genes and TEs for complementarity to piRNAs. The mechanism of this scanning is currently unknown. Here we report the DamID-seq mapping of multiple Piwi-interacting chromosomal domains in somatic cells of Drosophila ovaries. These domains significantly overlap with genomic regions tethered to Nuclear Pore Complexes (NPCs). Accordingly, Piwi was coimmunoprecipitated with the component of NPCs Elys and with the Xmas-2 subunit of RNA transcription and export complex, known to interact with NPCs. However, only a small Piwi fraction has transient access to DNA at nuclear pores. Importantly, although 36% of the protein-coding genes overlap with Piwi-interacting domains and RNA-immunoprecipitation results demonstrate promiscuous Piwi binding to numerous genic and TE nuclear transcripts, according to available data Piwi does not silence these genes, likely due to the absence of perfect base-pairing between piRNAs and their transcripts. PMID:28472469

  12. In Vivo Imaging of Nuclear Receptor Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Dart, D Alwyn; Bevan, Charlotte L

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors drive key processes during development, reproduction, metabolism, and disease. In order to understand and analyze, as well as manipulate, their actions it is imperative that we are able to study them in whole animals and in a spatiotemporal manner. The increasing repertoire of transgenic animals, expressing reporter genes driven by a specific nuclear receptor, enables us to do this. Use of luciferase reporter genes is the method of choice of many researchers as it is well tolerated, relatively easy to use, and robust. Further, luciferase lends itself to the process as it can penetrate tissue and can be manipulated to degrade rapidly thus allowing a dynamic response. However, limited resolution, lack of quantitation, and the largely two-dimensional images acquired make it desirable to support results using ex vivo imaging and enzymatic and/or immunohistochemical analysis of dissected tissue. As well as enabling the visualization of nuclear receptor signaling in wild-type animals, crossing these mouse models with models of disease will provide invaluable information on how such signaling is dysregulated during disease progression, and how we may manipulate nuclear receptor signaling in therapy. The use of in vivo imaging therefore provides the power to determine where and when in development, aging, and disease nuclear receptors are active and how ligands or receptor modulators affect this.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of human small nuclear RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Jawdekar, Gauri W.; Henry, R. William

    2009-01-01

    The products of human snRNA genes have been frequently described as performing housekeeping functions and their synthesis refractory to regulation. However, recent studies have emphasized that snRNA and other related non-coding RNA molecules control multiple facets of the central dogma, and their regulated expression is critical to cellular homeostasis during normal growth and in response to stress. Human snRNA genes contain compact and yet powerful promoters that are recognized by increasingly well-characterized transcription factors, thus providing a premier model system to study gene regulation. This review summarizes many recent advances deciphering the mechanism by which the transcription of human snRNA and related genes are regulated. PMID:18442490

  14. Replication but not transcription of simian virus 40 DNA is dependent on nuclear domain 10.

    PubMed

    Tang, Q; Bell, P; Tegtmeyer, P; Maul, G G

    2000-10-01

    DNA viruses from several families including herpes simplex virus type 1, adenovirus type 5, and simian virus 40 (SV40), start their transcription and replication adjacent to a specific nuclear domain, ND10. We asked whether a specific viral DNA sequence determines the location of these synthetic activities at such restricted nuclear sites. Partial and overlapping SV40 sequences were introduced into a beta-galactosidase expression vector, and the beta-galactosidase transcripts were localized by in situ hybridization. Transcripts derived from control plasmids were found throughout the nucleus and at highly concentrated sites but not at ND10. SV40 genomic segments supported ND10-associated transcription only when the origin and the coding sequence for the large T antigen were present. When the large T-antigen coding sequence was eliminated but the T antigen was constitutively expressed in COS-7 cells, the viral origin was sufficient to localize transcription and replication to ND10. Deletion analysis showed that only the large T-antigen binding site II (the core origin) was required but the T antigen was needed for detectable transcription at ND10. Large T antigen expressed from plasmids without the viral core origin did not bind or localize to ND10. Blocking of DNA replication prevented the accumulation of transcripts at ND10, indicating that only sites with replicating templates accumulated transcripts. Transcription at ND10 did not enhance total protein synthesis of plasmid transcripts. These findings suggest that viral transcription at ND10 may only be a consequence of viral genomes directed to ND10 for replication. Although plasmid transcription can take place anywhere in the nucleus, T-antigen-directed replication is apparently restricted to ND10.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of human Paraoxonase 1 by nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Ruiz, N; Murillo-González, F E; Rojas-García, A E; Mackness, Mike; Bernal-Hernández, Y Y; Barrón-Vivanco, B S; González-Arias, C A; Medina-Díaz, I M

    2017-02-20

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a calcium-dependent lactonase synthesized primarily in the liver and secreted into the plasma, where it is associates with high density lipoproteins (HDL). PON1 acts as antioxidant preventing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, a process considered critical in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Additionally, PON1 hydrolyzes and detoxifies some toxic metabolites of organophosphorus compounds (OPs). Thus, PON1 activity and expression levels are important for determining susceptibility to OPs intoxication and risk of developing diseases related to inflammation and oxidative stress. Increasing evidence has demonstrated the modulation of PON1 expression by many factors is due to interaction with nuclear receptors (NRs). Here, we briefly review the studies in this area and discuss the role of nuclear receptors in the regulation of PON1 expression, as well as how understanding these mechanisms may allow us to manipulate PON1 levels to improve drug efficacy and treat disease.

  16. Allosteric controls of nuclear receptor function in the regulation of transcription.

    PubMed

    Billas, Isabelle; Moras, Dino

    2013-07-10

    Nuclear receptors control a large number of physiological events through the regulation of gene transcription. Their activation function involves and is controlled by ligands and multiple cofactors (repressors, activators and bridging proteins). Further post-translational modifications resulting from the crosstalk between different signaling pathways provide additional regulations. The numerous players involved allow the sophisticated fine-tuning of transcriptional regulation. The present review describes how allosteric mechanisms are used in the control of the sequential and ordered binding of nuclear receptors and the various protein effectors to target DNA.

  17. Transcriptional competence of the integrated HIV-1 provirus at the nuclear periphery

    PubMed Central

    Dieudonné, Mariacarolina; Maiuri, Paolo; Biancotto, Chiara; Knezevich, Anna; Kula, Anna; Lusic, Marina; Marcello, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Spatial distribution of genes within the nucleus contributes to transcriptional control, allowing optimal gene expression as well as constitutive or regulated gene repression. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrates into host chromatin to transcribe and replicate its genome. Lymphocytes harbouring a quiescent but inducible provirus are a challenge to viral eradication in infected patients undergoing antiviral therapy. Therefore, our understanding of the contribution of sub-nuclear positioning to viral transcription may also have far-reaching implications in the pathology of the infection. To gain an insight into the conformation of chromatin at the site of HIV-1 integration, we investigated lymphocytes carrying a single latent provirus. In the silenced state, the provirus was consistently found at the nuclear periphery, associated in trans with a pericentromeric region of chromosome 12 in a significant number of quiescent cells. After induction of the transcription, this association was lost, although the location of the transcribing provirus remained peripheral. These results, extended to several other cell clones, unveil a novel mechanism of transcriptional silencing involved in HIV-1 post-transcriptional latency and reinforce the notion that gene transcription may also occur at the nuclear periphery. PMID:19478796

  18. A Novel Nuclear Import Pathway for the Transcription Factor TFIIS

    PubMed Central

    Albertini, Markus; Pemberton, Lucy F.; Rosenblum, Jonathan S.; Blobel, Günter

    1998-01-01

    We have identified a novel pathway for protein import into the nucleus. We have shown that the previously identified but uncharacterized yeast protein Nmd5p functions as a karyopherin. It was therefore designated Kap119p (karyopherin with Mr of 119 kD). We localized Kap119p to both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We identified the transcription elongation factor TFIIS as its major cognate import substrate. The cytoplasmic Kap119p exists as an approximately stoichiometric complex with TFIIS. RanGTP, not RanGDP, dissociated the isolated Kap119p/TFIIS complex and bound to Kap119p. Kap119p also bound directly to a number of peptide repeat containing nucleoporins in overlay assays. In wild-type cells, TFIIS was primarily localized to the nucleus. In a strain where KAP119 has been deleted, TFIIS was mislocalized to the cytoplasm indicating that TFIIS is imported into the nucleus by Kap119p. The transport of various substrates that use other karyopherin-mediated import or export pathways was not affected in a kap119Δ strain. Hence Kap119p is a novel karyopherin that is responsible for the import of the transcription elongation factor TFIIS. PMID:9852143

  19. Nuclear extracts lacking DNA-dependent protein kinase are deficient in multiple round transcription.

    PubMed

    Woodard, R L; Anderson, M G; Dynan, W S

    1999-01-01

    We have compared levels of in vitro transcription in nuclear extracts from DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)-deficient and DNA-PK-containing Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. DNA-PK-deficient cell lines are radiosensitive mutants lacking either the catalytic subunit or the 80-kDa subunit of the Ku protein regulatory component. Extracts from DNA-PK-deficient cell lines had a 2-7-fold decrease in the level of in vitro transcription when compared with matched controls. This decrease was observed with several promoters. Transcription could be restored to either of the deficient extracts by addition of small amounts of extract from the DNA-PK-containing cell lines. Transcription was not restored by addition of purified DNA-PK catalytic subunit, Ku protein, or individually purified general transcription factors. We conclude that extracts from DNA-PK-deficient cells lack a positively acting regulatory factor or a complex of factors not readily reconstituted with individual proteins. We have also investigated the mechanistic defect in the deficient extracts and have found that the observed differences in transcription levels between Ku-positive and Ku-negative cell lines can be attributed solely to a greater ability of the Ku-positive nuclear extracts to carry out secondary initiation events subsequent to the first round of transcription.

  20. Quantification of nascent transcription by bromouridine immunocapture nuclear run-on RT-qPCR.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Thomas C; Hart, Jonathan R; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Weinberg, Marc S; Vogt, Peter K; Morris, Kevin V

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear run-on (NRO) is a method that measures transcriptional activity via the quantification of biochemically labeled nascent RNA molecules derived from nuclear isolates. Widespread use of this technique has been limited because of its technical difficulty relative to steady-state total mRNA analyses. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the quantification of transcriptional activity in human cell cultures. Nuclei are first isolated and NRO transcription is performed in the presence of bromouridine. Labeled nascent transcripts are purified by immunoprecipitation, and transcript levels are determined by reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Data are then analyzed using standard techniques described elsewhere. This method is rapid (the protocol can be completed in 2 d) and cost-effective, exhibits negligible detection of background noise from unlabeled transcripts, requires no radioactive materials and can be performed from as few as 500,000 nuclei. It also takes advantage of the high sensitivity, specificity and dynamic range of RT-qPCR.

  1. Transcription and nuclear transport of CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats in yeast.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Emmanuelle; Dujon, Bernard; Richard, Guy-Franck

    2002-08-15

    Trinucleotide repeats are involved in several neurological disorders in humans. DNA sequences containing CAG/CTG repeats are prone to slippage during replication and double-strand break repair. The effects of trinucleotide repeats on transcription and on nuclear export were analyzed in vivo in yeast. Transcription of a CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeat in the 3'-untranslated region of a URA3 reporter gene leads to transcription of messenger RNAs several kilobases longer than the expected size. These long mRNAs form more readily when CAG rather than CTG repeats are transcribed. CAG- or CUG-containing transcripts show a non-homogeneous cellular localization. We propose that long mRNAs result from transcription slippage, and discuss the possible implications for human diseases.

  2. Murine Leukemia Virus Uses NXF1 for Nuclear Export of Spliced and Unspliced Viral Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Toshie; Davila, Jaime I.; Malcolm, Jessica A.; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A.; Tonne, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intron-containing mRNAs are subject to restricted nuclear export in higher eukaryotes. Retroviral replication requires the nucleocytoplasmic transport of both spliced and unspliced RNA transcripts, and RNA export mechanisms of gammaretroviruses are poorly characterized. Here, we report the involvement of the nuclear export receptor NXF1/TAP in the nuclear export of gammaretroviral RNA transcripts. We identified a conserved cis-acting element in the pol gene of gammaretroviruses, including murine leukemia virus (MLV) and xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMRV), named the CAE (cytoplasmic accumulation element). The CAE enhanced the cytoplasmic accumulation of viral RNA transcripts and the expression of viral proteins without significantly affecting the stability, splicing, or translation efficiency of the transcripts. Insertion of the CAE sequence also facilitated Rev-independent HIV Gag expression. We found that the CAE sequence interacted with NXF1, whereas disruption of NXF1 ablated CAE function. Thus, the CAE sequence mediates the cytoplasmic accumulation of gammaretroviral transcripts in an NXF1-dependent manner. Disruption of NXF1 expression impaired cytoplasmic accumulations of both spliced and unspliced RNA transcripts of XMRV and MLV, resulting in their nuclear retention or degradation. Thus, our results demonstrate that gammaretroviruses use NXF1 for the cytoplasmic accumulation of both spliced and nonspliced viral RNA transcripts. IMPORTANCE Murine leukemia virus (MLV) has been studied as one of the classic models of retrovirology. Although unspliced host messenger RNAs are rarely exported from the nucleus, MLV actively exports unspliced viral RNAs to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive studies, how MLV achieves this difficult task has remained a mystery. Here, we have studied the RNA export mechanism of MLV and found that (i) the genome contains a sequence which supports the efficient nuclear export of viral RNAs, (ii) the cellular factor NXF1 is

  3. Inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export of transcription factors by leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Akiko; Sarma, Nayan J; Abdul-Nabi, Anmaar M; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2010-05-21

    NUP98 is a nucleoporin that plays complex roles in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules. Rearrangements of the NUP98 gene in human leukemia result in the expression of numerous fusion oncoproteins whose effect on nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins on CRM1-mediated nuclear export. NUP98-HOXA9, a prototypic NUP98 fusion, inhibited the nuclear export of two known CRM1 substrates: mutated cytoplasmic nucleophosmin and HIV-1 Rev. In vitro binding assays revealed that NUP98-HOXA9 binds CRM1 through the FG repeat motif in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner similar to but stronger than the interaction between CRM1 and its export substrates. Two NUP98 fusions, NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10, whose fusion partners are structurally and functionally unrelated, interacted with endogenous CRM1 in myeloid cells as shown by co-immunoprecipitation. These leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins interacted with CRM1, Ran, and the nucleoporin NUP214 in a manner fundamentally different from that of wild-type NUP98. NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10 formed characteristic aggregates within the nuclei of a myeloid cell line and primary human CD34+ cells and caused aberrant localization of CRM1 to these aggregates. These NUP98 fusions caused nuclear accumulation of two transcription factors, NFAT and NFkappaB, that are regulated by CRM1-mediated export. The nuclear entrapment of NFAT and NFkappaB correlated with enhanced transcription from promoters responsive to these transcription factors. Taken together, the results suggest a new mechanism by which NUP98 fusions dysregulate transcription and cause leukemia, namely, inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export with aberrant nuclear retention of transcriptional regulators.

  4. Computational Characterization of Modes of Transcriptional Regulation of Nuclear Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Yogita; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Bakke, Marit; Lenhard, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Background Nuclear receptors are a large structural class of transcription factors that act with their co-regulators and repressors to maintain a variety of biological and physiological processes such as metabolism, development and reproduction. They are activated through the binding of small ligands, which can be replaced by drug molecules, making nuclear receptors promising drug targets. Transcriptional regulation of the genes that encode them is central to gaining a deeper understanding of the diversity of their biochemical and biophysical roles and their role in disease and therapy. Even though they share evolutionary history, nuclear receptor genes have fundamentally different expression patterns, ranging from ubiquitously expressed to tissue-specific and spatiotemporally complex. However, current understanding of regulation in nuclear receptor gene family is still nascent. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigate the relationship between long-range regulation of nuclear receptor family and their known functionality. Towards this goal, we identify the nuclear receptor genes that are potential targets based on counts of highly conserved non-coding elements. We validate our results using publicly available expression (RNA-seq) and histone modification (ChIP-seq) data from the ENCODE project. We find that nuclear receptor genes involved in developmental roles show strong evidence of long-range mechanism of transcription regulation with distinct cis-regulatory content they feature clusters of highly conserved non-coding elements distributed in regions spanning several Megabases, long and multiple CpG islands, bivalent promoter marks and statistically significant higher enrichment of enhancer mark around their gene loci. On the other hand nuclear receptor genes that are involved in tissue-specific roles lack these features, having simple transcriptional controls and a greater variety of mechanisms for producing paralogs. We further examine the

  5. Computational characterization of modes of transcriptional regulation of nuclear receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Yogita; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Bakke, Marit; Lenhard, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are a large structural class of transcription factors that act with their co-regulators and repressors to maintain a variety of biological and physiological processes such as metabolism, development and reproduction. They are activated through the binding of small ligands, which can be replaced by drug molecules, making nuclear receptors promising drug targets. Transcriptional regulation of the genes that encode them is central to gaining a deeper understanding of the diversity of their biochemical and biophysical roles and their role in disease and therapy. Even though they share evolutionary history, nuclear receptor genes have fundamentally different expression patterns, ranging from ubiquitously expressed to tissue-specific and spatiotemporally complex. However, current understanding of regulation in nuclear receptor gene family is still nascent. In this study, we investigate the relationship between long-range regulation of nuclear receptor family and their known functionality. Towards this goal, we identify the nuclear receptor genes that are potential targets based on counts of highly conserved non-coding elements. We validate our results using publicly available expression (RNA-seq) and histone modification (ChIP-seq) data from the ENCODE project. We find that nuclear receptor genes involved in developmental roles show strong evidence of long-range mechanism of transcription regulation with distinct cis-regulatory content they feature clusters of highly conserved non-coding elements distributed in regions spanning several Megabases, long and multiple CpG islands, bivalent promoter marks and statistically significant higher enrichment of enhancer mark around their gene loci. On the other hand nuclear receptor genes that are involved in tissue-specific roles lack these features, having simple transcriptional controls and a greater variety of mechanisms for producing paralogs. We further examine the combinatorial patterns of histone maps

  6. Nuclear DISC1 regulates CRE-mediated gene transcription and sleep homeostasis in the fruit fly

    PubMed Central

    Sawamura, Naoya; Ando, Tetsuya; Maruyama, Yasushi; Fujimuro, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Hiroaki; Honjo, Ken; Shimoda, Masami; Toda, Hirofumi; Sawamura-Yamamoto, Takako; Makuch, Lauren A; Hayashi, Akiko; Ishizuka, Koko; Cascella, Nicola G.; Kamiya, Atsushi; Ishida, Norio; Tomoda, Toshifumi; Hai, Tsonwin; Furukubo-Tokunaga, Katsuo; Sawa, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) is one of major susceptibility factors for a wide range of mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, and autism spectrum conditions. DISC1 is located in several subcellular domains, such as the centrosome and the nucleus, and interacts with various proteins, including NudE-like (NUDEL/NDEL1) and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4)/CREB2. Nevertheless, a role for DISC1 in vivo remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we have generated a Drosophila model for examining normal functions of DISC1 in living organisms. DISC1 transgenic flies with preferential accumulation of exogenous human DISC1 in the nucleus display disturbance in sleep homeostasis, which has been reportedly associated with CREB signaling/CRE-mediated gene transcription. Thus, in mammalian cells, we characterized nuclear DISC1, and identified a subset of nuclear DISC1 that co-localizes with the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies, a nuclear compartment for gene transcription. Furthermore, we identified three functional cis-elements that regulate the nuclear localization of DISC1. We also report that DISC1 interacts with ATF4/CREB2 and a co-repressor N-CoR, modulating CRE-mediated gene transcription. PMID:18762802

  7. Nuclear DISC1 regulates CRE-mediated gene transcription and sleep homeostasis in the fruit fly.

    PubMed

    Sawamura, N; Ando, T; Maruyama, Y; Fujimuro, M; Mochizuki, H; Honjo, K; Shimoda, M; Toda, H; Sawamura-Yamamoto, T; Makuch, L A; Hayashi, A; Ishizuka, K; Cascella, N G; Kamiya, A; Ishida, N; Tomoda, T; Hai, T; Furukubo-Tokunaga, K; Sawa, A

    2008-12-01

    Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) is one of major susceptibility factors for a wide range of mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression and autism spectrum conditions. DISC1 is located in several subcellular domains, such as the centrosome and the nucleus, and interacts with various proteins, including NudE-like (NUDEL/NDEL1) and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4)/CREB2. Nevertheless, a role for DISC1 in vivo remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we have generated a Drosophila model for examining normal functions of DISC1 in living organisms. DISC1 transgenic flies with preferential accumulation of exogenous human DISC1 in the nucleus display disturbance in sleep homeostasis, which has been reportedly associated with CREB signaling/CRE-mediated gene transcription. Thus, in mammalian cells, we characterized nuclear DISC1, and identified a subset of nuclear DISC1 that colocalizes with the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies, a nuclear compartment for gene transcription. Furthermore, we identified three functional cis-elements that regulate the nuclear localization of DISC1. We also report that DISC1 interacts with ATF4/CREB2 and a corepressor N-CoR, modulating CRE-mediated gene transcription.

  8. Inhibition of the TEF/TEAD transcription factor activity by nuclear calcium and distinct kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M; Andrade, V A; Andrade, S J; Pusl, T; Ortega, J M; Goes, A M; Leite, M F

    2003-02-07

    Transcription enhancer factor (TEF/TEAD) is a family of four transcription factors that share a common TEA-DNA binding domain and are involved in similar cellular functions, such as cell differentiation and proliferation. All adult tissues express at least one of the four TEAD genes, so this family of transcription factors may be of widespread importance, yet little is known about their regulation. Here we examine the factors that regulate TEAD activity in CHO cells. RT-PCR indicated the presence of TEAD-1, TEAD-3, and both isoforms of TEAD-4, but not TEAD-2. Quantitative measurements showed that TEAD-4 is most abundant, followed by TEAD-3, then TEAD-1. We examined the relative effects of nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+) on TEAD activity, since TEAD proteins are localized to the nucleus and since free Ca(2+) within the nucleus selectively regulates transcription in some systems. Chelation of nuclear but not cytosolic Ca(2+) increased TEAD activity two times above control. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) also increased TEAD activity, while cAMP decreased TEAD activity, and protein kinase C had no effect. Together, these results show that nuclear Ca(2+), MAPK, and cAMP each negatively regulate the activity of the TEAD transcription factor.

  9. Role of zinc finger structure in nuclear localization of transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tatsuo; Azumano, Makiko; Uwatoko, Chisana; Itoh, Kohji Kuwahara, Jun

    2009-02-27

    Transcription factor Sp1 is localized in the nucleus and regulates gene expression. Our previous study demonstrated that the carboxyl terminal region of Sp1 containing 3-zinc finger region as DNA binding domain can also serve as nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, the nuclear transport mechanism of Sp1 has not been well understood. In this study, we performed a gene expression study on mutant Sp1 genes causing a set of amino acid substitutions in zinc finger domains to elucidate nuclear import activity. Nuclear localization of the GFP-fused mutant Sp1 proteins bearing concomitant substitutions in the first and third zinc fingers was highly inhibited. These mutant Sp1 proteins had also lost the binding ability as to the GC box sequence. The results suggest that the overall tertiary structure formed by the three zinc fingers is essential for nuclear localization of Sp1 as well as dispersed basic amino acids within the zinc fingers region.

  10. Simultaneous live imaging of the transcription and nuclear position of specific genes

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between genome organization and gene expression has recently been established. However, the relationships between spatial organization, dynamics, and transcriptional regulation of the genome remain unknown. In this study, we developed a live-imaging method for simultaneous measurements of the transcriptional activity and nuclear position of endogenous genes, which we termed the ‘Real-time Observation of Localization and EXpression (ROLEX)’ system. We demonstrated that ROLEX is highly specific and does not affect the expression level of the target gene. ROLEX enabled detection of sub-genome-wide mobility changes that depended on the state of Nanog transactivation in embryonic stem cells. We believe that the ROLEX system will become a powerful tool for exploring the relationship between transcription and nuclear dynamics in living cells. PMID:26092696

  11. Isolation of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don Nuclei and Measurement of Rate of Tryptophan decarboxylase Gene Transcription Using Nuclear Run-On Transcription Assay.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    An accurate assessment of transcription 'rate' is often desired to describe the promoter activity. In plants, isolation of transcriptionally active nuclei and their subsequent use in nuclear run-on assays has been challenging and therefore limit an accurate measurement of gene transcription 'rate'. Catharanthus roseus has emerged as a model medicinal plant as it exhibits an unsurpassed spectrum of chemodiversity, producing over 130 alkaloids through the terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) pathway and therefore serves as a 'molecular hub' to understand gene expression profiles. The protocols presented here streamline, adapt and optimize the existing methods of nuclear run-on assay for use in C. roseus. Here, we fully describe all the steps to isolate transcriptionally active nuclei from C. roseus leaves and utilize them to perform nuclear run-on transcription assay. Nuclei isolated by this method transcribed at a level consistent with their response to external stimuli, as transcription rate of TDC gene was found to be higher in response to external stimuli i.e. when seedlings were subjected to UV-B light or to methyl jasmonate (MeJA). However, the relative transcript abundance measured parallel through qRT-PCR was found to be inconsistent with the synthesis rate indicating that some post transcriptional events might have a role in transcript stability in response to stimuli. Our study provides an optimized, efficient and inexpensive method of isolation of intact nuclei and nuclear 'run-on' transcription assay to carry out in-situ measurement of gene transcription rate in Catharanthus roseus. This would be valuable in investigating the transcriptional and post transcriptional response of other TIA pathway genes in C. roseus. Isolated nuclei may also provide a resource that could be used for performing the chip assay as well as serve as the source of nuclear proteins for in-vitro EMSA studies. Moreover, nascent nuclear run-on transcript could be further subjected to RNA

  12. Feed-forward transcriptional programming by nuclear receptors: regulatory principles and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Sarah K; Gerber, Anthony N

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are widely targeted to treat a range of human diseases. Feed-forward loops are an ancient mechanism through which single cell organisms organize transcriptional programming and modulate gene expression dynamics, but they have not been systematically studied as a regulatory paradigm for NR-mediated transcriptional responses. Here, we provide an overview of the basic properties of feed-forward loops as predicted by mathematical models and validated experimentally in single cell organisms. We review existing evidence implicating feed-forward loops as important in controlling clinically relevant transcriptional responses to estrogens, progestins, and glucocorticoids, among other NR ligands. We propose that feed-forward transcriptional circuits are a major mechanism through which NRs integrate signals, exert temporal control over gene regulation, and compartmentalize client transcriptomes into discrete subunits. Implications for the design and function of novel selective NR ligands are discussed.

  13. Mitochondrial-Nuclear Interactions Mediate Sex-Specific Transcriptional Profiles in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mossman, Jim A.; Tross, Jennifer G.; Li, Nan; Wu, Zhijin; Rand, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The assembly and function of mitochondria require coordinated expression from two distinct genomes, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in either genome can be a source of phenotypic variation, yet their coexpression has been largely overlooked as a source of variation, particularly in the emerging paradigm of mitochondrial replacement therapy. Here we tested how the transcriptome responds to mtDNA and nDNA variation, along with mitonuclear interactions (mtDNA × nDNA) in Drosophila melanogaster. We used two mtDNA haplotypes that differ in a substantial number of single nucleotide polymorphisms, with >100 amino acid differences. We placed each haplotype on each of two D. melanogaster nuclear backgrounds and tested for transcription differences in both sexes. We found that large numbers of transcripts were differentially expressed between nuclear backgrounds, and that mtDNA type altered the expression of nDNA genes, suggesting a retrograde, trans effect of mitochondrial genotype. Females were generally more sensitive to genetic perturbation than males, and males demonstrated an asymmetrical effect of mtDNA in each nuclear background; mtDNA effects were nuclear-background specific. mtDNA-sensitive genes were not enriched in male- or female-limited expression space in either sex. Using a variety of differential expression analyses, we show the responses to mitonuclear covariation to be substantially different between the sexes, yet the mtDNA genes were consistently differentially expressed across nuclear backgrounds and sexes. Our results provide evidence that the main mtDNA effects can be consistent across nuclear backgrounds, but the interactions between mtDNA and nDNA can lead to sex-specific global transcript responses. PMID:27558138

  14. Mitochondrial-Nuclear Interactions Mediate Sex-Specific Transcriptional Profiles in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mossman, Jim A; Tross, Jennifer G; Li, Nan; Wu, Zhijin; Rand, David M

    2016-10-01

    The assembly and function of mitochondria require coordinated expression from two distinct genomes, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in either genome can be a source of phenotypic variation, yet their coexpression has been largely overlooked as a source of variation, particularly in the emerging paradigm of mitochondrial replacement therapy. Here we tested how the transcriptome responds to mtDNA and nDNA variation, along with mitonuclear interactions (mtDNA × nDNA) in Drosophila melanogaster We used two mtDNA haplotypes that differ in a substantial number of single nucleotide polymorphisms, with >100 amino acid differences. We placed each haplotype on each of two D. melanogaster nuclear backgrounds and tested for transcription differences in both sexes. We found that large numbers of transcripts were differentially expressed between nuclear backgrounds, and that mtDNA type altered the expression of nDNA genes, suggesting a retrograde, trans effect of mitochondrial genotype. Females were generally more sensitive to genetic perturbation than males, and males demonstrated an asymmetrical effect of mtDNA in each nuclear background; mtDNA effects were nuclear-background specific. mtDNA-sensitive genes were not enriched in male- or female-limited expression space in either sex. Using a variety of differential expression analyses, we show the responses to mitonuclear covariation to be substantially different between the sexes, yet the mtDNA genes were consistently differentially expressed across nuclear backgrounds and sexes. Our results provide evidence that the main mtDNA effects can be consistent across nuclear backgrounds, but the interactions between mtDNA and nDNA can lead to sex-specific global transcript responses. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  15. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5' UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

  16. Quantification of nascent transcription by bromouridine immunocapture nuclear run-on RT-qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Thomas C.; Hart, Jonathan R.; Kaikkonen, Minna U.; Weinberg, Marc S.; Vogt, Peter K.; Morris, Kevin V.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear run-on (NRO) is a method that measures transcriptional activity via the quantification of biochemically labelled nascent RNA molecules derived from nuclear isolates. Widespread usage of this technique has been limited due to its technical difficulty relative to steady-state total mRNA analyses. Here we describe in detail a highly optimised and validated protocol for the quantification of transcriptional activity in human cell cultures using a modified bromouridine immunocapture NRO method and Reverse Transcription-quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-qPCR). This method is rapid (the protocol can be completed in two days), cost-effective, exhibits negligible detection of background noise from unlabelled transcripts, requires no radioactive materials, and can be performed from as little as 500,000 nuclei. It also takes advantage of the high sensitivity, specificity and dynamic range of RT-qPCR. Protocol-specific issues such as appropriate qPCR assay design, data normalisation, changes in nuclear RNA content between experimental conditions, unequal label incorporation, and background signal determination are also discussed. PMID:26182239

  17. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Transcription Sites and Their Association with Splicing Factor–Rich Nuclear Speckles

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiangyun; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Samarabandu, Jagath; Berezney, Ronald

    1999-01-01

    Transcription sites are detected by labeling nascent transcripts with BrUTP in permeabilized 3T3 mouse fibroblasts followed by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Inhibition and enzyme digestion studies confirm that the labeled sites are from RNA transcripts and that RNA polymerase I (RP I) and II (RP II) are responsible for nucleolar and extranucleolar transcription, respectively. An average of 2,000 sites are detected per nucleus with over 90% in the extranucleolar compartment where they are arranged in clusters and three-dimensional networklike arrays. The number of transcription sites, their three-dimensional organization and arrangement into functional zones (Wei et al. 1998) is strikingly maintained after extraction for nuclear matrix. Significant levels of total RP II mediated transcription sites (45%) were associated with splicing factor–rich nuclear speckles even though the speckles occupied <10% of the total extranucleolar space. Moreover, the vast majority of nuclear speckles (>90%) had moderate to high levels of associated transcription activity. Transcription sites were found along the periphery as well as inside the speckles themselves. These spatial relations were confirmed in optical sections through individual speckles and after in vivo labeling of nascent transcripts. Our results demonstrate that nuclear speckles and their surrounding regions are major sites of RP II-mediated transcription in the cell nucleus, and support the view that both speckle- and nonspeckle-associated regions of the nucleus contain sites for the coordination of transcription and splicing processes. PMID:10444064

  18. Assembly of the Nuclear Transcription and Processing Machinery: Cajal Bodies (Coiled Bodies) and Transcriptosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Joseph G.; Bellini, Michel; Wu, Zheng’an; Murphy, Christine

    1999-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of RNA transcription and processing factors in the amphibian oocyte nucleus or germinal vesicle. RNA polymerase I (pol I), pol II, and pol III occur in the Cajal bodies (coiled bodies) along with various components required for transcription and processing of the three classes of nuclear transcripts: mRNA, rRNA, and pol III transcripts. Among these components are transcription factor IIF (TFIIF), TFIIS, splicing factors, the U7 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle, the stem–loop binding protein, SR proteins, cleavage and polyadenylation factors, small nucleolar RNAs, nucleolar proteins that are probably involved in pre-rRNA processing, and TFIIIA. Earlier studies and data presented here show that several of these components are first targeted to Cajal bodies when injected into the oocyte and only subsequently appear in the chromosomes or nucleoli, where transcription itself occurs. We suggest that pol I, pol II, and pol III transcription and processing components are preassembled in Cajal bodies before transport to the chromosomes and nucleoli. Most components of the pol II transcription and processing pathway that occur in Cajal bodies are also found in the many hundreds of B-snurposomes in the germinal vesicle. Electron microscopic images show that B-snurposomes consist primarily, if not exclusively, of 20- to 30-nm particles, which closely resemble the interchromatin granules described from sections of somatic nuclei. We suggest the name pol II transcriptosome for these particles to emphasize their content of factors involved in synthesis and processing of mRNA transcripts. We present a model in which pol I, pol II, and pol III transcriptosomes are assembled in the Cajal bodies before export to the nucleolus (pol I), to the B-snurposomes and eventually to the chromosomes (pol II), and directly to the chromosomes (pol III). The key feature of this model is the preassembly of the transcription and processing machinery into

  19. Urban renewal in the nucleus: is protein turnover by proteasomes absolutely required for nuclear receptor-regulated transcription?

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Zafar; O'Malley, Bert W

    2004-03-01

    The importance of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in higher eukaryotes has been well established in cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, and cell differentiation, but has only recently been linked to nuclear hormone receptor-regulated gene transcription. Characterization of a number of ubiquitin proteasome pathway enzymes as coactivators and observations that several nuclear receptors are ubiquitinated and degraded in the course of their nuclear activities provide evidence that ubiquitin proteasome-mediated protein degradation plays an integral role in eukaryotic transcription. In addition to receptors, studies have revealed that coactivators are ubiquitinated and degraded via the proteasome. The notion that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway is involved in gene transcription is further strengthened by the fact that ubiquitin proteasome pathway enzymes are recruited to the promoters of target genes and that proteasome-dependent degradation of nuclear receptors is required for efficient transcriptional activity. These findings suggest that protein degradation is coupled with nuclear receptor coactivation activity. It is possible that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway modulates transcription by promoting remodeling and turnover of the nuclear receptor-transcription complex. In this review, we discus the possible role of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in nuclear hormone receptor-regulated gene transcription.

  20. A novel bipartite nuclear localization signal with an atypically long linker in DOF transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Jonas; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Ruzicic, Slobodan

    2010-05-01

    Large molecules require a nuclear localization signal (NLS) for translocation into the nucleus. Classical NLSs are rich in basic amino acids and they represent three groups, based on their structural features: SV40 T-antigen-type, yeast mating factor Matalpha-2-type, and bipartite NLSs. DNA-binding-with-one-finger (DOF) transcription factors play important roles in plants, and although their nuclear localization has been demonstrated in several cases, public protein localization prediction tools fail to detect NLS motifs in these proteins. Here, we demonstrate that an atypical bipartite NLS with a 17 amino acid long linker between its flanking basic regions directs Arabidopsis thaliana DOF proteins to the cell nucleus. The novel bipartite NLS is highly conserved in plant DOF transcription factors, including the single DOF protein in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  1. Malondialdehyde inhibits an AMPK-mediated nuclear translocation and repression activity of ALDH2 in transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ji-Woong; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Cho, Sung-Chun; Ha, Moon-Kyung; Song, Kye-Yong; Youn, Hong-Duk; Park, Sang Chul

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} ALDH2 is an MDA-modified protein in old rat kidney tissues. {yields} AMPK associates with ALDH2 and triggers the nuclear localization of ALDH2. {yields} ALDH2 serves as a general transcriptional repressor by associating with HDACs. {yields} MDA inhibits the AMPK-mediated translocation of ALDH2 and its repression activity. -- Abstract: Aging process results from deleterious damages by reactive oxygen species, in particular, various metabolic aldehydes. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is one of metabolic enzymes detoxifying various aldehydes under oxidative conditions. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a key role in controlling metabolic process. However, little was known about the relationship of ALDH2 with AMPK under oxidative conditions. Here, we, by using MDA-specific monoclonal antibody, screened the tissues of young and old rats for MDA-modified proteins and identified an ALDH2 as a prominent MDA-modified protein band in the old rat kidney tissue. ALDH2 associates with AMPK and is phosphorylated by AMPK. In addition, AICAR, an activator of AMP-activated protein kinase, induces the nuclear translocation of ALDH2. ALDH2 in nucleus is involved in general transcription repression by association with histone deacetylases. Furthermore, MDA modification inhibited the translocation of ALDH2 and the association with AMPK, and ultimately led to de-repression of transcription in the reporter system analysis. In this study, we have demonstrated that ALDH2 acts as a transcriptional repressor in response to AMPK activation, and MDA modifies ALDH2 and inhibits repressive activity of ALDH2 in general transcription. We thus suggest that increasing amount of MDA during aging process may interrupt the nuclear function of ALDH2, modulated by AMPK.

  2. Transcription-dependent nuclear localization of DAZAP1 requires an N-terminal signal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Tzu; Wen, Wan-Ching; Yen, Pauline H.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when the nuclear transcription is inhibited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1's transcription-dependent nuclear localization requires N-terminal N42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SLIRP binds to N42 and may be involved in the process. -- Abstract: Deleted in Azoospermia Associated Protein 1 (DAZAP1) is a ubiquitous hnRNP protein required for normal development and spermatogenesis. It resides predominantly in the nucleus and moves between the nucleus and the cytoplasm via a ZNS shuttling signal at its C-terminus. DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when RNA polymerase II activity is inhibited by actinomycin D. Here we report the mapping of a 42-amino acid segment (N42) at the N-terminus of DAZAP1 that is both necessary and sufficient for its transcription-dependent nuclear localization. In addition, using a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified SLIRP as a N42-binding protein which may regulate DAZAP1 subcellular localization.

  3. Nuclear networking fashions pre-messenger RNA and primary microRNA transcripts for function

    PubMed Central

    Pawlicki, Jan M.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2010-01-01

    The expression of protein-coding genes is enhanced by the exquisite coupling of transcription by RNA polymerase II with pre-messenger RNA processing reactions, such as 5′-end capping, splicing and 3′-end formation. Integration between cotranscriptional processing events extends beyond the nucleus, as proteins that bind cotranscriptionally can affect the localization, translation and degradation of the mature messenger RNA. MicroRNAs are RNA polymerase II transcripts with crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression. Recent data demonstrate that processing of primary microRNA transcripts might be yet another cotranscriptional event that is woven into this elaborate nuclear network. This review discusses the extensive molecular interactions that couple the earliest steps in gene expression and therefore influence the final fate and function of the mature messenger RNA or microRNA produced. PMID:20004579

  4. Dynamic sorting of nuclear components into distinct nucleolar caps during transcriptional inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shav-Tal, Yaron; Blechman, Janna; Darzacq, Xavier; Montagna, Cristina; Dye, Billy T; Patton, James G; Singer, Robert H; Zipori, Dov

    2005-05-01

    Nucleolar segregation is observed under some physiological conditions of transcriptional arrest. This process can be mimicked by transcriptional arrest after actinomycin D treatment leading to the segregation of nucleolar components and the formation of unique structures termed nucleolar caps surrounding a central body. These nucleolar caps have been proposed to arise from the segregation of nucleolar components. We show that contrary to prevailing notion, a group of nucleoplasmic proteins, mostly RNA binding proteins, relocalized from the nucleoplasm to a specific nucleolar cap during transcriptional inhibition. For instance, an exclusively nucleoplasmic protein, the splicing factor PSF, localized to nucleolar caps under these conditions. This structure also contained pre-rRNA transcripts, but other caps contained either nucleolar proteins, PML, or Cajal body proteins and in addition nucleolar or Cajal body RNAs. In contrast to the capping of the nucleoplasmic components, nucleolar granular component proteins dispersed into the nucleoplasm, although at least two (p14/ARF and MRP RNA) were retained in the central body. The nucleolar caps are dynamic structures as determined using photobleaching and require energy for their formation. These findings demonstrate that the process of nucleolar segregation and capping involves energy-dependent repositioning of nuclear proteins and RNAs and emphasize the dynamic characteristics of nuclear domain formation in response to cellular stress.

  5. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling enhances nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, Cimona V.; Fitzgerald, Latricia D.; Thompson, Marilyn E. . E-mail: methompson@mmc.edu

    2007-05-15

    Signaling pathways involved in regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic distribution of BRCA1 have not been previously reported. Here, we provide evidence that heregulin {beta}1-induced activation of the Akt pathway increases the nuclear content of BRCA1. First, treatment of T47D breast cancer cells with heregulin {beta}1 results in a two-fold increase in nuclear BRCA1 as assessed by FACS analysis, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. This heregulin-induced increase in nuclear BRCA1 is blocked by siRNA-mediated down-regulation of Akt. Second, mutation of threonine 509 in BRCA1, the site of Akt phosphorylation, to an alanine, attenuates the ability of heregulin to induce BRCA1 nuclear accumulation. These data suggest that Akt-catalyzed phosphorylation of BRCA1 is required for the heregulin-regulated nuclear concentration of BRCA1. Because most functions ascribed to BRCA1 occur within the nucleus, we postulated that phosphorylation-dependent nuclear accumulation of BRCA1 would result in enhanced nuclear activity, specifically transcriptional activity, of BRCA1. This postulate is affirmed by our observation that the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate GADD45 promoter constructs was enhanced in T47D cells treated with heregulin {beta}1. Furthermore, the heterologous expression of BRCA1 in HCC1937 human breast cancer cells, which have constitutively active Akt, also induces GADD45 promoter activity, whereas the expression of BRCA1 in which threonine 509 has been mutated to an alanine is able to only minimally induce promoter activity. These findings implicate Akt in upstream events leading to BRCA1 nuclear localization and function.

  6. O-GlcNAc-glycosylation of {beta}-catenin regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sayat, Ria; Leber, Brian; Grubac, Vanja; Wiltshire, Lesley; Persad, Sujata

    2008-09-10

    {beta}-catenin plays a role in intracellular adhesion and regulating gene expression. The latter role is associated with its oncogenic properties. Phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin controls its intracellular expression but mechanism/s that regulates the nuclear localization of {beta}-catenin is unknown. We demonstrate that O-GlcNAc glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation) of {beta}-catenin negatively regulates its levels in the nucleus. We show that normal prostate cells (PNT1A) have significantly higher amounts of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin compared to prostate cancer (CaP) cells. The total nuclear levels of {beta}-catenin are higher in the CaP cells than PNT1A but only a minimal fraction of the nuclear {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells are O-GlcNAcylated. Increasing the levels of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells with PUGNAc (O- (2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-gluco-pyranosylidene) amino-N-phenylcarbamate) treatment is associated with a progressive decrease in the levels of {beta}-catenin in the nucleus. TOPFlash reporter assay and mRNA expressions of {beta}-catenin's target genes indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of {beta}-catenin results in a decrease in its transcriptional activity. We define a novel modification of {beta}-catenin that regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional function.

  7. Direct visualization of the co-transcriptional assembly of a nuclear body by noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuntao S; Sunwoo, Hongjae; Zhang, Bin; Spector, David L

    2011-01-01

    The cell nucleus is a highly compartmentalized organelle harbouring a variety of dynamic membraneless nuclear bodies. How these subnuclear domains are established and maintained is not well understood. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanism of how one nuclear body, the paraspeckle, is assembled and organized. Paraspeckles are discrete ribonucleoprotein bodies found in mammalian cells and implicated in nuclear retention of hyperedited mRNAs. We developed a live-cell imaging system that allows for the inducible transcription of Men ɛ/β (also known as Neat1; ref. 12) noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) and the direct visualization of the recruitment of paraspeckle proteins. Using this system, we demonstrate that Men ɛ/β ncRNAs are essential to initiate the de novo assembly of paraspeckles. These newly formed structures effectively harbour nuclear-retained mRNAs confirming that they are bona fide functional paraspeckles. By three independent approaches, we show that it is the act of Men ɛ/β transcription, but not ncRNAs alone, that regulates paraspeckle maintenance. Finally, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analyses supported a critical structural role for Men ɛ/β ncRNAs in paraspeckle organization. This study establishes a model in which Men ɛ/β ncRNAs serve as a platform to recruit proteins to assemble paraspeckles.

  8. Drosophila SAF-B Links the Nuclear Matrix, Chromosomes, and Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso-Parra, Catalina; Maggert, Keith A.

    2010-01-01

    Induction of gene expression is correlated with alterations in nuclear organization, including proximity to other active genes, to the nuclear cortex, and to cytologically distinct domains of the nucleus. Chromosomes are tethered to the insoluble nuclear scaffold/matrix through interaction with Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Region (SAR/MAR) binding proteins. Identification and characterization of proteins involved in establishing or maintaining chromosome-scaffold interactions is necessary to understand how the nucleus is organized and how dynamic changes in attachment are correlated with alterations in gene expression. We identified and characterized one such scaffold attachment factor, a Drosophila homolog of mammalian SAF-B. The large nuclei and chromosomes of Drosophila have allowed us to show that SAF-B inhabits distinct subnuclear compartments, forms weblike continua in nuclei of salivary glands, and interacts with discrete chromosomal loci in interphase nuclei. These interactions appear mediated either by DNA-protein interactions, or through RNA-protein interactions that can be altered during changes in gene expression programs. Extraction of soluble nuclear proteins and DNA leaves SAF-B intact, showing that this scaffold/matrix-attachment protein is a durable component of the nuclear matrix. Together, we have shown that SAF-B links the nuclear scaffold, chromosomes, and transcriptional activity. PMID:20422039

  9. Transcriptional regulation is affected by subnuclear targeting of reporter plasmids to PML nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Block, Gregory J; Eskiw, Christopher H; Dellaire, Graham; Bazett-Jones, David P

    2006-12-01

    Whereas the PML protein has been reported to have both transcriptional coactivator and corepressor potential, the contribution of the PML nuclear body (PML NB) itself to transcriptional regulation is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that plasmid DNA artificially tethered to PML or the PML NB-targeting domain of Sp100 is preferentially localized to PML NBs. Using the tethering technique, we targeted a simian virus 40 promoter-driven luciferase reporter plasmid to PML NBs, resulting in the repression of the transgene transcriptional activity. Conversely, the tethering of a cytomegalovirus promoter-containing reporter plasmid resulted in activation. Targeting a minimal eukaryotic promoter did not affect its activity. The expression of targeted promoters could be modulated by altering the cellular concentration of PML NB components, including Sp100 and isoforms of the PML protein. Finally, we demonstrate that ICP0, the promiscuous herpes simplex virus transactivator, increases the level of transcriptional activation of plasmid DNA tethered to the PML NB. We conclude that when PML NB components are artificially tethered to reporter plasmids, the PML NB contributes to the regulation of the tethered DNA in a promoter-dependent manner. Our findings demonstrate that transient transcription assays are sensitive to the subnuclear localization of the transgene plasmid.

  10. An active nuclear retention signal in the glucocorticoid receptor functions as a strong inducer of transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Carrigan, Amanda; Walther, Rhian F; Salem, Houssein Abdou; Wu, Dongmei; Atlas, Ella; Lefebvre, Yvonne A; Haché, Robert J G

    2007-04-13

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) cycles between a naive chaperone-complexed form in the cytoplasm and a transcriptionally active steroid-bound nuclear form. Nuclear import of GR occurs rapidly and is mediated through the importin alpha/beta karyopherin import pathway. By contrast, nuclear export of GR occurs only slowly under most conditions, despite a dependence on active signaling. In this study we have defined a nuclear retention signal (NRS) in the hinge region of GR that actively opposes the nuclear export of GR as well as the nuclear export mediated through an ectopic CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal (NES). The GR NRS overlaps closely with the basic NL1 nuclear localization signal (NLS) but can be distinguished from NL1 by targeted mutagenesis. Substitution of the classical NLS from SV40 T antigen for the GR NL1 results in a receptor in which nuclear export is accelerated. Remarkably, although the SV40-modified GR remains predominantly nuclear in the presence of steroid and is recruited to transcriptional regulatory regions indistinguishably from wild-type GR, the substitution dramatically weakens the ability of GR to activate transcription of a mouse mammary tumor virus reporter gene. These results suggest that active nuclear retention of GR plays an integral role in glucocorticoid signaling.

  11. Nuclear mRNA quality control in yeast is mediated by Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment, as revealed by the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Honorine, Romy; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Libri, Domenico; Rahmouni, A. Rachid

    2011-01-01

    The production of mature export-competent transcripts is under the surveillance of quality control steps where aberrant mRNP molecules resulting from inappropriate or inefficient processing and packaging reactions are subject to exosome-mediated degradation. Previously, we have shown that the heterologous expression of bacterial Rho factor in yeast interferes in normal mRNP biogenesis leading to the production of full-length yet aberrant transcripts that are degraded by the nuclear exosome with ensuing growth defect. Here, we took advantage of this new tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which an integrated system recognizes aberrancies at each step of mRNP biogenesis and targets the defective molecules for destruction. We show that the targeting and degradation of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts is associated with a large increase of Nrd1 recruitment to the transcription complex via its CID and RRM domains and a concomitant enrichment of exosome component Rrp6 association. The targeting and degradation of the aberrant transcripts is suppressed by the overproduction of Pcf11 or its isolated CID domain, through a competition with Nrd1 for recruitment by the transcription complex. Altogether, our results support a model in which a stimulation of Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment coordinates the recognition and removal of aberrant transcripts by promoting the attachment of the nuclear mRNA degradation machinery. PMID:21113025

  12. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    The following is a review of research accomplished in the first two years of funding for the above mentioned project. The work performed is a molecular characterization of nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which are deficient in different stages in the post-transcriptional expression of a single chloroplast encoded polypeptide, the D2 protein of Photosystem II. Our long-term goals are to understand the molecular mechanisms by which nuclear gene products affect the expression of chloroplast genes. Specifically, we which to understand how specific nuclear gene products affect the turnover rate of the D2 encoding mRNA (psbD), how other nuclear encoded factors work to promote the translation of psbD mRNA and/or stabilize the D2 protein, and what the role of the D2 protein itself is in Photosystem II assembly and in the control of expression of other chloroplast genes. This progress report will be organized into four major sections concerning (I) The characterization of nuclear mutants affected in D2 translation/turnover, (II) The study of trans-acting factors which associate with the 5{prime} end of the psbD mRNA, (III) In vitro mutagenesis of the psbD gene, and (IV) Additional studies.

  13. Nuclear actin depolymerization in transcriptionally active avian and amphibian oocytes leads to collapse of intranuclear structures

    PubMed Central

    Maslova, Antonina; Krasikova, Alla

    2012-01-01

    Actin, which is normally depleted in the nuclei of somatic cells, accumulates in high amounts in giant nuclei of amphibian oocytes. The supramolecular organization and functions of this nuclear pool of actin in growing vertebrate oocyte are controversial. Here, we investigated the role of nuclear actin in the maintenance of the spatial architecture of intranuclear structures in avian and amphibian growing oocytes. A meshwork of filamentous actin was not detected in freshly isolated or fixed oocyte nuclei of Xenopus, chicken or quail. We found that the actin meshwork inside the oocyte nucleus could be induced by phalloidin treatment. Actin polymerization is demonstrated to be required to stabilize the specific spatial organization of nuclear structures in avian and amphibian growing oocytes. In experiments with the actin depolymerizing drugs cytochalasin D and latrunculin A, we showed that disassembly of nuclear actin polymers led to chromosome condensation and their transportation to a limited space within the oocyte nucleus. Experimentally induced “collapsing” of chromosomes and nuclear bodies, together with global inhibition of transcription, strongly resembled the process of karyosphere formation during oocyte growth. PMID:22572951

  14. Network Analysis of Transcription Factors for Nuclear Reprogramming into Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Using Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; S.Roy, Sanjiban; J.Hsu, Minna; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Research related to induce pluripotent stem (iPS) cell generation has increased rapidly in recent years. Six transcription factors, namely OCT4, SOX2, C-MYC, KLF4, NANOG, and LIN28 have been widely used for iPS cell generation. As there is a lack of data on intra- and inter-networking among these six different transcription factors, the objective of this study is to analyze the intra- and inter-networks between them using bioinformatics. Materials and Methods: In this computational biology study, we used AminoNet, MATLAB to examine networking between the six different transcription factors. The directed network was constructed using MATLAB programming and the distance between nodes was estimated using a phylogram. The protein-protein interactions between the nuclear reprogramming factors was performed using the software STRING. Results: The relationship between C-MYC and NANOG was depicted using a phylogenetic tree and the sequence analysis showed OCT4, C-MYC, NANOG, and SOX2 together share a common evolutionary origin. Conclusion: This study has shown an innovative rapid method for the analysis of intra and inter-networking among nuclear reprogramming factors. Data presented may aid researchers to understand the complex regulatory networks involving iPS cell generation. PMID:24381858

  15. Microbiota regulate intestinal epithelial gene expression by suppressing the transcription factor Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha.

    PubMed

    Davison, James M; Lickwar, Colin R; Song, Lingyun; Breton, Ghislain; Crawford, Gregory E; Rawls, John F

    2017-04-06

    Microbiota influence diverse aspects of intestinal physiology and disease in part by controlling tissue-specific transcription of host genes. However, host genomic mechanisms mediating microbial control of intestinal gene expression are poorly understood. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) is the most ancient family of nuclear receptor transcription factors with important roles in human metabolic and inflammatory bowel diseases, but a role in host response to microbes is unknown. Using an unbiased screening strategy, we found that zebrafish Hnf4a specifically binds and activates a microbiota-suppressed intestinal epithelial transcriptional enhancer. Genetic analysis revealed that zebrafish hnf4a activates nearly half of the genes that are suppressed by microbiota, suggesting microbiota negatively regulate Hnf4a. In support, analysis of genomic architecture in mouse intestinal epithelial cells disclosed that microbiota colonization leads to activation or inactivation of hundreds of enhancers along with drastic genome-wide reduction of HNF4A and HNF4G occupancy. Interspecies meta-analysis suggested interactions between HNF4A and microbiota promote gene expression patterns associated with human inflammatory bowel diseases. These results indicate a critical and conserved role for HNF4A in maintaining intestinal homeostasis in response to microbiota.

  16. Temporal analysis and spatial mapping of Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus transcripts and in vitro translation polypeptides

    Treesearch

    James M. Slavicek

    1991-01-01

    Genomic expression of the Lymantriu dispar multinucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (LdMNPV) was studied. Viral specific transcripts expressed in cell culture at various times from 2 through 72 h postinfection were identified and their genomic origins mapped through Northern analysis. Sixty-five distinct transcripts were identified in this...

  17. Nuclear actin modulates cell motility via transcriptional regulation of adhesive and cytoskeletal genes

    PubMed Central

    Sharili, Amir S.; Kenny, Fiona N.; Vartiainen, Maria K.; Connelly, John T.

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a classic biomechanical mediator of cell migration. While it is known that actin also shuttles in and out of the nucleus, its functions within this compartment remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated how nuclear actin regulates keratinocyte gene expression and cell behavior. Gene expression profiling of normal HaCaT keratinocytes compared to HaCaTs over-expressing wild-type β-actin or β-actin tagged with a nuclear localization sequence (NLS-actin), identified multiple adhesive and cytoskeletal genes, such as MYL9, ITGB1, and VCL, which were significantly down-regulated in keratinocytes with high levels of nuclear actin. In addition, genes associated with transcriptional regulation and apoptosis were up-regulated in cells over expressing NLS-actin. Functionally, accumulation of actin in the nucleus altered cytoskeletal and focal adhesion organization and inhibited cell motility. Exclusion of endogenous actin from the nucleus by knocking down Importin 9 reversed this phenotype and enhanced cell migration. Based on these findings, we conclude that the level of actin in the nucleus is a transcriptional regulator for tuning keratinocyte migration. PMID:27650314

  18. p63 Transcription Factor Regulates Nuclear Shape and Expression of Nuclear Envelope-Associated Genes in Epidermal Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Valentina; Malashchuk, Igor; Asamaowei, Inemo E; Poterlowicz, Krzysztof; Fessing, Michael Y; Sharov, Andrey A; Karakesisoglou, Iakowos; Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Mardaryev, Andrei

    2017-10-01

    The maintenance of a proper nuclear architecture and three-dimensional organization of the genes, enhancer elements, and transcription machinery plays an essential role in tissue development and regeneration. Here we show that in the developing skin, epidermal progenitor cells of mice lacking p63 transcription factor display alterations in the nuclear shape accompanied by a marked decrease in expression of several nuclear envelope-associated components (Lamin B1, Lamin A/C, Sun1, Nesprin-3, Plectin) compared with controls. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR assay showed enrichment of p63 on Sun1, Syne3, and Plec promoters, suggesting them as p63 targets. Alterations in the nuclei shape and expression of nuclear envelope-associated proteins were accompanied by altered distribution patterns of the repressive histone marks trimethylation on lysine 27 of histone H3, trimethylation on lysine 9 of histone H3, and heterochromatin protein 1-alpha in p63-null keratinocytes. These changes were also accompanied by downregulation of the transcriptional activity and relocation of the keratinocyte-specific gene loci away from the sites of active transcription toward the heterochromatin-enriched repressive nuclear compartments in p63-null cells. These data demonstrate functional links between the nuclear envelope organization, chromatin architecture, and gene expression in keratinocytes and suggest nuclear envelope-associated genes as important targets mediating p63-regulated gene expression program in the epidermis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Roscovitine Inhibits EBNA1 Serine 393 Phosphorylation, Nuclear Localization, Transcription, and Episome Maintenance▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Myung-Soo; Lee, Eun Kyung; Soni, Vishal; Lewis, Timothy A.; Koehler, Angela N.; Srinivasan, Viswanathan; Kieff, Elliott

    2011-01-01

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection causes human lymphomas and carcinomas. EBV usually persists as an episome in malignant cells. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBNA1 binding to multiple cognate sites in oriP. To search for inhibitors of EBNA1- and oriP-dependent episome maintenance or transcription, a library of 40,550 small molecules was screened for compounds that inhibit EBNA1- and oriP-dependent transcription and do not inhibit EBNA1- and oriP-independent transcription. This screening identified roscovitine, a selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), CDK2, CDK5, and CDK7. Based on motif predictions of EBNA1 serine 393 as a CDK phosphorylation site and 486RALL489 and 580KDLVM584 as potential cyclin binding domains, we hypothesized that cyclin binding to EBNA1 may enable CDK1, -2, -5, or -7 to phosphorylate serine 393. We found that Escherichia coli-expressed EBNA1 amino acids 387 to 641 were phosphorylated in vitro by CDK1-, -2-, -5-, and -7/cyclin complexes and serine 393 phosphorylation was roscovitine inhibited. Further, S393A mutation abrogated phosphorylation. S393A mutant EBNA1 was deficient in supporting EBNA1- and oriP-dependent transcription and episome persistence, and roscovitine had little further effect on the diminished S393A mutant EBNA1-mediated transcription or episome persistence. Immunoprecipitated FLAG-EBNA1 was phosphorylated in vitro, and roscovitine inhibited this phosphorylation. Moreover, roscovitine decreased nuclear EBNA1 and often increased cytoplasmic EBNA1, whereas S393A mutant EBNA1 was localized equally in the nucleus and cytoplasm and was unaffected by roscovitine treatment. These data indicate that roscovitine effects are serine 393 specific and that serine 393 is important in EBNA1- and oriPCp-dependent transcription and episome persistence. PMID:21209116

  20. Roscovitine inhibits EBNA1 serine 393 phosphorylation, nuclear localization, transcription, and episome maintenance.

    PubMed

    Kang, Myung-Soo; Lee, Eun Kyung; Soni, Vishal; Lewis, Timothy A; Koehler, Angela N; Srinivasan, Viswanathan; Kieff, Elliott

    2011-03-01

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection causes human lymphomas and carcinomas. EBV usually persists as an episome in malignant cells. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBNA1 binding to multiple cognate sites in oriP. To search for inhibitors of EBNA1- and oriP-dependent episome maintenance or transcription, a library of 40,550 small molecules was screened for compounds that inhibit EBNA1- and oriP-dependent transcription and do not inhibit EBNA1- and oriP-independent transcription. This screening identified roscovitine, a selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), CDK2, CDK5, and CDK7. Based on motif predictions of EBNA1 serine 393 as a CDK phosphorylation site and (486)RALL(489) and (580)KDLVM(584) as potential cyclin binding domains, we hypothesized that cyclin binding to EBNA1 may enable CDK1, -2, -5, or -7 to phosphorylate serine 393. We found that Escherichia coli-expressed EBNA1 amino acids 387 to 641 were phosphorylated in vitro by CDK1-, -2-, -5-, and -7/cyclin complexes and serine 393 phosphorylation was roscovitine inhibited. Further, S393A mutation abrogated phosphorylation. S393A mutant EBNA1 was deficient in supporting EBNA1- and oriP-dependent transcription and episome persistence, and roscovitine had little further effect on the diminished S393A mutant EBNA1-mediated transcription or episome persistence. Immunoprecipitated FLAG-EBNA1 was phosphorylated in vitro, and roscovitine inhibited this phosphorylation. Moreover, roscovitine decreased nuclear EBNA1 and often increased cytoplasmic EBNA1, whereas S393A mutant EBNA1 was localized equally in the nucleus and cytoplasm and was unaffected by roscovitine treatment. These data indicate that roscovitine effects are serine 393 specific and that serine 393 is important in EBNA1- and oriPCp-dependent transcription and episome persistence.

  1. Nuclear transcription factor Nrf2 suppresses prostate cancer cells growth and migration through upregulating ferroportin.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dong; Zhou, Cuixing; Shi, Yunbo; Lu, Hao; Xu, Renfang; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-11-29

    VTo investigate the effect of nuclear transcription factor Nrf2 on the transcription of Ferroportin (FPN) in prostate cancer cells, and the regulation mechanisms of FPN on cell viability, migration and apoptosis of prostate cancer cells.Empty vectors, pEGFPC1-Nrf2, pEGFPC1-FPN, Si-FPN and Si-Nrf2 were transfected into prostate cancer cell line PC3. The expression of mRNA and protein were measured by real time-PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot. Cell viability, migration, cycle and apoptosis were tested by CCK-8 assay, wound healing and flow cytometry, respectively. The interaction between FPN and Nrf2 was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assay.The viability, migration and mitosis of PC3 cells could be repressed by over-expressed FPN, with decreased intracellular ferritin. The CHIP assay demonstrated that Nrf2 is one transcription factor of FPN and promotes its transcription. With the increase of Nrf2 in PC3 cells, the viability, migration ability and concentration of ferritin were suppressed, while the apoptosis rate was increased. The above effects were counteracted by down-regulating FPN.FPN could inhibit the prostate cancer cell viability, migration and mitosis, which is also related to a decrease of intracellular ferritin content. In conclusion, Nrf2 suppresses prostate cancer cells viability, migration, and mitosis through upregulating FPN.

  2. Identifying Novel Transcriptional and Epigenetic Features of Nuclear Lamina-associated Genes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feinan; Yao, Jie

    2017-12-01

    Because a large portion of the mammalian genome is associated with the nuclear lamina (NL), it is interesting to study how native genes resided there are transcribed and regulated. In this study, we report unique transcriptional and epigenetic features of nearly 3,500 NL-associated genes (NL genes). Promoter regions of active NL genes are often excluded from NL-association, suggesting that NL-promoter interactions may repress transcription. Active NL genes with higher RNA polymerase II (Pol II) recruitment levels tend to display Pol II promoter-proximal pausing, while Pol II recruitment and Pol II pausing are not correlated among non-NL genes. At the genome-wide scale, NL-association and H3K27me3 distinguishes two large gene classes with low transcriptional activities. Notably, NL-association is anti-correlated with both transcription and active histone mark levels among genes not significantly enriched with H3K9me3 or H3K27me3, suggesting that NL-association may represent a novel gene repression pathway. Interestingly, an NL gene subgroup is not significantly enriched with H3K9me3 or H3K27me3 and is transcribed at higher levels than the rest of NL genes. Furthermore, we identified distal enhancers associated with active NL genes and reported their epigenetic features.

  3. Identification, localization, transcription, and sequence analysis of the Choristoneura fumiferana nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNA polymerase gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, J J; Carstens, E B

    1995-06-01

    The location of the Choristoneura fumiferana baculovirus DNA polymerase gene was determined by hybridization analysis using a probe prepared from the previously identified polymerase gene from the Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the Choristoneura fumiferana baculovirus DNA polymerase gene consists of 2970 base pairs encoding 990 amino acids (114.2 kDa). Transcriptional analysis demonstrated that overlapping transcripts of 3.2 and 4.6 kb, first detected at 6 hr postinfection, potentially coded for the DNA polymerase gene. The major transcription starts sites, identified at 6 hr postinfection, mapped to baculovirus consensus early start sites CGTGCTCA and CAGT. The relatively low level and late initiation of the DNA polymerase gene coupled with our previous data on the temporal control of DNA replication and late gene synthesis (Liu and Carstens, 1993) suggests that the low virulence of the spruce budworm baculovirus may be related to the regulation of its gene expression at the transcriptional level.

  4. Nuclear transcription factor Nrf2 suppresses prostate cancer cells growth and migration through upregulating ferroportin

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Dong; Zhou, Cuixing; Shi, Yunbo; Lu, Hao; Xu, Renfang; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    VTo investigate the effect of nuclear transcription factor Nrf2 on the transcription of Ferroportin (FPN) in prostate cancer cells, and the regulation mechanisms of FPN on cell viability, migration and apoptosis of prostate cancer cells. Empty vectors, pEGFPC1-Nrf2, pEGFPC1-FPN, Si-FPN and Si-Nrf2 were transfected into prostate cancer cell line PC3. The expression of mRNA and protein were measured by real time-PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot. Cell viability, migration, cycle and apoptosis were tested by CCK-8 assay, wound healing and flow cytometry, respectively. The interaction between FPN and Nrf2 was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assay. The viability, migration and mitosis of PC3 cells could be repressed by over-expressed FPN, with decreased intracellular ferritin. The CHIP assay demonstrated that Nrf2 is one transcription factor of FPN and promotes its transcription. With the increase of Nrf2 in PC3 cells, the viability, migration ability and concentration of ferritin were suppressed, while the apoptosis rate was increased. The above effects were counteracted by down-regulating FPN. FPN could inhibit the prostate cancer cell viability, migration and mitosis, which is also related to a decrease of intracellular ferritin content. In conclusion, Nrf2 suppresses prostate cancer cells viability, migration, and mitosis through upregulating FPN. PMID:27788496

  5. Gene loops function to maintain transcriptional memory through interaction with the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Tan-Wong, Sue Mei; Wijayatilake, Hashanthi D.; Proudfoot, Nick J.

    2009-01-01

    Inducible genes in yeast retain a “memory” of recent transcriptional activity during periods of short-term repression, allowing them to be reactivated faster when reinduced. This confers a rapid and versatile gene expression response to the environment. We demonstrate that this memory mechanism is associated with gene loop interactions between the promoter and 3′ end of the responsive genes HXK1 and GAL1∷FMP27. The maintenance of these memory gene loops (MGLs) during intervening periods of transcriptional repression is required for faster RNA polymerase II (Pol II) recruitment to the genes upon reinduction, thereby facilitating faster mRNA accumulation. Notably, a sua7-1 mutant or the endogenous INO1 gene that lacks this MGL does not display such faster reinduction. Furthermore, these MGLs interact with the nuclear pore complex through association with myosin-like protein 1 (Mlp1). An mlp1Δ strain does not maintain MGLs, and concomitantly loses transcriptional memory. We predict that gene loop conformations enhance gene expression by facilitating rapid transcriptional response to changing environmental conditions. PMID:19933151

  6. Cell-free production of transducible transcription factors for nuclear reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William C.; Patel, Kedar G.; Lee, Jieun; Ghebremariam, Yohannes T.; Wong, H. Edward; Cooke, John P.; Swartz, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Ectopic expression of a defined set of transcription factors chosen from Oct3/4, Sox2, c-Myc, Klf4, Nanog, and Lin28 can directly reprogram somatic cells to pluripotency. These reprogrammed cells are referred to as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). To date, iPSCs have been successfully generated using lentiviruses, retroviruses, adenoviruses, plasmids, transposons, and recombinant proteins. Nucleic acid-based approaches raise concerns about genomic instability. In contrast, a protein-based approach for iPSC generation can avoid DNA integration concerns as well as provide greater control over the concentration, timing, and sequence of transcription factor stimulation. Researchers recently demonstrated that polyarginine peptide conjugation can deliver recombinant protein reprogramming factor (RF) cargoes into cells and reprogram somatic cells into iPSCs. However, the protein-based approach requires a significant amount of protein for the reprogramming process. Producing fusion reprogramming factors in the large amounts required for this approach using traditional heterologous in vivo production methods is difficult and cumbersome since toxicity, product aggregation, and proteolysis by endogenous proteases limit yields. In this work, we show that cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) is a viable option for producing soluble and functional transducible transcription factors for nuclear reprogramming. We used an E. coli-based cell-free protein synthesis system to express the above set of six human RFs as fusion proteins, each with a nona-arginine (R9) protein transduction domain. Using the flexibility offered by the CFPS platform, we successfully addressed proteolysis and protein solubility problems to produce full-length and soluble R9-RF fusions. We subsequently showed that R9-Oct3/4, R9-Sox2, and R9-Nanog exhibit cognate DNA binding activities, R9-Nanog translocates across the plasma and nuclear membranes, and R9-Sox2 exerts transcriptional activity on a known

  7. Transcriptional activation of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 by nuclear receptor TLX

    SciTech Connect

    Iwahara, Naotoshi; Hisahara, Shin; Hayashi, Takashi; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2009-09-04

    An orphan nuclear receptor TLX is a transcriptional repressor that promotes the proliferation and self-renewal of neural precursor cells (NPCs). SIRT1, an NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase, is highly expressed in the NPCs and participates in neurogenesis. Here, we found that TLX colocalized with SIRT1 and knockdown of TLX by small interfering RNAs decreased SIRT1 levels in NPCs. TLX increased the SIRT1 expression by binding to the newly identified TLX-activating element in the SIRT1 gene promoter in HEK293 cells. Thus, TLX is an inducer of SIRT1 and may contribute to neurogenesis both as a transactivator and as a repressor.

  8. Inositol polyphosphate multikinase (IPMK) in transcriptional regulation and nuclear inositide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Malabanan, M. Merced; Blind, Raymond D.

    2017-01-01

    Inositol polyphosphate multikinase (IPMK, ipk2, Arg82, ArgRIII) is an inositide kinase with unusually flexible substrate specificity and the capacity to partake in many functional protein–protein interactions (PPIs). By merging these two activities, IPMK is able to execute gene regulatory functions that are very unique and only now beginning to be recognized. In this short review, we present a brief history of IPMK, describe the structural biology of the enzyme and highlight a few recent discoveries that have shed more light on the role IPMK plays in inositide metabolism, nuclear signalling and transcriptional regulation. PMID:26862216

  9. Non-nuclear Pool of Splicing Factor SFPQ Regulates Axonal Transcripts Required for Normal Motor Development.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Jinu, Swapna; Gordon, Patricia M; Fielding, Triona; Taylor, Richard; Smith, Bradley N; Snowden, Victoria; Blanc, Eric; Vance, Caroline; Topp, Simon; Wong, Chun-Hao; Bielen, Holger; Williams, Katherine L; McCann, Emily P; Nicholson, Garth A; Pan-Vazquez, Alejandro; Fox, Archa H; Bond, Charles S; Talbot, William S; Blair, Ian P; Shaw, Christopher E; Houart, Corinne

    2017-04-04

    Recent progress revealed the complexity of RNA processing and its association to human disorders. Here, we unveil a new facet of this complexity. Complete loss of function of the ubiquitous splicing factor SFPQ affects zebrafish motoneuron differentiation cell autonomously. In addition to its nuclear localization, the protein unexpectedly localizes to motor axons. The cytosolic version of SFPQ abolishes motor axonal defects, rescuing key transcripts, and restores motility in the paralyzed sfpq null mutants, indicating a non-nuclear processing role in motor axons. Novel variants affecting the conserved coiled-coil domain, so far exclusively found in fALS exomes, specifically affect the ability of SFPQ to localize in axons. They broadly rescue morphology and motility in the zebrafish mutant, but alter motor axon morphology, demonstrating functional requirement for axonal SFPQ. Altogether, we uncover the axonal function of the splicing factor SFPQ in motor development and highlight the importance of the coiled-coil domain in this process.

  10. [Expression and role of nuclear transcription factor Sp1 in macrophages stimulated by silicon dioxide].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-sheng; Zeng, Qing-fu; Feng, De-yun; Hu, Yong-bin; Wen, Ji-fang

    2006-09-01

    To study the expression and localization of nuclear transcription factor Sp1 in macrophages after stimulated by silicon dioxide in vivo and in vitro. Forty Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into the control group and the silica exposure group, 20 in each group. The rat silicosis models were established by direct tracheal instillation of silica into rat lung (0.2 g/kg) only once while the control group was instilled with equal amount of saline. Animals were killed at 1st, 7th, 14th, 21st and 28th day after instillation. Dynamic changes of Sp1 protein expression and its cellular localization were detected by immunohistochemistry in pulmonary macrophages. In vitro, Sp1 mRNA and protein expression and their dynamic changes were monitored by RT-PCR and western blotting after stimulated by silicon dioxide in cultured RAW264.7 macrophages respectively. Cellular localization of Sp1 protein was characterized by immunocytochemistry. Compared to the control group, the Sp1 protein expression was increased in pulmonary macrophages and reached the peak at the 14th day in the silica exposure group. In vitro, the Sp1 mRNA level began to rise at 30 minutes after the administration of silicon dioxide and reached the peak at 240 minutes and then decreased to the minimal level at 960 minutes. The Sp1 total protein and nuclear protein also exhibited the similar trend. The former reached the peak at 240 minutes and the latter at 480 minutes. The significant nuclear translocation of Sp1 protein was observed at 120 minutes after the administration of silicon dioxide and became most significant at 480 minutes. Silicon dioxide can activate nuclear transcription factor Sp1 in macrophages in vivo and in vitro. Sp1 might play an important pathogenic role in the development of silicosis.

  11. Hydration status affects nuclear distribution of transcription factor tonicity responsive enhancer binding protein in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Cha, J H; Woo, S K; Han, K H; Kim, Y H; Handler, J S; Kim, J; Kwon, H M

    2001-11-01

    Tonicity responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is the transcription factor that regulates tonicity responsive expression of proteins that catalyze cellular accumulation of compatible osmolytes. In cultured MDCK cells, hypertonicity stimulates the activity of TonEBP via a combination of increased protein abundance and increased nuclear localization. For investigating regulation of TonEBP in the kidney, rats were subjected to water loading or dehydration. Water loading lowered urine osmolality and mRNA expression of sodium/myo-inositol cotransporter (SMIT), a target gene of TonEBP, in the renal medulla; dehydration doubled the urine osmolality and increased SMIT mRNA expression. In contrast, overall abundance of TonEBP and its mRNA measured by immunoblot and ribonuclease protection assay, respectively, was not affected. Immunohistochemical analysis, however, revealed that nuclear distribution of TonEBP is generally increased throughout the medulla in dehydrated animals compared with water loaded animals. Increased nuclear localization was particularly dramatic in thin limbs. Notable exceptions were the middle to terminal portions of the inner medullary collecting ducts and blood vessels, where a change in TonEBP distribution was not evident. Immunohistochemical detection of SMIT mRNA revealed that the changes in nuclear distribution of TonEBP correlate with expression of SMIT. It is concluded that under physiologic conditions, nucleocytoplasmic distribution is the dominant mode of regulation of TonEBP in the renal medulla.

  12. Nuclear F-actin enhances the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by increasing its nuclear localization and binding to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; de Lanerolle, Primal; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Actin plays multiple roles both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic actin, in addition to its structural role in the cytoskeleton, also contributes to the subcellular localization of transcription factors by interacting with them or their partners. The transcriptional cofactor β-catenin, which acts as an intracellular transducer of canonical Wnt signaling, indirectly associates with the cytoplasmic filamentous actin (F-actin). Recently, it has been observed that F-actin is transiently formed within the nucleus in response to serum stimulation and integrin signaling, and also during gene reprogramming. Despite these earlier observations, information about the function of nuclear F-actin is poorly defined. Here, by facilitating the accumulation of nuclear actin artificially, we demonstrate that polymerizing nuclear actin enhanced the nuclear accumulation and transcriptional function of β-catenin. Our results also show that the nuclear F-actin colocalizes with β-catenin and enhances the binding of β-catenin to the downstream target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including the genes for the cell cycle regulators c-myc and cyclin D, and the OCT4 gene. Nuclear F-actin itself also associated with these genes. Since Wnt/β-catenin signaling has important roles in cell differentiation and pluripotency, our observations suggest that nuclear F-actin formed during these biological processes is involved in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  13. Aging adult porcine fibroblasts can support nuclear transfer and transcription factor-mediated reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Zhang, Pengfei; Jiang, Shaoshuai; Ding, Biao; Zuo, Xiaoyuan; Li, Yunsheng; Cao, Zubing; Zhang, Yunhai

    2017-10-03

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) technology are two classical reprogramming methods. Donor cell types can affect the reprogramming results in the above two methods. We here used porcine embryonic fibroblasts (PEFs) and adult porcine ear skin fibroblasts (APEFs) and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) as donor cells for SCNT and source cells for iPSCs to study their in vitro developmental capability and colony-formation efficiency, respectively. For SCNT, fusion and cleavage rate has no significant difference among PEFs, ADSCs and APEFs. The rate and total cell number of blastocysts in the APEF group were significant lower than that in PEFs and ADSCs. For transcription factor-mediated reprogramming, the reprogramming efficiency of ADSCs were significantly higher than PEFs and APEFs and there is no significant difference between PEFs and APEFs. Furthermore, PEFs, APEFs and ADSCs can be used to generate iPSCs. Fianlly, somatic cloned pigs could still be successfully generated from APEFs, suggesting terminally differentiated aging adult somatic cells could be reprogrammed into a totipotent state. Considering the easy availability of animal tissue and the costs of establishing cell lines, aging porcine ear fibroblasts can support nuclear transfer-mediated and transcription factor-based reprogramming. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  14. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-3 homologue 1 (HFH-1) represses transcription of smooth muscle-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Hoggatt, A M; Kriegel, A M; Smith, A F; Herring, B P

    2000-10-06

    Results show that smooth muscle-specific promoters represent novel downstream targets of the winged helix factor hepatocyte nuclear factor-3 homologue 1 (HFH-1). HFH-1 strongly represses telokin promoter activity when overexpressed in A10 vascular smooth muscle cells. HFH-1 was also found to repress transcription of several other smooth muscle-specific promoters, including the SM22alpha promoter. HFH-1 inhibits telokin promoter activity, by binding to a forkhead consensus site located within an AT-rich region of the telokin promoter. The DNA-binding domain alone was sufficient to mediate inhibition, suggesting that binding of HFH-1 blocks the binding of other positive-acting factors. HFH-1 does not disrupt serum response factor binding to an adjacent CArG box within the telokin promoter, implying that HFH-1 must compete with other unidentified trans-activators to mediate repression. The localization of HFH-1 mRNA to the epithelial cell layer of mouse bladder and stomach implicates HFH-1 in repressing telokin expression in epithelial cells. This suggests that cell-specific expression of telokin is likely mediated by both positive-acting factors in smooth muscle cells and negative-acting factors in nonmuscle cell types. We propose a model in which the smooth muscle specificity of the telokin promoter is regulated by interactions between positive- and negative-acting members of the hepatocyte nuclear factor-3/forkhead family of transcription factors.

  15. Diversification of fasting regulated transcription in a cluster of duplicated nuclear hormone receptors in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Vohanka, Jaroslav; Simecková, Katerina; Machalová, Eliska; Behenský, Frantisek; Krause, Michael W; Kostrouch, Zdenek; Kostrouchová, Marta

    2010-09-01

    The genome of Caenorhabditis elegans encodes more than 280 nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in contrast to the 48 NHRs in humans and 18 NHRs in Drosophila. The majority of the C. elegans NHRs are categorized as supplementary nuclear receptors (supnrs) that evolved by successive duplications of a single ancestral gene. The evolutionary pressures that lead to the expansion of NHRs in nematodes, as well as the function of the majority of supnrs, are not known. Here, we have studied the expression of seven genes organized in a cluster on chromosome V: nhr-206, nhr-208, nhr-207, nhr-209, nhr-154, nhr-153 and nhr-136. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR and analyses using transgenic lines carrying GFP fusion genes with their putative promoters revealed that all seven genes of this cluster are expressed and five have partially overlapping expression patterns including in the pharynx, intestine, certain neurons, the anal sphincter muscle, and male specific cells. Four genes in this cluster are conserved between C. elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae whereas three genes are present only in C. elegans, the apparent result of a relatively recent expansion. Interestingly, we find that a subset of the conserved and non-conserved genes in this cluster respond transcriptionally to fasting in tissue-specific patterns. Our results reveal the diversification of the temporal, spatial, and metabolic gene expression patterns coupled with evolutionary drift within supnr family members. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A Photo-Degradable Gene Delivery System for Enhanced Nuclear Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hoyoung, Lee; Yeji, Kim; Patrick G., Schweickert; Stephen F., Konieczny; You-Yeon, Won

    2013-01-01

    There currently exists a significant gap in our understanding of how the detailed chemical characteristics of polycation gene carriers influence their delivery performances in overcoming an important cellular-level transport barrier, i.e., intranuclear gene transcription. In this study, a UV-degradable gene carrier material (ENE4-1) was synthesized by crosslinking low molecular weight branched polyethylenimine (bPEI-2k) molecules using UV-cleavable o-nitrobenzyl urethane (NBU) as the linker molecule. NBU degrades upon exposure to mild UV irradiation. Therefore, this UV-degradable carrier allows us to control the chemical characteristics of the polymer/DNA complex (polyplex) particles at desired locations within the intracellular environment. By using this photolytic DNA carrier, we found that the exact timing of the UV degradation significantly influences the gene transfection efficiencies of ENE4-1/DNA(pGL2) polyplexes in HeLa cells. Interestingly, even if the polyplexes were UV-degraded at different intracellular locations/times, their nuclear entry efficiency was not influenced by the location/timing of UV degradation. The UV treatment did not influence the size or binding strength of the polyplexes. However, we confirmed that the degradation of the carrier molecules impacts the chemical characteristics of the polyplexes (it produces carbamic acid and nitrosobenzyl aldehyde groups on ENE4-1). We believe that these anionic acid groups enhance the interaction of the polyplexes with nuclear transcription proteins and thus the final gene expression levels; this effect was found to occur, even though UV irradiation itself has a general effect of reducing transfection efficiencies. Excess (uncomplexed) ENE4-1 polymers appear to not play any role in the UV-enhanced gene transcription phenomenon. PMID:24172855

  17. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus (HBV) by LNA-mediated nuclear interference with HBV DNA transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhen; Xiang, Wenqing; Guo, Yajuan; Chen, Zhi; Liu, Wei; Lu, Daru

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} LNA-modified oligonucleotides can pass through the plasma membrane of cultured cells even without using transfection machinery. {yields} LNA-modified oligonucleotides passed efficiently across the cell membrane, and lipid-coating facilitated translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. {yields} LNA-oligonucleotide designed to target nuclear HBV DNA efficiently suppresses HBV replication and transcription in cultured hepatic cells. -- Abstract: Silencing target genes with small regulatory RNAs is widely used to investigate gene function and therapeutic drug development. Recently, triplex-based approaches have provided another attractive means to achieve targeted gene regulation and gene manipulation at the molecular and cellular levels. Nuclear entry of oligonucleotides and enhancement of their affinity to the DNA targets are key points of such approaches. In this study, we developed lipid-based transport of a locked-nucleic-acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotide for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA interference in human hepatocytes expressing HBV genomic DNA. In these cells, the LNA-modified oligonucleotides passed efficiently across the cell membrane, and lipid-coating facilitated translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The oligonucleotide specifically targeting HBV DNA clearly interfered with HBV DNA transcription as shown by a block in pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) production. The HBV DNA-targeted oligonucleotide suppressed HBV DNA replication and HBV protein production more efficiently than small interfering RNAs directed to the pgRNA. These results demonstrate that fusion with lipid can carry LNA-modified oligonucleotides to the nucleus where they regulate gene expression. Interfering with HBV DNA transcription by LNA-modified oligonucleotides has strong potential as a new strategy for HBV inhibition.

  18. Modulation of Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2-dependent transcription by protein arginine methyltransferase 5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Fang, Jia-Shih; Chen, Ling-Chih; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Catalytic active PRMT5 substantially binds to the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 augments the EBNA2-dependent transcription. ► PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 enhances the promoter occupancy of EBNA2 on its target promoters. -- Abstract: Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) 2 features an Arginine–Glycine repeat (RG) domain at amino acid positions 335–360, which is a known target for protein arginine methyltransferaser 5 (PRMT5). In this study, we performed protein affinity pull-down assays to demonstrate that endogenous PRMT5 derived from lymphoblastoid cells specifically associated with the protein bait GST-E2 RG. Transfection of a plasmid expressing PRMT5 induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in EBNA2-dependent transcription of both the LMP1 promoter in AKATA cells, which contain the EBV genome endogenously, and a Cp-Luc reporter plasmid in BJAB cells, which are EBV negative. Furthermore, we showed that there was a 2-fold enrichment of EBNA2 occupancy in target promoters in the presence of exogenous PRMT5. Taken together, we show that PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of EBNA2 RG domain to coordinate with EBNA2-mediated transcription. This modulation suggests that PRMT5 may play a role in latent EBV infection.

  19. DNA Damage-induced Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K SUMOylation Regulates p53 Transcriptional Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pelisch, Federico; Pozzi, Berta; Risso, Guillermo; Muñoz, Manuel Javier; Srebrow, Anabella

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that is a key player in the p53-triggered DNA damage response, acting as a cofactor for p53 in response to DNA damage. hnRNP K is a substrate of the ubiquitin E3 ligase MDM2 and, upon DNA damage, is de-ubiquitylated. In sharp contrast with the role and consequences of the other post-translational modifications, nothing is known about the role of SUMO conjugation to hnRNP K in p53 transcriptional co-activation. In the present work, we show that hnRNP K is modified by SUMO in lysine 422 within its KH3 domain, and sumoylation is regulated by the E3 ligase Pc2/CBX4. Most interestingly, DNA damage stimulates hnRNP K sumoylation through Pc2 E3 activity, and this modification is required for p53 transcriptional activation. Abrogation of hnRNP K sumoylation leads to an aberrant regulation of the p53 target gene p21. Our findings link the DNA damage-induced Pc2 activation to the p53 transcriptional co-activation through hnRNP K sumoylation. PMID:22825850

  20. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 post-transcriptionally regulates Drp1 expression in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, So Jung; Lee, Heejin; Jo, Doo Shin; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Han Byeol; Seo, Hae Mi; Rubinsztein, David C; Koh, Jae-Young; Lee, Eun Kyung; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2015-12-01

    Excessive mitochondrial fission is associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) possesses specific fission activity in the mitochondria and peroxisomes. Various post-translational modifications of Drp1 are known to modulate complex mitochondrial dynamics. However, the post-transcriptional regulation of Drp1 remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) regulates Drp1 expression at the post-transcriptional level. hnRNP A1 directly interacts with Drp1 mRNA at its 3'UTR region, and enhances translation potential without affecting mRNA stability. Down-regulation of hnRNP A1 induces mitochondrial elongation by reducing Drp1 expression. Moreover, depletion of hnRNP A1 suppresses 3-NP-mediated mitochondrial fission and dysfunction. In contrast, over-expression of hnRNP A1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation by increasing Drp1 expression. Additionally, hnRNP A1 significantly exacerbates 3-NP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in neuroblastoma cells. Interestingly, treatment with 3-NP induces subcellular translocation of hnRNP A1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, which accelerates the increase in Drp1 expression in hnRNP A1 over-expressing cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that hnRNP A1 controls mitochondrial dynamics by post-transcriptional regulation of Drp1.

  1. Deacetylase-Independent Function of HDAC3 in Transcription and Metabolism Requires Nuclear Receptor Corepressor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zheng; Feng, Dan; Fang, Bin; Mullican, Shannon E.; You, Seo-Hee; Lim, Hee-Woong; Everett, Logan J.; Nabel, Christopher S.; Li, Yun; Selvakumaran, Vignesh; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are believed to regulate gene transcription by catalyzing deacetylation reactions. HDAC3 depletion in mouse liver upregulates lipogenic genes and results in severe hepatosteatosis. Here we show that pharmacologic HDAC inhibition in primary hepatocytes causes histone hyperacetylation but does not upregulate expression of HDAC3 target genes. Meanwhile, deacetylase-dead HDAC3 mutants can rescue hepatosteatosis and repress lipogenic genes expression in HDAC3-depleted mouse liver, demonstrating that histone acetylation is insufficient to activate gene transcription. Mutations abolishing interactions with the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCOR or SMRT) render HDAC3 nonfunctional in vivo. Additionally, liver-specific knockout of NCOR, but not SMRT, causes metabolic and transcriptomal alterations resembling those of mice without hepatic HDAC3, demonstrating that interaction with NCOR is essential for deacetylase-independent function of HDAC3. These findings highlight non-enzymatic roles of a major HDAC in transcriptional regulation in vivo and warrant reconsideration of the mechanism of action of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:24268577

  2. Agonist ligands mediate the transcriptional response of nuclear receptor heterodimers through distinct stoichiometric assemblies with coactivators.

    PubMed

    Pavlin, Mark Remec; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Fernandez, Elias J

    2014-09-05

    The constitutive androstane (CAR) and retinoid X receptors (RXR) are ligand-mediated transcription factors of the nuclear receptor protein superfamily. Functional CAR:RXR heterodimers recruit coactivator proteins, such as the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC1). Here, we show that agonist ligands can potentiate transactivation through both coactivator binding sites on CAR:RXR, which distinctly bind two SRC1 molecules. We also observe that SRC1 transitions from a structurally plastic to a compact form upon binding CAR:RXR. Using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) we show that the CAR(tcp):RXR(9c)·SRC1 complex can encompass two SRC1 molecules compared with the CAR(tcp):RXR·SRC1, which binds only a single SRC1. Moreover, sedimentation coefficients and molecular weights determined by analytical ultracentrifugation confirm the SAXS model. Cell-based transcription assays show that disrupting the SRC1 binding site on RXR alters the transactivation by CAR:RXR. These data suggest a broader role for RXR within heterodimers, whereas offering multiple strategies for the assembly of the transcription complex. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Trinucleotide-repeat expanded and normal DMPK transcripts contain unusually long poly(A) tails despite differential nuclear residence.

    PubMed

    Gudde, Anke E E G; van Kessel, Ingeborg D G; André, Laurène M; Wieringa, Bé; Wansink, Derick G

    2017-06-01

    In yeast and higher eukaryotes nuclear retention of transcripts may serve in control over RNA decay, nucleocytoplasmic transport and premature cytoplasmic appearance of mRNAs. Hyperadenylation of RNA is known to be associated with nuclear retention, but the cause-consequence relationship between hyperadenylation and regulation of RNA nuclear export is still unclear. We compared polyadenylation status between normal and expanded DMPK transcripts in muscle cells and tissues derived from unaffected individuals and patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). DM1 is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by (CTG)n repeat expansion in the DMPK gene. DM1 etiology is characterized by an almost complete block of nuclear export of DMPK transcripts carrying a long (CUG)n repeat, including aberrant sequestration of RNA-binding proteins. We show here by use of cell fractionation, RNA size separation and analysis of poly(A) tail length that a considerable fraction of transcripts from the normal DMPK allele is also retained in the nucleus (~30%). They carry poly(A) tails with an unusually broad length distribution, ranging between a few dozen to >500 adenosine residues. Remarkably, expanded DMPK (CUG)n transcripts from the mutant allele, almost exclusively nuclear, carry equally long poly(A) tails. Our findings thus suggest that nuclear retention may be a common feature of regulation of DMPK RNA expression. The typical forced nuclear residence of expanded DMPK transcripts affects this regulation in tissues of DM1 patients, but not through hyperadenylation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. KPNB1-mediated nuclear import is required for motility and inflammatory transcription factor activity in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Stelma, Tamara; Leaner, Virna D.

    2017-01-01

    Karyopherin β1 is a nuclear import protein involved in the transport of proteins containing a nuclear localisation sequence. Elevated Karyopherin β1 expression has been reported in cancer and transformed cells and is essential for cancer cell proliferation and survival. Transcription factors such as NFĸB and AP-1 contain a nuclear localisation sequence and initiate the expression of multiple factors associated with inflammation and cancer cell biology. Our study investigated the effect of inhibiting nuclear import via Karyopherin β1 on cancer cell motility and inflammatory signaling using siRNA and the novel small molecule, Inhibitor of Nuclear Import-43, INI-43. Inhibition of Karyopherin β1 led to reduced migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells. Karyopherin β1 is essential for the translocation of NFĸB into the nucleus as nuclear import inhibition caused its cytoplasmic retention and decreased transcriptional activity. A similar decrease was seen in AP-1 transcriptional activity upon Karyopherin β1 inhibition. Consequently reduced interleukin-6, interleukin-1 beta, tumour necrosis factor alpha and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor expression, target genes of NFkB and AP-1, was observed. Migration studies inhibiting individual transcription factors suggested that INI-43 may affect a combination of signaling events. Our study provides further evidence that inhibiting KPNB1 has anti-cancer effects and shows promise as a chemotherapeutic target. PMID:28427184

  5. Spatial Profiling of Nuclear Receptor Transcription Patterns over the Course of Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Ronit; Hu, Jack; Krause, Henry M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has shown that many of the 18 family members of Drosophila nuclear receptor transcription factors function in a temporal hierarchy to coordinate developmental progression and growth with the rate limiting process of metabolism. To gain further insight into these interactions and processes, we have undertaken a whole-family analysis of nuclear receptor mRNA spatial expression patterns over the entire process of embryogenesis, as well as the 3rd instar wandering larva stage, by using high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization. Overall, the patterns of expression are remarkably consistent with previously mapped spatial activity profiles documented during the same time points, with similar hot spots and temporal profiles in endocrine and metabolically important tissues. Among the more remarkable of the findings is that the majority of mRNA expression patterns observed show striking subcellular distributions, indicating potentially critical roles in the control of protein synthesis and subsequent subcellular distributions. These patterns will serve as a useful reference for future studies on the tissue-specific roles and interactions of nuclear receptor proteins, partners, cofactors and ligands. PMID:23665880

  6. Orphan nuclear receptor TLX recruits histone deacetylases to repress transcription and regulate neural stem cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, GuoQiang; Yu, Ruth T.; Evans, Ronald M.; Shi, Yanhong

    2007-01-01

    TLX is a transcription factor that is essential for neural stem cell proliferation and self-renewal. However, the molecular mechanism of TLX-mediated neural stem cell proliferation and self-renewal is largely unknown. We show here that TLX recruits histone deacetylases (HDACs) to its downstream target genes to repress their transcription, which in turn regulates neural stem cell proliferation. TLX interacts with HDAC3 and HDAC5 in neural stem cells. The HDAC5-interaction domain was mapped to TLX residues 359–385, which contains a conserved nuclear receptor–coregulator interaction motif IXXLL. Both HDAC3 and HDAC5 have been shown to be recruited to the promoters of TLX target genes along with TLX in neural stem cells. Recruitment of HDACs led to transcriptional repression of TLX target genes, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21CIP1/WAF1(p21), and the tumor suppressor gene, pten. Either inhibition of HDAC activity or knockdown of HDAC expression led to marked induction of p21 and pten gene expression and dramatically reduced neural stem cell proliferation, suggesting that the TLX-interacting HDACs play an important role in neural stem cell proliferation. Moreover, expression of a TLX peptide containing the minimal HDAC5 interaction domain disrupted the TLX–HDAC5 interaction. Disruption of this interaction led to significant induction of p21 and pten gene expression and to dramatic inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a mechanism for neural stem cell proliferation through transcriptional repression of p21 and pten gene expression by TLX–HDAC interactions. PMID:17873065

  7. Discovery of Transcriptional Targets Regulated by Nuclear Receptors Using a Probabilistic Graphical Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mikyung; Huang, Ruili; Tong, Weida

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcriptional regulators that play vital roles in key biological processes such as growth, differentiation, metabolism, reproduction, and morphogenesis. Disruption of NRs can result in adverse health effects such as NR-mediated endocrine disruption. A comprehensive understanding of core transcriptional targets regulated by NRs helps to elucidate their key biological processes in both toxicological and therapeutic aspects. In this study, we applied a probabilistic graphical model to identify the transcriptional targets of NRs and the biological processes they govern. The Tox21 program profiled a collection of approximate 10 000 environmental chemicals and drugs against a panel of human NRs in a quantitative high-throughput screening format for their NR disruption potential. The Japanese Toxicogenomics Project, one of the most comprehensive efforts in the field of toxicogenomics, generated large-scale gene expression profiles on the effect of 131 compounds (in its first phase of study) at various doses, and different durations, and their combinations. We applied author-topic model to these 2 toxicological datasets, which consists of 11 NRs run in either agonist and/or antagonist mode (18 assays total) and 203 in vitro human gene expression profiles connected by 52 shared drugs. As a result, a set of clusters (topics), which consists of a set of NRs and their associated target genes were determined. Various transcriptional targets of the NRs were identified by assays run in either agonist or antagonist mode. Our results were validated by functional analysis and compared with TRANSFAC data. In summary, our approach resulted in effective identification of associated/affected NRs and their target genes, providing biologically meaningful hypothesis embedded in their relationships. PMID:26643261

  8. Nuclear transcription factors: a new approach to enhancing cellular responses to ALA-mediated photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay; Sato, Nobuyuki; Moore, Brian; Mack, Judith; Gasbarre, Christopher; Keevey, Samantha; Ortel, Bernhard; Sinha, Alok; Khachemoune, Amor

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using aminolevulinic acid (ALA) relies upon the uptake of ALA into cancer cells, where it is converted into a porphyrin intermediate, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) that is highly photosensitizing. For large or resistant tumors, however, ALA/PDT is often not completely effective due to inadequate PpIX levels. Therefore, new approaches to enhance the intracellular production of PpIX are sought. Here, we describe a general approach to improve intracellular PpIX accumulation via manipulations that increase the expression of an enzyme, coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO), that is rate-determining for PpIX production. We show that nuclear hormones that promote terminal differentiation, e.g. vitamin D or androgens, can also increase the accumulation of PpIX and the amount of killing of the target cells upon exposure to light. These hormones bind to intracellular hormone receptors that translocate to the nucleus, where they act as transcription factors to increase the expression of target genes. We have found that several other transcription factors associated with terminal differentiation, including members of the CCAAT enhancer binding (C/EBP) family, and a homeobox protein named Hoxb13, are also capable of enhancing PpIX accumulation. These latter transcription factors appear to interact directly with the CPO gene promoter, resulting in enhanced CPO transcriptional activity. Our data in several different cell systems, including epithelial cells of the skin and prostate cancer cells, indicate that enhancement of CPO expression and PpIX accumulation represents a viable new approach toward improving the efficacy of ALA/PDT.

  9. RGS12TS-S Localizes at Nuclear Matrix-Associated Subnuclear Structures and Represses Transcription: Structural Requirements for Subnuclear Targeting and Transcriptional Repression

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Tapan K.; Fisher, Rory A.

    2002-01-01

    RGS12TS-S, an 1,157-amino-acid RGS protein (regulator of G protein signaling), is a nuclear protein that exhibits a unique pattern of subnuclear organization into nuclear foci or dots when expressed endogenously or ectopically. We now report that RGS12TS-S is a nuclear matrix protein and identify structural determinants that target this protein to the nuclear matrix and to discrete subnuclear sites. We also determine the relationship between RGS12TS-S-decorated nuclear dots and known subnuclear domains involved in control of gene expression and provide the first evidence that RGS12TS-S is functionally involved in the regulation of transcription and cell cycle events. A novel nuclear matrix-targeting sequence was identified that is distinct from a second novel motif needed for targeting RGS12TS-S to nuclear dots. RGS12TS-S nuclear dots were distinct from Cajal bodies, SC-35 domains, promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies, Polycomb group domains, and DNA replication sites. However, RGS12TS-S inhibited S-phase DNA synthesis in various tumor cell lines independently of Rb and p53 proteins, and its prolonged expression promoted formation of multinucleated cells. Expression of RGS12TS-S dramatically reduced bromo-UTP incorporation into sites of transcription. RGS12TS-S, when tethered to a Gal4 DNA binding domain, dramatically inhibited basal transcription from a Gal4-E1b TATA promoter in a histone deacetylase-independent manner. Structural analysis revealed a role for the unique N-terminal domain of RGS12TS-S in its transcriptional repressor and cell cycle-regulating activities and showed that the RGS domain was dispensable for these functions. These results provide novel insights into the structure and function of RGS12TS-S in the nucleus and demonstrate that RGS12TS-S possesses biological activities distinct from those of other members of the RGS protein family. PMID:12024043

  10. Nuclear translocation uncovers the amyloid peptide Aβ42 as a regulator of gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Barucker, Christian; Harmeier, Anja; Weiske, Joerg; Fauler, Beatrix; Albring, Kai Frederik; Prokop, Stefan; Hildebrand, Peter; Lurz, Rudi; Heppner, Frank L; Huber, Otmar; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2014-07-18

    Although soluble species of the amyloid-β peptide Aβ42 correlate with disease symptoms in Alzheimer disease, little is known about the biological activities of amyloid-β (Aβ). Here, we show that Aβ peptides varying in lengths from 38 to 43 amino acids are internalized by cultured neuroblastoma cells and can be found in the nucleus. By three independent methods, we demonstrate direct detection of nuclear Aβ42 as follows: (i) biochemical analysis of nuclear fractions; (ii) detection of biotin-labeled Aβ in living cells by confocal laser scanning microscopy; and (iii) transmission electron microscopy of Aβ in cultured cells, as well as brain tissue of wild-type and transgenic APPPS1 mice (overexpression of amyloid precursor protein and presenilin 1 with Swedish and L166P mutations, respectively). Also, this study details a novel role for Aβ42 in nuclear signaling, distinct from the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Aβ42 specifically interacts as a repressor of gene transcription with LRP1 and KAI1 promoters. By quantitative RT-PCR, we confirmed that mRNA levels of the examined candidate genes were exclusively decreased by the potentially neurotoxic Aβ42 wild-type peptide. Shorter peptides (Aβ38 or Aβ40) and other longer peptides (nontoxic Aβ42 G33A substitution or Aβ43) did not affect mRNA levels. Overall, our data indicate that the nuclear translocation of Aβ42 impacts gene regulation, and deleterious effects of Aβ42 in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis may be influenced by altering the expression profiles of disease-modifying genes.

  11. Nuclear Translocation Uncovers the Amyloid Peptide Aβ42 as a Regulator of Gene Transcription*♦

    PubMed Central

    Barucker, Christian; Harmeier, Anja; Weiske, Joerg; Fauler, Beatrix; Albring, Kai Frederik; Prokop, Stefan; Hildebrand, Peter; Lurz, Rudi; Heppner, Frank L.; Huber, Otmar; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Although soluble species of the amyloid-β peptide Aβ42 correlate with disease symptoms in Alzheimer disease, little is known about the biological activities of amyloid-β (Aβ). Here, we show that Aβ peptides varying in lengths from 38 to 43 amino acids are internalized by cultured neuroblastoma cells and can be found in the nucleus. By three independent methods, we demonstrate direct detection of nuclear Aβ42 as follows: (i) biochemical analysis of nuclear fractions; (ii) detection of biotin-labeled Aβ in living cells by confocal laser scanning microscopy; and (iii) transmission electron microscopy of Aβ in cultured cells, as well as brain tissue of wild-type and transgenic APPPS1 mice (overexpression of amyloid precursor protein and presenilin 1 with Swedish and L166P mutations, respectively). Also, this study details a novel role for Aβ42 in nuclear signaling, distinct from the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Aβ42 specifically interacts as a repressor of gene transcription with LRP1 and KAI1 promoters. By quantitative RT-PCR, we confirmed that mRNA levels of the examined candidate genes were exclusively decreased by the potentially neurotoxic Aβ42 wild-type peptide. Shorter peptides (Aβ38 or Aβ40) and other longer peptides (nontoxic Aβ42 G33A substitution or Aβ43) did not affect mRNA levels. Overall, our data indicate that the nuclear translocation of Aβ42 impacts gene regulation, and deleterious effects of Aβ42 in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis may be influenced by altering the expression profiles of disease-modifying genes. PMID:24878959

  12. A novel function of the mitochondrial transcription factor Mtf1 in fission yeast; Mtf1 regulates the nuclear transcription of srk1.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenxia; Wang, Zhe; Jiang, Hengyi; Zhang, Jing; Bähler, Jürg; Chen, Dongrong; Murchie, Alastair I H

    2011-04-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Mtf1 and its homologues function as mitochondrial transcription factors for the mitochondrial RNA polymerase in the mitochondrion. Here we show that in fission yeast Mtf1 exerts a non-mitochondrial function as a nuclear factor that regulates transcription of srk1, which is a kinase involved in the stress response and cell cycle progression. We first found Mtf1 expression in the nucleus. A ChIP-chip approach identified srk1 as a putative Mtf1 target gene. Over expression of Mtf1 induced transcription of the srk1 gene and Mtf1 deletion led to a reduction in transcription of the srk1 gene in vivo. Mtf1 overexpression causes cell elongation in a srk1 dependent manner. Mtf1 overexpression can cause cytoplasmic accumulation of Cdc25. We also provide biochemical evidence that Mtf1 binds to the upstream sequence of srk1. This is the first evidence that a mitochondrial transcription factor Mtf1 can regulate a nuclear gene. Mtf1 may also have a role in cell cycle progression.

  13. Transcription of Nrdp1 by the androgen receptor is regulated by nuclear Filamin A in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Savoy, Rosalinda M.; Chen, Liqun; Siddiqui, Salma; Melgoza, Frank U.; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Drake, Christiana; Jathal, Maitreyee K.; Bose, Swagata; Steele, Thomas M.; Mooso, Benjamin A.; D’Abronzo, Leandro S.; Fry, William H.; Carraway, Kermit L.; Mudryj, Maria; Ghosh, Paramita M.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) progression is regulated by the androgen receptor (AR); however, patients undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for disseminated PCa eventually develop castration resistant PCa (CRPC). Studies showed that AR, a transcription factor, occupies distinct genomic loci in CRPC compared to hormone-naïve PCa; however, the cause for this distinction was unknown. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1 is a model AR target modulated by androgens in hormone-naïve PCa but not in CRPC. Using Nrdp1, we investigated how AR switches transcription programs during CRPC progression. The proximal Nrdp1 promoter contains an androgen response element (ARE); we demonstrated AR binding to this ARE in androgen-sensitive PCa. Analysis of hormone-naive human prostatectomy specimens revealed correlation between Nrdp1 and AR expression, supporting AR regulation of Nrdp1 levels in androgen-sensitive tissue. However, despite sustained AR levels, AR binding to the Nrdp1 promoter and Nrdp1 expression were suppressed in CRPC. Elucidation of the suppression mechanism demonstrated correlation of Nrdp1 levels with nuclear localization of the scaffolding protein Filamin A (FlnA) which, as we previously showed, is itself repressed following ADT in many CRPC tumors. Restoration of nuclear FlnA in CRPC stimulated AR binding to Nrdp1 ARE, increased its transcription, and augmented Nrdp1 protein expression and responsiveness to ADT, indicating that nuclear FlnA controls AR-mediated androgen-sensitive Nrdp1 transcription. Expressions of other AR-regulated genes lost in CRPC were also re-established by nuclear FlnA. Thus our data demonstrate that nuclear FlnA promotes androgen-dependent AR-regulated transcription in PCa, while loss of nuclear FlnA in CRPC alters the AR-regulated transcription program. PMID:25759396

  14. Transcription of Nrdp1 by the androgen receptor is regulated by nuclear filamin A in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Savoy, Rosalinda M; Chen, Liqun; Siddiqui, Salma; Melgoza, Frank U; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Drake, Christiana; Jathal, Maitreyee K; Bose, Swagata; Steele, Thomas M; Mooso, Benjamin A; D'Abronzo, Leandro S; Fry, William H; Carraway, Kermit L; Mudryj, Maria; Ghosh, Paramita M

    2015-06-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) progression is regulated by the androgen receptor (AR); however, patients undergoing androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) for disseminated PCa eventually develop castration-resistant PCa (CRPC). Results of previous studies indicated that AR, a transcription factor, occupies distinct genomic loci in CRPC compared with hormone-naïve PCa; however, the cause of this distinction was unknown. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1 is a model AR target modulated by androgens in hormone-naïve PCa but not in CRPC. Using Nrdp1, we investigated how AR switches transcription programs during CRPC progression. The proximal Nrdp1 promoter contains an androgen response element (ARE); we demonstrated AR binding to this ARE in androgen-sensitive PCa. Analysis of hormone-naive human prostatectomy specimens revealed correlation between Nrdp1 and AR expression, supporting AR regulation of NRDP1 levels in androgen-sensitive tissue. However, despite sustained AR levels, AR binding to the Nrdp1 promoter and Nrdp1 expression were suppressed in CRPC. Elucidation of the suppression mechanism demonstrated correlation of NRDP1 levels with nuclear localization of the scaffolding protein filamin A (FLNA) which, as we previously showed, is itself repressed following ADT in many CRPC tumors. Restoration of nuclear FLNA in CRPC stimulated AR binding to Nrdp1 ARE, increased its transcription, and augmented NRDP1 protein expression and responsiveness to ADT, indicating that nuclear FLNA controls AR-mediated androgen-sensitive Nrdp1 transcription. Expression of other AR-regulated genes lost in CRPC was also re-established by nuclear FLNA. Thus, our results indicate that nuclear FLNA promotes androgen-dependent AR-regulated transcription in PCa, while loss of nuclear FLNA in CRPC alters the AR-regulated transcription program. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  15. Interaction between the yeast mitochondrial and nuclear genomes influences the abundance of novel transcripts derived from the spacer region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, V S; Conrad-Webb, H; Docherty, R; Butow, R A

    1989-01-01

    We have identified stable transcripts from the so-called nontranscribed spacer region (NTS) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat in certain respiration-deficient strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These RNAs, which are transcribed from the same strand as is the 37S rRNA precursor, are 500 to 800 nucleotides long and extend from the 5' end of the 5S rRNA gene to three major termination sites about 1,780, 1,830, and 1,870 nucleotides from the 3' end of the 26S rRNA gene. A survey of various wild-type and respiration-deficient strains showed that NTS transcript abundance depended on the mitochondrial genotype and a single codominant nuclear locus. In strains with that nuclear determinant, NTS transcripts were barely detected in [rho+] cells, were slightly more abundant in various mit- derivatives, and were most abundant in petites. However, in one petite that was hypersuppressive and contained a putative origin of replication (ori5) within its 757-base-pair mitochondrial genome, NTS transcripts were no more abundant than in [rho+] cells. The property of low NTS transcript abundance in the hypersuppressive petite was unstable, and spontaneous segregants that contained NTS transcripts as abundant as in the other petites examined could be obtained. Thus, respiration deficiency per se is not the major factor contributing to the accumulation of these unusual RNAs. Unlike RNA polymerase I transcripts, the abundant NTS RNAs were glucose repressible, fractionated as poly(A)+ RNAs, and were sensitive to inhibition by 10 micrograms of alpha-amanitin per ml, a concentration that had no effect on rRNA synthesis. Abundant NTS RNAs are therefore most likely derived by polymerase II transcription. Images PMID:2473390

  16. Low Ozone Concentrations Stimulate Cytoskeletal Organization, Mitochondrial Activity and Nuclear Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Costanzo, M.; Cisterna, B.; Vella, A.; Cestari, T.; Covi, V.; Tabaracci, G.; Malatesta, M.

    2015-01-01

    Ozone therapy is a modestly invasive procedure based on the regeneration capabilities of low ozone concentrations and used in medicine as an alternative/adjuvant treatment for different diseases. However, the cellular mechanisms accounting for the positive effects of mild ozonization are still largely unexplored. To this aim, in the present study the effects of low ozone concentrations (1 to 20 µg O3/mL O2) on structural and functional cell features have been investigated in vitro by using morphological, morphometrical, cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques at bright field, fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Cells exposed to pure O2 or air served as controls. The results demonstrated that the effects of ozone administration are dependent on gas concentration, and the cytoskeletal organization, mitochondrial activity and nuclear transcription may be differently affected. This suggests that, to ensure effective and permanent metabolic cell activation, ozone treatments should take into account the cytological and cytokinetic features of the different tissues. PMID:26150162

  17. Superoxide dismutase 1 acts as a nuclear transcription factor to regulate oxidative stress resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Chi Kwan; Liu, Yuan; Thomas, Janice; Zhang, Yanjie; Zheng, X. F. Steven

    2015-01-01

    Summary Superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1) has been known for nearly half a century for catalysis of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide. Here we report a new Sod1 function in oxidative signaling: in response to elevated endogenous and exogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), Sod1 rapidly relocates into the nucleus, which is important for maintaining genomic stability. Interestingly, H2O2 is sufficient to promote Sod1 nuclear localization, indicating that it is responding to general ROS rather than Sod1 substrate superoxide. ROS signaling is mediated by Mec1/ATM and its effector Dun1/Cds1 kinase, through Dun1 interaction with Sod1 and regulation of Sod1 by phosphorylation at S60, 99. In the nucleus, Sod1 binds to the promoters and regulates the expression of oxidative resistance and repair genes. Altogether, our study unravels an unorthodox function of Sod1 as a transcription factor and elucidates the regulatory mechanism for its localization. PMID:24647101

  18. Nuclear factor one transcription factors: divergent functions in developmental versus adult stem cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Lachlan; Genovesi, Laura A.; Gronostajski, Richard M.; Wainwright, Brandon J.; Piper, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear factor one (NFI) transcription factors are a group of site-specific DNA-binding proteins that are emerging as critical regulators of stem cell biology. During development NFIs promote the production of differentiated progeny at the expense of stem cell fate, with Nfi null mice exhibiting defects such as severely delayed brain and lung maturation, skeletomuscular defects and renal abnormalities, phenotypes that are often consistent with patients with congenital Nfi mutations. Intriguingly, recent research suggests that in adult tissues NFI factors play a qualitatively different role than during development, with NFIs serving to promote the survival and maintenance of slow-cycling adult stem cell populations rather than their differentiation. Here we review the role of NFI factors in development, largely focusing on their role as promoters of stem cell differentiation, and attempt to reconcile this with the emerging role of NFIs in adult stem cell niches. PMID:25156673

  19. Zinc fingers 1, 2, 5 and 6 of transcriptional regulator, PRDM4, are required for its nuclear localisation

    SciTech Connect

    Tunbak, Hale; Georgiou, Christiana; Guan, Cui; Richardson, William David; Chittka, Alexandra

    2016-05-27

    PRDM4 is a member of the PRDM family of transcriptional regulators which control various aspects of cellular differentiation and proliferation. PRDM proteins exert their biological functions both in the cytosol and the nucleus of cells. All PRDM proteins are characterised by the presence of two distinct structural motifs, the PR/SET domain and the zinc finger (ZF) motifs. We previously observed that deletion of all six zinc fingers found in PRDM4 leads to its accumulation in the cytosol, whereas overexpressed full length PRDM4 is found predominantly in the nucleus. Here, we investigated the requirements for single zinc fingers in the nuclear localisation of PRDM4. We demonstrate that ZF's 1, 2, 5 and 6 contribute to the accumulation of PRDM4 in the nucleus. Their effect is additive as deleting either ZF1-2 or ZF 5–6 redistributes PRDM4 protein from being almost exclusively nuclear to cytosolic and nuclear. We investigated the potential mechanism of nuclear shuttling of PRDM4 via the importin α/β-mediated pathway and find that PRDM4 nuclear targeting is independent of α/β-mediated nuclear import. -- Highlights: •Zinc fingers 1, 2, 5, and 6 are necessary for efficient nuclear localisation of PRDM4. •Zinc fingers 3 and 4 are dispensable for nuclear localisation of PRDM4. •Zinc knuckle is dispensable for nuclear localisation of PRDM4. •PRDM4 nuclear transport is independent of importin α/β-mediated pathway of nuclear import.

  20. Nuclear respiratory factor 1 and endurance exercise promote human telomere transcription

    PubMed Central

    Diman, Aurélie; Boros, Joanna; Poulain, Florian; Rodriguez, Julie; Purnelle, Marin; Episkopou, Harikleia; Bertrand, Luc; Francaux, Marc; Deldicque, Louise; Decottignies, Anabelle

    2016-01-01

    DNA breaks activate the DNA damage response and, if left unrepaired, trigger cellular senescence. Telomeres are specialized nucleoprotein structures that protect chromosome ends from persistent DNA damage response activation. Whether protection can be enhanced to counteract the age-dependent decline in telomere integrity is a challenging question. Telomeric repeat–containing RNA (TERRA), which is transcribed from telomeres, emerged as important player in telomere integrity. However, how human telomere transcription is regulated is still largely unknown. We identify nuclear respiratory factor 1 and peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ coactivator 1α as regulators of human telomere transcription. In agreement with an upstream regulation of these factors by adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP)–activated protein kinase (AMPK), pharmacological activation of AMPK in cancer cell lines or in normal nonproliferating myotubes up-regulated TERRA, thereby linking metabolism to telomere fitness. Cycling endurance exercise, which is associated with AMPK activation, increased TERRA levels in skeletal muscle biopsies obtained from 10 healthy young volunteers. The data support the idea that exercise may protect against aging. PMID:27819056

  1. Nuclear respiratory factor 1 and endurance exercise promote human telomere transcription.

    PubMed

    Diman, Aurélie; Boros, Joanna; Poulain, Florian; Rodriguez, Julie; Purnelle, Marin; Episkopou, Harikleia; Bertrand, Luc; Francaux, Marc; Deldicque, Louise; Decottignies, Anabelle

    2016-07-01

    DNA breaks activate the DNA damage response and, if left unrepaired, trigger cellular senescence. Telomeres are specialized nucleoprotein structures that protect chromosome ends from persistent DNA damage response activation. Whether protection can be enhanced to counteract the age-dependent decline in telomere integrity is a challenging question. Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), which is transcribed from telomeres, emerged as important player in telomere integrity. However, how human telomere transcription is regulated is still largely unknown. We identify nuclear respiratory factor 1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α as regulators of human telomere transcription. In agreement with an upstream regulation of these factors by adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK), pharmacological activation of AMPK in cancer cell lines or in normal nonproliferating myotubes up-regulated TERRA, thereby linking metabolism to telomere fitness. Cycling endurance exercise, which is associated with AMPK activation, increased TERRA levels in skeletal muscle biopsies obtained from 10 healthy young volunteers. The data support the idea that exercise may protect against aging.

  2. Nuclear factor I and epithelial cell-specific transcription of human papillomavirus type 16.

    PubMed Central

    Apt, D; Chong, T; Liu, Y; Bernard, H U

    1993-01-01

    The transcription of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) is mediated by the viral enhancer. Epithelial cell-specific activation is achieved by the cooperative interaction of apparently ubiquitous transcriptional factors. One of them, nuclear factor I (NFI), binds seven sites within the HPV-16 enhancer. Point mutations on enhancer fragments, which retain epithelial cell specificity, verify the functional contribution of NFI. In band shift experiments, the epithelial cell-derived NFI proteins CTF-1, CTF-2, and CTF-3 form a characteristic pattern of heterodimeric complexes which are observed in all epithelial cells tested. Divergence from this pattern in fibroblasts, liver cells, and lymphoid cells correlates with the lack of HPV-16 enhancer activation. The HPV-16 enhancer can be activated by CTF-1 in SL-2 cells, which lack NFI-like proteins. However, exogenous CTF-1 fails to overcome the inactivity of the viral enhancer in fibroblasts. Western immunoblot and supershift analysis shows that exogenously introduced CTF-1 proteins form different heterodimer complexes with the given subset of endogenous NFI proteins in epithelial or fibroblast cells. Polymerase chain reaction analysis and cDNA library screens identified the endogenous fibroblast type NFI as NFI-X, an NFI family member originally cloned from hamster liver cells. The strict correlation between the activation or lack of activation of the HPV-16 enhancer and cell-specific subsets of NFI proteins argues for the pivotal role of NFI binding sites in the epithelial cell-specific function of the viral enhancer. Images PMID:8392590

  3. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Transcription Factor Nfatp Controls Superantigen-Induced Lethal Shock

    PubMed Central

    Tsytsykova, Alla V.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2000-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is the key mediator of superantigen-induced T cell lethal shock. Here, we show that nuclear factor of activated T cells transcription factor, NFATp, controls susceptibility to superantigen-induced lethal shock in mice through its activation of TNF-α gene transcription. In NFATp-deficient mice, T cell stimulation leads to delayed induction and attenuation of TNF-α mRNA levels, decreased TNF-α serum levels, and resistance to superantigen-induced lethal shock. By contrast, after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, serum levels of TNF-α and susceptibility to shock are unaffected. These results demonstrate that NFATp is an essential activator of immediate early TNF-α gene expression in T cells and they present in vivo evidence of the inducer- and cell type–specific regulation of TNF-α gene expression. Furthermore, they suggest NFATp as a potential selective target in the treatment of superantigen-induced lethal shock. PMID:10952728

  4. ROLE OF HEPATOCYTE NUCLEAR FACTOR 4α IN CONTROLLING COPPER-RESPONSIVE TRANSCRIPTION

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min Ok; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2010-01-01

    Previous global transcriptome and interactome analyses of copper-treated HepG2 cells identified hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) as a potential master regulator of copper-responsive transcription. Copper exposure caused a decrease in the expression of HNF4α at both mRNA and protein levels, which was accompanied by a decrease in the level of HNF4α binding to its consensus DNA binding sequence. qRT-PCR and RNAi studies demonstrated that changes in HNF4α expression ultimately affected the expressions of its down-stream target genes. Analysis of up-stream regulators of HNF4α expression, including p53 and ATF3, showed that copper caused an increase in the steady-state level of these proteins. These results support a model for copper-responsive transcription in which the metal affects ATF3 expression, and stabilizes p53 resulting in the down-regulation of HNF4α expression. Additionally, copper may directly affect p53 protein levels. The suppression of HNF4α activity may contribute to the molecular mechanism underlying the physiological and toxicological consequences of copper toxicity in hepatic-derived cells. PMID:20875833

  5. The convergent roles of the nuclear factor I transcription factors in development and cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kok-Siong; Lim, Jonathan W C; Richards, Linda J; Bunt, Jens

    2017-09-26

    The nuclear factor I (NFI) transcription factors play important roles during normal development and have been associated with developmental abnormalities in humans. All four family members, NFIA, NFIB, NFIC and NFIX, have a homologous DNA binding domain and function by regulating cell proliferation and differentiation via the transcriptional control of their target genes. More recently, NFI genes have also been implicated in cancer based on genomic analyses and studies of animal models in a variety of tumours across multiple organ systems. However, the association between their functions in development and in cancer is not well described. In this review, we summarise the evidence suggesting a converging role for the NFI genes in development and cancer. Our review includes all cancer types in which the NFI genes are implicated, focusing predominantly on studies demonstrating their oncogenic or tumour-suppressive potential. We conclude by presenting the challenges impeding our understanding of NFI function in cancer biology, and demonstrate how a developmental perspective may contribute towards overcoming such hurdles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional and structural characterization of the mammalian TREX-2 complex that links transcription with nuclear messenger RNA export

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Divyang; Lutz, Sheila; Hurt, Ed; Laskey, Ronald A.; Stewart, Murray; Wickramasinghe, Vihandha O.

    2012-01-01

    Export of messenger RNA (mRNA) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is a critical step in the gene expression pathway of eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the functional and structural characterization of the mammalian TREX-2 complex and show how it links transcription/processing with nuclear mRNA export. Mammalian TREX-2 is based on a germinal-centre associated nuclear protein (GANP) scaffold to which ENY2, PCID2 and centrins bind and depletion of any of these components inhibits mRNA export. The crystal structure of the GANP:ENY2 complex shows that two ENY2 chains interact directly with GANP, but they have different orientations from those observed on yeast Sac3. GANP is required to recruit ENY2 to nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), but ENY2 is not necessary to recruit GANP, which requires both its CID and MCM3AP domains, together with nucleoporin Nup153. GANP and ENY2 associate with RNA polymerase II and inhibition of mRNA processing redistributes GANP from NPCs into nuclear foci indicating that mammalian TREX-2 is associated with transcription. Thus, we implicate TREX-2 as an integral component of the mammalian mRNA export machinery where it links transcription and nuclear export by facilitating the transfer of mature mRNPs from the nuclear interior to NPCs. PMID:22307388

  7. Nuclear HMGA1 nonhistone chromatin proteins directly influence mitochondrial transcription, maintenance, and function

    SciTech Connect

    Dement, Gregory A.; Maloney, Scott C.; Reeves, Raymond . E-mail: reevesr@mail.wsu.edu

    2007-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that HMGA1 proteins translocate from the nucleus to mitochondria and bind to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) at the D-loop control region [G.A. Dement, N.R. Treff, N.S. Magnuson, V. Franceschi, R. Reeves, Dynamic mitochondrial localization of nuclear transcription factor HMGA1, Exp. Cell Res. 307 (2005) 388-401.] [11]. To elucidate possible physiological roles for such binding, we employed methods to analyze mtDNA transcription, mitochondrial maintenance, and other organelle functions in transgenic human MCF-7 cells (HA7C) induced to over-express an HA-tagged HMGA1 protein and control (parental) MCF-7 cells. Quantitative real-time (RT) PCR analyses demonstrated that mtDNA levels were reduced approximately 2-fold in HMGA1 over-expressing HA7C cells and flow cytometric analyses further revealed that mitochondrial mass was significantly reduced in these cells. Cellular ATP levels were also reduced in HA7C cells and survival studies showed an increased sensitivity to killing by 2-deoxy-D-glucose, a glycolysis-specific inhibitor. Flow cytometric analyses revealed additional mitochondrial abnormalities in HA7C cells that are consistent with a cancerous phenotype: namely, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased mitochondrial membrane potential ({delta}{psi}{sub m}). Additional RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that gene transcripts from both the heavy (ND2, COXI, ATP6) and light (ND6) strands of mtDNA were up-regulated approximately 3-fold in HA7C cells. Together, these mitochondrial changes are consistent with many previous reports and reveal several possible mechanisms by which HMGA1 over-expression, a common feature of naturally occurring cancers, may affect tumor progression.

  8. Expression Profiles of the Nuclear Receptors and Their Transcriptional Coregulators During Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Androutsellis-Theotokis, A.; Chrousos, G. P.; McKay, R. D.; DeCherney, A. H.; Kino, T.

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are pluripotent precursors with the ability to proliferate and differentiate into 3 neural cell lineages, neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying these biologic processes is essential for understanding both physiologic and pathologic neural development and regeneration after injury. Nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) and their transcriptional coregulators also play crucial roles in neural development, functions and fate. To identify key NRs and their transcriptional regulators in NSC differentiation, we examined mRNA expression of 49 NRs and many of their coregulators during differentiation (0–5 days) of mouse embryonic NSCs induced by withdrawal of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2). 37 out of 49 NRs were expressed in NSCs before induction of differentiation, while receptors known to play major roles in neural development, such as THRα, RXRs, RORs, TRs, and COUPTFs, were highly expressed. CAR, which plays important roles in xenobiotic metabolism, was also highly expressed. FGF2 withdrawal induced mRNA expression of RORγ, RXRγ, and MR by over 20-fold. Most of the transcriptional coregulators examined were expressed basally and throughout differentiation without major changes, while FGF2 withdrawal strongly induced mRNA expression of several histone deacetylases (HDACs), including HDAC11. Dexamethasone and aldosterone, respectively a synthetic glucocorticoid and natural mineralocorticoid, increased NSC numbers and induced differentiation into neurons and astrocytes. These results indicate that the NRs and their coregulators are present and/or change their expression during NSC differentiation, suggesting that they may influence development of the central nervous system in the absence or presence of their ligands. PMID:22990992

  9. The Oct-1 POU-specific domain can stimulate small nuclear RNA gene transcription by stabilizing the basal transcription complex SNAPc.

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, V; Cleary, M A; Herr, W; Hernandez, N

    1996-01-01

    The RNA polymerase II and III human small nuclear RNA promoters have a common basal element, the proximal sequence element, which binds the TATA box-binding protein-containing complex SNAPc. They also contain an enhancer characterized by a highly conserved octamer sequence, which constitutes a binding site for the broadly expressed POU domain transcription factor Oct-1. The POU domain is a bipartite DNA-binding domain consisting of a POU-homeo (POUH) domain and a POU-specific (POUs) domain joined by a flexible linker. Here, we show that the Oct-1 POU domain but not the related Pit-1 POU domain can facilitate the binding of SNAPc to the proximal sequence element, and activate transcription. The effect is probably mediated by protein-protein contacts, and 1 of 30 amino acid differences between the Oct-1 and Pit-1 POUs domains is the key determinant for the differential interaction with SNAPc and the ability to activate transcription. These results show that a function that is the hallmark of activation domains, namely, recruitment of a basal transcription complex resulting in activation of transcription, can be performed by a DNA-binding domain. In this case, subtle changes between activator DNA-binding domains, as subtle as a single amino acid difference, can profoundly affect interaction with the basal transcription machinery. PMID:8628262

  10. Effects of primary metabolites of organophosphate flame retardants on transcriptional activity via human nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Van den Eede, Nele; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-03-14

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have been used in a wide variety of applications and detected in several environmental matrices, including indoor air and dust. Continuous human exposure to these chemicals is of growing concern. In this study, the agonistic and/or antagonistic activities of 12 primary OPFR-metabolites against ten human nuclear receptors were examined using cell-based transcriptional assays, and compared to those of their parent compounds. As a result, 3-hydroxylphenyl diphenyl phosphate and 4-hydroxylphenyl diphenyl phosphate showed more potent estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ agonistic activity than did their parent, triphenyl phosphate (TPHP). In addition, these hydroxylated TPHP-metabolites also showed ERβ antagonistic activity at higher concentrations and exhibited pregnane X receptor (PXR) agonistic activity as well as androgen receptor (AR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonistic activities at similar levels to those of TPHP. Bis(2-butoxyethyl) 3'-hydroxy-2-butoxyethyl phosphate and 2-hydroxyethyl bis(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate act as PXR agonists at similar levels to their parent, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate. On the other hand, seven diester OPFR-metabolites and 1-hydroxy-2-propyl bis(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate did not show any receptor activity. Taken together, these results suggest that hydroxylated TPHP-metabolites show increased estrogenicity compared to the parent compound, whereas the diester OPFR-metabolites may have limited nuclear receptor activity compared to their parent triester OPFRs.

  11. Visualization of nuclear localization of transcription factors with cyan and green fluorescent proteins in the red alga Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Uji, Toshiki; Takahashi, Megumu; Saga, Naotsune; Mikami, Koji

    2010-04-01

    Transcription factors play a central role in expression of genomic information in all organisms. The objective of our study is to analyze the function of transcription factors in red algae. One way to analyze transcription factors in eukaryotic cells is to study their nuclear localization, as reported for land plants and green algae using fluorescent proteins. There is, however, no report documenting subcellular localization of transcription factors from red algae. In the present study, using the marine red alga Porphyra yezoensis, we confirmed for the first time successful expression of humanized fluorescent proteins (ZsGFP and ZsYFP) from a reef coral Zoanthus sp. and land plant-adapted sGFP(S65T) in gametophytic cells comparable to expression of AmCFP. Following molecular cloning and characterization of transcription factors DP-E2F-like 1 (PyDEL1), transcription elongation factor 1 (PyElf1) and multiprotein bridging factor 1 (PyMBF1), we then demonstrated that ZsGFP and AmCFP can be used to visualize nuclear localization of PyElf1 and PyMBF1. This is the first report to perform visualization of subcellular localization of transcription factors as genome-encoded proteins in red algae.

  12. Capsaicinoids improve egg production by regulating ovary nuclear transcription factors against heat stress in quail.

    PubMed

    Sahin, N; Orhan, C; Tuzcu, M; Juturu, V; Sahin, K

    2016-12-12

    To examine the molecular mechanism of capsaicinoid supplementation from capsicum extract, laying Japanese quail (n = 180, 5 weeks old) were reared either at 22°C for 24 h/d (thermoneutral, TN) or at 34°C for 8 h/d (heat stress, HS) and fed on one of three diets containing 0, 25 or 50 mg of capsaicinoids per kilogram for 12 weeks (2 × 3 factorial arrangement). The results revealed that exposure to HS decreased feed consumption by 10.7% and egg production by 13.6%, increased serum and ovary malondialdehyde (MDA) levels by 66.9% and 88.1%, respectively, and reduced ovary superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities by 28.3%, 48.7% and 43.8%, respectively. There were magnifications in the ovary nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cell (NF-κB) levels by 42.4% and suppressions in nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), protein kinase B (Akt) and haem-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) levels by 29.2%, 38.2% and 30.7%, respectively, in heat-stressed quail. With increasing supplemental capsaicinoids, there were linear increases in egg production, antioxidant enzyme activity, linear decreases in ovary MDA and NF-κB levels and linear increases in ovary Nrf2, Akt and HO-1 levels at a greater extent in quail reared under TN condition than those reared under HS condition. Two-way treatment interactions showed that the degree of restorations in all response variables was more notable under the HS environment than under the TN environment as supplemental capsaicinoid level was increased. In conclusion, capsaicinoid supplementation alleviates oxidative stress through regulating the ovary nuclear transcription factors in heat-stressed quail.

  13. Transcriptomic Changes Due to Cytoplasmic TDP-43 Expression Reveal Dysregulation of Histone Transcripts and Nuclear Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Amlie-Wolf, Alexandre; Ryvkin, Paul; Tong, Rui; Dragomir, Isabelle; Suh, EunRan; Xu, Yan; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Gregory, Brian D.; Kwong, Linda K.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Wang, Li-San; Lee, Edward B.

    2015-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is normally a nuclear RNA-binding protein that exhibits a range of functions including regulation of alternative splicing, RNA trafficking, and RNA stability. However, in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 inclusions (FTLD-TDP), TDP-43 is abnormally phosphorylated, ubiquitinated, and cleaved, and is mislocalized to the cytoplasm where it forms distinctive aggregates. We previously developed a mouse model expressing human TDP-43 with a mutation in its nuclear localization signal (ΔNLS-hTDP-43) so that the protein preferentially localizes to the cytoplasm. These mice did not exhibit a significant number of cytoplasmic aggregates, but did display dramatic changes in gene expression as measured by microarray, suggesting that cytoplasmic TDP-43 may be associated with a toxic gain-of-function. Here, we analyze new RNA-sequencing data from the ΔNLS-hTDP-43 mouse model, together with published RNA-sequencing data obtained previously from TDP-43 antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) knockdown mice to investigate further the dysregulation of gene expression in the ΔNLS model. This analysis reveals that the transcriptomic effects of the overexpression of the ΔNLS-hTDP-43 transgene are likely due to a gain of cytoplasmic function. Moreover, cytoplasmic TDP-43 expression alters transcripts that regulate chromatin assembly, the nucleolus, lysosomal function, and histone 3’ untranslated region (UTR) processing. These transcriptomic alterations correlate with observed histologic abnormalities in heterochromatin structure and nuclear size in transgenic mouse and human brains. PMID:26510133

  14. Bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) bromodomain inhibition activate transcription via transient release of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) from 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Bartholomeeusen, Koen; Xiang, Yanhui; Fujinaga, Koh; Peterlin, B Matija

    2012-10-19

    By phosphorylating elongation factors and the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) is the critical kinase for transcription elongation and co-transcriptional processing of eukaryotic genes. It exists in inactive small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (7SK snRNP) and active (free P-TEFb) complexes in cells. The P-TEFb equilibrium determines the state of cellular activation, proliferation, and differentiation. Free P-TEFb, which is required for growth, can be recruited to RNA polymerase II via transcription factors, BRD4, or the super elongation complex (SEC). UV light, various signaling cascades, transcriptional blockade, or compounds such as hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA), suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), and other histone deacetylase inhibitors lead to a rapid release of free P-TEFb, followed by its reassembly into the 7SK snRNP. As a consequence, transcription of HEXIM1, a critical 7SK snRNP subunit, and HIV is induced. In this study, we found that a bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) bromodomain inhibitor, JQ1, which inhibits BRD4 by blocking its association with chromatin, also leads to the rapid release of free P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP. Indeed, JQ1 transiently increased levels of free P-TEFb and BRD4·P-TEFb and SEC·P-TEFb complexes in cells. As a consequence, the levels of HEXIM1 and HIV proteins rose. Importantly, the knockdown of ELL2, a subunit of the SEC, blocked the ability of JQ1 to increase HIV transcription. Finally, the effects of JQ1 and HMBA or SAHA on the P-TEFb equilibrium were cooperative. We conclude that HMBA, SAHA, and JQ1 affect transcription elongation by a similar and convergent mechanism.

  15. Temporal analysis and spatial mapping of Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus transcripts and in-vitro translation products

    Treesearch

    James M. Slavicek; Nancy Hayes-Plazolles

    1991-01-01

    The Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus LdNPV) is being used as a biopesticide against the gypsy moth. We are attempting to enhance the potency of the LdNPV through recombinant DNA technology. As a prerequisite to genetic manipulation, we have characterized LdNPV gene expression in cell culture through the generation of transcription and...

  16. Nuclear cereblon modulates transcriptional activity of Ikaros and regulates its downstream target, enkephalin, in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takeyoshi; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-08-26

    The gene coding cereblon (CRBN) was originally identified in genetic linkage analysis of mild autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability. CRBN has broad localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, the significance of nuclear CRBN remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the role of CRBN in the nucleus. First, we generated a series of CRBN deletion mutants and determined the regions responsible for the nuclear localization. Only CRBN protein lacking the N-terminal region was localized outside of the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal region is important for its nuclear localization. CRBN was also identified as a thalidomide-binding protein and component of the cullin-4-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Thalidomide has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the transcription factor Ikaros by CRBN-mediated degradation. To investigate the nuclear functions of CRBN, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments and evaluated the binding of CRBN to Ikaros. As a result, we found that CRBN was associated with Ikaros protein, and the N-terminal region of CRBN was required for Ikaros binding. In luciferase reporter gene experiments, CRBN modulated transcriptional activity of Ikaros. Furthermore, we found that CRBN modulated Ikaros-mediated transcriptional repression of the proenkephalin gene by binding to its promoter region. These results suggest that CRBN binds to Ikaros via its N-terminal region and regulates transcriptional activities of Ikaros and its downstream target, enkephalin.

  17. Split personality of transcription factors inside and outside the nuclear border.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, José R; Mellström, Britt

    2007-01-30

    Growing evidence indicates that transcription factors may have functions entirely distinct from the regulation of gene transcription. Here we describe three transcription factors that, when outside the nucleus, regulate calcium homeostasis by three independent but convergent mechanisms.

  18. Extensive nuclear influence on mitochondrial transcription and genome structure in male-fertile and male-sterile alloplasmic Nicotiana materials.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, G; Glimelius, K

    1991-10-01

    Nuclear influences on mitochondrial transcription and genome organization were analysed in six different male-fertile and male-sterile alloplasmic Nicotiana cultivars. The alloplasmic materials were compared with the corresponding nuclear species (N. tabacum) and cytoplasmic donor species (N. debneyi, N. rapanda or N. suaveolens) in Northern and Southern analyses using twelve different mitochondrial genes as probes. The investigation revealed that the nucleus exerts extensive influence on the expression and structure of the mitochondrial genome. For the majority of the probes, changes in both mitochondrial transcription and DNA patterns in alloplasmic cultivars were detected. Even though changes in transcription patterns, which correlated with male sterility, were detected for three of the probes (atpA, orf25 and coxII), the changes were not consistent for all the male-sterile materials. Likewise, no consistent association between mtDNA restriction patterns and cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) was detected.

  19. Dynamics of the STAT3 Transcription Factor: Nuclear Import Dependent on Ran and Importin-β1

    PubMed Central

    Cimica, Velasco; Chen, Hui-Chen; Iyer, Janaki K.; Reich, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) induces transcription of genes that control differentiation, inflammation, proliferation, and tumor cell invasion. Cytokines such as interleukin-6 and interferon stimulate the specific tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3, which confers its ability to bind consensus DNA targets. In addition, unphosphorylated STAT3 has been demonstrated to induce specific gene expression. STAT3 must gain entrance to the nucleus to impact transcription, however access to the nucleus is a tightly regulated process. Because nuclear trafficking is critical to the function of STAT3, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which STAT3 is imported to the nucleus. Live cell imaging techniques were used with STAT3 tagged with green fluorescence protein (GFP) or photoactivatable GFP to follow the cellular dynamics of both unphosphorylated and tyrosine phosphorylated forms. Cytokine activation did not alter the rate of STAT3 nuclear import or nuclear export. In addition, Förster resonance energy transfer experiments revealed homomeric interaction of unphosphorylated STAT3 dependent on its amino terminus, but this dimerization is not necessary for its nuclear import. Previous work demonstrated the adapter importin-α3 binds to STAT3 and is required for nuclear import. To determine whether STAT3 nuclear import is mediated by the importin-α/importin-β1 heterodimer, the effects of siRNA to importin-β1 were evaluated. Results indicate STAT3 nuclear import is dependent on the function of importin-β1. Since the Ran GTPase is necessary to bind importin-β1 in the nucleus for release of importin-α-cargo, the effect of a GTPase deficient mutant of Ran was tested. Expression of the Ran interfering mutant inhibited STAT3 nuclear import. This study defines importin-α/importin-β1/Ran as the molecular mechanism by which STAT3 traffics to the nucleus. PMID:21625522

  20. Activation of the human mitochondrial transcription factor A gene by nuclear respiratory factors: a potential regulatory link between nuclear and mitochondrial gene expression in organelle biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Virbasius, J V; Scarpulla, R C

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA), the product of a nuclear gene, stimulates transcription from the two divergent mitochondrial promoters and is likely the principal activator of mitochondrial gene expression in vertebrates. Here we establish that the proximal promoter of the human mtTFA gene is highly dependent upon recognition sites for the nuclear respiratory factors, NRF-1 and NRF-2, for activity. These factors have been previously implicated in the activation of numerous nuclear genes that contribute to mitochondrial respiratory function. The affinity-purified factors from HeLa cells specifically bind to the mtTFA NRF-1 and NRF-2 sites through guanine nucleotide contacts that are characteristic for each site. Mutations in these contacts eliminate NRF-1 and NRF-2 binding and also dramatically reduce promoter activity in transfected cells. Although both factors contribute, NRF-1 binding appears to be the major determinant of promoter function. This dependence on NRF-1 activation is confirmed by in vitro transcription using highly purified recombinant proteins that display the same binding specificities as the HeLa cell factors. The activation of the mtTFA promoter by both NRF-1 and NRF-2 therefore provides a link between the expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes and suggests a mechanism for their coordinate regulation during organelle biogenesis. Images PMID:8108407

  1. Early nuclear exclusion of the transcription factor max is associated with retinal ganglion cell death independent of caspase activity.

    PubMed

    Petrs-Silva, Hilda; de Freitas, Fabíola G; Linden, Rafael; Chiarini, Luciana B

    2004-02-01

    We examined the behavior of the transcription factor Max during retrograde neuronal degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. Using immunohistochemistry, we found a progressive redistribution of full-length Max from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and dendrites of the ganglion cells following axon damage. Then, the axotomized cells lose all their content of Max, while undergoing nuclear pyknosis and apoptotic cell death. After treatment of retinal explants with either anisomycin or thapsigargin, the rate of nuclear exclusion of Max accompanied the rate of cell death as modulated by either drug. Treatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor abolished both TUNEL staining and immunoreactivity for activated caspase-3, but did not affect the subcellular redistribution of Max immunoreactivity after axotomy. The data show that nuclear exclusion of the transcription factor Max is an early event, which precedes and is independent of the activation of caspases, during apoptotic cell death in the central nervous system.

  2. Nuclear cereblon modulates transcriptional activity of Ikaros and regulates its downstream target, enkephalin, in human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Takeyoshi; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-08-26

    The gene coding cereblon (CRBN) was originally identified in genetic linkage analysis of mild autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability. CRBN has broad localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, the significance of nuclear CRBN remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the role of CRBN in the nucleus. First, we generated a series of CRBN deletion mutants and determined the regions responsible for the nuclear localization. Only CRBN protein lacking the N-terminal region was localized outside of the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal region is important for its nuclear localization. CRBN was also identified as a thalidomide-binding protein and component of the cullin-4-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Thalidomide has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the transcription factor Ikaros by CRBN-mediated degradation. To investigate the nuclear functions of CRBN, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments and evaluated the binding of CRBN to Ikaros. As a result, we found that CRBN was associated with Ikaros protein, and the N-terminal region of CRBN was required for Ikaros binding. In luciferase reporter gene experiments, CRBN modulated transcriptional activity of Ikaros. Furthermore, we found that CRBN modulated Ikaros-mediated transcriptional repression of the proenkephalin gene by binding to its promoter region. These results suggest that CRBN binds to Ikaros via its N-terminal region and regulates transcriptional activities of Ikaros and its downstream target, enkephalin. - Highlights: • We found that CRBN is a nucleocytoplasmic shutting protein and identified the key domain for nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. • CRBN associates with the transcription factor Ikaros via the N-terminal domain. • CRBN modulates Ikaros-mediated transcriptional regulation and its downstream target, enkephalin.

  3. CDC39, an essential nuclear protein that negatively regulates transcription and differentially affects the constitutive and inducible HIS3 promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Collart, M A; Struhl, K

    1993-01-01

    The yeast HIS3 promoter region contains two functionally distinct TATA elements, TC and TR, that are responsible respectively for initiation from the +1 and +13 sites. Both TC and TR support basal HIS3 transcription and require the TATA binding protein TFIID, but only TR responds to transcriptional activation by GCN4 and GAL4. By selecting for yeast strains that increase transcription by a GCN4 derivative with a defective activation domain, we have isolated a temperature-sensitive mutation in CDC39, a previously defined gene implicated in cell-cycle control and the pheromone response. This cdc39-2 mutation causes increased basal transcription of many, but not all genes, as well as increased transcriptional activation by GCN4 and GAL4. Surprisingly, basal HIS3 transcription from the +1 initiation site is strongly increased, while initiation from the +13 site is barely affected. Thus, unlike acidic activator proteins that function through TR, CDC39 preferentially affects transcription mediated by TC. CDC39 is an essential gene that encodes a very large nuclear protein (2108 amino acids) containing two glutamine-rich regions. These observations suggest that CDC39 negatively regulates transcription either by affecting the general RNA polymerase II machinery or by altering chromatin structure. Images PMID:8428577

  4. Transcription-dependent nucleolar cap localization and possible nuclear function of DExH RNA helicase RHAU

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, Fumiko; Stadler, Michael; Chalupnikova, Katerina; Oakeley, Edward; Nagamine, Yoshikuni

    2008-04-01

    RHAU (RNA helicase associated with AU-rich element) is a DExH protein originally identified as a factor accelerating AU-rich element-mediated mRNA degradation. The discovery that RHAU is predominantly localized in the nucleus, despite mRNA degradation occurring in the cytoplasm, prompted us to consider the nuclear functions of RHAU. In HeLa cells, RHAU was found to be localized throughout the nucleoplasm with some concentrated in nuclear speckles. Transcriptional arrest altered the localization to nucleolar caps, where RHAU is closely localized with RNA helicases p68 and p72, suggesting that RHAU is involved in transcription-related RNA metabolism in the nucleus. To see whether RHAU affects global gene expression transcriptionally or posttranscriptionally, we performed microarray analysis using total RNA from RHAU-depleted HeLa cell lines, measuring both steady-state mRNA levels and mRNA half-lives by actinomycin D chase. There was no change in the half-lives of most transcripts whose steady-state levels were affected by RHAU knockdown, suggesting that these transcripts are subjected to transcriptional regulation. We propose that RHAU has a dual function, being involved in both the synthesis and degradation of mRNA in different subcellular compartments.

  5. Nuclear localization domains of GATA activator Gln3 are required for transcription of target genes through dephosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Numamoto, Minori; Tagami, Shota; Ueda, Yusuke; Imabeppu, Yusuke; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Maekawa, Hiromi; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    The GATA transcription activator Gln3 in the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) activates transcription of nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-sensitive genes. In cells grown in the presence of preferred nitrogen sources, Gln3 is phosphorylated in a TOR-dependent manner and localizes in the cytoplasm. In cells grown in non-preferred nitrogen medium or treated with rapamycin, Gln3 is dephosphorylated and is transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, thereby activating the transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. Caffeine treatment also induces dephosphorylation of Gln3 and its translocation to the nucleus and transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. However, the details of the mechanism by which phosphorylation controls Gln3 localization and transcriptional activity are unknown. Here, we focused on two regions of Gln3 with nuclear localization signal properties (NLS-K, and NLS-C) and one with nuclear export signal (NES). We constructed various mutants for our analyses: gln3 containing point mutations in all potential phosphoacceptor sites (Thr-339, Ser-344, Ser-347, Ser-355, Ser-391) in the NLS and NES regions to produce non-phosphorylatable (alanine) or mimic-phosphorylatable (aspartic acid) residues; and deletion mutants. We found that phosphorylation of Gln3 was impaired in all of these mutations and that the aspartic acid substitution mutants showed drastic reduction of Gln3-mediated transcriptional activity despite the fact that the mutations had no effect on nuclear localization of Gln3. Our observations suggest that these regions are required for transcription of target genes presumably through dephosphorylation. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Lycopene activates antioxidant enzymes and nuclear transcription factor systems in heat-stressed broilers.

    PubMed

    Sahin, K; Orhan, C; Tuzcu, M; Sahin, N; Hayirli, A; Bilgili, S; Kucuk, O

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary lycopene supplementation on growth performance, antioxidant status, and muscle nuclear transcription factor [Kelch like-ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) and (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)] expressions in broiler chickens exposed to heat stress (HS). A total of 180 one-day-old male broiler chicks (Ross 308) were assigned randomly to one of 2×3 factorially arranged treatments: two housing temperatures (22°C for 24 h/d; thermoneutral, TN or 34°C for 8 h/d HS) and three dietary lycopene levels (0, 200, or 400 mg/kg). Each treatment consisted of three replicates of 10 birds. Birds were reared to 42 d of age. Heat stress caused reductions in feed intake and weight gain by 12.2 and 20.7% and increased feed efficiency by 10.8% (P<0.0001 for all). Increasing dietary lycopene level improved performance in both environments. Birds reared under the HS environment had lower serum and muscle lycopene concentration (0.34 vs. 0.50 μg/mL and 2.80 vs. 2.13 μg/g), activities of superoxide dismutase (151 vs. 126 U/mL and 131 vs. 155 U/mg protein), glutathione peroxidase (184 vs. 154 U/mL and 1.39 vs. 1.74 U/mg protein), and higher malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration (0.53 vs. 0.83 μg/mL and 0.78 vs. 0.45 μg/ mg protein) than birds reared under the TN environment. Changes in levels of lycopene and MDA and activities of enzymes in serum and muscle varied by the environmental temperature as dietary lycopene level increased. Moreover, increasing dietary lycopene level suppressed muscle Keap1 expression and enhanced muscle Nrf2 expression, which had increased by 150% and decreased by 40%, respectively in response to HS. In conclusion, lycopene supplementation alleviates adverse effects of HS on performance through modulating expressions of stress-related nuclear transcription factors.

  7. Selective Impairment of Nuclear Factor-κB-Dependent Gene Transcription in Adult Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca, Jimena; Goren, Nora; Prieto, Patricia; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Boscá, Lisardo

    2007-01-01

    The ability of neonatal and adult cardiomyocytes to activate the nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway in response to lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1β challenge has been investigated and compared with that of peritoneal macrophages. The activation of the IκB kinase and the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα and IκBβ was much lower in adult cardiomyocytes than in the neonatal counterparts and macrophages. This restricted activation of the NF-κB pathway resulted in a significant reduction in the time of nuclear activation of NF-κB, as deduced by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and in the transcription of target genes, such as IκBα, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and nitric-oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2). Studies on chromatin immunoprecipitation showed binding of NF-κB proteins to the regulatory κB sites identified in the promoters of the IκBα, COX-2, and NOS-2 genes in macrophages and, to a lower extent, in neonatal cardiomyocytes. The binding to these κB sites in adult cardiomyocytes was observed only in the IκBα promoter and was minimal or absent in the COX-2 and NOS-2 promoters, respectively, suggesting a restricted activation of NF-κB-regulated genes in these cells. These data indicate that the function of the NF-κB pathway in adult cardiomyocytes is limited in time, which results in the expression of a reduced number of genes and provides a functional explanation for the absence of NOS-2 inducibility in these cells under proinflammatory conditions. PMID:17675583

  8. Osmoprotective Transcription Factor NFAT5/TonEBP Modulates Nuclear Factor-κB Activity

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Isabelle; Leroy, Valérie; Kwon, H. Moo; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Féraille, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Tonicity-responsive binding-protein (TonEBP or NFAT5) is a widely expressed transcription factor whose activity is regulated by extracellular tonicity. TonEBP plays a key role in osmoprotection by binding to osmotic response element/TonE elements of genes that counteract the deleterious effects of cell shrinkage. Here, we show that in addition to this “classical” stimulation, TonEBP protects cells against hypertonicity by enhancing nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity. We show that hypertonicity enhances NF-κB stimulation by lipopolysaccharide but not tumor necrosis factor-α, and we demonstrate overlapping protein kinase B (Akt)-dependent signal transduction pathways elicited by hypertonicity and transforming growth factor-α. Activation of p38 kinase by hypertonicity and downstream activation of Akt play key roles in TonEBP activity, IκBα degradation, and p65 nuclear translocation. TonEBP affects neither of these latter events and is itself insensitive to NF-κB signaling. Rather, we reveal a tonicity-dependent interaction between TonEBP and p65 and show that NF-κB activity is considerably enhanced after binding of NF-κB-TonEBP complexes to κB elements of NF-κB–responsive genes. We demonstrate the key roles of TonEBP and Akt in renal collecting duct epithelial cells and in macrophages. These findings reveal a novel role for TonEBP and Akt in NF-κB activation on the onset of hypertonic challenge. PMID:20685965

  9. Osmoprotective transcription factor NFAT5/TonEBP modulates nuclear factor-kappaB activity.

    PubMed

    Roth, Isabelle; Leroy, Valérie; Kwon, H Moo; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Féraille, Eric; Hasler, Udo

    2010-10-01

    Tonicity-responsive binding-protein (TonEBP or NFAT5) is a widely expressed transcription factor whose activity is regulated by extracellular tonicity. TonEBP plays a key role in osmoprotection by binding to osmotic response element/TonE elements of genes that counteract the deleterious effects of cell shrinkage. Here, we show that in addition to this "classical" stimulation, TonEBP protects cells against hypertonicity by enhancing nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity. We show that hypertonicity enhances NF-κB stimulation by lipopolysaccharide but not tumor necrosis factor-α, and we demonstrate overlapping protein kinase B (Akt)-dependent signal transduction pathways elicited by hypertonicity and transforming growth factor-α. Activation of p38 kinase by hypertonicity and downstream activation of Akt play key roles in TonEBP activity, IκBα degradation, and p65 nuclear translocation. TonEBP affects neither of these latter events and is itself insensitive to NF-κB signaling. Rather, we reveal a tonicity-dependent interaction between TonEBP and p65 and show that NF-κB activity is considerably enhanced after binding of NF-κB-TonEBP complexes to κB elements of NF-κB-responsive genes. We demonstrate the key roles of TonEBP and Akt in renal collecting duct epithelial cells and in macrophages. These findings reveal a novel role for TonEBP and Akt in NF-κB activation on the onset of hypertonic challenge.

  10. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K inhibits heat shock-induced transcriptional activity of heat shock factor 1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jae-Jin; Cho, Jin-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeho; Park, A Young; Kang, Wonmo; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2017-08-04

    When cells are exposed to heat shock and various other stresses, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is activated, and the heat shock response (HSR) is elicited. To better understand the molecular regulation of the HSR, we used 2D-PAGE-based proteome analysis to screen for heat shock-induced post-translationally modified cellular proteins. Our analysis revealed that two protein spots typically present on 2D-PAGE gels and containing heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) with trioxidized Cys(132) disappeared after the heat shock treatment and reappeared during recovery, but the total amount of hnRNP K protein remained unchanged. We next tested whether hnRNP K plays a role in HSR by regulating HSF1 and found that hnRNP K inhibits HSF1 activity, resulting in reduced expression of hsp70 and hsp27 mRNAs. hnRNP K also reduced binding affinity of HSF1 to the heat shock element by directly interacting with HSF1 but did not affect HSF1 phosphorylation-dependent activation or nuclear localization. hnRNP K lost its ability to induce these effects when its Cys(132) was substituted with Ser, Asp, or Glu. These findings suggest that hnRNP K inhibits transcriptional activity of HSF1 by inhibiting its binding to heat shock element and that the oxidation status of Cys(132) in hnRNP K is critical for this inhibition. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Post-transcriptional regulation of meiotic genes by a nuclear RNA silencing complex

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Emily D.; Braun, Craig R.; Gygi, Steven P.; Moazed, Danesh

    2014-01-01

    RNA is a central component of gene-silencing pathways that regulate diverse cellular processes. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, an RNA-based mechanism represses meiotic gene expression during vegetative growth. This pathway depends on the zinc finger protein Red1, which is required to degrade meiotic mRNAs as well as to target histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methylation, a repressive chromatin mark, to a subset of meiotic genes. However, the mechanism of Red1 function is unknown. Here we use affinity purification and mass spectrometry to identify a Red1-containing nuclear RNA silencing (NURS) complex. In addition to Red1, this complex includes the Mtl1, Red5, Ars2, Rmn1, and Iss10 proteins and associates with several other complexes that are involved in either signaling or mediating RNA silencing. By analyzing the effects of gene knockouts and inducible knockdown alleles, we show that NURS subunits regulate RNA degradation and H3K9 methylation at meiotic genes. We also identify roles for individual NURS subunits in interactions with Mmi1, an RNA-binding protein that marks meiotic RNAs for destruction, and the nuclear exosome RNA degradation complex. Finally, we show that the levels of H3K9 methylation at meiotic genes are not sufficient to restrict RNA polymerase II access or repress gene expression during vegetative growth. Our results demonstrate that Red1 partners with other proteins to silence meiotic gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Conservation of a NURS-like complex in human cells suggests that this pathway plays an ancient and fundamental role in RNA silencing. PMID:24713849

  12. Involvement of nuclear factor I transcription/replication factor in the early stage of chondrocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Uchihashi, Takayuki; Kimata, Masaaki; Tachikawa, Kanako; Koshimizu, Takao; Okada, Tomoko; Ihara-Watanabe, Miyuki; Sakai, Norio; Kogo, Mikihiko; Ozono, Keiichi; Michigami, Toshimi

    2007-12-01

    Gene-trap mutagenesis is based on the notion that the random insertion of a trapping vector may disturb the function of inserted genes. To identify the genes involved in chondrocytic differentiation, we applied this method to a murine mesenchymal cell line, ATDC5, which differentiate into mature chondrocytes in the presence of insulin, and isolated a clone in which the gene encoding a transcription/replication factor, nuclear factor I-B (NFIB), was trapped. In this particular clone, named #7-57, the trap vector pPT1-geo was inserted into intron 6 of the NFIB gene in one of the alleles. As a result, both wild-type NFIB and a mutant protein lacking the carboxyl-terminal transactivation/repression domain were expressed in the clone. Immunoprecipitation/Western blotting confirmed the interaction between wild-type NFIB and the truncated protein derived from the trapped allele, suggesting that the mutant protein formed a heterodimer with wild-type NFI proteins. When cultured in the differentiation medium, #7-57 exhibited impaired nodule formation and less accumulation of cartilageous matrices compared with the parental ATDC5 cells. In addition, the expression of marker genes for proliferating chondrocytes, including type II collagen (Col2a1), matrillin-1, and PTHrP, was reduced in the clone. The expression of SOX9 was also slightly decreased in the clone #7-57 compared with the parental cells. The overexpression of wild-type NFIB in parental ATDC5 cells resulted in the increased expression of Col2a1, and a series of reporter assays using a Col2a1 promoter/enhancer-luciferase construct demonstrated the transcriptional regulation of the gene by NFIB and the dominant-negative effect of the truncated mutant derived from the trapped allele. Interestingly, mutation in the SOX9-binding site in the 48-bp cis-element located in intron 1 failed to abolish the transactivation of Col2a1 gene by NFIB, suggesting that NFI regulates the transactivation of Col2a1, at least in part

  13. A conserved RNA structural element within the hepatitis B virus post-transcriptional regulatory element enhance nuclear export of intronless transcripts and repress the splicing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Visootsat, Akasit; Payungporn, Sunchai; T-Thienprasert, Nattanan P

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a primary cause of hepatocellular carcinoma and liver cirrhosis worldwide. To develop novel antiviral drugs, a better understanding of HBV gene expression regulation is vital. One important aspect is to understand how HBV hijacks the cellular machinery to export unspliced RNA from the nucleus. The HBV post-transcriptional regulatory element (HBV PRE) has been proposed to be the HBV RNA nuclear export element. However, the function remains controversial, and the core element is unclear. This study, therefore, aimed to identify functional regulatory elements within the HBV PRE and investigate their functions. Using bioinformatics programs based on sequence conservation and conserved RNA secondary structures, three regulatory elements were predicted, namely PRE 1151-1410, PRE 1520-1620 and PRE 1650-1684. PRE 1151-1410 significantly increased intronless and unspliced luciferase activity in both HepG2 and COS-7 cells. Likewise, PRE 1151-1410 significantly elevated intronless and unspliced HBV surface transcripts in liver cancer cells. Moreover, motif analysis predicted that PRE 1151-1410 contains several regulatory motifs. This study reported the roles of PRE 1151-1410 in intronless transcript nuclear export and the splicing mechanism. Additionally, these results provide knowledge in the field of HBV RNA regulation. Moreover, PRE 1151-1410 may be used to enhance the expression of other mRNAs in intronless reporter plasmids.

  14. The second AT-hook of the architectural transcription factor HMGA2 is determinant for nuclear localization and function

    PubMed Central

    Cattaruzzi, Giacomo; Altamura, Sandro; Tessari, Michela A.; Rustighi, Alessandra; Giancotti, Vincenzo; Pucillo, Carlo; Manfioletti, Guidalberto

    2007-01-01

    High Mobility Group A (HMGA) is a family of architectural nuclear factors which play an important role in neoplastic transformation. HMGA proteins are multifunctional factors that associate both with DNA and nuclear proteins that have been involved in several nuclear processes including transcription. HMGA localization is exclusively nuclear but, to date, the mechanism of nuclear import for these proteins remains unknown. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) for HMGA2, a member of the HMGA family. The NLS overlaps with the second of the three AT-hooks, the DNA-binding domains characteristic for this group of proteins. The functionality of this NLS was demonstrated by its ability to target a heterologous β-galactosidase/green fluorescent protein fusion protein to the nucleus. Mutations to alanine of basic residues within the second AT-hook resulted in inhibition of HMGA2 nuclear localization and impairment of its function in activating the cyclin A promoter. In addition, HMGA2 was shown to directly interact with the nuclear import receptor importin-α2 via the second AT-hook. HMGA proteins are overexpressed and rearranged in a variety of tumors; our findings can thus help elucidating their role in neoplastic transformation. PMID:17324944

  15. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products. Progress report, June 1, 1990--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5` UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

  16. Amphibian interorder nuclear transfer embryos reveal conserved embryonic gene transcription, but deficient DNA replication or chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Narbonne, Patrick; Gurdon, John B

    2012-01-01

    Early interspecies nuclear transfer (iNT) experiments suggested that a foreign nucleus may become permanently damaged after a few rounds of cell division in the cytoplasm of another species. That is, in some distant species combinations, nucleocytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) blastula nuclei can no longer support development, even if they are back-transferred into their own kind of egg cytoplasm. We monitored foreign DNA amplification and RNA production by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and RT-qPCR in interorder amphibian hybrids and cybrids formed by the transfer of newt (Pleurodeles waltl) embryonic nuclei into intact and enucleated frog (Xenopus laevis) eggs. We found a dramatic reduction in the expansion of foreign DNA and cell numbers in developing cybrid embryos that correlated with reduced gene transcription. Interestingly, expansion in cell numbers was rescued by the recipient species (Xenopus) maternal genome in iNT hybrids, but it did not improve P. waltl DNA expansion or gene transcription. Also, foreign gene transcripts, normalized to DNA copy numbers, were mostly normal in both iNT hybrids and cybrids. Thus, incomplete foreign DNA replication and/or chromosome segregation during cell division may be the major form of nuclear damage occurring as a result of nuclear replication in a foreign cytoplasmic environment. It also shows that the mechanisms of embryonic gene transcription are highly conserved across amphibians and may not be a major cause of cybrid lethality.

  17. Expression of prox1, lymphatic endothelial nuclear transcription factor, in Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma and tufted angioma.

    PubMed

    Le Huu, Aude Rimella; Jokinen, Chris H; Rubin, Brian P; Ruben, Brian P; Mihm, Martin C; Weiss, Sharon W; North, Paula E; Dadras, Soheil S

    2010-11-01

    Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KHE) and tufted angioma (TA) are rare tumors mainly occurring in early childhood. Our recent results showed that ectopic overexpression of human Prox1 gene, a lymphatic endothelial nuclear transcription factor, promoted an aggressive behavior in 2 murine models of KHE. This dramatic Prox1-induced phenotype prompted us to investigate immunohistochemical staining pattern of Prox1, podoplanin (D2-40), LYVE-1, and Prox1/CD34 as well as double immunofluorescent staining pattern of LYVE-1/CD31 in KHE and TA, compared with other pediatric vascular tumors. For this purpose, we examined 75 vascular lesions: KHE (n=18), TA (n=13), infantile hemangioma (n=13), pyogenic granuloma (n=18), and granulation tissue (n=13). Overall, KHE and TA shared an identical endothelial immunophenotype: the neoplastic spindle cells were Prox1, podoplanin, LYVE-1, CD31, and CD34, whereas endothelial cells within glomeruloid foci were Prox1, podoplanin, LYVE-1, CD31, and CD34. The lesional cells of all infantile hemangiomas and pyogenic granulomas were negative for Prox1 in the presence of positive internal control. These findings provide immunophenotypic evidence to support a preexisting notion that KHE and TA are closely related, if not identical. Overall, our results show, for the first time, that Prox1 is an immunohistochemical biomarker helpful in confirming the diagnosis of KHE/TA and in distinguishing it from infantile hemangioma and pyogenic granuloma.

  18. The orphan nuclear receptor DAX-1 acts as a novel transcriptional corepressor of PPAR{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Gwang Sik; Lee, Gha Young; Nedumaran, Balachandar; Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, Kyung Tae; Park, Sang Chul; Lee, Young Chul; Kim, Jae Bum Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2008-05-30

    DAX-1 is an atypical nuclear receptor (NR) which functions primarily as a transcriptional corepressor of other NRs via heterodimerization. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {gamma} is a ligand-dependent NR which performs a key function in adipogenesis. In this study, we evaluated a novel cross-talk mechanism between DAX-1 and PPAR{gamma}. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that DAX-1 inhibits the transactivity of PPAR{gamma} in a dose-dependent manner. DAX-1 directly competed with the PPAR{gamma} coactivator (PGC)-1{alpha} for binding to PPAR{gamma}. Endogenous levels of DAX-1 were significantly lower in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes as compared to preadipocytes. Using a retroviral expression system, we demonstrated that DAX-1 overexpression downregulates the expression of PPAR{gamma} target genes, resulting in an attenuation of adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. Our results suggest that DAX-1 acts as a corepressor of PPAR{gamma} and performs a potential function in the regulation of PPAR{gamma}-mediated cellular differentiation.

  19. Rrp6: Integrated roles in nuclear RNA metabolism and transcription termination

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Melanie J.

    2015-01-01

    The yeast RNA exosome is a eukaryotic ribonuclease complex essential for RNA processing, surveillance and turnover. It is comprised of a barrel-shaped core and cap as well as a 3’–5’ ribonuclease known as Dis3 which contains both endo- and exonuclease domains. A second exonuclease, Rrp6, is added in the nucleus. Dis3 and Rrp6 have both shared and distinct roles in RNA metabolism, and this review will focus primarily on Rrp6 and the roles of the RNA exosome in the nucleus. The functions of the nuclear exosome are modulated by cofactors and interacting partners specific to each type of substrate. Generally, the cofactor TRAMP (Trf4/5-Air2/1-Mtr4 polyadenylation) complex helps unwind unstable RNAs, RNAs requiring processing such as rRNAs, tRNAs, or snRNAs or improperly processed RNAs and direct it toward the exosome. In yeast, Rrp6 interacts with Nrd1, the cap binding complex (CBC), and RNA Polymerase II to aid in nascent RNA processing, termination, and polyA tail length regulation. Recent studies have shown that proper termination and processing of short, non-coding RNAs by Rrp6 is particularly important for transcription regulation across the genome and has important implications for regulation of diverse processes at the cellular level. Loss of proper Rrp6 and exosome activity may contribute to various pathologies such as autoimmune disease, neurological disorders, and cancer. PMID:26612606

  20. Arsenic Trioxide Activate Transcription of Heme Oxygenase-1 by Promoting Nuclear Translocation of NFE2L2.

    PubMed

    Yue, Zhen; Zhong, Lingzhi; Mou, Yan; Wang, Xiaotong; Zhang, Haiying; Wang, Yang; Xia, Jianxin; Li, Ronggui; Wang, Zonggui

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that induced expression of Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is responsible for the resistance of human osteosarcoma MG63 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO). The present study was aimed at investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of HO-1 that occurs after exposure of MG63 cells to ATO. First, using RT-QPCT and Western-blot, we found that ATO strongly induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in these human osteosarcoma cells. Then by analyzing HO-1 mRNA of MG63 cells exposed to ATO in the presence and absence of a transcription inhibitor Actinomycin-D (Act-D), we demonstrated that ATO activates HO-1 expression in MG63 cells by regulating the transcription of the gene. Finally, through the analysis of the NFE2L2 protein levels among the total cellular and nuclear proteins by Western-blot and Immunocytochemical staning, we determined that ATO enhanced the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2), also known as Nrf2. From these results we have concluded that transcription activation of HO-1 resulting from the nuclear translocation of NFE2L2 is the underlying molecular mechanism for its high induction, which, in turn, is responsible for the resistance of human osteosarcoma cells to ATO treatment.

  1. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein R Cooperates with Mediator to Facilitate Transcription Reinitiation on the c-Fos Gene

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Aya; Shimada, Miho; Nakadai, Tomoyoshi; Nishimura, Ken; Hisatake, Koji

    2013-01-01

    The c-fos gene responds to extracellular stimuli and undergoes robust but transient transcriptional activation. Here we show that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein R (hnRNP R) facilitates transcription reinitiation of the c-fos promoter in vitro in cooperation with Mediator. Consistently, hnRNP R interacts with the Scaffold components (Mediator, TBP, and TFIIH) as well as TFIIB, which recruits RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and TFIIF to Scaffold. The cooperative action of hnRNP R and Mediator is diminished by the cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module, which is comprised of CDK8, Cyclin C, MED12 and MED13 of the Mediator subunits. Interestingly, we find that the length of the G-free cassettes, and thereby their transcripts, influences the hnRNP R-mediated facilitation of reinitiation. Indeed, indicative of a possible role of the transcript in facilitating transcription reinitiation, the RNA transcript produced from the G-free cassette interacts with hnRNP R through its RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and arginine-glycine-glycine (RGG) domain. Mutational analyses of hnRNP R indicate that facilitation of initiation and reinitiation requires distinct domains of hnRNP R. Knockdown of hnRNP R in mouse cells compromised rapid induction of the c-fos gene but did not affect transcription of constitutive genes. Together, these results suggest an important role for hnRNP R in regulating robust response of the c-fos gene. PMID:23967313

  2. Functional nuclear organization of transcription and DNA replication: a topographical marriage between chromatin domains and the interchromatin compartment.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Y; Gunkel, M; Schermelleh, L; Beichmanis, S; Neumann, J; Heidemann, M; Leonhardt, H; Eick, D; Cremer, C; Cremer, T

    2010-01-01

    We studied the nuclear topography of RNA transcription and DNA replication in mammalian cell types with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy, which offers a resolution beyond the classical Abbe/Raleigh limit. Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) demonstrated a network of channels and wider lacunas, called the interchromatin compartment (IC). The IC starts at nuclear pores and expands throughout the nuclear space. It is demarcated from the compact interior of higher-order chromatin domains (CDs) by a 100-200-nm thick layer of decondensed chromatin, termed the perichromatin region (PR). Nascent DNA, nascent RNA, RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II), as well as histone modifications for transcriptionally competent/active chromatin, are highly enriched in the PR, whereas splicing speckles are observed in the interior of the IC. In line with previous electron microscopic evidence, spectral precision distance/position determination microscopy (SPDM) confirmed the presence of RNA Pol II clusters indicative of transcription factories. Still, a substantial part of transcription apparently takes place outside of such factories. Previous electron microscopic evidence has suggested that the functional nuclear organization of DNA replication depends on brownian movements of chromatin between the CD interior and the PR. As an incentive for future studies, we hypothesize that such movements also take place during transcription, i.e., only the actually transcribed part of a gene may be located within the PR, whereas its major part, including previously or later transcribed sequences, is embedded in a higher-order chromatin configuration in the interior of the CD.

  3. Transcriptional Regulation by Nuclear Corepressors and PGC-1α: Implications for Mitochondrial Quality Control and Insulin Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhengtang; Ding, Shuzhe

    2012-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and estrogen-related receptor (ERRα) are ligand-activated nuclear receptors that coordinately regulate gene expression. Recent evidence suggests that nuclear corepressors, NCoR, RIP140, and SMRT, repress nuclear receptors-mediated transcriptional activity on specific promoters, and thus regulate insulin sensitivity, adipogenesis, mitochondrial number, and activity in vivo. Moreover, the coactivator PGC-1α that increases mitochondrial biogenesis during exercise and calorie restriction directly regulates autophagy in skeletal muscle and mitophagy in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. In this paper, we discuss the PGC-1α's novel role in mitochondrial quality control and the role of nuclear corepressors in regulating insulin sensitivity and interacting with PGC-1α.

  4. Transcriptional Regulation by Nuclear Corepressors and PGC-1α: Implications for Mitochondrial Quality Control and Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhengtang; Ding, Shuzhe

    2012-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and estrogen-related receptor (ERRα) are ligand-activated nuclear receptors that coordinately regulate gene expression. Recent evidence suggests that nuclear corepressors, NCoR, RIP140, and SMRT, repress nuclear receptors-mediated transcriptional activity on specific promoters, and thus regulate insulin sensitivity, adipogenesis, mitochondrial number, and activity in vivo. Moreover, the coactivator PGC-1α that increases mitochondrial biogenesis during exercise and calorie restriction directly regulates autophagy in skeletal muscle and mitophagy in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. In this paper, we discuss the PGC-1α's novel role in mitochondrial quality control and the role of nuclear corepressors in regulating insulin sensitivity and interacting with PGC-1α. PMID:23304112

  5. Morris Water Maze Training in Mice Elevates Hippocampal Levels of Transcription Factors Nuclear Factor (Erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 and Nuclear Factor Kappa B p65

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Wanda M.; Pahlavan, Payam S.; Djordjevic, Jelena; McAllister, Danielle; Platt, Eric E.; Alashmali, Shoug; Bernstein, Michael J.; Suh, Miyoung; Albensi, Benedict C.

    2015-01-01

    Research has identified several transcription factors that regulate activity-dependent plasticity and memory, with cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) being the most well-studied. In neurons, CREB activation is influenced by the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), considered central to immunity but more recently implicated in memory. The transcription factor early growth response-2 (Egr-2), an NF-κB gene target, is also associated with learning and memory. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), an antioxidant transcription factor linked to NF-κB in pathological conditions, has not been studied in normal memory. Given that numerous transcription factors implicated in activity-dependent plasticity demonstrate connections to NF-κB, this study simultaneously evaluated protein levels of NF-κB, CREB, Egr-2, Nrf2, and actin in hippocampi from young (1 month-old) weanling CD1 mice after training in the Morris water maze, a hippocampal-dependent spatial memory task. After a 6-day acquisition period, time to locate the hidden platform decreased in the Morris water maze. Mice spent more time in the target vs. non-target quadrants of the maze, suggestive of recall of the platform location. Western blot data revealed a decrease in NF-κB p50 protein after training relative to controls, whereas NF-κB p65, Nrf2 and actin increased. Nrf2 levels were correlated with platform crosses in nearly all tested animals. These data demonstrate that training in a spatial memory task results in alterations in and associations with particular transcription factors in the hippocampus, including upregulation of NF-κB p65 and Nrf2. Training-induced increases in actin protein levels caution against its use as a loading control in immunoblot studies examining activity-dependent plasticity, learning, and memory. PMID:26635523

  6. A highly organized structure mediating nuclear localization of a Myb2 transcription factor in the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chien-Hsin; Chang, Lung-Chun; Hsu, Hong-Ming; Wei, Shu-Yi; Liu, Hsing-Wei; Lee, Yu; Kuo, Chung-Chi; Indra, Dharmu; Chen, Chinpan; Ong, Shiou-Jeng; Tai, Jung-Hsiang

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear proteins usually contain specific peptide sequences, referred to as nuclear localization signals (NLSs), for nuclear import. These signals remain unexplored in the protozoan pathogen, Trichomonas vaginalis. The nuclear import of a Myb2 transcription factor was studied here using immunodetection of a hemagglutinin-tagged Myb2 overexpressed in the parasite. The tagged Myb2 was localized to the nucleus as punctate signals. With mutations of its polybasic sequences, 48KKQK51 and 61KR62, Myb2 was localized to the nucleus, but the signal was diffusive. When fused to a C-terminal non-nuclear protein, the Myb2 sequence spanning amino acid (aa) residues 48 to 143, which is embedded within the R2R3 DNA-binding domain (aa 40 to 156), was essential and sufficient for efficient nuclear import of a bacterial tetracycline repressor (TetR), and yet the transport efficiency was reduced with an additional fusion of a firefly luciferase to TetR, while classical NLSs from the simian virus 40 T-antigen had no function in this assay system. Myb2 nuclear import and DNA-binding activity were substantially perturbed with mutation of a conserved isoleucine (I74) in helix 2 to proline that altered secondary structure and ternary folding of the R2R3 domain. Disruption of DNA-binding activity alone by point mutation of a lysine residue, K51, preceding the structural domain had little effect on Myb2 nuclear localization, suggesting that nuclear translocation of Myb2, which requires an ordered structural domain, is independent of its DNA binding activity. These findings provide useful information for testing whether myriad Mybs in the parasite use a common module to regulate nuclear import.

  7. Acute β-Adrenergic Activation Triggers Nuclear Import of Histone Deacetylase 5 and Delays Gq-induced Transcriptional Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Wei Jenny; Lee, Linda; Yu, David; Dao, Khanha; Bossuyt, Julie; Bers, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    During hemodynamic stress, catecholamines and neurohumoral stimuli may induce co-activation of Gq-coupled receptors and β-adrenergic receptors (β-AR), leading to cardiac remodeling. Dynamic regulation of histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5), a transcriptional repressor, is crucial during stress signaling due to its role in epigenetic control of fetal gene markers. Little is known about its regulation during acute and chronic β-AR stimulation and its cross-interaction with Gq signaling in adult cardiac myocytes. Here, we evaluate the potential cross-talk between Gq-driven and β-AR mediated signaling at the level of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC5. We show the translocation of GFP-tagged wild type HDAC5 or mutants (S279A and S279D) in response to β-AR or Gq agonists. Isoproterenol (ISO) or PKA activation results in strong nuclear accumulation of HDAC5 in contrast to nuclear export driven by Ca2+-calmodulin protein kinase II and protein kinase D. Moreover, nuclear accumulation of HDAC5 under acute ISO/PKA signaling is dependent on phosphorylation of Ser-279 and can block subsequent Gq-mediated nuclear HDAC5 export. Intriguingly, the attenuation of Gq-induced export is abolished after chronic PKA activation, yet nuclear HDAC5 remains elevated. Last, the effect of chronic β-AR signaling on HDAC5 translocation was examined in adult myocytes from a rabbit model of heart failure, where ISO-induced nuclear import is ablated, but Gq-agonist mediated export is preserved. Acute β-AR/PKA activation protects against hypertrophic signaling by delaying Gq-mediated transcriptional activation. This serves as a key physiological control switch before allowing genetic reprogramming via HDAC5 nuclear export during more severe stress, such as heart failure. PMID:23161540

  8. Nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 utilize similar glutamine-containing clusters of hydrophobic residues to activate transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Gugneja, S; Virbasius, C M; Scarpulla, R C

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF-1 and NRF-2) are ubiquitous transcription factors that have been implicated in the control of nuclear genes required for respiration, heme biosynthesis, and mitochondrial DNA transcription and replication. Recently, both factors have been found to be major transcriptional determinants for a subset of these genes that define a class of simple promoters involved in respiratory chain expression. Here, functional domains required for transactivation by NRF-1 have been defined. An atypical nuclear localization signal resides in a conserved amino-terminal region adjacent to the DNA binding domain and consists of functionally redundant clusters of basic residues. A second domain in the carboxy-terminal half of the molecule is necessary for transcriptional activation. The activation domains of both NRF-1 and NRF-2 were extensively characterized by both deletion and alanine substitution mutagenesis. The results show that these domains do not fall into known classes defined by a preponderance of amino acid residues, including glutamines, prolines, or isoleucines, as found in other eukaryotic activators. Rather, in both factors, a series of tandemly arranged clusters of hydrophobic amino acids were required for activation. Although all of the functional clusters contain glutamines, the glutamines differ from the hydrophobic residues in that they are inconsequential for activation. Unlike the NRF-2 domain, which contains its essential hydrophobic motifs within 40 residues, the NRF-1 domain spans about 40% of the molecule and appears to have a bipartite structure. The findings indicate that NRF-1 and NRF-2 utilize similar hydrophobic structural motifs for activating transcription. PMID:8816484

  9. Nuclear translocation of doublecortin-like protein kinase and phosphorylation of a transcription factor JDP2

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamine, Tadashi; Nomada, Shohgo; Onouchi, Takashi; Kameshita, Isamu; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase. • In living cells, DCLK was cleaved into two functional fragments. • zDCLK(kinase) was translocated into the nucleus by osmotic stresses. • Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. • JDP2 was efficiently phosphorylated by zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. - Abstract: Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase predominantly expressed in brain. In a previous paper, we reported that zebrafish DCLK2 (zDCLK) was cleaved into two functional fragments; the N-terminal zDCLK(DC + SP) with microtubule-binding activity and the C-terminal zDCLK(kinase) with a Ser/Thr protein kinase activity. In this study, we demonstrated that zDCLK(kinase) was widely distributed in the cytoplasm and translocated into the nucleus when the cells were treated under hyperosmotic conditions with NaCl or mannitol. By two-hybrid screening using the C-terminal domain of DCLK, Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a nuclear transcription factor, was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. Furthermore, JDP2 served as an efficient substrate for zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. These results suggest that the kinase fragment of DCLK is translocated into the nucleus upon hyperosmotic stresses and that the kinase efficiently phosphorylates JDP2, a possible target in the nucleus, with the aid of histones.

  10. Nuclear translocation of {alpha}N-catenin by the novel zinc finger transcriptional repressor ZASC1

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaerts, Sven; Vanlandschoot, Ann; Hengel, Jolanda van; Roy, Frans van . E-mail: F.Vanroy@dmbr.UGent.be

    2005-11-15

    Alpha-catenins anchor the transmembrane cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin indirectly to the actin cytoskeleton through interaction with {beta}-catenin or plakoglobin. Three different {alpha}-catenins are known at present: {alpha}E-, {alpha}T-, and {alpha}N-catenin. Despite their different expression patterns, no functional differences between the {alpha}-catenins are known. In a yeast two-hybrid screening with {alpha}N-catenin as bait, we identified the Cys{sub 2}-His{sub 2} zinc finger protein ZASC1. The mRNA and protein of ZASC1 were ubiquitously expressed in various cell lines and human tissues. Our results suggest an association of the ZASC1 protein with DNA, and luciferase reporter assays revealed that ZASC1 is a transcriptional repressor. Upon transient overexpression, the ZASC1 protein localized in the nucleus, to where it was able to recruit cytoplasmic {alpha}N-catenin. Neither the highly related {alpha}E-catenin nor {alpha}T-catenin interacted with ZASC1. By interchanging parts of {alpha}N-catenin and {alpha}E-catenin cDNAs, we were able to narrow down the interaction region of {alpha}N-catenin to two limited amino-terminal regions. On the other hand, the interaction of ZASC1 with {alpha}N-catenin can be mediated by the domain comprising zinc fingers six to eight of ZASC1. The interaction and nuclear cotranslocation of a neural {alpha}-catenin with a putative proto-oncogene product as reported here provides novel insights into the signaling functions of {alpha}-catenins.

  11. Two proteolytic fragments of menin coordinate the nuclear transcription and postsynaptic clustering of neurotransmitter receptors during synaptogenesis between Lymnaea neurons

    PubMed Central

    Getz, Angela M.; Visser, Frank; Bell, Erin M.; Xu, Fenglian; Flynn, Nichole M.; Zaidi, Wali; Syed, Naweed I.

    2016-01-01

    Synapse formation and plasticity depend on nuclear transcription and site-specific protein targeting, but the molecular mechanisms that coordinate these steps have not been well defined. The MEN1 tumor suppressor gene, which encodes the protein menin, is known to induce synapse formation and plasticity in the CNS. This synaptogenic function has been conserved across evolution, however the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unidentified. Here, using central neurons from the invertebrate Lymnaea stagnalis, we demonstrate that menin coordinates subunit-specific transcriptional regulation and synaptic clustering of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) during neurotrophic factor (NTF)-dependent excitatory synaptogenesis, via two proteolytic fragments generated by calpain cleavage. Whereas menin is largely regarded as a nuclear protein, our data demonstrate a novel cytoplasmic function at central synapses. Furthermore, this study identifies a novel synaptogenic mechanism in which a single gene product coordinates the nuclear transcription and postsynaptic targeting of neurotransmitter receptors through distinct molecular functions of differentially localized proteolytic fragments. PMID:27538741

  12. Differential effects of culture and nuclear transfer on relative transcript levels of genes with key roles during preimplantation.

    PubMed

    Moreira, P N; Fernández-Gonzalez, R; Ramirez, M A; Pérez-Crespo, M; Rizos, D; Pintado, B; Gutiérrez-Adán, A

    2006-02-01

    It is well known that the preimplantation culture environment to which embryos are exposed influences the expression of developmentally important genes. Recently, it has been reported that MEMalpha, a culture medium commonly used for somatic cells, allows high rates of preimplantation development and development to term of mouse somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. The objective of this study was to compare the differential effects of this medium and of the nuclear transfer procedure on the relative mRNA abundance of several genes with key roles during preimplantation. The relative mRNA levels of nine genes (Glut 1, Glut 5, G6PDH, Bax, Survivin, Gpx 1, Oct4, mTert and IGF2bp1) were quantified at blastocyst stage on cumulus cell cloned embryos cultured in MEMalpha, as well as on in vivo cultured and MEMalpha cultured controls. Only three of the nine transcripts analysed (Glut 5, Gpx 1 and Igf2bp1) were significantly down-regulated at blastocyst stage in in vitro produced controls. However, most genes analysed in our MEMalpha cultured cloned embryos showed altered transcription levels. Interestingly, between cloned and in vitro produced controls only the transcription levels measured for Glut 1 were significantly different. This result suggests that Glut 1 may be a good marker for embryo quality after cumulus cell nuclear transfer.

  13. Nuclear factor-erythroid-2 related transcription factor-1 (Nrf1) is regulated by O-GlcNAc transferase.

    PubMed

    Han, Jeong Woo; Valdez, Joshua L; Ho, Daniel V; Lee, Candy S; Kim, Hyun Min; Wang, Xiaorong; Huang, Lan; Chan, Jefferson Y

    2017-09-01

    The Nrf1 (Nuclear factor E2-related factor 1) transcription factor performs a critical role in regulating cellular homeostasis. Using a proteomic approach, we identified Host Cell Factor-1 (HCF1), a co-regulator of transcription, and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), the enzyme that mediates protein O-GlcNAcylation, as cellular partners of Nrf1a, an isoform of Nrf1. Nrf1a directly interacts with HCF1 through the HCF1 binding motif (HBM), while interaction with OGT is mediated through HCF1. Overexpression of HCF1 and OGT leads to increased Nrf1a protein stability. Addition of O-GlcNAc decreases ubiquitination and degradation of Nrf1a. Transcriptional activation by Nrf1a is increased by OGT overexpression and treatment with PUGNAc. Together, these data suggest that OGT can act as a regulator of Nrf1a. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Gamma Interferon-Dependent Transcriptional Memory via Relocalization of a Gene Locus to PML Nuclear Bodies▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gialitakis, Manolis; Arampatzi, Panagiota; Makatounakis, Takis; Papamatheakis, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Memory of past cellular responses is an essential adaptation to repeating environmental stimuli. We addressed the question of whether gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-inducible transcription generates memory that sensitizes cells to a second stimulus. We have found that the major histocompatibility complex class II gene DRA is relocated to promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies upon induction with IFN-γ, and this topology is maintained long after transcription shut off. Concurrent interaction of PML protein with mixed-lineage leukemia generates a prolonged permissive chromatin state on the DRA gene characterized by high promoter histone H3 K4 dimethylation that facilitates rapid expression upon restimulation. We propose that the primary signal-induced transcription generates spatial and epigenetic memory that is maintained through several cell generations and endows the cell with increased responsiveness to future activation signals. PMID:20123968

  15. Intra-nuclear mobility and target search mechanisms of transcription factors: a single-molecule perspective on gene expression.

    PubMed

    Normanno, Davide; Dahan, Maxime; Darzacq, Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Precise expression of specific genes in time and space is at the basis of cellular viability as well as correct development of organisms. Understanding the mechanisms of gene regulation is fundamental and still one of the great challenges for biology. Gene expression is regulated also by specific transcription factors that recognize and bind to specific DNA sequences. Transcription factors dynamics, and especially the way they sample the nucleoplasmic space during the search for their specific target in the genome, are a key aspect for regulation and it has been puzzling researchers for forty years. The scope of this review is to give a state-of-the-art perspective over the intra-nuclear mobility and the target search mechanisms of specific transcription factors at the molecular level. Going through the seminal biochemical experiments that have raised the first questions about target localization and the theoretical grounds concerning target search processes, we describe the most recent experimental achievements and current challenges in understanding transcription factors dynamics and interactions with DNA using in vitro assays as well as in live prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear Transport and RNA Processing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Nuclear pore complex evolution: a trypanosome Mlp analogue functions in chromosomal segregation but lacks transcriptional barrier activity.

    PubMed

    Holden, Jennifer M; Koreny, Ludek; Obado, Samson; Ratushny, Alexander V; Chen, Wei-Ming; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Kelly, Steven; Chait, Brian T; Aitchison, John D; Rout, Michael P; Field, Mark C

    2014-05-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) has dual roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport and chromatin organization. In many eukaryotes the coiled-coil Mlp/Tpr proteins of the NPC nuclear basket have specific functions in interactions with chromatin and defining specialized regions of active transcription, whereas Mlp2 associates with the mitotic spindle/NPC in a cell cycle-dependent manner. We previously identified two putative Mlp-related proteins in African trypanosomes, TbNup110 and TbNup92, the latter of which associates with the spindle. We now provide evidence for independent ancestry for TbNup92/TbNup110 and Mlp/Tpr proteins. However, TbNup92 is required for correct chromosome segregation, with knockout cells exhibiting microaneuploidy and lowered fidelity of telomere segregation. Further, TbNup92 is intimately associated with the mitotic spindle and spindle anchor site but apparently has minimal roles in control of gene transcription, indicating that TbNup92 lacks major barrier activity. TbNup92 therefore acts as a functional analogue of Mlp/Tpr proteins, and, together with the lamina analogue NUP-1, represents a cohort of novel proteins operating at the nuclear periphery of trypanosomes, uncovering complex evolutionary trajectories for the NPC and nuclear lamina.

  17. Functional Analysis of Adenovirus Protein IX Identifies Domains Involved in Capsid Stability, Transcriptional Activity, and Nuclear Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Grave, Linda; Puvion-Dutilleul, Francine; Chatton, Bruno; Kedinger, Claude

    2001-01-01

    The product of adenovirus (Ad) type 5 gene IX (pIX) is known to actively participate in the stability of the viral icosahedron, acting as a capsid cement. We have previously demonstrated that pIX is also a transcriptional activator of several viral and cellular TATA-containing promoters, likely contributing to the transactivation of the Ad expression program. By extensive mutagenesis, we have now delineated the functional domains involved in each of the pIX properties: residues 22 to 26 of the highly conserved N-terminal domain are crucial for incorporation of the protein into the virion; specific residues of the C-terminal leucine repeat are responsible for pIX interactions with itself and possibly other proteins, a property that is critical for pIX transcriptional activity. We also show that pIX takes part in the virus-induced nuclear reorganization of late infected cells: the protein induces, most likely through self-assembly, the formation of specific nuclear structures which appear as dispersed nuclear globules by immunofluorescence staining and as clear amorphous spherical inclusions by electron microscopy. The integrity of the leucine repeat appears to be essential for the formation and nuclear retention of these inclusions. Together, our results demonstrate the multifunctional nature of pIX and provide new insights into Ad biology. PMID:11435594

  18. Nuclear pore complex evolution: a trypanosome Mlp analogue functions in chromosomal segregation but lacks transcriptional barrier activity

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Jennifer M.; Koreny, Ludek; Obado, Samson; Ratushny, Alexander V.; Chen, Wei-Ming; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Kelly, Steven; Chait, Brian T.; Aitchison, John D.; Rout, Michael P.; Field, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) has dual roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport and chromatin organization. In many eukaryotes the coiled-coil Mlp/Tpr proteins of the NPC nuclear basket have specific functions in interactions with chromatin and defining specialized regions of active transcription, whereas Mlp2 associates with the mitotic spindle/NPC in a cell cycle–dependent manner. We previously identified two putative Mlp-related proteins in African trypanosomes, TbNup110 and TbNup92, the latter of which associates with the spindle. We now provide evidence for independent ancestry for TbNup92/TbNup110 and Mlp/Tpr proteins. However, TbNup92 is required for correct chromosome segregation, with knockout cells exhibiting microaneuploidy and lowered fidelity of telomere segregation. Further, TbNup92 is intimately associated with the mitotic spindle and spindle anchor site but apparently has minimal roles in control of gene transcription, indicating that TbNup92 lacks major barrier activity. TbNup92 therefore acts as a functional analogue of Mlp/Tpr proteins, and, together with the lamina analogue NUP-1, represents a cohort of novel proteins operating at the nuclear periphery of trypanosomes, uncovering complex evolutionary trajectories for the NPC and nuclear lamina. PMID:24600046

  19. Nuclear localization of a putative Phytophthora sojae bZIP1 transcription factor is mediated by multiple targeting motifs.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yufeng; Tyler, Brett M

    2017-02-18

    Oomycetes are fungal-like eukaryotic microbes in the kingdom Stramenopila. We recently found that the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora sojae uses nuclear localization signals (NLSs) for translocation of proteins into the nucleus that differ from conventional well-characterized NLSs from mammals and yeast. Here we have characterized in depth the nuclear localization signals of a P. sojae basic leucine zipper transcription factor, PsbZIP1. Nuclear localization of PsbZIP1 was determined by a central conserved region overlapping the DNA binding domain. Mutational analysis of this region identified four distinct elements that contributed multiplicatively to nuclear localization, but the conserved DNA binding residues were not required. Three of the elements showed autonomous NLS activity and the fourth served as a nuclear localization enhancer. Sequences within two of the nuclear localization elements defined a new form of bipartite NLS consisting of a triplet of basic residues followed by a tail of scattered basic amino acids. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Overexpression of the Transcriptional Repressor Complex BCL-6/BCoR Leads to Nuclear Aggregates Distinct from Classical Aggresomes

    PubMed Central

    Buchberger, Elisabeth; El Harchi, Miriam; Payrhuber, Dietmar; Zommer, Anna; Schauer, Dominic; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Bilban, Martin; Brostjan, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear inclusions of aggregated proteins have primarily been characterized for molecules with aberrant poly-glutamine repeats and for mutated or structurally altered proteins. They were termed “nuclear aggresomes” and misfolding was shown to promote association with molecular chaperones and proteasomes. Here, we report that two components of a transcriptional repressor complex (BCL-6 and BCoR) of wildtype amino acid sequence can independently or jointly induce the formation of nuclear aggregates when overexpressed. The observation that the majority of cells rapidly downregulate BCL-6/BCoR levels, supports the notion that expression of these proteins is under tight control. The inclusions occur when BCL-6/BCoR expression exceeds 150-fold of endogenous levels. They preferentially develop in the nucleus by a gradual increase in aggregate size to form large, spheroid structures which are not associated with heat shock proteins or marked by ubiquitin. In contrast, we find the close association of BCL-6/BCoR inclusions with PML bodies and a reduction in aggregation upon the concomitant overexpression of histone deacetylases or heat shock protein 70. In summary, our data offer a perspective on nuclear aggregates distinct from classical “nuclear aggresomes”: Large complexes of spheroid structure can evolve in the nucleus without being marked by the cellular machinery for protein refolding and degradation. However, nuclear proteostasis can be restored by balancing the levels of chaperones. PMID:24146931

  1. Nuclear localization of γ-tubulin affects E2F transcriptional activity and S-phase progression

    PubMed Central

    Höög, Greta; Zarrizi, Reihaneh; von Stedingk, Kristoffer; Jonsson, Kristina; Alvarado-Kristensson, Maria

    2011-01-01

    We show that the centrosome- and microtubule-regulating protein γ-tubulin interacts with E2 promoter binding factors (E2Fs) to modulate E2F transcriptional activity and thereby control cell cycle progression. γ-Tubulin contains a C-terminal signal that results in its translocation to the nucleus during late G1 to early S phase. γ-Tubulin mutants showed that the C terminus interacts with the transcription factor E2F1 and that the E2F1–γ-tubulin complex is formed during the G1/S transition, when E2F1 is transcriptionally active. Furthermore, E2F transcriptional activity is altered by reduced expression of γ-tubulin or by complex formation between γ-tubulin and E2F1, E2F2, or E2F3, but not E2F6. In addition, the γ-tubulin C terminus encodes a DNA-binding domain that interacts with E2F-regulated promoters, resulting in γ-tubulin-mediated transient activation of E2Fs. Thus, we report a novel mechanism regulating the activity of E2Fs, which can help explain how these proteins affect cell cycle progression in mammalian cells.—Höög, G., Zarrizi, R., von Stedingk, K., Jonsson, K., Alvarado-Kristensson, M. Nuclear localization of γ-tubulin affects E2F transcriptional activity and S-phase progression. PMID:21788450

  2. Release of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) from 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) activates hexamethylene bisacetamide-inducible protein (HEXIM1) transcription.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingyang; Xiang, Yanhui; Fujinaga, Koh; Bartholomeeusen, Koen; Nilson, Kyle A; Price, David H; Peterlin, B Matija

    2014-04-04

    By phosphorylating negative elongation factors and the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which is composed of CycT1 or CycT2 and CDK9, activates eukaryotic transcription elongation. In growing cells, it is found in active and inactive forms. In the former, free P-TEFb is a potent transcriptional coactivator. In the latter, it is inhibited by HEXIM1 or HEXIM2 in the 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), which contains, additionally, 7SK snRNA, methyl phosphate-capping enzyme (MePCE), and La-related protein 7 (LARP7). This P-TEFb equilibrium determines the state of growth and proliferation of the cell. In this study, the release of P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP led to increased synthesis of HEXIM1 but not HEXIM2 in HeLa cells, and this occurred only from an unannotated, proximal promoter. ChIP with sequencing revealed P-TEFb-sensitive poised RNA polymerase II at this proximal but not the previously annotated distal HEXIM1 promoter. Its immediate upstream sequences were fused to luciferase reporters and were found to be responsive to many P-TEFb-releasing compounds. The superelongation complex subunits AF4/FMR2 family member 4 (AFF4) and elongation factor RNA polymerase II 2 (ELL2) were recruited to this proximal promoter after P-TEFb release and were required for its transcriptional effects. Thus, P-TEFb regulates its own equilibrium in cells, most likely to maintain optimal cellular homeostasis.

  3. Analysis of the Heat Shock Response in Mouse Liver Reveals Transcriptional Dependence on the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα)

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) regulates responses to chemical or physical stress in part by altering expression of genes involved in proteome maintenance. Many of these genes are also transcriptionally regulated by h...

  4. Analysis of the Heat Shock Response in Mouse Liver Reveals Transcriptional Dependence on the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα)

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) regulates responses to chemical or physical stress in part by altering expression of genes involved in proteome maintenance. Many of these genes are also transcriptionally regulated by h...

  5. Cytoplasmic genome substitution in wheat affects the nuclear-cytoplasmic cross-talk leading to transcript and metabolite alterations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alloplasmic lines provide a unique tool to study nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions. Three alloplasmic lines, with nuclear genomes from Triticum aestivum and harboring cytoplasm from Aegilops uniaristata, Aegilops tauschii and Hordeum chilense, were investigated by transcript and metabolite profiling to identify the effects of cytoplasmic substitution on nuclear-cytoplasmic signaling mechanisms. Results In combining the wheat nuclear genome with a cytoplasm of H. chilense, 540 genes were significantly altered, whereas 11 and 28 genes were significantly changed in the alloplasmic lines carrying the cytoplasm of Ae. uniaristata or Ae. tauschii, respectively. We identified the RNA maturation-related process as one of the most sensitive to a perturbation of the nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction. Several key components of the ROS chloroplast retrograde signaling, together with the up-regulation of the ROS scavenging system, showed that changes in the chloroplast genome have a direct impact on nuclear-cytoplasmic cross-talk. Remarkably, the H. chilense alloplasmic line down-regulated some genes involved in the determination of cytoplasmic male sterility without expressing the male sterility phenotype. Metabolic profiling showed a comparable response of the central metabolism of the alloplasmic and euplasmic lines to light, while exposing larger metabolite alterations in the H. chilense alloplasmic line as compared with the Aegilops lines, in agreement with the transcriptomic data. Several stress-related metabolites, remarkably raffinose, were altered in content in the H. chilense alloplasmic line when exposed to high light, while amino acids, as well as organic acids were significantly decreased. Alterations in the levels of transcript, related to raffinose, and the photorespiration-related metabolisms were associated with changes in the level of related metabolites. Conclusion The replacement of a wheat cytoplasm with the cytoplasm of a related species affects

  6. The RNA Helicases AtMTR4 and HEN2 Target Specific Subsets of Nuclear Transcripts for Degradation by the Nuclear Exosome in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Heike; Zuber, Hélène; Sement, François M.; Chicher, Johana; Kuhn, Lauriane; Hammann, Philippe; Brunaud, Véronique; Bérard, Caroline; Bouteiller, Nathalie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Aubourg, Sébastien; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Vaucheret, Hervé; Gagliardi, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    The RNA exosome is the major 3′-5′ RNA degradation machine of eukaryotic cells and participates in processing, surveillance and turnover of both nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA. In both yeast and human, all nuclear functions of the exosome require the RNA helicase MTR4. We show that the Arabidopsis core exosome can associate with two related RNA helicases, AtMTR4 and HEN2. Reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation shows that each of the RNA helicases co-purifies with the exosome core complex and with distinct sets of specific proteins. While AtMTR4 is a predominantly nucleolar protein, HEN2 is located in the nucleoplasm and appears to be excluded from nucleoli. We have previously shown that the major role of AtMTR4 is the degradation of rRNA precursors and rRNA maturation by-products. Here, we demonstrate that HEN2 is involved in the degradation of a large number of polyadenylated nuclear exosome substrates such as snoRNA and miRNA precursors, incompletely spliced mRNAs, and spurious transcripts produced from pseudogenes and intergenic regions. Only a weak accumulation of these exosome substrate targets is observed in mtr4 mutants, suggesting that MTR4 can contribute, but plays rather a minor role for the degradation of non-ribosomal RNAs and cryptic transcripts in Arabidopsis. Consistently, transgene post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is marginally affected in mtr4 mutants, but increased in hen2 mutants, suggesting that it is mostly the nucleoplasmic exosome that degrades aberrant transgene RNAs to limit their entry in the PTGS pathway. Interestingly, HEN2 is conserved throughout green algae, mosses and land plants but absent from metazoans and other eukaryotic lineages. Our data indicate that, in contrast to human and yeast, plants have two functionally specialized RNA helicases that assist the exosome in the degradation of specific nucleolar and nucleoplasmic RNA populations, respectively. PMID:25144737

  7. The elongation complex components BRD4 and MLLT3/AF9 are transcriptional coactivators of nuclear retinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Flajollet, Sébastien; Rachez, Christophe; Ploton, Maheul; Schulz, Céline; Gallais, Rozenn; Métivier, Raphaël; Pawlak, Michal; Leray, Aymeric; Issulahi, Al Amine; Héliot, Laurent; Staels, Bart; Salbert, Gilles; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear all-trans retinoic acid receptors (RARs) initiate early transcriptional events which engage pluripotent cells to differentiate into specific lineages. RAR-controlled transactivation depends mostly on agonist-induced structural transitions in RAR C-terminus (AF-2), thus bridging coactivators or corepressors to chromatin, hence controlling preinitiation complex assembly. However, the contribution of other domains of RAR to its overall transcriptional activity remains poorly defined. A proteomic characterization of nuclear proteins interacting with RAR regions distinct from the AF-2 revealed unsuspected functional properties of the RAR N-terminus. Indeed, mass spectrometry fingerprinting identified the Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) and ALL1-fused gene from chromosome 9 (AF9/MLLT3), known to associate with and regulates the activity of Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb), as novel RAR coactivators. In addition to promoter sequences, RAR binds to genomic, transcribed regions of retinoid-regulated genes, in association with RNA polymerase II and as a function of P-TEFb activity. Knockdown of either AF9 or BRD4 expression affected differentially the neural differentiation of stem cell-like P19 cells. Clusters of retinoid-regulated genes were selectively dependent on BRD4 and/or AF9 expression, which correlated with RAR association to transcribed regions. Thus RAR establishes physical and functional links with components of the elongation complex, enabling the rapid retinoid-induced induction of genes required for neuronal differentiation. Our data thereby extends the previously known RAR interactome from classical transcriptional modulators to components of the elongation machinery, and unravel a functional role of RAR in transcriptional elongation.

  8. The Elongation Complex Components BRD4 and MLLT3/AF9 Are Transcriptional Coactivators of Nuclear Retinoid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Flajollet, Sébastien; Rachez, Christophe; Ploton, Maheul; Schulz, Céline; Gallais, Rozenn; Métivier, Raphaël; Pawlak, Michal; Leray, Aymeric; Issulahi, Al Amine; Héliot, Laurent; Staels, Bart; Salbert, Gilles; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear all-trans retinoic acid receptors (RARs) initiate early transcriptional events which engage pluripotent cells to differentiate into specific lineages. RAR-controlled transactivation depends mostly on agonist-induced structural transitions in RAR C-terminus (AF-2), thus bridging coactivators or corepressors to chromatin, hence controlling preinitiation complex assembly. However, the contribution of other domains of RAR to its overall transcriptional activity remains poorly defined. A proteomic characterization of nuclear proteins interacting with RAR regions distinct from the AF-2 revealed unsuspected functional properties of the RAR N-terminus. Indeed, mass spectrometry fingerprinting identified the Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) and ALL1-fused gene from chromosome 9 (AF9/MLLT3), known to associate with and regulates the activity of Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb), as novel RAR coactivators. In addition to promoter sequences, RAR binds to genomic, transcribed regions of retinoid-regulated genes, in association with RNA polymerase II and as a function of P-TEFb activity. Knockdown of either AF9 or BRD4 expression affected differentially the neural differentiation of stem cell-like P19 cells. Clusters of retinoid-regulated genes were selectively dependent on BRD4 and/or AF9 expression, which correlated with RAR association to transcribed regions. Thus RAR establishes physical and functional links with components of the elongation complex, enabling the rapid retinoid-induced induction of genes required for neuronal differentiation. Our data thereby extends the previously known RAR interactome from classical transcriptional modulators to components of the elongation machinery, and unravel a functional role of RAR in transcriptional elongation. PMID:23762261

  9. Nuclear sequestration of COL1A1 mRNA transcript associated with type I osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)

    SciTech Connect

    Primorac, D.; Stover, M.L.; McKinstry, M.B.

    1994-09-01

    Previously we identified an OI type I patient with a splice donor mutation that resulted in intron 26 retention instead of exon skipping and sequestration of normal levels of the mutant transcript in the nuclear compartment. Intron retention was consistent with the exon definition hypothesis for splice site selection since the size of the exon-intron-exon unit was less than 300 bp. Furthermore, the retained intron contained in-frame stop codons which is thought to cause the mutant RNA to remain within the nucleus rather than appearing in the cytoplasm. To test these hypotheses, genomic fragments containing the normal sequence or the donor mutation were cloned into a collagen minigene and expressed in stably tansfected NIH 3T3 cells. None of the modifications to the normal intron altered the level of RNA that accumulated in the cytoplasm, as expected. However none of the modifications to the mutant intron allowed accumulation of normal levels of mRNA in the cytoplasm. Moreover, in contrast to our findings in the patient`s cells only low levels of mutant transcript were found in the nucleus; a fraction of the transcript did appear in the cytoplasm which had spliced the mutant donor site correctly. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated equal levels of transcription from each transgene. Expression of another donor mutation known to cause in-frame exon skipping in OI type IV was accurately reproduced in the minigene in transfected 3T3 cells. Our experience suggests that either mechanism can lead to formation of a null allele possibly related to the type of splicing events surrounding the potential stop codons. Understanding the rules governing inactivation of a collagen RNA transcript may be important in designing a strategy to inactivate a dominate negative mutation associated with the more severe forms of OI.

  10. Transcriptional regulation of the human Liver X Receptor α gene by Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α

    SciTech Connect

    Theofilatos, Dimitris; Anestis, Aristomenis; Hashimoto, Koshi; Kardassis, Dimitris

    2016-01-15

    Liver X Receptors (LXRs) are sterol-activated transcription factors that play major roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, HDL biogenesis and reverse cholesterol transport. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms that control the expression of the human LXRα gene in hepatic cells. A series of reporter plasmids containing consecutive 5′ deletions of the hLXRα promoter upstream of the luciferase gene were constructed and the activity of each construct was measured in HepG2 cells. This analysis showed that the activity of the human LXRα promoter was significantly reduced by deleting the −111 to −42 region suggesting the presence of positive regulatory elements in this short proximal fragment. Bioinformatics data including motif search and ChIP-Seq revealed the presence of a potential binding motif for Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 α (HNF-4α) in this area. Overexpression of HNF-4α in HEK 293T cells increased the expression of all LXRα promoter constructs except −42/+384. In line, silencing the expression of endogenous HNF-4α in HepG2 cells was associated with reduced LXRα protein levels and reduced activity of the −111/+384 LXRα promoter but not of the −42/+384 promoter. Using ChiP assays in HepG2 cells combined with DNAP assays we mapped the novel HNF-4α specific binding motif (H4-SBM) in the −50 to −40 region of the human LXRα promoter. A triple mutation in this H4-SBM abolished HNF-4α binding and reduced the activity of the promoter to 65% relative to the wild type. Furthermore, the mutant promoter could not be transactivated by HNF-4α. In conclusion, our data indicate that HNF-4α may have a wider role in cell and plasma cholesterol homeostasis by controlling the expression of LXRα in hepatic cells. - Highlights: • The human LXRα promoter contains a HNF-4α specific binding motif in the proximal −50/−40 region. • Mutations in this motif abolished HNF4α binding and transactivation of the h

  11. Global analysis of the nuclear processing of transcripts with unspliced U12-type introns by the exosome

    PubMed Central

    Niemelä, Elina H.; Oghabian, Ali; Staals, Raymond H.J.; Greco, Dario; Pruijn, Ger J.M.; Frilander, Mikko J.

    2014-01-01

    U12-type introns are a rare class of introns in the genomes of diverse eukaryotes. In the human genome, they number over 700. A subset of these introns has been shown to be spliced at a slower rate compared to the major U2-type introns. This suggests a rate-limiting regulatory function for the minor spliceosome in the processing of transcripts containing U12-type introns. However, both the generality of slower splicing and the subsequent fate of partially processed pre-mRNAs remained unknown. Here, we present a global analysis of the nuclear retention of transcripts containing U12-type introns and provide evidence for the nuclear decay of such transcripts in human cells. Using SOLiD RNA sequencing technology, we find that, in normal cells, U12-type introns are on average 2-fold more retained than the surrounding U2-type introns. Furthermore, we find that knockdown of RRP41 and DIS3 subunits of the exosome stabilizes an overlapping set of U12-type introns. RRP41 knockdown leads to slower decay kinetics of U12-type introns and globally upregulates the retention of U12-type, but not U2-type, introns. Our results indicate that U12-type introns are spliced less efficiently and are targeted by the exosome. These characteristics support their role in the regulation of cellular mRNA levels. PMID:24848017

  12. [Effect of the attenuated strain (TC-83) of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus on nuclear transcription in rat brain cells].

    PubMed

    Valero-Fuenmayor, N; Añez, F; Teruel-López, M E

    1996-03-01

    In the present study the effect of the attenuated strain TC-83 of the Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis virus on the nuclear transcription in brain cells of rats was assessed. The transcription activity of the DNA depending RNA polymerases (types I and II) in the isolated nuclei of brain of infected rats and controls was determinated by incorporation of the (3H) UTP. Simultaneously a viral replication curve in the brain and the serum was carried out by plaque forming method in chicken embryo cell cultures. RNA polymerase I activity was only significantly reduced after 25 hours of infection, respect to control values, while polymerase II activity was progressive and significantly diminished from inicial stages of the viral infection at 10, 15, 20 y 25 hours post-infection compared to control values. The virus was not detected in the brain but after 25 hours post-infection with very low titers (< 0.7 log10 P.F.U./ml.), while the viral presence in the blood was demonstrated after a 10 hour period. Our results demonstrated a marked effect of the attenuated strain on the brain nuclear transcription, although the presence of the virus was not detected in the brain of the infected rats. This finding suggest a mechanism of action which deserves further studies to elucidate the cerebral metabolic response and the pathogenesis of the Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis infection.

  13. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 in health and neurodegenerative disease: from structural insights to post-transcriptional regulatory roles.

    PubMed

    Bekenstein, Uriya; Soreq, Hermona

    2013-09-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) are a family of conserved nuclear proteins that associate with nascent RNA polymerase II transcripts to yield hnRNP particles, playing key roles in mRNA metabolism, DNA-related functions and microRNA biogenesis. HnRNPs accompany transcripts from stages of transcriptional regulation through splicing and post-transcriptional regulation, and are believed to affect the majority of expressed genes in mammals. Most hnRNP mRNA transcripts undergo alternative splicing and post-translational modifications, to yield a remarkable diversity of proteins with numerous functional elements that work in concert in their multiple functions. Therefore, mis-regulation of hnRNPs leads to different maladies. Here, we focus on the role of one of the best-known members of this protein family, hnRNP A1 in RNA metabolism, and address recent works that note its multileveled involvement in several neurodegenerative disorders. Initially discovered as a DNA binding protein, hnRNP A1 includes two RNA recognition motifs, and post-translational modifications of these and other regions in this multifunctional protein alter both its nuclear pore shuttling properties and its RNA interactions and affect transcription, mRNA splicing and microRNA biogenesis. HnRNP A1 plays several key roles in neuronal functioning and its depletion, either due to debilitated cholinergic neurotransmission or under autoimmune reactions causes drastic changes in RNA metabolism. Consequently, hnRNP A1 decline contributes to the severity of symptoms in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), fronto-temporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) and HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). At the translational level, these properties of hnRNP A1 led to massive research efforts aimed at developing RNA

  14. Neuronal expression of nuclear transcription factor MafG in the rat medulla oblongata after baroreceptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kumaki, Iku; Yang, Dawei; Koibuchi, Noriyuki; Takayama, Kiyoshige

    2006-03-06

    The medulla oblongata is the site of central baroreceptive neurons in mammals. These neurons express specific basic-leucine zipper transcription factors (bZIP) after baroreceptor stimulation. Previously we showed that activation of baroreceptors induced expression of nuclear transcription factors c-Fos and FosB in central baroreceptive neurons. Here we studied the effects of baroreceptor stimulation on induction of MafG, a member of small Maf protein family that functions as dimeric partners for various bZIP transcription factors by forming transcription-regulating complexes, in the rat medulla oblongata. To determine whether gene expression of MafG is induced by stimulation of arterial baroreceptors, we examined the expression of its mRNA by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR method and its gene product by immunohistochemistry. We found that the number of MafG transcripts increased significantly in the medulla oblongata after baroreceptor stimulation. MafG-immunoreactive neurons were distributed in the nucleus tractus solitarii, the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, the ambiguous nucleus and the ventrolateral medulla. The numbers of MafG-immunoreactive neurons in these nuclei were significantly greater in test rats than in saline-injected control rats. We also found approximately 20% of MafG-immunoreactive neurons coexpress FosB after baroreceptor stimulation. Our results suggest that MafG cooperates with FosB to play critical roles as an immediate early gene in the signal transduction of cardiovascular regulation mediated by baroreceptive signals in the medulla oblongata.

  15. Mutations in nuclear genes alter post-transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial genes.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nuclear gene products are required for the expression of mitochondrial genes and elaboration of functional mitochondrial protein complexes. To better understand the roles of these nuclear genes, we exploited the mitochondrial encoded S-type of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS-S) and developed a nove...

  16. Time-dependent c-Myc transactomes mapped by Array-based nuclear run-on reveal transcriptional modules in human B cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinshui; Zeller, Karen; Chen, Yu-Chi; Watkins, Tonya; Barnes, Kathleen C; Becker, Kevin G; Dang, Chi V; Cheadle, Chris

    2010-03-15

    The definition of transcriptional networks through measurements of changes in gene expression profiles and mapping of transcription factor binding sites is limited by the moderate overlap between binding and gene expression changes and the inability to directly measure global nuclear transcription (coined "transactome"). We developed a method to measure nascent nuclear gene transcription with an Array-based Nuclear Run-On (ANRO) assay using commercial microarray platforms. This strategy provides the missing component, the transactome, to fully map transcriptional networks. ANRO measurements in an inducible c-Myc expressing human P493-6 B cell model reveals time-dependent waves of transcription, with a transactome early after c-Myc induction that does not persist at a late, steady-state phase, when genes that are regulated by c-Myc and E2F predominate. Gene set matrix analysis further uncovers functionally related groups of genes putatively regulated by waves of transcription factor motifs following Myc induction, starting with AP1 and CREB that are followed by EGR1, NFkB and STAT, and ending with E2F, Myc and ARNT/HIF motifs. By coupling ANRO with previous global mapping of c-Myc binding sites by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in P493-6 cells, we define a set of transcriptionally regulated direct c-Myc target genes and pave the way for the use of ANRO to comprehensively map any transcriptional network.

  17. SRY-box-containing Gene 2 Regulation of Nuclear Receptor Tailless (Tlx) Transcription in Adult Neural Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Shimozaki, Koji; Zhang, Chun-Li; Suh, Hoonkyo; Denli, Ahmet M.; Evans, Ronald M.; Gage, Fred H.

    2012-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis is maintained by self-renewable neural stem cells (NSCs). Their activity is regulated by multiple signaling pathways and key transcription factors. However, it has been unclear whether these factors interplay with each other at the molecular level. Here we show that SRY-box-containing gene 2 (Sox2) and nuclear receptor tailless (TLX) form a molecular network in adult NSCs. We observed that both Sox2 and TLX proteins bind to the upstream region of Tlx gene. Sox2 positively regulates Tlx expression, whereas the binding of TLX to its own promoter suppresses its transcriptional activity in luciferase reporter assays. Such TLX-mediated suppression can be antagonized by overexpressing wild-type Sox2 but not a mutant lacking the transcriptional activation domain. Furthermore, through regions involved in DNA-binding activity, Sox2 and TLX physically interact to form a complex on DNAs that contain a consensus binding site for TLX. Finally, depletion of Sox2 revealed the potential negative feedback loop of TLX expression that is antagonized by Sox2 in adult NSCs. These data suggest that Sox2 plays an important role in Tlx transcription in cultured adult NSCs. PMID:22194602

  18. Nucleolin is important for Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 1-mediated episome binding, maintenance, and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Lin; Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Zhao, Bo; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Shen, Chih-Long; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-wen

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for EBV episome maintenance, replication, and transcription. These effects are mediated by EBNA1 binding to cognate oriP DNA, which comprise 20 imperfect copies of a 30-bp dyad symmetry enhancer and an origin for DNA replication. To identify cell proteins essential for these EBNA1 functions, EBNA1 associated cell proteins were immune precipitated and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Nucleolin (NCL) was identified to be EBNA1 associated. EBNA1's N-terminal 100 aa and NCL's RNA-binding domains were critical for EBNA1/NCL interaction. Lentivirus shRNA-mediated NCL depletion substantially reduced EBNA1 recruitment to oriP DNA, EBNA1-dependent transcription of an EBV oriP luciferase reporter, and EBV genome maintenance in lymphoblastoid cell lines. NCL RNA-binding domain K429 was critical for ATP and EBNA1 binding. NCL overexpression increased EBNA1 binding to oriP and transcription, whereas NCL K429A was deficient. Moreover, NCL silencing impaired lymphoblastoid cell line growth. These experiments reveal a surprisingly critical role for NCL K429 in EBNA1 episome maintenance and transcription, which may be a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24344309

  19. The Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 reprograms transcription by mimicry of high mobility group A proteins

    PubMed Central

    Coppotelli, Giuseppe; Mughal, Nouman; Callegari, Simone; Sompallae, Ramakrishna; Caja, Laia; Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; Dantuma, Nico P.; Moustakas, Aristidis; Masucci, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    Viral proteins reprogram their host cells by hijacking regulatory components of protein networks. Here we describe a novel property of the Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1) that may underlie the capacity of the virus to promote a global remodeling of chromatin architecture and cellular transcription. We found that the expression of EBNA1 in transfected human and mouse cells is associated with decreased prevalence of heterochromatin foci, enhanced accessibility of cellular DNA to micrococcal nuclease digestion and decreased average length of nucleosome repeats, suggesting de-protection of the nucleosome linker regions. This is a direct effect of EBNA1 because targeting the viral protein to heterochromatin promotes large-scale chromatin decondensation with slow kinetics and independent of the recruitment of adenosine triphosphate–dependent chromatin remodelers. The remodeling function is mediated by a bipartite Gly-Arg rich domain of EBNA1 that resembles the AT-hook of High Mobility Group A (HMGA) architectural transcription factors. Similar to HMGAs, EBNA1 is highly mobile in interphase nuclei and promotes the mobility of linker histone H1, which counteracts chromatin condensation and alters the transcription of numerous cellular genes. Thus, by regulating chromatin compaction, EBNA1 may reset cellular transcription during infection and prime the infected cells for malignant transformation. PMID:23358825

  20. Identification, molecular cloning, and transcription analysis of the Choristoneura fumiferana nuclear polyhedrosis virus spindle-like protein gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, J J; Carstens, E B

    1996-09-15

    The Choristoneura fumiferana nuclear polyhedrosis virus spindle-like protein (slp) gene has been identified and localized immediately downstream and in the same orientation as the CfMNPV DNA polymerase gene. The slp gene is 1101 bp long, predicted to code for a 366 amino acid (42.1 kDa) polypeptide. Transcriptional analysis revealed that the CfMNPV slp gene is expressed at late times postinfection, beginning at 24 hr postinfection and is most abundantly expressed after 36 hr. Transcription initiates within a single baculovirus consensus late start site sequence (GTAAG) at position -18 relative to the translation start codon. Based on amino acid comparisons, the CfMNPV gene is closely related to other similar baculovirus genes and distantly but recognizably related to the fusolin proteins of two entomopoxviruses. The conservation of amino acid sequence, glycosylation signals and specific domains throughout the protein suggest that this gene product may play an important role in insect DNA virus replication.

  1. Upregulation of Nuclear Factor-Related Kappa B Suggests a Disorder of Transcriptional Regulation in Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Candelier, Marina; Lang, Philippe; Sahali, Djillali

    2012-01-01

    Immune mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome, the most frequent glomerular disease in children, are believed to involve a systemic disorder of T cell function and cell mediated immunity. How these perturbations take place remains unclear. We report here that NFRKB, a member of the chromatin remodeling complex, is upregulated in MCNS relapse, mainly in CD4+T cells and B cells and undergo post-translational modifications including sumoylation. We showed that NFRKB was highly expressed in nuclear compartment during the relapse, while it was restricted to cytoplasm in remission. NFRKB induced the activation of AP1 signaling pathway by upregulating the expression of c-jun. We showed that NFRKB promotes hypomethylation of genomic DNA, suggesting its implication in regulation of gene expression by enhancing the binding of transcription factors through chromatin remodeling. These results suggest for the first time that NFRKB may be involved in the disorders of transcriptional regulation commonly observed in MCNS relapse. PMID:22291976

  2. The transcriptional activity of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha is inhibited via phosphorylation by ERK1/2

    PubMed Central

    Bacquet, Caroline; Kiss, Judit; Sipeki, Szabolcs; Martin, Ludovic; Buday, László; Bálint, Bálint L.; Arányi, Tamás

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) nuclear receptor is a master regulator of hepatocyte development, nutrient transport and metabolism. HNF4α is regulated both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels by different mechanisms. Several kinases (PKA, PKC, AMPK) were shown to phosphorylate and decrease the activity of HNF4α. Activation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway, inducing proliferation and survival, inhibits the expression of HNF4α. However, based on our previous results we hypothesized that HNF4α is also regulated at the post-transcriptional level by ERK1/2. Here we show that ERK1/2 is capable of directly phosphorylating HNF4α in vitro at several phosphorylation sites including residues previously shown to be targeted by other kinases, as well. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that phosphorylation of HNF4α leads to a reduced trans-activational capacity of the nuclear receptor in luciferase reporter gene assay. We confirm the functional relevance of these findings by demonstrating with ChIP-qPCR experiments that 30-minute activation of ERK1/2 leads to reduced chromatin binding of HNF4α. Accordingly, we have observed decreasing but not disappearing binding of HNF4α to the target genes. In addition, 24-hour activation of the pathway further decreased HNF4α chromatin binding to specific loci in ChIP-qPCR experiments, which confirms the previous reports on the decreased expression of the HNF4a gene due to ERK1/2 activation. Our data suggest that the ERK1/2 pathway plays an important role in the regulation of HNF4α-dependent hepatic gene expression. PMID:28196117

  3. The transcriptional activity of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha is inhibited via phosphorylation by ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Vető, Borbála; Bojcsuk, Dóra; Bacquet, Caroline; Kiss, Judit; Sipeki, Szabolcs; Martin, Ludovic; Buday, László; Bálint, Bálint L; Arányi, Tamás

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) nuclear receptor is a master regulator of hepatocyte development, nutrient transport and metabolism. HNF4α is regulated both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels by different mechanisms. Several kinases (PKA, PKC, AMPK) were shown to phosphorylate and decrease the activity of HNF4α. Activation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway, inducing proliferation and survival, inhibits the expression of HNF4α. However, based on our previous results we hypothesized that HNF4α is also regulated at the post-transcriptional level by ERK1/2. Here we show that ERK1/2 is capable of directly phosphorylating HNF4α in vitro at several phosphorylation sites including residues previously shown to be targeted by other kinases, as well. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that phosphorylation of HNF4α leads to a reduced trans-activational capacity of the nuclear receptor in luciferase reporter gene assay. We confirm the functional relevance of these findings by demonstrating with ChIP-qPCR experiments that 30-minute activation of ERK1/2 leads to reduced chromatin binding of HNF4α. Accordingly, we have observed decreasing but not disappearing binding of HNF4α to the target genes. In addition, 24-hour activation of the pathway further decreased HNF4α chromatin binding to specific loci in ChIP-qPCR experiments, which confirms the previous reports on the decreased expression of the HNF4a gene due to ERK1/2 activation. Our data suggest that the ERK1/2 pathway plays an important role in the regulation of HNF4α-dependent hepatic gene expression.

  4. Isolation and purification of a hen nuclear oestrogen receptor and its effect on transcription of chick chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R G; Schwartz, R J

    1979-01-01

    An oestrogen receptor was isolated, characterized and purified from the nuclear fraction of the hen oviduct. The receptor sediments at 4.6 S on glycerol gradients, has an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.1 X 10(-10)M, an association constant (ka) of 1.4 X 10(-6) M-1.S-1, and a dissociation constant (kd) of 5 x 10(-5) s-1. The receptor chromatographed from DEAE-cellulose as a single peak at 0.15 M-KCl and was not retained by phosphocellulose. Polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of the receptor in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate demonstrated two subunits with apparent mol.wts. of 74000 and 80000. The overall purification achieved was 90000-fold by using a combination of cell fractionation, (NH4)2SO4 fractionation and affinity chromatography. This represents the first separation, isolation and purification of the highest-affinity binding component (Kd 10(-10)M) of two high-affinity oestrogen-binding proteins present in both chick and hen oviduct cytosol and nuclei. To examine directly the effect of the purified receptor on transcription a reconstituted cell-free system was used, which contained the receptor--oestradiol complex, Escherichia coli RNA polymerase, rifampicin and chromatin prepared from hormone-withdrawn chick tissue. The receptor-hormone complex at a concentration of 0.1 nM stimulated transcription of oviduct chromatin by promoting an increase of 14000 sites for RNA-chain initiation, which is similar to the number of additional sites measured in the oviducts of diethylstilboestrol-stimulated immature chicks [Tsai, Schwartz, Tsai & O'Malley (1975) J. Biol. Chem. 250, 5165-5174]. Oestradiol alone had no effect on transcription. Thus the data demonstrate that the purified nuclear oestradiol-receptor complex can regulate gene transcription in vitro in a manner similar to that observed in target cells in vivo. Images Fig. 4. PMID:534532

  5. Multiple NUCLEAR FACTOR Y transcription factors respond to abiotic stress in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Lin, Zhongyuan; Tao, Qing; Liang, Mingxiang; Zhao, Gengmao; Yin, Xiangzhen; Fu, Ruixin

    2014-01-01

    Members of the plant NUCLEAR FACTOR Y (NF-Y) family are composed of the NF-YA, NF-YB, and NF-YC subunits. In Brassica napus (canola), each of these subunits forms a multimember subfamily. Plant NF-Ys were reported to be involved in several abiotic stresses. In this study, we demonstrated that multiple members of thirty three BnNF-Ys responded rapidly to salinity, drought, or ABA treatments. Transcripts of five BnNF-YAs, seven BnNF-YBs, and two BnNF-YCs were up-regulated by salinity stress, whereas the expression of thirteen BnNF-YAs, ten BnNF-YBs, and four BnNF-YCs were induced by drought stress. Under NaCl treatments, the expression of one BnNF-YA10 and four NF-YBs (BnNF-YB3, BnNF-YB7, BnNF-YB10, and BnNF-YB14) were greatly increased. Under PEG treatments, the expression levels of four NF-YAs (BnNF-YA9, BnNF-YA10, BnNF-YA11, and BnNF-YA12) and five NF-YBs (BnNF-YB1, BnNF-YB8, BnNF-YB10, BnNF-YB13, and BnNF-YB14) were greatly induced. The expression profiles of 20 of the 27 salinity- or drought-induced BnNF-Ys were also affected by ABA treatment. The expression levels of six NF-YAs (BnNF-YA1, BnNF-YA7, BnNF-YA8, BnNF-YA9, BnNF-YA10, and BnNF-YA12) and seven BnNF-YB members (BnNF-YB2, BnNF-YB3, BnNF-YB7, BnNF-YB10, BnNF-YB11, BnNF-YB13, and BnNF-YB14) and two NF-YC members (BnNF-YC2 and BnNF-YC3) were greatly up-regulated by ABA treatments. Only a few BnNF-Ys were inhibited by the above three treatments. Several NF-Y subfamily members exhibited collinear expression patterns. The promoters of all stress-responsive BnNF-Ys harbored at least two types of stress-related cis-elements, such as ABRE, DRE, MYB, or MYC. The cis-element organization of BnNF-Ys was similar to that of Arabidopsis thaliana, and the promoter regions exhibited higher levels of nucleotide sequence identity with Brassica rapa than with Brassica oleracea. This work represents an entry point for investigating the roles of canola NF-Y proteins during abiotic stress responses and provides insight into

  6. The variations in the nuclear proteome reveal new transcription factors and mechanisms involved in UV stress response in Pinus radiata.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Jesús; Alegre, Sara; Nagler, Matthias; Escandón, Mónica; Annacondia, María Luz; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Valledor, Luis; Cañal, María Jesús

    2016-06-30

    The importance of UV stress and its side-effects over the loss of plant productivity in forest species demands a deeper understanding of how pine trees respond to UV irradiation. Although the response to UV stress has been characterized at system and cellular levels, the dynamics within the nuclear proteome triggered by UV is still unknown despite that they are essential for gene expression and regulation of plant physiology. To fill this gap this work aims to characterize the variations in the nuclear proteome as a response to UV irradiation by using state-of-the-art mass spectrometry-based methods combined with novel bioinformatics workflows. The combination of SEQUEST, de novo sequencing, and novel annotation pipelines allowed cover sensing and transduction pathways, endoplasmic reticulum-related mechanisms and the regulation of chromatin dynamism and gene expression by histones, histone-like NF-Ys, and other transcription factors previously unrelated to this stress source, as well as the role of alternative splicing and other mechanisms involved in RNA translation and protein synthesis. The determination of 33 transcription factors, including NF-YB13, Pp005698_3 (NF-YB) and Pr009668_2 (WD-40), which are correlated to stress responsive mechanisms like an increased accumulation of photoprotective pigments and reduced photosynthesis, pointing them as strong candidate biomarkers for breeding programs aimed to improve UV resistance of pine trees. The description of the nuclear proteome of Pinus radiata combining a classic approach based on the use of SEQUEST and the use of a mass accuracy precursor alignment (MAPA) allowed an unprecedented protein coverage. This workflow provided the methodological basis for characterizing the changes in the nuclear proteome triggered by UV irradiation, allowing the depiction of the nuclear events involved in stress response and adaption. The relevance of some of the discovered proteins will suppose a major advance in stress biology

  7. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  8. Total cellular protein presence of the transcription factor IRF8 does not necessarily correlate with its nuclear presence.

    PubMed

    Minderman, Hans; Maguire, Orla; O'Loughlin, Kieran L; Muhitch, Jason; Wallace, Paul K; Abrams, Scott I

    2017-01-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF8) plays an essential role in myeloid differentiation and lineage commitment, based largely on molecular and genetic studies. The detection of IRF8 in specific cell populations by flow cytometry (FCM) has the potential to provide new insights into normal and pathologic myelopoiesis, but critical validation of this protein-based approach, particularly in human samples, is lacking. In this study, the assessment of total cellular IRF8 presence was compared to its specific nuclear presence as assessed by imaging flow cytometry (IFC) analysis. Peptide neutralization of the IRF8-specific antibody that has been predominantly used to date in the literature served as a negative control for the immunofluorescent labeling. Expression of total IRF8 was analyzed by total cellular fluorescence analogous to the mean fluorescence intensity readout of conventional FCM. Additionally, specific nuclear fluorescence and the similarity score between the nuclear image (DAPI) and the corresponding IRF8 image for each cell were analyzed as parameters for nuclear localization of IRF8. IFC showed that peptide blocking eliminated binding of the IRF8 antibody in the nucleus. It also reduced cytoplasmic binding of the antibody but not to the extent observed in the nucleus. In agreement with the similarity score data, the total cellular IRF8 as well as nuclear IRF8 intensities decreased with peptide blocking. In healthy donor peripheral blood subpopulations and a positive control cell line (THP-1), the assessment of IRF8 by total cellular presence correlated well with its specific nuclear presence and correlated with the known distribution of IRF8 in these cells. In clinical samples of myeloid-derived suppressors cells derived from patients with renal carcinoma, however, total cellular IRF8 did not necessarily correlate with its nuclear presence. Discordance was primarily associated with peptide blocking having a proportionally greater

  9. Farnesyl pyrophosphate is a novel transcriptional activator for a subset of nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Das, Sharmistha; Schapira, Matthieu; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Goyanka, Ritu; Cardozo, Timothy; Samuels, Herbert H

    2007-11-01

    In silico docking of a chemical library with the ligand-binding domain of thyroid hormone nuclear receptor-beta (TRbeta) suggested that farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), a key intermediate in cholesterol synthesis and protein farnesylation, might function as an agonist. Surprisingly, addition of FPP to cells activated TR as well as the classical steroid hormone receptors but not peroxisome proliferative-activating receptors, farnesoid X receptor, liver X receptor, or several orphan nuclear receptors the ligands of which are unknown. FPP enhanced receptor-coactivator binding in vitro and in vivo, and elevation of FPP levels in cells by squalene synthetase or farnesyl transferase inhibitors leads to activation. The FPP effect was blocked by selective receptor antagonists, and in silico docking with 143 nuclear receptor ligand-binding domain structures revealed that FPP only docked with the agonist conformation of those receptors activated by FPP. Our results suggest that certain nuclear receptors maintain a common structural feature that may reflect an action of FPP on an ancient nuclear receptor or that FPP could function as a ligand for one of the many orphan nuclear receptors the ligands of which have not yet been identified. This finding also has potential interesting implications that may, in part, explain the pleotropic effects of statins as well as certain actions of farnesylation inhibitors in cells.

  10. Viral and host cellular transcription in Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus-infected gypsy moth cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Guzo, D; Rathburn, H; Guthrie, K; Dougherty, E

    1992-01-01

    Infection of two gypsy moth cell lines (IPLB-Ld652Y and IPLB-LdFB) by the Autographa californica multiple-enveloped nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) is characterized by extremely attenuated viral protein synthesis followed by a total arrest of all viral and cellular protein production. In this study, AcMNPV- and host cell-specific transcription were examined. Overall levels of viral RNAs in infected gypsy moth cells were, at most measured times, comparable to RNA levels from an infected cell line (TN-368) permissive for AcMNPV replication. Northern blot (RNA) analyses using viral and host gene-specific probes revealed predominantly normal-length virus- and cell-specific transcripts postinfection. Transport of viral RNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and transcript stability in infected gypsy moth cells also appeared normal compared with similar parameters for AcMNPV-infected TN-368 cells. Host cellular and viral mRNAs extracted from gypsy moth and TN-368 cells at various times postinfection and translated in vitro yielded similar spectra of host and viral proteins. Treatment of infected gypsy moth cells with the DNA synthesis inhibitor aphidicolin eliminated the total protein synthesis shutoff in infected IPLB-LdFB cells but had no effect on protein synthesis inhibition in infected IPLB-Ld652Y cells. The apparent selective block in the translation of viral transcripts early in infection and the absence of normal translation or transcription of host cellular genes at later times is discussed. Images PMID:1560533

  11. Dexamethasone inhibits human interleukin 2 but not interleukin 2 receptor gene expression in vitro at the level of nuclear transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Boumpas, D T; Anastassiou, E D; Older, S A; Tsokos, G C; Nelson, D L; Balow, J E

    1991-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids have an inhibitory effect on the expression of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) genes. To determine the mechanisms of this inhibition, human T lymphocytes were stimulated with mitogens in the presence of dexamethasone. Nuclear transcription run-off assays showed that high doses of dexamethasone inhibited the transcription of the IL-2 gene but not that of the IL-2R gene. Post-transcriptionally, high doses of dexamethasone (10(-4) M) were required to inhibit IL-2R mRNA levels by 50%, whereas lower doses (10(-6) M) inhibited by greater than 70% the accumulation of IL-2 mRNA. IL-2 mRNA half-life decreased in the presence of dexamethasone (10(-6) M) by approximately 50%. At the protein product level, dexamethasone inhibited both IL-2 production, as well as cell surface and soluble forms of IL-2R. IL-2R gene expression was inhibited for at least 72 h after exposure of cells to dexamethasone. In the presence of exogenous IL-2, dexamethasone failed to exert a significant effect on the production of IL-2R protein. These data indicate that dexamethasone has a greater effect on the expression of the IL-2 gene than on the IL-2R gene. Dexamethasone both inhibits transcription of the IL-2 gene and decreases the stability of IL-2 mRNA. The effect of dexamethasone on the IL-2R gene is post-transcriptional and may result indirectly from decreased IL-2 production. Images PMID:2022743

  12. Anti-Nuclear Antibody Production and Autoimmunity in Transgenic Mice that Over-Express the Transcription Factor Bright

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Malini; Nixon, Jamee C.; Maier, Shannon; Workman, Jennifer; Farris, A. Darise; Webb, Carol F.

    2009-01-01

    The B cell-restricted transcription factor, Bright, up-regulates immunoglobulin heavy chain transcription three- to seven-fold in activated B cells in vitro. Bright function is dependent upon both active Bruton’s tyrosine kinase and its substrate, the transcription factor, TFII-I. In mouse and human B lymphocytes, Bright transcription is down regulated in mature B cells, and its expression is tightly regulated during B cell differentiation. To determine how Bright expression affects B cell development, transgenic mice were generated that express Bright constitutively in all B lineage cells. These mice exhibited increases in total B220+ B lymphocyte lineage cells in the bone marrow, but the relative percentages of the individual subpopulations were not altered. Splenic immature transitional B cells were significantly expanded both in total cell numbers and as increased percentages of cells relative to other B cell subpopulations. Serum immunoglobulin levels, particularly IgG isotypes, were increased slightly in the Bright transgenic mice compared to littermate controls. However, immunization studies suggest that responses to all foreign antigens were not increased globally. Moreover, four week-old Bright transgenic mice produced anti-nuclear antibodies. Older animals developed antibody deposits in the kidney glomeruli, but did not succumb to further autoimmune sequelae. These data indicate that enhanced Bright expression results in failure to maintain B cell tolerance and suggest a previously unappreciated role for Bright regulation in immature B cells. Bright is the first B cell-restricted transcription factor demonstrated to induce autoimmunity. Therefore, the Bright transgenics provide a novel model system for future analyses of B cell autoreactivity. PMID:17312145

  13. Identification of nuclear hormone receptor pathways causing insulin resistance by transcriptional and epigenomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sona; Tsai, Linus T.; Zhou, Yiming; Evertts, Adam; Xu, Su; Griffin, Michael J.; Issner, Robbyn; Whitton, Holly J.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Epstein, Charles B.; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S.; Rosen, Evan D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Insulin resistance is a sine qua non of Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and a frequent complication of multiple clinical conditions, including obesity, aging, and steroid use, among others. How such a panoply of insults can result in a common phenotype is incompletely understood. Furthermore, very little is known about the transcriptional and epigenetic basis of this disorder, despite evidence that such pathways are likely to play a fundamental role. Here, we compare cell autonomous models of insulin resistance induced by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) or by the steroid dexamethasone (Dex) to construct detailed transcriptional and epigenomic maps associated with cellular insulin resistance. These data predict that the glucocorticoid receptor and vitamin D receptor are common mediators of insulin resistance, which we validate using gain- and loss-of-function studies. These studies define a common transcriptional and epigenomic signature in cellular insulin resistance enabling the identification of pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:25503565

  14. Gene Resistance to Transcriptional Reprogramming following Nuclear Transfer Is Directly Mediated by Multiple Chromatin-Repressive Pathways.

    PubMed

    Jullien, Jerome; Vodnala, Munender; Pasque, Vincent; Oikawa, Mami; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George; David, Sarah Anne; Brochard, Vincent; Wang, Stan; Bradshaw, Charles; Koseki, Haruhiko; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Beaujean, Nathalie; Gurdon, John

    2017-03-02

    Understanding the mechanism of resistance of genes to reactivation will help improve the success of nuclear reprogramming. Using mouse embryonic fibroblast nuclei with normal or reduced DNA methylation in combination with chromatin modifiers able to erase H3K9me3, H3K27me3, and H2AK119ub1 from transplanted nuclei, we reveal the basis for resistance of genes to transcriptional reprogramming by oocyte factors. A majority of genes is affected by more than one type of treatment, suggesting that resistance can require repression through multiple epigenetic mechanisms. We classify resistant genes according to their sensitivity to 11 chromatin modifier combinations, revealing the existence of synergistic as well as adverse effects of chromatin modifiers on removal of resistance. We further demonstrate that the chromatin modifier USP21 reduces resistance through its H2AK119 deubiquitylation activity. Finally, we provide evidence that H2A ubiquitylation also contributes to resistance to transcriptional reprogramming in mouse nuclear transfer embryos.

  15. Cytoplasmic and nuclear quality control and turnover of single-stranded RNA modulate post-transcriptional gene silencing in plants

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Ana Beatriz; Martínez de Alba, Angel Emilio; Bardou, Florian; Crespi, Martin D.; Vaucheret, Hervé; Maizel, Alexis; Mallory, Allison C.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA quality control (RQC) uses both endonucleolytic and exonucleolytic degradation to eliminate dysfunctional RNAs. In addition, endogenous and exogenous RNAs are degraded through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), which is triggered by the production of double-stranded (ds)RNAs and proceeds through short-interfering (si)RNA-directed ARGONAUTE-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage. Compromising cytoplasmic or nuclear 5′–3′ exoribonuclease function enhances sense-transgene (S)-PTGS in Arabidopsis, suggesting that these pathways compete for similar RNA substrates. Here, we show that impairing nonsense-mediated decay, deadenylation or exosome activity enhanced S-PTGS, which requires host RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6/SGS2/SDE1) and SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING 3 (SGS3) for the transformation of single-stranded RNA into dsRNA to trigger PTGS. However, these RQC mutations had no effect on inverted-repeat–PTGS, which directly produces hairpin dsRNA through transcription. Moreover, we show that these RQC factors are nuclear and cytoplasmic and are found in two RNA degradation foci in the cytoplasm: siRNA-bodies and processing-bodies. We propose a model of single-stranded RNA tug-of-war between RQC and S-PTGS that ensures the correct partitioning of RNA substrates among these RNA degradation pathways. PMID:23482394

  16. Cytoplasmic and nuclear quality control and turnover of single-stranded RNA modulate post-transcriptional gene silencing in plants.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Ana Beatriz; Martínez de Alba, Angel Emilio; Bardou, Florian; Crespi, Martin D; Vaucheret, Hervé; Maizel, Alexis; Mallory, Allison C

    2013-04-01

    Eukaryotic RNA quality control (RQC) uses both endonucleolytic and exonucleolytic degradation to eliminate dysfunctional RNAs. In addition, endogenous and exogenous RNAs are degraded through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), which is triggered by the production of double-stranded (ds)RNAs and proceeds through short-interfering (si)RNA-directed ARGONAUTE-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage. Compromising cytoplasmic or nuclear 5'-3' exoribonuclease function enhances sense-transgene (S)-PTGS in Arabidopsis, suggesting that these pathways compete for similar RNA substrates. Here, we show that impairing nonsense-mediated decay, deadenylation or exosome activity enhanced S-PTGS, which requires host RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6/SGS2/SDE1) and SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING 3 (SGS3) for the transformation of single-stranded RNA into dsRNA to trigger PTGS. However, these RQC mutations had no effect on inverted-repeat-PTGS, which directly produces hairpin dsRNA through transcription. Moreover, we show that these RQC factors are nuclear and cytoplasmic and are found in two RNA degradation foci in the cytoplasm: siRNA-bodies and processing-bodies. We propose a model of single-stranded RNA tug-of-war between RQC and S-PTGS that ensures the correct partitioning of RNA substrates among these RNA degradation pathways.

  17. The C-terminal domain-phosphorylated IIO form of RNA polymerase II is associated with the transcription repressor NC2 (Dr1/DRAP1) and is required for transcription activation in human nuclear extracts.

    PubMed

    Castaño, E; Gross, P; Wang, Z; Roeder, R G; Oelgeschläger, T

    2000-06-20

    Activation of class II gene transcription may involve alleviation of transcription repression as well as stimulation of the assembly and function of the general RNA polymerase (RNAP) II transcription machinery. Here, we investigated whether activator-reversible transcription repression by NC2 (Dr1/DRAP1) contributes to maximum induction levels in unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts. Surprisingly, we found that depletion of NC2 does not significantly affect basal transcription, but dramatically reduces activated transcription. Immunoblot analyses revealed that the loss of activator function coincides with selective removal of the C-terminal domain (CTD)-hyperphosphorylated RNAP IIO along with NC2. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments with purified factors confirmed that NC2 interacts with RNAP IIO, but not with the unphosphorylated or hypophosphorylated RNAP IIA or CTD-less RNAP IIB forms. Finally, we demonstrate that, in contrast to previously published observations in cell-free systems reconstituted with purified factors, only the CTD-phosphorylated form of RNAP II can mediate activator function in the context of unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts. These findings reveal an unexpected link between NC2 and transcription activation and suggest that regulation of RNAP II transcription through reversible CTD phosphorylation might be more complex than previously proposed.

  18. Expression of nuclear transcription factor kappa B in locally advanced human cervical cancer treated with definitive chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Garg, Amit K; Jhingran, Anuja; Klopp, Ann H; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Kunnumakkara, Ajai B; Broadus, Russell R; Eifel, Patricia J; Buchholz, Thomas A

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), a transcriptional factor that has been shown to be constitutively active in cervical cancer, is part of an important pathway leading to treatment resistance in many tumor types. The purpose of our study was to determine whether expression of NF-κB in pretreatment specimens and specimens taken shortly after treatment initiation correlated with outcome in cervical cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiation. Eighteen patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were enrolled in a study in which cervical biopsy specimens were obtained before radiation therapy and 48 h after treatment initiation. Matched biopsy specimens from 16 of these patients were available and evaluated for the nuclear expression of NF-κB protein by immunohistochemical staining. After a median follow-up of 43 months, there were 9 total treatment failures. Nuclear staining for NF-κB was positive in 3 of 16 pretreatment biopsy specimens (19%) and 5 of 16 postradiation biopsy specimens (31%). Pretreatment expression of NF-κB nuclear staining correlated with increased rates of local-regional failure (100% vs. 23%, p = 0.01), distant failure (100% vs. 38%, p = 0.055), disease-specific mortality (100% vs. 31%, p = 0.03), and overall mortality (100% vs. 38%, p = 0.055). Our data suggest that pretreatment nuclear expression of NF-κB may be associated with a poor outcome for cervical cancer patients treated with chemoradiation. Although these data require validation in a larger group of patients, the results support the continued study of the relationship between NF-κB and outcome in patients treated for carcinoma of the cervix. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression of Nuclear Transcription Factor Kappa B in Locally Advanced Human Cervical Cancer Treated With Definitive Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Amit K.; Jhingran, Anuja; Klopp, Ann H.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Kunnumakkara, Ajai B.; Broadus, Russell R.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), a transcriptional factor that has been shown to be constitutively active in cervical cancer, is part of an important pathway leading to treatment resistance in many tumor types. The purpose of our study was to determine whether expression of NF-{kappa}B in pretreatment specimens and specimens taken shortly after treatment initiation correlated with outcome in cervical cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were enrolled in a study in which cervical biopsy specimens were obtained before radiation therapy and 48 h after treatment initiation. Matched biopsy specimens from 16 of these patients were available and evaluated for the nuclear expression of NF-{kappa}B protein by immunohistochemical staining. Results: After a median follow-up of 43 months, there were 9 total treatment failures. Nuclear staining for NF-{kappa}B was positive in 3 of 16 pretreatment biopsy specimens (19%) and 5 of 16 postradiation biopsy specimens (31%). Pretreatment expression of NF-{kappa}B nuclear staining correlated with increased rates of local-regional failure (100% vs. 23%, p = 0.01), distant failure (100% vs. 38%, p = 0.055), disease-specific mortality (100% vs. 31%, p = 0.03), and overall mortality (100% vs. 38%, p = 0.055). Conclusions: Our data suggest that pretreatment nuclear expression of NF-{kappa}B may be associated with a poor outcome for cervical cancer patients treated with chemoradiation. Although these data require validation in a larger group of patients, the results support the continued study of the relationship between NF-{kappa}B and outcome in patients treated for carcinoma of the cervix.

  20. Nuclear Perilipin 5 integrates lipid droplet lipolysis with PGC-1α/SIRT1-dependent transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo-Montejano, Violeta I.; Saxena, Geetu; Kusminski, Christine M.; Yang, Chaofeng; McAfee, John L.; Hahner, Lisa; Hoch, Kathleen; Dubinsky, William; Narkar, Vihang A.; Bickel, Perry E.

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctional cellular lipid metabolism contributes to common chronic human diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, fatty liver disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy. How cells balance lipid storage and mitochondrial oxidative capacity is poorly understood. Here we identify the lipid droplet protein Perilipin 5 as a catecholamine-triggered interaction partner of PGC-1α. We report that during catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis, Perilipin 5 is phosphorylated by protein kinase A and forms transcriptional complexes with PGC-1α and SIRT1 in the nucleus. Perilipin 5 promotes PGC-1α co-activator function by disinhibiting SIRT1 deacetylase activity. We show by gain-and-loss of function studies in cells that nuclear Perilipin 5 promotes transcription of genes that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function. We propose that Perilipin 5 is an important molecular link that couples the coordinated catecholamine activation of the PKA pathway and of lipid droplet lipolysis with transcriptional regulation to promote efficient fatty acid catabolism and prevent mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27554864

  1. Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3A protein regulates CDKN2B transcription via interaction with MIZ-1

    PubMed Central

    Bazot, Quentin; Deschamps, Thibaut; Tafforeau, Lionel; Siouda, Maha; Leblanc, Pascal; Harth-Hertle, Marie L.; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Lotteau, Vincent; Kempkes, Bettina; Tommasino, Massimo; Gruffat, Henri; Manet, Evelyne

    2014-01-01

    The Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 3 family of protein is critical for the EBV-induced primary B-cell growth transformation process. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen we identified 22 novel cellular partners of the EBNA3s. Most importantly, among the newly identified partners, five are known to play direct and important roles in transcriptional regulation. Of these, the Myc-interacting zinc finger protein-1 (MIZ-1) is a transcription factor initially characterized as a binding partner of MYC. MIZ-1 activates the transcription of a number of target genes including the cell cycle inhibitor CDKN2B. Focusing on the EBNA3A/MIZ-1 interaction we demonstrate that binding occurs in EBV-infected cells expressing both proteins at endogenous physiological levels and that in the presence of EBNA3A, a significant fraction of MIZ-1 translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Moreover, we show that a trimeric complex composed of a MIZ-1 recognition DNA element, MIZ-1 and EBNA3A can be formed, and that interaction of MIZ-1 with nucleophosmin (NPM), one of its coactivator, is prevented by EBNA3A. Finally, we show that, in the presence of EBNA3A, expression of the MIZ-1 target gene, CDKN2B, is downregulated and repressive H3K27 marks are established on its promoter region suggesting that EBNA3A directly counteracts the growth inhibitory action of MIZ-1. PMID:25092922

  2. Sensitive detection of transcription factors in cell nuclear extracts by using a molecular beacons based amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Ke; Zhu, Xue; Xie, Minhao

    2016-03-15

    Monitoring transcription factor (TF) levels provides an important assessment of the state of cell populations. Unfortunately, traditional methods for monitoring TF concentration are generally cumbersome and time-consuming. We developed an ultrasensitive one-pot TF detection method that uses target-molecular beacons-dependent amplification (TMDA) fluorescence strategy to circumvent the aforementioned limitations in TF detection. In this assay, we employed a DNA1/DNA2 duplex as the reporting probe and a stem-loop DNA molecular beacon (MB) as the signaling probe. The integration of protein-DNA1/DNA2 duplex and exonuclease III (Exo III) digestion can convert the detection of transcription factors to the detection of reporter oligonucleotides. The subsequent hybridization of the reporter oligonucleotides with the molecular beacons opens the stem-loop structure. The formation of the DNA complex triggers amplification reaction and the recovery of the fluorescence. This assay exhibits high sensitivity with a detection limit of 2.2 pM and a detection range of 3 orders of magnitude, which is superior to most currently used methods for transcription factor detection. More importantly, this method is suitable for the direct detection of TFs in crude nuclear extracts of cancer cells.

  3. Transcriptional integration of metabolism by the nuclear sterol-activated receptors LXR and FXR.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Anna C; Tontonoz, Peter

    2012-03-14

    Nuclear receptors are integrators of hormonal and nutritional signals, mediating changes to metabolic pathways within the body. Given that modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism has been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis, a greater understanding of pathways that regulate metabolism in physiology and disease is crucial. The liver X receptors (LXRs) and the farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are activated by oxysterols and bile acids, respectively. Mounting evidence indicates that these nuclear receptors have essential roles, not only in the regulation of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism but also in the integration of sterol, fatty acid and glucose metabolism.

  4. Transcriptional integration of metabolism by the nuclear sterol-activated receptors LXR and FXR

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are integrators of hormonal and nutritional signals, mediating changes to metabolic pathways within the body. Given that modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism has been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis, a greater understanding of pathways that regulate metabolism in physiology and disease is crucial. The liver X receptors (LXRs) and the farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are activated by oxysterols and bile acids, respectively. Mounting evidence indicates that these nuclear receptors have essential roles, not only in the regulation of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism but also in the integration of sterol, fatty acid and glucose metabolism. PMID:22414897

  5. A Pair of Maternal Chromosomes Derived from Meiotic Nondisjunction in Trisomy 21 Affects Nuclear Architecture and Transcriptional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Omori, Sayaka; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Banno, Kimihiko; Tsuji, Ayumi; Nawa, Nobutoshi; Hirata, Katsuya; Kawatani, Keiji; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Taniguchi, Hidetoshi; Arahori, Hitomi; Wada, Kazuko; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ozono, Keiichi

    2017-04-10

    Eukaryotic genomes are organised into complex higher-order structures within the nucleus, and the three-dimensional arrangement of chromosomes is functionally important for global gene regulation. The existence of supernumerary chromosome 21 in Down syndrome may perturb the nuclear architecture at different levels, which is normally optimised to maintain the physiological balance of gene expression. However, it has not been clearly elucidated whether and how aberrant configuration of chromosomes affects gene activities. To investigate the effects of trisomy 21 on nuclear organisation and gene expression, we performed three-dimensional fluorescent imaging analysis of chromosome-edited human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which enabled identification of the parental origin of the three copies of chromosome 21. We found that two copies of maternal chromosomes resulting from meiotic nondisjunction had a higher tendency to form an adjacent pair and were located relatively distant from the nuclear membrane, suggesting the conserved interaction between these homologous chromosomes. Transcriptional profiling of parental-origin-specific corrected disomy 21 iPSC lines indicated upregulated expression of the maternal alleles for a group of genes, which was accompanied by a fluctuating expression pattern. These results suggest the unique effects of a pair of maternal chromosomes in trisomy 21, which may contribute to the pathological phenotype.

  6. Transcription Factor EB Is Selectively Reduced in the Nuclear Fractions of Alzheimer's and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Brains

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies suggest that autophagy is strongly dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as evidenced by accumulation of numerous autophagosomes, lysosomes with discontinuous membranes, and aggregated proteins in the patients' brains. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) was recently discovered to be a master regulator of lysosome biogenesis and autophagy. To examine whether aberrant autophagy in AD and ALS is due to alterations in TFEB expression, we systematically quantified the levels of TFEB in these brains by immunoblotting. Interestingly, cytoplasmic fractions of AD brains showed increased levels of normalized (to tubulin) TFEB only at Braak stage IV (61%, p < 0.01). Most importantly, normalized (to lamin) TFEB levels in the nuclear fractions were consistently reduced starting from Braak stage IV (52%, p < 0.01), stage V (67%, p < 0.01), and stage VI (85%, p < 0.01) when compared to normal control (NC) brains. In the ALS brains also, nuclear TFEB levels were reduced by 62% (p < 0.001). These data suggest that nuclear TFEB is selectively lost in ALS as well as AD brains, in which TFEB reduction was Braak-stage-dependent. Taken together, the observed reductions in TFEB protein levels may be responsible for the widely reported autophagy defects in these disorders. PMID:27433468

  7. Expression of nuclear receptors (AhR, PXR, CAR) and transcription factor (Nrf2) in human parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Droździk, Agnieszka; Kowalczyk, Robert; Urasińska, Elzbieta; Kurzawski, Mateusz

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors and transcription factors coordinate expression of many genes, and regulation of their expression determines cellular response to various endo- and exogenous factors. There is paucity of data regarding expression of nuclear receptors and factors in salivary glands. In the present study, a focus was placed on human parotid gland expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Parotid salivary tissue was obtained from patients undergoing the gland dissection. Quantitative real-time PCR aimmunohistochemical staining were used for expression studies. The highest mRNA expression was documented for NFE2L2 coding for Nrf2. Lower expression was seen in the case of AHR gene coding for AhR. PXR was constitutively present at very low level and CAR expression was below the limit of quantification. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the parotid gland specimens revealed cytoplasmic Nrf2 expression in striated duct cells as well as within myoepithelial cells. Acinar cells were mostly negative for Nrf2. Expression of AhR was found within the cytoplasm in striated duct cells. Acinar and myoepithelial cells were negative for AhR. Having in mind their role in regulating function of many enzymes and transmembrane transporters, expression of these factors seem play a role in salivary gland physiology, pathology as well as drug transport and metabolism.

  8. Nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) transcription proteins regulate genes involved in adipocyte metabolism and lipolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holowachuk, Eugene W. . E-mail: geneh@telenet.net

    2007-09-21

    NFAT involvement in adipocyte physiological processes was examined by treatment with CsA and/or GSK3{beta} inhibitors (Li{sup +} or TZDZ-8), which prevent or increase NFAT nuclear translocation, respectively. CsA treatment reduced basal and TNF{alpha}-induced rates of lipolysis by 50%. Adipocytes preincubated with Li{sup +} or TZDZ-8 prior to CsA and/or TNF{alpha}, exhibited enhanced basal rates of lipolysis and complete inhibition of CsA-mediated decreased rates of lipolysis. CsA treatment dramatically reduced the mRNA levels of adipocyte-specific genes (aP2, HSL, PPAR{gamma}, ACS and Adn), compared with control or TNF{alpha}-treatment, whereas Li{sup +} pretreatment blocked the inhibitory effects of CsA, and mRNA levels of aP2, HSL, PPAR{gamma}, and ACS were found at or above control levels. NFAT nuclear localization, assessed by EMSA, confirmed that CsA or Li{sup +} treatments inhibited or increased NFAT nuclear translocation, respectively. These results show that NFAT proteins in mature adipocytes participate in the transcriptional control of genes involved in adipocyte metabolism and lipolysis.

  9. Nuclear role of WASp in gene transcription is uncoupled from its ARP2/3-dependent cytoplasmic role in actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sadhukhan, Sanjoy; Sarkar, Koustav; Taylor, Matthew; Candotti, Fabio; Vyas, Yatin M

    2014-07-01

    Defects in Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASp) underlie development of WAS, an X-linked immunodeficiency and autoimmunity disorder of childhood. Nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) of the WASp family generate F-actin in the cytosol via the VCA (verprolin-homology, cofilin-homology, and acidic) domain and support RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription in the nucleus. Whether nuclear-WASp requires the integration of its actin-related protein (ARP)2/3-dependent cytoplasmic function to reprogram gene transcription, however, remains unresolved. Using the model of human TH cell differentiation, we find that WASp has a functional nuclear localizing and nuclear exit sequences, and accordingly, its effects on transcription are controlled mainly at the level of its nuclear entry and exit via the nuclear pore. Human WASp does not use its VCA-dependent, ARP2/3-driven, cytoplasmic effector mechanisms to support histone H3K4 methyltransferase activity in the nucleus of TH1-skewed cells. Accordingly, an isolated deficiency of nuclear-WASp is sufficient to impair the transcriptional reprogramming of TBX21 and IFNG promoters in TH1-skewed cells, whereas an isolated deficiency of cytosolic-WASp does not impair this process. In contrast, nuclear presence of WASp in TH2-skewed cells is small, and its loss does not impair transcriptional reprogramming of GATA3 and IL4 promoters. Our study unveils an ARP2/3:VCA-independent function of nuclear-WASp in TH1 gene activation that is uncoupled from its cytoplasmic role in actin polymerization.

  10. A conserved family of nuclear phosphoproteins localized to sites of polymerase II transcription

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    An antibody was identified previously that recognizes sites of polymerase II transcription on lampbrush chromosomes, puffs on polytene chromosomes, and many small granules in the nucleoplasm of all cells tested. This antibody binds a conserved family of phosphorylated polypeptides in vertebrate and invertebrate cells. We developed a method for purifying these proteins that involves differential solubility in MgCl2. We isolated a Drosophila cDNA encoding one of the proteins using information obtained from microsequencing. In vivo expression studies show that this protein is concentrated on sites of polymerase II transcription and that it is highly phosphorylated. The protein shares a high degree of homology with proteins involved in alternative splicing of pre-mRNA suggesting the possibility that this protein plays a role in pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:1717489

  11. Structural and calorimetric studies demonstrate that the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) transcription factor is imported into the nucleus via a monopartite NLS sequence.

    PubMed

    Wiedmann, Mareike M; Aibara, Shintaro; Spring, David R; Stewart, Murray; Brenton, James D

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) is ubiquitously overexpressed in ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) and is a potential therapeutic target. To explore potential approaches that block HNF1β transcription we have identified and characterised extensively the nuclear localisation signal (NLS) for HNF1β and its interactions with the nuclear protein import receptor, Importin-α. Pull-down assays demonstrated that the DNA binding domain of HNF1β interacted with a spectrum of Importin-α isoforms and deletion constructs tagged with eGFP confirmed that the HNF1β (229)KKMRRNR(235) sequence was essential for nuclear localisation. We further characterised the interaction between the NLS and Importin-α using complementary biophysical techniques and have determined the 2.4Å resolution crystal structure of the HNF1β NLS peptide bound to Importin-α. The functional, biochemical, and structural characterisation of the nuclear localisation signal present on HNF1β and its interaction with the nuclear import protein Importin-α provide the basis for the development of compounds targeting transcription factor HNF1β via its nuclear import pathway.

  12. Nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of the transcription factor FoxO1 is regulated by neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lixia; Zheng, Wenhua; Chabot, Jean-Guy; Unterman, Terry G; Quirion, Remi

    2005-06-01

    FoxO1, a member of the FoxO subfamily of forkhead transcription factors, is an important target for insulin and growth factor signaling in the regulation of metabolism, cell cycle and proliferation, and survival in peripheral tissues. However, its role in the central nervous system is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the effect of neurotrophic factors on nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of FoxO1. We showed that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and nerve growth factor (NGF) potently induced the nuclear exclusion of FoxO1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) while neurotrophin (NT)-3 and NT-4 were much weaker and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) failed to induce FoxO1 translocation in PC12 cells. FoxO1 translocation was inhibited by LY294002, a well-established PI3K/Akt kinase inhibitor. Moreover, FoxO1 was phosphorylated at Thr24 and Ser256 residues by the above neurotrophic factors, with the exception of BDNF. Triple mutant FoxO1, in which three Akt/PKB phosphorylation sites (Thr24, Ser256 and Ser319) were mutated to alanine, resulted in the complete nuclear targeting of the expressed FoxO1-GFP fusion protein in the presence of the above neurotrophic factors in both PC12 cells and cultured hippocampal and cortical neurons. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that neurotrophic factors are able to regulate nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of FoxO1 via the PI3K/Akt pathway in neuronal cells.

  13. Nuclear life of the voltage-gated Cacnb4 subunit and its role in gene transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Ronjat, Michel; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Barbado, Maud; De Waard, Michel; Mori, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    The pore-forming subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels is associated to auxiliary subunits among which the cytoplasmic β subunit. The different isoforms of this subunit control both the plasma membrane targeting and the biophysical properties of the channel moiety. In a recent study, we demonstrated that the Cacnb4 (β 4) isoform is at the center of a new signaling pathway that connects neuronal excitability and gene transcription. This mechanism relies on nuclear targeting of β 4 triggered by neuronal electrical stimulation. This re-localization of β 4 is promoted by its interaction with Ppp2r5d a regulatory subunit of PP2A in complex with PP2A itself. The formation, as well as the nuclear translocation, of the β 4/ Ppp2r5d/ PP2A complex is totally impaired by the premature R482X stops mutation of β 4 that has been previously associated with juvenile epilepsy. Taking as a case study the tyrosine hydroxylase gene that is strongly upregulated in brain of lethargic mice, deficient for β 4 expression, we deciphered the molecular steps presiding to this signaling pathway. Here we show that expression of wild-type β 4 in HEK293 cells results in the regulation of several genes, while expression of the mutated β 4 (β 1-481) produces a different set of gene regulation. Several genes regulated by β 4 in HEK293 cells were also regulated upon neuronal differentiation of NG108-15 cells that induces nuclear translocation of β 4 suggesting a link between β 4 nuclear targeting and gene regulation.

  14. The chromatin remodelling complex WSTF-SNF2h interacts with nuclear myosin 1 and has a role in RNA polymerase I transcription.

    PubMed

    Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Fomproix, Nathalie; Cavellán, Erica; Voit, Renate; Reimer, Georg; Krüger, Tim; Thyberg, Johan; Scheer, Ulrich; Grummt, Ingrid; Farrants, Ann-Kristin Ostlund

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear actin and myosin 1 (NM1) are key regulators of gene transcription. Here, we show by biochemical fractionation of nuclear extracts, protein-protein interaction studies and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays that NM1 is part of a multiprotein complex that contains WICH, a chromatin remodelling complex containing WSTF (Williams syndrome transcription factor) and SNF2h. NM1, WSTF and SNF2h were found to be associated with RNA polymerase I (Pol I) and ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA). RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NM1 and WSTF reduced pre-rRNA synthesis in vivo, and antibodies to WSTF inhibited Pol I transcription on pre-assembled chromatin templates but not on naked DNA. The results indicate that NM1 cooperates with WICH to facilitate transcription on chromatin.

  15. The chromatin remodelling complex WSTF–SNF2h interacts with nuclear myosin 1 and has a role in RNA polymerase I transcription

    PubMed Central

    Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Fomproix, Nathalie; Cavellán, Erica; Voit, Renate; Reimer, Georg; Krüger, Tim; Thyberg, Johan; Scheer, Ulrich; Grummt, Ingrid; Östlund Farrants, Ann-Kristin

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear actin and myosin 1 (NM1) are key regulators of gene transcription. Here, we show by biochemical fractionation of nuclear extracts, protein–protein interaction studies and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays that NM1 is part of a multiprotein complex that contains WICH, a chromatin remodelling complex containing WSTF (Williams syndrome transcription factor) and SNF2h. NM1, WSTF and SNF2h were found to be associated with RNA polymerase I (Pol I) and ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA). RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NM1 and WSTF reduced pre-rRNA synthesis in vivo, and antibodies to WSTF inhibited Pol I transcription on pre-assembled chromatin templates but not on naked DNA. The results indicate that NM1 cooperates with WICH to facilitate transcription on chromatin. PMID:16514417

  16. Meeting Report: Nuclear Receptors: Transcription Factors and Drug Targets Connecting Basic Research with Translational Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tuckermann, Jan; Bourguet, William; Mandrup, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    The biannual European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) conference on nuclear receptors was organized by Beatrice Desvergne and Laszlo Nagy and took place in Cavtat near Dubrovnik on the Adriatic coast of Croatia September 25–29, 2009. The meeting brought together researchers from all over the world covering a wide spectrum from fundamental mechanistic studies to metabolism, clinical studies, and drug development. In this report, we summarize the recent and exciting findings presented by the speakers at the meeting. PMID:20519330

  17. PIASy Represses CCAAT/Enhancer-binding Protein δ (C/EBPδ) Transcriptional Activity by Sequestering C/EBPδ to the Nuclear Periphery*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shanggen; Si, Junling; Liu, Tong; DeWille, James W.

    2008-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer binding proteinδ (C/EBPδ) plays a key role in mammary epithelial cell G0 growth arrest, and “loss of function” alterations in C/EBPδ have been reported in breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. C/EBPδ is regulated at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational levels, suggesting tight control of C/EBPδ content and function. Protein inhibitors of activated STATs (PIASs) regulate a growing number of transcription factors, including C/EBPs. HC11 nontransformed mammary epithelial cells express PIAS3, PIASxβ, and PIASy, and all three PIAS family members repress C/EBPδ transcriptional activity. PIASy is the most potent, however, repressing C/EBPδ transcriptional activity by >80%. PIASy repression of C/EBPδ transcriptional activity is dependent upon interaction between the highly conserved PIASy N-terminal nuclear matrix binding domain (SAPD) and the C/EBPδ transactivation domain (TAD). PIASy repression of C/EBPδ transcriptional activity is independent of histone deacetylase activity, PIASy E3 SUMO ligase activity, and C/EBPδ sumoylation status. PIASy expression is associated with C/EBPδ translocation from nuclear foci, where C/EBPδ co-localizes with p300, to the nuclear periphery. PIASy-mediated translocation of C/EBPδ is dependent upon the PIASy SAPD and C/EBPδ TAD. PIASy reduces the expression of C/EBPδ adhesion-related target genes and enhances repopulation of open areas within a cell monolayer in the in vitro “scratch” assay. These results demonstrate that PIASy represses C/EBPδ by a mechanism that requires interaction between the PIASy SAPD and C/EBPδ TAD and does not require PIASy SUMO ligase activity or C/EBPδ sumoylation. PIASy alters C/EBPδ nuclear localization, reduces C/EBPδ transcriptional activity, and enhances cell proliferation/migration. PMID:18477566

  18. Bonus, a Drosophila Homolog of TIF1 Proteins, Interacts with Nuclear Receptors and Can Inhibit βFTZ-F1-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Beckstead, Robert; Ortiz, José A; Sanchez, Cecilia; Prokopenko, Sergei N; Chambon, Pierre; Losson, Régine; Bellen, Hugo J

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila bonus (bon) gene encodes a homolog of the vertebrate TIF1 transcriptional cofactors. bon is required for male viability, molting, and numerous events in metamorphosis including leg elongation, bristle development, and pigmentation. Most of these processes are associated with genes that have been implicated in the ecdysone pathway, a nuclear hormone receptor pathway required throughout Drosophila development. Bon is associated with sites on the polytene chromosomes and can interact with numerous Drosophila nuclear receptor proteins. Bon binds via an LxxLL motif to the AF-2 activation domain present in the ligand binding domain of βFTZ-F1 and behaves as a transcriptional inhibitor in vivo. PMID:11336699

  19. Nuclear-encoded factors involved in post-transcriptional processing and modification of mitochondrial tRNAs in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Christopher A.; Nicholls, Thomas J.; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) encodes 22 tRNAs (mt-tRNAs) that are necessary for the intraorganellar translation of the 13 mtDNA-encoded subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes. Maturation of mt-tRNAs involves 5′ and 3′ nucleolytic excision from precursor RNAs, as well as extensive post-transcriptional modifications. Recent data suggest that over 7% of all mt-tRNA residues in mammals undergo post-transcriptional modification, with over 30 different modified mt-tRNA positions so far described. These processing and modification steps are necessary for proper mt-tRNA function, and are performed by dedicated, nuclear-encoded enzymes. Recent growing evidence suggests that mutations in these nuclear genes (nDNA), leading to incorrect maturation of mt-tRNAs, are a cause of human mitochondrial disease. Furthermore, mtDNA mutations in mt-tRNA genes, which may also affect mt-tRNA function, processing, and modification, are also frequently associated with human disease. In theory, all pathogenic mt-tRNA variants should be expected to affect only a single process, which is mitochondrial translation, albeit to various extents. However, the clinical manifestations of mitochondrial disorders linked to mutations in mt-tRNAs are extremely heterogeneous, ranging from defects of a single tissue to complex multisystem disorders. This review focuses on the current knowledge of nDNA coding for proteins involved in mt-tRNA maturation that have been linked to human mitochondrial pathologies. We further discuss the possibility that tissue specific regulation of mt-tRNA modifying enzymes could play an important role in the clinical heterogeneity observed for mitochondrial diseases caused by mutations in mt-tRNA genes. PMID:25806043

  20. The nuclear receptor ERβ engages AGO2 in regulation of gene transcription, RNA splicing and RISC loading.

    PubMed

    Tarallo, Roberta; Giurato, Giorgio; Bruno, Giuseppina; Ravo, Maria; Rizzo, Francesca; Salvati, Annamaria; Ricciardi, Luca; Marchese, Giovanna; Cordella, Angela; Rocco, Teresa; Gigantino, Valerio; Pierri, Biancamaria; Cimmino, Giovanni; Milanesi, Luciano; Ambrosino, Concetta; Nyman, Tuula A; Nassa, Giovanni; Weisz, Alessandro

    2017-10-06

    The RNA-binding protein Argonaute 2 (AGO2) is a key effector of RNA-silencing pathways It exerts a pivotal role in microRNA maturation and activity and can modulate chromatin remodeling, transcriptional gene regulation and RNA splicing. Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is endowed with oncosuppressive activities, antagonizing hormone-induced carcinogenesis and inhibiting growth and oncogenic functions in luminal-like breast cancers (BCs), where its expression correlates with a better prognosis of the disease. Applying interaction proteomics coupled to mass spectrometry to characterize nuclear factors cooperating with ERβ in gene regulation, we identify AGO2 as a novel partner of ERβ in human BC cells. ERβ-AGO2 association was confirmed in vitro and in vivo in both the nucleus and cytoplasm and is shown to be RNA-mediated. ChIP-Seq demonstrates AGO2 association with a large number of ERβ binding sites, and total and nascent RNA-Seq in ERβ + vs ERβ - cells, and before and after AGO2 knock-down in ERβ + cells, reveals a widespread involvement of this factor in ERβ-mediated regulation of gene transcription rate and RNA splicing. Moreover, isolation and sequencing by RIP-Seq of ERβ-associated long and small RNAs in the cytoplasm suggests involvement of the nuclear receptor in RISC loading, indicating that it may also be able to directly control mRNA translation efficiency and stability. These results demonstrate that AGO2 can act as a pleiotropic functional partner of ERβ, indicating that both factors are endowed with multiple roles in the control of key cellular functions.

  1. Sigma-1 receptor mediates cocaine-induced transcriptional regulation by recruiting chromatin-remodeling factors at the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Yi A; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Shan; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Bonci, Antonello; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2015-11-24

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in cellular regulation. Here we found a new function of Sig-1R, in that it translocates from the ER to the nuclear envelope (NE) to recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules and regulate the gene transcription thereof. Sig-1Rs mainly reside at the ER-mitochondrion interface. However, on stimulation by agonists such as cocaine, Sig-1Rs translocate from ER to the NE, where Sig-1Rs bind NE protein emerin and recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules, including lamin A/C, barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), and histone deacetylase (HDAC), to form a complex with the gene repressor specific protein 3 (Sp3). Knockdown of Sig-1Rs attenuates the complex formation. Cocaine was found to suppress the gene expression of monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) in the brain of wild-type but not Sig-1R knockout mouse. A single dose of cocaine (20 mg/kg) in rats suppresses the level of MAOB at nuclear accumbens without affecting the level of dopamine transporter. Daily injections of cocaine in rats caused behavioral sensitization. Withdrawal from cocaine in cocaine-sensitized rats induced an apparent time-dependent rebound of the MAOB protein level to about 200% over control on day 14 after withdrawal. Treatment of cocaine-withdrawn rats with the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl completely alleviated the behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Our results demonstrate a role of Sig-1R in transcriptional regulation and suggest cocaine may work through this newly discovered genomic action to achieve its addictive action. Results also suggest the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl as a therapeutic agent to block certain actions of cocaine during withdrawal.

  2. Sigma-1 receptor mediates cocaine-induced transcriptional regulation by recruiting chromatin-remodeling factors at the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shang-Yi A.; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Shan; Wang, Xiao-fei; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Bonci, Antonello; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in cellular regulation. Here we found a new function of Sig-1R, in that it translocates from the ER to the nuclear envelope (NE) to recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules and regulate the gene transcription thereof. Sig-1Rs mainly reside at the ER–mitochondrion interface. However, on stimulation by agonists such as cocaine, Sig-1Rs translocate from ER to the NE, where Sig-1Rs bind NE protein emerin and recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules, including lamin A/C, barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), and histone deacetylase (HDAC), to form a complex with the gene repressor specific protein 3 (Sp3). Knockdown of Sig-1Rs attenuates the complex formation. Cocaine was found to suppress the gene expression of monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) in the brain of wild-type but not Sig-1R knockout mouse. A single dose of cocaine (20 mg/kg) in rats suppresses the level of MAOB at nuclear accumbens without affecting the level of dopamine transporter. Daily injections of cocaine in rats caused behavioral sensitization. Withdrawal from cocaine in cocaine-sensitized rats induced an apparent time-dependent rebound of the MAOB protein level to about 200% over control on day 14 after withdrawal. Treatment of cocaine-withdrawn rats with the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl completely alleviated the behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Our results demonstrate a role of Sig-1R in transcriptional regulation and suggest cocaine may work through this newly discovered genomic action to achieve its addictive action. Results also suggest the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl as a therapeutic agent to block certain actions of cocaine during withdrawal. PMID:26554014

  3. Rhinovirus stimulation of interleukin-6 in vivo and in vitro. Evidence for nuclear factor kappa B-dependent transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Z; Tang, W; Ray, A; Wu, Y; Einarsson, O; Landry, M L; Gwaltney, J; Elias, J A

    1996-01-01

    To further understand the biology of rhinovirus (RV), we determined whether IL-6 was produced during RV infections and characterized the mechanism by which RV stimulates lung cell IL-6 production. In contrast to normals and minimally symptomatic volunteers, IL-6 was detected in the nasal washings from patients who developed colds after RV challenge. RV14 and RV1A, major and minor receptor group RVs, respectively, were potent stimulators of IL-6 protein production in vitro. These effects were associated with significant increases in IL-6 mRNA accumulation and gene transcription. RV was also a potent stimulator of IL-6 promoter-driven luciferase activity. This stimulation was modestly decreased by mutation of the nuclear factor (NF)-IL-6 site and abrogated by mutation of the NF-kappa B site in this promoter. An NF-kappa B-DNA binding activity, mediated by p65, p50, and p52 NF-kappa B moieties, was rapidly induced in RV-infected cells. Activator protein 1-DNA binding was not similarly altered. These studies demonstrate that IL-6 is produced during symptomatic RV infections, that RVs are potent stimulators of IL-6 elaboration, and that RV stimulation IL-6 production is mediated by an NF-kappa B-dependent transcriptional stimulation pathway. IL-6 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of RV infection, and NF-kappa B activation is likely to be an important event in RV-induced pathologies. PMID:8567963

  4. Nuclear Import of the Parsley bZIP Transcription Factor CPRF2 Is Regulated by Phytochrome Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Stefan; Wellmer, Frank; Nick, Peter; Rügner, Alexander; Schäfer, Eberhard; Harter, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    In plants, light perception by photoreceptors leads to differential expression of an enormous number of genes. An important step for differential gene expression is the regulation of transcription factor activities. To understand these processes in light signal transduction we analyzed the three well-known members of the common plant regulatory factor (CPRF) family from parsley (Petroselinum crispum). Here, we demonstrate that these CPRFs, which belong to the basic- region leucine-zipper (bZIP) domain-containing transcription factors, are differentially distributed within parsley cells, indicating different regulatory functions within the regulatory networks of the plant cell. In particular, we show by cell fractionation and immunolocalization approaches that CPRF2 is transported from the cytosol into the nucleus upon irradiation due to action of phytochrome photoreceptors. Two NH2-terminal domains responsible for cytoplasmic localization of CPRF2 in the dark were characterized by deletion analysis using a set of CPRF2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene fusion constructs transiently expressed in parsley protoplasts. We suggest that light-induced nuclear import of CPRF2 is an essential step in phytochrome signal transduction. PMID:9922448

  5. Gene-specific requirement of a nuclear protein, IkappaB-zeta, for promoter association of inflammatory transcription regulators.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Soh; Matsuo, Susumu; Muta, Tatsushi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Akira, Shizuo; Takeshige, Koichiro

    2008-11-21

    Expression of many inflammatory genes is induced through activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB. In contrast to the advanced understanding of cytoplasmic control of NF-kappaB activation, its regulation in the nucleus has not been fully understood despite its importance in selective gene expression. We previously identified an inducible nuclear protein, IkappaB-zeta, and demonstrated that this molecule is indispensable for the expression of a group of NF-kappaB-regulated genes. In this study, we established a unique gene induction system, in which IkappaB-zeta is expressed independently of inflammatory stimuli, to specifically investigate the molecular basis underlying IkappaB-zeta-mediated gene activation. We show that in the presence of IkappaB-zeta other primary response genes are dispensable for the expression of the target secondary response genes. ChIP analyses revealed that IkappaB-zeta is required for stimulus-induced recruitment of NF-kappaB onto the target promoter in a gene-specific manner. Surprisingly, IkappaB-zeta is also necessary for the gene-selective promoter recruitment of another inflammatory transcription factor, C/EBPbeta, and the chromatin remodeling factor Brg1. We propose a new gene regulatory mechanism underlying the selective expression of inflammatory genes.

  6. Cynaropicrin from Cynara scolymus L. suppresses photoaging of skin by inhibiting the transcription activity of nuclear factor-kappa B.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuka Tsuda; Tanaka, Kiyotaka; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Tomoji; Masutani, Teruaki; Tsuboi, Makoto; Akao, Yukihiro

    2013-01-15

    Aging of skin is characterized by skin wrinkling, laxity, and pigmentation induced by several environmental stress factors. Histological changes during the photoaging of skin include hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes causing skin wrinkles and pigmentation. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is one of the representative transcription factors active in conjunction with inflammation. NF-κB is activated by stimulation such as ultraviolet rays and inflammatory cytokines and induces the expression of various genes such as those of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1). We screened several plant extracts for their possible inhibitory effect on the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. One of them, an extract from Cynara scolymus L., showed a greatest effect on the suppression of NF-κB transactivation. As a result, we found that cynaropicrin, which is a sesquiterpene lactone, inhibited the NF-κB-mediated transactivation of bFGF and MMP-1. Furthermore, it was confirmed that in an in vivo mouse model cynaropicrin prevented skin photoaging processes leading to the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes. These findings taken together indicate that cynaropicrin is an effective antiphotoaging agent that acts by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated transactivation.

  7. The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells c3 modulates the function of macrophages in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Ravi; Deng, Jing; Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Yong Gyu; Park, Gye Young; Xiao, Lei; Joo, Myungsoo; Christman, John William; Karpurapu, Manjula

    2014-01-01

    The role of the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) was initially identified in T and B cell gene expression, but its role in regulating gene expression in macrophages during sepsis is not known. Our data show that NFATc3 regulates expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Selective inhibition of NFAT by cyclosporine A and a competitive peptide inhibitor 11R-VIVIT inhibited endotoxin-induced expression of iNOS and nitric oxide (NO) release. Macrophages from NFATc3 knockout (KO) mice show reduced iNOS expression and NO release and attenuated bactericidal activity. Gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that endotoxin challenge increases NFATc3 binding to the iNOS promoter, resulting in transcriptional activation of iNOS. The binding of NFATc3 to the iNOS promoter is abolished by NFAT inhibitors. NFATc3 KO mice subjected to sepsis show that NFATc3 is necessary for bacterial clearance in mouse lungs during sepsis. Our study demonstrates for the first time that NFATc3 is necessary for macrophage iNOS expression during sepsis, which is essential for containment of bacterial infections.

  8. Nuclear Respiratory Factor-1 (NRF-1) Regulates Transcription of the CXC Receptor 4 (CXCR4) in the Rat Retina.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Ying; Chen, Zhao; Qiu, Jin; Yu, Na; Tang, Mingjun; Wang, Qiyun; Ge, Jian; Yu, Keming; Zhuang, Jing

    2017-09-01

    The CXC receptor 4 (CXCR4) is required for various physiologic and pathologic processes in the eye, including stem cell trafficking, neuronal development, immune responses, and ocular neovascularization. Here, we used the rat retina models to determine the mechanisms driving CXCR4 transcription. The expression pattern of CXCR4 and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) were profiled in the rat retina during the course of development. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHiP) assay determined the transcriptional mechanism of CXCR4 in rat retina. A rat model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) that mimics retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury was established. Under either normoxic or hypoxic conditions, CXCR4 and NRF-1 expression in rat retinas was tracked by RT-PCR and Western analysis. Immunofluorescence staining localized CXCR4 and NRF-1. Both CXCR4 and NRF-1 were highly expressed in the neonatal rat retina, down-regulated in parallel, and silenced in fully developed retinas (1 month of age). ChIP assays revealed that NRF-1 was required for CXCR4 promoter activity in rat retinas. In the OIR rat model, retinal hypoxia induced up-regulation of CXCR4 and NRF-1 concurrently. Our findings suggest that NRF-1 regulates the expression of CXCR4 in normal retinal development and in pathologic processes of retinal hypoxia and neovascularization.

  9. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3A protein regulates CDKN2B transcription via interaction with MIZ-1.

    PubMed

    Bazot, Quentin; Deschamps, Thibaut; Tafforeau, Lionel; Siouda, Maha; Leblanc, Pascal; Harth-Hertle, Marie L; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Lotteau, Vincent; Kempkes, Bettina; Tommasino, Massimo; Gruffat, Henri; Manet, Evelyne

    2014-09-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 3 family of protein is critical for the EBV-induced primary B-cell growth transformation process. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen we identified 22 novel cellular partners of the EBNA3s. Most importantly, among the newly identified partners, five are known to play direct and important roles in transcriptional regulation. Of these, the Myc-interacting zinc finger protein-1 (MIZ-1) is a transcription factor initially characterized as a binding partner of MYC. MIZ-1 activates the transcription of a number of target genes including the cell cycle inhibitor CDKN2B. Focusing on the EBNA3A/MIZ-1 interaction we demonstrate that binding occurs in EBV-infected cells expressing both proteins at endogenous physiological levels and that in the presence of EBNA3A, a significant fraction of MIZ-1 translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Moreover, we show that a trimeric complex composed of a MIZ-1 recognition DNA element, MIZ-1 and EBNA3A can be formed, and that interaction of MIZ-1 with nucleophosmin (NPM), one of its coactivator, is prevented by EBNA3A. Finally, we show that, in the presence of EBNA3A, expression of the MIZ-1 target gene, CDKN2B, is downregulated and repressive H3K27 marks are established on its promoter region suggesting that EBNA3A directly counteracts the growth inhibitory action of MIZ-1. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Transcriptional Regulation of CYP2B6 Expression by Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 3β in Human Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Linhao; Li, Daochuan; Heyward, Scott; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    CYP2B6 plays an increasingly important role in xenobiotic metabolism and detoxification. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR) have been established as predominant regulators for the inductive expression of CYP2B6 gene in human liver. However, there are dramatic interindividual variabilities in CYP2B6 expression that cannot be fully explained by the CAR/PXR-based modulation alone. Here, we show that expression level of CYP2B6 was correlated with that of hepatocyte nuclear factor 3β (HNF3β) in human primary hepatocytes prepared from 35 liver donors. Utilizing recombinant virus-mediated overexpression or knockdown of HNF3β in HepG2 cells, as well as constructs containing serial deletion and site-directed mutation of HNF3β binding motifs in CYP2B6 luciferase reporter assays, we demonstrated that the presence or lack of HNF3β expression markedly correlated with CYP2B6 gene expression and its promoter activity. Novel enhancer modules of HNF3β located upstream of the CYP2B6 gene transcription start site were identified and functionally validated as key elements governing HNF3β-mediated CYP2B6 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in human primary hepatocytes and surface plasmon resonance binding affinity experiments confirmed the essential role of these enhancers in the recruitment of HNF3β to the promoter of CYP2B6 gene. Overall, these findings indicate that HNF3β represents a new liver enriched transcription factor that is involved in the transcription of CYP2B6 gene and contributes to the large interindividual variations of CYP2B6 expression in human population.

  11. Nuclear factors that bind two regions important to transcriptional activity of the simian immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Winandy, S; Renjifo, B; Li, Y; Hopkins, N

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies identified two regions in the U3 region of a molecular clone of simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVmac142, that are important to transcriptional activity under conditions of induction as well as basal-level expression (B. Renjifo, N. A. Speck, S. Winandy, N. Hopkins, and Y. Li, J. Virol. 64:3130-3134, 1990). One region includes the NF-kappa B binding site, while the other lies just 5' of this site between nucleotides -162 and -114 (the -162 to -114 region). The fact that the NF-kappa B site mutation attenuated transcriptional activity in uninduced T cells and fibroblasts where activated NF-kappa B would not be present suggested that a factor(s) other than NF-kappa B could be acting through this site. In this study, we have identified a factor which binds to a cis element overlapping the NF-kappa B site. This factor, which we call simian factor 3 (SF3), would play a role in regulation under conditions of basal level expression, whereas under conditions of induction, NF-kappa B would act via this region. SF3 may also bind to an element in the -162 to -114 region. In addition, we have identified two other factors that bind the -162 to -114 region. One, which we designated SF1, is a ubiquitous basal factor, and the other, SF2, is a T-cell-predominant phorbol myristate acetate-inducible factor. Through identification of nuclear factors that interact with the U3 region of the SIVmac142 long terminal repeat, we can gain insight into how this virus is transcriptionally regulated under conditions of basal-level expression as well as conditions of T-cell activation. Images PMID:1501272

  12. The leukemia associated ETO nuclear repressor gene is regulated by the GATA-1 transcription factor in erythroid/megakaryocytic cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Eight-Twenty-One (ETO) nuclear co-repressor gene belongs to the ETO homologue family also containing Myeloid Translocation Gene on chromosome 16 (MTG16) and myeloid translocation Gene-Related protein 1 (MTGR1). By chromosomal translocations ETO and MTG16 become parts of fusion proteins characteristic of morphological variants of acute myeloid leukemia. Normal functions of ETO homologues have as yet not been examined. The goal of this work was to identify structural and functional promoter elements upstream of the coding sequence of the ETO gene in order to explore lineage-specific hematopoietic expression and get hints to function. Results A putative proximal ETO promoter was identified within 411 bp upstream of the transcription start site. Strong ETO promoter activity was specifically observed upon transfection of a promoter reporter construct into erythroid/megakaryocytic cells, which have endogeneous ETO gene activity. An evolutionary conserved region of 228 bp revealed potential cis-elements involved in transcription of ETO. Disruption of the evolutionary conserved GATA -636 consensus binding site repressed transactivation and disruption of the ETS1 -705 consensus binding site enhanced activity of the ETO promoter. The promoter was stimulated by overexpression of GATA-1 into erythroid/megakaryocytic cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay with erythroid/megakaryocytic cells showed specific binding of GATA-1 to the GATA -636 site. Furthermore, results from chromatin immunoprecipitation showed GATA-1 binding in vivo to the conserved region of the ETO promoter containing the -636 site. The results suggest that the GATA -636 site may have a role in activation of the ETO gene activity in cells with erythroid/megakaryocytic potential. Leukemia associated AML1-ETO strongly suppressed an ETO promoter reporter in erythroid/megakaryocytic cells. Conclusions We demonstrate that the GATA-1 transcription factor binds and transactivates the ETO proximal

  13. Interaction of Sp1 zinc finger with transport factor in the nuclear localization of transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tatsuo; Kitamura, Haruka; Uwatoko, Chisana; Azumano, Makiko; Itoh, Kohji; Kuwahara, Jun

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} Sp1 zinc fingers themselves interact with importin {alpha}. {yields} Sp1 zinc finger domains play an essential role as a nuclear localization signal. {yields} Sp1 can be transported into the nucleus in an importin-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Transcription factor Sp1 is localized in the nucleus and regulates the expression of many cellular genes, but the nuclear transport mechanism of Sp1 is not well understood. In this study, we revealed that GST-fused Sp1 protein bound to endogenous importin {alpha} in HeLa cells via the Sp1 zinc finger domains, which comprise the DNA binding domain of Sp1. It was found that the Sp1 zinc finger domains directly interacted with a wide range of importin {alpha} including the armadillo (arm) repeat domain and the C-terminal acidic domain. Furthermore, it turned out that all three zinc fingers of Sp1 are essential for binding to importin {alpha}. Taken together, these results suggest that the Sp1 zinc finger domains play an essential role as a NLS and Sp1 can be transported into the nucleus in an importin-dependent manner even though it possesses no classical NLSs.

  14. The hypersensitive response to tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus nuclear shuttle protein is inhibited by transcriptional activator protein.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mazhar; Mansoor, Shahid; Iram, Shazia; Zafar, Yusuf; Briddon, Rob W

    2007-12-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is a common feature of plant disease resistance reactions and a type of programmed cell death (PCD). Many pathogens are able to modulate pathways involved in cell death. In contrast to animal viruses, inhibitors of PCD activity have not been identified for plant-infecting viruses. Previously, we have reported that the nuclear shuttle protein (NSP) of Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) induces an HR in Nicotiana tabacum and Lycopersicon esculentum plants when expressed under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. However, HR is not evident in plants infected with ToLCNDV, suggesting that the virus encodes a factor (or factors) that counters this response. Analysis of all ToLCNDV-encoded genes pinpointed the transcriptional activator protein (TrAP) as the factor mediating the anti-HR effect. Deletion mutagenesis showed the central region of TrAP, containing a zinc finger domain and nuclear localization signal, to be important in inhibiting the HR. These results demonstrate that TrAP counters HR-induced cell death, the first such activity identified for a plant-infecting virus.

  15. The enhancement of nuclear receptor transcriptional activation by a mouse actin-binding protein, alpha actinin 2.

    PubMed

    Huang, S M; Huang, C J; Wang, W M; Kang, J C; Hsu, W C

    2004-04-01

    The p160 coactivators, steroid receptor coactivator 1, glucocorticoid receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) and the activator of thyroid and retinoic acid receptor, have two activation domains, AD1 and AD2, which transmit the activation signal from the DNA-bound nuclear receptor to the chromatin and/or transcription machinery. In screening for mammalian proteins that bind the AD2 of GRIP1, we identified a mouse actin-binding protein, alpha actinin 2 (mACTN2). mACTN2 was expressed in the heart, skeletal muscle, lung, brain and testis, but there was no expression in the spleen, liver or kidney. Interestingly, the expression level of mACTN2 in the developing embryo depended on the embryonic stage. We further demonstrated that mACTN2 could enhance two transactivation activities of GRIP1, which in turn could enhance the homodimerization of mACTN2. Importantly, mACTN2 not only served as a primary coactivator for androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and thyroid receptor activities, but also acted synergistically with GRIP1 to enhance these nuclear receptor (NR) functions. However, the NR binding motif, LXXLL, conserved in mACTN2 and other actinin family proteins, might be a dispensable domain for its coactivator roles in NRs. These findings suggested that mACTN2 might play an important role in GRIP1-induced NR coactivator functions.

  16. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibits T-cell activation by targeting both nuclear factor of activated T-cells and NF-kappaB transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Nieves; Sancho, Rocío; Macho, Antonio; Calzado, Marco A; Fiebich, Bernd L; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2004-03-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), which is derived from the propolis of honeybee hives, has been shown to reveal anti-inflammatory properties. Since T-cells play a key role in the onset of several inflammatory diseases, we have evaluated the immunosuppressive activity of CAPE in human T-cells, discovering that this phenolic compound is a potent inhibitor of early and late events in T-cell receptor-mediated T-cell activation. Moreover, we found that CAPE specifically inhibited both interleukin (IL)-2 gene transcription and IL-2 synthesis in stimulated T-cells. To further characterize the inhibitory mechanisms of CAPE at the transcriptional level, we examined the DNA binding and transcriptional activities of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, nuclear factor of activated cells (NFAT), and activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors in Jurkat cells. We found that CAPE inhibited NF-kappaB-dependent transcriptional activity without affecting the degradation of the cytoplasmic NF-kappaB inhibitory protein, IkappaBalpha. However, both NF-kappaB binding to DNA and transcriptional activity of a Gal4-p65 hybrid protein were clearly prevented in CAPE-treated Jurkat cells. Moreover, CAPE inhibited both the DNA-binding and transcriptional activity of NFAT, a result that correlated with its ability to inhibit phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin-induced NFAT1 dephosphorylation. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities of this natural compound.

  17. Dual function of a nuclear factor I binding site in MMTV transcription regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Buetti, E; Kühnel, B; Diggelmann, H

    1989-01-01

    Using linker-scanning mutagenesis we had previously identified four elements within the MMTV LTR which are necessary for transcriptional stimulation by glucocorticoid hormones. Two of them overlapped with regions to which the glucocorticoid receptor binds in vitro. The third element contained a NF-I binding site, and the fourth the TATA box. Here we show that mutations that abolish in vitro binding of NF-I had a negative effect also on the basal activity of the MMTV promoter of LTR-containing plasmids stably integrated in Ltk- fibroblasts. The analysis of double mutants altered in the NF-I plus either one of the receptor binding elements further demonstrated that the NF-I site functionally cooperated with the proximal (-120) element, which alone was extremely inefficient in stimulation. The stronger distal (-181/-172) element was independent of NF-I and showed functional cooperativity with the proximal hormone-binding element. Images PMID:2542892

  18. Nuclear phosphoproteome analysis of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation reveals system-wide phosphorylation of transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Rabiee, Atefeh; Schwämmle, Veit; Sidoli, Simone; Dai, Jie; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Mandrup, Susanne; Jensen, Ole N

    2017-03-01

    Adipocytes (fat cells) are important endocrine and metabolic cells critical for systemic insulin sensitivity. Both adipose excess and insufficiency are associated with adverse metabolic function. Adipogenesis is the process whereby preadipocyte precursor cells differentiate into lipid-laden mature adipocytes. This process is driven by a network of transcriptional regulators (TRs). We hypothesized that protein PTMs, in particular phosphorylation, play a major role in activating and propagating signals within TR networks upon induction of adipogenesis by extracellular stimulus. We applied MS-based quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics to monitor the alteration of nuclear proteins during the early stages (4 h) of preadipocyte differentiation. We identified a total of 4072 proteins including 2434 phosphorylated proteins, a majority of which were assigned as regulators of gene expression. Our results demonstrate that adipogenic stimuli increase the nuclear abundance and/or the phosphorylation levels of proteins involved in gene expression, cell organization, and oxidation-reduction pathways. Furthermore, proteins acting as negative modulators involved in negative regulation of gene expression, insulin stimulated glucose uptake, and cytoskeletal organization showed a decrease in their nuclear abundance and/or phosphorylation levels during the first 4 h of adipogenesis. Among 288 identified TRs, 49 were regulated within 4 h of adipogenic stimulation including several known and many novel potential adipogenic regulators. We created a kinase-substrate database for 3T3-L1 preadipocytes by investigating the relationship between protein kinases and protein phosphorylation sites identified in our dataset. A majority of the putative protein kinases belong to the cyclin-dependent kinase family and the mitogen-activated protein kinase family including P38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases, suggesting that these kinases act as orchestrators of early adipogenesis.

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor activation of NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells)-dependent transcription: a role for the transcription factor NFATc4 in neurotrophin-mediated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Groth, Rachel D; Mermelstein, Paul G

    2003-09-03

    A member of the neurotrophin family, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates neuronal survival and differentiation during development. Within the adult brain, BDNF is also important in neuronal adaptive processes, such as the activity-dependent plasticity that underlies learning and memory. These long-term changes in synaptic strength are mediated through alterations in gene expression. However, many of the mechanisms by which BDNF is linked to transcriptional and translational regulation remain unknown. Recently, the transcription factor NFATc4 (nuclear factor of activated T-cells isoform 4) was discovered in neurons, where it is believed to play an important role in long-term changes in neuronal function. Interestingly, NFATc4 is particularly sensitive to the second messenger systems activated by BDNF. Thus, we hypothesized that NFAT-dependent transcription may be an important mediator of BDNF-induced plasticity. In cultured rat CA3-CA1 hippocampal neurons, BDNF activated NFAT-dependent transcription via TrkB receptors. Inhibition of calcineurin blocked BDNF-induced nuclear translocation of NFATc4, thus preventing transcription. Further, phospholipase C was a critical signaling intermediate between BDNF activation of TrkB and the initiation of NFAT-dependent transcription. Both inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3)-mediated release of calcium from intracellular stores and activation of protein kinase C were required for BDNF-induced NFAT-dependent transcription. Finally, increased expression of IP3 receptor 1 and BDNF after neuronal exposure to BDNF was linked to NFAT-dependent transcription. These results suggest that NFATc4 plays a crucial role in neurotrophin-mediated synaptic plasticity.

  20. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ, an integrator of transcriptional repression and nuclear receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanhong; Hon, Michelle; Evans, Ronald M.

    2002-01-01

    The three PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor) isoforms are critical regulators of lipid homeostasis by controlling the balance between the burning and storage of long chain fatty acids. Whereas PPARα and PPARγ have been studied extensively, the function of PPARδ remains the most elusive. Intriguingly, in cotransfection experiments, PPARδ is a potent inhibitor of ligand-induced transcriptional activity of PPARα and PPARγ. This inhibition is achieved, in part, by binding of PPARδ to a peroxisome proliferator response element and the association of nonliganded PPARδ with corepressors SMRT (silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors), SHARP (SMRT and histone deacetylase-associated repressor protein), and class I histone deacetylases. Stable expression of PPARδ inhibits the expression of endogenous PPARα target gene expression in 3T3-PPARα cells, whereas a PPARδ mutant that does not interact with the corepressor SMRT loses its ability to repress the induction of PPARα target gene. Similarly, stable expression of PPARδ in 3T3-PPARγ cells leads to inhibition of PPARγ target gene expression and PPARγ-mediated adipogenesis. Given the widespread expression of PPARδ and the restricted pattern for PPARα and PPARγ, these results suggest a role for PPARδ as a gateway receptor whose relative levels of expression can be used to modulate PPARα and PPARγ activity. PMID:11867749

  1. Increased AICD generation does not result in increased nuclear translocation or activation of target gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Elaine; Isbert, Simone; Kern, Andreas; Jaeger, Sebastian; Martin, Anne M.; Hebert, Sebastien S.; Behl, Christian; Weggen, Sascha; De Strooper, Bart; Pietrzik, Claus U.

    2008-08-01

    A sequence of amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleavages culminates in the sequential release of the APP intracellular domain (AICD) and the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}) and/or p3 fragment. One of the environmental factors favouring the accumulation of AICD appears to be a rise in intracellular pH. Here we further identified the metabolism and subcellular localization of artificially expressed constructs under such conditions. We also co-examined the mechanistic lead up to the AICD accumulation and explored possible significances for its increased expression. We found that most of the AICD generated under pH neutralized conditions is likely cleaved from C83. While the AICD surplus was unable to further activate transcription of a luciferase reporter via a Gal4-DNA-binding domain, it failed entirely via the endogenous promoter regions of proposed target genes, APP and KAI1. The lack of a specific transactivation potential was also demonstrated by the unchanged levels of target gene mRNA. However, rather than translocating to the nucleus, the AICD surplus remains membrane tethered or free in the cytosol where it interacts with Fe65. Therefore we provide strong evidence that an increase in AICD generation does not directly promote gene activation of previously proposed target 0011gen.

  2. Diminished Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcription and Nuclear Transport in Primary Macrophages Arrested in Early G1 Phase of the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Zwart, Bianca M.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2000-01-01

    Previously, we and others have demonstrated that the process of reverse transcription of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is disturbed in nondividing macrophages and quiescent T lymphocytes. Here we analyzed which phase of the cell cycle in macrophages is crucial for early steps in the HIV-1 replication cycle. HIV-1 Ba-L-inoculated macrophages arrested early in the G1 phase by n-butyrate contained incomplete products of reverse transcription. In gamma-irradiated macrophages, reverse transcription was successfully completed but proviral integration could not be detected. In these cells, nuclear import was disturbed as reflected by the absence of two-long-terminal-repeat circles. In macrophages arrested late in G1 phase by aphidicolin or 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-benzimidazole (DRB), reverse transcription was unaffected. Proviral integration occurred efficiently in DRB-treated macrophages, whereas integrated proviral DNA could not be detected after aphidicolin treatment. Arrest at G2 phase of the cell cycle by nocodazole did not affect reverse transcription or proviral integration. Treatment of macrophages with hydroxyurea (HU), which reduces the intracellular deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pool by blocking the de novo synthesis of dNTP, resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcription. This could partially be restored by the addition of nucleoside precursors. Addition of nucleoside precursors enhanced both reverse transcription and cell proliferation. However, the disturbed reverse transcription observed in the nonproliferating and n-butyrate-treated macrophages could not be restored by addition of nucleoside precursors. Similar to observations in quiescent T lymphocytes, incomplete proviral DNA species were arrested in the cytoplasm of the macrophages. Our results indicate that also in primary macrophages the intracellular nucleotide pools and other cellular factors that coincide with late G1 phase of the cell cycle may

  3. PML-associated repressor of transcription (PAROT), a novel KRAB-zinc finger repressor, is regulated through association with PML nuclear bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, Sandra; Wiemann, Stefan; Will, Hans; Hofmann, Thomas G. . E-mail: t.hofmann@dkfz.de

    2006-04-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are implicated in transcriptional regulation. Here we identify a novel transcriptional repressor, PML-associated repressor of transcription (PAROT), which is regulated in its repressor activity through recruitment to PML-NBs. PAROT is a Krueppel-associated box ( KRAB) zinc-finger (ZNF) protein, which comprises an amino terminal KRAB-A and KRAB-B box, a linker domain and 8 tandemly repeated C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-ZNF motifs at its carboxy terminus. Consistent with its domain structure, when tethered to DNA, PAROT represses transcription, and this is partially released by the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A. PAROT colocalizes with members of the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) family and with transcriptional intermediary factor-1{beta}/KRAB-associated protein 1 (TIF-1{beta}/KAP1), a transcriptional corepressor for the KRAB-ZNF family. Interestingly, PML isoform IV, in contrast to PML-III, efficiently recruits PAROT and TIF-1{beta} from heterochromatin to PML-NBs. PML-NB recruitment of PAROT partially releases its transcriptional repressor activity, indicating that PAROT can be regulated through subnuclear compartmentalization. Taken together, our data identify a novel transcriptional repressor and provide evidence for its regulation through association with PML-NBs.

  4. Trafficking of the Transcription Factor Nrf2 to Promyelocytic Leukemia-Nuclear Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Malloy, Melanie Theodore; McIntosh, Deneshia J.; Walters, Treniqka S.; Flores, Andrea; Goodwin, J. Shawn; Arinze, Ifeanyi J.

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitylation of Nrf2 by the Keap1-Cullin3/RING box1 (Cul3-Rbx1) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex targets Nrf2 for proteasomal degradation in the cytoplasm and is an extensively studied mechanism for regulating the cellular level of Nrf2. Although mechanistic details are lacking, reports abound that Nrf2 can also be degraded in the nucleus. Here, we demonstrate that Nrf2 is a target for sumoylation by both SUMO-1 and SUMO-2. HepG2 cells treated with As2O3, which enhances attachment of SUMO-2/3 to target proteins, increased SUMO-2/3-modification (polysumoylation) of Nrf2. We show that Nrf2 traffics, in part, to promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs). Cell fractions harboring key components of PML-NBs did not contain biologically active Keap1 but contained modified Nrf2 as well as RING finger protein 4 (RNF4), a poly-SUMO-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase. Overexpression of wild-type RNF4, but not the catalytically inactive mutant, decreased the steady-state levels of Nrf2, measured in the PML-NB-enriched cell fraction. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 interfered with this decrease, resulting in elevated levels of polysumoylated Nrf2 that was also ubiquitylated. Wild-type RNF4 accelerated the half-life (t½) of Nrf2, measured in PML-NB-enriched cell fractions. These results suggest that RNF4 mediates polyubiquitylation of polysumoylated Nrf2, leading to its subsequent degradation in PML-NBs. Overall, this work identifies Nrf2 as a target for sumoylation and provides a novel mechanism for its degradation in the nucleus, independent of Keap1. PMID:23543742

  5. The expression level of the transcription factor Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) determines cellular survival after radiation treatment.

    PubMed

    Mandl, Markus; Lieberum, Maria- Katharina; Dunst, Juergen; Depping, Reinhard

    2015-11-16

    Tumour hypoxia promotes radioresistance and is associated with poor prognosis. The transcription factor Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), also designated as Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1β, is part of the HIF pathway which mediates cellular adaptations to oxygen deprivation and facilitates tumour progression. The subunits HIF-1α and ARNT are key players within this pathway. HIF-1α is regulated in an oxygen-dependent manner whereas ARNT is considered to be constitutively expressed. However, there is mounting evidence that certain tumour cells are capable to elevate ARNT in hypoxia which suggests a survival benefit. Therefore the objective of this study was to elucidate effects of an altered ARNT expression level on the cellular response to radiation. Different human cell lines (Hep3B, MCF-7, 786-Owt, 786-Ovhl, RCC4wt and RCC4vhl) originating from various tumour entities (Hepatocellular carcinoma, breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma respectively) were X-irradiated using a conventional linear accelerator. Knockdown of ARNT expression was achieved by transient siRNA transfection. Complementary experiments were performed by forced ARNT overexpression using appropriate plasmids. Presence/absence of ARNT protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Clonogenic survival assays were performed in order to determine cellular survival post irradiation. Statistical comparison of two groups was achieved by the unpaired t-test. The results of this study indicate that ARNT depletion renders tumour cells susceptible to radiation whereas overexpression of this transcription factor confers radioresistance. These findings provide evidence to consider ARNT as a drug target and as a predictive marker in clinical applications concerning the response to radiation.

  6. Sensitive Detection of Transcription Factor in Nuclear Extracts by Target-Actuated Isothermal Amplification-Mediated Fluorescence Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Xiang, Dongxue; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Chun-Yang

    2017-10-03

    Transcription factors (TFs) modulate the process of gene transcription by binding to specific DNA sequences, and their alteration may cause a variety of diseases. Here, we develop a simple and sensitive method to directly detect TF in crude nuclear extracts using target-actuated isothermal amplification-mediated fluorescence enhancement with fluorescent base 2-aminopurine (2-AP) as the fluorophore. In the presence of TF, its specific binding to the probe prevents the digestion of the probe by exonuclease III (Exo III), initiating the extension reaction to produce DNA duplexes which may be subsequently digested by λ exonuclease to release single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) and free 2-AP molecules. Although some excess probes may be partially digested by Exo III, the phosphorothioate modification between two binding sites of the probe may generate a hindrance to preserve the rest of TF-binding probes which may hybridize with the released ssDNAs to initiate new cycles of nicking-digestion-hybridization, generating abundant free 2-AP molecules for significant fluorescence enhancement. Different from the reported amplification strategies, all the TF-binding probes take part in the amplification reaction no matter if they bind with TF or not, greatly improving the detection signal. This method can be used for sensitive detection of NF-κBp50 with a detection limit of 4.11 × 10(-4) mg/mL and the screening of potential TF inhibitors as well. Importantly, this method is very simple without the involvement of any external quenchers, extra primers, and templates, and it may be extended to selectively detect various DNA-binding proteins by simply changing the binding-site sequences of the probes.

  7. PGC-1-Related Coactivator, a Novel, Serum-Inducible Coactivator of Nuclear Respiratory Factor 1-Dependent Transcription in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ulf; Scarpulla, Richard C.

    2001-01-01

    The thermogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) coactivator 1 (PGC-1) has previously been shown to activate mitochondrial biogenesis in part through a direct interaction with nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1). In order to identify related coactivators that act through NRF-1, we searched the databases for sequences with similarities to PGC-1. Here, we describe the first characterization of a 177-kDa transcriptional coactivator, designated PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC). PRC is ubiquitously expressed in murine and human tissues and cell lines; but unlike PGC-1, PRC was not dramatically up-regulated during thermogenesis in brown fat. However, its expression was down-regulated in quiescent BALB/3T3 cells and was rapidly induced by reintroduction of serum, conditions where PGC-1 was not detected. PRC activated NRF-1-dependent promoters in a manner similar to that observed for PGC-1. Moreover, NRF-1 was immunoprecipitated from cell extracts by antibodies directed against PRC, and both proteins were colocalized to the nucleoplasm by confocal laser scanning microscopy. PRC interacts in vitro with the NRF-1 DNA binding domain through two distinct recognition motifs that are separated by an unstructured proline-rich region. PRC also contains a potent transcriptional activation domain in its amino terminus adjacent to an LXXLL motif. The spatial arrangement of these functional domains coincides with those found in PGC-1, supporting the conclusion that PRC and PGC-1 are structurally and functionally related. We conclude that PRC is a functional relative of PGC-1 that operates through NRF-1 and possibly other activators in response to proliferative signals. PMID:11340167

  8. The structural basis of gas-responsive transcription by the human nuclear hormone receptor REV-ERBbeta.

    PubMed

    Pardee, Keith I; Xu, Xiaohui; Reinking, Jeff; Schuetz, Anja; Dong, Aiping; Liu, Suya; Zhang, Rongguang; Tiefenbach, Jens; Lajoie, Gilles; Plotnikov, Alexander N; Botchkarev, Alexey; Krause, Henry M; Edwards, Aled

    2009-02-24

    Heme is a ligand for the human nuclear receptors (NR) REV-ERBalpha and REV-ERBbeta, which are transcriptional repressors that play important roles in circadian rhythm, lipid and glucose metabolism, and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and cancer. Here we show that transcription repression mediated by heme-bound REV-ERBs is reversed by the addition of nitric oxide (NO), and that the heme and NO effects are mediated by the C-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD). A 1.9 A crystal structure of the REV-ERBbeta LBD, in complex with the oxidized Fe(III) form of heme, shows that heme binds in a prototypical NR ligand-binding pocket, where the heme iron is coordinately bound by histidine 568 and cysteine 384. Under reducing conditions, spectroscopic studies of the heme-REV-ERBbeta complex reveal that the Fe(II) form of the LBD transitions between penta-coordinated and hexa-coordinated structural states, neither of which possess the Cys384 bond observed in the oxidized state. In addition, the Fe(II) LBD is also able to bind either NO or CO, revealing a total of at least six structural states of the protein. The binding of known co-repressors is shown to be highly dependent upon these various liganded states. REV-ERBs are thus highly dynamic receptors that are responsive not only to heme, but also to redox and gas. Taken together, these findings suggest new mechanisms for the systemic coordination of molecular clocks and metabolism. They also raise the possibility for gas-based therapies for the many disorders associated with REV-ERB biological functions.

  9. The Structural Basis of Gas-Responsive Transcription by the Human Nuclear Hormone Receptor REV-ERBβ

    PubMed Central

    Pardee, Keith I; Xu, Xiaohui; Reinking, Jeff; Schuetz, Anja; Dong, Aiping; Liu, Suya; Zhang, Rongguang; Tiefenbach, Jens; Lajoie, Gilles; Plotnikov, Alexander N; Botchkarev, Alexey; Krause, Henry M; Edwards, Aled

    2009-01-01

    Heme is a ligand for the human nuclear receptors (NR) REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, which are transcriptional repressors that play important roles in circadian rhythm, lipid and glucose metabolism, and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and cancer. Here we show that transcription repression mediated by heme-bound REV-ERBs is reversed by the addition of nitric oxide (NO), and that the heme and NO effects are mediated by the C-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD). A 1.9 Å crystal structure of the REV-ERBβ LBD, in complex with the oxidized Fe(III) form of heme, shows that heme binds in a prototypical NR ligand-binding pocket, where the heme iron is coordinately bound by histidine 568 and cysteine 384. Under reducing conditions, spectroscopic studies of the heme-REV-ERBβ complex reveal that the Fe(II) form of the LBD transitions between penta-coordinated and hexa-coordinated structural states, neither of which possess the Cys384 bond observed in the oxidized state. In addition, the Fe(II) LBD is also able to bind either NO or CO, revealing a total of at least six structural states of the protein. The binding of known co-repressors is shown to be highly dependent upon these various liganded states. REV-ERBs are thus highly dynamic receptors that are responsive not only to heme, but also to redox and gas. Taken together, these findings suggest new mechanisms for the systemic coordination of molecular clocks and metabolism. They also raise the possibility for gas-based therapies for the many disorders associated with REV-ERB biological functions. PMID:19243223

  10. Post-fusion treatment with MG132 increases transcription factor expression in somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in pigs.

    PubMed

    You, Jinyoung; Lee, Joohyeong; Kim, Jinyoung; Park, Junhong; Lee, Eunsong

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of post-fusion treatment of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) oocytes with the proteasomal inhibitor MG132 on maturation promoting factor (MPF) activity, nuclear remodeling, embryonic development, and gene expression of cloned pig embryos. Immediately after electrofusion, SCNT oocytes were treated with MG132 and/or caffeine for 2 hr, vanadate for 0.5 hr, or vanadate for 0.5 hr followed by MG132 for 1.5 hr. Of the MG132 concentrations tested (0-5 microM), the 1 microM concentration showed a higher rate of blastocyst formation (25.9%) than 0 (14.2%), 0.5 (16.9%), and 5 microM (16.9%). Post-fusion treatment with MG132, caffeine, and both MG132 and caffeine improved blastocyst formation (22.1%, 21.4%, and 24.4%, respectively), whereas vanadate treatment inhibited blastocyst formation (6.5%) compared to the control (11.1%). When examined 2 hr after fusion and 1 hr after activation, MPF activity remained at a higher (P < 0.05) level in SCNT oocytes that were treated post-fusion with caffeine and/or MG132, but it was decreased by vanadate. The rate of oocytes showing premature chromosome condensation was not altered by MG132 but was decreased by vanadate treatment. In addition, formation of single pronuclei was increased by MG132 compared to control and vanadate treatment. MG132-treated embryos showed increased expression of POU5F1, DPPA2, DPPA3, DPPA5, and NDP52l1 genes compared to control embryos. Our results demonstrate that post-fusion treatment of SCNT oocytes with MG132 prevents MPF degradation and increases expression of transcription factors in SCNT embryos, which are necessary for normal development of SCNT embryos. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT)-3 Activates Nuclear Factor (NF)-κB in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiming; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Harris, David M.; Li, Ping; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Keating, Michael J.; Estrov, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB plays a major role in the pathogenesis of B-cell neoplasms. A broad array of mostly extracellular stimuli has been reported to activate NF-κB, to various degrees, in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. Because CLL cells harbor high levels of unphosphorylated (U) signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 protein and U-STAT3 was reported to activate NF-κB, we sought to determine whether U-STAT3 activates NF-κB in CLL. Using the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) we studied peripheral blood low-density cells from 15 patients with CLL and found that CLL cell nuclear extracts from all the samples bound to an NF-κB DNA probe, suggesting that NF-κB is constitutively activated in CLL. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that STAT3 bound NF-κB p65, and confocal microscopy studies detected U-STAT3/NF-κB complexes in the nuclei of CLL cells, thereby confirming these findings. Furthermore, infection of CLL cells with retroviral STAT3-shRNA attenuated the binding of NF-κB to DNA, as assessed by EMSA, and downregulated mRNA levels of NF-κB-regulated genes, as assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Taken together, our data suggest that U-STAT3 binds to the NF-κB p50/p65 dimers and that the U-STAT3/NF-κB complexes bind to DNA and activate NF-κB-regulated genes in CLL cells. PMID:21364020

  12. FBI-1 enhances transcription of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB)-responsive E-selectin gene by nuclear localization of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Kee; Kang, Jae-Eun; Park, Hye-Jin; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Yim, Tae-Hee; Kim, Jung-Min; Heo, Min-Kyu; Kim, Kyu-Yeun; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Hur, Man-Wook

    2005-07-29

    The POZ domain is a highly conserved protein-protein interaction motif found in many regulatory proteins. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) plays a key role in the expression of a variety of genes in response to infection, inflammation, and stressful conditions. We found that the POZ domain of FBI-1 (factor that binds to the inducer of short transcripts of human immunodeficiency virus-1) interacted with the Rel homology domain of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB in both in vivo and in vitro protein-protein interaction assays. FBI-1 enhanced NF-kappaB-mediated transcription of E-selectin genes in HeLa cells upon phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate stimulation and overcame gene repression by IkappaB alpha or IkappaB beta. In contrast, the POZ domain of FBI-1, which is a dominant-negative form of FBI-1, repressed NF-kappaB-mediated transcription, and the repression was cooperative with IkappaB alpha or IkappaB beta. In contrast, the POZ domain tagged with a nuclear localization sequence polypeptide of FBI-1 enhanced NF-kappaB-responsive gene transcription, suggesting that the molecular interaction between the POZ domain and the Rel homology domain of p65 and the nuclear localization by the nuclear localization sequence are important in the transcription enhancement mediated by FBI-1. Confocal microscopy showed that FBI-1 increased NF-kappaB movement into the nucleus and increased the stability of NF-kappaB in the nucleus, which enhanced NF-kappaB-mediated transcription of the E-selectin gene. FBI-1 also interacted with IkappaB alpha and IkappaB beta.

  13. Activation of the inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor interleukin-6 during inflammatory and psychological stress in the brain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The transcription factor nuclear factor interleukin 6 (NF-IL6) is known to be activated by various inflammatory stimuli in the brain. Interestingly, we recently detected NF-IL6-activation within the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis of rats after systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injection. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether NF-IL6 is activated during either, inflammatory, or psychological stress in the rat brain. Methods Rats were challenged with either the inflammatory stimulus LPS (100 μg/kg, i.p.) or exposed to a novel environment. Core body temperature (Tb) and motor activity were monitored using telemetry, animals were killed at different time points, brains and blood removed, and primary cell cultures of the anterior pituitary lobe (AL) were investigated. Analyses were performed using immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and cytokine-specific bioassays. Results Stress stimulation by a novel environment increased NF-IL6-immunoreactivity (IR) in the pituitary’s perivascular macrophages and hypothalamic paraventricular cells and a rise in Tb lasting approximately 2 h. LPS stimulation lead to NF-IL6-IR in several additional cell types including ACTH-IR-positive corticotrope cells in vivo and in vitro. Two other proinflammatory transcription factors, namely signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 and NFκB, were significantly activated and partially colocalized with NF-IL6-IR in cells of the AL only after LPS-stimulation, but not following psychological stress. In vitro NF-IL6-activation was associated with induction and secretion of TNFα in folliculostellate cells, which could be antagonized by the JAK-STAT-inhibitor AG490. Conclusions We revealed, for the first time, that NF-IL6 activation occurs not only during inflammatory LPS stimulation, but also during psychological stress, that is, a novel environment. Both stressors were associated with time-dependent activation of NF-IL6 in different cell

  14. Meiotic nuclear movements in fission yeast are regulated by the transcription factor Mei4 downstream of a Cds1-dependent replication checkpoint pathway.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Kun; Yamamoto, Takaharu G; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Chikashige, Yuji; Masukata, Hisao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2015-03-01

    In meiosis, the fission yeast nucleus displays an elongated morphology, moving back and forth within the cell; these nuclear movements continue for approximately 2 h before meiotic nuclear divisions. Meiotic DNA replication occurs in an early phase of the nuclear movements and is followed by meiotic prophase. Here we report that in mutants deficient in meiotic DNA replication, the duration of nuclear movements is strikingly prolonged to four to 5 h. We found that this prolongation was caused by the Cds1-dependent replication checkpoint, which represses expression of the mei4(+) gene encoding a meiosis-specific transcription factor. In the absence of Mei4, nuclear movements persisted for more than 8 h. In contrast, overproduction of Mei4 accelerated termination of nuclear movements to approximately 30 min. These results show that Mei4 is involved in the termination of nuclear movements and that Mei4-mediated regulatory pathways link a DNA replication checkpoint to the termination of nuclear movements.

  15. Definition and prediction of the full range of transcription factor binding sites—the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 dimeric site

    PubMed Central

    Locker, Joseph; Ghosh, David; Luc, Phuong-Van; Zheng, Jianhua

    2002-01-01

    In animals, transcription factor binding sites are hard to recognize because of their extensive variation. We therefore characterized the general relationship between a specific protein-binding site and its DNA sequence and used this relationship to generate a predictive algorithm for searching other DNA sequences. The experimental process was defined by studying hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF1), which binds DNA as a dimer on two inverted-repeat 7-bp half sites separated by one base. The binding model was based on the equivalence of the two half sites, which was confirmed in examples where specific modified sites were compared. Binding competition analysis was used to determine the effects of substitution of all four bases at each position in the half site. From these data, a weighted half-site matrix was generated and the full site was evaluated as the sum of two half-site scores. This process accurately predicted even weak binding sites that were significantly different from the consensus sequence. The predictions also showed a direct correlation with measured protein binding. PMID:12202766

  16. Mapping of Early and Late Transcripts Encoded by the Autographa californica Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus Genome: Is Viral RNA Spliced?

    PubMed Central

    Lübbert, Hermann; Doerfler, Walter

    1984-01-01

    Early and late transcripts were mapped on the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus genome by Northern blotting and hybridization with the cloned viral EcoRI fragments. At least 11 early and about 90 late RNAs were compared with over 32 polypeptides synthesized by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected RNA. The latter method, of course, had its limitations also and did not guarantee that all viral RNAs could be detected in this way. A comparison of cytoplasmic and total cellular RNAs showed no clear-cut differences in their size distributions. We found that there were more RNA classes than corresponding proteins encoded by them and mapped by in vitro translation. By using the Berk-Sharp method and analyses of DNA-RNA hybrids by one-dimensional or two-dimensional neutral and alkaline gel electrophoreses, we were unable to adduce evidence for RNA splicing in this viral system. Minor splices, particularly at sites close to the termini of RNA molecules, could not be excluded. Images PMID:16789249

  17. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A/B and G inhibits the transcription of gonadotropin-releasing-hormone 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sheng; Korzan, Wayne J.; Chen, Chun-Chun; Fernald, Russell D.

    2008-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1) causes the release of gonadotropins from the pituitary to control reproduction. Here we report that two heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNP-A/B and hnRNP-G) bind to the GnRH-I upstream promoter region in a cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni. We identified these binding proteins using a newly developed homology based method of mass spectrometric peptide mapping. We show that both hnRNP-A/B and hnRNP-G co-localize with GnRH1 in the pre-optic area of the hypothalamus in the brain. We also demonstrated that these ribonucleoproteins exhibit similar binding capacity in vivo, using immortalized mouse GT1-7 cells where overexpression of either hnRNP-A/B or hnRNP-G significantly down-regulate GnRH1 mRNA levels in GT1-7 cells, suggesting that both act as repressors in GnRH1 transcriptional regulation. PMID:17920292

  18. Activation of nuclear transcription factor-kappaB in mouse brain induced by a simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kimberly C.; Manna, Sunil K.; Yamauchi, Keiko; Ramesh, Vani; Wilson, Bobby L.; Thomas, Renard L.; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Kulkarni, Anil D.; Pellis, Neil R.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity induces inflammatory responses and modulates immune functions that may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to a microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects; however, there is little research exploring the etiology of these effects resulting from exposure to such an environment. It is also known that spaceflight is associated with increase in oxidative stress; however, this phenomenon has not been reproduced in land-based simulated microgravity models. In this study, an attempt has been made to show the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mice brain, using ground-based microgravity simulator. Increased ROS was observed in brain stem and frontal cortex with concomitant decrease in glutathione, on exposing mice to simulated microgravity for 7 d. Oxidative stress-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappaB was observed in all the regions of the brain. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase was phosphorylated equally in all regions of the brain exposed to simulated microgravity. These results suggest that exposure of brain to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors, and these have been earlier argued to be oxidative stress dependent.

  19. Activation of nuclear transcription factor-kappaB in mouse brain induced by a simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kimberly C.; Manna, Sunil K.; Yamauchi, Keiko; Ramesh, Vani; Wilson, Bobby L.; Thomas, Renard L.; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Kulkarni, Anil D.; Pellis, Neil R.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity induces inflammatory responses and modulates immune functions that may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to a microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects; however, there is little research exploring the etiology of these effects resulting from exposure to such an environment. It is also known that spaceflight is associated with increase in oxidative stress; however, this phenomenon has not been reproduced in land-based simulated microgravity models. In this study, an attempt has been made to show the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mice brain, using ground-based microgravity simulator. Increased ROS was observed in brain stem and frontal cortex with concomitant decrease in glutathione, on exposing mice to simulated microgravity for 7 d. Oxidative stress-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappaB was observed in all the regions of the brain. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase was phosphorylated equally in all regions of the brain exposed to simulated microgravity. These results suggest that exposure of brain to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors, and these have been earlier argued to be oxidative stress dependent.

  20. Phosphoproteomics profiling suggests a role for nuclear βΙPKC in transcription processes of undifferentiated murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Costa-Junior, Helio Miranda; Garavello, Nicole Milaré; Duarte, Mariana Lemos; Berti, Denise Aparecida; Glaser, Talita; de Andrade, Alexander; Labate, Carlos A; Ferreira, André Teixeira da Silva; Perales, Jonas Enrique Aguilar; Xavier-Neto, José; Krieger, José Eduardo; Schechtman, Deborah

    2010-12-03

    Protein kinase C (PKC) plays a key role in embryonic stem cell (ESC) proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation. However, the function of specific PKC isoenzymes have yet to be determined. Of the PKCs expressed in undifferentiated ESCs, βIPKC was the only isoenzyme abundantly expressed in the nuclei. To investigate the role of βΙPKC in these cells, we employed a phosphoproteomics strategy and used two classical (cPKC) peptide modulators and one βIPKC-specific inhibitor peptide. We identified 13 nuclear proteins that are direct or indirect βΙPKC substrates in undifferentiated ESCs. These proteins are known to be involved in regulating transcription, splicing, and chromatin remodeling during proliferation and differentiation. Inhibiting βΙPKC had no effect on DNA synthesis in undifferentiated ESCs. However, upon differentiation, many cells seized to express βΙPKC and βΙPKC was frequently found in the cytoplasm. Taken together, our results suggest that βIPKC takes part in the processes that maintain ESCs in their undifferentiated state.

  1. Identification of heteromolecular binding sites in transcription factors Sp1 and TAF4 using high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Emi; Inoue, Rintaro; Sugiyama, Masaaki; Kuwahara, Jun; Matsuzaki, Katsumi; Hoshino, Masaru

    2017-08-31

    The expression of eukaryotic genes is precisely controlled by interactions between general transcriptional factors and promoter-specific transcriptional activators. The fourth element of TATA-box binding protein-associated factor (TAF4), an essential subunit of the general transcription factor TFIID, serves as a coactivator for various promoter-specific transcriptional regulators. Interactions between TAF4 and site-specific transcriptional activators, such as Sp1, are important for regulating the expression levels of genes of interest. However, only limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between these transcriptional regulatory proteins. We herein analyzed the interaction between the transcriptional factors Sp1 and TAF4 using high-resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We found that four glutamine-rich (Q-rich) regions in TAF4 were largely disordered under nearly physiological conditions. Among them, the first Q-rich region in TAF4 was essential for the interaction with another Q-rich region in the Sp1 molecule, most of which was largely disordered. The residues responsible for this interaction were specific and highly localized in a defined region within a range of 20-30 residues. Nevertheless, a detailed analysis of (13) C-chemical shift values suggested that no significant conformational change occurred upon binding. These results indicate a prominent and exceptional binding mode for intrinsically disordered proteins other than the well-accepted concept of "coupled folding and binding." © 2017 The Protein Society.

  2. Rho-kinase signaling controls nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of class IIa histone deacetylase (HDAC7) and transcriptional activation of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1.

    PubMed

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Barresi, Sabina; Petrini, Stefania; Bertini, Enrico; Zanni, Ginevra

    2015-04-03

    Rho-kinase (ROCK) has been well documented to play a key role in RhoA-induced actin remodeling. ROCK activation results in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation either by direct action on MLC kinase (MLCK) or by inhibition of MLC phosphatase (MLCP), modulating actin-myosin contraction. We found that inhibition of the ROCK pathway in induced pluripotent stem cells, leads to nuclear export of HDAC7 and transcriptional activation of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 while in cells with constitutive ROCK hyperactivity due to loss of function of the RhoGTPase activating protein Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1), the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 is downregulated. Our study identify a new target of ROCK signaling via myosin phosphatase subunit (MYPT1) and Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) at the nuclear level and provide new insights in the cellular functions of ROCK. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. c-Fos-activated synthesis of nuclear phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P₂] promotes global transcriptional changes.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Gabriel O; Renner, Marianne L; Gil, Germán A; Rodríguez-Berdini, Lucia; Caputto, Beatriz L

    2014-08-01

    c-Fos is a well-recognized member of the AP-1 (activator protein-1) family of transcription factors. In addition to this canonical activity, we previously showed that cytoplasmic c-Fos activates phospholipid synthesis through a mechanism independent of its genomic AP-1 activity. c-Fos associates with particular enzymes of the lipid synthesis pathway at the endoplasmic reticulum and increases the Vmax of the reactions without modifying the Km values. This lipid synthesis activation is associated with events of differentiation and proliferation that require high rates of membrane biogenesis. Since lipid synthesis also occurs in the nucleus, and different phospholipids have been assigned transcription regulatory functions, in the present study we examine if c-Fos also acts as a regulator of phospholipid synthesis in the nucleus. Furthermore, we examine if c-Fos modulates transcription through its phospholipid synthesis activator capacity. We show that nuclear-localized c-Fos associates with and activates PI4P5K (phosphatidylinositol-4-monophosphate 5-kinase), but not with PI4KIIIβ (type IIIβ phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase) thus promoting PtdIns(4,5)P₂ (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate) formation, which, in turn, promotes transcriptional changes. We propose c-Fos as a key regulator of nuclear PtdIns(4,5)P₂ synthesis in response to growth signals that results in c-Fos-dependent transcriptional changes promoted by the newly synthesized lipids.

  4. The insulin-PI3K/TOR pathway induces a HIF-dependent transcriptional response in Drosophila by promoting nuclear localization of HIF-alpha/Sima.

    PubMed

    Dekanty, Andrés; Lavista-Llanos, Sofía; Irisarri, Maximiliano; Oldham, Sean; Wappner, Pablo

    2005-12-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a heterodimeric transcription factor composed of a constitutively expressed HIF-beta subunit and an oxygen-regulated HIF-alpha subunit. We have previously defined a hypoxia-inducible transcriptional response in Drosophila melanogaster that is homologous to the mammalian HIF-dependent response. In Drosophila, the bHLH-PAS proteins Similar (Sima) and Tango (Tgo) are the functional homologues of the mammalian HIF-alpha and HIF-beta subunits, respectively. HIF-alpha/Sima is regulated by oxygen at several different levels that include protein stability and subcellular localization. We show here for the first time that insulin can activate HIF-dependent transcription, both in Drosophila S2 cells and in living Drosophila embryos. Using a pharmacological approach as well as RNA interference, we determined that the effect of insulin on HIF-dependent transcriptional induction is mediated by PI3K-AKT and TOR pathways. We demonstrate that stimulation of the transcriptional response involves upregulation of Sima protein but not sima mRNA. Finally, we have analyzed in vivo the effect of the activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway on the subcellular localization of Sima protein. Overexpression of dAKT and dPDK1 in normoxic embryos provoked a major increase in Sima nuclear localization, mimicking the effect of a hypoxic treatment. A similar increase in Sima nuclear localization was observed in dPTEN homozygous mutant embryos, confirming that activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway promotes nuclear accumulation of Sima protein. We conclude that regulation of HIF-alpha/Sima by the PI3K-AKT-TOR pathway is a major conserved mode of regulation of the HIF-dependent transcriptional response in Drosophila.

  5. Pre-neurodegeneration of mitral cells in the pcd mutant mouse is associated with DNA damage, transcriptional repression, and reorganization of nuclear speckles and Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Valero, Jorge; Berciano, Maria T; Weruaga, Eduardo; Lafarga, Miguel; Alonso, José R

    2006-11-01

    DNA damage and impairment of its repair underlie several neurodegenerative diseases. The Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd) mutation causes the loss of Nna1 expression and is associated with a selective and progressive degeneration of specific neuronal populations, including mitral cells in the olfactory bulb. Using an in situ transcription assay, molecular markers for both nuclear compartments and components of the DNA damage/repair pathway, and ultrastructural analysis, here we demonstrate that the pcd mutation induces the formation of DNA damage/repair foci in mitral cells. Furthermore, this effect is associated with transcriptional inhibition, heterochromatinization, nucleolar segregation and the reorganization of nuclear speckles of splicing factors and Cajal bodies. The most significant cytoplasmic alteration observed was a partial replacement of rough endoplasmic reticulum cisternae by a larger amount of free ribosomes, while other organelles were structurally preserved. The tools employed in this work may be of use for the early detection of predegenerative processes in neurodegenerative disorders and for validating rescue strategies.

  6. Interaction of Yna1 and Yna2 Is Required for Nuclear Accumulation and Transcriptional Activation of the Nitrate Assimilation Pathway in the Yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    PubMed Central

    Silvestrini, Lucia; Rossi, Beatrice; Gallmetzer, Andreas; Mathieu, Martine; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Berardi, Enrico; Strauss, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    A few yeasts, including Hansenula polymorpha are able to assimilate nitrate and use it as nitrogen source. The genes necessary for nitrate assimilation are organised in this organism as a cluster comprising those encoding nitrate reductase (YNR1), nitrite reductase (YNI1), a high affinity transporter (YNT1), as well as the two pathway specific Zn(II)2Cys2 transcriptional activators (YNA1, YNA2). Yna1p and Yna2p mediate induction of the system and here we show that their functions are interdependent. Yna1p activates YNA2 as well as its own (YNA1) transcription thus forming a nitrate-dependent autoactivation loop. Using a split-YFP approach we demonstrate here that Yna1p and Yna2p form a heterodimer independently of the inducer and despite both Yna1p and Yna2p can occupy the target promoter as mono- or homodimer individually, these proteins are transcriptionally incompetent. Subsequently, the transcription factors target genes containing a conserved DNA motif (termed nitrate-UAS) determined in this work by in vitro and in vivo protein-DNA interaction studies. These events lead to a rearrangement of the chromatin landscape on the target promoters and are associated with the onset of transcription of these target genes. In contrast to other fungi and plants, in which nuclear accumulation of the pathway-specific transcription factors only occur in the presence of nitrate, Yna1p and Yna2p are constitutively nuclear in H. polymorpha. Yna2p is needed for this nuclear accumulation and Yna1p is incapable of strictly positioning in the nucleus without Yna2p. In vivo DNA footprinting and ChIP analyses revealed that the permanently nuclear Yna1p/Yna2p heterodimer only binds to the nitrate-UAS when the inducer is present. The nitrate-dependent up-regulation of one partner protein in the heterodimeric complex is functionally similar to the nitrate-dependent activation of nuclear accumulation in other systems. PMID:26335797

  7. Interaction of Yna1 and Yna2 Is Required for Nuclear Accumulation and Transcriptional Activation of the Nitrate Assimilation Pathway in the Yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Silvestrini, Lucia; Rossi, Beatrice; Gallmetzer, Andreas; Mathieu, Martine; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Berardi, Enrico; Strauss, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    A few yeasts, including Hansenula polymorpha are able to assimilate nitrate and use it as nitrogen source. The genes necessary for nitrate assimilation are organised in this organism as a cluster comprising those encoding nitrate reductase (YNR1), nitrite reductase (YNI1), a high affinity transporter (YNT1), as well as the two pathway specific Zn(II)2Cys2 transcriptional activators (YNA1, YNA2). Yna1p and Yna2p mediate induction of the system and here we show that their functions are interdependent. Yna1p activates YNA2 as well as its own (YNA1) transcription thus forming a nitrate-dependent autoactivation loop. Using a split-YFP approach we demonstrate here that Yna1p and Yna2p form a heterodimer independently of the inducer and despite both Yna1p and Yna2p can occupy the target promoter as mono- or homodimer individually, these proteins are transcriptionally incompetent. Subsequently, the transcription factors target genes containing a conserved DNA motif (termed nitrate-UAS) determined in this work by in vitro and in vivo protein-DNA interaction studies. These events lead to a rearrangement of the chromatin landscape on the target promoters and are associated with the onset of transcription of these target genes. In contrast to other fungi and plants, in which nuclear accumulation of the pathway-specific transcription factors only occur in the presence of nitrate, Yna1p and Yna2p are constitutively nuclear in H. polymorpha. Yna2p is needed for this nuclear accumulation and Yna1p is incapable of strictly positioning in the nucleus without Yna2p. In vivo DNA footprinting and ChIP analyses revealed that the permanently nuclear Yna1p/Yna2p heterodimer only binds to the nitrate-UAS when the inducer is present. The nitrate-dependent up-regulation of one partner protein in the heterodimeric complex is functionally similar to the nitrate-dependent activation of nuclear accumulation in other systems.

  8. Regulation of the nuclear export of the transcription factor NFATc1 by protein kinases after slow fibre type electrical stimulation of adult mouse skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tiansheng; Cseresnyés, Zoltán; Liu, Yewei; Randall, William R; Schneider, Martin F

    2007-03-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)c1 has been shown to be involved in turning on slow skeletal muscle fibre gene expression. Previous studies from our laboratory have characterized the stimulation pattern-dependent nuclear import and resting shuttling of NFATc1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) in flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle fibres from adult mouse. In this study, we use viral expression of the transcription factor NFATc1-GFP fusion protein to investigate the mechanisms underlying the nuclear export of the NFATc1-GFP that accumulated in the nuclei of cultured dissociated adult mouse FDB muscle fibres during slow-twitch fibre type electrical stimulation. In these studies, we found that inhibition of either glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) or casein kinase 1 or 2 (CK1/2) markedly slowed the decay of nuclear NFATc1-GFP after cessation of muscle fibre electrical stimulation, whereas inhibition of casein kinase 1delta, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and protein kinase A had little effect. Simultaneous inhibition of GSK3beta and CK1/2 completely blocked the nuclear export of NFATc1-GFP after muscle activity. We also developed a simplified model of NFATc1 phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and nuclear fluxes, and used this model to simulate the observed time courses of nuclear NFATc1-GFP with and without NFATc1 kinase inhibition. Our results suggest that GSK3beta and CK1/2 are the major protein kinases that contribute to the removal of NFATc1 that accumulates in muscle fibre nuclei during muscle activity, and that GSK3beta and CK1/2 are responsible for phosphorylating NFATc1 in muscle nuclei in a complementary or synergistic fashion.

  9. Role of Calcineurin, hnRNPA2 and Akt in Mitochondrial Respiratory Stress-Mediated Transcription Activation of Nuclear Gene Targets

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Manti; Tang, Weigang; Sondheimer, Neal; Avadhani, Narayan G.

    2010-01-01

    Pathophysiological conditions causing mitochondrial dysfunction and altered transmembrane potential (Δψm) initiate a mitochondrial respiratory stress response, also known as mitochondrial retrograde response, in a variety of mammalian cells. An increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ [Ca2+]c as part of this signaling cascade activates Ca2+ responsive phosphatase, Calcineurin (Cn). Activation of IGF1R accompanied by increased glycolysis, invasiveness, and resistance to apoptosis are phenotypic hallmarks of C2C12 rhabdomyoblast cells subjected to this stress. The signaling is associated with activation and increased nuclear translocation of a number of transcription factors including a novel NFκB (cRel: p50) pathway, NFAT, CREB and C/EBPδ. This culminates in the upregulation of a number of nuclear genes including Cathepsin L, RyR1, Glut4 and Akt1. We observed that stress regulated transcription activation of nuclear genes involves a cooperative interplay between NFκB (cRel:p50), C/EBPδ, CREB, NFAT. Our results show that the functional synergy of these factors requires the stress-activated heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, hnRNPA2 as a transcriptional co-activator. We report here that mitochondrial stress leads to induced expression and activation of serine threonine kinase Akt1. Interestingly, we observe that Akt1 phosphorylates hnRNPA2 under mitochondrial stress conditions, which is a crucial step for the recruitment of this coactivator to the stress target promoters and culmination in mitochondrial stress-mediated transcription activation of target genes. We propose that mitochondrial stress plays an important role in tumor progression and emergence of invasive phenotypes. PMID:20153290

  10. BZLF1, an Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early protein, induces p65 nuclear translocation while inhibiting p65 transcriptional function

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Thomas E.; Kenney, Shannon C. . E-mail: shann@med.unc.edu

    2004-10-25

    We have previously demonstrated that the Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early BZLF1 protein interacts with, and is inhibited by, the NF-{kappa}B family member p65. However, the effects of BZLF1 on NF-{kappa}B activity have not been intensively studied. Here we show that BZLF1 inhibits p65-dependent gene expression. BZLF1 inhibited the ability of IL-1, as well as transfected p65, to activate the expression of two different NF-{kappa}B-responsive genes, ICAM-1 and I{kappa}B-{alpha}. BZLF1 also reduced the constitutive level of I{kappa}B-{alpha} protein in HeLa and A549 cells, and increased the amount of nuclear NF-{kappa}B to a similar extent as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) treatment. In spite of this BZLF1-associated increase in the nuclear form of NF-{kappa}B, BZLF1 did not induce binding of NF-{kappa}B to NF-{kappa}B responsive promoters (as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay) in vivo, although TNF-{alpha} treatment induced NF-{kappa}B binding as expected. Overexpression of p65 dramatically inhibited the lytic replication cycle of EBV in 293-EBV cells, confirming that NF-{kappa}B also inhibits BZLF1 transcriptional function. Our results are consistent with a model in which BZLF1 inhibits the transcriptional function of p65, resulting in decreased transcription of I{kappa}B-{alpha}, decreased expression of I{kappa}B-{alpha} protein, and subsequent translocation of NF-{kappa}B to the nucleus. This nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B may promote viral latency by negatively regulating BZLF1 transcriptional activity. In situations where p65 activity is limiting in comparison to BZLF1, the ability of BZLF1 to inhibit p65 transcriptional function may protect the virus from the host immune system during the lytic form of infection.

  11. Thyroglobulin repression of thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) gene expression is mediated by decreased DNA binding of nuclear factor I proteins which control constitutive TTF-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, M; Chung, H K; Ulianich, L; Grassadonia, A; Suzuki, K; Kohn, L D

    2000-11-01

    Follicular thyroglobulin (TG) selectively suppresses the expression of thyroid-restricted transcription factors, thereby altering the expression of thyroid-specific proteins. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which TG suppresses the prototypic thyroid-restricted transcription factor, thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), in rat FRTL-5 thyrocytes. We show that the region between bp -264 and -153 on the TTF-1 promoter contains two nuclear factor I (NFI) elements whose function is involved in TG-mediated suppression. Thus, NFI binding to these elements is critical for constitutive expression of TTF-1; TG decreases NFI binding to the NFI elements in association with TG repression. NFI is a family of transcription factors that is ubiquitously expressed and contributes to constitutive and cell-specific gene expression. In contrast to the contribution of NFI proteins to constitutive gene expression in other systems, we demonstrate that follicular TG transcriptionally represses all NFI RNAs (NFI-A, -B, -C, and -X) in association with decreased NFI binding and that the RNA levels decrease as early as 4 h after TG treatment. Although TG treatment for 48 h results in a decrease in NFI protein-DNA complexes measured in DNA mobility shift assays, NFI proteins are still detectable by Western analysis. We show, however, that the binding of all NFI proteins is redox regulated. Thus, diamide treatment of nuclear extracts strongly reduces the binding of NFI proteins, and the addition of higher concentrations of dithiothreitol to nuclear extracts from TG-treated cells restores NFI-DNA binding to levels in extracts from untreated cells. We conclude that NFI binding to two NFI elements, at bp -264 to -153, positively regulates TTF-1 expression and controls constitutive TTF-1 levels. TG mediates the repression of TTF-1 gene expression by decreasing NFI RNA and protein levels, as well as by altering the binding activity of NFI, which is redox controlled.

  12. A Phylogenetically Conserved Group of Nuclear Factor-Y Transcription Factors Interact to Control Nodulation in Legumes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Laloum, Tom; Lepage, Agnès; Ariel, Federico; Frances, Lisa; Gamas, Pascal; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    The endosymbiotic association between legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia leads to the formation of a new root-derived organ called the nodule in which differentiated bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that can be assimilated by the host plant. Successful root infection by rhizobia and nodule organogenesis require the activation of symbiotic genes that are controlled by a set of transcription factors (TFs). We recently identified Medicago truncatula nuclear factor-YA1 (MtNF-YA1) and MtNF-YA2 as two M. truncatula TFs playing a central role during key steps of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-M. truncatula symbiotic interaction. NF-YA TFs interact with NF-YB and NF-YC subunits to regulate target genes containing the CCAAT box consensus sequence. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid screen approach, we identified the NF-YB and NF-YC subunits able to interact with MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in planta, we further demonstrated by both coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation that these NF-YA, -B, and -C subunits interact and form a stable NF-Y heterotrimeric complex. Reverse genetic and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR approaches revealed the importance of these newly identified NF-YB and NF-YC subunits for rhizobial symbiosis and binding to the promoter of MtERN1 (for Ethylene Responsive factor required for Nodulation), a direct target gene of MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. Finally, we verified that a similar trimer is formed in planta by the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) NF-Y subunits, revealing the existence of evolutionary conserved NF-Y protein complexes to control nodulation in leguminous plants. This sheds light on the process whereby an ancient heterotrimeric TF mainly controlling cell division in animals has acquired specialized functions in plants. PMID:26432878

  13. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II regulates nuclear receptor, myogenic, and metabolic gene expression in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Lisa M; Wang, Shu-Ching Mary; Eriksson, Natalie A; Myers, Stephen A; Murray, Lauren A; Muscat, George E O

    2011-02-24

    We demonstrate that chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) mRNA is more abundantly expressed (than COUP-TFI mRNA) in skeletal muscle C2C12 cells and in (type I and II) skeletal muscle tissue from C57BL/10 mice. Consequently, we have utilized the ABI TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA) platform to analyze gene expression changes specifically attributable to ectopic COUP-TFII (relative to vector only) expression in muscle cells. Utilizing a TLDA-based platform and 5 internal controls, we analyze the entire NR superfamily, 96 critical metabolic genes, and 48 important myogenic regulatory genes on the TLDA platform utilizing 5 internal controls. The low density arrays were analyzed by rigorous statistical analysis (with Genorm normalization, Bioconductor R, and the Empirical Bayes statistic) using the (integromics) statminer software. In addition, we validated the differentially expressed patho-physiologically relevant gene (identified on the TLDA platform) glucose transporter type 4 (Glut4). We demonstrated that COUP-TFII expression increased the steady state levels of Glut4 mRNA and protein, while ectopic expression of truncated COUP-TFII lacking helix 12 (COUP-TFΔH12) reduced Glut4 mRNA expression in C2C12 cells. Moreover, COUP-TFII expression trans-activated the Glut4 promoter (-997/+3), and ChIP analysis identified selective recruitment of COUP-TFII to a region encompassing a highly conserved SP1 binding site (in mouse, rat, and human) at nt positions -131/-118. Mutation of the SpI site ablated COUP-TFII mediated trans-activation of the Glut4 promoter. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that in skeletal muscle cells, COUP-TFII regulates several nuclear hormone receptors, and critical metabolic and muscle specific genes.

  14. Genetic reprogramming of transcription factor ap-2gamma in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer preimplantation embryos and placentomes.

    PubMed

    Aston, Kenneth I; Li, Gugan-Peng; Hicks, Brady A; Winger, Quinton A; White, Kenneth L

    2009-03-01

    Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) efficiency remains very low despite a tremendous amount of research devoted to its improvement over the past decade. Frequent early and mid-gestational losses are commonly accompanied by placental abnormalities. A transcription factor, activating protein AP-2gamma, has been shown to be necessary for proper placental development in the mouse. We first evaluated the expression of the gene coding for AP-2gamma (Tfap2c) in several bovine fibroblast donor cell lines and found it was not expressed. Subsequently we determined the expression profile of Tfap2c in oocytes and various stages of preimplantation in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos. Tfap2c was undetectable in oocytes and early embryos, and was detectable at relatively high levels in morula and blastocyst IVF embryos. The lack of expression in oocytes and donor cells means Tfap2c must be induced in the zygote at the morula stage in properly reprogrammed embryos. SCNT embryos expressed Tfap2c at the eight-cell stage, 2 days earlier than control embryos. Control embryos first expressed Tfap2c at the morula stage, and at this stage Tfap2c was significantly lower in the SCNT embryos. No differences in expression were detected at the blastocyst stage. To determine whether Tfap2c was properly reprogrammed in the placenta of SCNT pregnancies, we evaluated its expression in cotyledons and caruncles of SCNT and control pregnancies between days 55 and 90 gestation. Expression of Tfap2c in caruncles significantly increased between days 55 and 90, while expression in cotyledons was relatively consistent over that same period. Expression levels in SCNT tissues were not different from controls. This data indicates Tfap2c expression is altered in early preimplantation SCNT embryos, which may have developmental consequences resulting from genes influenced by Tfap2c, but expression was not different at the blastocyst stage and in placentomes.

  15. A Phylogenetically Conserved Group of Nuclear Factor-Y Transcription Factors Interact to Control Nodulation in Legumes.

    PubMed

    Baudin, Maël; Laloum, Tom; Lepage, Agnès; Rípodas, Carolina; Ariel, Federico; Frances, Lisa; Crespi, Martin; Gamas, Pascal; Blanco, Flavio Antonio; Zanetti, Maria Eugenia; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Niebel, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The endosymbiotic association between legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia leads to the formation of a new root-derived organ called the nodule in which differentiated bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that can be assimilated by the host plant. Successful root infection by rhizobia and nodule organogenesis require the activation of symbiotic genes that are controlled by a set of transcription factors (TFs). We recently identified Medicago truncatula nuclear factor-YA1 (MtNF-YA1) and MtNF-YA2 as two M. truncatula TFs playing a central role during key steps of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-M. truncatula symbiotic interaction. NF-YA TFs interact with NF-YB and NF-YC subunits to regulate target genes containing the CCAAT box consensus sequence. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid screen approach, we identified the NF-YB and NF-YC subunits able to interact with MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in planta, we further demonstrated by both coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation that these NF-YA, -B, and -C subunits interact and form a stable NF-Y heterotrimeric complex. Reverse genetic and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR approaches revealed the importance of these newly identified NF-YB and NF-YC subunits for rhizobial symbiosis and binding to the promoter of MtERN1 (for Ethylene Responsive factor required for Nodulation), a direct target gene of MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. Finally, we verified that a similar trimer is formed in planta by the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) NF-Y subunits, revealing the existence of evolutionary conserved NF-Y protein complexes to control nodulation in leguminous plants. This sheds light on the process whereby an ancient heterotrimeric TF mainly controlling cell division in animals has acquired specialized functions in plants.

  16. Nuclear Transcription Factor Kappa B Downregulation Reduces Chemoresistance in Bone Marrow-derived Cells Through P-glycoprotein Modulation.

    PubMed

    Loaiza, Brenda; Hernández-Gutierrez, Salomon; Montesinos, Juan Jose; Valverde, Mahara; Rojas, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) is associated with many types of refractory cancer. However, despite multiple strategies to treat cancer and novel target drugs, multidrug resistance still causes relapses. The best-characterized mechanism responsible for multidrug resistance involves the expression of the MDR-1 gene product, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Because the direct inhibition of this protein is very toxic, other methods of multidrug resistance (MDR) regulation have been proposed. The MDR-1 promoter sequence contains a κB site, which is recognized by NF-κB. The aim of this work was to characterize whether NF-κB modulation changes the response of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) to chemotherapy. We exposed BMDCs to etoposide and doxorubicin, two of the most used antineoplastic drugs. BMDCs presented high tolerance to these drugs, which correlated with high intrinsic P-gp activity and strong protein expression of NF-κB. To determine the mechanism behind the poor sensitivity of BMDCs to chemotherapy, we blocked the activity of the heterodimer protein NF-κB using the pharmacological inhibitor Bay 11-7085 and through the transfection of an adenovirus negative mutant of I kappa B alpha. The multidrug resistance phenotype of BMDCs was reversed by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway, and this change was accompanied by a decrease in P-gp activity. NF-κB is a possible target for improving the antineoplastic response. Copyright © 2016 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dephosphorylation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factor is regulated by an RNA-protein scaffold complex.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sonia; Findlay, Gregory M; Bandukwala, Hozefa S; Oberdoerffer, Shalini; Baust, Beate; Li, Zhigang; Schmidt, Valentina; Hogan, Patrick G; Sacks, David B; Rao, Anjana

    2011-07-12

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) proteins are Ca(2+)-regulated transcription factors that control gene expression in many cell types. NFAT proteins are heavily phosphorylated and reside in the cytoplasm of resting cells; when cells are stimulated by a rise in intracellular Ca(2+), NFAT proteins are dephosphorylated by the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin and translocate to the nucleus to activate target gene expression. Here we show that phosphorylated NFAT1 is present in a large cytoplasmic RNA-protein scaffold complex that contains a long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA), NRON [noncoding (RNA) repressor of NFAT]; a scaffold protein, IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein (IQGAP); and three NFAT kinases, casein kinase 1, glycogen synthase kinase 3, and dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase. Combined knockdown of NRON and IQGAP1 increased NFAT dephosphorylation and nuclear import exclusively after stimulation, without affecting the rate of NFAT rephosphorylation and nuclear export; and both NRON-depleted T cells and T cells from IQGAP1-deficient mice showed increased production of NFAT-dependent cytokines. Our results provide evidence that a complex of lincRNA and protein forms a scaffold for a latent transcription factor and its regulatory kinases, and support an emerging consensus that lincRNAs that bind transcriptional regulators have a similar scaffold function.

  18. Dephosphorylation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factor is regulated by an RNA-protein scaffold complex

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sonia; Findlay, Gregory M.; Bandukwala, Hozefa S.; Oberdoerffer, Shalini; Baust, Beate; Li, Zhigang; Schmidt, Valentina; Hogan, Patrick G.; Sacks, David B.; Rao, Anjana

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) proteins are Ca2+-regulated transcription factors that control gene expression in many cell types. NFAT proteins are heavily phosphorylated and reside in the cytoplasm of resting cells; when cells are stimulated by a rise in intracellular Ca2+, NFAT proteins are dephosphorylated by the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin and translocate to the nucleus to activate target gene expression. Here we show that phosphorylated NFAT1 is present in a large cytoplasmic RNA-protein scaffold complex that contains a long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA), NRON [noncoding (RNA) repressor of NFAT]; a scaffold protein, IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein (IQGAP); and three NFAT kinases, casein kinase 1, glycogen synthase kinase 3, and dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase. Combined knockdown of NRON and IQGAP1 increased NFAT dephosphorylation and nuclear import exclusively after stimulation, without affecting the rate of NFAT rephosphorylation and nuclear export; and both NRON-depleted T cells and T cells from IQGAP1-deficient mice showed increased production of NFAT-dependent cytokines. Our results provide evidence that a complex of lincRNA and protein forms a scaffold for a latent transcription factor and its regulatory kinases, and support an emerging consensus that lincRNAs that bind transcriptional regulators have a similar scaffold function. PMID:21709260

  19. Transcription of the Tollip gene is elevated in intestinal epithelial cells through impaired O-GlcNAcylation-dependent nuclear translocation of the negative regulator Elf-1

    SciTech Connect

    Sugi, Yutaka; Takahashi, Kyoko; Nakano, Kou; Hosono, Akira; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Transcriptional activation of the Tollitip gene is higher in IECs than in monocytes. {yields} Nt -194/-186 region acts as a cis-element and is recognized by Elf-1. {yields} Elf-1 suppresses Tollip gene transcription in monocytes but not in IECs. {yields} O-GlcNAc modification is necessary for nuclear translocation of Elf-1. {yields} O-GlcNAcylation-dependent nuclear translocation of Elf-1 is impaired in IECs. -- Abstract: Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) must be tolerant of the large number of commensal bacteria inhabiting the intestinal tract to avoid excessive inflammatory reactions. Toll-interacting protein (Tollip), a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor signaling, is known to be expressed at high levels in IECs, and to thereby contribute to the hyporesponsiveness of IECs to commensals. In this study, we analyzed the underlying mechanisms for elevated transcription of the Tollip gene in IECs using a human IEC line, Caco-2, and a human monocyte line, THP-1, as a control. Elf-1 was identified as a transcription factor that negatively regulates Tollip gene expression. The transcription factor Elf-1 was localized in the nucleus by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification, whereas the unmodified form was detected only in the cytoplasm. Comparison of Caco-2 and THP-1 cells revealed that O-GlcNAc modification of Elf-1 was significantly lower in IECs than in monocytes. Collectively, the results indicate that insufficient O-GlcNAc modification prevents Elf-1-mediated transcriptional repression and thereby upregulates Tollip gene expression in IECs.

  20. Isolation of a Novel Family of C2H2 Zinc Finger Proteins Implicated in Transcriptional Repression Mediated by Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter Transcription Factor (COUP-TF) Orphan Nuclear Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Avram, Dorina; Fields, Andrew; Top, Karen Pretty On; Nevrivy, Daniel J.; Ishmael, Jane E.; Leid, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Two novel and related C2H2 zinc finger proteins that are highly expressed in the brain, CTIP1 and CTIP2 (COUP TF-interacting proteins 1 and 2, respectively), were isolated and shown to interact with all members of the chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF) subfamily of orphan nuclear receptors. The interaction of CTIP1 with ARP1 was studied in detail, and CTIP1 was found to harbor two independent ARP1 interaction domains, ID1 and ID2, whereas the putative AF-2 of ARP1 was required for interaction with CTIP1. CTIP1, which exhibited a punctate staining pattern within the nucleus of transfected cells, recruited cotransfected ARP1 to these foci and potentiated ARP1-mediated transcriptional repression of a reporter construct. However, transcriptional repression mediated by ARP1 acting through CTIP1 did not appear to involve recruitment of a trichostatin A-sensitive histone deacetylase(s) to the template, suggesting that this repression pathway may be distinct from that utilized by several other nuclear receptors. PMID:10744719

  1. Cotranscriptional recruitment of the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein Pab2 to nascent transcripts and association with translating mRNPs.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Caroline; Bachand, François

    2009-06-01

    Synthesis of the pre-mRNA poly(A) tail in the nucleus has important consequences on the translational activity of the mature mRNA in the cytoplasm. In most eukaryotes, nuclear polyadenylation of pre-mRNAs is thought to require the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein (PABP2/PABPN1) for poly(A) tail synthesis and ultimate length control. As yet, however, the extent of the association between PABP2 and the exported mRNA remains poorly understood. Here, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to show that the fission yeast ortholog of mammalian PABP2 (Pab2) is cotranscriptionally recruited to active genes. Notably, the association of Pab2 to genes precedes that of a typical 3'-processing/polyadenylation factor, suggesting that Pab2 recruitment during the transcription cycle precedes polyadenylation. The inclusion of an RNase step in our ChIP and immunoprecipitation assays suggests that Pab2 is cotranscriptionally recruited via nascent mRNA ribonucleoprotein (mRNPs). Tandem affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry also revealed that Pab2 associates with several ribosomal proteins as well as general translation factors. Importantly, whereas previous results suggest that the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein is not present on cytoplasmic mRNAs, we show that fission yeast Pab2 is associated with polysomes. Our findings suggest that Pab2 is recruited to nascent mRNPs during transcription and remains associated with translated mRNPs after nuclear export.

  2. Identification of Novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins with Nuclear Export Activity: Cell Cycle-Regulated Transcription Factor Ace2p Shows Cell Cycle-Independent Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Torben Heick; Neville, Megan; Rain, Jean Christophe; McCarthy, Terri; Legrain, Pierre; Rosbash, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear export of proteins containing leucine-rich nuclear export signals (NESs) is mediated by the NES receptor CRM1/Crm1p. We have carried out a yeast two-hybrid screen with Crm1p as a bait. The Crm1p-interacting clones were subscreened for nuclear export activity in a visual assay utilizing the Crm1p-inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB). This approach identified three Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins not previously known to have nuclear export activity. These proteins are the 5′ RNA triphosphatase Ctl1p, the cell cycle-regulated transcription factor Ace2p, and a protein encoded by the previously uncharacterized open reading frame YDR499W. Mutagenesis analysis show that YDR499Wp contains an NES that conforms to the consensus sequence for leucine-rich NESs. Mutagenesis of Ctl1p and Ace2p were unable to identify specific NES residues. However, a 29-amino-acid region of Ace2p, rich in hydrophobic residues, contains nuclear export activity. Ace2p accumulates in the nucleus at the end of mitosis and activates early-G1-specific genes. We now provide evidence that Ace2p is nuclear not only in late M-early G1 but also during other stages of the cell cycle. This feature of Ace2p localization explains its ability to activate genes such as CUP1, which are not expressed in a cell cycle-dependent manner. PMID:11027275

  3. The mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (mtFASII) pathway is capable of mediating nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk through the PPAR system of transcriptional activation

    SciTech Connect

    Parl, Angelika; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Clay, Hayley B.; Reiss, Sara; Li, Zhen; Murdock, Deborah G.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •The function of the mitochondria fatty acid synthesis pathway is partially unknown. •Overexpression of the pathway causes transcriptional activation through PPARs. •Knock down of the pathway attenuates that activation. •The last enzyme in the pathway regulates its own transcription. •Products of the mtFASII pathway are able to drive nuclear transcription. -- Abstract: Mammalian cells contain two fatty acid synthesis pathways, the cytosolic FASI pathway, and the mitochondrial FASII pathway. The selection behind the conservation of the mitochondrial pathway is not completely understood, given the presence of the cytosolic FAS pathway. In this study, we show through heterologous gene reporter systems and PCR-based arrays that overexpression of MECR, the last step in the mtFASII pathway, causes modulation of gene expression through the PPAR pathway. Electromobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrate that overexpression of MECR causes increased binding of PPARs to DNA, while cell fractionation and imaging studies show that MECR remains localized to the mitochondria. Interestingly, knock down of the mtFASII pathway lessens the effect of MECR on this transcriptional modulation. Our data are most consistent with MECR-mediated transcriptional activation through products of the mtFASII pathway, although we cannot rule out MECR acting as a coactivator. Further investigation into the physiological relevance of this communication will be necessary to better understand some of the phenotypic consequences of deficits in this pathway observed in animal models and human disease.

  4. Interaction of Heat Shock Protein Cpn10 with the Cyclin E/Cdk2 Substrate Nuclear Protein Ataxia-Telangiectasia (NPAT) Is Involved in Regulating Histone Transcription.

    PubMed

    Ling Zheng, Li; Wang, Fei Ya; Cong, Xiao Xia; Shen, Yue; Rao, Xi Sheng; Huang, Dao Sheng; Fan, Wei; Yi, Peng; Wang, Xin Bao; Zheng, Lei; Zhou, Yi Ting; Luo, Yan

    2015-12-04

    Precise modulation of histone gene transcription is critical for cell cycle progression. As a direct substrate of Cyclin E/CDK2, nuclear protein ataxia-telangiectasia (NPAT) is a crucial factor in regulating histone transcription and cell cycle progression. Here we identified that Cpn10/HSPE, a 10-kDa heat shock protein, is a novel interacting partner of NPAT. A pool of Cpn10 is colocalized with NPAT foci during G1 and S phases in nuclei. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments unraveled an essential role of Cpn10 in histone transcription. A conserved DLFD motif within Cpn10 was critical for targeting NPAT and modulating histone transcription. More importantly, knockdown of Cpn10 disrupted the focus formation of both NPAT and FADD-like interleukin-1β-converting enzyme-associated huge protein without affecting Coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Finally, Cpn10 is important for S phase progression and cell proliferation. Taken together, our finding revealed a novel role of Cpn10 in the spatial regulation of NPAT signaling and disclosed a previously unappreciated link between the heat shock protein and histone transcription regulation.

  5. Heat shock factor 1 upregulates transcription of Epstein-Barr Virus nuclear antigen 1 by binding to a heat shock element within the BamHI-Q promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng-Wei; Wu, Xian-Rui; Liu, Wen-Ju; Liao, Yi-Ji; Lin, Sheng; Zong, Yong-Sheng; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Mai, Shi-Juan; Xie, Dan

    2011-12-20

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for maintenance of the episome and establishment of latency. In this study, we observed that heat treatment effectively induced EBNA1 transcription in EBV-transformed B95-8 and human LCL cell lines. Although Cp is considered as the sole promoter used for the expression of EBNA1 transcripts in the lymphoblastoid cell lines, the RT-PCR results showed that the EBNA1 transcripts induced by heat treatment arise from Qp-initiated transcripts. Using bioinformatics, a high affinity and functional heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-binding element within the - 17/+4 oligonucleotide of the Qp was found, and was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Moreover, heat shock and exogenous HSF1 expression induced Qp activity in reporter assays. Further, RNA interference-mediated HSF1 gene silencing attenuated heat-induced EBNA1 expression in B95-8 cells. These results provide evidence that EBNA1 is a new target for the transcription factor HSF1.

  6. Interaction of Heat Shock Protein Cpn10 with the Cyclin E/Cdk2 Substrate Nuclear Protein Ataxia-Telangiectasia (NPAT) Is Involved in Regulating Histone Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Ling Zheng, Li; Wang, Fei Ya; Cong, Xiao Xia; Shen, Yue; Rao, Xi Sheng; Huang, Dao Sheng; Fan, Wei; Yi, Peng; Wang, Xin Bao; Zheng, Lei; Zhou, Yi Ting; Luo, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Precise modulation of histone gene transcription is critical for cell cycle progression. As a direct substrate of Cyclin E/CDK2, nuclear protein ataxia-telangiectasia (NPAT) is a crucial factor in regulating histone transcription and cell cycle progression. Here we identified that Cpn10/HSPE, a 10-kDa heat shock protein, is a novel interacting partner of NPAT. A pool of Cpn10 is colocalized with NPAT foci during G1 and S phases in nuclei. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments unraveled an essential role of Cpn10 in histone transcription. A conserved DLFD motif within Cpn10 was critical for targeting NPAT and modulating histone transcription. More importantly, knockdown of Cpn10 disrupted the focus formation of both NPAT and FADD-like interleukin-1β-converting enzyme-associated huge protein without affecting Coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Finally, Cpn10 is important for S phase progression and cell proliferation. Taken together, our finding revealed a novel role of Cpn10 in the spatial regulation of NPAT signaling and disclosed a previously unappreciated link between the heat shock protein and histone transcription regulation. PMID:26429916

  7. Src subfamily kinases regulate nuclear export and degradation of transcription factor Nrf2 to switch off Nrf2-mediated antioxidant activation of cytoprotective gene expression.

    PubMed

    Niture, Suryakant K; Jain, Abhinav K; Shelton, Phillip M; Jaiswal, Anil K

    2011-08-19

    Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is a nuclear transcription factor that in response to chemical and radiation stress regulates coordinated induction of a battery of cytoprotective gene expressions leading to cellular protection. In this study, we investigated the role of Src kinases in the regulation of Nrf2 and downstream signaling. siRNA-mediated inhibition of Fyn, Src, Yes, and Fgr, but not Lyn, in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 cells, led to nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and up-regulation of Nrf2 downstream gene expression. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts with combined deficiency of Fyn/Src/Yes/Fgr supported results from siRNA. In addition, steady-state overexpression of Fyn, Src, and Yes phosphorylated Nrf2Tyr568 that triggered nuclear export and degradation of Nrf2 and down-regulation of Nrf2 downstream gene expression. Exposure of cells to antioxidant, oxidant, or UV radiation increased nuclear import of Fyn, Src, and Yes kinases, which phosphorylated Nrf2Tyr568 resulting in nuclear export and degradation of Nrf2. Further analysis revealed that stress-activated GSK3β acted upstream to the Src kinases and phosphorylated the Src kinases, leading to their nuclear localization and Nrf2 phosphorylation. The overexpression of Src kinases in Hepa-1 cells led to decreased Nrf2, increased apoptosis, and decreased cell survival. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in Src kinases showed nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, induction of Nrf2 and downstream gene expression, reduced apoptosis, and increased cell survival. The studies together demonstrate that Src kinases play a critical role in nuclear export and degradation of Nrf2, thereby providing a negative feedback mechanism to switch off Nrf2 activation and restore normal cellular homeostasis.

  8. Nuclear cathepsin D enhances TRPS1 transcriptional repressor function to regulate cell cycle progression and transformation in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bach, Anne-Sophie; Derocq, Danielle; Laurent-Matha, Valérie; Montcourrier, Philippe; Sebti, Salwa; Orsetti, Béatrice; Theillet, Charles; Gongora, Céline; Pattingre, Sophie; Ibing, Eva; Roger, Pascal; Linares, Laetitia K; Reinheckel, Thomas; Meurice, Guillaume; Kaiser, Frank J; Gespach, Christian; Liaudet-Coopman, Emmanuelle

    2015-09-29

    The lysosomal protease cathepsin D (Cath-D) is overproduced in breast cancer cells (BCC) and supports tumor growth and metastasis formation. Here, we describe the mechanism whereby Cath-D is accumulated in the nucleus of ERα-positive (ER+) BCC. We identified TRPS1 (tricho-rhino-phalangeal-syndrome 1), a repressor of GATA-mediated transcription, and BAT3 (Scythe/BAG6), a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling chaperone protein, as new Cath-D-interacting nuclear proteins. Cath-D binds to BAT3 in ER+ BCC and they partially co-localize at the surface of lysosomes and in the nucleus. BAT3 silencing inhibits Cath-D accumulation in the nucleus, indicating that Cath-D nuclear targeting is controlled by BAT3. Fully mature Cath-D also binds to full-length TRPS1 and they co-localize in the nucleus of ER+ BCC where they are associated with chromatin. Using the LexA-VP16 fusion co-activator reporter assay, we then show that Cath-D acts as a transcriptional repressor, independently of its catalytic activity. Moreover, microarray analysis of BCC in which Cath-D and/or TRPS1 expression were silenced indicated that Cath-D enhances TRPS1-mediated repression of several TRPS1-regulated genes implicated in carcinogenesis, including PTHrP, a canonical TRPS1 gene target. In addition, co-silencing of TRPS1 and Cath-D in BCC affects the transcription of cell cycle, proliferation and transformation genes, and impairs cell cycle progression and soft agar colony formation. These findings indicate that Cath-D acts as a nuclear transcriptional cofactor of TRPS1 to regulate ER+ BCC proliferation and transformation in a non-proteolytic manner.

  9. Nuclear Localization of the Autism Candidate Gene Neurobeachin and Functional Interaction with the NOTCH1 Intracellular Domain Indicate a Role in Regulating Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tuand, Krizia; Stijnen, Pieter; Volders, Karolien; Declercq, Jeroen; Nuytens, Kim; Meulemans, Sandra; Creemers, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurobeachin (NBEA) is an autism spectrum disorders (ASD) candidate gene. NBEA deficiency affects regulated secretion, receptor trafficking, synaptic architecture and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation. NBEA is a large multidomain scaffolding protein. From N- to C-terminus, NBEA has a concanavalin A-like lectin domain flanked by armadillo repeats (ACA), an A-kinase anchoring protein domain that can bind to PKA, a domain of unknown function (DUF1088) and a BEACH domain, preceded by a pleckstrin homology-like domain and followed by WD40 repeats (PBW). Although most of these domains mediate protein-protein interactions, no interaction screen has yet been performed. Methods Yeast two-hybrid screens with the ACA and PBW domain modules of NBEA gave a list of interaction partners, which were analyzed for Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment. Neuro-2a cells were used for confocal microscopy and nuclear extraction analysis. NOTCH-mediated transcription was studied with luciferase reporter assays and qRT-PCR, combined with NBEA knockdown or overexpression. Results Both domain modules showed a GO enrichment for the nucleus. PBW almost exclusively interacted with transcription regulators, while ACA interacted with a number of PKA substrates. NBEA was partially localized in the nucleus of Neuro-2a cells, albeit much less than in the cytoplasm. A nuclear localization signal was found in the DUF1088 domain, which was shown to contribute to the nuclear localization of an EGFP-DPBW fusion protein. Yeast two-hybrid identified the Notch1 intracellular domain as a physical interactor of the PBW domain and a role for NBEA as a negative regulator in Notch-mediated transcription was demonstrated. Conclusion Defining novel interaction partners of conserved NBEA domain modules identified a role for NBEA as transcriptional regulator in the nucleus. The physical interaction of NBEA with NOTCH1 is most relevant for ASD pathogenesis because NOTCH signaling is essential for

  10. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT.

  11. Aerobic Exercise Suppresses Atherosclerosis Through Adiponectin-Nuclear Transcription Factor κB Pathway in Apolipoprotein E-deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weidong; Wang, Haiying; Jiao, Guangfa; Yue, Jingjing; Wang, Guowei

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the therapeutic effect of aerobic exercise on atherosclerosis (AS) in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice and the adiponectin (ApN)-nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB) pathway involved in the related anti-inflammation. ApoE-deficient mice with AS (AS+C), and ApoE-deficient mice with AS and aerobic exercise (AS+E) were investigated for body weight and visceral fat. Pathomorphology of the aortic vascular wall was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated with hematoxylin-eosin staining. The ApN messenger RNA level in adipose tissue and ApN level in plasma were determined. The aortic adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) and NF-κB levels were determined with western blot. There was no significant difference in body weight between the AS+C and the AS+E groups, but visceral fat in the AS+E group was significantly smaller than that in the AS+C group. Aortic vascular wall fiber board in the AS+C group broke, but this aortic disease in the AS+E group was obviously alleviated. The AS+E group showed a smaller neointimal hyperplasia and plaque area compared with AS+C group. After a high-fat diet, the ApN levels in both adipose tissue and plasma were decreased in the AS+C group and returned to a relative high level in the AS+E group. The expression of AdipoR1 protein in the AS+C group was significantly lower than those in the AS+E group. As for NF-κB protein, its enhanced expression in the AS+C group was reversed to a relatively low level in the AS+E group. Aerobic exercise suppressed AS through the ApN-NF-κB pathway in ApoE-deficient mice. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Chromium histidinate protects against heat stress by modulating the expression of hepatic nuclear transcription factors in quail.

    PubMed

    Orhan, C; Akdemir, F; Sahin, N; Tuzcu, M; Komorowski, J R; Hayirli, A; Sahin, K

    2012-01-01

    1. This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of supplemental chromium histidinate (CrHis) on performance and expressions of hepatic nuclear factors kappaB, an enhancer (NF-κB) and an inhibitor (IκBα) of activated B cells in heat-stressed Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica). 2. A total of 180, 10-d-old Japanese quail were allocated randomly into 6 groups in a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement. Birds were reared either at 22°C for 24 h/d (thermoneutral, TN) or 34°C for 8 h/d (heat stress, HS) for 32 d and fed on one of three diets supplemented with 0, 400 or 800 µg of CrHis per kg of diet. Each group consisted of 10 cages, each containing three quail. Data (performance variables and hepatic NF-κB and IκBα) were analysed using 2-way ANOVA. 3. Heat stress caused reductions in cumulative feed intake (FI) by 5·7%, weight gain (WG) by 13·0%, final body weight (FBW) by 10·3%, carcase weight by 12·6% and carcase efficiency by 2·3% and an increase in feed conversion ratio (FCR, feed consumed, g:weight gained, g) by 8·4%. As supplemental CrHis level increased up to 800 µg/kg, there were linear increases in cumulative FI (from 602 to 609 g), WG (from 134 to 138 g), FBW (from 167 to 171 g), cold carcase weight (from 110 to 114 g) and cold carcase efficiency (from 65·5 to 66·4%) and a decrease in FE (from 4·51 to 4·42). The environmental temperature by CrHis level interaction effect on performance parameters was insignificant. Hepatic NF-κB p65 concentration was higher and hepatic IκBα concentration was lower in quail exposed to HS than in quail kept at TN temperature. Increasing supplemental CrHis level linearly inhibited hepatic NF-κB p65 expression from 134·4 to 105·3% and linearly enhanced hepatic IκBα expression from 73·4 to 99·6%. The decrease in hepatic NF-κB expression and the increase in hepatic IκB expression were more notable in the TN environment than in the HS environment. 4. In conclusion, heat

  13. Phosphorylation of Nrf2 in the transcription activation domain by casein kinase 2 (CK2) is critical for the nuclear translocation and transcription activation function of Nrf2 in IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Apopa, Patrick L; He, Xiaoqing; Ma, Qiang

    2008-02-01

    The antioxidant-activated transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates the induction of cytoprotective genes against chemical toxicity and oxidative injuries. The role of phosphorylation in Nrf2 activation has been suggested but remains elusive. We report that phenolic antioxidant/pro-oxidant tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) induced two forms of the Nrf2 protein in neuroblastoma cells (IMR-32), which migrated as distinctive bands on SDS-PAGE. In vitro treatment with lambda phosphatase eliminated the slower migrating form and increased the amount of the faster migrating form of Nrf2. In vivo (32)Pi-phosphorylation resulted in (32)Pi-labeling of the Nrf2 protein in the presence of tBHQ that can be dephosphorylated by lambda phosphotase, indicating that the slower migrating form is a phosphorylated Nrf2 protein and the faster form an unphosphorylated Nrf2. Unphosphorylated Nrf2 predominated in the cytoplasm, whereas the phosphorylated form preferentially localized in the nucleus. Nuclear Nrf2 can be dephosphorylated by lambda phosphotase in vitro and be converted to the faster migrating form, implicating phosphorylation of Nrf2 in the cytoplasmic-nuclear translocation of the protein. Deletional analyses from both the carboxyl- and amino-ends revealed the transcription activation (TA) domains Neh4 (Nrf2-ECH homology 4) and Neh5 (Nrf2-ECH homology 5) as a major region necessary for the phosphorylation. The TA domains are characterized by the presence of multiple phosphorylation sites of casein kinase 2 (CK2). Moreover, CK2 phosphorylated the TA domains in vitro. Treatment with CK2 inhibitor 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7,-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (DMAT) blocked the induction of endogenous target genes of Nrf2 in cells and inhibited the TA activities of both the full length and the TA domains of Nrf2 to a large extent. Finally, phosphorylation of the TA domains correlated with the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 that was inhibited by DMAT in a

  14. A Conserved Nuclear Cyclophilin Is Required for Both RNA Polymerase II Elongation and Co-transcriptional Splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jeong H.; Rechsteiner, Andreas; Strome, Susan; Kelly, William G.

    2016-01-01

    The elongation phase of transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) involves numerous events that are tightly coordinated, including RNA processing, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. RNA splicing factors are associated with elongating Pol II, and the interdependent coupling of splicing and elongation has been documented in several systems. Here we identify a conserved, multi-domain cyclophilin family member, SIG-7, as an essential factor for both normal transcription elongation and co-transcriptional splicing. In embryos depleted for SIG-7, RNA levels for over a thousand zygotically expressed genes are substantially reduced, Pol II becomes significantly reduced at the 3’ end of genes, marks of transcription elongation are reduced, and unspliced mRNAs accumulate. Our findings suggest that SIG-7 plays a central role in both Pol II elongation and co-transcriptional splicing and may provide an important link for their coordination and regulation. PMID:27541139

  15. Rho-kinase signaling controls nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of class IIa Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) and transcriptional activation of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1

    SciTech Connect

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Barresi, Sabina; Petrini, Stefania; Bertini, Enrico; Zanni, Ginevra

    2015-04-03

    Rho-kinase (ROCK) has been well documented to play a key role in RhoA-induced actin remodeling. ROCK activation results in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation either by direct action on MLC kinase (MLCK) or by inhibition of MLC phosphatase (MLCP), modulating actin–myosin contraction. We found that inhibition of the ROCK pathway in induced pluripotent stem cells, leads to nuclear export of HDAC7 and transcriptional activation of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 while in cells with constitutive ROCK hyperactivity due to loss of function of the RhoGTPase activating protein Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1), the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 is downregulated. Our study identify a new target of ROCK signaling via myosin phosphatase subunit (MYPT1) and Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) at the nuclear level and provide new insights in the cellular functions of ROCK. - Highlights: • ROCK regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC7 via phosphorylation of MYPT1. • Nuclear export of HDAC7 and upregulation of NR4A1 occurs with low ROCK activity. • High levels of ROCK activity due to OPHN1 loss of function downregulate NR4A1.

  16. Nuclear receptor Rev-erb alpha (Nr1d1) functions in concert with Nr2e3 to regulate transcriptional networks in the retina.

    PubMed

    Mollema, Nissa J; Yuan, Yang; Jelcick, Austin S; Sachs, Andrew J; von Alpen, Désirée; Schorderet, Daniel; Escher, Pascal; Haider, Neena B

    2011-03-08

    The majority of diseases in the retina are caused by genetic mutations affecting the development and function of photoreceptor cells. The transcriptional networks directing these processes are regulated by genes such as nuclear hormone receptors. The nuclear hormone receptor gene Rev-erb alpha/Nr1d1 has been widely studied for its role in the circadian cycle and cell metabolism, however its role in the retina is unknown. In order to understand the role of Rev-erb alpha/Nr1d1 in the retina, we evaluated the effects of loss of Nr1d1 to the developing retina and its co-regulation with the photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor gene Nr2e3 in the developing and mature retina. Knock-down of Nr1d1 expression in the developing retina results in pan-retinal spotting and reduced retinal function by electroretinogram. Our studies show that NR1D1 protein is co-expressed with NR2E3 in the outer neuroblastic layer of the developing mouse retina. In the adult retina, NR1D1 is expressed in the ganglion cell layer and is co-expressed with NR2E3 in the outer nuclear layer, within rods and cones. Several genes co-targeted by NR2E3 and NR1D1 were identified that include: Nr2c1, Recoverin, Rgr, Rarres2, Pde8a, and Nupr1. We examined the cyclic expression of Nr1d1 and Nr2e3 over a twenty-four hour period and observed that both nuclear receptors cycle in a similar manner. Taken together, these studies reveal a novel role for Nr1d1, in conjunction with its cofactor Nr2e3, in regulating transcriptional networks critical for photoreceptor development and function.

  17. Nuclear import of the transcription factor SHOOT MERISTEMLESS depends on heterodimerization with BLH proteins expressed in discrete sub-domains of the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Cole, Melanie; Nolte, Carolin; Werr, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The gene SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM) is required for the initiation and the maintenance of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) in Arabidopsis and encodes a MEINOX/three amino acid loop extension (TALE)-HD-type transcription factor. Translational fusions with the green fluorescent protein showed that STM is not nuclear by default. In a yeast two-hybrid screen performed with a meristem-enriched cDNA library, three interacting BLH (Bel1-like homeodomain) transcription factors were identified. According to bimolecular fluorescence complementation, STM is targeted into the nuclear compartment through heterodimerization with BLH partner proteins, which are expressed in distinct SAM domains from the center to the periphery. On a functional level, overexpression experiments in transgenic Arabidopsis plants suggest that individual heterodimers provide distinct contributions. These results contribute to our understanding of the STM transcription factor function in the SAM and also shed new light on the evolution of the TALE-HD super gene family in animal and plant lineages.

  18. Transcriptional Activity and Nuclear Localization of Cabut, the Drosophila Ortholog of Vertebrate TGF-β-Inducible Early-Response Gene (TIEG) Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Belacortu, Yaiza; Weiss, Ron; Kadener, Sebastian; Paricio, Nuria

    2012-01-01

    Background Cabut (Cbt) is a C2H2-class zinc finger transcription factor involved in embryonic dorsal closure, epithelial regeneration and other developmental processes in Drosophila melanogaster. Cbt orthologs have been identified in other Drosophila species and insects as well as in vertebrates. Indeed, Cbt is the Drosophila ortholog of the group of vertebrate proteins encoded by the TGF-ß-inducible early-response genes (TIEGs), which belong to Sp1-like/Krüppel-like family of transcription factors. Several functional domains involved in transcriptional control and subcellular localization have been identified in the vertebrate TIEGs. However, little is known of whether these domains and functions are also conserved in the Cbt protein. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the transcriptional regulatory activity of the Drosophila Cbt protein, we performed Gal4-based luciferase assays in S2 cells and showed that Cbt is a transcriptional repressor and able to regulate its own expression. Truncated forms of Cbt were then generated to identify its functional domains. This analysis revealed a sequence similar to the mSin3A-interacting repressor domain found in vertebrate TIEGs, although located in a different part of the Cbt protein. Using β-Galactosidase and eGFP fusion proteins, we also showed that Cbt contains the bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) previously identified in TIEG proteins, although it is non-functional in insect cells. Instead, a monopartite NLS, located at the amino terminus of the protein and conserved across insects, is functional in Drosophila S2 and Spodoptera exigua Sec301 cells. Last but not least, genetic interaction and immunohistochemical assays suggested that Cbt nuclear import is mediated by Importin-α2. Conclusions/Significance Our results constitute the first characterization of the molecular mechanisms of Cbt-mediated transcriptional control as well as of Cbt nuclear import, and demonstrate the existence of

  19. Critical role of charged residues in helix 7 of the ligand binding domain in Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α dimerisation and transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Oxombre, Bénédicte; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe; Laine, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α (HNF4α, NR2A1) is central to hepatocyte and pancreatic β-cell functions. Along with retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), HNF4α belongs to the nuclear receptor subfamily 2 (NR2), characterised by a conserved arginyl residue and a glutamate residue insert in helix 7 (H7) of the ligand binding domain (LBD). Crystallographic studies indicate that R348 and E352 residues in RXRα H7 are involved in charge-driven interactions that improve dimerisation. Consistent with these findings, we showed that removing the charge of the corresponding residues in HNF4α H7, R258 and E262, impaired dimerisation in solution. Moreover, our results provide a new concept according to which helices of the HNF4α LBD dimerisation interface contribute differently to dimerisation required for DNA binding; unlike H9 and H10, H7 is not involved in DNA binding. Substitutions of E262 decreased the repression of HNF4α transcriptional activity by a dominant-negative HNF4α mutant, highlighting the importance of this residue for dimerisation in the cell context. The E262 insert is crucial for HNF4α function since its deletion abolished HNF4α transcriptional activity and coactivator recruitment. The glutamate residue insert and the conserved arginyl residue in H7 most probably represent a signature of the NR2 subfamily of nuclear receptors. PMID:14602925

  20. Critical role of charged residues in helix 7 of the ligand binding domain in Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4alpha dimerisation and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Oxombre, Bénédicte; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe; Laine, Bernard

    2003-11-15

    Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha, NR2A1) is central to hepatocyte and pancreatic beta-cell functions. Along with retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha), HNF4alpha belongs to the nuclear receptor subfamily 2 (NR2), characterised by a conserved arginyl residue and a glutamate residue insert in helix 7 (H7) of the ligand binding domain (LBD). Crystallographic studies indicate that R348 and E352 residues in RXRalpha H7 are involved in charge-driven interactions that improve dimerisation. Consistent with these findings, we showed that removing the charge of the corresponding residues in HNF4alpha H7, R258 and E262, impaired dimerisation in solution. Moreover, our results provide a new concept according to which helices of the HNF4alpha LBD dimerisation interface contribute differently to dimerisation required for DNA binding; unlike H9 and H10, H7 is not involved in DNA binding. Substitutions of E262 decreased the repression of HNF4alpha transcriptional activity by a dominant-negative HNF4alpha mutant, highlighting the importance of this residue for dimerisation in the cell context. The E262 insert is crucial for HNF4alpha function since its deletion abolished HNF4alpha transcriptional activity and coactivator recruitment. The glutamate residue insert and the conserved arginyl residue in H7 most probably represent a signature of the NR2 subfamily of nuclear receptors.

  1. Altered RNA processing and export lead to retention of mRNAs near transcription sites and nuclear pore complexes or within the nucleolus

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Biplab; Montpetit, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Many protein factors are required for mRNA biogenesis and nuclear export, which are central to the eukaryotic gene expression program. It is unclear, however, whether all factors have been identified. Here we report on a screen of >1000 essential gene mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for defects in mRNA processing and export, identifying 26 mutants with defects in this process. Single-molecule FISH data showed that the majority of these mutants accumulated mRNA within specific regions of the nucleus, which included 1) mRNAs within the nucleolus when nucleocytoplasmic transport, rRNA biogenesis, or RNA processing and surveillance was disrupted, 2) the buildup of mRNAs near transcription sites in 3′-end processing and chromosome segregation mutants, and 3) transcripts being enriched near nuclear pore complexes when components of the mRNA export machinery were mutated. These data show that alterations to various nuclear processes lead to the retention of mRNAs at discrete locations within the nucleus. PMID:27385342

  2. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta; Delogu, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Giampiero; Farace, Cristiano; Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Madeddu, Roberto; Olivero, Martina; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. - highlights: • CSE1L is a key player in nucleocytoplasmic traffic by forming complex with Ran. • AKT phosphorylates RanBP3 that regulates the nucleocytoplasmic gradient of Ran. • The activated oncogenic AKT drives the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L. • CSE1L in the nucleus up-regulates genes conveying pro-oncogenic signals. • CSE1L might contribute to tumor progression driven by the activated oncogenic AKT.

  3. Nuclear respiratory factor 2 induces the expression of many but not all human proteins acting in mitochondrial DNA transcription and replication.

    PubMed

    Bruni, Francesco; Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Cantatore, Palmiro; Roberti, Marina

    2010-02-05

    In mammals, NRF-2 (nuclear respiratory factor 2), also named GA-binding protein, is an Ets family transcription factor that controls many genes involved in cell cycle progression and protein synthesis as well as in mitochondrial biogenesis. In this paper, we analyzed the role of NRF-2 in the regulation of human genes involved in mitochondrial DNA transcription and replication. By a combination of bioinformatic and biochemical approaches, we found that the factor binds in vitro and in vivo to the proximal promoter region of the genes coding for the transcription termination factor mTERF, the RNA polymerase POLRMT, the B subunit of the DNA polymerase-gamma, the DNA helicase TWINKLE, and the single-stranded DNA-binding protein mtSSB. The role of NRF-2 in modulating the expression of those genes was further established by RNA interference and overexpression strategies. On the contrary, we found that NRF-2 does not control the genes for the subunit A of DNA polymerase-gamma and for the transcription repressor MTERF3; we suggest that these genes are under regulatory mechanisms that do not involve NRF proteins. Since NRFs are known to positively control the expression of transcription-activating proteins, the novelty emerging from our data is that proteins playing antithetical roles in mitochondrial DNA transcription, namely activators and repressors, are under different regulatory pathways. Finally, we developed a more stringent consensus with respect to the general consensus of NRF-2/GA-binding protein when searching for NRF-2 binding sites in the promoter of mitochondrial proteins.

  4. Transcript variations, phylogenetic tree and chromosomal localization of porcine aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) genes.

    PubMed

    Sadowska, Agnieszka; Paukszto, Lukasz; Nynca, Anna; Szczerbal, Izabela; Orlowska, Karina; Swigonska, Sylwia; Ruszkowska, Monika; Molcan, Tomasz; Jastrzebski, Jan P; Panasiewicz, Grzegorz; Ciereszko, Renata E

    2017-03-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor best known for mediating xenobiotic-induced toxicity. AhR requires aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) to form an active transcription complex and promote the activation of genes which have dioxin responsive element in their regulatory regions. The present study was performed to determine the complete cDNA sequences of porcine AhR and ARNT genes and their chromosomal localization. Total RNA from porcine livers were used to obtain the sequence of the entire porcine transcriptome by next-generation sequencing (NGS; lllumina HiSeq2500). In addition, both, in silico analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to determine chromosomal localization of porcine AhR and ARNT genes. In silico analysis of nucleotide sequences showed that there were two transcript variants of AhR and ARNT genes in the pig. In addition, computer analysis revealed that AhR gene in the pig is located on chromosome 9 and ARNT on chromosome 4. The results of FISH experiment confirmed the localization of porcine AhR and ARNT genes. In the present study, for the first time, the full cDNAs of AhR and ARNT were demonstrated in the pig. In future, it would be interesting to determine the tissue distribution of AhR and ARNT transcript variants in the pig and to test whether these variants are associated with different biological functions and/or different activation pathways.

  5. Tamoxifen increases nuclear respiratory factor 1 transcription by activating estrogen receptor beta and AP-1 recruitment to adjacent promoter binding sites.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Margarita M; Luken, Kristen H; Zimmer, Amber S; Lenzo, Felicia L; Smith, Ryan J; Arteel, Maia W; Kollenberg, Tara J; Mattingly, Kathleen A; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2011-04-01

    Little is known about endogenous estrogen receptor β (ERβ) gene targets in human breast cancer. We reported that estradiol (E(2)) induces nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcription through ERα in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Here we report that 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT), with an EC(50) of ~1.7 nM, increases NRF-1 expression by recruiting ERβ, cJun, cFos, CBP, and RNA polymerase II to and dismissing NCoR from the NRF1 promoter. Promoter deletion and transient transfection studies showed that the estrogen response element (ERE) is essential and that an adjacent AP-1 site contributes to maximal 4-OHT-induced NRF-1 transcription. siRNA knockdown of ERβ revealed that ERβ inhibits basal NRF-1 expression and is required for 4-OHT-induced NRF-1 transcription. An AP-1 inhibitor blocked 4-OHT-induced NRF-1 expression. The 4-OHT-induced increase in NRF-1 resulted in increased transcription of NRF-1 target CAPNS1 but not CYC1, CYC2, or TFAM despite increased NRF-1 coactivator PGC-1α protein. The absence of TFAM induction corresponds to a lack of Akt-dependent phosphorylation of NRF-1 with 4-OHT treatment. Overexpression of NRF-1 inhibited 4-OHT-induced apoptosis and siRNA knockdown of NRF-1 increased apoptosis, indicating an antiapoptotic role for NRF-1. Overall, NRF-1 expression and activity is regulated by 4-OHT via endogenous ERβ in MCF-7 cells.

  6. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α (HNF4α) Is a Transcription Factor of Vertebrate Fatty Acyl Desaturase Gene as Identified in Marine Teleost Siganus canaliculatus

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yewei; Wang, Shuqi; Chen, Junliang; Zhang, Qinghao; Liu, Yang; You, Cuihong; Monroig, Óscar; Tocher, Douglas R.; Li, Yuanyou

    2016-01-01

    Rabbitfish Siganus canaliculatus was the first marine teleost demonstrated to have the capability of biosynthesizing long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) from C18 precursors, and to possess a Δ4 fatty acyl desaturase (Δ4 Fad) which was the first report in vertebrates, and is a good model for studying the regulatory mechanisms of LC-PUFA biosynthesis in teleosts. In order to understand regulatory mechanisms of transcription of Δ4 Fad, the gene promoter was cloned and characterized in the present study. An upstream sequence of 1859 bp from the initiation codon ATG was cloned as the promoter candidate. On the basis of bioinformatic analysis, several binding sites of transcription factors (TF) including GATA binding protein 2 (GATA-2), CCAAT enhancer binding protein (C/EBP), nuclear factor 1 (NF-1), nuclear factor Y (NF-Y), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) and sterol regulatory element (SRE), were identified in the promoter by site-directed mutation and functional assays. HNF4α and NF-1 were confirmed to interact with the core promoter of Δ4 Fad by gel shift assay and mass spectrometry. Moreover, over-expression of HNF4α increased promoter activity in HEK 293T cells and mRNA level of Δ4 Fad in rabbitfish primary hepatocytes, respectively. The results indicated that HNF4α is a TF of rabbitfish Δ4 Fad. To our knowledge, this is the first report on promoter structure of a Δ4 Fad, and also the first demonstration of HNF4α as a TF of vertebrate Fad gene involved in transcription regulation of LC-PUFA biosynthesis. PMID:27472219

  7. Hepatitis B virus nuclear export elements: RNA stem-loop α and β, key parts of the HBV post-transcriptional regulatory element.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chun Shen; Brown, Chris M

    2016-09-01

    Many viruses contain RNA elements that modulate splicing and/or promote nuclear export of their RNAs. The RNAs of the major human pathogen, hepatitis B virus (HBV) contain a large (~600 bases) composite cis-acting 'post-transcriptional regulatory element' (PRE). This element promotes expression from these naturally intronless transcripts. Indeed, the related woodchuck hepadnavirus PRE (WPRE) is used to enhance expression in gene therapy and other expression vectors. These PRE are likely to act through a combination of mechanisms, including promotion of RNA nuclear export. Functional components of both the HBV PRE and WPRE are 2 conserved RNA cis-acting stem-loop (SL) structures, SLα and SLβ. They are within the coding regions of polymerase (P) gene, and both P and X genes, respectively. Based on previous studies using mutagenesis and/or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), here we propose 2 covariance models for SLα and SLβ. The model for the 30-nucleotide SLα contains a G-bulge and a CNGG(U) apical loop of which the first and the fourth loop residues form a CG pair and the fifth loop residue is bulged out, as observed in the NMR structure. The model for the 23-nucleotide SLβ contains a 7-base-pair stem and a 9-nucleotide loop. Comparison of the models with other RNA structural elements, as well as similarity searches of human transcriptome and viral genomes demonstrate that SLα and SLβ are specific to HBV transcripts. However, they are well conserved among the hepadnaviruses of non-human primates, the woodchuck and ground squirrel.

  8. Evidence for the Involvement of Xenobiotic-responsive Nuclear Receptors in Transcriptional Effects Upon Perfluoroalkyl Acid Exposure in Diverse Species.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans and other species have detectable body burdens of a number of perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAA) including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). In mouse and rat liver these compounds elicit transcriptional and phenotypic effects similar to pe...

  9. Evidence for the Involvement of Xenobiotic-response Nuclear Receptors in Transcriptional Effects Upon Perfluroroalkyl Acid Exposure in Diverse Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans and ecological species have been found to have detectable body burdens of a number of perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAA) including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). In mouse and rat liver these compounds elicit transcriptional and phenotyp...

  10. Evidence for the Involvement of Xenobiotic-response Nuclear Receptors in Transcriptional Effects Upon Perfluroroalkyl Acid Exposure in Diverse Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans and ecological species have been found to have detectable body burdens of a number of perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAA) including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). In mouse and rat liver these compounds elicit transcriptional and phenotyp...

  11. Evidence for the Involvement of Xenobiotic-responsive Nuclear Receptors in Transcriptional Effects Upon Perfluoroalkyl Acid Exposure in Diverse Species.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans and other species have detectable body burdens of a number of perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAA) including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). In mouse and rat liver these compounds elicit transcriptional and phenotypic effects similar to pe...

  12. Ciliary Entry of the Hedgehog Transcriptional Activator Gli2 Is Mediated by the Nuclear Import Machinery but Differs from Nuclear Transport in Being Imp-α/β1-Independent.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Belén; Graña, Martín; Badano, José L; Irigoín, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    Gli2 is the primary transcriptional activator of Hedgehog signalling in mammals. Upon stimulation of the pathway, Gli2 moves into the cilium before reaching the nucleus. However, the mechanisms underlying its entry into the cilium are not completely understood. Since several similarities have been reported between nuclear and ciliary import, we investigated if the nuclear import machinery participates in Gli2 ciliary entry. Here we show that while two conserved classical nuclear localization signals mediate Gli2 nuclear localization via importin (Imp)-α/β1, these sequences are not required for Gli2 ciliary import. However, blocking Imp-mediated transport through overexpression of GTP-locked Ran reduced the percentage of Gli2 positive cilia, an effect that was not explained by increased CRM1-dependent export of Gli2 from the cilium. We explored the participation of Imp-β2 in Gli2 ciliary traffic and observed that this transporter is involved in moving Gli2 into the cilium, as has been described for other ciliary proteins. In addition, our data indicate that Imp-β2 might also collaborate in Gli2 nuclear entry. How does Imp-β2 determine the final destination of a protein that can localize to two distinct subcellular compartments remains an open question. Therefore, our data shows that the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling machinery plays a critical role mediating the subcellular distribution of Gli2 and the activation of the pathway, but distinct importins likely play a differential role mediating its ciliary and nuclear translocation.

  13. Ciliary Entry of the Hedgehog Transcriptional Activator Gli2 Is Mediated by the Nuclear Import Machinery but Differs from Nuclear Transport in Being Imp-α/β1-Independent

    PubMed Central

    Torrado, Belén; Graña, Martín; Badano, José L.; Irigoín, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    Gli2 is the primary transcriptional activator of Hedgehog signalling in mammals. Upon stimulation of the pathway, Gli2 moves into the cilium before reaching the nucleus. However, the mechanisms underlying its entry into the cilium are not completely understood. Since several similarities have been reported between nuclear and ciliary import, we investigated if the nuclear import machinery participates in Gli2 ciliary entry. Here we show that while two conserved classical nuclear localization signals mediate Gli2 nuclear localization via importin (Imp)-α/β1, these sequences are not required for Gli2 ciliary import. However, blocking Imp-mediated transport through overexpression of GTP-locked Ran reduced the percentage of Gli2 positive cilia, an effect that was not explained by increased CRM1-dependent export of Gli2 from the cilium. We explored the participation of Imp-β2 in Gli2 ciliary traffic and observed that this transporter is involved in moving Gli2 into the cilium, as has been described for other ciliary proteins. In addition, our data indicate that Imp-β2 might also collaborate in Gli2 nuclear entry. How does Imp-β2 determine the final destination of a protein that can localize to two distinct subcellular compartments remains an open question. Therefore, our data shows that the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling machinery plays a critical role mediating the subcellular distribution of Gli2 and the activation of the pathway, but distinct importins likely play a differential role mediating its ciliary and nuclear translocation. PMID:27579771

  14. Mutations that reduce its specific DNA binding inhibit high NaCl-induced nuclear localization of the osmoprotective transcription factor NFAT5

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Yuichiro; Li, Jinxi; Villers, Courtney; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Burg, Maurice B.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cell 5 (NFAT5) is activated by the stress of hypertonicity (e.g., high NaCl). Increased expression of NFAT5 target genes causes accumulation of protective organic osmolytes and heat shock proteins. Under normotonic conditions (∼300 mosmol/kgH2O), NFAT5 is distributed between the nucleus and cytoplasm, hypertonicity causes it to translocate into the nucleus, and hypotonicity causes it to translocate into the cytoplasm. The mechanism of translocation is complex and not completely understood. NFAT5-T298 is a known contact site of NFAT5 with its specific DNA element [osmotic response element (ORE)]. In the present study, we find that mutation of NFAT5-T298 to alanine or aspartic acid not only reduces binding of NFAT5 to OREs (EMSA) but also proportionately reduces high NaCl-induced nuclear translocation of NFAT5. Combined mutation of other NFAT5 DNA contact sites (R293A/E299A/R302A) also greatly reduces both specific DNA binding and nuclear localization of NFAT5. NFAT5-T298 is a potential phosphorylation site, but, using protein mass spectrometry, we do not find phosphorylation at NFAT5-T298. Further, decreased high NaCl-induced nuclear localization of NFAT5 mutated at T298 does not involve previously known regulatory mechanisms, including hypotonicity-induced export of NFAT5, regulated by phosphorylation of NFAT5-S155, XPO1 (CRM1/exportin1)-mediated export of NFAT5 from the nucleus, or hypertonicity-induced elevation of NUP88, which enhances nuclear localization of NFAT5. We conclude that specific DNA binding of NFAT5 contributes to its nuclear localization, by mechanisms, as yet undetermined, but independent of ones previously described to regulate NFAT5 distribution. PMID:22992674

  15. Signal Transduction Triggered by Iron to Induce the Nuclear Importation of a Myb3 Transcription Factor in the Parasitic Protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis*

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hong-Ming; Lee, Yu; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Liu, Hsing-Wei; Chu, Chien-Hsin; Chou, Ya-Wen; Chen, Yet-Ran; Chen, Shu-Hui; Tai, Jung-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    Iron was previously shown to induce rapid nuclear translocation of a Myb3 transcription factor in the protozoan parasite, Trichomonas vaginalis. In the present study, iron was found to induce a transient increase in cellular cAMP, followed by the nuclear influx of Myb3, whereas the latter was also induced by 8-bromo-cyclic AMP. Iron-inducible cAMP production and nuclear influx of Myb3 were inhibited by suramin and SQ22536, respective inhibitors of the Gα subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins and adenylyl cyclases. In contrast, the nuclear influx of Myb3 induced by iron or 8-bromo-cAMP was delayed or inhibited, respectively, by H89, the inhibitor of protein kinase A. Using liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry, Thr156 and Lys143 in Myb3 were found to be phosphorylated and ubiquitinated, respectively. These modifications were induced by iron and inhibited by H89, as shown by immunoprecipitation-coupled Western blotting. Iron-inducible ubiquitination and nuclear influx were aborted in T156A and K143R, but T156D was constitutively ubiquitinated and persistently localized to the nucleus. Myb3 was phosphorylated in vitro by the catalytic subunit of a T. vaginalis protein kinase A, TvPKAc. A transient interaction between TvPKAc and Myb3 and the phosphorylation of both proteins were induced in the parasite shortly after iron or 8-bromo-cAMP treatment. Together, these observations suggest that iron may induce production of cAMP and activation of TvPKAc, which then induces the phosphorylation of Myb3 and subsequent ubiquitination for accelerated nuclear influx. It is conceivable that iron probably exerts a much broader impact on the physiology of the parasite than previously thought to encounter environmental changes. PMID:25183012

  16. The N Terminus of the Influenza B Virus Nucleoprotein Is Essential for Virus Viability, Nuclear Localization, and Optimal Transcription and Replication of the Viral Genome

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Lee; Smith, Matt; Davidson, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza viruses is a multifunctional protein with essential roles throughout viral replication. Despite influenza A and B viruses belonging to separate genera of the Orthomyxoviridae family, their NP proteins share a relatively high level of sequence conservation. However, NP of influenza B viruses (BNP) contains an evolutionarily conserved N-terminal 50-amino-acid extension that is absent from NP of influenza A viruses. There is conflicting evidence as to the functions of the BNP N-terminal extension; however, this has never been assessed in the context of viral infection. We have used reverse genetics to assess the significance of this region on the functions of BNP and virus viability. The truncation of more than three amino acids prevented virus recovery, suggesting that the N-terminal extension is essential for virus viability. Mutational analysis indicated that multiple regions of the protein are involved in the nuclear localization of BNP, with the entire N-terminal extension required for this to function efficiently. Viruses containing mutations in the first 10 residues of BNP demonstrated few differences in nuclear localization; however, the viruses exhibited significant reductions in viral mRNA transcription and genome replication, resulting in significantly attenuated phenotypes. Mutations introduced to ablate a previously reported nuclear localization signal also resulted in a significant decrease in mRNA production during early stages of viral replication. Overall, our results demonstrate that the N-terminal extension of BNP is essential to virus viability not only for directing nuclear localization of BNP but also for regulating viral mRNA transcription and genome replication. IMPORTANCE The multifunctional NP of influenza viruses has roles throughout the viral replication cycle; therefore, it is essential for virus viability. Despite high levels of homology between the NP of influenza A and B viruses, the NP of

  17. Death-domain associated protein-6 (DAXX) mediated apoptosis in hantavirus infection is counter-balanced by activation of interferon-stimulated nuclear transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Khaiboullina, Svetlana F.; Morzunov, Sergey P.; Boichuk, Sergei V.; Palotás, András; Jeor, Stephen St.; Lombardi, Vincent C.; Rizvanov, Albert A.

    2013-09-01

    Hantaviruses are negative strand RNA species that replicate predominantly in the cytoplasm. They also activate numerous cellular responses, but their involvement in nuclear processes is yet to be established. Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), this study investigates the molecular finger-print of nuclear transcription factors during hantavirus infection. The viral-replication-dependent activation of pro-myelocytic leukemia protein (PML) was followed by subsequent localization in nuclear bodies (NBs). PML was also found in close proximity to activated Sp100 nuclear antigen and interferon-stimulated gene 20 kDa protein (ISG-20), but co-localization with death-domain associated protein-6 (DAXX) was not observed. These data demonstrate that hantavirus triggers PML activation and localization in NBs in the absence of DAXX-PLM-NB co-localization. The results suggest that viral infection interferes with DAXX-mediated apoptosis, and expression of interferon-activated Sp100 and ISG-20 proteins may indicate intracellular intrinsic antiviral attempts.

  18. Sus1, Sac3, and Thp1 mediate post-transcriptional tethering of active genes to the nuclear rim as well as to non-nascent mRNP

    PubMed Central

    Chekanova, Julia A.; Abruzzi, Katharine C.; Rosbash, Michael; Belostotsky, Dmitry A.

    2008-01-01

    Errors in the mRNP biogenesis pathway can lead to retention of mRNA in discrete, transcription-site-proximal foci. This RNA remains tethered adjacent to the transcription site long after transcriptional shutoff. Here we identify Sus1, Thp1, and Sac3 as factors required for the persistent tethering of such foci (dots) to their cognate genes. We also show that the prolonged association of previously activated GAL genes with the nuclear periphery after transcriptional shutoff is similarly dependent on the Sac3-Thp1-Sus1-Cdc31 complex. We suggest that the complex associates with nuclear mRNP and that mRNP properties influence the association of dot-confined mRNA with its gene of origin as well as the post-transcriptional retention of the cognate gene at the nuclear periphery. These findings indicate a coupling between the mRNA-to-gene and gene-to-nuclear periphery tethering. Taken together with other recent findings, these observations also highlight the importance of nuclear mRNP to the mobilization of active genes to the nuclear rim. PMID:18003937

  19. The Nuclear Protein IκBζ Forms a Transcriptionally Active Complex with Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) p50 and the Lcn2 Promoter via the N- and C-terminal Ankyrin Repeat Motifs.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Akira; Yamazaki, Soh; Sumimoto, Hideki

    2016-09-23

    The nuclear protein IκBζ, comprising the N-terminal trans-activation domain and the C-terminal ankyrin repeat (ANK) domain composed of seven ANK motifs, activates transcription of a subset of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-dependent innate immune genes such as Lcn2 encoding the antibacterial protein lipocalin-2. Lcn2 activation requires formation of a complex containing IκBζ and NF-κB p50, a transcription factor that harbors the DNA-binding Rel homology region but lacks a trans-activation domain, on the promoter with the canonical NF-κB-binding site (κB site) and its downstream cytosine-rich element. Here we show that IκBζ productively interacts with p50 via Asp-451 in the N terminus of ANK1, a residue that is evolutionarily conserved among IκBζ and the related nuclear IκB proteins Bcl-3 and IκBNS Threonine substitution for Asp-451 abrogates direct association with the κB-site-binding protein p50, complex formation with the Lcn2 promoter DNA, and activation of Lcn2 transcription. The basic residues Lys-717 and Lys-719 in the C-terminal region of ANK7 contribute to IκBζ binding to the Lcn2 promoter, probably via interaction with the cytosine-rich element required for Lcn2 activation; glutamate substitution for both lysines results in a loss of transcriptionally active complex formation without affecting direct contact of IκBζ with p50. Both termini of the ANK domain in Bcl-3 and IκBNS function in a manner similar to that of IκBζ to interact with promoter DNA, indicating a common mechanism in which the nuclear IκBs form a regulatory complex with NF-κB and promoter DNA via the invariant aspartate in ANK1 and the conserved basic residues in ANK7. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. The Enzyme-Like Domain of Arabidopsis Nuclear β-Amylases Is Critical for DNA Sequence Recognition and Transcriptional Activation.

    PubMed

    Soyk, Sebastian; Simková, Klára; Zürcher, Evelyne; Luginbühl, Leonie; Brand, Luise H; Vaughan, Cara K; Wanke, Dierk; Zeeman, Samuel C

    2014-04-01

    Plant BZR1-BAM transcription factors contain a β-amylase (BAM)-like domain, characteristic of proteins involved in starch breakdown. The enzyme-derived domains appear to be noncatalytic, but they determine the function of the two Arabidopsis thaliana BZR1-BAM isoforms (BAM7 and BAM8) during transcriptional initiation. Removal or swapping of the BAM domains demonstrates that the BAM7 BAM domain restricts DNA binding and transcriptional activation, while the BAM8 BAM domain allows both activities. Furthermore, we demonstrate that BAM7 and BAM8 interact on the protein level and cooperate during transcriptional regulation. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues in the BAM domain of BAM8 shows that its function as a transcriptional activator is independent of catalysis but requires an intact substrate binding site, suggesting it may bind a ligand. Microarray experiments with plants overexpressing truncated versions lacking the BAM domain indicate that the pseudo-enzymatic domain increases selectivity for the preferred cis-regulatory element BBRE (BZR1-BAM Responsive Element). Side specificity toward the G-box may allow crosstalk to other signaling networks. This work highlights the importance of the enzyme-derived domain of BZR1-BAMs, supporting their potential role as metabolic sensors. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcription factories

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Dietmar; Trajanoski, Zlatko; McNally, James G.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that transcription does not occur homogeneously or diffusely throughout the nucleus, but rather at a number of specialized, discrete sites termed transcription factories. The factories are composed of ~4–30 RNA polymerase molecules, and are associated with many other molecules involved in transcriptional activation and mRNA processing. Some data suggest that the polymerase molecules within a factory remain stationary relative to the transcribed DNA, which is thought to be reeled through the factory site. There is also some evidence that transcription factories could help organize chromatin and nuclear structure, contributing to both the formation of chromatin loops and the clustering of active and co-regulated genes. PMID:23109938

  2. Transcriptional activation of LON Gene by a new form of mitochondrial stress: A role for the nuclear respiratory factor 2 in StAR overload response (SOR).

    PubMed

    Bahat, Assaf; Perlberg, Shira; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Isaac, Sara; Eden, Amir; Lauria, Ines; Langer, Thomas; Orly, Joseph

    2015-06-15

    High output of steroid hormone synthesis in steroidogenic cells of the adrenal cortex and the gonads requires the expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) that facilitates cholesterol mobilization to the mitochondrial inner membrane where the CYP11A1/P450scc enzyme complex converts the sterol to the first steroid. Earlier studies have shown that StAR is active while pausing on the cytosolic face of the outer mitochondrial membrane while subsequent import of the protein into the matrix terminates the cholesterol mobilization activity. Consequently, during repeated activity cycles, high level of post-active StAR accumulates in the mitochondrial matrix. To prevent functional damage due to such protein overload effect, StAR is degraded by a sequence of three to four ATP-dependent proteases of the mitochondria protein quality control system, including LON and the m-AAA membranous proteases AFG3L2 and SPG7/paraplegin. Furthermore, StAR expression in both peri-ovulatory ovarian cells, or under ectopic expression in cell line models, results in up to 3-fold enrichment of the mitochondrial proteases and their transcripts. We named this novel form of mitochondrial stress as StAR overload response (SOR). To better understand the SOR mechanism at the transcriptional level we analyzed first the unexplored properties of the proximal promoter of the LON gene. Our findings suggest that the human nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), also known as GA binding protein (GABP), is responsible for 88% of the proximal promoter activity, including the observed increase of transcription in the presence of StAR. Further studies are expected to reveal if common transcriptional determinants coordinate the SOR induced transcription of all the genes encoding the SOR proteases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Discovery of osmosensitive transcriptional regulation of human cytochrome P450 3As by the tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (nuclear factor of activated T cells 5).

    PubMed

    Kosuge, Kazuhiro; Chuang, Andrew I; Uematsu, Satoko; Tan, Kah Poh; Ohashi, Kyoichi; Ko, Ben C B; Ito, Shinya

    2007-10-01

    We report the discovery of an osmosensitive transcriptional control of human CYP3A4, CYP3A7, and CYP3A5. Ambient hypertonicity (350-450 mOsmol/kg) increased mRNA expressions of the CYP3A by approximately 10- to 20-fold in human-intestinal C(2)bbe1 cells, followed by an increase of CYP3A protein. Hypotonicity, on the other hand, suppressed CYP3A mRNA levels, indicating that physiological isotonic conditions may regulate the basal expression of CYP3A. Similar responses to ambient tonicity were observed in other human-derived cell lines (intestinal LS180 and hepatic HepG2) and human primary colonic cells. The 11-base pair tonicity-responsive enhancer (TonE) is an osmosensitive regulator that is activated by the transcription factor, the nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5). Luciferase-based reporter assays of 13 consensus TonE motifs within +/-10 kilobases (kb) from the transcription start sites of CYP3A showed that only the CYP3A7 intron 2 region ( approximately 5 kb downstream from the transcription start site), which contains two TonE motifs (+5076/+5086 and + 5417/+5427), was responsive to hypertonicity stimuli. This observation was confirmed upon cotransfection with an NFAT5 expression vector, small interfering RNA, or dominant-negative NFAT5. Deletion and mutation analyses suggested that the TonE (+5417/+5427) is indispensable for the enhancer activity. NFAT5 binding to the CYP3A7 intron 2 TonE motif was demonstrated with electrophoretic mobility shift assay and in a native cell context by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We conclude that transcription of human CYP3A is influenced by ambient tonicity. The physiological significance of the tonic regulation of CYP3A enzymes remains to be determined.

  4. Amino Acids of Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 3A Essential for Repression of Jκ-Mediated Transcription and Their Evolutionary Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Dalbiès-Tran, Rozenn; Stigger-Rosser, Evelyn; Dotson, Travis; Sample, Clare E.

    2001-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 3A (EBNA-3A) is essential for virus-mediated immortalization of B lymphocytes in vitro and is believed to regulate transcription of cellular and/or viral genes. One known mechanism of regulation is through its interaction with the cellular transcription factor Jκ. This interaction downregulates transcription mediated by EBNA-2 and Jκ. To identify the amino acids that play a role in this interaction, we have generated mutant EBNA-3A proteins. A mutant EBNA-3A protein in which alanine residues were substituted for amino acids 199, 200, and 202 no longer downregulated transcription. Surprisingly, this mutant protein remained able to coimmunoprecipitate with Jκ. Using a reporter gene assay based on the recruitment of Jκ by various regions spanning EBNA-3A, we have shown that this mutation abolished binding of Jκ to the N-proximal region (amino acids 125 to 222) and that no other region of EBNA-3A alone was sufficient to mediate an association with Jκ. To determine the biological significance of the interaction of EBNA-3A with Jκ, we have studied its conservation in the simian lymphocryptovirus herpesvirus papio (HVP) by cloning HVP-3A, the homolog of EBNA-3A encoded by this virus. This 903-amino-acid protein exhibited 37% identity with its EBV counterpart, mainly within the amino-terminal half. HVP-3A also interacted with Jκ through a region located between amino acids 127 and 223 and also repressed transcription mediated through EBNA-2 and Jκ. The evolutionary conservation of this function, in proteins that have otherwise significantly diverged, argues strongly for an important biological role in virus-mediated immortalization of B lymphocytes. PMID:11119577

  5. Transcriptional regulation of chicken cytochrome P450 2D49 basal expression by CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Tang, Shulin; Dong, Linfeng; Chen, Qingmei; Liu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Deng, Yiqun

    2014-03-01

    Chicken cytochrome P450 (CYP)2D49 is structurally and functionally related to human CYP2D6, which is an important drug-metabolizing enzyme. To date, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of this cytochrome. Through deletion analysis of the CYP2D49 promoter, we identified two putative degenerate CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)-binding sites and an imperfect DR1 element (the site contains direct repeats of the hexamer AGGTCA separated by a one-nucleotide spacer motif) within regions -296/-274, -274/-226, and -226/-183, respectively, which may play critical roles in the transcriptional activation of the CYP2D49 gene. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that the putative C/EBP boxes and DR1 element in the CYP2D49 promoter are functional motifs that bind to C/EBPα and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α), respectively. Furthermore, we studied the functional importance and relationships of these transcription factor-binding sites by examining the effects of mutation and deletion of these regions on promoter activity. These studies revealed that the two C/EBP-binding sites show a compensatory relationship and work cooperatively with the DR1 element to modulate the transcription of CYP2D49. The results of overexpressing C/EBPα and HNF4α in culture cells further confirmed that both C/EBPα and HNF4α contribute significantly to sustaining a high level of CYP2D49 transcription. In conclusion, the data indicate that the constitutive hepatic expression of CYP2D49 is governed by both C/EBPα and HNF4α. Further studies will be required to fully characterize the molecular mechanisms that modulate CYP2D49 expression. © 2014 FEBS.

  6. Transcription-independent role of Bach1 in mitosis through a nuclear exporter Crm1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Shiraki, Takuma; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2012-02-17

    The transcriptional repressor Bach1 mediates various stress responses. Despite its role in transcription, Bach1 is predominantly exported to the cytoplasm in a Crm1-dependent manner, but the functional role of its cytoplasmic retention is still unclear. We found that Bach1 was also excluded from mitotic chromatin by a C-terminal cytoplasmic localization sequence dependent and leptomycin B sensitive process. Bach1 depletion resulted in disordered mitotic chromosome alignment, which was rescued by Bach1 mutants lacking the BTB or DNA binding domains, suggesting its transcription-independent mechanism. We thus revealed a novel role of Bach1 in the regulation of mitotic chromosome dynamics. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhanced Cardiac Akt/Protein Kinase B Signaling Contributes to Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy in Part by Impairing Mitochondrial Function via Transcriptional Repression of Mitochondrion-Targeted Nuclear Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wende, Adam R.; O'Neill, Brian T.; Bugger, Heiko; Riehle, Christian; Tuinei, Joseph; Buchanan, Jonathan; Tsushima, Kensuke; Wang, Li; Caro, Pilar; Guo, Aili; Sloan, Crystal; Kim, Bum Jun; Wang, Xiaohui; Pereira, Renata O.; McCrory, Mark A.; Nye, Brenna G.; Benavides, Gloria A.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.; Shioi, Tetsuo; Weimer, Bart C.

    2014-01-01

    Sustained Akt activation induces cardiac hypertrophy (LVH), which may lead to heart failure. This study tested the hypothesis that Akt activation contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction in pathological LVH. Akt activation induced LVH and progressive repression of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) pathways. Preventing LVH by inhibiting mTOR failed to prevent the decline in mitochondrial function, but glucose utilization was maintained. Akt activation represses expression of mitochondrial regulatory, FAO, and oxidative phosphorylation genes in vivo that correlate with the duration of Akt activation in part by reducing FOXO-mediated transcriptional activation of mitochondrion-targeted nuclear genes in concert with reduced signaling via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)/PGC-1α and other transcriptional regulators. In cultured myocytes, Akt activation disrupted mitochondrial bioenergetics, which could be partially reversed by maintaining nuclear FOXO but not by increasing PGC-1α. Thus, although short-term Akt activation may be cardioprotective during ischemia by reducing mitochondrial metabolism and increasing glycolysis, long-term Akt activation in the adult heart contributes to pathological LVH in part by reducing mitochondrial oxidative capacity. PMID:25535334

  8. GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation couples ER-Golgi transport and nuclear stabilisation of the CREB-H transcription factor to mediate Apolipoprotein secretion.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Sónia; Carreira, Suzanne; O'Hare, Peter

    2017-04-05

    CREB-H, an ER-anchored transcription factor plays a key role in regulating secretion in metabolic pathways, particularly triglyceride homeostasis. It controls the production both of secretory pathway components and cargoes including apolipoproteins ApoA-IV and ApoC-II, contributing to VLDL/HDL distribution and lipolysis. The key mechanism controlling CREB-H activity involves its ER retention and forward transport to the Golgi, where it is cleaved by Golgi-resident proteases releasing the N-terminal product which traffics to the nucleus to effect transcriptional responses. Here we show that a serine-rich motif, termed the P-motif located in the N-terminus between serines 73 to 90, controls release of the precursor transmembrane form from the ER and its forward transport to the Golgi. This motif is subject to GSK-3 phosphorylation promoting ER-retention while mutation of target serines or drug inhibition of GSK-3 activity, co-ordinately induces both forward transport of the precursor and cleavage, resulting in nuclear import. We previously showed that for the nuclear product, the P-motif is subject to multiple phosphorylations which regulate stability by targeting the protein to the SCF(Fbw1a) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Thus phosphorylation at the P-motif provides integrated control of CREB-H function, coupling intercompartmental transport in the cytoplasm with stabilisation of the active form in the nucleus.

  9. Equal impact of diffusion and DNA binding rates on the potential spatial distribution of nuclear factor κB transcription factor inside the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sycheva, A M; Kel, A; Nikolaev, E N; Moshkovskii, S A

    2014-06-01

    There are two physical processes that influence the spatial distribution of transcription factor molecules entering the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell, the binding to genomic DNA and the diffusion throughout the nuclear volume. Comparison of the DNA-protein association rate constant and the protein diffusion constant may determine which one is the limiting factor. If the process is diffusion-limited, transcription factor molecules are captured by DNA before their even distribution in the nuclear volume. Otherwise, if the reaction rate is limiting, these molecules diffuse evenly and then find their binding sites. Using well-studied human NF-κB dimer as an example, we calculated its diffusion constant using the Debye-Smoluchowski equation. The value of diffusion constant was about 10(-15) cm(3)/s, and it was comparable to the NF-κB association rate constant for DNA binding known from previous studies. Thus, both diffusion and DNA binding play an equally important role in NF-κB spatial distribution. The importance of genome 3D-structure in gene expression regulation and possible dependence of gene expression on the local concentration of open chromatin can be hypothesized from our theoretical estimate.

  10. Complex formation of p65/RelA with nuclear Akt1 for enhanced transcriptional activation of NF-{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Osong; Kim, Kyung A; He, Long; Jung, Mira; Jeong, Sook Jung; Ahn, Jong Seog Kim, Bo Yeon

    2008-01-25

    Akt1 was revealed to interact with Ki-Ras in the cytoplasm of Ki-Ras-transformed human prostate epithelial cells, 267B1/K-ras. Moreover, p65/RelA in the nucleus was found to interact with both Ki-Ras and Akt1, suggesting the nuclear translocation of Akt1:Ki-Ras complex for NF- {kappa}B activation. In support of this, compared with wild type Akt1, the dominant negative Akt1 mutant was decreased in its nuclear expression, reducing the Ki-Ras-induced NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activation. Moreover, inhibitors of Ras (sulindac sulfide and farnesyltransferase inhibitor I) or PI3K/Akt (wortmannin), reduced the amounts of Akt1 and Ki-Ras in the nucleus as well as partial NF-{kappa}B activity. The complete inhibition of Ki-Ras-induced NF-{kappa}B activation, however, could only be obtained by combined treatment with wortmannin and proteasome inhibitor-1. Accordingly, clonogenic assay showed Akt1 contribution to I{kappa}B{alpha}-mediated NF-{kappa}B activation for oncogenic cell growth by Ki-Ras. Our data suggest a crucial role of Ki-Ras:Akt1 complex in NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activation and enhancement of cell survival.

  11. Nuclear Localization of CD26 Induced by a Humanized Monoclonal Antibody Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth by Modulating of POLR2A Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kohji; Hayashi, Mutsumi; Madokoro, Hiroko; Nishida, Hiroko; Du, Wenlin; Ohnuma, Kei; Sakamoto, Michiie; Morimoto, Chikao; Yamada, Taketo

    2013-01-01

    CD26 is a type II glycoprotein known as dipeptidyl peptidase IV and has been identified as one of the cell surface markers associated with various types of cancers and a subset of cancer stem cells. Recent studies have suggested that CD26 expression is involved in tumor growth, tumor invasion, and metastasis. The CD26 is shown in an extensive intracellular distribution, ranging from the cell surface to the nucleus. We have previously showed that the humanized anti-CD26 monoclonal antibody (mAb), YS110, exhibits inhibitory effects on various cancers. However, functions of CD26 on cancer cells and molecular mechanisms of impaired tumor growth by YS110 treatment are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the treatment with YS110 induced nuclear translocation of both cell-surface CD26 and YS110 in cancer cells and xenografted tumor. It was shown that the CD26 and YS110 were co-localized in nucleus by immunoelectron microscopic analysis. In response to YS110 treatment, CD26 was translocated into the nucleus via caveolin-dependent endocytosis. It was revealed that the nuclear CD26 interacted with a genomic flanking region of the gene for POLR2A, a subunit of RNA polymerase II, using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. This interaction with nuclear CD26 and POLR2A gene consequently led to transcriptional repression of the POLR2A gene, resulting in retarded cell proliferation of cancer cells. Furthermore, the impaired nuclear transport of CD26 by treatment with an endocytosis inhibitor or expressions of deletion mutants of CD26 reversed the POLR2A repression induced by YS110 treatment. These findings reveal that the nuclear CD26 functions in the regulation of gene expression and tumor growth, and provide a novel mechanism of mAb-therapy related to inducible translocation of cell-surface target molecule into the nucleus. PMID:23638030

  12. Dissecting nuclear Wingless signalling: recruitment of the transcriptional co-activator Pygopus by a chain of adaptor proteins.

    PubMed

    Städeli, Reto; Basler, Konrad

    2005-11-01

    Members of the Wingless (Wg)/Wnt family of secreted glycoproteins control cell fate during embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Wnt signals regulate the expression of target genes by activating a conserved signal transduction pathway. Upon receptor activation, the signal is transmitted intracellularly by stabilization of Armadillo (Arm)/beta-catenin. Arm/beta-catenin translocates to the nucleus, interacts with DNA-binding factors of the Pangolin (Pan)/TCF/LEF class and activates transcription of target genes in cooperation with the recently identified proteins Legless/BCL9 (Lgs) and Pygopus (Pygo). Here, we analyse the mode of action of Pan, Arm, Lgs, and Pygo in Drosophila cultured cells. We provide evidence that together these four proteins form a 'chain of adaptors' linking the NH2-terminal homology domain (NHD) of Pygo to the DNA-binding domain of Pan. We show that the NHD has potent transcriptional activation capacity, which differs from that of acidic activator domains and depends on a conserved NPF tripeptide. A single point mutation within this NPF motif abolishes the transcriptional activity of the Pygo NHD in vitro and strongly reduces Wg signalling in vivo. Together, our results suggest that the transcriptional output of Wg pathway activity largely relies on a 'chain of adaptors' design to direct the Pygo NHD to Wg target promoters in an Arm-dependent manner.

  13. Adaptive and specialised transcriptional responses to xenobiotic stress in Caenorhabditis elegans are regulated by nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Laura M; Rayson, Samantha J; Flemming, Anthony J; Urwin, Peter E

    2013-01-01

    Characterisation of the pathways by which xenobiotics are metabolised and excreted in both target and non-target organisms is crucial for the rational design of effective and specific novel bioactive molecules. Consequently, we have investigated the induced responses of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to a variety of xenobiotics which represent a range of putative modes of action. The majority of genes that were specifically induced in preliminary microarray analyses encoded enzymes from Phase I and II metabolism, including cytochrome P450s, short chain dehydrogenases, UDP-glucuronosyl transferases and glutathione transferases. Changes in gene expression were confirmed by quantitative PCR and GFP induction in reporter strains driven by promoters for transcription of twelve induced enzymes was investigated. The particular complement of metabolic genes induced was found to be highly contingent on the xenobiotic applied. The known regulators of responses to applied chemicals ahr-1, hif-1, mdt-15 and nhr-8 were not required for any of these inducible responses and skn-1 regulated GFP expression from only two of the promoters. Reporter strains were used in conjunction with systematic RNAi screens to identify transcription factors which drive expression of these genes under xenobiotic exposure. These transcription factors appeared to regulate specific xenobiotic responses and have no reported phenotypes under standard conditions. Focussing on nhr-176 we demonstrate the role of this transcription factor in mediating the resistance to thiabendazole.

  14. IL6 Inhibits HBV Transcription by Targeting the Epigenetic Control of the Nuclear cccDNA Minichromosome

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Gianna Aurora; Scisciani, Cecilia; Pediconi, Natalia; Lupacchini, Leonardo; Alfalate, Dulce; Guerrieri, Francesca; Calvo, Ludovica; Salerno, Debora; Di Cocco, Silvia; Levrero, Massimo; Belloni, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is organized as a mini-chromosome in the nuclei of infected hepatocytes by histone and non-histone proteins. Transcription from the cccDNA of the RNA replicative intermediate termed pre-genome (pgRNA), is the critical step for genome amplification and ultimately determines the rate of HBV replication. Multiple evidences suggest that cccDNA epigenetic modifications, such as histone modifications and DNA methylation, participate in regulating the transcriptional activity of the HBV cccDNA. Inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, LTβ) and the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin-6 (IL6) inhibit hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication and transcription. Here we show, in HepG2 cells transfected with linear HBV monomers and HBV-infected NTCP-HepG2 cells, that IL6 treatment leads to a reduction of cccDNA-bound histone acetylation paralleled by a rapid decrease in 3.5kb/pgRNA and subgenomic HBV RNAs transcription without affecting cccDNA chromatinization or cccDNA levels. IL6 repressive effect on HBV replication is mediated by a loss of HNF1α and HNF4α binding to the cccDNA and a redistribution of STAT3 binding from the cccDNA to IL6 cellular target genes. PMID:26580974

  15. NUCLEAR FACTOR Y, Subunit C (NF-YC) Transcription Factors Are Positive Regulators of Photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardana, Chamindika L.; Holt III, Ben F.

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that NF-Y transcription factors are positive regulators of skotomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. Three NF-YC genes (NF-YC3, NF-YC4, and NF-YC9) are known to have overlapping functions in photoperiod dependent flowering and previous studies demonstrated that they interact with basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. This included ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), which has well-demonstrated roles in photomorphogenesis. Similar to hy5 mutants, we report that nf-yc3 nf-yc4 nf-yc9 triple mutants failed to inhibit hypocotyl elongation in all tested light wavelengths. Surprisingly, nf-yc3 nf-yc4 nf-yc9 hy5 mutants had synergistic defects in light perception, suggesting that NF-Ys represent a parallel light signaling pathway. As with other photomorphogenic transcription factors, nf-yc3 nf-yc4 nf-yc9 triple mutants also partially suppressed the short hypocotyl and dwarf rosette phenotypes of CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (cop1) mutants. Thus, our data strongly suggest that NF-Y transcription factors have important roles as positive regulators of photomorphogenesis, and in conjunction with other recent reports, implies that the NF-Y are multifaceted regulators of early seedling development. PMID:27685091

  16. Down-regulation of the zinc-finger homeobox protein TSHZ2 releases GLI1 from the nuclear repressor complex to restore its transcriptional activity during mammary tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Riku, Miho; Inaguma, Shingo; Ito, Hideaki; Tsunoda, Takumi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kasai, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Although breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies, the molecular mechanisms underlying its development and progression are not fully understood. To identify key molecules involved, we screened publicly available microarray datasets for genes differentially expressed between breast cancers and normal mammary glands. We found that three of the genes predicted in this analysis were differentially expressed among human mammary tissues and cell lines. Of these genes, we focused on the role of the zinc-finger homeobox protein TSHZ2, which is down-regulated in breast cancer cells. We found that TSHZ2 is a nuclear protein harboring a bipartite nuclear localization signal, and we confirmed its function as a C-terminal binding protein (CtBP)-dependent transcriptional repressor. Through comprehensive screening, we identified TSHZ2-suppressing genes such as AEBP1 and CXCR4, which are conversely up-regulated by GLI1, the downstream transcription factor of Hedgehog signaling. We found that GLI1 forms a ternary complex with CtBP2 in the presence of TSHZ2 and that the transcriptional activity of GLI1 is suppressed by TSHZ2 in a CtBP-dependent manner. Indeed, knockdown of TSHZ2 increases the expression of AEBP1 and CXCR4 in TSHZ2-expressing immortalized mammary duct epithelium. Concordantly, immunohistochemical staining of mammary glands revealed that normal duct cells expresses GLI1 in the nucleus along with TSHZ2 and CtBP2, whereas invasive ductal carcinoma cells, which does not express TSHZ2, show the increase in the expression of AEBP1 and CXCR4 and in the cytoplasmic localization of GLI1. Thus, we propose that down-regulation of TSHZ2 is crucial for mammary tumorigenesis via the activation of GLI1. PMID:26744317

  17. Nuclear transcription factor Oct-1 binds to the 5'-upstream region of CYP1A1 and negatively regulates its expression.

    PubMed

    Bhat, R; Weaver, J A; Sterling, K M; Bresnick, E

    1996-02-01

    The cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases, which represent an extended superfamily, catalyze the biotransformation of many endogenous and exogenous substances. One of these hemoproteins, cytochrome P4501A1, is most closely associated with the bioactivation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzo[a]pyrene, which may play a role in environmental carcinogenesis. A negative regulatory element (NRE) has been localized in the 5'-upstream region of the cytochrome P4501A1 gene (CYP1A1) at -843 to -746 base pairs from the site of transcription. The purpose of this research was to define any interactions of trans-acting proteins with this cis element. Rat liver nuclei were used as the source of trans-acting proteins and a biotinylated NRE-bearing fragment (-782 to -843 bp) from a plasmid which contained the CYP1A1 was prepared by the polymerase chain reaction technique. Gel mobility shift assays were used to demonstrate interactions between this NRE fragment and nuclear proteins. The specific binding to an octamer-containing motif in the 5'-upstream region of CYP1A1 was demonstrated; this was used as a step in the partial purification from rat liver of the transcription factor, Oct-1. Conventional chromatographic procedures and DNA recognition site affinity chromatography were also used. HepG2 human hepatoma cells were transfected with both pMCoLUC+ which contains the luciferase gene as a reporter gene driven by the CYP1A1 promoter (including the NRE), and an Oct-1 expression vector. Luciferase activity/mg protein in the doubly-transfected cells was significantly lower than in cells containing only pMCoLUC+. A nuclear transcription factor Oct-1 interacts with a portion of the NRE of the rat CYP1A1, suppressing the expression of this gene. These findings may help to explain the low level of basal expression of CYP1A1 in mammalian systems.

  18. Post-transcriptional regulation of cyclins D1, D3 and G1 and proliferation of human cancer cells depend on IMP-3 nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Rivera Vargas, T; Boudoukha, S; Simon, A; Souidi, M; Cuvellier, S; Pinna, G; Polesskaya, A

    2014-05-29

    RNA-binding proteins of the IMP family (insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) mRNA-binding proteins 1-3) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Multiple studies have linked high expression of IMP proteins, and especially of IMP-3, to an unfavorable prognosis in numerous types of cancer. The specific importance of IMP-3 for cancer transformation remains poorly understood. We here show that all three IMPs can directly bind the mRNAs of cyclins D1, D3 and G1 (CCND1, D3 and G1) in vivo and in vitro, and yet only IMP-3 regulates the expression of these cyclins in a significant manner in six human cancer cell lines of different origins. In the absence of IMP-3, the levels of CCND1, D3 and G1 proteins fall dramatically, and the cells accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, leading to almost complete proliferation arrest. Our results show that, compared with IMP-1 and IMP-2, IMP-3 is enriched in the nucleus, where it binds the transcripts of CCND1, D3 and G1. The nuclear localization of IMP-3 depends on its protein partner HNRNPM and is indispensable for the post-transcriptional regulation of expression of the cyclins. Cytoplasmic retention of IMP-3 and HNRNPM in human cancer cells leads to significant drop in proliferation. In conclusion, a nuclear IMP-3-HNRNPM complex is important for the efficient synthesis of CCND1, D3 and G1 and for the proliferation of human cancer cells.

  19. Sigma-1 Receptors Regulate Bcl-2 Expression by Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation of Nuclear Factor κB

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Johann

    2010-01-01

    The expression of Bcl-2, the major antiapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, is under complex controls of several factors, including reactive oxygen species (ROS). The σ-1 receptor (Sig-1R), which was recently identified as a novel molecular chaperone at the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM), has been shown to exert robust cellular protective actions. However, mechanisms underlying the antiapoptotic action of the Sig-1R remain to be clarified. Here, we found that the Sig-1R promotes cellular survival by regulating the Bcl-2 expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Although both Sig-1Rs and Bcl-2 are highly enriched at the MAM, Sig-1Rs neither associate physically with Bcl-2 nor regulate stability of Bcl-2 proteins. However, Sig-1Rs tonically regulate the expression of Bcl-2 proteins. Knockdown of Sig-1Rs down-regulates whereas overexpression of Sig-1Rs up-regulates bcl-2 mRNA, indicating that the Sig-1R transcriptionally regulates the expression of Bcl-2. The effect of Sig-1R small interfering RNA down-regulating Bcl-2 was blocked by ROS scavengers and by the inhibitor of the ROS-inducible transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). Knockdown of Sig-1Rs up-regulates p105, the precursor of NF-κB, while concomitantly decreasing inhibitor of nuclear factor-κBα. Sig-1R knockdown also accelerates the conversion of p105 to the active form p50. Lastly, we showed that knockdown of Sig-1Rs potentiates H2O2-induced apoptosis; the action is blocked by either the NF-κB inhibitor oridonin or overexpression of Bcl-2. Thus, these findings suggest that Sig-1Rs promote cell survival, at least in part, by transcriptionally regulating Bcl-2 expression via the ROS/NF-κB pathway. PMID:19855099

  20. CA150, a nuclear protein associated with the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme, is involved in Tat-activated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Suñé, C; Hayashi, T; Liu, Y; Lane, W S; Young, R A; Garcia-Blanco, M A

    1997-01-01

    Maximal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gene expression requires specific cellular factors in addition to the virus-encoded trans-activator protein Tat and the RNA element TAR. We developed a functional assay, based on transcriptional activation in vitro, to identify these cellular factors. Here, we describe the purification and molecular cloning of CA150, a nuclear protein that is associated with the human RNA polymerase II holoenzyme and is involved in Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcriptional activation. The sequence of CA150 contains an extensive glutamine- and alanine-rich repeat that is found in transcriptional modulators such as GAL11 and SSN6 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zeste in Drosophila melanogaster. Immunodepletion of CA150 abolished Tat trans activation in vitro. Moreover, overexpression of a mutant CA150 protein specifically and dramatically decreased Tat-mediated activation of the HIV-1 promoter in vivo, strongly suggesting a role for CA150 in HIV-1 gene regulation. Immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that both CA150 and Tat associate with the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme. Furthermore, we found that functional Tat associates with the holoenzyme whereas activation-deficient Tat mutants do not. Thus, we propose that Tat action is transduced via an RNA polymerase II holoenzyme that contains CA150. PMID:9315662

  1. Exo70 is transcriptionally up-regulated by hepatic nuclear factor 4α and contributes to cell cycle control in hepatoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujie; Hou, Jihuan; Mi, Panying; Mao, Liyuan; Xu, Liang; Zhang, Youyu; Xiao, Li; Cao, Hanwei; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhang, Bing; Song, Gang; Hu, Tianhui; Zhan, Yan-yan

    2016-01-01

    Exo70, a member of the exocyst complex, is involved in cell exocytosis, migration, invasion and autophagy. However, the expression regulation and function of Exo70 in hepatocellular carcinoma are still poorly understood. In this study, we found Exo70 expression in human hepatoma cells was greatly reduced after knocking down hepatic nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α), the most important and abundant transcription factor in liver. This regulation occurred at the transcriptional level but not post-translational level. HNF4α transactivated Exo70 promoter through directly binding to the HNF4α-response element in this promoter. Cell cycle analysis further revealed that down-regulation of HNF4α and Exo70 was essential to berberine-stimulated G2/M cell cycle arrest in hepatoma cells. Moreover, knocking down either Exo70 or HNF4α induced G2/M phase arrest of hepatoma cells. Exo70 acted downstream of HNF4α to stimulate G2/M transition via increasing Cdc2 expression. Together, our results identify Exo70 as a novel transcriptional target of HNF4α to promote cell cycle progression in hepatoma, thus provide a basis for the development of therapeutic strategies for hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26848864

  2. The nuclear localization of the Arabidopsis transcription factor TIP is blocked by its interaction with the coat protein of Turnip crinkle virus

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Tao; Qu Feng; Morris, T. Jack . E-mail: jmorris@unlnotes.unl.edu

    2005-01-20

    We have previously reported that TIP, an Arabidopsis protein, interacts with the coat protein (CP) of Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) in yeast cells and that this interaction correlated with the resistance response in the TCV-resistant Arabidopsis ecotype Dijon-17. TIP was also able to activate transcription of reporter genes in yeast cells, suggesting that it is likely a transcription factor. We have now verified the physical interaction between TIP and TCV CP in vitro and showed that CP mutants unable to interact with TIP in yeast cells bind TIP with much lower affinity in vitro. Secondly, we have performed gel shift experiments demonstrating that TIP does not bind to DNA in a sequence-specific manner. The subcellular localization of TIP was also investigated by transiently expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged TIP in Nicotiana benthamiana plant cells, which showed that GFP-tagged TIP localizes primarily to nuclei. Significantly, co-expression of TCVCP and GFP-TIP prevented the nuclear localization of TIP. Together, these results suggest that TIP might be a transcription factor involved in regulating the defense response of Arabidopsis to TCV and that its normal role is compromised by interaction with the invading viral CP.

  3. FUS interacts with nuclear matrix-associated protein SAFB1 as well as Matrin3 to regulate splicing and ligand-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Takanashi, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    FUS (Fused-in-Sarcoma) is a multifunctional DNA/RNA binding protein linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD). Since FUS is localized mainly in the nucleus with nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling, it is critical to understand physiological functions in the nucleus to clarify pathogenesis. Here we report a yeast two-hybrid screening identified FUS interaction with nuclear matrix-associated protein SAFB1 (scaffold attachment factor B1). FUS and SAFB1, abundant in chromatin-bound fraction, interact in a DNA-dependent manner. N-terminal SAP domain of SAFB1, a DNA-binding motif, was required for its localization to chromatin-bound fraction and splicing regulation. In addition, depletion of SAFB1 reduced FUS’s localization to chromatin-bound fraction and splicing activity, suggesting SAFB1 could tether FUS to chromatin compartment thorough N-terminal DNA-binding motif. FUS and SAFB1 also interact with Androgen Receptor (AR) regulating ligand-dependent transcription. Moreover, FUS interacts with another nuclear matrix-associated protein Matrin3, which is muted in a subset of familial ALS cases and reportedly interacts with TDP-43. Interestingly, ectopic ALS-linked FUS mutant sequestered endogenous Matrin3 and SAFB1 in the cytoplasmic aggregates. These findings indicate SAFB1 could be a FUS’s functional platform in chromatin compartment to regulate RNA splicing and ligand-dependent transcription and shed light on the etiological significance of nuclear matrix-associated proteins in ALS pathogenesis. PMID:27731383

  4. Detection of the long noncoding RNAs nuclear-enriched autosomal transcript 1 (NEAT1) and metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 in the peripheral blood of HIV-1-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Jin, C; Peng, X; Xie, T; Lu, X; Liu, F; Wu, H; Yang, Z; Wang, J; Cheng, L; Wu, N

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in HIV-1 infection have not been extensively studied. Here we detected two lncRNAs, nuclear-enriched autosomal transcript 1 (NEAT1) and metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and plasma of HIV-1-infected patients. Fifty-nine HIV-1-infected patients and 21 healthy controls were recruited for the study, of whom 31 patients were highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-naïve and 28 patients had been receiving HAART for more than 1 year with undetectable viral loads. Total RNA was extracted from PBMCs and plasma, and levels of NEAT1 and MALAT1 were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We found that the levels of NEAT1 and MALAT1 in PBMCs were up-regulated in HAART-naïve patients and were reduced in patients receiving HAART. NEAT1 was down-regulated in the plasma of infected patients and expression was correlated with CD4 T-cell count. Our findings suggest that NEAT1 and MALAT1 may interact with HIV-1 in vivo and that the presence of NEAT1 in plasma is a potential biomarker of HIV-1 infection. © 2015 British HIV Association.

  5. Transcriptional Regulation of the Sodium-activated Potassium Channel SLICK (KCNT2) Promoter by Nuclear Factor-κB*

    PubMed Central

    Tomasello, Danielle L.; Gancarz-Kausch, Amy M.; Dietz, David M.; Bhattacharjee, Arin

    2015-01-01

    Although recent studies have shown the sodium-activated potassium channel SLACK (KCNT1) can contribute to neuronal excitability, there remains little information on the physiological role of the closely related SLICK (KCNT2) channel. Activation of SLICK channels may be important during pathological states such as ischemia, in which an increase in intracellular sodium and chloride can perturb membrane potential and ion homeostasis. We have identified two NFκB-binding sites within the promoter region of the human SLICK (KCNT2) and orthologous rat Slick (Kcnt2) genes, suggesting that conditions in which NFκB transcriptional activity is elevated promote expression of this channel. NFκB binding to the rat Slick promoter was confirmed in vivo by ChIP analyses, and NFκB was found differentially bound to the two sites. We verified NFκB transcriptional regulation of SLICK/Slick by mutational analyses and studying gene expression by luciferase assay in P19 cells, where NFκB is constitutively active. For the rat gene, activation of the Slick promoter was found to be additive in single NFκB mutations and synergistic in double mutations. Unexpectedly, for the human gene, NFκB exhibited cooperativity in activating the SLICK promoter. The human SLICK promoter constructs were then tested under hypoxic conditions in PC-12 cells, where NFκB is not active. Only under hypoxic conditions could luciferase activity be detected; the double NFκB mutant construct failed to exhibit activity. Transcriptional regulation of Slick by NFκB was verified in primary neurons. The Slick transcript decreased 24 h after NFκB inhibition. Our data show SLICK expression is predominantly under the control of NFκB. Because neuronal NFκB activation occurs during stressful stimuli such as hypoxia and injury, our findings suggest that SLICK is a neuroprotective gene. PMID:26100633

  6. Transcriptional Regulation of the Sodium-activated Potassium Channel SLICK (KCNT2) Promoter by Nuclear Factor-κB.

    PubMed

    Tomasello, Danielle L; Gancarz-Kausch, Amy M; Dietz, David M; Bhattacharjee, Arin

    2015-07-24

    Although recent studies have shown the sodium-activated potassium channel SLACK (KCNT1) can contribute to neuronal excitability, there remains little information on the physiological role of the closely related SLICK (KCNT2) channel. Activation of SLICK channels may be important during pathological states such as ischemia, in which an increase in intracellular sodium and chloride can perturb membrane potential and ion homeostasis. We have identified two NFκB-binding sites within the promoter region of the human SLICK (KCNT2) and orthologous rat Slick (Kcnt2) genes, suggesting that conditions in which NFκB transcriptional activity is elevated promote expression of this channel. NFκB binding to the rat Slick promoter was confirmed in vivo by ChIP analyses, and NFκB was found differentially bound to the two sites. We verified NFκB transcriptional regulation of SLICK/Slick by mutational analyses and studying gene expression by luciferase assay in P19 cells, where NFκB is constitutively active. For the rat gene, activation of the Slick promoter was found to be additive in single NFκB mutations and synergistic in double mutations. Unexpectedly, for the human gene, NFκB exhibited cooperativity in activating the SLICK promoter. The human SLICK promoter constructs were then tested under hypoxic conditions in PC-12 cells, where NFκB is not active. Only under hypoxic conditions could luciferase activity be detected; the double NFκB mutant construct failed to exhibit activity. Transcriptional regulation of Slick by NFκB was verified in primary neurons. The Slick transcript decreased 24 h after NFκB inhibition. Our data show SLICK expression is predominantly under the control of NFκB. Because neuronal NFκB activation occurs during stressful stimuli such as hypoxia and injury, our findings suggest that SLICK is a neuroprotective gene.

  7. Transcriptional suppression of CTP:phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase by 25-hydroxycholesterol is mediated by nuclear factor-Y and Yin Yang 1.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hiromi; Aoyama, Chieko; Horibata, Yasuhiro; Satou, Motoyasu; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Itoh, Masahiko; Hosaka, Kohei; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Pcyt2 (CTP:phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in mammalian PE (phosphatidylethanolamine) biosynthesis. Previously, we reported that Pcyt2 mRNA levels increased in several types of cells after serum starvation, an effect that could be suppressed by supplementation with low-density lipoprotein or 25-HC (25-hydroxycholesterol). Transcription of Hmgcr, which encodes 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, is also suppressed by 25-HC in the same dose-dependent manner. Nevertheless, a sterol-regulatory element was not detected in the Pcyt2 promoter region. The important element for transcriptional control of Pcyt2 by 25-HC (1.25 μM) was determined to reside between -56 and -36 on the basis of analysis with several Pcyt2 promoter deletion-luciferase reporters in NIH 3T3 cells. Using the yeast one-hybrid system, we found that NF-Y (nuclear factor-Y) binds at C(-37)CAAT(-41) and YY1 (Yin Yang1) binds at C(-42)AT(-40) in the Pcyt2 promoter. Endogenous NF-Y and YY1 bind clearly and competitively to these sites and are important for basal Pcyt2 transcription. Moreover, NF-Y binds to the Hmgcr promoter at C(-14)CA(-12) in gel-shift analysis, and suppression of the basal luciferase activity of the Hmgcr promoter-reporter construct (-30/+61) by 25-HC was abolished when C(-14)CA(-12) was mutated. Furthermore, transcriptional suppression of Pcyt2 by 25-HC was reduced following knockdown targeting of NF-YA or YY1. ChIP analysis revealed that 25-HC inhibited the interaction between NF-Y and RNA polymerase II on the Pcyt2 and Hmgcr promoters. On the basis of these results, we conclude that NF-Y and YY1 are important for the basal transcription of Pcyt2 and that NF-Y is involved in the inhibitory effects of 25-HC on Pcyt2 transcription.

  8. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) family of proteins: transcriptional modifiers with multi-functional protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, M P; Prefontaine, G G; Beischlag, T V

    2013-08-01

    The basic Helix-Loop-Helix/PER-ARNT-SIM (bHLH-PAS) domain family of transcription factors mediates cellular responses to a variety of internal and external stimuli. As functional transcription factors, these proteins act as bHLH-PAS heterodimers and can be further sub-classified into sensory/activated subunits and regulatory or ARNT-like proteins. This class of proteins act as master regulators of the bHLH-PAS superfamily of transcription factors that mediate circadian rhythm gene programs, innate and adaptive immune responses, oxygen-sensing mechanisms and compensate for deleterious environmental exposures. Some contribute to the etiology of human pathologies including cancer because of their effects on cell growth and metabolism. We will review the canonical roles of ARNT and ARNT-like proteins with an emphasis on coactivator selectivity and recruitment. We will also discuss recent advances in our understanding of noncanonical DNA-binding independent or off-target roles of ARNT that are uncoupled from its classic heterodimeric bHLH-PAS binding partners. Understanding the DNA binding-independent functions of ARNT may identify novel therapeutic options for the treatment of a large spectrum of disease states.

  9. Control of V(D)J Recombination through Transcriptional Elongation and Changes in Locus Chromatin Structure and Nuclear Organization.

    PubMed

    Del Blanco, Beatriz; García, Vanina; García-Mariscal, Alberto; Hernández-Munain, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    V(D)J recombination is the assembly of gene segments at the antigen receptor loci to generate antigen receptor diversity in T and B lymphocytes. This process is regulated, according to defined developmental programs, by the action of a single specific recombinase complex formed by the recombination antigen gene (RAG-1/2) proteins that are expressed in immature lymphocytes. V(D)J recombination is strictly controlled by RAG-1/2 accessibility to specific recombination signal sequences in chromatin at several levels: cellular lineage, temporal regulation, gene segment order, and allelic exclusion. DNA cleavage by RAG-1/2 is regulated by the chromatin structure, transcriptional elongation, and three-dimensional architecture and position of the antigen receptor loci in the nucleus. Cis-elements specifically direct transcription and V(D)J recombination at these loci through interactions with transacting factors that form molecular machines that mediate a sequence of structural events. These events open chromatin to activate transcriptional elongation and to permit the access of RAG-1/2 to their recombination signal sequences to drive the juxtaposition of the V, D, and J segments and the recombination reaction itself. This chapter summarizes the advances in this area and the important role of the structure and position of antigen receptor loci within the nucleus to control this process.

  10. Nuclear receptor coactivator/coregulator NCoA6(NRC) is a pleiotropic coregulator involved in transcription, cell survival, growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Muktar A.; Samuels, Herbert H.

    2008-01-01

    NCoA6 (also referred to as NRC, ASC-2, TRBP, PRIP and RAP250) was originally isolated as a ligand-dependent nuclear receptor interacting protein. However, NCoA6 is a multifunctional coregulator or coactivator necessary for transcriptional activation of a wide spectrum of target genes. The NCoA6 gene is amplified and overexpressed in breast, colon and lung cancers. NCoA6 is a 250 kDa protein which harbors a potent N-terminal activation domain, AD1; and a second, centrally-located activation domain, AD2, which is necessary for nuclear receptor signaling. The intrinsic activation potential of NCoA6 is regulated by its C-terminal STL regulatory domain. Near AD2 is an LxxLL-1 motif which interacts with a wide spectrum of ligand-bound NRs with high-affinity. A second LxxLL motif (LxxLL-2) located towards the C-terminal region is more restricted in its NR specificity. The potential role of NCoA6 as a co-integrator is suggested by its ability to enhance transcriptional activation of a wide variety of transcription factors and from its in vivo association with a number of known cofactors including CBP/p300. NCoA6 has been shown to associate with at least three distinct coactivator complexes containing Set methyltransferases as core polypeptides. The composition of these complexes suggests that NCoA6 may play a fundamental role in transcriptional activation by modulating chromatin structure through histone methylation. Knockout studies in mice suggest that NCoA6 is an essential coactivator. NCoA6-/- embryos die between 8.5-12.5 dpc from general growth retardation coupled with developmental defects in the heart, liver, brain and placenta. NCoA6-/- MEFs grow at a reduced rate compared to WT MEFs and spontaneously undergo apoptosis, indicating the importance of NCoA6 as a prosurvival and anti-apoptotic gene. Studies with NCoA6+/- and conditional knockout mice suggest that NCoA6 is a pleiotropic coregulator involved in growth, development, wound healing and maintenance of energy

  11. Disturbed Cyclical Stretch of Endothelial Cells Promotes Nuclear Expression of the Pro-Atherogenic Transcription Factor NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Pedrigi, Ryan M; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos I; Kondiboyina, Avinash; Sidhu, Sukhjinder; Chau, James; Patel, Miten B; Baeriswyl, Daniel C; Drakakis, Emmanuel M; Krams, Rob

    2017-04-01

    Exposure of endothelial cells to low and multidirectional blood flow is known to promote a pro-atherogenic phenotype. The mechanics of the vessel wall is another important mechano-stimulus within the endothelial cell environment, but no study has examined whether changes in the magnitude and direction of cell stretch can be pro-atherogenic. Herein, we developed a custom cell stretching device to replicate the in vivo stretch environment of the endothelial cell and examined whether low and multidirectional stretch promote nuclear translocation of NF-κB. A fluid-structure interaction model of the device demonstrated a nearly uniform strain within the region of cell attachment and a negligible magnitude of shear stress due to cyclical stretching of the cells in media. Compared to normal cyclical stretch, a low magnitude of cyclical stretch or no stretch caused increased expression of nuclear NF-κB (p = 0.09 and p < 0.001, respectively). Multidirectional stretch also promoted significant nuclear NF-κB expression, comparable to the no stretch condition, which was statistically higher than the low (p < 0.001) and normal (p < 0.001) stretch conditions. This is the first study to show that stretch conditions analogous to atherogenic blood flow profiles can similarly promote a pro-atherogenic endothelial cell phenotype, which supports a role for disturbed vessel wall mechanics as a pathological cell stimulus in the development of advanced atherosclerotic plaques.

  12. Addition and correction: the NF-kappa B-like DNA binding activity observed in Dictyostelium nuclear extracts is due to the GBF transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Traincard, F; Ponte, E; Pun, J; Coukell, B; Veron, M

    2001-10-01

    We have previously reported that a NF-kappa B transduction pathway was likely to be present in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. This conclusion was based on several observations, including the detection of developmentally regulated DNA binding proteins in Dictyostelium nuclear extracts that bound to bona fide kappa B sequences. We have now performed additional experiments which demonstrate that the protein responsible for this NF-kappa B-like DNA binding activity is the Dictyostelium GBF (G box regulatory element binding factor) transcription factor. This result, along with the fact that no sequence with significant similarity to components of the mammalian NF-kappa B pathway can be found in Dictyostelium genome, now almost entirely sequenced, led us to reconsider our previous conclusion on the occurrence of a NF-kappa B signal transduction pathway in Dictyostelium.

  13. The transcriptional integrator CREB-binding protein mediates positive cross talk between nuclear hormone receptors and the hematopoietic bZip protein p45/NF-E2.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, X; Reginato, M J; Andrews, N C; Lazar, M A

    1997-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) and retinoic acid (RA) play important roles in erythropoiesis. We found that the hematopoietic cell-specific bZip protein p45/NF-E2 interacts with T3 receptor (TR) and RA receptor (RAR) but not retinoid X receptor. The interaction is between the DNA-binding domain of the nuclear receptor and the leucine zipper region of p45/NF-E2 but is markedly enhanced by cognate ligand. Remarkably, ligand-dependent transactivation by TR and RAR is markedly potentiated by p45/NF-E2. This effect of p45/NF-E2 is prevented by maf-like protein p18, which functions positively as a heterodimer with p45/NF-E2 on DNA. Potentiation of hormone action by p45/NF-E2 requires its activation domain, which interacts strongly with the multifaceted coactivator cyclic AMP response element protein-binding protein (CBP). The region of CBP which interacts with p45/NF-E2 is the same interaction domain that mediates inhibition of hormone-stimulated transcription by AP1 transcription factors. Overexpression of the bZip interaction domain of CBP specifically abolishes the positive cross talk between TR and p45/NF-E2. Thus, positive cross talk between p45/NF-E2 and nuclear hormone receptors requires direct protein-protein interactions between these factors and with CBP, whose integration of positive signals from two transactivation domains provides a novel mechanism for potentiation of hormone action in hematopoietic cells. PMID:9032267

  14. Positive Regulation by γ-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor Subunit-1 of Chondrogenesis through Acceleration of Nuclear Translocation of Activating Transcription Factor-4*

    PubMed Central

    Takahata, Yoshifumi; Hinoi, Eiichi; Takarada, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yukari; Ogawa, Shinya; Yoneda, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    A view that signaling machineries for the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are functionally expressed by cells outside the central nervous system is now prevailing. In this study, we attempted to demonstrate functional expression of GABAergic signaling molecules by chondrocytes. In cultured murine costal chondrocytes, mRNA was constitutively expressed for metabotropic GABAB receptor subunit-1 (GABABR1), but not for GABABR2. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the predominant expression of GABABR1 by prehypertrophic to hypertrophic chondrocytes in tibial sections of newborn mice. The GABABR agonist baclofen failed to significantly affect chondrocytic differentiation determined by Alcian blue staining and alkaline phosphatase activity in cultured chondrocytes, whereas newborn mice knocked out of GABABR1 (KO) showed a decreased body size and delayed calcification in hyoid bone and forelimb and hindlimb digits. Delayed calcification was also seen in cultured metatarsals from KO mice with a marked reduction of Indian hedgehog gene (Ihh) expression. Introduction of GABABR1 led to synergistic promotion of the transcriptional activity of activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4) essential for normal chondrogenesis, in addition to facilitating ATF4-dependent Ihh promoter activation. Although immunoreactive ATF4 was negligibly detected in the nucleus of chondrocytes from KO mice, ATF4 expression was again seen in the nucleus and cytoplasm after the retroviral introduction of GABABR1 into cultured chondrocytes from KO mice. In nuclear extracts of KO chondrocytes, a marked decrease was seen in ATF4 DNA binding. These results suggest that GABABR1 positively regulates chondrogenesis through a mechanism relevant to the acceleration of nuclear translocation of ATF4 for Ihh expression in chondrocytes. PMID:22879594

  15. Transcription, translation, and cellular localization of three Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus structural proteins: ODV-E18, ODV-E35, and ODV-EC27.

    PubMed

    Braunagel, S C; He, H; Ramamurthy, P; Summers, M D

    1996-08-01

    This paper identifies two structural proteins of the occluded derived viral envelope of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV): ODV-E18 and ODV-E35. In addition, we identify a protein, ODV-EC27, that is incorporated into the capsid of occluded virus, which is not detected in budded virus. The genes for these proteins reside within the IE0 intron. The intron was sequenced, and five open reading frames (ORF) were identified. ORF 3 (genomic ORF 143) codes for the ODV envelope protein, ODV-E18. ORF 4 (genomic ORF 144) codes for ODV-EC27, and Western blot analyses locate this protein to both the ODV capsid and envelope. Transcripts for both ODV-E18 and ODV-EC27 initiate from conserved TAAG motifs, and transcripts are detected from 16 through 72 hr p.i. Antiserum to ODV-E18 recognizes a band of 18 kDa on Western blots of extracts from infected cells and bands of 18 and 35 kDa on Western blots of proteins from purified ODV envelope. N-terminal amino acid sequencing reveals that both ODV-E18 and ODV-E35 contain the same N-terminus. Antiserum to ODV-EC27 recognizes a protein of 27 kDa on Western blots of extracts from infected cells and bands of 27 and 35 kDa on Western blots of proteins from purified ODV. Using immunogold labeling techniques, ODV-E18 and/or ODV-E35 are detected in viral induced intranuclear microvesicles and are not detected in the plasma membrane, cytoplasmic membranes, or the nuclear envelope. Immunogold labeling using antisera to ODV-EC27 detects this protein on both the ODV envelope and capsid.

  16. DNA-binding affinity and transcriptional activity of the RelA homodimer of nuclear factor kappa B are not correlated.

    PubMed

    Mulero, Maria Carmen; Huang, De-Bin; Nguyen, H Thien; Wang, Vivien; Li, Yidan; Biswas, Tapan; Ghosh, Gourisankar

    2017-09-21

    The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factor family regulates genes involved in cell proliferation and inflammation. The promoters of these genes often contain NF-κB binding sites (κB sites) arranged in tandem. How NF-κB activates transcription through these multiple sites is incompletely understood. We report here an X-ray crystal structure of homodimers comprising the RelA DNA binding domain containing the Rel homology region (RHR) in NF-κB bound to an E-selectin promoter fragment with tandem κB sites. This structure revealed that two dimers bind asymmetrically to the symmetrically arranged κB sites at which multiple cognate contacts between one dimer to the corresponding DNA are broken. Since simultaneous RelA RHR dimer binding to tandem sites in solution was anti-cooperative, we inferred that asymmetric RelA RHR binding with fewer contacts likely indicates a dissociative binding mode. We found that both κB sites are essential for reporter gene activation by full-length RelA homodimer, suggesting that dimers facilitate DNA binding to each other even though their stable co-occupation is not promoted. Promoter variants with altered spacing and orientation of tandem κB sites displayed unexpected reporter activities that were not explained by solution-binding pattern of RelA RHR. Remarkably, full-length RelA bound all DNAs with a weaker affinity and specificity. Moreover, the transactivation domain (AD) played a negative role in DNA binding. These observations suggest that other nuclear factors influence full-length RelA binding to DNA by neutralizing AD negative effect. We propose that DNA binding by NF-κB dimers is highly complex and modulated by facilitated association-dissociation processes. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa-B, during the estrous cycle and early pregnancy in the pig

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Establishment and maintenance of pregnancy in the pig involves intricate communication between the developing conceptuses and the maternal endometrium. This process occurs during trophoblast elongation which is spaciotemporally associated with conceptus synthesis and release of IL1B concomitant with pregnancy-specific endometrial up-regulation of IL-1 receptors, providing the potential for activation of the transcription factor, NFKB. The objective of the current investigation was to determine changes in expression and cellular localization of NFKB and associated factors during the estrous cycle and early pregnancy in the pig. In situ hybridization was used to localize changes in PGR, ESR1, and TNFRSF11A during the peri-implantation period. Quantitative RT-PCR was utilized to demonstrate gene expression changes for NFKB1, RELA, TNFRSF11A, TLR4, NFKBIA and NFKBIB. Transcription factor ELISA demonstrated an overall increase in RELA during the peri-implantation period in both cyclic and pregnant gilts. While the presence of TNFSF11A and TLR4 were both detected, TLR4 expression changes were temporally associated with NFKB expression and activation. Collectively, these data demonstrate that NFKB activation may occur during the period of uterine receptivity in both the cyclic and pregnant endometrium. PMID:20426870

  18. Cocaine induces cell death and activates the transcription nuclear factor kappa-b in pc12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lepsch, Lucilia B; Munhoz, Carolina D; Kawamoto, Elisa M; Yshii, Lidia M; Lima, Larissa S; Curi-Boaventura, Maria F; Salgado, Thais ML; Curi, Rui; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Scavone, Cristoforo

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine is a worldwide used drug and its abuse is associated with physical, psychiatric and social problems. The mechanism by which cocaine causes neurological damage is very complex and involves several neurotransmitter systems. For example, cocaine increases extracellular levels of dopamine and free radicals, and modulates several transcription factors. NF-κB is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression involved in cellular death. Our aim was to investigate the toxicity and modulation of NF-κB activity by cocaine in PC 12 cells. Treatment with cocaine (1 mM) for 24 hours induced DNA fragmentation, cellular membrane rupture and reduction of mitochondrial activity. A decrease in Bcl-2 protein and mRNA levels, and an increase in caspase 3 activity and cleavage were also observed. In addition, cocaine (after 6 hours treatment) activated the p50/p65 subunit of NF-κB complex and the pretreatment of the cells with SCH 23390, a D1 receptor antagonist, attenuated the NF-κB activation. Inhibition of NF-κB activity by using PDTC and Sodium Salicilate increased cell death caused by cocaine. These results suggest that cocaine induces cell death (apoptosis and necrosis) and activates NF-κB in PC12 cells. This activation occurs, at least partially, due to activation of D1 receptors and seems to have an anti-apoptotic effect on these cells. PMID:19183502

  19. Cocaine induces cell death and activates the transcription nuclear factor kappa-B in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lepsch, Lucilia B; Munhoz, Carolina D; Kawamoto, Elisa M; Yshii, Lidia M; Lima, Larissa S; Curi-Boaventura, Maria F; Salgado, Thais M L; Curi, Rui; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Scavone, Cristoforo

    2009-02-01

    Cocaine is a worldwide used drug and its abuse is associated with physical, psychiatric and social problems. The mechanism by which cocaine causes neurological damage is very complex and involves several neurotransmitter systems. For example, cocaine increases extracellular levels of dopamine and free radicals, and modulates several transcription factors. NF-kappaB is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression involved in cellular death. Our aim was to investigate the toxicity and modulation of NF-kappaB activity by cocaine in PC 12 cells. Treatment with cocaine (1 mM) for 24 hours induced DNA fragmentation, cellular membrane rupture and reduction of mitochondrial activity. A decrease in Bcl-2 protein and mRNA levels, and an increase in caspase 3 activity and cleavage were also observed. In addition, cocaine (after 6 hours treatment) activated the p50/p65 subunit of NF-kappaB complex and the pretreatment of the cells with SCH 23390, a D1 receptor antagonist, attenuated the NF-kappaB activation. Inhibition of NF-kappaB activity by using PDTC and Sodium Salicilate increased cell death caused by cocaine. These results suggest that cocaine induces cell death (apoptosis and necrosis) and activates NF-kappaB in PC12 cells. This activation occurs, at least partially, due to activation of D1 receptors and seems to have an anti-apoptotic effect on these cells.

  20. Promoter architecture and transcriptional regulation of musculoskeletal embryonic nuclear protein 1b (mustn1b) gene in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Bregua, P; Chien, C J; Megias, M; Du, S D; Rotllant, J

    2017-09-11

    Mustn1 is a specific musculoskeletal protein that plays a critical role in myogenesis and chondrogenesis in vertebrates. Whole-mount in situ hybridization revealed that mustn1b mRNAs are specifically expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles in zebrafish embryos. However, the precise function and the regulatory elements required for its muscle-specific expression are largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to explore and uncover the target genomic regions that regulate mustn1b gene expression by in-vivo functional characterization of the mustn1b promoter. We report here stable expression analyses of eGFP from fluorescent transgenic reporter zebrafish line containing a 0.8kb_mustn1b-Tol2-eGFP construct. eGFP expression was specifically found in the skeletal and cardiac muscle tissues. We show that reporter zebrafish lines generated replicate the endogenous mustn1b expression pattern in early zebrafish embryos. Specific site direct-mutagenesis analysis revealed that promoter activity resides in two annotated genomic regulatory regions each one corresponding to a specific functional transcription factor binding site. Our data indicates that mustn1b is specifically expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle tissues and its muscle specificity is controlled by the 0.2 kb promoter and flanking sequences and in vivo regulated by the action of two sequence-specific families of transcription factors (TFs). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Transcriptional activities of nuclear SREBP-1a, -1c, and -2 to different target promoters of lipogenic and cholesterogenic genes.

    PubMed

    Amemiya-Kudo, Michiyo; Shimano, Hitoshi; Hasty, Alyssa H; Yahagi, Naoya; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Okazaki, Hiroaki; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Iizuka, Yoko; Ohashi, Ken; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Harada, Kenji; Gotoda, Takanari; Sato, Ryuichiro; Kimura, Satoshi; Ishibashi, Shun; Yamada, Nobuhiro

    2002-08-01

    Recent studies on the in vivo roles of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) family indicate that SREBP-2 is more specific to cholesterogenic gene expression whereas SREBP-1 targets lipogenic genes. To define the molecular mechanism involved in this differential regulation, luciferase-reporter gene assays were performed in HepG2 cells to compare the transactivities of nuclear SREBP-1a, -1c, and -2 on a battery of SREBP-target promoters containing sterol regulatory element (SRE), SRE-like, or E-box sequences. The results show first that cholesterogenic genes containing classic SREs in their promoters are strongly and efficiently activated by both SREBP-1a and SREBP-2, but not by SREBP-1c. Second, an E-box containing reporter gene is much less efficiently activated by SREBP-1a and -1c, and SREBP-2 was inactive in spite of its ability to bind to the E-box. Third, promoters of lipogenic enzymes containing variations of SRE (SRE-like sequences) are strongly activated by SREBP-1a, and only modestly and equally by both SREBP-1c and -2. Finally, substitution of the unique tyrosine residue within the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) portion of nuclear SREBPs with arginine, the conserved residue found in all other bHLH proteins, abolishes the transactivity of all SREBPs for SRE, and conversely results in markedly increased activity of SREBP-1 but not activity of SREBP-2 for E-boxes. These data demonstrate the different specificity and affinity of nuclear SREBP-1 and -2 for different target DNAs, explaining a part of the mechanism behind the differential in vivo regulation of cholesterogenic and lipogenic enzymes by SREBP-1 and -2, respectively.

  2. The Chromatin Regulator DMAP1 Modulates Activity of the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Transcription Factor Relish in the Drosophila Innate Immune Response*

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Akira; Fukuyama, Hidehiro; Imler, Jean-Luc; Hoffmann, Jules A.

    2014-01-01

    The host defense of the model organism Drosophila is under the control of two major signaling cascades controlling transcription factors of the NF-κB family, the Toll and the immune deficiency (IMD) pathways. The latter shares extensive similarities with the mammalian TNF-R pathway and was initially discovered for its role in anti-Gram-negative bacterial reactions. A previous interactome study from this laboratory reported that an unexpectedly large number of proteins are binding to the canonical components of the IMD pathway. Here, we focus on DNA methyltransferase-associated protein 1 (DMAP1), which this study identified as an interactant of Relish, a Drosophila transcription factor reminiscent of the mammalian p105 NF-κB protein. We show that silencing of DMAP1 expression both in S2 cells and in flies results in a significant reduction of Escherichia coli-induced expression of antimicrobial peptides. Epistatic analysis indicates that DMAP1 acts in parallel or downstream of Relish. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments further reveal that, in addition to Relish, DMAP1 also interacts with Akirin and the Brahma-associated protein 55 kDa (BAP55). Taken together, these results reveal that DMAP1 is a novel nuclear modulator of the IMD pathway, possibly acting at the level of chromatin remodeling. PMID:24947515

  3. The pesticide deltamethrin increases free radical production and promotes nuclear translocation of the stress response transcription factor Nrf2 in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Li, HY; Wu, SY; Ma, Q; Shi, N

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) plays a critical role in the mammalian response to chemical and oxidative stress through induction of phase II detoxification enzymes and oxidative stress response proteins. We reported that Nrf2 expression was activated by deltamethrin (DM), a prototype of the widely used pyrithroid pesticides, in PC12 cells. However, no study has examined Nrf2 nuclear translocation and free radical production, two hallmarks of oxidative stress, in the mammalian brain in vivo. To this end, we examined translocation of Nrf2 and production of free radicals in rat brain exposed to DM. Indeed, DM initiated nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, Nrf2 translocation was accompanied by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 gene, an Nrf2-regulated gene linked to free radical production. Deltamethrin exposure promoted free radical formation in rat brain and reactive oxygen species generation in PC12 cells. Translocation of Nrf2 may be a response to DM-dependent induction of free radicals and DM may act as a mammalian neurotoxin by initiating oxidative stress. PMID:21398409

  4. Transcriptional profiling of the nuclear factor-kappaB pathway identifies a subgroup of primary lymphoma of the central nervous system with low BCL10 expression.

    PubMed

    Courts, Cornelius; Montesinos-Rongen, Manuel; Martin-Subero, Jose Ignacio; Brunn, Anna; Siemer, Dörte; Zühlke-Jenisch, Reina; Pels, Hendrik; Jürgens, Annika; Schlegel, Uwe; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G H; Schaller, Carlo; Reifenberger, Guido; Sabel, Michael; Warnecke-Eberz, Ute; Wiestler, Otmar D; Küppers, Ralf; Siebert, Reiner; Deckert, Martina

    2007-03-01

    Recent studies point to a role of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB signaling in a subset of diffuse large B cell lymphomas. We have analyzed the expression of 21 genes encoding NF-kappaB family members, upstream modulators, and targets in 32 primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSLs) by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Compared with nonmalignant germinal center centroblasts, expression of BCL10, REL, IAP1, and TRAF1 was significantly lower in PCNSLs, whereas that of BAX, BCLXL, BCL2, MALT1, CARD9, CARD10, CARD11, CARD14, CCND2, cFLIP, RELA, RELB, NFKB1, NFKB2, and IRF4 was higher. Hierarchical clustering of gene expression data revealed two distinct subgroups of PCNSLs, which were characterized by significantly different transcriptional levels, predominantly of BCL10, but also of REL and IAP1. Thus, these quantitative RT-PCR data with expression of genes of the NF-kappaB family as well as NF-kappaB-regulated genes together with immunohistochemical detection of nuclear RELA and REL indicate activation of the NF-kappaB pathway in PCNSLs, which may contribute to their high proliferative activity and the low level of apoptosis.

  5. Identification of cis-acting sequences responsible for phorbol ester induction of human serum amyloid A gene expression via a nuclear factor kB-like transcription factor

    SciTech Connect

    Edbrooke, M.R.; Cheshire, J.K.; Woo, P.; Burt, B.W.

    1989-05-01

    The authors have analyzed the 5'-flanking region of one of the genes coding for the human acute-phase protein, serum amyloid A (SAA). They found that SAA mRNA could be increased fivefold in transfected cells by treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). To analyze this observation further, they placed a 265-base-pair 5' SAA fragment upstream of the reporter chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene and transfected this construct into HeLa cells. PMA treatment of these transient transfectants resulted in increased CAT expression. Nuclear proteins from PMA-treated HeLa cells bound to this DNA fragment, and methylation interference analysis showed that the binding was specific to the sequence GGGACTTTCC (between -82 and -91), a sequence previously described by others as the binding site for the nuclear factor NF/kappa/B. In a cotransfection competition experiment, they could abolish PMA-induced CAT activity by using cloned human immunodeficiency virus long-terminal-repeat DNA containing the NF/kappa/B-binding sequence. The same long-terminal-repeat DNA containing mutant NF/kappa/B-binding sequences did not affect CAT expression, which suggested that binding by an NF/kappa/B-like factor is required for increased SAA transcription.

  6. In vitro transcription of a Drosophila U1 small nuclear RNA gene requires TATA box-binding protein and two proximal cis-acting elements with stringent spacing requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Zamrod, Z; Tyree, C M; Song, Y; Stumph, W E

    1993-01-01

    Transcription of a Drosophila U1 small nuclear RNA gene was functionally analyzed in cell extracts derived from 0- to 12-h embryos. Two promoter elements essential for efficient initiation of transcription in vitro by RNA polymerase II were identified. The first, termed PSEA, is located between positions -41 and -61 relative to the transcription start site, is crucial for promoter activity, and is the dominant element for specifying the transcription initiation site. PSEA thus appears to be functionally homologous to the proximal sequence element of vertebrate small nuclear RNA genes. The second element, termed PSEB, is located at positions -25 to -32 and is required for an efficient level of transcription initiation because mutation of PSEB, or alteration of the spacing between PSEA and PSEB, severely reduced transcriptional activity relative to that of the wild-type promoter. Although the PSEB sequence does not have any obvious sequence similarity to a TATA box, conversion of PSEB to the canonical TATA sequence dramatically increased the efficiency of the U1 promoter and simultaneously relieved the requirement for the upstream PSEA. Despite these effects, introduction of the TATA sequence into the U1 promoter had no effect on the choice of start site or on the RNA polymerase II specificity of the promoter. Finally, evidence is presented that the TATA box-binding protein is required for transcription from the wild-type U1 promoter as well as from the TATA-containing U1 promoter. Images PMID:8355718

  7. Suppression of chronic inflammation with engineered nanomaterials delivering nuclear factor κB transcription factor decoy oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Farahmand, Leila; Darvishi, Behrad; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan

    2017-11-01

    As a prototypical pro-inflammatory transcription factor, constitutive activation of NF-κB signaling pathway has been reported in several chronic inflammatory disorders including inflammatory bowel disease, cystic fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. Application of decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) against NF-κB, as an effective molecular therapy approach, has brought about several promising outcomes in treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders. However, systematic administration of these genetic constructs is mostly hampered due to their instability, rapid degradation by nucleases and poor cellular uptake. Both chemical modification and application of delivery systems have shown to effectively overcome some of these limitations. Among different administered delivery systems, nanomaterials have gained much attention for delivering NF-κB decoy ODNs owing to their high loading capacity, targeted delivery and ease of synthesis. In this review, we highlight some of the most recently developed nanomaterial-based delivery systems for overcoming limitations associated with clinical application of these genetic constructs.

  8. Keap1 silencing boosts lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription of interleukin 6 via activation of nuclear factor κB in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Peng; Xue, Peng; Dong, Jian; Peng, Hui; Clewell, Rebecca; Wang, Aiping; Wang, Yue; Peng, Shuangqing; Qu, Weidong; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2013-11-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL6) is a multifunctional cytokine that regulates immune and inflammatory responses. Multiple transcription factors, including nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), regulate IL6 transcription. Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) is a substrate adaptor protein for the Cullin 3-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, which regulates the degradation of many proteins, including Nrf2 and IκB kinase β (IKKβ). Here, we found that stable knockdown of Keap1 (Keap1-KD) in RAW 264.7 (RAW) mouse macrophages and human monocyte THP-1 cells significantly increased expression of Il6, and Nrf2-target genes, under basal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.001–0.1 μg/ml)-challenged conditions. However, Nrf2 activation alone, by tert-butylhydroquinone treatment of RAW cells, did not increase expression of Il6. Compared to cells transduced with scrambled non-target negative control shRNA, Keap1-KD RAW cells showed enhanced protein levels of IKKβ and increased expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 under non-stressed and LPS-treated conditions. Because the expression of Il6 in Keap1-KD RAW cells was significantly attenuated by silencing of Ikkβ, but not Nrf2, it appears that stabilized IKKβ is responsible for the enhanced transactivation of Il6 in Keap1-KD cells. This study demonstrated that silencing of Keap1 in macrophages boosts LPS-induced transcription of Il6 via NF-κB activation. Given the importance of IL6 in the inflammatory response, the Keap1–IKKβ–NF-κB pathway may be a novel target for treatment and prevention of inflammation and associated disorders. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Keap1 increases expression of Il6 in macrophages. • Silencing of Keap1 results in protein accumulation of IKKβ and NF-κB p65. • Induction of Il6 resulting from Keap1 silencing is attributed to NF-κB activation.

  9. Transcriptional activation by the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen is facilitated by an N-terminal chromatin-binding motif.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lai-Yee; Matchett, Gerald A; Wilson, Angus C

    2004-09-01

    In immunocompromised patients, infection with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) can give rise to Kaposi's sarcoma and several lymphoproliferative disorders. In these tumors, KSHV establishes a latent infection in many of the rapidly proliferating and morphologically abnormal cells. Only a few viral gene products are expressed by the latent virus, and one of the best characterized is the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), a nuclear protein required for the maintenance of viral episomal DNA in the dividing host cell. LANA can also activate or repress an assortment of cellular and viral promoters and may contribute to pathogenesis by allowing the proliferation and survival of host cells. Here we show that activation of the human E2F1 and cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) promoters requires elements from both the N- and C-terminal regions of LANA. Deletion of the first 22 amino acids, which are necessary for episome tethering, does not affect nuclear localization but significantly reduces transactivation. Within the deleted peptide, we have identified a short sequence, termed the chromatin-binding motif (CBM), that binds tightly to interphase and mitotic chromatin. A second chromatin-binding activity resides in the C terminus but is not sufficient for optimal transactivation. Alanine substitutions within the CBM reveal a close correlation between the transactivation and chromatin binding activities, implying a mechanistic link. In contrast to promoter activation, we find that the 223 amino acids of the LANA C terminus are sufficient to inhibit p53-mediated activation of the human BAX promoter, indicating that the CBM is not required for all transcription-related functions.

  10. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate prevents lipid peroxidation and enhances antioxidant defense system via modulating hepatic nuclear transcription factors in heat-stressed quails.

    PubMed

    Sahin, K; Orhan, C; Tuzcu, M; Ali, S; Sahin, N; Hayirli, A

    2010-10-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenol derived from green tea, exerts antioxidant effects. Oxidative stress is one of the consequences of heat stress (HS), which also depresses performance in poultry. This experiment was conducted to elucidate the action mode of EGCG in alleviation of oxidative stress in heat-stressed quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica). A total of 180 five-week-old female Japanese quails were reared either at 22°C for 24 h/d (thermoneutral, TN) or 34°C for 8 h/d (HS) for 12 wk. Birds in both environments were randomly fed 1 of 3 diets: basal diet and basal diet added with 200 or 400 mg of EGCG/kg of diet. Each of the 2×3 factorially arranged groups was replicated in 10 cages, each containing 3 quails. Performance variables [feed intake (FI) and egg production (EP)], oxidative stress biomarkers [malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px)] and hepatic transcription factors [nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)] were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA. Exposure to HS caused reductions in FI by 9.7% and EP by 14.4%, increased hepatic MDA level by 84.8%, and decreased hepatic SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px activities by 25.8, 52.3, and 45.5%, respectively (P<0.0001 for all). The hepatic NF-κB expression was greater (156 vs. 82%) and Nrf2 expression was lower (84 vs. 118%) for quails reared under the HS environment than for those reared under the TN environment (P<0.0001 for both). In response to increasing supplemental EGCG level, there were linear increases in FI from 29.6 to 30.9 g/d and EP from 84.3 to 90.1%/d, linear decreases in hepatic MDA level from 2.82 to 1.72 nmol/g and Nrf2 expression from 77.5 to 123.3%, and linear increases in hepatic SOD (146.4 to 182.2), CAT (36.2 to 47.1), and GSH-Px (13.5 to 18.5) activities (U/mg of protein) and NF-κB expression (149.7 to 87.3%) (P<0.0001 for all). Two

  11. Food Components Modulate Obesity and Energy Metabolism via the Transcriptional Regulation of Lipid-Sensing Nuclear Receptors.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and hypertension. Many modern people have a tendency to overeat owing to stress and loosening of self-control. Moreover, energy expenditure varies greatly among individuals. Scientific reduction of obesity is important under these circumstances. Furthermore, recent research on molecular levels has clarified the differentiation of adipocytes, the level of subsequent fat accumulation, and the secretion of the biologically active adipokines by adipocytes. Adipose tissues and obesity have become the most important target for the prevention and treatment of many chronic diseases. We have identified various food-derived compounds modulating nuclear receptors, especially peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor(PPAR), in the regulation of energy metabolism and obesity. In this review, we discuss the PPARs that are most important in obesity and energy metabolism.

  12. Identification of the Flavonoid Luteolin as a Repressor of the Transcription Factor Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Inoue, Jun; Choi, Jung-Min; Nakamura, Shugo; Yan, Zhen; Fushinobu, Shinya; Kamada, Haruhiko; Kato, Hisanori; Hashidume, Tsutomu; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the expression of genes involved in the secretion of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins and in glucose metabolism. In the present study, we identified a naturally occurring flavonoid, luteolin, as a repressor of HNF4α by screening for effectors of the human microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) promoter. Luciferase reporter gene assays revealed that the activity of the MTP gene promoter was suppressed by luteolin and that the mutation of HNF4α-binding element abolished luteolin responsiveness. Luteolin treatment caused a significant decrease in the mRNA levels of HNF4α target genes in HepG2 cells and inhibited apoB-containing lipoprotein secretion in HepG2 and differentiated Caco2 cells. The interaction between luteolin and HNF4α was demonstrated using absorption spectrum analysis and luteolin-immobilized beads. Luteolin did not affect the DNA binding of HNF4α to the promoter region of its target genes but suppressed the acetylation level of histone H3 in the promoter region of certain HNF4α target genes. Short term treatment of mice with luteolin significantly suppressed the expression of HNF4α target genes in the liver. In addition, long term treatment of mice with luteolin significantly suppressed their diet-induced obesity and improved their serum glucose and lipid parameters. Importantly, long term luteolin treatment lowered serum VLDL and LDL cholesterol and serum apoB protein levels, which was not accompanied by fat accumulation in the liver. These results suggest that the flavonoid luteolin ameliorates an atherogenic lipid profile in vivo that is likely to be mediated through the inactivation of HNF4α. PMID:26272613

  13. Nuclear localization and transactivation by Vitis CBF transcription factors are regulated by combinations of conserved amino acid domains.

    PubMed

    Carlow, Chevonne E; Faultless, J Trent; Lee, Christine; Siddiqua, Mahbuba; Edge, Alison; Nassuth, Annette

    2017-09-01

    The highly conserved CBF pathway is crucial in the regulation of plant responses to low temperatures. Extensive analysis of Arabidopsis CBF proteins revealed that their functions rely on several conserved amino acid domains although the exact function of each domain is disputed. The question was what functions similar domains have in CBFs from other, overwintering woody plants such as Vitis, which likely have a more involved regulation than the model plant Arabidopsis. A total of seven CBF genes were cloned and sequenced from V. riparia and the less frost tolerant V. vinifera. The deduced species-specific amino acid sequences differ in only a few amino acids, mostly in non-conserved regions. Amino acid sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis showed two distinct groups of Vitis CBFs. One group contains CBF1, CBF2, CBF3 and CBF8 and the other group contains CBF4, CBF5 and CBF6. Transient transactivation assays showed that all Vitis CBFs except CBF5 activate via a CRT or DRE promoter element, whereby Vitis CBF3 and 4 prefer a CRT element. The hydrophobic domains in the C-terminal end of VrCBF6 were shown to be important for how well it activates. The putative nuclear localization domain of Vitis CBF1 was shown to be sufficient for nuclear localization, in contrast to previous reports for AtCBF1, and also important for transactivation. The latter highlights the value of careful analysis of domain functions instead of reliance on computer predictions and published data for other related proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. A quasi-lentiviral green fluorescent protein reporter exhibits nuclear export features of late human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcripts

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Marcus; Ludwig, Christine; Kehlenbeck, Sylvia; Jungert, Kerstin; Wagner, Ralf . E-mail: ralf.wagner@klinik.uni-regensburg.de

    2006-09-01

    We have previously shown that Rev-dependent expression of HIV-1 Gag from CMV immediate early promoter critically depends on the AU-rich codon bias of the gag gene. Here, we demonstrate that adaptation of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene to HIV codon bias is sufficient to turn this hivGFP RNA into a quasi-lentiviral message following the rules of late lentiviral gene expression. Accordingly, GFP expression was significantly decreased in transfected cells strictly correlating with reduced RNA levels. In the presence of the HIV 5' major splice donor, the hivGFP RNAs were stabilized in the nucleus and efficiently exported to the cytoplasm following fusion of the 3' Rev-responsive element (RRE) and coexpression of HIV-1 Rev. This Rev-dependent translocation was specifically inhibited by leptomycin B suggesting export via the CRM1-dependent pathway used by late lentiviral transcripts. In conclusion, this quasi-lentiviral reporter system may provide a new platform for developing sensitive Rev screening assays.

  15. A time of change: Dynamics of chromatin and transcriptional regulation during nuclear programming in early Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Boija, Ann; Mannervik, Mattias

    2015-10-01

    In order for a new organism to form, the genomes of the highly specialized egg and sperm need to be reprogrammed into a totipotent state that is capable of generating all of the cell types that comprise an organism. This reprogramming occurs by erasing chromatin modifications, leaving the cells in a naïve state, followed by the induction of specialized programming events. Pioneer factors bind to the genome prior to zygotic genome activation, followed by acetylation of histones and further chromatin specialization by the addition of methylation marks later during differentiation. Genome-wide approaches have provided insight into the genomic and epigenomic regulation of gene expression during development, providing a new perspective on the process of cell specification and differentiation. In this review, we discuss how distal DNA and core promoter elements, RNA polymerase pausing, transcription factors, and co-regulators interact to shape the chromatin landscape and direct tissue-specific expression patterns during embryo development, focusing on the well-characterized Drosophila embryo.

  16. An evolutionary conserved interaction between the Gcm transcription factor and the SF1 nuclear receptor in the female reproductive system

    PubMed Central

    Cattenoz, Pierre B.; Delaporte, Claude; Bazzi, Wael; Giangrande, Angela

    2016-01-01

    NR5A1 is essential for the development and for the function of steroid producing glands of the reproductive system. Moreover, its misregulation is associated with endometriosis, which is the first cause of infertility in women. Hr39, the Drosophila ortholog of NR5A1, is expressed and required in the secretory cells of the spermatheca, the female exocrine gland that ensures fertility by secreting substances that attract and capacitate the spermatozoids. We here identify a direct regulator of Hr39 in the spermatheca: the Gcm transcription factor. Furthermore, lack of Gcm prevents the production of the secretory cells and leads to female sterility in Drosophila. Hr39 regulation by Gcm seems conserved in mammals and involves the modification of the DNA methylation profile of mNr5a1. This study identifies a new molecular pathway in female reproductive system development and suggests a role for hGCM in the progression of reproductive tract diseases in humans. PMID:27886257

  17. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C targets p53 and modulates its transcriptional and apoptotic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Fuming; Saha, Abhik; Murakami, Masanao; Kumar, Pankaj; Knight, Jason S.; Cai Qiliang; Choudhuri, Tathagata; Robertson, Erle S.

    2009-06-05

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancers and the corresponding encoded protein induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest at the G1/S checkpoint in response to DNA damage. To date, previous studies have shown that antigens encoded by human tumor viruses such as SV40 large T antigen, adenovirus E1A and HPV E6 interact with p53 and disrupt its functional activity. In a similar fashion, we now show that EBNA3C, one of the EBV latent antigens essential for the B-cell immortalization in vitro, interacts directly with p53. Additionally, we mapped the interaction of EBNA3C with p53 to the C-terminal DNA-binding and the tetramerization domain of p53, and the region of EBNA3C responsible for binding to p53 was mapped to the N-terminal domain of EBNA3C (residues 130-190), previously shown to interact with a number of important cell-cycle components, specifically SCF{sup Skp2}, cyclin A, and cMyc. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EBNA3C substantially represses the transcriptional activity of p53 in luciferase based reporter assays, and rescues apoptosis induced by ectopic p53 expression in SAOS-2 (p53{sup -/-}) cells. Interestingly, we also show that the DNA-binding ability of p53 is diminished in the presence of EBNA3C. Thus, the interaction between the p53 and EBNA3C provides new insights into the mechanism(s) by which the EBNA3C oncoprotein can alter cellular gene expression in EBV associated human cancers.

  18. Transcriptional Corepressor SMILE Recruits SIRT1 to Inhibit Nuclear Receptor Estrogen Receptor-related Receptor γ Transactivation*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan-Bin; Park, Jeong-Hoh; Kim, Don-Kyu; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Oh, Sangmi; Park, Seung Bum; Shong, Minho; Lee, In-Kyu; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2009-01-01

    SMILE (small heterodimer partner interacting leucine zipper protein) has been identified as a corepressor of the glucocorticoid receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α. Here we show that SMILE also represses estrogen receptor-related receptor γ (ERRγ) transactivation. Knockdown of SMILE gene expression increases ERRγ activity. SMILE directly interacts with ERRγ in vitro and in vivo. Domain mapping analysis showed that SMILE binds to the AF2 domain of ERRγ. SMILE represses ERRγ transactivation partially through competition with coactivators PGC-1α, PGC-1β, and GRIP1. Interestingly, the repression of SMILE on ERRγ is released by SIRT1 inhibitors, a catalytically inactive SIRT1 mutant, and SIRT1 small interfering RNA but not by histone protein deacetylase inhibitor. In vivo glutathione S-transferase pulldown and coimmunoprecipitation assays validated that SMILE physically interacts with SIRT1. Furthermore, the ERRγ inverse agonist GSK5182 enhances the interaction of SMILE with ERRγ and SMILE-mediated repression. Knockdown of SMILE or SIRT1 blocks the repressive effect of GSK5182. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that GSK5182 augments the association of SMILE and SIRT1 on the promoter of the ERRγ target PDK4. GSK5182 and adenoviral overexpression of SMILE cooperate to repress ERRγ-induced PDK4 gene expression, and this repression is released by overexpression of a catalytically defective SIRT1 mutant. Finally, we demonstrated that ERRγ regulates SMILE gene expression, which in turn inhibits ERRγ. Overall, these findings implicate SMILE as a novel corepressor of ERRγ and recruitment of SIRT1 as a novel repressive mechanism for SMILE and ERRγ inverse agonist. PMID:19690166

  19. Berberis vulgaris root extract alleviates the adverse effects of heat stress via modulating hepatic nuclear transcription factors in quails.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Kazim; Orhan, Cemal; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Borawska, Maria H; Jabłonski, Jakub; Guler, Osman; Sahin, Nurhan; Hayirli, Armagan

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the action mode of Berberis vulgaris root extract in the alleviation of oxidative stress, female Japanese quails (n 180, aged 5 weeks) were reared, either at 22°C for 24 h/d (thermoneutral, TN) or 34°C for 8 h/d (heat stress, HS), and fed one of three diets: diets containing 0, 100 or 200 mg of B. vulgaris root extract per kg for 12 weeks. Exposure to HS depressed feed intake by 8·5% and egg production by 12·1%, increased hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) level by 98·0% and decreased hepatic superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities by 23·5, 35·4 and 55·7%, respectively (P<0·001 for all). There were also aggravations in expressions of hepatic NF-κB and heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) by 42 and 43%, respectively and suppressions in expressions of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and haeme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) by 57 and 61%, respectively, in heat-stressed quails (P<0·001 for all). As supplemental B. vulgaris extract increased, there were linear increases in performance parameters, activities of antioxidant enzymes and hepatic Nrf2 and HO-1 expressions (P<0·001 for all) and linear decreases in hepatic MDA level and NF-κB and HSP70 expressions at a greater extent in quails reared under TN condition and those reared under HS condition. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of B. vulgaris root extract to quails reduces the detrimental effects of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation resulting from HS via activating the host defence system at the cellular level.

  20. Production of Viral mRNA in Adenovirus-Transformed Cells by the Post-Transcriptional Processing of Heterogeneous Nuclear RNA Containing Viral and Cell Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wall, R.; Weber, J.; Gage, Z.; Darnell, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Adenovirus 2-transformed cells contain virus-specific sequences which are covalently linked to cell-specific RNA sequences in heterogeneous nuclear RNA (HnRNA) molecules larger than 45S. Virus sequences are identified by hybridization to viral DNA, and the cell sequences are detected by hybridization to cellular DNA under conditions where hybridization only occurs to reiterated sites in cell DNA. Such large composite viral-cell HnRNA molecules presumably arise through the uninterrupted transcription of host sequences and integrated viral DNA. Adenovirus-specific polysomal RNA from these cells sediments as three discrete species at 16, 20, and 26S. These specific classes of viral mRNA do not contain rapidly hybridizing host-specific RNA sequences. Both virus-specific HnRNA and mRNA contain polyadenylic acid sequences since they bind to polyU columns at levels characteristics of other polyA-terminated HnRNA and mRNA. Thus, the discrete species of virus-specific mRNA in adenovirus 2 transformed cells appear to be derived from high-molecular-weight virus-specific HnRNA through a series of post-transcriptional modifications involving polyA addition. Subsequently the HnRNA is cleaved so that the cell-specific RNA sequences that originate from the reiterated sites in cell DNA do not accompany the adenovirus mRNA to the cytoplasm. These events for the adenovirus-specific mRNA appear, therefore, to be similar to the stages in the biogenesis of the majority of mRNA in eukaryotic cells. PMID:4736534

  1. Concerted effects of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 to control vitamin D-directed gene transcription and RNA splicing in human bone cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Park, Juw Won; Chun, Rene F.; Lisse, Thomas S.; Garcia, Alejandro J.; Zavala, Kathryn; Sea, Jessica L.; Lu, Zhi-xiang; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S.; Xing, Yi; Hewison, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally recognized as an RNA splicing regulator, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNPC1/C2) can also bind to double-stranded DNA and function in trans as a vitamin D response element (VDRE)-binding protein. As such, hnRNPC1/C2 may couple transcription induced by the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) with subsequent RNA splicing. In MG63 osteoblastic cells, increased expression of the 1,25(OH)2D target gene CYP24A1 involved immunoprecipitation of hnRNPC1/C2 with CYP24A1 chromatin and RNA. Knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 suppressed expression of CYP24A1, but also increased expression of an exon 10-skipped CYP24A1 splice variant; in a minigene model the latter was attenuated by a functional VDRE in the CYP24A1 promoter. In genome-wide analyses, knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 resulted in 3500 differentially expressed genes and 2232 differentially spliced genes, with significant commonality between groups. 1,25(OH)2D induced 324 differentially expressed genes, with 187 also observed following hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown, and a further 168 unique to hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown. However, 1,25(OH)2D induced only 10 differentially spliced genes, with no overlap with differentially expressed genes. These data indicate that hnRNPC1/C2 binds to both DNA and RNA and influences both gene expression and RNA splicing, but these actions do not appear to be linked through 1,25(OH)2D-mediated induction of transcription. PMID:27672039

  2. Concerted effects of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 to control vitamin D-directed gene transcription and RNA splicing in human bone cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Park, Juw Won; Chun, Rene F; Lisse, Thomas S; Garcia, Alejandro J; Zavala, Kathryn; Sea, Jessica L; Lu, Zhi-Xiang; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S; Xing, Yi; Hewison, Martin

    2017-01-25

    Traditionally recognized as an RNA splicing regulator, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNPC1/C2) can also bind to double-stranded DNA and function in trans as a vitamin D response element (VDRE)-binding protein. As such, hnRNPC1/C2 may couple transcription induced by the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) with subsequent RNA splicing. In MG63 osteoblastic cells, increased expression of the 1,25(OH)2D target gene CYP24A1 involved immunoprecipitation of hnRNPC1/C2 with CYP24A1 chromatin and RNA. Knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 suppressed expression of CYP24A1, but also increased expression of an exon 10-skipped CYP24A1 splice variant; in a minigene model the latter was attenuated by a functional VDRE in the CYP24A1 promoter. In genome-wide analyses, knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 resulted in 3500 differentially expressed genes and 2232 differentially spliced genes, with significant commonality between groups. 1,25(OH)2D induced 324 differentially expressed genes, with 187 also observed following hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown, and a further 168 unique to hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown. However, 1,25(OH)2D induced only 10 differentially spliced genes, with no overlap with differentially expressed genes. These data indicate that hnRNPC1/C2 binds to both DNA and RNA and influences both gene expression and RNA splicing, but these actions do not appear to be linked through 1,25(OH)2D-mediated induction of transcription. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Kinome-Wide Functional Genomics Screen Reveals a Novel Mechanism of TNFα-Induced Nuclear Accumulation of the HIF-1α Transcription Factor in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schoolmeesters, Angela; Brown, Daniel D.; Fedorov, Yuriy

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its most important subunit, HIF-1α, plays a central role in tumor progression by regulating genes involved in cancer cell survival, proliferation and metastasis. HIF-1α activity is associated with nuclear accumulation of the transcription factor and regulated by several mechanisms including modulation of protein stability and degradation. Among recent advances are the discoveries that inflammation-induced cytokines and growth factors affect protein accumulation of HIF-1α under normoxia conditions. TNFα, a major pro-inflammatory cytokine that promotes tumorigenesis is known as a stimulator of HIF-1α activity. To improve our understanding of TNFα-mediated regulation of HIF-1α nuclear accumulation we screened a kinase-specific siRNA library using a cell imaging–based HIF-1α-eGFP chimera reporter assay. Interestingly, this systematic analysis determined that depletion of kinases involved in conventional TNFα signaling (IKK/NFκB and JNK pathways) has no detrimental effect on HIF-1α accumulation. On the other hand, depletion of PRKAR2B, ADCK2, TRPM7, and TRIB2 significantly decreases the effect of TNFα on HIF-1α stability in osteosarcoma and prostate cancer cell lines. These newly discovered regulators conveyed their activity through a non-conventional RELB-depended NFκB signaling pathway and regulation of superoxide activity. Taken together our data allow us to conclude that TNFα uses a distinct and complex signaling mechanism to induce accumulation of HIF-1α in cancer cells. In summary, our results illuminate a novel mechanism through which cancer initiation and progression may be promoted by inflammatory cytokines, highlighting new potential avenues for fighting this disease. PMID:22355351

  4. Differential ligand-dependent interactions between the AF-2 activating domain of nuclear receptors and the putative transcriptional intermediary factors mSUG1 and TIF1.

    PubMed Central

    vom Baur, E; Zechel, C; Heery, D; Heine, M J; Garnier, J M; Vivat, V; Le Douarin, B; Gronemeyer, H; Chambon, P; Losson, R

    1996-01-01

    Using a yeast two-hybrid system we report the isolation of a novel mouse protein, mSUG1, that interacts with retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) both in yeast cells and in vitro in a ligand- and AF-2 activating domain (AF-2 AD)-dependent manner and show that it is a structural and functional homologue of the essential yeast protein SUG1. mSUG1 also efficiently interacts with other nuclear receptors, including oestrogen (ER), thyroid hormone (TR), Vitamin D3 (VDR) and retinoid X (RXR) receptors. By comparing the interaction properties of these receptors with mSUG1 and TIF1, we demonstrate that: (i) RXR alpha efficiently interacts with TIF1, but not with mSUG1, whereas TR alpha interacts much more efficiently with mSUG1 than with TIF1, and RAR alpha, VDR and ER efficiently interact with mSUG1 and TIF1; (ii) the amphipathic alpha-helix core of the AF-2 AD is differentially involved in interactions of RAR alpha with mSUG1 and TIF1; (iii) the AF-2 AD cores of RAR alpha and ER are similarly involved in their interaction with TIF1, but not with mSUG1. Thus, the interaction interfaces between the different receptors and either mSUG1 or TIF1 may vary depending on the nature of the receptor and the putative mediator of its AF-2 function. We discuss the possibility that mSUG1 and TIF1 may mediate the transcriptional activity of the AF-2 of nuclear receptors through different mechanisms. Images PMID:8598193

  5. Green tea component EGCG, insulin and IGF-1 promote nuclear efflux of atrophy-associated transcription factor Foxo1 in skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Robert J; Russell, Sarah J; Schneider, Martin F

    2015-12-01

    Prevention and slowing of skeletal muscle atrophy with nutritional approaches offers the potential to provide far-reaching improvements in the quality of life for our increasingly aging population. Here we show that polyphenol flavonoid epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG), found in the popular beverage green tea (Camellia sinensis), demonstrates similar effects to the endogenous hormones insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin in the ability to suppress action of the atrophy-promoting transcription factor Foxo1 through a net translocation of Foxo1 out of the nucleus as monitored by nucleo-cytoplasmic movement of Foxo1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) in live skeletal muscle fibers. Foxo1-GFP nuclear efflux is rapid in IGF-1 or insulin, but delayed by an additional 30 min for EGCG. Once activated, kinetic analysis with a simple mathematical model shows EGCG, IGF-1 and insulin all produce similar apparent rate constants for Foxo1-GFP unidirectional nuclear influx and efflux. Interestingly, EGCG appears to have its effect at least partially via parallel signaling pathways that are independent of IGF-1's (and insulin's) downstream PI3K/Akt/Foxo1 signaling axis. Using the live fiber model system, we also determine the dose-response curve for both IGF-1 and insulin on Foxo1 nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution. The continued understanding of the activation mechanisms of EGCG could allow for nutritional promotion of green tea's antiatrophy skeletal muscle benefits and have implications in the development of a clinically significant parallel pathway for new drugs to target muscle wasting and the reduced insulin receptor sensitivity which causes type II diabetes mellitus.

  6. Taurine and niacin block lung injury and fibrosis by down-regulating bleomycin-induced activation of transcription nuclear factor-kappaB in mice.

    PubMed

    Gurujeyalakshmi, G; Wang, Y; Giri, S N

    2000-04-01

    The effects of taurine (T) and niacin (N) on bleomycin (BL)-induced increased production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-6, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and increased collagen content and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation in the lungs were investigated in mice. The mice were intratracheally instilled with saline (SA) or BL (0.1 U/mouse/50 microliter) under ketamine and xylazine anesthesia. They had ad libitum access to diet containing 2.5% niacin (w/w) or the same control diet (CD) and water with and without taurine (1%) 3 days before intratracheal instillation and throughout the study. The mice were sacrificed at different times for collecting BALF and lungs, which were appropriately processed for various measurements. Treatment with taurine and niacin attenuated the BL-induced increases in proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1alpha, TNF-alpha, IL-6, and TGF-beta in BALF and lung hydroxyproline content of the mice in BL + TN groups. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of total RNA from whole lung was performed to assess the induction of TNF-alpha and IL-1 mRNAs as markers of NF-kappaB activation. The NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity in whole-lung extract was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. This revealed a progressive increase in NF-kappaB activation and IkBalpha depletion in lungs from mice in BL + CD groups from day 1 through day 21 compared with the corresponding SA + CD control groups. Treatment with taurine and niacin generally inhibited the BL-induced increases in the nuclear localization of NF-kappaB and preserved IkappaBalpha protein in BL + TN groups. This may be one of the mechanisms for the antifibrotic effect of taurine and niacin.

  7. Transcription Factor Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1β (HNF-1β) Regulates MicroRNA-200 Expression through a Long Noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Hajarnis, Sachin S; Patel, Vishal; Aboudehen, Karam; Attanasio, Massimo; Cobo-Stark, Patricia; Pontoglio, Marco; Igarashi, Peter

    2015-10-09

    The transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β (HNF-1β) regulates tissue-specific gene expression in the kidney and other epithelial organs. Mutations of HNF-1β produce kidney cysts, and previous studies have shown that HNF-1β regulates the transcription of cystic disease genes, including Pkd2 and Pkhd1. Here, we combined chromatin immunoprecipitation and next-generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) with microarray analysis to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) that are directly regulated by HNF-1β in renal epithelial cells. These studies identified members of the epithelial-specific miR-200 family (miR-200b/200a/429) as novel transcriptional targets of HNF-1β. HNF-1β binds to two evolutionarily conserved sites located 28 kb upstream to miR-200b. Luciferase reporter assays showed that the HNF-1β binding sites were located within a promoter that was active in renal epithelial cells. Mutations of the HNF-1β binding sites abolished promoter activity. RT-PCR analysis revealed that a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is transcribed from the promoter and encodes the miR-200 cluster. Inhibition of the lncRNA with siRNAs decreased the levels of miR-200 but did not affect expression of the Ttll10 host gene. The expression of the lncRNA and miR-200 was decreased in kidneys from HNF-1β knock-out mice and renal epithelial cells expressing dominant-negative mutant HNF-1β. The expression of miR-200 targets, Zeb2 and Pkd1, was increased in HNF-1β knock-out kidneys and in cells expressing mutant HNF-1β. Overexpression of miR-200 decreased the expression of Zeb2 and Pkd1 in HNF-1β mutant cells. These studies reveal a novel pathway whereby HNF-1β directly contributes to the control of miRNAs that are involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cystic kidney disease. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. High NaCl–induced activation of CDK5 increases phosphorylation of the osmoprotective transcription factor TonEBP/OREBP at threonine 135, which contributes to its rapid nuclear localization

    PubMed Central

    Gallazzini, Morgan; Heussler, Gary E.; Kunin, Margarita; Izumi, Yuichiro; Burg, Maurice B.; Ferraris, Joan D.

    2011-01-01

    When activated by high NaCl, tonicity-responsive enhancer–binding protein/osmotic response element–binding protein (TonEBP/OREBP) increases transcription of osmoprotective genes. High NaCl activates TonEBP/OREBP by increasing its phosphorylation, nuclear localization, and transactivating activity. In HEK293 cells, mass spectrometry shows phosphorylation of TonEBP/OREBP-S120, -S134, -T135, and -S155. When those residues are individually mutated to alanine, nuclear localization is greater for S155A, less for S134A and T135A, and unchanged for S120A. High osmolality increases phosphorylation at T135 in HEK293 cells and in rat renal inner medullas in vivo. In HEK293 cells, high NaCl activates cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), which directly phosphorylates TonEBP/OREBP-T135. Inhibition of CDK5 activity reduces the rapid high NaCl–induced nuclear localization of TonEBP/OREBP but does not affect its transactivating activity. High NaCl induces nuclear localization of TonEBP/OREBP faster (≤2 h) than it increases its overall protein abundance (≥6 h). Inhibition of CDK5 reduces the increase in TonEBP/OREBP transcriptional activity that has occurred by 4 h after NaCl is raised, associated with less nuclear TonEBP/OREBP at that time, but does not reduce either activity or nuclear TonEBP/OREBP after 16 h. Thus high NaCl–induced increase of the overall abundance of TonEBP/OREBP, by itself, eventually raises its effective level in the nucleus, but its rapid CDK5-dependent nuclear localization accelerates the process, speeding transcription of osmoprotective target genes. PMID:21209322

  9. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Ginger Binds with Importin-α through Its Junction Domain for Nuclear Localization, and Further Interacts with NAC Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Vivek, Padmanabhan Jayanthi; Resmi, Mohankumar Saraladevi; Sreekumar, Sweda; Sivakumar, K. C.; Tuteja, Narendra; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are important sensors of Ca2+ elevations in plant cells regulating the gene expression linked with various cellular processes like stress response, growth and development, metabolism, and cytoskeleton dynamics. Ginger is an extensively used spice due to its unique flavor and immense medicinal value. The two major threats that interfere with the large scale production of ginger are the salinity and drought stress. ZoCDPK1 (Zingiber officinale Calcium-dependent protein kinase 1) is a salinity and drought-inducible CDPK gene isolated from ginger and undergoes dynamic subcellular localization during stress conditions. ZoCDPK1, with signature features of a typical Ca2+ regulated kinase, also possesses a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in its junction domain (JD). A striking feature in ZoCDPK1 is the rare occurrence of a coupling between the NLS in JD and consensus sequences in regulatory domain. Here, we further identified its nature of nuclear localization and its interaction partners. In the homology model generated for ZoCDPK1, the regulatory domain mimics the crystal structure of the regulatory domain in Arabidopsis CDPK1. Molecular docking simulation of importin (ZoIMPα), an important protein involved in nuclear translocation, into the NLS of ZoCDPK1 was well-visualized. Furthermore, the direct interaction of ZoCDPK1 and ZoIMPα proteins was studied by the yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H) system, which confirmed that junction domain (JD) is an important interaction module required for ZoCDPK1 and ZoIMPα binding. The probable interacting partners of ZoCDPK1 were also identified using Y2H experiment. Of the 10 different stress-related interacting partners identified for ZoCDPK1, NAC transcription factor (TF) needs special mention, especially in the context of ZoCDPK1 function. The interaction between ZoCDPK1 and NAC TF, in fact, corroborate with the results of gene expression and over-expression studies of ZoCDPK1. Hence

  10. The nuclear-encoded sigma factor SIG4 directly activates transcription of chloroplast psbA and ycf17 genes in the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Gaku; Imamura, Sousuke; Era, Atsuko; Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Hanaoka, Mitsumasa; Tanaka, Kan

    2015-05-01

    The plant organelle chloroplast originated from the endosymbiosis of a cyanobacterial-like photosynthetic bacterium, and still retains its own genome derived from this ancestor. We have been focusing on a unicellular red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, as a model photosynthetic eukaryote. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptional specificity of SIG4, which is one of four nuclear-encoded chloroplast RNA polymerase sigma factors in this alga. Accumulation of the SIG4 protein was observed in response to nitrogen depletion or high light conditions. By comparing the chloroplast transcriptomes under nitrogen depletion and SIG4-overexpressing conditions, we identified several candidate genes as SIG4 targets. Together with the results of chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, the promoters of the psbA (encoding the D1 protein of the photosystem II reaction center) and ycf17 (encoding a protein of the early light-inducible protein family) genes were shown to be direct activation targets. The phycobilisome (PBS) CpcB protein was decreased by SIG4 overexpression, which suggests the negative involvement of SIG4 in PBS accumulation. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 regulates expression of nuclear factor-erythroid-2 related transcription factor-1 (Nrf1) and inhibits pro-survival function of Nrf1

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Madhurima; Kwong, Erick K.; Park, Eujean; Nagra, Parminder; Chan, Jefferson Y.

    2013-08-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor-1 (Nrf1) is a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that is known to regulate antioxidant and cytoprotective gene expression. It was recently shown that Nrf1 is regulated by SCF–Fbw7 ubiquitin ligase. However our knowledge of upstream signals that targets Nrf1 for degradation by the UPS is not known. We report here that Nrf1 expression is negatively regulated by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) in Fbw7-dependent manner. We show that GSK3 interacts with Nrf1 and phosphorylates the Cdc4 phosphodegron domain (CPD) in Nrf1. Mutation of serine residue in the CPD of Nrf1 to alanine (S350A), blocks Nrf1 from phosphorylation by GSK3, and stabilizes Nrf1. Knockdown of Nrf1 and expression of a constitutively active form of GSK3 results in increased apoptosis in neuronal cells in response to ER stress, while expression of the GSK3 phosphorylation resistant S350A–Nrf1 attenuates apoptotic cell death. Together these data suggest that GSK3 regulates Nrf1 expression and cell survival function in response to stress activation. Highlights: • The effect of GSK3 on Nrf1 expression was examined. • GSK3 destabilizes Nrf1 protein via Fbw7 ubiquitin ligase. • GSK3 binds and phosphorylates Nrf1. • Protection from stress-induced apoptosis by Nrf1 is inhibited by GSK3.

  12. In vivo footprinting of the human IL-2 gene reveals a nuclear factor bound to the transcription start site in T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brunvand, M W; Krumm, A; Groudine, M

    1993-01-01

    The IL-2 gene is a T cell specific gene that is expressed early during the activation-specific T lymphocyte development program. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and DNase I footprinting assays have defined DNA/protein interactions at the IL-2 promoter cis-elements in vitro. To determine if the trans-activators documented in T cell nuclear extracts actually bind the IL-2 promoter in vivo, ligation mediated PCR (LMPCR) genomic footprinting was performed on the IL-2 promoter in both activated and non-activated T cells and HL60 promyelocytes, which do not express the IL-2 gene. The in vivo footprints indicate that the IL-2 gene transcription start site and TATA sequence are protected in both activated and resting T cells, prior to the appearance of detectable IL-2 steady state message. The distal NF-AT and the NF kappa B sites are each footprinted and the Oct/OAP site contains hypersensitive residues in the unstimulated T lymphocytes. Additional residues are protected in each of these sites after T cell activation. The proximal NF-AT site (NF-IL-2B) and the AP-1 site at -150 are protected in activated Jurkat T lymphocytes, but these two sites are not protected in activated Jurkat lymphocytes stably transfected a gene construct containing multiple NFAT binding sites. Images PMID:8233832