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Sample records for nucleation heterogeneous multicomponent

  1. Heterogeneous nucleation and shape transformation of multicomponent metallic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon Gu; Krylova, Galyna; Phillips, Patrick J; Klie, Robert F; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Shibata, Tomohiro; Bunel, Emilio E; Liu, Yuzi; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Lee, Byeongdu; Shevchenko, Elena V

    2015-02-01

    To be able to control the functions of engineered multicomponent nanomaterials, a detailed understanding of heterogeneous nucleation at the nanoscale is essential. Here, by using in situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we show that in the heterogeneous nucleation and growth of Au on Pt or Pt-alloy seeds the heteroepitaxial growth of the Au shell exerts high stress (∼2 GPa) on the seed by forming a core/shell structure in the early stage of the reaction. The development of lattice strain and subsequent strain relaxation, which we show using atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy to occur through the slip of {111} layers, induces morphological changes from a core/shell to a dumbbell structure, and governs the nucleation and growth kinetics. We also propose a thermodynamic model for the nucleation and growth of dumbbell metallic heteronanostructures.

  2. Heterogeneous nucleation in multi-component vapor on a partially wettable charged conducting particle. II. The generalized Laplace, Gibbs-Kelvin, and Young equations and application to nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noppel, M.; Vehkamäki, H.; Winkler, P. M.; Kulmala, M.; Wagner, P. E.

    2013-10-01

    Based on the results of a previous paper [M. Noppel, H. Vehkamäki, P. M. Winkler, M. Kulmala, and P. E. Wagner, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 134107 (2013)], we derive a thermodynamically consistent expression for reversible or minimal work needed to form a dielectric liquid nucleus of a new phase on a charged insoluble conducting sphere within a uniform macroscopic one- or multicomponent mother phase. The currently available model for ion-induced nucleation assumes complete spherical symmetry of the system, implying that the seed ion is immediately surrounded by the condensing liquid from all sides. We take a step further and treat more realistic geometries, where a cap-shaped liquid cluster forms on the surface of the seed particle. We derive the equilibrium conditions for such a cluster. The equalities of chemical potentials of each species between the nucleus and the vapor represent the conditions of chemical equilibrium. The generalized Young equation that relates contact angle with surface tensions, surface excess polarizations, and line tension, also containing the electrical contribution from triple line excess polarization, expresses the condition of thermodynamic equilibrium at three-phase contact line. The generalized Laplace equation gives the condition of mechanical equilibrium at vapor-liquid dividing surface: it relates generalized pressures in neighboring bulk phases at an interface with surface tension, excess surface polarization, and dielectric displacements in neighboring phases with two principal radii of surface curvature and curvatures of equipotential surfaces in neighboring phases at that point. We also re-express the generalized Laplace equation as a partial differential equation, which, along with electrostatic Laplace equations for bulk phases, determines the shape of a nucleus. We derive expressions that are suitable for calculations of the size and composition of a critical nucleus (generalized version of the classical Kelvin-Thomson equation).

  3. Heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation compared: rapid nucleation on microscopic impurities.

    PubMed

    Sear, Richard P

    2006-03-16

    We use computer simulation to calculate the rates of both homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation on microscopic impurities. We do so in perhaps the simplest model of fluids and magnets: the two-dimensional Ising model. We expect our results to be qualitatively applicable to many simple and complex fluids. We find that heterogeneous nucleation on an impurity that is not only microscopic but also as small as possible, that is, a single fixed spin, is more than four orders of magnitude faster than homogeneous nucleation. The rate of heterogeneous nucleation then increases by a factor of approximately five for each additional fixed spin in the impurity. These results suggest that impurities as small as single molecules can result in homogeneous nucleation being irrelevant due to heterogeneous nucleation on these microscopic impurities being much faster.

  4. Effective binary theory of multi-component nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalikmanov, V. I.

    2015-03-28

    Classical theory of multi-component nucleation [O. Hirschfelder, J. Chem. Phys. 61, 2690 (1974)] belongs to the class of the so-called intractable problems: it requires computational time which is an exponential function of the number of components N. For a number of systems of practical interest with N > 10, the brute-force use of the classical theory becomes virtually impossible and one has to resort to an effective medium approach. We present an effective binary model which captures important physics of multi-component nucleation. The distinction between two effective species is based on the observation that while all N components contribute to the cluster thermodynamic properties, there is only a part of them which trigger the nucleation process. The proposed 2D-theory takes into account adsorption by means of the Gibbs dividing surface formalism and uses statistical mechanical considerations for the treatment of small clusters. Theoretical predictions for binary-, ternary-, and 14-component mixtures are compared with available experimental data and other models.

  5. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice on carbon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lupi, Laura; Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-02-26

    Atmospheric aerosols can promote the heterogeneous nucleation of ice, impacting the radiative properties of clouds and Earth's climate. The experimental investigation of heterogeneous freezing of water droplets by carbonaceous particles reveals widespread ice freezing temperatures. It is not known which structural and chemical characteristics of soot account for the variability in ice nucleation efficiency. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the nucleation of ice from liquid water in contact with graphitic surfaces. We find that atomically flat carbon surfaces promote heterogeneous nucleation of ice, while molecularly rough surfaces with the same hydrophobicity do not. Graphitic surfaces and other surfaces that promote ice nucleation induce layering in the interfacial water, suggesting that the order imposed by the surface on liquid water may play an important role in the heterogeneous nucleation mechanism. We investigate a large set of graphitic surfaces of various dimensions and radii of curvature and find that variations in nanostructures alone could account for the spread in the freezing temperatures of ice on soot in experiments. We conclude that a characterization of the nanostructure of soot is needed to predict its ice nucleation efficiency.

  6. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice from supercooled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, Lane Howard

    The relaxation of a metastable phase via the formation of a critical domain of the corresponding stable phase is a phenomenon that has been studied extensively in condensed matter physics. This dissertation describes laboratory studies of this phenomenon in the context of ice nucleation from undercooled liquid water. Such a study presents unique experimental challenges because the formation of a critical embryo is a statistical event, and once it occurs the entire sample relaxes to the stable phase. In order to study this statistical process it is necessary to create a large ensemble of separate, yet identical, domains of the metastable phase. The design of an apparatus is described which creates such an ensemble, in time, by repeatedly freezing and thawing a single water drop. This apparatus allows for the collection of a large data set and therefore can identify subtle changes in nucleation statistics that are produced by external controls. This dissertation describes a series of experiments intended to probe several aspects of ice nucleation. Results are presented for homogeneous ice nucleation as well as heterogeneous ice nucleation by; silanized and unsilanized glass, aliphatic alcohol Langmuir films, ionizing radiation, electric fields and motion at the three phase contact line. These experiments are analyzed largely in the context of classical nucleation theory. The unique experimental technique described here allows for sensitive tests of the temperature dependent nucleation rates, R( T), in these systems. Analysis of the R( T) within the context of classical nucleation theory constrains thermodynamic parameters and provides insight into these nucleation processes.

  7. Generalized Gibbs' approach in heterogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    Abyzov, Alexander S; Schmelzer, Jürn W P

    2013-04-28

    Heterogeneous nucleation (condensation and boiling) on planar solid surfaces is described taking into account changes of the state parameters of the critical clusters in dependence on supersaturation. The account of the variation of the state parameters of the cluster phase on nucleation is performed in the framework of the generalized Gibbs' approach. One-component van der Waals fluids are chosen as a model for the analysis of the basic qualitative characteristics of the process. The analysis is performed for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces and similarities and differences between condensation and boiling processes are discussed for the two different cases. It is shown that, in the generalized Gibbs' approach, contact angle and catalytic factor for heterogeneous nucleation become dependent on the degree of metastability (undercooling or superheating) of the fluid. For the case of formation of a droplet in supersaturated vapor on a hydrophobic surface and bubble formation in a liquid on a hydrophilic surface the solid surface has only a minor influence on nucleation. In the alternative cases of condensation of a droplet on a hydrophilic surface and of bubble formation in a liquid on a hydrophobic surface, nucleation is significantly enhanced by the solid. Effectively, the existence of the solid surface results in a significant shift of the spinodal to lower supersaturations as compared with homogeneous nucleation. Qualitatively the same behavior is observed now near the new (solid surface induced) limits of instability of the fluid as compared with the behavior near to the spinodal curve in the case of homogeneous nucleation.

  8. Generalized Gibbs' approach in heterogeneous nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abyzov, Alexander S.; Schmelzer, Jürn W. P.

    2013-04-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation (condensation and boiling) on planar solid surfaces is described taking into account changes of the state parameters of the critical clusters in dependence on supersaturation. The account of the variation of the state parameters of the cluster phase on nucleation is performed in the framework of the generalized Gibbs' approach. One-component van der Waals fluids are chosen as a model for the analysis of the basic qualitative characteristics of the process. The analysis is performed for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces and similarities and differences between condensation and boiling processes are discussed for the two different cases. It is shown that, in the generalized Gibbs' approach, contact angle and catalytic factor for heterogeneous nucleation become dependent on the degree of metastability (undercooling or superheating) of the fluid. For the case of formation of a droplet in supersaturated vapor on a hydrophobic surface and bubble formation in a liquid on a hydrophilic surface the solid surface has only a minor influence on nucleation. In the alternative cases of condensation of a droplet on a hydrophilic surface and of bubble formation in a liquid on a hydrophobic surface, nucleation is significantly enhanced by the solid. Effectively, the existence of the solid surface results in a significant shift of the spinodal to lower supersaturations as compared with homogeneous nucleation. Qualitatively the same behavior is observed now near the new (solid surface induced) limits of instability of the fluid as compared with the behavior near to the spinodal curve in the case of homogeneous nucleation.

  9. Heterogeneous nucleation in solutions: generalized Gibbs' approach.

    PubMed

    Abyzov, Alexander S; Schmelzer, Jürn W P

    2014-06-28

    Heterogeneous nucleation in solutions on planar solid surfaces is modeled taking into account changes of the state parameters of the critical clusters in dependence on supersaturation. The account of the variation of the state parameters of the cluster phase on nucleation is performed in the framework of the generalized Gibbs' approach. A regular solution is chosen as a model for the analysis of the basic qualitative characteristics of the process. It is shown that, employing the generalized Gibbs approach, contact angle and catalytic activity factor for heterogeneous nucleation become dependent on the degree of metastability (supersaturation) of the solution. For the case of formation of a cluster in supersaturated solutions on a surface of low wettability (the macroscopic equilibrium contact angles being larger than 90°), the solid surface has only a minor influence on nucleation. In the alternative case of high wettability (for macroscopic equilibrium contact angles being less than 90°), nucleation is significantly enhanced by the solid surface. Effectively, the existence of the solid surface results in a significant shift of the spinodal to lower supersaturations as compared with homogeneous nucleation. Qualitatively, the same behavior is observed now near the new (solid surface induced) limits of instability of the solution as compared with the behavior near to the spinodal curve in the case of homogeneous nucleation.

  10. Repeatability and randomness in heterogeneous freezing nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, G.

    2008-08-01

    This study is aimed at clarifying the relative importance of the specific character of the nuclei and of the duration of supercooling in heterogeneous freezing nucleation by immersed impurities. Laboratory experiments were carried out in which sets of water drops underwent multiple cycles of freezing and melting. The drops contained suspended particles of mixtures of materials; the resulting freezing temperatures ranged from -6°C to -24°C. Rank correlation coefficients between observed freezing temperatures of the drops in successive runs were >0.9 with very high statistical significance, and thus provide strong support for the modified singular model of heterogeneous immersion freezing nucleation. For given drops, changes in freezing temperatures between cycles were relatively small (<1°C) for the majority of the events. These frequent small fluctuations in freezing temperatures are interpreted as reflections of the random nature of embryo growth and are associated with a nucleation rate that is a function of a temperature difference from the characteristic temperatures of nuclei. About a sixth of the changes were larger, up to ±5°C, and exhibited some systematic patterns. These are thought to arise from alterations of the nuclei, some being permanent and some transitory. The results are used to suggest ways of describing ice initiation in cloud models that account for both the temperature and the time dependence of freezing nucleation.

  11. Repeatability and randomness in heterogeneous freezing nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, G.

    2008-02-01

    This study is aimed at clarifying the relative importance of the specific character of the nuclei and of the duration of supercooling in heterogeneous freezing nucleation by immersed impurities. Laboratory experiments were carried out in which sets of water drops underwent multiple cycles of freezing and melting. The drops contained suspended particles of mixtures of materials; the resulting freezing temperatures ranged from -6°C to -24°C. Rank correlation coefficients between observed freezing temperatures of the drops in successive runs were >0.9 with very high statistical significance, and thus provide strong support for the modified singular model of heterogeneous immersion freezing nucleation. For given drops, changes in freezing temperatures between cycles were relatively small (<1°C) for the majority of the events. These frequent small fluctuations in freezing temperatures are interpreted as reflections of the random nature of embryo growth and are associated with a nucleation rate that is a function of a temperature difference from the characteristic temperatures of nuclei. About a sixth of the changes were larger, up to ±5°C, and exhibited some systematic patterns. These are thought to arise from alterations of the nuclei, some being permanent and some transitory. The results are used to suggest ways of describing ice initiation in cloud models that account for both the temperature and the time dependence of freezing nucleation.

  12. Heterogeneous nucleation of aspartame from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Noriaki; Kinno, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Kenji

    1990-03-01

    Waiting times, the time from the instant of quenching needed for a first nucleus to appear, were measured at constant supercoolings for primary nucleation of aspartame (α-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methylester) from aqueous solutions, which were sealed into glass ampoules (solution volume = 3.16 cm 3). Since the waiting time became shorter by filtering the solution prior to quenching, the nucleation was concluded to be heterogeneously induced. The measured waiting time consisted of two parts: time needed for the nucleus to grow to a detactable size (growth time) and stochastic time needed for nucleation (true waiting time). The distribution of the true waiting time, is well explained by a stochastic model, in which nucleation is regarded to occur heterogeneously and in a stochastic manner by two kinds of active sites. The active sites are estimated to be located on foreign particles in which such elements as Si, Al and Mg were contained. The amount of each element is very small in the order of magnitude of ppb (mass basis) of the whole solution. The growth time was correlated with the degree of supercooling.

  13. Laboratory studies of multicomponent nucleation of sulfuric acid, ammonia and amine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Benson, D. R.; Erupe, M.; Markovich, A.

    2010-12-01

    In this presentation, we will discuss our recent laboratory studies of multicomponent nucleation involving sulphuric acid, ammonia, and various organic compounds. Experiments are made using the KSU multicomponent nucleation experiment setup [Benson et al., 2008; Benson, 2009; Young et al., 2008]. We use a fast flow reactor which is temperature- and RH-controlled. Sulphuric acid is produced from the SO2 + OH reaction. Sulphuric acid, ammonia and organic compounds are measured directly by chemical ionization mass spectrometers. Experiments are made in the well-controlled experimental condition, which allows us to reproduce experimental data with high accuracy and precision and provide constrained experimental conditions that control nucleation, including each aerosol precursor concentration.

  14. Freezing Rate Due to Heterogeneous Nucleation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, Gabor

    1994-07-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation of ice from supercooled water is influenced by the nature of the foreign nuclei that serve as the sites for ice embryo formation, and by the stochastic nature of the process of embryo growth to critical size. The relative roles of these two factors have been the subject of some debate, especially as they influence the way nucleation of ice is modeled in clouds. `Freezing rate' is defined as the time-dependent rate at which a population of macroscopically identical samples (e.g., drops in a volume of air) freeze due to the nuclei contained in them. Freezing rate is the combined result of nucleus content and of time dependence. The time-dependent freezing rate model (TDFR) is consistent with available empirical evidence. For droplets cooled at rates of the order of 1°C per min, the nucleus content, or nucleus spectrum, predicts the freezing rate with reasonable accuracy. For samples exposed to a fixed temperature, the time dependence of the freezing rate becomes important, but the probability of freezing is not the same for each individual of the sample population. Stochastic models are not supported by the results. Application of the TDFR model and use of measured freezing nucleus data for precipitation provide a basis for the description of ice formation via immersion-freezing nucleation in cloud models. Limitations to full development of these models arise from inadequate knowledge about the freezing nucleus content of cloud water as a function of cloud evolution.

  15. Glassy aerosols heterogeneously nucleate cirrus ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Theodore W.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Dobbie, Steven; Cui, Zhiqiang; Al-Jumur, Sardar M. R. K.; Möhler, Ottmar; Schnaiter, Martin; Wagner, Robert; Benz, Stefan; Niemand, Monika; Saathoff, Harald; Ebert, Volker; Wagner, Steven; Kärcher, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Ice clouds in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL, ~12-18 km, ~180-200 K) play a key role in dehydrating air entering the stratosphere. However, in-situ measurements show that air within these clouds is unexpectedly supersaturated(1); normally the growth of ice crystals rapidly quenches any supersaturation. A number of explanations for high in-cloud humidity have been put forward, but recent research suggests high humidity may be related to the low numbers of ice crystals found within these clouds(1). Low ice number densities can be produced through selective nucleation by a small subset of aerosol particles. This is inconsistent with homogeneous nucleation of ice in liquid aerosols. However, droplets rich in organic material, ubiquitous in the TTL, are known to become glassy (amorphous, non-crystalline solid) under TTL conditions(2,3). Here we show, using a large cloud simulation chamber, that glassy solution droplets nucleate ice heterogeneously at low supersaturations. Using a one-dimensional cirrus model we also show that nucleation by glassy aerosol in the TTL may explain low TTL ice number densities and high in-cloud humidity. Recent measurements of the composition of TTL cirrus residues are consistent with our findings(4). (1) Krämer, M. et al. Ice supersaturations and cirrus cloud crystal numbers. Atm. Chem. Phys. 9, 3505-3522 (2009). (2) Murray, B. J. Inhibition of ice crystallisation in highly viscous aqueous organic acid droplets. Atm. Chem. Phys. 8, 5423-5433 (2008). (3) Zobrist, B., Marcolli, C., Pedernera, D. A. & Koop, T. Do atmospheric aerosols form glasses? Atm. Chem. Phys. 8, 5221-5244 (2008). (4) Froyd, K. D., Murphy, D. M., Lawson, P., Baumgardner, D. & Herman, R. L. Aerosols that form subvisible cirrus at the tropical tropopause. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 10, 209-218 (2010).

  16. Bubble nucleation in magmas: a dominantly heterogeneous process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, T.; Hammer, J. E.; Brachfeld, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The processes governing volatile exsolution, and particularly the timing of initial vapor phase nucleation with respect to depth in the conduit, control a magma's explosive potential. Experimental studies have shown that nucleation kinetics exert the dominant control on degassing efficiency in silicate melts. Homogeneous nucleation (i.e. without assistance from crystal substrates or other phases) often requires attainment of large supersaturation pressures (ΔPN, the change in pressure required for nucleation), while heterogeneous nucleation on pre-existing crystals can occur at significantly lower ΔPN (<50 MPa). Crystal-poor rhyolites have therefore been largely regarded as the type example of homogeneous bubble nucleation, disequilibrium degassing and heightened explosivity. while other less viscous magmas (dacite, phonolite, basalt) are thought to more often foster heterogeneous nucleation with variable departures from equilibrium. Distinguishing between the two nucleation mechanisms is vital for applications that employ classical nucleation theory and its derivatives: for instance, Toramaru's increasingly used decompression-rate meter (Toramaru 2006) links the number density of bubbles per unit volume melt (NV) of pyroclasts - a readily obtained textural characteristic - to rates of pressure change (dP/dt) during ascent. These formulations require an explicit or implicit decision as to whether magma degassing was dominated by homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation. This study exploits the large number of textural datasets available for eruptions involving various magma compositions to examine the dominant nucleation mechanism in natural melts. Because Fe-Ti oxides are unrivaled in their capacity to favor heterogeneous nucleation, the absence of high concentrations of petrographically-observable Fe-Ti oxide crystals in erupted pyroclasts is often taken as an indicator that homogeneous nucleation dominated bubble vesiculation in rhyolites. This contribution

  17. Heterogeneous nucleation in and out of pores.

    PubMed

    Page, Amanda J; Sear, Richard P

    2006-08-11

    We study the nucleation of a new thermodynamic phase in pores and find that the nucleation often proceeds via two steps: nucleation of pore filling, and nucleation out of the pore. These two rates have opposing dependencies on pore size, resulting in a pore size at which the nucleation rate of the new phase is maximal. This finding is relevant to attempts to design and use porous media to crystallize proteins.

  18. Ice nucleation on carbon surface supports the classical theory for heterogeneous nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabriolu, Raffaela; Li, Tianshu

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of heterogeneous nucleation in nature was explained qualitatively by the classical theory for heterogeneous nucleation established over more than 60 years ago, but the quantitative validity and the key conclusions of the theory have remained unconfirmed. Employing the forward flux sampling method and the coarse-grained water model (mW), we explicitly computed the heterogeneous ice nucleation rates in the supercooled water on a graphitic surface at various temperatures. The independently calculated ice nucleation rates were found to fit well according to the classical theory for heterogeneous nucleation. The fitting procedure further yields the estimate of the potency factor, which measures the ratio of the heterogeneous nucleation barrier to the homogeneous nucleation barrier. Remarkably, the estimated potency factor agrees quantitatively with the volumetric ratio of the critical nuclei between the heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation. Our numerical study thus provides a strong support to the quantitative power of the theory and allows understanding ice nucleation behaviors under the most relevant freezing conditions.

  19. Heterogeneous ice nucleation: bridging stochastic and singular freezing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, D.; Shaw, R. A.; Hartmann, S.; Wex, H.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Stratmann, F.

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation, a primary pathway for ice formation in the atmosphere, has been described alternately as being stochastic, in direct analogy with homogeneous nucleation, or singular, with ice nuclei initiating freezing at deterministic temperatures. We present an idealized model that bridges these stochastic and singular descriptions of heterogeneous ice nucleation. This "soccer ball" model treats statistically similar particles as being covered with surface sites (patches of finite area) characterized by different nucleation barriers, but with each surface site following the stochastic nature of ice embryo formation. The model provides a phenomenological explanation for seemingly contradictory experimental results obtained in our research groups. We suggest that ice nucleation is fundamentally a stochastic process but that for realistic atmospheric particle populations this process can be masked by the heterogeneity of surface properties. Full evaluation of the model will require experiments with well characterized ice nucleating particles and the ability to vary both temperature and waiting time for freezing.

  20. Enhanced heterogeneous ice nucleation by special surface geometry

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yuanfei; Cao, Boxiao; Li, Tianshu

    2017-01-01

    The freezing of water typically proceeds through impurity-mediated heterogeneous nucleation. Although non-planar geometry generically exists on the surfaces of ice nucleation centres, its role in nucleation remains poorly understood. Here we show that an atomically sharp, concave wedge can further promote ice nucleation with special wedge geometries. Our molecular analysis shows that significant enhancements of ice nucleation can emerge both when the geometry of a wedge matches the ice lattice and when such lattice match does not exist. In particular, a 45° wedge is found to greatly enhance ice nucleation by facilitating the formation of special topological defects that consequently catalyse the growth of regular ice. Our study not only highlights the active role of defects in nucleation but also suggests that the traditional concept of lattice match between a nucleation centre and crystalline lattice should be extended to include a broader match with metastable, non-crystalline structural motifs. PMID:28513603

  1. Enhanced heterogeneous ice nucleation by special surface geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yuanfei; Cao, Boxiao; Li, Tianshu

    2017-05-01

    The freezing of water typically proceeds through impurity-mediated heterogeneous nucleation. Although non-planar geometry generically exists on the surfaces of ice nucleation centres, its role in nucleation remains poorly understood. Here we show that an atomically sharp, concave wedge can further promote ice nucleation with special wedge geometries. Our molecular analysis shows that significant enhancements of ice nucleation can emerge both when the geometry of a wedge matches the ice lattice and when such lattice match does not exist. In particular, a 45° wedge is found to greatly enhance ice nucleation by facilitating the formation of special topological defects that consequently catalyse the growth of regular ice. Our study not only highlights the active role of defects in nucleation but also suggests that the traditional concept of lattice match between a nucleation centre and crystalline lattice should be extended to include a broader match with metastable, non-crystalline structural motifs.

  2. Homogeneous vs. heterogeneous nucleation in water-dicarboxylic acid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hienola, A. I.; Vehkamäki, H.; Riipinen, I.; Kulmala, M.

    2009-03-01

    Binary heterogeneous nucleation of water-succinic/glutaric/malonic/adipic acid on nanometer-sized particles is investigated within the frame of classical heterogeneous nucleation theory. Homogeneous nucleation is also included for comparison. It is found that the nucleation probabilities depend on the contact angle and on the size of the seed particles. New thermodynamical properties, such as saturation vapor pressure, density and surface tension for all the dicarboxylic acid aqueous solutions are included in the calculations. While the new surface tension and density formulations do not bring any significant difference in the computed nucleation rate for homogeneous nucleation for succinic and glutaric acids, the use of the newly derived equations for the vapor pressure decrease the acid concentrations in gas phase by 3 orders of magnitude. According to our calculations, the binary heterogeneous nucleation of succinic acid-water and glutaric acid-water - although it requires a 3-4 orders of magnitude lower vapor concentrations than the homogeneous nucleation - cannot take place under atmospheric conditions. On the other hand binary homogeneous nucleation of adipic acid-water systems might be possible under conditions occuring in upper boundary layer. However, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between the surface and the molecules of the nucleating vapor should be considered in the future.

  3. A nanoscale temperature-dependent heterogeneous nucleation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y. Y.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-06-14

    Classical nucleation theory relies on the hypothetical equilibrium of the whole nucleation system, and neglects the thermal fluctuations of the surface; this is because the high entropic gains of the (thermodynamically extensive) surface would lead to multiple stable states. In fact, at the nanometer scale, the entropic gains of the surface are high enough to destroy the stability of the thermal equilibrium during nucleation, comparing with the whole system. We developed a temperature-dependent nucleation theory to elucidate the heterogeneous nucleation process, by considering the thermal fluctuations based on classical nucleation theory. It was found that the temperature not only affected the phase transformation, but also influenced the surface energy of the nuclei. With changes in the Gibbs free energy barrier, nucleation behaviors, such as the nucleation rate and the critical radius of the nuclei, showed temperature-dependent characteristics that were different from those predicted by classical nucleation theory. The temperature-dependent surface energy density of a nucleus was deduced based on our theoretical model. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results suggested that the developed nucleation theory has the potential to contribute to the understanding and design of heterogeneous nucleation at the nanoscale.

  4. Direct Observations of Nucleation in a Nondilute Multicomponent Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudbrack, Chantal K.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Seidman, David N.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical pathways leading to gamma'(L1(sub 2)) nucleation from nondilute Ni-5.2 Al-14.2 Cr at. %, gama(fcc), at 873 K are followed with radial distribution functions and isoconcentration surface analyses of direct-space atom-probe tomographic images. Although Cr atoms initially are randomly distributed, a distribution of congruent Ni3Al short-range-order domains (SRO), [R] approx. equals 0.6 nm, results from Al diffusion during quenching. Domain site occupancy develops as their number density increases leading to Al-rich phase separation by gamma'-nucleation, [R]=0.75 nm, after SRO occurs.

  5. Direct Observations of Nucleation in a Nondilute Multicomponent Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudbrack, Chantal K.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Seidman, David N.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical pathways leading to gamma'(L1(sub 2)) nucleation from nondilute Ni-5.2 Al-14.2 Cr at. %, gama(fcc), at 873 K are followed with radial distribution functions and isoconcentration surface analyses of direct-space atom-probe tomographic images. Although Cr atoms initially are randomly distributed, a distribution of congruent Ni3Al short-range-order domains (SRO), [R] approx. equals 0.6 nm, results from Al diffusion during quenching. Domain site occupancy develops as their number density increases leading to Al-rich phase separation by gamma'-nucleation, [R]=0.75 nm, after SRO occurs.

  6. The influence of finite impurity size on heterogeneous nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of the finite size of impurities upon the heterogeneous nucleation rate is examined. Simple arguments based upon probability theory are used to find the relative nucleation rate, p(j), on particles containing j nuclei. The expression for p(j) is used in turn to compute the overall nucleation rate and average number of nuclei on an impurity as a function of time.

  7. The influence of finite impurity size on heterogeneous nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of the finite size of impurities upon the heterogeneous nucleation rate is examined. Simple arguments based upon probability theory are used to find the relative nucleation rate, p(j), on particles containing j nuclei. The expression for p(j) is used in turn to compute the overall nucleation rate and average number of nuclei on an impurity as a function of time.

  8. Temperature dependence of heterogeneous nucleation: Extension of the Fletcher model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Robert; Winkler, Paul; Wagner, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Recently there have been several cases reported where the critical saturation ratio for onset of heterogeneous nucleation increases with nucleation temperature (positive slope dependence). This behavior contrasts with the behavior observed in homogeneous nucleation, where a decreasing critical saturation ratio with increasing nucleation temperature (negative slope dependence) seems universal. For this reason the positive slope dependence is referred to as anomalous. Negative slope dependence is found in heterogeneous nucleation as well, but because so few temperature-dependent measurements have been reported, it is not presently clear which slope condition (positive or negative) will become more frequent. Especially interesting is the case of water vapor condensation on silver nanoparticles [Kupc et al., AS&T 47: i-iv, 2013] where the critical saturation ratio for heterogeneous nucleation onset passes through a maximum, at about 278K, with higher (lower) temperatures showing the usual (anomalous) temperature dependence. In the present study we develop an extension of Fletcher's classical, capillarity-based, model of heterogeneous nucleation that explicitly resolves the roles of surface energy and surface entropy in determining temperature dependence. Application of the second nucleation theorem, which relates temperature dependence of nucleation rate to cluster energy, yields both necessary and sufficient conditions for anomalous temperature behavior in the extended Fletcher model. In particular it is found that an increasing contact angle with temperature is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for anomalous temperature dependence to occur. Methods for inferring microscopic contact angle and its temperature dependence from heterogeneous nucleation probability measurements are discussed in light of the new theory.

  9. Suppression of heterogeneous bubble nucleation by upstream subcooled liquid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Peterson, G. P.

    2006-05-01

    The threshold levels for quasi-steady-state bubble nucleation on a smooth platinum surface located in a microchannel, both with and without liquid flow, are explored. The measured threshold for motionless liquid compares well with the theoretical value as calculated from the classical kinetics of nucleation. The measured threshold for the case of flow in the microchannel exceeds the measured value for motionless liquid and even exceeds the theoretical value. The observed phenomena suggest that in the absence of impurities, classical theory can accurately predict the heterogeneous nucleation. In addition, subcooled fluids were found to suppress bubble nucleation.

  10. Heterogeneous critical nucleation on a completely wettable substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2011-06-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of a new bulk phase on a flat substrate can be associated with the surface phase transition called wetting transition. When this bulk heterogeneous nucleation occurs on a completely wettable flat substrate with a zero contact angle, the classical nucleation theory predicts that the free-energy barrier of nucleation vanishes. In fact, there always exists a critical nucleus and a free-energy barrier as the first-order prewetting transition will occur even when the contact angle is zero. Furthermore, the critical nucleus changes its character from the critical nucleus of surface phase transition below bulk coexistence (undersaturation) to the critical nucleus of bulk heterogeneous nucleation above the coexistence (oversaturation) when it crosses the coexistence. Recently, Sear [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 164510 (2008)], 10.1063/1.2992160 has shown, by a direct numerical calculation of nucleation rate, that the nucleus does not notice this change when it crosses the coexistence. In our work, the morphology and the work of formation of critical nucleus on a completely wettable substrate are re-examined across the coexistence using the interface-displacement model. Indeed, the morphology and the work of formation changes continuously at the coexistence. Our results support the prediction of Sear and will rekindle the interest on heterogeneous nucleation on a completely wettable substrate.

  11. Heterogeneous bubble nucleation on pyroxene and plagioclase in andesite magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleše, P.; Higgins, M.; Brun, F.; Casselman, J.; Fife, J.; Mancini, L.; Lanzafame, G.; Baker, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding bubble nucleation and growth has long been considered a key to improving our knowledge of magmatic evolution, and aiding our goal of predicting violent volcanic eruptions. The role crystals play as heterogeneous nucleation sites for bubbles has become an active area of research because they have the potential to reduce the supersaturation necessary for bubble growth. The nucleation sites of bubbles in magmas are elusive because they cannot be directly observed in natural volcanic systems. Studies are generally conducted on natural, post-eruption samples or quenched experimental charges, but both provide only a view of the final state and provide little information on how this state was achieved. We directly observed bubble nucleation and growth by 4D in-situ synchrotron X-ray tomography of bubble nucleation and growth at the Swiss Light Source. Experiments were conducted on previously prepared, hydrous, crystal-bearing andesitic melts to observe bubble nucleation and track bubble growth and movement. We collected 3D images every 0.5 s while heating hydrated melts at 1 atm. We observed that bubbles first nucleated heterogeneously at clinopyroxene/melt and near plagioclase/melt interfaces, rather than homogeneously within the melt. Heterogeneous nucleation on one oxide crystal and homogeneous nucleation within the melt occurred significantly after nucleation on the silicates. The measured bubble-crystal contact angle was not constant and decreased with time. Bubbles grew much larger than the crystals in the experiments, producing textures similar to those seen in some natural volcanic samples. Our results show that the presence of silicate phases in magmas must be taken into account when discussing bubble nucleation in magmatic systems.

  12. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicosia, A.; Piazza, M.; Santachiara, G.; Belosi, F.

    2017-05-01

    The occurrence of ice-nucleating aerosols in the atmosphere has a profound impact on the properties of clouds, and in turn, influences our understanding on weather and climate. Research on this topic has grown constantly over the last decades, driven by advances in online and offline instruments capable of measuring the characteristics of these cloud-modifying aerosol particles. This article presents different aspects to the understanding of how aerosol particles can trigger the nucleation of ice in clouds. In addition, we present some experimental results obtained with the Dynamic Filter Processing Chamber, an off-line instrument that has been applied extensively in the last years and that circumvents some of the problems related to the measurement of Ice Nucleating Particles properties.

  13. Thermokinetics of heterogeneous droplet nucleation on conically textured substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Sanat K.; Das, Prasanta K.; Maiti, Biswajit

    2015-11-01

    Within the framework of the classical theory of heterogeneous nucleation, a thermokinetic model is developed for line-tension-associated droplet nucleation on conical textures considering growth or shrinkage of the formed cluster due to both interfacial and peripheral monomer exchange and by considering different geometric configurations. Along with the principle of free energy extremization, Katz kinetic approach has been employed to study the effect of substrate conicity and wettability on the thermokinetics of heterogeneous water droplet nucleation. Not only the peripheral tension is found to have a considerable effect on the free energy barrier but also the substrate hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity are observed to switch over their roles between conical crest and trough for different growth rates of the droplet. Besides, the rate of nucleation increases and further promotes nucleation for negative peripheral tension as it diminishes the free energy barrier appreciably. Moreover, nucleation inhibition can be achievable for positive peripheral tension due to the enhancement of the free energy barrier. Analyzing all possible geometric configurations, the hydrophilic narrower conical cavity is found to be the most preferred nucleation site. These findings suggest a physical insight into the context of surface engineering for the promotion or the suppression of nucleation on real or engineered substrates.

  14. Physical aspects of heterogeneities in multi-component lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Komura, Shigeyuki; Andelman, David

    2014-06-01

    Ever since the raft model for biomembranes has been proposed, the traditional view of biomembranes based on the fluid-mosaic model has been altered. In the raft model, dynamical heterogeneities in multi-component lipid bilayers play an essential role. Focusing on the lateral phase separation of biomembranes and vesicles, we review some of the most relevant research conducted over the last decade. We mainly refer to those experimental works that are based on physical chemistry approach, and to theoretical explanations given in terms of soft matter physics. In the first part, we describe the phase behavior and the conformation of multi-component lipid bilayers. After formulating the hydrodynamics of fluid membranes in the presence of the surrounding solvent, we discuss the domain growth-law and decay rate of concentration fluctuations. Finally, we review several attempts to describe membrane rafts as two-dimensional microemulsion.

  15. From embryos to precipitates: a study of nucleation and growth in a multicomponent ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhongwu; Liu, C T; Wang, Xun-Li; Littrell, Ken; Miller, Michael K; An, Ke; Chin, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of nanoscale precipitates in a new class of high-strength, multicomponent, ferritic steels has been studied with complementary state-of-the-art microstructural characterization techniques of atom probe tomography for individual embryos and precipitates and small-angle neutron scattering for their statistical averages. Both techniques revealed a bimodal size distribution, with subnanometer embryos, and nanoscale precipitates. The embryos, which have a radius of {approx}0.4 nm, are enriched in Cu and served as preferential sites for nucleation. The critical radius for nucleation was determined to be {approx}0.7 nm. Subsequent growth of the precipitates is dictated by volumetric diffusion, as predicted by the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner theory.

  16. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Protein Crystals on Fluorinated Layered Silicate

    PubMed Central

    Ino, Keita; Udagawa, Itsumi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Kubota, Munehiro; Kurosaka, Keiichi; Arai, Kazuhito; Seki, Yasutaka; Nogawa, Masaya; Tsunoda, Tatsuo; Mizukami, Fujio; Taguchi, Hayao; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2011-01-01

    Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface. PMID:21818343

  17. Critical humidities of homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation: Inferences from extended classical nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostyanov, Vitaly I.; Curry, Judith A.

    2009-02-01

    A generalization of classical ice nucleation theory is used to derive analytical expressions for the critical (threshold) humidities of homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing. The critical radius and energy of an ice embryo and nucleation rates were derived previously by the authors as functions of temperature, pressure, water saturation ratio, and radii of freezing particles. Here we invert the analytical expressions for the nucleation rates and solve them relative to the critical water and ice saturation ratios (or critical relative humidities). The critical humidities are expressed as analytical functions of temperature, pressure, nucleation or cooling rates, radius of freezing particles and their physico-chemical properties, misfit strain, and activation energy. Calculations of critical ice relative humidities are made using these equations over an extended temperature range down to -75°C and are compared with previous empirical parameterizations and experimental data, and differences are interpreted in the context of variation of the other parameters. It is shown that the critical humidities for heterogeneous ice nucleation are lower than those for homogeneous nucleation; however, this difference is not constant but depends substantially on the temperature and properties of freezing aerosol. Some simple parameterizations for cloud and climate models are suggested.

  18. Ice nucleation in nature: supercooling point (SCP) measurements and the role of heterogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, P W; Heneghan, A F; Haymet, A D J

    2003-02-01

    In biological systems, nucleation of ice from a supercooled aqueous solution is a stochastic process and always heterogeneous. The average time any solution may remain supercooled is determined only by the degree of supercooling and heterogeneous nucleation sites it encounters. Here we summarize the many and varied definitions of the so-called "supercooling point," also called the "temperature of crystallization" and the "nucleation temperature," and exhibit the natural, inherent width associated with this quantity. We describe a new method for accurate determination of the supercooling point, which takes into account the inherent statistical fluctuations of the value. We show further that many measurements on a single unchanging sample are required to make a statistically valid measure of the supercooling point. This raises an interesting difference in circumstances where such repeat measurements are inconvenient, or impossible, for example for live organism experiments. We also discuss the effect of solutes on this temperature of nucleation. Existing data appear to show that various solute species decrease the nucleation temperature somewhat more than the equivalent melting point depression. For non-ionic solutes the species appears not to be a significant factor whereas for ions the species does affect the level of decrease of the nucleation temperature.

  19. Heterogeneous nucleation and growth of nanoparticles at environmental interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Jun, Young -Shin; Kim, Doyoon; Neil, Chelsea W.

    2016-08-11

    Here, mineral nucleation is a phase transformation of aqueous components to solids with an accompanying creation of new surfaces. In this evolutional, yet elusive, process, nuclei often form at environmental interfaces, which provide remarkably reactive sites for heterogeneous nucleation and growth. Naturally occurring nucleation processes significantly contribute to the biogeochemical cycles of important components in the Earth’s crust, such as iron and manganese oxide minerals and calcium carbonate. However, in recent decades, these cycles have been significantly altered by anthropogenic activities, which affect the aqueous chemistry and equilibrium of both surface and subsurface systems. These alterations can trigger the dissolutionmore » of existing minerals and formation of new nanoparticles (i.e., nucleation and growth) and consequently change the porosity and permeability of geomedia in subsurface environments. Newly formed nanoparticles can also actively interact with components in natural and engineered aquatic systems, including those posing a significant hazard such as arsenic. These interactions can bilaterally influence the fate and transport of both newly formed nanoparticles and aqueous components. Due to their importance in natural and engineered processes, heterogeneous nucleation at environmental interfaces has started to receive more attention. However, a lack of time-resolved in situ analyses makes the evaluation of heterogeneous nucleation challenging because the physicochemical properties of both the nuclei and surfaces significantly and dynamically change with time and aqueous chemistry. This Account reviews our in situ kinetic studies of the heterogeneous nucleation and growth behaviors of iron(III) (hydr)oxide, calcium carbonate, and manganese (hydr)oxide minerals in aqueous systems. In particular, we utilized simultaneous small-angle and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/GISAXS) to investigate in situ and in real

  20. Scaling properties of induction times in heterogeneous nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shneidman, Vitaly A.; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1991-01-01

    The heterogeneous-to-homogeneous induction time ratio is obtained as a function of the contact angle in the asymptotic limit of a high nucleation barrier. Model-dependent corrections to t(ind) are investigated, particularly in cases of the Turnbull-Fisher model used in numerical simulations by Greer et al. (1990).

  1. Advances in heterogeneous ice nucleation research: Theoretical modeling and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beydoun, Hassan

    In the atmosphere, cloud droplets can remain in a supercooled liquid phase at temperatures as low as -40 °C. Above this temperature, cloud droplets freeze via heterogeneous ice nucleation whereby a rare and poorly understood subset of atmospheric particles catalyze the ice phase transition. As the phase state of clouds is critical in determining their radiative properties and lifetime, deficiencies in our understanding of heterogeneous ice nucleation poses a large uncertainty on our efforts to predict human induced global climate change. Experimental challenges in properly simulating particle-induced freezing processes under atmospherically relevant conditions have largely contributed to the absence of a well-established model and parameterizations that accurately predict heterogeneous ice nucleation. Conversely, the sparsity of reliable measurement techniques available struggle to be interpreted by a single consistent theoretical or empirical framework, which results in layers of uncertainty when attempting to extrapolate useful information regarding ice nucleation for use in atmospheric cloud models. In this dissertation a new framework for describing heterogeneous ice nucleation is developed. Starting from classical nucleation theory, the surface of an ice nucleating particle is treated as a continuum of heterogeneous ice nucleating activity and a particle specific distribution of this activity g is derived. It is hypothesized that an individual particle species exhibits a critical surface area. Above this critical area the ice nucleating activity of a particle species can be described by one g distribution, g, while below it g expresses itself expresses externally resulting in particle to particle variability in ice nucleating activity. The framework is supported by cold plate droplet freezing measurements for dust and biological particles in which the total surface area of particle material available is varied. Freezing spectra above a certain surface area

  2. Comparison of parameterizations for homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koop, T.; Zobrist, B.

    2009-04-01

    The formation of ice particles from liquid aqueous aerosols is of central importance for the physics and chemistry of high altitude clouds. In this paper, we present new laboratory data on ice nucleation and compare them with two different parameterizations for homogeneous as well as heterogeneous ice nucleation. In particular, we discuss and evaluate the effect of solutes and ice nuclei. One parameterization is the λ-approach which correlates the depression of the freezing temperature of aqueous droplets in comparison to pure water droplets, Tf, with the corresponding depression, Tm, of the equilibrium ice melting point: Tf = λ × Tm. Here, λ is independent of concentration and a constant that is specific for a particular solute or solute/ice nucleus combination. The other approach is water-activity-based ice nucleation theory which describes the effects of solutes on the freezing temperature Tf via their effect on water activity: aw(Tf) = awi(Tf) + aw. Here, awi is the water activity of ice and aw is a constant that depends on the ice nucleus but is independent of the type of solute. We present new data on both homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation with varying types of solutes and ice nuclei. We evaluate and discuss the advantages and limitations of the two approaches for the prediction of ice nucleation in laboratory experiments and atmospheric cloud models.

  3. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice on model carbon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinero, V.; Lupi, L.; Hudait, A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonaceous particles account for 10% of the particulate matter in the atmosphere. The experimental investigation of heterogeneous freezing of water droplets by carbonaceous particles reveals widespread ice freezing temperatures. The origin of the soot and its oxidation and aging modulate its ice nucleation ability, however, it is not known which structural and chemical characteristics of soot account for the variability in ice nucleation efficiency. We find that atomically flat carbon surfaces promote heterogeneous nucleation of ice, while molecularly rough surfaces with the same hydrophobicity do not. We investigate a large set of graphitic surfaces of various dimensions and radii of curvature consistent with those of soot in experiments, and find that variations in nanostructures alone could account for the spread in the freezing temperatures of ice on soot in experiments. A characterization of the nanostructure of soot is needed to predict its ice nucleation efficiency. Atmospheric oxidation and aging of soot modulates its ice nucleation ability. It has been suggested that an increase in the ice nucleation ability of aged soot results from an increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces upon oxidation. Oxidation, however, also impacts the nanostructure of soot, making it difficult to assess the separate effects of soot nanostructure and hydrophilicity in experiments. We investigate the effect of changes in hydrophilicity of model graphitic surfaces on the freezing temperature of ice. Our results indicate that the hydrophilicity of the surface is not in general a good predictor of ice nucleation ability. We find a correlation between the ability of a surface to promote nucleation of ice and the layering of liquid water at the surface. The results of this work suggest that ordering of liquid water in contact with the surface plays an important role in the heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanism. References: L. Lupi, A. Hudait and V. Molinero, J. Am. Chem. Soc

  4. Molecular simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation. I. Controlling ice nucleation through surface hydrophilicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Stephen J.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Slater, B.; Michaelides, Angelos

    2015-05-14

    Ice formation is one of the most common and important processes on earth and almost always occurs at the surface of a material. A basic understanding of how the physicochemical properties of a material’s surface affect its ability to form ice has remained elusive. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to directly probe heterogeneous ice nucleation at a hexagonal surface of a nanoparticle of varying hydrophilicity. Surprisingly, we find that structurally identical surfaces can both inhibit and promote ice formation and analogous to a chemical catalyst, it is found that an optimal interaction between the surface and the water exists for promoting ice nucleation.We use our microscopic understanding of the mechanism to design a modified surface in silico with enhanced ice nucleating ability. C 2015 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

  5. Adjoint Techniques to Minimize the Uncertainty in Heterogeneous Nucleation Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, A.; Sullivan, S.; Sheyko, B. A.; Barahona, D.

    2014-12-01

    Although recent research has focused on more accurately representing heterogeneous ice nucleation in climate models, significant uncertainties are still associated with these nucleation spectra. Here we present adjoint techniques as a new, computationally efficient means of helping to minimize these uncertainites. Automatic differentiation tools are used to construct the adjoint model of the 2009 Barahona and Nenes ice nucleation parameterization (ABN13), run in both the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 and the Goddard Earth Observing System Model version 5 at pressure levels relevant to both cirrus and mixed-phase clouds. Ice crystal number sensitivities to dynamic and aerosol inputs are calculated using two empirical spectra (Phillips et al. 2008 and Phillips et al. 2013) and one spectrum based on classical nucleation theory (Barahona and Nenes 2009). At cirrus-relevant altitudes, the sensitivity can be used to classify freezing regime; we see large regions of homogeneous freezing in the tropics but predominantly heterogeneous freezing elsewhere. The more recent empirical spectrum indicates the importance of accumulation mode dust number; of appropriately representating vertical motions; and of accurate threshold supersaturations in determining in-cloud crystal number on a global scale. Glassy aerosol has a small, seasonally-dependent contribution at high altitudes, while the global contribution of black carbon to ice number becomes negligible. Attribution analyses also allows us to pinpoint which variables and regions generate the most variability in ice crystal number, and whether this variability comes from inherent parameterization biases or from input fluctuations.

  6. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate on Modified Silica Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Miller, Carrie; Komunjer, Ljepša; Hlady, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, CaHPO4•2H2O (DCPD) was studied on untreated planar fused silica and on three modified silica surfaces: octadecylsilyl (OTS) modified silica, human serum albumin treated OTS silica, and UV-oxidized 3-mercaptopropyltriethoxysilyl (MTS) modified silica. The supersaturation ratio of calcium and phosphate solution with respect to DCPD was kept below ~10. The nucleated crystals were observed 24 hours and one week after initial contact between supersaturated solutions and substrate surfaces using bright field and reflectance interference contrast microscopy. No DCPD crystals nucleated on albumin-treated OTS-silica. Majority of the DCDP crystals formed on the other modified silica surfaces appeared to be morphologically similar irrespective of the nature of nucleating substrate. Reflectance interference contrast microscopy provided a proof that the majority of the crystals on these substrates do not develop an extended contact with the substrate surface. The images showed that the most extended contact planes were between the DCPD crystals and MTS modified silica surface. The crystals nucleated on OTS-treated and untreated silica surfaces showed only few or none well-developed contact planes.

  7. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Naphthalene Vapor on Water Surface

    PubMed

    Smolík; Schwarz

    1997-01-15

    The evaporation of a water drop into a ternary gaseous mixture of air, steam, and naphthalene vapor was investigated. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical prediction based on a numerical solution of coupled boundary layer equations for heat and mass transfer from a drop moving in ternary gas. In the experiments the naphthalene vapor condensed on the water drop as a supercooled liquid even at temperatures far below the melting point of naphthalene. The condensation on drop surface is discussed in terms of classical theory of heterogeneous nucleation on smooth surfaces.

  8. Alteration of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation Properties Induced by Particle Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Polen, M.; Beydoun, H.; Lawlis, E.; Ahern, A.; Jahn, L.; Hill, T. C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol particles that can serve as ice nuclei frequently experience rapid and extensive chemical aging during atmospheric transport. This is known to significantly alter some ice nucleation modes of the few types of ice nucleation particle systems where aging effects have been simulated, such as for mineral dust. Yet much of our understanding of atmospheric particle freezing properties is derived from measurements of fresh or unaged particles. We know almost nothing regarding how atmospheric aging might alter the freezing properties of biomass burning aerosol or biological particle nucleants. We have investigated the effects of simulated aging using a chamber reactor on the heterogeneous ice nucleation properties of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) and ice-active bacteria particles. Some types of aging were found to enhance the freezing ability of BBA, exhibited as a shift in a portion of the droplet freezing curve to warmer temperatures by a few °C. Ice-active bacteria were found to consistently loose their most ice-active nucleants after repeated aging cycles. The bacterial systems always retained significantly efficient ice active sites that still allowed them to induce freezing at mild/warm temperatures, despite this decrease in freezing ability. A comprehensive series of online single-particle mass spectrometry and offline spectromicroscopic analysis of individual particles was used to determine how the aging altered the aerosol's composition, and gain mechanistic insights into how this in turn altered the freezing properties. Our new ice nucleation framework that uses a continuous distribution of ice active site ability (contact angle) was used to interpret the droplet freezing spectra and understand how aging alters the internal and external variability, and rigidity, of the ice active sites.

  9. Surface design for controlled crystallization: the role of surface chemistry and nanoscale pores in heterogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    Diao, Ying; Myerson, Allan S; Hatton, T Alan; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2011-05-03

    Current industrial practice for control of primary nucleation (nucleation from a system without pre-existing crystalline matter) during crystallization from solution involves control of supersaturation generation, impurity levels, and solvent composition. Nucleation behavior remains largely unpredictable, however, due to the presence of container surfaces, dust, dirt, and other impurities that can provide heterogeneous nucleation sites, thus making the control and scale-up of processes that depend on primary nucleation difficult. To develop a basis for the rational design of surfaces to control nucleation during crystallization from solution, we studied the role of surface chemistry and morphology of various polymeric substrates on heterogeneous nucleation using aspirin as a model compound. Nucleation induction time statistics were utilized to investigate and quantify systematically the effectiveness of polymer substrates in inducing nucleation. The nucleation induction time study revealed that poly(4-acryloylmorpholine) and poly(2-carboxyethyl acrylate), each cross-linked by divinylbenzene, significantly lowered the nucleation induction time of aspirin while the other polymers were essentially inactive. In addition, we found the presence of nanoscopic pores on certain polymer surfaces led to order-of-magnitude faster aspirin nucleation rates when compared with surfaces without pores. We studied the preferred orientation of aspirin crystals on polymer films and found the nucleation-active polymer surfaces preferentially nucleated the polar facets of aspirin, guided by hydrogen bonds. A model based on interfacial free energies was also developed which predicted the same trend of polymer surface nucleation activities as indicated by the nucleation induction times.

  10. Ice nucleation in solutions and freeze-avoiding insects-homogeneous or heterogeneous?

    PubMed

    Zachariassen, Karl Erik; Kristiansen, Erlend; Pedersen, Sindre Andre; Hammel, Harold T

    2004-06-01

    This article challenges the common view that solutions and cold-hardy freeze-avoiding insects always freeze by heterogeneous nucleation. Data are presented to show that the nucleation temperatures of a variety of solutions and freeze-avoiding insects are a function of the water volume as described by the data previously published by Bigg in 1953. The article also points out that the relationships between melting point depression and depression of nucleation temperature are different for samples undergoing homogeneous nucleation and those undergoing heterogeneous nucleation. Aqueous solutions and freeze-avoiding insects display a relationship like that of homogeneously nucleated samples. It is also argued that the identity of the "impurities" assumed to cause heterogeneous nucleation in aqueous solutions and insects is obscure and that the "impurities" have features which make their existence rather unlikely.

  11. The Theory of Ice Nucleation by Heterogeneous Freezing of Deliquescent Mixed CCN. Part I: Critical Radius, Energy, and Nucleation Rate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostyanov, Vitaly I.; Curry, Judith A.

    2004-11-01

    This paper extends previous work on the theory of heterogenous ice nucleation. The goals of this analysis are to explain empirical observations of ice nucleation and to provide a suitable framework for modeling and parameterizing the ice nucleation process in cloud-scale and large-scale atmospheric models. Considered are the processes of heterogeneous freezing of deliquescent mixed cloud condensation nuclei that may serve as ice nuclei, and the properties of an ice germ critical radius, energy, and nucleation rate of ice crystals are examined as functions of temperature and supersaturation. Expressions for nucleation in a polydisperse aerosol for the deliquescence-freezing mode are developed. Equations are derived for the threshold and critical saturation ratios as functions of temperature and nucleation rate, and for the threshold and critical temperatures as functions of saturation ratio. Equivalence of the new formulation for the freezing point depression with traditional expressions is shown and the concepts of the effective temperature and supercooling are introduced. These new formulations are used in a companion paper for simulations of ice nucleation using a cloud parcel model.


  12. Heterogeneous nucleation of catalyst-free InAs nanowires on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, U. P.; Ercolani, D.; Zannier, V.; Battiato, S.; Ubyivovk, E.; Mikhailovskii, V.; Murata, Y.; Heun, S.; Beltram, F.; Sorba, L.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the heterogeneous nucleation of catalyst-free InAs nanowires on Si(111) substrates by chemical beam epitaxy. We show that nanowire nucleation is enhanced by sputtering the silicon substrate with energetic particles. We argue that particle bombardment introduces lattice defects on the silicon surface that serve as preferential nucleation sites. The formation of these nucleation sites can be controlled by the sputtering parameters, allowing the control of nanowire density in a wide range. Nanowire nucleation is accompanied by unwanted parasitic islands, but careful choice of annealing and growth temperature allows us to strongly reduce the relative density of these islands and to realize samples with high nanowire yield.

  13. The role of heterogeneity in long-range interacting systems: From nucleation to earthquake fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, James Brian

    The role of heterogeneity in two long-range systems is explored with a focus on the interplay of this heterogeneity with the component system interactions. The first will be the heterogeneous Ising model with long-range interactions. Earthquake fault systems under long-range stress transfer with varying types of heterogeneity will be the second system of interest. First I will review the use of the intervention method to determine the time and place of nucleation and extend its use as an indicator for spinodal nucleation. The heterogeneous Ising model with fixed magnetic sites will then be reformulated as a dilute random field Ising model. This reformulation will allow for the application of spinodal nucleation theory to the heterogeneous Ising model by correcting the spinodal field and the critical exponent sigma describing the critical behavior of clusters in spinodal nucleation theory. The applicability of this correction is shown by simulations that determine the cluster scaling of the nucleating droplets near the spinodal. Having obtained a reasonable definition of the saddle point object describing the nucleation droplet, the density profile of the nucleating droplet is measured and deviations from homogeneous spinodal nucleation are found due to the excess amount of sparseness in the nucleating droplet due to the heterogeneity. Earthquake fault systems are then introduced and a connection is shown of two earthquake models. Heterogeneity is introduced in the form of asperities with the intent of modeling the effect of hard rocks on earthquake statistics. The asperities are observed to be a crucial element in explaining the behavior of aftershocks resulting in Omori's law. A second form of heterogeneity is introduced by coupling the Olami-Feder-Christensen model to an invasion percolation model for the purpose of modeling an earthquake fault system undergoing hydraulic fracturing. The ergodicty and event size statistics are explored in this extended model. The

  14. Heterogeneous ice nucleation: exploring the transition from stochastic to singular freezing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, D.; Shaw, R. A.; Hartmann, S.; Wex, H.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Stratmann, F.

    2011-08-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation, a primary pathway for ice formation in the atmosphere, has been described alternately as being stochastic, in direct analogy with homogeneous nucleation, or singular, with ice nuclei initiating freezing at deterministic temperatures. We present an idealized, conceptual model to explore the transition between stochastic and singular ice nucleation. This "soccer ball" model treats particles as being covered with surface sites (patches of finite area) characterized by different nucleation barriers, but with each surface site following the stochastic nature of ice embryo formation. The model provides a phenomenological explanation for seemingly contradictory experimental results obtained in our research groups. Even with ice nucleation treated fundamentally as a stochastic process this process can be masked by the heterogeneity of surface properties, as might be typical for realistic atmospheric particle populations. Full evaluation of the model findings will require experiments with well characterized ice nucleating particles and the ability to vary both temperature and waiting time for freezing.

  15. Homogeneous versus heterogeneous crystal nucleation in Li2O-2SiO2 glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, M. C.; Neilson, G. F.; Uhlmann, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    When analyzing crystal nucleation in glasses, it is difficult to distinguish between homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. A method is proposed to investigate the nature of crystal nucleation in Li2O-2SiO2, and calculations are performed to determine under which conditions saturation effects help ascertain the nature of the nucleation. The capability of detecting impurity particles in unheated glass via standard micrographic techniques (SEM or REM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is explored. Results indicate that if the maximum impurity particle densities do not exceed 2 x 10 to the 7th per cu cm then heterogeneous nucleation may be excluded and most impurity particles with densities in excess of 10 to the 10th per cu cm are detectable by SAXS. It is concluded that crystal nucleation in this system most probably occurs homogeneously.

  16. Stimulated Heterogeneous Nucleation of Supercooled Liquid H2 Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, E. L.; Schaper, S.; Toennies, J. P.

    2000-07-01

    The properties of H(2) droplets formed by condensation in a supersonic freejet were probed by the capture and coagulation of CO molecules for the purpose of determining whether the droplets are liquid or solid. The CO was introduced into the H(2) droplets by passing the droplet beam through a scattering chamber containing CO at room temperature and various pressures. Reduction of droplet size as a result of droplet collisions with CO molecules was determined by measuring the droplet size downstream from the scattering region for several different values of the CO pressure. The size of the embedded clusters formed by coagulation of the captured CO molecules was determined from the mass spectra measured for several values of CO pressure in the scattering chamber. A comparison of (a) the observed dramatic loss of about 7% of the H(2) molecules from a droplet after between 2 and 8 collisions with (b) the loss predicted due to evaporation/sublimation in the event of solidification is taken to be compelling evidence that the H(2) droplets were liquid prior to their collisions with the CO scattering gas. The observed dependence of the maximum CO cluster size on the collision frequency appears to indicate that a sufficiently high collision frequency will liquify a droplet which otherwise would be solid. This observation supports the conclusion that the H(2) droplets are solidified as a consequence of heterogeneous nucleation induced by the captured CO molecules. The evidence in favor of a liquid state. coupled with the estimated 4K droplet temperature, suggest strongly that the supercooled H(2) droplets are superfluid.

  17. Stimulated heterogeneous nucleation of supercooled liquid H2 droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, E. L.; Schaper, S.; Toennies, J. P.

    2001-08-01

    The properties of H2 droplets formed by condensation in a supersonic freejet were probed by the capture and coagulation of CO molecules for the purpose of determining whether the droplets are liquid or solid. The CO was introduced into the H2 droplets by passing the droplet beam through a scattering chamber containing CO at room temperature and various pressures. Reduction of droplet size as a result of droplet collisions with CO molecules was determined by measuring the droplet size downstream from the scattering region for several different values of the CO pressure. The size of the embedded clusters formed by coagulation of the captured CO molecules was determined from the mass spectra measured for several values of CO pressure in the scattering chamber. A comparison of (a) the observed dramatic loss of about 7% of the H2 molecules from a droplet after between 2 and 8 collisions with (b) the loss predicted due to evaporation/sublimation in the event of solidification is taken to be compelling evidence that the H2 droplets were liquid prior to their collisions with the CO scattering gas. The observed dependence of the maximum CO cluster size on the collision frequency appears to indicate that a sufficiently high collision frequency will liquify a droplet which otherwise would be solid. This observation supports the conclusion that the H2 droplets are solidified as a consequence of heterogeneous nucleation induced by the captured CO molecules. The evidence in favor of a liquid state, coupled with the estimated 4K droplet temperature, suggest strongly that the supercooled H2 droplets are superfluid.

  18. Atomic-scale heterogeneity of a multicomponent bulk metallic glass with excellent glass forming ability.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Konno, K; Zhang, W; Kumar, V; Matsuura, M; Inoue, A; Sakurai, T; Chen, M W

    2009-08-14

    We report the atomic structure of a multicomponent Cu45Zr45Ag10 bulk metallic glass investigated by state-of-the-art experimental and computational techniques. In comparison with a binary Cu50Zr50 metallic glass, Zr-rich interpenetrating clusters centered by paired and stringed Ag atoms and Cu-rich icosahedra are widely observed in the ternary Cu45Zr45Ag10 alloy. The atomic-scale heterogeneity caused by chemical short- and medium-range order is found to play a key role in stabilizing the liquid phase and in improving the glass forming ability of the multicomponent alloy.

  19. Heterogeneous ice nucleation of mineral dust particles exposed to ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanji, Zamin A.; Welti, André; Chou, Cédric; Stetzer, Olaf; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2013-05-01

    Deposition and immersion mode ice nucleation studies of kaolinite (Ka) and Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles exposed to ozone at 430 ppbv, 1.4 and 4.3 ppmv for approximately 2 hours in a stainless steel aerosol tank are presented. The polydisperse particles used have a mode mobility diameter of 800 nm for Ka and 400 nm for ATD. The portable ice nucleation chamber (PINC) and immersion chamber (IMCA-ZINC) were used to study deposition and immersion mode ice nucleation respectively. Both instruments sampled through a particle impactor with a diameter cut-off size of 1 μm. Preliminary results indicate that ice nucleation can be enhanced or inhibited depending on ozone concentration used for the ageing process with higher concentrations suppressing ice nucleation in both immersion and deposition modes. Additionally, Ka and ATD respond differently to the ageing process and to the different modes of ice nucleation. Ozone surface coverage and initial uptake coefficients are presented for the low exposure studies to explain the ice nucleation behavior observed. Ice Active Surface Site Densities (IASSD) are presented as a means of comparison and parameterization of the data to predict potential atmospheric ice nuclei (IN) concentrations.

  20. The microscopic features of heterogeneous ice nucleation may affect the macroscopic morphology of atmospheric ice crystals.

    PubMed

    Cox, Stephen J; Raza, Zamaan; Kathmann, Shawn M; Slater, Ben; Michaelides, Angelos

    2013-01-01

    It is surprisingly difficult to freeze water. Almost all ice that forms under "mild" conditions (temperatures > -40 degrees C) requires the presence of a nucleating agent--a solid particle that facilitates the freezing process--such as clay mineral dust, soot or bacteria. In a computer simulation, the presence of such ice nucleating agents does not necessarily alleviate the difficulties associated with forming ice on accessible timescales. Nevertheless, in this work we present results from molecular dynamics simulations in which we systematically compare homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation, using the atmospherically important clay mineral kaolinite as our model ice nucleating agent. From our simulations, we do indeed find that kaolinite is an excellent ice nucleating agent but that contrary to conventional thought, non-basal faces of ice can nucleate at the basal face of kaolinite. We see that in the liquid phase, the kaolinite surface has a drastic effect on the density profile of water, with water forming a dense, tightly bound first contact layer. Monitoring the time evolution of the water density reveals that changes away from the interface may play an important role in the nucleation mechanism. The findings from this work suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleating agents may not only enhance the ice nucleation rate, but also alter the macroscopic structure of the ice crystals that form.

  1. Heterogeneous Nucleation of an n-Alkane on Tetrahedrally Coordinated Crystals.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Alexander J; Locker, C Rebecca; Rutledge, Gregory C

    2017-02-02

    Heterogeneous nucleation refers to the propensity for phase transformations to initiate preferentially on foreign surfaces, such as vessel walls, dust particles, or formulation additives. In crystallization, the form of the initial nucleus has ramifications for the crystallographic form, morphology, and properties of the resulting solid. Nevertheless, the discovery and design of nucleating agents remains a matter of trial and error because of the very small spatiotemporal scales over which the critical nucleus is formed and the extreme difficulty of examining such events empirically. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate a method for the rapid screening of entire families of materials for activity as nucleating agents and for characterizing their mechanism of action. The method is applied to the crystallization of n-pentacontane, a model surrogate for polyethylene, on the family of tetrahedrally coordinated crystals, including diamond and silicon. A systematic variation of parameters in the interaction potential permits a comprehensive, physically based screening of nucleating agents in this class of materials, including both real and hypothetical candidates. The induction time for heterogeneous nucleation is shown to depend strongly on crystallographic registry between the nucleating agent and the critical nucleus, indicative of an epitaxial mechanism in this class of materials. Importantly, the severity of this registry requirement weakens with decreasing rigidity of the substrate and increasing strength of attraction to the surface of the nucleating agent. Employing this method, a high-throughput computational screening of nucleating agents becomes possible, facilitating the discovery of novel nucleating agents within a broad "materials genome" of possible additives.

  2. Two-component heterogeneous nucleation kinetics and an application to Mars.

    PubMed

    Määttänen, Anni; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Lauri, Antti; Napari, Ismo; Kulmala, Markku

    2007-10-07

    We develop a two-component heterogeneous nucleation model that includes exact calculation of the Stauffer-type [D. Stauffer, J. Aerosol Sci. 7, 319 (1976)] steady-state kinetic prefactor using the correct heterogeneous Zeldovich factor for a heterogeneous two-component system. The model, and a simplified version of it, is tested by comparing its predictions to experimental data for water-n-propanol nucleating on silver particles. The model is then applied to water-carbon dioxide system in Martian conditions, which has not been modeled before. Using the ideal mixture assumption, the model shows theoretical possibilities for two-component nucleation adjacent to the initial stages of one-component water nucleation, especially with small water vapor amounts. The numbers of carbon dioxide molecules in the critical cluster are small in the case of large water amounts (up to 300 ppm) in the gas phase, but larger when there is very little water vapor (1 ppm).

  3. Competitive heterogeneous nucleation onto a microscopic impurity in a Potts model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asuquo, Cletus C.; McArthur, Danielle; Bowles, Richard K.

    2016-08-01

    Many metastable systems can nucleate to multiple competing stable or intermediate metastable states. In this work, a Potts model, subject to external fields, is used to study the competitive nucleation of two phases attempting to grow on a microscopic impurity. Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the free energy surfaces for the system under different conditions, where the relative stability of the phases is adjusted by changing the interaction parameters, and the nucleation rates obtained using multicomponent transition state theory (TST) are compared with the rates measured using the survival probability method. We find that the two methods predict similar nucleation rates when the free energy barrier used in the transition state theory is defined as the work required to form a critical embryo from the metastable phase. An analysis of the free energy surfaces also reveals that the competition between the nucleating phases leads to an effective drying of the impurity which slows down the nucleation rate compared to the single phase case.

  4. Improved Success of Sparse Matrix Protein Crystallization Screening with Heterogeneous Nucleating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Anil S.; Robin, Gautier; Guncar, Gregor; Saunders, Neil F. W.; Newman, Janet; Martin, Jennifer L.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2007-01-01

    Background Crystallization is a major bottleneck in the process of macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Successful crystallization requires the formation of nuclei and their subsequent growth to crystals of suitable size. Crystal growth generally occurs spontaneously in a supersaturated solution as a result of homogenous nucleation. However, in a typical sparse matrix screening experiment, precipitant and protein concentration are not sampled extensively, and supersaturation conditions suitable for nucleation are often missed. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested the effect of nine potential heterogenous nucleating agents on crystallization of ten test proteins in a sparse matrix screen. Several nucleating agents induced crystal formation under conditions where no crystallization occurred in the absence of the nucleating agent. Four nucleating agents: dried seaweed; horse hair; cellulose and hydroxyapatite, had a considerable overall positive effect on crystallization success. This effect was further enhanced when these nucleating agents were used in combination with each other. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that the addition of heterogeneous nucleating agents increases the chances of crystal formation when using sparse matrix screens. PMID:17971854

  5. Heterogeneous nucleation of a semicrystalline polymer on fiber surfaces

    Treesearch

    Sangyeob Lee; Todd f. Shupe; Leslie h. Groom; Chung Y. Hse

    2006-01-01

    Nucleation phenomenon as affected by the surface conditions of six identical wood/non-wood fibers with three levels of fiber treatments were investigated by a combination of complementary techniques. This study was based on results of a preliminary study on the influence of surface characteristics of thermomechanical pulp (TMP) fibers on the transcrystalline layer (TLC...

  6. The interface of heterogeneous nucleation on single crystal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L.; Xia, M.; Li, J.

    2016-03-01

    Under controlled nucleation process was achieved by solidifying a high purity Al droplet on a single crystal Al2O3 substrate in a high vacuum chamber. The following X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis and measured undercooling prove that the nucleation was triggered by the substrate. Various lattice mismatches between new crystal and substrate (C/S) were obtained through this approach. Combining XRD patterns and high resolution transmission electron microscope analysis we found that the morphology of interface was affected by lattice misfit. An epitaxial layer was found at C/S interface with larger lattice misfit, as in Al(100)//Al2O3(0001) system. Further experiments on introduced alloying element, Sb, into liquid Al shows a suppressed epitaxial layer of Al. Chemical reaction between liquid and substrate also contributes to the formation of the interface. The nucleation of Al on the MgO substrates was actually nucleated on MgAl2O4, chemical reaction product of Al and MgO, rather than MgO.

  7. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice on anthropogenic organic particles collected in Mexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Knopf, D.A.; Wang, B.; Laskin, A.; Moffet, R.C.; Gilles, M.K.

    2010-06-20

    This study reports on heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of predominantly organic (or coated with organic material) anthropogenic particles sampled within and around the polluted environment of Mexico City. The onset of heterogeneous ice nucleation was observed as a function of particle temperature (Tp), relative humidity (RH), nucleation mode, and particle chemical composition which is influenced by photochemical atmospheric aging. Particle analyses included computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). In contrast to most laboratory studies employing proxies of organic aerosol, we show that anthropogenic organic particles collected in Mexico City can potentially induce ice nucleation at experimental conditions relevant to cirrus formation. The results suggest a new precedent for the potential impact of organic particles on ice cloud formation and climate.

  8. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Ice on Anthropogenic Organic Particles Collected in Mexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Knopf, Daniel A.; Wang, BingBing; Laskin, Alexander; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Marry K.

    2010-06-05

    This study reports on heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of predominantly organic or coated with organic material anthropogenic particles sampled within and around the polluted environment of Mexico City. The onset of heterogeneous ice nucleation was observed as a function of particle temperature (Tp), relative humidity (RH), nucleation mode, and chemical composition of particles influenced by their photochemical atmospheric aging. Particle analyses was conducted using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). In contrast to the majority of laboratory studies employing proxies of organic aerosol, we show that anthropogenic organic particles collected in Mexico City have can potentially induce ice nucleation at experimental conditions relevant to cirrus formation. The reported results suggest a new paradigm for the potential impact of organic particles on ice cloud formation and climate.

  9. Role of dynamic heterogeneities in crystal nucleation kinetics in an oxide supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Prabhat K.; Cassar, Daniel R.; Zanotto, Edgar D.

    2016-12-01

    The temperature at which the classical critical nucleus size is equal to the average size of the cooperatively rearranging regions (CRR) in a supercooled liquid has been referred to as a "cross-over" temperature. We show, for the first time, using published nucleation rate, viscosity, and thermo-physical data, that the cross-over temperature for the lithium disilicate melt is significantly larger than the temperature of the kinetic spinodal and is equal or close to the temperature corresponding to the maximum in the experimentally observed nucleation rates. We suggest that the abnormal decrease in nucleation rates below the cross-over temperature is most likely because, in this regime, the CRR size controls the critical nucleus size and the nucleation rate. This finding links, for the first time, measured nucleation kinetics to the dynamic heterogeneities in a supercooled liquid.

  10. Molecular simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation. II. Peeling back the layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Stephen J.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Slater, Ben; Michaelides, Angelos

    2015-05-01

    Coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations are presented in which the sensitivity of the ice nucleation rate to the hydrophilicity of a graphene nanoflake is investigated. We find that an optimal interaction strength for promoting ice nucleation exists, which coincides with that found previously for a face centered cubic (111) surface. We further investigate the role that the layering of interfacial water plays in heterogeneous ice nucleation and demonstrate that the extent of layering is not a good indicator of ice nucleating ability for all surfaces. Our results suggest that to be an efficient ice nucleating agent, a surface should not bind water too strongly if it is able to accommodate high coverages of water.

  11. Molecular Simulations of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation. II. Peeling back the Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Stephen J.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Slater, B.; Michaelides, Angelos

    2015-05-14

    Coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations are presented in which the sensitivity of the ice nucleation rate to the hydrophilicity of a graphene nanoflake is investigated. We find that an optimal interaction strength for promoting ice nucleation exists, which coincides with that found previously for a face centered cubic (111) surface. We further investigate the role that the layering of interfacial water plays in heterogeneous ice nucleation and demonstrate that the extent of layering is not a good indicator of ice nucleating ability for all surfaces. Our results suggest that to be an efficient ice nucleating agent, a surface should not bind water too strongly if it is able to accommodate high coverages of water.

  12. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias R.; Gilles, Marry K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2012-09-25

    Atmospheric ice formation induced by particles with complex chemical and physical properties through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by ambient particles collected from urban environments in Los Angeles and Mexico City are presented. Using a vapour controlled cooling system equipped with an optical microscopy, the range of onset conditions for ice nucleation and water uptake by the collected particles was determined as a function of temperature (200{273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) up to water saturation. Three distinctly different types of authentic atmospheric particles were investigated including soot particles associated with organics/inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn containing inorganic particles apportioned to anthropogenic emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption ne structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, signicant differences in water uptake and immersion freezing effciencies of the different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, the particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation effciencies and formed ice at RHice values well below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data show that the chemical composition of these eld{collected particles plays an important role in determining water uptake and immersion freezing. Heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coeffcients, cumulative ice nuclei (IN) spectrum, and IN activated fraction for deposition ice nucleation are derived. The presented ice nucleation data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine particles comprising of various chemical and physical properties exhibit distinctly different ice

  13. Orientation dependence of heterogeneous nucleation at the Cu-Pb solid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palafox-Hernandez, J. Pablo; Laird, Brian B.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we examine the effect of surface structure on the heterogeneous nucleation of Pb crystals from the melt at a Cu substrate using molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation. In a previous work [Palafox-Hernandez et al., Acta Mater. 59, 3137 (2011)] studying the Cu/Pb solid-liquid interface with MD simulation, we observed that the structure of the Cu(111) and Cu(100) interfaces was significantly different at 625 K, just above the Pb melting temperature (618 K for the model). The Cu(100) interface exhibited significant surface alloying in the crystal plane in contact with the melt. In contrast, no surface alloying was seen at the Cu(111) interface; however, a prefreezing layer of crystalline Pb, 2-3 atomic planes thick and slightly compressed relative to bulk Pb crystal, was observed to form at the interface. We observe that at the Cu(111) interface the prefreezing layer is no longer present at 750 K, but surface alloying in the Cu(100) interface persists. In a series of undercooling MD simulations, heterogeneous nucleation of fcc Pb is observed at the Cu(111) interface within the simulation time (5 ns) at 592 K—a 26 K undercooling. Nucleation and growth at Cu(111) proceeded layerwise with a nearly planar critical nucleus. Quantitative analysis yielded heterogeneous nucleation barriers that are more than two orders of magnitude smaller than the predicted homogeneous nucleation barriers from classical nucleation theory. Nucleation was considerably more difficult on the Cu(100) surface-alloyed substrate. An undercooling of approximately 170 K was necessary to observe nucleation at this interface within the simulation time. From qualitative observation, the critical nucleus showed a contact angle with the Cu(100) surface of over 90°, indicating poor wetting of the Cu(100) surface by the nucleating phase, which according to classical heterogeneous nucleation theory provides an explanation of the large undercooling necessary to nucleate on the Cu(100) surface

  14. BINARY: an optical freezing array for assessing temperature and time dependence of heterogeneous ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budke, C.; Koop, T.

    2015-02-01

    A new optical freezing array for the study of heterogeneous ice nucleation in microliter-sized droplets is introduced, tested and applied to the study of immersion freezing in aqueous Snomax® suspensions. In the Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARraY (BINARY) ice nucleation can be studied simultaneously in 36 droplets at temperatures down to -40 °C (233 K) and at cooling rates between 0.1 and 10 K min-1. The droplets are separated from each other in individual compartments, thus preventing a Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen type water vapor transfer between droplets as well as avoiding the seeding of neighboring droplets by formation and surface growth of frost halos. Analysis of freezing and melting occurs via an automated real-time image analysis of the optical brightness of each individual droplet. As an application ice nucleation in water droplets containing Snomax® at concentrations from 1 ng mL-1 to 1 mg mL-1 was investigated. Using different cooling rates, a small time dependence of ice nucleation induced by two different classes of ice nucleators (INs) contained in Snomax® was detected and the corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient was quantified. The observed time dependence is smaller than those of other types of INs reported in the literature, suggesting that the BINARY setup is suitable for quantifying time dependence for most other INs of atmospheric interest, making it a useful tool for future investigations.

  15. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 2: Nucleation of ice on synoptic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Hoyle, C. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Dörnbrack, A.; Peter, T.

    2013-04-01

    This paper provides unprecedented evidence for the importance of heterogeneous nucleation, likely on solid particles of meteoritic origin, and of small-scale temperature fluctuations, for the formation of ice particles in the Arctic stratosphere. During January 2010, ice PSCs (Polar Stratospheric Clouds) were shown by CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) to have occurred on a synoptic scale (~ 1000 km dimension). CALIPSO observations also showed widespread PSCs containing nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles in December 2009, prior to the occurrence of synoptic-scale regions of ice PSCs during mid-January 2010. We demonstrate by means of detailed microphysical modeling along air parcel trajectories that the formation of these PSCs is not readily reconciled with expectations from the conventional understanding of PSC nucleation mechanisms. The measurements are at odds with the previous laboratory-based understanding of PSC formation, which deemed direct heterogeneous nucleation of NAT and ice on preexisting solid particles unlikely. While a companion paper (Part 1) addresses the heterogeneous nucleation of NAT during December 2009, before the existence of ice PSCs, this paper shows that also the large-scale occurrence of stratospheric ice in January 2010 cannot be explained merely by homogeneous ice nucleation but requires the heterogeneous nucleation of ice, e.g. on meteoritic dust or preexisting NAT particles. The required efficiency of the ice nuclei is surprisingly high, namely comparable to that of known tropospheric ice nuclei such as mineral dust particles. To gain model agreement with the ice number densities inferred from observations, the presence of small-scale temperature fluctuations, with wavelengths unresolved by the numerical weather prediction models, is required. With the derived rate parameterization for heterogeneous ice nucleation we are able to explain and reproduce CALIPSO observations throughout the

  16. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 2: Nucleation of ice on synoptic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Hoyle, C. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Dörnbrack, A.; Peter, T.

    2013-11-01

    This paper provides compelling evidence for the importance of heterogeneous nucleation, likely on solid particles of meteoritic origin, and of small-scale temperature fluctuations, for the formation of ice particles in the Arctic stratosphere. During January 2010, ice PSCs (polar stratospheric clouds) were shown by CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) to have occurred on a synoptic scale (~1000 km dimension). CALIPSO observations also showed widespread PSCs containing NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) particles in December 2009, prior to the occurrence of synoptic-scale regions of ice PSCs during mid-January 2010. We demonstrate by means of detailed microphysical modeling along air parcel trajectories that the formation of these PSCs is not readily reconciled with expectations from the conventional understanding of PSC nucleation mechanisms. The measurements are at odds with the previous laboratory-based understanding of PSC formation, which deemed direct heterogeneous nucleation of NAT and ice on preexisting solid particles unlikely. While a companion paper (Part 1) addresses the heterogeneous nucleation of NAT during December 2009, before the existence of ice PSCs, this paper shows that also the large-scale occurrence of stratospheric ice in January 2010 cannot be explained merely by homogeneous ice nucleation but requires the heterogeneous nucleation of ice, e.g. on meteoritic dust or preexisting NAT particles. The required efficiency of the ice nuclei is surprisingly high, namely comparable to that of known tropospheric ice nuclei such as mineral dust particles. To gain model agreement with the ice number densities inferred from observations, the presence of small-scale temperature fluctuations, with wavelengths unresolved by the numerical weather prediction models, is required. With the derived rate parameterization for heterogeneous ice nucleation we are able to explain and reproduce CALIPSO observations throughout the

  17. Interfacial energies for heterogeneous nucleation of calcium carbonate on mica and quartz.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingyun; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Lee, Byeongdu; Waychunas, Glenn A; Jun, Young-Shin

    2014-05-20

    Interfacial free energies often control heterogeneous nucleation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) on mineral surfaces. Here we report an in situ experimental study of CaCO3 nucleation on mica (muscovite) and quartz, which allows us to obtain the interfacial energies governing heterogeneous nucleation. In situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) was used to measure nucleation rates at different supersaturations. The rates were incorporated into classical nucleation theory to calculate the effective interfacial energies (α'). Ex situ Raman spectroscopy identified both calcite and vaterite as CaCO3 polymorphs; however, vaterite is the most probable heterogeneous nuclei mineral phase. The α' was 24 mJ/m(2) for the vaterite-mica system and 32 mJ/m(2) for the vaterite-quartz system. The smaller α' of the CaCO3-mica system led to smaller particles and often higher particle densities on mica. A contributing factor affecting α' in our system was the smaller structural mismatch between CaCO3 and mica compared to that between CaCO3 and quartz. The extent of hydrophilicity and the surface charge could not explain the observed CaCO3 nucleation trend on mica and quartz. The findings of this study provide new thermodynamic parameters for subsurface reactive transport modeling and contribute to our understanding of mechanisms where CaCO3 formation on surfaces is of concern.

  18. Modelling heterogeneous ice nucleation on mineral dust and soot with parameterizations based on laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoose, C.; Hande, L. B.; Mohler, O.; Niemand, M.; Paukert, M.; Reichardt, I.; Ullrich, R.

    2016-12-01

    Between 0 and -37°C, ice formation in clouds is triggered by aerosol particles acting as heterogeneous ice nuclei. At lower temperatures, heterogeneous ice nucleation on aerosols can occur at lower supersaturations than homogeneous freezing of solutes. In laboratory experiments, the ability of different aerosol species (e.g. desert dusts, soot, biological particles) has been studied in detail and quantified via various theoretical or empirical parameterization approaches. For experiments in the AIDA cloud chamber, we have quantified the ice nucleation efficiency via a temperature- and supersaturation dependent ice nucleation active site density. Here we present a new empirical parameterization scheme for immersion and deposition ice nucleation on desert dust and soot based on these experimental data. The application of this parameterization to the simulation of cirrus clouds, deep convective clouds and orographic clouds will be shown, including the extension of the scheme to the treatment of freezing of rain drops. The results are compared to other heterogeneous ice nucleation schemes. Furthermore, an aerosol-dependent parameterization of contact ice nucleation is presented.

  19. Phase nucleation and evolution mechanisms in heterogeneous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udupa, Anirudh

    Phase nucleation and evolution is a problem of critical importance in many applications. As the length scales are reduced, it becomes increasingly important to consider interfacial and micro-structural effects that can be safely ignored at larger length scales owing to randomness. The theory of phase nucleation has been addressed usually by the classical nucleation theory, which was originally derived for single component fluid systems, after making an assumption of equilibrium. The criterion has not been rigorously derived for solids, which are far from equilibrium due to dissipation by multiple physical drivers. In this thesis, a thermodynamically sound nucleation criterion is derived for systems with multiple interacting physical phenomena and multiple dissipating mechanisms. This is done, using the tools of continuum mechanics, by determining the change in free energy upon the introduction of a new nucleus into the system. The developed theory is demonstrated to be a generalization of the classical nucleation theory (CNT). The developed theory is then applied to the problem of electromigration driven void nucleation, a serious reliability concern for the microelectronics industry. The void grows and eventually severs the line making the chip nonfunctional. There are two classes of theories at present in the electromigration literature to address the problem of void nucleation, the vacancy supersaturation theory and the entropic dissipation theory, both of which are empirical and based on intuition developed from experimental observations. When the developed theory was applied to the problem of electromigration, it was found to be consistent with the vacancy supersaturation theory, but provided the correct energetic quantity, the chemical potential, which has contribution from both the vacancy concentration as well as the hydrostatic stress. An experiment, consisting of electromigration tests on serpentine lines, was developed to validate the developed

  20. Chemical processing does not always impair heterogeneous ice nucleation of mineral dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Demott, P. J.; Prenni, A. J.; Minambres, L.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Moehler, O.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral dust particles are the most abundant heterogeneous ice nuclei in the atmosphere. They also frequently become mixed with secondary material during atmospheric transport. The effect that such atmospheric processing has on the ice nucleation properties of dust particles remains under investigation. We have studied changes in the ice nucleation ability of various mineral dust sources after exposure to nitric acid in an aerosol flow tube, and after heterogeneous nucleation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the AIDA cloud expansion chamber. Both chemical treatments altered and homogenized the dust particles’ heterogeneous ice nucleation properties below water-saturation, but had no apparent impact on the immersion-freezing fraction well above water saturation. The fraction of particles capable of nucleating ice at fixed mixed-phase cloud temperatures between -35 and -15 °C was determined using a continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) as the relative humidity with respect to water (RHw) was scanned from 75% to 110% RHw. Exposure to both nitric acid and SOA impaired essentially all ice nucleation in the deposition-regime below water saturation, while causing the onset of condensation-freezing to occur in a step-wise manner over a small range of RHw just below water saturation. We interpret this as the result of an increase in particle hygroscopicity following chemical treatment. This allows the mineral particles to absorb enough water to overcome solute freezing point depression effects and nucleate ice via condensation-freezing at a slightly smaller and narrower range of RHw than the less hygroscopic untreated dust can. Immersion-freezing above water saturation was not affected by either treatment. This is in stark contrast to earlier experiments where dust was exposed to sulfuric acid from a heated vapor source; ice nucleation was notably impaired in both the deposition and immersion-freezing regimes following sulfuric acid treatment.

  1. Nucleation versus spinodal decomposition in phase formation processes in multicomponent solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelzer, Jürn W. P.; Abyzov, Alexander S.; Möller, Jörg

    2004-10-01

    In the present paper, some further results of application of the generalized Gibbs' approach [J. W. P. Schmelzer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 112, 3820 (2000); 114, 5180 (2001); 119, 6166 (2003)] to describing new-phase formation processes are outlined. The path of cluster evolution in size and composition space is determined taking into account both thermodynamic and kinetic factors. The basic features of these paths of evolution are discussed in detail for a simple model of a binary mixture. According to this analysis, size and composition of the clusters of the newly evolving phase change in an unexpected way which is qualitatively different as compared to the classical picture of nucleation-growth processes. As shown, nucleation (i.e., the first stage of cluster formation starting from metastable initial states) exhibits properties resembling spinodal decomposition (the size remains nearly constant while the composition changes) although the presence of an activation barrier distinguishes the nucleation process from true spinodal decomposition. In addition, it is shown that phase formation both in metastable and unstable initial states near the classical spinodal may proceed via a passage of a ridge of the thermodynamic potential with a finite work of the activation barrier even though (for unstable initial states) the value of the work of critical cluster formation (corresponding to the saddle point of the thermodynamic potential) is zero. This way, it turns out that nucleation concepts—in a modified form as compared with the classical picture—may govern also phase formation processes starting from unstable initial states. In contrast to the classical Gibbs' approach, the generalized Gibbs' method provides a description of phase changes both in binodal and spinodal regions of the phase diagram and confirms the point of view assuming a continuity of the basic features of the phase transformation kinetics in the vicinity of the classical spinodal curve.

  2. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2011-11-01

    Ice formation induced by atmospheric particles through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Onset conditions for heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by particles collected in Los Angeles and Mexico City were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). Four dominant particle types were identified including soot associated with organics, soot with organic and inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn-containing particles apportioned to emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, significant differences in onsets of water uptake and immersion freezing of different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation efficiencies and formed ice atRHicewell below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data suggest that water uptake and immersion freezing are more sensitive to changes in particle chemical composition compared to deposition ice nucleation. The data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine influenced particles, exhibiting various chemical and physical properties, possess distinctly different ice nucleation efficiencies and can serve as efficient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed-phase clouds.

  3. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2012-09-01

    Ice formation induced by atmospheric particles through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Onset conditions for heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by particles collected in Los Angeles and Mexico City were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). Four dominant particle types were identified including soot associated with organics, soot with organic and inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn-containing particles apportioned to emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, significant differences in onsets of water uptake and immersion freezing of different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation efficiencies and formed ice atRHicewell below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data suggest that water uptake and immersion freezing are more sensitive to changes in particle chemical composition compared to deposition ice nucleation. The data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine influenced particles, exhibiting various chemical and physical properties, possess distinctly different ice nucleation efficiencies and can serve as efficient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed-phase clouds.

  4. Heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous secondary organic aerosol produced from ozonolysis of α-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, Karoliina; Kristensen, Thomas B.; Järvinen, Emma; Nichman, Leonid; Fuchs, Claudia; Gordon, Hamish; Herenz, Paul; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Garimella, Sarvesh; Dias, Antonio; Frege, Carla; Höppel, Niko; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Robert; Yan, Chao; Amorim, Antonio; Baltensperger, Urs; Curtius, Joachim; Donahue, Neil M.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Worsnop, Douglas; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-05-01

    There are strong indications that particles containing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) exhibit amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states in the atmosphere. This may facilitate heterogeneous ice nucleation and thus influence cloud properties. However, experimental ice nucleation studies of biogenic SOA are scarce. Here, we investigated the ice nucleation ability of viscous SOA particles. The SOA particles were produced from the ozone initiated oxidation of α-pinene in an aerosol chamber at temperatures in the range from -38 to -10 °C at 5-15 % relative humidity with respect to water to ensure their formation in a highly viscous phase state, i.e. semi-solid or glassy. The ice nucleation ability of SOA particles with different sizes was investigated with a new continuous flow diffusion chamber. For the first time, we observed heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous α-pinene SOA for ice saturation ratios between 1.3 and 1.4 significantly below the homogeneous freezing limit. The maximum frozen fractions found at temperatures between -39.0 and -37.2 °C ranged from 6 to 20 % and did not depend on the particle surface area. Global modelling of monoterpene SOA particles suggests that viscous biogenic SOA particles are indeed present in regions where cirrus cloud formation takes place. Hence, they could make up an important contribution to the global ice nucleating particle budget.

  5. A novel optical freezing array for the examination of cooling rate dependence in heterogeneous ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budke, Carsten; Dreischmeier, Katharina; Koop, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Homogeneous ice nucleation is a stochastic process, implying that it is not only temperature but also time dependent. For heterogeneous ice nucleation it is still under debate whether there is a significant time dependence or not. In case of minor time dependence it is probably sufficient to use a singular or slightly modified singular approach, which mainly supposes temperature dependence and just small stochastic variations. We contribute to this discussion using a novel optical freezing array termed BINARY (Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARraY). The setup consists of an array of microliter-sized droplets on a Peltier cooling stage. The droplets are separated from each other with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) spacer to prevent a Bergeron-Findeisen process, in which the first freezing droplets grow at the expense of the remaining liquid ones due to their vapor pressure differences. An automatic detection of nucleation events is realized optically by the change in brightness during freezing. Different types of ice nucleating agents were tested with the presented setup, e. g. pollen and clay mineral dust. Exemplarily, cooling rate dependent measurements are shown for the heterogeneous ice nucleation induced by Snomax®. The authors gratefully acknowledge funding by the German Research Foundation (DFG) through the project BIOCLOUDS (KO 2944/1-1) and through the research unit INUIT (FOR 1525) under KO 2944/2-1. We particularly thank our INUIT partners for fruitful collaboration and sharing of ideas and IN samples.

  6. FOREWORD: Heterogenous nucleation and microstructure formation—a scale- and system-bridging approach Heterogenous nucleation and microstructure formation—a scale- and system-bridging approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmerich, H.

    2009-11-01

    Scope and aim of this volume. Nucleation and initial microstructure formation play an important role in almost all aspects of materials science [1-5]. The relevance of the prediction and control of nucleation and the subsequent microstructure formation is fully accepted across many areas of modern surface and materials science and technology. One reason is that a large range of material properties, from mechanical ones such as ductility and hardness to electrical and magnetic ones such as electric conductivity and magnetic hardness, depend largely on the specific crystalline structure that forms in nucleation and the subsequent initial microstructure growth. A very demonstrative example for the latter is the so called bamboo structure of an integrated circuit, for which resistance against electromigration [6] , a parallel alignment of grain boundaries vertical to the direction of electricity, is most favorable. Despite the large relevance of predicting and controlling nucleation and the subsequent microstructure formation, and despite significant progress in the experimental analysis of the later stages of crystal growth in line with new theoretical computer simulation concepts [7], details about the initial stages of solidification are still far from being satisfactorily understood. This is in particular true when the nucleation event occurs as heterogenous nucleation. The Priority Program SPP 1296 'Heterogenous Nucleation and Microstructure Formation—a Scale- and System-Bridging Approach' [8] sponsored by the German Research Foundation, DFG, intends to contribute to this open issue via a six year research program that enables approximately twenty research groups in Germany to work interdisciplinarily together following this goal. Moreover, it enables the participants to embed themselves in the international community which focuses on this issue via internationally open joint workshops, conferences and summer schools. An outline of such activities can be found

  7. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Trichloroethylene Ozonation Products in the Formation of New Fine Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Sun, Xiaomin; Chen, Jianmin; Li, Xiang

    2017-02-01

    Free radicals in atmosphere have played an important role in the atmospheric chemistry. The chloro-Criegee free radicals are produced easily in the decomposition of primary ozonide (POZ) of the trichloroethylene, and can react with O2, NO, NO2, SO2 and H2O subsequently. Then the inorganic salts, polar organic nitrogen and organic sulfur compounds, oxygen-containing heterocyclic intermediates and polyhydroxy compounds can be obtained. The heterogeneous nucleation of oxidation intermediates in the formation of fine particles is investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. The detailed nucleation processes are reported. According to molecular dynamics simulation, the nucleation with a diameter of 2 nm is formed in the Organic Compounds-(NH4)2SO4-H2O system. The spontaneous nucleation is an important process in the formation of fine particles in atmosphere. The model study gives a good example from volatile organic compounds to new fine particles.

  8. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Trichloroethylene Ozonation Products in the Formation of New Fine Particles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Sun, Xiaomin; Chen, Jianmin; Li, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Free radicals in atmosphere have played an important role in the atmospheric chemistry. The chloro-Criegee free radicals are produced easily in the decomposition of primary ozonide (POZ) of the trichloroethylene, and can react with O2, NO, NO2, SO2 and H2O subsequently. Then the inorganic salts, polar organic nitrogen and organic sulfur compounds, oxygen-containing heterocyclic intermediates and polyhydroxy compounds can be obtained. The heterogeneous nucleation of oxidation intermediates in the formation of fine particles is investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. The detailed nucleation processes are reported. According to molecular dynamics simulation, the nucleation with a diameter of 2 nm is formed in the Organic Compounds-(NH4)2SO4-H2O system. The spontaneous nucleation is an important process in the formation of fine particles in atmosphere. The model study gives a good example from volatile organic compounds to new fine particles. PMID:28198438

  9. What makes a good descriptor for heterogeneous ice nucleation on OH-patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedevilla, Philipp; Fitzner, Martin; Michaelides, Angelos

    2017-09-01

    Freezing of water is arguably one of the most common phase transitions on Earth and almost always happens heterogeneously. Despite its importance, we lack a fundamental understanding of what makes substrates efficient ice nucleators. Here we address this by computing the ice nucleation (IN) ability of numerous model hydroxylated substrates with diverse surface hydroxyl (OH) group arrangements. Overall, for the substrates considered, we find that neither the symmetry of the OH patterns nor the similarity between a substrate and ice correlate well with the IN ability. Instead, we find that the OH density and the substrate-water interaction strength are useful descriptors of a material's IN ability. This insight allows the rationalization of ice nucleation ability across a wide range of materials and can aid the search and design of novel potent ice nucleators in the future.

  10. On the heterogeneous nucleation of mesospheric ice on meteoric smoke particles: Microphysical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, Heiner; Wilms, Henrike; Strelnikov, Boris; Rapp, Markus

    2014-10-01

    Meteor smoke particles (MSP), which are thought to be the nucleation germs for mesospheric ice, are currently discussed to consist of highly absorbing materials such as magnesiowüstite, hematite or magnesium-iron-silicates and may therefore be warmer than the ambient atmosphere. In order to quantify the temperature difference between MSP and the atmosphere we developed a model to calculate the MSP equilibrium temperature in radiational and collisional balance. The temperature difference between MSP and the surrounding atmosphere strongly depends on the composition of the MSP, especially on the relative iron content, where a higher iron content leads to warmer MSP. We then derive an expression of the nucleation rate of mesospheric ice particles which explicitly accounts for this temperature difference. We find that the nucleation rate is strongly reduced by several orders of magnitude if the germ temperature is increased by only a few Kelvin. Implementing this nucleation rate depending on the germ temperature into CARMA, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres, we find that fewer but larger ice particles are formed compared to a reference scenario with no temperature difference between MSP and ambient atmosphere. This may indicate that iron-rich MSP are not ideal ice nuclei and that either other MSP-types or other nucleation pathways (e.g. wave induced heterogeneous nucleation or even homogeneous nucleation) are responsible for ice formation at the mesopause.

  11. Effects of seed particle size and composition on heterogeneous nucleation of n-nonane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Paul M.; Hienola, Anca; Steiner, Gerhard; Hill, Gerard; Vrtala, Aron; Reischl, Georg P.; Kulmala, Markku; Wagner, Paul E.

    2008-11-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of supersaturated n-nonane vapour on seed particles of different size and composition has been investigated using a fast expansion chamber. Monodisperse seed particle sizes were ranging from about 4 nm up to about 24 nm in diameter. By using different types of particle generators WO x, Ag and (NH 4) 2SO 4 particles were generated. For direct comparison between different particle compositions overlapping sizes have been generated for WO x and Ag at about 7 nm particle diameter as well as for Ag and (NH 4) 2SO 4 at about 15 nm. Nucleation temperature was kept constant at about 278 K. Experimental data were compared to Kelvin equation and Fletcher theory including the effect of line tension. It was found that heterogeneous nucleation of n-nonane seems to be independent of seed particle composition and starts well below the Kelvin curve. Good agreement was achieved with Fletcher theory including the effect of line tension.

  12. The Many Faces of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation: Interplay Between Surface Morphology and Hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Martin; Sosso, Gabriele C; Cox, Stephen J; Michaelides, Angelos

    2015-10-28

    What makes a material a good ice nucleating agent? Despite the importance of heterogeneous ice nucleation to a variety of fields, from cloud science to microbiology, major gaps in our understanding of this ubiquitous process still prevent us from answering this question. In this work, we have examined the ability of generic crystalline substrates to promote ice nucleation as a function of the hydrophobicity and the morphology of the surface. Nucleation rates have been obtained by brute-force molecular dynamics simulations of coarse-grained water on top of different surfaces of a model fcc crystal, varying the water-surface interaction and the surface lattice parameter. It turns out that the lattice mismatch of the surface with respect to ice, customarily regarded as the most important requirement for a good ice nucleating agent, is at most desirable but not a requirement. On the other hand, the balance between the morphology of the surface and its hydrophobicity can significantly alter the ice nucleation rate and can also lead to the formation of up to three different faces of ice on the same substrate. We have pinpointed three circumstances where heterogeneous ice nucleation can be promoted by the crystalline surface: (i) the formation of a water overlayer that acts as an in-plane template; (ii) the emergence of a contact layer buckled in an ice-like manner; and (iii) nucleation on compact surfaces with very high interaction strength. We hope that this extensive systematic study will foster future experimental work aimed at testing the physiochemical understanding presented herein.

  13. Inclusion of line tension effect in classical nucleation theory for heterogeneous nucleation: A rigorous thermodynamic formulation and some unique conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Singha, Sanat K.; Das, Prasanta K. Maiti, Biswajit

    2015-03-14

    A rigorous thermodynamic formulation of the geometric model for heterogeneous nucleation including line tension effect is missing till date due to the associated mathematical hurdles. In this work, we develop a novel thermodynamic formulation based on Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT), which is supposed to illustrate a systematic and a more plausible analysis for the heterogeneous nucleation on a planar surface including the line tension effect. The appreciable range of the critical microscopic contact angle (θ{sub c}), obtained from the generalized Young’s equation and the stability analysis, is θ{sub ∞} < θ{sub c} < θ′ for positive line tension and is θ{sub M} < θ{sub c} < θ{sub ∞} for negative line tension. θ{sub ∞} is the macroscopic contact angle, θ′ is the contact angle for which the Helmholtz free energy has the minimum value for the positive line tension, and θ{sub M} is the local minima of the nondimensional line tension effect for the negative line tension. The shape factor f, which is basically the dimensionless critical free energy barrier, becomes higher for lower values of θ{sub ∞} and higher values of θ{sub c} for positive line tension. The combined effect due to the presence of the triple line and the interfacial areas (f{sup L} + f{sup S}) in shape factor is always within (0, 3.2), resulting f in the range of (0, 1.7) for positive line tension. A formerly presumed appreciable range for θ{sub c}(0 < θ{sub c} < θ{sub ∞}) is found not to be true when the effect of negative line tension is considered for CNT. Estimation based on the property values of some real fluids confirms the relevance of the present analysis.

  14. Heterogeneous ice nucleation: Exploring the transition from stochastic to singular freezing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratmann, F.; Niedermeier, D.; Hartmann, S.; Shaw, R. A.; Clauss, T.; Wex, H.

    2011-12-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation directly influences cloud physical processes, precipitation formation, global radiation balances, and therefore Earth's climate (Cantrell and Heymsfield, 2005 and references therein). It is important to understand the heterogeneous freezing process at a fundamental level in order to describe this process in a physically-based way that will behave robustly in weather and climate models. There is longstanding debate as to whether heterogeneous ice nucleation is a stochastic process (e.g., Carte, 1956) or whether it exhibits singular behaviour (e.g., Langham and Mason, 1958). Fundamentally, the stochastic ice nucleation behavior implies ice nucleation being time dependent, while singular behavior is characterized by ice nucleation taking place on specific particle surface sites at a certain temperature and being time independent (Vali and Stansbury, 1966). We addressed this issue using both experimental and theoretical methods. Experiments focused on immersion freezing of Arizona Test Dust (ATD) were carried out using the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS), a seven meter long laminar flow diffusion chamber. Both, temperature and time dependencies of ATD-particle induced immersion freezing were investigated. It was found, that ATD-particle induced immersion freezing took place over a wide temperature range and exhibited no detectable time dependence within the range investigated. The theoretical investigations were carried out using a Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) based, i.e., purely stochastic, numerical model. This idealized model treats statistically similar particles as being covered with surface sites (patches of finite area) characterized by different nucleation barriers, but with each surface site following the stochastic nature of ice embryo formation. The model provides a phenomenological explanation for seemingly contradictory experimental results obtained in the past. Based on CNT alone, a population of

  15. Formation mechanisms of gold-zinc oxide hexagonal nanopyramids by heterogeneous nucleation using microwave synthesis.

    PubMed

    Herring, Natalie P; AbouZeid, Khaled; Mohamed, Mona B; Pinsk, John; El-Shall, M Samy

    2011-12-20

    This work reports the development of a fast and simple "one-pot" route for the synthesis of hybrid Au-ZnO hexagonal nanopyramids by sequential homogeneous-heterogeneous nucleation steps involving both Au and Zn ions using microwave irradiation (MWI). The rapid decomposition of zinc acetate by MWI in the presence of a mixture of oleic acid (OAc) and oleylamine (OAm) results in the formation of hexagonal ZnO nanopyramids. In the presence of Au ions, the initially formed Au nanocrystals act as heterogeneous nuclei for the nucleation and growth of the ZnO nanopyramids. The Au nanoparticles promote the heterogeneous nucleation of ZnO and the formation of the hexagonal base of the ZnO nanopyramids. Using preformed Au nanoparticles instead of Au ions results in a narrow size distribution of uniform Au-ZnO nanopyramids, each consisting of a gold nanoparticle embedded in the center of the hexagonal base of the ZnO nanopyramid. We study the factors that control the nucleation and growth of these complex structures, and provide new insights into the stepwise homogeneous-heterogeneous mechanism and the conventional heterogeneous nucleation on preformed Au nanoparticles. The formation of the hetero nanostructures Au-ZnO nanopyramids is strongly dependent on the molar ratios of OAc to OAm. The presence of OAc with a considerable dipole moment results in strong electrostatic interaction with the polar surfaces of the growing ZnO nanocrystals thus resulting in slowing the growth rate of the polar planes and allowing the formation of well-developed facets. In the absence of Au nanoparticles, a high concentration of zinc acetate and longer MWI times are required for the production of the nanopyramids. The gold nanoparticles could provide the metallic contact points within the hybrid nanopyramids which could facilitate the bottom-up assembly of Au-ZnO devices. Furthermore, the Au-ZnO nanopyramids could have improved performance in solar energy conversion and photocatalysis.

  16. Irradiation-induced heterogeneous nucleation in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Garcia, P.; Sabathier, C.; Van Brutzel, L.; Dorado, B.; Garrido, F.; Maillard, S.

    2010-07-01

    Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the first stages of defect cluster formation resulting from 10 keV displacement cascades in uranium dioxide. Nanometre size cavities and dislocation loops are shown to appear as a result of the irradiation process. A specifically designed TEM experiment involving He implanted thin foils have also been carried out to support this modelling work. These results, in conjunction with several other observations taken from the literature of ion implanted or neutron irradiated uranium dioxide, suggest a radiation damage controlled heterogeneous mechanism for insoluble fission product segregation in UO 2.

  17. Recent Developments in Modeling Heteroepitaxy/Heterogeneous Nucleation by Dynamical Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podmaniczky, Frigyes; Tóth, Gyula I.; Tegze, György; Gránásy, László

    2015-11-01

    Crystallization of supersaturated liquids usually starts by epitaxial growth or by heterogeneous nucleation on foreign surfaces. Herein, we review recent advances made in modeling heteroepitaxy and heterogeneous nucleation on flat/modulated surfaces and nanoparticles within the framework of a simple dynamical density functional theory, known as the phase-field crystal model. It will be shown that the contact angle and the nucleation barrier are nonmonotonous functions of the lattice mismatch between the substrate and the crystalline phase. In continuous cooling studies for substrates with lattice mismatch, we recover qualitatively the Matthews-Blakeslee mechanism of stress release via the misfit dislocations. The simulations performed for particle-induced freezing will be confronted with recent analytical results, exploring thus the validity range of the latter. It will be demonstrated that time-dependent studies are essential, as investigations based on equilibrium properties often cannot identify the preferred nucleation pathways. Modeling of these phenomena is essential for designing materials on the basis of controlled nucleation and/or nano-patterning.

  18. Heterogeneous dislocation nucleation in single crystal copper-antimony solid-solution alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajgarhia, Rahul K.; Spearot, Douglas E.; Saxena, Ashok

    2009-07-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are employed to study the partial dislocation nucleation process in single crystal copper with varying concentrations of antimony (0.0-2.0 at%Sb) under uniaxial tension. A well-established embedded-atom method potential is used to represent the Cu-Cu interactions and a recently developed Lennard-Jones potential is used for the Cu-Sb and Sb-Sb interactions. Antimony atoms are randomly distributed as substitutional defects in the Cu single crystal. MD simulations indicate that the tensile stress required for partial dislocation nucleation in the crystal decreases with increasing concentration of Sb. The strain field around Sb dopant atoms in the Cu lattice reduces the unstable stacking fault energy, which promotes heterogeneous nucleation of partial dislocations and reduces the tensile stresses required for plastic deformation. In addition, the role of Sb on the reduction in the stress required for dislocation nucleation is found to be orientation-dependent. Finally, both temperature and Sb distribution play a role in the statistical variation of the stress required for heterogeneous partial dislocation nucleation; this variation is maximum at moderate levels of Sb concentration (0.20-0.50 at%Sb).

  19. The Role of Lattice Misfit on Heterogeneous Nucleation of Pure Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Yang, L.; Zhang, D.; Xia, M.; Wang, Y.; Li, J. G.

    2016-10-01

    α-Alumina (Al2O3) single crystals with different termination planes were used as heterogeneous nucleation substrates for liquid aluminum to varying lattice misfits at the interface between substrate and newly nucleated aluminum grain. Undercooling during the nucleation process was measured for interface configurations with varied lattice misfit, while the solidified Al/Al2O3 interfaces were directly observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Based on experimental results, the effect of lattice misfit on nucleation behavior was systematically investigated following previous misfit-interfacial energy models, with clarification being made by the undercooling measurement and HRTEM observations of the interfaces in the Al/Al2O3 system. When the misfit is smaller than 13 pct, both experimental results and theoretical analysis show that the currently existing models through modification and incorporating energy calculation can be used to fit the detected undercooling of investigated system. Beyond 13 pct, a new hypothesis was developed to accommodate lattice misfit with stacking faults such as microtwins according to the HRTEM analysis. The interfacial energy is then replaced by the stacking fault energy accumulated in the strained area. It is shown that the lattice misfit plays an important role in determining the heterogeneous nucleation of liquid aluminum. The nucleation undercooling is then able to be predicted by the theoretically calculated interfacial energy using the integrated models developed in the work. The prediction results were also verified by the HRTEM analysis on the nucleation interface of the Al/Al2O3 systems and detected undercooling on corresponding systems.

  20. BINARY: an optical freezing array for assessing temperature and time dependence of heterogeneous ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budke, C.; Koop, T.

    2014-09-01

    A new optical freezing array for the study of heterogeneous ice nucleation in microliter-sized droplets is introduced, tested and applied to the study of immersion freezing in aqueous Snomax® suspensions. In the Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARraY (BINARY) ice nucleation can be studied simultaneously in 36 droplets at temperatures down to -40 °C (233 K) and at cooling rates between 0.1 K min-1 and 10 K min-1. The droplets are separated from each other in individual compartments, thus preventing a Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen type water vapor transfer between droplets as well as avoiding the seeding of neighboring droplets by formation and surface growth of frost halos. Analysis of freezing and melting occurs via an automated real time image analysis of the optical brightness of each individual droplet. As an application ice nucleation in water droplets containing Snomax® at concentrations from 1 ng mL-1 to 1 mg mL-1 was investigated. Using different cooling rates a minute time dependence of ice nucleation induced by Class A and Class C ice nucleators contained in Snomax® was detected. For the Class A IN a very strong increase of the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient with decreasing temperature of λ ≡ -dln(jhet)/dT = 8.7 K-1 was observed emphasizing the capability of the BINARY device. This value is larger than those of other types of IN reported in the literature, suggesting that the BINARY setup is suitable for quantifying time dependence for most other IN of atmospheric interest, making it a useful tool for future investigations.

  1. A technique for quantifying heterogeneous ice nucleation in microlitre supercooled water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whale, T. F.; Murray, B. J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Wilson, T. W.; Umo, N. S.; Baustian, K. J.; Atkinson, J. D.; Workneh, D. A.; Morris, G. J.

    2015-06-01

    In many clouds, the formation of ice requires the presence of particles capable of nucleating ice. Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) are rare in comparison to cloud condensation nuclei. However, the fact that only a small fraction of aerosol particles can nucleate ice means that detection and quantification of INPs is challenging. This is particularly true at temperatures above about -20 °C since the population of particles capable of serving as INPs decreases dramatically with increasing temperature. In this paper, we describe an experimental technique in which droplets of microlitre volume containing ice-nucleating material are cooled down at a controlled rate and their freezing temperatures recorded. The advantage of using large droplet volumes is that the surface area per droplet is vastly larger than in experiments focused on single aerosol particles or cloud-sized droplets. This increases the probability of observing the effect of less common, but important, high-temperature INPs and therefore allows the quantification of their ice nucleation efficiency. The potential artefacts which could influence data from this experiment, and other similar experiments, are mitigated and discussed. Experimentally determined heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiencies for K-feldspar (microcline), kaolinite, chlorite, NX-illite, Snomax® and silver iodide are presented.

  2. A technique for quantifying heterogeneous ice nucleation in microlitre supercooled water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whale, T. F.; Murray, B. J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Umo, N. S.; Baustian, K. J.; Atkinson, J. D.; Morris, G. J.

    2014-09-01

    The ice content of mixed phase clouds, which contain both supercooled water and ice, affects both their lifetime and radiative properties. In many clouds, the formation of ice requires the presence of particles capable of nucleating ice. One of the most important features of ice nucleating particles (INPs) is that they are rare in comparison to cloud condensation nuclei. However, the fact that only a small fraction of aerosol particles can nucleate ice means that detection and quantification of INPs is challenging. This is particularly true at temperatures above about -20 °C since the population of particles capable of serving as INPs decreases dramatically with increasing temperature. In this paper, we describe an experimental technique in which droplets of microlitre volume containing ice nucleating material are cooled down at a controlled rate and their freezing temperatures recorded. The advantage of using large droplet volumes is that the surface area per droplet is vastly larger than in experiments focused on single aerosol particles or cloud-sized droplets. This increases the probability of observing the effect of less common, but important, high temperature INPs and therefore allows the quantification of their ice nucleation efficiency. The potential artefacts which could influence data from this experiment, and other similar experiments, are mitigated and discussed. Experimentally determined heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiencies for K-feldspar (microcline), kaolinite, chlorite, Snomax®, and silver iodide are presented.

  3. Heterogeneous nucleation and dendritic growth within undercooled liquid niobium under electrostatic levitation condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. J.; Hu, L.; Wang, L.; Wei, B.

    2017-09-01

    The physical mechanisms of crystal nucleation and dendritic growth within undercooled niobium were systematically studied by electrostatic levitation and molecular dynamics methods. The maximum undercooling was achieved as 454 K (0.16Tm), while the hypercooling limit was determined as 706 K (0.26Tm). The undercooling probability displayed Poisson distribution and indicated the occurrence of heterogeneous nucleation. The calculated critical nucleus size reduced rapidly with undercooling and the solid-liquid interface energy was deduced to be 0.367 J m-2. In addition, the dendritic growth velocity of pure niobium exhibited a power relation versus undercooling, and reached 41 m s-1 at the maximum undercooling.

  4. Effect of solutes on the heterogeneous nucleation temperature of supercooled water: an experimental determination.

    PubMed

    Wilson, P W; Haymet, A D J

    2009-04-21

    We investigate the effect of solute concentration on the heterogeneous ice nucleation temperature (T(het)) of aqueous solutions of both NaCl and d-glucose. An automatic lag time apparatus (ALTA) technique allows the dependence of T(het) on solute concentration to be determined with statistical significance. Our results point to the solute-induced lowering of T(het) being a factor of two times the equivalent melting point depression at any fixed concentration, the same factor reported for homogeneous nucleation experiments with small molecular weight solutes.

  5. Probabilistic aspects of polymorph selection by heterogeneous nucleation on microporous hydrophobic membrane surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, Efrem; Di Profio, Gianluca; Drioli, Enrico

    2008-12-01

    In this work, probabilistic aspects related to the heterogeneous nucleation on microporous hydrophobic surfaces, i.e. polymeric membranes, have been theoretically investigated to understand the ability of this innovative crystallization technique to promote the formation of different polymorphs. The theoretical results, which clarify the effects of physicochemical properties of membranes (i.e. porosity, contact angle between supersaturated solution, and polymeric substrate) on the nucleation process of polymorphs, have been used to discuss the experimentally observed selective crystallization of forms I and II of paracetamol.

  6. Heterogeneous ice nucleation of α-pinene SOA particles before and after ice cloud processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert; Höhler, Kristina; Huang, Wei; Kiselev, Alexei; Möhler, Ottmar; Mohr, Claudia; Pajunoja, Aki; Saathoff, Harald; Schiebel, Thea; Shen, Xiaoli; Virtanen, Annele

    2017-05-01

    The ice nucleation ability of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles was investigated at temperatures between 253 and 205 K in the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere cloud simulation chamber. Pristine SOA particles were nucleated and grown from pure gas precursors and then subjected to repeated expansion cooling cycles to compare their intrinsic ice nucleation ability during the first nucleation event with that observed after ice cloud processing. The unprocessed α-pinene SOA particles were found to be inefficient ice-nucleating particles at cirrus temperatures, with nucleation onsets (for an activated fraction of 0.1%) as high as for the homogeneous freezing of aqueous solution droplets. Ice cloud processing at temperatures below 235 K only marginally improved the particles' ice nucleation ability and did not significantly alter their morphology. In contrast, the particles' morphology and ice nucleation ability was substantially modified upon ice cloud processing in a simulated convective cloud system, where the α-pinene SOA particles were first activated to supercooled cloud droplets and then froze homogeneously at about 235 K. As evidenced by electron microscopy, the α-pinene SOA particles adopted a highly porous morphology during such a freeze-drying cycle. When probing the freeze-dried particles in succeeding expansion cooling runs in the mixed-phase cloud regime up to 253 K, the increase in relative humidity led to a collapse of the porous structure. Heterogeneous ice formation was observed after the droplet activation of the collapsed, freeze-dried SOA particles, presumably caused by ice remnants in the highly viscous material or the larger surface area of the particles.

  7. Influence of low-gravity solidification on heterogeneous nucleation in stable iron-carbon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Huameng; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of gravity on the processes of nucleation and growth of Fe-C alloys during directional solidification was investigated in experiments in which inoculated and uninoculated samples of an alloy of the gray iron type were solidified on ground (1 g) and under the low-gravity (low-g) and high-gravity (high-g) conditions obtained by aircraft parabolic flights. It was found that a higher number of grains was obtained during solidification in high-g condition, due to higher convection in high-g. It was demonstrated that grain multiplication due to convection can contribute up to 23 percent of the total number of grains resulting from heterogeneous nucleation of uninoculated samples. For the case of inoculated samples, it was found that the contribution of the convection-induced nucleation can be as high as 30 percent, but can be zero at very low or very high grain numbers.

  8. Influence of low-gravity solidification on heterogeneous nucleation in stable iron-carbon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Huameng; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of gravity on the processes of nucleation and growth of Fe-C alloys during directional solidification was investigated in experiments in which inoculated and uninoculated samples of an alloy of the gray iron type were solidified on ground (1 g) and under the low-gravity (low-g) and high-gravity (high-g) conditions obtained by aircraft parabolic flights. It was found that a higher number of grains was obtained during solidification in high-g condition, due to higher convection in high-g. It was demonstrated that grain multiplication due to convection can contribute up to 23 percent of the total number of grains resulting from heterogeneous nucleation of uninoculated samples. For the case of inoculated samples, it was found that the contribution of the convection-induced nucleation can be as high as 30 percent, but can be zero at very low or very high grain numbers.

  9. Heterogeneous nucleation from a supercooled ionic liquid on a carbon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoxia; Shen, Yan; Hung, Francisco R.; Santiso, Erik E.

    2016-12-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the nucleation of the crystal phase of the ionic liquid [dmim+][Cl-] from its supercooled liquid phase, both in the bulk and in contact with a graphitic surface of D = 3 nm. By combining the string method in collective variables [Maragliano et al., J. Chem. Phys. 125, 024106 (2006)], with Markovian milestoning with Voronoi tessellations [Maragliano et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 5, 2589-2594 (2009)] and order parameters for molecular crystals [Santiso and Trout, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 064109 (2011)], we computed minimum free energy paths, the approximate size of the critical nucleus, the free energy barrier, and the rates involved in these nucleation processes. For homogeneous nucleation, the subcooled liquid phase has to overcome a free energy barrier of ˜85 kcal/mol to form a critical nucleus of size ˜3.6 nm, which then grows into the monoclinic crystal phase. This free energy barrier becomes about 42% smaller (˜49 kcal/mol) when the subcooled liquid phase is in contact with a graphitic disk, and the critical nucleus formed is about 17% smaller (˜3.0 nm) than the one observed for homogeneous nucleation. The crystal formed in the heterogeneous nucleation scenario has a structure that is similar to that of the bulk crystal, with the exception of the layers of ions next to the graphene surface, which have larger local density and the cations lie with their imidazolium rings parallel to the graphitic surface. The critical nucleus forms near the graphene surface separated only by these layers of ions. The heterogeneous nucleation rate (˜4.8 × 1011 cm-3 s-1) is about one order of magnitude faster than the homogeneous rate (˜6.6 × 1010 cm-3 s-1). The computed free energy barriers and nucleation rates are in reasonable agreement with experimental and simulation values obtained for the homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation of other systems (ice, urea, Lennard-Jones spheres, and oxide glasses).

  10. The Theory of Ice Nucleation by Heterogeneous Freezing of Deliquescent Mixed CCN. Part II: Parcel Model Simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostyanov, Vitaly I.; Curry, Judith A.

    2005-02-01

    The new theory of ice nucleation by heterogeneous freezing of deliquescent mixed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) presented in Part I is incorporated into a parcel model with explicit water and ice bin microphysics to simulate the process of ice nucleation under transient thermodynamic conditions. Simulations are conducted over the temperature range -4° to -60°C, with vertical velocities varying from 1 to 100 cm s-1, for varying initial relative humidities and aerosol characteristics. These simulations show that the same CCN that are responsible for the drop nucleation may initiate crystal nucleation and can be identified as ice nuclei (IN) when crystals form. The simulated nucleation rates and concentrations of nucleated crystals depend on temperature and supersaturation simultaneously, showing good agreement with observations but with noticeable differences when compared with classical temperature-only and supersaturation-only parameterizations. The kinetics of heterogeneous ice nucleation exhibits a negative feedback via water supersaturation, whereby ice nucleation depends on the water supersaturation that is diminished by ice crystal diffusional growth. This feedback is stronger than the corresponding feedback for drop nucleation, and may explain discrepancies between observed ice nuclei concentrations and ice crystal concentrations, the very small fraction of CCN that may serve as IN, and the much smaller crystal concentrations as compared to drop concentrations. The relative importance of heterogeneous versus homogeneous nucleation is examined for a variety of cloud conditions. Based on these calculations, a simple parameterization for ice crystal concentration is suggested for use in cloud models and large-scale models.

  11. Heterogeneous Formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds- Part 1: Nucleation of Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooss, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid-December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled a thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  12. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 1: Nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-03-01

    Satellite based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled the thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed PSCs very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  13. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 1: Nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-09-01

    Satellite-based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid-December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled a thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  14. Heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous secondary organic aerosol produced from ozonolysis of α-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, K.; Kristensen, T. B.; Järvinen, E.; Nichman, L.; Fuchs, C.; Gordon, H.; Herenz, P.; Hoyle, C. R.; Duplissy, J.; Garimella, S.; Dias, A.; Frege, C.; Höppel, N.; Tröstl, J.; Wagner, R.; Yan, C.; Amorim, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Gallagher, M. W.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Tomé, A.; Virtanen, A.; Worsnop, D.; Stratmann, F.

    2015-12-01

    There are strong indications that particles containing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) exhibit amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states in the atmosphere. This may facilitate deposition ice nucleation and thus influence cirrus cloud properties. However, experimental ice nucleation studies of biogenic SOA are scarce. Here, we investigated the ice nucleation ability of viscous SOA particles. The SOA particles were produced from the ozone initiated oxidation of α-pinene in an aerosol chamber at temperatures in the range from -38 to -10 °C at 5-15 % relative humidity with respect to water to ensure their formation in a highly viscous phase state, i.e. semi-solid or glassy. The ice nucleation ability of SOA particles with different sizes was investigated with a new continuous flow diffusion chamber. For the first time, we observed heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous α-pinene SOA in the deposition mode for ice saturation ratios between 1.3 and 1.4 significantly below the homogeneous freezing limit. The maximum frozen fractions found at temperatures between -36.5 and -38.3 °C ranged from 6 to 20 % and did not depend on the particle surface area. Global modelling of monoterpene SOA particles suggests that viscous biogenic SOA particles are indeed present in regions where cirrus cloud formation takes place. Hence, they could make up an important contribution to the global ice nuclei (IN) budget.

  15. Investigation of heterogeneous ice nucleation in pollen suspensions and washing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreischmeier, Katharina; Budke, Carsten; Koop, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Biological particles such as pollen often show ice nucleation activity at temperatures higher than -20 °C. Immersion freezing experiments of pollen washing water demonstrate comparable ice nucleation behaviour as water containing the whole pollen bodies (Pummer et al., 2012). It was suggested that polysaccharide molecules leached from the grains are responsible for the ice nucleation. Here, heterogeneous ice nucleation in birch pollen suspensions and their washing water was investigated by two different experimental methods. The optical freezing array BINARY (Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARraY) allows the direct observation of freezing of microliter-sized droplets. The IN spectra obtained from such experiments with birch pollen suspensions over a large concentration range indicate several different ice nucleation active species, two of which are present also in the washing water. The latter was probed also in differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experiments of emulsified sub-picoliter droplets. Due to the small droplet size in the emulsion samples and at small concentration of IN in the washing water, such DSC experiments can exhibit the ice nucleation behaviour of a single nucleus. The two heterogeneous freezing signals observed in the DSC thermograms can be assigned to two different kinds of ice nuclei, confirming the observation from the BINARY measurements, and also previous studies on Swedish birch pollen washing water (Augustin et al., 2012). The authors gratefully acknowledge funding by the German Research Foundation (DFG) through the project BIOCLOUDS (KO 2944/1-1) and through the research unit INUIT (FOR 1525) under KO 2944/2-1. We particularly thank our INUIT partners for fruitful collaboration and sharing of ideas and IN samples. S. Augustin, H. Wex, D. Niedermeier, B. Pummer, H. Grothe, S. Hartmann, L. Tomsche, T. Clauss, J. Voigtländer, K. Ignatius, and F. Stratmann, Immersion freezing of birch pollen washing water, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 10989

  16. Developing a new parameterization framework for the heterogeneous ice nucleation of atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Romy; Hiranuma, Naruki; Hoose, Corinna; Möhler, Ottmar; Niemand, Monika; Steinke, Isabelle; Wagner, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Developing a new parameterization framework for the heterogeneous ice nucleation of atmospheric aerosol particles Ullrich, R., Hiranuma, N., Hoose, C., Möhler, O., Niemand, M., Steinke, I., Wagner, R. Aerosols of different nature induce microphysical processes of importance for the Earth's atmosphere. They affect not only directly the radiative budget, more importantly they essentially influence the formation and life cycles of clouds. Hence, aerosols and their ice nucleating ability are a fundamental input parameter for weather and climate models. During the previous years, the AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber was used to extensively measure, under nearly realistic conditions, the ice nucleating properties of different aerosols. Numerous experiments were performed with a broad variety of aerosol types and under different freezing conditions. A reanalysis of these experiments offers the opportunity to develop a uniform parameterization framework of ice formation for many atmospherically relevant aerosols in a broad temperature and humidity range. The analysis includes both deposition nucleation and immersion freezing. The aim of this study is to develop this comprehensive parameterization for heterogeneous ice formation mainly by using the ice nucleation active site (INAS) approach. Niemand et al. (2012) already developed a temperature dependent parameterization for the INAS- density for immersion freezing on desert dust particles. In addition to a reanalysis of the ice nucleation behaviour of desert dust (Niemand et al. (2012)), volcanic ash (Steinke et al. (2010)) and organic particles (Wagner et al. (2010,2011)) this contribution will also show new results for the immersion freezing and deposition nucleation of soot aerosols. The next step will be the implementation of the parameterizations into the COSMO- ART model in order to test and demonstrate the usability of the framework. Hoose, C. and Möhler, O. (2012) Atmos

  17. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and phase transition of viscous α-pinene secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, Karoliina; Kristensen, Thomas B.; Järvinen, Emma; Nichman, Leonid; Fuchs, Claudia; Gordon, Hamish; Herenz, Paul; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Baltensperger, Urs; Curtius, Joachim; Donahue, Neil M.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Virtanen, Annele; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-04-01

    There are strong indications that particles containing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) exhibit amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states in the atmosphere. This may facilitate deposition ice nucleation and thus influence cirrus cloud properties. Global model simulations of monoterpene SOA particles suggest that viscous biogenic SOA are indeed present in regions where cirrus cloud formation takes place. Hence, they could make up an important contribution to the global ice nucleating particle (INP) budget. However, experimental ice nucleation studies of biogenic SOA are scarce. Here, we investigated the ice nucleation ability of viscous SOA particles at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) experiment at CERN (Ignatius et al., 2015, Järvinen et al., 2015). In the CLOUD chamber, the SOA particles were produced from the ozone initiated oxidation of α-pinene at temperatures in the range from -38 to -10° C at 5-15 % relative humidity with respect to water (RHw) to ensure their formation in a highly viscous phase state, i.e. semi-solid or glassy. We found that particles formed and grown in the chamber developed an asymmetric shape through coagulation. As the RHw was increased to between 35 % at -10° C and 80 % at -38° C, a transition to spherical shape was observed with a new in-situ optical method. This transition confirms previous modelling of the viscosity transition conditions. The ice nucleation ability of SOA particles was investigated with a new continuous flow diffusion chamber SPIN (Spectrometer for Ice Nuclei) for different SOA particle sizes. For the first time, we observed heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous α-pinene SOA in the deposition mode for ice saturation ratios between 1.3 and 1.4, significantly below the homogeneous freezing limit. The maximum frozen fractions found at temperatures between -36.5 and -38.3° C ranged from 6 to 20 % and did not depend on the particle surface area. References Ignatius, K. et al., Heterogeneous ice

  18. Doubled heterogeneous crystal nucleation in sediments of hard sphere binary-mass mixtures.

    PubMed

    Löwen, Hartmut; Allahyarov, Elshad

    2011-10-07

    Crystallization during the sedimentation process of a binary colloidal hard spheres mixture is explored by Brownian dynamics computer simulations. The two species are different in buoyant mass but have the same interaction diameter. Starting from a completely mixed system in a finite container, gravity is suddenly turned on, and the crystallization process in the sample is monitored. If the Peclet numbers of the two species are both not too large, crystalline layers are formed at the bottom of the cell. The composition of lighter particles in the sedimented crystal is non-monotonic in the altitude: it is first increasing, then decreasing, and then increasing again. If one Peclet number is large and the other is small, we observe the occurrence of a doubled heterogeneous crystal nucleation process. First, crystalline layers are formed at the bottom container wall which are separated from an amorphous sediment. At the amorphous-fluid interface, a secondary crystal nucleation of layers is identified. This doubled heterogeneous nucleation can be verified in real-space experiments on colloidal mixtures. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  19. Polyol Synthesis of Silver Nanowires by Heterogeneous Nucleation and Mechanistic Aspects Influencing its Length and Diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuette, Waynie Mark

    Various additives are employed in the polyol synthesis of silver nanowires (Ag NWs), which are typically halide salts such as NaCl. A variety of mechanistic roles have been suggested for these additives. My research showed that the early addition of NaCl in the polyol synthesis of Ag NWs from AgNO3 in ethylene glycol results in the rapid formation of AgCl nanocubes, which induce the heterogeneous nucleation of metallic Ag upon their surfaces. Ag NWs subsequently grow from these nucleation sites. The conclusions are supported by studies using ex-situ generated AgCl nanocubes. Additionally, the final mean silver nanowire diameter is found to be independent of the size of the heterogeneous nucleant, showing that the diameter is not significantly influenced by the nucleation event. Kinetics studies determine that nanowire diameter, length, and aspect ratio grow in parallel to one another and with the extent of the Ag+ reduction reaction, demonstrating that growth is reduction-rate limited. The results are interpreted to support nanowire growth by a surface-catalyzed reduction process occurring on all nanowire surfaces, and to exclude nanoparticle aggregation or Ostwald ripening as primary components of the growth mechanism.

  20. Adaptive implicit finite element methods for multicomponent compressible flow in heterogeneous and fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    This work presents adaptive implicit first-order and second-order discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods for the transport of multicomponent compressible fluids in heterogeneous and fractured porous media, discretized by triangular, quadrilateral, and hexahedral grids. The adaptive implicit method (AIM) combines the advantages of purely explicit or implicit methods (in time). In grid cells with high fluxes or low pore volumes, the transport update is done implicitly to alleviate the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) time step constraints of the conditionally stable explicit approach. Grid cells with a large CFL condition are updated explicitly. Combined, this allows higher efficiency than explicit methods, but it reduces the "penalty" of implicit methods, which exhibit high numerical dispersion and are more computationally and storage expensive per time step. The advantages of AIM are modest for uniform grids and rock properties. However, in heterogeneous or fractured reservoirs explicit methods may become impractical, while a fully implicit approach introduces unnecessary numerical dispersion and is overkill for low-permeability layers and matrix blocks. In such applications, AIM is shown to be significantly more efficient and accurate. The division between explicit and implicit grid cells is made adaptively in space and time. This allows for a high level of explicitness and can also adapt to high fluxes caused by, e.g., viscous and gravitational flow instabilities. Numerical examples demonstrate the powerful features of AIM to model, e.g., solute transport, carbon sequestration in saline aquifers, and miscible gas injection in fractured oil and gas reservoirs.

  1. A novel approach to the theory of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    Ruckenstein, Eli; Berim, Gersh O; Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to the theory of nucleation, formulated relatively recently by Ruckenstein, Narsimhan, and Nowakowski (see Refs. [7-16]) and developed further by Ruckenstein and other colleagues, is presented. In contrast to the classical nucleation theory, which is based on calculating the free energy of formation of a cluster of the new phase as a function of its size on the basis of macroscopic thermodynamics, the proposed theory uses the kinetic theory of fluids to calculate the condensation (W(+)) and dissociation (W(-)) rates on and from the surface of the cluster, respectively. The dissociation rate of a monomer from a cluster is evaluated from the average time spent by a surface monomer in the potential well as obtained from the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation in the phase space of position and momentum for liquid-to-solid transition and the phase space of energy for vapor-to-liquid transition. The condensation rates are calculated using traditional expressions. The knowledge of those two rates allows one to calculate the size of the critical cluster from the equality W(+)=W(-) as well as the rate of nucleation. The developed microscopic approach allows one to avoid the controversial application of classical thermodynamics to the description of nuclei which contain a few molecules. The new theory was applied to a number of cases, such as the liquid-to-solid and vapor-to-liquid phase transitions, binary nucleation, heterogeneous nucleation, nucleation on soluble particles and protein folding. The theory predicts higher nucleation rates at high saturation ratios (small critical clusters) than the classical nucleation theory for both solid-to-liquid as well as vapor-to-liquid transitions. As expected, at low saturation ratios for which the size of the critical cluster is large, the results of the new theory are consistent with those of the classical one. The present approach was combined with the density functional theory to account for the density

  2. The kinetics of heterogeneous nucleation and growth: an approach based on a grain explicit model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouet-Leduc, B.; Maillet, J.-B.; Denoual, C.

    2014-04-01

    A model for phase transitions initiated on grain boundaries is proposed and tested against numerical simulations: this approach, based on a grain explicit model, allows us to consider the granular structure, resulting in accurate predictions for a wide span of nucleation processes. Comparisons are made with classical models of homogeneous (JMAK: Johnson and Mehl 1939 Trans. Am. Inst. Min. Eng. 135 416; Avrami 1939 J. Chem. Phys. 7 1103; Kolmogorov 1937 Bull. Acad. Sci. USSR, Mat. Ser. 1 335) as well as heterogeneous (Cahn 1996 Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Phase Transformations Im et al (Pittsburgh: Materials Research Society)) nucleation. A transition scale based on material properties is proposed, allowing us to discriminate between random and site-saturated regimes. Finally, we discuss the relationship between an Avrami-type exponent and the transition regime, establishing conditions for its extraction from experiments.

  3. Modeling expected solute concentration in randomly heterogeneous flow systems with multicomponent reactions.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Maria E; Destouni, Georgia; Martinet, Philippe

    2004-05-01

    Many environmental problems require assessment of extensive reaction systems within natural subsurface flow systems exhibiting large physical and biogeochemical heterogeneity. We present an approach to couple stochastic advective-reactive modeling of physical solute transport (LaSAR) with the geochemical model PHREEQC for modeling solute concentrations in systems with variable flow velocity and multicomponent reactions. PHREEQC allows for general and flexible quantification of a multitude of linear and nonlinear geochemical processes, while LaSAR efficiently handles field-scale solute spreading in stochastic heterogeneous flow fields. The combined LaSAR-PHREEQC approach requires very modest computational efforts, thereby allowing a large number of reactive transport problems to be readily assessed and facilitating handling of quantifiable uncertainty in environmental model applications. Computational efficiency and explicit handling of field-scale dispersion without introduction of excessive fluid mixing that may impair model results are general advantages of the LaSAR compared with alternative solute transport modeling approaches. The LaSAR-PHREEQC approach is restricted to steady or unidirectional flow fields, and our specific application examples are limited to homogeneous reaction systems without local or transverse dispersion-diffusion, although these are not general methodological limitations. As a comprehensive application example, we simulate the spreading of acid mine drainage in a groundwater focusing on Zn2+ and including relevant, major-component geochemistry. Model results show that Zn2+ may be substantially attenuated by both sorption and precipitation, with flow heterogeneity greatly affecting expected solute concentrations downstream of the mine waste deposit in both cases.

  4. The Effect of Spatial Heterogeneities on Nucleation Kinetics in Amorphous Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ye

    The mechanical property of the Al based metallic glass could be enhanced significantly by introducing the high number density of Al-fcc nanocrystals (1021 ˜1023 m-3) to the amorphous matrix through annealing treatments, which motivates the study of the nucleation kinetics for the microstructure control. With the presence of a high number density (1025 m-3) of aluminum-like medium range order (MRO), the Al-Y-Fe metallic glass is considered to be spatially heterogeneous. Combining the classical nucleation theory with the structural configuration, a MRO seeded nucleation model has been proposed and yields theoretical steady state nucleation rates consistent with the experimental results. In addition, this model satisfies all the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints to be reasonable. Compared with the Al-Y-Fe system, the primary crystallization onset temperature decreases significantly and the transient delay time (tau) is shorter in the Al-Y-Fe-Pb(In) systems because the insoluble Pb and In nanoparticles in the amorphous matrix served as extrinsic spatial heterogeneity to provide the nucleation sites for Al-fcc precipitation and the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images of the Pb-Al interface revealed a good wetting behavior between the Al and Pb nanoparticles. The study of the transient delay time (tau) could provide insight on the transport behavior during the nucleation and a more convenient approach to evaluate the delay time has been developed by measuring the Al-Y-Fe amorphous alloy glass transition temperature (Tg) shift with the increasing annealing time (tannealing) in FlashDSC. The break point in the Tg vs. log(tannealing) plot has been identified to correspond to the delay time by the TEM characterization. FlashDSC tests with different heating rates and different compositions (Al-Y-Fe-Pb and Zn-Mg-Ca-Yb amorphous alloys) further confirmed the break point and delay time relationship. The amorphous matrix composition and the

  5. Modeling multicomponent ionic transport in groundwater with IPhreeqc coupling: Electrostatic interactions and geochemical reactions in homogeneous and heterogeneous domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-12-01

    The key role of small-scale processes like molecular diffusion and electrochemical migration has been increasingly recognized in multicomponent reactive transport in saturated porous media. In this study, we propose a two-dimensional multicomponent reactive transport model taking into account the electrostatic interactions during transport of charged ions in physically and chemically heterogeneous porous media. The modeling approach is based on the local charge balance and on the description of compound-specific and spatially variable diffusive/dispersive fluxes. The multicomponent ionic transport code is coupled with the geochemical code PHREEQC-3 by utilizing the IPhreeqc module, thus enabling to perform the geochemical calculations included in the PHREEQC's reaction package. The multicomponent reactive transport code is benchmarked with different 1-D and 2-D transport problems. Successively, conservative and reactive transport examples are presented to demonstrate the capability of the proposed model to simulate transport of charged species in heterogeneous porous media with spatially variable physical and chemical properties. The results reveal that the Coulombic cross-coupling between dispersive fluxes can significantly influence conservative as well as reactive transport of charged species both at the laboratory and at the field scale.

  6. Computer simulation of heterogeneous nucleation of colloidal crystals at planar walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, B. J.; Deb, D.; Schmitz, F.; Statt, A.; Tröster, A.; Winkler, A.; Zykova-Timan, T.; Virnau, P.; Binder, K.

    2014-02-01

    A mini-review of the classical theory of heterogeneous nucleation at planar walls is given, and tests by Monte Carlo simulations for simple models of colloidal suspensions exhibiting a fluid-solid transition are described. This theory (due to Turnbull) assumes sphere-cap-shaped "sessile" droplets at the substrate, and the nucleation barrier that appears in the classical theory of homogeneous nucleation then is reduced by a factor depending on the Young contact angle. Various approximations inherent in this theory are examined: curvature corrections to the interfacial free energy of small droplets; neglect of anisotropy of the surface tension between crystal and fluid; neglect of corrections due to the line tension of the three-phase contact line; continuum rather than atomistic description. Also the problem of precise identification of the particles belonging (or not) to the "droplet" is discussed, and an alternative concept of extracting droplet properties from an analysis of finite size effects on phase coexistence in finite simulation boxes is explored. While the focus of our treatment is on the Asakura-Oosawa model of colloid polymer mixtures, also simple Ising/lattice gas models are considered to test some of these questions.

  7. Control of heterogeneous nucleation and growth kinetics of dopamine-melanin by altering substrate chemistry.

    PubMed

    Klosterman, Luke; Riley, John K; Bettinger, Christopher John

    2015-03-24

    Dopamine-melanin (DM or "polydopamine") can be deposited on virtually any substrate from solution through autoxidation of dopamine. The versatility of this process has allowed surface-mediated assembly of DM for a wide variety of functional coatings. Here we report the impact of well-defined surface chemistries on the nucleation and growth of such films. DM was deposited on silicon dioxide (SiO2) and SiO2 substrates modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) bearing octadecyl (C18), phenethyl, and aminopropyl functional groups. Atomic force microscopy revealed three-dimensional islands whose areal density and surface coverage are lowest on bare SiO2 substrates and highest on the neutral aromatic and aliphatic substrates. Increasing the pH of the solution from 8.2 to 10 dissociates catechol moieties in DM and inhibits adsorption on negatively charged SiO2 substrates. The growth rate of DM films on SAM-modified SiO2 is maximized at pH 9.5 and almost completely abolished at pH 10 because of increased DM solubility. The initial rates of DM adsorption were measured using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation measurements. The initial adsorption rate is proportional to the nucleation density, which increases as the hydrophobicity of the substrate increases. Taken together, these data provide insight into the rates of heterogeneous nucleation and growth of DM on substrates with well-defined chemistries.

  8. Controls of Polysaccharide Chemistry on the Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Heterogeneous Calcium Carbonate Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffre, A. J.; Han, N.; Dove, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    Polysaccharide fibrils control the orientation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) biominerals. Good examples are found in the multilayered extracellular mucilaginous sheath of green algae and cyanobacteria and in specialized vesicles inside coccolithophorids. More complex organisms such as arthropods and mollusks form biomineralized exoskeletons and shells that consist of insoluble polysaccharides and soluble acid-rich proteins. In these structures, CaCO3 mineral orientation occurs along fibers of the polysaccharide chitin. This raises the question of whether polysaccharide chemistry has specific roles in directing biomineralization. The last three decades of research show that acidic proteins influence CaCO3 polymorph selection, crystallographic orientation, and nucleation and growth rates but little is known about the function of polysaccharides. In fact, polysaccharides are long considered an inert component of organic frameworks. In this experimental investigation, we test the hypothesis that polysaccharides have chemistry-specific influences on calcification by measuring the kinetics of calcite nucleation onto three types of polysaccharide films under controlled solution compositions. Characterized polysaccharides of simple repeating monomer sequences were chosen as model compounds to represent the major carbohydrates seen in microbial and calcifying environments: 1) alginic acid with carboxyl groups, 2) hyaluronic acid with alternating carboxyl and acetylamine groups, and 3) chitosan with amine and acetylamine groups. Biosubstrates were prepared by electrodeposition of these compounds as thin gel-like films onto gold-coated silicon wafers. Using a flow-through cell, heterogeneous nucleation rates of calcite were measured for a suite of supersaturation conditions. These rate data were compared to similar measurements for carboxyl- and hydroxyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers. Calcite nucleation rates onto the three polysaccharides vary by a factor of 400x

  9. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation During Ozonolysis of Organic Thin Films on Aqueous Solution Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, G.; Cantrell, W.

    2005-12-01

    The mechanism by which ice is created affects cloud properties and processes. Although homogeneous ice nucleation is reasonably well understood, both experimentally and theoretically, heterogeneous ice nucleation is not. Since deep convection in the tropics lofts organic materials high into the atmosphere, it is important to achieve an understanding of heterogeneous nucleation by these materials and how it affects cirrus cloud formation. Sources of atmospheric organic compounds include combustion, biomass burning, emissions from vegetation, and sea spray which contains organic material from the ocean's surface. Fatty acids such as stearic acid and oleic acid are common organic constituents. The reaction of oleic acid with atmospheric ozone has recently become a model for understanding how atmospheric oxidation processes affect organic particles. Over the past six years, more than twenty publications have described reactive uptake coefficients, primary products, secondary reactions, mechanisms, and other aspects of this oxidation. With this background information in mind, we built an ozonolysis apparatus in tandem with a solution drop freezer to study the freezing point of 10-microliter, 0.25 M sodium chloride solution droplets coated with thin layers of 18-carbon fatty acids or alcohols. We determined the freezing points before and after ozonolysis for solution droplets coated with stearic acid, oleic acid, cis-13-octadecenoic acid, oleyl alcohol, and 1-octadecanol. During the experiments, temperature cycling was controlled by a computer-driven temperature controller. Results showed little change in mean freezing temperature before and after ozonolysis for all of the organic compounds studied except oleyl alcohol. The lack of a significant temperature change for oleic acid may be good news for atmospheric modelers since the well-studied reaction of ozone with oleic acid is known to give a complex mixture of products.

  10. Shear zone nucleation and deformation transient: effect of heterogeneities and loading conditions in experimentally deformed calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, L. F. G.; Rybacki, E.; Dresen, G. H.; Kilian, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the Earth's middle to lower crust, strain is frequently localized along ductile shear zones, which commonly nucleate at structural and material heterogeneities. To investigate shear zone nucleation and development due to heterogeneities, we performed constant strain-rate (CSR) and constant stress (CS) simple shear (torsion) deformation experiments on Carrara marble samples containing weak (limestone) inclusions. The experiments were conducted in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900 °C temperature and 400 MPa confining pressure and maximum bulk shear strains of 3. Peak shear stress was about 20 MPa for all the samples, followed by smooth weakening and steady state behavior. The strain is predominantly localized in the host marble within the process zone in front of the inclusion, defined by a zone of intense grain size reduction due to dynamic recrystallization. In CS tests a narrow shear zone developed in front of the inclusion, whereas in CSR experiments the deformation is more heterogeneously distributed, up to g=3.. In the later, secondary foliations oblique to the process zone and alternating thin, high-strain layers are common. In samples deformed at the same shear strain (g=1), the average recrystallized grain size in the process zone is similar for CS and CSR conditions. Crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) measurements shows that different grain sizes have slightly different CPO patterns. CPO strength varies for different grain sizes, with a CPO strength peak between 40-50 μm, decreasing progressively within smaller grain size, but with secondary peaks for different coarse-grained sizes. Our observations suggest that the initial formation and transient deformation of shear zones is strongly affected by loading conditions.

  11. Revealing heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si by AlP in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiehua; Hage, Fredrik S.; Liu, Xiangfa; Ramasse, Quentin; Schumacher, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si can be attributed to the presence of AlP. Although P, in the form of AlP particles, is usually observed in the centre of primary Si, there is still a lack of detailed investigations on the distribution of P within primary Si and eutectic Si in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys at the atomic scale. Here, we report an atomic-scale experimental investigation on the distribution of P in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys. P, in the form of AlP particles, was observed in the centre of primary Si. However, no significant amount of P was detected within primary Si, eutectic Si and the Al matrix. Instead, P was observed at the interface between the Al matrix and eutectic Si, strongly indicating that P, in the form of AlP particles (or AlP ‘patch’ dependent on the P concentration), may have nucleated on the surface of the Al matrix and thereby enhanced the heterogeneous nucleation of eutectic Si. The present investigation reveals some novel insights into heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si by AlP in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys and can be used to further develop heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms based on adsorption. PMID:27120994

  12. Revealing heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si by AlP in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiehua; Hage, Fredrik S; Liu, Xiangfa; Ramasse, Quentin; Schumacher, Peter

    2016-04-28

    The heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si can be attributed to the presence of AlP. Although P, in the form of AlP particles, is usually observed in the centre of primary Si, there is still a lack of detailed investigations on the distribution of P within primary Si and eutectic Si in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys at the atomic scale. Here, we report an atomic-scale experimental investigation on the distribution of P in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys. P, in the form of AlP particles, was observed in the centre of primary Si. However, no significant amount of P was detected within primary Si, eutectic Si and the Al matrix. Instead, P was observed at the interface between the Al matrix and eutectic Si, strongly indicating that P, in the form of AlP particles (or AlP 'patch' dependent on the P concentration), may have nucleated on the surface of the Al matrix and thereby enhanced the heterogeneous nucleation of eutectic Si. The present investigation reveals some novel insights into heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si by AlP in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys and can be used to further develop heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms based on adsorption.

  13. Revealing heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si by AlP in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiehua; Hage, Fredrik S.; Liu, Xiangfa; Ramasse, Quentin; Schumacher, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si can be attributed to the presence of AlP. Although P, in the form of AlP particles, is usually observed in the centre of primary Si, there is still a lack of detailed investigations on the distribution of P within primary Si and eutectic Si in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys at the atomic scale. Here, we report an atomic-scale experimental investigation on the distribution of P in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys. P, in the form of AlP particles, was observed in the centre of primary Si. However, no significant amount of P was detected within primary Si, eutectic Si and the Al matrix. Instead, P was observed at the interface between the Al matrix and eutectic Si, strongly indicating that P, in the form of AlP particles (or AlP ‘patch’ dependent on the P concentration), may have nucleated on the surface of the Al matrix and thereby enhanced the heterogeneous nucleation of eutectic Si. The present investigation reveals some novel insights into heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si by AlP in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys and can be used to further develop heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms based on adsorption.

  14. Heterogeneous-nucleation and glass-formation studies of 56Ga2O3-44CaO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin C.; Curreri, Peter A.; Pline, David

    1987-01-01

    Glass formation and heterogeneous crystallization are described for the reluctant-glass-forming 56Ga2O3-44CaO eutectic composition. The times and temperatures for nucleation at various cooling rates and experimental conditions were measured and empirical continuous-cooling-crystallization boundaries were constructed for various heterogeneous nucleation processes. A definition for an empirical critical cooling rate to form a glass from reluctant borderline glass formers is proposed, i.e., the cooling rate that results in glass formation in 95 percent of the quenching experiments.

  15. ZnO nanoparticles favours heterogeneous nucleation in PET-ZnO nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Harshita; Awasthi, Kamlendra; Saraswat, Yogendra K.; Saraswat, Vibhav K.

    2015-07-01

    The structural and chemical properties with non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of PET-ZnO nanocomposites have been reported in this article. ZnO nanoparticles have been synthesized via chemical route with average diameter 19 nm which made confirm by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) techniques. PET-ZnO nanocomposites have been prepared by solution casting method. The structural and chemical changes occurred in poly (ethylene terephthalate) after inclusion of ZnO nanoparticles have been studied with the help of XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. It was observed from differential scanning calorimeter that ZnO nanoparticles work as nucleating agent for heterogeneous nucleation in PET matrix under non-isothermal crystallization process. The combined Avrami and Ozawa models have been proved adequate to explain non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of PET-ZnO nanocomposites, and also, ZnO nanoparticles have been caused to reduce crystallization activation energy in pristine PET as per the applied Kissinger model.

  16. Epitaxy versus oriented heterogeneous nucleation of organic crystals on ionic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, K. R.; Shlichta, P. J.; Wilcox, W. R.; Lefever, R. A.

    1997-04-01

    It is plausible to assume that epitaxy is a special case of heterogeneous nucleation in which a restrictive crystallographic relationship exists between substrate and deposit orientations. This would mean that epitaxial substrates should always induce a perceptible reduction in the critical supercooling for nucleation of the deposit. To test this hypothesis, the critical supercoolings of six organic compounds were measured on glass and 11 single-crystal cleaved substrates including (0001) graphite, (001) mica, (111) BaF 2, SrF 2, and CaF 2, and (100) KCl, KBr, KI, NaCl, NaF, and LiF. Reductions in supercooling (with reference to glass substrates) were checked many times for repeatability and reproducibility and shown in almost all cases to have a standard deviation of 1 C or less. Acetanilide, benzoic acid, and p-bromochlorobenzene showed a wide range of supercooling reductions and were oriented on all crystalline substrates. Naphthalene and p-dibromobenzene showed only slight supercooling reductions but were oriented on all substrates, including glass. Benzil showed strong supercooling reductions only for mica and KI but was oriented not only in these cases but also with KI, BaF 2, CaF 2, and graphite. There was little correlation between degree of lattice match and either supercooling reduction or degree of preferred orientation. These results suggest that, for the systems and geometry studied, forces such as molecular dipole binding and growth anisotropy had a stronger effect than lattice match.

  17. A case of type I polar stratospheric cloud formation by heterogeneous nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Ferry, G. V.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Goodman, J.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA ER-2 aircraft flew on January 24, 1989, from Stavanger to Spitsbergen, Norway, at the 430-440 K potential temperature surface (19.2-19.8 km pressure altitude). Aerosols were sampled continuously by an optical particle counter (PMS-FSSP300) for concentration and size analyses, and during five 10-min intervals by four wire and one replicator impactor for concentration, size, composition, and phase analysis. During sampling, the air saturation of H2O with respect to ice changed from 20 to 100 percent, and of HNO3 with respect to nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) from subsaturation to supersaturation. Data from both instruments indicate a condensation of hydrochloric acid and, later, nitric acid on the background aerosol particles as the ambient temperature decreases along the flight track. This heterogeneous nucleation mechanism generates type I polar stratospheric cloud particles of 10-fold enhanced optical depth, which could play a role in stratospheric ozone depletion.

  18. Line-tension-induced scenario of heterogeneous nucleation on a spherical substrate and in a spherical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2015-07-01

    Line-tension-induced scenario of heterogeneous nucleation is studied for a lens-shaped nucleus with a finite contact angle nucleated on a spherical substrate and on the bottom of the wall of a spherical cavity. The effect of line tension on the free energy of a critical nucleus can be separated from the usual volume term. By comparing the free energy of a lens-shaped critical nucleus of a finite contact angle with that of a spherical nucleus, we find that a spherical nucleus may have a lower free energy than a lens-shaped nucleus when the line tension is positive and large, which is similar to the drying transition predicted by Widom [B. Widom, J. Phys. Chem. 99, 2803 (1995)]. Then, the homogeneous nucleation rather than the heterogeneous nucleation will be favorable. Similarly, the free energy of a lens-shaped nucleus becomes negative when the line tension is negative and large. Then, the barrier-less nucleation with no thermal activation called athermal nucleation will be realized.

  19. Thermodynamic formulation of the barrier for heterogeneous pinned nucleation: Implication to the crossover scenarios associated with barrierless and homogeneous nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Sanat K.; Das, Prasanta K.; Maiti, Biswajit

    2017-06-01

    The effect of contact line pinning on nucleation is reported using continuum thermodynamics. Based on the principle of the free-energy maximization, closed-form expressions in the dimensionless form for the free-energy of the three-phase metastable system and the thermodynamic barrier are formulated with respect to the system geometry and the substrate wettability. The condition of maximality limits the dynamic contact angle within the cluster-phase-phobic regime. The dimensionless nucleation barrier or the potency factor can be divided into two components related to the system geometry and the pinning effect. Depending on the relative value of the equilibrium and the critical dynamic contact angle, the contact line pinning can either have favorable or adverse effects. Associated pinning-depinning transition can also lead to the crossovers related to barrierless and homogeneous nucleation. Contact line tension is found to have a considerable effect during these transitional scenarios. Complete wetting transition associated with barrierless nucleation can take place due to the presence of tensile (negative) line tension. On the other hand, complete drying transition related to homogeneous nucleation can occur when line tension is compressive (positive) in nature. The pinning has a favorable effect only when the substrate wettability is within the cluster-phase-philic regime. There can be favorable, adverse, or no pinning effects when the substrate wettability is within the cluster-phase-phobic regime. Although the contact line is pinned, the minimum value of the potency factor is obtained when equilibrium and dynamic contact angles are equal.

  20. Laboratory Measurements on Heterogeneous Nucleation and Growth of Water Vapor on Meteor Smoke Particle Analogues under Conditions of the Mesopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duft, D.; Nachbar, M.; Wilms, H.; Rapp, M.; Leisner, T.

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of water vapor on charged nanometer sized (radius< 2nm) meteor smoke particles (MSP) is believed to be the dominating nucleation process in the mesopause region leading to the formation of polar mesospheric clouds (PMC). However, application of classical nucleation theory to the cold conditions of the polar summer mesopause comprises large uncertainties giving rise to strongly variant model predictions of PMC formation. To reduce these uncertainties laboratory measurements of nucleation and growth rates are required. We use an electrodynamic trap to investigate the nucleation and growth of water vapor on singly charged sub-3nm MSP analogues in the laboratory under mesospheric conditions typical during PMC growth initiation. The particles are created in a microwave plasma particle source and stored in a quadrupole ion trap under mesospheric pressure and temperature, where they are subjected to the high supersaturation necessary for nucleation and growth on nanometer sized particles. The particle mass and mass change by water accretion is monitored with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer as a function of residence time under supersaturated conditions. In this contribution we present for the first time measurements of nucleation and growth rates of water vapor on MSP analogues with an initial radius between 1.5nm and 3 nm. Contact parameter, sticking coefficient as well as charge effects on vapor pressure of small particles at mesospheric conditions are presented. These parameters are essential for the microphysical understanding and further global model calculations of PMC formation.

  1. Effect of Manganese Sulphide Size on the Precipitation of Tin Heterogeneous Nucleation in as-Cast Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guilin; Song, Bo; Tao, Sufen; Cai, Zeyun

    2015-05-01

    Tramp elements in steels such as tin have been thought harmful because of the hot brittleness at grain boundaries and will be enriched in new steels because of difficulty of removal. It has been an important and difficult matter for metallurgist to use these elements. In the present paper, the as-cast steel containing high concentration of tin is prepared in laboratory and tin precipitates at the manganese sulphide inclusions have been found. A theoretical model is established to calculate the size of manganese sulphide inclusions acted as the heterogeneous nucleation site of tin precipitation. The results show that the inclusions with the smaller contact angle between tin precipitate is more advantageous to be the nucleus of tin heterogeneous nucleation. In this experiment, the manganese sulphide inclusions whose size is 2~4 μm in diameter can act as the nuclei of the nucleation of tin precipitation.

  2. Structural match of heterogeneously nucleated Mn(OH)2(s) nanoparticles on quartz under various pH conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Jung, Haesung; Lee, Byeongdu; Jun, Young -Shin

    2016-09-14

    The early nucleation stage of Mn (hydr)oxide on mineral surfaces is crucial to understand its occurrence and the cycling of nutrients in environmental systems. However, there are only limited studies on the heterogeneous nucleation of Mn(OH)2(s) as the initial stage of Mn (hydr)oxide precipitation. Here, we investigated the effect of pH on the initial nucleation of Mn(OH)2(s) on quartz. Under various pH conditions of 9.8, 9.9, and 10.1, we analyzed the structural matches between quartz and heterogeneously nucleated Mn(OH)2(s). The structural matches were calculated by measuring lateral and vertical dimensions using grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and atomicmore » force microscopy (AFM), respectively. We found that a poorer structural match occurred at a higher pH than at a lower pH. The faster nucleation at a higher pH condition accounted for the observed poorer structural match. By fitting the structural match using classical nucleation theory, we also calculated the interfacial energy between Mn(OH)2(s) and water (γnf = 71 ± 7 mJ/m2). The calculated m values and γnf provided the variance of interfacial energy between quartz and Mn(OH)2(s): γsn = 262–272 mJ/m2. As a result, this study provides new qualitative and quantitative information about heterogeneous nucleation on environmentally an abundant mineral surface, quartz, and it offers important underpinnings for understanding the fate and transport of trace ions in environmental systems.« less

  3. Heterogeneous Nucleation and Growth of Barium Sulfate at Organic-Water Interfaces: Interplay between Surface Hydrophobicity and Ba2+ Adsorption

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, Chong; Stack, Andrew G.; Koishi, Ayumi; ...

    2016-05-10

    Barium sulfate (BaSO4) is a common scale-forming mineral in natural and engineered systems, yet the rates and mechanisms of heterogeneous BaSO4 nucleation are not understood. To address these, we created idealized interfaces on which to study heterogeneous nucleation rates and mechanisms, which also are good models for organic–water interfaces: self-assembled thin films terminated with different functional groups (i.e., -COOH, -SH, or mixed -SH & COOH) coated on glass slides. BaSO4 precipitation on coatings from Barite-supersaturated solutions (saturation index, SI, = 1.1) was investigated using grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering. After reaction for 1 h, a little amount of BaSO4 formed onmore » hydrophilic bare and -COOH coated glasses. Meanwhile, BaSO4 nucleation was significantly promoted on hydrophobic -SH and mixed -SH & COOH coatings. This is because substrate hydrophobicity likely affected the interfacial energy and hence thermodynamic favorability of heterogeneous nucleation. The heterogeneous BaSO4 nucleation and growth kinetics were found to be affected by the amount of Ba2+ adsorption onto the substrate and incipient BaSO4 nuclei. The importance of Ba2+ adsorption was further corroborated by the finding that precipitation rate increased under [Ba2+]/[SO42–] concentration ratios >1. These observations suggest that thermodynamic favorability for nucleation is governed by substrate–water interfacial energy, while given favorable thermodynamics, the rate is governed by ion attachment to substrates and incipient nuclei.« less

  4. Aluminum affects heterogeneous Fe(III) (Hydr)oxide nucleation, growth, and ostwald ripening.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yandi; Li, Qingyun; Lee, Byeongdu; Jun, Young-Shin

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous coprecipitation of iron and aluminum oxides is an important process for pollutant immobilization and removal in natural and engineered aqueous environments. Here, using a synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering technique, we studied heterogeneous nucleation and growth of Fe(III) (hydr)oxide on quartz under conditions found in acid mine drainage (at pH = 3.7 ± 0.2, [Fe(3+)] = 10(-4) M) with different initial aqueous Al/Fe ratios (0:1, 1:1, and 5:1). Interestingly, although the atomic ratios of Al/Fe in the newly formed Fe(III) (hydr)oxide precipitates were less than 1%, the in situ particle size and volume evolutions of the precipitates on quartz were significantly influenced by aqueous Al/Fe ratios. At the end of the 3 h experiments, with aqueous Al/Fe ratios of 0:1, 1:1, and 5:1, the average radii of gyration of particles on quartz were 5.7 ± 0.3, 4.6 ± 0.1, and 3.7 ± 0.3 nm, respectively, and the ratio of total particle volumes on quartz was 1.7:3.4:1.0. The Fe(III) (hydr)oxide precipitates were poorly crystallized, and were positively charged in all solutions. In the presence of Al(3+), Al(3+) adsorption onto quartz changed the surface charge of quartz from negative to positive, which caused the slower heterogeneous growth of Fe(III) (hydr)oxide on quartz. Furthermore, Al affected the amount of water included in the Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, which can influence their adsorption capacity. This study yielded important information usable for pollutant removal not only in natural environments, but also in engineered water treatment processes.

  5. Surface-charge-induced orientation of interfacial water suppresses heterogeneous ice nucleation on α-alumina (0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmonem, Ahmed; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Hoffmann, Nadine; Sánchez, M. Alejandra; Cyran, Jenée D.; Kiselev, Alexei; Bonn, Mischa

    2017-06-01

    Surface charge is one of the surface properties of atmospheric aerosols, which has been linked to heterogeneous ice nucleation and hence cloud formation, microphysics, and optical properties. Despite the importance of surface charge for ice nucleation, many questions remain on the molecular-level mechanisms at work. Here, we combine droplet-freezing assay studies with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to correlate interfacial water structure to surface nucleation strength. We study immersion freezing of aqueous solutions of various pHs on the atmospherically relevant aluminum oxide α-Al2O3 (0001) surface using an isolated droplet on the surface. The high-pH solutions freeze at temperatures higher than that of the low-pH solution, while the neutral pH has the highest freezing temperature. On the molecular level, the SFG spectrum of the interfacial water changes substantially upon freezing. At all pHs, crystallization leads to a reduction of intensity of the 3400 cm-1 water resonance, while the 3200 cm-1 intensity drops for low pH but increases for neutral and high pHs. We find that charge-induced surface templating suppresses nucleation, irrespective of the sign of the surface charge. Heterogeneous nucleation is most efficient for the nominally neutral surface.

  6. Laboratory Experiments on Heterogeneous CO2 Ice Nucleation and Growth Rates on Meteor Smoke Particle Analogues in the Martian Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachbar, M.; Duft, D.; Mangan, T.; Gomez Martin, J. C.; Plane, J. M. C.; Leisner, T.

    2014-12-01

    CO2 ice particles with radii of about 100 nm have been detected in the Martian mesosphere region at heights between 80 km and 100 km. Gravity waves propagating upward cause a cooling of this region leading to temporary supersaturated conditions during which heterogeneous nucleation of CO2 can take place. Large uncertainties in describing the nucleation processes at the extreme conditions of the Martian mesopause region state the need of laboratory measurements. Sub-3 nanometer radius meteor smoke particle (MSP) analogues are created in a microwave plasma and stored in an electrodynamic trap for examining CO2 ice nucleation as well as growth rates at low particle temperatures between 60 K and 75 K and CO2 concentrations up to 1017 m-3 which are reasonably close to conditions present in the Martian mesosphere. Ice nucleation and growth processes of the particles are examined by analyzing the mass distribution of the particles with a time of flight spectrometer as a function of the residence time under supersaturated conditions. In this paper, first measurements of CO2 ice nucleation and growth on iron oxide and silicate particles will be presented. These results are extrapolated to realistic Martian conditions reducing the large uncertainty in dealing with CO2 ice nucleation on MSPs.

  7. In Situ Determination of Interfacial Energies between Heterogeneously Nucleated CaCO 3 and Quartz Substrates: Thermodynamics of CO 2 Mineral Trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Hu, Yandi; Lee, Byeongdu; Jun, Young-Shin; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2013-01-02

    The precipitation of carbonate minerals—mineral trapping—is considered one of the safest sequestration mechanisms ensuring long-term geologic storage of CO{sub 2}. However, little is known about the thermodynamic factors controlling the extent of heterogeneous nucleation at mineral surfaces exposed to the fluids in porous reservoirs. The goal of this study is to determine the thermodynamic factors controlling heterogeneous nucleation of carbonate minerals on pristine quartz (100) surfaces, which are assumed representative of sandstone reservoirs. To probe CaCO{sub 3} nucleation on quartz (100) in solution and with nanoscale resolution, an in situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering technique has been utilized. With this method, a value of α = 36 ± 5 mJ/m{sup 2} for the effective interfacial free energy governing heterogeneous nucleation of CaCO{sub 3} has been obtained by measuring nucleation rates at different solution supersaturations. This value is lower than the interfacial energy governing calcite homogeneous nucleation (α ≈ 120 mJ/m{sup 2}), suggesting that heterogeneous nucleation of calcium carbonate is favored on quartz (100) at ambient pressure and temperature conditions, with nucleation barriers between 2.5% and 15% lower than those expected for homogeneous nucleation. These observations yield important quantitative parameters readily usable in reactive transport models of nucleation at the reservoir scale.

  8. In situ determination of interfacial energies between heterogeneously nucleated CaCO3 and quartz substrates: thermodynamics of CO2 mineral trapping.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Hu, Yandi; Lee, Byeongdu; Jun, Young-Shin; Waychunas, Glenn A

    2013-01-02

    The precipitation of carbonate minerals--mineral trapping--is considered one of the safest sequestration mechanisms ensuring long-term geologic storage of CO(2). However, little is known about the thermodynamic factors controlling the extent of heterogeneous nucleation at mineral surfaces exposed to the fluids in porous reservoirs. The goal of this study is to determine the thermodynamic factors controlling heterogeneous nucleation of carbonate minerals on pristine quartz (100) surfaces, which are assumed representative of sandstone reservoirs. To probe CaCO(3) nucleation on quartz (100) in solution and with nanoscale resolution, an in situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering technique has been utilized. With this method, a value of α' = 36 ± 5 mJ/m(2) for the effective interfacial free energy governing heterogeneous nucleation of CaCO(3) has been obtained by measuring nucleation rates at different solution supersaturations. This value is lower than the interfacial energy governing calcite homogeneous nucleation (α ≈ 120 mJ/m(2)), suggesting that heterogeneous nucleation of calcium carbonate is favored on quartz (100) at ambient pressure and temperature conditions, with nucleation barriers between 2.5% and 15% lower than those expected for homogeneous nucleation. These observations yield important quantitative parameters readily usable in reactive transport models of nucleation at the reservoir scale.

  9. RAPID INDUCTION OF HETEROGENEOUS ICE NUCLEATION IN A BIOLOGICALLY COMPATIBLE COOLANT

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Joshua; Bull, Diana; Becker, Lance

    2012-01-01

    Hypothermia is gaining recognition as an important medical treatment. To treat local cases of injury such as stroke, or certain surgical procedures, there is a need to induce local hypothermia. To treat shock or cardiac arrest survivors, there is a need to rapidly induce global hypothermia. Rapid induction of hypothermia has been achieved in animal research, but it has yet to be achieved clinically using a simple, widely practicable method. The clinical need for therapeutic hypothermia represents an engineering opportunity to develop an easy to use coolant that is sterile, biologically compatible, and maximizes coolant heat capacity. Here we present an initial characterization of a prototype platform technology designed to create a sterile, biologically compatible, high heat capacity coolant that has the potential to be used in all of these clinical applications. The coolant is a specially processed micro-particulate ice saline slurry, that can be easily pumped into a patient through surgical tubing, syringes, or minimally invasive surgical instruments. The device induces heterogeneous ice nucleation in a saline stream that has been super-cooled from room temperature to a temperature below the saline freezing point. Currently, the device begins continuous production of ice slurry that contains ~30 % ice by mass within 10 minutes. The nominal ice particle diameter is smaller than 100 μm. This work represents a significant first step toward addressing clinical needs for rapid human cooling. PMID:25954121

  10. Heterogeneous nucleation in the polyol process for the synthesis of FeCo alloy powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Uk Rae; Lee, Dong Gun; Ahn, Byung Hyun; Lee, Je Hyun; Koo, Bon Heun

    2014-05-01

    Here, we report a polyol method to prepare monodispersed FeCo alloy particles with Pt seeds added in the production of nanoparticles. The prepared samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and magnetic measurements. Structural studies revealed that the FeCo nanoparticles had a body-centered cubic (BCC) structure. FE-SEM analysis demonstrated a sphere morphology for the FeCo alloy particles. The size of the FeCo nanoparticles could be well tuned by changing the number of Pt-seed partices in the FeCo alloy. The magnetic properties of the FeCo alloys were investigated as a function of the Pt-seed concentration and temperature. The saturation magnetization and coercivity of the FeCo nanoparticles were found to depend on the molar ratio of Fe/Co, as well as the number of Pt-seeds, and increased with increasing FeCo concentration. A higher value of the saturation magnetization, 218 emu/g, was obtained for the 0.07-M concentration of FeCo alloy. In the process of producing an FeCo alloy powder by heterogeneous nucleation, a powder having minute sizes could be produced under the experimental conditions of a Pt-seed-added temperature of 90 °C and a Pt/FeCo mole ratio of 8 × 10-5, and showed far superior properties.

  11. RAPID INDUCTION OF HETEROGENEOUS ICE NUCLEATION IN A BIOLOGICALLY COMPATIBLE COOLANT.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Joshua; Bull, Diana; Becker, Lance

    Hypothermia is gaining recognition as an important medical treatment. To treat local cases of injury such as stroke, or certain surgical procedures, there is a need to induce local hypothermia. To treat shock or cardiac arrest survivors, there is a need to rapidly induce global hypothermia. Rapid induction of hypothermia has been achieved in animal research, but it has yet to be achieved clinically using a simple, widely practicable method. The clinical need for therapeutic hypothermia represents an engineering opportunity to develop an easy to use coolant that is sterile, biologically compatible, and maximizes coolant heat capacity. Here we present an initial characterization of a prototype platform technology designed to create a sterile, biologically compatible, high heat capacity coolant that has the potential to be used in all of these clinical applications. The coolant is a specially processed micro-particulate ice saline slurry, that can be easily pumped into a patient through surgical tubing, syringes, or minimally invasive surgical instruments. The device induces heterogeneous ice nucleation in a saline stream that has been super-cooled from room temperature to a temperature below the saline freezing point. Currently, the device begins continuous production of ice slurry that contains ~30 % ice by mass within 10 minutes. The nominal ice particle diameter is smaller than 100 μm. This work represents a significant first step toward addressing clinical needs for rapid human cooling.

  12. Parameterization of heterogeneous ice nucleation on mineral dust particles: An application in a regional scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemand, M.; Vogel, B.; Vogel, H.; Connolly, P.; Klein, H.; Bingemer, H.; Hoose, C.; Moehler, O.; Leisner, T.

    2010-12-01

    In climate and weather models, the quantitative description of aerosol and cloud processes relies on simplified assumptions. This contributes major uncertainties to the prediction of global and regional climate change. The parameterization of heterogeneous ice nucleation is a step towards improving our current knowledge of the importance of the cloud ice phase in weather and climate models and can aid in the theoretical understanding of such processes. This contribution presents a new parameterization derived from a large number of experiments carried out at the aerosol and cloud chamber facility AIDA [1] of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. AIDA is especially suitable to study ice nucleation processes at tropospheric and stratospheric cloud conditions covering a wide range of temperature and pressure. During pumping expansion, cooling rates between -0.3 and -5.0 K/min, equating to vertical wind velocities of 0.5 to 8 m/s, and a relative humidity range of up to more than 200% with respect to ice can be reached. The parameterization is valid for the temperature range -35°C to -15°C. In order to derive and test the parameterization a parameter called the ice-active surface site density was calculated for a number of different experiments with mineral dust acting as ice nuclei in the immersion and/or deposition mode. An exponential function was fitted to this data of ice-active surface site density vs. temperature. The curve fit was then used within the bin microphysical model ACPIM [2] to simulate the ice formation rates from the experiments. The major dust outbreak over the Sahara in May 2008 which was followed by a dust transport over the Mediterranean and Western Europe was simulated using the regional scale online coupled model system COSMO-ART (Vogel et al., 2009). Based on the model results the exponential curve fit was used to calculate the ice nuclei number concentration at Kleiner Feldberg (Germany). The results will be compared to measurements from

  13. Heterogeneous ice nucleation on dust particles sourced from nine deserts worldwide - Part 1: Immersion freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boose, Yvonne; Welti, André; Atkinson, James; Ramelli, Fabiola; Danielczok, Anja; Bingemer, Heinz G.; Plötze, Michael; Sierau, Berko; Kanji, Zamin A.; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2016-12-01

    Desert dust is one of the most abundant ice nucleating particle types in the atmosphere. Traditionally, clay minerals were assumed to determine the ice nucleation ability of desert dust and constituted the focus of ice nucleation studies over several decades. Recently some feldspar species were identified to be ice active at much higher temperatures than clay minerals, redirecting studies to investigate the contribution of feldspar to ice nucleation on desert dust. However, so far no study has shown the atmospheric relevance of this mineral phase.For this study four dust samples were collected after airborne transport in the troposphere from the Sahara to different locations (Crete, the Peloponnese, Canary Islands, and the Sinai Peninsula). Additionally, 11 dust samples were collected from the surface from nine of the biggest deserts worldwide. The samples were used to study the ice nucleation behavior specific to different desert dusts. Furthermore, we investigated how representative surface-collected dust is for the atmosphere by comparing to the ice nucleation activity of the airborne samples. We used the IMCA-ZINC setup to form droplets on single aerosol particles which were subsequently exposed to temperatures between 233 and 250 K. Dust particles were collected in parallel on filters for offline cold-stage ice nucleation experiments at 253-263 K. To help the interpretation of the ice nucleation experiments the mineralogical composition of the dusts was investigated. We find that a higher ice nucleation activity in a given sample at 253 K can be attributed to the K-feldspar content present in this sample, whereas at temperatures between 238 and 245 K it is attributed to the sum of feldspar and quartz content present. A high clay content, in contrast, is associated with lower ice nucleation activity. This confirms the importance of feldspar above 250 K and the role of quartz and feldspars determining the ice nucleation activities at lower temperatures as found

  14. Unprecedented Evidence for Large Scale Heterogeneous Nucleation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds, Likely by Nanometer-Sized Meteoritic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, I.; Pitts, M. C.; Luo, B.; Hoyle, C. R.; Zobrist, B.; Jacot, L.; Poole, L. R.; Grooss, J.; Weigel, R.; Borrmann, S.; Ebert, M.; Duprat, J.; Peter, T.

    2012-12-01

    Recent observations cast serious doubts on our understanding of the processes responsible for polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation. PSCs play crucial roles in polar ozone chemistry by hosting heterogeneous reactions and by removal of reactive nitrogen through sedimenting nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles. An extensive field campaign took place in the Arctic during the winter 2009/2010 within the European Union project RECONCILE, complemented by measurements from the spaceborne CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization) instrument. Through trajectory and microphysical box model calculations, we analyzed CALIOP data from the RECONCILE winter to investigate the nucleation of PSC particles in detail. One significant finding was that liquid/NAT mixture PSCs were prevalent in late December 2009, a period during which no ice PSCs were observed, and temperatures were higher by 6 K than required for homogeneous ice freezing at the onset of PSC formation. These NAT particles must have formed through some non-ice nucleation mechanism, which runs counter to the widely held view that the only efficient NAT nuclei were ice crystals formed by homogeneous freezing of STS droplets. Furthermore, in mid-January 2010, a large region of the Arctic vortex cooled below the frost point, leading to widespread synoptic-scale ice PSCs, unusual for the Arctic. Our modeling studies indicate that a match with the CALIOP data calls for new heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms for both NAT and ice particles, namely freezing on nanometer-sized, solid nuclei immersed in the liquid stratospheric aerosols. Number concentrations of non-volatile particles were measured in situ during RECONCILE by means of the heated channel of the condensation nuclei (CN) counter COPAS on board of the high-flying aircraft Geophysica. 60-80 % of all CN survived heating to 250 °C. Offline Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis of RECONCILE impactor samples

  15. Controlling the locus of bubble nucleation by dissolved gases in heterogeneous liquid-liquid systems.

    PubMed

    Priyananda, Pramith; Hawkett, Brian S; Warr, Gregory G

    2010-01-19

    We have examined the nucleation of chemically generated nitrogen gas bubbles in microheterogeneous systems, using optical microscopy on a model system consisting of a single liquid-liquid interface. Results clearly show that bubble nucleation occurs in both the aqueous and oil phases, despite the nitrogen production reaction being a purely aqueous phase process. A theoretical model is developed which describes the time evolution of the nitrogen concentration profile, and this reveals that bubbles in the oil are a result of homogeneous nucleation of dissolved N(2) transported across the interface into a (supersaturated) diffusion layer. We further show that bubble nucleation in the oil can be inhibited or eliminated by adding water-soluble surfactants, which facilitates aqueous phase bubble nucleation and then acts as highly effective nitrogen sinks, severely reducing the flux of dissolved gas across the water-oil interface.

  16. Influence of the Heterogeneous Nucleation Sites on the Kinetics of Intermetallic Phase Formation in Aged Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, Elis Almeida; Magnabosco, Rodrigo

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this work is to study the influence of the heterogeneous nucleation site quantity, observed in different ferrite and austenite grain size samples, on the phase transformations that result in intermetallic phases in a UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel (DSS). Solution treatment was conducted for 1, 24, 96, or 192 hours at 1373 K (1100 °C) to obtain different ferrite and austenite grain sizes. After solution treatment, isothermal aging treatments for 5, 8, 10, 20, 30, or 60 minutes at 1123 K (850 °C) were performed to verify the influence of different amounts of heterogeneous nucleation sites in the kinetics of intermetallic phase formation. The sample solution treated for 1 hour, with the highest surface area between matrix phases, was the one that presented, after 60 minutes at 1123 K (850 °C), the smaller volume fraction of ferrite (indicative of greater intermetallic phase formation), higher volume of sigma (that was present in coral-like and compact morphologies), and chi phase. It was not possible to identify which was the first nucleated phase, sigma or chi. It was also observed that the phase formation kinetics is higher for the sample solution treated for 1 hour. It was evidenced that, from a certain moment on, the chi phase begins to be consumed due to the sigma phase formation, and the austenite/ferrite interface presents higher S V for all solution treatment times. It was also observed that intermetallic phases form preferably in austenite-ferrite interfaces, although the higher occupation rate occurs at triple junction ferrite-ferrite-ferrite. It was verified that there was no saturation of nucleation sites in any interface type nor triple junction, and the equilibrium after 1 hour of aging at 1123 K (850 °C) was not achieved. It was then concluded that sigma phase formation is possibly controlled by diffusional processes, without saturation of nucleation sites.

  17. A first test of the hypothesis of biogenic magnetite-based heterogeneous ice-crystal nucleation in cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsuko; Golash, Harry N; Kirschvink, Joseph L

    2016-06-01

    An outstanding biophysical puzzle is focused on the apparent ability of weak, extremely low-frequency oscillating magnetic fields to enhance cryopreservation of many biological tissues. A recent theory holds that these weak magnetic fields could be inhibiting ice-crystal nucleation on the nanocrystals of biological magnetite (Fe3O4, an inverse cubic spinel) that are present in many plant and animal tissues by causing them to oscillate. In this theory, magnetically-induced mechanical oscillations disrupt the ability of water molecules to nucleate on the surface of the magnetite nanocrystals. However, the ability of the magnetite crystal lattice to serve as a template for heterogeneous ice crystal nucleation is as yet unknown, particularly for particles in the 10-100 nm size range. Here we report that the addition of trace-amounts of finely-dispersed magnetite into ultrapure water samples reduces strongly the incidence of supercooling, as measured in experiments conducted using a controlled freezing apparatus with multiple thermocouples. SQUID magnetometry was used to quantify nanogram levels of magnetite in the water samples. We also report a relationship between the volume change of ice, and the degree of supercooling, that may indicate lower degassing during the crystallization of supercooled water. In addition to supporting the role of ice-crystal nucleation by biogenic magnetite in many tissues, magnetite nanocrystals could provide inexpensive, non-toxic, and non-pathogenic ice nucleating agents needed in a variety of industrial processes, as well as influencing the dynamics of ice crystal nucleation in many natural environments. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Importance of aerosol composition, mixing state, and morphology for heterogeneous ice nucleation: A combined field and laboratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baustian, Kelly J.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Wise, Matthew E.; Pratt, Kerri A.; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Hallar, A. Gannet; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2012-03-01

    In this study chemical compositions of background aerosol and ice nuclei were examined through laboratory investigations using Raman spectroscopy and field measurements by single-particle mass spectrometry. Aerosol sampling took place at Storm Peak Laboratory in Steamboat Springs, Colorado (elevation of 3210 m). A cascade impactor was used to collect coarse-mode aerosol particles for laboratory analysis by Raman spectroscopy; the composition, mixing state, and heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of individual particles were examined. For in situ analysis of fine-mode aerosol, ice nucleation on ambient particles was observed using a compact ice nucleation chamber. Ice crystals were separated from unactivated aerosol using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor, and ice nuclei were analyzed using particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry. For both fine and coarse modes, the ice nucleating particle fractions were enriched in minerals and depleted in sulfates and nitrates, compared to the background aerosol sampled. The vast majority of particles in both the ambient and ice active aerosol fractions contained a detectable amount of organic material. Raman spectroscopy showed that organic material is sometimes present in the form of a coating on the surface of inorganic particles. We find that some organic-containing particles serve as efficient ice nuclei while others do not. For coarse-mode aerosol, organic particles were only observed to initiate ice formation when oxygen signatures were also present in their spectra.

  19. CO2-crystal wettability in potassic magmas: implications for eruptive dynamics in light of experimental evidence for heterogeneous nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sottili, Gianluca; Fanara, Sara; Silleni, Aurora; Palladino, Danilo M.; Schmidt, Burkhard C.

    2017-05-01

    The volatile content in magmas is fundamental for the triggering and style of volcanic eruptions. Carbon dioxide, the second most abundant volatile component in magmas after H2O, is the first to reach saturation upon ascent and depressurization. We investigate experimentally CO2-bubble nucleation in trachybasalt and trachyte melts at high temperature and high pressure (HT and HP) through wetting-angle measurements on different (sialic, mafic or oxide) phenocryst phases. The presence of crystals lowers the supersaturation required for CO2-bubble nucleation up to 37 per cent (heterogeneous nucleation, HeN), with a minor role of mineral chemistry. Different from H2O-rich systems, feldspar crystals are effective in reducing required supersaturation for bubble nucleation. Our data suggest that leucite, the dominant liquidus phase in ultrapotassic systems at shallow depth (i.e. <100 MPa), facilitates late-stage, extensive magma vesiculation through CO2HeN, which may explain the shifting of CO2-rich eruptive systems towards an apparently anomalous explosive behaviour.

  20. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds-nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-05-01

    Satellite based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current theory, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring on the surface of dust or meteoritic particles. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along tens of thousands of trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT PSCs with these observations enables the thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory and is simple to implement in models. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed PSCs very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories.

  1. Effect of surface free energies on the heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet: a molecular dynamics simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, W; Lan, Z; Peng, B L; Wen, R F; Ma, X H

    2015-02-07

    Heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet on surfaces with different solid-liquid interaction intensities is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The interaction potentials between surface atoms and vapor molecules are adjusted to obtain various surface free energies, and the nucleation process and wetting state of nuclei on surfaces are investigated. The results indicate that near-constant contact angles are already established for nano-scale nuclei on various surfaces, with the contact angle decreasing with solid-liquid interaction intensities linearly. Meanwhile, noticeable fluctuation of vapor-liquid interfaces can be observed for the nuclei that deposited on surfaces, which is caused by the asymmetric forces from vapor molecules. The formation and growth rate of nuclei are increasing with the solid-liquid interaction intensities. For low energy surface, the attraction of surface atoms to water molecules is comparably weak, and the pre-existing clusters can depart from the surface and enter into the bulk vapor phase. The distribution of clusters within the bulk vapor phase becomes competitive as compared with that absorbed on surface. For moderate energy surfaces, heterogeneous nucleation predominates and the formation of clusters within bulk vapor phase is suppressed. The effect of high energy particles that embedded in low energy surface is also discussed under the same simulation system. The nucleation preferably initiates on the high energy particles, and the clusters that formed on the heterogeneous particles are trapped around their original positions instead of migrating around as that observed on smooth surfaces. This feature makes it possible for the heterogeneous particles to act as fixed nucleation sites, and simulation results also suggest that the number of nuclei increases monotonously with the number of high energy particles. The growth of nuclei on high energy particles can be divided into three sub-stages, beginning with the formation

  2. Effect of surface free energies on the heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet: A molecular dynamics simulation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Lan, Z.; Peng, B. L.; Wen, R. F.; Ma, X. H.

    2015-02-07

    Heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet on surfaces with different solid-liquid interaction intensities is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The interaction potentials between surface atoms and vapor molecules are adjusted to obtain various surface free energies, and the nucleation process and wetting state of nuclei on surfaces are investigated. The results indicate that near-constant contact angles are already established for nano-scale nuclei on various surfaces, with the contact angle decreasing with solid-liquid interaction intensities linearly. Meanwhile, noticeable fluctuation of vapor-liquid interfaces can be observed for the nuclei that deposited on surfaces, which is caused by the asymmetric forces from vapor molecules. The formation and growth rate of nuclei are increasing with the solid-liquid interaction intensities. For low energy surface, the attraction of surface atoms to water molecules is comparably weak, and the pre-existing clusters can depart from the surface and enter into the bulk vapor phase. The distribution of clusters within the bulk vapor phase becomes competitive as compared with that absorbed on surface. For moderate energy surfaces, heterogeneous nucleation predominates and the formation of clusters within bulk vapor phase is suppressed. The effect of high energy particles that embedded in low energy surface is also discussed under the same simulation system. The nucleation preferably initiates on the high energy particles, and the clusters that formed on the heterogeneous particles are trapped around their original positions instead of migrating around as that observed on smooth surfaces. This feature makes it possible for the heterogeneous particles to act as fixed nucleation sites, and simulation results also suggest that the number of nuclei increases monotonously with the number of high energy particles. The growth of nuclei on high energy particles can be divided into three sub-stages, beginning with the formation

  3. New cloud chamber experiments on the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid in the deposition nucleation and immersion freezing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehler, O.; Wagner, R.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2010-12-01

    crystallised from less supersaturated solution droplets and exposed to slow growth conditions in a supersaturated environment in the AIDA camber over a time period of several hours, were found to be much poorer heterogeneous ice nuclei. We speculate that under these conditions a crystal surface structure with less-active sites for the initiation of ice nucleation was generated. Such particles were found to be almost ice-inactive in both the deposition and condensation mode. At times, the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid dihydrate significantly changed when the particles had been processed in preceding cloud droplet activation steps. Experimental methods, results, and atmospheric implications will be presented and discussed at the conference. [1] Kerminen et al., Atmos. Env., 33, 2089-2100, 1999. [2] Kerminen et al., J. Aerosol Sci., 31, 349-362, 2000. [3] Kawamura et al., Atmos. Env., 30, 1709-1722, 1996. [4] Marcolli et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, 108, 2216-2224, 2004. [5] Zobrist et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 3115-3129, 2006. [6] Wagner et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 7617-7641, 2010.

  4. Influence of Surface Morphology on the Heterogeneous Ice nucleation Efficiency of Hematite Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Hoffmann, N.; Steinke, I.; Kiselev, A. A.; Dreyer, A.; Zhang, K.; Kulkarni, G.; Koop, T.; Moehler, O.

    2013-12-01

    Localized morphological features, such as cracks and edges, can enhance ice nucleation through droplet-freezing and water vapor deposition at these active sites. Herein, we have conducted a comprehensive investigation examining the role of surface milling upon ice nucleation for hematite particles as a model proxy of atmospheric dust particles. The immersion and deposition mode ice nucleation efficiencies of laboratory-generated monodispersed-cubic and milled hematite particles were measured using the AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber in the temperature (T) range between -28 °C and -82 °C. We observed that the immersion mode ice nucleation efficiency of milled hematite particles is almost an order of magnitude higher at -35.2 °C < T < -33.5 °C than that of the cubic hematite particles, indicating a substantial effect of morphological irregularities on the ice activation. For the deposition mode freezing below -50 °C and lower on, as previously postulated in the literature, our measurements showed that an exponential increase in supersaturations were required to achieve a constant nucleation efficiency (i.e., ns > 2.5 x 108 m-2). Deposition observations may be due to water uptake at particle surface and/or within bulk phase in subsaturated conditions. Applications of the fitted parameterization derived from AIDA measurements to modeling simulations with the single column version of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 as well as microphysical characteristics of hematite surface are also presented.

  5. Understanding Cirrus Ice Crystal Number Variability for Different Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Sylvia C.; Betancourt, Ricardo Morales; Barahona, Donifan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    Along with minimizing parameter uncertainty, understanding the cause of temporal and spatial variability of the nucleated ice crystal number, Ni, is key to improving the representation of cirrus clouds in climate models. To this end, sensitivities of Ni to input variables like aerosol number and diameter provide valuable information about nucleation regime and efficiency for a given model formulation. Here we use the adjoint model of the adjoint of a cirrus formation parameterization (Barahona and Nenes, 2009b) to understand Ni variability for various ice-nucleating particle (INP) spectra. Inputs are generated with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, and simulations are done with a theoretically derived spectrum, an empirical lab-based spectrum and two field-based empirical spectra that differ in the nucleation threshold for black carbon particles and in the active site density for dust. The magnitude and sign of Ni sensitivity to insoluble aerosol number can be directly linked to nucleation regime and efficiency of various INP. The lab-based spectrum calculates much higher INP efficiencies than field-based ones, which reveals a disparity in aerosol surface properties. Ni sensitivity to temperature tends to be low, due to the compensating effects of temperature on INP spectrum parameters; this low temperature sensitivity regime has been experimentally reported before but never deconstructed as done here.

  6. Understanding cirrus ice crystal number variability for different heterogeneous ice nucleation spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Sullivan, Sylvia C.; Morales Betancourt, Ricardo; Barahona, Donifan; ...

    2016-03-03

    Along with minimizing parameter uncertainty, understanding the cause of temporal and spatial variability of the nucleated ice crystal number, Ni, is key to improving the representation of cirrus clouds in climate models. To this end, sensitivities of Ni to input variables like aerosol number and diameter provide valuable information about nucleation regime and efficiency for a given model formulation. Here we use the adjoint model of the adjoint of a cirrus formation parameterization (Barahona and Nenes, 2009b) to understand Ni variability for various ice-nucleating particle (INP) spectra. Inputs are generated with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, and simulations are donemore » with a theoretically derived spectrum, an empirical lab-based spectrum and two field-based empirical spectra that differ in the nucleation threshold for black carbon particles and in the active site density for dust. The magnitude and sign of Ni sensitivity to insoluble aerosol number can be directly linked to nucleation regime and efficiency of various INP. The lab-based spectrum calculates much higher INP efficiencies than field-based ones, which reveals a disparity in aerosol surface properties. Ni sensitivity to temperature tends to be low, due to the compensating effects of temperature on INP spectrum parameters; this low temperature sensitivity regime has been experimentally reported before but never deconstructed as done here.« less

  7. A water activity based model of heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics for freezing of water and aqueous solution droplets

    DOE PAGES

    Knopf, Daniel A.; Alpert, Peter A.

    2013-04-24

    Immersion freezing of water and aqueous solutions by particles acting as ice nuclei (IN) is a common process of heterogeneous ice nucleation which occurs in many environments, especially in the atmosphere where it results in the glaciation of clouds. Here we experimentally show, using a variety of IN types suspended in various aqueous solutions, that immersion freezing temperatures and kinetics can be described solely by temperature, T, and solution water activity, aw, which is the ratio of the vapour pressure of the solution and the saturation water vapour pressure under the same conditions and, in equilibrium, equivalent to relative humiditymore » (RH). This allows the freezing point and corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient, Jhet, to be uniquely expressed by T and aw, a result we term the aw based immersion freezing model (ABIFM). This method is independent of the nature of the solute and accounts for several varying parameters, including cooling rate and IN surface area, while providing a holistic description of immersion freezing and allowing prediction of freezing temperatures, Jhet, frozen fractions, ice particle production rates and numbers. Our findings are based on experimental freezing data collected for various IN surface areas, A, and cooling rates, r, of droplets variously containing marine biogenic material, two soil humic acids, four mineral dusts, and one organic monolayer acting as IN. For all investigated IN types we demonstrate that droplet freezing temperatures increase as A increases. Similarly, droplet freezing temperatures increase as the cooling rate decreases. The log10(Jhet) values for the various IN types derived exclusively by T and aw, provide a complete description of the heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics. Thus, the ABIFM can be applied over the entire range of T, RH, total particulate surface area, and cloud activation timescales typical of atmospheric conditions. Finally, we demonstrate that ABIFM can be

  8. Experiment and theory for heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals in a porous medium

    PubMed Central

    Chayen, Naomi E.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Sear, Richard P.

    2006-01-01

    The determination of high-resolution structures of proteins requires crystals of suitable quality. Because of the new impetus given to structural biology by structural genomics/proteomics, the problem of crystallizing proteins is becoming increasingly acute. There is therefore an urgent requirement for the development of new efficient methods to aid crystal growth. Nucleation is the crucial step that determines the entire crystallization process. Hence, the holy grail is to design a “universal nucleant,” a substrate that induces the nucleation of crystals of any protein. We report a theory for nucleation on disordered porous media and its experimental testing and validation using a mesoporous bioactive gel-glass. This material induced the crystallization of the largest number of proteins ever crystallized using a single nucleant. The combination of the model and the experimental results opens up the scope for the rational design of nucleants, leading to alternative means of controlling crystallization. PMID:16407115

  9. Experiment and theory for heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals in a porous medium.

    PubMed

    Chayen, Naomi E; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Sear, Richard P

    2006-01-17

    The determination of high-resolution structures of proteins requires crystals of suitable quality. Because of the new impetus given to structural biology by structural genomics/proteomics, the problem of crystallizing proteins is becoming increasingly acute. There is therefore an urgent requirement for the development of new efficient methods to aid crystal growth. Nucleation is the crucial step that determines the entire crystallization process. Hence, the holy grail is to design a "universal nucleant," a substrate that induces the nucleation of crystals of any protein. We report a theory for nucleation on disordered porous media and its experimental testing and validation using a mesoporous bioactive gel-glass. This material induced the crystallization of the largest number of proteins ever crystallized using a single nucleant. The combination of the model and the experimental results opens up the scope for the rational design of nucleants, leading to alternative means of controlling crystallization.

  10. Producing Solar Cells By Surface Preparation For Accelerated Nucleation Of Microcrystalline Silicon On Heterogeneous Substrates.

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Liyou; Chen, Liangfan

    1998-03-24

    Attractive multi-junction solar cells and single junction solar cells with excellent conversion efficiency can be produced with a microcrystalline tunnel junction, microcrystalline recombination junction or one or more microcrystalline doped layers by special plasma deposition processes which includes plasma etching with only hydrogen or other specified etchants to enhance microcrystalline growth followed by microcrystalline. nucleation with a doped hydrogen-diluted feedstock.

  11. Heterogeneous nucleation and growth of water vapor on meteoric smoke particle analogues at mesospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachbar, Mario; Duft, Denis; Leisner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Sub 2 nm meteoric smoke particles (MSP) produced from the ablation and recondensation of meteoric material are believed to be the major kind of nuclei causing the formation of water ice particles in the mesopause of Earth at heights of 80-90 km. These so called noctiLucent clouds (NLC) are frequently detected during polar summer, whereas the microphysical nucleation process and subsequent growth on such small particles are understood only poorly. Parameterizing these processes results in large uncertainties especially due to a lack of experimental data on desorption energies and critical saturation for the activation of nucleation under realistic mesospheric conditions, which states the need of laboratory measurements. We produce charged nanometer sized (2-3 nm) MSP analogues in a microwave plasma particle source and transfer them to a novel linear ion trap which allows us to trap the particles under typical mesospheric temperatures and H2O concentrations. The adsorption of H2O molecules on the particles surface followed by nucleation and growth can be examined by analyzing the mass distribution of the particles with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer as function of the residence time under supersaturated conditions. In this contribution we present such measurements for single positively as well as negatively charged particles which allow us to determine the desorption energy of water vapor on the investigated nanoparticles as well as the critical saturation needed to activate nucleation and subsequent growth.

  12. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Soufriere Hills Volcanic Ash Immersed in Water Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, J. D.; Neuberg, J. W.; O’Sullivan, D.; Wilson, T. W.; Whale, T. F.; Neve, L.; Umo, N. S.; Malkin, T. L.; Murray, B. J.

    2017-01-01

    Fine particles of ash emitted during volcanic eruptions may sporadically influence cloud properties on a regional or global scale as well as influencing the dynamics of volcanic clouds and the subsequent dispersion of volcanic aerosol and gases. It has been shown that volcanic ash can trigger ice nucleation, but ash from relatively few volcanoes has been studied for its ice nucleating ability. In this study we quantify the efficiency with which ash from the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat nucleates ice when immersed in supercooled water droplets. Using an ash sample from the 11th February 2010 eruption, we report ice nucleating efficiencies from 246 to 265 K. This wide range of temperatures was achieved using two separate droplet freezing instruments, one employing nanolitre droplets, the other using microlitre droplets. Soufriere Hills volcanic ash was significantly more efficient than all other ash samples that have been previously examined. At present the reasons for these differences are not understood, but may be related to mineralogy, amorphous content and surface chemistry. PMID:28056077

  13. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Soufriere Hills Volcanic Ash Immersed in Water Droplets.

    PubMed

    Mangan, T P; Atkinson, J D; Neuberg, J W; O'Sullivan, D; Wilson, T W; Whale, T F; Neve, L; Umo, N S; Malkin, T L; Murray, B J

    2017-01-01

    Fine particles of ash emitted during volcanic eruptions may sporadically influence cloud properties on a regional or global scale as well as influencing the dynamics of volcanic clouds and the subsequent dispersion of volcanic aerosol and gases. It has been shown that volcanic ash can trigger ice nucleation, but ash from relatively few volcanoes has been studied for its ice nucleating ability. In this study we quantify the efficiency with which ash from the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat nucleates ice when immersed in supercooled water droplets. Using an ash sample from the 11th February 2010 eruption, we report ice nucleating efficiencies from 246 to 265 K. This wide range of temperatures was achieved using two separate droplet freezing instruments, one employing nanolitre droplets, the other using microlitre droplets. Soufriere Hills volcanic ash was significantly more efficient than all other ash samples that have been previously examined. At present the reasons for these differences are not understood, but may be related to mineralogy, amorphous content and surface chemistry.

  14. A multicomponent assembly approach for the design of deep desulfurization heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanqi; Xuan, Weimin; Zhang, Mengmeng; Miras, Haralampos N; Song, Yu-Fei

    2016-12-06

    Deep desulfurization is a challenging task and global efforts are focused on the development of new approaches for the reduction of sulfur-containing compounds in fuel oils. In this work, we have proposed a new design strategy for the development of deep desulfurization heterogeneous catalysts. Based on the adopted design strategy, a novel composite material of polyoxometalate (POM)-based ionic liquid-grafted layered double hydroxides (LDHs) was synthesized by an exfoliation/grafting/assembly process. The structural properties of the as-prepared catalyst were characterized using FT-IR, XRD, TG, NMR, XPS, BET, SEM and HRTEM. The heterogeneous catalyst exhibited high activity in deep desulfurization of DBT (dibenzothiophene), 4,6-DMDBT (4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene) and BT (benzothiophene) at 70 °C in 25, 30 and 40 minutes, respectively. The catalyst can be easily recovered and reused at least ten times without obvious decrease of its catalytic activity. Such excellent sulfur removal ability as well as the cost efficiency of the novel heterogeneous catalyst can be attributed to the rational design, where the spatial proximity of the substrate and the active sites, the immobilization of ionic liquid onto the LDHs via covalent bonding and the recyclability of the catalyst are carefully considered.

  15. Active sites in heterogeneous ice nucleation-the example of K-rich feldspars.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Alexei; Bachmann, Felix; Pedevilla, Philipp; Cox, Stephen J; Michaelides, Angelos; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Leisner, Thomas

    2017-01-27

    Ice formation on aerosol particles is a process of crucial importance to Earth's climate and the environmental sciences, but it is not understood at the molecular level. This is partly because the nature of active sites, local surface features where ice growth commences, is still unclear. Here we report direct electron-microscopic observations of deposition growth of aligned ice crystals on feldspar, an atmospherically important component of mineral dust. Our molecular-scale computer simulations indicate that this alignment arises from the preferential nucleation of prismatic crystal planes of ice on high-energy (100) surface planes of feldspar. The microscopic patches of (100) surface, exposed at surface defects such as steps, cracks, and cavities, are thought to be responsible for the high ice nucleation efficacy of potassium (K)-feldspar particles. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Pre-ordering of interfacial water in the pathway of heterogeneous ice nucleation does not lead to a two-step crystallization mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Laura; Peters, Baron; Molinero, Valeria

    2016-12-01

    According to Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT), the transition from liquid to crystal occurs in a single activated step with a transition state controlled by the size of the crystal embryo. This picture has been challenged in the last two decades by several reports of two-step crystallization processes in which the liquid first produces pre-ordered or dense domains, within which the crystal nucleates in a second step. Pre-ordering preceding crystal nucleation has been recently reported in simulations of ice crystallization, raising the question of whether the mechanism of ice nucleation involves two steps. In this paper, we investigate the heterogeneous nucleation of ice on carbon surfaces. We use molecular simulations with efficient coarse-grained models combined with rare event sampling methods and free energy calculations to elucidate the role of pre-ordering of liquid water at the carbon surface in the reaction coordinate for heterogeneous nucleation. We find that ice nucleation proceeds through a classical mechanism, with a single barrier between liquid and crystal. The reaction coordinate that determines the crossing of the nucleation barrier is the size of the crystal nucleus, as predicted by CNT. Wetting of the critical ice nuclei within pre-ordered domains decreases the nucleation barrier, increasing the nucleation rates. The preferential pathway for crystallization involves the early creation of pre-ordered domains that are the birthplace of the ice crystallites but do not represent a minimum in the free energy pathway from liquid to ice. We conclude that a preferential pathway through an intermediate-order precursor does not necessarily result in a two-step mechanism.

  17. Can we define an asymptotic value for the ice active surface site density for heterogeneous ice nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, Dennis; Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie; Hartmann, Susan; Wex, Heike; Ignatius, Karoliina; Stratmann, Frank

    2015-04-01

    The formation of ice in atmospheric clouds has a substantial influence on the radiative properties of clouds as well as on the formation of precipitation. Therefore much effort has been made to understand and quantify the major ice formation processes in clouds. Immersion freezing has been suggested to be a dominant primary ice formation process in low and mid-level clouds (mixed-phase cloud conditions). It also has been shown that mineral dust particles are the most abundant ice nucleating particles in the atmosphere and thus may play an important role for atmospheric ice nucleation (Murray et al., 2012). Additionally, biological particles like bacteria and pollen are suggested to be potentially involved in atmospheric ice formation, at least on a regional scale (Murray et al., 2012). In recent studies for biological particles (SNOMAX and birch pollen), it has been demonstrated that freezing is induced by ice nucleating macromolecules and that an asymptotic value for the mass density of these ice nucleating macromolecules can be determined (Hartmann et al., 2013; Augustin et al., 2013, Wex et al., 2014). The question arises whether such an asymptotic value can also be determined for the ice active surface site density ns, a parameter which is commonly used to describe the ice nucleation activity of e.g., mineral dust. Such an asymptotic value for ns could be an important input parameter for atmospheric modeling applications. In the presented study, we therefore investigated the immersion freezing behavior of droplets containing size-segregated, monodisperse feldspar particles utilizing the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). For all particle sizes considered in the experiments, we observed a leveling off of the frozen droplet fraction reaching a plateau within the heterogeneous freezing temperature regime (T > -38°C) which was proportional to the particle surface area. Based on these findings, we could determine an asymptotic value for the ice

  18. New cloud chamber experiments on the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid in the immersion mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2011-03-01

    The heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid in the immersion mode has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling runs with airborne, ternary solution droplets composed of, (i), sodium chloride, oxalic acid, and water (NaCl/OA/H2O) and, (ii), sulphuric acid, oxalic acid, and water (H2SO4/OA/H2O). Polydisperse aerosol populations with median diameters ranging from 0.5-0.7 μm and varying solute concentrations were prepared. The expansion experiments were conducted in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at initial temperatures of 244 and 235 K. In the ternary NaCl/OA/H2O system, solid inclusions of oxalic acid, presumably nucleated as oxalic acid dihydrate, were formed by temporarily exposing the ternary solution droplets to a relative humidity below the efflorescence point of NaCl. The matrix of the crystallised NaCl particulates triggered the precipitation of the organic crystals which later remained as solid inclusions in the solution droplets when the relative humidity was subsequently raised above the deliquescence point of NaCl. The embedded oxalic acid crystals reduced the critical ice saturation ratio required for the homogeneous freezing of pure NaCl/H2O solution droplets at a temperature of around 231 K from 1.38 to about 1.32. Aqueous solution droplets with OA inclusions larger than about 0.27 μm in diameter efficiently nucleated ice by condensation freezing when they were activated to micron-sized cloud droplets at 241 K, i.e., they froze well above the homogeneous freezing temperature of pure water droplets of about 237 K. Our results on the immersion freezing potential of oxalic acid corroborate the findings from a recent study with emulsified aqueous solutions containing crystalline oxalic acid. In those experiments, the crystallisation of oxalic acid diyhdrate was triggered by a preceding homogeneous freezing cycle with the emulsion samples. The expansion cooling cycles with ternary H2SO4/OA

  19. New cloud chamber experiments on the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid in the immersion mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2010-12-01

    The heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid in the immersion mode has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling runs with airborne, ternary solution droplets composed of, (i), sodium chloride, oxalic acid, and water (NaCl/OA/H2O) and, (ii), sulphuric acid, oxalic acid, and water (H2SO4/OA/H2O). Polydisperse aerosol populations with median diameters ranging from 0.5-0.7 μm and varying solute concentrations were prepared. The expansion experiments were conducted in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at initial temperatures of 244 and 235 K. In the ternary NaCl/OA/H2O system, solid inclusions of oxalic acid, presumably nucleated as oxalic acid dihydrate, were formed by temporarily exposing the ternary solution droplets to a relative humidity below the efflorescence point of NaCl. The matrix of the crystallised NaCl particulates triggered the precipitation of the organic crystals which later on remained as solid inclusions in the solution droplets when the relative humidity was again raised above the deliquescence point of NaCl. The embedded oxalic acid crystals reduced the critical ice saturation ratio required for the homogeneous freezing of pure NaCl/H2O solution droplets at a temperature of around 231 K from 1.38 to about 1.32. Aqueous solution droplets with OA inclusions larger than about 0.27 μm in diameter efficiently nucleated ice by condensation freezing when they were activated to micron-sized cloud droplets at 241 K, i.e., they froze well above the homogeneous freezing temperature of pure water droplets of about 237 K. Our results on the immersion freezing potential of oxalic acid corroborate the findings from a recent study with emulsified aqueous solutions containing crystalline oxalic acid. In those experiments, the crystallisation of oxalic acid diyhdrate was triggered by a preceding homogeneous freezing cycle with the emulsion samples. The expansion cooling cycles with ternary H2SO4/OA/H2O

  20. Heterogeneous nucleation and growth dynamics in the light-induced phase transition in vanadium dioxide

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, Nathaniel F.; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Seo, Minah; ...

    2016-03-02

    Here we report on ultrafast optical investigations of the light-induced insulator-to-metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide with controlled disorder generated by substrate mismatch. These results reveal common dynamics of this optically-induced phase transition that are independent of this disorder. Lastly, above the fluence threshold for completing the transition to the rutile crystalline phase, we find a common time scale, independent of sample morphology, of 40.5 ± 2 ps that is consistent with nucleation and growth dynamics of the R phase from the parent M1 ground state.

  1. A water activity based model of heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics for freezing of water and aqueous solution droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Knopf, Daniel A.; Alpert, Peter A.

    2013-04-24

    Immersion freezing of water and aqueous solutions by particles acting as ice nuclei (IN) is a common process of heterogeneous ice nucleation which occurs in many environments, especially in the atmosphere where it results in the glaciation of clouds. Here we experimentally show, using a variety of IN types suspended in various aqueous solutions, that immersion freezing temperatures and kinetics can be described solely by temperature, T, and solution water activity, aw, which is the ratio of the vapour pressure of the solution and the saturation water vapour pressure under the same conditions and, in equilibrium, equivalent to relative humidity (RH). This allows the freezing point and corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient, Jhet, to be uniquely expressed by T and aw, a result we term the aw based immersion freezing model (ABIFM). This method is independent of the nature of the solute and accounts for several varying parameters, including cooling rate and IN surface area, while providing a holistic description of immersion freezing and allowing prediction of freezing temperatures, Jhet, frozen fractions, ice particle production rates and numbers. Our findings are based on experimental freezing data collected for various IN surface areas, A, and cooling rates, r, of droplets variously containing marine biogenic material, two soil humic acids, four mineral dusts, and one organic monolayer acting as IN. For all investigated IN types we demonstrate that droplet freezing temperatures increase as A increases. Similarly, droplet freezing temperatures increase as the cooling rate decreases. The log10(Jhet) values for the various IN types derived exclusively by T and aw, provide a complete description of the heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics. Thus, the ABIFM can be applied over the entire range of

  2. A water activity based model of heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics for freezing of water and aqueous solution droplets.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Alpert, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Immersion freezing of water and aqueous solutions by particles acting as ice nuclei (IN) is a common process of heterogeneous ice nucleation which occurs in many environments, especially in the atmosphere where it results in the glaciation of clouds. Here we experimentally show, using a variety of IN types suspended in various aqueous solutions, that immersion freezing temperatures and kinetics can be described solely by temperature, T, and solution water activity, a(w), which is the ratio of the vapour pressure of the solution and the saturation water vapour pressure under the same conditions and, in equilibrium, equivalent to relative humidity (RH). This allows the freezing point and corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient, J(het), to be uniquely expressed by T and a(w), a result we term the a(w) based immersion freezing model (ABIFM). This method is independent of the nature of the solute and accounts for several varying parameters, including cooling rate and IN surface area, while providing a holistic description of immersion freezing and allowing prediction of freezing temperatures, J(het), frozen fractions, ice particle production rates and numbers. Our findings are based on experimental freezing data collected for various IN surface areas, A, and cooling rates, r, of droplets variously containing marine biogenic material, two soil humic acids, four mineral dusts, and one organic monolayer acting as IN. For all investigated IN types we demonstrate that droplet freezing temperatures increase as A increases. Similarly, droplet freezing temperatures increase as the cooling rate decreases. The log10(J(het)) values for the various IN types derived exclusively by Tand a(w), provide a complete description of the heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics. Thus, the ABIFM can be applied over the entire range of T, RH, total particulate surface area, and cloud activation timescales typical of atmospheric conditions. Lastly, we demonstrate that ABIFM can

  3. Discovery of Multicomponent Heterogeneous Catalysts via Admixture Screening: PdBiTe Catalysts for Aerobic Oxidative Esterification of Primary Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Mannel, David S; Ahmed, Maaz S; Root, Thatcher W; Stahl, Shannon S

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we demonstrate the utility of "admixture screening" for the discovery of new multicomponent heterogeneous Pd catalyst compositions that are highly effective for aerobic oxidative methyl esterification of primary alcohols. The identification of possible catalysts for this reaction was initiated by the screening of simple binary and ternary admixtures of Pd/charcoal in combination with one or two metal and/or metalloid components as the catalyst. This approach permitted rapid evaluation of over 400 admixture combinations for the oxidative methyl esterification of 1-octanol at 60 °C in methanol. Product yields from these reactions varied widely, ranging from 2% to 88%. The highest yields were observed with Bi-, Te-, and Pb-based additives, and particularly from those containing both Bi and Te. Validation of the results was achieved by preparing specific PdBiTe catalyst formulations via a wet-impregnation method, followed by application of response surface methodology to identify the optimal Pd-Bi-Te catalyst stoichiometry. This approach revealed two very effective catalyst compositions: PdBi0.47Te0.09/C (PBT-1) and PdBi0.35Te0.23/C (PBT-2). The former catalyst was used in batch aerobic oxidation reactions with different primary alcohols and shown to be compatible with substrates bearing heterocycle and halide substituents. The methyl ester products were obtained in >90% yield in nearly all cases. Implementation of the PBT-2 catalyst in a continuous-flow packed-bed reactor achieved nearly 60 000 turnovers with no apparent loss of catalytic activity.

  4. Capturing heterogeneous nucleation of nanoscale pits and subsequent crystal shrinkage during Ostwald ripening of a metal phosphate.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sung-Yoon; Kim, Young-Min; Choi, Si-Young; Kim, Jin-Gyu

    2015-01-27

    It has been generally accepted that crystal shrinkage during Ostwald ripening can be understood simply as a reverse process of crystal growth, and as a result, little attention has been paid to shrinkage behavior. The entire microstructure of polycrystalline materials, however, forms as a consequence of both growing and shrinking crystals. Thus, scrutiny of shrinking characteristics in addition to growth aspects is essential for a complete understanding of the evolution of microstructure during Ostwald ripening. By capturing real-time in situ high-resolution electron micrographs at high temperature, we herein demonstrate the shrinkage behavior of nanocrystals embedded in a solid crystalline matrix during the ripening process of a metal phosphate. Unlike typical crystal growth behavior based on two-dimensional homogeneous nucleation, heterogeneous types of nucleation with nanoscale pits at solid-solid interfaces (or crystal edges) are observed to dominantly occur during shrinkage of the crystals. The findings of this study suggest that crystal shrinkage proceeds with a lower activation energy barrier than that of crystal growth, although both crystal growth and shrinkage take place at the same time during Ostwald ripening.

  5. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice catalyzed by high molecular weight organic compounds, before and after ozonolysis, using octadecene as a model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irish, S.; Shackelford, A.; Cantrell, W.

    2007-12-01

    High altitude clouds may be affected by the products of biomass burning, which can be lofted into the upper troposphere through deep convection. To further complicate the picture, once in the atmosphere, organic compounds may be transformed through oxidation, possibly changing their characteristics as freezing catalysts. Using 1- and 9-octadecene as a model for unsaturated, non-polar high molecular weight organic compounds, we will show that exposure to ozone does not change the characteristic temperature at which a coating of octadecene catalyzes heterogeneous ice nucleation. In addition, the phase of the octadecene (liquid or crystalline) when ozonolysis takes place does not affect the characteristic freezing temperature. Results from studies of the same system using infrared spectroscopy will also be presented.

  6. Overview: Application of heterogeneous nucleation in grain-refining of metals.

    PubMed

    Greer, A L

    2016-12-07

    In all of metallurgical processing, probably the most prominent example of nucleation control is the "inoculation" of melts to suppress columnar solidification and to obtain fine equiaxed grain structures in the as-cast solid. In inoculation, a master alloy is added to the melt to increase its solute content and to add stable particles that can act as nucleants for solid grains. This is important for alloys of many metals, and in other cases such as ice nucleation in living systems, but inoculation of aluminum alloys using Al-5Ti-1B (wt.%) master alloy is the exemplar. The key elements are (i) that the chemical interactions between nucleant TiB2 particles and the melt ensure that the solid phase (α-Al) exists on the surface of the particles even above the liquidus temperature of the melt, (ii) that these perfect nucleants can initiate grains only when the barrier for free growth of α-Al is surmounted, and (iii) that (depending on whether the melt is spatially isothermal or not) the release of latent heat, or the limited extent of constitutional supercooling, can act to limit the number of grains that is initiated and therefore the degree of grain refinement that can be achieved. We review recent studies that contribute to better understanding, and improvement, of grain refinement in general. We also identify priorities for future research. These include the study of the effects of nanophase dispersions in melts. Preliminary studies show that such dispersions may be especially effective in achieving grain refinement, and raise many questions about the underlying mechanisms. The stimulation of icosahedral short-range ordering in the liquid has been shown to lead to grain refinement, and is a further priority for study, especially as the refinement can be achieved with only minor additions of solute.

  7. Overview: Application of heterogeneous nucleation in grain-refining of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, A. L.

    2016-12-01

    In all of metallurgical processing, probably the most prominent example of nucleation control is the "inoculation" of melts to suppress columnar solidification and to obtain fine equiaxed grain structures in the as-cast solid. In inoculation, a master alloy is added to the melt to increase its solute content and to add stable particles that can act as nucleants for solid grains. This is important for alloys of many metals, and in other cases such as ice nucleation in living systems, but inoculation of aluminum alloys using Al-5Ti-1B (wt.%) master alloy is the exemplar. The key elements are (i) that the chemical interactions between nucleant TiB2 particles and the melt ensure that the solid phase (α-Al) exists on the surface of the particles even above the liquidus temperature of the melt, (ii) that these perfect nucleants can initiate grains only when the barrier for free growth of α-Al is surmounted, and (iii) that (depending on whether the melt is spatially isothermal or not) the release of latent heat, or the limited extent of constitutional supercooling, can act to limit the number of grains that is initiated and therefore the degree of grain refinement that can be achieved. We review recent studies that contribute to better understanding, and improvement, of grain refinement in general. We also identify priorities for future research. These include the study of the effects of nanophase dispersions in melts. Preliminary studies show that such dispersions may be especially effective in achieving grain refinement, and raise many questions about the underlying mechanisms. The stimulation of icosahedral short-range ordering in the liquid has been shown to lead to grain refinement, and is a further priority for study, especially as the refinement can be achieved with only minor additions of solute.

  8. Sizes and spatial relationships of crystals in granitic plutons: Exploring the crystallization gaps, heterogeneous nucleation, and mechanical clustering of crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špillar, V.; Dolejš, D.

    2012-04-01

    observed parameters were reproduced by a three-dimensional numerical model with time-dependent nucleation and growth rates, and with variable degree of clustering induced by changing the ratio of homogeneous vs. heterogeneous nucleation rate, between

  9. Structural match of heterogeneously nucleated Mn(OH)2(s) nanoparticles on quartz under various pH conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Haesung; Lee, Byeongdu; Jun, Young -Shin

    2016-09-14

    The early nucleation stage of Mn (hydr)oxide on mineral surfaces is crucial to understand its occurrence and the cycling of nutrients in environmental systems. However, there are only limited studies on the heterogeneous nucleation of Mn(OH)2(s) as the initial stage of Mn (hydr)oxide precipitation. Here, we investigated the effect of pH on the initial nucleation of Mn(OH)2(s) on quartz. Under various pH conditions of 9.8, 9.9, and 10.1, we analyzed the structural matches between quartz and heterogeneously nucleated Mn(OH)2(s). The structural matches were calculated by measuring lateral and vertical dimensions using grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. We found that a poorer structural match occurred at a higher pH than at a lower pH. The faster nucleation at a higher pH condition accounted for the observed poorer structural match. By fitting the structural match using classical nucleation theory, we also calculated the interfacial energy between Mn(OH)2(s) and water (γnf = 71 ± 7 mJ/m2). The calculated m values and γnf provided the variance of interfacial energy between quartz and Mn(OH)2(s): γsn = 262–272 mJ/m2. As a result, this study provides new qualitative and quantitative information about heterogeneous nucleation on environmentally an abundant mineral surface, quartz, and it offers important underpinnings for understanding the fate and transport of trace ions in environmental systems.

  10. Structural match of heterogeneously nucleated Mn(OH)2(s) nanoparticles on quartz under various pH conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Haesung; Lee, Byeongdu; Jun, Young -Shin

    2016-09-14

    The early nucleation stage of Mn (hydr)oxide on mineral surfaces is crucial to understand its occurrence and the cycling of nutrients in environmental systems. However, there are only limited studies on the heterogeneous nucleation of Mn(OH)2(s) as the initial stage of Mn (hydr)oxide precipitation. Here, we investigated the effect of pH on the initial nucleation of Mn(OH)2(s) on quartz. Under various pH conditions of 9.8, 9.9, and 10.1, we analyzed the structural matches between quartz and heterogeneously nucleated Mn(OH)2(s). The structural matches were calculated by measuring lateral and vertical dimensions using grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. We found that a poorer structural match occurred at a higher pH than at a lower pH. The faster nucleation at a higher pH condition accounted for the observed poorer structural match. By fitting the structural match using classical nucleation theory, we also calculated the interfacial energy between Mn(OH)2(s) and water (γnf = 71 ± 7 mJ/m2). The calculated m values and γnf provided the variance of interfacial energy between quartz and Mn(OH)2(s): γsn = 262–272 mJ/m2. As a result, this study provides new qualitative and quantitative information about heterogeneous nucleation on environmentally an abundant mineral surface, quartz, and it offers important underpinnings for understanding the fate and transport of trace ions in environmental systems.

  11. Heterogeneous Nucleation and Growth of Barium Sulfate at Organic-Water Interfaces: Interplay between Surface Hydrophobicity and Ba2+ Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Chong; Stack, Andrew G.; Koishi, Ayumi; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Lee, Sang Soo; Hu, Yandi

    2016-05-10

    Barium sulfate (BaSO4) is a common scale-forming mineral in natural and engineered systems, yet the rates and mechanisms of heterogeneous BaSO4 nucleation are not understood. To address these, we created idealized interfaces on which to study heterogeneous nucleation rates and mechanisms, which also are good models for organic–water interfaces: self-assembled thin films terminated with different functional groups (i.e., -COOH, -SH, or mixed -SH & COOH) coated on glass slides. BaSO4 precipitation on coatings from Barite-supersaturated solutions (saturation index, SI, = 1.1) was investigated using grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering. After reaction for 1 h, a little amount of BaSO4 formed on hydrophilic bare and -COOH coated glasses. Meanwhile, BaSO4 nucleation was significantly promoted on hydrophobic -SH and mixed -SH & COOH coatings. This is because substrate hydrophobicity likely affected the interfacial energy and hence thermodynamic favorability of heterogeneous nucleation. The heterogeneous BaSO4 nucleation and growth kinetics were found to be affected by the amount of Ba2+ adsorption onto the substrate and incipient BaSO4 nuclei. The importance of Ba2+ adsorption was further corroborated by the finding that precipitation rate increased under [Ba2+]/[SO42–] concentration ratios >1. These observations suggest that thermodynamic favorability for nucleation is governed by substrate–water interfacial energy, while given favorable thermodynamics, the rate is governed by ion attachment to substrates and incipient nuclei.

  12. Heterogeneous Nucleation and Growth of Barium Sulfate at Organic-Water Interfaces: Interplay between Surface Hydrophobicity and Ba2+ Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Chong; Stack, Andrew G.; Koishi, Ayumi; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Lee, Sang Soo; Hu, Yandi

    2016-05-10

    Barium sulfate (BaSO4) is a common scale-forming mineral in natural and engineered systems, yet the rates and mechanisms of heterogeneous BaSO4 nucleation are not understood. To address these, we created idealized interfaces on which to study heterogeneous nucleation rates and mechanisms, which also are good models for organic–water interfaces: self-assembled thin films terminated with different functional groups (i.e., -COOH, -SH, or mixed -SH & COOH) coated on glass slides. BaSO4 precipitation on coatings from Barite-supersaturated solutions (saturation index, SI, = 1.1) was investigated using grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering. After reaction for 1 h, a little amount of BaSO4 formed on hydrophilic bare and -COOH coated glasses. Meanwhile, BaSO4 nucleation was significantly promoted on hydrophobic -SH and mixed -SH & COOH coatings. This is because substrate hydrophobicity likely affected the interfacial energy and hence thermodynamic favorability of heterogeneous nucleation. The heterogeneous BaSO4 nucleation and growth kinetics were found to be affected by the amount of Ba2+ adsorption onto the substrate and incipient BaSO4 nuclei. The importance of Ba2+ adsorption was further corroborated by the finding that precipitation rate increased under [Ba2+]/[SO42–] concentration ratios >1. These observations suggest that thermodynamic favorability for nucleation is governed by substrate–water interfacial energy, while given favorable thermodynamics, the rate is governed by ion attachment to substrates and incipient nuclei.

  13. Heterogeneous Nucleation and Growth of Barium Sulfate at Organic–Water Interfaces: Interplay between Surface Hydrophobicity and Ba 2+ Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Chong; Stack, Andrew G.; Koishi, Ayumi; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Lee, Sang Soo; Hu, Yandi

    2016-05-31

    Barium sulfate (BaSO4) is a common scale-forming mineral in natural and engineered systems, yet the rates and mechanisms of heterogeneous BaSO4 nucleation are not understood. To address these, we created idealized interfaces on which to study heterogeneous nucleation rates and mechanisms, which also are good models for organic–water interfaces: self-assembled thin films terminated with different functional groups (i.e., -COOH, -SH, or mixed -SH & COOH) coated on glass slides. BaSO4 precipitation on coatings from Barite-supersaturated solutions (saturation index, SI, = 1.1) was investigated using grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering. After reaction for 1 h, a little amount of BaSO4 formed on hydrophilic bare and -COOH coated glasses. Meanwhile, BaSO4 nucleation was significantly promoted on hydrophobic -SH and mixed -SH & COOH coatings. This is because substrate hydrophobicity likely affected the interfacial energy and hence thermodynamic favorability of heterogeneous nucleation. The heterogeneous BaSO4 nucleation and growth kinetics were found to be affected by the amount of Ba2+ adsorption onto the substrate and incipient BaSO4 nuclei. The importance of Ba2+ adsorption was further corroborated by the finding that precipitation rate increased under [Ba2+]/[SO42–] concentration ratios >1. These observations suggest that thermodynamic favorability for nucleation is governed by substrate–water interfacial energy, while given favorable thermodynamics, the rate is governed by ion attachment to substrates and incipient nuclei.

  14. Atomization of High-Viscosity Fluids for Aromatherapy Using Micro-heaters for Heterogeneous Bubble Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Junhui; Kong, Ka Wai; Chan, Ho-Yin; Sun, Winston; Li, Wen Jung; Chau, Eric Boa Fung; Chan, George Kak Man

    2017-01-01

    The development of a novel lead-free microelectromechanical-system (MEMS)-based atomizer using the principle of thermal bubble actuation is presented. It is a low-cost, lead-free design that is environmentally friendly and harmless to humans. It has been tested to be applicable over a wide range of fluid viscosities, ranging from 1 cP (e.g., water) to 200 cP (e.g., oil-like fluid) at room temperature, a range that is difficult to achieve using ordinary atomizers. The results demonstrate that the average power consumption of the atomizer is approximately 1 W with an atomization rate of 0.1 to 0.3 mg of deionized (DI) water per cycle. The relationships between the micro-heater track width and the track gap, the size of the micro-cavities and the nucleation energy were studied to obtain an optimal atomizer design. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) results indicate that the diameter of the ejected droplets ranges from 30 to 90 μm with a speed of 20 to 340 mm/s. In addition, different modes of spraying are reported for the first time. It is envisioned that the successful development of this MEMS-based atomizing technology will revolutionize the existing market for atomizers and could also benefit different industries, particularly in applications involving viscous fluids.

  15. Atomization of High-Viscosity Fluids for Aromatherapy Using Micro-heaters for Heterogeneous Bubble Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Law, Junhui; Kong, Ka Wai; Chan, Ho-Yin; Sun, Winston; Li, Wen Jung; Chau, Eric Boa Fung; Chan, George Kak Man

    2017-01-11

    The development of a novel lead-free microelectromechanical-system (MEMS)-based atomizer using the principle of thermal bubble actuation is presented. It is a low-cost, lead-free design that is environmentally friendly and harmless to humans. It has been tested to be applicable over a wide range of fluid viscosities, ranging from 1 cP (e.g., water) to 200 cP (e.g., oil-like fluid) at room temperature, a range that is difficult to achieve using ordinary atomizers. The results demonstrate that the average power consumption of the atomizer is approximately 1 W with an atomization rate of 0.1 to 0.3 mg of deionized (DI) water per cycle. The relationships between the micro-heater track width and the track gap, the size of the micro-cavities and the nucleation energy were studied to obtain an optimal atomizer design. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) results indicate that the diameter of the ejected droplets ranges from 30 to 90 μm with a speed of 20 to 340 mm/s. In addition, different modes of spraying are reported for the first time. It is envisioned that the successful development of this MEMS-based atomizing technology will revolutionize the existing market for atomizers and could also benefit different industries, particularly in applications involving viscous fluids.

  16. Atomization of High-Viscosity Fluids for Aromatherapy Using Micro-heaters for Heterogeneous Bubble Nucleation

    PubMed Central

    Law, Junhui; Kong, Ka Wai; Chan, Ho-Yin; Sun, Winston; Li, Wen Jung; Chau, Eric Boa Fung; Chan, George Kak Man

    2017-01-01

    The development of a novel lead-free microelectromechanical-system (MEMS)-based atomizer using the principle of thermal bubble actuation is presented. It is a low-cost, lead-free design that is environmentally friendly and harmless to humans. It has been tested to be applicable over a wide range of fluid viscosities, ranging from 1 cP (e.g., water) to 200 cP (e.g., oil-like fluid) at room temperature, a range that is difficult to achieve using ordinary atomizers. The results demonstrate that the average power consumption of the atomizer is approximately 1 W with an atomization rate of 0.1 to 0.3 mg of deionized (DI) water per cycle. The relationships between the micro-heater track width and the track gap, the size of the micro-cavities and the nucleation energy were studied to obtain an optimal atomizer design. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) results indicate that the diameter of the ejected droplets ranges from 30 to 90 μm with a speed of 20 to 340 mm/s. In addition, different modes of spraying are reported for the first time. It is envisioned that the successful development of this MEMS-based atomizing technology will revolutionize the existing market for atomizers and could also benefit different industries, particularly in applications involving viscous fluids. PMID:28074925

  17. A~comprehensive parameterization of heterogeneous ice nucleation of dust surrogate: laboratory study with hematite particles and its application to atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Paukert, M.; Steinke, I.; Zhang, K.; Kulkarni, G.; Hoose, C.; Schnaiter, M.; Saathoff, H.; Möhler, O.

    2014-06-01

    A new heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization that covers a~wide temperature range (-36 to -78 °C) is presented. Developing and testing such an ice nucleation parameterization, which is constrained through identical experimental conditions, is critical in order to accurately simulate the ice nucleation processes in cirrus clouds. The surface-scaled ice nucleation efficiencies of hematite particles, inferred by ns, were derived from AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber measurements under water subsaturated conditions that were realized by continuously changing temperature (T) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) in the chamber. Our measurements showed several different pathways to nucleate ice depending on T and RHice conditions. For instance, almost T-independent freezing was observed at -60 °C < T < -50 °C, where RHice explicitly controlled ice nucleation efficiency, while both T and RHice played roles in other two T regimes: -78 °C < T < -60 °C and -50 °C < T < -36 °C. More specifically, observations at T colder than -60 °C revealed that higher RHice was necessary to maintain constant ns, whereas T may have played a significant role in ice nucleation at T warmer than -50 °C. We implemented new ns parameterizations into two cloud models to investigate its sensitivity and compare with the existing ice nucleation schemes towards simulating cirrus cloud properties. Our results show that the new AIDA-based parameterizations lead to an order of magnitude higher ice crystal concentrations and inhibition of homogeneous nucleation in colder temperature regions. Our cloud simulation results suggest that atmospheric dust particles that form ice nuclei at lower temperatures, below -36 °C, can potentially have stronger influence on cloud properties such as cloud longevity and initiation when compared to previous parameterizations.

  18. Inversion of multicomponent seismic data and rock-physics intepretation for evaluating lithology, fracture and fluid distribution in heterogeneous anisotropic reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Ilya Tsvankin; Kenneth L. Larner

    2004-11-17

    Within the framework of this collaborative project with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Stanford University, the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) group developed and implemented a new efficient approach to the inversion and processing of multicomponent, multiazimuth seismic data in anisotropic media. To avoid serious difficulties in the processing of mode-converted (PS) waves, we devised a methodology for transforming recorded PP- and PS-wavefields into the corresponding SS-wave reflection data that can be processed by velocity-analysis algorithms designed for pure (unconverted) modes. It should be emphasized that this procedure does not require knowledge of the velocity model and can be applied to data from arbitrarily anisotropic, heterogeneous media. The azimuthally varying reflection moveouts of the PP-waves and constructed SS-waves are then combined in anisotropic stacking-velocity tomography to estimate the velocity field in the depth domain. As illustrated by the case studies discussed in the report, migration of the multicomponent data with the obtained anisotropic velocity model yields a crisp image of the reservoir that is vastly superior to that produced by conventional methods. The scope of this research essentially amounts to building the foundation of 3D multicomponent, anisotropic seismology. We have also worked with the LLNL and Stanford groups on relating the anisotropic parameters obtained from seismic data to stress, lithology, and fluid distribution using a generalized theoretical treatment of fractured, poroelastic rocks.

  19. Global model comparison of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations in mixed phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.

    2012-04-01

    A new aerosol-dependent mixed phase cloud parameterization for deposition/condensation/immersion (DCI) ice nucleation and one for contact freezing are compared to the original formulations in a coupled general circulation model and aerosol transport model. The present-day cloud liquid and ice water fields and cloud radiative forcing are analyzed and compared to observations. The new DCI freezing parameterization changes the spatial distribution of the cloud water field. Significant changes are found in the cloud ice water fraction and in the middle cloud fractions. The new DCI freezing parameterization predicts less ice water path (IWP) than the original formulation, especially in the Southern Hemisphere. The smaller IWP leads to a less efficient Bergeron-Findeisen process resulting in a larger liquid water path, shortwave cloud forcing, and longwave cloud forcing. It is found that contact freezing parameterizations have a greater impact on the cloud water field and radiative forcing than the two DCI freezing parameterizations that we compared. The net solar flux at top of atmosphere and net longwave flux at the top of the atmosphere change by up to 8.73 and 3.52 W m-2, respectively, due to the use of different DCI and contact freezing parameterizations in mixed phase clouds. The total climate forcing from anthropogenic black carbon/organic matter in mixed phase clouds is estimated to be 0.16-0.93 W m-2using the aerosol-dependent parameterizations. A sensitivity test with contact ice nuclei concentration in the original parameterization fit to that recommended by Young (1974) gives results that are closer to the new contact freezing parameterization.

  20. Cobalt nanowires prepared by heterogeneous nucleation in propanediol and their catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiying; Guo, Xiaohui; Chen, Junli; Li, Juan; Song, Wei; Shen, Wenjie

    2008-09-01

    Co nanowires with a diameter of 10 nm and a length up to 1000 nm were synthesized by the chemical reduction of cobalt acetate in propanediol using Ru as the heterogeneous agent and stearic acid as the surfactant. The morphology of the Co nanomaterials depended strongly on the concentrations of stearic acid and sodium hydroxide and the temperature, which governed the reduction rate of Co2+ in the liquid and the growth rate of Co nanocrystals. Very tiny Ru nanoparticles formed at the beginning of the synthesis significantly lowered the reduction temperature of Co2+ species, affording an easy separation and growth of Co nanocrystals. Solid cobalt stearate and cobalt alkoxide were readily formed at the initial stage of the synthesis, which determined the reduction rate of Co2+ through a dynamic equilibrium between the solid and the solution. In addition to forming cobalt stearate, the stearic acid, as a structure-directing agent, mainly induced the anisotropic growth of Co nanocrystals. The Co nanowires as heterogeneous catalysts showed quite promising activity and selectivity for the hydrogenation of citral and the hydrogenolysis of glycerol.

  1. Nonclassical nucleation and growth of inorganic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jisoo; Yang, Jiwoong; Kwon, Soon Gu; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of nanoparticles with particular compositions and structures can lead to nanoparticles with notable physicochemical properties, thus promoting their use in various applications. In this area of nanoscience, the focus is shifting from size- and shape-uniform single-component nanoparticles to multicomponent nanoparticles with enhanced performance and/or multifunctionality. With the increasing complexity of synthetic reactions, an understanding of the formation mechanisms of the nanoparticles is needed to enable a systematic synthetic approach. This Review highlights mechanistic studies underlying the synthesis of nanoparticles, with an emphasis on nucleation and growth behaviours that are not expected from classical theories. We discuss the structural properties of nanoclusters that are of a size that bridges molecules and solids. We then describe the role of nanoclusters in the prenucleation process as well as in nonclassical nucleation models. The growth of nanoparticles via the assembly and merging of primary particles is also overviewed. Finally, we present the heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms behind the synthesis of multicomponent nanoparticles.

  2. New insights into selective heterogeneous nucleation of metal nanoparticles on oxides by microwave-assisted reduction: rapid synthesis of high-activity supported catalysts.

    PubMed

    Anumol, Erumpukuthickal Ashok; Kundu, Paromita; Deshpande, Parag Arvind; Madras, Giridhar; Ravishankar, Narayanan

    2011-10-25

    Microwave-based methods are widely employed to synthesize metal nanoparticles on various substrates. However, the detailed mechanism of formation of such hybrids has not been addressed. In this paper, we describe the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of reduction of metal salts by ethylene glycol under microwave heating conditions. On the basis of this analysis, we identify the temperatures above which the reduction of the metal salt is thermodynamically favorable and temperatures above which the rates of homogeneous nucleation of the metal and the heterogeneous nucleation of the metal on supports are favored. We delineate different conditions which favor the heterogeneous nucleation of the metal on the supports over homogeneous nucleation in the solvent medium based on the dielectric loss parameters of the solvent and the support and the metal/solvent and metal/support interfacial energies. Contrary to current understanding, we show that metal particles can be selectively formed on the substrate even under situations where the temperature of the substrate is lower than that of the surrounding medium. The catalytic activity of the Pt/CeO(2) and Pt/TiO(2) hybrids synthesized by this method for H(2) combustion reaction shows that complete conversion is achieved at temperatures as low as 100 °C with Pt-CeO(2) catalyst and at 50 °C with Pt-TiO(2) catalyst. Our method thus opens up possibilities for rational synthesis of high-activity supported catalysts using a fast microwave-based reduction method.

  3. IgG particle formation during filling pump operation: a case study of heterogeneous nucleation on stainless steel nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Anil K; Randolph, Theodore W; Dong, Aichun; Maloney, Kevin M; Hitscherich, Carl; Carpenter, John F

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated factors associated with vial filling with a positive displacement piston pump leading to formation of protein particles in a formulation of an IgG. We hypothesized that nanoparticles shed from the pump's solution-contact surfaces nucleated protein aggregation and particle formation. Vials of IgG formulation filled at a clinical manufacturing site contained a few visible particles and about 100,000 particles (1.5-3 microm) per mL. In laboratory studies with the same model (National Instruments FUS-10) of pump, pumping of 20 mg/mL IgG formulation resulted in about 300,000 particles (1.5-3 microm) per mL. Pumping of protein-free formulation resulted in 13,000 particles (1.5-15 microm) per mL. More than 99% of the particles were 0.25-0.95 microm in size. Mixing of protein-free pumped solution with an equal volume of 40 mg/mL IgG resulted in 300,000 particles (1.5-15 microm) per mL. Also, mixing IgG formulation with 30,000/mL stainless steel nanoparticles resulted in formation of 30,000 protein microparticles (1.5-15 microm) per mL. Infrared spectroscopy showed that secondary structure of IgG in microparticles formed by pumping or mixing with steel nanoparticles was minimally perturbed. Our results document that nanoparticles of foreign materials shed by pumps can serve as heterogeneous nuclei for formation of protein microparticles. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  4. A Comprehensive Parameterization of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation of Dust Surrogate: Laboratory Study with Hematite Particles and Its Application to Atmospheric Models

    SciTech Connect

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Paukert, Marco; Steinke, Isabelle; Zhang, Kai; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Hoose, Corinna; Schnaiter, Martin; Saathoff, Harald; Mohler, Ottmar

    2014-12-10

    A new heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization that covers a wide temperature range (-36 °C to -78 °C) is presented. Developing and testing such an ice nucleation parameterization, which is constrained through identical experimental conditions, is critical in order to accurately simulate the ice nucleation processes in cirrus clouds. The surface-scaled ice nucleation efficiencies of hematite particles, inferred by ns, were derived from AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber measurements under water subsaturated conditions that were realized by continuously changing temperature (T) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) in the chamber. Our measurements showed several different pathways to nucleate ice depending on T and RHice conditions. For instance, almost independent freezing was observed at -60 °C < T < -50 °C, where RHice explicitly controlled ice nucleation efficiency, while both T and RHice played roles in other two T regimes: -78 °C < T < -60 °C and -50 °C < T < -36 °C. More specifically, observations at T colder than -60 °C revealed that higher RHice was necessary to maintain constant ns, whereas T may have played a significant role in ice nucleation at T warmer than -50 °C. We implemented new ns parameterizations into two cloud models to investigate its sensitivity and compare with the existing ice nucleation schemes towards simulating cirrus cloud properties. Our results show that the new AIDA-based parameterizations lead to an order of magnitude higher ice crystal concentrations and inhibition of homogeneous nucleation in colder temperature regions. Our cloud simulation results suggest that atmospheric dust particles that form ice nuclei at lower temperatures, below -36 °C, can potentially have stronger influence on cloud properties such as cloud longevity and initiation when compared to previous parameterizations.

  5. A comprehensive parameterization of heterogeneous ice nucleation of dust surrogate: laboratory study with hematite particles and its application to atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Paukert, M.; Steinke, I.; Zhang, K.; Kulkarni, G.; Hoose, C.; Schnaiter, M.; Saathoff, H.; Möhler, O.

    2014-12-01

    A new heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization that covers a wide temperature range (-36 to -78 °C) is presented. Developing and testing such an ice nucleation parameterization, which is constrained through identical experimental conditions, is important to accurately simulate the ice nucleation processes in cirrus clouds. The ice nucleation active surface-site density (ns) of hematite particles, used as a proxy for atmospheric dust particles, were derived from AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber measurements under water subsaturated conditions. These conditions were achieved by continuously changing the temperature (T) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) in the chamber. Our measurements showed several different pathways to nucleate ice depending on T and RHice conditions. For instance, almost T-independent freezing was observed at -60 °C < T < -50 °C, where RHice explicitly controlled ice nucleation efficiency, while both T and RHice played roles in other two T regimes: -78 °C < T < -60 °C and -50 °C < T < -36 °C. More specifically, observations at T lower than -60 °C revealed that higher RHice was necessary to maintain a constant ns, whereas T may have played a significant role in ice nucleation at T higher than -50 °C. We implemented the new hematite-derived ns parameterization, which agrees well with previous AIDA measurements of desert dust, into two conceptual cloud models to investigate their sensitivity to the new parameterization in comparison to existing ice nucleation schemes for simulating cirrus cloud properties. Our results show that the new AIDA-based parameterization leads to an order of magnitude higher ice crystal concentrations and to an inhibition of homogeneous nucleation in lower-temperature regions. Our cloud simulation results suggest that atmospheric dust particles that form ice nuclei at lower temperatures, below -36 °C, can potentially have a stronger influence on cloud

  6. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes. Part II. Sensitivity to heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations and dust emissions

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; ...

    2015-09-14

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of icemore » supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O₃, SO₄²⁻, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO₂, and SO₂ over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and precipitation depending on whether the

  7. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes. Part II. Sensitivity to heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations and dust emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai -Yung

    2015-09-14

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of ice supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O₃, SO₄²⁻, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO₂, and SO₂ over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and precipitation depending on

  8. Application of an Online-Coupled Regional Climate Model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for Examination of Ice Nucleation Schemes: Part II. Sensitivity to Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation Parameterizations and Dust Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung

    2015-09-01

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of ice supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O3, SO42-, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO2, and SO2 over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and

  9. Study of Heterogeneous Nucleation of Eutectic Si in High-Purity Al-Si Alloys with Sr Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarif, Muhammad; McKay, Brian; Schumacher, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Al-5 wt pct Si master-alloys with controlled Sr and/or P addition/s were produced using super purity Al 99.99 wt pct and Si 99.999 wt pct materials in an arc melter. The master-alloy was melt-spun resulting in the production of thin ribbons. The Al matrix of the ribbons contained entrained Al-Si eutectic droplets that were subsequently investigated. Differential scanning calorimetry, thermodynamic calculations, and transmission electron microscopy techniques were employed to examine the effect of the Sr and P additions on eutectic undercoolings and nucleation phenomenon. Results indicate that, unlike P, Sr does not promote nucleation. Increasing Sr additions depressed the eutectic nucleation temperature. This may be a result of the formation of a Sr phase that could consume or detrimentally affect potent AlP nucleation sites.

  10. (NH4)2SO4 heterogeneous nucleation and glycerol evaporation of (NH4)2SO4-glycerol system in its dynamic efflorescence process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chen; Luan, Ye-mei; Shi, Xiao-min; Zhang, Yun-hong

    2017-02-01

    Using the FTIR-ATR technique, we investigated the heterogeneous nucleation process of aqueous (NH4)2SO4 binary droplets and (NH4)2SO4/glycerol ternary droplets. From the red shift of δ-NH4+ with a linearly declining relative humidity (RH), the ERHs of pure (NH4)2SO4 droplets and mixed (NH4)2SO4/glycerol droplets with different organic-inorganic ratio (OIR) of 1:4, 1:2 and 1:1 ranges from ∼51.9 to ∼34.9%, ∼49.8 to ∼33.0%, ∼48.0 to ∼30.6% and ∼43.7 to ∼25.2%, respectively. From the changing absorbance of δ-NH4+ band, we determined the heterogeneous nucleation rates of crystalline (NH4)2SO4 in the pure and mixed droplets. The interfacial tension between an (NH4)2SO4 critical nucleus and surrounding (NH4)2SO4 solution was determined using classical nucleation theory and experimental data to be 0.031 ± 0.002 J m-2. Evaporation of glycerol in (NH4)2SO4/glycerol ternary droplets are also studied to be restrained by participation of (NH4)2SO4. Determined vapour pressure of glycerol is on the same magnitude with results from previous studies.

  11. Nanoscale heterogeneity, premartensitic nucleation, and a new plutonium structure in metastable δ fcc Pu-Ga alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conradson, Steven D.; Bock, Nicolas; Castro, Julio M.; Conradson, Dylan R.; Cox, Lawrence E.; Dmowski, Wojciech; Dooley, David E.; Egami, Takeshi; Espinosa-Faller, Francisco J.; Freibert, Franz J.; Garcia-Adeva, Angel J.; Hess, Nancy J.; Holmström, Erik K.; Howell, Rafael C.; Katz, Barbara; Lashley, Jason C.; Martinez, Raymond J.; Moore, David P.; Morales, Luis A.; Olivas, J. David; Pereyra, Ramiro A.; Ramos, Michael; Rudin, Sven P.; Villella, Phillip M.

    2014-06-01

    The scientifically fascinating question of the spatial extent and bonding of the 5f orbitals of Pu and its six different phases extends to its δ-retained alloys and the mechanism by which Ga and a number of other unrelated elements stabilize its low density face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure. This issue of phase stability is also important technologically because of its significance to Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship. Answering these questions requires information on the local order and structure around the Ga and its effects on the Pu. We have addressed this by characterizing the structures of a large number of Pu-Ga and two Pu-In and one Pu-Ce δ alloys, including a set of high purity δ Pu1-xGax materials with 1.7 ≤ x ≤ 6.4 at. % Ga that span the low [Ga] portion of the δ region of the phase diagram across the ˜3.3 at. % Ga metastability boundary, with extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy that probes the element specific local structure, supplemented by x-ray pair distribution function analysis that gives the total local structure to longer distances, and x-ray diffraction that gives the long-range average structure of the periodic component of the materials. Detailed analyses indicate that the alloys at and below a nominal composition of ˜3.3 at. % Ga are heterogeneous and in addition to the δ phase also contain up to ˜20% of a novel, coexisting "σ" structure for Pu that forms in nanometer scale domains that are locally depleted in Ga. The invariance of the Ga EXAFS with composition indicates that this σ structure forms in Ga-depleted domains that result from the Ga atoms in the δ phase self-organizing into a quasi-intermetallic with a stoichiometry of Pu25-35Ga so that δ Pu-Ga is neither a random solid solution nor the more stable Pu3Ga + α. Above this 3.3 at. % Ga nominal composition, the δ Pu-Ga alloy is homogeneous, and no σ phase is present. These results that demonstrate that collective and cooperative

  12. Molecular Study of the Effects of Chemical Processing on Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation: Role of Active Sites and Product Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihvonen, S.; Schill, G. P.; Murphy, K. A.; Mueller, K.; Tolbert, M. A.; Freedman, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosol is the largest global source of ice nuclei, but the identity of the active sites for nucleation is unknown. During atmospheric transport, mineral dust aerosol can encounter and react with sulfuric acid, which affects the ice nucleation activity either due to changes to reactive surface sites or product formation. In this study, we reacted two types of clays found in mineral dust, kaolinite and montmorillonite, with sulfuric acid. Variation in the mineral due to acid treatment was separated from product formation through rinsing techniques. The samples were subsequently reacted with a probe molecule, (3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)dimethylchlorosilane, that selectively binds to edge hydroxyl groups that are bonded to a silicon atom with three bridging oxygens. Hydroxyl groups are considered potential active sites, because they can hydrogen bond with water and facilitate ice nucleation. Attachment to these sites was quantified by 19F magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) of the 19F atoms on the probe molecule, which provided a direct correlation of the number of hydroxyl groups. Our results indicate that the number of edge-site hydroxyl groups increases with exposure to acid. Ice nucleation measurements indicate that the sulfuric acid-treated mineral is less ice active than the untreated mineral. Surprisingly, no difference between the nucleation activity of the untreated mineral and acid-treated, rinsed mineral is observed. As a result, we hypothesize that once a critical density of active sites is reached for ice nucleation, there is no further change in nucleation activity despite a continued increase in active sites. We additionally propose that the reduced activity of the acid-treated mineral is due to product formation that blocks active sites on the mineral, rather than changes to active sites.

  13. Characterization of Oligomers of Heterogeneous Size as Precursors of Amyloid Fibril Nucleation of an SH3 Domain: An Experimental Kinetics Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruzafa, David; Morel, Bertrand; Varela, Lorena; Azuaga, Ana I.; Conejero-Lara, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the earliest molecular events during nucleation of the amyloid aggregation cascade is of fundamental significance to prevent amyloid related disorders. We report here an experimental kinetic analysis of the amyloid aggregation of the N47A mutant of the α-spectrin SH3 domain (N47A Spc-SH3) under mild acid conditions, where it is governed by rapid formation of amyloid nuclei. The initial rates of formation of amyloid structures, monitored by thioflavine T fluorescence at different protein concentrations, agree quantitatively with high-order kinetics, suggesting an oligomerization pre-equilibrium preceding the rate-limiting step of amyloid nucleation. The curves of native state depletion also follow high-order irreversible kinetics. The analysis is consistent with the existence of low-populated and heterogeneous oligomeric precursors of fibrillation that form by association of partially unfolded protein monomers. An increase in NaCl concentration accelerates fibrillation but reduces the apparent order of the nucleation kinetics; and a double mutant (K43A, N47A) Spc-SH3 domain, largely unfolded under native conditions and prone to oligomerize, fibrillates with apparent first order kinetics. On the light of these observations, we propose a simple kinetic model for the nucleation event, in which the monomer conformational unfolding and the oligomerization of an amyloidogenic intermediate are rapidly pre-equilibrated. A conformational change of the polypeptide chains within any of the oligomers, irrespective of their size, is the rate-limiting step leading to the amyloid nuclei. This model is able to explain quantitatively the initial rates of aggregation and the observed variations in the apparent order of the kinetics and, more importantly, provides crucial thermodynamic magnitudes of the processes preceding the nucleation. This kinetic approach is simple to use and may be of general applicability to characterize the amyloidogenic intermediates and

  14. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  15. Laboratory studies of deposition mode heterogeneous ice nucleation: Effects of ice nuclei composition, size and surface area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanji, Zaminhussein Abdulali

    The indirect aerosol effect contributes to major uncertainties in determining the radiation budget of the earth. A large uncertainty is due to the formation of ice clouds onto natural or anthropogenic aerosols. Field studies have shown that mineral type particles are often associated with ice crystals in the mid-upper troposphere and given the long residence time in the atmosphere of dust particles (˜2 weeks in the absence of precipitation), their contribution to ice formation processes is not fully defined. In order to probe ice formation onto natural mineral dust in a setting where it could be suspended as aerosol, a new continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) was built. This allowed investigations of the effects of total aerosol surface area and particle size. The CFDC was also used in an international inter-comparison of ice nucleation instrumentation to compare efficiencies of soot, biological aerosol (bacteria) and samples of natural desert dusts from different regions of the world. The laboratory observations were parameterized using nucleation rates (Jhet) and contact angles (theta) as described by classical nucleation theory. For both this experimental technique and a static one developed during the candidate's Masters degree, mineral dust particulate proved to be the most efficient ice nuclei (IN) activating at RH with respect to ice (RH i) as low as 105% at T=233 K. The efficiency varied with particle size and aerosol surface area (SA). Large particles or higher SA activated at lower RHi than small particles or lower SA. The static chamber was sensitive to the first ice event out of a large SA and therefore gave true onset RHi, which was lower than the onset defined by the CFDC studies, which was not sensitive to a single ice event. In addition the static chamber used a broader size range of particulate matter, including super micron particles while the CFDC particles sizes were restricted to below 0.5 microm. Soot and organic coated dust particles

  16. Preferential earthquake-nucleating locations on faults determined by heterogeneous direct- and evolution-effect parameters of rate- and state-dependent friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.; Ray, S.

    2015-12-01

    Rock friction experiments show that low-velocity fault friction may have a direct and subsequent evolutionary response to changes in slip velocity; the magnitude of which are respectively proportional to parameters a and b in constitutive relations of such rate- and state-dependent friction [e.g., Dieterich 1979; Ruina, 1983]. When a and b are uniform on a fault, translational invariance implies any location is a potential nucleation site, the choice determined by pre-instability conditions and external forcing. With heterogeneous parameters, symmetry is broken, which can create preferred nucleation sites. Recent work showed such heterogeneity does create favorable sites (Ray and Viesca, AGU '14). Here we study how distributions of (i) relative (0nucleation occurs at the local minimum and maximum of (ii) for nonlocal and local interactions, respectively

  17. Contributions of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation, Large-Scale Circulation, and Shallow Cumulus Detrainment to Cloud Phase Transition in Mixed-Phase Clouds with NCAR CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, D.; Wang, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Mixed-phase clouds consisting of both liquid and ice water occur frequently at high-latitudes and in mid-latitude storm track regions. This type of clouds has been shown to play a critical role in the surface energy balance, surface air temperature, and sea ice melting in the Arctic. Cloud phase partitioning between liquid and ice water determines the cloud optical depth of mixed-phase clouds because of distinct optical properties of liquid and ice hydrometeors. The representation and simulation of cloud phase partitioning in state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs) are associated with large biases. In this study, the cloud phase partition in mixed-phase clouds simulated from the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) is evaluated against satellite observations. Observation-based supercooled liquid fraction (SLF) is calculated from CloudSat, MODIS and CPR radar detected liquid and ice water paths for clouds with cloud-top temperatures between -40 and 0°C. Sensitivity tests with CAM5 are conducted for different heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations with respect to aerosol influence (Wang et al., 2014), different phase transition temperatures for detrained cloud water from shallow convection (Kay et al., 2016), and different CAM5 model configurations (free-run versus nudged winds and temperature, Zhang et al., 2015). A classical nucleation theory-based ice nucleation parameterization in mixed-phase clouds increases the SLF especially at temperatures colder than -20°C, and significantly improves the model agreement with observations in the Arctic. The change of transition temperature for detrained cloud water increases the SLF at higher temperatures and improves the SLF mostly over the Southern Ocean. Even with the improved SLF from the ice nucleation and shallow cumulus detrainment, the low SLF biases in some regions can only be improved through the improved circulation with the nudging technique. Our study highlights the challenges of

  18. On the interpretation of quantitative experimental data on nucleation rates using classical nucleation theory.

    PubMed

    Sear, Richard P

    2006-11-02

    We consider how experimental data for nucleation rates can be analyzed if it is assumed that classical nucleation theory is a reasonable description of the nucleation. In particular, we consider in detail experimental results for the nucleation of the protein lysozyme. Classical nucleation theory makes predictions for the functional form of the nucleation rate; physically reasonable bounds can be placed on the parameters of this functional form. The experimental data for lysozyme implies values for a parameter (the preexponential factor) that are outside the physically reasonable bounds for homogeneous nucleation but are consistent with heterogeneous nucleation. Also, the functional form of the rate suggests that there is a distribution of barrier heights. Such a distribution is likely for heterogeneous nucleation but not possible for homogeneous nucleation. Modeling experimental data with classical nucleation theory is a generally applicable way of distinguishing between homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation.

  19. An Atomistic View of Amyloidogenic Self-assembly: Structure and Dynamics of Heterogeneous Conformational States in the Pre-nucleation Phase

    PubMed Central

    Matthes, Dirk; Gapsys, Vytautas; Brennecke, Julian T.; de Groot, Bert L.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of well-defined filamentous amyloid structures involves a polydisperse collection of oligomeric states for which relatively little is known in terms of structural organization. Here we use extensive, unbiased explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the structural and dynamical features of oligomeric aggregates formed by a number of highly amyloidogenic peptides at atomistic resolution on the μs time scale. A consensus approach has been adopted to analyse the simulations in multiple force fields, yielding an in-depth characterization of pre-fibrillar oligomers and their global and local structure properties. A collision cross section analysis revealed structurally heterogeneous aggregate ensembles for the individual oligomeric states that lack a single defined quaternary structure during the pre-nucleation phase. To gain insight into the conformational space sampled in early aggregates, we probed their substructure and found emerging β-sheet subunit layers and a multitude of ordered intermolecular β-structure motifs with growing aggregate size. Among those, anti-parallel out-of-register β-strands compatible with toxic β-barrel oligomers were particularly prevalent already in smaller aggregates and formed prior to ordered fibrillar structure elements. Notably, also distinct fibril-like conformations emerged in the oligomeric state and underscore the notion that pre-nucleated oligomers serve as a critical intermediate step on-pathway to fibrils. PMID:27616019

  20. An Atomistic View of Amyloidogenic Self-assembly: Structure and Dynamics of Heterogeneous Conformational States in the Pre-nucleation Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthes, Dirk; Gapsys, Vytautas; Brennecke, Julian T.; de Groot, Bert L.

    2016-09-01

    The formation of well-defined filamentous amyloid structures involves a polydisperse collection of oligomeric states for which relatively little is known in terms of structural organization. Here we use extensive, unbiased explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the structural and dynamical features of oligomeric aggregates formed by a number of highly amyloidogenic peptides at atomistic resolution on the μs time scale. A consensus approach has been adopted to analyse the simulations in multiple force fields, yielding an in-depth characterization of pre-fibrillar oligomers and their global and local structure properties. A collision cross section analysis revealed structurally heterogeneous aggregate ensembles for the individual oligomeric states that lack a single defined quaternary structure during the pre-nucleation phase. To gain insight into the conformational space sampled in early aggregates, we probed their substructure and found emerging β-sheet subunit layers and a multitude of ordered intermolecular β-structure motifs with growing aggregate size. Among those, anti-parallel out-of-register β-strands compatible with toxic β-barrel oligomers were particularly prevalent already in smaller aggregates and formed prior to ordered fibrillar structure elements. Notably, also distinct fibril-like conformations emerged in the oligomeric state and underscore the notion that pre-nucleated oligomers serve as a critical intermediate step on-pathway to fibrils.

  1. Heterogeneous nucleation of β-type precipitates on nanoscale Zr-rich particles in a Mg-6Zn-0.5Cu-0.6Zr alloy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Zirconium (Zr) is an important alloying element to Mg-Zn-based alloy system. In this paper, we report the formation of the β-type precipitates on the nanoscale Zr-rich particles in a Mg-6Zn-0.5Cu-0.6Zr alloy during ageing at 180°C. Scanning transmission electron microscopy examinations revealed that the nanoscale Zr-rich [0001]α rods/laths are dominant in the Zr-rich core regions of the as-quenched sample after a solution treatment at 430°C. More significantly, these Zr-rich particles served as favourable sites for heterogeneous nucleation of the Zn-rich β-type phase during subsequent isothermal ageing at 180°C. This research provides a potential route to engineer precipitate microstructure for better strengthening effect in the Zr-containing Mg alloys. PMID:22682092

  2. Nucleation in Synoptically Forced Cirrostratus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R.-F.; Starr, D. OC.; Reichardt, J.; DeMott, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Formation and evolution of cirrostratus in response to weak, uniform and constant synoptic forcing is simulated using a one-dimensional numerical model with explicit microphysics, in which the particle size distribution in each grid box is fully resolved. A series of tests of the model response to nucleation modes (homogeneous-freezing-only/heterogeneous nucleation) and heterogeneous nucleation parameters are performed. In the case studied here, nucleation is first activated in the prescribed moist layer. A continuous cloud-top nucleation zone with a depth depending on the vertical humidity gradient and one of the nucleation parameters is developed afterward. For the heterogeneous nucleation cases, intermittent nucleation zones in the mid-upper portion of the cloud form where the relative humidity is on the rise, because existent ice crystals do not uptake excess water vapor efficiently, and ice nuclei (IN) are available. Vertical resolution as fine as 1 m is required for realistic simulation of the homogeneous-freezing-only scenario, while the model resolution requirement is more relaxed in the cases where heterogeneous nucleation dominates. Bulk microphysical and optical properties are evaluated and compared. Ice particle number flux divergence, which is due to the vertical gradient of the gravity-induced particle sedimentation, is constantly and rapidly changing the local ice number concentration, even in the nucleation zone. When the depth of the nucleation zone is shallow, particle number concentration decreases rapidly as ice particles grow and sediment away from the nucleation zone. When the depth of the nucleation zone is large, a region of high ice number concentration can be sustained. The depth of nucleation zone is an important parameter to be considered in parametric treatments of ice cloud generation.

  3. Homogeneous crystal nucleation in polymers.

    PubMed

    Schick, Christoph; Androsch, R; Schmelzer, Juern W P

    2017-07-14

    The pathway of crystal nucleation significantly influences the structure and properties of semi-crystalline polymers. Crystal nucleation is normally heterogeneous at low supercooling, and homogeneous at high supercooling, of the polymer melt. Homogeneous nucleation in bulk polymers has been, so far, hardly accessible experimentally, and was even doubted to occur at all. This topical review summarizes experimental findings on homogeneous crystal nucleation in polymers. Recently developed fast scanning calorimetry, with cooling and heating rates up to 106 K s-1, allows for detailed investigations of nucleation near and even below the glass transition temperature, including analysis of nuclei stability. As for other materials, the maximum homogeneous nucleation rate for polymers is located close to the glass transition temperature. In the experiments discussed here, it is shown that polymer nucleation is homogeneous at such temperatures. Homogeneous nucleation in polymers is discussed in the framework of classical nucleation theory. The majority of our observations are consistent with the theory. The discrepancies may guide further research, particularly experiments to progress theoretical development. Progress in the understanding of homogeneous nucleation is much needed, since most of the modelling approaches dealing with polymer crystallization exclusively consider homogeneous nucleation. This is also the basis for advancing theoretical approaches to the much more complex phenomena governing heterogeneous nucleation. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  4. A computer model for one-dimensional mass and energy transport in and around chemically reacting particles, including complex gas-phase chemistry, multicomponent molecular diffusion, surface evaporation, and heterogeneous reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, S. Y.; Yetter, R. A.; Dryer, F. L.

    1992-01-01

    Various chemically reacting flow problems highlighting chemical and physical fundamentals rather than flow geometry are presently investigated by means of a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates multicomponent molecular diffusion, complex chemistry, and heterogeneous processes, in the interest of obtaining sensitivity-related information. The sensitivity equations were decoupled from those of the model, and then integrated one time-step behind the integration of the model equations, and analytical Jacobian matrices were applied to improve the accuracy of sensitivity coefficients that are calculated together with model solutions.

  5. A computer model for one-dimensional mass and energy transport in and around chemically reacting particles, including complex gas-phase chemistry, multicomponent molecular diffusion, surface evaporation, and heterogeneous reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, S. Y.; Yetter, R. A.; Dryer, F. L.

    1992-01-01

    Various chemically reacting flow problems highlighting chemical and physical fundamentals rather than flow geometry are presently investigated by means of a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates multicomponent molecular diffusion, complex chemistry, and heterogeneous processes, in the interest of obtaining sensitivity-related information. The sensitivity equations were decoupled from those of the model, and then integrated one time-step behind the integration of the model equations, and analytical Jacobian matrices were applied to improve the accuracy of sensitivity coefficients that are calculated together with model solutions.

  6. Can we define an asymptotic value for the ice active surface site density for heterogeneous ice nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, Dennis; Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie; Hartmann, Susan; Wex, Heike; Ignatius, Karoliina; Stratmann, Frank

    2015-05-01

    The immersion freezing behavior of droplets containing size-segregated, monodisperse feldspar particles was investigated. For all particle sizes investigated, a leveling off of the frozen droplet fraction was observed reaching a plateau within the heterogeneous freezing temperature regime (T >- 38°C). The frozen fraction in the plateau region was proportional to the particle surface area. Based on these findings, an asymptotic value for ice active surface site density ns, which we named ns⋆, could be determined for the investigated feldspar sample. The comparison of these results with those of other studies not only elucidates the general feasibility of determining such an asymptotic value but also shows that the value of ns⋆ strongly depends on the method of the particle surface area determination. However, such an asymptotic value might be an important input parameter for atmospheric modeling applications. At least it shows that care should be taken when ns is extrapolated to lower or higher temperature.

  7. Nucleation and growth of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castleman, A. W., Jr.; Keesee, R. G.

    Formation mechanisms and nucleation processes are examined, and nucleation in the stratosphere is considered, taking into account binary nucleation, ternary nucleation, binary heterogeneous nucleation, and heteromolecular nucleation. Attention is also given to the growth of aerosol particles, nucleation and growth in models, and the role of aerosols in the upper atmosphere. It is pointed out that various sampling studies and numerical models have provided evidence that the in situ oxidation of sulfur-bearing gases is responsible for the sulfate mass of the stratospheric aerosol. Data obtained by Castleman et al. (1974) suggest that there is a common source of sulfur compounds for the stratosphere of both the northern and southern hemispheres.

  8. Nucleation and growth of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, A. W., Jr.; Keesee, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    Formation mechanisms and nucleation processes are examined, and nucleation in the stratosphere is considered, taking into account binary nucleation, ternary nucleation, binary heterogeneous nucleation, and heteromolecular nucleation. Attention is also given to the growth of aerosol particles, nucleation and growth in models, and the role of aerosols in the upper atmosphere. It is pointed out that various sampling studies and numerical models have provided evidence that the in situ oxidation of sulfur-bearing gases is responsible for the sulfate mass of the stratospheric aerosol. Data obtained by Castleman et al. (1974) suggest that there is a common source of sulfur compounds for the stratosphere of both the northern and southern hemispheres.

  9. Two-component spin-coated Ag/CNT composite films based on a silver heterogeneous nucleation mechanism adhesion-enhanced by mechanical interlocking and chemical grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Kang, Zhixin; Bessho, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a new method for the synthesis of silver carbon nanotube (Ag/CNT) composite films as conductive connection units for flexible electronic devices is presented. This method is about a two-component solution process by spin coating with an after-treatment annealing process. In this method, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) act as the core of silver heterogeneous nucleation, which can be observed and analyzed by a field-emission scanning electron microscope. With the effects of mechanical interlocking, chemical grafting, and annealing, the interfacial adhesive strength between films and PET sheets was enhanced to 12 N cm‑1. The tensile strength of the Ag/CNT composite films was observed to increase by 38% by adding 5 g l‑1 MWCNTs. In the four-probe method, the resistivity of Ag/CNT-5 declined by 78.2% compared with pristine Ag films. The anti-fatigue performance of the Ag/CNT composite films was monitored by cyclic bending deformation and the results revealed that the growth rate of electrical resistance during the deformation was obviously retarded. As for industrial application, this method provides an efficient low-cost way to prepare Ag/CNT composite films and can be further applied to other coating systems.

  10. Two-component spin-coated Ag/CNT composite films based on a silver heterogeneous nucleation mechanism adhesion-enhanced by mechanical interlocking and chemical grafting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Kang, Zhixin; Bessho, Takeshi

    2017-03-10

    In this paper, a new method for the synthesis of silver carbon nanotube (Ag/CNT) composite films as conductive connection units for flexible electronic devices is presented. This method is about a two-component solution process by spin coating with an after-treatment annealing process. In this method, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) act as the core of silver heterogeneous nucleation, which can be observed and analyzed by a field-emission scanning electron microscope. With the effects of mechanical interlocking, chemical grafting, and annealing, the interfacial adhesive strength between films and PET sheets was enhanced to 12 N cm(-1). The tensile strength of the Ag/CNT composite films was observed to increase by 38% by adding 5 g l(-1) MWCNTs. In the four-probe method, the resistivity of Ag/CNT-5 declined by 78.2% compared with pristine Ag films. The anti-fatigue performance of the Ag/CNT composite films was monitored by cyclic bending deformation and the results revealed that the growth rate of electrical resistance during the deformation was obviously retarded. As for industrial application, this method provides an efficient low-cost way to prepare Ag/CNT composite films and can be further applied to other coating systems.

  11. On the ice nucleation spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barahona, D.

    2012-04-01

    This work presents a novel formulation of the ice nucleation spectrum, i.e. the function relating the ice crystal concentration to cloud formation conditions and aerosol properties. The new formulation is physically-based and explicitly accounts for the dependency of the ice crystal concentration on temperature, supersaturation, cooling rate, and particle size, surface area and composition. This is achieved by introducing the concepts of ice nucleation coefficient (the number of ice germs present in a particle) and nucleation probability dispersion function (the distribution of ice nucleation coefficients within the aerosol population). The new formulation is used to generate ice nucleation parameterizations for the homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and the heterogeneous deposition ice nucleation on dust and soot ice nuclei. For homogeneous freezing, it was found that by increasing the dispersion in the droplet volume distribution the fraction of supercooled droplets in the population increases. For heterogeneous ice nucleation the new formulation consistently describes singular and stochastic behavior within a single framework. Using a fundamentally stochastic approach, both cooling rate independence and constancy of the ice nucleation fraction over time, features typically associated with singular behavior, were reproduced. Analysis of the temporal dependency of the ice nucleation spectrum suggested that experimental methods that measure the ice nucleation fraction over few seconds would tend to underestimate the ice nuclei concentration. It is shown that inferring the aerosol heterogeneous ice nucleation properties from measurements of the onset supersaturation and temperature may carry significant error as the variability in ice nucleation properties within the aerosol population is not accounted for. This work provides a simple and rigorous ice nucleation framework where theoretical predictions, laboratory measurements and field campaign data can be

  12. On the Ice Nucleation Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, D.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel formulation of the ice nucleation spectrum, i.e. the function relating the ice crystal concentration to cloud formation conditions and aerosol properties. The new formulation is physically-based and explicitly accounts for the dependency of the ice crystal concentration on temperature, supersaturation, cooling rate, and particle size, surface area and composition. This is achieved by introducing the concepts of ice nucleation coefficient (the number of ice germs present in a particle) and nucleation probability dispersion function (the distribution of ice nucleation coefficients within the aerosol population). The new formulation is used to generate ice nucleation parameterizations for the homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and the heterogeneous deposition ice nucleation on dust and soot ice nuclei. For homogeneous freezing, it was found that by increasing the dispersion in the droplet volume distribution the fraction of supercooled droplets in the population increases. For heterogeneous ice nucleation the new formulation consistently describes singular and stochastic behavior within a single framework. Using a fundamentally stochastic approach, both cooling rate independence and constancy of the ice nucleation fraction over time, features typically associated with singular behavior, were reproduced. Analysis of the temporal dependency of the ice nucleation spectrum suggested that experimental methods that measure the ice nucleation fraction over few seconds would tend to underestimate the ice nuclei concentration. It is shown that inferring the aerosol heterogeneous ice nucleation properties from measurements of the onset supersaturation and temperature may carry significant error as the variability in ice nucleation properties within the aerosol population is not accounted for. This work provides a simple and rigorous ice nucleation framework where theoretical predictions, laboratory measurements and field campaign data can be

  13. Multicomponent membranes

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    A multicomponent membrane which may be used for separating various components which are present in a fluid feed mixture comprises a mixture of a plasticizer such as a glycol and an organic polymer cast upon a porous organic polymer support. The membrane may be prepared by casting an emulsion or a solution of the plasticizer and polymer on the porous support, evaporating the solvent and recovering the membrane after curing.

  14. Simulation Study of Heterogeneous Nucleation at Grain Boundaries During the Austenite-Ferrite Phase Transformation: Comparing the Classical Model with the Multi-Phase Field Nudged Elastic Band Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huajing; Shi, Rongpei; Wang, Yunzhi; Hoyt, Jeffrey J.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to study the heterogeneous nucleation occurring at grain boundaries (GBs) during the austenite (FCC) phase to ferrite (BCC) phase transformation in a pure Fe polycrystalline system. The critical nucleus properties (including size, shape, and activation energy) determined by classical nucleation theory are compared with those obtained by using a combination of the multi-phase field method (MPFM) and the nudged elastic band (NEB) method. For nucleation events that exhibit low-energy facets completely embedded within the parent FCC phase, there is a good agreement between the MD and the MPFM result with respect to the critical nucleus size, shape, and nucleation energy barrier. For systems where the emerging nucleus contains facets that cross the GB plane, the MPFM-NEB, when compared to MD, yields a better prediction than the classical approach for the nucleus morphology. New observations from the MPFM-NEB method indicate that the critical nucleus shape may change with volume and therefore depends on the nucleation driving force (undercooling).

  15. Direct observation of metal nanoparticles as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of supersaturated organic vapors: Nucleation of size-selected aluminum nanoparticles in acetonitrile and n-hexane vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsayed, Victor; Samy El-Shall, M.

    2014-08-01

    This work reports the direct observation and separation of size-selected aluminum nanoparticles acting as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of supersaturated vapors of both polar and nonpolar molecules. In the experiment, we study the condensation of supersaturated acetonitrile and n-hexane vapors on charged and neutral Al nanoparticles by activation of the metal nanoparticles to act as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of the organic vapor. Aluminum seed nanoparticles with diameters of 1 and 2 nm are capable of acting as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of supersaturated acetonitrile and hexane vapors. The comparison between the Kelvin and Fletcher diameters indicates that for the heterogeneous nucleation of both acetonitrile and hexane vapors, particles are activated at significantly smaller sizes than predicted by the Kelvin equation. The activation of the Al nanoparticles occurs at nearly 40% and 65% of the onset of homogeneous nucleation of acetonitrile and hexane supersaturated vapors, respectively. The lower activation of the charged Al nanoparticles in acetonitrile vapor is due to the charge-dipole interaction which results in rapid condensation of the highly polar acetonitrile molecules on the charged Al nanoparticles. The charge-dipole interaction decreases with increasing the size of the Al nanoparticles and therefore at low supersaturations, most of the heterogeneous nucleation events are occurring on neutral nanoparticles. No sign effect has been observed for the condensation of the organic vapors on the positively and negatively charged Al nanoparticles. The present approach of generating metal nanoparticles by pulsed laser vaporization within a supersaturated organic vapor allows for efficient separation between nucleation and growth of the metal nanoparticles and, consequently controls the average particle size, particle density, and particle size distribution within the liquid droplets of the condensing vapor. Strong

  16. Direct observation of metal nanoparticles as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of supersaturated organic vapors: Nucleation of size-selected aluminum nanoparticles in acetonitrile and n-hexane vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelsayed, Victor; Samy El-Shall, M.

    2014-08-07

    This work reports the direct observation and separation of size-selected aluminum nanoparticles acting as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of supersaturated vapors of both polar and nonpolar molecules. In the experiment, we study the condensation of supersaturated acetonitrile and n-hexane vapors on charged and neutral Al nanoparticles by activation of the metal nanoparticles to act as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of the organic vapor. Aluminum seed nanoparticles with diameters of 1 and 2 nm are capable of acting as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of supersaturated acetonitrile and hexane vapors. The comparison between the Kelvin and Fletcher diameters indicates that for the heterogeneous nucleation of both acetonitrile and hexane vapors, particles are activated at significantly smaller sizes than predicted by the Kelvin equation. The activation of the Al nanoparticles occurs at nearly 40% and 65% of the onset of homogeneous nucleation of acetonitrile and hexane supersaturated vapors, respectively. The lower activation of the charged Al nanoparticles in acetonitrile vapor is due to the charge-dipole interaction which results in rapid condensation of the highly polar acetonitrile molecules on the charged Al nanoparticles. The charge-dipole interaction decreases with increasing the size of the Al nanoparticles and therefore at low supersaturations, most of the heterogeneous nucleation events are occurring on neutral nanoparticles. No sign effect has been observed for the condensation of the organic vapors on the positively and negatively charged Al nanoparticles. The present approach of generating metal nanoparticles by pulsed laser vaporization within a supersaturated organic vapor allows for efficient separation between nucleation and growth of the metal nanoparticles and, consequently controls the average particle size, particle density, and particle size distribution within the liquid droplets of the condensing vapor. Strong

  17. Direct observation of metal nanoparticles as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of supersaturated organic vapors: nucleation of size-selected aluminum nanoparticles in acetonitrile and n-hexane vapors.

    PubMed

    Abdelsayed, Victor; El-Shall, M Samy

    2014-08-07

    This work reports the direct observation and separation of size-selected aluminum nanoparticles acting as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of supersaturated vapors of both polar and nonpolar molecules. In the experiment, we study the condensation of supersaturated acetonitrile and n-hexane vapors on charged and neutral Al nanoparticles by activation of the metal nanoparticles to act as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of the organic vapor. Aluminum seed nanoparticles with diameters of 1 and 2 nm are capable of acting as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of supersaturated acetonitrile and hexane vapors. The comparison between the Kelvin and Fletcher diameters indicates that for the heterogeneous nucleation of both acetonitrile and hexane vapors, particles are activated at significantly smaller sizes than predicted by the Kelvin equation. The activation of the Al nanoparticles occurs at nearly 40% and 65% of the onset of homogeneous nucleation of acetonitrile and hexane supersaturated vapors, respectively. The lower activation of the charged Al nanoparticles in acetonitrile vapor is due to the charge-dipole interaction which results in rapid condensation of the highly polar acetonitrile molecules on the charged Al nanoparticles. The charge-dipole interaction decreases with increasing the size of the Al nanoparticles and therefore at low supersaturations, most of the heterogeneous nucleation events are occurring on neutral nanoparticles. No sign effect has been observed for the condensation of the organic vapors on the positively and negatively charged Al nanoparticles. The present approach of generating metal nanoparticles by pulsed laser vaporization within a supersaturated organic vapor allows for efficient separation between nucleation and growth of the metal nanoparticles and, consequently controls the average particle size, particle density, and particle size distribution within the liquid droplets of the condensing vapor. Strong

  18. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Improvement in Dielectric Tunability of Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO4-Mg2TiO4 Composite Ceramics via Heterogeneous Nucleation Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuo; Li, Yong-Xiang

    2009-11-01

    Dielectric tunable composite ceramics Ba0.6Sr0.4 TiO3-Mg2TiO4 (BST-MT) are prepared with a heterogeneous nucleation sol-gel approach. The Mg2TiO4 powders are synthesized by the conventional solid-state reaction method. The micro-sized MT powders with dispersant Ciba-4010 are introduced into Ba-Sr-Ti sol to obtain uniform and homogeneous mixture compounds with nano-sized BST particles synthesized via heterogeneous nucleation (HN) in the sol-gel process. Thus, the microstructural and dielectric properties can be tailored. The dielectric constants of BST-MT composite ceramics can be adjusted in a large range from 294 to 1790, and the dielectric tunability can be adjusted from 29.4% to 37.0% with different MT contents from 60 wt% to 20 wt%. Compared to the samples prepared by the conventional solid-state (SS) process, the BST-MT composite ceramics by the heterogeneous nucleation sol-gel process exhibit a more uniform microstructure, and improve dielectric properties.

  19. The influence of heterogeneous nucleation on the surface crystallization of guaifenesin from melt extrudates containing Eudragit L10055 or Acryl-EZE.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Caroline D; Fegely, Kurt A; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali R; McGinity, James W

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of talc and humidity conditions during storage on the crystal growth of guaifenesin on the surface of melt-extruded matrix tablets. Tablets consisted of the model drug guaifenesin in a matrix of either Acryl-EZE(R) or Eudragit(R) L10055 and either no talc, 25% or 50% talc. After processing, the hot-melt-extruded matrix tablets were supersaturated with amorphous guaifenesin, which resulted in the development of guaifenesin drug crystals on exposed surfaces of the tablet during storage (all tablets were stored at 24 degrees C). A previously developed, quantitative test was used to assay for surface guaifenesin. In tablets with a drug-to-polymer ratio of 19:81, talc-containing tablets exhibited an earlier onset of crystal growth (storage at 17% relative humidity). The presence of talc also increased the amount of surface crystallization and was independent of the talc concentration, since the talc levels used in this study exceeded the critical nucleant concentration. Additional non-melting components did not have an additive effect on surface crystal growth. High humidity during storage (78%) increased guaifenesin crystallization, but moisture uptake of tablets did not correlate with increased drug recrystallization. When storage at 17% relative humidity was interrupted for 3days by storage at 78% relative humidity before the tablets were returned to their previous low RH storage conditions, crystal growth quickly increased during the high RH interval and remained at an elevated level throughout the remaining storage period. A similar intermediate period of low, 17% relative humidity in tablets stored before and after that time at 78% RH did not affect surface crystallization levels. The effects of humidity and talc on the crystallization of guaifenesin from melt-extruded dosage forms supersaturated with amorphous drug were ascribed to heterogeneous nucleation.

  20. Theoretical study of production of unique glasses in space. [kinetic relationships describing nucleation and crystallization phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, D. C.; Sievert, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The potential of producing the glassy form of selected materials in the weightless, containerless nature of space processing is examined through the development of kinetic relationships describing nucleation and crystallization phenomena. Transformation kinetics are applied to a well-characterized system (SiO2), an excellent glass former (B2O3), and a poor glass former (Al2O3) by conventional earth processing methods. Viscosity and entropy of fusion are shown to be the primary materials parameters controlling the glass forming tendency. For multicomponent systems diffusion-controlled kinetics and heterogeneous nucleation effects are considered. An analytical empirical approach is used to analyze the mullite system. Results are consistent with experimentally observed data and indicate the promise of mullite as a future space processing candidate.

  1. The C-protein tetramer binds 230 to 240 nucleotides of pre-mRNA and nucleates the assembly of 40S heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, M; Rech, J E; Northington, S J; Flicker, P F; Mayeda, A; Krainer, A R; LeStourgeon, W M

    1994-01-01

    A series of in vitro protein-RNA binding studies using purified native (C1)3C2 and (A2)3B1 tetramers, total soluble heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP), and pre-mRNA molecules differing in length and sequence have revealed that a single C-protein tetramer has an RNA site size of 230 to 240 nucleotides (nt). Two tetramers bind twice this RNA length, and three tetramers fold monoparticle lengths of RNA (700 nt) into a unique 19S triangular complex. In the absence of this unique structure, the basic A- and B-group proteins bind RNA to form several different artifactual structures which are not present in preparations of native hnRNP and which do not function in hnRNP assembly. Three (A2)3B1 tetramers bind the 19S complex to form a 35S assembly intermediate. Following UV irradiation to immobilize the C proteins on the packaged RNA, the 19S triangular complex is recovered as a remnant structure from both native and reconstituted hnRNP particles. C protein-RNA complexes composed of three, six, or nine tetramers (one, two, or three triangular complexes) nucleate the stoichiometric assembly of monomer, dimer, and trimer hnRNP particles. The binding of C-protein tetramers to RNAs longer than 230 nt is through a self-cooperative combinatorial mode. RNA packaged in the 19S complex and in 40S hnRNP particles is efficiently spliced in vitro. These findings demonstrate that formation of the triangular C protein-RNA complex is an obligate first event in the in vitro and probably the in vivo assembly the 40S hnRNP core particle, and they provide insight into the mechanism through which the core proteins package 700-nt increments of RNA. These findings also demonstrate that unless excluded by other factors, the C proteins are likely to be located along the length of nascent transcripts. Images PMID:8264621

  2. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gettelman, Andrew; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, Ulrike; Chen, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models (GCMs) are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the Aerosol Indirect Effects (AIE) of cirrus clouds on climate. Simulations have a range of ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations, but many simulations have higher present-day ice crystal number concentrations than in-situ observations. These different states result from different parameterizations of ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. Black carbon aerosols have a small (0.06 Wm(exp-2) and not statistically significant AIE when included as ice nuclei, for nucleation efficiencies within the range of laboratory measurements. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur as a consequence of increasing anthropogenic sulfur emissions with different mechanisms important in different models. In one model this is due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction, and in the other due to increases in heterogeneous nucleation with coated dust. The magnitude of the effect is the same however. The resulting ice AIE does not seem strongly dependent on the balance between homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Regional effects can reach several Wm2. Indirect effects are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation and lower ice number concentration in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.27 +/- 0.10 Wm(exp-2) (1 sigma uncertainty). This represents a 20% offset of the simulated total shortwave AIE for ice and liquid clouds of 1.6 Wm(sup-2).

  3. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, U.; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2012-10-19

    [1] Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models (GCMs) are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the Aerosol Indirect Effects (AIE) of cirrus clouds on climate. Simulations have a range of ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations, but many simulations have higher present-day ice crystal number concentrations than in-situ observations. These different states result from different parameterizations of ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. Black carbon aerosols have a small (-0.06 Wm-2) and not statistically significant AIE when included as ice nuclei, for nucleation efficiencies within the range of laboratory measurements. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur as a consequence of increasing anthropogenic sulfur emissions with different mechanisms important in different models. In one model this is due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction, and in the other due to increases in heterogeneous nucleation with coated dust. The magnitude of the effect is the same however. The resulting ice AIE does not seem strongly dependent on the balance between homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Regional effects can reach several Wm-2. Indirect effects are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation and lower ice number concentration in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.27 ± 0.10 Wm-2 (1σ uncertainty). Finally, this represents a 20% offset of the simulated total shortwave AIE for ice and liquid clouds of -1.6 Wm-2.

  4. Ice Nucleation Properties of Oxidized Carbon Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in many fields, particularly atmospheric science, but is still poorly understood. All known inorganic ice nucleating particles are relatively large in size and tend to be hydrophilic. Hence it is not obvious that carbon nanomaterials should nucleate ice. However, in this paper we show that four different readily water-dispersible carbon nanomaterials are capable of nucleating ice. The tested materials were carboxylated graphene nanoflakes, graphene oxide, oxidized single walled carbon nanotubes and oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The carboxylated graphene nanoflakes have a diameter of ∼30 nm and are among the smallest entities observed so far to nucleate ice. Overall, carbon nanotubes were found to nucleate ice more efficiently than flat graphene species, and less oxidized materials nucleated ice more efficiently than more oxidized species. These well-defined carbon nanomaterials may pave the way to bridging the gap between experimental and computational studies of ice nucleation. PMID:26267196

  5. Ice Nucleation Properties of Oxidized Carbon Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Whale, Thomas F; Rosillo-Lopez, Martin; Murray, Benjamin J; Salzmann, Christoph G

    2015-08-06

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in many fields, particularly atmospheric science, but is still poorly understood. All known inorganic ice nucleating particles are relatively large in size and tend to be hydrophilic. Hence it is not obvious that carbon nanomaterials should nucleate ice. However, in this paper we show that four different readily water-dispersible carbon nanomaterials are capable of nucleating ice. The tested materials were carboxylated graphene nanoflakes, graphene oxide, oxidized single walled carbon nanotubes and oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The carboxylated graphene nanoflakes have a diameter of ∼30 nm and are among the smallest entities observed so far to nucleate ice. Overall, carbon nanotubes were found to nucleate ice more efficiently than flat graphene species, and less oxidized materials nucleated ice more efficiently than more oxidized species. These well-defined carbon nanomaterials may pave the way to bridging the gap between experimental and computational studies of ice nucleation.

  6. Communication. Kinetics of scavenging of small, nucleating clusters. First nucleation theorem and sum rules

    DOE PAGES

    Malila, Jussi; McGraw, Robert; Laaksonen, Ari; ...

    2015-01-07

    Despite recent advances in monitoring nucleation from a vapor at close-to-molecular resolution, the identity of the critical cluster, forming the bottleneck for the nucleation process, remains elusive. During past twenty years, the first nucleation theorem has been often used to extract the size of the critical cluster from nucleation rate measurements. However, derivations of the first nucleation theorem invoke certain questionable assumptions that may fail, e.g., in the case of atmospheric new particle formation, including absence of subcritical cluster losses and heterogeneous nucleation on pre-existing nanoparticles. Here we extend the kinetic derivation of the first nucleation theorem to give amore » general framework to include such processes, yielding sum rules connecting the size dependent particle formation and loss rates to the corresponding loss-free nucleation rate and the apparent critical size from a naïve application of the first nucleation theorem that neglects them.« less

  7. Nucleation of Crystals in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekilov, Peter G.

    2010-07-01

    Solution crystallization is an essential part of processes in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries and a major step in physiological and pathological phenomena. Crystallization starts with nucleation and control of nucleation is crucial for the control of the number, size, perfection, polymorphism and other characteristics of the crystalline materials. Recently, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the mechanism of nucleation of crystals in solution. The most significant of these is the two-step mechanism of nucleation, according to which the crystalline nucleus appears inside pre-existing metastable clusters of size several hundred nanometers, which consist of dense liquid and are suspended in the solution. While initially proposed for protein crystals, the applicability of this mechanism has been demonstrated for small molecule organic materials, colloids, and biominerals. This mechanism helps to explain several long-standing puzzles of crystal nucleation in solution: nucleation rates which are many orders of magnitude lower than theoretical predictions, nucleation kinetic dependencies with steady or receding parts at increasing supersaturation, the role of heterogeneous substrates for polymorph selection, the significance of the dense protein liquid, and others. More importantly, this mechanism provides powerful tools for control of the nucleation process by varying the solution thermodynamic parameters so that the volume occupied by the dense liquid shrinks or expands.

  8. Truncated Dual-Cap Nucleation Site Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, Douglas M.; Sander, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    During heterogeneous nucleation within a metastable mushy-zone, several geometries for nucleation site development must be considered. Traditional spherical dual cap and crevice models are compared to a truncated dual cap to determine the activation energy and critical cluster growth kinetics in ternary Fe-Cr-Ni steel alloys. Results of activation energy results indicate that nucleation is more probable at grain boundaries within the solid than at the solid-liquid interface.

  9. Influence of local structural disorders on spectroscopic properties of multi-component CaF2-Bi2O3-P2O5-B2O3 glass ceramics with Cr2O3 as nucleating agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, S.; Narendrudu, T.; Yusub, S.; Suneel Kumar, A.; Ravi Kumar, V.; Veeraiah, N.; Krishna Rao, D.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-component CaF2-Bi2O3-P2O5-B2O3 glasses doped with different concentrations of Cr2O3 were crystallized through heat treatment. The prepared glass ceramic samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Spectroscopic studies viz., optical absorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were carried out. The XRD, SEM and DTA studies indicated that the samples contain different crystalline phases. Results of optical absorption and EPR studies pointed out the gradual conversion of chromium ions from Cr3 + state to Cr6 + state with an increase of Cr2O3 content from 0.1 to 0.5 mol%. The results of FTIR, Raman and EPR studies revealed that Cr6 + ions participate in the glass network in tetrahedral positions and seemed to increase the polymerization of the glass ceramics. The quantitative analysis of results of the spectroscopic studies further indicated that the glasses crystallized with low concentration of Cr2O3 are favourable for solid state laser devices.

  10. Influence of local structural disorders on spectroscopic properties of multi-component CaF₂-Bi₂O₃-P₂O₅-B₂O₃ glass ceramics with Cr₂O₃ as nucleating agent.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S; Narendrudu, T; Yusub, S; Kumar, A Suneel; Kumar, V Ravi; Veeraiah, N; Rao, D Krishna

    2016-01-15

    Multi-component CaF2-Bi2O3-P2O5-B2O3 glasses doped with different concentrations of Cr2O3 were crystallized through heat treatment. The prepared glass ceramic samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Spectroscopic studies viz., optical absorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were carried out. The XRD, SEM and DTA studies indicated that the samples contain different crystalline phases. Results of optical absorption and EPR studies pointed out the gradual conversion of chromium ions from Cr(3+) state to Cr(6+) state with an increase of Cr2O3 content from 0.1 to 0.5 mol%. The results of FTIR, Raman and EPR studies revealed that Cr(6+) ions participate in the glass network in tetrahedral positions and seemed to increase the polymerization of the glass ceramics. The quantitative analysis of results of the spectroscopic studies further indicated that the glasses crystallized with low concentration of Cr2O3 are favourable for solid state laser devices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nucleation and superstabilization in small systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, T.

    2017-09-01

    Phase transitions are known to present peculiarities in small systems that are related to depletion effects of the ambient phase. Mass conservation affects the conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium between a nucleus of the new phase and the matrix as compared with nucleation in infinite systems. This finite-size effect is known to delay the phase transition but can also impede nucleation in very small systems as it stabilizes the initial state, originally metastable in infinite systems. In this work, we investigate this superstabilization effect in the context of classical nucleation theory in multicomponent solutions and we derive an analytical expression for the system size below which nucleation becomes thermodynamically impossible. Comparing with the exact solution, our simple result is shown to accurately predict the superstabilization effect, and can therefore be used, for instance, as a guideline for the design of novel nanomaterials.

  12. Protein crystal nucleation in pores

    PubMed Central

    Nanev, Christo N.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2017-01-01

    The most powerful method for protein structure determination is X-ray crystallography which relies on the availability of high quality crystals. Obtaining protein crystals is a major bottleneck, and inducing their nucleation is of crucial importance in this field. An effective method to form crystals is to introduce nucleation-inducing heterologous materials into the crystallization solution. Porous materials are exceptionally effective at inducing nucleation. It is shown here that a combined diffusion-adsorption effect can increase protein concentration inside pores, which enables crystal nucleation even under conditions where heterogeneous nucleation on flat surfaces is absent. Provided the pore is sufficiently narrow, protein molecules approach its walls and adsorb more frequently than they can escape. The decrease in the nucleation energy barrier is calculated, exhibiting its quantitative dependence on the confinement space and the energy of interaction with the pore walls. These results provide a detailed explanation of the effectiveness of porous materials for nucleation of protein crystals, and will be useful for optimal design of such materials. PMID:28091515

  13. Dynamic density functional theory for nucleation: Non-classical predictions of mesoscopic nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Yatsyshin, Peter; Lutsko, James F.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) for fluids and its dynamic extension (DDFT) provide an appealing mean-field framework for describing equilibrium and dynamics of complex soft matter systems. For a long time, homogeneous nucleation was considered to be outside the limits of applicability of DDFT. However, our recently developed mesoscopic nucleation theory (MeNT) based on fluctuating hydrodynamics, reconciles the inherent randomness of the nucleation process with the deterministic nature of DDFT. It turns out that in the weak-noise limit, the most likely path (MLP) for nucleation to occur is determined by the DDFT equations. We present computations of MLPs for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in colloidal suspensions. For homogeneous nucleation, the MLP obtained is in excellent agreement with the reduced order-parameter description of MeNT, which predicts a multistage nucleation pathway. For heterogeneous nucleation, the presence of impurities in the fluid affects the MLP, but remarkably, the overall qualitative picture of homogeneous nucleation persists. Finally, we highlight the use of DDFT as a simulation tool, which is especially appealing as there are no known applications of MeNT to heterogeneous nucleation. We acknowledge financial support from the European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031 and from EPSRC via Grants No. EP/L020564 and EP/L025159.

  14. Nucleation of bubbles in liquid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Maris, H.J. ); Balibar, S.; Pettersen, M.S. )

    1993-12-01

    The authors give a brief survey of experiments that have been performed to study the nucleation of bubbles (cavitation) in liquid helium at negative pressures. There have been two principal motivations for research in this field. Because all impurities (except [sup 3]He) freeze out of the liquid at low temperatures, it is possible to prepare helium with a much higher purity than ordinary classical liquids. In any study of a nucleation process this is an important advantage because impurities introduce the complication of heterogeneous nucleation. The second reason for interest in helium is that at low enough temperatures nucleation is expected to be dominated by quantum tunnelling rather than thermal activation.

  15. Massively parallel molecular dynamics simulation of formation of clathrate-hydrate precursors at planar water-methane interfaces: insights into heterogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    English, Niall J; Lauricella, Marco; Meloni, Simone

    2014-05-28

    The formation of methane-hydrate precursors at large planar water-methane interfaces has been studied using massively parallel molecular dynamics in systems of varying size from around 10 000 to almost 7 × 10(6) molecules. This process took two distinct steps. First, the concentration of solvated methane clusters increases just inside the aqueous domain via slow diffusion from the methane-water interface, forming "clusters" of solvated methane molecules. Second, the re-ordering process of solvated methane and water molecules takes place in a manner very roughly consistent with the "blob" hypothesis, although with important differences, to form hydrate precursors, necessary for subsequent hydrate nucleation and crystallisation. It was found that larger system sizes serve to promote the formation rate of precursors.

  16. Physical and spectroscopic properties of multi-component Na2O-PbO-Bi2O3-SiO2 glass ceramics with Cr2O3 as nucleating agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambasiva Rao, M. V.; Rajyasree, Ch.; Narendrudu, T.; Suresh, S.; Suneel Kumar, A.; Veeraiah, N.; Krishna Rao, D.

    2015-09-01

    Transparent glass ceramics, synthesized from melt quenching followed by heat treatment, of the composition 10Na2O-30PbO-10Bi2O3-(50 - x)SiO2:xCr2O3 (mol%), where 0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.5, were characterized with XRD, DTA, SEM and EDS. Physical and spectroscopic studies, viz., optical absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), FTIR and Raman were investigated. The characterization of the host glass ceramic has revealed that the formation of a major phase of sodium silicate along with two minor phases such as lead silicate and bismuth oxide. By integrating Cr2O3 to the host glass additional crystal phases viz., NaCrO2, Na2Cr2O7 and Pb(CrO4) which are the complexes of Cr3+ and Cr6+ ions were also developed. As the concentration of nucleating agent is increased, a part of the Cr6+ ions is found to reduce in to Cr3+ ions. Spectroscopic studies have revealed that with an increase in the concentration of Cr2O3 from 0.1 to 0.5 mol%, there is a gradual increase in the intensity of vibrational modes of various asymmetric structural units of silicate, bismuthate and chromate in the glass ceramic network at the expense of symmetrical structural units. The analysis of the results of these studies has indicated that in the samples containing higher concentration of Cr2O3, chromium ions exists predominantly in Cr3+ state and occupy the octahedral positions in glass ceramic matrix and such glass ceramic samples are suitable for lasing action.

  17. Pb, Nd, and Sr isotopic evidence for a multicomponent source for rocks of Cook-Austral Islands and heterogeneities of mantle plumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakamura, Y.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1988-01-01

    Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions were measured in alkaline volcanic rocks (alkali basalt, ankaramite, nephelinite, phonolite, and trachyte) from the South Cook Islands (Aitutaki, Mauke, Rarotonga, Atiu, and Mangaia) and the Austral Islands (Rimatara and Rurutu). The results show that the Cook-Austral rocks have an extremely wide range in isotopic compositions of Pb: 206Pb 204Pb from 18.25 to 21.76, 207pb 204pb from 15.48 to 15.83, and sol208pb 204Pb from 38.37 to 40.62, whereas isotopic compositions of Sr and Nd are less variable. Isotopically, Mangaia, Rimatara, and Rurutu form one group (Mangaia group), which shows extremely radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions but near-MORB (mid-oceanic ridge basalts) values for Sr and Nd isotopic ratios. In contrast, samples from Aitutaki, Rarotonga, Mauke, and Atiu (Aitutaki group) have high 207Pb 204Pb and 208Pb 204Pb and moderately high 87Sr 86Sr (Dupal anomaly). The Aitutaki group could have been derived from heterogeneous mantle plumes, which rose from the enriched deep mantle (the almost primitive lower mantle or recycled continental and oceanic slabs). On the other hand, the Mangaia component could have been derived from the depleted upper mantle which may have been metasomatized with a CO2-rich fluid, as indicated by the near-MORB values of Sr and Nd isotopes. Although Pb isotopic data of the two groups cannot be distinguished from each other statistically, the end components of the Pb-Pb system do not match with those of the Nd-Sr system. Thus, the data must be explained by a multi-, at least three, component mixing model: the mantle plumes (Dupal component and a recycled oceanic slab), metasomatized upper mantle, and lithosphere. The K-Ar ages and isotopic characteristics of the Cook-Austral rocks indicate that if one mantle plume rises from the deep mantle in this region, it has separated into at least two segments on the way to the surface. ?? 1988.

  18. Pb, Nd, and Sr isotopic evidence for a multicomponent source for rocks of Cook-Austral Islands and heterogeneities of mantle plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Yoichi; Tatsumoto, Mitsunobu )

    1988-12-01

    Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions were measured in alkane volcanic rocks from the South Cook Islands and the Austral Islands. The results show that the Cook-Austral rocks have an extremely wide range in isotopic compositions of Pb: {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb from 18.25 to 21.76, {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb from 15.48 to 15.83, and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 204}Pb from 38.37 to 40.62, whereas isotopic compositions of Sr and Nd are less variable. Isotopically, Mangaia, Rimatara, and Rurutu form one group, which shows extremely ratiogenic Pb isotopic compositions but near-MORB (mid-ocean ridge basalts) values for Sr and Nd isotopic ratios. In contrast, samples from Aitutaki, Rarotonga, Mauke, and Atiu (Aitutaki group) have high {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 204}Pb and moderately high {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr (Dupal anomaly). The Aitutaki group could have been derived from heterogeneous mantle plumes, which rose from the enriched deep mantle (the almost primitive lower mantle or recycled continental and oceanic slabs). On the other hand, the Mangaia component could have been derived from the depleted upper mantle which may have been metasomatized with a Co{sub 2}-rich fluid, as indicated by the near-MORB values of Sr and Nd isotopes. Although Pb isotopic data of the two groups cannot be distinguished from each other statistically, the end components of the Pb-Pb system do not match with those of the Nd-Sr system. Thus, the data must be explained by a multi-, at least three, component mixing model: the mantle plumes, metasomatized upper mantle, and lithosphere. The K-Ar ages and isotopic characteristics of the Cook-Austral rocks indicate that if one mantle plume rises from the deep mantle in this region, it has separated into at least two segments on the way to the surface.

  19. Multicomponent Syntheses of Macrocycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Géraldine; Neuville, Luc; Bughin, Carine; Fayol, Aude; Zhu, Jieping

    How to access efficiently the macrocyclic structure remained to be a challenging synthetic topic. Although many elegant approaches/reactions have been developed, construction of diverse collection of macrocycles is still elusive. This chapter summarized the recently emerged research area dealing with multicomponent synthesis of macrocycles, with particular emphasis on the approach named "multiple multicomponent reaction using two bifunctional building blocks".

  20. Photoinduced Multicomponent Reactions.

    PubMed

    Garbarino, Silvia; Ravelli, Davide; Protti, Stefano; Basso, Andrea

    2016-12-12

    The combination of multicomponent approaches with light-driven processes opens up new scenarios in the area of synthetic organic chemistry, where the need for sustainable, atom- and energy-efficient reactions is increasingly urgent. Photoinduced multicomponent reactions are still in their infancy, but significant developments in this area are expected in the near future.

  1. Study on nucleation kinetics of lysozyme crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chen; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Jing J.; Wang, Xue Z.

    2017-07-01

    The nucleation kinetics of hen egg-white lysozyme crystallization was investigated using a hot stage cooling crystallizer and a microscope to monitor the solution crystallization process in real time. Images of crystals were continuously recorded under varied precipitant and protein concentrations. The nucleation rate was found to be higher at higher precipitant concentration, and increase monotonically with protein concentration if the precipitant concentration was held constant. Attempt was made to interpret the experimental data using classical nucleation theory. It was found that the model predictions are lower than the experimental values at low supersaturations but agree well with experimental data at high supersaturations. The trends in the experimental data suggest that two nucleation mechanisms might co-exist: heterogeneous nucleation seems to be the dominant at low supersaturation while at higher supersaturation homogeneous nucleation seems to play the major role.

  2. Deposition Nucleation or Pore Condensation and Freezing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Robert O.; Mahrt, Fabian; Marcolli, Claudia; Fahrni, Jonas; Brühwiler, Dominik; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2017-04-01

    Ice nucleation plays an important role in moderating Earth's climate and precipitation formation. Over the last century of research, several mechanisms for the nucleation of ice have been identified. Of the known mechanisms for ice nucleation, only deposition nucleation occurs below water saturation. Deposition nucleation is defined as the formation of ice from supersaturated water vapor on an insoluble particle without the prior formation of liquid. However, recent work has found that the efficiency of so-called deposition nucleation shows a dependence on the homogeneous freezing temperature of water even though no liquid phase is presumed to be present. Additionally, the ability of certain particles to nucleate ice more efficiently after being pre-cooled (pre-activation) raises questions on the true mechanism when ice nucleation occurs below water saturation. In an attempt to explain the dependence of the efficiency of so-called deposition nucleation on the onset of homogeneous freezing of liquid water, pore condensation and freezing has been proposed. Pore condensation and freezing suggests that the liquid phase can exist under sub-saturated conditions with respect to liquid in narrow confinements or pores due to the inverse Kelvin effect. Once the liquid-phase condenses, it is capable of nucleating ice either homogeneously or heterogeneously. The role of pore condensation and freezing is assessed in the Zurich Ice Nucleation Chamber, a continuous flow diffusion chamber, using spherical nonporous and mesoporous silica particles. The mesoporous silica particles have a well-defined particle size range of 400 to 600nm with discreet pore sizes of 2.5, 2.8, 3.5 and 3.8nm. Experiments conducted between 218K and 238K show that so-called deposition nucleation only occurs below the homogenous freezing temperature of water and is highly dependent on the presence of pores and their size. The results strongly support pore condensation and freezing, questioning the role of

  3. Heterogeneous nucleation of CdS to enhance visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen evolution of SiC/CdS composite

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yuan; Guo, Zhongnan E-mail: wxyuanwz@163.com; Wang, Da; Pan, Nanyan; Yuan, Wenxia E-mail: wxyuanwz@163.com

    2015-07-06

    Synthesis of composite photocatalyst is one of the most important strategies to enhance the yield of hydrogen produced by water splitting. However, one photocatalyst usually tends to randomly aggregate on the other's surface, which weakens the electron transport of the heterogeneous interface. Herein, we developed a hydrothermal reaction to synthesize the SiC/CdS composite with a feasible Z-scheme and well-controlled dispersion of CdS on SiC surface. Heterogeneous structure on the catalyst interface is obtained, leading to more light-absorption and effective electron-hole separation between the well-contacted components, which contribute to the doubly enhanced photocatalytic performance of the composite. This work provides a simple and practical route to improve the catalytic activity by optimizing the intrinsic contact of Z-scheme composite semiconductors.

  4. Heterogeneous nucleation of CdS to enhance visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen evolution of SiC/CdS composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuan; Guo, Zhongnan; Wang, Da; Pan, Nanyan; Yuan, Wenxia

    2015-07-01

    Synthesis of composite photocatalyst is one of the most important strategies to enhance the yield of hydrogen produced by water splitting. However, one photocatalyst usually tends to randomly aggregate on the other's surface, which weakens the electron transport of the heterogeneous interface. Herein, we developed a hydrothermal reaction to synthesize the SiC/CdS composite with a feasible Z-scheme and well-controlled dispersion of CdS on SiC surface. Heterogeneous structure on the catalyst interface is obtained, leading to more light-absorption and effective electron-hole separation between the well-contacted components, which contribute to the doubly enhanced photocatalytic performance of the composite. This work provides a simple and practical route to improve the catalytic activity by optimizing the intrinsic contact of Z-scheme composite semiconductors.

  5. Solute Behavior in the Initial Nucleation of V- and Nb-Containing Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. D.; Liu, W. Q.; Zhao, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    The three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) is used to characterize the solute behavior at the initial nucleation stage of carbide that precipitates in a quench-temper processed multicomponent V-Nb microalloyed steel. The equilibrium (V,Nb)C phase does not precipitate directly from the ferrous matrix with martensite structure, whereas it is preceded by the formation of isostructural diffuse atmosphere, Fe-depleted V-Nb cluster, and metastable phase (Fe,V,Nb)C successively. The transient phases are considered to largely reduce the required high energy, which is often accompanied by the appearance of the fresh incoherent carbide/matrix boundary. During the evolution of these phases, vanadium and niobium diffuse to the previously existing carbon-enriched cluster concurrently but with different mobilities from the aspect of the kinetic pathway, leading to heterogeneous distribution of solutes in the transient phases.

  6. Ice cloud processing of ultra-viscous/glassy aerosol particles leads to enhanced ice nucleation ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Skrotzki, J.; Leisner, T.; Wilson, T. W.; Malkin, T. L.; Murray, B. J.

    2012-09-01

    The ice nucleation potential of airborne glassy aqueous aerosol particles has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 247 and 216 K. Four different solutes were used as proxies for oxygenated organic matter found in the atmosphere: raffinose, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-DL-mandelic acid (HMMA), levoglucosan, and a multi-component mixture of raffinose with five dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate. Similar to previous experiments with citric acid aerosols, all particles were found to nucleate ice heterogeneously before reaching the homogeneous freezing threshold provided that the freezing cycles were started well below the respective glass transition temperatures of the compounds; this is discussed in detail in a separate article. In this contribution, we identify a further mechanism by which glassy aerosols can promote ice nucleation below the homogeneous freezing limit. If the glassy aerosol particles are probed in freezing cycles started only a few degrees below their respective glass transition temperatures, they enter the liquid regime of the state diagram upon increasing relative humidity (moisture-induced glass-to-liquid transition) before being able to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei. Ice formation then only occurs by homogeneous freezing at elevated supersaturation levels. When ice forms the remaining solution freeze concentrates and re-vitrifies. If these ice cloud processed glassy aerosol particles are then probed in a second freezing cycle at the same temperature, they catalyse ice formation at a supersaturation threshold between 5 and 30% with respect to ice. By analogy with the enhanced ice nucleation ability of insoluble ice nuclei like mineral dusts after they nucleate ice once, we refer to this phenomenon as pre-activation. We propose a number of possible explanations for why glassy aerosol particles that have re-vitrified in contact

  7. Ice cloud processing of ultra-viscous/glassy aerosol particles leads to enhanced ice nucleation ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Skrotzki, J.; Leisner, T.; Wilson, T. W.; Malkin, T. L.; Murray, B. J.

    2012-04-01

    The ice nucleation potential of airborne glassy aqueous aerosol particles has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 247 and 216 K. Four different solutes were used as proxies for oxygenated organic matter found in the atmosphere: raffinose, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-DL-mandelic acid (HMMA), levoglucosan, and a multi-component mixture of raffinose with five dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate. Similar to previous experiments with citric acid aerosols, all particles were found to nucleate ice heterogeneously before reaching the homogeneous freezing threshold provided that the freezing cycles were started well below the respective glass transition temperatures of the compounds; this is discussed in detail in a separate article. In this contribution, we identify a further mechanism by which glassy aerosols can promote ice nucleation below the homogeneous freezing limit. If the glassy aerosol particles are probed in freezing cycles started only a few degrees below their respective glass transition temperatures, they enter the liquid regime of the state diagram upon increasing relative humidity (moisture-induced glass-to-liquid transition) before being able to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei. Ice formation then only occurs by homogeneous freezing at elevated supersaturation levels. When ice forms the remaining solution freeze concentrates and re-vitrifies. If these ice cloud processed glassy aerosol particles are then probed in a second freezing cycle at the same temperature, they catalyse ice formation at a supersaturation threshold between 5 and 30% with respect to ice. By analogy with the enhanced ice nucleation ability of insoluble ice nuclei like mineral dusts after they nucleate ice once, we refer to this phenomenon as pre-activation. We propose a number of possible explanations for why glassy aerosols that have re-vitrified in contact with the

  8. Hydrophobic hydration driven self-assembly of curcumin in water: similarities to nucleation and growth under large metastability, and an analysis of water dynamics at heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Milan Kumar; Roy, Susmita; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-11-14

    As the beneficial effects of curcumin have often been reported to be limited to its small concentrations, we have undertaken a study to find the aggregation properties of curcumin in water by varying the number of monomers. Our molecular dynamics simulation results show that the equilibrated structure is always an aggregated state with remarkable structural rearrangements as we vary the number of curcumin monomers from 4 to 16 monomers. We find that the curcumin monomers form clusters in a very definite pattern where they tend to aggregate both in parallel and anti-parallel orientation of the phenyl rings, often seen in the formation of β-sheet in proteins. A considerable enhancement in the population of parallel alignments is observed with increasing the system size from 12 to 16 curcumin monomers. Due to the prevalence of such parallel alignment for large system size, a more closely packed cluster is formed with maximum number of hydrophobic contacts. We also follow the pathway of cluster growth, in particular the transition from the initial segregated to the final aggregated state. We find the existence of a metastable structural intermediate involving a number of intermediate-sized clusters dispersed in the solution. We have constructed a free energy landscape of aggregation where the metatsable state has been identified. The course of aggregation bears similarity to nucleation and growth in highly metastable state. The final aggregated form remains stable with the total exclusion of water from its sequestered hydrophobic core. We also investigate water structure near the cluster surface along with their orientation. We find that water molecules form a distorted tetrahedral geometry in the 1st solvation layer of the cluster, interacting rather strongly with the hydrophilic groups at the surface of the curcumin. The dynamics of such quasi-bound water molecules near the surface of curcumin cluster is considerably slower than the bulk signifying a restricted

  9. Hydrophobic hydration driven self-assembly of curcumin in water: Similarities to nucleation and growth under large metastability, and an analysis of water dynamics at heterogeneous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Milan Kumar; Roy, Susmita; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-11-01

    As the beneficial effects of curcumin have often been reported to be limited to its small concentrations, we have undertaken a study to find the aggregation properties of curcumin in water by varying the number of monomers. Our molecular dynamics simulation results show that the equilibrated structure is always an aggregated state with remarkable structural rearrangements as we vary the number of curcumin monomers from 4 to 16 monomers. We find that the curcumin monomers form clusters in a very definite pattern where they tend to aggregate both in parallel and anti-parallel orientation of the phenyl rings, often seen in the formation of β-sheet in proteins. A considerable enhancement in the population of parallel alignments is observed with increasing the system size from 12 to 16 curcumin monomers. Due to the prevalence of such parallel alignment for large system size, a more closely packed cluster is formed with maximum number of hydrophobic contacts. We also follow the pathway of cluster growth, in particular the transition from the initial segregated to the final aggregated state. We find the existence of a metastable structural intermediate involving a number of intermediate-sized clusters dispersed in the solution. We have constructed a free energy landscape of aggregation where the metatsable state has been identified. The course of aggregation bears similarity to nucleation and growth in highly metastable state. The final aggregated form remains stable with the total exclusion of water from its sequestered hydrophobic core. We also investigate water structure near the cluster surface along with their orientation. We find that water molecules form a distorted tetrahedral geometry in the 1st solvation layer of the cluster, interacting rather strongly with the hydrophilic groups at the surface of the curcumin. The dynamics of such quasi-bound water molecules near the surface of curcumin cluster is considerably slower than the bulk signifying a restricted

  10. Spatially resolved multicomponent gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Emily R.; Eden, Edward G. B.; McDonald, Tom O.; Adams, Dave J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicomponent supramolecular systems could be used to prepare exciting new functional materials, but it is often challenging to control the assembly across multiple length scales. Here we report a simple approach to forming patterned, spatially resolved multicomponent supramolecular hydrogels. A multicomponent gel is first formed from two low-molecular-weight gelators and consists of two types of fibre, each formed by only one gelator. One type of fibre in this ‘self-sorted network’ is then removed selectively by a light-triggered gel-to-sol transition. We show that the remaining network has the same mechanical properties as it would have done if it initially formed alone. The selective irradiation of sections of the gel through a mask leads to the formation of patterned multicomponent networks, in which either one or two networks can be present at a particular position with a high degree of spatial control.

  11. Kinetics of Ice Nucleation Confined in Nanoporous Alumina.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhito; Steinhart, Martin; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Floudas, George

    2015-09-03

    The nucleation mechanism of water (heterogeneous/homogeneous) can be regulated by confinement within nanoporous alumina. The kinetics of ice nucleation is studied in confinement by employing dielectric permittivity as a probe. Both heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation, obtained at low and high undercooling, respectively, are stochastic in nature. The temperature interval of metastability extends over ∼4 and 0.4 °C for heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation, respectively. Nucleation within a pore is spread to all pores in the template. We have examined a possible coupling of all pores through a heat wave and a sound wave, with the latter being a more realistic scenario. In addition, dielectric spectroscopy indicates that prior to crystallization undercooled water molecules relax with an activation energy of ∼50 kJ/mol, and this process acts as precursor to ice nucleation.

  12. Experiments on Nucleation in Different Flow Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuzick, R. J.; Hofmeister, W. H.; Morton, C. M.; Robinson, M. B.

    1999-01-01

    The vast majority of metallic engineering materials are solidified from the liquid phase. Understanding the solidification process is essential to control microstructure, which in turn, determines the properties of materials. The genesis of solidification is nucleation, where the first stable solid forms from the liquid phase. Nucleation kinetics determine the degree of undercooling and phase selection. As such, it is important to understand nucleation phenomena in order to control solidification or glass formation in metals and alloys. Early experiments in nucleation kinetics were accomplished by droplet dispersion methods. Dilatometry was used by Turnbull and others, and more recently differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry have been used for kinetic studies. These techniques have enjoyed success; however, there are difficulties with these experiments. Since materials are dispersed in a medium, the character of the emulsion/metal interface affects the nucleation behavior. Statistics are derived from the large number of particles observed in a single experiment, but dispersions have a finite size distribution which adds to the uncertainty of the kinetic determinations. Even though temperature can be controlled quite well before the onset of nucleation, the release of the latent heat of fusion during nucleation of particles complicates the assumption of isothermality during these experiments. Containerless processing has enabled another approach to the study of nucleation kinetics. With levitation techniques it is possible to undercool one sample to nucleation repeatedly in a controlled manner, such that the statistics of the nucleation process can be derived from multiple experiments on a single sample. The authors have fully developed the analysis of nucleation experiments on single samples following the suggestions of Skripov. The advantage of these experiments is that the samples are directly observable. The nucleation temperature

  13. The heterogeneous nucleation behavior of Al-Hf-P master alloy and its influence on the refinement of Mg2Si phase in Mg2Si/Al composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Min; Han, Huimin; Wang, Dantong; Zhao, Degang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Zhenqing

    A novel Al-7Hf-1.2P master alloy with HfP particles was successfully synthesized by in-situ melt reaction, in which HfP particles exhibited hexagonal plates in three-dimensional spaces. Under the optimized conditions, i.e. addition level of 2.5% Al-7Hf-1.2P master alloy, melting temperature of 780 °C and holding time of 60 min, the primary Mg2Si in Mg2Si/Al composites can be significantly refined from more than 121.70 μm to 19.20 μm, with morphologies improved from coarse dendrite to octahedron or truncated octahedron obviously. Furthermore, it was found that Hf also has a significant modification effect on eutectic Mg2Si simultaneously. However, the microstructure of Mg2Si/Al composite becomes slightly coarser with further increase of Hf addition exceeding 1.5%. Meanwhile, it was found that Hf precipitates in the form of HfSi2 with near spherical shape. Based on FESEM photo-micrographs, it was first observed that HfP could act as the heterogeneous nucleation sites for primary Mg2Si particles, resulting in the excellent refinement of Mg2Si/Al composites.

  14. Observations of fault zone heterogeneity effects on stress alteration and slip nucleation during a fault reactivation experiment in the Mont Terri rock laboratory, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaum, C.; Guglielmi, Y.

    2016-12-01

    of the Coulomb stress variations on discrete fault planes, considering the injection pressure variations with time in the packed-off sections as the source parameters. Results suggest that the fault architecture and heterogeneity play an important role on the local stress variation at the core-damage zone interface, favouring slip activation below sigma 3.

  15. Ice nucleation activity of polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichler, Magdalena; Felgitsch, Laura; Haeusler, Thomas; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in the atmosphere. It shows direct impact on our climate by triggering ice cloud formation and therefore it has much influence on the radiation balance of our planet (Lohmann et al. 2002; Mishchenko et al. 1996). The process itself is not completely understood so far and many questions remain open. Different substances have been found to exhibit ice nucleation activity (INA). Due to their vast differences in chemistry and morphology it is difficult to predict what substance will make good ice nuclei and which will not. Hence simple model substances must be found and be tested regarding INA. Our work aims at gaining to a deeper understanding of heterogeneous ice nucleation. We intend to find some reference standards with defined chemistry, which may explain the mechanisms of heterogeneous ice nucleation. A particular focus lies on biological carbohydrates in regards to their INA. Biological carbohydrates are widely distributed in all kingdoms of life. Mostly they are specific for certain organisms and have well defined purposes, e.g. structural polysaccharides like chitin (in fungi and insects) and pectin (in plants), which has also water-binding properties. Since they are widely distributed throughout our biosphere and mostly safe to use for nutrition purposes, they are well studied and easily accessible, rendering them ideal candidates as proxies. In our experiments we examined various carbohydrates, like the already mentioned chitin and pectin, as well as their chemical modifications. Lohmann U.; A Glaciation Indirect Aerosol Effect Caused by Soot Aerosols; J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 24 No.4; pp 11-1 - 11-4; 2002 Mishchenko M.I., Rossow W.B., Macke A., Lacis A. A.; Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Albedo, Bidirectional Reflectance and Optical Thickness Retrieval Accuracy to Ice Particle Shape, J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 101, No D12; pp. 16,973 - 16,985; 1996

  16. Reaction coordinate of incipient methane clathrate hydrate nucleation.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Brian C; Knott, Brandon C; Beckham, Gregg T; Wu, David T; Sum, Amadeu K

    2014-11-20

    Nucleation from solution is a ubiquitous phenomenon with relevance to myriad scientific disciplines, including pharmaceuticals, biomineralization, and disease. One prominent example is the nucleation of clathrate hydrates, multicomponent crystalline inclusion compounds relevant to the energy industry where they block pipelines and also constitute a potential vast energy resource. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of incipient hydrate formation remains unknown. Herein, we employ advanced molecular simulation tools (pB histogram, equilibrium path sampling) to provide a statistical-mechanical basis for extracting physical insight into the molecular steps by which clathrates form. Through testing the Mutually Coordinated Guest (MCG) order parameter, we demonstrate that both guest (methane) and host (water) structuring are crucial to accurately describe the nucleation of hydrates and determine a critical nucleus size of MCG-1 = 16 at 255 K and 500 bar. Equipped with a validated (and novel) reaction coordinate, subsequent equilibrium path sampling simulations yield the free energy barrier and nucleation rate. The resulting quantitative nucleation process is described by the MCG clustering mechanism. This constitutes a significant advance in the field of hydrates research, as the fitness of a molecular descriptor has never been statistically verified. More broadly, this work has significance to a wide range of multicomponent nucleation contexts wherein the formation mechanism depends on contributions from both solute and solvent.

  17. Ice Nucleation in Deep Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew; Stevens, David; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The processes controlling production of ice crystals in deep, rapidly ascending convective columns are poorly understood due to the difficulties involved with either modeling or in situ sampling of these violent clouds. A large number of ice crystals are no doubt generated when droplets freeze at about -40 C. However, at higher levels, these crystals are likely depleted due to precipitation and detrainment. As the ice surface area decreases, the relative humidity can increase well above ice saturation, resulting in bursts of ice nucleation. We will present simulations of these processes using a large-eddy simulation model with detailed microphysics. Size bins are included for aerosols, liquid droplets, ice crystals, and mixed-phase (ice/liquid) hydrometers. Microphysical processes simulated include droplet activation, freezing, melting, homogeneous freezing of sulfate aerosols, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. We are focusing on the importance of ice nucleation events in the upper part of the cloud at temperatures below -40 C. We will show that the ultimate evolution of the cloud in this region (and the anvil produced by the convection) is sensitive to these ice nucleation events, and hence to the composition of upper tropospheric aerosols that get entrained into the convective column.

  18. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  19. Transient nucleation in glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.

    1991-01-01

    Nucleation rates in condensed systems are frequently not at their steady state values. Such time dependent (or transient) nucleation is most clearly observed in devitrification studies of metallic and silicate glasses. The origin of transient nucleation and its role in the formation and stability of desired phases and microstructures are discussed. Numerical models of nucleation in isothermal and nonisothermal situations, based on the coupled differential equations describing cluster evolution within the classical theory, are presented. The importance of transient nucleation in glass formation and crystallization is discussed.

  20. Can Hail and Rain Nucleate Cloud Droplets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakaran, Prasanth; Weiss, Stephan; Krekhov, Alexei; Pumir, Alain; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2017-09-01

    We present results from moist convection in a mixture of pressurized sulfur hexafluoride (liquid and vapor), and helium (gas) to model the wet and dry components of the Earth's atmosphere. To allow for homogeneous nucleation, we operate the experiment close to critical conditions. We report on the nucleation of microdroplets in the wake of large cold liquid drops falling through the supersaturated atmosphere and show that the homogeneous nucleation is caused by isobaric cooling of the saturated sulfur hexafluoride vapor. Our results carry over to atmospheric clouds: falling hail and cold rain drops may enhance the heterogeneous nucleation of microdroplets in their wake under supersaturated atmospheric conditions. We also observed that under appropriate circumstances settling microdroplets form a rather stable horizontal cloud layer, which separates regions of super- and subcritical saturation.

  1. Nucleation of shear bands in amorphous alloys

    PubMed Central

    Perepezko, John H.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Chen, Ming-Wei; Wang, Jun-Qiang; Gonzalez, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The initiation and propagation of shear bands is an important mode of localized inhomogeneous deformation that occurs in a wide range of materials. In metallic glasses, shear band development is considered to center on a structural heterogeneity, a shear transformation zone that evolves into a rapidly propagating shear band under a shear stress above a threshold. Deformation by shear bands is a nucleation-controlled process, but the initiation process is unclear. Here we use nanoindentation to probe shear band nucleation during loading by measuring the first pop-in event in the load–depth curve which is demonstrated to be associated with shear band formation. We analyze a large number of independent measurements on four different bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) alloys and reveal the operation of a bimodal distribution of the first pop-in loads that are associated with different shear band nucleation sites that operate at different stress levels below the glass transition temperature, Tg. The nucleation kinetics, the nucleation barriers, and the density for each site type have been determined. The discovery of multiple shear band nucleation sites challenges the current view of nucleation at a single type of site and offers opportunities for controlling the ductility of BMG alloys. PMID:24594599

  2. Size Dependant Nucleation of Confined 2-Decanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanuel, Samuel; Bauer, Hillary; Safiq, Alexandrea; Dulmaa, Jargalsaikhan; Khraisat, Amer

    2012-02-01

    We have studied freezing and melting of physically confined 2-decanol in nano porous silica using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). Both melting and freezing temperatures are suppressed for physically confined 2-decanol. In the presence of bulk, freezing of the confined system is triggered by freezing of the bulk where nucleation is heterogeneous. There is, however, a cutoff size between 100 nm and 300 nm where phase transition is no longer initiated through heterogeneous nucleation. Below the cutoff size, nucleation is homogeneous where the confined system has to be supercooled further before any phase transition can occur. Melting of the confined system, on the other hand, is not influenced by the presence or absence of the bulk.

  3. Nucleation and droplet growth at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luijten, Carlo Cornelis Maria

    Homogeneous nucleation, the first stage of droplet formation in the absence of foreign particles, usually takes place in the presence of one or more supercritical carrier gases. The present work aimed at a systematic investigation of the effects of carrier gas pressure on nucleation and droplet growth. Using the so-called nucleation pulse method, nucleation and droplet growth can be separated in time, which facilitates quantitative study of these processes using Constant Angle Mie Scattering and light extinction. The method was implemented in a modified shock tube, using gas dynamic principles to create the pulse. In this way, nucleation and growth rates were measured as a function of temperature, pressure, and composition. Composition measurement at high pressure was achieved along two different routes. Water vapour concentrations were determined using a commercial humidity sensor, after calibration with total pressure as an independent parameter. Gas chromatography was used to determine hydrocarbon concentrations, after pressure reduction of the mixture over a thermostatic capillary tube. Using the above analysis techniques, nucleation and droplet growth experiments were performed for several vapour-gas mixtures, at pressures between 1 and 40 bar. Mixtures with a varying degree of interaction were selected, to allow for a systematic investigation of carrier gas influence. Besides these binary mixtures, the first quantitative nucleation and growth rates for- multicomponent-natural gas were obtained. Theoretical models for both nucleation and droplet growth were adapted to take into account the presence of a carrier gas, under condition of small carrier gas solubility. The main effects involved are the increase of saturated vapour density and decrease of surface tension with pressure. On the basis of our experiments, these effects were demonstrated to play important and counteracting roles in high pressure nucleation. Using Density Functional Theory, both effects

  4. Multicomponent MR Image Denoising

    PubMed Central

    Manjón, José V.; Thacker, Neil A.; Lull, Juan J.; Garcia-Martí, Gracian; Martí-Bonmatí, Luís; Robles, Montserrat

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance images are normally corrupted by random noise from the measurement process complicating the automatic feature extraction and analysis of clinical data. It is because of this reason that denoising methods have been traditionally applied to improve MR image quality. Many of these methods use the information of a single image without taking into consideration the intrinsic multicomponent nature of MR images. In this paper we propose a new filter to reduce random noise in multicomponent MR images by spatially averaging similar pixels using information from all available image components to perform the denoising process. The proposed algorithm also uses a local Principal Component Analysis decomposition as a postprocessing step to remove more noise by using information not only in the spatial domain but also in the intercomponent domain dealing in a higher noise reduction without significantly affecting the original image resolution. The proposed method has been compared with similar state-of-art methods over synthetic and real clinical multicomponent MR images showing an improved performance in all cases analyzed. PMID:19888431

  5. Ice-Nucleating Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Hitoshi

    Since the discovery of ice-nucleating bacteria in 1974 by Maki et al., a large number of studies on the biological characteristics, ice-nucleating substance, ice nucleation gene and frost damage etc. of the bacteria have been carried out. Ice-nucleating bacteria can cause the freezing of water at relatively warm temperature (-2.3°C). Tween 20 was good substrates for ice-nucleating activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens KUIN-1. Major fatty acids of Isolate (Pseudomonas fluorescens) W-11 grown at 30°C were palmitic, cis-9-hexadecenoic and cis-11-octadecenoic which amounted to 90% of the total fatty acids. Sequence analysis shows that an ice nucleation gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens is related to the gene of Pseudomonas syringae.

  6. Overview: Experimental studies of crystal nucleation: Metals and colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlach, Dieter M.; Palberg, Thomas; Klassen, Ina; Klein, Stefan; Kobold, Raphael

    2016-12-01

    Crystallization is one of the most important phase transformations of first order. In the case of metals and alloys, the liquid phase is the parent phase of materials production. The conditions of the crystallization process control the as-solidified material in its chemical and physical properties. Nucleation initiates the crystallization of a liquid. It selects the crystallographic phase, stable or meta-stable. Its detailed knowledge is therefore mandatory for the design of materials. We present techniques of containerless processing for nucleation studies of metals and alloys. Experimental results demonstrate the power of these methods not only for crystal nucleation of stable solids but in particular also for investigations of crystal nucleation of metastable solids at extreme undercooling. This concerns the physical nature of heterogeneous versus homogeneous nucleation and nucleation of phases nucleated under non-equilibrium conditions. The results are analyzed within classical nucleation theory that defines the activation energy of homogeneous nucleation in terms of the interfacial energy and the difference of Gibbs free energies of solid and liquid. The interfacial energy acts as barrier for the nucleation process. Its experimental determination is difficult in the case of metals. In the second part of this work we therefore explore the potential of colloidal suspensions as model systems for the crystallization process. The nucleation process of colloids is observed in situ by optical observation and ultra-small angle X-ray diffraction using high intensity synchrotron radiation. It allows an unambiguous discrimination of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation as well as the determination of the interfacial free energy of the solid-liquid interface. Our results are used to construct Turnbull plots of colloids, which are discussed in relation to Turnbull plots of metals and support the hypothesis that colloids are useful model systems to investigate crystal

  7. Phase coarsening in multicomponent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K. G.; Wang, Gabriel Q.

    2017-02-01

    A theory for phase coarsening in multicomponent systems is developed in which both the multicomponent thermodynamic effect and kinetic effect from a nonzero volume fraction are considered. In contrast to previous theory, a diffusion screening zone for a coarsening particle due to nonzero volume fraction is introduced. The evolution equation for phase coarsening in multicomponent systems is derived in a rigorous way in the framework of the maximum rate of dissipation with the constraints of mass and energy conservation. Existing previous relations are recovered and generalized. Some findings such as the relationship between the maximum particle size and volume fraction and particle size distribution in multicomponent systems are discovered.

  8. Experiments on Nucleation in Different Flow Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuzick, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    The vast majority of metallic engineering materials are solidified from the liquid phase. Understanding the solidification process is essential to control microstructure, which in turn, determines the properties of materials. The genesis of solidification is nucleation, where the first stable solid forms from the liquid phase. Nucleation kinetics determine the degree of undercooling and phase selection. As such, it is important to understand nucleation phenomena in order to control solidification or glass formation in metals and alloys. Early experiments in nucleation kinetics were accomplished by droplet dispersion methods [1-6]. Dilitometry was used by Turnbull and others, and more recently differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry have been used for kinetic studies. These techniques have enjoyed success; however, there are difficulties with these experiments. Since materials are dispersed in a medium, the character of the emulsion/metal interface affects the nucleation behavior. Statistics are derived from the large number of particles observed in a single experiment, but dispersions have a finite size distribution which adds to the uncertainty of the kinetic determinations. Even though temperature can be controlled quite well before the onset of nucleation, the release of the latent heat of fusion during nucleation of particles complicates the assumption of isothermality during these experiments. Containerless processing has enabled another approach to the study of nucleation kinetics [7]. With levitation techniques it is possible to undercool one sample to nucleation repeatedly in a controlled manner, such that the statistics of the nucleation process can be derived from multiple experiments on a single sample. The authors have fully developed the analysis of nucleation experiments on single samples following the suggestions of Skripov [8]. The advantage of these experiments is that the samples are directly observable. The nucleation

  9. Effect of solute on the nucleation and propagation of ice.

    PubMed

    Charoenrein, S; Goddard, M; Reid, D S

    1991-01-01

    Using the emulsion technique, we have studied nucleation of ice in aqueous solutions containing silver iodide or Pseudomonas syringae. Using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC), we determined characteristic temperatures of nucleation, and also rates of nucleation at selected temperatures. The freezing point depression induced by added solute is linearly related to the lowering of both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation temperature. Nucleation kinetics depend on a fifth power function of the temperature. Solute is found to affect the parameters of this relationship in different ways, dependent upon the nature of the catalytic site for ice nucleation. We have also studied the effect of composition on the linear propagation velocity (LPV) of ice in undercooled solutions contained in a U-tube. We have determined velocities in a range of concentrations of sugar solution at the same undercooling, and also as a function of undercooling. The role of added polymer has also been investigated. It is affected by the sugar concentration.

  10. Diamond Nucleation Using Polyethene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Makarov, Vladimir (Inventor); Varshney, Deepak (Inventor); Weiner, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  11. Diamond nucleation using polyethene

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir; Varshney, Deepak; Weiner, Brad

    2013-07-23

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  12. Kinetic theory of diffusion-limited nucleation.

    PubMed

    Philippe, T; Bonvalet, M; Blavette, D

    2016-05-28

    We examine binary nucleation in the size and composition space {R,c} using the formalism of the multivariable theory [N. V. Alekseechkin, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 124512 (2006)]. We show that the variable c drops out of consideration for very large curvature of the new phase Gibbs energy with composition. Consequently nuclei around the critical size have the critical composition, which is derived from the condition of criticality for the canonical variables and is found not to depend on surface tension. In this case, nucleation kinetics can be investigated in the size space only. Using macroscopic kinetics, we determine the general expression for the condensation rate when growth is limited by bulk diffusion, which accounts for both diffusion and capillarity and exhibits a different dependence with the critical size, as compared with the interface-limited regime. This new expression of the condensation rate for bulk diffusion-limited nucleation is the counterpart of the classical interface-limited result. We then extend our analysis to multicomponent solutions.

  13. Shape-anisotropic heterogeneous nucleation and magnetic Gibbs-Thomson effect in itinerant-electron metamagnetic transition of La(Fe0.88Si0.12)13 magnetocaloric compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, A.; Kondo, T.; Kano, M.; Yako, H.

    2013-01-01

    Macroscopic anisotropy of spatial selectivity in magnetic nucleation and growth was clarified for itinerant-electron metamagnetic transition of La(Fe0.88Si0.12)13 by the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau model combined with the Maxwell electromagnetic equation. Spontaneous generation of voltage supports symmetric growth in the longitudinal direction of the specimen as predicted by the simulation. The difference between nucleation-growth behaviors in thermally induced transition and those in field-induced transition is also elucidated. Electrical resistivity measurements also detect anisotropic growth of the induced phase. These results imply that the magnetic-dipole version of Gibbs-Thomson effect governs growth behavior.

  14. Magnetization of multicomponent ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Szalai, I; Dietrich, S

    2011-08-17

    The solution of the mean spherical approximation (MSA) integral equation for isotropic multicomponent dipolar hard sphere fluids without external fields is used to construct a density functional theory (DFT), which includes external fields, in order to obtain an analytical expression for the external field dependence of the magnetization of ferrofluidic mixtures. This DFT is based on a second-order Taylor series expansion of the free energy density functional of the anisotropic system around the corresponding isotropic MSA reference system. The ensuing results for the magnetic properties are in quantitative agreement with our canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulation data presented here.

  15. Nucleation and Crystallization in nucleated Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, Christoph; Zhuravlev, Evgeny; Wurm, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Crystallization is commonly considered as nucleation followed by a growth process. Here we apply the recently developed technique, differential fast scanning calorimetry (DFSC), for a unique, new look at the crystal growth of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) and PCL carbon nanotube composites from 185 K, below the glass transition temperature, to 330 K, close to the equilibrium melting temperature. The DFSC allows temperature control of the sample and determination of its heat capacity during temperature treatments by employing cooling and heating rates from 50 to 50,000 K/s. First, the crystal nucleation and overall crystallization half times were determined simultaneously in the range of temperatures where crystallization of PCL occurs. After attempting to analyze the experiments with the classical nucleation and growth model a new methodology is described, which addresses the specific problems of crystallization of flexible linear macromolecules. The structures seem to range from having practically unmeasurable latent heats of ordering (nuclei) to being clearly-recognizable, ordered species with rather sharp disordering endotherms at temperatures from the glass transition to equilibrium melting (increasingly perfect and larger crystals). The mechanisms and kinetics of growth (if any) involve a detailed understanding of the interaction with the surrounding rigid amorphous fraction (RAF) in dependence of crystal size and perfection. E. Zhuravlev, J.W.P. Schmelzer, B. Wunderlich and C. Schick, Kinetics of nucleation and crystallization in poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), Polymer 52 (2011) 1983-1997.

  16. Homogeneous ice nucleation from aqueous inorganic/organic particles representative of biomass burning: water activity, freezing temperatures, nucleation rates.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Rigg, Yannick J

    2011-02-10

    Homogeneous ice nucleation plays an important role in the formation of cirrus clouds with subsequent effects on the global radiative budget. Here we report on homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures and corresponding nucleation rate coefficients of aqueous droplets serving as surrogates of biomass burning aerosol. Micrometer-sized (NH(4))(2)SO(4)/levoglucosan droplets with mass ratios of 10:1, 1:1, 1:5, and 1:10 and aqueous multicomponent organic droplets with and without (NH(4))(2)SO(4) under typical tropospheric temperatures and relative humidities are investigated experimentally using a droplet conditioning and ice nucleation apparatus coupled to an optical microscope with image analysis. Homogeneous freezing was determined as a function of temperature and water activity, a(w), which was set at droplet preparation conditions. The ice nucleation data indicate that minor addition of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) to the aqueous organic droplets renders the temperature dependency of water activity negligible in contrast to the case of aqueous organic solution droplets. The mean homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient derived from 8 different aqueous droplet compositions with average diameters of ∼60 μm for temperatures as low as 195 K and a(w) of 0.82-1 is 2.18 × 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1). The experimentally derived freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients are in agreement with predictions of the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory when taking predictive uncertainties into account. However, the presented ice nucleation data indicate that the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory overpredicts the freezing temperatures by up to 3 K and corresponding ice nucleation rate coefficients by up to ∼2 orders of magnitude. A shift of 0.01 in a(w), which is well within the uncertainty of typical field and laboratory relative humidity measurements, brings experimental and predicted freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice

  17. Homogeneous freezing nucleation of stratospheric solution droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    The classical theory of homogeneous nucleation was used to calculate the freezing rate of sulfuric acid solution aerosols under stratospheric conditions. The freezing of stratospheric aerosols would be important for the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in the Arctic and Antarctic stratospheres. In addition, the rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions on stratospheric aerosols may be very sensitive to their state. The calculations indicate that homogeneous freezing nucleation of pure water ice in the stratospheric solution droplets would occur at temperatures below about 192 K. However, the physical properties of H2SO4 solution at such low temperatures are not well known, and it is possible that sulfuric acid aerosols will freeze out at temperatures ranging from about 180 to 195 K. It is also shown that the temperature at which the aerosols freeze is nearly independent of their size.

  18. Homogeneous freezing nucleation of stratospheric solution droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-10-01

    The classical theory of homogeneous nucleation was used to calculate the freezing rate of sulfuric acid solution aerosols under stratospheric conditions. The freezing of stratospheric aerosols would be important for the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in the Arctic and Antarctic stratospheres. In addition, the rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions on stratospheric aerosols may be very sensitive to their state. The calculations indicate that homogeneous freezing nucleation of pure water ice in the stratospheric solution droplets would occur at temperatures below about 192 K. However, the physical properties of H2SO4 solution at such low temperatures are not well known, and it is possible that sulfuric acid aerosols will freeze out at temperatures ranging from about 180 to 195 K. It is also shown that the temperature at which the aerosols freeze is nearly independent of their size.

  19. Nucleation in food colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povey, Malcolm J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Nucleation in food colloids has been studied in detail using ultrasound spectroscopy. Our data show that classical nucleation theory (CNT) remains a sound basis from which to understand nucleation in food colloids and analogous model systems using n-alkanes. Various interpretations and modifications of CNT are discussed with regard to their relevance to food colloids. Much of the evidence presented is based on the ultrasound velocity spectrometry measurements which has many advantages for the study of nucleating systems compared to light scattering and NMR due to its sensitivity at low solid contents and its ability to measure true solid contents in the nucleation and early crystal growth stages. Ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy also responds to critical fluctuations in the induction region. We show, however, that a periodic pressure fluctuation such as a quasi-continuous (as opposed to a pulse comprising only a few pressure cycles) ultrasound field can alter the nucleation process, even at very low acoustic intensity. Thus care must be taken when using ultrasound techniques that the measurements do not alter the studied processes. Quasi-continuous ultrasound fields may enhance or suppress nucleation and the criteria to determine such effects are derived. The conclusions of this paper are relevant to colloidal systems in foods, pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals, cosmetics, and personal products.

  20. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L. M. C.

    2014-12-14

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a metastable phase and a nucleating phase, we derive the fundamental dynamics for this phenomenon, based on continuous Fokker-Planck equations. We are readily able to treat non-isothermal nucleation even when the nucleating cores cannot be attributed intensive thermodynamic properties. In addition, we capture the dynamics of the time-dependent metastable phase being continuously expelled from the nucleating phase, and keep rigorous track of the volume corrections to the dynamics. Within our framework the definition of a thermodynamic nuclei temperature is manifest. For the special case of nucleation of a gas phase towards its vapor-liquid coexistence, we illustrate that our approach is capable of reproducing recent literature results obtained by more microscopic considerations for the suppression of the nucleation rate due to nonisothermal effects.

  1. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, M; Sagis, L M C

    2014-12-14

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a metastable phase and a nucleating phase, we derive the fundamental dynamics for this phenomenon, based on continuous Fokker-Planck equations. We are readily able to treat non-isothermal nucleation even when the nucleating cores cannot be attributed intensive thermodynamic properties. In addition, we capture the dynamics of the time-dependent metastable phase being continuously expelled from the nucleating phase, and keep rigorous track of the volume corrections to the dynamics. Within our framework the definition of a thermodynamic nuclei temperature is manifest. For the special case of nucleation of a gas phase towards its vapor-liquid coexistence, we illustrate that our approach is capable of reproducing recent literature results obtained by more microscopic considerations for the suppression of the nucleation rate due to nonisothermal effects.

  2. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L. M. C.

    2014-12-01

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a metastable phase and a nucleating phase, we derive the fundamental dynamics for this phenomenon, based on continuous Fokker-Planck equations. We are readily able to treat non-isothermal nucleation even when the nucleating cores cannot be attributed intensive thermodynamic properties. In addition, we capture the dynamics of the time-dependent metastable phase being continuously expelled from the nucleating phase, and keep rigorous track of the volume corrections to the dynamics. Within our framework the definition of a thermodynamic nuclei temperature is manifest. For the special case of nucleation of a gas phase towards its vapor-liquid coexistence, we illustrate that our approach is capable of reproducing recent literature results obtained by more microscopic considerations for the suppression of the nucleation rate due to nonisothermal effects.

  3. Two-Dimensional Nucleation of Ice from Supercooled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, L. H.; Seidler, G. T.

    2001-03-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation is the initial formation of a stable phase from a metastable phase in the presence of a catalyzing surface. This ubiquitous process has consequences ranging from metallurgy to the formation of kidney stones. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice plays a central role in cloud formation, suggesting one possible connection between anthropogenic pollutants and global climate. A key topic in the theory of nucleation is the geometry of the critical nucleus. Standard nucleation theories generally predict a compact critical nucleus with a surface of roughly constant curvature. We report measurements of the temperature dependent nucleation rate of ice from water samples supporting aliphatic alcohol Langmuir films. We use classical nucleation theory to extract thermodynamic parameters from the measured nucleation rates. From these parameters we conclude that both the effective free energy barrier and the molecular kinetics of nucleation are dominated by the physics at the interface. Our results give self-consistent evidence that the geometry of the critical nucleus in this system is essentially two-dimensional.

  4. Dynamics of ice nucleation on water repellent surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Azar; Yamada, Masako; Li, Ri; Shang, Wen; Otta, Shourya; Zhong, Sheng; Ge, Liehui; Dhinojwala, Ali; Conway, Ken R; Bahadur, Vaibhav; Vinciquerra, A Joseph; Stephens, Brian; Blohm, Margaret L

    2012-02-14

    Prevention of ice accretion and adhesion on surfaces is relevant to many applications, leading to improved operation safety, increased energy efficiency, and cost reduction. Development of passive nonicing coatings is highly desirable, since current antiicing strategies are energy and cost intensive. Superhydrophobicity has been proposed as a lead passive nonicing strategy, yet the exact mechanism of delayed icing on these surfaces is not clearly understood. In this work, we present an in-depth analysis of ice formation dynamics upon water droplet impact on surfaces with different wettabilities. We experimentally demonstrate that ice nucleation under low-humidity conditions can be delayed through control of surface chemistry and texture. Combining infrared (IR) thermometry and high-speed photography, we observe that the reduction of water-surface contact area on superhydrophobic surfaces plays a dual role in delaying nucleation: first by reducing heat transfer and second by reducing the probability of heterogeneous nucleation at the water-substrate interface. This work also includes an analysis (based on classical nucleation theory) to estimate various homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation rates in icing situations. The key finding is that ice nucleation delay on superhydrophobic surfaces is more prominent at moderate degrees of supercooling, while closer to the homogeneous nucleation temperature, bulk and air-water interface nucleation effects become equally important. The study presented here offers a comprehensive perspective on the efficacy of textured surfaces for nonicing applications.

  5. Probing Individual Ice Nucleation Events with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; China, Swarup; Knopf, Daniel; Gilles, Mary; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is one of the processes of critical relevance to a range of topics in the fundamental and the applied science and technologies. Heterogeneous ice nucleation initiated by particles proceeds where microscopic properties of particle surfaces essentially control nucleation mechanisms. Ice nucleation in the atmosphere on particles governs the formation of ice and mixed phase clouds, which in turn influence the Earth's radiative budget and climate. Heterogeneous ice nucleation is still insufficiently understood and poses significant challenges in predictive understanding of climate change. We present a novel microscopy platform allowing observation of individual ice nucleation events at temperature range of 193-273 K and relative humidity relevant for ice formation in the atmospheric clouds. The approach utilizes a home built novel ice nucleation cell interfaced with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (IN-ESEM system). The IN-ESEM system is applied for direct observation of individual ice formation events, determining ice nucleation mechanisms, freezing temperatures, and relative humidity onsets. Reported microanalysis of the ice nucleating particles (INP) include elemental composition detected by the energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (EDX), and advanced speciation of the organic content in particles using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The performance of the IN-ESEM system is validated through a set of experiments with kaolinite particles with known ice nucleation propensity. We demonstrate an application of the IN-ESEM system to identify and characterize individual INP within a complex mixture of ambient particles.

  6. Molecular Ice Nucleation Activity of Birch Pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgitsch, Laura; Bichler, Magdalena; Häusler, Thomas; Weiss, Victor U.; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation plays a major part in ecosystem and climate. Due to the triggering of ice cloud formation it influences the radiation balance of the earth, but also on the ground it can be found to be important in many processes of nature. So far the process of heterogeneous ice nucleation is not fully understood and many questions remain to be answered. Biological ice nucleation is hereby from great interest, because it shows the highest freezing temperatures. Several bacteria and fungi act as ice nuclei. A famous example is Pseudomonas syringae, a bacterium in commercial use (Snomax®), which increases the freezing from homogeneous freezing temperatures of approx. -40° C (for small volumes as in cloud droplets) to temperatures up to -2° C. In 2001 it was found that birch pollen can trigger ice nucleation (Diehl et al. 2001; Diehl et al. 2002). For a long time it was believed that this is due to macroscopic features of the pollen surface. Recent findings of Bernhard Pummer (2012) show a different picture. The ice nuclei are not attached on the pollen surface directly, but on surface material which can be easily washed off. This shows that not only the surface morphology, but also specific molecules or molecular structures are responsible for the ice nucleation activity of birch pollen. With various analytic methods we work on elucidating the structure of these molecules as well as the mechanism with which they trigger ice nucleation. To solve this we use various instrumental analytic techniques like Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS), and Gas-phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis (GEMMA). Also standard techniques like various chromatographic separation techniques and solvent extraction are in use. We state here that this feature might be due to the aggregation of small molecules, with agglomerates showing a specific surface structure. Our results

  7. Earthquake nucleation scaling from laboratory to Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Stefan; Kaneko, Yoshihiro; Harbord, Chris; Latour, Soumaya; Carpenter, Brett; De Paola, Nicola

    2017-04-01

    Migrating foreshock sequences along major plate boundaries and geodetic transient anomalies have been interpreted as indicators of aseismic creep for days to months prior to the initiation of earthquakes. In other cases no significant precursory activity is detected, even at well-instrumented sites, suggesting an abrupt rupture initiation. Both the nucleation size (e.g. Rice and Ruina's hRR∗ or Andrew's Lc) or its duration can be highly variable. Here we analyse the scaling of nucleation and the controls on stick-slip instability based on a review of recent laboratory experimental results. (1) Rupture propagation experiments on smooth model faults show a two-phase nucleation process with variable size and duration depending on loading rate, normal stress and frictional parameters. These results can be reproduced by numerical models incorporating rate-and-state friction laws, and can be up-scaled to simulate the nucleation process of crustal earthquakes. We used frictional properties from samples of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) to model the nucleation phase for magnitude˜2 repeating earthquakes at a 2.8-km depth. We predict that the nucleation could be detectable a few hours before the earthquake by strain measurements in the existing borehole. (2) An alternative set of experiments on rough model faults, instead, shows that initiation of rupture is primarily controlled by the size and the amount of heterogeneity induced by the fault topography and its interplay with the normal stress. In this case the onset of stick-slip is not predicted by the stability analysis within the rate-and-state framework, but rather by energy considerations more akin to Griffith's criterion in the presence of flaws. Although these two sets of experimental observations and their modelling are difficult to reconcile, they may be representative end members of earthquake faults with different degrees of heterogeneity.

  8. Experiments on Nucleation in Different Flow Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuzick, R. J.; Hofmeister, W. H.; Morton, C. M.; Robinson, M. B.

    1998-01-01

    can be measured by noncontact optical pyrometry, the mass of the sample is known, and post-processing analysis can be conducted on the sample. The disadvantages are that temperature measurement must have exceptionally high precision, and it is not possible to isolate specific heterogeneous sites as in droplet dispersions. Levitation processing of refractory materials in ultra high vacuum provides an avenue to conduct these kinetic studies on single samples. Two experimental methods have been identified where ultra high vacuum experiments are possible; electrostatic levitation in ground-based experiments and electromagnetic processing in low earth orbit on TEMPUS. Such experiments, reported here, were conducted on zirconium. Liquid zirconium is an excellent solvent and has a high solubility for contaminants contained in the bulk material as well as those contaminants found in the vacuum environment. Oxides, nitrides, and carbides do not exist in the melt, and do not form on the surface of molten zirconium, for the materials and vacuum levels used in this study. Ground-based experiments with electrostatic levitation have shown that the statistical nucleation kinetic experiments are viable and yield results which are consistent with classical nucleation theory. The advantage of low earth orbit experiments is the ability to vary the flow conditions in the liquid prior to nucleation. The put-pose of nucleation experiments in TEMPUS was to examine.

  9. Ice Nucleation Near the Surfactant-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlin, Caleb; Cantrell, Will; Taylor, Caroline

    2008-03-01

    Ice nucleation is a fundamental component of the atmospheric mechanisms driving the formation of clouds. Atmospheric nucleation occurs with a variety of compounds and conditions, but understanding the behavior of water is key in all cases. We have used multiscale molecular simulations to study heterogeneous nucleation in clouds, probing the influence of long-chain alcohols on the freezing of water droplets. Ice nucleation occurs at a finite distance from the heterogeneous surface, due to the disruption of the hydrogen bond network in response to the surfactant-water interface. The penetration depth of the disturbance is found to be dependent upon the chain length and surface organization, as well as the acidity of the terminal alcohol group.

  10. Injection of highly supersaturated oxygen solutions without nucleation.

    PubMed

    Creech, J; Divino, V; Patterson, W; Zalesky, P J; Brennen, C E

    2002-12-01

    It is possible to inject highly supersaturated aqueous solutions of gas through a small capillary into an aqueous environment without the formation of significant gas bubbles. Such a technique has considerable potential therapeutic value in the treatment, for example, of heart attacks and strokes. The present paper is the second in a series (see Brereton et al. [1]) investigating the basic phenomenon behind this surprising effect. Recent experiments clearly demonstrate that the nucleation, when it does occur, results from heterogeneous nucleation on the interior surface of the distal end of the capillary. This paper describes the effects of the treatment of this interior surface on the nucleation processes and the results of high speed video observations of the phenomena. A heterogeneous nucleation model is presented which is in accord with the experimental observations.

  11. The Solidification of Multicomponent Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Boettinger, William J.

    2017-01-01

    Various topics taken from the author’s research portfolio that involve multicomponent alloy solidification are reviewed. Topics include: ternary eutectic solidification and Scheil-Gulliver paths in ternary systems. A case study of the solidification of commercial 2219 aluminum alloy is described. Also described are modifications of the Scheil-Gulliver analysis to treat dendrite tip kinetics and solid diffusion for multicomponent alloys. PMID:28819348

  12. Main features of nucleation in model solutions of blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Solodyankina, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    The regularities of nucleation in a model solution of human blood plasma under the conditions similar to physiological have been investigated. The induction order and constants are determined. It is shown that an increase in supersaturation leads to a transition from heterogeneous to homogeneous nucleation of crystallites. The critical nucleus size is estimated for a pure model system and for a system containing a number of additives. The impurities under study are found to form the following descending sequence with respect to their effect on nucleation: alanine > glucose > glycine > citric acid > milky acid > magnesium ions.

  13. Direct imaging of quantum wires nucleated at diatomic steps

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, S. I.; Varela, M.; Sales, D. L.; Ben, T.; Pizarro, J.; Galindo, P. L.; Fuster, D.; Gonzalez, Y.; Gonzalez, L.; Pennycook, S. J.

    2007-10-01

    Atomic steps at growth surfaces are important heterogeneous sources for nucleation of epitaxial nano-objects. In the presence of misfit strain, we show that the nucleation process takes place preferentially at the upper terrace of the step as a result of the local stress relaxation. Evidence for strain-induced nucleation comes from the direct observation by postgrowth, atomic resolution, Z-contrast imaging of an InAs-rich region in a nanowire located on the upper terrace surface of an interfacial diatomic step.

  14. Toward a quantitative model of metamorphic nucleation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidies, F.; Pattison, D. R. M.; de Capitani, C.

    2011-11-01

    The formation of metamorphic garnet during isobaric heating is simulated on the basis of the classical nucleation and reaction rate theories and Gibbs free energy dissipation in a multi-component model system. The relative influences are studied of interfacial energy, chemical mobility at the surface of garnet clusters, heating rate and pressure on interface-controlled garnet nucleation and growth kinetics. It is found that the interfacial energy controls the departure from equilibrium required to nucleate garnet if attachment and detachment processes at the surface of garnet limit the overall crystallization rate. The interfacial energy for nucleation of garnet in a metapelite of the aureole of the Nelson Batholith, BC, is estimated to range between 0.03 and 0.3 J/m2 at a pressure of ca. 3,500 bar. This corresponds to a thermal overstep of the garnet-forming reaction of ca. 30°C. The influence of the heating rate on thermal overstepping is negligible. A significant feedback is predicted between chemical fractionation associated with garnet formation and the kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth of garnet giving rise to its lognormal—shaped crystal size distribution.

  15. Direct observation of ice nucleation events on individual atmospheric particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Knopf, Daniel A.; China, Swarup; Arey, Bruce W.; Harder, Tristan H.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is a physical chemistry process of critical relevance to a range of topics in the fundamental and the applied sciences and technologies. Heterogeneous ice nucleation remains insufficiently understood. This is in part due to the lack of experimental methods capable of in situ visualization of ice formation over nucleating substrates with microscopically characterized morphology and composition. We present development, validation and first applications of a novel electron microscopy platform allowing observation of individual ice nucleation events at temperature and relative humidity (RH) relevant for ice formation in a broad range of environmental and applied technology processes. The approach utilizes a custom-built ice nucleation cell, interfaced with an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (IN-ESEM system). The IN-ESEM system allows dynamic observations of individual ice formation events over particles of atmospheric relevance and determination of the ice nucleation mechanisms. Additional IN-ESEM experiments allow examination of the location of ice formation on the surface of individual particles and micro-spectroscopy analysis of the ice nucleating particles (INPs). This includes elemental composition detected by the energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (EDX), speciation of the organic content in particles using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), and Helium ion microscopy (HeIM). The capabilities of the IN-ESEM experimental platform are demonstrated first on laboratory standards and then by chemical imaging of INPs using a complex sample of ambient particles.

  16. Gas Hydrate Nucleation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, R. E.; Zatsepina, O.; Phelps, T. J.

    2003-12-01

    The onset of gas hydrate nucleation is greatly affected by the thermal history of the water that forms its lattice structure. Hydrate formation experiments were performed in a 72 liter pressure vessel by bubbling carbon dioxide through a 1 liter column at hydrate formation pressures (1.4 to 3.7 MPa) and temperatures (275.0 to 278.0 K) to quantify this effect. They show that when even a fraction ( e. g. 20 %) of the water in which hydrate has formed was recently frozen and thawed, the overpressurization for nucleation was reduced by an average of 50 % versus experiments performed in distilled water. In those experiments where a lower overpressure is present when hydrate nucleated, they tended to form on the surface of bubbles, whereas when a higher amount of overpressure was necessary for hydrate to nucleate, they appeared to form abruptly on bubble surfaces as well as from the bulk liquid phase. In approximation of classical nucleation, hydrate formation could be described as occurring by the spontaneous joining together of arising components of the hydrate lattice. In water that was frozen, and kept at a low temperature (< 275 K), molecular simulation models predict the predominance of water molecules organized as penatmeters, a possible subunit of the hydrate lattice. Our results suggest that in nature, initiation of hydrate formation may be strongly influenced by temperature dependant pre-structuring of water molecules prior to their contact with gas.

  17. Homogeneous nucleation kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, D. H.; Appleby, M. R.; Leedom, G. L.; Babu, S. V.; Naumann, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Homogeneous nucleation kinetics are rederived in a manner fundamentally similar to the approach of classical nucleation theory with the following modifications and improvements. First, the cluster is a parent phase cluster and does not require energization to the parent state. Second, the thermodynamic potential used to describe phase stability is a continuous function along the pathway of phase decomposition. Third, the kinetics of clustering corresponds directly to the diffusional flux of monomers through the cluster distribution and are formally similar to classical theory with the resulting kinetic equation modified by two terms in the preexponential factor. These terms correct for the influence of a supersaturation dependent clustering within the parent phase and for the influence of an asymmetrical cluster concentration as a function of cluster size at the critical cluster size. Fourth, the supersaturation dependence of the nucleation rate is of the same form as that given by classical nucleation theory. This supersaturation dependence must however be interpreted in terms of a size dependent surface tension. Finally, there are two scaling laws which describe supersaturation to either constant nucleation rate or to the thermodynamically determined physical spinodal.

  18. Dimers in nucleating vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushnikov, A. A.; Kulmala, M.

    1998-09-01

    The dimer stage of nucleation may affect considerably the rate of the nucleation process at high supersaturation of the nucleating vapor. Assuming that the dimer formation limits the nucleation rate, the kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is studied starting with the definition of dimers as bound states of two associating molecules. The partition function of dimer states is calculated by summing the Boltzmann factor over all classical bound states, and the equilibrium population of dimers is found for two types of intermolecular forces: the Lennard-Jones (LJ) and rectangular well+hard core (RW) potentials. The principle of detailed balance is used for calculating the evaporation rate of dimers. The kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is then investigated under the assumption that the trimers are stable with respect to evaporation and that the condensation rate is a power function of the particle mass. If the power exponent λ=n/(n+1) (n is a non-negative integer), the kinetics of the process is described by a finite set of moments of particle mass distribution. When the characteristic time of the particle formation by nucleation is much shorter than that of the condensational growth, n+2 universal functions of a nondimensional time define the kinetic process. These functions are calculated for λ=2/3 (gas-to-particle conversion in the free molecular regime) and λ=1/2 (formation of islands on surfaces).

  19. Colloids and Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerson, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the work funded under this grant were to develop a microphotographic technique and use it to monitor the nucleation and growth of crystals of hard colloidal spheres. Special attention is given to the possible need for microgravity studies in future experiments. A number of persons have been involved in this work. A masters student, Keith Davis, began the project and developed a sheet illumination apparatus and an image processing system for detection and analysis. His work on a segmentation program for image processing was sufficient for his master's research and has been published. A post doctoral student Bernie Olivier and a graduate student Yueming He, who originally suggested the sheet illumination, were funded by another source but along with Keith made photographic series of several samples (that had been made by Keith Davis). Data extraction has been done by Keith, Bernie, Yueming and two undergraduates employed on the grant. Results are published in Langmuir. These results describe the sheet lighting technique as one which illuminates not only the Bragg scattering crystal, but all the crystals. Thus, accurate crystal counts can be made for nucleation rate measurements. The strange crystal length scale reduction, observed in small angle light scattering (SALS) studies, following the initial nucleation and growth period, has been observed directly. The Bragg scattering (and dark) crystal size decreases in the crossover region. This could be an effect due to gravitational forces or due to over- compression of the crystal during growth. Direct observations indicate a complex morphology for the resulting hard sphere crystals. The crystal edges are fairly sharp but the crystals have a large degree of internal structure. This structure is a result of (unstable) growth and not aggregation. As yet unpublished work compares growth exponents data with data obtained by SALS. The nucleation rate density is determined over a broad volume fraction range

  20. Focus: Nucleation kinetics of shear bands in metallic glass.

    PubMed

    Wang, J Q; Perepezko, J H

    2016-12-07

    The development of shear bands is recognized as the primary mechanism in controlling the plastic deformability of metallic glasses. However, the kinetics of the nucleation of shear bands has received limited attention. The nucleation of shear bands in metallic glasses (MG) can be investigated using a nanoindentation method to monitor the development of the first pop-in event that is a signature of shear band nucleation. The analysis of a statistically significant number of first pop-in events demonstrates the stochastic behavior that is characteristic of nucleation and reveals a multimodal behavior associated with local spatial heterogeneities. The shear band nucleation rate of the two nucleation modes and the associated activation energy, activation volume, and site density were determined by loading rate experiments. The nucleation activation energy is very close to the value that is characteristic of the β relaxation in metallic glass. The identification of the rate controlling kinetics for shear band nucleation offers guidance for promoting plastic flow in metallic glass.

  1. Focus: Nucleation kinetics of shear bands in metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. Q.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    The development of shear bands is recognized as the primary mechanism in controlling the plastic deformability of metallic glasses. However, the kinetics of the nucleation of shear bands has received limited attention. The nucleation of shear bands in metallic glasses (MG) can be investigated using a nanoindentation method to monitor the development of the first pop-in event that is a signature of shear band nucleation. The analysis of a statistically significant number of first pop-in events demonstrates the stochastic behavior that is characteristic of nucleation and reveals a multimodal behavior associated with local spatial heterogeneities. The shear band nucleation rate of the two nucleation modes and the associated activation energy, activation volume, and site density were determined by loading rate experiments. The nucleation activation energy is very close to the value that is characteristic of the β relaxation in metallic glass. The identification of the rate controlling kinetics for shear band nucleation offers guidance for promoting plastic flow in metallic glass.

  2. Nucleation of electrically charged droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De, B. R.

    1979-01-01

    The nucleating droplets or clusters in many nucleation environments (various colloidal plasmas in laboratory and technological applications, astrophysical condensation environments, etc.) are likely to be at a finite electric potential. This may be due either to the presence of electrons and ions in the gas phase or to the thermal ionization or photoionization of the droplets. The paper demonstrates that this potential may introduce a nontrivial modification in the conventional nucleation theory. Some results for the typical case of nucleation of water droplets are presented. The general conclusion is that the electric potential makes nucleation harder to achieve, thereby demonstrating the importance of a finite droplet potential in the theory of nucleation.

  3. A detailed study of ice nucleation by feldspar minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whale, T. F.; Murray, B. J.; Wilson, T. W.; Carpenter, M. A.; Harrison, A.; Holden, M. A.; Vergara Temprado, J.; Morris, J.; O'Sullivan, D.

    2015-12-01

    Immersion mode heterogeneous ice nucleation plays a crucial role in controlling the composition of mixed phase clouds, which contain both supercooled liquid water and ice particles. The amount of ice in mixed phase clouds can affect cloud particle size, lifetime and extent and so affects radiative properties and precipitation. Feldspar minerals are probably the most important minerals for ice nucleation in mixed phase clouds because they nucleate ice more efficiently than other components of atmospheric mineral dust (Atkinson et al. 2013). The feldspar class of minerals is complex, containing numerous chemical compositions, several crystal polymorphs and wide variations in microscopic structure. Here we present the results of a study into ice nucleation by a wide range of different feldspars. We found that, in general, alkali feldspars nucleate ice more efficiently than plagioclase feldspars. However, we also found that particular alkali feldspars nucleate ice relatively inefficiently, suggesting that chemical composition is not the only important factor that dictates the ice nucleation efficiency of feldspar minerals. Ice nucleation by feldspar is described well by the singular model and is probably site specific in nature. The alkali feldspars that do not nucleate ice efficiently possess relatively homogenous structure on the micrometre scale suggesting that the important sites for nucleation are related to surface topography. Ice nucleation active site densities for the majority of tested alkali feldspars are similar to those found by Atkinson et al (2013), meaning that the validity of global aerosol modelling conducted in that study is not affected. Additionally, we have found that ice nucleation by feldspars is strongly influenced, both positively and negatively, by the solute content of droplets. Most other nucleants we have tested are unaffected by solutes. This provides insight into the mechanism of ice nucleation by feldspars and could be of importance

  4. Nucleation of Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinero, Valeria

    2009-03-01

    The freezing of water into ice is a ubiquitous transformation in nature, yet the microscopic mechanism of homogeneous nucleation of ice has not yet been elucidated. One of the reasons is that nucleation happens in time scales that are too fast for an experimental characterization and two slow for a systematic study with atomistic simulations. In this work we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the monatomic model of water mW[1] to shed light into the mechanism of homogeneous nucleation of ice and its relationship to the thermodynamics of supercooled water. Cooling of bulk water produces either crystalline ice or low- density amorphous ice (LDA) depending on the quenching rate. We find that ice crystallization occurs faster at temperatures close to the liquid-liquid transition, defined as the point of maximum inflection of the density with respect to the temperature. At the liquid-liquid transition, the time scale of nucleation becomes comparable to the time scale of relaxation within the liquid phase, determining --effectively- the end of the metastable liquid state. Our results imply that no ultraviscous liquid water can exist at temperatures just above the much disputed glass transition of water. We discuss how the scenario is changed when water is in confinement, and the relationship of the mechanism of ice nucleation to that of other liquids that present the same phase behavior, silicon [2] and germanium [3]. [4pt] [1] Molinero, V. & Moore, E. B. Water modeled as an intermediate element between carbon and silicon. Journal of Physical Chemistry B (2008). Online at http://pubs.acs.org/cgi- bin/abstract.cgi/jpcbfk/asap/abs/jp805227c.html [0pt] [2] Molinero, V., Sastry, S. & Angell, C. A. Tuning of tetrahedrality in a silicon potential yields a series of monatomic (metal-like) glass formers of very high fragility. Physical Review Letters 97, 075701 (2006).

  5. Effect of cloud-scale vertical velocity on the contribution of homogeneous nucleation to cirrus formation and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Liu, X.

    2016-06-01

    Ice nucleation is a critical process for the ice crystal formation in cirrus clouds. The relative contribution of homogeneous nucleation versus heterogeneous nucleation to cirrus formation differs between measurements and predictions from general circulation models. Here we perform large-ensemble simulations of the ice nucleation process using a cloud parcel model driven by observed vertical motions and find that homogeneous nucleation occurs rather infrequently, in agreement with recent measurement findings. When the effect of observed vertical velocity fluctuations on ice nucleation is considered in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, the relative contribution of homogeneous nucleation to cirrus cloud occurrences decreases to only a few percent. However, homogeneous nucleation still has strong impacts on the cloud radiative forcing. Hence, the importance of homogeneous nucleation for cirrus cloud formation should not be dismissed on the global scale.

  6. Overview: Understanding nucleation phenomena from simulations of lattice gas models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Kurt; Virnau, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in Ising/lattice gas models are reviewed with an emphasis on the general insight gained on the mechanisms by which metastable states decay. Attention is paid to the proper distinction of particles that belong to a cluster (droplet), that may trigger a nucleation event, from particles in its environment, a problem crucial near the critical point. Well below the critical point, the lattice structure causes an anisotropy of the interface tension, and hence nonspherical droplet shapes result, making the treatment nontrivial even within the conventional classical theory of homogeneous nucleation. For temperatures below the roughening transition temperature facetted crystals rather than spherical droplets result. The possibility to find nucleation barriers from a thermodynamic analysis avoiding a cluster identification on the particle level is discussed, as well as the question of curvature corrections to the interfacial tension. For the interpretation of heterogeneous nucleation at planar walls, knowledge of contact angles and line tensions is desirable, and methods to extract these quantities from simulations will be mentioned. Finally, also the problem of nucleation near the stability limit of metastable states and the significance of the spinodal curve will be discussed, in the light of simulations of Ising models with medium range interactions.

  7. Two types of amorphous protein particles facilitate crystal nucleation

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Tomoya; Vekilov, Peter G.; Furukawa, Erika; Shirai, Manabu; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Van Driessche, Alexander E. S.; Tsukamoto, Katsuo

    2017-01-01

    Nucleation, the primary step in crystallization, dictates the number of crystals, the distribution of their sizes, the polymorph selection, and other crucial properties of the crystal population. We used time-resolved liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to perform an in situ examination of the nucleation of lysozyme crystals. Our TEM images revealed that mesoscopic clusters, which are similar to those previously assumed to consist of a dense liquid and serve as nucleation precursors, are actually amorphous solid particles (ASPs) and act only as heterogeneous nucleation sites. Crystalline phases never form inside them. We demonstrate that a crystal appears within a noncrystalline particle assembling lysozyme on an ASP or a container wall, highlighting the role of heterogeneous nucleation. These findings represent a significant departure from the existing formulation of the two-step nucleation mechanism while reaffirming the role of noncrystalline particles. The insights gained may have significant implications in areas that rely on the production of protein crystals, such as structural biology, pharmacy, and biophysics, and for the fundamental understanding of crystallization mechanisms. PMID:28193873

  8. Overview: Understanding nucleation phenomena from simulations of lattice gas models.

    PubMed

    Binder, Kurt; Virnau, Peter

    2016-12-07

    Monte Carlo simulations of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in Ising/lattice gas models are reviewed with an emphasis on the general insight gained on the mechanisms by which metastable states decay. Attention is paid to the proper distinction of particles that belong to a cluster (droplet), that may trigger a nucleation event, from particles in its environment, a problem crucial near the critical point. Well below the critical point, the lattice structure causes an anisotropy of the interface tension, and hence nonspherical droplet shapes result, making the treatment nontrivial even within the conventional classical theory of homogeneous nucleation. For temperatures below the roughening transition temperature facetted crystals rather than spherical droplets result. The possibility to find nucleation barriers from a thermodynamic analysis avoiding a cluster identification on the particle level is discussed, as well as the question of curvature corrections to the interfacial tension. For the interpretation of heterogeneous nucleation at planar walls, knowledge of contact angles and line tensions is desirable, and methods to extract these quantities from simulations will be mentioned. Finally, also the problem of nucleation near the stability limit of metastable states and the significance of the spinodal curve will be discussed, in the light of simulations of Ising models with medium range interactions.

  9. Heterogeneous Catalysis: On Bathroom Mirrors and Boiling Stones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philipse, Albert P.

    2011-01-01

    Though heterogeneous nucleation of liquid droplets on a smooth surface (such as a bathroom mirror) is a classical topic in nucleation theory, it is not well-known that this topic is actually a pedagogical example of heterogeneous catalysis: the one and only effect of the surface is to lower the activation Gibbs energy of droplet formation. In…

  10. Heterogeneous Catalysis: On Bathroom Mirrors and Boiling Stones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philipse, Albert P.

    2011-01-01

    Though heterogeneous nucleation of liquid droplets on a smooth surface (such as a bathroom mirror) is a classical topic in nucleation theory, it is not well-known that this topic is actually a pedagogical example of heterogeneous catalysis: the one and only effect of the surface is to lower the activation Gibbs energy of droplet formation. In…

  11. The effects of ice on methane hydrate nucleation: a microcanonical molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengcai; Guo, Guang-Jun

    2017-07-26

    Although ice powders are widely used in gas hydrate formation experiments, the effects of ice on hydrate nucleation and what happens in the quasi-liquid layer of ice are still not well understood. Here, we used high-precision constant energy molecular dynamics simulations to study methane hydrate nucleation from vapor-liquid mixtures exposed to the basal, prismatic, and secondary prismatic planes of hexagonal ice (ice Ih). Although no significant difference is observed in hydrate nucleation processes for these different crystal planes, it is found, more interestingly, that methane hydrate can nucleate either on the ice surface heterogeneously or in the bulk solution phase homogeneously. Several factors are mentioned to be able to promote the heterogeneous nucleation of hydrates, including the adsorption of methane molecules at the solid-liquid interface, hydrogen bonding between hydrate cages and the ice structure, the stronger ability of ice to transfer heat than that of the aqueous solution, and the higher occurrence probability of hydrate cages in the vicinity of the ice surface than in the bulk solution. Meanwhile, however, the other factors including the hydrophilicity of ice and the ice lattice mismatch with clathrate hydrates can inhibit heterogeneous nucleation on the ice surface and virtually promote homogeneous nucleation in the bulk solution. Certainly, the efficiency of ice as a promoter and as an inhibitor for heterogeneous nucleation is different. We estimate that the former is larger than the latter under the working conditions. Additionally, utilizing the benefit of ice to absorb heat, the NVE simulation of hydrate formation with ice can mimic the phenomenon of ice shrinking during the heterogeneous nucleation of hydrates and lower the overly large temperature increase during homogeneous nucleation. These results are helpful in understanding the nucleation mechanism of methane hydrate in the presence of ice.

  12. Timing of pathogen adaptation to a multicomponent treatment.

    PubMed

    Bourget, Romain; Chaumont, Loïc; Sapoukhina, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    The sustainable use of multicomponent treatments such as combination therapies, combination vaccines/chemicals, and plants carrying multigenic resistance requires an understanding of how their population-wide deployment affects the speed of the pathogen adaptation. Here, we develop a stochastic model describing the emergence of a mutant pathogen and its dynamics in a heterogeneous host population split into various types by the management strategy. Based on a multi-type Markov birth and death process, the model can be used to provide a basic understanding of how the life-cycle parameters of the pathogen population, and the controllable parameters of a management strategy affect the speed at which a pathogen adapts to a multicomponent treatment. Our results reveal the importance of coupling stochastic mutation and migration processes, and illustrate how their stochasticity can alter our view of the principles of managing pathogen adaptive dynamics at the population level. In particular, we identify the growth and migration rates that allow pathogens to adapt to a multicomponent treatment even if it is deployed on only small proportions of the host. In contrast to the accepted view, our model suggests that treatment durability should not systematically be identified with mutation cost. We show also that associating a multicomponent treatment with defeated monocomponent treatments can be more durable than associating it with intermediate treatments including only some of the components. We conclude that the explicit modelling of stochastic processes underlying evolutionary dynamics could help to elucidate the principles of the sustainable use of multicomponent treatments in population-wide management strategies intended to impede the evolution of harmful populations.

  13. Reconciling disparate views of template-directed nucleation through measurement of calcite nucleation kinetics and binding energies

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Laura M.; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Han, Nizhou; Tao, Jinhui; Wang, Debin; De Yoreo, James J.; Dove, Patricia M.

    2014-01-01

    The physical basis for how macromolecules regulate the onset of mineral formation in calcifying tissues is not well established. A popular conceptual model assumes the organic matrix provides a stereochemical match during cooperative organization of solute ions. In contrast, another uses simple binding assays to identify good promoters of nucleation. Here, we reconcile these two views and provide a mechanistic explanation for template-directed nucleation by correlating heterogeneous nucleation barriers with crystal–substrate-binding free energies. We first measure the kinetics of calcite nucleation onto model substrates that present different functional group chemistries (carboxyl, thiol, phosphate, and hydroxyl) and conformations (C11 and C16 chain lengths). We find rates are substrate-specific and obey predictions of classical nucleation theory at supersaturations that extend above the solubility of amorphous calcium carbonate. Analysis of the kinetic data shows the thermodynamic barrier to nucleation is reduced by minimizing the interfacial free energy of the system, γ. We then use dynamic force spectroscopy to independently measure calcite–substrate-binding free energies, ΔGb. Moreover, we show that within the classical theory of nucleation, γ and ΔGb should be linearly related. The results bear out this prediction and demonstrate that low-energy barriers to nucleation correlate with strong crystal–substrate binding. This relationship is general to all functional group chemistries and conformations. These findings provide a physical model that reconciles the long-standing concept of templated nucleation through stereochemical matching with the conventional wisdom that good binders are good nucleators. The alternative perspectives become internally consistent when viewed through the lens of crystal–substrate binding. PMID:24434555

  14. Laboratory Studies of Ice Nucleation on Volcanic Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolbert, M. A.; Schill, G. P.; Genareau, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Ice nucleation on volcanic ash controls both ash aggregation and cloud glaciation, which affect human respiratory health, atmospheric transport, and global climate. We have performed laboratory studies of the depositional and immersion freezing efficiency of three distinct samples of volcanic ash using Raman Microscopy coupled to an environmental cell. Ash from the Fuego (Basaltic Ash, Guatemala), Soufriere Hills (Andesetic Ash, Montserrat), and Taupo (Rhyolitic Ash, New Zealand) volcanoes were chosen to represent different geographical locations and silica content. All ash samples were quantitatively analyzed for both percent crystallinity and mineralogy using X-ray diffraction. We find that all three samples of volcanic ash are excellent depositional ice nuclei, nucleating ice at ice saturation ratios of 1.05 ± 0.1. For immersion freezing, however, only the Taupo ash exhibited efficient heterogeneous ice nucleation activity. Similar to recent studies on mineral dust, we suggest that the mineralogy of volcanic ash may dictate its ice nucleation activity in the immersion mode.

  15. Mediating conducting polymer growth within hydrogels by controlling nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, A. J.; Green, R. A.; Poole-Warren, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the efficacy of primary and secondary nucleation for electrochemical polymerisation of conductive polymers within poly(vinyl alcohol) methacrylate hydrogels. The two methods of nucleation investigated were a primary heterogeneous mechanism via introduction of conductive bulk metallic glass (Mg64Zn30Ca5Na1) particles and a secondary mechanism via introduction of "pre-polymerised" conducting polymer within the hydrogel (PEDOT:PSS). Evidence of nucleation was not seen in the bulk metallic glass loaded gels, however, the PEDOT:PSS loaded gels produced charge storage capacities over 15 mC/cm2 when sufficient polymer was loaded. These studies support the hypothesis that secondary nucleation is an efficient approach to producing stand-alone conducting hydrogels.

  16. Continuity of the nucleation of bulk and surface phases.

    PubMed

    Sear, Richard P

    2008-10-28

    Nucleation of a new bulk phase is almost always heterogeneous: It occurs at a surface. Nucleation of a new surface phase also occurs at a surface of course. We study nucleation in an Ising model with both bulk and surface (prewetting) transitions. We find no clear distinction between nucleation of the bulk and surface phases. As the bulk transition is crossed, the phase that is nucleating changes from being a new surface phase to being a new bulk phase. However, neither the nucleation rate nor the nucleus itself changes discontinuously. It appears that because the nucleus is only approximately two spins high, it is oblivious to the fact that on one side of the bulk transition it will grow to form a thick wetting layer, while on the other side it will grow to form a bulk phase of limitless thickness. The phase diagram of hard spheres at a hard wall is analogous to that of our model. Therefore, we suggest that the nucleation of the crystal phase of hard spheres at a hard wall may also be indistinguishable from that associated with a prefreezing surface transition.

  17. High-Precision Nucleation Rate Measurements for Higher Melting Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokeloh, Joachim; Wilde, Gerhard

    2014-08-01

    Nucleation of a crystal in undercooled melts of higher melting face-centered-cubic-metals has often been studied in the past. However, the data available were not of sufficient accuracy and only covered nucleation rates in too small of a range to allow precise conclusions concerning the nature of the underlying process as well as concerning important parameters such as the solid-liquid interface free energy that can in principle be deducted from such analyses. One way to circumvent ambiguities and analyze nucleation kinetics under well-defined conditions experimentally is given by performing statistically significant numbers of repeated single droplet experiments. Application of proper statistics analyses yields nucleation rates that are independent of a specific nucleation model. The first studies that were conducted in accordance with this approach on pure model materials revealed that the approach is valid. The results are comparable to those obtained by classic nucleation theory applied to experimental data, and it was shown that one might need to rethink the common assumption that heterogeneous nucleation is almost always responsible for solidification initiation. The current results also show that often-used models for the solid-liquid interface free energy might lead to overestimated values.

  18. Nucleation at the Contact Line Observed on Nanotextured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostinski, A. B.; Gurganus, C.; Charnawskas, J. C.; Shaw, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Surface nucleation, and contact nucleation in particular, are important for many physical processes, including pharmaceutical drug synthesis, metallurgy, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. It has been conjectured that roughness plays a role in surface nucleation, the tendency for freezing to begin preferentially at the liquid-gas interface. Using high speed imaging, we sought evidence for freezing at the contact line on catalyst substrates with imposed characteristic length scales (texture). It is found that nano-scale texture causes a shift in the nucleation of ice in super-cooled water to the three-phase contact line, while micro-scale texture does not. The reduction in the Gibbs barrier for nucleation at the droplet triple line suggests that a line tension, inversely proportional to the surface feature length scale, may be the relevant physical mechanism. A survey of line tension values in literature supports this hypothesis. This work suggests that the physical morphology of a particle, and not just its chemical composition, is important for characterizing a nucleation catalyst.

  19. Influence of Grain Boundary Properties and Orientation on Void Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Saryu Jindal

    2016-03-01

    For ductile metals, dynamic fracture during shock loading is thought to occur through void nucleation, growth, and then coalescence that leads to material failure. Particularly for high purity metals, it has been observed by numerous investigators that, under incipient spall conditions, voids appear to heterogeneously nucleate at some grain boundaries, but not others. Several factors can affect the void nucleation stress at a grain boundary, such as grain boundary structure, orientation with respect to the loading direction, energy and excess volume, in addition to its interactions with dislocations. In this work, we focus on the influence of loading direction with respect to the grain boundary plane and grain boundary properties such as energy and excess volume on the stress required for void nucleation of a grain boundary, in copper from moleculardynamics simulations. Flyer plate simulations were carried out for four boundary types with different energies and excess volumes. These boundaries were chosen as model systems to represent various boundaries observed in “real” materials. Simulations indicate that there is no direct correlation between the void nucleation stress at a boundary and either its energy and excess volume. This result suggests that average properties of grain boundaries alone are not sufficient indicators of the spall strength of a boundary and perhaps local boundary properties need to be taken into account in order to predict its susceptibility to void nucleation for broad ranges of materials. We also present both experimental and simulation results corresponding to the affect of orientation on void nucleation.

  20. Nucleation of Mesospheric Cloud Particles: Model and Laboratory Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, H.; Kirsch, A.; Rapp, M.; Duft, D.; Nachbar, M.; Leisner, T.

    2014-12-01

    Nucleation of mesospheric ice is assumed to occur on meteor smoke particles (MSP). Classical nucleation theory however includes several insufficiently known parameters when applied to the conditions at the mesopause for heterogeneous nucleation on MSP. This leads to a great uncertainty in the nucleation rate for mesospheric ice particles. By determining the parameters with the largest impact and comparing different theories we identified a possible range of nucleation rates. These nucleation rates were implemented in the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA). To study the principal effects, CARMA was run in a one-dimensional setup with static background fields and also with dynamically driven fields from the Kühlungsborn Mechanistic Circulation Model (KMCM) for 69°N. The ice particle properties from both runs are compared with observational data from ALOMAR (69°N). We find that while the static background conditions lead to ice particles comparable to those measured by lidar above ALOMAR, the ice particles in the dynamically driven fields do not evolve to detectable populations. To account for the horizontal transport of ice particles, we extended the model to three dimensions and added a tracer algorithm, which enables us to follow the ice particles from their genesis to final evaporation and to analyse the whole life cycle of the ice particles.The modelling studies are completed by a comparison to initial laboratory results for ice nucleation rates on nanometer sized particles under realistic mesopause conditions.

  1. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  2. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C Mark; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-12-07

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  3. Heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry considers such topics concerning clusters, particles and microparticles as common problems in nucleation and growth, chemical kinetics, and catalysis, chemical reactions with aerosols, electron beam studies of natural and anthropogenic microparticles, and structural studies employing molecular beam techniques, as well as such gas-solid interaction topics as photoassisted reactions, catalyzed photolysis, and heterogeneous catalysis. Also discussed are sulfur dioxide absorption, oxidation, and oxidation inhibition in falling drops, sulfur dioxide/water equilibria, the evidence for heterogeneous catalysis in the atmosphere, the importance of heterogeneous processes to tropospheric chemistry, soot-catalyzed atmospheric reactions, and the concentrations and mechanisms of formation of sulfate in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  4. Heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry considers such topics concerning clusters, particles and microparticles as common problems in nucleation and growth, chemical kinetics, and catalysis, chemical reactions with aerosols, electron beam studies of natural and anthropogenic microparticles, and structural studies employing molecular beam techniques, as well as such gas-solid interaction topics as photoassisted reactions, catalyzed photolysis, and heterogeneous catalysis. Also discussed are sulfur dioxide absorption, oxidation, and oxidation inhibition in falling drops, sulfur dioxide/water equilibria, the evidence for heterogeneous catalysis in the atmosphere, the importance of heterogeneous processes to tropospheric chemistry, soot-catalyzed atmospheric reactions, and the concentrations and mechanisms of formation of sulfate in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  5. Theoretical Analysis of Bubble Nucleation in Molten Steel Supersaturated with Nitrogen or Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kangwei; Liu, Jianhua; Zhang, Jie; Shen, Shaobo

    2017-08-01

    The nucleation of bubbles in molten steel supersaturated with nitrogen or hydrogen was studied based on the theory of classical solidification nucleation. The mathematical models of critical radii for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation processes were derived. The results show that these critical radii are identical, but the volume of the bubble formed via the heterogeneous nucleation is only part of the spherical volume of the bubble formed via the homogeneous nucleation. Thus, the bubbles easily undergo heterogeneous nucleation on the surface of inclusions with poor wettability in molten steel. The effects of melt depth, nitrogen- or hydrogen-pretreatment pressure, and vacuum-treatment pressure on the critical-nucleation radius were studied based on the models derived. The results show that when the molten liquid is pretreated using nitrogen or hydrogen at 1 bar and, subsequently, treated at a vacuum pressure of 10-3 bar and a temperature of 1873 K (1600 °C), the bubbles nucleate spontaneously if the melt depth is below 0.39 m. Moreover, when the melt depths are 0.39 and 1.09 m, the critical-nucleation radii are 0 and 100 μm, respectively. When the melt depth is above 1.09 m, the critical-nucleation radius is greater than 100 μm. The critical melt depth for spontaneous nucleation and formation of different sizes of bubble nuclei increases when the molten steel is treated with nitrogen or hydrogen at a higher pretreatment pressure. However, the effects of the vacuum-treatment pressure on the critical melt depth for spontaneous nucleation and formation of different sizes of bubble nuclei are negligible. The experiments performed in this study helped in confirming part of the results of the theoretical analysis.

  6. Multicomponent Protein Cage Architectures for Photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Arunava; Prevelige, Peter E

    2016-01-04

    The primary goal of the project was to develop protein-templated approaches for the synthesis and directed assembly of semiconductor nanomaterials that are efficient for visible light absorption and hydrogen production. In general, visible-light-driven photocatalysis reactions exhibit low quantum efficiency for solar energy conversion primarily because of materials-related issues and limitations, such as the control of the band gap, band structure, photochemical stability, and available reactive surface area of the photocatalyst. Synthesis of multicomponent hierarchical nano-architectures, consisting of semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) with desired optical properties fabricated to maximize spatial proximity for optimum electron and energy transfer represents an attractive route for addressing the problem. Virus capsids are highly symmetrical, self-assembling protein cage nanoparticles that exist in a range of sizes and symmetries. Selective deposition of inorganic, by design, at specific locations on virus capsids affords precise control over the size, spacing, and assembly of nanomaterials, resulting in uniform and reproducible nano-architectures. We utilized the self-assembling capabilities of the 420 subunit, 60 nm icosahedral, P22 virus capsid to direct the nucleation, growth, and proximity of a range of component materials. Controlled fabrication on the exterior of the temperature stable shell was achieved by genetically encoding specific binding peptides into an externally exposed loop which is displayed on each of the 420 coat protein subunits. Localization of complimentary materials to the interior of the particle was achieved through the use “scaffolding-fusion proteins. The scaffolding domain drives coat protein polymerization resulting in a coat protein shell surrounding a core of approximately 300 scaffolding/fusion molecules. The fusion domain comprises a peptide which specifically binds the semiconductor material of interest.

  7. Multi-Component Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2008-11-01

    We explore multi-component dark matter models where the dark sector consists of multiple stable states with different mass scales, and dark forces coupling these states further enrich the dynamics. The multi-component nature of the dark matter naturally arises in supersymmetric models, where both R parity and an additional symmetry, such as a Z{sub 2}, is preserved. We focus on a particular model where the heavier component of dark matter carries lepton number and annihilates mostly to leptons. The heavier component, which is essentially a sterile neutrino, naturally explains the PAMELA, ATIC and synchrotron signals, without an excess in antiprotons which typically mars other models of weak scale dark matter. The lighter component, which may have a mass from a GeV to a TeV, may explain the DAMA signal, and may be visible in low threshold runs of CDMS and XENON, which search for light dark matter.

  8. Fluctuating multicomponent lattice Boltzmann model.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, D; Sbragaglia, M; Biferale, L; Gross, M; Varnik, F

    2015-02-01

    Current implementations of fluctuating lattice Boltzmann equations (FLBEs) describe single component fluids. In this paper, a model based on the continuum kinetic Boltzmann equation for describing multicomponent fluids is extended to incorporate the effects of thermal fluctuations. The thus obtained fluctuating Boltzmann equation is first linearized to apply the theory of linear fluctuations, and expressions for the noise covariances are determined by invoking the fluctuation-dissipation theorem directly at the kinetic level. Crucial for our analysis is the projection of the Boltzmann equation onto the orthonormal Hermite basis. By integrating in space and time the fluctuating Boltzmann equation with a discrete number of velocities, the FLBE is obtained for both ideal and nonideal multicomponent fluids. Numerical simulations are specialized to the case where mean-field interactions are introduced on the lattice, indicating a proper thermalization of the system.

  9. Controlling nucleation in protein solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demattei, R. C.; Feigelson, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    A simple one-step technique for controlling the nucleation stage in protein solutions without the use of a seed crystal was developed using a specially designed apparatus in which the nucleation and growth processes can be separated. The method can be applied only to species that have a temperature-dependent solubility. The effectiveness of this 'thermonucleating' device was demonstrated with the nucleation and growth of ice, Rochelle salt, and lysozyme.

  10. Multicomponent reactions in nucleoside chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Buchowicz, Włodzimierz

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review covers sixty original publications dealing with the application of multicomponent reactions (MCRs) in the synthesis of novel nucleoside analogs. The reported approaches were employed for modifications of the parent nucleoside core or for de novo construction of a nucleoside scaffold from non-nucleoside substrates. The cited references are grouped according to the usually recognized types of the MCRs. Biochemical properties of the novel nucleoside analogs are also presented (if provided by the authors). PMID:25161730

  11. Ice Nucleation by High Molecular Weight Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, W.

    2003-12-01

    Deep convection in the tropics is frequently associated with biomass burning. Recent work has suggested that the size of ice crystals in the anvils of tropical cumulonimbus clouds may be affected by biomass burning, though the mechanism for such an effect is uncertain (Sherwood, 2002). We will present results of an investigation of the role that high molecular weight organic compounds, known to be produced in biomass burning (Elias et al., 1999), may play in tropical cirrus anvils through heterogeneous nucleation of ice. In particular, we examine the mechanisms underlying heterogeneous nucleation of ice by films of long chain alcohols by studying the interaction of the alcohols and water/ice using temperature controlled, Attenuated Total Reflection - Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. The mechanisms are interpreted in the context of recent criticisms of some aspects of classical nucleation theory (Seeley and Seidler, 2001; Oxtoby, 1998). References V. Elias, B. Simoneit, A. Pereira, J. Cabral, and J. Cardoso, Detection of high molecular weight organic tracers in vegetation smoke samples by high-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Environ. Sci. Tecnol., 33, 2369-2376, 1999. D. Oxtoby, Nucleation of first-order phase transitions. Acc. Chem. Res., 31, 91-97, 1998. L. Seeley and G. Seidler, Preactivation in the nucleation of ice by Langmuir films of aliphatic alcohols. J. Chem. Phys., 114, 10464-10470, 2001. S. Sherwood, Aerosols and ice particle size in tropical cumulonimbus. J. Climate, 15, 1051-1063, 2002.

  12. Efficiency in chemistry: from hydrogen autotransfer to multicomponent catalysis.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Francisco; Foubelo, Francisco; González-Gómez, José C; Martínez, Ricardo; Ramón, Diego J; Riente, Paola; Yus, Miguel

    2010-08-01

    A hydrogen autotransfer reaction has been applied to the α-alkylation of ketones, with primary alcohols as the electrophilic component, either under homogeneous (using a Ru complex as catalyst) or under heterogeneous (using Ni nanoparticles) conditions. This process is both very efficient (concerning atom economy) and ecologically friendly (water as the only by-product generated). On the other hand, three multicomponent reactions, namely, the Strecker reaction (without any catalyst), the aza-Sakurai process (catalyzed by ferrite), and the addition of in situ generated Zn enolates to chiral sulfinylimines (catalyzed by Cu), have proven to be very efficient in the generation of a diversity of polyfunctionalized molecules.

  13. Seeding approach to crystal nucleation.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Jorge R; Vega, Carlos; Valeriani, Chantal; Sanz, Eduardo

    2016-01-21

    We present a study of homogeneous crystal nucleation from metastable fluids via the seeding technique for four different systems: mW water, Tosi-Fumi NaCl, Lennard-Jones, and Hard Spheres. Combining simulations of spherical crystal seeds embedded in the metastable fluid with classical nucleation theory, we are able to successfully describe the nucleation rate for all systems in a wide range of metastability. The crystal-fluid interfacial free energy extrapolated to coexistence conditions is also in good agreement with direct calculations of such parameter. Our results show that seeding is a powerful technique to investigate crystal nucleation.

  14. Crystal nucleation and glass formation in metallic alloy melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.

    1984-01-01

    Homogeneous nucleation, containerless solidification, and bulk formation of metallic glasses are discussed. Homogeneous nucleation is not a limiting factor for metallic glass formation at slow cooling rates if the reduced glass transition temperature is high enough. Such glasses can be made in bulk if heterogeneous nucleants are removed. Containerless processing eleminates potential sources of nucleants, but as drop tube experiments on the Pd-Si alloys show, the free surface may still be a very effective heterogeneous nucleant. Combination of etching and heating in vacuum or fluxing can be effective for cleaning fairly large ingots of nucleants. Reduced gravity processing has a potentially useful role in the fluxing technique, for example to keep large metallic ingots surrounded by a low density, low fluidity flux if this proved difficult under ground conditions. For systems where heterogeneous nucleants in the bulk of the ingot need gravity to segregate to the flux-metal interface, reduced gravity processing may not be appropriate for bulk glass formation.

  15. Laboratory studies of cirrus clouds: the ins and outs of ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolbert, M. A.; Schill, G. P.; Baustian, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    Although cirrus clouds are ever-present in the upper troposphere, the precise mechanisms governing their formation are still uncertain. Recent field observations suggest that ice nucleation in the atmosphere is often more consistent with a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism than a homogeneous one. In the present work, we use optical microscopy coupled with Raman spectroscopy to examine ice nucleation on individual micron-sized particles. Because upper tropospheric particles as well as sub-visible cirrus residues are enhanced in both sulfates and organics, our focus is on complex particles containing these two species. Particles with well-defined structures were generated by nebulization of solutions containing ammonium sulfate and an organic. As the relative humidity was decreased, the aqueous particles underwent liquid-liquid phase separation forming an organic coating over ammonium sulfate. Lowering the relative humidity further resulted in ammonium sulfate efflorescence to a crystalline solid. Ice nucleation was then studied on the layered particles as a function of temperature and relative humidity. During particle formation and ice nucleation, Raman mapping was used to determine the particle structures. Depending on the organic composition and temperature, ice was sometimes observed to nucleate on the ammonium sulfate core within the particle and sometimes nucleated on the organic outer layer. The combination of Raman and optical microscopy allows visualization of the ice nucleation process for complex particles. These studies reveal that the mechanism of heterogeneous ice nucleation depends not just on particle size, but also on particle composition, phase and mixing state.

  16. Nucleation and growth kinetics of biochemicals measured at high supersaturations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Amarjit J.; Kirwan, Donald J.

    1994-12-01

    A grid mixer device (characteristic micromixing time < 3 ms) was successfully used to measure both nucleation and growth kinetics of lovastatin in 60 vol% methanol and asparagine monohydrate in 50 vol% 2-propanol at 23°C at high supersaturations but in the absence of mixing limitations. The supersaturation ratios investigated were in the range 1.25-8.8 for the lovastatin system and 1.17-4.1 for the asparagine system. When plotted according to primary nucleation theory, the induction time and nucleation rate measurements for both systems exhibited a homogeneous nucleation region at high supersaturations and a heterogeneous nucleation region at low supersaturations. The values of interfacial free energy extracted from these measurements for lovastatin (1.4-1.6 mJ/m 2) and asparagine (4.5-6.1 mJ/m 2) were an order-of-magnitude lower than those for inorganic salts reflecting the weaker intermolecular bonding in such biochemical solutes. The measured crystal growth rates for both solutes over the entire range of supersaturation could be represented with a power law dependence on chemical potential driving force. The kinetic orders of crystal growth were found to be 6.7 and 2.9 for lovastatin and asparagine, respectively. These unusually high kinetic orders could be represented by a polynuclear surface nucleation growth mechanism. The activation energy for the growth of lovastatin was measured as 280 kJ/mol.

  17. Scale Reliability Evaluation with Heterogeneous Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.

    2015-01-01

    A latent variable modeling approach for scale reliability evaluation in heterogeneous populations is discussed. The method can be used for point and interval estimation of reliability of multicomponent measuring instruments in populations representing mixtures of an unknown number of latent classes or subpopulations. The procedure is helpful also…

  18. Scale Reliability Evaluation with Heterogeneous Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.

    2015-01-01

    A latent variable modeling approach for scale reliability evaluation in heterogeneous populations is discussed. The method can be used for point and interval estimation of reliability of multicomponent measuring instruments in populations representing mixtures of an unknown number of latent classes or subpopulations. The procedure is helpful also…

  19. The Ice Nucleation Ability of Selected Atmospherically Abundant Fungal Spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannone, R.; Chernoff, D. I.; Bertram, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    Ice clouds are widely recognized for their roles in the earth’s radiation budget and climate systems. However, their formation mechanisms are poorly understood thus constituting an uncertainty in the evaluation of the global radiation budget. An important mechanism of ice cloud formation is heterogeneous nucleation on aerosol particles. The surface properties of these particles, called ice nuclei (IN), directly affect the temperature at which ice nucleation occurs. There is a growing emphasis on the study of bioaerosols (e.g., bacteria, fungi, pollen) as IN since they are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. The focus of the current study is to determine the ice nucleation properties of spores obtained from a variety of fungi. Aerosolized spores were impacted onto a hydrophobic glass substrate and immersed in ultrapure water. A technique involving an optical light microscope coupled to a flow cell was used to precisely control temperature and humidity within the cell. A digital camera captured high-resolution video of the particles undergoing ice nucleation, allowing for the analyses of freezing events and particle sizes. The first experimental results using spores obtained from the fungal genera Cladosporium and Penicillium reveal an average temperature increase of ~1-5 K in the ice nucleation temperature compared to homogeneous nucleation (i.e., freezing of pure liquid water). Furthermore, there appears to be a relationship between the amount of spores present per droplet and the freezing temperature of water. These results are presented and discussed, and the potential contribution of these data to further the understanding of heterogeneous nucleation in the atmosphere is provided. Box plot summarizing freezing data for homogeneous nucleation experiments (leftmost box) and binned data from heterogeneous nucleation experiments involving spores of Cladosporium. Freezing data are distributed into 200 µm2 bins that represent the total area of all observable inclusions

  20. Nucleation of mesospheric cloud particles: Sensitivities and limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, Henrike; Rapp, Markus; Kirsch, Annekatrin

    2016-03-01

    Nucleation of mesospheric ice particles is thought to occur via heterogeneous nucleation on meteor smoke particles. However, several factors determining the nucleation rate are poorly known. To study the effect of uncertainties in the nucleation rate on cloud properties, we use the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres and systematically vary the nucleation rate over ±10 orders of magnitude. In one set of simulations, the background state of the atmosphere is described by climatological conditions. In a second set, gravity wave-perturbed profiles from the Kühlungsborn Mechanistic general Circulation Model (KMCM) are used with typical temperature (vertical wind) perturbations at the mesopause on the order of 9 K (0.45 m/s). The resulting noctilucent cloud (NLC) characteristics are compared to lidar and satellite measurements. Realistic NLCs compared to the lidar measurements can only be modeled if the nucleation rate is reduced by up to 3 orders of magnitude compared to standard assumptions. For the same cases, the simulated NLCs compare best to the satellite measurements if the nucleation rate is reduced by 2 orders of magnitude or more. Dynamical processes at the mesopause strongly influence the NLC development. In a gravity wave-perturbed atmosphere, the ice particles have only limited time for nucleation and growth. The growth time is limited by the vertical wind, because the vertical wind determines the residence time of the ice particles in the supersaturated region. Since the vertical wind amplitudes reach 1.5 m/s in KMCM (compared to a mean upwelling of ˜4 cm/s in the climatology), the ice particles remain significantly smaller in a gravity wave-perturbed atmosphere than in climatological background conditions.

  1. On Capillary Rise and Nucleation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, R.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of capillary rise and nucleation is presented. It is shown that both phenomena result from a balance between two competing energy factors: a volume energy and a surface energy. Such a comparison may help to introduce nucleation with a topic familiar to the students, capillary rise. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  2. On Capillary Rise and Nucleation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, R.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of capillary rise and nucleation is presented. It is shown that both phenomena result from a balance between two competing energy factors: a volume energy and a surface energy. Such a comparison may help to introduce nucleation with a topic familiar to the students, capillary rise. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  3. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller - and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  4. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  5. Phase nucleation in curved space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Leopoldo; García, Nicolás; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Lorenzana, José; Daniel, Vega

    Nucleation and growth is the dominant relaxation mechanism driving first-order phase transitions. In two-dimensional flat systems, nucleation has been applied to a wide range of problems in physics, chemistry and biology. Here we study nucleation and growth of two-dimensional phases lying on curved surfaces and show that curvature modifies both critical sizes of nuclei and paths towards the equilibrium phase. In curved space, nucleation and growth becomes inherently inhomogeneous and critical nuclei form faster on regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Substrates of varying shape display complex energy landscapes with several geometry-induced local minima, where initially propagating nuclei become stabilized and trapped by the underlying curvature (Gómez, L. R. et al. Phase nucleation in curved space. Nat. Commun. 6:6856 doi: 10.1038/ncomms7856 (2015).).

  6. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H; Sietsma, J; Offerman, S E

    2016-08-03

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR's) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR's with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller - and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR's. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  7. Dynamic decoupling and local atomic order of a model multicomponent metallic glass-former.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongmin; Sung, Bong June

    2015-06-17

    The dynamics of multicomponent metallic alloys is spatially heterogeneous near glass transition. The diffusion coefficient of one component of the metallic alloys may also decouple from those of other components, i.e., the diffusion coefficient of each component depends differently on the viscosity of metallic alloys. In this work we investigate the dynamic heterogeneity and decoupling of a model system for multicomponent Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 melts by using a hard sphere model that considers the size disparity of alloys but does not take chemical effects into account. We also study how such dynamic behaviors would relate to the local atomic structure of metallic alloys. We find, from molecular dynamics simulations, that the smallest component P of multicomponent Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 melts becomes dynamically heterogeneous at a translational relaxation time scale and that the largest major component Pd forms a slow subsystem, which has been considered mainly responsible for the stabilization of amorphous state of alloys. The heterogeneous dynamics of P atoms accounts for the breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation and also leads to the dynamic decoupling of P and Pd atoms. The dynamically heterogeneous P atoms decrease the lifetime of the local short-range atomic orders of both icosahedral and close-packed structures by orders of magnitude.

  8. Differences in ice nucleation behavior of arable and desert soil dust in deposition nucleation regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Romy; Vogel, Franziska; Möhler, Ottmar; Höhler, Kristina; Schiebel, Thea

    2017-04-01

    Soil dust from arid and semi-arid regions is one of the most abundant aerosol types in the atmosphere with emission rates of about 1600 Tg per year (Andreae et al. (2009)). Therewith, soil dust plays an important role for the atmospheric radiative transfer and also for the formation of clouds. Soil dust refers to dust sampled from agricultural used areas, to dust from bare soil as well as to dust from desert regions. By mass-spectrometric measurements of the chemical composition of ice residuals, mineral dust as component of soil dust was found to be the major heterogeneous ice nucleating particle (INP) type (e.g. Cziczo et al. (2013)), in particular in the upper troposphere. Also in laboratory studies the ice nucleation efficiency of the different soil dusts was investigated. It was shown that desert dusts (Ullrich et al. (2017)) as well as soil dusts from arable regions (O'Sullivan et al. (2014), Tobo et al. (2014)) are efficient INP. However, there is still a lack of data for ice nucleation on soil dusts for temperatures below about 220 K. With the AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber, we are able to characterize the ice nucleation efficiency for different aerosol types to temperatures down to 180 K and high ice supersaturations. In order to extend the already existing AIDA data base for deposition nucleation on desert dusts and agricultural soil dusts, new experiments were done in the upper tropospheric temperature regime. This contribution will show the results of the new experiments with desert dust in comparison to existing data for higher temperatures. The first data analysis confirms the temperature dependent trend of the ice nucleation activity as discussed and parameterized in a recent paper by Ullrich et al. (2017). Furthermore, the update and extension of the recently published parameterization of deposition nucleation for desert dust to lower temperatures will be discussed. The experiments with agricultural soil

  9. Simulation of Regional-scale Nucleation Events and Prediction of Aerosol Number Concentration in a Regional Air Quality Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Adams, P.; Pandis, S.

    2006-12-01

    Nanoparticles can perturb Earth's climate by growing to cloud condensation nuclei sizes and also may be harmful to human health. Accurate simulation of the nucleation, growth, and removal of multicomponent nanoparticles demands enormous computational resources. Most regional-scale three-dimensional chemical transport models do not include nanoparticles and do not conserve number concentrations. A major challenge associated with the simulation of nucleation events is the uncertainty regarding the controlling nucleation mechanism under typical atmospheric conditions. Previous work indicates that nucleation events in the Pittsburgh area are well predicted using ternary (H2O-H2SO4-NH3) nucleation theory, which was successful in predicting on which days nucleation events occurred during summer and winter, as well as the beginning and end of the events. To predict the composition and growth of nanoparticles, we have developed a computationally efficient new approach based on the Two-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics module. This model simulates inorganic and organic components of the nanoparticles describing both the number and the mass distribution of the particulate matter from approximately 1 nm to 10 micrometers. The model explains why nanoparticles were observed to be acidic during nucleation events that appear to involve ammonia. The simulation suggests that nanoparticles produced by ternary nucleation can be acidic due to depletion of ammonia vapor during the growth of the particles out of the nucleation sizes. The low CPU time requirements of the model using TOMAS make it suitable for incorporation in three- dimensional chemical transport models. The nucleation/coagulation/growth model has been added to the PMCAMx regional air quality model and is used for the investigation of nucleation events in the Eastern U.S. We can estimate number budget in the Eastern U.S. and predict frequency/size of nucleation events.

  10. A Multicomponent Latent Trait Model for Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embretson, Susan E.; Yang, Xiangdong

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a noncompensatory latent trait model, the multicomponent latent trait model for diagnosis (MLTM-D), for cognitive diagnosis. In MLTM-D, a hierarchical relationship between components and attributes is specified to be applicable to permit diagnosis at two levels. MLTM-D is a generalization of the multicomponent latent trait…

  11. Hydrodynamic theory of freezing: Nucleation and polycrystalline growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podmaniczky, Frigyes; Tóth, Gyula I.; Tegze, György; Gránásy, László

    2017-05-01

    Structural aspects of crystal nucleation in undercooled liquids are explored using a nonlinear hydrodynamic theory of crystallization proposed recently [G. I. Tóth et al., J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 26, 055001 (2014), 10.1088/0953-8984/26/5/055001], which is based on combining fluctuating hydrodynamics with the phase-field crystal theory. We show that in this hydrodynamic approach not only homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation processes are accessible, but also growth front nucleation, which leads to the formation of new (differently oriented) grains at the solid-liquid front in highly undercooled systems. Formation of dislocations at the solid-liquid interface and interference of density waves ahead of the crystallization front are responsible for the appearance of the new orientations at the growth front that lead to spherulite-like nanostructures.

  12. Hydrodynamic theory of freezing: Nucleation and polycrystalline growth.

    PubMed

    Podmaniczky, Frigyes; Tóth, Gyula I; Tegze, György; Gránásy, László

    2017-05-01

    Structural aspects of crystal nucleation in undercooled liquids are explored using a nonlinear hydrodynamic theory of crystallization proposed recently [G. I. Tóth et al., J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 26, 055001 (2014)JCOMEL0953-898410.1088/0953-8984/26/5/055001], which is based on combining fluctuating hydrodynamics with the phase-field crystal theory. We show that in this hydrodynamic approach not only homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation processes are accessible, but also growth front nucleation, which leads to the formation of new (differently oriented) grains at the solid-liquid front in highly undercooled systems. Formation of dislocations at the solid-liquid interface and interference of density waves ahead of the crystallization front are responsible for the appearance of the new orientations at the growth front that lead to spherulite-like nanostructures.

  13. Main features of nucleation in model solutions of oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Chikanova, E. S.; Punin, Yu. O.

    2015-05-01

    The regularities of nucleation in model solutions of oral cavity have been investigated, and the induction order and constants have been determined for two systems: saliva and dental plaque fluid (DPF). It is shown that an increase in the initial supersaturation leads to a transition from the heterogeneous nucleation of crystallites to a homogeneous one. Some additives are found to enhance nucleation: HCO{3/-} > C6H12O6 > F-, while others hinder this process: protein (casein) > Mg2+. It is established that crystallization in DPF occurs more rapidly and the DPF composition is favorable for the growth of small (52.6-26.1 μm) crystallites. On the contrary, the conditions implemented in the model saliva solution facilitate the formation of larger (198.4-41.8 μm) crystals.

  14. A Multicomponent Animal Virus Isolated from Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Jason T; Wiley, Michael R; Beitzel, Brett; Auguste, Albert J; Dupuis, Alan P; Lindquist, Michael E; Sibley, Samuel D; Kota, Krishna P; Fetterer, David; Eastwood, Gillian; Kimmel, David; Prieto, Karla; Guzman, Hilda; Aliota, Matthew T; Reyes, Daniel; Brueggemann, Ernst E; St John, Lena; Hyeroba, David; Lauck, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas C; O'Connor, David H; Gestole, Marie C; Cazares, Lisa H; Popov, Vsevolod L; Castro-Llanos, Fanny; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Kenny, Tara; White, Bailey; Ward, Michael D; Loaiza, Jose R; Goldberg, Tony L; Weaver, Scott C; Kramer, Laura D; Tesh, Robert B; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-09-14

    RNA viruses exhibit a variety of genome organization strategies, including multicomponent genomes in which each segment is packaged separately. Although multicomponent genomes are common among viruses infecting plants and fungi, their prevalence among those infecting animals remains unclear. We characterize a multicomponent RNA virus isolated from mosquitoes, designated Guaico Culex virus (GCXV). GCXV belongs to a diverse clade of segmented viruses (Jingmenvirus) related to the prototypically unsegmented Flaviviridae. The GCXV genome comprises five segments, each of which appears to be separately packaged. The smallest segment is not required for replication, and its presence is variable in natural infections. We also describe a variant of Jingmen tick virus, another Jingmenvirus, sequenced from a Ugandan red colobus monkey, thus expanding the host range of this segmented and likely multicomponent virus group. Collectively, this study provides evidence for the existence of multicomponent animal viruses and their potential relevance for animal and human health.

  15. Clustering of ice nucleation protein correlates with ice nucleation activity.

    PubMed

    Mueller, G M; Wolber, P K; Warren, G J

    1990-08-01

    Antibodies raised against a synthetic peptide specifically detect ice nucleation proteins from Pseudomonas species in Western blots. In immunofluorescent staining of whole bacteria, the antibodies reveal the protein in clusters, as indicated by patches of intense fluorescence in Escherichia coli cells heterologously expressing Pseudomonas ice nucleation genes. The abundance, size, and brightness of the clusters vary considerably from cell to cell. Their varying sizes may explain the variability in activity of bacterial ice nuclei. Growth at lower temperatures produces more ice nuclei, and gives brighter and more frequent patches, than growth at 37 degrees C. The observed clustering may thus reflect formation of functional ice nucleation sites in vivo. The presence of ice nucleation protein in clusters is also correlated with alterations in cell morphology.

  16. Ostwald ripening in multicomponent alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Umantsev, A.; Olson, G.B. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-10-15

    The widespread use of second-phase dispersions in materials has stimulated the intensive study of the diffusion processes occurring in them at the last stage of a first-order phase transformation, termed Ostwald ripening or coarsening. As a result of the large surface area, the mixture is not in thermodynamic equilibrium. Relaxation of such a system is characterized by an increase in the scale size of the second phase and a decrease in the total energy. The authors analyze the coarsening process of an ensemble of particles, precipitation from a multicomponent alloy of arbitrary composition. The authors utilize the method of expansion of chemical potentials, which enables us to describe the coarsening rate through partial derivatives of the chemical potential, with respect to the mole fractions of different components. The latter can be easily calculated numerically, with the help of modern computer database programs such as ThermoCalc. The multicomponent interactions for diffusion are not considered, which implies rather special properties of the matrix of mobility coefficients.

  17. Photosensitivity phenomena in multicomponent glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czachor, K.; Jedrzejewski, K.; Stępień, R.

    2005-09-01

    Low cost, high bandwidth, narrowband and multifunctionality are main targets for new optical devices development. Planar optics is probably the best solution for future telecom long distance and access transmission networks but also for metrology sensing devices. Many different materials can be used for this purpose like PECVD silica, multicomponent glasses or even polymers. Bragg grating inscription in such material is another advantage to achieve narrowband spectral characteristic of device, which is essential in modern systems. The main purpose of presented work was the development in technology and measurement techniques of channels formed on the surface of the glass. Planar couplers and structures that are more complicated can also be made in the same technology in the future. Special multicomponent glasses SiO2-GeO2-B2O3-Na2O-SnO2 with up to 6 %mol of Sn were synthetized and thin rectangular polished plates were prepared. The UV 244 nm 100 mW Coherent argon ion frequency doubled laser was used in our experiments. Surface relief structures similar to the compaction-densification/expansion model of photosensitivity were developed on the glass surface. The optical microscope and alpha-step profiler were used for preliminary tests of photoinduced structures on the glass surface. The ability of the writing possibility in function of Sn content and different laser power levels were analyzed.

  18. Focus Article: Theoretical aspects of vapor/gas nucleation at structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meloni, Simone; Giacomello, Alberto; Casciola, Carlo Massimo

    2016-12-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation is the preferential means of formation of a new phase. Gas and vapor nucleation in fluids under confinement or at textured surfaces is central for many phenomena of technological relevance, such as bubble release, cavitation, and biological growth. Understanding and developing quantitative models for nucleation is the key to control how bubbles are formed and to exploit them in technological applications. An example is the in silico design of textured surfaces or particles with tailored nucleation properties. However, despite the fact that gas/vapor nucleation has been investigated for more than one century, many aspects still remain unclear and a quantitative theory is still lacking; this is especially true for heterogeneous systems with nanoscale corrugations, for which experiments are difficult. The objective of this focus article is analyzing the main results of the last 10-20 years in the field, selecting few representative works out of this impressive body of the literature, and highlighting the open theoretical questions. We start by introducing classical theories of nucleation in homogeneous and in simple heterogeneous systems and then discuss their extension to complex heterogeneous cases. Then we describe results from recent theories and computer simulations aimed at overcoming the limitations of the simpler theories by considering explicitly the diffuse nature of the interfaces, atomistic, kinetic, and inertial effects.

  19. Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Soot Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-09-13

    We have studied ice formation at temperatures relevant to homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity, of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span an atmospherically relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation, with a comparison to a mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, and particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, only droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude that both uncoated and coated soot particles representative of those generated in our studies are unlikely to significantly contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

  20. Does hydrophilicity of carbon particles improve their ice nucleation ability?

    PubMed

    Lupi, Laura; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-09-04

    Carbonaceous particles account for 10% of the particulate matter in the atmosphere. Atmospheric oxidation and aging of soot modulates its ice nucleation ability. It has been suggested that an increase in the ice nucleation ability of aged soot results from an increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces upon oxidation. Oxidation, however, also impacts the nanostructure of soot, making it difficult to assess the separate effects of soot nanostructure and hydrophilicity in experiments. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the effect of changes in hydrophilicity of model graphitic surfaces on the freezing temperature of ice. Our results indicate that the hydrophilicity of the surface is not in general a good predictor of ice nucleation ability. We find a correlation between the ability of a surface to promote nucleation of ice and the layering of liquid water at the surface. The results of this work suggest that ordering of liquid water in contact with the surface plays an important role in the heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanism.

  1. The Contribution of Constitutional Supercooling to Nucleation and Grain Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    StJohn, D. H.; Prasad, A.; Easton, M. A.; Qian, M.

    2015-11-01

    The concept of constitutional supercooling (CS) including the term itself was first described and discussed qualitatively by Rutter and Chalmers in order to understand the formation of cellular structures during the solidification of tin, and then quantified by Tiller et al. On that basis, Winegard and Chalmers further considered `supercooling and dendritic freezing of alloys' where they described how CS promotes the heterogeneous nucleation of new crystals and the formation of an equiaxed zone. Since then the importance of CS in promoting the formation of equiaxed microstructures in both grain refined and unrefined alloys has been clearly revealed and quantified. This paper describes our current understanding of the role of CS in promoting nucleation and grain formation. It also highlights that CS, on the one hand, develops a nucleation-free zone surrounding each nucleated and growing grain and, on the other hand, protects this grain from readily remelting when temperature fluctuations occur due to convection. Further, due to the importance of the diffusion field that generates CS, recent analytical models are evaluated and compared with a numerical model. A comprehensive description of the mechanisms affecting nucleation and grain formation and the prediction of grain size is presented with reference to the influence of the casting conditions applied during the practical casting of an alloy.

  2. Heterodimer formation and crystal nucleation of gramicidin D.

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, B M; Gassman, R M; Langs, D A; Pangborn, W A; Duax, W L

    1998-01-01

    The linear pentadecapeptide antibiotic gramicidin D is a heterogeneous mixture of six components. Precise refinements of three-dimensional structures of naturally occurring gramicidin D in crystals obtained from methanol, ethanol, and n-propanol demonstrate the unexpected presence of stable left-handed antiparallel double-helical heterodimers that vary with the crystallization solvent. The side chains of Trp residues in the three structures exhibit sequence-specific patterns of conformational preference. Tyr substitution for Trp at position 11 appears to favor beta ribbon formation and stabilization of the antiparallel double helix that acts as a template for gramicidin folding and nucleation of different crystal forms. The fact that a minor component in a heterogeneous mixture influences aggregation and crystal nucleation has potential applications to other systems in which anomalous behavior is exhibited by aggregation of apparently homogeneous materials, such as the enigmatic behavior of prion proteins. PMID:9788907

  3. Bubble nucleation in stout beers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. T.; McKechnie, J. S.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    Bubble nucleation in weakly supersaturated solutions of carbon dioxide—such as champagne, sparkling wines, and carbonated beers—is well understood. Bubbles grow and detach from nucleation sites: gas pockets trapped within hollow cellulose fibers. This mechanism appears not to be active in stout beers that are supersaturated solutions of nitrogen and carbon dioxide. In their canned forms these beers require additional technology (widgets) to release the bubbles which will form the head of the beer. We extend the mathematical model of bubble nucleation in carbonated liquids to the case of two gases and show that this nucleation mechanism is active in stout beers, though substantially slower than in carbonated beers and confirm this by observation. A rough calculation suggests that despite the slowness of the process, applying a coating of hollow porous fibers to the inside of a can or bottle could be a potential replacement for widgets.

  4. Nucleation and growth of stratospheric aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.; Keesee, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    Various sampling studies and numerical models have provided evidence that the in situ oxidation of sulfur-bearing gases is responsible for the sulfate mass of the stratospheric aerosol. These data suggest that there is a common source of sulfur compounds for the stratosphere of both the northern and southern hemispheres. Using elementary modeling calculations and the results of laboratory experiments, researchers have speculated that the stratospheric aerosol layer originates, at least in part, from SO/sub 2/ oxidation via OH. Very little is known concerning the origin of the primary small particles that form as a result of processes following the generation of the precursors to the prenucleation embryos. It is almost certain that homogeneous nucleation does not operate in the atmosphere and that the more relevant processes are those termed heteromolecular and heterogeneous nucleation. The relative contribution of the various mechanisms proposed for the introduction of particles in the stratosphere has not been established. Nevertheless, the general characteristics and extent of the stratospheric sulfate aerosol are reasonably well understood in terms of coagulation, condensation, evaporation, and sedimentation when a source for the generation of new particles is assumed.

  5. Computational modeling of soot nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Seung-Hyun

    Recent studies indicate that soot is the second most significant driver of climate change---behind CO2, but ahead of methane---and increased levels of soot particles in the air are linked to health hazards such as heart disease and lung cancer. Within the soot formation process, soot nucleation is the least understood step, and current experimental findings are still limited. This thesis presents computational modeling studies of the major pathways of the soot nucleation process. In this study, two regimes of soot nucleation---chemical growth and physical agglomeration---were evaluated and the results demonstrated that combustion conditions determine the relative importance of these two routes. Also, the dimerization process of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which has been regarded as one of the most important physical agglomeration processes in soot formation, was carefully examined with a new method for obtaining the nucleation rate using molecular dynamics simulation. The results indicate that the role of pyrene dimerization, which is the commonly accepted model, is expected to be highly dependent on various flame temperature conditions and may not be a key step in the soot nucleation process. An additional pathway, coronene dimerization in this case, needed to be included to improve the match with experimental data. The results of this thesis provide insight on the soot nucleation process and can be utilized to improve current soot formation models.

  6. Bacterial nucleators: actin' on actin

    PubMed Central

    Bugalhão, Joana N.; Mota, Luís Jaime; Franco, Irina S.

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a key target of numerous microbial pathogens, including protozoa, fungi, bacteria and viruses. In particular, bacterial pathogens produce and deliver virulence effector proteins that hijack actin dynamics to enable bacterial invasion of host cells, allow movement within the host cytosol, facilitate intercellular spread or block phagocytosis. Many of these effector proteins directly or indirectly target the major eukaryotic actin nucleator, the Arp2/3 complex, by either mimicking nucleation promoting factors or activating upstream small GTPases. In contrast, this review is focused on a recently identified class of effector proteins from Gram-negative bacteria that function as direct actin nucleators. These effector proteins mimic functional activities of formins, WH2-nucleators and Ena/VASP assembly promoting factors demonstrating that bacteria have coopted the complete set of eukaryotic actin assembly pathways. Structural and functional analyses of these nucleators have revealed several motifs and/or mechanistic activities that are shared with eukaryotic actin nucleators. However, functional effects of these proteins during infection extend beyond plain actin polymerization leading to interference with other host cell functions such as vesicle trafficking, cell cycle progression and cell death. Therefore, their use as model systems could not only help in the understanding of the mechanistic details of actin polymerization but also provide novel insights into the connection between actin dynamics and other cellular pathways. PMID:26416078

  7. Developing Multicomponent Interventions using Fractional Factorial Designs

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Bibhas; Collins, Linda M.; Strecher, Victor J.; Murphy, Susan A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Multicomponent interventions composed of behavioral, delivery, or implementation factors in addition to medications are becoming increasingly common in health sciences. A natural experimental approach to developing and refiing such multicomponent interventions is to start with a large number of potential components and screen out the least active ones. Factorial designs can be used efficiently in this endeavor. We address common criticisms and misconceptions regarding the use of factorial designs in these screening studies. We also provide an operationalization of screening studies. As an example we consider the use of a screening study in the development of a multicomponent smoking cessation intervention. Simulation results are provided to support the discussions. PMID:19575485

  8. Particle Lithography Enables Fabrication of Multicomponent Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-feng; Swartz, Logan A.; Li, Jie-Ren; Liu, Yang; Liu, Gang-yu

    2014-01-01

    Multicomponent nanostructures with individual geometries have attracted much attention because of their potential to carry out multiple functions synergistically. The current work reports a simple method using particle lithography to fabricate multicomponent nanostructures of metals, proteins, and organosiloxane molecules, each with its own geometry. Particle lithography is well-known for its capability to produce arrays of triangular-shaped nanostructures with novel optical properties. This paper extends the capability of particle lithography by combining a particle template in conjunction with surface chemistry to produce multicomponent nanostructures. The advantages and limitations of this approach will also be addressed. PMID:24707328

  9. Multi-component assembly casting

    DOEpatents

    James, Allister W.

    2015-10-13

    Multi-component vane segment and method for forming the same. Assembly includes: positioning a pre-formed airfoil component (12) and a preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) in a mold, wherein the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18) each comprises an interlocking feature (24); preheating the mold; introducing molten structural material (46) into the mold; and solidifying the molten structural material such that it interlocks the pre-formed airfoil component (12) with respect to the preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) and is effective to provide structural support for the shroud heat resistant material (18). Surfaces between the airfoil component (12) and the structural material (46), between the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18), and between the shroud heat resistant material (18) and the structural material (46) are free of metallurgical bonds.

  10. Enthalpy Diffusion in Multicomponent Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A W

    2008-11-12

    The enthalpy diffusion flux in the multicomponent energy equation is a well known yet frequently neglected term. It accounts for energy changes, associated with compositional changes, resulting from species diffusion. Enthalpy diffusion is important in flows where significant mixing occurs between species of dissimilar molecular weight. The term plays a critical role in preventing local violations of the entropy condition. In simulations of nonpremixed combustion, omission of the enthalpy flux can lead to anomalous temperature gradients, which may cause mixing regions to exceed ignition conditions. The term can also play a role in generating acoustic noise in turbulent mixing layers. Euler solvers that rely on numerical diffusion to mix fluids cannot accurately predict the temperature in mixed regions. On the other hand, Navier-Stokes solvers that incorporate enthalpy diffusion can provide much more accurate results.

  11. Containerless Liquid to Solid Nucleation Pathways in Two Representative Grades of Commercially Available Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rulison, A. J.; Rhim, W.-K.; Bayuzick, R.; Hofmeister, W.; Morton, C.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental measurements were conducted to determine the solid metal nucleation pathways of radiatively cooling, molten zirconium spheres of two different commercially available purity grades in a high-vacuum, high-temperature electrostatic levitator. The ensemble distribution of maximum undercooling temperatures was interpreted using Poisson statistics to determine the temperature dependence of the solid metal nucleation rate. For a sample of nominally 99.95% pure zirconium, the results are consistent with heterogeneous solid metal nucleation either on static catalyst particles at least approx. 30 nm diameter or on a surface coating. For a sample of nominally 99% pure zirconium, however, it appears that heterogeneous solid metal nucleation occurred either on a polydispersion of approx. 10 nm (mean diameter) static catalyst particles or on dynamic catalyst particles that precipitated from a solution that became supersaturated as the melt cooled.

  12. Observations on the nucleation of ice VII in shock compressed water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Chapman, David J.; Eakins, Daniel E.; Bland, Simon N.

    2015-06-01

    The ability of water to freeze into the ice VII phase under dynamic compression is a good example of a liquid to solid phase change. The ice VII is thought to nucleate and grow from the window surfaces in a relatively slow process (on the order of 100ns) that can be seen in wave profiles and a visible darkening of the sample. On silica windows the process is evident but from sapphire surfaces the heterogeneous nucleation appears to be entirely absent and the water remains metastable. To investigate the influence of silica, and under what conditions sapphire might heterogeneously nucleate ice VII, we present an experimental technique incorporating multiple liquid targets diagnosed with PDV and high speed imaging of the nucleation process from a variety of surfaces and additives. The Institute of Shock Physics acknowledges the continued support of AWE and Imperial College London.

  13. Containerless Liquid to Solid Nucleation Pathways in Two Representative Grades of Commercially Available Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rulison, A. J.; Rhim, W.-K.; Bayuzick, R.; Hofmeister, W.; Morton, C.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental measurements were conducted to determine the solid metal nucleation pathways of radiatively cooling, molten zirconium spheres of two different commercially available purity grades in a high-vacuum, high-temperature electrostatic levitator. The ensemble distribution of maximum undercooling temperatures was interpreted using Poisson statistics to determine the temperature dependence of the solid metal nucleation rate. For a sample of nominally 99.95% pure zirconium, the results are consistent with heterogeneous solid metal nucleation either on static catalyst particles at least approx. 30 nm diameter or on a surface coating. For a sample of nominally 99% pure zirconium, however, it appears that heterogeneous solid metal nucleation occurred either on a polydispersion of approx. 10 nm (mean diameter) static catalyst particles or on dynamic catalyst particles that precipitated from a solution that became supersaturated as the melt cooled.

  14. Uphill diffusion in multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-05-21

    Molecular diffusion is an omnipresent phenomena that is important in a wide variety of contexts in chemical, physical, and biological processes. In the majority of cases, the diffusion process can be adequately described by Fick's law that postulates a linear relationship between the flux of any species and its own concentration gradient. Most commonly, a component diffuses down the concentration gradient. The major objective of this review is to highlight a very wide variety of situations that cause the uphill transport of one constituent in the mixture. Uphill diffusion may occur in multicomponent mixtures in which the diffusion flux of any species is strongly coupled to that of its partner species. Such coupling effects often arise from strong thermodynamic non-idealities. For a quantitative description we need to use chemical potential gradients as driving forces. The transport of ionic species in aqueous solutions is coupled with its partner ions because of the electro-neutrality constraints; such constraints may accelerate or decelerate a specific ion. When uphill diffusion occurs, we observe transient overshoots during equilibration; the equilibration process follows serpentine trajectories in composition space. For mixtures of liquids, alloys, ceramics and glasses the serpentine trajectories could cause entry into meta-stable composition zones; such entry could result in phenomena such as spinodal decomposition, spontaneous emulsification, and the Ouzo effect. For distillation of multicomponent mixtures that form azeotropes, uphill diffusion may allow crossing of distillation boundaries that are normally forbidden. For mixture separations with microporous adsorbents, uphill diffusion can cause supra-equilibrium loadings to be achieved during transient uptake within crystals; this allows the possibility of over-riding adsorption equilibrium for achieving difficult separations.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of ice nucleation by electric fields.

    PubMed

    Yan, J Y; Patey, G N

    2012-07-05

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate heterogeneous ice nucleation in model systems where an electric field acts on water molecules within 10-20 Å of a surface. Two different water models (the six-site and TIP4P/Ice models) are considered, and in both cases, it is shown that a surface field can serve as a very effective ice nucleation catalyst in supercooled water. Ice with a ferroelectric cubic structure nucleates near the surface, and dipole disordered cubic ice grows outward from the surface layer. We examine the influences of temperature and two important field parameters, the field strength and distance from the surface over which it acts, on the ice nucleation process. For the six-site model, the highest temperature where we observe field-induced ice nucleation is 280 K, and for TIP4P/Ice 270 K (note that the estimated normal freezing points of the six-site and TIP4P/Ice models are ∼289 and ∼270 K, respectively). The minimum electric field strength required to nucleate ice depends a little on how far the field extends from the surface. If it extends 20 Å, then a field strength of 1.5 × 10(9) V/m is effective for both models. If the field extent is 10 Å, then stronger fields are required (2.5 × 10(9) V/m for TIP4P/Ice and 3.5 × 10(9) V/m for the six-site model). Our results demonstrate that fields of realistic strength, that act only over a narrow surface region, can effectively nucleate ice at temperatures not far below the freezing point. This further supports the possibility that local electric fields can be a significant factor influencing heterogeneous ice nucleation in physical situations. We would expect this to be especially relevant for ice nuclei with very rough surfaces where one would expect local fields of varying strength and direction.

  16. Collaborative Research: failure of RockMasses from Nucleation and Growth of Microscopic Defects and Disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, William

    2016-09-12

    Over the 21 years of funding we have pursued several projects related to earthquakes, damage and nucleation. We developed simple models of earthquake faults which we studied to understand Gutenburg-Richter scaling, foreshocks and aftershocks, the effect of spatial structure of the faults and its interaction with underlying self organization and phase transitions. In addition we studied the formation of amorphous solids via the glass transition. We have also studied nucleation with a particular concentration on transitions in systems with a spatial symmetry change. In addition we investigated the nucleation process in models that mimic rock masses. We obtained the structure of the droplet in both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. We also investigated the effect of defects or asperities on the nucleation of failure in simple models of earthquake faults.

  17. Determining whether metals nucleate homogeneously on graphite: A case study with copper

    DOE PAGES

    Appy, David; Lei, Huaping; Han, Yong; ...

    2014-11-05

    In this study, we observe that Cu clusters grow on surface terraces of graphite as a result of physical vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum. We show that the observation is incompatible with a variety of models incorporating homogeneous nucleation and calculations of atomic-scale energetics. An alternative explanation, ion-mediated heterogeneous nucleation, is proposed and validated, both with theory and experiment. This serves as a case study in identifying when and whether the simple, common observation of metal clusters on carbon-rich surfaces can be interpreted in terms of homogeneous nucleation. We describe a general approach for making system-specific and laboratory-specific predictions.

  18. Determining whether metals nucleate homogeneously on graphite: A case study with copper

    SciTech Connect

    Appy, David; Lei, Huaping; Han, Yong; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C.; Shao, Dahai; Kwolek, Emma J.; Evans, J. W.; Thiel, P. A.

    2014-11-05

    In this study, we observe that Cu clusters grow on surface terraces of graphite as a result of physical vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum. We show that the observation is incompatible with a variety of models incorporating homogeneous nucleation and calculations of atomic-scale energetics. An alternative explanation, ion-mediated heterogeneous nucleation, is proposed and validated, both with theory and experiment. This serves as a case study in identifying when and whether the simple, common observation of metal clusters on carbon-rich surfaces can be interpreted in terms of homogeneous nucleation. We describe a general approach for making system-specific and laboratory-specific predictions.

  19. Determining whether metals nucleate homogeneously on graphite: A case study with copper

    SciTech Connect

    Appy, David; Lei, Huaping; Han, Yong; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C; Shao, Dahai; Kwolek, Emma J; Evans, J W; Thiel, P A

    2014-11-01

    We observe that Cu clusters grow on surface terraces of graphite as a result of physical vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum. We show that the observation is incompatible with a variety of models incorporating homogeneous nucleation and calculations of atomic-scale energetics. An alternative explanation, ion-mediated heterogeneous nucleation, is proposed and validated, both with theory and experiment. This serves as a case study in identifying when and whether the simple, common observation of metal clusters on carbon-rich surfaces can be interpreted in terms of homogeneous nucleation. We describe a general approach for making system-specific and laboratory-specific predictions.

  20. Investigation of nucleation processes during dynamic recrystallization of ice using cryo-EBSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauve, T.; Montagnat, M.; Barou, F.; Hidas, K.; Tommasi, A.; Mainprice, D.

    2017-02-01

    Nucleation mechanisms occurring during dynamic recrystallization play a crucial role in the evolution of microstructures and textures during high temperature deformation. In polycrystalline ice, the strong viscoplastic anisotropy induces high strain heterogeneities between grains which control the recrystallization mechanisms. Here, we study the nucleation mechanisms occurring during creep tests performed on polycrystalline columnar ice at high temperature and stress (T=-5°C;σ=0.5 MPa) by post-mortem analyses of deformation microstructures using cryogenic electron backscatter diffraction. The columnar geometry of the samples enables discrimination of the nuclei from the initial grains. Various nucleation mechanisms are deduced from the analysis of the nuclei relations with the dislocation sub-structures within grains and at grain boundaries. Tilt sub-grain boundaries and kink bands are the main structures responsible for development of polygonization and mosaic sub-structures. Nucleation by bulging at serrated grain boundaries is also an efficient nucleation mechanism near the grain boundaries where strain incompatibilities are high. Observation of nuclei with orientations not related to the `parent' ones suggests the possibility of `spontaneous' nucleation driven by the relaxation of the dislocation-related internal stress field. The complexity of the nucleation mechanisms observed here emphasizes the impact of stress and strain heterogeneities on dynamic recrystallization mechanisms. This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'.

  1. Investigation of nucleation processes during dynamic recrystallization of ice using cryo-EBSD.

    PubMed

    Chauve, T; Montagnat, M; Barou, F; Hidas, K; Tommasi, A; Mainprice, D

    2017-02-13

    Nucleation mechanisms occurring during dynamic recrystallization play a crucial role in the evolution of microstructures and textures during high temperature deformation. In polycrystalline ice, the strong viscoplastic anisotropy induces high strain heterogeneities between grains which control the recrystallization mechanisms. Here, we study the nucleation mechanisms occurring during creep tests performed on polycrystalline columnar ice at high temperature and stress (T=-5°C;σ=0.5 MPa) by post-mortem analyses of deformation microstructures using cryogenic electron backscatter diffraction. The columnar geometry of the samples enables discrimination of the nuclei from the initial grains. Various nucleation mechanisms are deduced from the analysis of the nuclei relations with the dislocation sub-structures within grains and at grain boundaries. Tilt sub-grain boundaries and kink bands are the main structures responsible for development of polygonization and mosaic sub-structures. Nucleation by bulging at serrated grain boundaries is also an efficient nucleation mechanism near the grain boundaries where strain incompatibilities are high. Observation of nuclei with orientations not related to the 'parent' ones suggests the possibility of 'spontaneous' nucleation driven by the relaxation of the dislocation-related internal stress field. The complexity of the nucleation mechanisms observed here emphasizes the impact of stress and strain heterogeneities on dynamic recrystallization mechanisms.This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Multicomponent fuel vaporization at high pressures.

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, D. J.; O'Rourke, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    We extend our multicomponent fuel model to high pressures using a Peng-Robinson equation of state, and implement the model into KIVA-3V. Phase equilibrium is achieved by equating liquid and vapor fugacities. The latent heat of vaporization and fuel enthalpies are also corrected for at high pressures. Numerical simulations of multicomponent evaporation are performed for single droplets for a diesel fuel surrogate at different pressures.

  3. Laser ultrasonic multi-component imaging

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Thomas K [Federal Way, WA; Telschow, Kenneth [Des Moines, WA

    2011-01-25

    Techniques for ultrasonic determination of the interfacial relationship of multi-component systems are discussed. In implementations, a laser energy source may be used to excite a multi-component system including a first component and a second component at least in partial contact with the first component. Vibrations resulting from the excitation may be detected for correlation with a resonance pattern indicating if discontinuity exists at the interface of the first and second components.

  4. Preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-08-03

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. As a result, these insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  5. Preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations

    DOE PAGES

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-08-03

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and thereforemore » nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. As a result, these insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.« less

  6. Homogeneous ice nucleation at moderate supercooling from molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Sanz, E; Vega, C; Espinosa, J R; Caballero-Bernal, R; Abascal, J L F; Valeriani, C

    2013-10-09

    Among all of the freezing transitions, that of water into ice is probably the most relevant to biology, physics, geology, or atmospheric science. In this work, we investigate homogeneous ice nucleation by means of computer simulations. We evaluate the size of the critical cluster and the nucleation rate for temperatures ranging between 15 and 35 K below melting. We use the TIP4P/2005 and the TIP4P/ice water models. Both give similar results when compared at the same temperature difference with the model's melting temperature. The size of the critical cluster varies from ∼8000 molecules (radius = 4 nm) at 15 K below melting to ∼600 molecules (radius = 1.7 nm) at 35 K below melting. We use Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) to estimate the ice-water interfacial free energy and the nucleation free-energy barrier. We obtain an interfacial free energy of 29(3) mN/m from an extrapolation of our results to the melting temperature. This value is in good agreement both with experimental measurements and with previous estimates from computer simulations of TIP4P-like models. Moreover, we obtain estimates of the nucleation rate from simulations of the critical cluster at the barrier top. The values we get for both models agree within statistical error with experimental measurements. At temperatures higher than 20 K below melting, we get nucleation rates slower than the appearance of a critical cluster in all water of the hydrosphere during the age of the universe. Therefore, our simulations predict that water freezing above this temperature must necessarily be heterogeneous.

  7. Interpretation of the microwave effect on induction time during CaSO4 primary nucleation by a cluster coagulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhichao; Li, Liye; Han, Wenxiang; Li, Jiawei; Wang, Baodong; Xiao, Yongfeng

    2017-10-01

    The effects of microwave on the induction time of CaSO4 are studied experimentally and theoretically. In the experiments, calcium sulfate is precipitated by mixing aqueous CaCl2 solution and Na2SO4 solution. The induction time is measured by recording the change of turbidity in solution. Various energy inputs are used to investigate the effect of energy input on nucleation. The results show that the induction time decreases with increasing supersaturation and increasing energy input. Employing the classical nucleation theory, the interfacial tension is estimated. In addition, the microwave effects on nucleation order (n) and nucleation coefficient (kN) are also investigated, and the corresponding values of homogeneous nucleation are compared with the values of heterogeneous nucleation in the microwave field. A cluster coagulation model, which brings together the classic nucleation models and the theories describing the behavior of colloidal suspension, was applied to estimate the induction time under various energy inputs. It is found that when nucleation is prominently homogeneous, the microwave energy input does not change the number of monomers in dominating clusters. And when nucleation is prominently heterogeneous, although the dominating cluster size increases with supersaturation increasing, at the same supersaturation level, the dominating cluster size remains constant in the microwave field.

  8. Chemical Nucleation of Diamond Films.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Soumen; Thomas, Evan L H; Jenny, Titus A; Williams, Oliver A

    2016-10-05

    With the large differences in surface energy between film and substrate in combination with the low sticking coefficient of hydrocarbon radicals, nanocrystalline diamond growth on foreign substrates typically results in poor nucleation densities. A seeding technique is therefore required to realize pinhole-free and thin coalesced films. In this work, a chemical nucleation method for growth of diamond on nondiamond substrates based on 2,2-divinyladamantane is shown. After treating with the carbon-containing DVA, the chemically treated wafers were exposed to low-power-density plasma, known as the incubation phase, to facilitate the formation of diamond nucleation sites followed by a high-power-density growth regime to produce coalesced films. The resulting films demonstrate high crystallinity, whereas the Raman spectra suggest high-quality diamond with low sp(2) content.

  9. Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Black Carbon Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-10-13

    We have studied the ice formation at heterogeneous and homogeneous temperatures, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span a relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation with a comparison to a well characterized mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, as well as particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude from our studies that both uncoated and coated soot particles are unlikely to contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

  10. Nucleation and adhesion of diamond films on Co cemented tungsten carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Polini, R.; Santarelli, M.; Traversa, E.

    1999-12-01

    Diamond deposits were grown using hot filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on pretreated Co cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrates with an average grain size of 6 {micro}m. Depositions were performed with 0.5 or 1.0% methane concentration and with substrate temperatures ranging from 750 to 1,000 C. Diamond nucleation densities were measured by scanning electron microscopy. Scratched and bias-enhanced nucleation pretreated substrates showed the larger nucleation densities. Etching of the WC performed by Murakami's reagent, followed by surface-Co dissolution (MP pretreatment), led to a roughened but scarcely nucleating surface. The performance of a scratching prior to the MP pretreatment allowed one to increase the nucleation density, due scratching-induced defects, confined in the outermost layer of WC grains, which act as nucleation sites. Smaller nucleation densities were observed with increasing the substrate temperature and reducing the methane concentration, confirming that diamond nucleates via a heterogeneous process. The adhesion of continuous films was evaluated by the reciprocal of the slope of crack radius-indentation load functions. The substrate pretreatments mainly affected the film adhesion, while the influence of CVD process conditions was minor. The two main factors that improve the diamond film adhesion are the coating-substrate contact area and the surface-Co removal.

  11. Thermostability analysis of line-tension-associated nucleation at a gas-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Sanat Kumar; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Maiti, Biswajit

    2017-01-01

    The influence of line tension on the thermostability of a droplet nucleated from an oversaturated vapor at the interface of the vapor and another immiscible liquid is investigated. Along with the condition of mechanical equilibrium, the notion of extremization of the reversible work of formation is considered to obtain the critical parameters related to heterogeneous nucleation. From the energetic formulation, the critical reversible work of formation is found to be greater than that of homogeneous nucleation for high value of the positive line tension. On the other hand, for high value of the negative line tension, the critical reversible work of formation becomes negative. Therefore, these thermodynamic instabilities under certain substrate wettability situations necessitate a free-energetics-based stability of the nucleated droplet, because the system energy is not minimized under these conditions. This thermostability is analogous to the transition-based stability proposed by Widom [B. Widom, J. Phys. Chem. 99, 2803 (1995)], 10.1021/j100009a041 in the case of partial wetting phenomena along with the positive line tension. The thermostability analysis limits the domain of the solution space of the present critical-value problem as the thermodynamic transformation in connection with homogeneous and workless nucleation is considered. Within the stability range of the geometry-based wetting parameters, three limiting modes of nucleation, i.e., total-dewetting-related homogeneous nucleation, and total-wetting-associated and total-submergence-associated workless nucleation scenarios, are identified. Either of the two related limiting wetting scenarios of workless nucleation, namely, total wetting and total submergence, is found to be favorable depending on the geometry-based wetting conditions. The line-tension-associated nucleation on a liquid surface can be differentiated from that on a rigid substrate, as in the former, the stability based on mechanical

  12. Crystal nucleation in lithium borate glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gary L.; Neilson, George F.; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1988-01-01

    Crystal nucleation measurements were made on three lithium borate compositions in the vicinity of Li2O-2Br2O3. All nucleation measurements were performed at 500 C. Certain aspects of the nucleation behavior indicated (tentatively) that it proceeded by a homogeneous mechanism. The steady state nucleation rate was observed to have the largest value when the Li2O concentration was slightly in excess of the diborate composition. The change in nucleation rate with composition is controlled by the variation of viscosity as well as the change in free energy with composition. The variation of nucleation rate is explained qualitatively in these terms.

  13. Multicomponent Therapeutics of Berberine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiaoyang; Yan, Dan; Yang, Meihua; Dong, Xiaoping; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2013-01-01

    Although berberine alkaloids (BAs) are reported to be with broad-spectrum antibacterial and antiviral activities, the interactions among BAs have not been elucidated. In the present study, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was chosen as a model organism, and modified broth microdilution was applied for the determination of the fluorescence absorption values to calculate the anti-MRSA activity of BAs. We have initiated four steps to seek the optimal combination of BAs that are (1) determining the anti-MRSA activity of single BA, (2) investigating the two-component combination to clarify the interactions among BAs by checkerboard assay, (3) investigating the multicomponent combination to determine the optimal ratio by quadratic rotation-orthogonal combination design, and (4) in vivo and in vitro validation of the optimal combination. The results showed that the interactions among BAs are related to their concentrations. The synergetic combinations included “berberine and epiberberine,” “jatrorrhizine and palmatine” and “jatrorrhizine and coptisine”; the antagonistic combinations included “coptisine and epiberberine”. The optimal combination was berberine : coptisine : jatrorrhizine : palmatine : epiberberine = 0.702 : 0.863 : 1 : 0.491 : 0.526, and the potency of the optimal combination on cyclophosphamide-immunocompromised mouse model was better than the natural combinations of herbs containing BAs. PMID:23634170

  14. Diclofenac Sodium Loaded Multicomponent Implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, Lila; Viitanen, Petrus; Ashammakhi, Nureddin

    2008-02-01

    Earlier we have reported on developing DS releasing bioabsorbable rods for inhibition of osteolysis [l]. Due to their unsatisfactory drug release profiles we assessed the use of sintering technique of enhancement of drug release in the current study. Melt extruded PLGA 80/20 rods were compounded 8 wt-% DS. Some rods were self reinforced (SR) and some of them were sterilized to get three different components with different drug release profiles. Different rods were sintered together with heat and pressure. Three different specimen groups with different construction were studied. Thermal properties were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Changes of IV were performed with capillary analysis and drug release measurements with UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Mechanical strength were measured two weeks, when disintegration occurred. Release rate consisted of 1) sharp jump start peak, 2) second smoother peak, and 3) third smooth peak. Released DS concentrations reached local therapeutic levels and maintained at that stage for 24-36 days. All DS was released during 50-70 days. The drug release from multicomponent implant was more stable and commenced earlier than from initial rods. Such properties were favored ones. Initial shear strength was 82 MPa and it decreased to 15 MPa. The mechanical bonding was sufficient although the components disintegrated relatively fast. By sintering different PLGA/DS components with different release rates it is possible to construct a truly controlled release implant for bone fixation with anti-inflammatory properties.

  15. Crystallization of classical multicomponent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Cumming, Andrew

    2010-03-15

    We develop a method for calculating the equilibrium properties of the liquid-solid phase transition in a classical, ideal, multicomponent plasma. Our method is a semianalytic calculation that relies on extending the accurate fitting formulas available for the one-, two-, and three-component plasmas to the case of a plasma with an arbitrary number of components. We compare our results to those of C. J. Horowitz et al. [Phys. Rev. E 75, 066101 (2007)], who used a molecular-dynamics simulation to study the chemical properties of a 17-species mixture relevant to the ocean-crust boundary of an accreting neutron star at the point where half the mixture has solidified. Given the same initial composition as Horowitz et al., we are able to reproduce to good accuracy both the liquid and solid compositions at the half-freezing point; we find abundances for most species within 10% of the simulation values. Our method allows the phase diagram of complex mixtures to be explored more thoroughly than possible with numerical simulations. We briefly discuss the implications for the nature of the liquid-solid boundary in accreting neutron stars.

  16. Dynamics of multicomponent lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camley, Brian Andrew

    We present theoretical and computational descriptions of the dynamics of multicomponent lipid bilayer membranes. These systems are both model systems for "lipid rafts" in cell membranes and interesting physical examples of quasi-two-dimensional fluids. Our chief tool is a continuum simulation that uses a phase field to track the composition of the membrane, and solves the hydrodynamic equations exactly using the appropriate Green's function (Oseen tensor) for the membrane. We apply this simulation to describe the diffusion of domains in phase-separated membranes, the dynamics of domain flickering, and the process of phase separation in lipid membranes. We then derive an analytical theory to describe domain flickering that is consistent with our simulation results, and use this to analyze experimental measurements of membrane domains. Through this method, we measure the membrane viscosity solely from fluorescence microscopy measurements. We study phase separation in quasi-two-dimensional membranes in depth with both simulations and scaling theory, and classify the different scaling regimes and morphologies, which differ from pure two-dimensional fluids. Our results may explain previous inconsistent measurements of the dynamical scaling exponent for phase separation in membranes. We also extend our theory beyond the simplest model, including the possibility that the membrane will be viscoelastic, as well as considering the inertia of the membrane and the fluid surrounding the membrane.

  17. Transport-induced shifts in condensate dew-point and composition in multicomponent systems with chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Nagarajan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Partial heterogeneous condensation phenomena in multicomponent reacting systems are analyzed taking into consideration the chemical element transport phenomena. It is demonstrated that the dew-point surface temperature in chemically reactive systems is not a purely thermodynamic quantity, but is influenced by the multicomponent diffusion and Soret-mass diffusion phenomena. Several distinct dew-points are shown to exist in such systems and, as a result of transport constraints, the 'sharp' locus between two chemically distinct condensates is systematically moved to a difference mainstream composition.

  18. Transport-induced shifts in condensate dew-point and composition in multicomponent systems with chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Nagarajan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Partial heterogeneous condensation phenomena in multicomponent reacting systems are analyzed taking into consideration the chemical element transport phenomena. It is demonstrated that the dew-point surface temperature in chemically reactive systems is not a purely thermodynamic quantity, but is influenced by the multicomponent diffusion and Soret-mass diffusion phenomena. Several distinct dew-points are shown to exist in such systems and, as a result of transport constraints, the 'sharp' locus between two chemically distinct condensates is systematically moved to a difference mainstream composition.

  19. A computationally efficient description of heterogeneous freezing: A simplified version of the Soccer ball model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, Dennis; Ervens, Barbara; Clauss, Tina; Voigtländer, Jens; Wex, Heike; Hartmann, Susan; Stratmann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In a recent study, the Soccer ball model (SBM) was introduced for modeling and/or parameterizing heterogeneous ice nucleation processes. The model applies classical nucleation theory. It allows for a consistent description of both apparently singular and stochastic ice nucleation behavior, by distributing contact angles over the nucleation sites of a particle population assuming a Gaussian probability density function. The original SBM utilizes the Monte Carlo technique, which hampers its usage in atmospheric models, as fairly time-consuming calculations must be performed to obtain statistically significant results. Thus, we have developed a simplified and computationally more efficient version of the SBM. We successfully used the new SBM to parameterize experimental nucleation data of, e.g., bacterial ice nucleation. Both SBMs give identical results; however, the new model is computationally less expensive as confirmed by cloud parcel simulations. Therefore, it is a suitable tool for describing heterogeneous ice nucleation processes in atmospheric models.

  20. Nucleation processes of nanobubbles at a solid/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chung-Kai; Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-04-01

    Experimental investigations of hydrophobic/water interfaces often return controversial results, possibly due to the unknown role of gas accumulation at the interfaces. Here, during advanced atomic force microscopy of the initial evolution of gas-containing structures at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/water interface, a fluid phase first appeared as a circular wetting layer ~0.3 nm in thickness and was later transformed into a cap-shaped nanostructure (an interfacial nanobubble). Two-dimensional ordered domains were nucleated and grew over time outside or at the perimeter of the fluid regions, eventually confining growth of the fluid regions to the vertical direction. We determined that interfacial nanobubbles and fluid layers have very similar mechanical properties, suggesting low interfacial tension with water and a liquid-like nature, explaining their high stability and their roles in boundary slip and bubble nucleation. These ordered domains may be the interfacial hydrophilic gas hydrates and/or the long-sought chemical surface heterogeneities responsible for contact line pinning and contact angle hysteresis. The gradual nucleation and growth of hydrophilic ordered domains renders the original homogeneous hydrophobic/water interface more heterogeneous over time, which would have great consequence for interfacial properties that affect diverse phenomena, including interactions in water, chemical reactions, and the self-assembly and function of biological molecules.

  1. Nucleation processes of nanobubbles at a solid/water interface

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chung-Kai; Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-01-01

    Experimental investigations of hydrophobic/water interfaces often return controversial results, possibly due to the unknown role of gas accumulation at the interfaces. Here, during advanced atomic force microscopy of the initial evolution of gas-containing structures at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/water interface, a fluid phase first appeared as a circular wetting layer ~0.3 nm in thickness and was later transformed into a cap-shaped nanostructure (an interfacial nanobubble). Two-dimensional ordered domains were nucleated and grew over time outside or at the perimeter of the fluid regions, eventually confining growth of the fluid regions to the vertical direction. We determined that interfacial nanobubbles and fluid layers have very similar mechanical properties, suggesting low interfacial tension with water and a liquid-like nature, explaining their high stability and their roles in boundary slip and bubble nucleation. These ordered domains may be the interfacial hydrophilic gas hydrates and/or the long-sought chemical surface heterogeneities responsible for contact line pinning and contact angle hysteresis. The gradual nucleation and growth of hydrophilic ordered domains renders the original homogeneous hydrophobic/water interface more heterogeneous over time, which would have great consequence for interfacial properties that affect diverse phenomena, including interactions in water, chemical reactions, and the self-assembly and function of biological molecules. PMID:27090291

  2. Noise analysis of nucleate boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. D.; Ram, K. S.

    1971-01-01

    The techniques of noise analysis have been utilized to investigate nucleate pool boiling. A simple experimental setup has been developed for obtaining the power spectrum of a nucleate boiling system. These techniques were first used to study single bubbles, and a method of relating the two-dimensional projected size and the local velocity of the bubbles to the auto-correlation functions is presented. This method is much less time consuming than conventional methods of measurement and has no probes to disturb the system. These techniques can be used to determine the contribution of evaporation to total heat flux in nucleate boiling. Also, these techniques can be used to investigate the effect of various parameters upon the frequency response of nucleate boiling. The predominant frequencies of the power spectrum correspond to the frequencies of bubble generation. The effects of heat input, degree of subcooling, and liquid surface tension upon the power spectra of a boiling system are presented. It was found that the degree of subcooling has a more pronounced effect upon bubble size than does heat flux. Also the effect of lowering surface tension can be sufficient to reduce the effect of the degree of subcooling upon the size of the bubbles.

  3. Nucleation pathway in coherent precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, T.; Blavette, D.

    2011-12-01

    The non-classical nucleation pathway of coherent precipitates has been computed through minimisation of the nucleation barrier in the composition (c)-size (R) space to predict the evolution of nucleus composition. The generalized Gibbs model, developed by Schmelzer et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 112 (2000) p.3820; J. Colloid Interface Sci. 272 (2004) p.109], has been extended to include misfit elastic energy. The composition of critical embryos c* was found to be independent of the interfacial constant. The composition of critical nuclei (c*) decreased with supersaturation. The elastic energy increased both c* and the nucleation barrier, as well as R*. The evolution of nucleus composition (c) as a function of size (R) along the minimum energy pathway was computed. Nucleation only starts when a size threshold is exceeded. Then, rapid enrichment to the expected composition (c β) precedes a constant composition regime. However, for small supersaturations, the change in cluster composition can occur sharply for a very small radius and then the composition slowly increased with a significant change in size. Coherency misfit energy was found to slow down the evolution of nuclei composition with R. The model was compared to experimental results.

  4. New Findings on Ice Nucleation in Mid-latitude Cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lawson, P.; Baker, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    Recent GCM simulations (CESM1) show a global aerosol indirect effect of -1.39 W m-2 with -2.02 W m-2 from shortwave and +0.63 W m-2 from longwave cloud forcing, the longwave being due to homogeneous nucleation of ice crystals. However, the extent of homogeneous nucleation in ice clouds is poorly understood. This study uses results from a recent field campaign, SPARTICUS (Small PARTicles In CirrUS), to evaluate the impact of homogeneous nucleation on the ice particle size distribution (PSD) shape, as well as ice particle concentration, shape, PSD effective size and fall speed. While earlier measurements were difficult to evaluate for ice nucleation effects due to the problem of ice particle shattering, recent in-situ measurements using the 2 dimensional-stereo (2D-S) probe have greatly reduced this problem resulting in provocative findings for both synoptic and anvil cirrus sampled during SPARTICUS. For mid-latitude synoptic and anvil cirrus around -40°C, these new measurements show that clear changes in the ice PSD and its properties occur regarding (1) PSD shape, (2) total number concentration-to-ice water content ratio (N/IWC), (3) PSD mean size, (4) PSD mean area ratio and (5) the mass-weighted fall velocity (Vm). These changes are consistent with a change in ice nucleation mechanism, with heterogeneous nucleation processes active at temperatures warmer than -40°C and homogeneous freezing nucleation at temperatures colder than -40°C. The change in Vm implies that cirrus colder than -40°C will have longer lifetimes and greater cloud coverage than warmer cirrus clouds, all other relevant factors remaining equal. The increase in N/IWC with colder temperatures (T < -40°C) appears consistent with homogeneous nucleation theory. Figure 1 shows normalized frequency distribution of PSD area ratios for temperatures above and below -40°C. Area ratios (ice particle projected area/area of circle defined by particle maximum dimension) are a measure of ice particle shape

  5. Conscientiousness increases efficiency of multicomponent behavior.

    PubMed

    Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian

    2015-10-27

    Many everyday situations require the flexible interruption and changing of different actions to achieve a goal. Several strategies can be applied to do so, but those requiring high levels of cognitive control seem to confer an efficiency (speed) advantage in situations requiring multi-component behavior. However, it is elusive in how far personality traits affect performance in such situations. Given that top-down control is an important aspect of personality and furthermore correlates with conscientiousness, N = 163 participants completed the NEO-FFI and performed an experimental (stop-change) paradigm assessing multicomponent behavior. Applying mathematical constraints to the behavioral data, we estimated the processing strategy of each individual. The results show that multicomponent behavior is selectively affected by conscientiousness which explained approximately 19% of the measured inter-individual behavioral variance. Conscientiousness should hence be seen as a major personality dimension modulating multicomponent behavior. Highly conscientious people showed a more effective, step-by-step processing strategy of different actions necessary to achieve a goal. In situations with simultaneous requirements, this strategy equipped them with an efficiency (speed) advantage towards individuals with lower conscientiousness. In sum, the results show that strategies and the efficiency with which people cope with situations requiring multicomponent behavior are strongly influenced by their personality.

  6. Conscientiousness increases efficiency of multicomponent behavior

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Many everyday situations require the flexible interruption and changing of different actions to achieve a goal. Several strategies can be applied to do so, but those requiring high levels of cognitive control seem to confer an efficiency (speed) advantage in situations requiring multi-component behavior. However, it is elusive in how far personality traits affect performance in such situations. Given that top-down control is an important aspect of personality and furthermore correlates with conscientiousness, N = 163 participants completed the NEO-FFI and performed an experimental (stop-change) paradigm assessing multicomponent behavior. Applying mathematical constraints to the behavioral data, we estimated the processing strategy of each individual. The results show that multicomponent behavior is selectively affected by conscientiousness which explained approximately 19% of the measured inter-individual behavioral variance. Conscientiousness should hence be seen as a major personality dimension modulating multicomponent behavior. Highly conscientious people showed a more effective, step-by-step processing strategy of different actions necessary to achieve a goal. In situations with simultaneous requirements, this strategy equipped them with an efficiency (speed) advantage towards individuals with lower conscientiousness. In sum, the results show that strategies and the efficiency with which people cope with situations requiring multicomponent behavior are strongly influenced by their personality. PMID:26503352

  7. Multicomponent liquid ion exchange with chabazite zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.M.; Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Byers, C.W.

    1993-10-01

    In spite of the increasing commercial use of zeolites for binary and multicomponent sorption, the understanding of the basic mass-transfer processes associated with multicomponent zeolite ion-exchange systems is quite limited. This study was undertaken to evaluate Na-Ca-Mg-Cs-Sr ion exchange from an aqueous solution using a chabazite zeolite. Mass-transfer coefficients and equilibrium equations were determined from experimental batch-reactor data for single and multicomponent systems. The Langmuir isotherm was used to represent the equilibrium relationship for binary systems, and a modified Dubinin-Polyani model was used for the multicomponent systems. The experimental data indicate that diffusion through the microporous zeolite crystals is the primary diffusional resistance. Macropore diffusion also significantly contributes to the mass-transfer resistance. Various mass-transfer models were compared to the experimental data to determine mass-transfer coefficients. Effective diffusivities were obtained which accurately predicted experimental data using a variety of models. Only the model which accounts for micropore and macropore diffusion occurring in series accurately predicted multicomponent data using single-component diffusivities. Liquid and surface diffusion both contribute to macropore diffusion. Surface and micropore diffusivities were determined to be concentration dependent.

  8. Hard sphere crystal nucleation and growth near large spherical impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Villeneuve, V. W. A.; Verboekend, D.; Dullens, R. P. A.; Aarts, D. G. A. L.; Kegel, W. K.; Lekkerkerker, H. N. W.

    2005-11-01

    We report how large spherical impurities affect the nucleation and growth of hard sphere colloidal crystals. Both the impurities and the colloids are fluorescently labelled polymethylmetacrylate particles and are dispersed in an optically and density matching solvent mixture. Crystal growth, initiated either at the impurity surface, or at the sample bottom, was studied by imaging sequences of two-dimensional xy-slices in the plane of the impurity's centre of mass with a laser scanning confocal microscope. At least two factors determine whether a large impurity can function as a seed for heterogeneous nucleation: timescales and impurity curvature. The curvature needs to be sufficiently low for crystal nuclei to form on the impurity surface. If bulk crystal growth has already approached the impurity, bulk growth is dominant over growth of crystallites on the impurity surface. Such surface crystallites eventually reorient to adapt to the overall bulk crystal symmetry.

  9. Nucleation of bubbles on a solidification front—experiment and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, P. S.; Huang, C. C.; Lee, K. W.

    2003-06-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles on an advancing solidification front during the freezing of water containing a dissolved gas has been experimentally and analytically studied. The formation of bubbles resulting from supersaturation of liquids is commonly encountered in different fields such as heat transfer, manufacturing, and bioscience. In this work, the sizes of nucleating bubbles and the concentration profiles of dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide gases in the water ahead of the solidification front have been measured. From successful comparisons between the measured and predicted critical radii of nucleating bubbles and distributions of dissolved gas content, the phenomena of heterogeneous nucleation in a binary weak solution during the freezing process are quantitatively confirmed. The results show that an increase in gas content at the solidification front in the liquid decreases the free-energy barrier and critical radii of bubbles that are formed on the solidification front. The sizes of the critical radii decrease and the number of nucleating bubbles increase in the early stage of solidification. As the solidification rates decrease at longer times, the content of the dissolved gas in the liquid on the advancing interface decreases and the critical radii of nucleating bubbles increase.

  10. Marine sources of ice nucleating particles: results from phytoplankton cultures and samples collected at sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilbourn, E.; Thornton, D.; Brooks, S. D.; Graff, J.

    2016-12-01

    The role of marine aerosols as ice nucleating particles is currently poorly understood. Despite growing interest, there are remarkably few ice nucleation measurements on representative marine samples. Here we present results of heterogeneous ice nucleation from laboratory studies and in-situ air and sea water samples collected during NAAMES (North Atlantic Aerosol and Marine Ecosystems Study). Thalassiosira weissflogii (CCMP 1051) was grown under controlled conditions in batch cultures and the ice nucleating activity depended on the growth phase of the cultures. Immersion freezing temperatures of the lab-grown diatoms were determined daily using a custom ice nucleation apparatus cooled at a set rate. Our results show that the age of the culture had a significant impact on ice nucleation temperature, with samples in stationary phase causing nucleation at -19.9 °C, approximately nine degrees warmer than the freezing temperature during exponential growth phase. Field samples gathered during the NAAMES II cruise in May 2016 were also tested for ice nucleating ability. Two types of samples were gathered. Firstly, whole cells were fractionated by size from surface seawater using a BD Biosciences Influx Cell Sorter (BD BS ISD). Secondly, aerosols were generated using the SeaSweep and subsequently size-selected using a PIXE Cascade Impactor. Samples were tested for the presence of ice nucleating particles (INP) using the technique described above. There were significant differences in the freezing temperature of the different samples; of the three sample types the lab-grown cultures tested during stationary phase froze at the warmest temperatures, followed by the SeaSweep samples (-25.6 °C) and the size-fractionated cell samples (-31.3 °C). Differences in ice nucleation ability may be due to size differences between the INP, differences in chemical composition of the sample, or some combination of these two factors. Results will be presented and atmospheric implications

  11. The double nucleation model for sickle cell haemoglobin polymerization: full integration and comparison with experimental data.

    PubMed

    Medkour, Terkia; Ferrone, Frank; Galactéros, Frédéric; Hannaert, Patrick

    2008-06-01

    Sickle cell haemoglobin (HbS) polymerization reduces erythrocyte deformability, causing deleterous vaso-occlusions. The double-nucleation model states that polymers grow from HbS aggregates, the nuclei, (i) in solution (homogeneous nucleation), (ii) onto existing polymers (heterogeneous nucleation). When linearized at initial HbS concentration, this model predicts early polymerization and its characteristic delay-time (Ferrone et al. J Mol Biol 183(4):591-610, 611-631, 1985). Addressing its relevance for describing complete polymerization, we constructed the full, non-linearized model (Simulink), The MathWorks). Here, we compare the simulated outputs to experimental progress curves (n = 6-8 different [HbS], 3-6 mM range, from Ferrone's group). Within 10% from start, average root mean square (rms) deviation between simulated and experimental curves is 0.04 +/- 0.01 (25 degrees C, n = 8; mean +/- standard error). Conversely, for complete progress curves, averaged rms is 0.48 +/- 0.04. This figure is improved to 0.13 +/- 0.01 by adjusting heterogeneous pathway parameters (p < 0.01): the nucleus stability (sigma(2) micro( cc ): + 40%), and the fraction of polymer surface available for nucleation (phi), from 5e(-7), (3 mM) to 13 (6 mM). Similar results are obtained at 37 degrees C. We conclude that the physico-chemical description of heterogeneous nucleation warrants refinements in order to capture the whole HbS polymerization process.

  12. Interpretation of freezing nucleation experiments: singular and stochastic; sites and surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, G.

    2014-06-01

    Publications of recent years dealing with laboratory experiments of immersion freezing reveal uncertainties about the fundamentals of heterogeneous freezing nucleation. While it appears well accepted that there are two major factors that determine the process, namely fluctuations in the size and configuration of incipient embryos of the solid phase and the role of the substrate to aid embryo formation, views have been evolving about the relative importance of these two elements. The importance of specific surface sites is being established in a growing number of experiments and a number of approaches have been proposed to incorporate these results into model descriptions. Many of these models share a common conceptual basis yet diverge in the way random and deterministic factors are combined. The divergence can be traced to uncertainty about the permanence of nucleating sites, to the lack of detailed knowledge about what surface features constitute nucleating sites, and to the consequent need to rely on empirical or parametric formulas to define the population of sites of different effectiveness. Recent experiments and models, consistent with earlier work, demonstrate the existence and primary role of permanent nucleating sites and the continued need for empirically based formulations of heterogeneous freezing. In order to clarify some aspects of the processes controlling immersion freezing, the paper focuses on three identifiably separate but interrelated issues: (i) the combination of singular and stochastic factors, (ii) the role of specific surface sites, and (iii) the modeling of heterogeneous ice nucleation.

  13. Interpretation of freezing nucleation experiments: singular and stochastic; sites and surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, G.

    2014-01-01

    Publications of recent years dealing with laboratory experiments of immersion freezing reveal uncertainties about the fundamentals of heterogeneous freezing nucleation. While it appears well accepted that there are two major factors that determine the process, namely fluctuations in the size and configuration of incipient embryos of the solid phase and the role of the substrate to aid embryo formation, views have been evolving about the relative importance of these two elements. The importance of specific surface sites is being established in a growing number of experiments and a number of approaches have been proposed to incorporate these results into model descriptions. Many of these models share a common conceptual basis yet diverge in the way random and deterministic factors are combined. The divergence can be traced to uncertainty about the permanence of nucleating sites, to the lack of detailed knowledge about what surface features constitute nucleating sites, and to the consequent need to rely on empirical or parametric formulas to define the population of sites of different effectiveness. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate that recent experiments and models, consistent with earlier work, point to the existence and primary role of permanent nucleating sites and to the continued need for empirically based formulations of heterogeneous freezing. The paper focuses on three identifiably separate but interrelated issues: (i) the combination of singular and stochastic factors, (ii) the role of specific surface sites, and (iii) the modeling of heterogeneous ice nucleation.

  14. Influence of solvent polarity and supersaturation on template-induced nucleation of carbamazepine crystal polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parambil, Jose V.; Poornachary, Sendhil K.; Tan, Reginald B. H.; Heng, Jerry Y. Y.

    2017-07-01

    Studies on the use of template surfaces to induce heterogeneous crystal nucleation have gained momentum in recent years-with potential applications in selective crystallisation of polymorphs and in the generation of seed crystals in a continuous crystallisation process. In developing a template-assisted solution crystallisation process, the kinetics of homogeneous versus heterogeneous crystal nucleation could be influenced by solute-solvent, solute-template, and solvent-template interactions. In this study, we report the effect of solvents of varying polarity on the nucleation of carbamazepine (CBZ) crystal polymorphs, a model active pharmaceutical ingredient. The experimental results demonstrate that functionalised template surfaces are effective in promoting crystallisation of either the metastable (form II) or stable (form III) polymorphs of CBZ only in moderately (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol) and low polar (toluene) solvents. A solvent with high polarity (acetonitrile) is thought to mask the template effect on heterogeneous nucleation due to strong solute-solvent and solvent-template interactions. The current study highlights that a quality-by-design (QbD) approach-considering the synergistic effects of solute concentration, solvent type, solution temperature, and template surface chemistry on crystal nucleation-is critical to the development of a template-induced crystallisation process.

  15. AGN Activity in Nucleated Galaxies as Measured by Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foord, Adi; Gallo, Elena; Hodges-Kluck, Edmund; Miller, Brendan P.; Baldassare, Vivienne F.; Gültekin, Kayhan; Gnedin, Oleg Y.

    2017-05-01

    Motivated by theoretical expectations that nuclear star clusters (NSCs) in galactic centers may provide a favorable environment for supermassive black holes to form and/or efficiently grow, we set out to measure the fraction of nearby nucleated galaxies that also host an active galactic nucleus. We targeted a distance-limited sample of 98 objects with the Chandra X-ray Telescope, down to a uniform X-ray luminosity threshold of ˜1038 erg s-1. The sample is composed of 47 late-types and 51 early-types, enabling us to further investigate the active fraction as a function of galactic morphology. After correcting for contamination to the nuclear X-ray signal from bright X-ray binaries, we measure an active fraction f=11.2{ % }-4.9+7.4 (1σ C.L.) across the whole sample, in agreement with previous estimates based on a heterogeneous combination of optical, X-ray, and radio diagnostics, by Seth et al. After accounting for the different stellar mass distributions in our samples, we find no statistically significant difference in the active fraction of early- versus late-type nucleated galaxies, with f=10.6{ % }-4.9+11.9 and 10.8{ % }-6.3+11.3, respectively. For the early-type nucleated galaxies, we are able to carry out a controlled comparison with a parent sample of non-nucleated galaxies covering the same stellar mass range, again finding no statistically significant difference in the active fraction. Taken at face value, our findings suggest that the presence of an NSC does not facilitate or enhance accretion-powered emission from a nuclear supermassive black hole. This is true even for late-type nucleated galaxies, home to bluer NSCs and arguably larger gas reservoirs.

  16. Ice nucleation activity of diesel soot particles at Cirrus relevant conditions: Effects of hydration, secondary organics coating, hydration, soot morphology, and coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; China, Swarup; Liu, Shang; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Sharma, Noopur; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Aiken, A. C.; Chand, Duli; Laskin, Alexander; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shilling, John E.; Shutthanandan, V.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2016-04-16

    The role of atmospheric relevant soot particles that are processed in the atmosphere toward ice nucleation at cirrus cloud condition is poorly understood. In this study, the ice nucleating properties of diesel soot particles subjected to various physical and chemical aging treatments were investigated at temperatures ranging from -40 to -50 °C. We show that bare soot particles nucleate ice in deposition mode, but coating with secondary organics suppresses the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of soot particles requiring homogeneous freezing threshold conditions. However, the ice nucleation efficiency of soot particles coated with an aqueous organic layer was similar to bare soot particles. Hydration of bare soot particles slightly enhanced the ice nucleation efficiency, and the IN abilities of compact soot particles (roundness = ~ 0.6) were similar to bare lacey soot particles (roundness = ~ 0.4). These results indicate that ice nucleation properties are sensitive to the various aging treatments.

  17. Deposition of thin films of multicomponent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Composite films of multicomponent materials, such as oxides and nitrides, e.g., lead zirconate titanate, are deposited by dc magnetron sputtering, employing a rotating substrate holder, which rotates relative to a plurality of targets, one target for each metal element of the multicomponent material. The sputtering is carried out in a reactive atmosphere. The substrates on which the layers are deposited are at ambient temperature. Following deposition of the composite film, the film is heated to a temperature sufficient to initiate a solid state reaction and form the final product, which is substantially single phase and substantially homogeneous.

  18. Multi-Component Reactions in Heterocyclic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas J. J.; Orru, Romano V. A.; Chebanov, Valentin A.; Sakhno, Yana I.; Saraev, Vyacheslav E.; Muravyova, Elena A.; Andrushchenko, Anastasia Yu.; Desenko, Sergey M.; Akhmetova, V. R.; Khabibullina, G. R.; Rakhimova, E. B.; Vagapov, R. A.; Khairullina, R. R.; Niatshina, Z. T.; Murzakova, N. N.; Maslivets, Andrey N.; Voskressensky, Leonid G.; Danagulyan, Gevorg G.; Murtchyan, Armen D.; Tumanyan, Araksya K.; Banfi, Luca; Basso, Andrea; de Moliner, Fabio; Guanti, Giuseppe; Petricci, Elena; Riva, Renata; Taddei, Maurizio; Naimi-Jamal, M. Reza; Mashkouri, Sara; Sharifi, Ali; Przhevalski, Nikolai M.; Rozhkova, Elena N.; Tokmakov, Gennadii P.; Magedov, Igor V.; Armisheva, M. N.; Rassudihina, N. A.; Vahrin, M. I.; Gein, V. L.; Shaabani, Ahmad; Rezayan, Ali Hossein; Sarvary, Afshin; Heidary, Marjan; Ng, Seik Weng; Beliaev, Nikolai A.; Mokrushin, Vladimir S.; Paramonov, Igor V.; Ilyin, Alexey; Garkushenko, Anna K.; Dushek, Maria A.; Sagitullina, Galina P.; Sagitullin, Reva S.; Kysil, Volodymyr; Khvat, Alexander; Tsirulnikov, Sergey; Tkachenko, Sergey; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre; Gein, Vladimir L.; Panova, Olga S.; Ilyn, Alexey P.; Kravchenko, Dmitri V.; Potapov, Victor V.; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V.; Vichegjanina, V. N.; Levandovskaya, E. B.; Gein, V. L.; Vahrin, M. I.; Vladimirov, I. N.; Zorina, A. A.; Nosova, N. V.; Gein, V. L.; Fedorova, O. V.; Vahrin, M. I.

    Multi-component and domino reactions are efficient and effective methods in the sustainable and diversity-oriented synthesis of heterocycles. In particular, transition metal-catalyzed multi-component sequences have recently gained considerable interest. Based upon the Sonogashira entry to alkynones, alkenones, and intermediate allenes, we have opened new avenues to the one-pot synthesis of numerous classes of heterocyclic frameworks in an MCR fashion. This methodological approach has now found various applications in one-pot syntheses of functional chromophores, pharmaceutically active compounds, and marine alkaloids and derivatives.

  19. Refreeze experiments with water droplets containing different types of ice nuclei interpreted by classical nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Lukas; Marcolli, Claudia; Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Homogeneous nucleation of ice in supercooled water droplets is a stochastic process. In its classical description, the growth of the ice phase requires the emergence of a critical embryo from random fluctuations of water molecules between the water bulk and ice-like clusters, which is associated with overcoming an energy barrier. For heterogeneous ice nucleation on ice-nucleating surfaces both stochastic and deterministic descriptions are in use. Deterministic (singular) descriptions are often favored because the temperature dependence of ice nucleation on a substrate usually dominates the stochastic time dependence, and the ease of representation facilitates the incorporation in climate models. Conversely, classical nucleation theory (CNT) describes heterogeneous ice nucleation as a stochastic process with a reduced energy barrier for the formation of a critical embryo in the presence of an ice-nucleating surface. The energy reduction is conveniently parameterized in terms of a contact angle α between the ice phase immersed in liquid water and the heterogeneous surface. This study investigates various ice-nucleating agents in immersion mode by subjecting them to repeated freezing cycles to elucidate and discriminate the time and temperature dependences of heterogeneous ice nucleation. Freezing rates determined from such refreeze experiments are presented for Hoggar Mountain dust, birch pollen washing water, Arizona test dust (ATD), and also nonadecanol coatings. For the analysis of the experimental data with CNT, we assumed the same active site to be always responsible for freezing. Three different CNT-based parameterizations were used to describe rate coefficients for heterogeneous ice nucleation as a function of temperature, all leading to very similar results: for Hoggar Mountain dust, ATD, and larger nonadecanol-coated water droplets, the experimentally determined increase in freezing rate with decreasing temperature is too shallow to be described properly by

  20. Identification and quantification of ice nucleation active microorganisms by digital droplet PCR (ddPCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, Martin; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2015-04-01

    Several bioaerosol types, including bacteria, fungi, pollen and lichen, have been identified as sources of biological ice nucleators (IN) which induce ice formation already at temperatures as high as -10 °C or above. Accordingly, they potentially contribute widely to environmental ice nucleation in the atmosphere and are of great interest in the study of natural heterogenous ice nucleation processes. Ice nucleation active microorganisms have been found and studied among bacteria (Proteobacteria) and fungi (phyla Basidiomycota and Ascomycota). The mechanisms enabling the microorganisms to ice nucleation are subject to ongoing research. While it has been demonstrated that whole cells can act as ice nucleators in the case of bacteria due to the presence of specific membrane proteins, cell-free ice nucleation active particles seem to be responsible for this phenomenon in fungi and lichen. The identification and quantification of these ice nucleation active microorganisms and their IN in atmospheric samples is crucial to understand their contribution to the pool of atmospheric IN. This is not a trivial task since the respective microorganisms are often prevalent in lowest concentrations and a variety of states, be it viable cells, spores or cell debris from dead cells. Molecular biology provides tools to identify and quantify ice nucleation active microorganisms independent of their state by detecting genetic markers specific for the organism of interest. Those methods are not without their drawbacks in terms of sample material concentration required or reliable standardization. Digital Droplet Polymerase Chain Reaction (ddPCR) was chosen for our demands as a more elegant, quick and specific method in the investigation of ice nucleation active microorganisms in atmospheric samples. The advantages of ddPCR lie in the simultaneous detection and quantification of genetic markers and their original copy numbers in a sample. This is facilitated by the fractionation of the

  1. Multiphase, multicomponent phase behavior prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadmohammadi, Younas

    Accurate prediction of phase behavior of fluid mixtures in the chemical industry is essential for designing and operating a multitude of processes. Reliable generalized predictions of phase equilibrium properties, such as pressure, temperature, and phase compositions offer an attractive alternative to costly and time consuming experimental measurements. The main purpose of this work was to assess the efficacy of recently generalized activity coefficient models based on binary experimental data to (a) predict binary and ternary vapor-liquid equilibrium systems, and (b) characterize liquid-liquid equilibrium systems. These studies were completed using a diverse binary VLE database consisting of 916 binary and 86 ternary systems involving 140 compounds belonging to 31 chemical classes. Specifically the following tasks were undertaken: First, a comprehensive assessment of the two common approaches (gamma-phi (gamma-ϕ) and phi-phi (ϕ-ϕ)) used for determining the phase behavior of vapor-liquid equilibrium systems is presented. Both the representation and predictive capabilities of these two approaches were examined, as delineated form internal and external consistency tests of 916 binary systems. For the purpose, the universal quasi-chemical (UNIQUAC) model and the Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS) were used in this assessment. Second, the efficacy of recently developed generalized UNIQUAC and the nonrandom two-liquid (NRTL) for predicting multicomponent VLE systems were investigated. Third, the abilities of recently modified NRTL model (mNRTL2 and mNRTL1) to characterize liquid-liquid equilibria (LLE) phase conditions and attributes, including phase stability, miscibility, and consolute point coordinates, were assessed. The results of this work indicate that the ϕ-ϕ approach represents the binary VLE systems considered within three times the error of the gamma-ϕ approach. A similar trend was observed for the for the generalized model predictions using

  2. Single Particle Laser Mass Spectrometry Applied to Differential Ice Nucleation Experiments at the AIDA Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gallavardin, S. J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Lohmann, U.; Moehler, Ottmar; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Dan

    2008-08-26

    Experiments conducted at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located in Karlsruhe, Germany permit investigation of particle properties that affect the nucleation of ice at temperature and water vapor conditions relevant to cloud microphysics and climate issues. Ice clouds were generated by heterogeneous nucleation of Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, and hematite and homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid. Ice crystals formed in the chamber were inertially separated from unactivated, or ‘interstitial’ aerosol particles with a pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), then evaporated. The ice residue (i.e., the aerosol which initiated ice nucleation plus any material which was scavenged from the gas- and/or particle-phase), was chemically characterized at the single particle level using a laser ionization mass spectrometer. In this manner the species that first nucleated ice could be identified out of a mixed aerosol population in the chamber. Bare mineral dust particles were more effective ice nuclei (IN) than similar particles with a coating. Metallic particles from contamination in the chamber initiated ice nucleation before other species but there were few enough that they did not compromise the experiments. Nitrate, sulfate, and organics were often detected on particles and ice residue, evidently from scavenging of trace gas-phase species in the chamber. Hematite was a more effective ice nucleus than illite. Ice residue was frequently larger than unactivated test aerosol due to the formation of aggregates due to scavenging, condensation of contaminant gases, and the predominance of larger aerosol in nucleation.

  3. Homogeneous ice nucleation and supercooled liquid water in orographic wave clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Miloshevich, Larry M.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigates ice nucleation mechanisms in cold lenticular wave clouds, a cloud type characterized by quasi-steady-state air motions and microphysical properties. It is concluded that homogeneous ice nucleation is responsible for the ice production in these clouds at temperatures below about -33 C. The lack of ice nucleation observed above -33 C indicates a dearth of ice-forming nuclei, and hence heterogeneous ice nucleation, in these clouds. Aircraft measurements in the temperature range -31 to -41 C show the following complement of simultaneous and abrupt changes in cloud properties that indicate a transition from the liquid phase to ice: disappearance of liquid water; decrease in relative humidity from near water saturation to ice saturation; increase in mean particle size; change in particle concentration; and change in temperature due to the release of latent heat. A numerical model of cloud particle growth and homogeneous ice nucleation is used to aid in interpretation of our in situ measurements. The abrupt changes in observed cloud properties compare favorably, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with results from the homogeneous ice nucleation model. It is shown that the homogeneous ice nucleation rates from the measurements are consistent with the temperature-dependent rates employed by the model (within a factor of 100, corresponding to about 1 C in temperature) in the temperature range -35 deg to -38 C. Given the theoretical basis of the modeled rates, it may be reasonable to apply them throughout the -30 to -50 C temperature range considered by the theory.

  4. Experimental Tests of Nucleation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dea, Jack Yuen

    1982-03-01

    In recent years there has been controversy surrounding experimental nucleation data that did not conform to classical nucleation theory. More recent data, however, suggest good agreement between theory and experiment. At the Desert Research Institute (DRI), it was decided to perform sensitive tests of nucleation in soluble aerosol particles using newly developed instruments and techniques. Very steady aerosol generation was accomplished with a newly developed atomizer; very high monodispersity in the sample aerosol was achieved using two electrical mobility analyzers in series; and, very fine control over the supersaturation was achieved using a newly developed CFD (Continuous Flow Diffusion) cloud chamber built for NASA for use in zero -gravity situations. The results of a series of experiments indicated that the supersaturation needs to be about 15% greater than predicted by theory. However, a mass correction, taking into account the shape of the salt particles produced data that are in excellent agreement with theory. Moreover, the relative hygroscopicity of several soluble substances and the slopes of the Kohler curves obtained agreed very well with theory. The results mean that the hygroscopicity of various substances can be rated using the Kohler curves. Calculations have been done to determine the hygroscopicity of a number of sulfate compounds. The results of these calculations indicate that under restricted conditions (aerosol diameters < 0.1 (mu)m and aerosol particles composed of either one soluble compound or one soluble compound plus an insoluble component), it is possible to distinguish apart most of the sulfate species using either the DFC cloud chamber or an instantaneous version of the CFD cloud chamber. These results point to a possible application of nucleation theory to aerosol species differentiation in the atmosphere.

  5. Diamond nucleation under bias conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckel, R.; Stammler, M.; Janischowsky, K.; Ley, L.; Albrecht, M.; Strunk, H.P.

    1998-01-01

    The so-called bias pretreatment allows the growth of heteroepitaxial diamond films by plasma chemical vapor deposition on silicon (100) surfaces. We present plan-view and cross-sectional transmission electron micrographs of the substrate surface at different phases of the bias pretreatment. These observations are augmented by measurements of the etch rates of Si, SiC, and different carbon modifications under plasma conditions and the size distribution of oriented diamond crystals grown after bias pretreatment. Based on these results a new model for diamond nucleation under bias conditions is proposed. First, a closed layer of nearly epitaxially oriented cubic SiC with a thickness of about 10 nm is formed. Subplantation of carbon into this SiC layer causes a supersaturation with carbon and results in the subcutaneous formation of epitaxially oriented nucleation centers in the SiC layer. Etching of the SiC during the bias pretreatment as well as during diamond growth brings these nucleation centers to the sample surface and causes the growth of diamonds epitaxially oriented on the Si/SiC substrate. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Nucleation precursors in protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Vorontsova, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystal nucleation is a central problem in biological crystallography and other areas of science, technology and medicine. Recent studies have demonstrated that protein crystal nuclei form within crucial precursors. Here, methods of detection and characterization of the precursors are reviewed: dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy and Brownian microscopy. Data for several proteins provided by these methods have demonstrated that the nucleation precursors are clusters consisting of protein-dense liquid, which are metastable with respect to the host protein solution. The clusters are several hundred nanometres in size, the cluster population occupies from 10−7 to 10−3 of the solution volume, and their properties in solutions supersaturated with respect to crystals are similar to those in homogeneous, i.e. undersaturated, solutions. The clusters exist owing to the conformation flexibility of the protein molecules, leading to exposure of hydrophobic surfaces and enhanced intermolecular binding. These results indicate that protein conformational flexibility might be the mechanism behind the metastable mesoscopic clusters and crystal nucleation. Investigations of the cluster properties are still in their infancy. Results on direct imaging of cluster behaviors and characterization of cluster mechanisms with a variety of proteins will soon lead to major breakthroughs in protein biophysics. PMID:24598910

  7. Evaporation rate of nucleating clusters.

    PubMed

    Zapadinsky, Evgeni

    2011-11-21

    The Becker-Döring kinetic scheme is the most frequently used approach to vapor liquid nucleation. In the present study it has been extended so that master equations for all cluster configurations are included into consideration. In the Becker-Döring kinetic scheme the nucleation rate is calculated through comparison of the balanced steady state and unbalanced steady state solutions of the set of kinetic equations. It is usually assumed that the balanced steady state produces equilibrium cluster distribution, and the evaporation rates are identical in the balanced and unbalanced steady state cases. In the present study we have shown that the evaporation rates are not identical in the equilibrium and unbalanced steady state cases. The evaporation rate depends on the number of clusters at the limit of the cluster definition. We have shown that the ratio of the number of n-clusters at the limit of the cluster definition to the total number of n-clusters is different in equilibrium and unbalanced steady state cases. This causes difference in evaporation rates for these cases and results in a correction factor to the nucleation rate. According to rough estimation it is 10(-1) by the order of magnitude and can be lower if carrier gas effectively equilibrates the clusters. The developed approach allows one to refine the correction factor with Monte Carlo and molecular dynamic simulations.

  8. Ice nucleation properties of agricultural soil dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, Isabelle; Funk, Roger; Busse, Jacqueline; Iturri, Antonela; Kirchen, Silke; Leue, Martin; Möhler, Ottmar; Schwartz, Thomas; Sierau, Berko; Toprak, Emre; Ulrich, Andreas; Hoose, Corinna; Leisner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Soil dust particles emitted from agricultural areas contain large amounts of organic material such as fungi, bacteria and plant debris. Being carrier for potentially highly ice-active biological particles, agricultural soil dusts are candidates for being very ice-active as well. In this work, we present ice nucleation experiments conducted in the AIDA cloud chamber. We investigated the ice nucleation efficiency of four types of soil dust from different regions of the world. Results are presented for the immersion freezing and the deposition nucleation mode: all soil dusts show higher ice nucleation efficiencies than desert dusts, especially at temperatures above 254 K. For one soil dust sample, the effect of heat treatments was investigated. Heat treatments did not affect the ice nucleation efficiency which presumably excludes primary biological particles as the only source of the increased ice nucleation efficiency. Therefore, organo-mineral complexes or organic compounds may contribute substantially to the high ice nucleation activity of agricultural soil dusts.

  9. Role of nucleation in nanodiamond film growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lifshitz, Y.; Lee, C.H.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, W.J.; Bello, I.; Lee, S.T.

    2006-06-12

    Nanodiamond films were deposited using different microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition schemes following several nucleation pretreatment methods. The nucleation efficiency and the films structure were investigated using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. C{sub 2} dimer growth (CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2} in 90% Ar) cannot nucleate diamond and works only on existing diamond surfaces. The methyl radical process (up to 20% CH{sub 4} in H{sub 2}) allows some nucleation probability on appropriate substrates. Prolonged bias enhanced nucleation initiates both diamond nucleation and growth. C{sub 2} dimer growth results in pure nanodiamond free of amorphous carbon, while prolonged bias enhanced nucleation forms an amorphous carbon/nanodiamond composite.

  10. Sigmoid kinetics of protein crystal nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanev, Christo N.; Tonchev, Vesselin D.

    2015-10-01

    A non-linear differential equation expressing the new phase nucleation rate in the different steps of the process (non-stationary and stationary nucleation and in the plateau region) is derived from basic principles of the nucleation theory. It is shown that one and the same sigmoid (logistic) function describes both nucleation scenarios: the one according to the classical theory, and the other according to the modern two-stage mechanism of protein crystal formation. Comparison to experimental data on both insulin crystal nucleation kinetics and on bovine β-lactoglobulin crystallization indicates a good agreement with the sigmoidal prediction. Experimental data for electrochemical nucleation and glass crystallization obey the same sigmoid time dependence, and suggest universality of this nucleation kinetics law.

  11. Calcium sulfate polymorph evolution dominated by competitive nucleation in gypsum metastable zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hailu; Jia, Caiyun; Chen, Qiaoshan; Jiang, Guangming

    2017-07-01

    Calcium sulfate polymorph evolution during spontaneous precipitation was probed in 1.75 m CaCl2 solutions at 85.0 °C. Metastable calcium sulfate dihydrate (DH) and unstable α-hemihydrate (α-HH) precipitated concomitantly with the dominant phase presenting an order of DH → α-HH → DH upon supersaturation. Competitive nucleation assisted with heterogeneous nucleation of relatively less stable phase at lower supersaturations accounts for such a polymorph evolution. Lower interfacial energy and higher supersaturation result in the DH formation, while heterogeneous nucleation triggers the α-HH formation. Increment in CaCl2 concentration favors α-HH precipitation by decreasing the water activity and narrowing the supersaturation gap between DH and α-HH. This work presents a facile rule manipulating the polymorph evolution and provides a control strategy for selective synthesis of α-HH in industry.

  12. Kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth in Pd(40)Ni(40)P(20) glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drehman, A. J.; Greer, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of Pd(40)Ni(40)P(20) glass, produced by cooling the melt at 1 or 800 K/s, are heated in a differential scanning calorimeter to determine the crystallization kinetics. Optical microscopy shows that eutectic crystallization proceeds both by growth from the surface of the samples and by the growth of spherical regions around preexisting nuclei in the interior. A modified Kissinger (1957) analysis is used to obtain the activation energy for crystal growth (3.49 eV). The steady state homogeneous nucleation frequency at 590 K is about 10 million/cu m per sec. This is estimated to be the maximum nucleation frequency: it is too low to account for the observed population of quenched-in nuclei, which are therefore presumed to be heterogeneous. The major practical obstacle to glass formation in this system is heterogeneous nucleation.

  13. Numerical Modeling of Plasmas in which Nanoparticles Nucleate and Grow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Pulkit

    consistently simulate the dynamics and charging of particles during afterglow. It was found that dusty plasma afterglow is dominated by different time scales for electron and ion dynamics. Particle size and charge distribution changes significantly during the afterglow. Finally, a simplified chemistry model was included in dusty plasma numerical model to simulate the dynamics of argon-silane dusty plasma. The chemistry model treats silane dissociation and reactions of silicon hydrides containing up to two silicon atoms. The nucleation rate is equated to rate of formation of anions containing two Si atoms, and a heterogeneous reaction model is used to model particle surface growth. Evolution of particle size and concentration is explained and the importance of variable surface growth rate and nucleation rate is discussed.

  14. Upscaling multi-component reactive transport in presence of connected subsurface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmann, M.; Mañé, R.; Tyukhova, A.

    2015-12-01

    Heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity leads to incomplete mixing. Upscaling using the dispersion tensor in the advection-dispersion equation overestimates local mixing. Modelling multi-component reactive transport leads to an overestimation of reaction rates and overall reactions. Multi-rate mass transfer was shown previously to better represent mixing. But it is still unclear under what conditions this linear model is able to represent the underlying non-linear process. We study explicit multi-component transport in heterogeneous aquifers for the example of calcite-dissolution. We compare different types of heterogeneity from intermediately well connected (multigaussian) fields to very well connected fields. The fundamental difference stems from their connectivity structure. We observe for the well connected field different dominating channels with an almost uniform advective velocity while the multigaussian fields show dominating channels with a varying advective velocity. Then, we compare our results with an effective reactive mass transfer model where the distribution of exchanges rates or the memory function are derived from information of the hydraulic conductivity field only. We see that reactive multi-rate models show a good agreement for the well connected fields where the connected channels are more or less homogeneous and the immobile inclusions are of more or less equal size. We find connectivity important for upscaling reactive transport in highly heterogeneous conductivity fields.

  15. Ice nucleation and droplet formation by bare and coated soot particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Beth; Kulkarni, Gourihar; BeráNek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-09-01

    We have studied ice formation at temperatures relevant to homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity, of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied in order to span an atmospherically relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone in order to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation, with a comparison to a mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, and particle hygroscopicity. At 253 K and 243 K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, only droplet formation was observed. At 233 K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude that both uncoated and coated soot particles comparable to those generated in our studies are unlikely to significantly contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233 K and 253 K.

  16. NAT nucleation and denitrification in the polar stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Engel, Ines; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas; Frey, Wiebke; Molleker, Sergej; Borrmann, Stephan; Schlager, Hans; Vömel, Holger; Kivi, Rigel; Walker, Kaley A.; Santee, Michelle L.; Stiller, Gabriele; Pitts, Michael; Müller, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles in the polar stratosphere are known to influence the chemistry of ozone depletion. NAT particles, along with other liquid and crystalline particles, provide heterogeneous surfaces for chlorine activation. More importantly, they can take up significant amounts of HNO3 from the gas phase and transport HNO3 downward by sedimentation. This can lead to denitrification, in the Arctic typically at altitudes above about 20 km, and a re-nitrification below, at the level where the NAT particles evaporate. The nucleation rate of NAT particles is a critical parameter for the simulation of this process. Very low NAT nucleation rates around 2?10-9cm-3s-1 have been deduced for low NAT supersaturations from observations. In previous studies, vertical HNO3 transport has been successfully simulated by Lagrangian 3-D simulations using a constant NAT nucleation rate of around 2?10-9cm-3s-1, for the Arctic winters in the years 2003 and 2005. However, for winter 2009/2010, this approach does not generate satisfying results. Here, saturation dependent NAT nucleation rates were derived from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), observations under the assumption that NAT nucleates heterogeneously on dust particles that are characterized by active sites with a certain occurrence probability distribution depending on the contact angle. Simulations with the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM) along back-trajectories starting from points where PSCs were observed by CALIPSO allow the parametrisation of heterogeneous nucleation rates for NAT and ice on dust, and the reproduction of the different PSC classes observed. We present simulations by the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) of the winter 2009/2010 applying this new parametrisation of heterogeneous NAT nucleation rates. The CLaMS simulation is initialized using a combination of MLS, MIPAS-ENVISAT and ACE-FTS data. The simulation

  17. Multicomponent Synthesis of α-Branched Amides

    PubMed Central

    DeBenedetto, Mikkel V.; Green, Michael E.; Wan, Shuangyi; Park, Jung-Hyun; Floreancig, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    α-Branched amides are prepared by multicomponent reactions in which nitriles undergo hydrozirconation to form metalloimines that react with acyl chlorides. The resulting acylimines react with a variety of π-nucleophiles in the presence of Lewis acids to form the desired amides. PMID:19152262

  18. D Multicomponent Time Domain Elastic Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, R. U.; De Basabe, J. D.; Gallardo, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The search of hydrocarbon reservoirs between the finest stratigraphic and structural traps relies on the detailed surveying and interpretation of multicomponent seismic waves. This need makes Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) one of the most active topics in seismic exploration research and there are a limited number of FWI algorithms that undertake the elastic approach required to model these multicomponent data. We developed an iterative Gauss-Newton 2D time-domain elastic FWI scheme that reproduces the vertical and horizontal particle velocity as measured by common seismic surveys and obtains simultaneously the distribution of three elastic parameters of our subsurface model (density ρ and the Lame parameters λ and μ). The elastic wave is propagated in a heterogeneous elastic media using a time domain 2D velocity-stress staggered grid finite difference method. Our code observes the necessary stability conditions and includes absorbing boundary conditions and basic multi-thread parallelization. The same forward modeling code is also used to calculate the Frechet's derivatives with respect to the three parameters of our model following the sensitivity equation approach and perturbation theory. We regularized our FWI algorithm applying two different criteria: (1) First