Science.gov

Sample records for nuclei 89rb 92y

  1. {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of the neutron-rich nuclei {sup 89}Rb, {sup 92}Y, and {sup 93}Y with multinucleon transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bucurescu, D.; Ionescu-Bujor, M.; Iordachescu, A.; Mihai, C.; Suliman, G.; Rusu, C.; Marginean, N.; Ur, C. A.; Marginean, R.; De Angelis, G.; Corradi, L.; Vedova, F. Della; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Guiot, B.; Napoli, D.; Stefanini, A. M.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Bazzacco, D.; Beghini, S.

    2007-12-15

    The positive-parity yrast states in the {sup 89}Rb, {sup 92}Y, and {sup 93}Y nuclei were studied using {gamma}-ray spectroscopy with heavy-ion induced reactions. In the multinucleon transfer reactions {sup 208}Pb+{sup 90}Zr (590 MeV) and {sup 238}U+{sup 82}Se (505 MeV), several {gamma}-ray transitions were identified in these nuclei by means of coincidences between recoiling ions identified with the PRISMA spectrometer and {gamma} rays detected with the CLARA {gamma}-ray array in thin target experiments. Level schemes were subsequently determined from triple-{gamma} coincidences recorded with the GASP array in a thick target experiment, in the reactions produced by a 470 MeV {sup 82}Se beam with a {sup 192}Os target. The observed level schemes are compared to shell-model calculations.

  2. Cosmogenic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raisbeck, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmogenic nuclei, nuclides formed by nuclear interactions of galactic and solar cosmic rays with extraterrestrial or terrestrial matter are discussed. Long lived radioactive cosmogenic isotopes are focused upon. Their uses in dating, as tracers of the interactions of cosmic rays with matter, and in obtaining information on the variation of primary cosmic ray flux in the past are discussed.

  3. Active galactic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Andrew C.

    1999-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei are the most powerful, long-lived objects in the Universe. Recent data confirm the theoretical idea that the power source is accretion into a massive black hole. The common occurrence of obscuration and outflows probably means that the contribution of active galactic nuclei to the power density of the Universe has been generally underestimated. PMID:10220363

  4. Exotic Light Nuclei

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerny, Joseph; Poskanzer, Arthur M.

    1978-01-01

    Among the light elements, nuclei with unequal numbers of protons and neutrons are highly unstable. Some survive just long enough to be detected and exhibit unusual regimes of radioactive decay. ( Autor/MA)

  5. Radiations from hot nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, F. Bary

    1993-01-01

    The investigation indicates that nuclei with excitation energy of a few hundred MeV to BeV are more likely to radiate hot nuclear clusters than neutrons. These daughter clusters could, furthermore, de-excite emitting other hot nuclei, and the chain continues until these nuclei cool off sufficiently to evaporate primarily neutrons. A few GeV excited nuclei could radiate elementary particles preferentially over neutrons. Impact of space radiation with materials (for example, spacecraft) produces highly excited nuclei which cool down emitting electromagnetic and particle radiations. At a few MeV excitation energy, neutron emission becomes more dominant than gamma-ray emission and one often attributes the cooling to take place by successive neutron decay. However, a recent experiment studying the cooling process of 396 MeV excited Hg-190 casts some doubt on this thinking, and the purpose of this investigation is to explore the possibility of other types of nuclear emission which might out-compete with neutron evaporation.

  6. Physics of Unstable Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoa, Dao Tien; Egelhof, Peter; Gales, Sydney; Giai, Nguyen Van; Motobayashi, Tohru

    2008-04-01

    Studies at the RIKEN RI beam factory / T. Motobayashi -- Dilute nuclear states / M. Freer -- Studies of exotic systems using transfer reactions at GANIL / D. Beaumel et al. -- First results from the Magnex large-acceptance spectrometer / A. Cunsolo et al. -- The ICHOR project and spin-isospin physics with unstable beams / H. Sakai -- Structure and low-lying states of the [symbol]He exotic nucleus via direct reactions on proton / V. Lapoux et al. -- Shell gap below [symbol]Sn based on the excited states in [symbol]Cd and [symbol]In / M. Górska -- Heavy neutron-rich nuclei produced in the fragmentation of a [symbol]Pb beam / Zs. Podolyák et al. -- Breakup and incomplete fusion in reactions of weakly-bound nuclei / D.J. Hinde et al. -- Excited states of [symbol]B and [symbol]He and their cluster aspect / Y. Kanada-En'yo et al. -- Nuclear reactions with weakly-bound systems: the treatment of the continuum / C. H. Dasso, A. Vitturi -- Dynamic evolution of three-body decaying resonances / A. S. Jensen et al. -- Prerainbow oscillations in [symbol]He scattering from the Hoyle state of [symbol]C and alpha particle condensation / S. Ohkubo, Y. Hirabayashi -- Angular dispersion behavior in heavy ion elastic scattering / Q. Wang et al. -- Microscopic optical potential in relativistic approach / Z.Yu. Ma et al. -- Exotic nuclei studied in direct reactions at low momentum transfer - recent results and future perspectives at fair / P. Egelhof -- Isotopic temperatures and symmetry energy in spectator fragmentation / M. De Napoli et al. -- Multi-channel algebraic scattering theory and the structure of exotic compound nuclei / K. Amos et al. -- Results for the first feasibility study for the EXL project at the experimental storage ring at GSI / N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki et al. -- Coulomb excitation of ISOLDE neutron-rich beams along the Z = 28 chain / P. Van Duppen -- The gamma decay of the pygmy resonance far from stability and the GDR at finite temperature / G. Benzoni et al

  7. Critical-point nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.M.

    2004-10-01

    It has been suggested that a change of nuclear shape may be described in terms of a phase transition and that specific nuclei may lie close to the critical point of the transition. Analytical descriptions of such critical-point nuclei have been introduced recently and they are described briefly. The results of extensive searches for possible examples of critical-point behavior are presented. Alternative pictures, such as describing bands in the candidate nuclei using simple {Delta}K = 0 and {Delta}K = 2 rotational-coupling models, are discussed, and the limitations of the different approaches highlighted. A possible critical-point description of the transition from a vibrational to rotational pairing phase is suggested.

  8. Scattering Of Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P; Roth, R

    2009-12-15

    The exact treatment of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the fundamental interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. Above all nuclear scattering and reactions, which require the solution of the many-body quantum-mechanical problem in the continuum, represent an extraordinary theoretical as well as computational challenge for ab initio approaches.We present a new ab initio many-body approach which derives from the combination of the ab initio no-core shell model with the resonating-group method [4]. By complementing a microscopic cluster technique with the use of realistic interactions, and a microscopic and consistent description of the nucleon clusters, this approach is capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states in light nuclei. We will discuss applications to neutron and proton scattering on sand light p-shell nuclei using realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, and outline the progress toward the treatment of more complex reactions.

  9. Response of hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Broglia, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The dipole giant resonance is reviewed, as it is the only vibration which has been experimentally identified in the decay of hot nuclei. The mechanism of exciting the resonance and the mode of the resonance are described. The methods used to calculate the vibrations from the shell model are discussed, including the Hartree-Fock approximation and random phase approximation. Nuclei formed by compound nuclear reactions, which possess high excitation energy and angular momentum, are considered. It is argued that the stability of the dipole may be used to advantage in the study of other properties of nuclei at high excitation. It is also considered possible that the discussion of the dipole giant resonance may be extended to the gamma decay of the isovector quadrupole vibration. 26 refs., 18 figs. (LEW)

  10. Electromagnetic structure of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, R.G.

    1986-07-01

    A brief review is given of selected topics in the electromagnetic structure of nucleons and nuclei, including nucleon form factors from both quantum chromodynamics and electron scattering data, measurements of the deuteron and triton form factors, quasi-elastic scattering, and the EMC effect. 47 refs., 13 figs. (LEW)

  11. Quark structure of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenbecler, R.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review is given of selected topics involved in the relativistic quark structure of nuclei such as the infinite momentum variables, scaling variables, counting rules, forward-backward variables, thermodynamic-like limit, QCD effects, higher quark bags, confinement, and many unanswered questions.

  12. Transfer involving deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.O.; Guidry, M.W.; Canto, L.F.

    1985-03-01

    Results are reviewed of 1- and 2-neutron transfer reactions at near-barrier energies for deformed nuclei. Rotational angular momentum and excitation patterns are examined. A strong tendency to populating high spin states within a few MeV of the yrast line is noted, and it is interpreted as preferential transfer to rotation-aligned states. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  13. Energetic Nuclei, Superdensity and Biomedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldin, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    High-energy, relativistic nuclei were first observed in cosmic rays. Studing these nuclei has provided an opportunity for analyzing the composition of cosmic rays and for experimentally verifying principles governing the behavior of nuclear matter at high and super-high temperatures. Medical research using accelerated nuclei is suggested.…

  14. τ- capture in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Huan, Ching; Oset, Eulogio

    1991-04-01

    We determine the capture rate of a τ- from inner atomic orbits in medium and heavy nuclei through the reaction τ-p-->nvτ, The capture rates are of the order of 2×109 s-1, a factor 150 larger than the muon capture rates in heavy nuclei, and three orders of magnitude smaller than the ordinary free τ- width. The investigatiion of this and related τ- capture channels would allow the exploration of the nuclear excitation mechanisms in an unsusual regime of momentum transfer and would provide valuable information on the axial form factor of the nucleon at large momentum transfer. Permanent address: Departmento de Física Teórica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia - CSIC, E-46100 Burjassot (Valencia) Spain.

  15. Nuclei in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2016-06-01

    This work is an attempt to present some problems on the evolution of the Universe: the nucleosynthesis and cosmochronology from the standpoint of physics of particles and nuclei, in particular with the use of the latest results, obtained by means of radioactive nuclear beams. The comparison is made between the processes taking place in the Universe and the mechanisms of formation and decay of nuclei, as well as of their interaction at different energies. Examples are given to show the capabilities of nuclearphysics methods for studying cosmic objects and properties of the Universe. The results of investigations in nuclear reactions, induced by radioactive nuclear beams, make it possible to analyze the nucleosynthesis scenario in the region of light elements in a new manner.

  16. Pairing forces in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    In this contribution, the author mentions some features of pairing forces that are unique to nuclei and cover some areas of major interest in nuclear structure research, that involve pairing. At the level of most nuclear structure studies, nuclei are treated as consisting of two kinds of fermions (protons and neutrons) in a valence space with rather few levels. These features give rise to unique aspects of pairing forces in nuclei: (1) n-p pairing in T = 0 as well as the usual T = 1 pairing that is characteristic of like fermions; (2) a need to correct pairing calculations for the (1/N) effects that can typically be neglected in superconducting solids. An issue of current concern is the nature of the pairing interaction: several recent studies suggest a need for a density dependent form of the pairing interaction. There is a good deal of feedback between the questions of accurate calculations of pairing interactions and the form and magnitude of the pairing interaction. Finally, the authors discuss some many-body wave functions that are a generalization of the BCS wave function form, and apply them to a calculation of energy level spacings in superdeformed rotational bands.

  17. Properties of Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahe, J.; Vanysek, V.; Weissman, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    Active long- and short-period comets contribute about 20 to 30 % of the major impactors on the Earth. Cometary nuclei are irregular bodies, typically a few to ten kilometers in diameter, with masses in the range 10(sup 15) to 10(sup 18) g. The nuclei are composed of an intimate mixture of volatile ices, mostly water ice and hydrocarbon and silicate grains. The composition is the closest to solar composition of any known bodies in the solar system. The nuclei appear to be weakly bonded agglomerations of smaller icy planetesimals, and material strengths estimated from observed tidal disruption events are fairly low, typically 10(sup 2) to 10(sup 4) N m(sup -2). Density estimates range between 0.2 and 1.2 g cm(sup -3) but are very poorly determined, if at all. As comets age they develop nonvolitile crusts on their surfaces which eventually render them inactive, similar in appearance to carbonaceous asteroids. However, dormant comets may continue to show sporadic activity and outbursts for some time before they become truly extinct. The source of the long-period comets is the Oort cloud, a vast spherical cloud of perhaps 10(sup 12) to 10(sup 13) comets surrounding the solar system and extending to interstellar distances. The likely source for short-period comets is the Kuiper belt. a ring of perhaps 10(sup 8) to 10(sup 10) remnant icy planetesimals beyond the orbit of Neptune, though some short-period comets may also be long-period comets from the Oort cloud which have been perturbed into short-period orbits.

  18. Electroproduction of Strange Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    E.V. Hungerford

    2002-06-01

    The advent of high-energy, CW-beams of electrons now allows electro-production and precision studies of nuclei containing hyperons. Previously, the injection of strangeness into a nucleus was accomplished using secondary beams of mesons, where beam quality and target thickness limited the missing mass resolution. We review here the theoretical description of the (e, e'K+) reaction mechanism, and discuss the first experiment demonstrating that this reaction can be used to precisely study the spectra of light hypernuclei. Future experiments based on similar techniques, are expected to attain even better resolutions and rates.

  19. Damping in Yb nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, F.S.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Lee, I.Y.; Ward, D.; Fallon, P.; Cromaz, M.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Clark, R.M.; Diamond, R.M.; Gorgen, A.

    2002-07-01

    In a mixture of three Yb nuclei, we find the rotational damping widths vary from 180 keV at 1.1 MeV {gamma}-ray energy to 290 keV at 1.5 MeV, and the average compound damping widths (or spreading widths) vary from 40 keV at 1.1 MeV {gamma}-ray energy to 60 keV at 1.3 MeV. The simulations also suggest extensive motional narrowing.

  20. Electron Scattering from Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    J. Wallace Van Orden

    2002-08-01

    The description of nuclei at distances on the order of a fermi or less poses a difficult challenge for theoretical physicists. At larger distances the traditional description of the nucleus as a collection of interacting nucleons has been quite successful and substantial progress has been made in recent years in describing few-nucleon systems using this approach. However, it has been known for several decades that the nucleons themselves are composite objects which are believed to be described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). QCD is a complicated nonlinear strongly interacting field theory which can only be used for calculation in special circumstances. Due to the property of asymptotic freedom exhibited by QCD, perturbative calculations of QCD can be made at large momentum transfers and have achieved substantial success for a variety of processes. Understanding the transition from traditional pictures of nuclei to QCD is a substantial challenge. As an example of this problem, this paper describes recent calculations of elastic electron-deuteron scattering based on a relativistic extension of the traditional nuclear physics approach. The results of this work are compared to new data obtained at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory and to the predictions of perturbative QCD.

  1. Exotic nuclei in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2012-07-01

    Recently the academic community has marked several anniversaries connected with discoveries that played a significant role in the development of astrophysical investigations. The year 2009 was proclaimed by the United Nations the International Year of Astronomy. This was associated with the 400th anniversary of Galileo Galilei's discovery of the optical telescope, which marked the beginning of regular research in the field of astronomy. An important contribution to not only the development of physics of the microcosm, but also to the understanding of processes occurring in the Universe, was the discovery of the atomic nucleus made by E. Rutherford 100 years ago. Since then the investigations in the fields of physics of particles and atomic nuclei have helped to understand many processes in the microcosm. Exactly 80 years ago, K. Yanski used a radio-telescope in order to receive the radiation from cosmic objects for the first time, and at the present time this research area of physics is the most efficient method for studying the properties of the Universe. Finally, the April 12, 1961 (50 years ago) launching of the first sputnik into space with a human being onboard, the Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, marked the beginning of exploration of the Universe with the direct participation of man. All these achievements considerably extended our ideas about the Universe. This work is an attempt to present some problems on the evolution of the Universe: the nucleosynthesis and cosmochronology from the standpoint of physics of particles and nuclei, in particular with the use of the latest results, obtained by means of radioactive nuclear beams. The comparison is made between the processes taking place in the Universe and the mechanisms of formation and decay of nuclei, as well as of their interaction at different energies. Examples are given to show the capabilities of nuclear-physics methods for studying cosmic objects and properties of the Universe. The results of

  2. IBA in deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.; Warner, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    The structure and characteristic properties and predictions of the IBA in deformed nuclei are reviewed, and compared with experiment, in particular for /sup 168/Er. Overall, excellent agreement, with a minimum of free parameters (in effect, two, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), was obtained. A particularly surprising, and unavoidable, prediction is that of strong ..beta.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. transitions, a feature characteristically absent in the geometrical model, but manifest empirically. Some discrepancies were also noted, principally for the K=4 excitation, and the detailed magnitudes of some specific B(E2) values. Considerable attention is paid to analyzing the structure of the IBA states and their relation to geometric models. The bandmixing formalism was studied to interpret both the aforementioned discrepancies and the origin of the ..beta.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. transitions. The IBA states, extremely complex in the usual SU(5) basis, are transformed to the SU(3) basis, as is the interaction Hamiltonian. The IBA wave functions appear with much simplified structure in this way as does the structure of the associated B(E2) values. The nature of the symmetry breaking of SU(3) for actual deformed nuclei is seen to be predominantly ..delta..K=0 mixing. A modified, and more consistent, formalism for the IBA-1 is introduced which is simpler, has fewer free parameters (in effect, one, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), is in at least as good agreement with experiment as the earlier formalism, contains a special case of the 0(6) limit which corresponds to that known empirically, and appears to have a close relationship to the IBA-2. The new formalism facilitates the construction of contour plots of various observables (e.g., energy or B(E2) ratios) as functions of N and chi/sub Q/ which allow the parameter-free discussion of qualitative trajectories or systematics.

  3. Quarks in Few Body Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Roy J.

    2016-03-01

    Electron scattering at very high Bjorken x from hadrons provides an excellent test of models, has an important role in high energy physics, and from nuclei, provides a window into short range correlations. Light nuclei have a key role because of the relatively well-known nuclear structure. The development of a novel tritium target for Jefferson Lab has led to renewed interest in the mass three system. For example, deep inelastic scattering experiments in the light nuclei provide a powerful means to determine the neutron structure function. The isospin dependence of electron scattering from mass-3 nuclei provide information on short range correlations in nuclei. The program using the new tritium target will be presented along with a summary of other experiments aimed at revealing the large-x structure of the nucleon.

  4. Isolation of nuclei from yeast.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, M M; Halvorson, H O

    1971-05-01

    A method for isolation of nuclei from Saccharomyces cervisiae in high yield is described. The DNA/protein ratio of the isolated nuclei is 10 times higher than that of whole cells. Examination of these nuclei in phase and electron microscopes has shown them to be round bodies having a double membrane, microtubules, and a dark crescent at one end. The optimum conditions for extraction and resolution of histones of these nuclei on acrylamide gels have been investigated. The nuclei have an active RNA polymerase (E.C. 2.7.7.6) and are able to synthesize RNA in vitro. They are also readily stainable with Giemsa's, Feulgen's, and acridine orange methods. PMID:19866769

  5. Generalized parton distributions in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey

    2009-12-01

    Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) of nuclei describe the distribution of quarks and gluons in nuclei probed in hard exclusive reactions, such as e.g. deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS). Nuclear GPDs and nuclear DVCS allow us to study new aspects of many traditional nuclear effects (nuclear shadowing, EMC effect, medium modifications of the bound nucleons) as well as to access novel nuclear effects. In my talk, I review recent theoretical progress in the area of nuclear GPDs.

  6. Electroweak properties of light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Saori

    2016-03-01

    In this talk, I will review the present understanding of nuclear electroweak properties of light nuclei, including electromagnetic moments, form factors and transitions, as well as selected beta decays in A <= 10 nuclei. Emphasis will be on calculations based on nuclear Hamiltonians that include two- and three-nucleon realistic potentials, along with one- and two-body electroweak currents. Work supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  7. The nature of comet nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, Mark V.; Walker, Russell G.

    1992-01-01

    The icy-conglomerate model of comet nuclei has dominated all others since its introduction. It provided a basis for understanding the non-gravitational motions of comets which had perplexed dynamicists up to that time, and provided a focus for understanding cometary composition and origin. The image of comets as dirty snowballs was quickly adopted. Comet nuclei including their trail mass loss rates and refractory to volatile mass ratios are described.

  8. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Mørch, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    The tensile strength of ordinary water such as tap water or seawater is typically well below 1 bar. It is governed by cavitation nuclei in the water, not by the tensile strength of the water itself, which is extremely high. Different models of the nuclei have been suggested over the years, and experimental investigations of bubbles and cavitation inception have been presented. These results suggest that cavitation nuclei in equilibrium are gaseous voids in the water, stabilized by a skin which allows diffusion balance between gas inside the void and gas in solution in the surrounding liquid. The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure–time history of the water. A recent model and associated experiments throw new light on the effects of transient pressures on the tensile strength of water, which may be notably reduced or increased by such pressure changes. PMID:26442138

  9. Polarized EMC Effect in Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Cloet; A. W. Thomas; W. Bentz

    2006-06-05

    The discovery of the EMC effect and the proton spin crisis by the European Muon Collaboration are two of the standout experiments of the last 25 years. It is therefore surprising that there has been no experimental and little theoretical investigation of the spin structure functions of atomic nuclei. To address this we present results for the spin-dependent structure functions of nuclei. The quark degrees of freedom in nuclei are accessed via the convolution formalism. Where the nucleon bound state is obtained by solving the relativistic Faddeev equation, and a relativistic shell model is used to model the atomic nucleus. We find the important result that the medium modifications to the polarized structure functions are about twice that of the unpolarized case.

  10. Octupole shapes in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.

    1994-08-01

    Theoretical calculations and measurements show the presence of strong octupole correlations in thecyround states and low-lying states of odd-mass and odd-odd nuclei in the RaPa region. Evidence for octupole correlations is provided by the observation of parity doublets and reductions in M1 matrix elements, decoupling parameters, and Coriolis matrix elements Involving high-j states. Enhancement of E1 transition rates has also been observed for some of the octupole deformed nuclei. The most convincing argument for octupole deformation is provided by the similarities of the reduced alpha decay rates to the two members of parity doublets.

  11. Exotic nuclei and nuclear forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    2013-01-01

    I overview new aspects of the structure of exotic nuclei as compared to stable nuclei, focusing on several characteristic effects of nuclear forces. The shell structure of nuclei has been proposed by Mayer and Jensen, and has been considered to be kept valid basically for all nuclei, with well-known magic numbers, 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, …. Nuclear forces were shown, very recently, to change this paradigm. It will be presented that the evolution of shell structure occurs in various ways as more neutrons and/or protons are added, and I will present basic points of this shell evolution in terms of the monopole interaction of nuclear forces. I will discuss three types of nuclear forces. The first one is the tensor force. The tensor force is one of the most fundamental nuclear forces, but its first-order effect on the shell structure has been clarified only recently in studies on exotic nuclei. The tensor force can change the spin-orbit splitting depending on the occupation of specific orbits. This results in changes of the shell structure in many nuclei, and consequently some of Mayer-Jensen's magic numbers are lost and new ones emerge, in certain nuclei. This mechanism can be understood in an intuitive way, meaning that the effect is general and robust. The second type of nuclear forces is central force. I will show a general but unknown property of the central force in the shell-model Hamiltonian that can describe nuclear properties in a good agreement with experiment. I will then demonstrate how it can be incorporated into a simple model of the central force, and will discuss how this force works in the shell evolution. Actually, by combining this central force with the tensor force, one can understand and foresee how the same proton-neutron interaction drives the shell evolution, for examples such as Sn/Sb isotopes, N = 20 nuclei and Ni/Cu isotopes. The distribution of single-particle strength is discussed also in comparison to (e,e‧p) experiment on 48Ca. The shell

  12. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions.

  13. Proton Distribution in Heavy Nuclei

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Johnson, M. H; Teller, E.

    1953-11-13

    It is reasoned that, from considerations connected with beta-decay stability and Coulomb repulsion forces, a neutron excess is developed on the surface of heavy nuclei. Several consequences of this qualitative analysis in nucleon interactions are briefly noted. (K.S.)

  14. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions.

  15. Nuclei and propeller cavitation inception

    SciTech Connect

    Gindroz, B.; Billet, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Propeller cavitation inception tests were conducted in the Grand Tunnel Hydrodynamique (GTH) of the Bassin d`Essaid des Carenes. Both acoustic and visual cavitation inception were determined for leading-edge sheet, travelling bubble, and tip vortex. These data were obtained for specific water quality conditions. The water quality was determined from cavitation susceptibility meter measurements for degassed water (maximum liquid tension, few nuclei), low injection rate of microbubbles (medium liquid tension, low nuclei concentration), medium injection rate of microbubbles (medium liquid tension, high nuclei concentration) and high injection rate of microbubbles (minimum liquid tension, high nuclei concentration). Results clearly demonstrate a different influence of water quality for each type of cavitation. Little variation in cavitation inception index for a significant increase in liquid tension and microbubble size distribution was found for leading-edge sheet; however, tip vortex cavitation inception index decreased significantly for an increase in liquid tension. In addition, a dependency on event rate was determined for tip vortex cavitation inception.

  16. Transitional nuclei near shell closures

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, G.

    2014-08-14

    High spin states in Bismuth and Thallium nuclei near the Z = 82 shell closure and Cesium nuclei near the N = 82 shell closure in A = 190 and A = 130 regions, respectively, have been experimentally investigated using heavy-ion fusion evaporation reaction and by detecting the gamma rays using the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA). Interesting shape properties in these transitional nuclei have been observed. The results were compared with the neighboring nuclei in these two regions. The total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations have been performed for a better understanding of the observed properties. In mass region A = 190, a change in shape from spherical to deformed has been observd around neutron number N = 112 for the Bi (Z = 83) isotopes with proton number above the magic gap Z = 82, whereas, the shape of Tl (Z = 81) isotopes with proton number below the magic gap Z = 82 remains stable as a function of neutron number. An important transition from aplanar to planar configuration of angular momentum vectors leading to the occurance of nuclar chirality and magnetic rotation, respectively, has been proposed for the unique parity πh{sub 11/2}⊗νh{sub 11/2} configuration in Cs isotopes in the mass region A ∼ 130 around neutron number N = 79. These results are in commensurate with the TRS calculations.

  17. Electromagnetic structure of light nuclei

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pastore, Saori

    2016-03-25

    Here, the present understanding of nuclear electromagnetic properties including electromagnetic moments, form factors and transitions in nuclei with A ≤ 10 is reviewed. Emphasis is on calculations based on nuclear Hamiltonians that include two- and three-nucleon realistic potentials, along with one- and two-body electromagnetic currents derived from a chiral effective field theory with pions and nucleons.

  18. International Symposium on Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Cherepanov, E. A.

    Methods of production of light exotic nuclei and study of their ptoperties -- Superheavy elements. Syhnthesis and properties -- Nuclear fission -- Nuclear reactions -- rare processes, decay and nuclear structure -- Experimental set-ups and future projects -- Radioactive beams. Production and research programmes -- Public relations.

  19. Scissors Mode in Gd Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Parker, W.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, G. J.; Walker, C. L.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Wu, C. Y.

    2012-02-01

    Spectra of γ rays following neutron capture at isolated resonances of 6 stable Gd isotopes were measured with highly segmented BaF2 detector DANCE at the Los Alamos LANSCE spallation neutron source. The main emphasis was put on studying the γ-cascade decay of neutron resonances to get unique information on photon strength. An analysis of the accumulated γ-ray spectra within the extreme statistical model leads to an inescapable conclusion that scissors mode resonances are built not only on the ground-state, but also on excited levels in all product nuclei studied. The results on summed B(M1)↑ strength and energy of the scissors mode are compared with systematics of scissors mode parameters for the ground-state transitions deduced from nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements. A specific feature of our experiments is the investigation of scissors mode of odd nuclei, for which the nuclear resonance fluorescence provides only limited information.

  20. Physical processing of cometary nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Stern, S. Alan

    1989-01-01

    Cometary nuclei were formed far from the Sun in the colder regions of the solar nebula, and have been stored in distant orbits in the Oort cloud over most of the history of the solar system. It had been thought that this benign environment would preserve comets in close to their original pristine state. However, recent studies have identified a number of physical processes that have likely acted to modify cometary nuclei in a variety of significant ways. It is important to consider all of these possible processes, both in deciding on a site on the nucleus for collection of cometary samples, and in interpreting the results of analyses of returned cometary samples. Although it can no longer be said that comets are pristine samples of original solar nebula material, they are still the best obtainable samples of that unique period in the formation of the planetary system.

  1. Dynamics of hot rotating nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcias, F.; de La Mota, V.; Remaud, B.; Royer, G.; Sébille, F.

    1991-02-01

    The deexcitation of hot rotating nuclei is studied within a microscopic semiclassical transport formalism. This framework allows the study of the competition between the fission and evaporation channels of deexcitation, including the mean-field and two-body interactions, without shape constraint for the fission channel. As a function of initial angular momenta and excitation energies, the transitions between three regimes is analyzed [particle evaporation, binary (ternary) fussion and multifragmentation], which correspond to well-defined symmetry breakings in the inertia tensor of the system. The competition between evaporation and binary fission is studied, showing the progressive disappearance of the fission process with increasing excitation energies, up to a critical point where nuclei pass directly from evaporation to multifragmentation channels.

  2. Direct Reactions with Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, G.; Typel, S.

    2005-10-14

    We discuss recent work on Coulomb dissociation and an effective-range theory of low-lying electromagnetic strength of halo nuclei. We propose to study Coulomb dissociation of a halo nucleus bound by a zero-range potential as a homework problem. We study the transition from stripping to bound and unbound states and point out in this context that the Trojan-Horse method is a suitable tool to investigate subthreshold resonances.

  3. Mass model for unstable nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.

    1994-02-01

    We present some essential features of a macroscopic-microscopic nuclear-structure model, with special emphasis on the results of a recent global calculation of nuclear masses. We discuss what should be some minimal requirements of a nuclear mass model and study how the macroscopic-microscopic method and other nuclear mass models fulfil such basic requirements. We study in particular the reliability of nuclear mass models in regions of nuclei that were not considered in the determination of the model parameters.

  4. Carbon-resistant Ni-Zr0.92Y0.08O2-δ supported solid oxide fuel cells using Ni-Cu-Fe alloy cermet as on-cell reforming catalyst and mixed methane-steam as fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Bin; Li, Meng; Luo, Jing-li; Pu, Jian; Chi, Bo; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Two types of anode-supported cell are fabricated by tape casting, screen printing and sintering processes. The first one is a conventional anode supported cell (ASC); and the other, namely CASC, contains an extra layer of Ni-Cu/Ni-Fe alloys-BaZr0.1Ce0.7Y0.1Yb0.1O3-δ (NCF-BZCYYb) cermet catalyst on the surface of the anode-support. Using CH4-3 mol. % H2O as the fuel, the initial performance of the CASC is moderately improved, compared with that of the ASC; the power density of the CASC and ASC at 500 mA cm-2 and 800 °C remain stable on the level of 470 mW cm-2 for approximately 11 and 0.8 h, respectively, before cell disintegration caused by carbon formation. The performances of the CASC in the fuel of CH4-33.3 mol. % H2O are significantly increased above the level of the ASC, demonstrating an initial peak power density ranging from 280 to 1638 mW cm-2 at temperatures between 600 and 800 °C and a stable power density of 485 mW cm-2 at 500 mA cm-2 and 800 °C for 48 h. Carbon deposition in the anode region of the tested CASC cell is not detected, as the NCF-BZCYYb is a more active catalyst than the Ni-Zr0.92Y0.08O2-δ (YSZ) anode-support for CH4 steam reforming.

  5. Ground states of larger nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, S.C.; Wiringa, R.B.; Pandharipande, V.R.

    1995-08-01

    The methods used for the few-body nuclei require operations on the complete spin-isospin vector; the size of this vector makes such methods impractical for nuclei with A > 8. During the last few years we developed cluster expansion methods that do not require operations on the complete vector. We use the same Hamiltonians as for the few-body nuclei and variational wave functions of form similar to the few-body wave functions. The cluster expansions are made for the noncentral parts of the wave functions and for the operators whose expectation values are being evaluated. The central pair correlations in the wave functions are treated exactly and this requires the evaluation of 3A-dimensional integrals which are done with Monte Carlo techniques. Most of our effort was on {sup 16}O, other p-shell nuclei, and {sup 40}Ca. In 1993 the Mathematics and Computer Science Division acquired a 128-processor IBM SP which has a theoretical peak speed of 16 Gigaflops (GFLOPS). We converted our program to run on this machine. Because of the large memory on each node of the SP, it was easy to convert the program to parallel form with very low communication overhead. Considerably more effort was needed to restructure the program from one oriented towards long vectors for the Cray computers at NERSC to one that makes efficient use of the cache of the RS6000 architecture. The SP made possible complete five-body cluster calculations of {sup 16}O for the first time; previously we could only do four-body cluster calculations. These calculations show that the expectation value of the two-body potential is converging less rapidly than we had thought, while that of the three-body potential is more rapidly convergent; the net result is no significant change to our predicted binding energy for {sup 16}O using the new Argonne v{sub 18} potential and the Urbana IX three-nucleon potential. This result is in good agreement with experiment.

  6. Shape Coexistence in Transitional Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, W. D.; Schmelzenbach, P.; Wood, J. L.; Allmond, J. M.; Krane, K. S.; Loats, J.; Stapels, C. J.; Norman, E. B.

    2007-10-01

    The ``transitional'' nuclei near N=90 have long been a focus of experimental and theoretical investigations. We report on a program of study of the N=90 and N=88 nuclei with a focus on the structure of ^150Sm elucidated through new high-statistics, precision γ-ray coincidence spectroscopy and γ-γ angular correlation data from the radioactive decay of ^150Pm (T1/2= 2.68 h, Q^- = 3454 keV, J^π= 1^-) and ^150m,gEu (T1/2= 12.8 h, J^π= 0^- and T1/2= 36.9 y, J^π= 5^(-), respectively, Q^+(g.s.)= 2261 keV). In particular, very weak key collective transitions (e.g., the 2^+2(1046) ->4^+1(773) 272 keV γ ray) are observed and precision δ(E2/M1) mixing ratios are extracted (determining δJ = 0 transitions). This data, when combined with published results from conversion electron measurements, two-neutron transfer studies, and Coulomb excitation supports the results from detailed multiple-spectroscopy studies of ^152Sm [1] indicating that shape coexistence underlies the structure at N=88, 90. [1] W. D. Kulp, et al., arXiv:0706.4129 [nucl-ex].

  7. Thermal instability of cell nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmt, Enrico; Kießling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A.

    2014-07-01

    DNA is known to be a mechanically and thermally stable structure. In its double stranded form it is densely packed within the cell nucleus and is thermo-resistant up to 70\\:^\\circ {\\rm{C}}. In contrast, we found a sudden loss of cell nuclei integrity at relatively moderate temperatures ranging from 45 to 55\\:^\\circ {\\rm{C}}. In our study, suspended cells held in an optical double beam trap were heated under controlled conditions while monitoring the nuclear shape. At specific critical temperatures, an irreversible sudden shape transition of the nuclei was observed. These temperature induced transitions differ in abundance and intensity for various normal and cancerous epithelial breast cells, which clearly characterizes different cell types. Our results show that temperatures slightly higher than physiological conditions are able to induce instabilities of nuclear structures, eventually leading to cell death. This is a surprising finding since recent thermorheological cell studies have shown that cells have a lower viscosity and are thus more deformable upon temperature increase. Since the nucleus is tightly coupled to the outer cell shape via the cytoskeleton, the force propagation of nuclear reshaping to the cell membrane was investigated in combination with the application of cytoskeletal drugs.

  8. Physical Processing of Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Stern, S. Alan

    1997-01-01

    Cometary nuclei preserve a cosmo-chemical record of conditions and processes in the primordial solar nebula, and possibly even the interstellar medium. However, that record is not perfectly preserved over the age of the solar system due to a variety of physical processes which act to modify cometary surfaces and interiors. Possible structural and/or internal processes include: collisional accretion, disruption, and reassembly during formation; internal heating by long and short-lived radionuclides; amorphous to crystalline phase transitions, and thermal stresses. Identified surface modification processes include: irradiation by galactic cosmic rays, solar protons, UV photons, and the Sun's T Tauri stage mass outflow; heating by passing stars and nearby supernovae; gardening by debris impacts; the accretion of interstellar dust and gas and accompanying erosion by hypervelocity dust impacts and sputtering; and solar heating with accompanying crust formation. These modification processes must be taken into account in both the planning and the interpretation of the results of a Comet Nucleus Sample Return Mission. Sampling of nuclei should be done at as great a depth below the surface crust as technically feasible, and at vents or fissures leading to exposed volatiles at depth. Samples of the expected cometary crust and near-surface layers also need to be returned for analysis to achieve a better understanding of the effects of these physical processes. We stress that comets are still likely less modified dm any other solar system bodies, but the degree of modification can vary greatly from one comet to the next.

  9. Selfconsistent calculations for hyperdeformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Molique, H.; Dobaczewski, J.; Dudek, J.; Luo, W.D.

    1996-12-31

    Properties of the hyperdeformed nuclei in the A {approximately} 170 mass range are re-examined using the self-consistent Hartree-Fock method with the SOP parametrization. A comparison with the previous predictions that were based on a non-selfconsistent approach is made. The existence of the {open_quotes}hyper-deformed shell closures{close_quotes} at the proton and neutron numbers Z=70 and N=100 and their very weak dependence on the rotational frequency is suggested; the corresponding single-particle energy gaps are predicted to play a role similar to that of the Z=66 and N=86 gaps in the super-deformed nuclei of the A {approximately} 150 mass range. Selfconsistent calculations suggest also that the A {approximately} 170 hyperdeformed structures have neglegible mass asymmetry in their shapes. Very importantly for the experimental studies, both the fission barriers and the {open_quotes}inner{close_quotes} barriers (that separate the hyperdeformed structures from those with smaller deformations) are predicted to be relatively high, up to the factor of {approximately}2 higher than the corresponding ones in the {sup 152}Dy superdeformed nucleus used as a reference.

  10. Review of metastable states in heavy nuclei.

    PubMed

    Dracoulis, G D; Walker, P M; Kondev, F G

    2016-07-01

    The structure of nuclear isomeric states is reviewed in the context of their role in contemporary nuclear physics research. Emphasis is given to high-spin isomers in heavy nuclei, with [Formula: see text]. The possibility to exploit isomers to study some of the most exotic nuclei is a recurring theme. In spherical nuclei, the role of octupole collectivity is discussed in detail, while in deformed nuclei the limitations of the K quantum number are addressed. Isomer targets and isomer beams are considered, along with applications related to energy storage, astrophysics, medicine, and experimental advances. PMID:27243336

  11. Review of metastable states in heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dracoulis, G. D.; Walker, P. M.; Kondev, F. G.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of nuclear isomeric states is reviewed in the context of their role in contemporary nuclear physics research. Emphasis is given to high-spin isomers in heavy nuclei, with A≳ 150 . The possibility to exploit isomers to study some of the most exotic nuclei is a recurring theme. In spherical nuclei, the role of octupole collectivity is discussed in detail, while in deformed nuclei the limitations of the K quantum number are addressed. Isomer targets and isomer beams are considered, along with applications related to energy storage, astrophysics, medicine, and experimental advances.

  12. Reaction theory for exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaccorso, Angela

    2014-05-09

    Exotic nuclei are usually defined as those with unusual N/Z ratios. They can be found in the crust of neutron stars enbedded in a sea of electrons or created in laboratory by fragmentation of a primary beam (in-flight method) or of the target (ISOL method). They are extremely important for nuclear astrophysics, see for example Ref.[1]. Furthermore by studying them we can check the limits of validity of nuclear reaction and structure models. This contribution will be devoted to the understanding of how by using reaction theory and comparing to the data we can extract structure information. We shall discuss the differences between the mechanisms of transfer and breakup reactions, an we will try to explain how nowadays it is possible to do accurate spectroscopy in extreme conditions.

  13. The Physics of Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, Fred L.

    1997-01-01

    The recent developments in cometary studies suggest rather low mean densities and weak structures for the nuclei. They appear to be accumulations of fairly discrete units loosely bound together, as deduced from the observations of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 during its encounter with Jupiter. The compressive strengths deduced from comet splitting by Opik and Sekanina are extremely low. These values are confirmed by theory developed here. assuming that Comet P/Holmes had a companion that collided with it in 1892. There follows a short discussion that suggests that the mean densities of comets should increase with comet dimensions. The place of origin of short-period comets may relate to these properties.

  14. Theory of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    The involvement of accretion disks around supermassive black holes in the theory of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is discussed. The physics of thin and thick accretion disks is discussed and the partition between thermal and nonthermal energy production in supermassive disks is seen as uncertain. The thermal limit cycle may operate in supermassive disks (Shields, 1985), with accumulation of gas in the disk for periods of 10 to the 4th to 10 to the 7th years, punctuated by briefer outbursts during which the mass is rapidly transferred to smaller radii. An extended X-ray source in AGN is consistent with observations (Tennant and Mushotsky, 1983), and a large wind mass loss rate exceeding the central accretion rate means that only a fraction of the mass entering the disk will reach the central object; the rest being lost to the wind. Controversy in the relationship between the broad lines and the disk is also discussed.

  15. Single Pion production from Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. K.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Ahmed, S.

    2007-12-21

    We have studied charged current one pion production induced by {nu}{sub {mu}}({nu}-bar{sub {mu}}) from some nuclei. The calculations have been done for the incoherent pion production processes from these nuclear targets in the {delta} dominance model and take into account the effect of Pauli blocking, Fermi motion and renormalization of {delta} properties in the nuclear medium. The effect of final state interactions of pions has also been taken into account. The numerical results have been compared with the recent results from the MiniBooNE experiment for the charged current 1{pi} production, and also with some of the older experiments in Freon and Freon-Propane from CERN.

  16. The mysterious microcircuitry of the cerebellar nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Uusisaari, Marylka; De Schutter, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The microcircuitry of cerebellar cortex and, in particular, the physiology of its main element, the Purkinje neuron, has been extensively investigated and described. However, activity in Purkinje neurons, either as single cells or populations, does not directly mediate the cerebellar effects on the motor effector systems. Rather, the result of the entire cerebellar cortical computation is passed to the relatively small cerebellar nuclei that act as the final, integrative processing unit in the cerebellar circuitry. The nuclei ultimately control the temporal and spatial features of the cerebellar output. Given this key role, it is striking that the internal organization and the connectivity with afferent and efferent pathways in the cerebellar nuclei are rather poorly known. In the present review, we discuss some of the many critical shortcomings in the understanding of cerebellar nuclei microcircuitry: the extent of convergence and divergence of the cerebellar cortical pathway to the various cerebellar nuclei neurons and subareas, the possible (lack of) conservation of the finely-divided topographical organization in the cerebellar cortex at the level of the nuclei, as well as the absence of knowledge of the synaptic circuitry within the cerebellar nuclei. All these issues are important for predicting the pattern-extraction and encoding capabilities of the cerebellar nuclei and, until resolved, theories and models of cerebellar motor control and learning may err considerably. PMID:21521761

  17. Fusion probability in heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tathagata; Nath, S.; Pal, Santanu

    2015-03-01

    Background: Fusion between two massive nuclei is a very complex process and is characterized by three stages: (a) capture inside the potential barrier, (b) formation of an equilibrated compound nucleus (CN), and (c) statistical decay of the CN leading to a cold evaporation residue (ER) or fission. The second stage is the least understood of the three and is the most crucial in predicting yield of superheavy elements (SHE) formed in complete fusion reactions. Purpose: A systematic study of average fusion probability, , is undertaken to obtain a better understanding of its dependence on various reaction parameters. The study may also help to clearly demarcate onset of non-CN fission (NCNF), which causes fusion probability, PCN, to deviate from unity. Method: ER excitation functions for 52 reactions leading to CN in the mass region 170-220, which are available in the literature, have been compared with statistical model (SM) calculations. Capture cross sections have been obtained from a coupled-channels code. In the SM, shell corrections in both the level density and the fission barrier have been included. for these reactions has been extracted by comparing experimental and theoretical ER excitation functions in the energy range ˜5 %-35% above the potential barrier, where known effects of nuclear structure are insignificant. Results: has been shown to vary with entrance channel mass asymmetry, η (or charge product, ZpZt ), as well as with fissility of the CN, χCN. No parameter has been found to be adequate as a single scaling variable to determine . Approximate boundaries have been obtained from where starts deviating from unity. Conclusions: This study quite clearly reveals the limits of applicability of the SM in interpreting experimental observables from fusion reactions involving two massive nuclei. Deviation of from unity marks the beginning of the domain of dynamical models of fusion. Availability of precise ER cross

  18. Thermal evolution of cometary nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prialnik, D.

    2014-07-01

    Thermal modeling of comet nuclei and similar objects involves the solution of conservation equations for energy and masses of the various components over time. For simplicity, the body is generally, but not necessarily, assumed to be of spherical shape. The processes included in such calculations are heat transfer, gas flow, dust drag, phase transitions, internal heating by various sources, internal structure alterations, surface sublimation. Physical properties --- such as the thermal conductivity, permeability, material strength, and porous structure --- are assumed, based on the best available estimates from laboratory experiments and space-mission results. Calculations employ various numerical procedures and require significant computational power, data analysis, and often sophisticated methods of graphical presentation. They start with a body of given size, mass, and composition, as well as a given orbit. The results yield properties and activity patterns that can be confronted with observations. Initial parameters may be adjusted until agreement is achieved. A glimpse into the internal structure of the object, which is inaccessible to direct observation, is thus obtained. The last decade, since the extensive overview of the subject was published (Modeling the structure and activity of comet nuclei, Prialnik, D.; Benkhoff, J.; Podolak, M., in Comets II, M. C. Festou, H. U. Keller, and H. A. Weaver, eds., University of Arizona Press, Tucson, p.359-387), thermal modeling has significantly advanced. This was prompted both by new properties and phenomena gleaned from observations, one example being main-belt comets, and the continual increase in computational power and performance. Progress was made on two fronts. On the computational side, multi-dimensional models have been developed, adaptive-grid and moving-boundaries techniques have been adopted, and long-term evolutionary calculations have become possible, even spanning the lifetime of the Solar System. On

  19. Star formation around active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, William C.

    1987-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (Seyfert nuclei and their relatives) and intense star formation can both deliver substantial amounts of energy to the vicinity of a galactic nucleus. Many luminous nuclei have energetics dominated by one of these mechanisms, but detailed observations show that some have a mixture. Seeing both phenomena at once raises several interesting questions: (1) Is this a general property of some kinds of nuclei? How many AGNs have surround starbursts, and vice versa? (2) As in 1, how many undiscovered AGNs or starbursts are hidden by a more luminous instance of the other? (3) Does one cause the other, and by what means, or do both reflect common influences such as potential well shape or level of gas flow? (4) Can surrounding star formation tell us anything about the central active nuclei, such as lifetimes, kinetic energy output, or mechanical disturbance of the ISM? These are important points in the understanding of activity and star formation in galactic nuclei. Unfortunately, the observational ways of addressing them are as yet not well formulated. Some preliminary studies are reported, aimed at clarifying the issues involved in study of the relationships between stellar and nonstellar excitement in galactic nuclei.

  20. Molecular outflows in starburst nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Nath, Biman B.; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations have detected molecular outflows in a few nearby starburst nuclei. We discuss the physical processes at work in such an environment in order to outline a scenario that can explain the observed parameters of the phenomenon, such as the molecular mass, speed and size of the outflows. We show that outflows triggered by OB associations, with NOB ≥ 105 (corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR)≥1 M⊙ yr-1 in the nuclear region), in a stratified disk with mid-plane density n0 ˜ 200-1000 cm-3 and scale height z0 ≥ 200(n0/102 cm-3)-3/5 pc, can form molecules in a cool dense and expanding shell. The associated molecular mass is ≥107 M⊙ at a distance of a few hundred pc, with a speed of several tens of km s-1. We show that a SFR surface density of 10 ≤ ΣSFR ≤ 50 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 favours the production of molecular outflows, consistent with observed values.

  1. Unbound Resonances in Light Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, Elizabeth; Finck, Joseph; Gueye, Paul; Thoennessen, Michael; MoNA Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Currently there has been no comprehensive study undertaken to compile experimental results from neutron unbound spectroscopy using invariant mass measurements, gamma resolutions, and half-lives. At Central Michigan University, Hampton University, and the NSCL, a project was initiated to catalog all unbound resonances in light nuclei (Z = 1-12). Unbound resonances were characterized by having a confirmed neutron decay branch and/or an energy level greater than the neutron binding energy listed for that isotope according to either the National Nuclear Data Center's Evaluated Nuclear Structure Files or Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List and the referred journals therein. Unbound resonances will be presented for twelve elements: H, He, Li, Be, B, C, N, O, Fl, Ne, Na, and Mg. The isotopes in which unbound resonances occur will be identified, along with unbound energy levels for these isotopes. If known, each unbound resonance's gamma resolution, half-life, method of production and journal reference were also determined and a selection of these will be presented.

  2. Neurotransmitters of the suprachiasmatic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Reghunandanan, Vallath; Reghunandanan, Rajalaxmy

    2006-01-01

    There has been extensive research in the recent past looking into the molecular basis and mechanisms of the biological clock, situated in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. Neurotransmitters are a very important component of SCN function. Thorough knowledge of neurotransmitters is not only essential for the understanding of the clock but also for the successful manipulation of the clock with experimental chemicals and therapeutical drugs. This article reviews the current knowledge about neurotransmitters in the SCN, including neurotransmitters that have been identified only recently. An attempt was made to describe the neurotransmitters and hormonal/diffusible signals of the SCN efference, which are necessary for the master clock to exert its overt function. The expression of robust circadian rhythms depends on the integrity of the biological clock and on the integration of thousands of individual cellular clocks found in the clock. Neurotransmitters are required at all levels, at the input, in the clock itself, and in its efferent output for the normal function of the clock. The relationship between neurotransmitter function and gene expression is also discussed because clock gene transcription forms the molecular basis of the clock and its working. PMID:16480518

  3. The morphology of cometary nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, H. U.; Jorda, L.

    comets display residual activity or clouds of dust grains around their nuclei. Taking the residual signal into account (mostly using simple models for the brightness distribution) the size estimates of the nuclei could be improved. The (nuclear) magnitude of a comet depends on the product of its albedo and cross-section. Only in a few cases could the albedo and size of a cometary nucleus be separated by additional observation of its thermal emission at infrared wavelengths. By comparison with outer Solar System asteroids Cruikshank et al. (1985) derived a surprisingly low albedo of about 0.04. A value in clear contradiction to the perception of an icy surface but fully confirmed by the first resolved images of a cometary nucleus during the flybys of the Vega and Giotto spacecraft of comet Halley (Sagdeev et al. 1986, Keller et al. 1986). The improvements of radar techniques led to the detection of reflected signals and finally to the derivation of nuclear dimensions and rotation rates. The observations, however, are also model dependent (rotation and size are similarly interwoven as are albedo and size) and sensitive to large dust grains in the vicinity of a nucleus. As an example, Kamoun et al. (1982) determined the radius of comet Encke to 1.5 (2.3, 1.0) km using the spin axis determination of Whipple and Sekanina (1979). The superb spatial resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is not quite sufficient to resolve a cometary nucleus. The intensity distribution of the inner coma, however, can be observed and extrapolated toward the nucleus based on models of the dust distribution. If this contribution is subtracted from the central brightness the signal of the nucleus can be derived and hence its product of albedo times cross-section (Lamy and Toth 1995, Rembor 1998, Keller and Rembor 1998; Section 4.3). It has become clear that cometary nuclei are dark, small, often irregular bodies with dimensions ranging from about a kilometre (comet Wirtanen, the target of

  4. Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

    2012-09-12

    It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

  5. ULTRA-RELATIVISTIC NUCLEI: A NEW FRONTIER

    SciTech Connect

    MCLERRAN,L.

    1999-10-29

    The collisions of ultra-relativistic nuclei provide a window on the behavior of strong interactions at asymptotically high energies. They also will allow the authors to study the bulk properties of hadronic matter at very high densities.

  6. GDR in Hot Nuclei: New Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camera, F.; Kmiecik, M.; Wieland, O.; Benzoni, G.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Crespi, F.; Mason, P.; Moroni, A.; Million, B.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Styczen, J.; Brekiesz, M.; Meczynski, W.; Zieblinski, M.; Gramegna, F.; Barlini, S.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Lanchais, A. L.; Mastinu, P. F.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Geraci, E.; Ordine, A.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.

    2005-04-01

    The measured properties of the Giant Dipole Resonance in hot rotating nuclei are successfully described with the model of thermal fluctuations, even though there are still some open problems especially at very low (T < 1.2MeV), very high (T >2.5MeV) temperatures and missing data in some mass regions. Recent experimental works have addressed more specific problems regarding the nuclear shape and its behaviour in very particular and delimited phase space regions. In this paper will be discussed new exclusive measurements of the GDR γ decay in heavy 216Rn nuclei (where the shape of nuclei surviving fission have been probed) and some preliminary data on the 132Ce nuclei at very high excitation energy.

  7. Clusterization and quadrupole deformation in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, J.; Algora, A.; Antonenko, N. V.; Jolos, R. V.; Scheid, W.; Darai, J.; Hess, P. O.

    2006-04-26

    We study the interrelation of the clusterization and quadrupole deformation of atomic nuclei, by applying cluster models. Both the energetic stability and the exclusion principle is investigated. Special attention is paid to the relative orientations of deformed clusters.

  8. From Nucleons To Nuclei To Fusion Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P; Roth, R; Horiuchi, W

    2012-02-15

    Nuclei are prototypes of many-body open quantum systems. Complex aggregates of protons and neutrons that interact through forces arising from quantum chromo-dynamics, nuclei exhibit both bound and unbound states, which can be strongly coupled. In this respect, one of the major challenges for computational nuclear physics, is to provide a unified description of structural and reaction properties of nuclei that is based on the fundamental underlying physics: the constituent nucleons and the realistic interactions among them. This requires a combination of innovative theoretical approaches and high-performance computing. In this contribution, we present one of such promising techniques, the ab initio no-core shell model/resonating-group method, and discuss applications to light nuclei scattering and fusion reactions that power stars and Earth-base fusion facilities.

  9. A focus on shape coexistence in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, J. L.; Heyde, K.

    2016-02-01

    The present collection of articles focuses on new directions and developments under the title of shape coexistence in nuclei, following our 2011 Reviews of Modern Physics article (K Heyde and J L Wood).

  10. Understanding nuclei in the upper sd - shell

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, M. Saha; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta; Kshetri, Ritesh; Sarkar, S.

    2014-08-14

    Nuclei in the upper-sd shell usually exhibit characteristics of spherical single particle excitations. In the recent years, employment of sophisticated techniques of gamma spectroscopy has led to observation of high spin states of several nuclei near A ≃ 40. In a few of them multiparticle, multihole rotational states coexist with states of single particle nature. We have studied a few nuclei in this mass region experimentally, using various campaigns of the Indian National Gamma Array setup. We have compared and combined our empirical observations with the large-scale shell model results to interpret the structure of these nuclei. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. This gives us an opportunity to investigate the interplay of single particle and collective degrees of freedom in this mass region.

  11. Perspectives of production of superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Bezbakh, A. N.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Scheid, W.

    2016-07-01

    Possible ways of production of superheavies are discussed. Impact of nuclear structure on the production of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions is discussed. The proton shell closure at Z = 120 is discussed.

  12. Infrared Observations of Cometary Dust and Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisse, Carey

    2004-01-01

    This bibliography lists citations for publications published under the grant. Subjects of the publications include cometary dust, instellar and interplanetary dust, comet nuclei and comae, Comet Hale-Bopp, infrared observations of comets, mass loss, and comet break-up.

  13. Organization of projections from the raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halberstadt, A. L.; Balaban, C. D.

    2003-01-01

    Previous anatomic and electrophysiological evidence suggests that serotonin modulates processing in the vestibular nuclei. This study examined the organization of projections from serotonergic raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats. The distribution of serotonergic axons in the vestibular nuclei was visualized immunohistochemically in rat brain slices using antisera directed against the serotonin transporter. The density of serotonin transporter-immunopositive fibers is greatest in the superior vestibular nucleus and the medial vestibular nucleus, especially along the border of the fourth ventricle; it declines in more lateral and caudal regions of the vestibular nuclear complex. After unilateral iontophoretic injections of Fluoro-Gold into the vestibular nuclei, retrogradely labeled neurons were found in the dorsal raphe nucleus (including the dorsomedial, ventromedial and lateral subdivisions) and nucleus raphe obscurus, and to a minor extent in nucleus raphe pallidus and nucleus raphe magnus. The combination of retrograde tracing with serotonin immunohistofluorescence in additional experiments revealed that the vestibular nuclei receive both serotonergic and non-serotonergic projections from raphe nuclei. Tracer injections in densely innervated regions (especially the medial and superior vestibular nuclei) were associated with the largest numbers of Fluoro-Gold-labeled cells. Differences were observed in the termination patterns of projections from the individual raphe nuclei. Thus, the dorsal raphe nucleus sends projections that terminate predominantly in the rostral and medial aspects of the vestibular nuclear complex, while nucleus raphe obscurus projects relatively uniformly throughout the vestibular nuclei. Based on the topographical organization of raphe input to the vestibular nuclei, it appears that dense projections from raphe nuclei are colocalized with terminal fields of flocculo-nodular lobe and uvula Purkinje cells. It is hypothesized that

  14. Cosmic Ray Nuclei (CRN) detector investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Peter; Muller, Dietrich; Lheureux, Jacques; Swordy, Simon

    1991-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Nuclei (CRN) detector was designed to measure elemental composition and energy spectra of cosmic radiation nuclei ranging from lithium to iron. CRN was flown as part of Spacelab 2 in 1985, and consisted of three basic components: a gas Cerenkov counter, a transition radiation detector, and plastic scintillators. The results of the experiment indicate that the relative abundance of elements in this range, traveling at near relativistic velocities, is similar to those reported at lower energy.

  15. Synthesis of superheavy nuclei: Obstacles and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Karpov, A. V.; Greiner, Walter

    2015-01-01

    There are only 3 methods for the production of heavy and superheavy (SH) nuclei, namely, fusion reactions, a sequence of neutron capture and beta(-) decay and multinucleon transfer reactions. Low values of the fusion cross sections and very short half-lives of nuclei with Z<120 put obstacles in synthesis of new elements. At the same time, an important area of SH isotopes located between those produced in the cold and hot fusion reactions remains unstudied yet. This gap could be filled in fusion reactions of 48Ca with available lighter isotopes of Pu, Am, and Cm. New neutron-enriched isotopes of SH elements may be produced with the use of a 48Ca beam if a 250Cm target would be prepared. In this case we get a real chance to reach the island of stability owing to a possible beta(+) decay of 291114 and 287112 nuclei formed in this reaction with a cross section of about 0.8 pb. A macroscopic amount of the long-living SH nuclei located at the island of stability may be produced by using the pulsed nuclear reactors of the next generation only if the neutron fluence per pulse will be increased by about three orders of magnitude. Multinucleon transfer processes look quite promising for the production and study of neutron-rich heavy nuclei located in upper part of the nuclear map not reachable by other reaction mechanisms. Reactions with actinide beams and targets are of special interest for synthesis of new neutron-enriched transfermium nuclei and not-yet-known nuclei with closed neutron shell N=126 having the largest impact on the astrophysical r-process. The estimated cross sections for the production of these nuclei allows one to plan such experiments at currently available accelerators.

  16. Decay spectroscopy of exotic nuclei at RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, H.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron-rich nuclei around the doubly magic nucleus 132Sn and the double midshell nucleus 170Dy have been investigated by means of decay spectroscopy techniques with the EURICA setup at the RIBF facility at RIKEN. The nuclei of interest were produced by in-flight fission of a high-intensity 238U beam at 345 MeV/u. In this contribution, some selected topics are reported.

  17. Major new sources of biological ice nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, B. F.; Hill, T.; Henderson-Begg, S. K.

    2009-12-01

    Almost all research on biological ice nucleation has focussed on a limited number of bacteria. Here we characterise several major new sources of biogenic ice nuclei. These include mosses, hornworts, liverworts and cyanobacteria. Ice nucleation in the eukaryotic bryophytes appears to be ubiquitous. The temperature at which these organisms nucleate is that at which the difference in vapour pressure over ice and water is at or close to its maximum. At these temperatures (-8 to -18 degrees C) ice will grow at the expense of supercooled water. These organisms are dependent for their water on occult precipitation - fog, dew and cloudwater which by its nature is not collected in conventional rain gauges. Therefore we suggest that these organism produce ice nuclei as a water harvesting mechanism. Since the same mechanism would also drive the Bergeron-Findeisen process, and as moss is known to become airborne, these nuclei may have a role in the initiation of precipitation. The properties of these ice nuclei are very different from the well characterised bacterial nuclei. We will also present DNA sequence data showing that, although related, the proteins responsible are only very distantly related to the classical bacterial ice nuclei.

  18. Geomagnetically trapped energetic helium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Gregory Guzik, T.; Wefel, J.P.; Roger Pyle, K.; Cooper, J.F.

    1996-07-01

    Geomagnetically trapped helium nuclei, at high energy ({approximately}40{endash}100 MeV/nucleon), have been measured by the ONR-604 instrument during the 1990/1991 CRRES mission. The ONR-604 instrument resolved the isotopes of helium with a mass resolution of 0.1 amu. The energetic helium observed at {ital L}{lt}2.3 have a pitch angle distribution peaking perpendicular to the local magnetic field, which is characteristic of a trapped population. Both the trapped {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He show two peaks at {ital L}=1.2 and 1.9. Each isotope{close_quote}s flux, in each peak, can be characterized by a power law energy spectrum. The energy spectrum of the {sup 3}He is different from that of {sup 4}He, indicating that the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratio is energy dependent. Over the energy range of 51{endash}86 MeV/nucleon, the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratio is 8.7{plus_minus}3.1 at {ital L}=1.1{endash}1.5 and is 2.4{plus_minus}0.6 at {ital L}=1.5{endash}2.3. The trapped helium counting rates decrease gradually with time during the CRRES mission, when the anomalous component is excluded from the inner heliosphere, indicating that these high energy ions were not injected by flares during this time period. The decrease in intensity is attributed mainly to the events around {ital L}=1.9. The helium around {ital L}=1.2, dominated by {sup 3}He, does not show a significant temporal evolution, which implies a long-term energetic trapped {sup 3}He population. Two possible origins of the geomagnetically trapped helium isotopes are the interactions of energetic protons with the upper atmosphere and/or the inward diffusion and acceleration of helium ions due to electric-field fluctuations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. 76 FR 63702 - In the Matter of the Designation of Conspiracy of Fire Nuclei, aka Conspiracy of the Nuclei of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Matter of the Designation of Conspiracy of Fire Nuclei, aka Conspiracy of the Nuclei of Fire, aka Conspiracy of Cells of Fire, aka Synomosia of Pyrinon Tis Fotias, aka Thessaloniki-Athens Fire Nuclei... January 23, 2003, I hereby determine that the organization known as Conspiracy of Fire Nuclei, also...

  20. Compact Nuclei in Galaxies at Moderate Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarajedini, Vicki Lynn

    The purpose of this study is to understand the space density and properties of active galaxies to z ≃ 0.8. We have investigated the frequency and nature of unresolved nuclei in galaxies at moderate redshift as indicators of nuclear activity such as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) or starbursts. Candidates are selected by fitting imaged galaxies with multi-component models using maximum likelihood estimate techniques to determine the best model fit. We select those galaxies requiring an unresolved, point source component in the galaxy nucleus, in addition to a disk and/or bulge component, to adequately model the galaxy light. We have searched 70 WFPC2 images primarily from the Medium Deep Survey for galaxies containing compact nuclei. In our survey of 1033 galaxies, the fraction containing an unresolved nuclear component ≥3% of the total galaxy light is 16±3% corrected for incompleteness and 9±1% for nuclei ≥5% of the galaxy light. Most of the nuclei are ~<20% of the total galaxy light. The majority of the host galaxies are spirals with little or no bulge component. The V-I colors of the nuclei are compared with synthetic colors for Seyferts and starburst nuclei to help differentiate between AGNs and starbursts in our sample. Spectroscopic redshifts have been obtained for 35 of our AGN/starburst candidates and photometric redshifts are estimated to an accuracy of σz≃0.1 for the remaining sample. We present the upper limit luminosity function (LF) for low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN) in two redshift bins to z = 0.8. We detect mild number density evolution of the form φ∝ (1+z)1.9 for nuclei at -18 ~

  1. Stability and production of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, P. |; Nix, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    Beyond uranium heavy elements rapidly become increasingly unstable with respect to spontaneous fission as the proton number Z increases, because of the disruptive effect of the long-range Coulomb force. However, in the region just beyond Z = 100 magic proton and neutron numbers and the associated shell structure enhances nuclear stability sufficient to allow observation of additional nuclei. Some thirty years ago it was speculated that an island of spherical, relatively stable superheavy nuclei would exist near the next doubly magic proton-neutron combination beyond {sup 208}Pb, that is, at proton number Z = 114 and neutron number N = 184. Theory and experiment now show that there also exists a rock of stability in the vicinity of Z = 110 and N = 162 between the actinide region, which previously was the end of the peninsula of known elements, and the predicted island of spherical superheavy nuclei slightly southwest of the magic numbers Z = 114 and N = 184. The authors review here the stability properties of the heavy region of nuclei. Just as the decay properties of nuclei in the heavy region depend strongly on shell structure, this structure also dramatically affects the fusion entrance channel. The six most recently discovered new elements were all formed in cold-fusion reactions. They discuss here the effect of the doubly magic structure of the target in cold-fusion reactions on the fusion barrier and on dissipation.

  2. Structure and spectroscopy of transcurium nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.

    2001-11-09

    The stability of the superheavy elements depends on the shell corrections which are governed by the single-particle spectra. Ideally one would like to experimentally determine the single-particle levels in the superheavy nuclei but the production of only a few atoms of these nuclides precludes such measurements. One therefore has to identify single-particle levels in the heaviest nuclei which are available in at least nanoCurie amounts. They have studied the structure of such heavy nuclei in the Z=98 region and identified many single-particle states. In particular, they have studied the structure of {sup 251}Cf and {sup 249}Bk by measuring the radiations emitted in the {alpha} decay of {sup 255}Fm and {sup 253}Es. These single-particle spectra can be used to test theoretical models for superheavy elements.

  3. Is Fusion Inhibited for Weakly Bound Nuclei?

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, J.; Munhoz, M.; Szanto, E.M.; Carlin, N.; Added, N.; Suaide, A.A.; de Moura, M.M.; Liguori Neto, R.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Canto, L.F.

    1997-01-01

    Complete fusion of light radioactive nuclei is predicted to be hindered at near-barrier energies. This feature is investigated in the case of the least bound stable nuclei. Evaporation residues resulting from the {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 9}Be and {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 12}C fusion reactions have been measured in order to study common features in reactions involving light weakly bound nuclei. The experimental excitation functions revealed that the fusion cross section is significantly smaller than the total reaction cross section and also smaller than the fusion cross section expected from the available systematics. A clear correlation between the fusion probability and nucleon (cluster) separation energy has been established.The results suggest that the breakup process has a strong influence on the hindrance of the fusion cross section. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Pair correlations in neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    We started a program to study the ground-state properties of heavy, neutron-rich nuclei using the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) approximation. This appears at present to be the most realistic approach for heavy nuclei that contain many loosely bound valence neutrons. The two-neutron density obtained in this approach can be decomposed into two components, one associated with the mean field and one associated with the pairing field. The latter has a structure that is quite similar to the pair-density obtained by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian for a two-neutron halo, which was studied earlier. This allows comparison of the HFB solutions against numerically exact solutions for two-neutron halos. This work is in progress. We intend to apply the HFB method to predict the ground-state properties of heavier, more neutron-rich nuclei that may be produced at future radioactive beam facilities.

  5. Ambartsumyan's concept of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachikian, E. Ye.

    2010-01-01

    As Victor Ambartsumyan, himself, noted, the concept of active galactic nuclei occupies a special place among his scientific ideas. It was proposed more than half a century ago and was recognized by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences as revolutionary, on a copernican scale. However, by no means all of its propositions were accepted at once by large parts of the astronomy community. Nevertheless, as the American astrophysicist A. R. Sandage has written, “today, not one astronomer would deny the mystery surrounding the nuclei of galaxies or that the first to recognize the rich reward held in this treasury was Viktor Ambartsumian.” The purpose of this article is to acquaint the reader with the major stages in the formation and development of the concept of active galactic nuclei and with some of the work on this topic done at the Byurakan and other astrophysical observatories throughout the world.

  6. African Dust Aerosols as Atmospheric Ice Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMott, Paul J.; Brooks, Sarah D.; Prenni, Anthony J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Sassen, Kenneth; Poellot, Michael; Rogers, David C.; Baumgardner, Darrel

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the ice nucleating ability of aerosol particles in air masses over Florida having sources from North Africa support the potential importance of dust aerosols for indirectly affecting cloud properties and climate. The concentrations of ice nuclei within dust layers at particle sizes below 1 pn exceeded 1/cu cm; the highest ever reported with our device at temperatures warmer than homogeneous freezing conditions. These measurements add to previous direct and indirect evidence of the ice nucleation efficiency of desert dust aerosols, but also confirm their contribution to ice nuclei populations at great distances from source regions.

  7. {gamma}-vibrational states in superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yang; Long Guilu; Al-Khudair, Falih; Sheikh, Javid A.

    2008-04-15

    Recent experimental advances have made it possible to study excited structure in superheavy nuclei. The observed states have often been interpreted as quasiparticle excitations. We show that in superheavy nuclei collective vibrations systematically appear as low-energy excitation modes. By using the microscopic Triaxial Projected Shell Model, we make a detailed prediction on {gamma}-vibrational states and their E2 transition probabilities to the ground state band in fermium and nobelium isotopes where active structure research is going on, and in {sup 270}Ds, the heaviest isotope where decay data have been obtained for the ground-state and for an isomeric state.

  8. Computer Model Of Fragmentation Of Atomic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Norbury, John W.; KHAN FERDOUS; Badavi, Francis F.

    1995-01-01

    High Charge and Energy Semiempirical Nuclear Fragmentation Model (HZEFRG1) computer program developed to be computationally efficient, user-friendly, physics-based program for generating data bases on fragmentation of atomic nuclei. Data bases generated used in calculations pertaining to such radiation-transport applications as shielding against radiation in outer space, radiation dosimetry in outer space, cancer therapy in laboratories with beams of heavy ions, and simulation studies for designing detectors for experiments in nuclear physics. Provides cross sections for production of individual elements and isotopes in breakups of high-energy heavy ions by combined nuclear and Coulomb fields of interacting nuclei. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77.

  9. Clathrate hydrates in cometary nuclei and porosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1988-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of formation and decomposition of CO2-clathrate hydrate in cometary nuclei are discussed. As far as it is known, this is the only clathrate hydrate which is unstable at low temperatures. Calculation shows that, in accord with other evidence, neither volume nor grain boundary diffusion in the clathrate lattice can be responsible for the rate of these reactions and that a surface mechanism with the attendant sensitivity to pressure must play a crucial role. Density changes accompanying CO2-clathrate decomposition and formation can lead to microporosity and enhanced brittleness or even to fracture of cometary nuclei at low temperatures. Other clathrate hydrates and mixed clathrates are also discussed.

  10. Exotic nuclei with open heavy flavor mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Shigehiro; Sudoh, Kazutaka

    2009-08-01

    We propose stable exotic nuclei bound with D and B mesons with respect to heavy quark symmetry. We indicate that an approximate degeneracy of D(B) and D*(B*) mesons plays an important role, and discuss the stability of DN and BN bound states. We find the binding energies 1.4 MeV and 9.4 MeV for each state in the J{sup P}=1/2{sup -} with the I=0 channel. We discuss also possible existence of exotic nuclei DNN and BNN.

  11. Transfer-induced fission of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Zubov, A. S.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Scheid, W.

    2010-07-15

    Possibilities of transfer-induced fission of new isotopes of superheavy nuclei with charge numbers 103-108 are studied for the first time in the reactions {sup 48}Ca+{sup 244,246,248}Cm at energies near the corresponding Coulomb barriers. The predicted cross sections are found to be measurable with the detection of three-body final states.

  12. Quasars: Active nuclei of young galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komberg, B. V.

    1980-01-01

    The hypothetical properties of 'young' galaxies and possible methods of observing them are discussed. It is proposed that star formation first takes place in the central regions of protogalaxies which may appear as quasar-like objects. An evolutionary scheme is outlined in which the radio quasars are transformed in time into the nuclei of radio galaxies.

  13. Form Factors and Radii of Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sick, Ingo

    2015-09-15

    We discuss the determination of electromagnetic form factors from the world data on electron–nucleus scattering for nuclei Z ≤ 3, with particular emphasis on the derivation of the moments required for comparison with measurements from electronic/muonic atoms and isotope shifts.

  14. Four-body correlations in nuclei.

    PubMed

    Sambataro, M; Sandulescu, N

    2015-09-11

    Low-energy spectra of 4n nuclei are described with high accuracy in terms of four-body correlated structures ("quartets"). The states of all N≥Z nuclei belonging to the A=24 isobaric chain are represented as a superposition of two-quartet states, with quartets being characterized by isospin T and angular momentum J. These quartets are assumed to be those describing the lowest states in ^{20}Ne (T_{z}=0), ^{20}F (T_{z}=1), and ^{20}O (T_{z}=2). We find that the spectrum of the self-conjugate nucleus ^{24}Mg can be well reproduced in terms of T=0 quartets only and that, among these, the J=0 quartet plays by far the leading role in the structure of the ground state. The same conclusion is drawn in the case of the three-quartet N=Z nucleus ^{28}Si. As an application of the quartet formalism to nuclei not confined to the sd shell, we provide a description of the low-lying spectrum of the proton-rich ^{92}Pd. The results achieved indicate that, in 4n nuclei, four-body degrees of freedom are more important and more general than usually expected. PMID:26406824

  15. RNA-sequencing from single nuclei.

    PubMed

    Grindberg, Rashel V; Yee-Greenbaum, Joyclyn L; McConnell, Michael J; Novotny, Mark; O'Shaughnessy, Andy L; Lambert, Georgina M; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Lee, Jun; Fishman, Max; Robbins, Gillian E; Lin, Xiaoying; Venepally, Pratap; Badger, Jonathan H; Galbraith, David W; Gage, Fred H; Lasken, Roger S

    2013-12-01

    It has recently been established that synthesis of double-stranded cDNA can be done from a single cell for use in DNA sequencing. Global gene expression can be quantified from the number of reads mapping to each gene, and mutations and mRNA splicing variants determined from the sequence reads. Here we demonstrate that this method of transcriptomic analysis can be done using the extremely low levels of mRNA in a single nucleus, isolated from a mouse neural progenitor cell line and from dissected hippocampal tissue. This method is characterized by excellent coverage and technical reproducibility. On average, more than 16,000 of the 24,057 mouse protein-coding genes were detected from single nuclei, and the amount of gene-expression variation was similar when measured between single nuclei and single cells. Several major advantages of the method exist: first, nuclei, compared with whole cells, have the advantage of being easily isolated from complex tissues and organs, such as those in the CNS. Second, the method can be widely applied to eukaryotic species, including those of different kingdoms. The method also provides insight into regulatory mechanisms specific to the nucleus. Finally, the method enables dissection of regulatory events at the single-cell level; pooling of 10 nuclei or 10 cells obscures some of the variability measured in transcript levels, implying that single nuclei and cells will be extremely useful in revealing the physiological state and interconnectedness of gene regulation in a manner that avoids the masking inherent to conventional transcriptomics using bulk cells or tissues.

  16. Ice Nuclei Production in Volcanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Few, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    The paper [Durant et al., 2008] includes a review of research on ice nucleation in explosive volcanic clouds in addition to reporting their own research on laboratory measurements focused on single-particle ice nucleation. Their research as well as the research they reviewed were concerned with the freezing of supercooled water drops (250 to 260 K) by volcanic ash particles acting as ice freezing nuclei. Among their conclusions are: Fine volcanic ash particles are very efficient ice freezing nuclei. Volcanic clouds likely contain fine ash concentrations 104 to 105 times greater than found in meteorological clouds. This overabundance of ice nuclei will produce a cloud with many small ice crystals that will not grow larger as they do in meteorological clouds because the cloud water content is widely distributed among the numerous small ice crystals. The small ice crystals have a small fall velocity, thus volcanic clouds are very stable. The small ice crystals are easily lofted into the stratosphere transporting water and adsorbed trace gasses. In this paper we examine the mechanism for the production of the small ice nuclei and develop a simple model for calculating the size of the ice nuclei based upon the distribution of magma around imbedded bubbles. We also have acquired a volcanic bomb that exhibits bubble remnants on its entire surface. The naturally occurring fragments from the volcanic bomb reveal a size distribution consistent with that predicted by the simple model. Durant, A. J., R. A. Shaw, W. I. Rose, Y. Mi, and G. G. J. Ernst (2008), Ice nucleation and overseeding of ice in volcanic clouds, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D09206, doi:10.1029/2007JD009064.

  17. Nuclear Shell Structure and Beta Decay I. Odd A Nuclei II. Even A Nuclei

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Mayer, M.G.; Moszkowski, S.A.; Nordheim, L.W.

    1951-05-01

    In Part I a systematics is given of all transitions for odd A nuclei for which sufficiently reliable data are available. The allowed or forbidden characters of the transitions are correlated with the positions of the initial and final odd nucleon groups in the nuclear shell scheme. The nuclear shells show definite characteristics with respect to parity of the ground states. The latter is the same as the one obtained from known spins and magnetic moments in a one-particle interpretation. In Part II a systematics of the beta transitions of even-A nuclei is given. An interpretation of the character of the transitions in terms of nuclear shell structure is achieved on the hypothesis that the odd nucleon groups have the same structure as in odd-A nuclei, together with a simple coupling rule between the neutron and proton groups in odd-odd nuclei.

  18. New magic nuclei and neutron-proton pairing

    SciTech Connect

    Boboshin, I. N.

    2008-07-15

    Special features of new magic nuclei and their connection with the shell structure are considered. The mechanism of neutron-proton pairing is proposed as a basis for the formation of new magic nuclei. A law of nucleon pairing is introduced. Spin-parity values are explained for a number of odd-odd nuclei.

  19. Monopole strength function of deformed superfluid nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoitsov, M.; Kortelainen, M.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Losa, C.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2011-10-01

    We present an efficient method for calculating strength functions using the finite-amplitude method (FAM) for deformed superfluid heavy nuclei within the framework of the nuclear density functional theory. We demonstrate that FAM reproduces strength functions obtained with the fully self-consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) at a fraction of the computational cost. As a demonstration, we compute the isoscalar and isovector monopole strengths for strongly deformed configurations in 100Zr and 240Pu by considering huge quasiparticle QRPA spaces. Our approach to FAM, based on Broyden's iterative procedure, opens the possibility for large-scale calculations of strength distributions in well-deformed superfluid nuclei across the nuclear landscape.

  20. Antiproton Production by CR on Air Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskalenko, I. V.; Mashnik, S. G.

    2003-01-01

    Recent measurements of the cosmic ray (CR) antiproton flux have been shown to challenge existing CR propagation models. In particular, the conventional reacceleration model designed to match secondary/primary nuclei ratios produces too few antiprotons. Recently there appear some indications that the atmospheric contribution to antiproton production is considerably underestimated, which implies that antiproton CR flux might be lower. This may be the primary reason of the discrepancy discovered in CR propagation. We use the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model code LAQGSM together with available data on antiproton production on nuclei to analyse the accuracy of existing parameterizations of antiproton production cross section. The LAQGSM model has been shown to reproduce well nuclear reactions and hadronic data in the range 0.01-800 GeV/nucleon.

  1. Nuclei at HERA and heavy ion physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.; Strikman, M.

    1995-12-31

    Copies of 16 viewgraph sets from a workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, 17-18 November, 1995. Titles of talks: HERA: The Present; HERA: Potential with Nuclei; Review of Hadron-Lepton Nucleus Data; Fermilab E665: results in muon scattering; Interactions of Quarks and Gluons with Nuclear Matter; Rescattering in Nuclear Targets for Photoproduction and DIS; Structure Functions and Nuclear Effect at PHENIX; Probing Spin-Averaged and Spin-Dependent Parton Distributions Using the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR); Jet Quenching in eA, pA, AA; Nuclear Gluon Shadowing via Continuum Lepton Pairs; What can we learn from HERA with a colliding heavy ion beam? The limiting curve of leading particles at infinite A; Coherent Production of Vector Mesons off Light Nuclei in DIS; A Model of High Parton Densities in PQCD; Gluon Production for Weizaecker-Williams Field in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions; Summary Talk.

  2. Effective field theory for lattice nuclei.

    PubMed

    Barnea, N; Contessi, L; Gazit, D; Pederiva, F; van Kolck, U

    2015-02-01

    We show how nuclear effective field theory (EFT) and ab initio nuclear-structure methods can turn input from lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) into predictions for the properties of nuclei. We argue that pionless EFT is the appropriate theory to describe the light nuclei obtained in LQCD simulations carried out at pion masses heavier than the physical pion mass. We solve the EFT using the effective-interaction hyperspherical harmonics and auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo methods. Fitting the three leading-order EFT parameters to the deuteron, dineutron, and triton LQCD energies at m_{π}≈800  MeV, we reproduce the corresponding alpha-particle binding and predict the binding energies of mass-5 and mass-6 ground states. PMID:25699436

  3. Onset of rotational damping in superdeformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Matsuo, M.

    1997-02-01

    We discuss damping of the collective rotational motion in A ˜ 150 superdeformed nuclei by means of a shell-model combining the cranked Nilsson mean field and the surface and volume delta two-body residual forces. It is shown that, because of the shell structure associated with the superdeformed mean field, onset energy of the rotational damping becomes Ex ˜ 1.5-3 MeV above the yrast line, with significant variation for different neutron and proton numbers. The mechanism of the shell structure effect is investigated through detailed analysis of level densities in superdeformed nuclei. The variation in onset of damping is associated with variation in the single-particle structure at the Fermi surface.

  4. Shell model for warm rotating nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, M.; Yoshida, K.; Dossing, T.

    1996-12-31

    Utilizing a shell model which combines the cranked Nilsson mean-field and the residual surface and volume delta two-body forces, the authors discuss the onset of rotational damping in normal- and super-deformed nuclei. Calculation for a typical normal deformed nucleus {sup 168}Yb indicates that the rotational damping sets in at around 0.8 MeV above the yrast line, and about 30 rotational bands of various length exists at a given rotational frequency, in overall agreement with experimental findings. It is predicted that the onset of rotational damping changes significantly in different superdeformed nuclei due to the variety of the shell gaps and single-particle orbits associated with the superdeformed mean-field.

  5. Collective properties of drip-line nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hamamoto, I.; Sagawa, H.

    1996-12-31

    Performing the spherical Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations with Skyrme interactions and, then, using RPA solved in the coordinate space with the Green`s function method, the authors have studied the effect of the unique shell structure as well as the very low particle threshold on collective modes in drip line nuclei. In this method a proper strength function in the continuum is obtained, though the spreading width of collective modes is not included. They have examined also one-particle resonant states in the obtained HF potential. Unperturbed particle-hole (p-h) response functions are carefully studied, which contain all basic information on the exotic behaviour of the RPA strength function in drip line nuclei.

  6. Monopole Strength Function of Deformed Superfluid Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Stoitsov, M. V.; Kortelainen, E. M.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Losa, C.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2011-01-01

    We present an efficient method for calculating strength functions using the finite amplitude method (FAM) for deformed superfluid heavy nuclei within the framework of the nuclear density functional theory. We demonstrate that FAM reproduces strength functions obtained with the fully self-consistent quasi-particle random-phase approximation (QRPA) at a fraction of computational cost. As a demonstration, we compute the isoscalar and isovector monopole strength for strongly deformed configurations in ^{240}Pu by considering huge quasi-particle QRPA spaces. Our approach to FAM, based on Broyden's iterative procedure, opens the possibility for large-scale calculations of strength distributions in well-bound and weakly bound nuclei across the nuclear landscape.

  7. [Bilateral infarction of the caudate nuclei].

    PubMed

    Mrabet, A; Mrad-Ben Hammouda, I; Abroug, Z; Smiri, W; Haddad, A

    1994-01-01

    We report the case of a 57-year-old right-handed woman, with a history of hypertension, who, in February 1990, suddenly developed behavioral and cognitive abnormalities. Prior to the onset of her illness she had been normal. On examination, neuropsychological testing (Wechsler Mental Test, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised, Knox Cube Test) elicited attention abnormalities, decreased recent memory, apathy, reduced spontaneity and initiative and left hemiparesia. CT scan showed small low density areas in the head of both caudate nuclei and right internal capsule, indicating infarction. Two years later, the deficit had partially resolved. Apathy persisted; psychometry showed an IQ of 57. Bilateral damage to the head of the caudate nuclei disrupt cortical-subcortical connections. The caudate nucleus is an essential component of basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuitry and its contribution to cognitive functions and behavior appears to be important. PMID:7801044

  8. Electromagnetic interactions with nuclei and nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, S.T.; Sealock, R.M.

    1990-11-10

    This report discusses the following topics: general LEGS work; photodisintegration of the deuteron; progress towards other experiments; LEGS instrumentation; major LEGS software projects; NaI detector system; nucleon detector system; waveshifting fibers; EGN prototype detector for CEBAF; photon beam facility at CEBAF; delta electroproduction in nuclei; quasielastic scattering and excitation of the Delta by {sup 4}He(e,e{prime}); and quasielastic scattering at high Q{sup 2}.

  9. Accretion disk thermal instability in galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineshige, S.; Shields, G. A.

    1990-03-01

    The nonlinear evolution and spatial propagation of the thermal instability in accretion disks in galactic nuclei are investigated. Integrations of the vertical structure of the disks are described for different alpha prescriptions, and the thermal stability is examined. Global time-dependent calculations of the unstable disks are performed which show that there are two distinct types of behavior according to the assumed prescription for the viscosity parameter: the 'purr' type and the 'roar' type. The roar type is analyzed in some detail.

  10. How do nuclei really vibrate or rotate

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, H.G.; Kunz, J.; Mosel, U.; Mueller, M.; Schuh, A.; Wust, U.

    1983-01-01

    By means of the adiabatic cranking model the properties of the current and velocity fields of nuclear quadrupole vibrations for even-even nuclei in the rare-earth region are investigated. BCS correlated wave functions based on the Nilsson single particle Hamiltonian have been used. The current fields are analyzed in terms of vector spherical harmonics. The realistic microscopic currents show a vortex structure not present in the classical irrotational flow. The microscopic origin of the vortex structure is investigated.

  11. Green's function calculations of light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, ZhongHao; Wu, Qiang; Xu, FuRong

    2016-09-01

    The influence of short-range correlations in nuclei was investigated with realistic nuclear force. The nucleon-nucleon interaction was renormalized with V lowk technique and applied to the Green's function calculations. The Dyson equation was reformulated with algebraic diagrammatic constructions. We also analyzed the binding energy of 4He, calculated with chiral potential and CD-Bonn potential. The properties of Green's function with realistic nuclear forces are also discussed.

  12. Superconducting magnetic spectrometer for cosmic ray nuclei.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. H.; Buffington, A.; Wahlig, M. A.; Dauber, P.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes the design, calibration, and operation of a magnetic spectrometer for particle astronomy. The spectrometer consists of a superconducting magnet, optical spark chambers, scintillation detectors, and associated electronics. The instrument has been flown in a balloon gondola to 4.8 g/sq cm residual atmosphere, where it was used to analyze the charge and differential rigidity spectra of primary nuclei from 5 to 100 GeV/c.

  13. Understanding active galactic nuclei: peeling the onion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krolik, J. H.

    A brief review is presented of selected current problems in understanding active galactic nuclei, with special emphasis on the contributions that X-ray observations can make. Questions having to do with: how the character of the host galaxy influences nuclear activity; emission line regions; the border between the nucleus and the stellar portion of the active galaxy; radiation of the nonthermal continuum; and the possible existence of an accretion disk are touched upon.

  14. Gamma rays from active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    1990-01-01

    The general properties of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and quasars are reviewed with emphasis on their continuum spectral emission. Two general classes of models for the continuum are outlined and critically reviewed in view of the impending GRO (Gamma Ray Observatory) launch and observations. The importance of GRO in distinguishing between these models and in general in furthering the understanding of AGN is discussed. The very broad terms the status of the current understanding of AGN are discussed.

  15. Velocity distributions for fast rotating nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.; Zhang, X.; Zhuo, Y.; Feng, R.

    1982-01-01

    The velocity field is calculated on the basis of the exact wave functions of the cranked deformed harmonic oscillator by including the term of ..delta..N = 2 subject to the conditions of isotropic velocity distribution and self-consistency between potential and density distribution. We study the characteristics of velocity distributions of nuclei with the large rotational frequencies. We also discuss the effects of two types of self-consistency conditions on the velocity distributions.

  16. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Voutier, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) is the golden exclusive channel for the study of the partonic structure of hadrons, within the universal framework of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). This paper presents the aim and general ideas of the DVCS experimental program off nuclei at the Jefferson Laboratory. The benefits of the study of the coherent and incoherent channels to the understanding of the EMC (European Muon Collaboration) effect are discussed, along with the case of nuclear targets to access neutron GPDs.

  17. Complex fragment emission from hot compound nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1986-03-01

    The experimental evidence for compound nucleus emission of complex fragments at low energies is used to interpret the emission of the same fragments at higher energies. The resulting experimental picture is that of highly excited compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion processes which decay statistically. In particular, complex fragments appear to be produced mostly through compound nucleus decay. In the appendix a geometric-kinematic theory for incomplete fusion and the associated momentum transfer is outlined. 10 refs., 19 figs.

  18. On Closed Shells in Nuclei. II

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Mayer, M. G.

    1949-04-01

    Discussion on the use of spins and magnetic moments of the even-odd nuclei by Feenberg and Nordheim to determine the angular momentum of the eigenfunction of the odd particle; discussion of prevalence of isomerism in certain regions of the isotope chart; tabulated data on levels of square well potential, spectroscopic levels, spin term, number of states, shells and known spins and orbital assignments.

  19. The fractionation of nuclei from mammalian cells by zonal centrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. R.; Mathias, A. P.; Pennington, F.; Ridge, D.

    1968-01-01

    1. Purified liver nuclei from adult rats separate into two main zones when centrifuged in the slow-speed zonal rotor. One zone contains diploid nuclei, the other tetraploid. 2. The effect of age on the pattern of rat liver ploidy was examined. Tetraploid nuclei are virtually absent from young animals. They increase in proportion steadily with age. Partial hepatectomy disturbs the pattern of ploidy. 3. The zonal centrifuge permits the separation of diploid, tetraploid, octaploid and hexadecaploid nuclei from mouse liver. 4. Rat liver nuclei are isopycnic with sucrose solutions of density 1·35 at 5°. ImagesFig. 1.PLATE 1Fig. 9. PMID:4876099

  20. Fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    Measurements of fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei {sup 78}Kr and {sup 100}Mo showed a different behavior at low energies, if compared to measurements with {sup 86}Kr and {sup 92}Mo. This points to a possible influence of nuclear structure on the fusion process. One way to characterize the structure of vibrational nuclei is via their restoring force parameters C{sub 2} which can be calculated from the energy of the lowest 2{sup +} state and the corresponding B(E2) value. A survey of the even-even nuclei between A = 28-150 shows strong variations in C{sub 2} values spanning two orders of magnitude. The lowest values for C{sub 2} are observed for {sup 78}Kr, {sup 104}Ru and {sup 124}Xe followed by {sup 74,76}Ge, {sup 74,76}Se, {sup 100}Mo and {sup 110}Pd. In order to learn more about the influence of {open_quotes}softness{close_quotes} on the sub-barrier fusion enhancement, we measured cross sections for evaporation residue production for the systems {sup 78}Kr + {sup 104}Ru and {sup 78}Kr + {sup 76}Ge with the gas-filled magnet technique. For both systems, fusion excitation functions involving the closed neutron shell nucleus {sup 86}Kr were measured previously. The data are presently being analyzed.

  1. Chromatin associations in Arabidopsis interphase nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Veit; Rudnik, Radoslaw; Schubert, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    The arrangement of chromatin within interphase nuclei seems to be caused by topological constraints and related to gene expression depending on tissue and developmental stage. In yeast and animals it was found that homologous and heterologous chromatin association are required to realize faithful expression and DNA repair. To test whether such associations are present in plants we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana interphase nuclei by FISH using probes from different chromosomes. We found that chromatin fiber movement and variable associations, although in general relatively seldom, may occur between euchromatin segments along chromosomes, sometimes even over large distances. The combination of euchromatin segments bearing high or low co-expressing genes did not reveal different association frequencies probably due to adjacent genes of deviating expression patterns. Based on previous data and on FISH analyses presented here, we conclude that the global interphase chromatin organization in A. thaliana is relatively stable, due to the location of its 10 centromeres at the nuclear periphery and of the telomeres mainly at the centrally localized nucleolus. Nevertheless, chromatin movement enables a flexible spatial genome arrangement in plant nuclei. PMID:25431580

  2. Few-Body Models of Light Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershov, S. N.; Vaagen, J. S.; Zhukov, M. V.

    2015-06-01

    Experiments confirm a variety of cluster structures in many light nuclei. The observation of nuclear halos at drip-lines has accentuated the question of the degrees of freedom for bound and low-lying continuum states. In these cases the many-body dynamics of nuclear structure may be well approximated by few-body cluster models that often suggest conceptually simple approaches explaining successfully many features of light nuclei. Thus few-body cluster models have been successfully used for description of the nuclear structure of weakly bound halo nuclei and their emergent cluster degrees of freedom. They have attractive features supplying in a most transparent way the asymptotic behavior and continuum properties of weakly bound systems. Such models assume a separation in internal cluster (core) degrees of freedom and the relative motion of few-body constituents. Such separation is only an approximation, and low-lying states appear where the core cannot be considered as inert system and additional degrees of freedom connected to excited core states have to be taken into account. For fixed total angular momentum a coupling to excited core states having different spins involves additional partial waves into the consideration. This allows to account for some emergent (collective) core degrees of freedom and gives a more realistic description of nuclear properties. It is an analogue to increasing the number of shells within the framework of shell-model approaches. Some examples from recent nuclear structure exploration within few-body halo cluster models are presented.

  3. Potential energy surfaces of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, M.; Rutz, K.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.; Reinhard, P.-G. Rutz, K.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.

    1998-10-01

    We investigate the structure of the potential energy surfaces of the superheavy nuclei {sub 158}{sup 258}Fm{sub 100}, {sub 156}{sup 264}Hs{sub 108}, {sub 166}{sup 278}112, {sub 184}{sup 298}114, and {sub 172}{sup 292}120 within the framework of self-consistent nuclear models, i.e., the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach and the relativistic mean-field model. We compare results obtained with one representative parametrization of each model which is successful in describing superheavy nuclei. We find systematic changes as compared to the potential energy surfaces of heavy nuclei in the uranium region: there is no sufficiently stable fission isomer any more, the importance of triaxial configurations to lower the first barrier fades away, and asymmetric fission paths compete down to rather small deformation. Comparing the two models, it turns out that the relativistic mean-field model gives generally smaller fission barriers. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Interaction of eta mesons with nuclei.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, N G; Khemchandani, K P; Upadhyay, N J; Jain, B K

    2013-06-01

    Back in the mid-1980s, a new branch of investigation related to the interaction of eta mesons with nuclei came into existence. It started with the theoretical prediction of possible exotic states of eta mesons and nuclei bound by the strong interaction and later developed into an extensive experimental program to search for such unstable states as well as understand the underlying interaction via eta-meson producing reactions. The vast literature of experimental as well as theoretical works that studied various aspects of eta-producing reactions such as the π(+)n → ηp, pd → (3)Heη, p (6)Li → (7)Be η and γ (3)He → η X, to name a few, had but one objective in mind: to understand the eta-nucleon (ηN) and hence the η-nucleus interaction which could explain the production data and confirm the existence of some η-mesic nuclei. In spite of these efforts, there remain uncertainties in the knowledge of the ηN and hence the η-nucleus interaction. Therefore, this review is an attempt to bind together the findings in these works and draw some global and specific conclusions which can be useful for future explorations.The ηN scattering length (which represents the strength of the η-nucleon interaction) using different theoretical models and analyzing the data on η production in pion, photon and proton induced reactions was found to be spread out in a wide range, namely, 0.18 ≤ Re aηN ≤ 1.03 fm and 0.16 ≤ Rm aηN ≤ 0.49 fm. Theoretical searches of heavy η-mesic nuclei based on η-nucleus optical potentials and lighter ones based on Faddeev type few-body approaches predict the existence of several quasibound and resonant states. Although some hints of η-mesic states such as (3)(η)He and (25)(η)Mg do exist from previous experiments, the promise of clearer signals for the existence of η-mesic nuclei lies in the experiments to be performed at the J-PARC, MAMI and COSY facilities in the near future. This review is aimed at giving an overall status

  5. Automated Segmentation of Nuclei in Breast Cancer Histopathology Images

    PubMed Central

    Paramanandam, Maqlin; O’Byrne, Michael; Ghosh, Bidisha; Mammen, Joy John; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Thamburaj, Robinson; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    The process of Nuclei detection in high-grade breast cancer images is quite challenging in the case of image processing techniques due to certain heterogeneous characteristics of cancer nuclei such as enlarged and irregularly shaped nuclei, highly coarse chromatin marginalized to the nuclei periphery and visible nucleoli. Recent reviews state that existing techniques show appreciable segmentation accuracy on breast histopathology images whose nuclei are dispersed and regular in texture and shape; however, typical cancer nuclei are often clustered and have irregular texture and shape properties. This paper proposes a novel segmentation algorithm for detecting individual nuclei from Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained breast histopathology images. This detection framework estimates a nuclei saliency map using tensor voting followed by boundary extraction of the nuclei on the saliency map using a Loopy Back Propagation (LBP) algorithm on a Markov Random Field (MRF). The method was tested on both whole-slide images and frames of breast cancer histopathology images. Experimental results demonstrate high segmentation performance with efficient precision, recall and dice-coefficient rates, upon testing high-grade breast cancer images containing several thousand nuclei. In addition to the optimal performance on the highly complex images presented in this paper, this method also gave appreciable results in comparison with two recently published methods—Wienert et al. (2012) and Veta et al. (2013), which were tested using their own datasets. PMID:27649496

  6. Automated Segmentation of Nuclei in Breast Cancer Histopathology Images.

    PubMed

    Paramanandam, Maqlin; O'Byrne, Michael; Ghosh, Bidisha; Mammen, Joy John; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Thamburaj, Robinson; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    The process of Nuclei detection in high-grade breast cancer images is quite challenging in the case of image processing techniques due to certain heterogeneous characteristics of cancer nuclei such as enlarged and irregularly shaped nuclei, highly coarse chromatin marginalized to the nuclei periphery and visible nucleoli. Recent reviews state that existing techniques show appreciable segmentation accuracy on breast histopathology images whose nuclei are dispersed and regular in texture and shape; however, typical cancer nuclei are often clustered and have irregular texture and shape properties. This paper proposes a novel segmentation algorithm for detecting individual nuclei from Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained breast histopathology images. This detection framework estimates a nuclei saliency map using tensor voting followed by boundary extraction of the nuclei on the saliency map using a Loopy Back Propagation (LBP) algorithm on a Markov Random Field (MRF). The method was tested on both whole-slide images and frames of breast cancer histopathology images. Experimental results demonstrate high segmentation performance with efficient precision, recall and dice-coefficient rates, upon testing high-grade breast cancer images containing several thousand nuclei. In addition to the optimal performance on the highly complex images presented in this paper, this method also gave appreciable results in comparison with two recently published methods-Wienert et al. (2012) and Veta et al. (2013), which were tested using their own datasets. PMID:27649496

  7. Automated Segmentation of Nuclei in Breast Cancer Histopathology Images.

    PubMed

    Paramanandam, Maqlin; O'Byrne, Michael; Ghosh, Bidisha; Mammen, Joy John; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Thamburaj, Robinson; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    The process of Nuclei detection in high-grade breast cancer images is quite challenging in the case of image processing techniques due to certain heterogeneous characteristics of cancer nuclei such as enlarged and irregularly shaped nuclei, highly coarse chromatin marginalized to the nuclei periphery and visible nucleoli. Recent reviews state that existing techniques show appreciable segmentation accuracy on breast histopathology images whose nuclei are dispersed and regular in texture and shape; however, typical cancer nuclei are often clustered and have irregular texture and shape properties. This paper proposes a novel segmentation algorithm for detecting individual nuclei from Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained breast histopathology images. This detection framework estimates a nuclei saliency map using tensor voting followed by boundary extraction of the nuclei on the saliency map using a Loopy Back Propagation (LBP) algorithm on a Markov Random Field (MRF). The method was tested on both whole-slide images and frames of breast cancer histopathology images. Experimental results demonstrate high segmentation performance with efficient precision, recall and dice-coefficient rates, upon testing high-grade breast cancer images containing several thousand nuclei. In addition to the optimal performance on the highly complex images presented in this paper, this method also gave appreciable results in comparison with two recently published methods-Wienert et al. (2012) and Veta et al. (2013), which were tested using their own datasets.

  8. Nuclei at extreme conditions. A relativistic study

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasjev, Anatoli

    2014-11-14

    The major goals of the current project were further development of covariant density functional theory (CDFT), better understanding of its features, its application to different nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics phenomena and training of graduate and undergraduate students. The investigations have proceeded in a number of directions which are discussed in detail in the part “Accomplishments” of this report. We have studied the role of isovector and isoscalar proton-neutron pairings in rotating nuclei; based on available experimental data it was concluded that there are no evidences for the existence of isoscalar proton-neutron pairing. Generalized theoretical approach has been developed for pycnonuclear reaction rates in the crust of neutron stars and interior of white dwarfs. Using this approach, extensive database for considerable number of pycnonuclear reactions involving stable and neutron-rich light nuclei has been created; it can be used in future for the study of various nuclear burning phenomena in different environments. Time-odd mean fields and their manifestations in terminating states, non-rotating and rotating nuclei have been studied in the framework of covariant density functional theory. Contrary to non-relativistic density functional theories these fields, which are important for a proper description of nuclear systems with broken time-reversal symmetry, are uniquely defined in the CDFT framework. Hyperdeformed nuclear shapes (with semi-axis ratio 2.5:1 and larger) have been studied in the Z = 40-58 part of nuclear chart. We strongly believe that such shapes could be studied experimentally in the future with full scale GRETA detector.

  9. The Structure of Nuclei Far from Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zganjar, E.F.

    1999-02-25

    From among a number of important nuclear structure results that have emerged from our research program during the past few years, two stand out as being of extra significance. These are: (a) the identification of a diabatic coexisting structure in {sup 187}Au which arises solely from differences in proton occupation of adjacent oscillator shells, and (b) the realization of a method for estimating EO strength in nuclei and the resulting prediction that the de-excitation of superdeformed bands may proceed, in some cases, by strong EO transitions.

  10. Probing Chiral Interactions in Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nogga, A; Barrett, B R; Meissner, U; Witala, H; Epelbaum, E; Kamada, H; Navratil, P; Glockle, W; Vary, J P

    2004-01-08

    Chiral two- and three-nucleon interactions are studied in a few-nucleon systems. We investigate the cut-off dependence and convergence with respect to the chiral expansion. It is pointed out that the spectra of light nuclei are sensitive to the three-nucleon force structure. As an example, we present calculations of the 1{sup +} and 3{sup +} states of {sup 6}Li using the no-core shell model approach. The results show contributions of the next-to-next-to-leading order terms to the spectra, which are not correlated to the three-nucleon binding energy prediction.

  11. Electron capture on iron group nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, D.J.; Chatterjee, L.; Strayer, M.R.; Dean, D.J.; Chatterjee, L.; Langanke, K.; Chatterjee, L.; Radha, P.B.

    1998-07-01

    We present Gamow-Teller strength distributions from shell model Monte Carlo studies of fp-shell nuclei that may play an important role in the precollapse evolution of supernovas. We then use these strength distributions to calculate the electron-capture cross sections and rates in the zero-momentum transfer limit. We also discuss the thermal behavior of the cross sections. We find large differences in these cross sections and rates when compared to the naive single-particle estimates. These differences need to be taken into account for improved modeling of the early stages of type-II supernova evolution. thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Leviatan, A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Short-Distance Structure of Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas Higinbotham, Eliazer Piasetzky, Stephen Wood

    2011-06-01

    One of Jefferson Lab's original missions was to further our understanding of the short-distance structure of nuclei. In particular, to understand what happens when two or more nucleons within a nucleus have strongly overlapping wave-functions; a phenomena commonly referred to as short-range correlations. Herein, we review the results of the (e,e'), (e,e'p) and (e,e'pN) reactions that have been used at Jefferson Lab to probe this short-distance structure as well as provide an outlook for future experiments.

  14. Effective field theory for deformed atomic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papenbrock, T.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present an effective field theory (EFT) for a model-independent description of deformed atomic nuclei. In leading order this approach recovers the well-known results from the collective model by Bohr and Mottelson. When higher-order corrections are computed, the EFT accounts for finer details such as the variation of the moment of inertia with the band head and the small magnitudes of interband E2 transitions. For rotational bands with a finite spin of the band head, the EFT is equivalent to the theory of a charged particle on the sphere subject to a magnetic monopole field.

  15. Exploring the Physics of Unstable Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volya, Alexander

    In this presentation the Continuum Shell Model (CSM) approach is advertised as a powerful theoretical tool for studying physics of unstable nuclei. The approach is illustrated using 17O as an example, which is followed by a brief presentation of the general CSM formalism. The successes of the CSM are highlighted and references are provided throughout the text. As an example, the CSM is applied perturbatively to 20O allowing one to explore the effects of continuum on positions of weakly bound states and low-lying resonances, as well as to discern some effects of threshold discontinuity.

  16. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations for light nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiringa, R. B.

    1998-10-23

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground and low-lying excited states for nuclei with A {le} 8 are made using a realistic Hamiltonian that fits NN scattering data. Results for more than 40 different (J{pi}, T) states, plus isobaric analogs, are obtained and the known excitation spectra are reproduced reasonably well. Various density and momentum distributions and electromagnetic form factors and moments have also been computed. These are the first microscopic calculations that directly produce nuclear shell structure from realistic NN interactions.

  17. Flux of light antimatter nuclei near Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Baret, B.; Barrau, A.; Buenerd, M.; Derome, L.; Duperray, R.; Protasov, K.; Vratogna, S.; Maurin, D.

    2006-07-11

    The fluxes of light antinuclei A{<=} 4 induced near earth by Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions with the interstellar matter (ISM) in the Galaxy are calculated in a phenomenological framework. The hadronic production cross-section for antinucleons is based on a recent parametrization of a wide set of accelerator data. The production of light nuclei is calculated using coalescence models. The non annihilating inelastic scattering process for the antideuterons is discussed and taken into account for the first time via a more realistic procedure than used so far for antiprotons.

  18. Rotational spacings in superdeformed bands of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.; Farhan, A.

    1995-08-01

    An unexpected result of the experimental investigation of superdeformed rotational bands is the observation of near-identical dynamic moments of inertia in different nuclei. This phenomenon was also noted in normally deformed rotational bands. A priori, the BCS method is suspect at I = 0 for the treatment of superdeformed nuclear shapes because the single-particle level density near the nuclear surface is small. If it were large, there would be no superdeformed minimum. At high spin, pairing correlations are further weakened, and the BCS method becomes even worse.

  19. Cloud condensation nuclei near marine stratus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, James G.; Frisbie, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    Extensive airborne measurements of cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectra and concentrations of total particles, or condensation nuclei (CN), below, in, and above the stratus cloud decks off the southern California coast point to important aerosol-cloud interactions. Consistently low CCN concentrations below cloud appear to be due to cloud scavenging processes which include Brownian coagulation, nucleation, coalescence, and drizzle. The higher CCN and CN concentrations above cloud are associated with ambient ozone concentrations which suggest a link with continental, probably anthropogenic, sources, even at distances of 500 km from the California coast.

  20. Reactions and structure of exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, H.

    1993-08-01

    Radioactive beam experiments have made it possible to study the structure of light neutron rich nuclei. A characteristic feature is a large dipole strength near threshold. An excellent example is the loosely bound nucleus ``Li for which Coulomb dissociation plays a dominant role in breakup reactions on a high Z target. I will describe a three-body model and apply it to calculate the dipole response of {sup 11}Li and the momentum distributions for the three-body breakup reaction: {sup 11}Li {yields} {sup 9}Li+n+n, and comparisons will be made to recent three-body coincidence measurements.

  1. Invariant mass spectroscopy of halo nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Takashi

    2008-11-11

    We have applied the invariant mass spectroscopy to explore the low-lying exited states of halo nuclei at intermediate energies around 70 MeV/nucleon at RIKEN. As examples, we show here the results of Coulomb breakup study for {sup 11}Li using the Pb target, as well as breakup reactions of {sup 14}Be with p and C targets. The former study revealed a strong Coulomb breakup cross section reflecting the large enhancement of E1 strength at low excitation energies (soft E1 excitation). The latter revealed the observation of the first 2{sup +} state in {sup 14}Be.

  2. Self-Consistency Effects In Superheavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasjev, A.V.; Frauendorf, S.

    2005-04-05

    The influence of the central depression in the density distribution of spherical superheavy nuclei on the shell structure is studied within the relativistic mean field theory. Large depression leads to the shell gaps at the proton Z = 120 and neutron N = 172 numbers, while flatter density distribution favors N = 184 for neutrons and leads to the appearance of a Z 126 shell gap and to the decrease of the size of the Z = 120 shell gap. The correlations between the magic shell gaps and the magnitude of central depression are discussed for relativistic and non-relativistic mean field theories.

  3. Signatures for quark clustering in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, C.E.; Lassila, K.E.

    1994-04-01

    As a signature for the presence of quark clusters in nuclei, the authors suggest studying backward protons produced by electron scattering off deuterons and suggest a ratio that cancels out much of the detailed properties of deuterons or 6-quark clusters. The test may be viewed as a test that the short range part of the deuteron is still a 2-nucleon system. They make estimates to show how it fails in characteristic and significant ways if the two nucleons at short range coalesce into a kneaded 6-quark cluster.

  4. Effective field theory for deformed atomic nuclei

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Papenbrock, Thomas F.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2016-04-13

    In this paper, we present an effective field theory (EFT) for a model-independent description of deformed atomic nuclei. In leading order this approach recovers the well-known results from the collective model by Bohr and Mottelson. When higher-order corrections are computed, the EFT accounts for finer details such as the variation of the moment of inertia with the band head and the small magnitudes of interband E2 transitions. Finally, for rotational bands with a finite spin of the band head, the EFT is equivalent to the theory of a charged particle on the sphere subject to a magnetic monopole field.

  5. Nuclear data on unstable nuclei for astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael S.; Meyer, Richard A.; Bardayan, Daniel W.; Blackmon, Jeffery C.; Chae, Kyungyuk; Guidry, Michael W.; Hix, W. Raphael; Kozub, R. L.; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Ma, Zhanwen; Scott, Jason P.

    2004-12-01

    Recent measurements with radioactive beams at ORNL's Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) have prompted the evaluation of a number of reactions involving unstable nuclei needed for stellar explosion studies. We discuss these evaluations, as well as the development of a new computational infrastructure to enable the rapid incorporation of the latest nuclear physics results in astrophysics models. This infrastructure includes programs that simplify the generation of reaction rates, manage rate databases, and visualize reaction rates, all hosted at a new website http://www.nucastrodata.org.

  6. Boost covariant gluon distributions in large nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLerran, Larry; Venugopalan, Raju

    1998-04-01

    It has been shown recently that there exist analytical solutions of the Yang-Mills equations for non-Abelian Weizsäcker-Williams fields which describe the distribution of gluons in large nuclei at small x. These solutions however depend on the color charge distribution at large rapidities. We here construct a model of the color charge distribution of partons in the fragmentation region and use it to compute the boost covariant momentum distributions of wee gluons. The phenomenological applications of our results are discussed.

  7. Enhanced subbarrier fusion for proton halo nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Raj; Lay, J. A.; Vitturi, A.

    2014-02-01

    In this Brief Report we use a simple model to describe the dynamical effects of break-up processes in the subbarrier fusion involving weakly bound nuclei. We model two similar cases involving either a neutron or a proton halo nucleus, both schematically coupled to the break-up channels. We find that the decrease of the Coulomb barrier in the proton break-up channel leads, ceteris paribus, to a larger enhancement of the subbarrier fusion probabilities with respect to the neutron halo case.

  8. Unsupervised segmentation of overlapped nuclei using Bayesian classification.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chanho; Kim, Changick; Chae, Seoung Wan; Oh, Sukjoong

    2010-12-01

    In a fully automatic cell extraction process, one of the main issues to overcome is the problem related to extracting overlapped nuclei since such nuclei will often affect the quantitative analysis of cell images. In this paper, we present an unsupervised Bayesian classification scheme for separating overlapped nuclei. The proposed approach first involves applying the distance transform to overlapped nuclei. The topographic surface generated by distance transform is viewed as a mixture of Gaussians in the proposed algorithm. In order to learn the distribution of the topographic surface, the parametric expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm is employed. Cluster validation is performed to determine how many nuclei are overlapped. Our segmentation approach incorporates a priori knowledge about the regular shape of clumped nuclei to yield more accurate segmentation results. Experimental results show that the proposed method yields superior segmentation performance, compared to those produced by conventional schemes.

  9. Direct observation of light focusing by single photoreceptor cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Błaszczak, Zuzanna; Kreysing, Moritz; Guck, Jochen

    2014-05-01

    The vertebrate retina is inverted with respect to its optical function, which requires light to pass through the entire tissue prior to detection. The last significant barrier for photons to overcome is the outer nuclear layer formed by photoreceptor cell (PRC) nuclei. Here we experimentally characterise the optical properties of PRC nuclei using bright-field defocusing microscopy to capture near-field intensity distributions behind individual nuclei. We find that some nuclei efficiently focus incident light confirming earlier predictions based on comparative studies of chromatin organisation in nocturnal and diurnal mammals. The emergence of light focusing during the development of mouse nuclei highlights the acquired nature of the observed lens-like behaviour. Optical characterisation of these nuclei is an important first step towards an improved understanding of how light transmission through the retina is influenced by its constituents.

  10. Optical Tweezing Nuclei in the Cellular Blastoderm of Drosophila Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoetz, Eva-Maria; Chaikin, Paul M.; Wieschaus, Eric F.

    2004-03-01

    Optical tweezers are used to manipulate nuclei in the syncytial blastoderm of Drosophila embryos. Our aim is to move a nucleus in a living embryo and study the reactions of its nearest neighbors to this displacement. Effects on the surrounding nuclei may allow us to test models in which actin-microtubule networks connect individual nuclei and keep them in place. In our experiments we use video analysis to follow individual nuclei using GFP-labeled histone protein. In a first approach, we were able to move nuclei in embryonic homogenates suspended in oil. Although the squashing destroys the cell, mitotic nuclear divisions continue, implying that the cytoskeleton, which connects the nuclei to the cortex, is still functioning. We will present studies of nuclear interactions in these squashes and in intact syncytial blastoderms.

  11. Precision measurement of the mass difference between light nuclei and anti-nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alice Collaboration; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; di Bari, D.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hilden, T. E.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, M. Mohisin; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, Mimae.; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; McDonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira de Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira da Costa, H.; Pereira de Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Seeder, K. S.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; van der Maarel, J.; van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-10-01

    The measurement of the mass differences for systems bound by the strong force has reached a very high precision with protons and anti-protons. The extension of such measurement from (anti-)baryons to (anti-)nuclei allows one to probe any difference in the interactions between nucleons and anti-nucleons encoded in the (anti-)nuclei masses. This force is a remnant of the underlying strong interaction among quarks and gluons and can be described by effective theories, but cannot yet be directly derived from quantum chromodynamics. Here we report a measurement of the difference between the ratios of the mass and charge of deuterons (d) and anti-deuterons (), and 3He and nuclei carried out with the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) detector in Pb-Pb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 2.76 TeV. Our direct measurement of the mass-over-charge differences confirms CPT invariance to an unprecedented precision in the sector of light nuclei. This fundamental symmetry of nature, which exchanges particles with anti-particles, implies that all physics laws are the same under the simultaneous reversal of charge(s) (charge conjugation C), reflection of spatial coordinates (parity transformation P) and time inversion (T).

  12. Monte Carlo Simulation of Heavy Nuclei Photofission at Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade-II, E.; Freitas, E.; Garcia, F.; Tavares, O. A. P.; Duarte, S. B.

    2009-06-03

    A detailed description of photofission process at intermediate energies (200 to 1000 MeV) is presented. The study of the reaction is performed by a Monte Carlo method which allows the investigation of properties of residual nuclei and fissioning nuclei. The information obtained indicate that multifragmentation is negligible at the photon energies studied here, and that the symmetrical fission is dominant. Energy and mass distributions of residual and fissioning nuclei were calculated.

  13. Designer Nuclei--Making Atoms that Barely Exist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kate L.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2010-01-01

    The physics of nuclei is not a democratic field. It has to be said, some nuclei are just more interesting than others. And some are more useful than others, either to explain the origins of the elements, or the nature of matter itself, or for uses in medicine and other applied fields. The trick is to work out which nuclei are going to be the most…

  14. Spin Modes in Nuclei and Nuclear Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2011-05-06

    Spin modes in stable and unstable exotic nuclei are studied and important roles of tensor and three-body forces on nuclear structure are discussed. New shell model Hamiltonians, which have proper tensor components, are shown to explain shell evolutions toward drip-lines and spin properties of both stable and exotic nuclei, for example, Gamow-Teller transitions in {sup 12}C and {sup 14}C and an anomalous M1 transition in {sup 17}C. The importance and the necessity of the repulsive monopole corrections in isospin T = 1 channel to the microscopic two-body interactions are pointed out. The corrections are shown to lead to the proper shell evolutions in neutron-rich isotopes. The three-body force, in particular the Fujita-Miyazawa force induced by {Delta} excitations, is pointed out to be responsible for the repulsive corrections among the valence neutrons. The important roles of the three-body force on the energies and transitions in exotic oxygen and calcium isotopes are demonstrated.

  15. STELLAR TRANSITS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Beky, Bence; Kocsis, Bence E-mail: bkocsis@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are typically surrounded by a dense stellar population in galactic nuclei. Stars crossing the line of site in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) produce a characteristic transit light curve, just like extrasolar planets do when they transit their host star. We examine the possibility of finding such AGN transits in deep optical, UV, and X-ray surveys. We calculate transit light curves using the Novikov-Thorne thin accretion disk model, including general relativistic effects. Based on the expected properties of stellar cusps, we find that around 10{sup 6} solar mass SMBHs, transits of red giants are most common for stars on close orbits with transit durations of a few weeks and orbital periods of a few years. We find that detecting AGN transits requires repeated observations of thousands of low-mass AGNs to 1% photometric accuracy in optical, or {approx}10% in UV bands or soft X-ray. It may be possible to identify stellar transits in the Pan-STARRS and LSST optical and the eROSITA X-ray surveys. Such observations could be used to constrain black hole mass, spin, inclination, and accretion rate. Transit rates and durations could give valuable information on the circumnuclear stellar clusters as well. Transit light curves could be used to image accretion disks with unprecedented resolution, allowing us to resolve the SMBH silhouette in distant AGNs.

  16. Sextic potential for \\gamma -rigid prolate nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buganu, P.; Budaca, R.

    2015-10-01

    The equation of the Bohr-Mottelson Hamiltonian with a sextic oscillator potential is solved for γ -rigid prolate nuclei. The associated shape phase space is reduced to three variables which are exactly separated. The angular equation has the spherical harmonic functions as solutions, while the β equation is converted to the quasi-exactly solvable case of the sextic oscillator potential with a centrifugal barrier. The energies and the corresponding wave functions are given in closed form and depend, up to a scaling factor, on a single parameter. The {0}+ and {2}+ states are exactly determined, having an important role in the assignment of some ambiguous states for the experimental β bands. Due to the special properties of the sextic potential, the model can simulate, by varying the free parameter, a shape phase transition from a harmonic to an anharmonic prolate β -soft rotor crossing through a critical point. Numerical applications are performed for 39 nuclei: {}98-108Ru, {}{100,102}Mo, {}116-130Xe, {}{132,134}Ce, {}146-150Nd, {}{150,152}Sm, {}{152,154}Gd, {}{154,156}Dy, 172Os, {}180-196Pt, 190Hg and 222Ra. The best candidates for the critical point are found to be 104Ru and {}{120,126}Xe, followed closely by 128Xe, 172Os, 196Pt and 148Nd.

  17. Observations of anthropogenic cloud condensation nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, James G.

    1990-01-01

    Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) concentrations and spectral measurements obtained with the DRI instantaneous CCN spectrometer (Hudson, 1989) over the last few years are presented. The climatic importance of cloud microphysics has been pointed out. The particles which affect cloud microphysics are cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The commonly-observed order of magnitude difference in cloud droplet concentrations between maritime and continental air masses (i.e., Squires, 1958) was determined to be caused by systematic differences in the concentrations of CCN between continental and maritime air masses (e.g., Twomey and Wojciechowski, 1969). Twomey (1977) first pointed out that cloud microphysics also affects the radiative properties of clouds. Thus continental and anthropogenic CCN could affect global temperature. Resolution of this Twomey effect requires answers to two questions - whether antropogenic CCN are a significant contribution to atmospheric CCN, and whether they are actually affecting cloud microphysics to an extent which is of climatic importance. The reasons for the contrast between continental and maritime CCN concentration are not understood. The question of the relative importance of anthropogenic CCN is addressed. These observations should shed light on this complex question although further research is being conducted in order to produce more quantitative answers. Accompanying CN measurements made with a TSI 3020 condensation nucleus (CN) counter are also presented.

  18. Compound And Rotational Damping In Warm Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Leoni, S.; Bracco, A.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Camera, F.; Grassi, C.; Million, B.; Paleni, A.; Pignanelli, M.; Vigezzi, E.; Wieland, O.; Matsuo, M.; Doessing, T.; Herskind, B.; Hagemann, G.B.; Wilson, J.; Maj, A.; Kmiecik, M.; LoBianco, G.; Petrache, C.M.

    2005-04-05

    The {gamma}-decay from excited nuclei is used to study the interplay between rotational motion and compound nucleus formation in deformed nuclei. A new analysis technique is presented which allows for the first time to directly measure the rotational and compound damping widths {gamma}rot and {gamma}{mu} from {gamma}-coincidence spectra. The method is first tested on simulated spectra and then applied to high-statistics EUROBALL data on the nucleus 163Er. Experimental values of {approx_equal}200 and 20 keV are obtained for {gamma}rot and {gamma}{mu}, respectively, in the spin region I {approx_equal} 30-40 ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), in good agreement with microscopic cranked shell model calculations for the specific nucleus. A dependence of rotational damping on the K-quantum number of the nuclear states is also observed, both in experiment and theory, resulting in a {approx_equal}30% reduction of {gamma}rot for high-K states. This points to a delayed onset of rotational damping in high-K configurations.

  19. Stellar Transits in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béky, Bence; Kocsis, Bence

    2013-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are typically surrounded by a dense stellar population in galactic nuclei. Stars crossing the line of site in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) produce a characteristic transit light curve, just like extrasolar planets do when they transit their host star. We examine the possibility of finding such AGN transits in deep optical, UV, and X-ray surveys. We calculate transit light curves using the Novikov-Thorne thin accretion disk model, including general relativistic effects. Based on the expected properties of stellar cusps, we find that around 106 solar mass SMBHs, transits of red giants are most common for stars on close orbits with transit durations of a few weeks and orbital periods of a few years. We find that detecting AGN transits requires repeated observations of thousands of low-mass AGNs to 1% photometric accuracy in optical, or ~10% in UV bands or soft X-ray. It may be possible to identify stellar transits in the Pan-STARRS and LSST optical and the eROSITA X-ray surveys. Such observations could be used to constrain black hole mass, spin, inclination, and accretion rate. Transit rates and durations could give valuable information on the circumnuclear stellar clusters as well. Transit light curves could be used to image accretion disks with unprecedented resolution, allowing us to resolve the SMBH silhouette in distant AGNs.

  20. Theoretical studies of hadrons and nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    COTANCH, STEPHEN R

    2007-03-20

    This report details final research results obtained during the 9 year period from June 1, 1997 through July 15, 2006. The research project, entitled Theoretical Studies of Hadrons and Nuclei , was supported by grant DE-FG02-97ER41048 between North Carolina State University [NCSU] and the U. S. Department of Energy [DOE]. In compliance with grant requirements the Principal Investigator [PI], Professor Stephen R. Cotanch, conducted a theoretical research program investigating hadrons and nuclei and devoted to this program 50% of his time during the academic year and 100% of his time in the summer. Highlights of new, significant research results are briefly summarized in the following three sections corresponding to the respective sub-programs of this project (hadron structure, probing hadrons and hadron systems electromagnetically, and many-body studies). Recent progress is also discussed in a recent renewal/supplemental grant proposal submitted to DOE. Finally, full detailed descriptions of completed work can be found in the publications listed at the end of this report.

  1. 30 Years of sodium/X-nuclei magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R

    2014-02-01

    In principle, all nuclei with nonzero spin can be employed for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Special scanner hardware and MR sequences are required to select the nucleus-specific frequency and to enable imaging with "sufficient" signal-to-noise ratio. This Special Issue starts with an overview of different nuclei that can be used for MRI today, followed by a review article about techniques required for imaging of quadrupolar nuclei with short relaxation times. Sequence developments to improve image quality and applications on different organs and diseases are presented for different nuclei ((23)Na, (35)Cl, (17)O, and (19)F), with a focus on imaging at natural abundance.

  2. Shape coexistence and triaxiality in nuclei near 80Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, S. J.; Xu, F. R.; Shen, S. F.; Liu, H. L.; Wyss, R.; Yan, Y. P.

    2014-12-01

    Total-Routhian-surface calculations have been performed to investigate the shape evolutions of A ˜80 nuclei: Zr-8480,Sr-8076 , and Mo,8684 . Shape coexistences of spherical, prolate, and oblate deformations have been found in these nuclei. Particularly for the nuclei 80Sr and 82Zr , the energy differences between two shape-coexisting states are less than 220 keV. At high spins, the g9 /2 shell plays an important role in shape evolutions. It has been found that the alignment of the g9 /2 quasiparticles drives nuclei to be triaxial.

  3. Isolation and characterization of nuclei from rice embryos.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, J; Lim, P Y; Aratani, K; Akazawa, T

    1992-04-01

    A method has been developed to isolate pure preparations of nuclei in high yield from commercially available viable rice embryos (germ), employing extraction with buffer solution containing glycerol (without detergent) and polyamine, followed by centrifugation on a 30% Percoll cushion. The intactness of the isolated nuclei was confirmed by light microscopy as well as electron microscopy. The protein profiles of both whole nuclei and nuclear extracts obtained by SDS-PAGE, organellar marker enzyme activities, DNA and RNA analyses, and in vitro RNA synthesis, all indicate that the highly purified nuclei are isolated from rice embryos.

  4. The Size Distribution of Jupiter-Family Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Lowry, Stephen C.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: We are continuing our program to determine the size distribution of cometary nuclei. We have compiled a catalog of 105 measurements of 57 cometary nuclei, drawn from the general literature, from our own program of CCD photometry of distant cometary nuclei (Lowry and Weissman), and from unpublished observations by colleagues. We model the cumulative size distribution of the nuclei as a power law. Previous determinations of the size distribution slope do not agree. Fernandez et al. found a slope of alpha = 2.65+/-0.25 whereas Lowry et al. and Weissman and Lowry each found a slope of alpha = 1.60+/-0.10.

  5. Gravitational lensing of active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, J N

    1995-01-01

    Most of the known cases of strong gravitational lensing involve multiple imaging of an active galactic nucleus. The properties of lensed active galactic nuclei make them promising systems for astrophysical applications of gravitational lensing; in particular, they show structure on scales of milliseconds of arc to tens of seconds of arc, they are variable, and they are polarized. More than 20 cases of strong gravitational lenses are now known, and about half of them are radio sources. High-resolution radio imaging is making possible the development of well-constrained lens models. Variability studies at radio and optical wavelengths are beginning to yield results of astrophysical interest, such as an independent measure of the distance scale and limits on source sizes. PMID:11607613

  6. On single nucleon wave functions in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Talmi, Igal

    2011-05-06

    The strong and singular interaction between nucleons, makes the nuclear many body theory very complicated. Still, nuclei exhibit simple and regular features which are simply described by the shell model. Wave functions of individual nucleons may be considered just as model wave functions which bear little resemblance to the real ones. There is, however, experimental evidence for the reality of single nucleon wave functions. There is a simple method of constructing such wave functions for valence nucleons. It is shown that this method can be improved by considering the polarization of the core by the valence nucleon. This gives rise to some rearrangement energy which affects the single valence nucleon energy within the nucleus.

  7. Clusters in neutron-rich light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelavić Malenica, D.; Milin, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Lattuada, M.; Miljanić, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Prepolec, L.; Scuderi, V.; Skukan, N.; Soić, N.; Torresi, D.; Uroić, M.

    2016-05-01

    Due to their high selectivity, transfer and sequential decay reactions are powerful tools for studies of both single particle (nucleon) and cluster states in light nuclei. Their use is particularly simple for investigations of α-particle clustering (because α-particle has Jπ=0+, which simplifies spin and parity assignments to observed cluster states), but they are also easily applicable to other types of clustering. Recent results on clustering in neutron-rich isotopes of beryllium, boron and carbon obtained measuring the 10B+10B reactions (at 50 and 72 MeV) are presented. The highly efficient and segmented detector systems used, built from 4 Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSD) allowed detection of double and multiple coincidences and, in that way, studies of states populated in transfer reactions, as well as their sequential decay.

  8. Eta-mesic nuclei: Past, present, future

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Haider, Q.; Liu, Lon -Chang

    2015-09-23

    Eta-mesic nucleus or the quasibound nuclear state of an eta (η) meson in a nucleus is caused by strong interaction force alone. This new type of nuclear species, which extends the landscape of nuclear physics, has been extensively studied since its prediction in 1986. We review and analyze in great detail the models of the fundamental η–nucleon interaction leading to the formation of an η–mesic nucleus, the methods used in calculating the properties of a bound η, and the approaches employed in the interpretation of the pertinent experimental data. In view of the successful observation of the η–mesic nucleus 25Mgηmore » and other promising experimental results, future direction in searching for more η–mesic nuclei is suggested.« less

  9. Unexpected Strong Decay Mode of Superheavy Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Gherghescu, R. A.; Greiner, W.

    Calculations of half-lives of superheavy nuclei (SH) show an unexpected result: for some of them heavy particle radioactivity (HPR) dominates over alpha decay—the main decay mode of the majority of recently discovered SHs. The result is important for theory and future experiments producing heavier SHs with a substantial amount of funding. The standard identification technique by alpha decay chains will be impossible for these cases. HPR had been predicted in 1980 four years before the first experiment. The daughter is mainly the doubly magic ^{208}Pb. We changed the concept of HPR to allow emitted particles with Z_e > 28from parents with Z > 110 (daughter around ^{208}Pb). We find a trend toward shorter half-lives and larger branching ratios relative to alpha decay for heavier SHs. A new table of measured masses AME11 and the theoretical LiMaZe01, KTUY05 and FRDM95 tables are used to determine Q-values.

  10. PHYSICS OF ELECTROWEAK INTERACTIONS WITH NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Orlandini, Giuseppina

    2010-04-26

    In this series of lectures it is illustrated how one can study the strong dynamics of nuclei by means of the electroweak probe. In particular, the most important steps to derive the cross sections in first order perturbation theory are reviewed. In the derivation the focus is put on the main ingredients entering the hadronic part (response functions), i.e. the initial and final states of the system and the operators relevant for the reaction. Emphasis is put on the electromagnetic interaction with few-nucleon systems. The Lorentz integral transform method to calculate the response functions ab initio is described. A few examples of the comparison between theoretical and experimental results are shown. The dependence of the response functions on the nuclear interaction and in particular on three-body forces is emphasized.

  11. Ultra heavy nuclei in the cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. Robert

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the measurements of the ultraheavy cosmic ray abundances obtained by the Heavy Nuclei Experiment aboard the NASA High Energy Astronomy Observatory-3. It is found that the cosmic ray abundances are in broad agreement with solar system abundances with a step-FIP fractionation model applied although in detail there are some differences. In particular, Ge and Pb appear to be underabundant in the cosmic radiation. Although the platinum/lead ratio and the actinides are consistent with some r-process enhancement, the cosmic ray source is not dominated by the r-process up through the 50s as evidenced by the Sr/Rb ratio and by the abundance of Sn and Ba. The actinides are not greatly enhanced, ruling out freshly synthesized r-process production as the primary source of the heavy cosmic rays.

  12. Are cometary nuclei primordial rubble piles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    Whipple's icy conglomerate model for the cometary nucleus has had considerable sucess in explaining a variety of cometary phenomena such as gas production rates and nongravitational forces. However, as discussed here, both observational evidence and theoretical considerations suggest that the cometary nucleus may not be a well-consolidated single body, but may instead be a loosely bound agglomeration of smaller fragments, weakly bonded and subject to occasional or even frequent disruptive events. The proposed model is analogous to the 'rubble pile' model suggested for the larger main-belt asteroids, although the larger cometary fragments are expected to be primordial condensations rather than collisionally derived debris as in the asteroid case. The concept of cometary nuclei as primordial rubble piles is proposed as a modification of the basic Whipple model, not as a replacement for it.

  13. The scission point configuration of fissioning nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyuk, Fedir

    2016-06-01

    We define the optimal shape which fissioning nuclei attain just before the scission and calculate the deformation energy as function of the mass asymmetry at the scission point. The calculated deformation energy is used in quasi-static approximation for the estimation of mass distribution, total kinetic and excitation energy of fission fragments, and the total number of prompt neutrons. The calculated results reproduce rather well the experimental data on the position of the peaks in the mass distribution of fission fragments, the total kinetic and excitation energy of fission fragments. The calculated value of neutron multiplicity is somewhat larger than experimental results. The saw-tooth structure of neutron multiplicity is qualitatively reproduced.

  14. Nonaxial-octupole effect in superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-S.; Sun, Yang; Gao Zaochun

    2008-06-15

    The triaxial-octupole Y{sub 32} correlation in atomic nuclei has long been expected to exist but experimental evidence has not been clear. We find, in order to explain the very low-lying 2{sup -} bands in the transfermium mass region, that this exotic effect may manifest itself in superheavy elements. Favorable conditions for producing triaxial-octupole correlations are shown to be present in the deformed single-particle spectrum, which is further supported by quantitative Reflection Asymmetric Shell Model calculations. It is predicted that the strong nonaxial-octupole effect may persist up to the element 108. Our result thus represents the first concrete example of spontaneous breaking of both axial and reflection symmetries in the heaviest nuclear systems.

  15. Properties of mantles on cometary nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1989-01-01

    The formation, structure, and properties of dusty mantles on cometary nuclei are investigated using various theoretical arguments and experimental data. It is shown how the growth of the mantle is affected by the varying thermal conductivity and how an initial chemically undifferentiated surface layer changes into a mechanically rather weak, less than 10 to the 7th dyn /sq cm, mantle which then strengthens to reach values of the order of 10 to the 8th dyn/sq cm. Organic CHON decomposition products may lower the porosity below the expected value of about 0.5 and lead to an increase of the surface temperature. They may also further strengthen the overall bonding of the mantle.

  16. Microscopic analysis of pear-shaped nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.

    2015-10-01

    We analyze the quadrupole-octupole collective states based on the microscopic energy density functional framework. By mapping the deformation constrained self-consistent axially symmetric mean-field energy surfaces onto the equivalent Hamiltonian of the sd f interacting boson model (IBM), that is, onto the energy expectation value in the boson coherent state, the Hamiltonian parameters are determined. The resulting IBM Hamiltonian is used to calculate excitation spectra and transition rates for the positive- and negative-parity collective states in nuclei characteristic for octupole deformation and collectivity. Consistently with the empirical trend, the microscopic calculation based on the systematics of β2 - β3 energy maps, the resulting low-lying negative-parity bands and transition rates show evidence of a shape transition between stable octupole deformation and octupole vibrations characteristic for β3-soft potentials.

  17. Magic ultramagnetized nuclei in explosive nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratyev, V. N.

    2012-11-15

    Direct evidence of the presence of {sup 44}Ti and content of the isotope in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A are obtained from the analysis of gamma-ray spectrum of the remnant. A significant excess of observational {sup 44}Ti volume on predictions of supernova models can be explained as the magnetization effect in the process of explosive nucleosynthesis. The formation of chemical elements is considered accounting for superstrong magnetic fields predicted for supernovae and neutron stars. Using the arguments of nuclear statistical equilibrium, a significant effect of magnetic field on the nuclear shell energy is demonstrated. The magnetic shift of the most tightly 'bound' nuclei from the transition metals of iron series to titanium leads to an exponential increase in the portion of {sup 44}Ti and, accordingly to a significant excess of the yield of these products of nucleosynthesis.

  18. DUST EMISSION FROM UNOBSCURED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G. D.; Levenson, N. A.; Uddin, S. A.; Sirocky, M. M.

    2009-05-20

    We use mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy of unobscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to reveal their native dusty environments. We concentrate on Seyfert 1 galaxies, observing a sample of 31 with the Infrared Spectrograph aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, and compare them with 21 higher luminosity quasar counterparts. Silicate dust reprocessing dominates the MIR spectra, and we generally measure the 10 and 18 {mu}m spectral features weakly in emission in these galaxies. The strengths of the two silicate features together are sensitive to the dust distribution. We present numerical radiative transfer calculations that distinguish between clumpy and smooth geometries, which are applicable to any central heating source, including stars as well as AGNs. In the observations, we detect the obscuring 'torus' of unified AGN schemes, modeling it as compact and clumpy. We also determine that star formation increases with AGN luminosity, although the proportion of the galaxies' bolometric luminosity attributable to stars decreases with AGN luminosity.

  19. Dust Emission from Unobscured Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, G. D.; Levenson, N. A.; Uddin, S. A.; Sirocky, M. M.

    2009-05-01

    We use mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy of unobscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to reveal their native dusty environments. We concentrate on Seyfert 1 galaxies, observing a sample of 31 with the Infrared Spectrograph aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, and compare them with 21 higher luminosity quasar counterparts. Silicate dust reprocessing dominates the MIR spectra, and we generally measure the 10 and 18 μm spectral features weakly in emission in these galaxies. The strengths of the two silicate features together are sensitive to the dust distribution. We present numerical radiative transfer calculations that distinguish between clumpy and smooth geometries, which are applicable to any central heating source, including stars as well as AGNs. In the observations, we detect the obscuring "torus" of unified AGN schemes, modeling it as compact and clumpy. We also determine that star formation increases with AGN luminosity, although the proportion of the galaxies' bolometric luminosity attributable to stars decreases with AGN luminosity.

  20. Echo Mapping of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, B. M.; Horne, K.

    2004-01-01

    Echo mapping makes use of the intrinsic variability of the continuum source in active galactic nuclei to map out the distribution and kinematics of line-emitting gas from its light travel time-delayed response to continuum changes. Echo mapping experiments have yielded sizes for the broad line-emitting region in about three dozen AGNs. The dynamics of the line-emitting gas seem to be dominated by the gravity of the central black hole, enabling measurement of the black-hole masses in AGNs. We discuss requirements for future echo-mapping experiments that will yield the high quality velocity-delay maps of the broad-line region that are needed to determine its physical nature.

  1. Cloud condensation nuclei near marine cumulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, James G.

    1993-01-01

    Extensive airborne measurements of cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectra and condensation nuclei below, in, between, and above the cumulus clouds near Hawaii point to important aerosol-cloud interactions. Consistent particle concentrations of 200/cu cm were found above the marine boundary layer and within the noncloudy marine boundary layer. Lower and more variable CCN concentrations within the cloudy boundary layer, especially very close to the clouds, appear to be a result of cloud scavenging processes. Gravitational coagulation of cloud droplets may be the principal cause of this difference in the vertical distribution of CCN. The results suggest a reservoir of CCN in the free troposphere which can act as a source for the marine boundary layer.

  2. History of the Nuclei Important for Cosmochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Bradley S.

    2004-01-01

    An essential aspect of studying the nuclei important for cosmochemistry is their production in stars. Over the grant period, we have further developed the Clemson/American University of Beirut stellar evolution code. Through use of a biconjugate-gradient matrix solver, we now routinely solve l0(exp 6) x l0(exp 6) sparse matrices on our desktop computers. This has allowed us to couple nucleosynthesis and convection fully in the 1-D star, which, in turn, provides better estimates of nuclear yields when the mixing and nuclear burning timescales are comparable. We also have incorporated radiation transport into our 1-D supernova explosion code. We used the stellar evolution and explosion codes to compute iron abundances in a 25 Solar mass star and compared the results to data from RIMS.

  3. Inclusive Inelastic Electron Scattering from Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Fomin, Nadia

    2007-10-26

    Inclusive electron scattering from nuclei at large x and Q{sup 2} is the result of a reaction mechanism that includes both quasi-elastic scattering from nucleons and deep inelastic scattering from the quark consitituents of the nucleons. Data in this regime can be used to study a wide variety of topics, including the extraction of nuclear momentum distributions, the infiuence of final state interactions and the approach to y-scaling, the strength of nucleon-nucleon correlations, and the approach to x-scaling, to name a few. Selected results from the recent experiment E02-019 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will be shown and their relevance discussed.

  4. Could life have evolved in cometary nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Nun, A.; Lazcano-Araujo, A.; Oro, J.

    1981-01-01

    The suggestion by Hoyle and Wickramasinghe (1978) that life might have originated in cometary nuclei rather than directly on the earth is discussed. Factors in the cometary environment including the conditions at perihelion passage leading to the ablation of cometary ices, ice temperatures, the absence of an atmosphere and discrete liquid and solid surfaces, weak cometary structure incapable of supporting a liquid core, and radiation are presented as arguments against biopoesis in comets. It is concluded that although the contribution of cometary and meteoritic matter was significant in shaping the earth environment, the view that life on earth originally arose in comets is untenable, and the proposition that the process of interplanetary infection still occurs is unlikely in view of the high specificity of host-parasite relationships.

  5. Photometric reverberation mapping of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramolla, M.; Pozo, F.; Westhues, C.; Haas, M.; Chini, R.; Steenbrugge, K.; Lemke, R.; Murphy, M.

    2014-12-01

    Photometric reverberation mapping is a novel method used to determine the size and geometry of the broad line region (BLR) in active galactic nuclei (AGN) as well as their host galaxy free luminosities. Establishing a tight luminosity - BLR-size relation may allow type-1 AGN to be used as cosmological distance probes. However, the quality of the results is most sensible to dense time sampling and continuity of the photometric lightcurves. This demands an observatory, with optimal environmental conditions, like the "Universitätssternwarte Bochum", located in the Atacama Desert in Chile. The massive amount of observations are controlled robotically, adapting observational schedules of the telescopes to the weather conditions. Here we present one of the first promising results of our studies.

  6. Eta-mesic nuclei: Past, present, future

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Q.; Liu, Lon -Chang

    2015-09-23

    Eta-mesic nucleus or the quasibound nuclear state of an eta (η) meson in a nucleus is caused by strong interaction force alone. This new type of nuclear species, which extends the landscape of nuclear physics, has been extensively studied since its prediction in 1986. We review and analyze in great detail the models of the fundamental η–nucleon interaction leading to the formation of an η–mesic nucleus, the methods used in calculating the properties of a bound η, and the approaches employed in the interpretation of the pertinent experimental data. In view of the successful observation of the η–mesic nucleus 25Mgη and other promising experimental results, future direction in searching for more η–mesic nuclei is suggested.

  7. Unobscured Type 2 Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yong; Rieke, George H.; Smith, Paul; Rigby, Jane; Hines, Dean; Donley, Jennifer; Schmidt, Gary; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.

    2010-05-01

    Type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with intrinsically weak broad emission lines (BELs) would be exceptions to the unified model. After examining a number of proposed candidates critically, we find that the sample is contaminated significantly by objects with BELs of strengths indicating that they actually contain intermediate-type AGNs, plus a few Compton-thick sources as revealed by extremely low ratios of X-ray to nuclear IR luminosities. We develop quantitative metrics that show two (NGC 3147 and NGC 4594) of the remaining candidates to have BELs 2-3 orders of magnitude weaker than those of typical type 1 AGNs. Several more galaxies remain as candidates to have anomalously weak BELs, but this status cannot be confirmed with the existing information. Although the parent sample is poorly defined, the two confirmed objects are well under 1% of its total number of members, showing that the absence of a BEL is possible, but very uncommon in AGN. We evaluate these two objects in detail using multi-wavelength measurements including new IR data obtained with Spitzer and ground-based optical spectropolarimeteric observations. They have little X-ray extinction with N H < ~1021 cm-2. Their IR spectra show strong silicate emission (NGC 4594) or weak aromatic features on a generally power-law continuum with a suggestion of silicates in emission (NGC 3147). No polarized BEL is detected in NGC 3147. These results indicate that the two unobscured type 2 objects have circumnuclear tori that are approximately face-on. Combined with their X-ray and optical/UV properties, this behavior implies that we have an unobscured view of the nuclei and thus that they have intrinsically weak BELs. We compare their properties with those of the other less-extreme candidates. We then compare the distributions of bolometric luminosities and accretion rates of these objects with theoretical models that predict weak BELs.

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiringa, R. B.; Physics

    2008-01-01

    A major goal in nuclear physics is to understand how nuclear binding, structure, and reactions can be described from the underlying interactions between individual nucleons. We want to compute the properties of an A-nucleon system as an A-body problem with free-space nuclear interactions that describe nucleon-nucleon (NN) scattering and the two-nucleon bound-state. Properties of interest for a given nucleus include the ground-state binding energy, excitation spectrum, one- and two-nucleon density and momentum distributions, electromagnetic moments and transitions. They also wish to describe the interactions of nuclei with electrons, neutrinos, pions, nucleons, and other nuclei. Such calculations can provide a standard of comparison to test whether sub-nucleonic effects, such as explicit quark degrees of freedom, must be invoked to explain an observed phenomenon. they can also be used to evaluate nuclear matrix elements needed for some test of the standard model, and to predict reaction rates that are difficult or impossible to measure in the laboratory. For example, all the astrophysical reactions that contribute to the Big Bang or to solar energy production should be amenable to such ab initio calculations. To achieve this goal, they must both determine reasonable Hamiltonians to be used and devise reliable many-body methods to evaluate them. Significant progress has been made in the past decade on both fronts, with the development of a number of potential models that accurately reproduce NN elastic scattering data, and a variety of advanced many-body methods. In practice, to reproduce experimental energies and transitions, it appears necessary to add many-nucleon forces to the Hamiltonian and electroweak charge and current operators beyond the basic single-nucleon terms. While testing their interactions and currents against experiment, it is also important to test the many-body methods against each other to ensure that any approximations made are not biasing the

  9. Pluvial Inhibition by Urban Cloud Condensation Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Yum, S. S.

    2002-05-01

    Cloud microphysics and sub-cloud aerosol measurements in urban and cleaner air masses showed the effects of anthropogenic air pollution. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements in three different parts of the world displayed typical urban/clean air mass differences in concentrations. Near-simultaneous cloud droplet measurements (diameter < 50 micrometers) showed the higher concentrations and smaller sizes expected for higher CCN concentrations. The commensurate lower concentrations of large cloud droplets (30-50 micrometers) in urban air indicated that the higher CCN concentrations were responsible for the order(s) of magnitude lower drizzle drop (diameter > 50 micrometers) concentrations in the urban-influenced clouds. The similarity of the clean and urban- influenced cloud droplet spectra near cloud base suggested no differences in giant nuclei concentrations that have been suggested to be responsible for greater precipitation in cleaner clouds. This suppression of warm rain by higher CCN concentrations occurred hundreds of km from the urban sources. Similar effects were found for three different cloud types in these three field projects: 1) stratocumulus clouds in the eastern Atlantic (ASTEX); 2) small cumulus clouds in eastern Florida (SCMS); and small trade wind cumuli in the Indian Ocean (INDOEX). Comparisons of CCN and cloud droplet concentrations in the three projects showed a more-or-less linear relationship between CCN and cloud droplet concentrations. Comparisons of CCN and cloud droplet spectra showed that supersaturations were lower in the urban-influenced clouds due to greater competition for condensed water. This means that a smaller percentage of the higher urban CCN concentrations actually produced cloud droplets. However, the supersaturation suppression was smaller because droplet sizes were so reduced that many urban cloud droplets escaped detection. This underestimation of cloud droplet concentrations suggested a greater suppression of

  10. Dynamical effects in fusion with exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo-Phuoc, K.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Reactions with stable beams have demonstrated strong interplay between nuclear structure and fusion. Exotic beam facilities open new perspectives to understand the impact of neutron skin, large isospin, and weak binding energies on fusion. Microscopic theories of fusion are required to guide future experiments. Purpose: To investigate new effects of exotic structures and dynamics in near-barrier fusion with exotic nuclei. Method: Microscopic approaches based on the Hartree-Fock (HF) mean-field theory are used for studying fusion barriers in -54Ca40+116Sn reactions for even isotopes. Bare potential barriers are obtained assuming frozen HF ground-state densities. Dynamical effects on the barrier are accounted for in time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations of the collisions. Vibrational couplings are studied in the coupled-channel framework and near-barrier nucleon transfer is investigated with TDHF calculations. Results: The development of a neutron skin in exotic calcium isotopes strongly lowers the bare potential barrier. However, this static effect is not apparent when dynamical effects are included. On the contrary, a fusion hindrance is observed in TDHF calculations with the most neutron-rich calcium isotopes which cannot be explained by vibrational couplings. Transfer reactions are also important in these systems due to charge equilibration processes. Conclusions: Despite its impact on the bare potential, the neutron skin is not seen as playing an important role in the fusion dynamics. However, the charge transfer with exotic projectiles could lead to an increase of the Coulomb repulsion between the fragments, suppressing fusion. The effects of transfer and dissipative mechanisms on fusion with exotic nuclei deserve further studies.

  11. Cloud Condensation Nuclei Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Simpson, J.

    2002-01-01

    The first measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) within and around tropical cyclones were made with the Desert Research Institute (DRI) CCN spectrometer (Hudson 1909) from a NOAA P-3 Hurricane Hunter aircraft throughout the 2001 season. Two penetrations of the closed eye of Hurricane Erin off the northeast US coast on Sept. 10 showed concentrations consistently well in excess of 1000 per cubic cm at approximately 1.4% supersaturation. Simultaneous condensation nuclei (CN--total particle) concentrations were consistently well in excess of 2000 per cubic cm throughout these closed eye penetrations. These within eye measurements at 4 km altitude for exceeded CCN and CN measurements just outside of the storm at similar altitudes--300 and 600 per cubic cm respectively. These CCN and CN concentrations within this closed eye were far above concentrations in maritime air masses; they are characteristic of continental or polluted air masses. Although there was a possibility that Saharan duct may have gotten into this storm these sub tenth micrometer particles are much too small and much too numerous to be dust. Such high concentrations may have originated from European air pollution, which may have been transported by similar airflow patterns to those that carry Saharan dust across the Atlantic. These high concentrations may be a manifestation of descending air that brings higher concentrations that are often characteristic of the upper troposphere (Clarke and Kapustin 2002). Later in the month measurements in Humberto showed highly variable CCN and CN concentrations that ranged from lots than 5 per cubic cm to more than 1000 per Cubic cm over km scale distances within and around the open eye of this tropical storm/hurricane. These very low concentrations suggest strong cloud scavenging.

  12. Possible alternative parity bands in the heaviest nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Shneidman, T. M.; Jolos, R. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2006-09-15

    The low-lying alternative parity bands in heaviest nuclei are predicted for the first time. The parity splitting and electric dipole, quadrupole, and octupole transition moments of heavy nuclei are calculated within a cluster model. The model is based on the assumption that reflection asymmetric shapes are produced by the motion of the nuclear system in the mass asymmetry coordinate.

  13. Order-to-chaos transition in rotational nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, F.S.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Ward, D.; Fallon, P.; Cromaz, M.; Clark, R.M.; Descovich, M.; Diamond, R.M.; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E.

    2004-05-13

    The authors have studied the narrow (valley-ridge) structure in the {gamma}-ray spectrum following a heavy-ion fusion reaction that produces several ytterbium nuclei. The intensity of this structure can be quantitatively related to the average chaotic behavior in these nuclei and they have traced this behavior from nearly fully ordered to nearly fully chaotic.

  14. Ice nuclei measurements from solid rocket motor effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E., II

    1980-01-01

    The ice crystal forming nuclei (IN) measured in solid rocket motor (SRM) exhaust products is discussed in relation to space shuttle exhaust. Preliminary results from laboratory investigations and flight preparations for March 1978 Titan launch are discussed. The work necessary to provide adequate measurements of IN and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the stabilized ground clouds from SRM's is studied.

  15. Molecular bond effects in the fusion of halo nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulani, C. A.; Balantekin, A. B.

    1993-09-01

    We consider the effect of the long tail of the neutron distribution in the fusion of halo nuclei. We show that for relative separations on the order of the halo size, the exchange of the valence neutrons between the two nuclei is responsible for an effective attractive potential which decreases the Coulomb barrier and increases the fusion cross sections dramatically.

  16. Continuum Response and Reaction in Neutron-Rich Be Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Ueda, Manabu; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2004-02-27

    We study E1 resonances, breakup and fusion reactions for weakly bound Be nuclei. The absorbing-boundary condition (ABC) is used to describe both the outgoing and incoming boundary conditions. The neutron continuum plays important roles in response and reaction of neutron drip-line nuclei.

  17. Particle Acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    1997-01-01

    The high efficiency of energy generation inferred from radio observations of quasars and X-ray observations of Seyfert active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is apparently achieved only by the gravitational conversion of the rest mass energy of accreting matter onto supermassive black holes. Evidence for the acceleration of particles to high energies by a central engine is also inferred from observations of apparent superluminal motion in flat spectrum, core-dominated radio sources. This phenomenon is widely attributed to the ejection of relativistic bulk plasma from the nuclei of active galaxies, and accounts for the existence of large scale radio jets and lobes at large distances from the central regions of radio galaxies. Reports of radio jets and superluminal motion from galactic black hole candidate X-ray sources indicate that similar processes are operating in these sources. Observations of luminous, rapidly variable high-energy radiation from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory show directly that particles are accelerated to high energies in a compact environment. The mechanisms which transform the gravitational potential energy of the infalling matter into nonthermal particle energy in galactic black hole candidates and AGNs are not conclusively identified, although several have been proposed. These include direct acceleration by static electric fields (resulting from, for example, magnetic reconnection), shock acceleration, and energy extraction from the rotational energy of Kerr black holes. The dominant acceleration mechanism(s) operating in the black hole environment can only be determined, of course, by a comparison of model predictions with observations. The purpose of the work proposed for this grant was to investigate stochastic particle acceleration through resonant interactions with plasma waves that populate the magnetosphere surrounding an accreting black hole. Stochastic acceleration has been successfully applied to the

  18. Could life have evolved in cometary nuclei?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Nun, A.; Lazcano-Araujo, A.; Oró, J.

    1981-12-01

    Hoyle and Wickramasinghe have recently suggested that life may have originated in cometary nuclei rather than directly on Earth. Even though comets are known to contain substantial amounts of organic compounds which may have contributed to the formation of biochemical molecules on the primitive Earth, it is doubtful that the process of chemical evolution has proceeded in comets beyond the stage that has occurred in carbonaceous chondrites. Some of the arguments which do not favor the occurrence of biopoesis in comets are: 1. A large layer of cometary ices is ablated from the nucleus' surface each time the comet passes through perihelion, so that essentially most of the organic products on the surface would be sublimed, blown off or polymerized. 2. Because of the low temperatures of the cometary ices, polymers formed on one perihelion passage would not migrate deep enough into the nucleus to be preserved before they would be ablated away by the next perihelion passage. 3. In the absence of atmosphere, and discrete liquid and solid surfaces, it is difficult to visualize the synthesis of key life molecules, such as oligopeptides, oligonucleotides and phospholipids by condensation and dehydration reactions as is presumed to have occurred in the evaporating ponds of the primitive Earth. 4. Observations suggest that cometary nuclei have a rather weak structure. Hence, the low central pressures in comets combined with the high vapor pressures of cometary ices at the melting point of water ice, suggest that a liquid core is not a tenable structure. Yet, even if a cometary nucleus is compact enough to hold a liquid core and a transient liquid water environment was provided by the decay of26Al, the continuous irradiation in water of most of the biologically relevant polymers would have hydrolyzed and degraded them. 5. Needless to say that the effects of radiation on self-replicating systems would also have caused the demise of any life forms which may have appeared under any

  19. Photoexcitation of magnetic and electric dipole transitions in heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Pitz, H. H.; Von Brentano, P.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Zilges, A.

    Systematic nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments have been performed at the bremsstrahlung facility of the 4 MV Stuttgart Dynamitron to investigate the distributions of magnetic and electric dipole excitations in heavy nuclei. Precise excitation energies, transition strengths, spins and decay branching ratios were deduced for numerous low lying dipole excitations in heavy spherical and deformed nuclei. Measurements of the linear polarization of resonantly scattered photons using a Compton polarimeter enabled model independent parity assignments. Recent results are presented concerning: the systematics and fragmentation of the M1 “ Scissors Mode” in even-even Rare Earth nuclei, the existence of the “ Scissors Mode” in odd deformed nuclei, 2 + ⊗ 3 - two-phonon E1 excitations in N=82 isotones and Z=50 isotopes, 2 + ⊗ 3 - ⊗ particle multiplets in odd nuclei around N=82, low lying ΔK=0 electric dipole excitations in deformed nuclei, and E1 excitations around 2.6 MeV in deformed nuclei, which are interpreted as candidates for novel two-phonon excitations (coupling of the K=1 octupole and K=2, γ-vibrations).

  20. Are there X(5) Nuclei in the A ~80 Region?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Daeg

    2002-04-01

    Recently, a new class of symmetries, based on solutions of differential equations, has been introduced to model phase transition and critical point behavior in nuclei. For the shape transition region between a spherical vibrator and an axial rotor the dynamical symmetry for the critical point is designated X(5) and levels are assigned quantum numbers, s, that determine their energies and transition rates. Signatures of X(5) nuclei include the energy ratios E(4_1^+)/E(2_1^+) for a given s sequence of levels, E(0_2^+)/E(2_1^+) between the s=2 and s=1 sequences, E(J)/E(2^+) as a function of J for the s=1 sequence, and intra- and inter-sequence B(E2) values. Examples that fit the X(5) description have been found for rare earth nuclei in the N=90 region. Data for the A ~80 region has been searched for evidence of the X(5) dynamical symmetry. A comparison of the available data to those in the N=90 nuclei provides tantalizing hints of nuclei with X(5) character. Confirmation will require additional data, especially B(E2) values. Since the nuclei involved are far from stability, such measurements will require accelerated beams of radioactive nuclei that will be available at the proposed RIA facility.

  1. Characterization of brain cell nuclei with decondensed chromatin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ping; McKinney, Elizabeth C; Kandasamy, Muthugapatti M; Albert, Alexandria L; Meagher, Richard B

    2015-07-01

    Although multipotent cell types have enlarged nuclei with decondensed chromatin, this property has not been exploited to enhance the characterization of neural progenitor cell (NPC) populations in the brain. We found that mouse brain cell nuclei that expressed exceptionally high levels of the pan neuronal marker NeuN/FOX3 (NeuN-High) had decondensed chromatin relative to most NeuN-Low or NeuN-Neg (negative) nuclei. Purified NeuN-High nuclei expressed significantly higher levels of transcripts encoding markers of neurogenesis, neuroplasticity, and learning and memory (ARC, BDNF, ERG1, HOMER1, NFL/NEF1, SYT1), subunits of chromatin modifying machinery (SIRT1, HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC11, KAT2B, KAT3A, KAT3B, KAT5, DMNT1, DNMT3A, Gadd45a, Gadd45b) and markers of NPC and cell cycle activity (BRN2, FOXG1, KLF4, c-MYC, OCT4, PCNA, SHH, SOX2) relative to neuronal NeuN-Low or to mostly non-neuronal NeuN-Neg nuclei. NeuN-High nuclei expressed higher levels of HDAC1, 2, 4, and 5 proteins. The cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, thalamus, and nucleus accumbens contained high percentages of large decondensed NeuN-High nuclei, while the cerebellum, and pons contained very few. NeuN-High nuclei have the properties consistent with their being derived from extremely active neurons with elevated rates of chromatin modification and/or NPC-like cells with multilineage developmental potential. The further analysis of decondensed neural cell nuclei should provide novel insights into neurobiology and neurodegenerative disease.

  2. Dribs II:. a Source of Radioactive Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szöllős, O.; Kliman, J.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Itkis, M. G.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Mishinsky, G. V.; Zhemenik, V. I.

    2002-12-01

    The facility for neutron-rich nuclei production, as a specific part of the project DRIBS - phase II, based on the use of photofission and the characteristics of microtron MT-25 as a source of bremsstrahlung photons are described. Target selection with regard to maximum yield production of strong neutron-rich fission products and with respect to its safety and availability is discussed. Geant 4 simulation toolkit was used to obtain bremsstrahlung γ-beam characteristics and its angular spred was compared with measurements on MT-25 microtron. Next, calculation of fission-rate and fission density in 238U target at nominal values of MT-25 microtron are presented. Calculations of the yield from photofission based on the Wahl's ZP model for charge distribution of fission fragments are compared with experimental data for independent yield of xenon isotopes measured. As result the independent and cummulative yields from photofission of 238U for mictrotron MT-25, as a driver accelerator for DRIBS II, for up to 890 isotopes and their isomers were obtained. Mean characteristics of this compact facility with some others RIB projects are compared.

  3. On Complex Nuclei Energetics in LENR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.; Hora, Heinz

    2005-03-01

    Swimming Electron Layer (SEL) theory plus fission of ``complex nuclei'' were proposed earlier to explain reaction products observed in electrolysis with multi-layer thin-film metallic electrodesootnotetext1.G.H. Miley, and J.A. Patterson, J. New Energy, Vol. 1, pp.11-15, (1996).. SEL was then extended to treat gas-diffusion driven transmutation experimentsootnotetextG. H. Miley and H. Hora, ``Nuclear Reactions in Solids,'' APS DNP Mtg., East Lansing, MI, Oct (2002).. It is also consistent with measured charged-particle emission during thin-film electrolysis and x-ray emission during plasma bombardment experimentsootnotetextA. Karabut, ``X-ray emission in high-current glow discharge,'' Proc., ICCF-9, Beijing China, May (2002).. The binding energy per complex nucleon can be estimated by an energy balance combined with identification of products for each complex e.g. complexes of A 39 have ˜ 0.05 MeV/Nucleon, etc, in thin film electrolysis. Energies in gas diffusion experiments are lower due to the reduced trap site potential at the multi-atom surface. In the case of x-ray emission, complexes involve subsurface defect center traps, giving only a few keV/Nucleon, consistent with experiments^3.

  4. Warped circumbinary disks in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Sohn, Bong Won; Jung, Taehyun; Zhao, Guangyao; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Naito, Tsuguya

    2014-07-20

    We study a warping instability of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating disk surrounding binary supermassive black holes on a circular orbit. Such a circumbinary disk is subject to not only tidal torques due to the binary gravitational potential but also radiative torques due to radiation emitted from an accretion disk around each black hole. We find that a circumbinary disk initially aligned with the binary orbital plane is unstable to radiation-driven warping beyond the marginally stable warping radius, which is sensitive to both the ratio of vertical to horizontal shear viscosities and the mass-to-energy conversion efficiency. As expected, the tidal torques give no contribution to the growth of warping modes but tend to align the circumbinary disk with the orbital plane. Since the tidal torques can suppress the warping modes in the inner part of circumbinary disk, the circumbinary disk starts to be warped at radii larger than the marginally stable warping radius. If the warping radius is of the order of 0.1 pc, a resultant semi-major axis is estimated to be of the order of 10{sup –2} pc to 10{sup –4} pc for 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉} black hole. We also discuss the possibility that the central objects of observed warped maser disks in active galactic nuclei are binary supermassive black holes with a triple disk: two accretion disks around the individual black holes and one circumbinary disk surrounding them.

  5. TESTING TESTS ON ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI MICROVARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    De Diego, Jose A.

    2010-03-15

    Literature on optical and infrared microvariability in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) reflects a diversity of statistical tests and strategies to detect tiny variations in the light curves of these sources. Comparison between the results obtained using different methodologies is difficult, and the pros and cons of each statistical method are often badly understood or even ignored. Even worse, improperly tested methodologies are becoming more and more common, and biased results may be misleading with regard to the origin of the AGN microvariability. This paper intends to point future research on AGN microvariability toward the use of powerful and well-tested statistical methodologies, providing a reference for choosing the best strategy to obtain unbiased results. Light curves monitoring has been simulated for quasars and for reference and comparison stars. Changes for the quasar light curves include both Gaussian fluctuations and linear variations. Simulated light curves have been analyzed using {chi}{sup 2} tests, F tests for variances, one-way analyses of variance and C-statistics. Statistical Type I and Type II errors, which indicate the robustness and the power of the tests, have been obtained in each case. One-way analyses of variance and {chi}{sup 2} prove to be powerful and robust estimators for microvariations, while the C-statistic is not a reliable methodology and its use should be avoided.

  6. Photodisintegration of Light Nuclei with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Ilieva, Yordanka Yordanova; Zachariou, Nicholas

    2013-08-01

    We report preliminary results of photodisintegration of deuteron and {sup 3}He measured with CLAS at Jefferson Lab. We have extracted the beam-spin asymmetry for the {vector {gamma}}d {yields} pn reaction at photon energies from 1.1 GeV to 2.3 GeV and proton center-of-mass (c.m.) angles between 35{degrees} and 135{degrees} . Our data show interesting evolution of the angular dependence of the observable as the photon energy increases. The energy dependence of the beam-spin asymmetry at 90 shows a change of slope at photon energy of 1.6 GeV. A comparison of our data with model calculations suggests that a fully non-perturbative treatment of the underlying dynamics may be able to describe the data better than a model based on hard scattering. We have observed onset of dimensional scaling in the cross section of two-body photodisintegration of {sup 3}He at remarkably low energy and momentum transfer, which suggests that partonic degrees of freedom may be relevant for the description of nuclei at energies lower than previously considered.

  7. Studies of active galactic nuclei with CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, A.; Böttcher, M.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we review the prospects for studies of active galactic nuclei (AGN) using the envisioned future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). This review focuses on jetted AGN, which constitute the vast majority of AGN detected at gamma-ray energies. Future progress will be driven by the planned lower energy threshold for very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray detections to ∼10 GeV and improved flux sensitivity compared to current-generation Cherenkov Telescope facilities. We argue that CTA will enable substantial progress on gamma-ray population studies by deepening existing surveys both through increased flux sensitivity and by improving the chances of detecting a larger number of low-frequency peaked blazars because of the lower energy threshold. More detailed studies of the VHE gamma-ray spectral shape and variability might furthermore yield insight into unsolved questions concerning jet formation and composition, the acceleration of particles within relativistic jets, and the microphysics of the radiation mechanisms leading to the observable high-energy emission. The broad energy range covered by CTA includes energies where gamma-rays are unaffected from absorption while propagating in the extragalactic background light (EBL), and extends to an energy regime where VHE spectra are strongly distorted. This will help to reduce systematic effects in the spectra from different instruments, leading to a more reliable EBL determination, and hence will make it possible to constrain blazar models up to the highest energies with less ambiguity.

  8. Electromagnetic Studies of Mesons, Nucleons, and Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Oliver K.

    2013-08-20

    Professor Baker was a faculty member at Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia, and, jointly, a Staff Physicist at Jefferson Lab in nearby Newport News from September 1989 to July 2006. The Department of Energy (DOE) funded the grant DE-FG02-97ER41035 Electromagnetic Studies of Mesons, Nucleons, and Nuclei, while Baker was in this joint appointment. Baker sent a closeout report on these activities to Hampton University’s Sponsored Research Office some years ago, shortly after joining Yale University in 2006. In the period around 2001, the research grant with Baker as the Principal Investigator (PI) was put under the supervision of Professor Liguang Tang at Hampton University. Baker continued to pursue the research while in this join appointment, however the administrative responsibilities with the DOE and with Hampton University rested with Professor Tang after 2001, to my recollection. What is written in this document is from Baker’s memory of the research activities, which he has not pursued since joining the Yale University faculty.

  9. {delta}-mediated pion production in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Praet, C.; Lalakulich, O.; Jachowicz, N.; Ryckebusch, J.

    2009-04-15

    We present a fully relativistic formalism for describing neutrino-induced {delta}-mediated single-pion production in nuclei. We assess the ambiguities stemming from the {delta} interactions and quantify the uncertainties in the axial form-factor parameters by comparing with the available bubble-chamber neutrino-scattering data. To include nuclear effects, we turn to a relativistic plane-wave impulse approximation (RPWIA) using realistic bound-state wave functions derived in the Hartree approximation to the {sigma}-{omega} Walecka model. For neutrino energies larger than 1 GeV, we show that a relativistic Fermi-gas model with appropriate binding-energy correction produces results that are comparable to the RPWIA that naturally includes Fermi motion, nuclear-binding effects, and the Pauli exclusion principle. Including {delta} medium modifications roughly halves the RPWIA cross section. Calculations for primary (prior to undergoing final-state interactions) pion production are presented for both electron- and neutrino-induced processes, and a comparison with electron-scattering data and other theoretical approaches is included. We infer that the total {delta}-production strength is underestimated by about 20 to 25%, a fraction that is due to the pionless decay modes of the {delta} in a medium. The model presented in this work can be naturally extended to include the effect of final-state interactions in a relativistic and quantum-mechanical way.

  10. Quasi periodic oscillations in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alston, W.; Fabian, A.; Markevičiutė, J.; Parker, M.; Middleton, M.; Kara, E.

    2016-05-01

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are coherent peaks of variability power observed in the X-ray power spectra (PSDs) of stellar mass X-ray binaries (XRBs). A scale invariance of the accretion process implies they should be present in the active galactic nuclei. The first robust detection was a ∼ 1 h periodicity in the Seyfert galaxy RE J1034+396 from a ∼ 90 ks XMM-Newton observation; however, subsequent observations failed to detect the QPO in the 0.3-10.0 keV band. In this talk we present the recent detection of the ∼ 1 h periodicity in the 1.0-4.0 keV band of 4 further low-flux/spectrally-harder observations of RE J1034+396 (see Alston et al. 2014). We also present recent work on the discovery of a QPO in the Seyfert galaxy, MS 2254.9-3712, which again is only detected in energy bands associated with the primary power-law continuum emission (Alston et al. 2015). We conclude these features are most likely analogous to the high-frequency QPOs observed in XRBs. In both sources, we also see evidence for X-ray reverberation at the QPO frequency, where soft X-ray bands and Iron Kα emission lag the primary X-ray continuum. These time delays may provide another diagnostic for understanding the underlying QPO mechanism observed in accreting black holes.

  11. Parameterizing cloud condensation nuclei concentrations during HOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hande, Luke B.; Engler, Christa; Hoose, Corinna; Tegen, Ina

    2016-09-01

    An aerosol model was used to simulate the generation and transport of aerosols over Germany during the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) field campaign of 2013. The aerosol number concentrations and size distributions were evaluated against observations, which shows satisfactory agreement in the magnitude and temporal variability of the main aerosol contributors to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. From the modelled aerosol number concentrations, number concentrations of CCN were calculated as a function of vertical velocity using a comprehensive aerosol activation scheme which takes into account the influence of aerosol chemical and physical properties on CCN formation. There is a large amount of spatial variability in aerosol concentrations; however the resulting CCN concentrations vary significantly less over the domain. Temporal variability is large in both aerosols and CCN. A parameterization of the CCN number concentrations is developed for use in models. The technique involves defining a number of best fit functions to capture the dependence of CCN on vertical velocity at different pressure levels. In this way, aerosol chemical and physical properties as well as thermodynamic conditions are taken into account in the new CCN parameterization. A comparison between the parameterization and the CCN estimates from the model data shows excellent agreement. This parameterization may be used in other regions and time periods with a similar aerosol load; furthermore, the technique demonstrated here may be employed in regions dominated by different aerosol species.

  12. Pairing and specific heat in hot nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambacurta, Danilo; Lacroix, Denis; Sandulescu, N.

    2013-09-01

    The thermodynamics of pairing phase-transition in nuclei is studied in the canonical ensemble and treating the pairing correlations in a finite-temperature variation after projection BCS approach (FT-VAP). Due to the restoration of particle number conservation, the pairing gap and the specific heat calculated in the FT-VAP approach vary smoothly with the temperature, indicating a gradual transition from the superfluid to the normal phase, as expected in finite systems. We have checked that the predictions of the FT-VAP approach are very accurate when compared to the results obtained by an exact diagonalization of the pairing Hamiltonian. The influence of pairing correlations on specific heat is analyzed for the isotopes 161,162Dy and 171,172Yb. It is shown that the FT-VAP approach, applied with a level density provided by mean field calculations and supplemented, at high energies, by the level density of the back-shifted Fermi gas model, can approximate reasonably well the main properties of specific heat extracted from experimental data. However, the detailed shape of the calculated specific heat is rather sensitive to the assumption made for the mean field.

  13. Shell model for warm rotating nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, M.; Døssing, T.; Vigezzi, E.; Broglia, R. A.; Yoshida, K.

    1997-04-01

    In order to provide a microscopic description of levels and E2 transitions in rapidly rotating nuclei with internal excitation energy up to a few MeV, use is made of a shell model which combines the cranked Nilsson mean-field and the residual surface delta two-body force. The damping of collective rotational motion is investigated in the case of a typical rare-earth nucleus, namely 168Yb. It is found that rotational damping sets in at around 0.8 MeV above the yrast line, and the number of levels which form rotational band structures is thus limited. We predict at a given rotational frequency the existence of about 30 rotational bands of various lengths, in overall agreement with the experimental findings. The onset of the rotational damping proceeds quite gradually as a function of the internal excitation energy. The transition region extends up to around 2 MeV above yrast and it is characterized by the presence of scars of discrete rotational bands which extend over few spin values and stand out among the damped transitions, and by a two-component profile in the Eγ- Eγ correlation. The important role played by the high-multipole components of the two-body residual interaction is emphasized.

  14. Probing the Physics of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Bradley M.

    2004-01-01

    As a result of a number of large multiwavelength monitoring campaigns that have taken place since the late 1980s, there are now several very large data sets on bright variable active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that are well-sampled in time and can be used to probe the physics of the AGN continuum source and the broad-line emitting region. Most of these data sets have been underutilized, as the emphasis thus far has been primarily on reverberation-mapping issues alone. Broader attempts at analysis have been made on some of the earlier IUE data sets (e.g., data from the 1989 campaign on NGC5 548) , but much of this analysis needs to be revisited now that improved versions of the data are now available from final archive processing. We propose to use the multiwavelength monitoring data that have been accumulated to undertake more thorough investigations of the AGN continuum and broad emission lines, including a more detailed study of line-profile variability, making use of constraints imposed by the reverberation results.

  15. Fission Properties for R-Process Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Erler, J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a systematics of fission barriers and fission lifetimes for the whole landscape of superheavy elements (SHE), i.e., nuclei with Z 100. The fission lifetimes are also compared with the -decay half-lives. The survey is based on a self-consistent description in terms of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) approach. Results for various different SHF parametrizations are compared to explore the robustness of the predictions. The fission path is computed by quadrupole constrained SHF. The computation of fission lifetimes takes care of the crucial ingredients of the large-amplitude collective dynamics along the fission path, as self-consistent collective mass and proper quantum corrections. We discuss the different topologies of fission landscapes which occur in the realm of SHE (symmetric versus asymmetric fission, regions of triaxial fission, bimodal fission, and the impact of asymmetric ground states). The explored region is extended deep into the regime of very neutron-rich isotopes as they are expected to be produced in the astrophysical r process.

  16. Cloud Condensation Nuclei in Fire-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The centerpiece of this research was the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements of the Desert Research Institute (DRI) CCN spectrometers on board the NCAR C-130 aircraft during the Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE) in May, 1998. These instruments operated successfully throughout all eight 10-hour research flights based in Fairbanks and the two ferry flights between Colorado and Fairbanks. Within a few months of completion of ACE the CCN data was edited and put into the archives. A paper was completed and published on the CCN climatology during the previous two FIRE field projects-FIRE 1 based in San Diego in June and July, 1987 and ASTEX based in the Azores Islands in June, 1992. This showed distinct contrasts in concentrations and spectra between continental and maritime CCN concentrations, which depended on air mass trajectories. Pollution episodes from Europe had distinct influences on particle concentrations at low altitudes especially within the boundary layer. At higher altitudes concentrations were similar in the two air mass regimes. Cloudier atmospheres showed lower concentrations especially below the clouds, which were a result mostly of coalescence scavenging.

  17. Cloud Condensation Nuclei in FIRE III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, James G.; Delnore, Victor E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Yum and Hudson showed that the springtime Arctic aerosol is probably a result of long-range transport at high altitudes. Scavenging of particles by clouds reduces the low level concentrations by a factor of 3. This produces a vertical gradient in particle concentrations when low-level clouds are present. Concentrations are uniform with height when clouds are not present. Low-level CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) spectra are similar to those in other maritime areas as found by previous projects including FIRE 1 and ASTEX, which were also supported on earlier NASA-FIRE grants. Wylie and Hudson carried this work much further by comparing the CCN spectra observed during ACE with back trajectories of air masses and satellite photographs. This showed that cloud scavenging reduces CCN concentrations at all altitudes over the springtime Arctic, with liquid clouds being more efficient scavengers than frozen clouds. The small size of the Arctic Ocean seems to make it more susceptible to continental and thus anthropogenic aerosol influences than any of the other larger oceans.

  18. Dielectronic Recombination In Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukic, D. V.; Schnell, M.; Savin, D. W.; Altun, Z.; Badnell, N.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E. W.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Sprenger, F.; Lestinsky, M.; Wolf, A.

    2006-01-01

    XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show rich spectra of X-ray absorption lines. These observations have detected a broad unresolved transition array (UTA) between approx. 15-17 A. This is attributed to inner-shell photoexcitation of M-shell iron ions. Modeling these UTA features is currently limited by uncertainties in the low-temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) data for M-shell iron. In order to resolve this issue, and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for plasma modeling, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Currently, laboratory measurements of low temperature DR can only be performed at storage rings. We use the DR data obtained at TSR, to calculate rate coefficients for plasma modeling and to benchmark theoretical DR calculations. Here we report our recent experimental results for DR of Fe XIV forming Fe XIII.

  19. Neutron Capture Cross Sections for Radioactive Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, Anton; Bedrossian, Peter; Escher, Jutta; Scielzo, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    Accurate neutron-capture cross sections for radioactive nuclei near or far away from the line of beta stability are crucial for understanding the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements. However, neutron-capture cross sections for short-lived radionuclides are difficult to measure due to the fact that the measurements require both highly radioactive samples and intense neutron sources. Essential ingredients for describing the γ decays following neutron capture are the γ-ray strength function and level densities. We will compare different indirect approaches for obtaining observables that can constrain Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations of capture cross sections. Specifically, we will consider photon scattering, transfer reactions, and beta-delayed neutron emission. Challenges that exist on the path to obtaining neutron-capture cross sections for reactions on isotopes far from stability will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of US DOE by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Funding was provided via the LDRD-ERD-069 project.

  20. Segmentation of clustered nuclei based on concave curve expansion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Sun, C; Pham, T D

    2013-07-01

    Segmentation of nuclei from images of tissue sections is important for many biological and biomedical studies. Many existing image segmentation algorithms may lead to oversegmentation or undersegmentation for clustered nuclei images. In this paper, we proposed a new image segmentation algorithm based on concave curve expansion to correctly and accurately extract markers from the original images. Marker-controlled watershed is then used to segment the clustered nuclei. The algorithm was tested on both synthetic and real images and better results are achieved compared with some other state-of-the-art methods.

  1. A generic nuclei detection method for histopathological breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kost, Henning; Homeyer, André; Bult, Peter; Balkenhol, Maschenka C. A.; van der Laak, Jeroen A. W. M.; Hahn, Horst K.

    2016-03-01

    The detection of cell nuclei plays a key role in various histopathological image analysis problems. Considering the high variability of its applications, we propose a novel generic and trainable detection approach. Adaption to specific nuclei detection tasks is done by providing training samples. A trainable deconvolution and classification algorithm is used to generate a probability map indicating the presence of a nucleus. The map is processed by an extended watershed segmentation step to identify the nuclei positions. We have tested our method on data sets with different stains and target nuclear types. We obtained F1-measures between 0.83 and 0.93.

  2. The intergalactic propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Sarkar, Subir; Taylor, Andrew M.; /Oxford U.

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic ray nuclei (A = 1-56) from cosmologically distant sources through the cosmic radiation backgrounds. Various models for the injected composition and spectrum and of the cosmic infrared background are studied using updated photodisintegration cross-sections. The observational data on the spectrum and the composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays are jointly consistent with a model where all of the injected primary cosmic rays are iron nuclei (or a mixture of heavy and light nuclei).

  3. Single particle versus collectivity, shapes of exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclaus, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    In this article some selected topics of nuclear structure research will be discussed as illustration of the progress reached in this field during the last thirty years. These examples evidence the improvement of our understanding of the atomic nucleus reached on the basis of countless experiments, performed to study both exotic nuclei (nuclei far-off the valley of stability) as well as nuclei under exotic conditions (high excitation energy/temperature or large angular momentum/rotational frequency), using stable and radioactive ion beams. The experimental progress, in parallel to the advancement of modern theoretical descriptions, led us to a much richer view of this fundamental many-body system.

  4. Image analysis for neuroblastoma classification: segmentation of cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Gurcan, Metin N; Pan, Tony; Shimada, Hiro; Saltz, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer of the nervous system. Current prognostic classification of this disease partly relies on morphological characteristics of the cells from H&E-stained images. In this work, an automated cell nuclei segmentation method is developed. This method employs morphological top-hat by reconstruction algorithm coupled with hysteresis thresholding to both detect and segment the cell nuclei. Accuracy of the automated cell nuclei segmentation algorithm is measured by comparing its outputs to manual segmentation. The average segmentation accuracy is 90.24+/-5.14% PMID:17947119

  5. Electric Dipole States and Time Reversal Violation in Nuclei.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, N.

    2016-06-01

    The nuclear Schiff moment is essential in the mechanism that induces a parity and time reversal violation in the atom. In this presentation we explore theoretically the properties and systematics of the isoscalar dipole in nuclei with the emphasis on the low-energy strength and the inverse energy weighted sum which determines the Schiff moment. We also study the influence of the isovector dipole strength distribution on the Schiff moment. The influence of a large neutron excess in nuclei is examined. The centroid energies of the isoscalar giant resonance (ISGDR) and the overtone of the isovector giant dipole resonance (OIVGDR) are given for a range of nuclei.

  6. New approach to calculating the potential energy of colliding nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kurmanov, R. S.; Kosenko, G. I.

    2014-12-15

    The differential method proposed by the present authors earlier for the reduction of volume integrals in calculating the potential energy of a compound nucleus is generalized to the case of two interacting nuclei. The Coulomb interaction energy is obtained for the cases of a sharp and a diffuse boundary of nuclei, while the nuclear interaction energy is found only for nuclei with a sharp boundary, the finiteness of the nuclear-force range being taken into account. The present method of calculations permits reducing the time it takes to compute the potential energy at least by two orders of magnitude.

  7. Relativistic mean field calculations in neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, G.; Bhattacharya, Madhubrata; Roy, Subinit

    2014-08-14

    Relativistic mean field calculations have been employed to study neutron rich nuclei. The Lagrange's equations have been solved in the co-ordinate space. The effect of the continuum has been effectively taken into account through the method of resonant continuum. It is found that BCS approximation performs as well as a more involved Relativistic Continuum Hartree Bogoliubov approach. Calculations reveal the possibility of modification of magic numbers in neutron rich nuclei. Calculation for low energy proton scattering cross sections shows that the present approach reproduces the density in very light neutron rich nuclei.

  8. Liquid drop model of spherical nuclei with account of viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokonov, A. Kh.

    2016-01-01

    In the frame of nuclear liquid drop model an analytical solution for the frequency of capillary oscillations is obtained with taking into account the damping due to viscosity and surrounding medium polarizability. The model has been applied for estimation of even-even spherical nuclei surface tension and viscosity. It has been shown that energy shift of capillary oscillations of even-even spherical nuclei due to viscous dissipation gives viscosities in the interval 4.2- 7.6 MeVfm-2c-1 for nuclei from 10646Pd to 19880Hg.

  9. New measurements of the EMC effect in light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    A. Daniel

    2009-12-01

    Modifications of structure functions in nuclei (EMC effect) suggest that the nuclear quark distribution function is not just the incoherent sum of the proton and neutron distributions, and made clear the importance of nuclear effects even in high energy measurements. Jefferson Lab experiment E03-103 made precise measurements of the EMC effect in few-body and heavy nuclei with emphasis on the large x region. Data from the light nuclei suggests that the nuclear dependence of the high x quark distribution may depend on the nucleon's local environment, rather than being a purely bulk effect.

  10. Is the Coulomb sum rule violated in nuclei?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, J.; Meziani, Z.-E.

    2001-08-01

    Guided by the experimental confirmation of the validity of the Effective Momentum Approximation (EMA) in quasi-elastic scattering off nuclei, we have re-examined the extraction of the longitudinal and transverse response functions in medium-weight and heavy nuclei. In the EMA we have performed a Rosenbluth separation of the available world data on 40Ca, 48Ca, 56Fe, 197Au, 208Pb and 238U. We find that the longitudinal response function for these nuclei is "quenched" and that the Coulomb sum is not saturated, at odds with claims in the literature.

  11. ON THE ANISOTROPY OF NUCLEI MID-INFRARED RADIATION IN NEARBY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Huan; Wang, JunXian; Liu, Teng E-mail: jxw@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-01-20

    In the center of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), the dusty torus absorbs the radiation from the central engine and reemits in mid-infrared (MIR). Observations have detected moderate anisotropy in the dust MIR emission, in the way that type 1 AGNs (type1s) are mildly brighter in MIR comparing with type 2 sources (type2s). However, type1s and type2s were found to follow statistically the same tight MIR-hard X-ray correlation, suggesting that the MIR emission is highly isotropic assuming that the hard X-ray radiation is inclination independent. We argue that this discrepancy could be solved considering that the hard X-ray emission in AGNs is also mildly anisotropic, as we recently discovered. To verify this diagram, we compare the subarcsecond 12 μm flux densities of type1s and type2s using the [O IV] λ25.89 μm emission line as an isotropic luminosity indicator. We find that on average type1s are brighter in nuclei 12 μm radiation by a factor of 2.6 ± 0.6 than type2s at given [O IV] λ25.89 μm luminosities, confirming the mild anisotropy of the nuclei 12 μm emission. We show that the anisotropy of the 12 μm emission we detected is in good agreement with radiative transfer models of clumpy tori. The fact that type1s and type2s follow the same tight MIR-hard X-ray correlation instead supports that both the MIR emission and hard X-ray emission in AGNs are mildly anisotropic.

  12. Propagation of UH cosmic ray nuclei in a leaky box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddington, C. Jake

    1997-05-01

    A weighted slab approximation to a leaky box model has been developed to study the influence of various parameters and cross sections on the propagation of Z > 28 ultraheavy (UH) cosmic ray nuclei from the source to earth. This model starts with nuclei of a given charge and energy and then follows them as they lose energy, fragment and escape. It is possible to vary the path length distribution, the escape length and the energy dependent cross sections of all the nuclei generated during the propagation. By combining the results for different nuclei and energies it is possible to compare any assumed source abundance distribution with that predicted at earth. This paper specifically considers the effects introduced when the cross sections are adjusted to take account of radioactive decays in flight, and shows that they are generally rather minor. Some predictions are made as to which elements will provide the best discriminators between various assumed sources.

  13. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei studied from resonance neutron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; Bečvár, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Haight, R. C.; Heil, M.; Jandel, M.; Käppeler, F.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Parker, W.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Valenta, S.; Vieira, D. J.; Walker, C. L.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Wu, C. Y.

    2012-10-01

    Spectra of γ rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei weremeasured. The objectives were to get new information on photon strength of 153,155-159Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is coupled not only to the ground state, but also to all excited levels of the nuclei studied. The specificity of our approach ensures unbiasedness in estimating the sumed scissors-mode strength ΣB(M1)↑, even for odd product nuclei, for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our analysis indicates that for these nuclei the sum ΣB(M1)↑ increases with A and for 157,159Gd it is significantly higher compared to 156,158Gd.

  14. Superheavy nuclei from 48Ca-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Utyonkov, V. K.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery and investigation of the new region of superheavy nuclei at the DGFRS separator based on fusion reactions of 48Ca with 238U-249Cf target nuclei are reviewed. The production cross sections and summaries of the decay properties, including the results of the posterior experiments performed at the SHIP, BGS, and TASCA separators, as well as at the chemistry setups, are discussed and compared with the theoretical calculations and the systematic trends in the α-decay and spontaneous fission properties. The properties of the new nuclei, isotopes of elements 112-118, and their decay products demonstrate significant increases in the stability of the heaviest nuclei with increasing neutron number and closer approach to magic number N = 184.

  15. P CYGNI PROFILES OF MOLECULAR LINES TOWARD ARP 220 NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Kazushi; Aalto, Susanne; Black, John H.; Conway, John E.; Costagliola, Francesco; Wilner, David J.; Peck, Alison B.; Spaans, Marco; Wang, Junzhi; Wiedner, Martina C.

    2009-08-01

    We report {approx}100 pc (0.''3) resolution observations of (sub)millimeter HCO{sup +} and CO lines in the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220. The lines peak at two merger nuclei, with HCO{sup +} being more spatially concentrated than CO. Asymmetric line profiles with blueshifted absorption and redshifted emission are discovered in HCO{sup +}(3-2) and (4-3) toward the two nuclei and in CO(3-2) toward one nucleus. We suggest that these P Cygni profiles are due to {approx}100 km s{sup -1} outward motion of molecular gas from the nuclei. This gas is most likely outflowing from the inner regions of the two nuclear disks rotating around individual nuclei, clearing the shroud around the luminosity sources there.

  16. New approach for alpha-decay calculations of deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2010-06-15

    We present a new theoretical approach to evaluate alpha-decay properties of deformed nuclei, namely the multichannel cluster model (MCCM). The deformed alpha-nucleus potential is taken into full account, and the coupled-channel Schroedinger equation with outgoing wave boundary conditions is employed for quasibound states. Systematic calculations are carried out for well-deformed even-even nuclei with Z>=98 and isospin dependence of nuclear potentials is included in the calculations. Fine structure observed in alpha decay is well described by the four-channel microscopic calculation, which is performed for the first time in alpha-decay studies. The good agreement between experiment and theory is achieved for both total alpha-decay half-lives and branching ratios to the ground-state rotational band of daughter nuclei. Predictions on the branching ratios to high-spin daughter states are presented for superheavy nuclei, which may be important to interpret future observations.

  17. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei studied from resonance neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    Spectra of {gamma} rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei were measured. The objectives were to get new information on photon strength of {sup 153,155-159}Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is coupled not only to the ground state, but also to all excited levels of the nuclei studied. The specificity of our approach ensures unbiasedness in estimating the sumed scissors-mode strength {Sigma}B(M1){up_arrow}, even for odd product nuclei, for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our analysis indicates that for these nuclei the sum {Sigma}B(M1){up_arrow} increases with A and for {sup 157,159}Gd it is significantly higher compared to {sup 156,158}Gd.

  18. Anomaly of the moment of inertia of shape transitional nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, J. B.; Hamilton, J. H.

    2011-06-15

    The change in the structure of the collective levels with spin angular momentum in atomic nuclei is often expressed in terms of the classical concepts of the kinematic and the dynamic moments of inertia varying with spin. For the well deformed even-even nuclei the kinematic moment of inertia increases with spin up to 10%-20%, at say I{sup {pi}} = 12{sup +}. However, for the shape transitional nuclei, or almost spherical nuclei, it increases with spin much faster. The pitfalls of using the rotor model form of kinematic moment of inertia in such cases are pointed out here. Alternative methods of extracting the nuclear structure information are explored. The important role of the ground state deformation is illustrated. The use of the power index formula for evaluating the effective moment of inertia, free from the assumption of the rotor model, is described.

  19. The parton distributions in nuclei and in polarized nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Close, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    The emerging information was reviewed on the way quark and anti-quark, and gluon distributions are modified in nuclei relative to free nucleons. Some implications of the recent data on polarized leptoproduction are discussed. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Modeling level structures of odd-odd deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Kern, J.; Piepenbring, R.; Boisson, J.P.

    1985-01-15

    A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei has been applied to actinide species where new experimental data have been obtained by use of neutron-capture gamma-ray spectroscopy. The input parameters required for the calculation were derived from empirical data on single-particle excitations in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Calculated configuration-specific values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings were used. Calculated and experimental level structures for /sup 238/Np, /sup 244/Am, and /sup 250/Bk are compared, as well as those for several nuclei in the rare-earch region. The agreement for the actinide species is excellent, with bandhead energies deviating 22 keV and rotational parameters 5%, on the average. Corresponding average deviations for five rare-earth nuclei are 47 keV and 7%. Several applications of this modeling technique are discussed.

  1. Modeling level structures of odd-odd deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Kern, J.; Piepenbring, R.; Boisson, J.P.

    1984-09-07

    A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei has been applied to actinide species where new experimental data have been obtained by use of neutron-capture gamma-ray spectroscopy. The input parameters required for the calculation were derived from empirical data on single-particle excitations in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Calculated configuration-specific values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings were used. Calculated and experimental level structures for /sup 238/Np, /sup 244/Am, and /sup 250/Bk are compared, as well as those for several nuclei in the rare-earth region. The agreement for the actinide species is excellent, with bandhead energies deviating 22 keV and rotational parameters 5%, on the average. Corresponding average deviations for five rare-earth nuclei are 47 keV and 7%. Several applications of this modeling technique are discussed. 18 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Open sd-shell nuclei from first principles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jansen, Gustav R.; Signoracci, Angelo J.; Hagen, Gaute; Navratil, Petr

    2016-07-05

    We extend the ab initio coupled-cluster e ective interaction (CCEI) method to open-shell nuclei with protons and neutrons in the valence space, and compute binding energies and excited states of isotopes of neon and magnesium. We employ a nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon interaction from chiral e ective eld theory evolved to a lower cuto via a similarity renormalization group transformation. We nd good agreement with experiment for binding energies and spectra, while charge radii of neon isotopes are underestimated. For the deformed nuclei 20Ne and 24Mg we reproduce rotational bands and electric quadrupole transitions within uncertainties estimated from an e ectivemore » eld theory for deformed nuclei, thereby demonstrating that collective phenomena in sd-shell nuclei emerge from complex ab initio calculations.« less

  3. Light element production by low energy nuclei from massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangioni-Flam, E.; Casse, M.; Ramaty, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Orion complex is a source of gamma rays attributed to the de-excitation of fast carbon and oxygen nuclei excited through interactions with ambient hydrogen and helium. This has consequences for the production and evolution of light isotopes in the Galaxy, as massive stars appear as prolific sources of C-O rich low energy nuclei. The different stages of massive star evolution are considered in relation to the acceleration of nuclei to moderate energies. It is concluded that the low energy nuclear component originating from massive stars plays a larger role than the usual Galactic cosmic rays in shaping the evolution of Li-6, Be-9, B-10 and B-11, especially in the early Galactic evolution. The enhancement of the B-11/B-10 ratio observed in meteorites and in the interstellar medium is attributed to the interaction of low energy carbon nuclei with ambient H and to a lesser degree, to neutrino spallation.

  4. Open s d -shell nuclei from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, G. R.; Schuster, M. D.; Signoracci, A.; Hagen, G.; Navrátil, P.

    2016-07-01

    We extend the ab initio coupled-cluster effective interaction (CCEI) method to open-shell nuclei with protons and neutrons in the valence space and compute binding energies and excited states of isotopes of neon and magnesium. We employ a nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon interaction from chiral effective field theory evolved to a lower cutoff via a similarity renormalization group transformation. We find good agreement with experiment for binding energies and spectra, while charge radii of neon isotopes are underestimated. For the deformed nuclei 20Ne and 24Mg, we reproduce rotational bands and electric quadrupole transitions within uncertainties estimated from an effective field theory for deformed nuclei, thereby demonstrating that collective phenomena in s d -shell nuclei emerge from complex ab initio calculations.

  5. Organic Aerosols as Cloud Condensation Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.

    2002-05-01

    The large organic component of the atmospheric aerosol contributes to both natural and anthropogenic cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Moreover, some organic substances may reduce droplet surface tension (Facchini et al. 1999), while others may be partially soluble (Laaksonen et al. 1998), and others may inhibit water condensation. The interaction of organics with water need to be understood in order to better understand the indirect aerosol effect. Therefore, laboratory CCN spectral measurements of organic aerosols are presented. These are measurements of the critical supersaturation (Sc), the supersaturation needed to produce an activated cloud droplet, as a function of the size of the organic particles. Substances include sodium lauryl (dodecyl) sulfate, oxalic, adipic, pinonic, hexadecanedioic, glutaric, stearic, succinic, phthalic, and benzoic acids. These size-Sc relationships are compared with theoretical and measured size-Sc relationships of common inorganic compounds (e.g., NaCl, KI, ammonium and calcium sulfate). Unlike most inorganics some organics display variations in solubility per unit mass as a function of particle size. Those showing relatively greater solubility at smaller sizes may be attributable to surface tension reduction, which is greater for less water dilution, as is the case for smaller particles, which are less diluted at the critical sizes. This was the case for sodium dodecyl sulfate, which does reduce surface tension. Relatively greater solubility for larger particles may be caused by greater dissolution at the higher dilutions that occur with larger particles; this is partial solubility. Measurements are also presented of internal mixtures of various organic and inorganic substances. These measurements were done with two CCN spectrometers (Hudson 1989) operating simultaneously. These two instruments usually displayed similar results in spite of the fact that they have different flow rates and supersaturation profiles. The degree of

  6. Primary Biological Aerosol as Cloud Condensation Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Francis; Griffiths, Paul; Herzog, Michael; Kalberer, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Primary biological aerosols (PBAs) represent a significant fraction of the total atmospheric aerosol mass burden. The low number density of PBA precludes a significant direct effect on the radiative budget of the Earth. However, the large particle size of PBA should allow them to have a significant indirect radiative effect on cloud processes if they are wettable. In particular, PBA may preferentially activate as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) when compared to the smaller background aerosol. This effect will be most pronounced under pristine conditions where the background aerosol concentrations are small and of low hygroscopicity. Recent measurements of high PBA concentration within the Amazon (Huffman et al. 2012) suggest that this region may be particularly important for PBA-cloud interactions, and hence a potential feedback between the atmosphere and biosphere could be established (Pöschl et al. 2010). This study investigates the ability of primary biological aerosol (PBA) to influence cloud formation and precipitation dynamics. In particular, pollen grains and fungal spores have been studied using a combined laboratory and modelling approach. The laboratory studies assessed the hygroscopicity, wettability and activation of the particles. The model output data suggests that under certain atmospheric conditions the activation of PBA can significantly interfere with the activation of the fine aerosol mode thus changing cloud dynamics. This work expands upon our previously published results on pollen activation (Pope 2010, Griffiths et al. 2012). References Huffman et al. (2012) 12, 11997. doi:10.5194/acp-12-11997-2012 Pöschl et al. (2010) Science. 329(5998), 1513. doi:10.1126/science.1191056 Pope (2010) Environ. Res. Lett. 5, 004015. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/5/4/044015 Griffiths et al. (2012) Atmos. Sci. Lett. 13(4), 289. doi:10.1002/asl.397

  7. New Neutron Rich Nuclei Near {sup 208}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Aeystoe, J.; Andreyev, A.; Evensen, A.-H.; Hoff, P.; Huhta, M.; Huyse, M.; ISOLDE Collaboration; Jokinen, A.; Karny, M.; Kugler, E.; Kurpeta, J.; Lettry, J.; Nieminen, A.; Plochocki, A.; Ramdhane, M.; Ravn, H.; Rykaczewski, K.; Szerypo, J.; VanDuppen, P.; Walter, G.; Woehr, A.

    1998-11-13

    The level properties near the stable doubly-magic nuclei formed the experimental grounds for the theoretical description of nuclear structure. However with a departure from the beta-stability line, the classical well-established shell structure might be modified. In particular, it may even vanish for extremely exotic neutron-rich nuclei near the neutron-drip line. Presently, it is impossible to verify such predictions by a direct experimental studies of these exotic objects. However, one may try to observe and understand the evolution of the nuclear structure while departing in the experiment as far as possible from the stable nuclei. An extension of experimental nuclear structure studies towards the nuclei characterized by high neutron excess is crucial for such verifications as well as for the {tau}-process nucleosynthesis scenario. Heavy neutron-rich nuclei, south-east of doubly-magic {sup 208}Pb, were always very difficult to produce and investigate. The nuclei like {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Pb or {sup 210}Tl marked the border line of known nuclei from the beginning of the radioactivity era for over ninety years. To illustrate the difficulties, one can refer to the experiments employing the on-line mass separator technique. A spallation of heavy targets like {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U by high-energy protons was proven as a source of heavy neutron-rich nuclei. The isotopes near and beyond doubly-magic {sup 208}Pb were produced too. However, such studies often suffered from an isobaric contamination of much more strongly produced and efficiently released elements like francium or radon and their decay products. A new experimental technique, based on the pulsed release element selective method recently developed at the PS Booster-ISOLDE at CERN [7,8,9] greatly reduces the contamination of these very short-lived {alpha}-emitters (Z {ge} 84) for the isobaric mass chains A=215 to A=218.

  8. Reaction Studies with Exotic Nuclei in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Muenzenberg, Gottfried; Schrieder, Gerhard

    2000-12-31

    The first experiments to explore nuclear ground-state properties of exotic nuclei with heavy-ion storage rings have already proved the research potential of precision experiments with the new experimental technique. In this contribution the perspectives for reaction studies in storage rings with energetic exotic nuclei at internal targets and in a small electron -- heavy ion collider are addressed. The feasibility of such experiments is discussed.

  9. The response of ionization chambers to relativistic heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Fixsen, D. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Grimm, G.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1985-01-01

    The LBL Bevalac for the Heavy Nuclei Experiment on HEAO-3, compared the response of a set of laboratory ionization chambers to beams of 26Fe, 36Kr, 54Xe, 67 Ho, and 79Au nuclei at maximum energies ranging from 1666 MeV/amu for Fe to 1049 MeV/amu for Au. The response of these chambers shows a significant deviation from the expected energy dependence, but only a slight deviation from Z sq scaling.

  10. Systematics of proton and diproton separation energies for light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, B.J.

    1997-10-01

    A simple method to estimate proton and two-proton separation energies of proton-rich nuclei is presented that is sufficiently accurate to allow the prediction of suitable candidates for observable diproton decay. The method is based on the systematics of measured particle separation energies. Predictions for proton-rich nuclei with Z=18{minus}24 are compared with the results of previous calculations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Dense Clouds near the Central Engine of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivron, R.; Tsuruta, S

    1993-01-01

    A model is presented which assumes the existence of cold dense clouds near the central engine of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs). The effects of such clouds on the observed spectrum are explored. It is shown that this model is consistent with the complicated observed spectra and variability behavior of most extensively studied Seyfert nuclei. The results are compared with other proposed models. The existing observational evidence appears to support the "cloud-model."

  12. Spectroscopy of the lightest nuclei in the Lanthanide region

    SciTech Connect

    Petrache, C. M.; Fantuzi, M.

    2007-11-30

    The lightest nuclei in the A = 130 mass region reachable with stable beams were investigated by using the {sup 40}Ca+{sup 92}Mo fusion-evaporation reaction and the powerful detection system consisting of GASP+ISIS+n-ring at Legnaro (Italy). The level scheme of {sup 122}La was established for the first time. The observed rotational bands are compared with the bands observed in the heavier Lanthanum nuclei and possible configuration assignments are discussed.

  13. A self-consistent study of triaxial black hole nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ming Yan

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional shapes of elliptical galaxies has not advanced much since the time of Edwin Hubble. Elliptical galaxies are still classified according to their luminosity distributions and the isophotal contour shapes of their two-dimensional images projected on the sky. Their intrinsic shapes could be oblate, prolate, or fully triaxial, since all such shapes produce perfectly elliptical contours on projection. One way to constrain the possible 3D shapes of elliptical galaxies is to attempt to construct self-consistent dynamical models with various shapes. In this study, models were constructed of the central regions (“nuclei”) of elliptical galaxies. Observed nuclei have a power-law dependence of stellar density on radius, and universally contain a single supermassive black hole at their center, with mass ˜106 109 M⊙ . At low energies in such nuclei, the motion was found to be essentially regular, i.e. non-chaotic; the gravitational potential can be considered as a perturbation to the integrable Keplerian potential. At higher energies, where the enclosed stellar mass is a few times the black hole mass, the black hole renders those orbits that come close to the black hole stochastic. This transition to global stochasticity is rapid and occurs at lower energies in more elongated nuclei. The self-consistency of triaxial models of black hole nuclei was demonstrated by using Schwarzschild's method to construct self-consistent orbital superpositions representing nuclei with different shapes. N-body integrations of Monte-Carlo realizations of the Schwarzschild solutions showed that some of these nuclei are stable; nearly prolate nuclei were found to be unstable, and they evolve rapidly to axisymmetric shapes. The possibility that nuclei may be triaxial in shape complicates the interpretation of stellar kinematical data from the centers of galaxies and may alter the inferred interaction rates between stars and supermassive black holes.

  14. Introduction to the study of collisions between heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bayman, B.F.

    1980-01-01

    Current investigations concerning the collisions of nuclei governed by small de Broglie wavelengths are reviewed. The wave packets localize nuclei in regions small compared to their diameters. Cross sections are examined for potential scattering, elastic scattering, quasi-molecular states, peripheral particle-transfer reactions, fusion, and deep inelastic collisions. Theories of fusion and deep inelastic collisions are summarized. This paper is in the nature of a review-tutorial. 45 references, 51 figures, 2 tables. (RWR)

  15. Laser Methods in the Study of Nuclei, Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamura, Takashi T.

    2005-01-01

    The VIth International Workshop on Application of Lasers in Atomic Nuclei Research was held at Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan in Poland from May 24 to 27, 2004. Its title this year was "Laser methods in the study of nuclei, atoms and molecules". Some topics are reviewed from a viewpoint of the atomic physics contribution to nuclear physics and its applications. It is suggested how this meeting should be organized in the future by taking the new geopolitics into account.

  16. Quantum Phase Transitions in Odd-Mass Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leviatan, A.; Petrellis, D.; Iachello, F.

    2013-03-01

    Quantum shape-phase transitions in odd-even nuclei are investigated in the framework of the interacting boson-fermion model. Classical and quantum analysis show that the presence of the odd fermion strongly influences the location and nature of the phase transition, especially near the critical point. Experimental evidence for the occurrence of spherical to axially-deformed transitions in odd-proton nuclei Pm, Eu and Tb (Z=61, 63, 65) is presented.

  17. Anti–nuclei production at the LHC measured with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufalino, Stefania; ALICE Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The excellent tracking and particle identification capabilities of the ALICE apparatus combined with the high particle production rates reached at the LHC in pp, p–Pb and in particular in Pb–Pb collisions allow for detailed study of the production of nuclei and anti-nuclei. In this paper, recent results on the production of the (anti-)deuteron and (anti-)helium are presented and compared with the expectations from statistical (thermal) particle production and coalescence models.

  18. Synthesis and study of atomic nuclei with Z > 100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flerov, G. N.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.

    The studies of atomic nuclei with Z > 100 are closely related to the synthesis of new chemical elements and to the investigation of stability limits for the heaviest nuclides. From the mid-50s these studies have been carried out using intense heavy-ion beams and highly sensitive techniques designed for the physical and chemical identification of rare short-lived nuclei. The studies proceeded in two stages, the first one being characterized by the use of hot-fusion reactions between the U, Pu, Am, Cm and Cf target nuclei and the C, N, O, and Ne projectiles and the second being based on the use of the cold-fusion reactions induced by Cr, Mn, and Fe projectiles on Pb and Bi target nuclei. As a result, the chemical elements with atomic numbers from 102 to 109 have first been synthesized. The radioactive properties of over 40 isotopes of these elements have been investigated and unambiguous evidence has been obtained that shell effects play a decisive role for the stability of the Z ≳ 104 nuclei against spontaneous fission. This provides an experimental substantiation for the known hypothesis that the island of nuclear stability should lie around Z ⋍ 114 and N ⋍ 178 or 184. It has been proposed to synthesize elements with Z ≥ 110 by the complete fusion reactions of uranium and adjacent element nuclei with projectile nuclei such as Ar and Ca. The spontaneous fission of a product nucleus (a total of 26 events) has been observed in Dubna experiments with the 232Th + 44Ca and 236U + 40Ar reactions. The authors of those studies tentatively assigned this activity to the decay of the nuclei of element 110.

  19. Isovector pairing and quartet condensation in N=Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sandulescu, N.; Negrea, D.; Dukelsky, J.; Johnson, C. W.

    2012-11-20

    We introduce and study a quartet condensate model (QCM) to treat the isovector pairing correlations in N=Z nuclei, by conserving the particle number and the total spin and isospin in the ground state of such nuclei. For the calculations we choose different isovector pairing forces acting on spherical and axially deformed single particle states. The results show that the QCM model describes very well the isovector pairing correlations for nuclear systems with N=Z.

  20. Phonon effects on the double mass differences in magic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saperstein, E. E.; Baldo, M.; Gnezdilov, N. V.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    Odd-even double mass differences (DMDs) of magic nuclei are found within an approach starting from the free N N interaction, accounting for particle-phonon coupling (PC) effects. We consider three PC effects: the phonon-induced effective interaction, the renormalization of the "ends" due to the pole PC contribution to the nucleon mass operator, and the change of the single-particle energies. The perturbation theory in gL2, where gL is the vertex of the creation of the L -multipole phonon, is used for PC calculations. PC corrections to single-particle energies are found with an approximate accounting for the tadpole diagram. Results for magic Ca,4840, Ni,7856, Sn,132100, and 208Pb nuclei are presented. For the lighter part of this set of nuclei, from 40Ca to 56Ni, the cases divide approximately in half, between those where the PC corrections to DMD values are in good agreement with the data and the ones with the opposite result. In the major part of the cases of worsening description of DMD, a poor applicability of the perturbation theory for the induced interaction is the most probable reason of the phenomenon. For intermediate nuclei, 78Ni and 100Sn, there are no sufficiently accurate data on masses of nuclei necessary for finding DMD values. Finally, for heavier nuclei, 132Sn and 208Pb, PC corrections always result in better agreement with experiment.

  1. Relative nuclei abundance inside the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Oscar

    2012-07-01

    The Sileye3/Alteino experiment was first operational on-board the International Space Station, ISS, 27 April 2002. From 2006 through 2009 it was activated for long duration measurements of relative particle abundance as part of the ESA ALTCRISS project. Measuring the relative abundance of different nuclei species inside the ISS gives important clues as to how the known cosmic ray spectrum outside the space station changes when traversing the hull, i.e. giving indications as to how the hadronic interactions in the hull gives rise to changes in the expected radiation environment for the astronauts, which is of great interest for risk assessments for future long duration deep space missions. In our work the relative abundance for nuclei species with energies above ≃ 60 MeV/n and 5 ≤ Z ≤ 26 are presented for different places and detector orientations inside the ISS, also with and without shielding of the detector. What can be seen when comparing with the relative abundance of nuclei in the cosmic rays, is a significant difference in abundance for odd Z nuclei, whereas even numbered are in better agreement. Odd Z nuclei are much more abundant inside the ISS. This is an update from our previous report with increased statistics and with relative abundance on more nuclei.

  2. Size-Invariant Detection of Cell Nuclei in Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Ram, Sundaresh; Rodriguez, Jeffrey J

    2016-07-01

    Accurate detection of individual cell nuclei in microscopy images is an essential and fundamental task for many biological studies. In particular, multivariate fluorescence microscopy is used to observe different aspects of cells in cultures. Manual detection of individual cell nuclei by visual inspection is time consuming, and prone to induce subjective bias. This makes automatic detection of cell nuclei essential for large-scale, objective studies of cell cultures. Blur, clutter, bleed-through, imaging noise and touching and partially overlapping nuclei with varying sizes and shapes make automated detection of individual cell nuclei a challenging task using image analysis. In this paper we propose a new automated method for fast and robust detection of individual cell nuclei based on their radial symmetric nature in fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) images obtained via confocal microscopy. The main contributions are two-fold. 1) This work presents a more accurate cell nucleus detection system using the fast radial symmetry transform (FRST). 2) The proposed cell nucleus detection system is robust against most occlusions and variations in size and moderate shape deformations. We evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm using precision/recall rates, Fβ-score and root-mean-squared distance (RMSD) and show that our algorithm provides improved detection accuracy compared to existing algorithms.

  3. Photoproduction of vector messons off nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kossov, M.

    1994-04-01

    Vector mesons play an important role in photonuclear reactions because they carry the same quantum numbers as the incident photon. It has recently been suggested by G.E. Brown and M. Rho that the mass of vector mesons could decrease with increasing baryon density. This phenomenon would provide a physical observable for chiral symmetry ({xi}{sup S}) restoration at high baryon density, an essential non-perturbative phenomenon associated with the structure of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). According to the constituent quark model the difference between the mass of the valence quark m{sub v} and the mass of the current quark m{sub c} is expected to be proportional to the mean vacuum value of the quark condensate: m{sub v}-m{sub c} {proportional_to} ({psi}{psi}){sub v}. The mass difference appears because of chiral symmetry breaking {xi}{sup SB}. QCD sum rule calculations show that the value of this difference is about 300 MeV for all quarks. If the mean vacuum value differs from that for the hadron density in nuclei, then the constituent quark mass should be renormalized as follows: m{sub v}{sup l}=m{sub c} + ({psi}{psi})n/({psi}{psi})v {center_dot}300MeV, where the indices n correspond to nuclear matter and v to vacuum. The same conclusion was reached in a nuclear matter model based on quark degrees of freedom. Using the symmetry properties of QCD in an effective Lagrangian theory, Brown and Rho have found a scaling law for the vector meson masses at finite baryon density: M{sub N}{sup n}/M{sub N}{sup v}=M{sub V}{sup n}/M{sub V}{sup v}=f{sub {pi}}{sup n}/f{sub {pi}}{sup v}, where f{sub {pi}} is the {pi} {r_arrow}{mu}{nu} decay constant playing the role of an order parameter for the chiral symmetry restoration. At nuclear density the value of f{sub {pi}} was found to be 15-20% smaller than in vacuum. In contrast to the constituent quark model, it was found that M{sup n}/M=({sub n}/{sub v}){sup 1/3}.

  4. The Structure of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, Gerard A.

    1997-01-01

    We are continuing our systematic investigation of the nuclear structure of nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN). Upon completion, our study will characterize hypothetical constructs such as narrow-line clouds, obscuring tori, nuclear gas disks. and central black holes with physical measurements for a complete sample of nearby AGN. The major scientific goals of our program are: (1) the morphology of the NLR; (2) the physical conditions and dynamics of individual clouds in the NLR; (3) the structure and physical conditions of the warm reflecting gas; (4) the structure of the obscuring torus; (5) the population and morphology of nuclear disks/tori in AGN; (6) the physical conditions in nuclear disks; and (7) the masses of central black holes in AGN. We will use the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to obtain high-resolution images and spatially resolved spectra. Far-UV spectroscopy of emission and absorption in the nuclear regions using HST/FOS and the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) will help establish physical conditions in the absorbing and emitting gas. By correlating the dynamics and physical conditions of the gas with the morphology revealed through our imaging program, we will be able to examine mechanisms for fueling the central engine and transporting angular momentum. The kinematics of the nuclear gas disks may enable us to measure the mass of the central black hole. Contemporaneous X-ray observations using ASCA will further constrain the ionization structure of any absorbing material. Monitoring of variability in the UV and X-ray absorption will be used to determine the location of the absorbing gas, possibly in the outflowing warm reflecting gas, or the broad-line region, or the atmosphere of the obscuring torus. Supporting ground-based observations in the optical, near-IR, imaging polarimetry, and the radio will complete our picture of the nuclear structures. With a comprehensive survey of these characteristics in a complete sample of nearby AGN, our

  5. Global systematics of octupole excitations in even-even nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robledo, L. M.; Bertsch, G. F.

    2011-11-01

    We present a computational methodology for a theory of the lowest axially symmetric octupole excitations applicable to all even-even nuclei beyond the lightest. The theory is the well-known generator-coordinate extension (GCM) of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) self-consistent mean field theory. We use the discrete-basis Hill-Wheeler (HW) method to compute the wave functions with an interaction from the Gogny family of Hamiltonians. Comparing to the compiled experimental data on octupole excitations, we find that the performance of the theory depends on the deformation characteristics of the nucleus. For nondeformed nuclei, the theory reproduces the energies to about ±20% apart from an overall scale factor of ≈1.6. The performance is somewhat poorer for (quadrupole) deformed nuclei, and for both together the dispersion of the scaled energies about the experimental values is about ±25%. This compares favorably with the performance of similar theories of the quadrupole excitations. Nuclei having static octupole deformations in HFB theory form a special category. These nuclei have the smallest measured octupole excitation energies as well as the smallest predicted energies. However, in these cases the energies are seriously underpredicted by the theory. We find that a simple two-configuration approximation, the minimization after projection (MAP) method, is almost as accurate as the full HW treatment, provided that the octupole-deformed nuclei are omitted from the comparison. This article is accompanied by a tabulation of the predicted octupole excitations for 818 nuclei extending from drip-line to drip-line, computed with several variants of the Gogny interaction.

  6. Shell closures, loosely bound structures, and halos in exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, G.; Singh, D.

    2013-04-15

    Inspired by the recent experiments indicating doubly magic nuclei that lie near the drip-line and encouraged by the success of our relativistic mean-field (RMF) plus state-dependent BCS approach to the description of the ground-state properties of drip-line nuclei, we develop this approach further, across the entire periodic table, to explore magic nuclei, loosely bound structures, and halo formation in exotic nuclei. In our RMF+BCS approach, the single-particle continuum corresponding to the RMF is replaced by a set of discrete positive-energy states for the calculations of pairing energy. Detailed analysis of the single-particle spectrum, pairing energies, and densities of the nuclei predict the unusual proton shell closures at proton numbers Z = 6, 14, 16, 34, and unusual neutron shell closures at neutron numbers N = 6, 14, 16, 34, 40, 70, 112. Further, in several nuclei like the neutron-rich isotopes of Ca, Zr, Mo, etc., the gradual filling of lowlying single-particle resonant state together with weakly bound single-particle states lying close to the continuum threshold helps accommodate more neutrons but with an extremely small increase in the binding energy. This gives rise to the occurrence of loosely bound systems of neutron-rich nuclei with a large neutron-to-proton ratio. In general, the halo-like formation, irrespective of the existence of any resonant state, is seen to be due to the large spatial extension of the wave functions for the weakly bound single-particle states with low orbital angular momentum having very small or no centrifugal barriers.

  7. Enumeration of islets by nuclei counting and light microscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pisania, Anna; Papas, Klearchos K; Powers, Daryl E; Rappel, Michael J; Omer, Abdulkadir; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C; Colton, Clark K

    2010-11-01

    Islet enumeration in impure preparations by conventional dithizone staining and visual counting is inaccurate and operator dependent. We examined nuclei counting for measuring the total number of cells in islet preparations, and we combined it with morphological analysis by light microscopy (LM) for estimating the volume fraction of islets in impure preparations. Cells and islets were disrupted with lysis solution and shear, and accuracy of counting successively diluted nuclei suspensions was verified with (1) visual counting in a hemocytometer after staining with crystal violet, and automatic counting by (2) aperture electrical resistance measurement and (3) flow cytometer measurement after staining with 7-aminoactinomycin-D. DNA content averaged 6.5 and 6.9 pg of DNA per cell for rat and human islets, respectively, in agreement with literature estimates. With pure rat islet preparations, precision improved with increasing counts, and samples with about ≥160 islets provided a coefficient of variation of about 6%. Aliquots of human islet preparations were processed for LM analysis by stereological point counting. Total nuclei counts and islet volume fraction from LM analysis were combined to obtain the number of islet equivalents (IEs). Total number of IE by the standard method of dithizone staining/manual counting was overestimated by about 90% compared with LM/nuclei counting for 12 freshly isolated human islet research preparations. Nuclei counting combined with islet volume fraction measurements from LM is a novel method for achieving accurate islet enumeration. PMID:20697375

  8. Leading twist nuclear shadowing phenomena in hard processes with nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    L. Franfurt; Guzey, V.; Strikman, M.

    2012-01-08

    We present and discuss the theory and phenomenology of the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing which is based on the combination of the generalization of Gribov-Glauber theory, QCD factorization theorems, and HERA QCD analysis of diffraction in lepton-proton deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We apply this technique for the analysis of a wide range of hard processes with nuclei-inclusive DIS on deuterons, medium-range and heavy nuclei, coherent and incoherent diffractive DIS with nuclei, and hard diffraction in proton-nucleus scattering - and make predictions for the effect of nuclear shadowing in the corresponding sea quark and gluon parton distributions. We also analyze the role of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in generalized parton distributions in nuclei and certain characteristics of final states in nuclear DIS. We discuss the limits of applicability of the leading twist approximation for small x scattering off nuclei and the onset of the black disk regime and methods of detecting it. It will be possible to check many of our predictions in the near future in the studies of the ultraperipheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Further checks will be possible in pA collisions at the LHC and forward hadron production at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). As a result, detailed tests will be possible at an Electon-Ion Collider (EIC) in USA and at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) at CERN.

  9. Leading twist nuclear shadowing phenomena in hard processes with nuclei

    DOE PAGESBeta

    L. Franfurt; Guzey, V.; Strikman, M.

    2012-01-08

    We present and discuss the theory and phenomenology of the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing which is based on the combination of the generalization of Gribov-Glauber theory, QCD factorization theorems, and HERA QCD analysis of diffraction in lepton-proton deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We apply this technique for the analysis of a wide range of hard processes with nuclei-inclusive DIS on deuterons, medium-range and heavy nuclei, coherent and incoherent diffractive DIS with nuclei, and hard diffraction in proton-nucleus scattering - and make predictions for the effect of nuclear shadowing in the corresponding sea quark and gluon parton distributions. We alsomore » analyze the role of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in generalized parton distributions in nuclei and certain characteristics of final states in nuclear DIS. We discuss the limits of applicability of the leading twist approximation for small x scattering off nuclei and the onset of the black disk regime and methods of detecting it. It will be possible to check many of our predictions in the near future in the studies of the ultraperipheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Further checks will be possible in pA collisions at the LHC and forward hadron production at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). As a result, detailed tests will be possible at an Electon-Ion Collider (EIC) in USA and at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) at CERN.« less

  10. Experiments with stored exotic nuclei at relativistic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, F.; Geissel, H.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Beckert, K.; Franzke, B.; Hausmann, M.; Kerscher, Th.; Klepper, O.; Kozhuharov, C.; Löbner, K. E. G.; Münzenberg, G.; Nolden, F.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Patyk, Z.; Radon, T.; Scheidenberger, C.; Steck, M.; Wollnik, H.

    2006-04-01

    A review and recent progress are presented from experiments on masses and lifetimes of bare and few-electron exotic nuclei at GSI. Relativistic rare isotopes produced via projectile fragmentation and fission were separated in flight by the fragment separator FRS and injected into the storage ring ESR. This worldwide unique experimental method gives access to all fragments with half-lives down to the microsecond range. The great research potential is demonstrated by the discovery of new isotopes along with simultaneous mass and lifetime measurements. Single particle decay measurements and the continuous recording of both stored mother and daughter nuclei open up a new era for nuclear spectroscopy. The study of bare and few-electron nuclei has also important astrophysical relevance with respect to the hot stellar conditions where reactions and decay are influenced by the degree of atomic ionization. The future international NUSTAR facility at FAIR consisting of a new large-acceptance in-flight separator (Super-FRS) and a dedicated storage ring system (CR-RESR-NESR) will be an ideal tool to study nuclei with new probes and to investigate the majority of relevant r- and rp-process nuclei which are not in reach with the present-day facilities.

  11. Source spectral index of heavy cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelmann, J. J.; Ferrando, P.; Koch-Miramond, L.; Masse, P.; Soutoul, A.; Webber, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    From the energy spectra of the heavy nuclei observed by the French-Danish experiment on HEAO-3, the source spectra of the mostly primary nuclei (C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, Ca and Fe) in the framework of an energy dependent leaky box model (Engelmann, et al., 1985) were derived. The energy dependence of the escape length was derived from the observed B/C and sub-iron/iron ratios and the presently available cross sections for C and Fe on H nuclei (Koch-Miramond, et al., 1983). A good fit to the source energy spectra of all these nuclei was obtained by a power law in momentum with an exponent gamma = -2.4+0.05 for the energy range 1 to 25GeV/n (Engelmann, et al., 1985). Comparison with data obtained at higher energy suggested a progressive flattening of these spectra. More accurate spectral indices are sought by using better values of the escape length based on the latest cross section measurements (Webber 1984, Soutoul, et al., this conference). The aim is also to extend the analysis to lower energies down to 0.4GeV/n (kinetic energy observed near Earth), using data obtained by other groups. The only nuclei for which a good data base is possessed in a broad range of energies are O and Fe, so the present study is restricted to these two elements.

  12. Characterization of Acremonium and Isaria ice nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pummer, Bernhard G.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2014-05-01

    Until recently, the only known fungal ice nuclei (IN) were a few exponents of lichen mycobionts and Fusarium spp. [Kieft and Ruscetti 1990, Pouleur et al. 1992, Hasegawa et al. 1994, Tsumuki et al. 1995], as well as two strains of mold [Jayaweera and Flanagan 1982]. Other investigated species did not show any IN activity [Pouleur et al. 1992, Iannone et al. 2011, Pummer et al. 2013]. In the last few years, IN-activity has been discovered in some rust and smut fungi [Morris et al. 2013, Haga et al. 2013], Acremonium implicatum (Acr.) and Isaria farinosa (Isa.) [Huffman et al. 2013] and a handful of other airborne and soil fungi [unpublished data]. We started characterizing the IN of Acr. and Isa.: Like other non-bacterial biological IN, they can be easily separated from the cells in aqueous suspension, and keep their activity. The IN-active aqueous suspensions were processed by filtration (5 μm, 0.1 μm, 300 kDa, 100 kDa) and exposure to heat (60° C) or guanidinium chloride (6 M). The IN activity of the processed samples was measured by a freezing assay of droplets, as described by Pummer et al. [2013]. Via the Vali formula, we calculated the amount of IN per gram of mycelium, which is higher than 105 g-1. The initial freezing temperature was -4° C for Isaria and -8° C for Acremonium IN. Both were completely knocked out by 60° C or guanidinium chloride. The Acremonium IN are in a mass range between 100 and 300 kDa. The Isaria IN seem to be either a bit larger, or more attached to larger particles, since not all of them pass through the 300-kDa-filter. It is likely that both of these new IN are proteinaceous like the IN of Fusarium spp. and lichen mycobionts, which belong to the Ascomycota phylum. Since the Isaria IN show a high onset freezing temperature and are rather large for single molecules, they might be agglomerates. Haga D.I. et al. (2013) J. Geophys. Res.: Atm. 118, 7260-7272 Hasegawa Y. et al. (1994) Biosci. Biotech. Biochem. 58, 2273-2274 Huffman A

  13. On liquid phases in cometary nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Richard; Faillace, George A.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we review the relevant literature and investigate conditions likely to lead to melting of H2O ice, methanol (CH3OH) ice, ethane (C2H6) ice and other volatile ices in cometary nuclei. On the basis of a heat balance model which takes account of volatiles loss, we predict the formation of occasional aqueous and hydrocarbon liquid phases in subsurface regions at heliocentric distances, rh of 1-3 AU, and 5-12 AU, respectively. Low triple-point temperatures and low vapour pressures of C2H6, C3H8, and some higher-order alkanes and alkenes, favour liquid phase formation in cometary bodies at high rh. Microporosity and the formation of a stabilization crust occluding the escape of volatiles facilitate liquid-phase formation. Characteristics of the near-surface which favour subsurface melting include; low effective surface emissivity (at low rh), high amorphous carbon content, average pore sizes of ˜10 μm or less, presence of solutes (e.g. CH3OH), mixtures of C2-C6 hydrocarbons (for melting at high rh), diurnal thermal cycling, and slow rotation rate. Applying the principles of soil mechanics, capillary forces are shown to initiate pre-melting phenomena and subsequent melting, which is expected to impart considerable strength of ˜104 Pa in partially saturated layers, reducing porosity and permeability, enhancing thermal conductivity and heat transfer. Diurnal thermal cycling is expected to have a marked effect on the composition and distribution of H2O ice in the near-surface leading to frost heave-type phenomena even where little if any true melting occurs. Where melting does take place, capillary suction in the wetted zone has the potential to enhance heat transfer via capillary wetting in a low-gravity environment, and to modify surface topography creating relatively smooth flat-bottomed features, which have a tendency to be located within small depressions. An important aspect of the "wetted layer" model is the prediction that diurnal melt-freeze cycles

  14. Aspects of data on the breakup of highly excited nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, A.I.; Wieman, H.H.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Ritter, H.G.; Stelzer, H.; Weik, F.; Kaufman, S.B.; Steinberg, E.P.; Wilkins, B.D.

    1983-05-01

    There is an awakening of theoretical interest in the mechanisms by which nuclear fragments (4 less than or equal to A less than or equal to 150) are produced in violent collisions of heavy ions. With this in mind we review some aspects of the available experimental data and point out some challenging features against which to test the models. The concept of evaporation is tremendously powerful when applied to pieces of nuclei of low excitation (1 or 2 MeV/u). Current interest focuses on higher excitations, at the point where the binding energy of the system vanishes. This is the transition from liquid nuclei to a gas of nucleons, and it may be that the critical phenomena that certainly exist in infinite nuclear matter will be manifest in finite nuclei under these conditions.

  15. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei measured, with the DANCE detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J.; Bečvář, F.; Krtička, M.; Valenta, S.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Walker, C. L.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Parker, W.; Wu, C. Y.

    2013-05-01

    Spectra of γ-rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei were measured with the DANCE detector. The objectives were to obtain new information on the photon strength of 153,155-159Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is built not only on the ground state, but also on all excited levels of the nuclei studied. Our approach allows estimating the summed scissors-mode strength \\sum B(M1)\\!\\!\\uparrow even for odd product nuclei for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our data indicate that for 157,159Gd the strength \\sum B(M1)\\!\\!\\uparrow is significantly higher compared to 156,158Gd.

  16. Abundances of cosmic ray nuclei heavier than 50 Sn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddington, C. J.; Fickle, R. K.; Garrard, T. L.; Stone, E. C.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported from 430 days of exposure of the heavy nuclei experiment on the HEAO-3 spacecraft. These results are confined to the heavy nuclei with Z equal to or greater than 50 and emphasize the conclusions obtained on the relative numbers of actinides and heavy stable elements in the lead-platinum region. The extreme paucity of actinides found is inconsistent with the predictions of a cosmic ray source that is highly enriched in r-process material, but quite consistent with a source whose composition is similar to that of normal solar system material. An upper limit, at the 95 percent confidence level, is placed in the ratio of nuclei with Z equal to or greater than 88/(Z in the range from 74 to 87) of 0.03.

  17. Segmentation of touching cell nuclei using gradient flow tracking.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Liu, T; Nie, J; Guo, L; Chen, J; Zhu, J; Xia, W; Mara, A; Holley, S; Wong, S T C

    2008-07-01

    Reliable cell nuclei segmentation is an important yet unresolved problem in biological imaging studies. This paper presents a novel computerized method for robust cell nuclei segmentation based on gradient flow tracking. This method is composed of three key steps: (1) generate a diffused gradient vector flow field; (2) perform a gradient flow tracking procedure to attract points to the basin of a sink; and (3) separate the image into small regions, each containing one nucleus and nearby peripheral background, and perform local adaptive thresholding in each small region to extract the cell nucleus from the background. To show the generality of the proposed method, we report the validation and experimental results using microscopic image data sets from three research labs, with both over-segmentation and under-segmentation rates below 3%. In particular, this method is able to segment closely juxtaposed or clustered cell nuclei, with high sensitivity and specificity in different situations.

  18. Supersaturation in the spontaneous formation of nuclei in water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, Adolf; Damkohler, Gerhard

    1953-01-01

    According to experience, a certain supersaturation is required for condensation of water vapor in the homogeneous phase; that is, for inception of the condensation, at a prescribed temperature, the water vapor partial pressure must lie above the saturation pressure. The condensation starts on so-called condensation nuclei. Solid or liquid suspended particles may serve as nuclei; these particles may either a priori be present in the gas phase (dust, soot), or may spontaneously be formed from the vapor molecules to be condensed themselves. Only the second case will be considered. Gas ions which facilitate the spontaneous formation of nuclei may be present or absent. The supersaturations necessary for spontaneous nucleus formation are in general considerable higher than those in the presence of suspended particles.

  19. Electronic Schrödinger equation with nonclassical nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Abedi, Ali; Maitra, Neepa T.; Yamashita, Koichi; Gross, E. K. U.

    2014-04-01

    We present a rigorous reformulation of the quantum mechanical equations of motion for the coupled system of electrons and nuclei that focuses on the dynamics of the electronic subsystem. Usually the description of electron dynamics involves an electronic Schrödinger equation where the nuclear degrees of freedom appear as parameters or as classical trajectories. Here we derive the exact Schrödinger equation for the subsystem of electrons, staying within a full quantum treatment of the nuclei. This exact Schrödinger equation features a time-dependent potential energy surface for electrons (e-TDPES). We demonstrate that this exact e-TDPES differs significantly from the electrostatic potential produced by classical or quantum nuclei.

  20. Fast electric dipole transitions in Ra-Ac nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.

    1985-01-01

    Lifetime of levels in /sup 225/Ra, /sup 225/Ac, and /sup 227/Ac have been measured by delayed coincidence techniques and these have been used to determine the E1 gamma-ray transition probabilities. The reduced E1 transition probabilities. The reduced E1 transition probabilities in /sup 225/Ra and /sup 225/Ac are about two orders of magnitude larger than the values in mid-actinide nuclei. On the other hand, the E1 rate in /sup 227/Ac is similar to those measured in heavier actinides. Previous studies suggest the presence of octupole deformation in all the three nuclei. The present investigation indicates that fast E1 transitions occur for nuclei with octupole deformation. However, the studies also show that there is no one-to-one correspondence between E1 rate and octupole deformation. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  1. UH-nuclei in the cosmic radiation, present and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddington, C. J.

    1985-01-01

    A brief survey of the present state of knowledge on the composition of the heaviest nuclei in the cosmic radiation, with emphasis on the actinides, is followed by a similarly brief description of expected near term improvements. A description is given of a large modular array which could be built and serviced from the Space Platform and would be capable of making critical tests on the various models of the origin and acceleration of these nuclei. This array would be composed of plastic Cerenkov detectors and would also measure time-of-flight across the array for each particle. In the configuration proposed it would observe two or more orders of magnitude more nuclei than any current or near future array.

  2. The Heavy Nuclei eXplorer (HNX) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Adams, J. H.; Barbier, L. M.; Craig, N.; Cummings, A. C.; Cummings, J. R.; Doke, T.; Hasebe, N.; Hayashi, T.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The primary scientific objectives of HNX, which was recently selected by NASA for a Small Explorer (SMEX) Mission Concept Study, are to measure the age of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since nucleosynthesis, determine the injection mechanism for the GCR accelerator (Volatility or FIP), and study the mix of nucleosynthetic processes that contribute to the source of GCRs. The experimental goal of HNX is to measure the elemental abundances of all individual stable nuclei from neon through the actinides and possibly beyond. HNX is composed of two instruments: ECCO, which measures elemental abundances of nuclei with Z greater than or equal to 72, and ENTICE. which measures elemental abundances of nuclei with Z between 10 and 82. We describe the mission and the science that can be addressed by HNX.

  3. Beta decay rates of neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marketin, Tomislav; Huther, Lutz; Petković, Jelena; Paar, Nils; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Heavy element nucleosynthesis models involve various properties of thousands of nuclei in order to simulate the intricate details of the process. By necessity, as most of these nuclei cannot be studied in a controlled environment, these models must rely on the nuclear structure models for input. Of all the properties, the beta-decay half-lives are one of the most important ones due to their direct impact on the resulting abundance distributions. In this study we present the results of a large-scale calculation based on the relativistic nuclear energy density functional, where both the allowed and the first-forbidden transitions are studied in more than 5000 neutron-rich nuclei. Aside from the astrophysical applications, the results of this calculation can also be employed in the modeling of the electron and antineutrino spectra from nuclear reactors.

  4. Nuclear rainbow in elastic scattering of {sup 9}Be nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Glukhov, Yu. A. Ogloblin, A. A.; Artemov, K. P.; Rudakov, V. P.

    2010-01-15

    A systematic investigation of the elastic scattering of the {sup 9}Be nucleus, which is among themost loosely bound stable nuclei was performed.Differential cross sections for elastic {sup 9}Be + {sup 16}O scattering were measured at a c.m. energy of 47.5 MeV (beam of 132-MeV {sup 16}O nuclei). Available data at different energy values and data for neighboring nuclei were included in our analysis. As a result, the very fact of rainbow scattering was reliably established for the first time in systems involving {sup 9}Be. In addition, the analysis in question made it possible to identify Airy minima and to determine unambiguously the nucleus-nucleus potential with a high probability.

  5. The pygmy dipole resonance in neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang Hung, Nguyen; Kiet, Hoang Anh Tuan; Duc, Huynh Ngoc; Thi Chuong, Nguyen

    2016-06-01

    The pygmy dipole resonance (PDR), which has been observed via the enhancement of the electric dipole strength E1 of atomic nuclei, is studied within a microscopic collective model. The latter employs the Hartree-Fock (HF) method with effective nucleon-nucleon interactions of the Skyrme types plus the random-phase approximation (RPA). The results of the calculations obtained for various even-even nuclei such as 16-28O, 40-58Ca, 100-120Sn, and 182-218Pb show that the PDR is significantly enhanced when the number of neutrons outside the stable core of the nucleus is increased, that is, in the neutron-rich nuclei. As the result, the relative ratio between the energy weighted sum of the strength of the PDR and that of the GDR (giant dipole resonance) does not exceed 4%. The collectivity of the PDR and GDR states will be also discussed.

  6. Beta decay rates of neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Marketin, Tomislav; Huther, Lutz; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2015-10-15

    Heavy element nucleosynthesis models involve various properties of thousands of nuclei in order to simulate the intricate details of the process. By necessity, as most of these nuclei cannot be studied in a controlled environment, these models must rely on the nuclear structure models for input. Of all the properties, the beta-decay half-lives are one of the most important ones due to their direct impact on the resulting abundance distributions. Currently, a single large-scale calculation is available based on a QRPA calculation with a schematic interaction on top of the Finite Range Droplet Model. In this study we present the results of a large-scale calculation based on the relativistic nuclear energy density functional, where both the allowed and the first-forbidden transitions are studied in more than 5000 neutron-rich nuclei.

  7. Improved variational wave functions for few-body nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wiringa, R.B.; Arriaga, A.; Pandharipande, V.R.

    1995-08-01

    We continued to work on improvements to our variational wave functions for use in Monte Carlo calculations of few-body nuclei. These trial functions include central, spin, isospin, tensor, and spin-orbit two-body correlations and three-body correlations for the three-nucleon potential. In the last two years we studied a variety of extra three-body correlations. Our search for possible forms was guided by comparisons made with 34-channel Faddeev wave functions provided by the Los Alamos-Iowa group. The new trial functions reduce the discrepancy with exact Faddeev calculations in {sup 3}H and Green`s Function Monte Carlo (GFMC) calculations in {sup 4}He by about 40%. This work is now being written up for publication. We hope to use similar comparisons with GFMC calculations in the six-body nuclei to find further improvements for the light p-shell nuclei, where the variational wave functions are not as good.

  8. Polarized Nuclei in a Simple Mirror Fusion Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of enhancing the ratio of output to input power Q in a simple mirror machine by polarizing Deuterium-Tritium (D- T) nuclei is evaluated. Taking the Livermore mirror reference design mirror ratio of 6.54, the expected sin(sup 2) upsilon angular distribution of fusion decay products reduces immediate losses of alpha particles to the loss cone by 7.6% and alpha-ion scattering losses by approx. 50%. Based on these findings, alpha- particle confinement times for a polarized plasma should therefore be 1.11 times greater than for isotropic nuclei. Coupling this enhanced alpha-particle heating with the expected greater than 50% D- T reaction cross section, a corresponding power ratio for polarized nuclei, Q(sub polarized), is found to be 1.63 times greater than the classical unpolarized value Q(sub classical). The effects of this increase in Q are assessed for the simple mirror.

  9. New description of the doublet bands in doubly odd nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ganev, H. G.; Georgieva, A. I.; Brant, S.; Ventura, A.

    2009-04-15

    The experimentally observed {delta}I=1 doublet bands in some odd-odd nuclei are analyzed within the orthosymplectic extension of the interacting vector boson model (IVBM). A new, purely collective interpretation of these bands is given on the basis of the obtained boson-fermion dynamical symmetry of the model. It is illustrated by its application to three odd-odd nuclei from the A{approx}130 region, namely {sup 126}Pr, {sup 134}Pr, and {sup 132}La. The theoretical predictions for the energy levels of the doublet bands as well as E2 and M1 transition probabilities between the states of the yrast band in the last two nuclei are compared with experiment and the results of other theoretical approaches. The obtained results reveal the applicability of the orthosymplectic extension of the IVBM.

  10. Concentrations of condensation nuclei in the vicinity of jetstream maxima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadle, R. D.; Shapiro, M. A.; Langer, G.

    1979-01-01

    Ozone and condensation nuclei were measured on March 29, 1977 (and March 30, GMT) from a Sabreliner in a frontal zone south of Denver, Colo. The ozone served as a tracer for stratospheric air and the condensation nuclei as a tracer for tropospheric air. Both the Langer condensation nucleus counter and the Rich-100 counter can be used to measure condensation nucleus concentrations in the vicinity of the tropopause. However, the former counter is more sensitive to low concentrations. The nuclei measured were found to be almost entirely larger than 0.005 micron in radius, consisting of thousands of molecules. The mesostructure of the ozone and condensation nucleus concentrations agreed well with a double structure of the frontal zone that became apparent from a detailed analysis of radiosonde data.

  11. [Selective localization of neptunium-237 in nuclei of mammalian cells].

    PubMed

    Galle, P; Boulahdour, H; Metivier, H

    1992-01-01

    After injection in the rat of soluble neptunium salt, the distribution of this element was studied at the subcellular level by electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Abnormal structures have been observed by electron microscopy in the nuclei of hepatocytes, and the same structures have also been observed in the nuclei of the proximal tubules cells of the kidney. These structures are formed of clusters of very small and dense particles, several nanometers in diameter. The clusters are localized in the central part of the nuclei and they are separate from nucleoli and heterochromatin. Electron probe X-ray analysis of this cluster have shown that they contain neptunium associated with phosphorus. In the cell containing neptunium inclusions, other non specific lesions are also observed (nuclear pycnosis, mitochondrial depletion).

  12. Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Zhaoqing; Jin Genming; Li Junqing; Scheid, Werner

    2007-10-15

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus, and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118, and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

  13. Description of Exotic Nuclei with the Interacting Boson Model

    SciTech Connect

    Boeyuekata, M.; Van Isacker, P.; Uluer, I.

    2008-11-11

    Even--even nuclei in the A{approx}100 mass region are investigated within the framework of the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1). The study includes energy spectra and electric quadrupole transition properties of zirconium, molybdenum, ruthenium and palladium isotopes with neutron number N{>=}54. A global parametrization of the IBM-1 hamiltonian is found leading to a description of 301 collective levels in 30 nuclei with a root-mean-square deviation from the observed level energies of 119 keV. The geometric character of the nuclei can be visualized by plotting the potential energy surface V({beta},{gamma}) obtained from the IBM-1 hamiltonian in the classical limit. The parametrization established on the basis of known elements is then used to predict properties of the unknown, neutron-rich isotopes {sup 106}Zr, {sup 112}Mo, {sup 116}Ru and {sup 120}Pd.

  14. Towards a Deeper Understanding of the Nucleus with Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormand, Erich

    2006-10-01

    Despite more than fifty years of study, many questions about now nuclei are put together remain. While nuclei near the valley of stability have provided a wealth of information, they are not sufficient to provide us with a comprehensive and unified description of the nucleus. Especially lacking is an accurate picture of those exotic species that are the basis of cosmic alchemy. The missing pieces in the puzzle can be filled in with a determined experimental and theoretical effort focusing on nuclei lying far from the valley of stability. Here, I will outline the intellectual challenges that can be addressed by proposed exotic-beam facilities, and how new experimental data will quide and refine theoretical descriptions of the nucleus.

  15. Fission of actinide nuclei using multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léguillon, Romain; Nishio, Katsuhisa; Hirose, Kentaro; Orlandi, Riccardo; Makii, Hiroyuki; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Ishii, Tetsuro; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Asai, Masato; Chiba, Satoshi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Araki, Shohei; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Tatsuzawa, Ryotaro; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2014-09-01

    We are promoting a campaign to measure fission-fragment mass distributions for neutron-rich actinide nuclei populated by transfer reactions from their ground state up to an excitation energy of several tens MeV. We thus obtain the excitation energy dependence of the mass distribution. The experiment was carried out at the 20 MV JAEA tandem facility at Tokai. We report on the data obtained in the direct reaction 18 O + 232 Th . Transfer-channels and excitation energies of the fissioning nuclei were identified using silicon dE-E detectors located at forward angle. Two fission fragments were detected in coincidence using multi-wire proportional counters. Fission fragment masses were determined by kinematic consideration. We obtained the fission fragment mass distributions for 13 nuclei from actinium to uranium and some fission barrier heights. We are promoting a campaign to measure fission-fragment mass distributions for neutron-rich actinide nuclei populated by transfer reactions from their ground state up to an excitation energy of several tens MeV. We thus obtain the excitation energy dependence of the mass distribution. The experiment was carried out at the 20 MV JAEA tandem facility at Tokai. We report on the data obtained in the direct reaction 18 O + 232 Th . Transfer-channels and excitation energies of the fissioning nuclei were identified using silicon dE-E detectors located at forward angle. Two fission fragments were detected in coincidence using multi-wire proportional counters. Fission fragment masses were determined by kinematic consideration. We obtained the fission fragment mass distributions for 13 nuclei from actinium to uranium and some fission barrier heights. Present study is supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  16. The Subsurface Structure and Density of Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, P. L.; Herique, A.; Toth, I.

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the internal structure and density of cometary nuclei. Indirect evidences available so far are not compelling and these questions essentially remain a matter of speculation. It is therefore important to fully exploit the potential sources of information and this is particularly the case of radar observations which have the capability to probe the first few meters of cometary nuclei when they come sufficiently close to Earth. We review the available results and find that proper data are available for eight nuclei yielding their geometric radar albedo and the dielectric permittivity of their subsurface assuming that the scattering of the radar beam is predominantly specular. The range of permittivity is quite broad, extending from 1.7 to 3.1 although a more realistic interval is probably 2 to 3.1 implying pronounced diversity in the subsurface properties of cometary nuclei. A novel interpretation of these results is performed based on the calculation of the dielectric permittivity of various samples of three-phase mixtures of ice, dust and vacuum using two mixing formulas and on the introduction of ternary diagrams where the three axes correspond to the volumetric fraction of the three phases. The derived values of the permittivity supplemented by a general constraint on the dust-to-ice mass ratio define restricted regions in the ternary diagrams broadly imposing that the ice fraction lies in the range 0.1 to 0.2, the dust fraction in the range 0.2 to 0.5, and the porosity in the range 35 % to 75 %. The density of the subsurface of the considered eight nuclei is only constrained to the broad range 500 to 2000 kg m-3 due to the poorly known density of the dust phase. However, the results unambiguously reveal considerable variation among cometary nuclei of the structure and properties of their subsurface layers.

  17. An efficient technique for nuclei segmentation based on ellipse descriptor analysis and improved seed detection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongming; Lu, Cheng; Mandal, Mrinal

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose an efficient method for segmenting cell nuclei in the skin histopathological images. The proposed technique consists of four modules. First, it separates the nuclei regions from the background with an adaptive threshold technique. Next, an elliptical descriptor is used to detect the isolated nuclei with elliptical shapes. This descriptor classifies the nuclei regions based on two ellipticity parameters. Nuclei clumps and nuclei with irregular shapes are then localized by an improved seed detection technique based on voting in the eroded nuclei regions. Finally, undivided nuclei regions are segmented by a marked watershed algorithm. Experimental results on 114 different image patches indicate that the proposed technique provides a superior performance in nuclei detection and segmentation.

  18. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  19. Beta decay asymmetry in mirror nuclei: A=9

    SciTech Connect

    Tengblad, Olof; Borge, M. J. G.; Fraile, L. M.; Axelsson, L.; Jonson, B.; Nyman, G.; Markenroth, K.; Wenander, F.; Bergmann, U.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Hornshoej, P.; Mukha, I.; Riisager, K.; Jading, Y.; Nilsson, T.; Martel, I.; Rolander, K. Wilhelmsen

    1999-11-16

    Investigations of light nuclei close to the drip lines have revealed new and intriguing features of the nuclear structure. The occurrence of halo structures in loosely bound systems has had a great impact on the nuclear physics research in the last years, as intriguing, but not yet solved, is the nature of transitions with very large beta strength. We report here on the investigation of this latter feature by an accurate measurement of the beta decay asymmetry between the mirror nuclei in the A=9 mass chain.

  20. Beta Decay Asymmetry in Mirror Nuclei: A = 9.

    SciTech Connect

    Olof Tengblad; L. Axelsson; U. Bergmann; M.J.G. Borge; L.M. Fraile; H.O.U. Fynbo; P. Hornshoj; Y. Jading; B. Jonson; T. Nilsson; G. Nyman; K. Markenroth; I. Martel; I. Mukha; K. Riisager; F. Wenander; K. Wilhelmsen Rolander

    1999-12-31

    Investigations of light nuclei close to the drip lines have revealed new and intriguing features of the nuclear structure. The occurrence of halo structures in loosely bound systems has had a great impact on the nuclear physics research in the last years, as intriguing, but not yet solved, is the nature of transitions with very large beta strength. We report here on the investigation of this latter feature by an accurate measurement of the beta decay asymmetry between the mirror nuclei in the A = 9 mass chain.

  1. Deformations and Quasiparticle Spectra of Nuclei in the Nobelium Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yue; Dobaczewski, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Toivanen, J.; Toivanen, P.

    2014-09-01

    We have performed self-consistent Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov calculations for nuclei close to 254No. Self-consistent deformations, including β2,4,6,8 as functions of the rotational frequency, were determined for even-even nuclei 246,248,250Fm, 252,254No, and 256Rf. The quasiparticle spectra for N = 151 isotones and Z = 99 isotopes were calculated and compared with experimental data and the results of Woods-Saxon calculations. We found that our calculations give high-order deformations similar to those obtained for the Woods-Saxon potential, and that the experimental quasiparticle energies are reasonably well reproduced.

  2. The response of ionization chambers to relativistic heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Fixsen, D. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Grimm, G.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a recent calibration at the LBL Bevalac for the Heavy Nuclei Experiment on HEAO-3, the response of a set of laboratory ionization chambers were compared to beams of 26Fe, 36 Kr, 54Xe, 67 Ho, and 79 Au nuclei at maximum energies ranging from 1666 MeV/amu for Fe to 1049 MeV/amu for Au. The response of these chambers shows a significant deviation from the expected energy dependence, but only a slight deviation from Z squared scaling.

  3. Modes of decay in neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B.; Biswal, S. K.; Singh, S. K.; Lahiri, C.; Patra, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    We calculate the ground, first intrinsic excited states and density distribution for neutron-rich thorium and uranium isotopes, within the framework of relativistic mean field (RMF) approach using axially deformed basis. The total nucleon densities are calculated, from which the cluster-structures inside the parent nuclei are determined. The possible modes of decay, like α-decay and β-decay are analyzed. We find the neutron-rich isotopes are stable against α-decay, however they are very much unstable against β-decay. The life time of these nuclei predicted to be tens of second against β-decay.

  4. JUSTIPEN: Japan US Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Papenbrock, Thomas

    2014-05-16

    The grant “JUSTIPEN: Japan US Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei ” (DOE DE-FG02-06ER41407) ran from 02/01/2006 thru 12/31/2013. JUSTIPEN is a venue for international collaboration between U.S.-based and Japanese scientists who share an interest in theory of rare isotopes. Since its inception JUSTIPEN has supported many visitors, fostered collaborations between physicists in the U.S. and Japan, and enabled them to deepen our understanding of exotic nuclei and their role in cosmos.

  5. Search for and discovery of chiral symmetry in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, A. A.

    2010-08-15

    Studies devoted to the discovery and investigation of chiral-symmetry breaking in nuclei are briefly reviewed. Unlike the case of molecules and the macrocosm, where chirality manifests itself in the spatial structure of objects, chirality in nuclei is connected with different relative orientation of valence-quasiparticle spins and the angular momentum of collective rotation of the triaxial core. Decisive arguments in favor of the existence of this effect are based on measurements of lifetimes of high-spin nuclear levels in the picosecond range by Doppler methods of {gamma} spectroscopy.

  6. Kaon, pion, and proton associated photofission of Bi nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y.; Margaryan, A.; Acha, A.; Ahmidouch, A.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Baker, O. K.; Baturin, P.; Benmokhtar, F.; Carlini, R.; Chen, X.; Christy, M.; Cole, L.; Danagoulian, S.; Daniel, A.; Dharmawardane, V.; Egiyan, K.; Elaasar, M.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Fujii, Y.; Furic, M.; Gan, L.; Gaskell, D.; Gasparian, A.; Gibson, E. F.; Grigoryan, N.; Gueye, P.; Halkyard, R.; Hashimoto, O.; Honda, D.; Horn, T.; Hu, B.; Hu, S.; Hungerford, Ed. V.; Ispiryan, M.; Johnston, K.; Jones, M.; Kalantarians, N.; Kaneta, M.; Kato, F.; Kato, S.; Kawama, D.; Keppel, C.; Knyazyan, S.; Li, Y.; Luo, W.; Mack, D.; Marikyan, G.; Maruyama, N.; Matsumura, A.; Miyoshi, T.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Nakamura, S. N.; Navasardyan, T.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, M.-I.; Nomura, H.; Nonaka, K.; Ohtani, A.; Okayasu, Y.; Pamela, P.; Parlakyan, L.; Perez, N.; Petkovic, T.; Randeniya, S.; Reinhold, J.; Rivera, R.; Roche, J.; Rodriguez, V. M.; Sato, Y.; Seva, T.; Simicevic, N.; Smith, G.; Sumihama, M.; Tadevosyan, V.; Takahashi, T.; Tamura, H.; Tang, L.; Tvaskis, V.; Vardanyan, H.; Vulcan, W.; Wang, B.; Wells, S.; Wood, S.; Yan, C.; Yuan, L.

    2010-10-01

    The first measurement of proton, pion, and kaon associated fission of Bi nuclei has been performed in a photon energy range 1. 45 < E γ < 1. 55 GeV. The fission probabilities are compared with an inclusive fission probabilities obtained with photons, protons and pions. The fission probability of Bi nuclei in coincidence with kaons is 0. 18 ± 0. 06 which is ˜3 times larger than the proton and pion associated fission probabilities and ˜2 times larger than inclusive ones. The kaon associated excess fission events are explained in terms of bound Λ residual states and their weak nonmesonic decays.

  7. Enhancement of octupole strength in near spherical nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robledo, L. M.

    2016-09-01

    The validity of the rotational formula used to compute E1 and E3 transition strengths in even-even nuclei is analyzed within the Generator Coordinate Method framework based on mean field wave functions. It turns out that those nuclei with spherical or near spherical shapes the E1 and E3 strengths computed with this formula are strongly underestimated and a sound evaluation of them requires angular-momentum projected wave functions. Results for several isotopic chains with proton number equal to or near magic numbers are analyzed and compared with experimental data. The use of angular-momentum projected wave functions greatly improves the agreement with the scarce experimental data.

  8. Shell And Halo Structure In Neutron-Rich Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nociforo, C.

    2010-06-01

    Spectroscopic investigations performed at the neutron drip line in case of sd shell nuclei have recently shown the existence of the new magic numbers Z = 8 and N = 14,16. Predictions within the nuclear shell model calculations for the {sup 23,24}O ground state have been confirmed measuring their neutron occupancy in breakup reactions performed by using the inflight radioactive ion beams produced at the Fragment Separator FRS of GSI. Some perspectives of studying the evolution of magic numbers in this region of light exotic nuclei are given.

  9. Physical Mechanism of Neutron Halo on Drip Line Light Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengda; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiaobin

    1995-12-01

    In order to extend the conventional shell model calculation with harmonic oscillator bases to halo nuclei a self-similar-structure shell model(SSM) in which the single particle orbit has state(orbit)-dependent frequency was proposed. We do this by a rescaling of both the kinetic and potential energy term of the harmonic oscillator and a mean field imitation so that the physical mechanisms of both neutron skin and neutron halo as well as the bound state properties of Borromean nuclei such as 6He, 11Li and 14Be can be revealed in SSM.

  10. Synthesis of thin, long heavy nuclei in ternary collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Yoritaka; Iida, Kei; Itagaki, Naoyuki

    2013-01-01

    We illustrate the formation of a thin, long structure of heavy nuclei by three-nucleus simultaneous collisions within time-dependent density functional theory. The impact parameter dependence for such a formation is systematically demonstrated through clarifications of the difference between binary and ternary collision events. A new method for producing thin, long heavy nuclei in the laboratory is suggested, as well as the possible formation of the thin, long structure in hot dense matter such as that encountered in core collapse supernovae.

  11. Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Sudowe, Ralf; Folden, Charles M., III; Nitsche, Heino; Hoffman, Darleane C.

    2005-01-15

    The overall objective of this project is the measurement of neutron capture cross sections of importance to stewardship science and astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis, while at the same time helping to train the next generation of scientists with expertise relevant to U.S. national nuclear security missions and to stewardship science. A primary objective of this project is to study neutron capture cross sections for various stable and unstable isotopes that will contribute to the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program by providing improved data for modeling and interpretation of nuclear device performance. Much of the information obtained will also be important in astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis. Measurements of these neutron capture cross sections are being conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility using the unique Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). In our early discussions with the DANCE group, decisions were made on the first cross sections to be measured and how our expertise in target preparation, radiochemical separations chemistry, and data analysis could best be applied. The initial emphasis of the project was on preparing suitable targets of both natural and separated stable europium isotopes in preparation for the ultimate goal of preparing a sufficiently large target of radioactive 155Eu (t1/2 = 4.7 years) and other radioactive and stable species for neutron cross-section measurements at DANCE. Our Annual Report, ''Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei'' by J. M. Schwantes, R. Sudowe, C. M. Folden III, H. Nitsche, and D. C. Hoffman, submitted to NNSA in December 2003, gives details about the initial considerations and scope of the project. During the current reporting period, electroplated targets of natural Eu together with valuable, stable, and isotopically pure 151Eu and 153Eu, and isotopically separated 154Sm were measured for

  12. COMETARY NUCLEI. The shape and structure of cometary nuclei as a result of low-velocity accretion.

    PubMed

    Jutzi, M; Asphaug, E

    2015-06-19

    Cometary nuclei imaged from flyby and rendezvous spacecraft show common evidence of layered structures and bilobed shapes. But how and when these features formed is much debated, with distinct implications for solar system formation, dynamics, and geology. We show that these features could be a direct result of accretionary collisions, based on three-dimensional impact simulations using realistic constitutive properties. We identify two regimes of interest: layer-forming splats and mergers resulting in bilobed shapes. For bodies with low tensile strength, our results can explain key morphologies of cometary nuclei, as well as their low bulk densities. This advances the hypothesis that nuclei formed by collisional coagulation-either out of cometesimals accreting in the early solar system or, alternatively, out of comparable-sized debris clumps paired in the aftermath of major collisions. PMID:26022415

  13. (Hyper)nuclei and anti-(hyper)nuclei production in Pb-Pb collisions in ALICE at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colocci, Manuel; ALICE Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The ALICE detector at the LHC is used to study Pb-Pb collisions at \\sqrt{sNN} = 2.76 TeV. At this energy almost equal amounts of matter and anti-matter are produced in the central rapidity region. This in turn enables the production of (hyper)nuclei and anti- (hyper)nuclei, which are measured with nearly identical abundances. Thanks to its high quality tracking and particle identification capabilities, the ALICE detector allows the investigation of these rarely produced (anti-)matter states. Preliminary results on the production of light (anti-)nuclei and (anti-)hypernuclei, and a search for exotic bound states are discussed in this article.

  14. Suprachiasmatic nuclei and Circadian rhythms. The role of suprachiasmatic nuclei on rhythmic activity of neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area, ventromedian nuclei and pineal gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishino, H.

    1977-01-01

    Unit activity of lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) and Ventromedian nuclei (VMN) was recorded in urethane anesthetized male rats. A 5 to 10 sec. a 3-5 min and a circadian rhythmicity were observed. In about 15% of all neurons, spontaneous activity of LHA and VMN showed reciprocal relationships. Subthreshold stimuli applied at a slow rate in the septum and the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) suppressed the rhythms without changing firing rates. On the other hand, stimulation of the optic nerve at a rate of 5 to 10/sec increased firing rates in 1/3 of neurons of SCN. Iontophoretically applied acetylcholine increased 80% of tested neurons of SCN, whereas norepinephrine, dopamine and 5 HT inhibited 64, 60 and 75% of SCN neurons respectively. These inhibitions were much stronger in neurons, the activity of which was increased by optic nerve stimulation. Stimulation of the SCN inhibited the tonic activity in cervical sympathetic nerves.

  15. Total disintegration of Ag and Br nuclei by 4. 5[ital A] GeV/[ital c] silicon nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, T.; Nasr, M.A.; Irfan, M. )

    1993-06-01

    Complete disintegrations of Ag and Br nuclei caused by a 4.5[ital A] GeV/[ital c] [sup 28]Si projectile have been analyzed to study the characteristics of the collisions with small impact parameters. The results are systematically compared with their corresponding values obtained for the interactions with comparatively larger impact parameters at the same beam momentum per nucleon. The variations of the mean multiplicity of the relativistic charged particles with the mean number of the interacting nucleons of the projectile nuclei and the normalized pseudorapidity density have also been examined.

  16. Isospin Mixing and the Continuum Coupling in Weakly Bound Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, N.; Nazarewicz, Witold; Ploszajczak, M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the near-threshold behavior of one-nucleon spectroscopic factors in mirror nuclei using the Gamow Shell Model, which simultaneously takes into account many-body correlations and continuum effects. We demonstrate that for weakly bound or unbound systems, the mirror symmetry-breaking effects are appreciable, and they manifest in large differences of spectroscopic factors in a mirror pair.

  17. Electric dipole moments of light nuclei from {chi}EFT

    SciTech Connect

    Higa, Renato

    2013-03-25

    I present recent calculations of EDMs of light nuclei using chiral effective field theory techniques. At leading-order, we argue that they can be expressed in terms of six CP-violating low-energy constants. With our expressions, eventual non-zero measurements of EDMs of deuteron, helion, and triton can be combined to disentangle the different sources of CP-violation.

  18. A theoretical approach to electromagnetic reactions in light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianrui; Miorelli, Mirko; Bacca, Sonia; Hagen, Gaute

    2016-03-01

    We briefly review the theory for electromagnetic reactions in light nuclei based on the coupled-cluster formulation of the Lorentz integral transform method. Results on photodisintegration reactions of 22O and 40Ca are reported and preliminary calculations on the Coulomb sum rule for 4He are discussed.

  19. Band structure of doubly-odd nuclei around mass 130

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiyama, Koji; Yoshinaga, Naotaka

    2011-05-06

    Nuclear structure of the doublet bands in the doubly-odd nuclei with mass A{approx}130 is studied in terms of a pair-truncated shell model. The model reproduces quite well the energy levels of the doublet bands and the electromagnetic transitions. The analysis of the electromagnetic transitions reveals new band structure of the doublet bands.

  20. A DELAUNAY TRIANGULATION APPROACH FOR SEGMENTING CLUMPS OF NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Quan; Chang, Hang; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-05-07

    Cell-based fluorescence imaging assays have the potential to generate massive amount of data, which requires detailed quantitative analysis. Often, as a result of fixation, labeled nuclei overlap and create a clump of cells. However, it is important to quantify phenotypic read out on a cell-by-cell basis. In this paper, we propose a novel method for decomposing clumps of nuclei using high-level geometric constraints that are derived from low-level features of maximum curvature computed along the contour of each clump. Points of maximum curvature are used as vertices for Delaunay triangulation (DT), which provides a setof edge hypotheses for decomposing a clump of nuclei. Each hypothesis is subsequently tested against a constraint satisfaction network for a near optimum decomposition. The proposed method is compared with other traditional techniques such as the watershed method with/without markers. The experimental results show that our approach can overcome the deficiencies of the traditional methods and is very effective in separating severely touching nuclei.

  1. A Semi-microscopic Approach to Clusterization in Heavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Darai, J.; Cseh, J.; Antonenko, N. V.; Jolos, R. V.; Algora, A.; Hess, P. O.; Scheid, W.

    2009-08-26

    We present a semimicroscopic approach to clusterization in heavy nuclei. The method is largely based on symmetry-considerations. As an example we determine the possible binary clusterizations of the shape isomers of the {sup 56}Ni nucleus. We combine our structure-considerations with energy-calculations.

  2. Nuclear pore ion channel activity in live syncytial nuclei.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Jose Omar

    2002-05-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are important nanochannels for the control of gene activity and expression. Most of our knowledge of NPC function has been derived from isolated nuclei and permeabilized cells in cell lysates/extracts. Since recent patch-clamp work has challenged the dogma that NPCs are freely permeable to small particles, a preparation of isolated living nuclei in their native liquid environment was sought and found: the syncytial nuclei in the water of the coconut Cocos nucifera. These nuclei have all properties of NPC-mediated macromolecular transport (MMT) and express foreign green fluorescent protein (GFP) plasmids. They display chromatin movement, are created by particle aggregation or by division, can grow by throwing filaments to catch material, etc. This study shows, for the first time, that living NPCs engaged in MMT do not transport physiological ions - a phenomenon that explains observations of nucleocytoplasmic ion gradients. Since coconuts are inexpensive (less than US$1/nut per litre), this robust preparation may contribute to our understanding of NPCs and cell nucleus and to the development of biotechnologies for the production of DNA, RNA and proteins.

  3. Mass extrapolations in the region of deformed rare Earth nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Borcea, C.; Audi, G.

    1998-12-21

    A procedure based on the regularity property of the mass surface is proposed to make predictions for the masses of neutron rich deformed nuclei in the rare earth region. Tables are given for the estimated masses; they extend up to the presumed limit of the deformation region.

  4. Formation of Heavy and Superheavy Neutron Rich Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zagrebaev, Valery; Greiner, Walter

    2010-04-30

    A new way is proposed to discover and examine unknown neutron-rich heavy and superheavy nuclei at the 'north-east' part of the nuclear map. The present limits of the upper part of the nuclear map is very close to stability while the unexplored area of heavy neutron-rich nuclides to the east of the stability line (also those located along the neutron closed shell N = 126) is extremely important for nuclear astrophysics investigations and for the understanding of the r-process of astrophysical nucleo-genesis. A novel idea is proposed for the production of these nuclei via low-energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions using a gain given by the shell effects. This finding may spur new studies at heavy ion facilities and should have significant impact for future experiments. The use of the multi-nucleon transfer reactions in low-energy collisions of heavy actinide nuclei gives us also the only chance to approach the 'island of stability' of superheavy elements. A possibility for a three-body decay (heavy ternary fission) is predicted for superheavy nuclei.

  5. Diversity of vestibular nuclei neurons targeted by cerebellar nodulus inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui; Blázquez, Pablo M; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A functional role of the cerebellar nodulus and ventral uvula (lobules X and IXc,d of the vermis) for vestibular processing has been strongly suggested by direct reciprocal connections with the vestibular nuclei, as well as direct vestibular afferent inputs as mossy fibres. Here we have explored the types of neurons in the macaque vestibular nuclei targeted by nodulus/ventral uvula inhibition using orthodromic identification from the caudal vermis. We found that all nodulus-target neurons are tuned to vestibular stimuli, and most are insensitive to eye movements. Such non-eye-movement neurons are thought to project to vestibulo-spinal and/or thalamo-cortical pathways. Less than 20% of nodulus-target neurons were sensitive to eye movements, suggesting that the caudal vermis can also directly influence vestibulo-ocular pathways. In general, response properties of nodulus-target neurons were diverse, spanning the whole continuum previously described in the vestibular nuclei. Most nodulus-target cells responded to both rotation and translation stimuli and only a few were selectively tuned to translation motion only. Other neurons were sensitive to net linear acceleration, similar to otolith afferents. These results demonstrate that, unlike the flocculus and ventral paraflocculus which target a particular cell group, nodulus/ventral uvula inhibition targets a large diversity of cell types in the vestibular nuclei, consistent with a broad functional significance contributing to vestibulo-ocular, vestibulo-thalamic and vestibulo-spinal pathways. PMID:24127616

  6. The Heavy Nuclei eXplorer (HNX) Small Explorer Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, John; Binns, W. Robert; Hams, Thomas; Israel, Martin; Krizmanic, John; Link, Jason; Rauch, Brian; Sakai, Kenichi; Sasaki, Makoto; Westphal, Andrew; Wiedenbeck, Mark; Heavy Nuclei eXplorer Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Heavy Nuclei eXplorer (HNX) will investigate the nature of the reservoirs of nuclei at the cosmic-ray sources, the mechanisms by which nuclei are removed from the reservoirs and injected into the cosmic accelerators, and the acceleration mechanism. HNX will use two large high-precision instruments, the Extremely-heavy Cosmic-ray Composition Observer (ECCO) and the Cosmic-ray Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (CosmicTIGER), flying in the SpaceX DragonLab, to measure, for the first time, the abundance of every individual element in the periodic table from carbon through the actinides, providing the first measurement of many of these elements. HNX will measure several thousand ultra-heavy galactic cosmic ray (UHGCR) nuclei Z >= 30, including about 50 actinides, and will: determine whether GCRs are accelerated from new or old material, and find their age; measure the mix of nucleosynthesis processes responsible for the UHGCRs; determine how UHGCR elements are selected for acceleration, and measure the mean integrated pathlength traversed by UHGCRs before observation. The scientific motivation and instrument complement of HNX will be discussed.

  7. Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, R K; Townsend, L W

    1994-07-01

    Using a fully self-consistent quantum statistical model, we demonstrate the possibility of Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions. The most favorable conditions of high densities and low temperatures are usually associated with astrophysical processes and may be difficult to achieve in heavy ion collisions. Nonetheless, some suggestions for the possible experimental verification of the existence of this phenomenon are made.

  8. MCNP6 fragmentation of light nuclei at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashnik, Stepan G.; Kerby, Leslie M.

    2014-11-01

    Fragmentation reactions induced on light target nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below are studied with the latest Los Alamos Monte Carlo transport code MCNP6 and with its cascade-exciton model (CEM) and Los Alamos version of the quark-gluon string model (LAQGSM) event generators, version 03.03, used as stand-alone codes. Such reactions are involved in different applications, like cosmic-ray-induced single event upsets (SEU's), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and ion beams, among others; therefore, it is important that MCNP6 simulates them as well as possible. CEM and LAQGSM assume that intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions on light nuclei occur generally in two stages. The first stage is the intranuclear cascade (INC), followed by the second, Fermi breakup disintegration of light excited residual nuclei produced after the INC. Both CEM and LAQGSM account also for coalescence of light fragments (complex particles) up to 4He from energetic nucleons emitted during INC. We investigate the validity and performance of MCNP6, CEM, and LAQGSM in simulating fragmentation reactions at intermediate energies and discuss possible ways of further improving these codes.

  9. Rapid Scan Humidified Growth Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory L. Kok; Athanasios Nenes

    2013-03-13

    This research focused on enhancements to the streamwise thermal gradient cloud condensation nuclei counter to support the rapid scan mode and to enhance the capability for aerosol humidified growth measurements. The research identified the needs for flow system modifications and range of capability for operating the conventional instrument in the rapid scan and humidified growth modes.

  10. Symmetry remnants in the face of competing interactions in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Leviatan, A.; Macek, M.

    2015-10-15

    Detailed description of nuclei necessitates model Hamiltonians which break most dynamical symmetries. Nevertheless, generalized notions of partial and quasi dynamical symmetries may still be applicable to selected subsets of states, amidst a complicated environment of other states. We examine such scenarios in the context of nuclear shape-phase transitions.

  11. Otolith-Canal Convergence In Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David; Si, Xiao-Hong

    2002-01-01

    The current final report covers the period from June 1, 1999 to May 31, 2002. The primary objective of the investigation was to determine how information regarding head movements and head position relative to gravity is received and processed by central vestibular nuclei neurons in the brainstem. Specialized receptors in the vestibular labyrinths of the inner ear function to detect angular and linear accelerations of the head, with receptors located in the semicircular canals transducing rotational head movements and receptors located in the otolith organs transducing changes in head position relative to gravity or linear accelerations of the head. The information from these different receptors is then transmitted to central vestibular nuclei neurons which process the input signals, then project the appropriate output information to the eye, head, and body musculature motor neurons to control compensatory reflexes. Although a number of studies have reported on the responsiveness of vestibular nuclei neurons, it has not yet been possible to determine precisely how these cells combine the information from the different angular and linear acceleration receptors into a correct neural output signal. In the present project, rotational and linear motion stimuli were separately delivered while recording responses from vestibular nuclei neurons that were characterized according to direct input from the labyrinth and eye movement sensitivity. Responses from neurons receiving convergent input from the semicircular canals and otolith organs were quantified and compared to non-convergent neurons.

  12. Thermostability of sperm nuclei assessed by microinjection into hamster oocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclei isolated from spermatozoa of various species (golden hamster, mouse, human, rooster, and the fish tilapia) were heated at 60 degrees-125 degrees C for 20-120 min and then microinjected into hamster oocytes to determine whether they could decondense and develop into pronucl...

  13. Folding model description of reactions with exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraheem, Awad A.; Hassanain, M. A.; Mokhtar, S. R.; Zaki, M. A.; Mahmoud, Zakaria M. M.; Farid, M. El-Azab

    2012-08-15

    Microscopic folding calculations based upon the effective M3Y nucleon-nucleon interaction and the nuclearmatter densities of the interacting nuclei have been carried out to explain recently measured experimental data of the {sup 6}He+{sup 120}Sn elastic scattering cross section at four different laboratory energies near the Coulomb barrier. The extracted reaction cross sections are also considered.

  14. Space telescope searches for black holes in galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) will allow astronomers to obtain luminosity profiles, rotation curves, and velocity dispersions at angular scales that are an order of magnitude superior to those obtained previously. This enhanced spatial resolution will greatly improve the sensitivity for detecting centrally condensed matter in nearby galactic nuclei including, possibly, black holes.

  15. Recent studies of heavy nuclei far from stability at JYFL

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, R.; Enqvist, T.; Helariutta, K.

    1996-12-31

    The new K=130 Cyclotron + ECR facility of the Physics Department of the University of Jyvaskyla (JYFL) provides stable beams from protons up to krypton ions for nuclear structure studies. Two instruments designed especially for in-beam spectroscopic studies of heavy nuclei at JYFL are introduced in this contribution. Some results from recent measurements with them are reported.

  16. Are the nuclei beyond 132Sn very exotic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozeva, R.; Naïdja, H.; Nowacki, F.; Odahara, A.; Moon, C.-B.; NP1112-RIBF87 Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The term exotic nucleus is used for nuclei that have different from normal behavior. However, it turns out that the term normal is valid only for nuclei close to stability and more particularly for regions close to double-shell closures. As long as one drives away in the neutron-rich nuclei, especially at intermediate mass number, interplay between normal single-particle and many collective particle-hole excitations compete. In some cases with the addition of neutrons, these may turn to evolve as a skin, acting against the core nucleus that may also influence its shell evolution. Knowledge of these nuclear ingredients is especially interesting beyond the doubly-magic 132Sn, however a little is known on how the excitations modes develop with the addition of both protons and neutrons. Especially for the Sb nuclei, where one gradually increases these valence particles, the orbital evolution and its impact on exoticness is very intriguing. Experimental studies were conducted on several such isotopes using isomer and, β-decay spectroscopy at RIBF within EURICA. In particular, new data on 140Sb and 136Sb are examined and investigated in the framework of shell model calculations.

  17. Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1994-01-01

    Using a fully self-consistent quantum statistical model, we demonstrate the possibility of Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions. The most favorable conditions of high densities and low temperatures are usually associated with astrophysical processes and may be difficult to achieve in heavy ion collisions. Nonetheless, some suggestions for the possible experimental verification of the existence of this phenomenon are made.

  18. Comparison of Muon Capture in Light and in Heavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Measday, David F.; Stocki, Trevor J.

    2007-10-26

    We have recently completed an experimental study at TRIUMF of muon capture in the following elements, N, Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Ni, I, Au, and Bi. We detected the nuclear gamma rays emitted by the product nuclei after muon capture. The energy of the gamma ray identifies the source nuclide, and thus the reaction which has occurred. Our data are of better quality, and more comprehensive than any other data set in the literature. The ({mu}{sup -},{nu}n) reaction is always dominant. In light nuclei, reactions such as ({mu}{sup -},{nu}p) and ({mu}{sup -},{nu}pn) can occur, but not for heavy nuclei. However the reverse is true for reactions such as ({mu}{sup -},{nu}3n) and ({mu}{sup -},{nu}4n), which are very rare in light nuclei, but easily detected in heavy elements. We shall discuss how such information can be useful in calculations of neutrino-nucleus interactions, and of electron-capture in supernovae.

  19. Environment and properties of obscured and unobscured active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, M.; Bornancini, C.

    We analyze the properties of obscured and unobscured active galactic nuclei selected using mid-infrared colors in the redshift range 1 < z < 3. We find that obscured objects are located in a denser local galaxy environment compared to the unobscured sample.

  20. Classical Dynamics of a Nucleon in Heavy Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jian-zhong; Zhao, En-guang; Zhuo, Yi-zhong; Wu, Xi-zhen; Zong, Hong-shi

    1998-05-01

    Within the framework of the two-center shell model, the classically dynamical behaviour of a nucleon in heavy nuclei is investigated when nuclear shape parameters are changed systematically. It is found that there is a good quantum-classical correspondence of nucleonic regular (chaotic) motion so that Bohigas, Giannoni and Schmit conjecture is confirmed once again.

  1. Cerebellar Deep Nuclei Involvement in Cognitive Adaptation and Automaticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callu, Delphine; Lopez, Joelle; El Massioui, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    To determine the role of the interpositus nuclei of cerebellum in rule-based learning and optimization processes, we studied (1) successive transfers of an initially acquired response rule in a cross maze and (2) behavioral strategies in learning a simple response rule in a T maze in interpositus lesioned rats (neurotoxic or electrolytic lesions).…

  2. The structure of nuclei far from beta stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zganjar, E.F.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses: shape coexistence and intruder states; the electric monopole transition in nuclei; gold isotopes; platinum isotopes; iridium isotopes; search for superdeformation in {sup 192}Hg; search for population of superformed states in {sup 194}Pb using {sup 194}Bi {beta}{sup +}-decay; detailed nuclear structure studies far from stability; prototype internal pair spectrometer; and picosecond lifetime spectrometer.

  3. An image processing pipeline to detect and segment nuclei in muscle fiber microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanen; Xu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yaming; Xia, Shunren; Yang, Zhong

    2014-08-01

    Muscle fiber images play an important role in the medical diagnosis and treatment of many muscular diseases. The number of nuclei in skeletal muscle fiber images is a key bio-marker of the diagnosis of muscular dystrophy. In nuclei segmentation one primary challenge is to correctly separate the clustered nuclei. In this article, we developed an image processing pipeline to automatically detect, segment, and analyze nuclei in microscopic image of muscle fibers. The pipeline consists of image pre-processing, identification of isolated nuclei, identification and segmentation of clustered nuclei, and quantitative analysis. Nuclei are initially extracted from background by using local Otsu's threshold. Based on analysis of morphological features of the isolated nuclei, including their areas, compactness, and major axis lengths, a Bayesian network is trained and applied to identify isolated nuclei from clustered nuclei and artifacts in all the images. Then a two-step refined watershed algorithm is applied to segment clustered nuclei. After segmentation, the nuclei can be quantified for statistical analysis. Comparing the segmented results with those of manual analysis and an existing technique, we find that our proposed image processing pipeline achieves good performance with high accuracy and precision. The presented image processing pipeline can therefore help biologists increase their throughput and objectivity in analyzing large numbers of nuclei in muscle fiber images.

  4. New results on the structure of exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Hiroyoshi

    2015-04-01

    `Exotic nuclei' far from the stability line are unique objects of many-body quantum system, where ratios of neutron number to proton number are much larger or much smaller than those of nuclei found in nature. Their exotic properties and phenomena emerge from their large isospin asymmetry, and even affect scenarios of nucleosynthesis in universe. One of the exotic emergences is shell evolution. The magic numbers of stable nuclei are known; 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, 82 and 126. However the numbers 8, 20 and 28 have been found no more magic in a neutron-rich region, and new magic numbers such as 6, 16, 32 and 34 have been discovered. To access nuclei far from the stability line, especially neutron-rich nuclei, a large heavy-ion accelerator facility `Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF)' was constructed at RIKEN, Japan in 2007. The facility is highly optimized for inflight production of fission fragments via a U beam. The accelerator complex delivers an intense 345 MeV/u U beam. The U nuclide is converted at a target to fission fragments. The fragments of interest are collected and separated at an inflight separator, and are delivered to several experimental devices. The shell evolution programs at RIBF have been conducted with two methods; in-beam gamma spectroscopy and decay spectroscopy. A standard setup of in-beam gamma spectroscopy is combination of a NaI gamma detector array `DALI2' and a beam line spectrometer `ZeroDegree Spectrometer (ZDS)'. Coincidence measurements of de-excitation gamma rays at DALI2 and of reaction products at ZDS make it possible to select reaction channels event-by-event and to observe excited states of exotic nuclei in a specific reaction channel. Recently, a French-made thick liquid hydrogen target system `MINOS' has been introduced to access more neutron-rich nuclei. Isomer and beta-delayed gamma spectroscopy is organized with a Euroball germanium cluster array system `EURICA' and an active silicon stopper In this talk, I would like to

  5. Properties of fission fragments for Z =112 -116 superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gurjit; Sandhu, Kirandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamical cluster decay model (DCM) is applied to understand the dynamics of 48Ca+238U,244Pu,248Cm reactions at comparable excitation energies across the barrier. To understand the capture stage of *286112 ,*292114 , and *296116 nuclei, the compound nucleus formation probability is calculated. The indication of PC N<1 in the DCM framework demonstrates the fact that some competing process such as quasifission may occur at the capture stage of the 48Ca induced reactions. To understand this further, the comparative decay analysis of *286112 ,*292114 and *296116 , nuclei is carried out using β2 i deformations within hot optimum orientation criteria, and the calculated fission cross sections find nice agreement with available data. The fission mass distribution shows a double humped structure where a symmetric peak observed around the Sn region appears to find its genesis in a symmetric quasifission component. On the other hand, the emergence of peaks around Pb in the decay of Z =112 , 114, and 116 nuclei signify the possible presence of asymmetric quasifission. Higher and broader asymmetric quasifission peaks are observed for *296116 and *292114 nuclei as compared to *286112 nucleus. Beside this, the total kinetic energy (TKE) distribution of the decay fragments is also explored by using different proximity potentials, such as Prox-77, Prox-88, and Prox-00. Prox-88 seems to perform better and the calculated TKE values find relatively better comparison at lower angular momentum states. The possible role of different radii of the decaying nuclei is also exercised to understand the TKE ¯ dynamics of 48Ca+238U,244Pu,248Cm reactions.

  6. Dynamic-angle spinning and double rotation of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, K.T. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei is complicated by the coupling of the electric quadrupole moment of the nucleus to local variations in the electric field. The quadrupolar interaction is a useful source of information about local molecular structure in solids, but it tends to broaden resonance lines causing crowding and overlap in NMR spectra. Magic- angle spinning, which is routinely used to produce high resolution spectra of spin-{1/2} nuclei like carbon-13 and silicon-29, is incapable of fully narrowing resonances from quadrupolar nuclei when anisotropic second-order quadrupolar interactions are present. Two new sample-spinning techniques are introduced here that completely average the second-order quadrupolar coupling. Narrow resonance lines are obtained and individual resonances from distinct nuclear sites are identified. In dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) a rotor containing a powdered sample is reoriented between discrete angles with respect to high magnetic field. Evolution under anisotropic interactions at the different angles cancels, leaving only the isotropic evolution of the spin system. In the second technique, double rotation (DOR), a small rotor spins within a larger rotor so that the sample traces out a complicated trajectory in space. The relative orientation of the rotors and the orientation of the larger rotor within the magnetic field are selected to average both first- and second-order anisotropic broadening. The theory of quadrupolar interactions, coherent averaging theory, and motional narrowing by sample reorientation are reviewed with emphasis on the chemical shift anisotropy and second-order quadrupolar interactions experienced by half-odd integer spin quadrupolar nuclei. The DAS and DOR techniques are introduced and illustrated with application to common quadrupolar systems such as sodium-23 and oxygen-17 nuclei in solids.

  7. The suprachiasmatic nuclei and retinohypothalamic tract in the western spotted skunk.

    PubMed

    May, R; DeSantis, M; Mead, R A

    1985-07-29

    The western spotted skunk has a well-developed retinohypothalamic tract projecting to the middle and caudal parts of the suprachiasmatic nuclei. The nuclei have a complex 3-dimensional shape and contain small neuronal somas.

  8. Enrichment of heavy nuclei in the April 17, 1972 solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischer, R. L.; Hart, H. R., Jr.; Renshaw, A.; Woods, R. T.

    1974-01-01

    Cosmic ray nuclei from the April 17, 1972 solar flare were recorded in polycarbonate plastic and phosphate glass track detectors exposed on the Apollo 16 flight. The energy spectra of iron group nuclei and of carbon and heavier nuclei were measured down to about 0.02 MeV/nucleon, revealing that the enrichment of iron relative to carbon and heavier nuclei increases markedly in this very low energy region.

  9. Comparing and contrasting nuclei and cold atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinner, N. T.; Jensen, A. S.

    2013-05-01

    The experimental revolution in ultracold atomic gas physics over the past decades has brought tremendous amounts of new insight to the world of degenerate quantum systems. Here we compare and contrast the developments of cold atomic gases with the physics of nuclei since many concepts, techniques, and nomenclatures are common to both fields. However, nuclei are finite systems with interactions that are typically much more complicated than those of ultracold atomic gases. The similarities and differences must therefore be carefully addressed for a meaningful comparison and to facilitate fruitful crossdisciplinary activity. We first consider condensates of bosonic and paired systems of fermionic particles with the mean-field description, but take great care to point out potential problems in the limit of small particle numbers. Along the way we review some of the basic results of Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory, as well as the BCS-BEC crossover and the Fermi gas in the unitarity limit, all within the context of ultracold atoms. Subsequently, we consider the specific example of an atomic Fermi gas from a nuclear physics perspective, comparing degrees of freedom, interactions, and relevant length and energy scales of cold atoms and nuclei. Next we address some attempts in nuclear physics to transfer the concepts of condensates in nuclei that can in principle be built from bosonic alpha-particle constituents. We also consider Efimov physics, a prime example of nuclear physics transferred to cold atoms, and consider which systems are more likely to show interesting bound state spectra. Finally, we address some recent studies of the BCS-BEC crossover in light nuclei and compare them to the concepts used in ultracold atomic gases. While many-body concepts such as BEC or BCS states are applicable in both subfields, we find that the interactions and finite particle numbers in nuclei can obscure the clear meaning they have in cold

  10. Fractionation of nuclei from brain by zonal centrifugation and a study of the ribonucleic acid polymerase activity in the various classes of nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Austoker, J.; Cox, D.; Mathias, A. P.

    1972-01-01

    1. The nuclei of the cells of the whole rat brain have been fractionated in a B-XIV zonal rotor with a discontinuous gradient of sucrose. Five fractions were obtained. Zone (I) contained neuronal nuclei (70%) and astrocytic nuclei (23%). Zone (II) contained astrocytic nuclei (81%) and neuronal nuclei (15%). Zone (III) contained astrocytic nuclei (84%) and oligodendrocytic nuclei (15%). Zone (IV) contained oligodendrocytic nuclei (92%) and zone (V) contained only oligodendrocytic nuclei. 2. The content of DNA, RNA and protein per nucleus was determined for each zone. Although the amount of DNA per nucleus is constant (7pg) the RNA varies from 4.5 to 2.5pg/nucleus and the protein from 38 to 17.6pg/nucleus. The neuronal nuclei have the greatest amounts of protein. The oligodendrocytic nuclei have the least content of RNA and protein. 3. The effects of pH, ionic strength, and Mg2+ and Mn2+ concentration on the activity of the nuclear system for synthesis in vitro of RNA have been investigated for unfractionated nuclei. From these studies a standard set of conditions for the assay of nuclear RNA polymerase has been established. 4. The activity of the RNA polymerase in each of the zonal fractions has been determined in the presence and in the absence of α-amanitin. Zone (II) is the most active, followed by zone (I). The nuclei of zones (IV) and (V) have comparable activity, which is 40% of that of zone (II). 5. The extent of incorporation of each of the four labelled nucleoside triphosphates by the nuclei from each zone has been measured. These values have been used to calculate the base composition of the RNA synthesized in vitro in each class of nucleus. 6. The effect of changes in the condition of assay of RNA polymerase in the different classes of nuclei has been investigated. Significant differences in the response to concentrations of metal ions and ammonium sulphate have been observed. 7. Homopolymer formation in each zone of brain nuclei has been determined. The

  11. Color transparency in incoherent electroproduction of {rho} mesons off nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nemchik, J.; Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.

    2013-04-15

    Color transparency (CT) phenomena in elastic electroproduction of vector mesons off nuclei are usually infected by the onset of coherence length (CL) effects. However, at low energies corresponding to the CLAS experiment at Jefferson Lab (JLab), one can study practically the net CT effects, since CL is much shorter than the nuclear radius. We investigate various manifestations of CT effects using rigorous quantum mechanical approach based on the path integral technique. We include also the effects of {rho} meson decay inside the nucleus leading to a rise of the nuclear suppression towards small values of Q{sup 2}. Motivated by the last CLAS data we predict the A, Q{sup 2} and l{sub c} dependence of nuclear transparency for {rho}{sup 0} mesons produced incoherently off nuclei. We also perform predictions for expected signal of CT corresponding to the planned JLab upgrade to 12 GeV electron beam.

  12. Ab Initio Calculations Of Nuclear Reactions And Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S.

    2014-05-05

    Our ultimate goal is to develop a fundamental theory and efficient computational tools to describe dynamic processes between nuclei and to use such tools toward supporting several DOE milestones by: 1) performing predictive calculations of difficult-to-measure landmark reactions for nuclear astrophysics, such as those driving the neutrino signature of our sun; 2) improving our understanding of the structure of nuclei near the neutron drip line, which will be the focus of the DOE’s Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being constructed at Michigan State University; but also 3) helping to reveal the true nature of the nuclear force. Furthermore, these theoretical developments will support plasma diagnostic efforts at facilities dedicated to the development of terrestrial fusion energy.

  13. The relation between star formation and active nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.

    1987-01-01

    Three questions relevant to the relation between an active nucleus and surrounding star formation are discussed. The infrared stellar CO absorption bands can be used to identify galaxies with large populations of young, massive stars and thus can identify strong starburst unambiguously, such as in NGC 6240, and can help identify composite active/starburst systems such as Arp 220. An active nucleus is probably not required for LINER spectral characteristics; dusty starburst galaxies, particularly if they are nearly edge-on, can produce LINER spectra through the shock heating of their interstellar media by supernovae combined with the obscuration of their nuclei in the optical. The Galactic Center would be an ideal laboratory for studying the interaction of starbursts and active nuclei, if both could be demonstrated to occur there. Failure to detect a cusp in the stellar distribution raises questions about the presence of an active nucleus, which should be answered by additional observations in the near future.

  14. Studies of the Shapes of Heavy Nuclei at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Peter A.

    For certain combinations of protons and neutrons there is a theoretical expectation that the shape of nuclei can assume octupole deformation, which would give rise to reflection asymmetry or a "pear-shape" in the intrinsic frame, either dynamically (octupole vibrations) or statically (permanent octupole deformation). In this talk I will briefly review the historic evidence for reflection asymmetry in nuclei and describe how recent experiments carried out at REX-ISOLDE have constrained nuclear theory and how they contribute to tests of extensions of the Standard Model. I will also discuss future prospects for measuring nuclear shapes from Coulomb Excitation: experiments are being planned that will exploit beams from HIE-ISOLDE that are cooled in the TSR storage ring and injected into a solenoidal spectrometer similar to the HELIOS device developed at the Argonne National Laboratory.

  15. Interacting boson models for N{approx}Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Van Isacker, P.

    2011-05-06

    This contribution discusses the use of boson models in the description of N{approx}Z nuclei. A brief review is given of earlier attempts, initiated by Elliott and co-workers, to extend the interacting boson model of Arima and Iachello by the inclusion of neutron-proton s and d bosons with T = 1 (IBM-3) as well as T = 0 (IBM-4). It is argued that for the N{approx}Z nuclei that are currently studied experimentally, a different approach is needed which invokes aligned neutron-proton pairs with angular momentum J = 2j and isospin T = 0. This claim is supported by an analysis of shell-model wave functions in terms of pair states. Results of this alternative version of the interacting boson model are compared with shell-model calculations in the 1g{sub 9/2} shell.

  16. Cosmochemical implications of the physical processing of cometary nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    McSween, H.Y. Jr. ); Weissman, P.R. )

    1989-12-01

    Comets are not necessarily pristine nebular and interstellar material, despite a common perception to that effect. Alteration processes may occur during comet formation in the outer planet region, during their dispersal to or residence within the Oort cloud, and after their return to the planetary region. Processes that may have significantly modified cometary nuclei include heating, impacts, and irradiation. Possible consequences include phase changes in ices, hydration reactions in silicates, synthesis of organic compounds, collisional disruption and re-accretion, shock and irradiation effects in minerals and ices, cosmogenic nuclide formation, redistribution or loss of volatiles, and formation of a refractory veneer. A model of cometary nuclei that emerges from these considerations provides a framework for understanding observations of comets and future samples.

  17. Three-Body Forces and Proton-Rich Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, Jason D; Menendez, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first study of three-nucleon (3N) forces for proton-rich nuclei along the N 8 and N 20 isotones. Our results for the ground-state energies and proton separation energies are in very good agreement with experiment where available, and with the empirical isobaric multiplet mass equation. We predict the spectra for all N 8 and N 20 isotones to the proton dripline, which agree well with experiment for 18Ne, 19Na, 20Mg and 42Ti. In all other cases, we provide first predictions based on nuclear forces. Our results are also very promising for studying isospin symmetry breaking in medium-mass nuclei based on chiral effective field theory.

  18. Expectations and Limits to Synthesize Nuclei with Z ≥ 120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardina, G.; Fazio, G.; Mandaglio, G.; Manganaro, M.; Nasirov, A. K.; Romaniuk, M. V.; Saccà, C.

    In order to explore the possibilities to synthesize the new superheavy elements with Z=120, 122, 124, 126 some hot-fusion (mass asymmetric) reactions and cold-fusion (less mass asymmetric) reactions are studied. The dynamics of reaction with massive nuclei and the formation probability of heavy and superheavy elements with Z=90-126 in the asymmetric and symmetric reactions are discussed. The systematics of fusion probability PCN and evaporation residue cross section σER in these reactions are presented. Moreover, we explore the possibility of synthesis of superheavy nuclei by the use of reaction with the neutron rich radioactive beam 132Sn, and by symmetric reactions like 136Xe+136Xe and 139,149La+ 139,149La.

  19. Vaporization of comet nuclei - Light curves and life times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, J. J.; Ahearn, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of vaporization from the nucleus of a comet are examined and it is shown that a latitude dependence of vaporization can explain the asymmetries in cometary light curves. An attempt is made to explain the observed variation in molecular production rates with heliocentric distance when employing CO2 and clathrate hydrate ice as cometary nuclei substances. The energy balance equation and the vapor pressure equations of water and CO2 are used in calculating the vaporization from a surface. Calculations were carried out from both dry-ice and water-ice nuclei, using a variety of different effective visual albedos, but primarily for a thermal infrared of 0 (emission). Attention is given to cometary lifetimes and light curves and it was determined that the asymmetry in light curves occurs (occasionally) as a 'seasonal' effect due to a variation in the angle between the comet's rotation axis and the sun-comet line.

  20. The abundances of nuclei in the cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.

    1974-01-01

    The relative abundances are treated as a consequence of processes in cosmic ray transport occurring during passage of the radiation through interstellar material at high velocity. Some of the subjects mentioned are nuclear fragmentation and the production of secondary nuclei, nuclear reactions, energy loss and nuclear decay, ionization, the range-energy relation and propagation variables, capture and loss of electrons, the propagation of nuclei, the transport equation, equilibrium solutions, energy-dependent path length distribution, exponential path length distributions, discrete spectra, sources, supernovae, and the origin of the abundances. The connection between the space-time features of the sources, the material traversed, and the effects of magnetic fields is established by describing the particle-field interaction as a diffusive or random-walk process.

  1. Enhancement and Suppression of Fusion in Reactions Forming Heavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hinde, D. J.

    2006-08-14

    A new framework for comparing fusion probabilities in reactions forming heavy elements is presented, that eliminates both theoretical and experimental uncertainties, and gives new insights into systematic behavior. This should help in predicting favorable reactions to form new heavy nuclei. The framework is firstly applied to the formation of isotopes of Thorium, where it is found that production yields follow a simple systematic behavior. The data consistently show that fusion is inhibited (presumably by quasi-fission) by about a factor of 10 for projectiles ranging from Ar to Sn, with little dependence on shell structure in the projectile, target or compound nuclei. Application to formation of isotopes of Nobelium shows much more drastic changes in fusion probability as a function of entrance-channel conditions.

  2. Assigning {gamma} deformation from fine structure in exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.; Arumugam, P.

    2011-10-28

    The nonadiabatic quasiparticle model for triaxial shapes is used to perform calculations for decay of {sup 141}Ho, the only known odd-Z even-N deformed nucleus for which fine structure in proton emission from both ground and isomeric states has been observed. All experimental data corresponding to this unique case namely, the rotational spectra of parent and daughter nuclei, decay widths and branching ratios for ground and isomeric states, could be well explained with a strong triaxial deformation {gamma}{approx}20. The recent experimental observation of fine structure decay from the isomeric state, can be explained only with an assignment of I{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup +} as the decaying state, in contradiction with the previous assignment, of I{sup {pi}} 1/2{sup +}, based on adiabatic calculations. This study reveals that proton emission measurements could be a precise tool to probe triaxial deformations and other structural properties of exotic nuclei beyond the proton dripline.

  3. Shape phase transitions in odd-A nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2008-11-11

    We investigate shape phase transitions in odd nuclei within the Interacting Boson Fermion Model. Special attention is given to the case of the transition from the vibrational behaviour to the stable axial deformation. The odd particle is assumed to be moving in the three single particle orbitals j = 1/2,3/2,5/2 with a boson-fermion Hamiltonian that leads to the occurrence of the SU{sup BF}(3) boson-fermion symmetry when the boson part approaches the SU(3) condition. Both energy spectra and electromagnetic transitions show characteristic patterns similar to those displayed by the even nuclei at the corresponding critical point. The role of the additional particle in characterizing the properties of the critical points in finite quantal systems is investigated by resorting to the formalism based on the intrinsic frame.

  4. Empirical formula for mass excess of heavy and superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjunatha, H. C.; Chandrika, B. M.; Seenappa, L.

    2016-08-01

    A new empirical formula is proposed for mass excess of heavy and superheavy nuclei in the region Z = 96-129. The parameters of the formula are obtained by making a polynomial fit to the available theoretical and experimental data. The calculated mass excess values are compared with the experimental values and other results of the earlier proposed models such as finite range droplet model (FRDM) and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) method. Standard deviation of calculated mass excess values for each atomic number is tabulated. The good agreement of present formula with the experiment and other models suggests that the present formula could be used to evaluate the mass excess values of heavy and superheavy nuclei in the region 96 ≤Z ≥129. This formula is a model-independent formula and is first of its kind that produces a mass excess values with the only simple inputs of only Z and A.

  5. Communication: Thermodynamics of stacking disorder in ice nuclei.

    PubMed

    Quigley, D

    2014-09-28

    A simple Ising-like model for the stacking thermodynamics of ice 1 is constructed for nuclei in supercooled water, and combined with classical nucleation theory. For relative stabilities of cubic and hexagonal ice I within the range of experimental estimates, this predicts critical nuclei are stacking disordered at strong sub-cooling, consistent with recent experiments. At higher temperatures nucleation of pure hexagonal ice is recovered. Lattice-switching Monte-Carlo is applied to accurately compute the relative stability of cubic and hexagonal ice for the popular mW model of water. Results demonstrate that this model fails to adequately capture the relative energetics of the two polytypes, leading to stacking disorder at all temperatures. PMID:25273401

  6. Communication: Thermodynamics of stacking disorder in ice nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, D.

    2014-09-01

    A simple Ising-like model for the stacking thermodynamics of ice 1 is constructed for nuclei in supercooled water, and combined with classical nucleation theory. For relative stabilities of cubic and hexagonal ice I within the range of experimental estimates, this predicts critical nuclei are stacking disordered at strong sub-cooling, consistent with recent experiments. At higher temperatures nucleation of pure hexagonal ice is recovered. Lattice-switching Monte-Carlo is applied to accurately compute the relative stability of cubic and hexagonal ice for the popular mW model of water. Results demonstrate that this model fails to adequately capture the relative energetics of the two polytypes, leading to stacking disorder at all temperatures.

  7. {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of N = Z nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, C. J.

    1999-09-10

    The use of {gamma}-ray spectroscopy to probe the properties of marginally bound nuclear states has evolved from being a curiosity a decade ago to being the mainstream use for these devices. The key to this success has been the development of ultra-sensitive channel selection techniques which allow the parentage of each emitted y-ray to be established. With these techniques, and the enhanced efficiency of the arrays themselves, the level of sensitivity for nuclear spectroscopy has increased by several orders of magnitude, in some special cases reaching the 10's nanobarns level, 1000 times more sensitive than was possible a decade ago. In this paper the author discusses some recent developments in light nuclear spectroscopy, on nuclei with N = Z, below mass 100. These examples have been chosen to compliment other presentations at this conference which have covered similar experiments in heavier nuclei.

  8. Auxetic nuclei in embryonic stem cells exiting pluripotency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliara, Stefano; Franze, Kristian; McClain, Crystal R.; Wylde, George W.; Fisher, Cynthia L.; Franklin, Robin J. M.; Kabla, Alexandre J.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Chalut, Kevin J.

    2014-06-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) self-renew in a state of naïve pluripotency in which they are competent to generate all somatic cells. It has been hypothesized that, before irreversibly committing, ESCs pass through at least one metastable transition state. This transition would represent a gateway for differentiation and reprogramming of somatic cells. Here, we show that during the transition, the nuclei of ESCs are auxetic: they exhibit a cross-sectional expansion when stretched and a cross-sectional contraction when compressed, and their stiffness increases under compression. We also show that the auxetic phenotype of transition ESC nuclei is driven at least in part by global chromatin decondensation. Through the regulation of molecular turnover in the differentiating nucleus by external forces, auxeticity could be a key element in mechanotransduction. Our findings highlight the importance of nuclear structure in the regulation of differentiation and reprogramming.

  9. Temperature dependent relativistic mean field for highly excited hot nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambhir, Y. K.; Maharana, J. P.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Panos, C. P.; Ring, P.

    2000-11-01

    The temperature dependent relativistic mean field (RMF-T) results obtained by using nonlinear Lagrangian parameter set NL3 are presented for a few selected representative spherical and deformed nuclei. The calculated total binding energy (entropy) decrease (increase) as temperature (T) increases. The depths of the potentials and the single particle (sp) energies change very little with temperature. The density slightly spreads out; as a result the radius increases as temperature rises. For well deformed nuclei the shell effects disappear at around T~3 MeV. This value of T is relatively higher as compared to the corresponding value of T (~1.8 MeV) obtained in the Strutinsky-type calculations. This difference in the value of T is shown to be due to the use of the effective nucleon mass (< the bare mass) appearing in the Skyrme III interaction or emerging from the RMF Lagrangian.

  10. Neutron transfer measurements on neutron-rich N=82 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, Steven D; Jones, K. L.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, Robert; Kapler, R.; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J Felix; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Shapira, Dan; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Smith, Michael Scott

    2009-01-01

    Calculations of r-process nucleosynthesis rely significantly on nuclear structure models as input, which are not well tested in the neutron-rich regime, due to the paucity of experimental data on the majority of these nuclei. High quality radioactive beams have recently made possible the measurement of (d,p) reactions on unstable nuclei in inverse kinematics, which can yield information on the development of single-neutron structure away from stability in close proximity to suggested r-process paths. The Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) has been developed for the measurement of such reactions. An early partial implementation of ORRUBA has been utilized to measure the {sup 132}Sn(d,p){sup 133}Sn and {sup 134}Te(d,p){sup 135}Te reactions for the first time.

  11. HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Düringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Gustafsson, Lotta; Kimura, Hiroshi; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-10-24

    HAMLET is a folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin in an active complex with oleic acid. HAMLET selectively enters tumor cells, accumulates in their nuclei and induces apoptosis-like cell death. This study examined the interactions of HAMLET with nuclear constituents and identified histones as targets. HAMLET was found to bind histone H3 strongly and to lesser extent histones H4 and H2B. The specificity of these interactions was confirmed using BIAcore technology and chromatin assembly assays. In vivo in tumor cells, HAMLET co-localized with histones and perturbed the chromatin structure; HAMLET was found associated with chromatin in an insoluble nuclear fraction resistant to salt extraction. In vitro, HAMLET bound strongly to histones and impaired their deposition on DNA. We conclude that HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei and propose that this interaction locks the cells into the death pathway by irreversibly disrupting chromatin organization.

  12. Heaviest Nuclei: New Element with Atomic Number 117

    ScienceCinema

    Oganessian, Yuri [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Russia and Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

    2016-07-12

    One of the fundamental outcomes of the nuclear shell model is the prediction of the 'stability islands' in the domain of the hypothetical super heavy elements. The talk is devoted to the experimental verification of these predictions - the synthesis and study of both the decay and chemical properties of the super heavy elements. The discovery of a new chemical element with atomic number Z=117 is reported. The isotopes 293117 and 294117 were produced in fusion reactions between 48Ca and 249Bk. Decay chains involving 11 new nuclei were identified by means of the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator. The measured decay properties show a strong rise of stability for heavier isotopes with Z =111, validating the concept of the long sought island of enhanced stability for heaviest nuclei.

  13. Rapid Isolation of Nuclei from Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Nabbi, Arash; Riabowol, Karl

    2015-08-01

    This protocol presents a rapid, efficient, and practical (REAP) method to separate nuclei from cultured cells in vitro with as little damage and contamination as possible. The REAP procedure is performed at low temperature and takes <2 min, which minimizes protein degradation, protein modification, and diffusion of soluble proteins out of the nuclear compartment while maintaining the integrity of protein complexes. A mild detergent, NP-40, is used together with mild mechanical shearing to disrupt the plasma membrane, leaving the nuclear membrane intact. The REAP method can be used with various cell lines grown in vitro and requires minimal optimization. The isolated nuclei are suitable for numerous downstream applications (e.g., western blotting, 2D gel electrophoresis, and immunoprecipitation). If desired, aliquots of whole-cell lysate and the cytoplasmic fraction can be saved for comparison. PMID:26240403

  14. An Exactly Solvable Supersymmetric Model of Semimagic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Balantekin, A. B.; Gueven, Nurtac; Pehlivan, Yamac

    2008-11-11

    A simple model of nucleons coupled to angular momentum zero (s-pairs) occupying the valance shell of a semi-magic nuclei is considered. The model has a separable, orbit dependent pairing interaction which dominates over the kinetic term. It is shown that such an interaction leads to an exactly solvable model whose (0{sup +}) eigenstates and energies can be computed very easily with the help of the algebraic Bethe ansatz method. It is also shown that the model has a supersymmetry which connects the spectra of some semimagic nuclei. The results obtained from this model for the semimagic Ni isotopes from {sup 58}Ni to {sup 68}Ni are given. In addition, a new and easier technique for calculating the energy eigenvalues from the Bethe ansatz equations is also presented.

  15. Probing the Evolution of the Shell Structures in Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    De Angelis, Giacomo

    2008-11-11

    Magic numbers are a key feature in finite Fermion systems since they are strongly related to the underlying mean field. The size of the shell gaps and their evolution far from stability can be linked to the shape and symmetry of the nuclear mean field. Moreover the study of nuclei with large neutron/proton ratio allow to probe the density dependence of the effective interaction. Changes of the nuclear density and size in nuclei with increasing N/Z ratios are expected to lead to different nuclear symmetries and excitations. In this contribution I will discuss some selected examples which show the big potential of stable beams and of binary reactions for the study of the properties of the neutron-rich nuclear many body systems.

  16. Ultra-High Spin Spectroscopy In Er Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.

    2008-11-11

    The discoveries observed in the ongoing conflict between collective and single-particle nuclear behaviour with increasing angular momentum have driven the field of nuclear spectroscopy for many decades and have given rise to new nuclear phenomena. Recently a new frontier of {gamma} spectroscopy at ultra-high spin has been opened in the rare-earth region with rotational bands that bypass the classic band-terminating states that appear at spin 45({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) in the N 90 Er nuclei. These weakly populated rotational structures have characteristics of triaxial strongly-deformed bands. Such structures have been observed in {sup 157,158,160}Er, following a series of experiments using the Gammasphere spectrometer. These observations herald a return to collective excitations at spins of about 50 to 65({Dirac_h}/2{pi}). This talk reviews the status of the spectroscopy and understanding of the observed structures in these Er and neighbouring nuclei.

  17. Interacting boson models for N˜Z nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Isacker, P.

    2011-05-01

    This contribution discusses the use of boson models in the description of N˜Z nuclei. A brief review is given of earlier attempts, initiated by Elliott and co-workers, to extend the interacting boson model of Arima and Iachello by the inclusion of neutron-proton s and d bosons with T = 1 (IBM-3) as well as T = 0 (IBM-4). It is argued that for the N˜Z nuclei that are currently studied experimentally, a different approach is needed which invokes aligned neutron-proton pairs with angular momentum J = 2j and isospin T = 0. This claim is supported by an analysis of shell-model wave functions in terms of pair states. Results of this alternative version of the interacting boson model are compared with shell-model calculations in the 1g9/2 shell.

  18. Hunting the snark: Identifying the organic ice nuclei in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Thomas C. J.; DeMott, Paul J.; Tobo, Yutaka; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Stump, William L.; Franc, Gary D.

    2013-05-01

    The contribution of soil organic matter as a potential source of atmospheric ice nuclei (IN) has long been postulated. Rather surprisingly, considering the abundance of IN active at warm temperatures in many soils, it remains unresolved. This research aimed to identify sources of high-temperature, organic IN in a range of Wyoming and Colorado soils. Methods used included physical, chemical and enzymatic tests combined with quantitative PCR to estimate the number of ice nucleation active bacteria. All soils contained 106 to >107 IN active at -10°C. Reductions in IN after heating or digestion with hydrogen peroxide suggested that IN active >-15°C were effectively all organic. Ice nuclei active >-7°C appear to be primarily a mixture of biological macromolecules. At colder temperatures there was a large pool of organic IN that were quite resistant to most physico-chemical challenges.

  19. Deuteron distribution in nuclei and the Levinger's factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhar, O.; Fabrocini, A.; Fantoni, S.; Illarionov, A. Yu.; Lykasov, G. I.

    2003-01-01

    We compute the distribution of quasideuterons in doubly closed shell nuclei. The ground states of 16O and 40Ca are described in ls coupling using a realistic Hamiltonian including the Argonne v'8 and the Urbana IX models of two- and three-nucleon potentials, respectively. The nuclear wave function contains central and tensor correlations, and correlated basis functions theory is used to evaluate the distribution of neutron-proton pairs, having the deuteron quantum numbers, as a function of their total momentum. By computing the number of deuteronlike pairs we are able to extract Levinger’s factor and compare to both the available experimental data and the predictions of the local density approximation, based on nuclear matter estimates. The agreement with the experiments is excellent, whereas the local density approximation is shown to sizably overestimate Levinger’s factor in the region of the medium nuclei.

  20. Bulk Properties of Nuclear Matter From Excitations of Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Shlomo, Shalom

    2007-10-26

    We consider the predictive power of Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation in determining properties of finite nuclei and thereby in extracting bulk properties of infinite nuclear matter (NM) by extrapolation. In particular, we review the current status of determining the value of NM incompressibility coefficient K, considering the most sensitive method of analyzing the recent accurate experimental data on excitation strengths of compression modes of nuclei within microscopic relativistic and non-relativistic theoretical models. We discuss the consequences of common violations of self-consistency in HF based random-phase-approximation calculations of strength functions and present results of highly accurate calculations of centroid energies and excitation cross sections of giant resonances. Explanations (resolutions) of long standing discrepancies in the value of K are presented.

  1. Evidence for dineutrons in extremely neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, K.K.; Parker, B. )

    1991-05-13

    It is shown that the continuum missing-mass spectra for the ({pi}{sup {minus}},{pi}{sup +}) and ({pi}{sup {minus}},{ital p}) reactions leading to extremely neutron-rich exotic nuclei can be explained in terms of phase-space distributions by invoking the presence of dineutrons as one of the products of the breakup. It is suggested that this indicates the presence of the dineutron as a cluster in these neutron-rich systems during their breakup. It is noted that these observations in weakly {ital unbound} systems may be analogs of the dineutron halos for which evidence has been found in weakly {ital bound} nuclei near the neutron drip line.

  2. Magnetic moments of light nuclei from lattice quantum chromodynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Beane, S.  R.; Chang, E.; Cohen, S.; Detmold, W.; Lin, H.  W.; Orginos, K.; Parreño, A.; Savage, M.  J.; Tiburzi, B.  C.

    2014-12-16

    We present the results of lattice QCD calculations of the magnetic moments of the lightest nuclei, the deuteron, the triton and 3He, along with those of the neutron and proton. These calculations, performed at quark masses corresponding to mπ ~ 800 MeV, reveal that the structure of these nuclei at unphysically heavy quark masses closely resembles that at the physical quark masses. We find that the magnetic moment of 3He differs only slightly from that of a free neutron, as is the case in nature, indicating that the shell-model configuration of two spin-paired protons and a valence neutron captures itsmore » dominant structure. Similarly a shell-model-like moment is found for the triton, μ3H ~ μp. The deuteron magnetic moment is found to be equal to the nucleon isoscalar moment within the uncertainties of the calculations.« less

  3. Neutrino absorption by hot nuclei in supernova environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhioev, Alan A.; Vdovin, A. I.; Wambach, J.

    2015-10-01

    Using the thermal quasiparticle random-phase approximation, we study the process of neutrino and antineutrino capture on hot nuclei in supernova environments. For the sample nuclei 56Fe and 82Ge we perform a detailed analysis of thermal effects on the strength distribution of allowed Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions which dominate low-energy charged-current neutrino reactions. The finite-temperature cross sections are calculated taking into account the contributions of both allowed and forbidden transitions. The enhancement of the low-energy cross sections is explained by considering thermal effects on the GT± strength. For 56Fe we compare the calculated finite-temperature cross sections with those obtained from large-scale shell-model calculations.

  4. Radio and mm-observations of active nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, P.

    Radio, mm-wave, and X ray observations of active galactic nuclei are reviewed, together with theoretical models for the phenomena. Formulas are defined for the power law energy distribution of relativistic electrons observed near the sources, the characteristic radio emission, the local emission coefficient, and electron energy loss. Consideration is also given to nonsynchrotron self-absorption and to international cooperation to coordinate radio telescopy on different continents to perform VLBI research. Most sources detected at low frequencies exhibit a steep spectrum halo, while flat spectrum sources at 5 GHz show little extended emission. The low frequency cut-offs encountered due to thermal absorption by H II regions are quantified. Injection and equilibrium spectra are examined, along with the synchrotron loss time scale, the inverse Compton limit, and evidence for repeated explosions in the nuclei. Finally, recent work at the Bonn radioastronomy facility is described.

  5. Production of actinide nuclei by multi-nucleon transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.

    1995-08-01

    Multi-nucleon transfers have increasingly allowed us to reach parts of the nuclear chart where regular compound nuclear reactions are prohibited. The interesting region of Ra and Rn, where a rich tapestry of nuclear structure manifests itself, is now accessible using this technique of deep inelastic scattering. In particular, these nuclei are predicted to lie at the onset of octupole deformation and the region is rich in examples of shape coexistence. There are several theoretical predictions of nuclear structure of these nuclei that have not been experimentally tested. Moreover, there is serious disagreement among these theories. We used a beam of {sup 136}Xe at 720 MeV from ATLAS on a target of {sup 232}Th to produce a range of Rn isotopes, with a mass from 220 to 224, and Ra isotopes with masses greater than 222. The beam energy, target and beam were selected carefully to enhance the cross-section for production of these nuclei and reduce the Doppler broadening of the gamma rays that were observed in the Argonne Notre Dame gamma-ray facility. The 12 germanium detectors of this array allowed the observation of gamma-gamma coincidences. The inner ball of 50 BGO detectors allowed us to record the multiplicity and sum-energy information for each event. The latter should permit us to determine the entry region in the products of the transfer reaction. We had four successful days of beam-time, when we collected in excess of 8 x 10{sup 7} events. Data analysis is in progress at the University of Liverpool. A complete set of spectroscopic information on the yrast structure of the many nuclei produced in this reaction is being extracted.

  6. Cluster Features of Normal-, Super- and Hyperdeformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G.G.; Antonenko, N.V.; Kuklin, S.N.

    2005-11-21

    It is shown that an important mode of nuclear excitations in different processes like as cluster radioactivity, parity splitting in normal deformed bands, decay out phenomenon of the yrast superdeformed states in the heavy nuclei and formation of super- and hyper-deformed states in induced fission and heavy ion reactions is related to the motion in charge (mass) asymmetry coordinate. With the suggested cluster model one can try to unify all phenomena mentioned above.

  7. Routing of Biomolecules and Transgenes’ Vectors in Nuclei of Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Malecki, Marek; Malecki, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    The molecular architecture of Nuclear Pore Complexes (NPCs), as well as the import and export of molecules through them, has been intensively studied in a variety of cells, including oocytes. However, the structures and mechanisms, involved in the transport of molecules beyond the NPCs, remained unclear, until now. The specific aim of this work was, therefore, to determine, if there exist any intranuclear structures in continuum with the NPCs. This information could help in explaining the mechanisms, which propel the distribution of biomolecules and vectors inside the cell nuclei. To attain this aim, we used rapid cryo-immobilization to capture molecular processes of living cells with millisecond resolution. We pursued molecular imaging, including electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, to reveal structures with nanometer spatial resolution. We also bioengineered single chain variable fragments to track biomolecules and transgenes’ constructs. Herein, we reveal the Nuclear Routing Networks (NRNs) in the oocytes of Xenopus laevis. The NRNs originate at and extend from the tops of intranuclear baskets of the NPCs to interconnect them, while creating a complex, intra-nuclear, three-dimensional architecture. The NRNs guide the export of both tRNA, as well as the Nuclear Export Signal (NES) equipped vectors, from the nuclei. Moreover, the NRNs guide the import of both nucleoplasmin, as well as the Nuclear Localization Signals (NLS) modified transgenes’ vectors, into the nuclei. The vectors equipped with these NLS and NES shuttle back and forth through the NPCs and NRNs. To summarize, we reveal the NRN, which functions as the guided distribution system in the Xenopus laevis oocytes’ nuclei. We further proceed with the identification of its molecular components. PMID:22896814

  8. Capabilities of the LDEF-2 heavy nuclei collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drach, J.; Price, P. B.; Salamon, M. H.; Tarle, G.; Ahlen, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    To take the next big step beyond High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-3) the Heavy Nuclei Collector (HNC), to be carried on an LDEF reflight, has the goals of greatly increased collecting power ( 30 actinides) and charge resolution sigma sub Z or = 0.25 E for Z up to approximately 100, which will provide abundances of all the charges 40 or Z or = 96 and permit sensitive searches for hypothetical particles such as monopoles, superheavy elements, and quark nuggets.

  9. Cooper pair sizes in superfluid nuclei in a simplified model

    SciTech Connect

    Vinas, X.; Schuck, P.; Pillet, N.

    2010-09-15

    Cooper pair sizes are evaluated in a simple harmonic oscillator model reproducing the values of sophisticated Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations. Underlying reasons for the very small sizes of 2.0-2.5 fm of Cooper pairs in the surface of nuclei are analyzed. It is shown that the confining properties of the nuclear volume is the dominating effect. It is argued that for Cooper pair sizes the local-density approximation idea is particularly inadapted.

  10. One-quasiparticle states in odd-Z heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kuklin, S. N.; Scheid, W.

    2010-11-15

    The isotopic dependencies of one-quasiparticle states in Es and Md are treated. In {sup 253,255}Lr, the energies of the lowest one-quasiproton states are calculated. The one-quasiparticle isomer states are revealed in the nuclei of an {alpha}-decay chain starting from {sup 269}Rg. The {alpha} decays from some isomer states are predicted. The population of isomer states in the complete fusion reactions is discussed.

  11. Breakdown of helium nuclei in matter processed near black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The rate of breakup of helium nuclei by particle induced reactions is computed. It is shown that the rate is determined by the endothermic reaction p + 4He 3He + d, becoming effective at kT approx. few MeV. It is suggested that matter having been processed to these temperatures will be depleted in helium and in the elements C, N, O, and Ne.

  12. Comet Nuclei Primordial Aggregation Effects on their Internal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasue, Jeremie; Botet, R.; Levasseur-Regourd, A.; Hadamcik, E.; Kofman, W.

    2009-09-01

    Comet nuclei have a low density ( 500 kg.m-3, e.g. [1]) and are easily disrupted. In situ studies have unveiled surface features hinting at a pervasive internal layered structure on 9P/Tempel 1 [2]. This indicates that specific processes occurred during its formation and lifetime. Our simulations describe the internal structure of comet nuclei due to their formation as aggregates of cometesimals [3]. The simulations take into account the amount of kinetic energy dissipated by sintering processes, the ejection of material during the impact and the variation in density and sizes of the cometesimals. From 10000 to 100000 cometesimals are considered with sizes down to tens of meters. A cohesive strength and density layering of the material occurs, leading to a highly cohesive core with less cohesive outer layers. The thickness of such layers is comparable to the larger layers observed at 9P/Tempel 1 ( 200 m). The porosity also increases with the distance to the centre of the nucleus. The cohesive strength of the nuclei obtained (<104 N.m-2) compares well with values deduced from disruption events observations and laboratory impact experiments. When the ejected material is lost, the internal structure of the nucleus can be erased. This suggests that either the structures observed are not primordial (cryovolcanism [4]) or that secondary mechanisms, such as the re-accretion of fragments after destructive collision, have occurred during the accretion process [5]. The results are used to improve cometary nuclei models for the analysis of the CONSERT experiment onboard Rosetta, which will study the dielectric properties and internal heterogeneities of the nucleus. LPI fellowship is acknowledged. [1] Levasseur-Regourd et al., PSS (2009) [2] Belton et al., Icarus (2007) [3] Lasue et al., Icarus (2009) [4] Belton et al., Icarus (2008) [5] Blum and Wurm, Annu. Rev. Astro. Astrophys. (2008)

  13. Spatial organization and correlations of cell nuclei in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Berman, Hal; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Torquato, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Accepting the hypothesis that cancers are self-organizing, opportunistic systems, it is crucial to understand the collective behavior of cancer cells in their tumorous heterogeneous environment. In the present paper, we ask the following basic question: Is this self-organization of tumor evolution reflected in the manner in which malignant cells are spatially distributed in their heterogeneous environment? We employ a variety of nontrivial statistical microstructural descriptors that arise in the theory of heterogeneous media to characterize the spatial distributions of the nuclei of both benign brain white matter cells and brain glioma cells as obtained from histological images. These descriptors, which include the pair correlation function, structure factor and various nearest neighbor functions, quantify how pairs of cell nuclei are correlated in space in various ways. We map the centroids of the cell nuclei into point distributions to show that while commonly used local spatial statistics (e.g., cell areas and number of neighboring cells) cannot clearly distinguish spatial correlations in distributions of normal and abnormal cell nuclei, their salient structural features are captured very well by the aforementioned microstructural descriptors. We show that the tumorous cells pack more densely than normal cells and exhibit stronger effective repulsions between any pair of cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that brain gliomas are organized in a collective way rather than randomly on intermediate and large length scales. The existence of nontrivial spatial correlations between the abnormal cells strongly supports the view that cancer is not an unorganized collection of malignant cells but rather a complex emergent integrated system.

  14. Otolith-Canal Convergence in Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David

    1996-01-01

    During manned spaceflight, acute vestibular disturbances often occur, leading to physical duress and a loss of performance. Vestibular adaptation to the weightless environment follows within two to three days yet the mechanisms responsible for the disturbance and subsequent adaptation are still unknown In order to understand vestibular system function in space and normal earth conditions the basic physiological mechanisms of vestibular information co coding must be determined. Information processing regarding head movement and head position with respect to gravity takes place in the vestibular nuclei neurons that receive signals From the semicircular canals and otolith organs in the vestibular labyrinth. These neurons must synthesize the information into a coded output signal that provides for the head and eye movement reflexes as well as the conscious perception of the body in three-dimensional space The current investigation will for the first time. determine how the vestibular nuclei neurons quantitatively synthesize afferent information from the different linear and angular acceleration receptors in the vestibular labyrinths into an integrated output signal. During the second year of funding, progress on the current project has been focused on the anatomical orientation of semicircular canals and the spatial orientation of the innervating afferent responses. This information is necessary in order to understand how vestibular nuclei neurons process the incoming afferent spatial signals particularly with the convergent otolith afferent signals that are also spatially distributed Since information from the vestibular nuclei is presented to different brain regions associated with differing reflexive and sensory functions it is important to understand the computational mechanisms used by vestibular neurons to produce the appropriate output signal.

  15. Purification of Tetrahymena nuclei by sedimentation at unit gravity.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Melody T; Allis, C David

    2010-04-01

    This protocol provides a method for purification of Tetrahymena nuclei using sedimentation at unit gravity. It is useful for applications where purity of micro- and macronuclei is required beyond that which is typically achieved by differential sedimentation alone. When differential sedimentation is followed by sedimentation at unit gravity, micro- and macronuclei can be purified to virtual homogeneity. This method also permits the purification of homogeneous populations of developing new macronuclei (anlagen) and distinct classes of micronuclei from various stages of conjugation.

  16. Calculation of Formation and Decay of Heavy Compound Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, E. A.

    2001-04-01

    The report describes a method for calculating fusion and decay probabilities in reactions leading to the production of transfermium elements. The competition between quasi-fission and fussion is described on the basis of the Dinuclear System Concept (DNSC). The both competition between fusion and quasi-fission and statistical decay of heavy highly fissionable excited compound nuclei is described in an approach based on the Monte-Carlo method.

  17. Recent developments in the study of nuclei far from stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zganjar, E.F.

    1984-01-01

    Recent advances in accelerators and experimental techniques have led to an enormous increase in the ability of scientists to synthesize and study new isotopes, particularly isotopes far from stability. Some of the recent results on nuclei far from stability which fall into the categories of new decay modes, shell closure away from stability, deformation and reinforcing shell gaps, and intruder states and shape coexistence are reviewed. 102 references.

  18. Isotopic dependence of induced fission cross sections for heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubov, A. S.; Bolgova, O. N.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.

    2009-10-01

    Using the statistical model, we calculate the induced fission cross sections for the nuclei 211-223Ra in their peripheral collisions with 208Pb. The role of closed shell N = 126 is studied. Level densities of the Fermi-gas model and of the model with collective enhancement are used. Taking into account the particle-hole excitation in addition to the collective Coulomb excitation, we obtain satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Influence of Neutron Enrichment on Disintegration Modes of Compound Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, E.; Gomez Del Campo, Jorge; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Shapira, Dan

    2008-11-01

    Cross sections, kinetic energy and angular distributions of fragments with charge 6 {le} Z {le} 28 emitted in {sup 78,82}Kr+{sup 40}C at 5.5 MeV/A reactions were measured at the GANIL facility using the INDRA apparatus. This experiment aims to investigate the influence of the neutron enrichment on the decay mechanism of excited nuclei. Data are discussed in comparison with predictions of transition state and Hauser-Feshbach models.

  20. The onset of deformation in neutron-deficient At nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. B.; Chapman, R.; Middleton, D. J.; Spohr, K.-M.; Cocks, J. F. C.; Dorvaux, O.; Helariutta, K.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kankaanpaeae, H.; Kettunen, H.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Muikku, M.; Nieminen, P.; Rahkila, P.; Savelius, A.; Coz, Y. Le

    1999-11-16

    Excited states in the {sup 197}At nucleus have been identified for the first time using the recoil-decay-tagging technique. The excitation energy of these states is found to be consistent with the systematics of neutron-deficient. At nuclei and with calculations indicating that the nucleus may be deformed in its ground state. A more recent experiment, to study states in {sup 195}At, is discussed.

  1. The Onset of Deformation in Neutron-Deficient At Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.B.; Chapman, R.; Cocks, J.F.C.; Dorvaux, O.; Helariutta, K.; Jones, P.M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kankaanpaa, H.; Kettunen, H.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Le Coz, Y.; Leino, M.; Middleton, D.J.; Muikku, M.; Nieminen, P.; Rahkila, P.; Savelius, A.; Spohr, K.-M.

    1999-12-31

    Excited states in the {sup 197}At nucleus have been identified for the first time using the recoil-decay-tagging technique. The excitation energy of these states is found to be consistent with the systematics of neutron-deficient At nuclei and with calculations indicating that the nucleus may be deformed in its ground state. A more recent experiment, to study states in {sup 195}At, is discussed.

  2. Octupole shaps in nuclei, and some rotational consequences thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, W.; Olanders, P.; Ragnarsson, I.; Dudek, J.; Leander, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    During the last years a large number of experimental papers presenting spectroscopic evidence for collective dipole and octupole deformations have appeared. Many theoretical attempts have been made to explain the observed spectroscopic properties in terms of stable octupole deformations. The coupling by the octupole potential, being proportional to Y/sub 30/, is strongest for those subshells for which ..delta..1 = 3. Therefore the tendency towards octupole deformation occurs just beyond closed shells where the high-j intruder subshells (N,1,j) lie very close to the normal parity subshells (N-1,1-3,j-3), i.e. for the particle numbers 34 (g/sub 9/2/-p/sub 3/2/), 56 (h/sub 11/2/-d/sub 5/2/). 9C (i/sub 13/2/-f/sub 7/2/) and 134 (j/sub 15/2/-g/sub 9/2/). Empirically, it is specifically for the particle numbers listed above that negative parity states are observed at relatively low energies in doubly even nuclei. From the different combinations of octupole-driving particle numbers four regions of likely candidates for octupole deformed equilibrium shapes emerge, namely the neutron-deficient nuclei with Z approx. = 90, N approx. = 134 (light actinides) and Z approx. = 34, N approx. = 34 (A approx. = 70) and the neutron-rich nuclei with Z approx. = 56, N approx. = 90 (heavy Ba) and Z approx. = 34, N/sup 56/ (A approx. = 90). In our calculations we searched for octupole unstable nuclei in these four mass regions. The Strutinsky method with the deformed Woods-Saxon potential was employed. The macroscopic part consists of a finite-range liquid drop energy, where both the surface and Coulomb terms contain a diffuseness correction.

  3. Composite particle representation for light sd shell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Collinson, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Composite Particle Representation is applied to light sd shell nuclei /sup 20/O, /sup 20/F and /sup 20/Ne. The energy spectrum is found to agree exactly with the shell model in all cases. The CPR theory is then used to examine the possible boson structure of sd shell wavefunctions. Only in the case of /sup 20/O are the wavefunctions found to have a high boson probability.

  4. Correlations of collective observables and the phonon structure of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.; Zamfir, N.V. ||

    1994-07-01

    A ``horizontal`` view of nuclear structures is described in which various observables are correlated over broad mass ranges. This approach leads to a number of remarkable correlations, to new understanding of the evolution of structure, to a challenge to microscopic theories, and to new signatures of structure that will be especially useful with radioactive beam experiments. In particular, this and other evidence suggests a nearly universal and pervasive role of phonon and multi-phonon excitations in nuclei.

  5. Boundary between hadron and quark-gluon structure of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pirner, H. J.; Vary, J. P.

    2011-07-15

    We show that the boundary between quark-dominated and hadron-dominated regions of nuclear structure may be blurred by multinucleon quark clusters arising from color percolation. Recent experiments supporting partial percolation in cold nuclei and full percolation in hot/dense nuclear matter include deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering, relativistic heavy-ion collisions, and the binding energy in {sup 5}He{sub {Lambda}.}

  6. Spectroscopic studies on light proton-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes, V.; Lichtenthaler, R.; Kubono, S.; Tanaka, M. H.; Nomura, T.; Katayama, I.; Kato, S.

    2007-02-12

    A systematic for the light proton rich nuclei with constant TZ = -3/2 isospin is proposed, where a survey on their structure have shown interesting features. Preliminary results of a re-analysis on the sctructure of 13O nucleus is also presented. This 13O nucleus have been investigated by the 3-neutron pick up (3He,6He) reaction, and new levels have been assigned for this nucleus.

  7. Ground state properties of superheavy nuclei with Z=117 and Z=119

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Zhongzhou; Chen Dinghan; Xu Chang

    2006-11-02

    We review the current studies on the ground-state properties of superheavy nuclei. It is shown that there is shape coexistence for the ground state of many superheavy nuclei from different models and many superheavy nuclei are deformed. This can lead to the existence of isomers in superheavy region and it plays an important role for the stability of superheavy nuclei. Some new results on Z=117 and Z=119 isotopes are presented. The agreement between theoretical results and experimental data clearly demonstrates the validity of theoretical models for the ground-state properties of superheavy nuclei.

  8. Multipole modes in deformed nuclei within the finite amplitude method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortelainen, M.; Hinohara, N.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2015-11-01

    Background: To access selected excited states of nuclei, within the framework of nuclear density functional theory, the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA) is commonly used. Purpose: We present a computationally efficient, fully self-consistent framework to compute the QRPA transition strength function of an arbitrary multipole operator in axially deformed superfluid nuclei. Methods: The method is based on the finite amplitude method (FAM) QRPA, allowing fast iterative solution of QRPA equations. A numerical implementation of the FAM-QRPA solver module has been carried out for deformed nuclei. Results: The practical feasibility of the deformed FAM module has been demonstrated. In particular, we calculate the quadrupole and octupole strengths in a heavy deformed nucleus 240Pu, without any truncations in the quasiparticle space. To demonstrate the capability to calculate individual QRPA modes, we also compute low-lying negative-parity collective states in 154Sm. Conclusions: The new FAM implementation enables calculations of the QRPA strength function throughout the nuclear landscape. This will facilitate global surveys of multipole modes and β decays and will open new avenues for constraining the nuclear energy density functional.

  9. Sensitivity of Cirrus Properties to Ice Nuclei Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The relative importance of heterogeneous and homogeneous ice nucleation for cirrus formation remains an active area of debate in the cloud physics community. From a theoretical perspective, a number of modeling studies have investigated the sensitivity of ice number concentration to the nucleation mechanism and the abundance of ice nuclei. However, these studies typically only addressed ice concentration immediately after ice nucleation. Recent modeling work has shown that the high ice concentrations produced by homogeneous freezing may not persist very long, which is consistent with the low frequency of occurrence of high ice concentrations indicated by cirrus measurements. Here, I use idealized simulations to investigate the impact of ice nucleation mechanism and ice nuclei abundance on the full lifecycle of cirrus clouds. The primary modeling framework used includes different modes of ice nucleation, deposition growth/sublimation, aggregation, sedimentation, and radiation. A limited number of cloud-resolving simulations that treat radiation/dynamics interactions will also been presented. I will show that for typical synoptic situations with mesoscale waves present, the time-averaged cirrus ice crystal size distributions and bulk cloud properties are less sensitive to ice nucleation processes than might be expected from the earlier simple ice nucleation calculations. I will evaluate the magnitude of the ice nuclei impact on cirrus for a range of temperatures and mesoscale wave specifications, and I will discuss the implications for cirrus aerosol indirect effects in general.

  10. Report: Nuclei segmentation of leukocytes in blood smear digital images.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Naveed; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Saba, Tanzila; Al-Rodhaan, Mznah; Al-Dhelaan, Abdullah

    2015-09-01

    The Leukocytes are differentiated from each other on the basis of their nuclei, demanded in many Medical studies, especially in all types of Leukemia by the Hematologists to note the disorder caused by specific type of Leukocyte. Leukemia is a life threatening disease. The work for diagnosing is manually carried out by the Hematologists involving much labor, time and human errors. The problems mentioned are easily addressed through computer vision techniques, but still accuracy and efficiency are demanded in terms of the basic and challenging step segmentation of Leukocyte's nuclei. The underlying study proposed better method in terms of accuracy and efficiency by designing a dynamic convolution filter for boosting low intensity values in the separated green channel of an RGB image and suppressing the high values in the same channel. The high values in the green channel become 255 (background) while the nuclei always have low values in the green channel and thus clearly appear as foreground. The proposed technique is tested on 365 images achieving an overall accuracy of 95.89%, while improving the efficiency by 10%. The proposed technique achieved its targets in a realistic way by improving the accuracy as well as the efficiency and both are highly required in the area.

  11. Production rates of cosmogenic nuclei on the lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Tie-Kuang; Yun, Su-Jun; Ma, Tao; Chang, Jin; Dong, Wu-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Guo-Long; Ren, Zhong-Zhou

    2014-07-01

    A physical model for Geant4-based simulation of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles' interaction with the lunar surface matter has been developed to investigate the production rates of cosmogenic nuclei. In this model the GCRs, mainly very high energy protons and α particles, bombard the surface of the Moon and produce many secondary particles, such as protons and neutrons. The energies of protons and neutrons at different depths are recorded and saved as ROOT files, and the analytical expressions for the differential proton and neutron fluxes are obtained through the best-fit procedure using ROOT software. To test the validity of this model, we calculate the production rates of the long-lived nuclei 10Be and 26Al in the Apollo 15 long drill core by combining the above differential fluxes and the newly evaluated spallation reaction cross sections. Our numerical results show that the theoretical production rates agree quite well with the measured data, which means that this model works well. Therefore, it can be expected that this model can be used to investigate the cosmogenic nuclei in future lunar samples returned by the Chinese lunar exploration program and can be extended to study other objects, such as meteorites and the Earth's atmosphere.

  12. Somatosensory nuclei of the manatee brainstem and thalamus.

    PubMed

    Sarko, Diana K; Johnson, John I; Switzer, Robert C; Welker, Wally I; Reep, Roger L

    2007-09-01

    Florida manatees have an extensive, well-developed system of vibrissae distributed over their entire bodies and especially concentrated on the face. Although behavioral and anatomical assessments support the manatee's reliance on somatosensation, a systematic analysis of the manatee thalamus and brainstem areas dedicated to tactile input has never been completed. Using histochemical and histological techniques (including stains for myelin, Nissl, cytochrome oxidase, and acetylcholinesterase), we characterized the relative size, extent, and specializations of somatosensory regions of the brainstem and thalamus. The principal somatosensory regions of the brainstem (trigeminal, cuneate, gracile, and Bischoff's nucleus) and the thalamus (ventroposterior nucleus) were disproportionately large relative to nuclei dedicated to other sensory modalities, providing neuroanatomical evidence that supports the manatee's reliance on somatosensation. In fact, areas of the thalamus related to somatosensation (the ventroposterior and posterior nuclei) and audition (the medial geniculate nucleus) appeared to displace the lateral geniculate nucleus dedicated to the subordinate visual modality. Furthermore, it is noteworthy that, although the manatee cortex contains Rindenkerne (barrel-like cortical nuclei located in layer VI), no corresponding cell clusters were located in the brainstem ("barrelettes") or thalamus ("barreloids"). PMID:17722080

  13. Production of new neutron-rich heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zagrebaev, Valery; Greiner, Walter

    2009-03-04

    A new way is found to discover and examine unknown neutron-rich heavy nuclei at the 'north-east' part of the nuclear map. This 'blank spot' of the nuclear map can be reached neither in fusion--fission reactions nor in fragmentation processes. The present limits of the upper part of the nuclear map are very close to stability while the unexplored area of heavy neutron-rich nuclides along the neutron closed shell N = 126(to the east of the stability line) is extremely important for nuclear astrophysics investigations and, in particular, for the understanding of the r-process of astrophysical nucleogenesis. A novel idea is proposed for the production of these nuclei via low-energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions with stable beams. The estimated yields of neutron-rich nuclei are found to be rather high in such reactions and several tens of new nuclides can be produced, for example, in the near-barrier collision of {sup 136}Xe with {sup 208}Pb. This finding may spur new studies at heavy-ion facilities and should have significant impact on future experiments.

  14. Experimental and phenomenological approaches to the structure of exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.; Zamfir, N.V. ||

    1995-07-01

    The structure of exotic nuclei that will become accessible with radioactive beams, especially in extremely neutron-rich nuclei where there is a large ``lever arm`` from the valley of stability, is likely to be quite different from anything we have yet encountered. There have been suggestions of radically-different shell structure due, for example, to more-rounded shell potentials (no ``l{sup 2}`` term in the Nilsson potential) or to weaker l{center_dot}s interactions. Also, the weak binding of the outermost nucleons, the coupling to the continuum, changes in residual p-n and pairing interactions, will all contribute to new types of structure and collectivity. Among other effects, magic numbers are likely to lose their robustness; sequences of shell model orbits might be altered in major ways; the onset, manifestations, and evolution of collectivity could be different; unique parity orbits may revert to their parent shells. Radioactive beams will provide the opportunity to study these exotic nuclei, but, at the same time, the amount of data obtainable win be much less than we are accustomed to. Hence, it will be necessary to develop highly-efficient experimental approaches on the one hand, and new signatures of structure, based on the simplest-to-obtain data, on the other. Recently, progress has been made in both areas, and this work is discussed below.

  15. A chronic neural interface to the macaque dorsal column nuclei.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Andrew G; Weigand, Pauline K; Sritharan, Srihari Y; Lucas, Timothy H

    2016-05-01

    The dorsal column nuclei (DCN) of the brain stem contain secondary afferent neurons, which process ascending somatosensory information. Most of the known physiology of the DCN in primates has been acquired in acute experiments with anesthetized animals. Here, we developed a technique to implant a multielectrode array (MEA) chronically in the DCN of macaque monkeys to enable experiments with the animals awake. Two monkeys were implanted with brain-stem MEAs for 2-5 mo with no major adverse effects. Responses of the cuneate and gracile nuclei were quantified at the level of both field potentials and single units. Tactile receptive fields (RFs) were identified for 315 single units. A subset of these units had very regular spiking patterns with spike frequencies predominantly in the alpha band (8-14 Hz). The stability of the neuronal recordings was assessed with a novel analysis that identified units by their mean spike waveform and by the spike-triggered average of activity on all other electrodes in the array. Fifty-six identified neurons were observed over two or more sessions and in a few cases for as long as 1 mo. RFs of stable neurons were largely consistent across days. The results demonstrate that a chronic DCN implant in a macaque can be safe and effective, yielding high-quality unit recording for several months. The unprecedented access to these nuclei in awake primates should lead to a better understanding of their role in sensorimotor behavior. PMID:26912601

  16. Microscopic formulation of the interacting boson model for rotational nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Kosuke; Shimizu, Noritaka; Otsuka, Takaharu; Guo, Lu

    2011-04-15

    We propose a novel formulation of the interacting boson model (IBM) for rotational nuclei with axially symmetric, strong deformation. The intrinsic structure represented by the potential-energy surface (PES) of a given multinucleon system has a certain similarity to that of the corresponding multiboson system. Based on this feature, one can derive an appropriate boson Hamiltonian, as already reported. This prescription, however, has a major difficulty in the rotational spectra of strongly deformed nuclei: the bosonic moment of inertia is significantly smaller than the corresponding nucleonic one. We present that this difficulty originates in the difference between the rotational response of a nucleon system and that of the corresponding boson system, and could arise even if the PESs of the two systems were identical. We further suggest that the problem can be solved by implementing the L{center_dot}L term into the IBM Hamiltonian, with the coupling constant derived from the cranking approach of Skyrme mean-field models. The validity of the method is confirmed for rare-earth and actinoid nuclei, as their experimental rotational yrast bands are reproduced nicely.

  17. Predicting the growth of nanoscale nuclei by histotripsy pulses.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2016-04-01

    Histotripsy is a focused ultrasound therapy that ablates tissue through the mechanical action of cavitation. Histotripsy-initiated cavitation activity is generated from shocked ultrasound pulses that scatter from incidental nuclei (shock scattering histotripsy), or purely tensile ultrasound pulses (microtripsy). The Yang/Church model was numerically integrated to predict the behavior of the cavitation nuclei exposed to measured shock scattering histotripsy pulses. The bubble motion exhibited expansion only behavior, suggesting that the ablative action of a histotripsy pulse is related to the maximum size of the bubble. The analytic model of Holland and Apfel was extended to predict the maximum size of cavitation nuclei for both shock scattering histotripsy and microtripsy excitations. The predictions of the analytic model and the numerical model agree within 2% for fully developed shock scattering histotripsy pulses (>72 MPa peak positive pressure). For shock scattering histotripsy pulses that are not fully developed (<72 MPa), the analytic model underestimated the maximum size by less than 5%. The analytic model was also used to predict bubble growth nucleated from microtripsy insonations, and was found to be consistent with experimental observations. Based on the extended analytic model, metrics were developed to predict the extent of the treatment zone from histotripsy pulses.

  18. Predicting the growth of nanoscale nuclei by histotripsy pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Kenneth B.; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-04-01

    Histotripsy is a focused ultrasound therapy that ablates tissue through the mechanical action of cavitation. Histotripsy-initiated cavitation activity is generated from shocked ultrasound pulses that scatter from incidental nuclei (shock scattering histotripsy), or purely tensile ultrasound pulses (microtripsy). The Yang/Church model was numerically integrated to predict the behavior of the cavitation nuclei exposed to measured shock scattering histotripsy pulses. The bubble motion exhibited expansion only behavior, suggesting that the ablative action of a histotripsy pulse is related to the maximum size of the bubble. The analytic model of Holland and Apfel was extended to predict the maximum size of cavitation nuclei for both shock scattering histotripsy and microtripsy excitations. The predictions of the analytic model and the numerical model agree within 2% for fully developed shock scattering histotripsy pulses (>72 MPa peak positive pressure). For shock scattering histotripsy pulses that are not fully developed (<72 MPa), the analytic model underestimated the maximum size by less than 5%. The analytic model was also used to predict bubble growth nucleated from microtripsy insonations, and was found to be consistent with experimental observations. Based on the extended analytic model, metrics were developed to predict the extent of the treatment zone from histotripsy pulses.

  19. Note on spin orbit interactions in nuclei and hypernuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, N.; Weise, W.

    2008-05-01

    A detailed comparison is made between the spin-orbit interactions in Λ hypernuclei and ordinary nuclei. We argue that there are three major contributions to the spin-orbit interaction: (1) a short-range component involving scalar and vector mean fields; (2) a "wrong-sign" spin-orbit term generated by the pion exchange tensor force in second order; and (3) a three-body term induced by two-pion exchange with excitation of virtual Δ (1232)-isobars (à la Fujita-Miyazawa). For nucleons in nuclei the long-range pieces related to the pion-exchange dynamics tend to cancel, leaving room dominantly for spin-orbit mechanisms of short-range origin (parametrized, e.g., in terms of relativistic scalar and vector mean fields terms). In contrast, the absence of an analogous 2π-exchange three-body contribution for Λ hyperons in hypernuclei leads to an almost complete cancellation between the short-range (relativistic mean-field) component and the "wrong-sign" spin-orbit interaction generated by second order π-exchange with an intermediate Σ hyperon. These different balancing mechanisms between short- and long-range components are able to explain simultaneously the very strong spin-orbit interaction in ordinary nuclei and the remarkably weak spin-orbit splitting in Λ hypernuclei.

  20. Masses of atomic nuclei in the infinite nuclear matter model

    SciTech Connect

    Satpathy, L.; Nayak, R.C.

    1988-07-01

    We present mass excesses of 3481 nuclei in the range 18less than or equal toAless than or equal to267 using the infinite nuclear matter model based on the Hugenholtz-Van Hove theorem. In this model the ground-state energy of a nucleus of asymmetry ..beta.. is considered equivalent to the energy of a perfect sphere made up of the infinite nuclear matter of the same asymmetry plus the residual energy due to shell effects, deformation, etc., called the local energy eta. In this model there are two kinds of parameters: global and local. The five global parameters characterizing the properties of the above sphere are determined by fitting the mass of all nuclei (756) in the recent mass table of Wapstra et al. having error bar less than 30 keV. The local parameters are determined for 25 regions each spanning 8 or 10 A values. The total number of parameters including the five global ones is 238. The root-mean-square deviation for the calculated masses from experiment is 397 keV for the 1572 nuclei used in the least-squares fit. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc.

  1. Masses of nuclei in the infinite nuclear matter model

    SciTech Connect

    Satpathy, L.; Nayak, R.C.

    1987-12-10

    The ground-state masses of 3481 nuclei in the range 18less than or equal toAless than or equal to267 have been calculated using the inifinite nuclear matter model based on the generalised Hugenholtz-Van Hove theorem. In this model there are two kinds of parameters: Global and local. The five global parameters which characterise the properties of the sphere made up of inifinite nuclear matter are determined once for all by fitting the masses of all nuclei (756) in the recent mass table with error bar less than 30 keV. The local parameters are determined for 25 regions defined by ..delta..A = 8 or 10. The r.m.s. deviation for the calculated masses from the experiment is 397 keV for the 1572 nuclei used in the least square fit. Sample results on Na isotopes and other recently measured masses have been given. The derived saturation properties of nuclear matter have been discussed.

  2. Light radioactive nuclei capture reactions with phenomenological potential models

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes, V.; Bertulani, C. A.

    2010-05-21

    Light radioactive nuclei play an important role in many astrophysical environments. Due to very low cross sections of some neutron and proton capture reactions by these radioactive nuclei at energies of astrophysical interest, direct laboratory measurements are very difficult. For radioactive nuclei such as {sup 8}Li and {sup 8}B, the direct measurement of neutron capture reactions is impossible. Indirect methods have been applied to overcome these difficulties. In this work we will report on the results and discussion of phenomenological potential models used to determine some proton and neutron capture reactions. As a test we show the results for the {sup 16}O(p,gamma){sup 17}F{sub gs}(5/2{sup +}) and {sup 16}O(p,gamma){sup 17}F{sub ex}(1/2{sup +}) capture reactions. We also computed the nucleosynthesis cross sections for the {sup 7}Li(n,gamma){sup 8}Li{sub gs}, {sup 8}Li(n,gamma){sup 9}Li{sub gs} and {sup 8}B(p,gamma){sup 9}C{sub gs} capture reactions.

  3. Anterior but not intralaminar thalamic nuclei support allocentric spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Mathieu; Gibb, Sheree J; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Dalrymple-Alford, John C

    2008-07-01

    Medial thalamic damage is a common cause of severe memory disruption in humans. Both the anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN) and the intralaminar thalamic nuclei (ILN) have been suggested as primary sites of diencephalic injury underlying learning and memory deficits, but their respective roles have yet to be resolved. The present study explicitly compared two spatial memory tasks in male PVGc hooded rats with selective neurotoxic lesions to either (1) the ATN or (2) the rostral ILN (and adjacent lateral mediodorsal thalamic nuclei; ILN/LT lesions). As predicted, the ATN group, but not the ILN/LT group, exhibited clear deficits in the Morris water maze task for the initial acquisition of a fixed hidden platform and its reversal to a new position. The second task examined acquisition of egocentric spatial reference memory for a left or right body turn, using any three arms in an 8-arm water maze on any given trial; contrary to predictions, both lesion groups performed as well as the Sham group. The lack of deficits in ILN/LT rats on this second task contrasted with previous findings reporting a detrimental effect of ILN/LT lesions on egocentric working memory. The clear dissociation between the influence of ATN and ILN/LT lesions with respect to allocentric spatial reference memory in the Morris maze emphasizes that caution is required when interpreting the effects of non-ATN thalamic lesions on spatial memory when the lesions encroach substantial areas of the adjacent ATN region.

  4. Momentum distributions in light halo nuclei and structure constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, L. A.; Bellotti, F. F.; Frederico, T.; Yamashita, M. T.; Tomio, Lauro

    2016-03-01

    The core recoil momentum distribution of neutron-rich isotopes of light exotic nuclei is studied within a three-body model, where the nuclei are described by a core and two neutrons, with interactions dominated by the s-wave channel. In our framework, the two-body subsystems should have large scattering lengths in comparison with the interaction range allowing to use a three-body model with a zero-range force. The ground-state halo wave functions in momentum space are obtained by using as inputs the two-neutron separation energy and the energies of the singlet neutron-neutron and neutron-core virtual states. Within our model, we obtain the momentum probability densities for the Borromean exotic nuclei 11Li and 22C. In the case of the core recoil momentum distribution of 11Li, a fair reproduction of the experimental data was obtained, without free parameters, considering only the two-body low-energies. By analysing the obtained core momentum distribution in face of recent experimental data, we verify that such data are constraining the 22C two-neutron separation energy to a value between 100 and 400 keV.

  5. Collective Motions in A = 100-112 Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Hwang, J. K.; Goodin, C.; Zhu, S. J.; Luo, Y. X.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Frauendorf, S.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.

    2010-10-11

    With a very high statistics data set with 5.7x10{sup 11} triple and higher fold {gamma} coincidences from the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf, a wealth of fascinating new collective motions in nuclei with A = 100-112 have been observed. Nothing was known previously about one- and two-phonon {gamma}-bands in odd-A nuclei. We discovered the first one-and two- phonon {gamma} vibrational bands in an odd N-even Z nucleus, {sup 105}Mo. The energies of the one- and two- phonon bands in {sup 104}Mo, {sup 105}Mo, {sup 106}Mo and {sup 108}Mo were recently studied and are remarkably similar in energies. The first chiral doublet bands in e-e nuclei were observed in triaxial {sup 106,108}Mo and {sup 110,112}Ru while such chiral band in {sup 108}Ru are perturbed by its {gamma}-soft shape. The experimental evidences, including our recent angular correlation studies are presented along with what these new bands are telling us about the evolving collective structures and deformation in this region.

  6. Global cloud condensation nuclei influenced by carbonaceous combustion aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pöschl, U.; Rap, A.; Forster, P. M.

    2011-03-01

    Black carbon in carbonaceous combustion aerosol warms the climate by absorbing solar radiation, meaning reductions in black carbon emissions are often perceived as an attractive global warming mitigation option. However, carbonaceous combustion aerosol can also act as cloud condensation nuclei (particles upon which cloud drops form) so they also cool the climate by increasing cloud albedo. The net radiative effect of carbonaceous combustion aerosol is uncertain because their contribution to cloud drops has not been evaluated on the global scale. By combining extensive observations of cloud condensation nuclei concentrations and a global aerosol model, we show that carbonaceous combustion aerosol accounts for more than half of global cloud condensation nuclei. The evaluated model predicts that wildfire and pollution (fossil fuel and biofuel) carbonaceous combustion aerosol causes a global mean aerosol indirect effect of -0.34 W m-2 due to changes in cloud albedo, with pollution sources alone causing a global mean aerosol indirect effect of -0.23 W m-2. The small size of carbonaceous combustion particles from pollution sources means that whilst they account for only one-third of the emitted mass from these sources they cause two-thirds of the cloud albedo indirect effect that is due to carbonaceous combustion aerosol. This cooling effect must be accounted for to ensure that black carbon emissions controls that reduce the high number concentrations of small pollution particles have the desired net effect on climate.

  7. Predicting the growth of nanoscale nuclei by histotripsy pulses

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2016-01-01

    Histotripsy is a focused ultrasound therapy that ablates tissue through the mechanical action of cavitation. Histotripsy-initiated cavitation activity is generated from shocked ultrasound pulses that scatter from incidental nuclei (shock scattering histotripsy), or purely tensile ultrasound pulses (microtripsy). The Yang/Church model was numerically integrated to predict the behavior of the cavitation nuclei exposed to measured shock scattering histotripsy pulses. The bubble motion exhibited expansion only behavior, suggesting that the ablative action of a histotripsy pulse is related to the maximum size of the bubble. The analytic model of Holland and Apfel was extended to predict the maximum size of cavitation nuclei for both shock scattering histotripsy and microtripsy excitations. The predictions of the analytic model and the numerical model agree within 2% for fully developed shock scattering histotripsy pulses (>72 MPa peak positive pressure). For shock scattering histotripsy pulses that are not fully developed (<72 MPa), the analytic model underestimated the maximum size by less than 5%. The analytic model was also used to predict bubble growth nucleated from microtripsy insonations, and was found to be consistent with experimental observations. Based on the extended analytic model, metrics were developed to predict the extent of the treatment zone from histotripsy pulses. PMID:26988374

  8. The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (anasen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, M.; Blackmon, J. C.; Gardiner, H. E.; Linhardt, L. E.; Macon, K. T.; Mondello, L. L.; Baby, L.; Johnson, E.; Koshchiy, E.; Rogachev, G.; Wiedenhöver, I.; Bardayan, D. W.

    2013-03-01

    Experimental information about most reactions involving short-lived nuclei is limited. New facilities aim to provide wider access to unstable isotopes, but the limited intensities require more efficient and selective techniques and devices. The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN) is a charged-particle detector array designed primarily for studies of reactions important in the αp- and rp- processes with proton-rich exotic nuclei. The array consists of 40 silicon-strip detectors backed with CsI scintillators. The detectors cover an area of about 1300 cm2 providing essentially complete solid angle coverage for the reactions of interest with good energy and position resolution. ANASEN also includes a position-sensitive annular gas proportional counter that allows it to be used as an active gas target/detector. ANASEN is designed for direct measurement of (α,p) re-actions in inverse kinematics as well as for studies of proton elastic and inelastic scattering, (p, γ) reactions and transfer reactions. The array is being developed by Louisiana State University and Florida State University. Presently it is located at the RESOLUT radioacitve ion beam facility at FSU, where the first experiments are being performed. In the future, the array will be used at the ReA3 facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory.

  9. Mechanisms of quinacrine binding and fluorescence in nuclei and chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Sumner, A T

    1986-01-01

    The mechanisms has been investigated whereby quinacrine binds to the DNA of nuclei and chromosomes in cytological preparations fixed in methanol-acetic acid. A variety of evidence is consistent with the idea that the quinacrine binds by intercalation. This is supported by a high value for the affinity of quinacrine for DNA, together with a saturation value of 0.2 quinacrine molecules/nucleotide; binding in the presence of strong salt solutions; and inhibition of fluorescence and banding by denaturation or depurination of DNA. At high quinacrine concentrations, weak binding of quinacrine to nuclei and chromosomes also occurs, but this is not relevant to the production of strong fluorescence or Q-banding patterns. A number of factors were tested which might have affected quinacrine fluorescence and banding. These included: pH; blocking protein amino groups by acetylation or benzoylation; introduction of hydrophobic groups by benzoylation; and dephosphorylation. All these treatments were without effect. However, comparison of the quinacrine fluorescence of human and onion nuclei, which differ substantially in the base composition of their DNA, shows that quinacrine fluorescence can be enhanced in cytological preparations by AT-rich DNA. PMID:3721920

  10. A novel dictionary based computer vision method for the detection of cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    De Vylder, Jonas; Aelterman, Jan; Lepez, Trees; Vandewoestyne, Mado; Douterloigne, Koen; Deforce, Dieter; Philips, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Cell nuclei detection in fluorescent microscopic images is an important and time consuming task in a wide range of biological applications. Blur, clutter, bleed through and partial occlusion of nuclei make individual nuclei detection a challenging task for automated image analysis. This paper proposes a novel and robust detection method based on the active contour framework. Improvement over conventional approaches is achieved by exploiting prior knowledge of the nucleus shape in order to better detect individual nuclei. This prior knowledge is defined using a dictionary based approach which can be formulated as the optimization of a convex energy function. The proposed method shows accurate detection results for dense clusters of nuclei, for example, an F-measure (a measure for detection accuracy) of 0.96 for the detection of cell nuclei in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, compared to an F-measure of 0.90 achieved by state-of-the-art nuclei detection methods.

  11. Unstable nuclei in coherent dissociation of relativistic nuclei 7,9Be, 10B and 10,11C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenkov, D. A.; Bradnova, V.; Firu, E.; Kornegrutsa, N. K.; Haiduc, M.; Mamatkulov, K. Z.; Kattabekov, R. R.; Neagu, A.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Rusakova, V. V.; Sarkisyan, V. R.; Stanoeva, R.; Zaitsev, A. A.; Zarubin, P. I.; Zarubina, I. G.

    2016-06-01

    Contribution of the unstable nuclei 7Be, 8Be and ®B into coherent dissociation events (“white” stars) of relativistic nuclei 7,9Be, 10B and 10,11C is under study on the basis of a nuclear track emulsion exposed to beams of the JINR Nuclotron. Distributions over the opening angle of α-pairs indicate to a simultaneous presence of virtual 8Beg.s. and 8Be2+ states in the ground states of the 9Be and 10C nuclei. The core 9B is manifested in the 10C nucleus with a probability of (30 ± 4)%, Selection of the 10C “white” stars accompanied by 8Beg.s. (9B) leads to the appearance in the excitation energy distribution of 2α2p “quartets” of the distinct peak with a maximum at 4.1 ± 0.3 MeV. 8Beg.s. decays are presented in 21% 2He + 2H and 19% in the 3He of the all 11C “white” stars. 9Bg.s. decays are identified in “white” stars 11C → 2He + 2H constituting 14% of the 11C “white” stars. The 9B nucleus. is manifested in the “white” stars 10B → 2He + 2H with a probability of (9 ± 1)%. For the 10B case yield of 8Beg.s. nuclei with the respect to 9B is about a factor of 3 higher than 9B.

  12. Isospin in Nuclei: Isospin has been reborn as an important and useful quantum number for all nuclei.

    PubMed

    Robson, D

    1973-01-12

    The major feature of isospin in nuclei that I have discussed here is its application to all nuclei. The rebirth of this quantum number in nuclear physics occurred in the early 1960's and was initiated almost entirely by the important work of Anderson et al. (4) and Fox et al. (5). There is still great interest in the use of isospin in its fullest sense as predicted by Wigner (3), and indeed isospin concepts have been largely responsible for demonstrating that nuclei in the doubly "magic number" region of (208)Pb are remarkably in agreement with shell model theory. The early experiments have also initiated a whole new set of more sophisticated experiments (some of which I have briefly alluded to above) which promise to keep many physicists busy for a long time to come. A particularly interesting series of experiments are those being performed (15) at Duke University with high-resolution proton beams. This work shows the highly detailed nature of analogue resonances, that is, as coherent superpositions of many complicated compound states yielding a beautifully modulated wave train, the modulation being observed only in conventional experiments with poor-resolution proton beams. Similarly, nuclear theorists have been led to vastly improve their interpretation of, and computational techniques for, both nuclear reactions and nuclear structure in order to meet the more stringent tests provided by such experiments. Perhaps a lesson can be learned from the historical development of the isospin concept. In the past the belief that T . T would not significantly commute with the dynamical Hamiltonian so that isospin would not be conserved sufficiently well enough certainly delayed the nuclear travels of isospin into the realm of heavy nuclei. Hopefully the same mistake will not occur in the future for other approximate symmetries of nature. PMID:17842982

  13. Interaction of Gold Nuclei with Photoemulsion Nuclei at Energies in the Range 100-1200 MeV per Nucleon and Cascade-Evaporation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, S.D.; Shablya, E.Ya.; Kosmach, V.F.; Vokal, S.; Plyuschev, V.A.

    2005-09-01

    The interaction of gold nuclei with photoemulsion nuclei at energies in the range 100-1200 MeV per nucleon was studied experimentally. A consistent comparison of the experimental data obtained in this way with the results of the calculations based on the cascade-evaporation model is performed.

  14. Allowance for the shell structure of colliding nuclei in the fusion-fission process

    SciTech Connect

    Litnevsky, V. L.; Kosenko, G. I.; Ivanyuk, F. A.; Pashkevich, V. V.

    2011-07-15

    The motion of two nuclei toward each other in fusion-fission reactions is considered. The state of the system of interacting nuclei is specified in terms of three collective coordinates (parameters). These are the distance between the centers of mass of the nuclei and the deformation parameter for each of them (the nose-to-nose orientation of the nuclei is assumed). The evolution of collective degrees of freedom of the system is described by Langevin equations. The energies of the Coulomb and nuclear (Gross-Kalinovsky potential) interactions of nuclei are taken into account in the potential energy of the system along with the deformation energy of each nucleus with allowance for shell effects. The motion of nuclei toward each other are calculated for two reaction types: reactions involving nuclei that are deformed ({sub 42}{sup 100}Mo + {sub 42}{sup 100}Mo {yields} {sub 84}{sup 200}Po) and those that are spherical ({sub 82}{sup 208}Pb + {sub 8}{sup 18}O {yields} {sub 90}{sup 226}Th) in the ground state. It is shown that the shell structure of interacting nuclei affects not only the fusion process as a whole (fusionbarrier height and initial-reaction-energy dependence of the probability that the nuclei involved touch each other) but also the processes occurring in each nucleus individually (shape of the nuclei and their excitation energies at the point of touching).

  15. Overlapping nuclei segmentation based on Bayesian networks and stepwise merging strategy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, M-R; Ko, B C; Nam, J-Y

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents a new approach to the segmentation of fluorescence in situ hybridization images. First, to segment the cell nuclei from the background, a threshold is estimated using a Gaussian mixture model and maximizing the likelihood function of the grey values for the cell images. After the nuclei segmentation, the overlapping and isolated nuclei are classified to facilitate a more accurate nuclei analysis. To do this, the morphological features of the nuclei, such their compactness, smoothness and moments, are extracted from training data to generate three probability distribution functions that are then applied to a Bayesian network as evidence. Following the nuclei classification, the overlapping nuclei are segmented into isolated nuclei using an intensity gradient transform and watershed algorithm. A new stepwise merging strategy is also proposed to merge fragments into a major nucleus. Experimental results using fluorescence in situ hybridization images confirm that the proposed system produced better segmentation results when compared to previous methods, because of the nuclei classification before separating the overlapping nuclei.

  16. Fission and Properties of Neutron-Rich Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Joseph H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Carter, H. K.

    2008-08-01

    Opening session. Nuclear processes in stellar explosions / M. Wiescher. In-beam [symbol]-ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei at NSCL / A. Gade -- Nuclear structure I. Shell-model structure of neutron-rich nuclei beyond [symbol]Sn / A. Covello ... [et al.]. Shell structure and evolution of collectivity in nuclei above the [symbol]Sn core / S. Sarkar and M. S. Sarkar. Heavy-ion fusion using density-constrained TDHF / A. S. Umar and V. E. Oberacker. Towards an extended microscopic theory for upper-fp shell nuclei / K. P. Drumev. Properties of the Zr and Pb isotopes near the drip-line / V. N. Tarasov ... [et al.]. Identification of high spin states in [symbol] Cs nuclei and shell model calculations / K. Li ... [et al.]. Recent measurements of spherical and deformed isomers using the Lohengrin fission-fragment spectrometer / G. S. Simpson ... [et al.] -- Nuclear structure II. Nuclear structure investigation with rare isotope spectroscopic investigations at GSI / P. Boutachkov. Exploring the evolution of the shell structures by means of deep inelastic reactions / G. de Anaelis. Probing shell closures in neutron-rich nuclei / R. Krücken for the S277 and REX-ISOLDEMINIBALL collaborations. Structure of Fe isotopes at the limits of the pf-shell / N. Hoteling ... [et al.]. Spectroscopy of K isomers in shell-stabilized trans-fermium nuclei / S. K. Tandel ... [et al.] -- Radioactive ion beam facilities. SPIRAL2 at GANIL: a world leading ISOL facility for the next decade / S. Gales. New physics at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) next to GSI / I. Augustin ... [et al.]. Radioactive beams from a high powered ISOL system / A. C. Shotter. RlKEN RT beam factory / T. Motobayashi. NSCL - ongoing activities and future perspectives / C. K. Gelbke. Rare isotope beams at Argonne / W. F. Henning. HRIBF: scientific highlights and future prospects / J. R. Beene. Radioactive ion beam research done in Dubna / G. M. Ter-Akopian ... [et al.] -- Fission I

  17. Number and spatial distribution of nuclei in the muscle fibres of normal mice studied in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bruusgaard, J C; Liestøl, K; Ekmark, M; Kollstad, K; Gundersen, K

    2003-01-01

    We present here a new technique with which to visualize nuclei in living muscle fibres in the intact animal, involving injection of labelled DNA into single cells. This approach allowed us to determine the position of all of nuclei within a sarcolemma without labelling satellite cells. In contrast to what has been reported in tissue culture, we found that the nuclei were immobile, even when observed over several days. Nucleic density was uniform along the fibre except for the endplate and some myotendinous junctions, where the density was higher. The perijunctional region had the same number of nuclei as the rest of the fibre. In the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle, the extrajunctional nuclei were elongated and precisely aligned to the long axis of the fibre. In the soleus, the nuclei were rounder and not well aligned. When comparing small and large fibres in the soleus, the number of nuclei varied approximately in proportion to cytoplasmic volume, while in the EDL the number was proportional to surface area. Statistical analysis revealed that the nuclei were not randomly distributed in either the EDL or the soleus. For each fibre, actual distributions were compared with computer simulations in which nuclei were assumed to repel each other, which optimizes the distribution of nuclei with respect to minimizing transport distances. The simulated patterns were regular, with clear row-like structures when the density of nuclei was low. The non-random and often row-like distribution of nuclei observed in muscle fibres may thus reflect regulatory mechanisms whereby nuclei repel each other in order to minimize transport distances. PMID:12813146

  18. Pions in nuclei, a probe of chiral symmetry restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienle, Paul; Yamazaki, Toshimitsu

    2004-03-01

    The recent progress in the study of the pion-nucleus s-wave interaction by the discovery of discrete excited states below the pion threshold in heavy nuclei is reviewed. These states are populated by ( d, 3He ) reactions at bombarding energies of 500-600 MeV, with the 3He observed at forward direction under kinematic conditions, where a large energy (in the order of a pion mass), but only a small momentum is transferred (recoil-free). The resulting distinct pattern of states can be uniquely assigned to deeply bound π- states coupled to well known neutron-hole states with the configurations ( nl) π( n‧ l‧ j) n-1. With sufficient energy resolution in the ( d, 3He ) spectroscopy it was for the first time possible to determine the excitation energy of each configuration with respect to the ground state of the residual nucleus with A-1 and from this also the binding energy, Bnl, and even the natural width, Γnl, of the pionic state. A summary of the results on binding energies and widths of pionic 1s and 2p states in nuclei with large neutron excesses, such as 207Pb, 205Pb, 123Sn, 119Sn and 115Sn is given. The structure of these states is determined by a superposition of a large repulsive s-wave π--nucleus interaction and an attractive Coulomb interaction, such that the pions are bound in a potential pocket at the surface of the nuclei, which leads to a halo-like pion distribution around the nucleus. The repulsive s-wave interaction reduces the binding energies of the 1s states in the Pb nuclei by roughly a factor of two and the widths to about 760 keV, which makes them discrete with no overlap to other states. The pion-nucleus interaction has its maximum contribution from an effective density ρe≈0.6 ρ0. So it is a sensitive tool to test in-medium effects by comparison with the known s-wave pion-nucleon interaction. An empirical procedure is developed to derive the s-wave pion nucleus potential parameters unambiguously by using only 1s-state binding energies

  19. PREFACE: Structure of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Michio; Otsuka, Takaharu; Aoi, Nori

    2006-11-01

    The International Symposium on `Structure of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Forces' was held at The Koshiba Hall, University of Tokyo, on 9 - 12 March 2006. This symposium was organized as an activity of the Grant-in-Aid for the specially promoted area `Monte Carlo Shell Model' from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture (MEXT) of Japan. The symposium was sponsored by the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) and by RIKEN. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss theoretical and experimental developments in the study of the structure of exotic nuclei and its relationship with nuclear forces. There has been much progress recently in our understanding of what the structure of exotic nuclei is and how it can be linked to nuclear forces, with emerging intriguing perspectives. The following subjects were covered in this symposium

  20. Present status and future of the shell model
  21. Effective interaction theories
  22. Experimental results and perspectives
  23. Few-body methods including ab initio calculations
  24. Advancements of mean-fieeld models
  25. Transition between shell and cluster structure
  26. Nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure
  27. Particle physics and the shell model
  28. Emphasis was placed on the interplay between many-body structures and nuclear forces, and on the experimental clarification of these topics. Around 80 participants attended the symposium and we enjoyed 34 excellent and lively invited talks and 26 oral presentations. The organizing committee consisted of B A Brown (MSU), S Fujii (CNS), M Honma (Aizu), T Kajino (NAO), T Mizusaki (Senshu), T Motobayashi (RIKEN), K Muto (TIT), T Otsuka (Chair, Tokyo/CNS/RIKEN), P Ring (TMU), N Shimizu (Scientific Secretary, Tokyo), S Shimoura (CNS), Y Utsuno (Scientific Secretary, JAEA). Finally, we would like to thank all the speakers and the participants as well as the other organizers for their contributions which made the symposium so successful.

  29. Descending spinal projections from the rostral gigantocellular reticular nuclei complex.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Gerlinda E; Holmes, Gregory M; Rogers, Richard C; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C

    2003-01-01

    Electrophysiological and physiological studies have suggested that the ventral medullary gigantocellular reticular nuclei (composed of the gigantocellular ventralis and pars alpha nuclei as well as the adjacent lateral paragigantocellular nucleus; abbreviated Gi-LPGi complex) provide descending control of pelvic floor organs (Mackel [1979] J. Physiol. (Lond.) 294:105-122; Hubscher and Johnson [1996] J. Neurophysiol. 76:2474-2482; Hubscher and Johnson [1999] J. Neurophysiol. 82:1381-1389; Johnson and Hubscher [1998] Neuroreport 9:341-345). Specifically, this complex of paramedian reticular nuclei has been implicated in the inhibition of sexual reflexes. In the present study, an anterograde fluorescent tracer was used to investigate direct descending projections from the Gi-LPGi complex to retrogradely labeled pudendal motoneurons (MN) in the male rat. Our results demonstrated that, although a high density of arborizations from Gi-LPGi fibers appears to be in close apposition to pudendal MNs, this relationship also applies to other MNs throughout the entire spinal cord. The Gi-LPGi also projects to spinal autonomic regions, i.e., both the intermediolateral cell column and the sacral parasympathetic nucleus, as well as to regions of the intermediate gray, which contain interneurons involved in the organization of pelvic floor reflexes. Lastly, throughout the length of the spinal cord, numerous neurons located primarily in laminae VII-X, were retrogradely labeled with Fluoro-Ruby after injections into the Gi-LPGi. The diffuse descending projections and arborizations of this pathway throughout the spinal cord suggest that this brainstem area is involved in the direct, descending control of a variety of spinal activities. These results are in contrast with our observations of the discrete projections of the caudal nucleus raphe obscurus, which target the autonomic and somatic MNs involved specifically in sexual and eliminative functions (Hermann et al. [1998] J. Comp

  1. The colors of cometary nuclei and other primitive bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, I.; Lamy, P. L.

    2005-12-01

    Primitive minor objects like Kuiper-belt objects (KBOs), Centaurs, cometary nuclei and low-albedo asteroids contain a considerable amount of information regarding the formation of early solar system planetesimals and some of the primordial processes. Broadband colors by themselves offer limited insight into surface composition but correlations either between different color indices or with other (e.g., orbital) parameters can shed some light on the questions of the composition and the evolution of the minor objects. Furthermore, a systematic comparison of the color indices of various populations may provide clues on their relationships, and concur along with dynamical studies, to establish a scenario of their formation and evolution in the solar system. We present new color results on cometary nuclei obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) whose superior resolution enables us to accurately isolate the nucleus signals from the surrounding comae. By combining with scrutinized available data obtained with ground-based telescopes, we accumulated a sample of 39 cometary nuclei, 34 ecliptic comets (ECs) and 5 nearly-isotropic comets (NICs) using the nomenclature of Levison (1996). We analyze color distributions and color-color correlations as well as correlations with other physical parameters. We present our own compilation of colors of 282 objects in the outer solar system, separately considering the different dynamical populations, classical KBOs in low and high-inclination orbits, resonant KBOs (practically Plutinos), scattered-disk objects (SDOs) and Centaurs. We perform a systematic analysis of color distributions of all plausible parent-child combinations and conclude by synthesizing the implications of the colors for the origin of ecliptic comets. We acknowledge the support of the French "Programme National de Planétologie", jointly funded by CNRS and CNES, and of the bilateral French--Hungarian cooperation program. I. Toth further acknowledges the

  2. Spin evolution of supermassive black holes and galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, David; Vasiliev, Eugene

    2012-11-01

    The spin angular momentum S of a supermassive black hole (SBH) precesses due to torques from orbiting stars, and the stellar orbits precess due to dragging of inertial frames by the spinning hole. We solve the coupled post-Newtonian equations describing the joint evolution of S and the stellar angular momenta Lj, j=1…N in spherical, rotating nuclear star clusters. In the absence of gravitational interactions between the stars, two evolutionary modes are found: (1) nearly uniform precession of S about the total angular momentum vector of the system and (2) damped precession, leading, in less than one precessional period, to alignment of S with the angular momentum of the rotating cluster. Beyond a certain distance from the SBH, the time scale for angular momentum changes due to gravitational encounters between the stars is shorter than spin-orbit precession times. We present a model, based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck equation, for the stochastic evolution of star clusters due to gravitational encounters and use it to evaluate the evolution of S in nuclei where changes in the Lj are due to frame dragging close to the SBH and to encounters farther out. Long-term evolution in this case is well described as uniform precession of the SBH about the cluster’s rotational axis, with an increasingly important stochastic contribution when SBH masses are small. Spin precessional periods are predicted to be strongly dependent on nuclear properties, but typical values are ˜107-108yr for low-mass SBHs in dense nuclei, ˜108-1010yr for SBH masses ˜108M⊙, and ˜1010-1011yr for the most massive SBHs. We compare the evolution of SBH spins in stellar nuclei to the case of torquing by an inclined, gaseous accretion disk.

  3. Eye-specific visual processing in the mouse suprachiasmatic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, Lauren; Brown, Timothy M

    2015-01-01

    Key points Daily changes in global levels of illumination synchronise daily physiological rhythms via bilateral retinal projections to the suprachiasmatic nuclei. We aimed to determine how retinal signals are integrated within the suprachiasmatic nuclei. By monitoring electrophysiological responses to visual stimuli we show that most suprachiasmatic neurons receive input from just one eye. Our results establish that suprachiasmatic neurons measure local light intensity and that any assessment of global light levels occurs at the network level. Abstract Internal circadian clocks are important regulators of mammalian biology, acting to coordinate physiology and behaviour in line with daily changes in the environment. At present, synchronisation of the circadian system to the solar cycle is believed to rely on a quantitative assessment of total ambient illumination, provided by a bilateral projection from the retina to the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). It is currently unclear, however, whether this photic integration occurs at the level of individual cells or within the SCN network. Here we use extracellular multielectrode recordings from the SCN of anaesthetised mice to show that most SCN neurons receive visual input from just one eye. While we find that binocular inputs to a subset of cells are important for rapid responses to changes in illumination, we find no evidence indicating that individual SCN cells are capable of reporting the average light intensity across the whole visual field. As a result of these local irradiance coding properties, our data establish that photic integration is primarily mediated at the level of the SCN network and suggest that accurate assessments of global light levels would be impaired by non-uniform illumination of either eye. PMID:25652666

  4. Abdominal surgery activates nesfatin-1 immunoreactive brain nuclei in rats.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette

    2010-02-01

    Abdominal surgery-induced postoperative gastric ileus is well established to induce Fos expression in specific brain nuclei in rats within 2-h after surgery. However, the phenotype of activated neurons has not been thoroughly characterized. Nesfatin-1 was recently discovered in the rat hypothalamus as a new anorexigenic peptide that also inhibits gastric emptying and is widely distributed in rat brain autonomic nuclei suggesting an involvement in stress responses. Therefore, we investigated whether abdominal surgery activates nesfatin-1-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the rat brain. Two hours after abdominal surgery with cecal palpation under short isoflurane anesthesia or anesthesia alone, rats were transcardially perfused and brains processed for double immunohistochemical labeling of Fos and nesfatin-1. Abdominal surgery, compared to anesthesia alone, induced Fos expression in neurons of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), locus coeruleus (LC), Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EW), rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and ventrolateral medulla (VLM). Double Fos/nesfatin-1 labeling showed that of the activated cells, 99% were nesfatin-1-immunoreactive in the SON, 91% in the LC, 82% in the rRPa, 74% in the EW and VLM, 71% in the anterior parvicellular PVN, 47% in the lateral magnocellular PVN, 41% in the medial magnocellular PVN, 14% in the NTS and 9% in the medial parvicellular PVN. These data established nesfatin-1 immunoreactive neurons in specific nuclei of the hypothalamus and brainstem as part of the neuronal response to abdominal surgery and suggest a possible implication of nesfatin-1 in the alterations of food intake and gastric transit associated with such a stressor. PMID:19944727

  5. Emergent soft monopole modes in weakly bound deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, J. C.; Kortelainen, M.; Zhang, Y. N.; Xu, F. R.

    2014-11-01

    Based on the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov solutions in large deformed coordinate spaces, the finite amplitude method for the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (FAM-QRPA) has been implemented, providing a suitable approach to probing collective excitations of weakly bound nuclei embedded in the continuum. The monopole excitation modes in magnesium isotopes up to the neutron drip line have been studied with the FAM-QRPA framework on both the coordinate-space and harmonic oscillator basis methods. Enhanced soft monopole strengths and collectivity as a result of weak-binding effects have been unambiguously demonstrated.

  6. Probing collectivity in the vicinity of neutron deficient Pb nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, T.; Page, R. D.; Petts, A.; Dewald, A.; Jolie, J.; Melon, B.; Pissulla, Th.; Hornillos, M. B. Gomez; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Rahkila, P.; Saren, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J.

    2008-05-12

    A series of recoil distance Doppler-shift lifetime measurements have been carried out to probe collectivity and configuration mixing of different shapes in the vicinity of neutron mid-shell Pb nuclei. Lifetime measurements of {sup 186}Pb and {sup 194}Po, the first ever utilizing the recoil-decay tagging method, probed the collectivity of coexisting prolate and oblate shapes in this region. Futher lifetime measurements of excited states in {sup 180}Hg, {sup 182}Hg and {sup 196}Po have been carried out.

  7. K = 6+ Isomers in Hf, yb and W Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Aswini Kumar; Walker, P. M.; Praharaj, C. R.; Xu, F. R.

    Using deformed Hartree-Fock and angular momentum projection (PHF) technique we try to understand the intrinsic structure and the systematics in the life times of K = 6+ isomers in the Hf isotopes (in 172-178Hf nuclei) and N = 104 Yb, Hf and W isotones. The band structure in 172Hf is reasonably well reproduced. The variation in the B(E2;2+ → 0+) values in the Hf isotopes as well as N = 104 isotones are well reproduced. The calculated K-forbidden E2 transition probabilities from the isomer bandheads to the 4+ yrast states qualitatively explain the variation of the lifetimes with N and Z.

  8. Quadrupole collectivity of neutron-rich nuclei around 132Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröll, Th.; Behrens, T.; Krücken, R.; Bildstein, V.; Faestermann, T.; Gernhäuser, R.; Mahgoub, M.; Maierbeck, P.; Münch, M.; Weinzierl, W.; Ames, F.; Habs, D.; Kester, O.; Lutter, R.; Morgan, T.; Pasini, M.; Rudolph, K.; Thirolf, P.; Diriken, J.; Huyse, M.; Ivanov, O.; Mayet, P.; Patronis, N.; Stefanescu, I.; van de Walle, J.; van Duppen, P.; Niedermaier, O.; Scheit, H.; Schwalm, D.; Eberth, J.; Finke, F.; Martin, D.; Reiter, P.; Scherillo, A.; Seidlitz, M.; Warr, N.; Weisshaar, D.; Iwanicki, J.; Butler, P.; Cederkäll, J.; Clément, E.; Delahaye, P.; Fraile, L. M.; Georgiev, G.; Köster, U.; Sieber, T.; Voulot, D.; Wenander, F.; Franchoo, S.; Hurst, A.; Ekström, A.; Kent, P. E.; Speidel, K.-H.; Leske, J.; Schielke, S.; Jungclaus, A.; Modamio, V.; Walker, J.; Coquard, L.; Pantea, M.; Pietralla, N.; Davinson, T.; Nardelli, S.

    2008-05-01

    We report on the ``safe'' Coulomb excitation of neutron-rich Cd, Xe, and Ba isotopes in the vicinity of the doubly-magic nucleus 132Sn. The radioactive nuclei have been produced by ISOLDE at CERN and postaccelerated by the REX-ISOLDE facility. The γ-decay of excited states has been detected by the MINIBALL array. The presented preliminary results for the B(E2) values are consistent with expectations from phenomenological systematics and will be compared with theoretical calculations.

  9. Kepler Observations of Rapid Optical Variability in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R. F.; Edelson, R.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Gandhi, P.

    2012-01-01

    Over three quarters in 2010 - 2011, Kepler monitored optical emission from four active galactic nuclei (AGN) with approx 30 min sampling, > 90% duty cycle and approx < 0.1% repeatability. These data determined the AGN optical fluctuation power spectral density functions (PSDs) over a wide range in temporal frequency. Fits to these PSDs yielded power law slopes of -2.6 to -3.3, much steeper than typically seen in the X-rays. We find evidence that individual AGN exhibit intrinsically different PSD slopes. The steep PSD fits are a challenge to recent AGN variability models but seem consistent with first order MRI theoretical calculations of accretion disk fluctuations.

  10. Light nuclei production in relativistic Au+nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, M. J.; Pope, J. K.; Beavis, D.; Carroll, J. B.; Chiba, J.; Chikanian, A.; Crawford, H. J.; Cronqvist, M.; Dardenne, Y.; Kumar, B. S.; Nagle, J. L.; Debbe, R.; Doke, T.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Hayano, R S; Hallman, Timothy J.; Heckman, H. H.; Kashiwagi, T.; Kikuchi, J.; Tanaka, K. H.; Kumar, B. S.; Kuo, C.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Mitchell, J. W.; Nagle, J. L.; Stankus, P.; Tanaka, K. H.; Welsh, R. C.; Zhan, W.

    1998-08-01

    We have measured the yields of protons and A=2-4 nuclei in collisions between 10.8 A GeV/ c Au beams and targets of Al, Cu, and Au. The data, which cover a broad rapidity range at low transverse momenta, were measured as a function of collision centrality using a focusing beam line spectrometer and a high-rate centrality detector. We investigate the dependence of coalescence parameters on event geometry. The data are compared with the predictions of an RQMD+coalescence model. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Symmetries in heavy nuclei and the proton-neutron interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA) nuclear structure model can be expressed in terms of the U(6) group, and thereby leads to three dynamical symmetries (or group chains) corresponding to different nuclear coupling schemes and geometrical shapes. The status of the empirical evidence for these three symmetries is reviewed, along with brief comments on the possible existence of supersymmetries in nuclei. The relationships between these symmetries, the nuclear phase transitional regions linking them, and the residual proton-neutron interaction are discussed in terms of a particularly simple scheme for parameterizing the effects of that interaction. 34 refs., 15 figs.

  12. Nuclear structure investigations in the region of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hessberger, F. P.

    2007-08-15

    Radioactive decay from the ground state or isomeric states has been investigated for a series of nuclei in the region of Z = 100-106 by means of {alpha}-{gamma}-or evaporation residue-({gamma}, conversion electron)-measurements in prompt and delayed coincidence. Systematic trends in single-particle level energies in N = 145-151 odd-even isotones could be extended up to Z = 104, while an energy systematics of lowlying Nilsson levels in odd-mass einsteinium isotopes was established. Information on nuclear levels at E* > 500 keV was obtained from the decay study of isomeric states in {sup 251-255}No.

  13. The study of the physics of cometary nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.; Marsden, B. G.; Sekanina, Z.

    1976-01-01

    A semiannual progress report describing the work completed during the period 1 September 1975 to 29 February 1976 on the physics of cometary nuclei was given. The following items were discussed: (1) a paper entitled ""A speculation about comets and the earth'', (2) a chapter entitled"" The physics of comets'' for ""Reviews of Astronomy and Astrophysics'', (3) continuing work on split comets, and (4) results dealing with a new application of nongravitational solar-radial forces as a measure of comet nucleus dimensions and activity.

  14. The liquid to vapor phase transition in excited nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.B.; Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Beaulieu, L.; Breuer, H.; Korteling, R.G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Lefort, T.; Pienkowski, L.; Ruangma, A.; Viola, V.E.; Yennello, S.J.

    2001-05-08

    For many years it has been speculated that excited nuclei would undergo a liquid to vapor phase transition. For even longer, it has been known that clusterization in a vapor carries direct information on the liquid-vapor equilibrium according to Fisher's droplet model. Now the thermal component of the 8 GeV/c pion + 197 Au multifragmentation data of the ISiS Collaboration is shown to follow the scaling predicted by Fisher's model, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of the liquid to vapor phase transition.

  15. The 1992 FRDM mass model and unstable nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, P.; Nix, R.J.

    1994-02-01

    We discuss the reliability of a recent global nuclear-structure calculation in regions far from {beta} stability. We focus on the results for nuclear masses, but also mention other results obtained in the nuclear-structure calculation, for example ground-state spins. We discuss what should be some minimal requirements of a nuclear mass model and study how the macroscopic-microscopic method and other nuclear mass models fullfil such basic requirements. We study in particular the reliability of nuclear mass models in regions of nuclei that were not considered in the determination of the model parameters.

  16. High-energy neutrinos from active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Done, C.; Salamon, M. H.; Sommers, P.

    1991-01-01

    The spectrum and high-energy neutrino background flux from photomeson production in active galactic nuclei (AGN) is calculated using the recent UV and X-ray observations to define the photon fields and an accretion-disk shock-acceleration model for producing high-energy particles. Collectively, AGN produce the dominant isotropic neutrino background between 10,000 and 10 to the 10th GeV, detectable with current instruments. AGN neutrinos should produce a sphere of stellar disruption which may explain the 'broad-line region' seen in AGN.

  17. Magnetic fields in the central engines of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1989-01-01

    Important physical processes which may occur in the central engines of active galactic nuclei and which rely on the presence of a strong magnetic field are discussed. These processes include those involved in the plasma physics of hot tenuous accretion flows, the production of nonthermal continuum radiation, and the radiative manifestation of hydromagnetic jet production. The main arguments which support the hypothesis that supermassive black holes are the prime movers in the central engines are reviewed, and some major deduction regarding the physical state of the accreting gas are pointed out.

  18. Aneuploidy detection in human sperm nuclei using PRINS technique

    SciTech Connect

    Girardet, A.; Coignet, L.; Andreo, B.

    1996-08-23

    Rapid and specific identification of chromosomes can be attained in situ using the PRimed IN Situ (PRINS) labelling technique. We have adapted this technique to mature human sperm in combination with a protocol for simultaneous decondensation and denaturation of sperm nuclei. This strategy allowed us to obtain double labelling of human spermatozoa in a <2-hr reaction. In the present study, we report the estimates of disomy for chromosomes 3, 7, 10, 11, and 17 on 64,642 spermatozoa from 2 normal males. The incidences of disomy ranged from 0.28-0.34%. There were no significant interindividual or interchromosomal differences in disomy rates. 27 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Rotation and wobbling motion in triaxially deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, K. )

    1992-06-01

    A quantum mechanical method of rotation and wobbling motion in triaxially deformed nuclei is represented within the framework of time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory. For such systems, the intrinsic frame is defined by imposing constraints of principal-axis frame. With aid of the canonical formulation of the constrained system, the Dirac quantization of the classical system is performed. It is shown that the commutation relations of angular momentum in the intrinsic frame then exactly satisfy the body-fixed frame. Furthermore, a method of describing large amplitude collective motion in the constrained system is proposed by extending the self-consistent collective-coordinate method.

  20. Relativistic mean field models for finite nuclei and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Chia

    In this dissertation we have created theoretical models for finite nuclei, nuclear matter, and neutron stars within the framework of relativistic mean field (RMF) theory, and we have used these models to investigate the elusive isovector sector and related physics, in particular, the neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei, the nuclear symmetry energy, and the properties of neutron stars. To build RMF models that incorporate collective excitations in finite nuclei in addition to their ground-state properties, we have extended the non-relativistic sum rule approach to the relativistic domain. This allows an efficient estimate of giant monopole energies. Moreover, we have combined an exact shell-model-like approach with the mean-field calculation to describe pairing correlations in open-shell nuclei. All the ingredients were then put together to establish the calibration scheme. We have also extended the transformation between model parameters and pseudo data of nuclear matter within the RMF context. Performing calibration in this pseudo data space can not only facilitate the searching algorithm but also make the pseudo data genuine model predictions. This calibration scheme is also supplemented by a covariance analysis enabling us to extract the information content of a model, including theoretical uncertainties and correlation coefficients. A series of RMF models subject to the same isoscalar constraints but one differing isovector assumption were then created using this calibration scheme. By comparing their predictions of the nuclear matter equation of state to both experimental and theoretical constraints, we found that a small neutron skin of about 0.16 fm in Pb208 is favored, indicating that the symmetry energy should be soft. To obtain stronger evidence, we proceeded to examine the evolution of the isotopic chains in both oxygen and calcium. Again, it was found that the model with such small neutron skin and soft symmetry energy can best describe both isotopic

  1. Collective Modes in Light Nuclei from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dytrych, T.; Launey, K. D.; Draayer, J. P.; Maris, P.; Vary, J. P.; Saule, E.; Catalyurek, U.; Sosonkina, M.; Langr, D.; Caprio, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Results for ab initio no-core shell model calculations in a symmetry-adapted SU(3)-based coupling scheme demonstrate that collective modes in light nuclei emerge from first principles. The low-lying states of Li6, Be8, and He6 are shown to exhibit orderly patterns that favor spatial configurations with strong quadrupole deformation and complementary low intrinsic spin values, a picture that is consistent with the nuclear symplectic model. The results also suggest a pragmatic path forward to accommodate deformation-driven collective features in ab initio analyses when they dominate the nuclear landscape.

  2. QCD coherence effects in high energy reactions with nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Raufeisen, J.

    2002-01-01

    The authors investigate QCD coherence effects in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) off nuclei and in Drell-Yan (DY) dilepton production in proton-nucleus collisions within the light-cone color-dipole approach. The physical mechanisms underlying the nuclear effects become very transparent in this approach and are explained in some detail. They present numerical calculations of nuclear shadowing in DIS and DY and compare to data. Nuclear effects in the DY transverse momentum distribition are calculated as well. The dipole approach is the only known way to calculate the Cronin effect without introducing additional parameters for nuclear targets.

  3. Microcosmic bang: Mashing atomic nuclei to create a quark soup

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, I.

    1996-09-21

    According to modern physics, the first micromoments of the Big Bang were a time of unimaginable extremes. No more than a cosmic spark, the universe was then so extraordinarily hot that the strong nuclear force was too weak to keep quarks bound tightly together in protons and other particles of ordinary matter. Free quarks roamed a thick broth of gluons, particles that carry the strong force. Physictists describe this extreme state of matter as a quark-gluon plasma. Now, they think that they have glimpsed such a state in the laboratory in high-energy collisions between heavy nuclei. This article describes the theory, the results and the future for this discovery.

  4. Cluster approach to the structure of nuclei with Z {>=} 96

    SciTech Connect

    Shneidman, T. M. Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Jolos, R. V.

    2007-08-15

    The properties of alternating parity bands in heavy nuclei {sup 234}Th, {sup 239-242}U, {sup 241-245}Pu, {sup 243-248}Cm, {sup 245-250}Cf, {sup 248-251}Fm, {sup 249-254}No, {sup 253-256}Rf, and {sup 258}Sg are analyzed within the dinuclearsystem model. The model is based on the assumption that the cluster-type shapes are produced by the motion of the nuclear system in the mass-asymmetry coordinate. The energies of the low-lying states whose parity is opposite to the parity of the ground state are predicted for the first time.

  5. From hadrons to nuclei with charm and bottom flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, S.; Sudoh, K.

    2011-10-21

    We discuss new exotic nuclei which contain D-bar and B mesons. As simplest systems, we consider D-bar(B) bound systems with one nucleon and two nucleons. With respecting to the heavy quark symmetry, we derive the one pion exchange potential as a long range force as an interaction between D-bar(B) meson and nucleon. We solve the Schroedinger equation with coupled channels, and investigate the D-barN (BN) bound states. We further discuss the possibility of existence of D-barNN (BNN). We discuss the possible observations of these exotic states in experiments in accelerator facilities.

  6. Unusual chemical compositions of noctilucent-cloud particle nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemenway, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    Two sounding rocket payloads were launched from the ESRO range in Sweden during a noctilucent cloud display. Large numbers of submicron particles were collected, most of which appear to be made up of a high density material coated with a low density material. Typical electron micrographs are shown. Particle chemical compositions have been measured by use of dispersive X-ray analysis equipment attached to an electron microscope and have revealed that most of the high density particle nuclei have atomic weights greater than iron.

  7. Optimal ultraviolet wavelength for in vivo photoacoustic imaging of cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Yao, Da-Kang; Chen, Ruimin; Maslov, Konstantin; Zhou, Qifa; Wang, Lihong V

    2012-05-01

    In order to image noninvasively cell nuclei in vivo without staining, we have developed ultraviolet photoacoustic microscopy (UV-PAM), in which ultraviolet light excites nucleic acids in cell nuclei to produce photoacoustic waves. Equipped with a tunable laser system, the UV-PAM was applied to in vivo imaging of cell nuclei in small animals. We found that 250 nm was the optimal wavelength for in vivo photoacoustic imaging of cell nuclei. The optimal wavelength enables UV-PAM to image cell nuclei using as little as 2 nJ laser pulse energy. Besides the optimal wavelength, application of a wavelength between 245 and 275 nm can produce in vivo images of cell nuclei with specific, positive, and high optical contrast.

  8. Effects of GA sub 4 on gene expression in isolated nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sechley, K.A.; Srivastava, L.M. )

    1989-04-01

    GA{sub 4} is active in promoting elongation in cucumber (Cucuminus sativus) hypocotyls. Nuclei, isolated from the apical 1cm portion of the hypocotyl and purified on Percoll step gradients increased transcription (({sup 3}H)UTP incorporation into TCA precipitable products) in the presence of GA{sub 4} compared to untreated nuclei. This response was not observed in nuclei isolated from basal (nontarget) regions of the hypocotyl. Enhanced transcription in the presence of GA{sub 4} appears to be affected by proteinaceous factors which can be washed out of the nuclei. The GA{sub 4} induced response of cucumber hypocotyls is temperature sensitive; nuclei isolated from plants grown at 34C do not show the above GA{sub 4}-induced transcriptional enhancement. Comparison of 2-D flurograms of in vitro translation products synthesized from transcripts obtained from intact plants and isolated nuclei in the presence or absence of GA{sub 4} is currently in progress.

  9. The major nucleoside triphosphatase in pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei and in rat liver nuclei share common epitopes also present in nuclear lamins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, C. G.; Dauwalder, M.; Clawson, G. A.; Hatem, C. L.; Roux, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    The major nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) activities in mammalian and pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei are associated with enzymes that are very similar both biochemically and immunochemically. The major NTPase from rat liver nuclei appears to be a 46-kD enzyme that represents the N-terminal portion of lamins A and C, two lamina proteins that apparently arise from the same gene by alternate splicing. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) G2, raised to human lamin C, both immunoprecipitates the major (47 kD) NTPase in pea nuclei and recognizes it in western blot analyses. A polyclonal antibody preparation raised to the 47-kD pea NTPase (pc480) reacts with the same lamin bands that are recognized by MAb G2 in mammalian nuclei. The pc480 antibodies also bind to the same lamin-like bands in pea nuclear envelope-matrix preparations that are recognized by G2 and three other MAbs known to bind to mammalian lamins. In immunofluorescence assays, pc480 and anti-lamin antibodies stain both cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens in plant cells, with slightly enhanced staining along the periphery of the nuclei. These results indicate that the pea and rat liver NTPases are structurally similar and that, in pea nuclei as in rat liver nuclei, the major NTPase is probably derived from a lamin precursor by proteolysis.

  10. New Measurements of High-Momentum Nucleons and Short-Range Structures in Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Fomin, N.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, R.; Benmokhtar, F.; Boeglin, W.; Bosted, P.; Bruell, A.; Bukhari, M. H. S.; Christy, M. E.; Chudakov, E.; Clasie, B.; Connell, S. H.; Dalton, M. M.; Daniel, A.; Day, D. B.; Dutta, D.; Ent, R.; El Fassi, L.; Fenker, H.; Filippone, B. W.; Garrow, K.; Gaskell, D.; Hill, C.; Holt, R. J.; Horn, T.; Jones, M. K.; Jourdan, J.; Kalantarians, N.; Keppel, C. E.; Kiselev, D.; Kotulla, M.; Lindgren, R.; Lung, A. F.; Malace, S.; Markowitz, P.; McKee, P.; Meekins, D. G.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Navasardyan, T.; Niculescu, G.; Opper, A. K.; Perdrisat, C.; Potterveld, D. H.; Punjabi, V.; Qian, X.; Reimer, P. E.; Roche, J.; Rodriguez, V. M.; Rondon, O.; Schulte, E.; Seely, J.; Segbefia, E.; Slifer, K.; Smith, G. R.; Solvignon, P.; Tadevosyan, V.; Tajima, S.; Tang, L.; Testa, G.; Trojer, R.; Tvaskis, V.; Vulcan, W. F.; Wasko, C.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S. A.; Wright, J.; Zheng, X.

    2012-02-01

    We present new, high-Q2 measurements of inclusive electron scattering from high-momentum nucleons in nuclei. This yields an improved extraction of the strength of two-nucleon correlations for several nuclei, including light nuclei where clustering effects can, for the first time, be examined. The data extend to the kinematic regime where three-nucleon correlations are expected to dominate and we observe significantly greater strength in this region than previous measurements.

  11. The nuclear structure of deformed odd-odd nuclei: Experimental and theoretical investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Jain, A.K.; Sood, P.C.; Sheline, R.K.

    1988-06-06

    Previous surveys of experimental level structure in deformed odd-odd nuclei have been updated with recent results for the lanthanide and actinide regions. The relative strengths of the effective neutron-proton interaction derived from these data are compared. The predictive power of a semi-empirical model for level structure in deformed odd-odd nuclei is demonstrated. Comparison is made with recent Hartree-Fock calculations of selected nuclei.

  12. New Measurements of High-Momentum Nucleons and Short-Range Structures in Nuclei

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fomin, N.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, R.; Benmokhtar, F.; Boeglin, W.; Bosted, P.; Bruell, A.; Bukhari, M. H. S.; Christy, M. E.; Chudakov, E.; et al

    2012-02-01

    We present new, high-Q2 measurements of inclusive electron scattering from high-momentum nucleons in nuclei. This yields an improved extraction of the strength of two-nucleon correlations for several nuclei, including light nuclei where clustering effects can, for the first time, be examined. The data extend to the kinematic regime where three-nucleon correlations are expected to dominate and we observe significantly greater strength in this region than previous measurements.

  13. Secondary electron background produced by heavy nuclei in a multiwire proportional counter hodoscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, S. H., Jr.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Schwille, H.; Pollvogt, U.

    1974-01-01

    The secondary electron background produced by heavy nuclei in a multiwire proportional counter hodoscope is calculated using both a simplified and a more complete Monte Carlo model. These results are compared with experimental data from a small multiwire proportional counter hodoscope operated in a 530 MeV/nucleon accelerator beam of nitrogen nuclei. Estimates of the secondary electron background produced by heavy relativistic nuclei are presented along with the detailed results from calculations of energy deposition in the hodoscope counter cells.

  14. {Delta}I = 2 energy staggering in normal deformed dysprosium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.A.; Brown, T.B.; Archer, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Very high spin states (I{ge}50{Dirac_h}) have been observed in {sup 155,156,157}Dy. The long regular band sequences, free from sharp backbending effects, observed in these dysprosium nuclei offer the possibility of investigating the occurence of any {Delta}I = 2 staggering in normal deformed nuclei. Employing the same analysis techniques as used in superdeformed nuclei, certain bands do indeed demonstrate an apparent staggering and this is discussed.

  15. Finite Nuclei in the Quark-Meson Coupling Model.

    PubMed

    Stone, J R; Guichon, P A M; Reinhard, P G; Thomas, A W

    2016-03-01

    We report the first use of the effective quark-meson coupling (QMC) energy density functional (EDF), derived from a quark model of hadron structure, to study a broad range of ground state properties of even-even nuclei across the periodic table in the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock+BCS framework. The novelty of the QMC model is that the nuclear medium effects are treated through modification of the internal structure of the nucleon. The density dependence is microscopically derived and the spin-orbit term arises naturally. The QMC EDF depends on a single set of four adjustable parameters having a clear physics basis. When applied to diverse ground state data the QMC EDF already produces, in its present simple form, overall agreement with experiment of a quality comparable to a representative Skyrme EDF. There exist, however, multiple Skyrme parameter sets, frequently tailored to describe selected nuclear phenomena. The QMC EDF set of fewer parameters, derived in this work, is not open to such variation, chosen set being applied, without adjustment, to both the properties of finite nuclei and nuclear matter.

  16. Finite Nuclei in the Quark-Meson Coupling Model.

    PubMed

    Stone, J R; Guichon, P A M; Reinhard, P G; Thomas, A W

    2016-03-01

    We report the first use of the effective quark-meson coupling (QMC) energy density functional (EDF), derived from a quark model of hadron structure, to study a broad range of ground state properties of even-even nuclei across the periodic table in the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock+BCS framework. The novelty of the QMC model is that the nuclear medium effects are treated through modification of the internal structure of the nucleon. The density dependence is microscopically derived and the spin-orbit term arises naturally. The QMC EDF depends on a single set of four adjustable parameters having a clear physics basis. When applied to diverse ground state data the QMC EDF already produces, in its present simple form, overall agreement with experiment of a quality comparable to a representative Skyrme EDF. There exist, however, multiple Skyrme parameter sets, frequently tailored to describe selected nuclear phenomena. The QMC EDF set of fewer parameters, derived in this work, is not open to such variation, chosen set being applied, without adjustment, to both the properties of finite nuclei and nuclear matter. PMID:26991171

  17. Probing Shell Closures in Neutron-Rich Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krücken, R.

    2008-08-01

    Results of two experimental campaigns are presented investigating shell structure in neutron-rich nuclei near 54Ca and 132Sn, respectively. In the first experiment excited states in 55Ti were investigated at the middle focus of the GSI FRS via one-neutron knock-out from 56Ti. Longitudinal momentum distributions were measured inclusively and in coincidence with a newly discovered gamma-ray at 955 keV detected by the MINIBALL gamma-ray detector array. From the momentum distributions the νp1/2 single-particle structure of the ground state was determined for the first time while the excited state at 955 keV is identified as the νp3/2 single-particle state. Secondly, results from the Coulomb excitation of neutron-rich nuclei 122,124,126Cd, 138,140,142,144Xe are presented. These experiments were performed at the REX-ISOLDE accelerator at CERN also using the MINIBALL array. The obtained B(E2)-values follow the expected systematic behavior that correlates the energy of the first excited 2+ state with the B(E2)-values and also agree well with the results of theoretical predictions.

  18. Histidine kinase activity in nuclei of Physarum polycephalum

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, H.R.; Pesis, K. Wei, Y.

    1987-05-01

    Nuclei of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum, contain a kinase that specifically phosphorylates the 1-nitrogen of histidine-75 of histone H4, in vitro. Phosphohistidine is alkali stable and acid labile. Similar alkali stable phosphorylation has been observed with beef heart extracts and S-100 extracts from S. cerevisiae. The activity may be similar to that previously reported by R.A. Smith and his colleagues in several mammalian tissues. They have begun a search for nuclear proteins that contain phosphohistidine. Cultures of Physarum were grown in the presence of /sup 32/P-phosphate using several different labeling protocols. Labeled nuclear proteins were fractionated on a Superose-12 column. Alkali stable phosphate label eluted close to the position of histone H1, although it was not on H1 itself. No alkali stable phosphate eluted at the position of histone H4, which was obtained in high yield by this procedure. The absence of alkali-stable phosphorylation of histone H4 was confirmed by gel electrophoresis of the crude nuclear proteins. The fraction containing alkali-stable phosphate was shown to contain phosphohistidine by amino acid analysis of a total alkaline hydrolysate. They conclude that Physarum nuclei possess at least one protein that contains phosphohistidine in vivo and that histone H4 does not contain phosphohistidine in this system.

  19. Automated seeding-based nuclei segmentation in nonlinear optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Medyukhina, Anna; Meyer, Tobias; Heuke, Sandro; Vogler, Nadine; Dietzek, Benjamin; Popp, Jürgen

    2013-10-01

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy based, e.g., on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) or two-photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) is a fast label-free imaging technique, with a great potential for biomedical applications. However, NLO microscopy as a diagnostic tool is still in its infancy; there is a lack of robust and durable nuclei segmentation methods capable of accurate image processing in cases of variable image contrast, nuclear density, and type of investigated tissue. Nonetheless, such algorithms specifically adapted to NLO microscopy present one prerequisite for the technology to be routinely used, e.g., in pathology or intraoperatively for surgical guidance. In this paper, we compare the applicability of different seeding and boundary detection methods to NLO microscopic images in order to develop an optimal seeding-based approach capable of accurate segmentation of both TPEF and CARS images. Among different methods, the Laplacian of Gaussian filter showed the best accuracy for the seeding of the image, while a modified seeded watershed segmentation was the most accurate in the task of boundary detection. The resulting combination of these methods followed by the verification of the detected nuclei performs high average sensitivity and specificity when applied to various types of NLO microscopy images.

  20. Mushrooms as Rainmakers: How Spores Act as Nuclei for Raindrops.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Maribeth O; Fischer, Mark W F; Money, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Millions of tons of fungal spores are dispersed in the atmosphere every year. These living cells, along with plant spores and pollen grains, may act as nuclei for condensation of water in clouds. Basidiospores released by mushrooms form a significant proportion of these aerosols, particularly above tropical forests. Mushroom spores are discharged from gills by the rapid displacement of a droplet of fluid on the cell surface. This droplet is formed by the condensation of water on the spore surface stimulated by the secretion of mannitol and other hygroscopic sugars. This fluid is carried with the spore during discharge, but evaporates once the spore is airborne. Using environmental electron microscopy, we have demonstrated that droplets reform on spores in humid air. The kinetics of this process suggest that basidiospores are especially effective as nuclei for the formation of large water drops in clouds. Through this mechanism, mushroom spores may promote rainfall in ecosystems that support large populations of ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic basidiomycetes. Our research heightens interest in the global significance of the fungi and raises additional concerns about the sustainability of forests that depend on heavy precipitation. PMID:26509436

  1. Population transfer HMQC for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Xu, Jun; Feng, Ningdong; Deng, Feng E-mail: jean-paul.amoureux@univ-lille1.fr; Li, Yixuan; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Hu, Bingwen; Chen, Qun; Amoureux, Jean-Paul E-mail: jean-paul.amoureux@univ-lille1.fr

    2015-03-07

    This work presents a detailed analysis of a recently proposed nuclear magnetic resonance method [Wang et al., Chem. Commun. 49(59), 6653-6655 (2013)] for accelerating heteronuclear coherence transfers involving half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei by manipulating their satellite transitions. This method, called Population Transfer Heteronuclear Multiple Quantum Correlation (PT-HMQC), is investigated in details by combining theoretical analyses, numerical simulations, and experimental investigations. We find that compared to instant inversion or instant saturation, continuous saturation is the most practical strategy to accelerate coherence transfers on half-integer quadrupolar nuclei. We further demonstrate that this strategy is efficient to enhance the sensitivity of J-mediated heteronuclear correlation experiments between two half-integer quadrupolar isotopes (e.g., {sup 27}Al-{sup 17}O). In this case, the build-up is strongly affected by relaxation for small T{sub 2}′ and J coupling values, and shortening the mixing time makes a huge signal enhancement. Moreover, this concept of population transfer can also be applied to dipolar-mediated HMQC experiments. Indeed, on the AlPO{sub 4}-14 sample, one still observes experimentally a 2-fold shortening of the optimum mixing time albeit with no significant signal gain in the {sup 31}P-({sup 27}Al) experiments.

  2. {alpha}-cluster structure and density waves in oblate nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko; Hidaka, Yoshimasa

    2011-07-15

    Pentagon and triangle shapes in {sup 28}Si and {sup 12}C are discussed in relation to nuclear density waves. In the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics calculations, the K{sup {pi}=}5{sup -} band in {sup 28}Si and the K{sup {pi}=}3{sup -} band in {sup 12}C are described by the pentagon and triangle shapes, respectively. These negative-parity bands can be interpreted as the parity partners of the K{sup {pi}=}0{sup +} ground bands and they are constructed from the parity-asymmetric-intrinsic states. The pentagon and the triangle shapes originate in 7{alpha}- and 3{alpha}-cluster structures, respectively. In a mean-field picture, they are described also by the static one-dimensional density waves at the edge of the oblate states. In analyses with ideal {alpha}-cluster models using Brink-Bloch cluster wave functions and that with a simplified model, we show that the static edge density waves for the pentagon and triangle shapes can be understood by spontaneous breaking of axial symmetry, i.e., the instability of the oblate states with respect to the edge density waves. The density wave is enhanced in the Z=N nuclei due to the proton-neutron coherent density waves, while it is suppressed in Z{ne}N nuclei.

  3. Evidence that the extraocular motor nuclei innervate monkey palisade endings.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Lars; May, Paul J; Pastor, Angel M; Streicher, Johannes; Blumer, Roland

    2011-02-01

    Palisade endings are found in the extraocular muscles (EOMs) of almost every mammalian species, including primates. These nerve specializations surrounding the muscle fiber insertion have been postulated to be the proprioceptors of the EOMs. However, it was recently demonstrated that palisade endings have a cholinergic nature, which reopened the question of whether palisade endings are motor or sensory structures. In this work, we examined whether the cell bodies of palisade endings lie in EOM motor nuclei by injecting an anterograde tracer, biotinylated dextran amine, into the abducens nucleus of a macaque monkey. Tracer visualization in the lateral rectus muscle was combined with choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and α-bungarotoxin staining. Analysis of the samples was performed by conventional light microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. About 30% of the nerve fibers innervating the muscle were tracer positive. These were ChAT positive as well. Tracer positive nerve fibers established motor contacts on singly and multiply innervated muscle fibers, which were confirmed by α-bungarotoxin staining. At the transition between muscle and distal tendon, we found palisade endings that contained tracer. Palisade endings exhibited the classic morphology: axons arising from the muscle extend onto the tendon, then turn back 180° and terminate in a cuff of terminals around an individual muscle fiber tip. This finding suggests that the cell bodies of palisade endings lie in the EOM motor nuclei, which complements prior studies demonstrating a cholinergic, and possibly motor, phenotype for palisade endings.

  4. The Energetic Trans-Iron Nuclei Experiment (ENTICE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Christian, E. R.; Denolfo, G. A.; Hams, T.; Link, J. T.; Mitchell, J. W.; Sasaki, M.; Adams, J. H.; Waddington, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    The ENTICE experiment is one of two instruments that comprise the "Orbiting Astrophysical Spectrometer in Space (OASIS)" which is presently undergoing a NASA "Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study". ENTICE is designed to make high precision measurements of the abundances of individual elements from neon through the actinides and, in addition, will search for possible superheavy nuclei in the galactic cosmic rays. The ENTICE instrument utilizes silicon detectors, aerogel and acrylic Cherenkov counters, and a scintillating optical fiber hodoscope to measure the charge and energy of these ultra-heavy nuclei for energies greater than 0.3 GeV/nucleon. It is a large instrument consisting of four modules with a total effective geometrical factor of 20 m2sr. Measurements made in space for a period of 3 years with ENTICE will enable us to determine if cosmic rays include a component of recently synthesized heavy elements (Pu and Cm), what the age of that component is, and test the model of the OB association origin of galactic cosmic rays. Additionally, it will enable us to study how diffusive shock acceleration of cosmic rays operates differently on interstellar grains and gas.

  5. Structure of the N=50 As, Ge, Ga nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, E.; de Angelis, G.; Duchene, G.; Faul, T.; Gadea, A.; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Ackermann, D.; Algora, A.; Aydin, S.; Azaiez, F.; Bazzacco, D.; Benzoni, G.; Bostan, M.; Byrski, T.; Celikovic, I.; Chapman, R.; Corradi, L.; Courtin, S.; Curien, D.; Pramanik, U. Datta; Didierjean, F.; Dorvaux, O.; Erduran, M. N.; Erturk, S.; Farnea, E.; Fioretto, E.; de France, G.; Franchoo, S.; Gall, B.; Gottardo, A.; Guiot, B.; Haas, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Ince, E.; Khouaja, A.; Kusoglu, A.; La Rana, G.; Labiche, M.; Lebhertz, D.; Lenzi, S.; Leoni, S.; Lunardi, S.; Mason, P.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Modamio, V.; Montagnoli, G.; Montanari, D.; Moro, R.; Mouginot, B.; Napoli, D. R.; O'Donnell, D.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Ollier, J.; Orlandi, R.; Pollarolo, G.; Recchia, F.; Robin, J.; Salsac, M.-D.; Scarlassara, F.; Singh, R. P.; Silvestri, R.; Smith, J. F.; Stefan, I.; Stefanini, A. M.; Subotic, K.; Szilner, S.; Tonev, D.; Torres, D. A.; Trotta, M.; Ujic, P.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Verney, D.; Yalcinkaya, M.; Wady, P. T.; Wiedemann, K. T.; Zuber, K.

    2012-11-01

    The level structures of the N=5083As, 82Ge, and 81Ga isotones have been investigated by means of multi-nucleon transfer reactions. A first experiment was performed with the CLARA-PRISMA setup to identify these nuclei. A second experiment was carried out with the GASP array in order to deduce the γ-ray coincidence information. The results obtained on the high-spin states of such nuclei are used to test the stability of the N=50 shell closure in the region of 78Ni (Z=28). The comparison of the experimental level schemes with the shell-model calculations yields an N=50 energy gap value of 4.7(3) MeV at Z=28. This value, in a good agreement with the prediction of the finite-range liquid-drop model as well as with the recent large-scale shell model calculations, does not support a weakening of the N=50 shell gap down to Z=28.

  6. Polarised nuclei for neutron science: recent applications and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glättli, Hans

    2004-08-01

    Neutron scattering on nuclei is spin dependent, particularly strongly for 1H. The means to achieve large nuclear polarisations and its use for structure analysis or as spin-handling device are reviewed. High resolution (diffraction) as well as low resolution (SANS) measurements can benefit from polarised nuclei by changing selectively the form factors of Bragg reflections or the contrasts (the scattering length density profiles) in SANS. The internal structure of ribosomes and the conformation of polymers in solution have been investigated by this method. A numerical simulation is presented to show the influence of steady-state polarisation of protons on the scattering from a protein-ARN model complex. In addition, a more recent technique, time-resolved SANS is described. It makes use of spatial polarisation gradients created around paramagnetic centres at the onset of nuclear polarisation. Such polarisation domains can enhance considerably the scattering amplitude of free radicals and thus contribute to determine their positions inside a complex protein. Examples of possible future experiments are proposed which combine simultaneously the selectivity of solid-state NMR techniques and neutron scattering.

  7. Vertical uniformity of cells and nuclei in epithelial monolayers.

    PubMed

    Neelam, Srujana; Hayes, Peter Robert; Zhang, Qiao; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2016-01-22

    Morphological variability in cytoskeletal organization, organelle position and cell boundaries is a common feature of cultured cells. Remarkable uniformity and reproducibility in structure can be accomplished by providing cells with defined geometric cues. Cells in tissues can also self-organize in the absence of directing extracellular cues; however the mechanical principles for such self-organization are not understood. We report that unlike horizontal shapes, the vertical shapes of the cell and nucleus in the z-dimension are uniform in cells in cultured monolayers compared to isolated cells. Apical surfaces of cells and their nuclei in monolayers were flat and heights were uniform. In contrast, isolated cells, or cells with disrupted cell-cell adhesions had nuclei with curved apical surfaces and variable heights. Isolated cells cultured within micron-sized square wells displayed flat cell and nuclear shapes similar to cells in monolayers. Local disruption of nuclear-cytoskeletal linkages resulted in spatial variation in vertical uniformity. These results suggest that competition between cell-cell pulling forces that expand and shorten the vertical cell cross-section, thereby widening and flattening the nucleus, and the resistance of the nucleus to further flattening results in uniform cell and nuclear cross-sections. Our results reveal the mechanical principles of self-organized vertical uniformity in cell monolayers.

  8. Collisions of deformed nuclei and superheavy-element production

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, Akira; Moeller, P. |||; Nix, J.R.; Sagawa, Hiroyuki, Sagawa

    1995-09-01

    A detailed understanding of complete fusion cross sections in heavy-ion collisions requires a consideration of the effects of the deformation of the projectile and target. The aim here is to show that deformation and orientation of the colliding nuclei have a very significant effect on the fusion-barrier height and on the compactness of the touching configuration. To facilitate discussions of fusion configurations of deformed nuclei, the authors develop a classification scheme and introduce a notation convention for these configurations. They discuss particular deformations and orientations that lead to compact touching configurations and to fusion-barrier heights that correspond to fairly low excitation energies of the compound systems. Such configurations should be the most favorable for producing superheavy elements. They analyze a few projectile-target combinations whose deformations allow favorable entrance-channel configurations and whose proton and neutron numbers lead to compound systems in a part of the superheavy region where a half-lives are calculated to be observable, that is, longer than 1 {micro}s.

  9. Mushrooms as Rainmakers: How Spores Act as Nuclei for Raindrops.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Maribeth O; Fischer, Mark W F; Money, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Millions of tons of fungal spores are dispersed in the atmosphere every year. These living cells, along with plant spores and pollen grains, may act as nuclei for condensation of water in clouds. Basidiospores released by mushrooms form a significant proportion of these aerosols, particularly above tropical forests. Mushroom spores are discharged from gills by the rapid displacement of a droplet of fluid on the cell surface. This droplet is formed by the condensation of water on the spore surface stimulated by the secretion of mannitol and other hygroscopic sugars. This fluid is carried with the spore during discharge, but evaporates once the spore is airborne. Using environmental electron microscopy, we have demonstrated that droplets reform on spores in humid air. The kinetics of this process suggest that basidiospores are especially effective as nuclei for the formation of large water drops in clouds. Through this mechanism, mushroom spores may promote rainfall in ecosystems that support large populations of ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic basidiomycetes. Our research heightens interest in the global significance of the fungi and raises additional concerns about the sustainability of forests that depend on heavy precipitation.

  10. Fusion-reactor plasmas with polarized nuclei. II

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Furth, H.P.; Valeo, E.J.; Budny, R.V.; Jassby, D.L.; Micklich, B.J.; Post, D.E.; Goldhaber, M.; Happer, W.

    1982-11-01

    New techniques of bulk polarization could be used to fuel a reactor with polarized hydrogenic atoms, so as to form a plasma of polarized nuclei. Theoretical calculations indicate that, once the nuclei of the plasma are polarized in some preferred state, they can maintain this state with a probability near 100% during their lifetime in the reactor, including possible recycling. There are a number of practical advantages to be gained from the use of polarized plasma in a fusion reactor. The nuclear reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and/or the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled. The D-T reaction rate can be enhanced by as much as 50%, with the reaction products emitted perpendicular to the magnetic field. Alternatively, it is possible to direct the reaction products primarily along the field, with no enhancement. In this case of the D-D reaction, the theoretical predictions are somewhat less certain. Enhancement of the reaction rate by a factor of 1.5-2.5 is to be expected. In a different polarization state, suppression of D-D reactions may be feasible - a possibility that would be of interest for a neutron-free D-He/sup 3/ reactor. A quantitative discussion of the relevant nuclear physics as well as of the various mechanisms producing depolarization is given.

  11. Galaxies and Galaxy Nuclei: From Hot Cores to Cold Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, S.

    2015-12-01

    Studying the molecular phase of the interstellar medium in galaxies is fundamental for the understanding of the onset and evolution of star formation and the growth of supermassive black holes. We can use molecules as observational tools exploiting them as tracers of chemical, physical and dynamical conditions. In this short review, key molecules (e.g. HCN, HCO+, HNC, HC3N, CN) in identifying the nature of buried activity and its evolution are discussed including some standard astrochemical scenarios. Furthermore, we can use IR excited molecular emission to probe the very inner regions of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) allowing us to get past the optically thick dust barrier of the compact obscured nuclei. We show that the vibrationally excited lines are important probes of nuclei where lines of CO, HCN and HCO+ in their vibrational ground state (ν=0) may be self-absorbed. Finally, molecular outflows are briefly discussed - including the new ALMA discovery of a highly collimated (jet-like) reversed molecular outflow in the lenticular, extremely radio-quiet galaxy NGC1377.

  12. Aging and the human vestibular nuclei: morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, J C; Díaz, C; Suárez, C; Fernández, J A; González del Rey, C; Navarro, A; Tolivia, J

    2000-04-14

    The data concerning the effects of age on the brainstem are scarce and few works are devoted to the human vestibular nuclear complex. The study of the effects of aging in the vestibular nuclei could have clinical interest due to the high prevalence of balance control and gait problems in the elderly. We have used in this work eight human brainstems of different ages sectioned and stained by the formaldehyde-thionin technique. The neuron's profiles were drawn with a camera lucida and Abercrombie's method was used to estimate the total number of neurons. The test of Kolmogorov-Smirnov with the correction of Lilliefors was used to evaluate the fit of our data to a normal distribution and a regression analysis was done to determine if the variation of our data with age was statistically significant. Aging does not affect the volume or length of the vestibular nuclear complex. Our results clearly show that neuronal loss occurs with aging in the descending (DVN), medial (MVN), and lateral (LVN) vestibular nuclei, but not in the superior (SVN). There are changes in the proportions of neurons of different sizes but they are not statistically significant. The neuronal loss could be related with the problems that elderly people have to compensate unilateral vestibular lesions and the alterations of the vestibulospinal reflexes. The preservation of SVN neurons can explain why vestibulo-ocular reflexes are compensated after unilateral vestibular injuries.

  13. The Heavy Nuclei eXplorer (HNX) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizmanic, John; Mitchell, John; Binns, W. Robert; Hams, Thomas; Israel, Martin; Link, Jason; Rauch, Brian; Sakai, Kenichi; Sasaki, Makoto; Westphal, Andrew; Wiedenbeck, Mark; Heavy Nuclei eXplorer Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Heavy Nuclei eXplorer (HNX) will use two large high-precision instruments, the Extremely-heavy Cosmic-ray Composition Observer (ECCO) and the Cosmic-ray Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (CosmicTIGER), designed to fly in a SpaceX DragonLab Capsule, to measure the cosmic-ray abundance of every individual element in the periodic table from carbon through curium, providing the first measurement of many of these elements. These measurements provide an investigation on the nature of the source material of cosmic rays, the processes that inject them into cosmic accelerators, and the acceleration mechanisms. HNX will measure several thousand ultra-heavy galactic cosmic ray (UHGCR) nuclei with Z >= 30 , including about 50 actinides (Z >= 79). These data allow for a measurement of the mix of new and old material that is accelerated to GCRs, determine their age, measure the mix of nucleosynthesis processes responsible for the UHGCRs, determine how UHGCR elements are selected for acceleration, and measure the mean integrated pathlength traversed by UHGCRs before observation. The scientific motivation and instrumentation of HNX will be discussed as well as recent beam test results.

  14. Lifetime measurements in transitional nuclei by fast electronic scintillation timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprio, M. A.; Zamfir, N. V.; Casten, R. F.; Amro, H.; Barton, C. J.; Beausang, C. W.; Cooper, J. R.; Gürdal, G.; Hecht, A. A.; Hutter, C.; Krücken, R.; McCutchan, E. A.; Meyer, D. A.; Novak, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Ressler, J. J.; Berant, Z.; Brenner, D. S.; Gill, R. L.; Regan, P. H.

    2002-10-01

    A new generation of experiments studying nuclei in spherical-deformed transition regions has been motivated by the introduction of innovative theoretical approaches to the treatment of these nuclei. The important structural signatures in the transition regions, beyond the basic yrast level properties, involve γ-ray transitions between low-spin, non-yrast levels, and so information on γ-ray branching ratios and absolute matrix elements (or level lifetimes) for these transitions is crucial. A fast electronic scintillation timing (FEST) system [H. Mach, R. L. Gill, and M. Moszyński, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 280, 49 (1989)], making use of BaF2 and plastic scintillation detectors, has been implemented at the Yale Moving Tape Collector for the measurement of lifetimes of states populated in β^ decay. Experiments in the A100 (Pd, Ru) and A150 (Dy, Yb) regions have been carried out, and a few examples will be presented. Supported by the US DOE under grants and contracts DE-FG02-91ER-40609, DE-FG02-88ER-40417, and DE-AC02-98CH10886 and by the German DFG under grant Pi 393/1.

  15. Odd-even staggering in neutron drip line nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changizi, S. A.; Qi, Chong

    2016-07-01

    We have done systematic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations in coordinate space on the one-quasi-particle energies and binding energy odd-even staggering (OES) in semi-magic nuclei with the zero-range volume, mixed and surface pairing forces in order to explore the influence of their density dependence. The odd-N isotopes are calculated within the blocking scheme. The strengths for the pairing forces are determined in two schemes by fitting locally to reproduce pairing gap in 120Sn and globally to all available data on the OES of semi-magic nuclei with Z ≥ 8. In the former calculations, there is a noticeable difference between the neutron mean gaps in neutron-rich O, Ca, Ni and Sn isotopes calculated with the surface pairing and those with the mixed and volume pairing. The difference gets much smaller if the globally optimized pairing strengths are employed. The heavier Pb isotopes show the opposite trend. Moreover, large differences between the mean gap and the OES may be expected in both calculations when one goes towards the neutron drip line.

  16. Vertical uniformity of cells and nuclei in epithelial monolayers.

    PubMed

    Neelam, Srujana; Hayes, Peter Robert; Zhang, Qiao; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2016-01-01

    Morphological variability in cytoskeletal organization, organelle position and cell boundaries is a common feature of cultured cells. Remarkable uniformity and reproducibility in structure can be accomplished by providing cells with defined geometric cues. Cells in tissues can also self-organize in the absence of directing extracellular cues; however the mechanical principles for such self-organization are not understood. We report that unlike horizontal shapes, the vertical shapes of the cell and nucleus in the z-dimension are uniform in cells in cultured monolayers compared to isolated cells. Apical surfaces of cells and their nuclei in monolayers were flat and heights were uniform. In contrast, isolated cells, or cells with disrupted cell-cell adhesions had nuclei with curved apical surfaces and variable heights. Isolated cells cultured within micron-sized square wells displayed flat cell and nuclear shapes similar to cells in monolayers. Local disruption of nuclear-cytoskeletal linkages resulted in spatial variation in vertical uniformity. These results suggest that competition between cell-cell pulling forces that expand and shorten the vertical cell cross-section, thereby widening and flattening the nucleus, and the resistance of the nucleus to further flattening results in uniform cell and nuclear cross-sections. Our results reveal the mechanical principles of self-organized vertical uniformity in cell monolayers. PMID:26795751

  17. Ab initio calculations of reactions with light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaglioni, Sofia; Hupin, Guillaume; Calci, Angelo; Navrátil, Petr; Roth, Robert

    2016-03-01

    An ab initio (i.e., from first principles) theoretical framework capable of providing a unified description of the structure and low-energy reaction properties of light nuclei is desirable to further our understanding of the fundamental interactions among nucleons, and provide accurate predictions of crucial reaction rates for nuclear astrophysics, fusion-energy research, and other applications. In this contribution we review ab initio calculations for nucleon and deuterium scattering on light nuclei starting from chiral two- and three-body Hamiltonians, obtained within the framework of the ab initio no-core shell model with continuum. This is a unified approach to nuclear bound and scattering states, in which square-integrable energy eigenstates of the A-nucleon system are coupled to (A-a)+a target-plus-projectile wave functions in the spirit of the resonating group method to obtain an efficient description of the many-body nuclear dynamics both at short and medium distances and at long ranges.

  18. Electromagnetic and neutral-weak response functions of light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovato, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    A major goal of nuclear theory is to understand the strong interaction in nuclei as it manifests itself in terms of two- and many-body forces among the nuclear constituents, the protons and neutrons, and the interactions of these constituents with external electroweak probes via one- and many-body currents. Using imaginary-time projection technique, quantum Monte Carlo allows for solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation even for Hamiltonians including highly spin-isospin dependent two- and three- body forces. I will present a recent Green's function Monte Carlo calculation of the quasi-elastic electroweak response functions in light nuclei, needed to describe electron and neutrino scattering. We found that meson-exchange two-body currents generate excess transverse strength from threshold to the quasielastic to the dip region and beyond. These results challenge the conventional picture of quasi elastic inclusive scattering as being largely dominated by single-nucleon knockout processes. These findings are of particular interest for the interpretation of neutrino oscillation signals.

  19. Mushrooms as Rainmakers: How Spores Act as Nuclei for Raindrops

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Millions of tons of fungal spores are dispersed in the atmosphere every year. These living cells, along with plant spores and pollen grains, may act as nuclei for condensation of water in clouds. Basidiospores released by mushrooms form a significant proportion of these aerosols, particularly above tropical forests. Mushroom spores are discharged from gills by the rapid displacement of a droplet of fluid on the cell surface. This droplet is formed by the condensation of water on the spore surface stimulated by the secretion of mannitol and other hygroscopic sugars. This fluid is carried with the spore during discharge, but evaporates once the spore is airborne. Using environmental electron microscopy, we have demonstrated that droplets reform on spores in humid air. The kinetics of this process suggest that basidiospores are especially effective as nuclei for the formation of large water drops in clouds. Through this mechanism, mushroom spores may promote rainfall in ecosystems that support large populations of ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic basidiomycetes. Our research heightens interest in the global significance of the fungi and raises additional concerns about the sustainability of forests that depend on heavy precipitation. PMID:26509436

  20. Deactivation of ice nuclei due to atmospherically relevant surface coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Cziczo, Daniel J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Gallavardin, S. J.; Moehler, Ottmar; Benz, Stefan; Saathoff, Harald; Murphy, Daniel M.

    2009-11-23

    The ice nucleation characteristics of Arizona Test Dust (ATD) and illite clay, surrogates for atmospheric ice nuclei, have been determined at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located at the Research Center Karlsruhe in Germany. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of sulphuric acid and ammonium sulphate coatings on the ability of these mineral dust surrogates to nucleate ice in an environment where particles realistically compete for water vapor. Coated ATD particles required higher saturations at all investigated temperatures, from -20 to -45º C, than did identical uncoated particles. Freezing of coated particles often required saturations approaching those for the homogeneous freezing of aqueous solutions of the coating material alone. Less pronounced effects were found for illite although the presence of a coating consistently increased the saturation or decreased the temperature required for ice formation. Analysis of ice residue at the single particle level suggests that the first coated particles to freeze had thinner or incomplete coatings when compared to particles that froze later in the expansion. This observation highlights a need to verify coating properties since an assumption of homogeneity of a group of coated aerosol may be incorrect. The increase in saturation ratio for freezing suggests that gas-phase uptake of sulphates, a large fraction of which are due to anthropogenic emissions, will reduce the ice and mixed-phase cloud formation potential of atmospheric ice nuclei.