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Sample records for nucleic acid duplexes

  1. Methods And Devices For Characterizing Duplex Nucleic Acid Molecules

    DOEpatents

    Akeson, Mark; Vercoutere, Wenonah; Haussler, David; Winters-Hilt, Stephen

    2005-08-30

    Methods and devices are provided for characterizing a duplex nucleic acid, e.g., a duplex DNA molecule. In the subject methods, a fluid conducting medium that includes a duplex nucleic acid molecule is contacted with a nanopore under the influence of an applied electric field and the resulting changes in current through the nanopore caused by the duplex nucleic acid molecule are monitored. The observed changes in current through the nanopore are then employed as a set of data values to characterize the duplex nucleic acid, where the set of data values may be employed in raw form or manipulated, e.g., into a current blockade profile. Also provided are nanopore devices for practicing the subject methods, where the subject nanopore devices are characterized by the presence of an algorithm which directs a processing means to employ monitored changes in current through a nanopore to characterize a duplex nucleic acid molecule responsible for the current changes. The subject methods and devices find use in a variety of applications, including, among other applications, the identification of an analyte duplex DNA molecule in a sample, the specific base sequence at a single nulceotide polymorphism (SNP), and the sequencing of duplex DNA molecules.

  2. Thermodynamics of RNA duplexes modified with unlocked nucleic acid nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Anna; Wengel, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamics provides insights into the influence of modified nucleotide residues on stability of nucleic acids and is crucial for designing duplexes with given properties. In this article, we introduce detailed thermodynamic analysis of RNA duplexes modified with unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) nucleotide residues. We investigate UNA single substitutions as well as model mismatch and dangling end effects. UNA residues placed in a central position makes RNA duplex structure less favourable by 4.0–6.6 kcal/mol. Slight destabilization, by ∼0.5–1.5 kcal/mol, is observed for 5′- or 3′-terminal UNA residues. Furthermore, thermodynamic effects caused by UNA residues are extremely additive with ΔG°37 conformity up to 98%. Direct mismatches involving UNA residues decrease the thermodynamic stability less than unmodified mismatches in RNA duplexes. Additionally, the presence of UNA residues adjacent to unpaired RNA residues reduces mismatch discrimination. Thermodynamic analysis of UNA 5′- and 3′-dangling ends revealed that stacking interactions of UNA residues are always less favourable than that of RNA residues. Finally, circular dichroism spectra imply no changes in overall A-form structure of UNA–RNA/RNA duplexes relative to the unmodified RNA duplexes. PMID:20562222

  3. Nucleic acid duplexes incorporating a dissociable covalent base pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, K.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    We have used molecular modeling techniques to design a dissociable covalently bonded base pair that can replace a Watson-Crick base pair in a nucleic acid with minimal distortion of the structure of the double helix. We introduced this base pair into a potential precursor of a nucleic acid double helix by chemical synthesis and have demonstrated efficient nonenzymatic template-directed ligation of the free hydroxyl groups of the base pair with appropriate short oligonucleotides. The nonenzymatic ligation reactions, which are characteristic of base paired nucleic acid structures, are abolished when the covalent base pair is reduced and becomes noncoplanar. This suggests that the covalent base pair linking the two strands in the duplex is compatible with a minimally distorted nucleic acid double-helical structure.

  4. Nucleic acid duplexes incorporating a dissociable covalent base pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, K.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    We have used molecular modeling techniques to design a dissociable covalently bonded base pair that can replace a Watson-Crick base pair in a nucleic acid with minimal distortion of the structure of the double helix. We introduced this base pair into a potential precursor of a nucleic acid double helix by chemical synthesis and have demonstrated efficient nonenzymatic template-directed ligation of the free hydroxyl groups of the base pair with appropriate short oligonucleotides. The nonenzymatic ligation reactions, which are characteristic of base paired nucleic acid structures, are abolished when the covalent base pair is reduced and becomes noncoplanar. This suggests that the covalent base pair linking the two strands in the duplex is compatible with a minimally distorted nucleic acid double-helical structure.

  5. Nucleic Acid Duplexes Incorporating a Dissociable Covalent Base Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kui; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1999-12-01

    We have used molecular modeling techniques to design a dissociable covalently bonded base pair that can replace a Watson-Crick base pair in a nucleic acid with minimal distortion of the structure of the double helix. We introduced this base pair into a potential precursor of a nucleic acid double helix by chemical synthesis and have demonstrated efficient nonenzymatic template-directed ligation of the free hydroxyl groups of the base pair with appropriate short oligonucleotides. The nonenzymatic ligation reactions, which are characteristic of base paired nucleic acid structures, are abolished when the covalent base pair is reduced and becomes noncoplanar. This suggests that the covalent base pair linking the two strands in the duplex is compatible with a minimally distorted nucleic acid double-helical structure.

  6. Small molecule-mediated duplex formation of nucleic acids with 'incompatible' backbones.

    PubMed

    Cafferty, Brian J; Musetti, Caterina; Kim, Keunsoo; Horowitz, Eric D; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Hud, Nicholas V

    2016-04-07

    Proflavine, a known intercalator of DNA and RNA, promotes duplex formation by nucleic acids with natural and non-natural backbones that otherwise form duplexes with low thermal stability, and even some that show no sign of duplex formation in the absence of proflavine. These findings demonstrate the potential for intercalators to be used as cofactors for the assembly of rationally designed nucleic acid structures, and could provide fundamental insights regarding intercalation of natural nucleic acid duplexes.

  7. Intercalating nucleic acids: the influence of linker length and intercalator type on their duplex stabilities.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Ulf B; Wamberg, Michael; El-Essawy, Farag A G; Ismail, Abd El-Hamid; Nielsen, Christina B; Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Jessen, Carsten H; Petersen, Michael; Pedersen, Erik B

    2004-01-01

    Six new examples of intercalating nucleic acids were synthesized in order to evaluate the dependence of the length of the linker between oligo and intercalator on the thermal stability of their corresponding duplexes and triplexes.

  8. Scaffolding along nucleic acid duplexes using 2'-amino-locked nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Astakhova, I Kira; Wengel, Jesper

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Incorporation of chemically modified nucleotide scaffolds into nucleic acids to form assemblies rich in function is an innovative area with great promise for nanotechnology and biomedical and material science applications. The intrinsic biorecognition potential of nucleic acids combined with advanced properties of the locked nucleic acids (LNAs) provide opportunities to develop new nanomaterials and devices like sensors, aptamers, and machines. In this Account, we describe recent research on preparation and investigation of the properties of LNA/DNA hybrids containing functionalized 2'-amino-LNA nucleotides. By application of different chemical reactions, modification of 2'-amino-LNA scaffolds can be efficiently performed in high yields and with various tags, postsynthetically or during the automated oligonucleotide synthesis. The choice of a synthetic method for scaffolding along 2'-amino-LNA mainly depends on the chemical nature of the modification, its price, its availability, and applications of the product. One of the most useful applications of the product LNA/DNA scaffolds containing 2'-amino-LNA is to detect complementary DNA and RNA targets. Examples of these applications include sensing of clinically important single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and imaging of nucleic acids in vitro, in cell culture, and in vivo. According to our studies, 2'-amino-LNA scaffolds are efficient within diagnostic probes for DNA and RNA targets and as therapeutics, whereas both 2'-amino- and isomeric 2'-α-l-amino-LNA scaffolds have promising properties for stabilization and detection of DNA nanostructures. Attachment of fluorescent groups to the 2'-amino group results in very high fluorescent quantum yields of the duplexes and remarkable sensitivity of the fluorescence signal to target binding. Notably, fluorescent LNA/DNA probes bind nucleic acid targets with advantages of high affinity and specificity. Thus, molecular motion of nanodevices and programmable

  9. Features of “All LNA” Duplexes Showing a New Type of Nucleic Acid Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Charlotte; Eichert, André; Oberthür, Dominik; Betzel, Christian; Geßner, Reinhard; Nitsche, Andreas; Fürste, Jens P.

    2012-01-01

    “Locked nucleic acids” (LNAs) belong to the backbone-modified nucleic acid family. The 2′-O,4′-C-methylene-β-D-ribofuranose nucleotides are used for single or multiple substitutions in RNA molecules and thereby introduce enhanced bio- and thermostability. This renders LNAs powerful tools for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. RNA molecules maintain the overall canonical A-type conformation upon substitution of single or multiple residues/nucleotides by LNA monomers. The structures of “all” LNA homoduplexes, however, exhibit significant differences in their overall geometry, in particular a decreased twist, roll and propeller twist. This results in a widening of the major groove, a decrease in helical winding, and an enlarged helical pitch. Therefore, the LNA duplex structure can no longer be described as a canonical A-type RNA geometry but can rather be brought into proximity to other backbone-modified nucleic acids, like glycol nucleic acids or peptide nucleic acids. LNA-modified nucleic acids provide thus structural and functional features that may be successfully exploited for future application in biotechnology and drug discovery. PMID:22666550

  10. Specific recognition of guanines in non-duplex regions of nucleic acids with potassium tungstate and hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Wuxiang; Xu, Xiaowei; He, Huan; Huang, Rong; Chen, Xi; Xiao, Heng; Yu, Zhenduo; Liu, Yi; Zhou, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Structural features of nucleic acids have become an integral part of current biomedical research. Highly selective and readily performed methods with little toxicity that target guanosines in non-duplex nucleic acids are needed, which led us to search for an effective agent for guanosine sequencing. Treatment of DNA or RNA with potassium tungstate and hydrogen peroxide produced damaged guanosines in DNA or RNA sequences. The damaged guanosines in non-duplex DNA could be cleaved by hot piperidine. Similarly, damaged guanosines in non-duplex RNA could be cleaved by aniline acetate. We could identify structural features of nucleic acid using this strategy instead of dimethyl sulphate and Ribonuclease T1. PMID:25355517

  11. Strand displacement and duplex invasion into double-stranded DNA by pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Bohländer, Peggy R; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2015-09-21

    The so-called acpcPNA system bears a peptide backbone consisting of 4'-substituted proline units with (2'R,4'R) configuration in an alternating combination with (2S)-amino-cyclopentane-(1S)-carboxylic acids. acpcPNA forms exceptionally stable hybrids with complementary DNA. We demonstrate herein (i) strand displacements by single-stranded DNA from acpcPNA-DNA hybrids, and by acpcPNA strands from DNA duplexes, and (ii) strand invasions by acpcPNA into double-stranded DNA. These processes were studied in vitro using synthetic oligonucleotides and by means of our concept of wavelength-shifting fluorescent nucleic acid probes, including fluorescence lifetime measurements that allow quantifying energy transfer efficiencies. The strand displacements of preannealed 14mer acpcPNA-7mer DNA hybrids consecutively by 10mer and 14mer DNA strands occur with rather slow kinetics but yield high fluorescence color ratios (blue : yellow or blue : red), fluorescence intensity enhancements, and energy transfer efficiencies. Furthermore, 14mer acpcPNA strands are able to invade into 30mer double-stranded DNA, remarkably with quantitative efficiency in all studied cases. These processes can also be quantified by means of fluorescence. This remarkable behavior corroborates the extraordinary versatile properties of acpcPNA. In contrast to conventional PNA systems which require 3 or more equivalents PNA, only 1.5 equivalents acpcPNA are sufficient to get efficient double duplex invasion. Invasions also take place even in the presence of 250 mM NaCl which represents an ionic strength nearly twice as high as the physiological ion concentration. These remarkable results corroborate the extraordinary properties of acpcPNA, and thus acpcPNA represents an eligible tool for biological analytics and antigene applications.

  12. The Contribution of the Activation Entropy to the Gas-Phase Stability of Modified Nucleic Acid Duplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari, Yvonne; Dugovič, Branislav; Istrate, Alena; Fignolé, Annabel; Leumann, Christian J.; Schürch, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA) is a sugar-modified analogue of DNA currently tested for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in an antisense approach. Tandem mass spectrometry plays a key role in modern medical diagnostics and has become a widespread technique for the structure elucidation and quantification of antisense oligonucleotides. Herein, mechanistic aspects of the fragmentation of tcDNA are discussed, which lay the basis for reliable sequencing and quantification of the antisense oligonucleotide. Excellent selectivity of tcDNA for complementary RNA is demonstrated in direct competition experiments. Moreover, the kinetic stability and fragmentation pattern of matched and mismatched tcDNA heteroduplexes were investigated and compared with non-modified DNA and RNA duplexes. Although the separation of the constituting strands is the entropy-favored fragmentation pathway of all nucleic acid duplexes, it was found to be only a minor pathway of tcDNA duplexes. The modified hybrid duplexes preferentially undergo neutral base loss and backbone cleavage. This difference is due to the low activation entropy for the strand dissociation of modified duplexes that arises from the conformational constraint of the tc-sugar-moiety. The low activation entropy results in a relatively high free activation enthalpy for the dissociation comparable to the free activation enthalpy of the alternative reaction pathway, the release of a nucleobase. The gas-phase behavior of tcDNA duplexes illustrates the impact of the activation entropy on the fragmentation kinetics and suggests that tandem mass spectrometric experiments are not suited to determine the relative stability of different types of nucleic acid duplexes.

  13. The Contribution of the Activation Entropy to the Gas-Phase Stability of Modified Nucleic Acid Duplexes.

    PubMed

    Hari, Yvonne; Dugovič, Branislav; Istrate, Alena; Fignolé, Annabel; Leumann, Christian J; Schürch, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA) is a sugar-modified analogue of DNA currently tested for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in an antisense approach. Tandem mass spectrometry plays a key role in modern medical diagnostics and has become a widespread technique for the structure elucidation and quantification of antisense oligonucleotides. Herein, mechanistic aspects of the fragmentation of tcDNA are discussed, which lay the basis for reliable sequencing and quantification of the antisense oligonucleotide. Excellent selectivity of tcDNA for complementary RNA is demonstrated in direct competition experiments. Moreover, the kinetic stability and fragmentation pattern of matched and mismatched tcDNA heteroduplexes were investigated and compared with non-modified DNA and RNA duplexes. Although the separation of the constituting strands is the entropy-favored fragmentation pathway of all nucleic acid duplexes, it was found to be only a minor pathway of tcDNA duplexes. The modified hybrid duplexes preferentially undergo neutral base loss and backbone cleavage. This difference is due to the low activation entropy for the strand dissociation of modified duplexes that arises from the conformational constraint of the tc-sugar-moiety. The low activation entropy results in a relatively high free activation enthalpy for the dissociation comparable to the free activation enthalpy of the alternative reaction pathway, the release of a nucleobase. The gas-phase behavior of tcDNA duplexes illustrates the impact of the activation entropy on the fragmentation kinetics and suggests that tandem mass spectrometric experiments are not suited to determine the relative stability of different types of nucleic acid duplexes. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  14. A novel universal real-time PCR system using the attached universal duplex probes for quantitative analysis of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Litao; Liang, Wanqi; Jiang, Lingxi; Li, Wenquan; Cao, Wei; Wilson, Zoe A; Zhang, Dabing

    2008-01-01

    Background Real-time PCR techniques are being widely used for nucleic acids analysis, but one limitation of current frequently employed real-time PCR is the high cost of the labeled probe for each target molecule. Results We describe a real-time PCR technique employing attached universal duplex probes (AUDP), which has the advantage of generating fluorescence by probe hydrolysis and strand displacement over current real-time PCR methods. AUDP involves one set of universal duplex probes in which the 5' end of the fluorescent probe (FP) and a complementary quenching probe (QP) lie in close proximity so that fluorescence can be quenched. The PCR primer pair with attached universal template (UT) and the FP are identical to the UT sequence. We have shown that the AUDP technique can be used for detecting multiple target DNA sequences in both simplex and duplex real-time PCR assays for gene expression analysis, genotype identification, and genetically modified organism (GMO) quantification with comparable sensitivity, reproducibility, and repeatability with other real-time PCR methods. Conclusion The results from GMO quantification, gene expression analysis, genotype identification, and GMO quantification using AUDP real-time PCR assays indicate that the AUDP real-time PCR technique has been successfully applied in nucleic acids analysis, and the developed AUDP real-time PCR technique will offer an alternative way for nucleic acid analysis with high efficiency, reliability, and flexibility at low cost. PMID:18522756

  15. X-ray Crystal Structure of a Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Duplex Composed of a Palindromic 10-mer DNA Strand Containing One LNA Thymine Monomer

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, M.; Minasov, G.; Teplova, M.; Kumar, R.; Wengel, J.

    2010-03-05

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA), a recently introduced nucleic acid analogue with a bicyclic 2'-O,4'-C-methylene linked furanose sugar, exhibits enhanced affinities for DNA and RNA relative to the corresponding oligodeoxyribonucleotides and oligoribonucleotides; we report the first crystal structure of an LNA unit incorporated in an oligonucleotide duplex. The structure at 1.4 {angstrom} resolution of the DNA-LNA decamer duplex with one LNA thymine monomer per strand provides a detailed view of the conformation and hydration of locked nucleic acid residues in a duplex A-form. Our study provides a first look at the conformational properties of LNA in a crystal structure at relatively high resolution. The main characteristics of the structure are the standard A-type conformation induced by LNA residues and the capacity of the 2'-oxygen that is part of the bicyclic sugar framework to engage in a least two hydrogen bonds to water molecules. Circular dichroism spectra (CD) of LNA-LNA duplexes in solution indicated that such duplexes appear to adopt a conformation that closely resembles the A-form geometry of RNA-RNA duplexes. However, these spectra also manifested subtle differences between the two species (data not shown). The present analysis of a duplex with only a single LNA residue per strand does not provide any insight into potential conformational differences between LNA and RNA duplexes. Attempts to determine a crystal structure of a completely modified LNA-LNA duplex are underway.

  16. Synthesis of peptide nucleic acids containing pyridazine derivatives as cytosine and thymine analogs, and their duplexes with complementary oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Tomori, Takahito; Miyatake, Yuya; Sato, Yuta; Kanamori, Takashi; Masaki, Yoshiaki; Ohkubo, Akihiro; Sekine, Mitsuo; Seio, Kohji

    2015-03-20

    Synthesis of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) is reported with new pyridazine-type nucleobases: 3-aminopyridazine (aPz) and 1-aminophthalazine (aPh) as cytosine analogs, and pyridazin-3-one (Pz(O)) and phthalazin-1-one (Ph(O)) as thymine analogs. The PNAs having an aPz or a Pz(O) formed duplexes with each complementary oligodeoxynucleotide forming a base pair with G or A, respectively, as evaluated by using UV melting analyses and circular dichroism (CD) spectra.

  17. Duplex DNA-Invading γ-Modified Peptide Nucleic Acids Enable Rapid Identification of Bloodstream Infections in Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Nölling, Jörk; Rapireddy, Srinivas; Amburg, Joel I.; Crawford, Elizabeth M.; Prakash, Ranjit A.; Rabson, Arthur R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bloodstream infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Early and targeted antimicrobial intervention is lifesaving, yet current diagnostic approaches fail to provide actionable information within a clinically viable time frame due to their reliance on blood culturing. Here, we present a novel pathogen identification (PID) platform that features the use of duplex DNA-invading γ-modified peptide nucleic acids (γPNAs) for the rapid identification of bacterial and fungal pathogens directly from blood, without culturing. The PID platform provides species-level information in under 2.5 hours while reaching single-CFU-per-milliliter sensitivity across the entire 21-pathogen panel. The clinical utility of the PID platform was demonstrated through assessment of 61 clinical specimens, which showed >95% sensitivity and >90% overall correlation to blood culture findings. This rapid γPNA-based platform promises to improve patient care by enabling the administration of a targeted first-line antimicrobial intervention. PMID:27094328

  18. Membraneless organelles can melt nucleic acid duplexes and act as biomolecular filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nott, Timothy J.; Craggs, Timothy D.; Baldwin, Andrew J.

    2016-06-01

    Membraneless organelles are cellular compartments made from drops of liquid protein inside a cell. These compartments assemble via the phase separation of disordered regions of proteins in response to changes in the cellular environment and the cell cycle. Here we demonstrate that the solvent environment within the interior of these cellular bodies behaves more like an organic solvent than like water. One of the most-stable biological structures known, the DNA double helix, can be melted once inside the liquid droplet, and simultaneously structures formed from regulatory single-stranded nucleic acids are stabilized. Moreover, proteins are shown to have a wide range of absorption or exclusion from these bodies, and can act as importers for otherwise-excluded nucleic acids, which suggests the existence of a protein-mediated trafficking system. A common strategy in organic chemistry is to utilize different solvents to influence the behaviour of molecules and reactions. These results reveal that cells have also evolved this capability by exploiting the interiors of membraneless organelles.

  19. Promotion of double-duplex invasion of peptide nucleic acids through conjugation with nuclear localization signal peptide.

    PubMed

    Aiba, Yuichiro; Honda, Yuta; Komiyama, Makoto

    2015-03-02

    Pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acid (pcPNA), as one of the most widely used synthetic DNA analogues, invades double-stranded DNA according to Watson-Crick rules to form invasion complexes. This unique mode of DNA recognition induces structural changes at the invasion site and can be used for a range of applications. In this paper, pcPNA is conjugated with a nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide, and its invading activity is notably promoted both thermodynamically and kinetically. Thus, the double-duplex invasion complex is formed promptly at low pcPNA concentrations under high salt conditions, where the invasion otherwise never occurs. Furthermore, NLS-modified pcPNA is successfully employed for site-selective DNA scission, and the targeted DNA is selectively cleaved under conditions that are not conducive for DNA cutters using unmodified pcPNAs. This strategy of pcPNA modification is expected to be advantageous and promising for a range of in vitro and in vivo applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Effects of salt, polyethylene glycol, and locked nucleic acids on the thermodynamic stabilities of consecutive terminal adenosine mismatches in RNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaobo; Nguyen, Mai-Thao; Overacre, Abigail; Seaton, Samantha; Schroeder, Susan J

    2013-04-04

    Consecutive terminal mismatches add thermodynamic stability to RNA duplexes and occur frequently in microRNA-mRNA interactions. Accurate thermodynamic stabilities of consecutive terminal mismatches contribute to the development of specific, high-affinity siRNA therapeutics. Consecutive terminal adenosine mismatches (TAMS) are studied at different salt concentrations, with polyethylene glycol cosolutes, and with locked nucleic acid (LNA) substitutions. These measurements provide benchmarks for the application of thermodynamic predictions to different physiological or therapeutic conditions. The salt dependence for RNA duplex stability is similar for TAMS, internal loops, and Watson-Crick duplexes. A unified model for predicting the free energy of an RNA duplex with or without loops and mismatches at lower sodium concentrations is presented. The destabilizing effects of PEG 200 are larger for TAMS than internal loops or Watson-Crick duplexes, which may result from different base stacking conformations, dynamics, and water hydration. In contrast, LNA substitutions stabilize internal loops much more than TAMS. Surprisingly, the average per adenosine increase in stability for LNA substitutions in internal loops is -1.82 kcal/mol and only -0.20 kcal/mol for TAMS. The stabilities of TAMS and internal loops with LNA substitutions have similar favorable free energies. Thus, the unfavorable free energy of adenosine internal loops is largely an entropic effect. The favorable stabilities of TAMS result mainly from base stacking. The ability of RNA duplexes to form extended terminal mismatches in the absence of proteins such as argonaute and identifying the enthalpic contributions to terminal mismatch stabilities provide insight into the physical basis of microRNA-mRNA molecular recognition and specificity.

  1. Triazole- and Tetrazole-Bridged Nucleic Acids: Synthesis, Duplex Stability, Nuclease Resistance, and in Vitro and in Vivo Antisense Potency.

    PubMed

    Mitsuoka, Yasunori; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Kugimiya, Akira; Waki, Reiko; Wada, Fumito; Tahara, Saori; Sawamura, Motoki; Noda, Mio; Fujimura, Yuko; Kato, Yuki; Hari, Yoshiyuki; Obika, Satoshi

    2017-01-06

    Antisense oligonucleotides are attractive therapeutic agents for several types of disease. One of the most promising modifications of antisense oligonucleotides is the introduction of bridged nucleic acids. As we report here, we designed novel bridged nucleic acids, triazole-bridged nucleic acid (TrNA), and tetrazole-bridged nucleic acid (TeNA), whose sugar conformations are restricted to N-type by heteroaromatic ring-bridged structures. We then successfully synthesized TrNA and TeNA and introduced these monomers into oligonucleotides. In UV-melting experiments, TrNA-modified oligonucleotides exhibited increased binding affinity toward complementary RNA and decreased binding affinity toward complementary DNA, although TeNA-modified oligonucleotides were decomposed under the annealing conditions. Enzymatic degradation experiments demonstrated that introduction of TrNA at the 3'-terminus rendered oligonucleotides resistant to nuclease digestion. Furthermore, we tested the silencing potencies of TrNA-modified antisense oligonucleotides using in vitro and in vivo assays. These experiments revealed that TrNA-modified antisense oligonucleotides induced potent downregulation of gene expression in liver. In addition, TrNA-modified antisense oligonucleotides showed a tendency for increased liver biodistribution. Taken together, our findings indicate that TrNA is a good candidate for practical application in antisense methodology.

  2. Hexahydrated magnesium ions bind in the deep major groove and at the outer mouth of A-form nucleic acid duplexes.

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.-G.; Sanishvili, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Wang, A. H.-J.; Univ. of Illinois; Northwestern Univ.

    2000-01-01

    Magnesium ions play important roles in the structure and function of nucleic acids. Whereas the tertiary folding of RNA often requires magnesium ions binding to tight places where phosphates are clustered, the molecular basis of the interactions of magnesium ions with RNA helical regions is less well understood. We have refined the crystal structures of four decamer oligonucleotides, d(ACCGGCCGGT), r(GCG)d(TATACGC), r(GC)d(GTATACGC) and r(G)d(GCGTATACGC) with bound hexahydrated magnesium ions at high resolution. The structures reveal that A-form nucleic acid has characteristic [Mg(H2O)6]2+ binding modes. One mode has the ion binding in the deep major groove of a GpN step at the O6/N7 sites of guanine bases via hydrogen bonds. Our crystallographic observations are consistent with the recent NMR observations that in solution [Co(NH3)6]3+, a model ion of [Mg(H2O)6]2+, binds in an identical manner. The other mode involves the binding of the ion to phosphates, bridging across the outer mouth of the narrow major groove. These [Mg(H2O)6]2+ ions are found at the most negative electrostatic potential regions of A-form duplexes. We propose that these two binding modes are important in the global charge neutralization, and therefore stability, of A-form duplexes.

  3. Calorimetry of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Rozners, Eriks; Pilch, Daniel S; Egli, Martin

    2015-12-01

    This unit describes the application of calorimetry to characterize the thermodynamics of nucleic acids, specifically, the two major calorimetric methodologies that are currently employed: differential scanning (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). DSC is used to study thermally induced order-disorder transitions in nucleic acids. A DSC instrument measures, as a function of temperature (T), the excess heat capacity (C(p)(ex)) of a nucleic acid solution relative to the same amount of buffer solution. From a single curve of C(p)(ex) versus T, one can derive the following information: the transition enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS), free energy (ΔG), and heat capacity (ΔCp); the state of the transition (two-state versus multistate); and the average size of the molecule that melts as a single thermodynamic entity (e.g., the duplex). ITC is used to study the hybridization of nucleic acid molecules at constant temperature. In an ITC experiment, small aliquots of a titrant nucleic acid solution (strand 1) are added to an analyte nucleic acid solution (strand 2), and the released heat is monitored. ITC yields the stoichiometry of the association reaction (n), the enthalpy of association (ΔH), the equilibrium association constant (K), and thus the free energy of association (ΔG). Once ΔH and ΔG are known, ΔS can also be derived. Repetition of the ITC experiment at a number of different temperatures yields the ΔCp for the association reaction from the temperature dependence of ΔH.

  4. The solution structure of double helical arabino nucleic acids (ANA and 2'F-ANA): effect of arabinoses in duplex-hairpin interconversion.

    PubMed

    Martín-Pintado, Nerea; Yahyaee-Anzahaee, Maryam; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Noronha, Anne M; Wilds, Christopher J; Damha, Masad J; González, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    We report here the first structure of double helical arabino nucleic acid (ANA), the C2'-stereoisomer of RNA, and the 2'-fluoro-ANA analogue (2'F-ANA). A chimeric dodecamer based on the Dickerson sequence, containing a contiguous central segment of arabino nucleotides, flanked by two 2'-deoxy-2'F-ANA wings was studied. Our data show that this chimeric oligonucleotide can adopt two different structures of comparable thermal stabilities. One structure is a monomeric hairpin in which the stem is formed by base paired 2'F-ANA nucleotides and the loop by unpaired ANA nucleotides. The second structure is a bimolecular duplex, with all the nucleotides (2'F-ANA and ANA) forming Watson-Crick base pairs. The duplex structure is canonical B-form, with all arabinoses adopting a pure C2'-endo conformation. In the ANA:ANA segment, steric interactions involving the 2'-OH substituent provoke slight changes in the glycosidic angles and, therefore, in the ANA:ANA base pair geometry. These distortions are not present in the 2'F-ANA:2'F-ANA regions of the duplex, where the -OH substituent is replaced by a smaller fluorine atom. 2'F-ANA nucleotides adopt the C2'-endo sugar pucker and fit very well into the geometry of B-form duplex, allowing for favourable 2'F···H8 interactions. This interaction shares many features of pseudo-hydrogen bonds previously observed in 2'F-ANA:RNA hybrids and in single 2'F-ANA nucleotides.

  5. Evaluation of nucleic acid duplex formation on gold over layers in biosensor fabricated using Czochralski-grown single-crystal silicon substrate.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Subash C B; Kumaresan, Ramanujam; Awazu, Koichi; Fujimaki, Makoto; Mizuhata, Minoru; Tominaga, Junji; Kumar, Penmetcha K R

    2010-09-01

    With a view to developing an economical and elegant biosensor chip, we compared the efficiencies of biosensors that use gold-coated single-crystal silicon and amorphous glass substrates. The reflectivity of light over a wide range of wavelengths was higher from gold layer coated single-crystal silicon substrates than from glass substrates. Furthermore, the efficiency of reflection from gold layers of two different thicknesses was examined. The thicker gold layer (100 nm) on the single-crystal silicon showed a higher reflectivity than the thinner gold film (10 nm). The formation of a nucleic acid duplex and aptamer-ligand interactions were evaluated on these gold layers, and a crystalline silicon substrate coated with the 100-nm-thick gold layer is proposed as an alternative substrate for studies of interactions of biomolecules.

  6. Modeling stopped-flow data for nucleic acid duplex formation reactions: the importance of off-path intermediates.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Jacqueline R; Rauzan, Brittany; Stegemann, Rachel; Deckert, Alice

    2013-08-01

    Evidence for unexpected off-path intermediates to DNA duplex formation is presented. These off-path intermediates are shown to involve unimolecular and, in one case, bimolecular structure in one of the single strands of complementary DNA. Three models are developed to account for the observed single-stranded structures that are formed in parallel with duplex formation. These models are applied to the analysis of stopped-flow data for eight different nonself-complementary duplex formation reactions in order to extract the elementary rate constant for formation of the duplex from the complementary random coil single-stranded DNA. The free energy of activation (at 25 °C) for the denaturation of each duplex is calculated from these data and is shown to have a linear correlation to the overall standard free energy for duplex formation (also at 25 °C). Duplexes that contain mismatches obey a parallel linear free-energy (LFE) relationship with a y-intercept that is greater than that of duplexes without mismatches. Slopes near unity for the LFE relationships indicate that all duplexes go through an early, unstructured transition state.

  7. A duplex PCR-based assay for measuring the amount of bacterial contamination in a nucleic acid extract from a culture of free-living protists.

    PubMed

    Marron, Alan O; Akam, Michael; Walker, Giselle

    2013-01-01

    Cultures of heterotrophic protists often require co-culturing with bacteria to act as a source of nutrition. Such cultures will contain varying levels of intrinsic bacterial contamination that can interfere with molecular research and cause problems with the collection of sufficient material for sequencing. Measuring the levels of bacterial contamination for the purposes of molecular biology research is non-trivial, and can be complicated by the presence of a diverse bacterial flora, or by differences in the relative nucleic acid yield per bacterial or eukaryotic cell. Here we describe a duplex PCR-based assay that can be used to measure the levels of contamination from marine bacteria in a culture of loricate choanoflagellates. By comparison to a standard culture of known target sequence content, the assay can be used to quantify the relative proportions of bacterial and choanoflagellate material in DNA or RNA samples extracted from a culture. We apply the assay to compare methods of purifying choanoflagellate cultures prior to DNA extraction, to determine their effectiveness in reducing bacterial contamination. Together with measurements of the total nucleic acid concentration, the assay can then be used as the basis for determining the absolute amounts of choanoflagellate DNA or RNA present in a sample. The assay protocol we describe here is a simple and relatively inexpensive method of measuring contamination levels in nucleic acid samples. This provides a new way to establish quantification and purification protocols for molecular biology and genomics in novel heterotrophic protist species. Guidelines are provided to develop a similar protocol for use with any protistan culture. This assay method is recommended where qPCR equipment is unavailable, where qPCR is not viable because of the nature of the bacterial contamination or starting material, or where prior sequence information is insufficient to develop qPCR protocols.

  8. The ups and downs of nucleic acid duplex stability: structure-stability studies on chemically-modified DNA:RNA duplexes.

    PubMed Central

    Freier, S M; Altmann, K H

    1997-01-01

    In an effort to discover novel oligonucleotide modifications for antisense therapeutics, we have prepared oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing more than 200 different modifications and measured their affinities for complementary RNA. These include modifications to the heterocyclic bases, the deoxy-ribose sugar and the phosphodiester linkage. From these results, we have been able to determine structure-activity relationships that correlate hybridization affinity with changes in oligonucleotide structure. Data for oligonucleotides containing modified pyrimidine nucleotides are presented. In general, modifications that resulted in the most stable duplexes contained a heteroatom at the 2'-position of the sugar. Other sugar modifications usually led to diminished hybrid stability. Most backbone modifications that led to improved hybridization restricted backbone mobility and resulted in an A-type sugar pucker for the residue 5'to the modified internucleotide linkage. Among the heterocycles, C-5-substituted pyrimidines stood out as substantially increasing duplex stability. PMID:9358149

  9. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow; Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  10. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James L.

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  11. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  12. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  13. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  14. Conformational transitions of duplex and triplex nucleic acid helices: thermodynamic analysis of effects of salt concentration on stability using preferential interaction coefficients.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, J. P.; Anderson, C. F.; Record, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    For order-disorder transitions of double- and triple-stranded nucleic acid helices, the midpoint temperatures Tm depend strongly on a +/-, the mean ionic activity of uniunivalent salt. Experimental determinations of dTm/d ln a +/- and of the enthalpy change (delta H(o)) accompanying the transition in excess salt permit evaluation of delta gamma, the stoichiometrically weighted combination of preferential interaction coefficients, each of which reflects thermodynamic effects of interactions of salt ions with a reactant or product of the conformational transition (formula; see text) Here delta H(o) is defined per mole of nucleotide by analogy to delta gamma. Application of Eq. 1 to experimental values of delta H(o) and Tm yields values of delta gamma for the denaturation of B-DNA over the range of NaCl concentrations 0.01-0.20 M (Privalov et al. (1969), Biopolymers 8,559) and for each of four order-disorder transitions of poly rA.(poly rU)n, n = 1, 2 over the range of NaCl concentrations 0.01-1.0 M (Krakauer and Sturtevant (1968), Biopolymers 6, 491). For denaturation of duplexes and triplexes, delta gamma is negative and not significantly dependent on a +/-, but delta gamma is positive and dependent on a +/- for the disproportionation transition of poly rA.poly rU duplexes. Quantitative interpretations of these trends and magnitudes of delta gamma in terms of coulombic and excluded volume effects are obtained by fitting separately each of the two sets of thermodynamic data using Eq. 1 with delta gamma PB evaluated from the cylindrically symmetric Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation for a standard model of salt-polyelectrolyte solutions. The only structural parameters required by this model are: b, the mean axial distance between the projections of adjacent polyion charges onto the cylindrical axis; and a, the mean distance of closest approach between a salt ion center and the cylindrical axis. Fixing bMS and aMS for the multi-stranded (ordered) conformations, we

  15. Nucleic Acid Immunity.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, G

    2017-01-01

    Organisms throughout biology need to maintain the integrity of their genome. From bacteria to vertebrates, life has established sophisticated mechanisms to detect and eliminate foreign genetic material or to restrict its function and replication. Tremendous progress has been made in the understanding of these mechanisms which keep foreign or unwanted nucleic acids from viruses or phages in check. Mechanisms reach from restriction-modification systems and CRISPR/Cas in bacteria and archaea to RNA interference and immune sensing of nucleic acids, altogether integral parts of a system which is now appreciated as nucleic acid immunity. With inherited receptors and acquired sequence information, nucleic acid immunity comprises innate and adaptive components. Effector functions include diverse nuclease systems, intrinsic activities to directly restrict the function of foreign nucleic acids (e.g., PKR, ADAR1, IFIT1), and extrinsic pathways to alert the immune system and to elicit cytotoxic immune responses. These effects act in concert to restrict viral replication and to eliminate virus-infected cells. The principles of nucleic acid immunity are highly relevant for human disease. Besides its essential contribution to antiviral defense and restriction of endogenous retroelements, dysregulation of nucleic acid immunity can also lead to erroneous detection and response to self nucleic acids then causing sterile inflammation and autoimmunity. Even mechanisms of nucleic acid immunity which are not established in vertebrates are relevant for human disease when they are present in pathogens such as bacteria, parasites, or helminths or in pathogen-transmitting organisms such as insects. This review aims to provide an overview of the diverse mechanisms of nucleic acid immunity which mostly have been looked at separately in the past and to integrate them under the framework nucleic acid immunity as a basic principle of life, the understanding of which has great potential to

  16. Double stranded nucleic acid biochips

    DOEpatents

    Chernov, Boris; Golova, Julia

    2006-05-23

    This invention describes a new method of constructing double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) microarrays based on the use of pre-synthesized or natural DNA duplexes without a stem-loop structure. The complementary oligonucleotide chains are bonded together by a novel connector that includes a linker for immobilization on a matrix. A non-enzymatic method for synthesizing double-stranded nucleic acids with this novel connector enables the construction of inexpensive and robust dsDNA/dsRNA microarrays. DNA-DNA and DNA-protein interactions are investigated using the microarrays.

  17. Method for isolating nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2015-09-29

    The current disclosure provides methods and kits for isolating nucleic acid from an environmental sample. The current methods and compositions further provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by reducing adsorption of nucleic acids by charged ions and particles within an environmental sample. The methods of the current disclosure provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by releasing adsorbed nucleic acids from charged particles during the nucleic acid isolation process. The current disclosure facilitates the isolation of nucleic acids of sufficient quality and quantity to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize or analyze the isolated nucleic acids for a wide variety of applications including, sequencing or species population analysis.

  18. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination.

  19. SAXS studies of ion-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Lois

    2011-01-01

    Positively charged ions, atoms, or molecules compensate the high negative charge of the nucleic acid backbone. Their presence is critical to the biological function of DNA and RNA. This review focuses on experimental studies probing (a) interactions between small ions and nucleic acids and (b) ion-mediated interactions between nucleic acid duplexes. Experimental results on these simple model systems can be compared with specific theoretical models to validate their predictions. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) provides unique insight into these interactions. Anomalous SAXS reports the spatial correlations of condensed (e.g., locally concentrated) counterions to individual DNA or RNA duplexes. SAXS very effectively reports interactions between nucleic acid helices, which range from strongly repulsive to strongly attractive depending on the ionic species present. The sign and strength of interparticle interactions are easily deduced from dramatic changes in the scattering profiles of interacting duplexes.

  20. Thermodynamic Analysis of Nylon Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Risheng; Ding, Liang; Sha, Ruojie; Lukeman, Philip S.

    2010-01-01

    The stability and structure of nylon nucleic acid duplexes with complementary DNA and RNA strands was examined. Thermal denaturing studies of a series of oligonucleotides containing nylon nucleic acids (1 to 5 amide linkages) revealed that the amide linkage enhanced significantly the binding affinity of nylon nucleic acids towards both complementary DNA (up to 26°C increase in the thermal transition temperature (Tm) for 5 linkages) and RNA (around 15°C increase in Tm for 5 linkages) when compared with non-amide linked precursor strands. For both DNA and RNA complements, increasing derivatization decreased the melting temperatures of uncoupled molecules relative to unmodified strands; by contrast, increasing lengths of coupled copolymer raised Tm from less to slightly greater than Tm of unmodified strands. Thermodynamic data extracted from melting curves and CD spectra of nylon nucleic acid duplexes were consistent with loss of stability due to incorporation of pendent groups on the 2′ position of ribose, and recovery of stability upon linkage of the side chains. PMID:18543259

  1. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  2. Nanostructured luminescently labeled nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kricka, Larry J; Fortina, Paolo; Park, Jason Y

    2017-03-01

    Important and emerging trends at the interface of luminescence, nucleic acids and nanotechnology are: (i) the conventional luminescence labeling of nucleic acid nanostructures (e.g. DNA tetrahedron); (ii) the labeling of bulk nucleic acids (e.g. single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA) with nanostructured luminescent labels (e.g. copper nanoclusters); and (iii) the labeling of nucleic acid nanostructures (e.g. origami DNA) with nanostructured luminescent labels (e.g. silver nanoclusters). This review surveys recent advances in these three different approaches to the generation of nanostructured luminescently labeled nucleic acids, and includes both direct and indirect labeling methods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A new general model for predicting melting thermodynamics of complementary and mismatched B-form duplexes containing locked nucleic acids: application to probe design for digital PCR detection of somatic mutations.

    PubMed

    Hughesman, Curtis; Fakhfakh, Kareem; Bidshahri, Roza; Lund, H Louise; Haynes, Charles

    2015-02-17

    Advances in real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), as well as the emergence of digital PCR (dPCR) and useful modified nucleotide chemistries, including locked nucleic acids (LNAs), have created the potential to improve and expand clinical applications of PCR through their ability to better quantify and differentiate amplification products, but fully realizing this potential will require robust methods for designing dual-labeled hydrolysis probes and predicting their hybridization thermodynamics as a function of their sequence, chemistry, and template complementarity. We present here a nearest-neighbor thermodynamic model that accurately predicts the melting thermodynamics of a short oligonucleotide duplexed either to its perfect complement or to a template containing mismatched base pairs. The model may be applied to pure-DNA duplexes or to duplexes for which one strand contains any number and pattern of LNA substitutions. Perturbations to duplex stability arising from mismatched DNA:DNA or LNA:DNA base pairs are treated at the Gibbs energy level to maintain statistical significance in the regressed model parameters. This approach, when combined with the model's accounting of the temperature dependencies of the melting enthalpy and entropy, permits accurate prediction of T(m) values for pure-DNA homoduplexes or LNA-substituted heteroduplexes containing one or two independent mismatched base pairs. Terms accounting for changes in solution conditions and terminal addition of fluorescent dyes and quenchers are then introduced so that the model may be used to accurately predict and thereby tailor the T(m) of a pure-DNA or LNA-substituted hydrolysis probe when duplexed either to its perfect-match template or to a template harboring a noncomplementary base. The model, which builds on classic nearest-neighbor thermodynamics, should therefore be of use to clinicians and biologists who require probes that distinguish and quantify two closely related alleles in either a

  4. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F; Chernyak, Natalia; Mader, Christopher C; Nallagatla, Subbarao; Kang, Richard S; Hao, Liangliang; Walker, David A; Halo, Tiffany L; Merkel, Timothy J; Rische, Clayton H; Anantatmula, Sagar; Burkhart, Merideth; Mirkin, Chad A; Gryaznov, Sergei M

    2015-03-31

    Immunomodulatory nucleic acids have extraordinary promise for treating disease, yet clinical progress has been limited by a lack of tools to safely increase activity in patients. Immunomodulatory nucleic acids act by agonizing or antagonizing endosomal toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8, and TLR9), proteins involved in innate immune signaling. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) that stimulate (immunostimulatory, IS-SNA) or regulate (immunoregulatory, IR-SNA) immunity by engaging TLRs have been designed, synthesized, and characterized. Compared with free oligonucleotides, IS-SNAs exhibit up to 80-fold increases in potency, 700-fold higher antibody titers, 400-fold higher cellular responses to a model antigen, and improved treatment of mice with lymphomas. IR-SNAs exhibit up to eightfold increases in potency and 30% greater reduction in fibrosis score in mice with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Given the clinical potential of SNAs due to their potency, defined chemical nature, and good tolerability, SNAs are attractive new modalities for developing immunotherapies.

  5. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F.; Chernyak, Natalia; Mader, Christopher C.; Nallagatla, Subbarao; Kang, Richard S.; Hao, Liangliang; Walker, David A.; Halo, Tiffany L.; Merkel, Timothy J.; Rische, Clayton H.; Anantatmula, Sagar; Burkhart, Merideth; Mirkin, Chad A.; Gryaznov, Sergei M.

    2015-01-01

    Immunomodulatory nucleic acids have extraordinary promise for treating disease, yet clinical progress has been limited by a lack of tools to safely increase activity in patients. Immunomodulatory nucleic acids act by agonizing or antagonizing endosomal toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8, and TLR9), proteins involved in innate immune signaling. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) that stimulate (immunostimulatory, IS-SNA) or regulate (immunoregulatory, IR-SNA) immunity by engaging TLRs have been designed, synthesized, and characterized. Compared with free oligonucleotides, IS-SNAs exhibit up to 80-fold increases in potency, 700-fold higher antibody titers, 400-fold higher cellular responses to a model antigen, and improved treatment of mice with lymphomas. IR-SNAs exhibit up to eightfold increases in potency and 30% greater reduction in fibrosis score in mice with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Given the clinical potential of SNAs due to their potency, defined chemical nature, and good tolerability, SNAs are attractive new modalities for developing immunotherapies. PMID:25775582

  6. Double-coding nucleic acids: introduction of a nucleobase sequence in the major groove of the DNA duplex using double-headed nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Sorinas, Antoni Figueras; Nielsen, Lise J; Slot, Maria; Skytte, Kirstine; Nielsen, Annie S; Jensen, Michael D; Sharma, Pawan K; Vester, Birte; Petersen, Michael; Nielsen, Poul

    2014-09-05

    A series of double-headed nucleosides were synthesized using the Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction. In the reactions, additional nucleobases (thymine, cytosine, adenine, or guanine) were attached to the 5-position of 2'-deoxyuridine or 2'-deoxycytidine through a propyne linker. The modified nucleosides were incorporated into oligonucleotides, and these were combined in different duplexes that were analyzed by thermal denaturation studies. All of the monomers were well tolerated in the DNA duplexes and induced only small changes in the thermal stability. Consecutive incorporations of the monomers led to increases in duplex stability owing to increased stacking interactions. The modified nucleotide monomers maintained the Watson-Crick base pair fidelity. Stable duplexes were observed with heavily modified oligonucleotides featuring 14 consecutive incorporations of different double-headed nucleotide monomers. Thus, modified duplexes with an array of nucleobases on the exterior of the duplex were designed. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that the additional nucleobases could expose their Watson-Crick and/or Hoogsteen faces for recognition in the major groove. This presentation of nucleobases may find applications in providing molecular information without unwinding the duplex.

  7. Stability and Mismatch Discrimination of Locked Nucleic Acid–DNA Duplexes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Locked nucleic acids (LNA; symbols of bases, +A, +C, +G, and +T) are introduced into chemically synthesized oligonucleotides to increase duplex stability and specificity. To understand these effects, we have determined thermodynamic parameters of consecutive LNA nucleotides. We present guidelines for the design of LNA oligonucleotides and introduce free online software that predicts the stability of any LNA duplex oligomer. Thermodynamic analysis shows that the single strand–duplex transition is characterized by a favorable enthalpic change and by an unfavorable loss of entropy. A single LNA modification confines the local conformation of nucleotides, causing a smaller, less unfavorable entropic loss when the single strand is restricted to the rigid duplex structure. Additional LNAs adjacent to the initial modification appear to enhance stacking and H-bonding interactions because they increase the enthalpic contributions to duplex stabilization. New nearest-neighbor parameters correctly forecast the positive and negative effects of LNAs on mismatch discrimination. Specificity is enhanced in a majority of sequences and is dependent on mismatch type and adjacent base pairs; the largest discriminatory boost occurs for the central +C·C mismatch within the +T+C+C sequence and the +A·G mismatch within the +T+A+G sequence. LNAs do not affect specificity in some sequences and even impair it for many +G·T and +C·A mismatches. The level of mismatch discrimination decreases the most for the central +G·T mismatch within the +G+G+C sequence and the +C·A mismatch within the +G+C+G sequence. We hypothesize that these discrimination changes are not unique features of LNAs but originate from the shift of the duplex conformation from B-form to A-form. PMID:21928795

  8. Nucleic acid detection methods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, C.L.; Yaar, R.; Szafranski, P.; Cantor, C.R.

    1998-05-19

    The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3{prime}-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated. 18 figs.

  9. Nucleic Acid Detection Methods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Cassandra L.; Yaar, Ron; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Cantor, Charles R.

    1998-05-19

    The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3'-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated.

  10. Reactivity of Nucleic Acid Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Marc M.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid oxidation plays a vital role in the etiology and treatment of diseases, as well as aging. Reagents that oxidize nucleic acids are also useful probes of the biopolymers’ structure and folding. Radiation scientists have contributed greatly to our understanding of nucleic acid oxidation using a variety of techniques. During the past two decades organic chemists have applied the tools of synthetic and mechanistic chemistry to independently generate and study the reactive intermediates produced by ionizing radiation and other nucleic acid damaging agents. This approach has facilitated resolving mechanistic controversies and lead to the discovery of new reactive processes. PMID:28529390

  11. Reactivity of Nucleic Acid Radicals.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Marc M

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid oxidation plays a vital role in the etiology and treatment of diseases, as well as aging. Reagents that oxidize nucleic acids are also useful probes of the biopolymers' structure and folding. Radiation scientists have contributed greatly to our understanding of nucleic acid oxidation using a variety of techniques. During the past two decades organic chemists have applied the tools of synthetic and mechanistic chemistry to independently generate and study the reactive intermediates produced by ionizing radiation and other nucleic acid damaging agents. This approach has facilitated resolving mechanistic controversies and lead to the discovery of new reactive processes.

  12. Understanding the role of base stacking in nucleic acids. MD and QM analysis of tandem GA base pairs in RNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Morgado, Claudio A; Svozil, Daniel; Turner, Douglas H; Šponer, Jiří

    2012-09-28

    Preceding NMR experiments show that the conformation of tandem GA base pairs, an important recurrent non-canonical building block in RNA duplexes, is context dependent. The GA base pairs adopt "sheared" N3(G)-N6(A), N2(G)-N7(A) geometry in the r(CGAG)(2) and r(iGGAiC)(2) contexts while switching to "imino" N1(G)-N1(A), O6(G)-N6(A) geometry in the r(GGAC)(2) and r(iCGAiG)(2) contexts (iC and iG stand for isocytosine and isoguanine, respectively). As base stacking is likely to be one of the key sources of the context dependence of the conformation of GA base pairs, we calculated base stacking energies in duplexes containing such base pairs, to see if this dependence can be predicted by stacking energy calculations. When investigating the context dependence of the GA geometry two different conformations of the same duplex were compared (imino vs. sheared). The geometries were generated via explicit solvent MD simulations of the respective RNA duplexes, while the subsequent QM energy calculations focused on base stacking interactions of the four internal base pairs. Geometrical relaxation of nucleobase atoms prior to the stacking energy computations has a non-negligible effect on the results. The stacking energies were derived at the DFT-D/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level. We show a rather good correspondence between the intrinsic gas-phase stacking energies and the NMR-determined GA geometries. The conformation with more favorable gas-phase stacking is in most cases the one observed in experiments. This correlation is not improved when including solvent effects via the COSMO method. On the other side, the stacking calculations do not predict the relative thermodynamic stability of duplex formation for different sequences.

  13. Functional nucleic acid probes and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2006-10-03

    The present invention provides functional nucleic acid probes, and methods of using functional nucleic acid probes, for binding a target to carry out a desired function. The probes have at least one functional nucleic acid, at least one regulating nucleic acid, and at least one attenuator. The functional nucleic acid is maintained in an inactive state by the attenuator and activated by the regulating nucleic acid only in the presence of a regulating nucleic acid target. In its activated state the functional nucleic acid can bind to its target to carry out a desired function, such as generating a signal, cleaving a nucleic acid, or catalyzing a reaction.

  14. A Simpler Nucleic Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, Leslie

    2000-01-01

    It has been supposed that for a nucleic acid analog to pair with RNA it must, like RNA, have a backbone with at least a sixatom repeat; a shorter backbone presumably would not stretch far enough to bind RNA properly. The Eschenmoser group has shown, however, that this first impression is incorrect.As they report in their new paper, Eschenmoser and co-workers ( I ) have now synthesized a substantial number of these polymers, which are called (L)-a-threofuranosyl oligonucleotides or TNAs. They are composed of bases linked to a threose sugar-phosphate backbone, with phosphodiester bonds connecting the nucleotides. The investigators discovered that pairs of complementary TNAs do indeed form stable Watson-Crick double helices and, perhaps more importantly, that TNAs form stable double helices with complementary RNAs and DNAs.

  15. A Simpler Nucleic Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, Leslie

    2000-01-01

    It has been supposed that for a nucleic acid analog to pair with RNA it must, like RNA, have a backbone with at least a sixatom repeat; a shorter backbone presumably would not stretch far enough to bind RNA properly. The Eschenmoser group has shown, however, that this first impression is incorrect.As they report in their new paper, Eschenmoser and co-workers ( I ) have now synthesized a substantial number of these polymers, which are called (L)-a-threofuranosyl oligonucleotides or TNAs. They are composed of bases linked to a threose sugar-phosphate backbone, with phosphodiester bonds connecting the nucleotides. The investigators discovered that pairs of complementary TNAs do indeed form stable Watson-Crick double helices and, perhaps more importantly, that TNAs form stable double helices with complementary RNAs and DNAs.

  16. Nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Sano, Takeshi; Misasi, John; Hatch, Anson; Cantor, Charles

    2001-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to high density nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesizing nucleic acid sequences on a solid surface. Specifically, the present invention contemplates the use of stabilized nucleic acid primer sequences immobilized on solid surfaces, and circular nucleic acid sequence templates combined with the use of isothermal rolling circle amplification to thereby increase nucleic acid sequence concentrations in a sample or on an array of nucleic acid sequences.

  17. Nucleic Acid-Based Nanoconstructs

    Cancer.gov

    Focuses on the design, synthesis, characterization, and development of spherical nucleic acid constructs as effective nanotherapeutic, single-entity agents for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and prostate cancers.

  18. Polymer-Nucleic Acid Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhuang-Lin; Xia, Yi-Qi; Yang, Qiu-Song; Tian, Wen-de; Chen, Kang; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2017-04-01

    Gene therapy is an important therapeutic strategy in the treatment of a wide range of genetic disorders. Polymers forming stable complexes with nucleic acids (NAs) are non-viral gene carriers. The self-assembly of polymers and nucleic acids is typically a complex process that involves many types of interaction at different scales. Electrostatic interaction, hydrophobic interaction, and hydrogen bonds are three important and prevalent interactions in the polymer/nucleic acid system. Electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds are the main driving forces for the condensation of nucleic acids, while hydrophobic interactions play a significant role in the cellular uptake and endosomal escape of polymer-nucleic acid complexes. To design high-efficiency polymer candidates for the DNA and siRNA delivery, it is necessary to have a detailed understanding of the interactions between them in solution. In this chapter, we survey the roles of the three important interactions between polymers and nucleic acids during the formation of polyplexes and summarize recent understandings of the linear polyelectrolyte-NA interactions and dendrimer-NA interactions. We also review recent progress optimizing the gene delivery system by tuning these interactions.

  19. Acidic domains around nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, G; Pack, G R

    1990-01-01

    The hydrogen ion concentration in the vicinity of DNA was mapped out within the Poisson-Boltzmann approximation. Experimental conditions were modeled by assuming Na-DNA to be solvated in a buffer solution containing 45 mM Tris and 3 mM Mg cations at pH 7.5. Three regions of high H+ concentration (greater than 10 microM) are predicted: one throughout the minor groove of DNA and two localized in the major groove near N7 of guanine and C5 of cytosine for a G.C base pair. These acidic domains correlate well with the observed covalent binding sites of benzo[a]pyrene epoxide (N2 of guanine) and of aflatoxin B1 epoxide (N7 of guanine), chemical carcinogens that presumably undergo acid catalysis to form highly reactive carbocations that ultimately bind to DNA. It is suggested that these regions of high H+ concentration may also be of concern in understanding interactions involving proteins and noncarcinogenic molecules with or near nucleic acids. PMID:2123348

  20. Identifying a base in a nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2005-02-08

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  1. Diagnostic applications of nucleic acid circuits.

    PubMed

    Jung, Cheulhee; Ellington, Andrew D

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: While the field of DNA computing and molecular programming was engendered in large measure as a curiosity-driven exercise, it has taken on increasing importance for analytical applications. This is in large measure because of the modularity of DNA circuitry, which can serve as a programmable intermediate between inputs and outputs. These qualities may make nucleic acid circuits useful for making decisions relevant to diagnostic applications. This is especially true given that nucleic acid circuits can potentially directly interact with and be triggered by diagnostic nucleic acids and other analytes. Chemists are, by and large, unaware of many of these advances, and this Account provides a means of touching on what might seem to be an arcane field. We begin by explaining nucleic acid amplification reactions that can lead to signal amplification, such as catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) and the hybridization chain reaction (HCR). In these circuits, a single-stranded input acts on kinetically trapped substrates via exposed toeholds and strand exchange reactions, refolding the substrates and allowing them to interact with one another. As multiple duplexes (CHA) or concatemers of increasing length (HCR) are generated, there are opportunities to couple these outputs to different analytical modalities, including transduction to fluorescent, electrochemical, and colorimetric signals. Because both amplification and transduction are at their root dependent on the programmability of Waston-Crick base pairing, nucleic acid circuits can be much more readily tuned and adapted to new applications than can many other biomolecular amplifiers. As an example, robust methods for real-time monitoring of isothermal amplification reactions have been developed recently. Beyond amplification, nucleic acid circuits can include logic gates and thresholding components that allow them to be used for analysis and decision making. Scalable and complex DNA circuits (seesaw gates

  2. Nucleic acid based molecular devices.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Yamuna; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2011-03-28

    In biology, nucleic acids are carriers of molecular information: DNA's base sequence stores and imparts genetic instructions, while RNA's sequence plays the role of a messenger and a regulator of gene expression. As biopolymers, nucleic acids also have exciting physicochemical properties, which can be rationally influenced by the base sequence in myriad ways. Consequently, in recent years nucleic acids have also become important building blocks for bottom-up nanotechnology: as molecules for the self-assembly of molecular nanostructures and also as a material for building machinelike nanodevices. In this Review we will cover the most important developments in this growing field of nucleic acid nanodevices. We also provide an overview of the biochemical and biophysical background of this field and the major "historical" influences that shaped its development. Particular emphasis is laid on DNA molecular motors, molecular robotics, molecular information processing, and applications of nucleic acid nanodevices in biology. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Isothermal Amplification of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongxi; Chen, Feng; Li, Qian; Wang, Lihua; Fan, Chunhai

    2015-11-25

    Isothermal amplification of nucleic acids is a simple process that rapidly and efficiently accumulates nucleic acid sequences at constant temperature. Since the early 1990s, various isothermal amplification techniques have been developed as alternatives to polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These isothermal amplification methods have been used for biosensing targets such as DNA, RNA, cells, proteins, small molecules, and ions. The applications of these techniques for in situ or intracellular bioimaging and sequencing have been amply demonstrated. Amplicons produced by isothermal amplification methods have also been utilized to construct versatile nucleic acid nanomaterials for promising applications in biomedicine, bioimaging, and biosensing. The integration of isothermal amplification into microsystems or portable devices improves nucleic acid-based on-site assays and confers high sensitivity. Single-cell and single-molecule analyses have also been implemented based on integrated microfluidic systems. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the isothermal amplification of nucleic acids encompassing work published in the past two decades. First, different isothermal amplification techniques are classified into three types based on reaction kinetics. Then, we summarize the applications of isothermal amplification in bioanalysis, diagnostics, nanotechnology, materials science, and device integration. Finally, several challenges and perspectives in the field are discussed.

  4. Double-helical nucleic acids with cross-linked strands: synthesis and applications in molecular biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antsypovitch, Sergei I.; Oretskaya, Tat'yana S.

    1998-03-01

    Data on the methods employed for cross-linking of DNA strands and for the synthesis of oligonucleotide duplexes with cross-links between strands are summarised. Existing methods are systematised; their advantages and drawbacks are discussed. The examples of applications of DNA duplexes with covalently cross-linked chains for the study of protein-nucleic acid recognition and mechanisms of action of nucleic acid-binding proteins for gaining information about the spatial structure of nucleic acids, and for the solution of other problems of molecular biology are given. The bibliography includes 131 references.

  5. [Circulating nucleic acids and infertility].

    PubMed

    Scalici, E; Mullet, T; Ferrières Hoa, A; Gala, A; Loup, V; Anahory, T; Belloc, S; Hamamah, S

    2015-09-01

    Circulating nucleic acids (cell-free DNA and microRNAs) have for particularity to be easily detectable in the biological fluids of the body. Therefore, they constitute biomarkers of interest in female and male infertility care. Indeed, in female, they can be used to detect ovarian reserve disorders (polycystic ovary syndrome and low functional ovarian reserve) as well as to assess follicular microenvironment quality. Moreover, in men, their expression levels can vary in case of spermatogenesis abnormalities. Finally, circulating nucleic acids have also the ability to predict successfully the quality of in vitro embryo development. Their multiple contributions during assisted reproductive technology (ART) make of them biomarkers of interest, for the development of new diagnostic and/or prognostic tests, applied to our specialty. Circulating nucleic acids would so offer the possibility of personalized medical care for infertile couples in ART.

  6. Anions in Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    PubMed

    D'Ascenzo, Luigi; Auffinger, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid crystallization buffers contain a large variety of chemicals fitting specific needs. Among them, anions are often solely considered for pH-regulating purposes and as cationic co-salts while their ability to directly bind to nucleic acid structures is rarely taken into account. Here we review current knowledge related to the use of anions in crystallization buffers along with data on their biological prevalence. Chloride ions are frequently identified in crystal structures but display low cytosolic concentrations. Hence, they are thought to be distant from nucleic acid structures in the cell. Sulfate ions are also frequently identified in crystal structures but their localization in the cell remains elusive. Nevertheless, the characterization of the binding properties of these ions is essential for better interpreting the solvent structure in crystals and consequently, avoiding mislabeling of electron densities. Furthermore, understanding the binding properties of these anions should help to get clues related to their potential effects in crowded cellular environments.

  7. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas [Ithaca, NY; Webb, Watt W [Ithaca, NY; Levene, Michael [Ithaca, NY; Turner, Stephen [Ithaca, NY; Craighead, Harold G [Ithaca, NY; Foquet, Mathieu [Ithaca, NY

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  8. Pyrene intercalating nucleic acids with a carbon linker.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, Michael E; Wamberg, Michael C; Pedersen, Erik B

    2011-03-01

    We have synthesized a carbon linker analogue of INA (oligonucleotides containing insertions of 1-O-(1-pyrenylmethyl)glycerol). Thermal stability studies showed an increase in melting temperature in favor of the carbon linker analogue. We also synthesized a carbon linker analogue with two pyrenes geminally attached. Fluorescence studies of this intercalating nucleic acid with the pyrene moieties inserted as a bulge showed formation of an excimer band. When a mismatch was introduced at the site of the intercalator, an excimer band was formed for the destabilized duplexes whereas an exciplex band was observed when the stability of the duplex was retained.

  9. Fluorescence energy transfer monitored competitive equilibria of nucleic acids: applications in thermodynamics and screening.

    PubMed

    Plum, G E; Breslauer, K J

    Precise thermodynamic characterization of nucleic acid complex stability is required to understand a variety of biologically significant events as well as to exploit the specific recognition capabilities of nucleic acids in biotechnology, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The development of a database of nucleic acid thermodynamics with sufficient precision to foster further developments in these areas requires new and improved measurement techniques. The combination of a competitive equilibrium titration with fluorescence energy transfer based detection provides a method for precise measurement of differences in free energy values for nucleic acid duplexes that far exceeds in precision those accessible via conventional methods. The method can be applied to detect and to characterize any deviation in a nucleic acid that alters duplex stability. Such deviations include, but are not limited to, mismatches; single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP); chemically modified nucleotide bases, sugars or phosphates; and conformational anomalies or folding motifs, such as, loops or hairpins.

  10. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.

    2002-01-01

    A method of producing a plurality of a nucleic acid array, comprising, in order, the steps of amplifying in situ nucleic acid molecules of a first randomly-patterned, immobilized nucleic acid array comprising a heterogeneous pool of nucleic acid molecules affixed to a support, transferring at least a subset of the nucleic acid molecules produced by such amplifying to a second support, and affixing the subset so transferred to the second support to form a second randomly-patterned, immobilized nucleic acid array, wherein the nucleic acid molecules of the second array occupy positions that correspond to those of the nucleic acid molecules from which they were amplified on the first array, so that the first array serves as a template to produce a plurality, is disclosed.

  11. Improved DNA hybridization parameters by Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (TINA).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uffe Vest

    2012-01-01

    This thesis establishes oligonucleotide design rules and applications of a novel group of DNA stabilizing molecules collectively called Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid - TINA. Three peer-reviewed publications form the basis for the thesis. One publication describes an improved and rapid method for determination of DNA melting points and two publications describe the effects of positioning TINA molecules in parallel triplex helix and antiparallel duplex helix forming DNA structures. The third publication establishes that TINA molecules containing oligonucleotides improve an antiparallel duplex hybridization based capture assay's analytical sensitivity compared to conventionel DNA oligonucleotides. Clinical microbiology is traditionally based on pathogenic microorganisms' culture and serological tests. The introduction of DNA target amplification methods like PCR has improved the analytical sensitivity and total turn around time involved in clinical diagnostics of infections. Due to the relatively weak hybridization between the two strands of double stranded DNA, a number of nucleic acid stabilizing molecules have been developed to improve the sensitivity of DNA based diagnostics through superior binding properties. A short introduction is given to Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen based DNA binding and the derived DNA structures. A number of other nucleic acid stabilizing molecules are described. The stabilizing effect of TINA molecules on different DNA structures is discussed and considered in relation to other nucleic acid stabilizing molecules and in relation to future use of TINA containing oligonucleotides in clinical diagnostics and therapy. In conclusion, design of TINA modified oligonucleotides for antiparallel duplex helixes and parallel triplex helixes follows simple purpose dependent rules. TINA molecules are well suited for improving multiplex PCR assays and can be used as part of novel technologies. Future research should test whether combinations of TINA

  12. Nucleic acid-metal ion interactions in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Katsuyuki; Murayama, Kazutaka

    2012-01-01

    Metal ions play a key role in nucleic acid structure and activity. Elucidation of the rules that govern the binding of metal ions is therefore an essential step for better understanding of the nucleic acid functions. This review is as an update to a preceding one (Metal Ions Biol. Syst., 1996, 32, 91-134), in which we offered a general view of metal ion interactions with mono-, di-, tri-, and oligonucleotides in the solid state, based on their crystal structures reported before 1994. In this chapter, we survey all the crystal structures of metal ion complexes with nucleotides involving oligonucleotides reported after 1994 and we have tried to uncover new characteristic metal bonding patterns for mononucleotides and oligonucleotides with A-RNA and A/B/Z-DNA fragments that form duplexes. We do not cover quadruplexes, duplexes with metal-mediated base-pairs, tRNAs, rRNAs in ribosome, ribozymes, and nucleic acid-drug and -protein complexes. Factors that affect metal binding to mononucleotides and oligonucleotide duplexes are also dealt with.

  13. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  14. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  15. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  16. Nucleic acid based logical systems.

    PubMed

    Han, Da; Kang, Huaizhi; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Cuichen; Zhou, Cuisong; You, Mingxu; Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2014-05-12

    Researchers increasingly visualize a significant role for artificial biochemical logical systems in biological engineering, much like digital logic circuits in electrical engineering. Those logical systems could be utilized as a type of servomechanism to control nanodevices in vitro, monitor chemical reactions in situ, or regulate gene expression in vivo. Nucleic acids (NA), as carriers of genetic information with well-regulated and predictable structures, are promising materials for the design and engineering of biochemical circuits. A number of logical devices based on nucleic acids (NA) have been designed to handle various processes for technological or biotechnological purposes. This article focuses on the most recent and important developments in NA-based logical devices and their evolution from in vitro, through cellular, even towards in vivo biological applications.

  17. Nucleic acid detection using MNAzymes.

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, Yulia V; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2010-02-26

    Deoxyribozymes are promising biotechnological tools. In a recent JACS article, Mokany et al. reported on the design of multi-component deoxyribozyme (MNAzyme) sensors based on 10-23 and 8-17 DNA enzymes. The sensors can detect down to 5 pM of a specific nucleic acid. The versatility of MNAzyme platform allows the design of catalytic cascades for signal amplification. This work is a step forward to PCR-free molecular diagnostics. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nucleic acid delivery with microbubbles and ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Rychak, Joshua J.; Klibanov, Alexander L.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based therapy is a growing field of drug delivery research. Although ultrasound has been suggested to enhance transfection decades ago, it took a combination of ultrasound with nucleic acid carrier systems (microbubbles, liposomes, polyplexes, viral carriers) to achieve reasonable nucleic acid delivery efficacy. Microbubbles serve as foci for local deposition of ultrasound energy near the target cell, and greatly enhance sonoporation. Major advantage of this approach is in the minimal transfection in the non-insonated non-target tissues. Microbubbles can be simply co-administered with the nucleic acid carrier or can be modified to carry nucleic acid themselves. Liposomes with embedded gas or gas precursor particles can also be used to carry nucleic acid, release and deliver it by the ultrasound trigger. Successful testing in a wide variety of animal models (myocardium, solid tumors, skeletal muscle, pancreas) proves the potential usefulness of this technique for nucleic acid drug delivery. PMID:24486388

  19. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R.; Niemeyer, Christof M.; Smith, Cassandra L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, Donald J.; Rusckowski, Mary

    1996-01-01

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

  20. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R.; Niemeyer, Christof M.; Smith, Cassandra L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, Donald J.; Rusckowski, Mary

    1999-10-12

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

  1. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, C.R.; Niemeyer, C.M.; Smith, C.L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, D.J.; Rusckowski, M.

    1996-10-01

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products. 5 figs.

  2. Multiplexed microfluidic approach for nucleic acid enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Langevin, Stanley Alan; Bent, Zachary; Renzi, Ronald F.; Ferko, Scott M.; Van De Vreugde, James L.; Lane, Todd; Patel, Kamlesh; Branda, Steven

    2016-04-26

    A system for enhancing a nucleic acid sample may include a one pump, a denaturing chamber; a microfluidic hydroxyapatite chromatography device configured for performing hydroxyapatite chromatography on the nucleic acid sample, a sample collector, and tubing connecting the pump with the denaturing chamber, the hydroxyapatite chromatography device and the sample collector such that the pump may be used to move the nucleic acid sample from the denaturing chamber to the hydroxyapatite chromatography device and then to the sample collector.

  3. Synthesis and biophysical properties of constrained D-altritol nucleic acids (cANA).

    PubMed

    Migawa, Michael T; Prakash, Thazha P; Vasquez, Guillermo; Seth, Punit P; Swayze, Eric E

    2013-09-06

    The first synthesis of constrained altritol nucleic acids (cANA) containing antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) was carried out to ascertain how conformationally restricting the D-altritol backbone-containing ASO (Me-ANA) would affect their ability to form duplexes with RNA. It was found that the thermal stability was reduced (cANA/RNA -1.1 °C/modification) compared to DNA/RNA, suggesting the constrained system results in a small destabilizing perturbation in the duplex structure.

  4. Do nucleic acids moonlight as molecular chaperones?

    PubMed

    Docter, Brianne E; Horowitz, Scott; Gray, Michael J; Jakob, Ursula; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-06-02

    Organisms use molecular chaperones to combat the unfolding and aggregation of proteins. While protein chaperones have been widely studied, here we demonstrate that DNA and RNA exhibit potent chaperone activity in vitro Nucleic acids suppress the aggregation of classic chaperone substrates up to 300-fold more effectively than the protein chaperone GroEL. Additionally, RNA cooperates with the DnaK chaperone system to refold purified luciferase. Our findings reveal a possible new role for nucleic acids within the cell: that nucleic acids directly participate in maintaining proteostasis by preventing protein aggregation. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Zip nucleic acids are potent hydrolysis probes for quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Clément; Moreau, Valérie; Deglane, Gaëlle; Voirin, Emilie; Erbacher, Patrick; Lenne-Samuel, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Zip nucleic acids (ZNAs) are oligonucleotides conjugated with cationic spermine units that increase affinity for their target. ZNAs were recently shown to enable specific and sensitive reactions when used as primers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse-transcription. Here, we report their use as quantitative PCR hydrolysis probes. Ultraviolet duplex melting data demonstrate that attachment of cationic residues to the 3′ end of an oligonucleotide does not alter its ability to discriminate nucleotides nor the destabilization pattern relative to mismatch location in the oligonucleotide sequence. The stability increase provided by the cationic charges allows the use of short dual-labeled probes that significantly improve single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. Longer ZNA probes were shown to display reduced background fluorescence, therefore, generating greater sensitivity and signal level as compared to standard probes. ZNA probes thus provide broad flexibility in assay design and also represent an effective alternative to minor groove binder- and locked nucleic-acid-containing probes. PMID:20071749

  6. Activating frataxin expression by repeat-targeted nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liande; Matsui, Masayuki; Corey, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is an incurable genetic disorder caused by a mutant expansion of the trinucleotide GAA within an intronic FXN RNA. This expansion leads to reduced expression of frataxin (FXN) protein and evidence suggests that transcriptional repression is caused by an R-loop that forms between the expanded repeat RNA and complementary genomic DNA. Synthetic agents that increase levels of FXN protein might alleviate the disease. We demonstrate that introducing anti-GAA duplex RNAs or single-stranded locked nucleic acids into patient-derived cells increases FXN protein expression to levels similar to analogous wild-type cells. Our data are significant because synthetic nucleic acids that target GAA repeats can be lead compounds for restoring curative FXN levels. More broadly, our results demonstrate that interfering with R-loop formation can trigger gene activation and reveal a new strategy for upregulating gene expression. PMID:26842135

  7. Molecular modeling of nucleic acid structure

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Bergonzo, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This unit is the first in a series of four units covering the analysis of nucleic acid structure by molecular modeling. This unit provides an overview of computer simulation of nucleic acids. Topics include the static structure model, computational graphics and energy models, generation of an initial model, and characterization of the overall three-dimensional structure. PMID:18428873

  8. Building biologically active nucleic acid nanocomplexes.

    PubMed

    Smith, C I Edvard; Lundin, Karin E; Simonson, Oscar E; Moreno, Pedro M D; Svahn, Mathias G; Wenska, Malgorzata; Strömberg, Roger

    2008-01-01

    The Bioplex technology allows the hybridization of functional entities to various forms of nucleic acids by the use of synthetic nucleic acid analogs. Such supramolecular assemblies can be made in a predetermined fashion and can confer new properties. The Zorro technology is based on a novel construct generated to simultaneously bind to both DNA strands. Such compounds may have gene silencing activity.

  9. Nucleic acids as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Salas, Luis M

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic nucleic acids (TNAs) and its precursors are applied to treat several pathologies and infections. TNA-based therapy has different rationales and mechanisms and can be classified into three main groups: 1) Therapeutic nucleotides and nucleosides; 2) Therapeutic oligonucleotides; and 3) Therapeutic polynucleotides. This review will focus in those TNAs that have reached clinical trials with anticancer and antiviral protocols, the two most common applications of TNAs. Although therapeutic nucleotides and nucleosides that interfere with nucleic acid metabolism and DNA polymerization have been successfully used as anticancer and antiviral drugs, they often produce toxic secondary effects related to dosage and continuous use. The use of oligonucleotides such as ribozyme and antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODNs) showed promise as therapeutic moieties but faced several issues such as nuclease sensitivity, off-target effects and efficient delivery. Nevertheless, immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotides and AS-ODNs represent the most successful group of therapeutic oligonucleotides in the clinic. A newer group of therapeutic oligonucleotides, the aptamers, is rapidly advancing towards early detection and treatment alternatives the have reached the commercial interest. Despite the very high in vitro efficiency of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) they present issues with intracellular target accessibility, specificity and delivery. DNA vaccines showed great promise, but they resulted in very poor responses in the clinic and further development is uncertain. Despite their many issues, the exquisite specificity and versatility of therapeutic oligonucleotides attracts a great deal of research and resources that will certainly convert them in the TNA of choice for treating cancer and viral diseases in the near future.

  10. Nonenzymatic catalytic signal amplification for nucleic acid hybridization assays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Wenhong (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Devices, methods, and kits for amplifying the signal from hybridization reactions between nucleic acid probes and their cognate targets are presented. The devices provide partially-duplexed, immobilized probe complexes, spatially separate from and separately addressable from immobilized docking strands. Cognate target acts catalytically to transfer probe from the site of probe complex immobilization to the site of immobilized docking strand, generating a detectable signal. The methods and kits of the present invention may be used to identify the presence of cognate target in a fluid sample.

  11. Recent progress in nucleic acids isotachophoresis.

    PubMed

    Datinská, Vladimíra; Voráčová, Ivona; Schlecht, Ulrich; Berka, Jan; Foret, František

    2017-10-05

    Progress achieved between 2014-2017 in the extraction and sample preparation of nucleic acid by isotachophoresis is reviewed in this paper. The isolation and purification of nucleic acids is very often compromised by a complex matrix such as blood and other bodily fluids, samples from the scene of crime, fossil samples, etc. While most of the common nucleic acids isolation techniques are based on extraction with inherent limitations with regard to quantitative results, isotachophoretic focusing is a quantitative process with a theoretically unlimited concentration factor. Since isotachophoresis belongs to less traditional approaches of nucleic acids purification, we present not only the latest developments in the application of isotachophoresis for the nucleic acids concentration but also a brief description of the principles of this method. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Methods for Identifying Ligands that Target Nucleic Acid Molecules and Nucleic Acid Structural Motifs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disney, Matthew D. (Inventor); Childs-Disney, Jessica L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for identifying a nucleic acid (e.g., RNA, DNA, etc.) motif which interacts with a ligand. The method includes providing a plurality of ligands immobilized on a support, wherein each particular ligand is immobilized at a discrete location on the support; contacting the plurality of immobilized ligands with a nucleic acid motif library under conditions effective for one or more members of the nucleic acid motif library to bind with the immobilized ligands; and identifying members of the nucleic acid motif library that are bound to a particular immobilized ligand. Also disclosed are methods for selecting, from a plurality of candidate ligands, one or more ligands that have increased likelihood of binding to a nucleic acid molecule comprising a particular nucleic acid motif, as well as methods for identifying a nucleic acid which interacts with a ligand.

  13. Multi-shell model of ion-induced nucleic acid condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Drozdetski, Aleksander V.; Pollack, Lois; Baker, Nathan A.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2016-04-21

    We present a semi-quantitative model of condensation of short nucleic acid (NA) duplexes in- duced by tri-valent cobalt hexammine (CoHex) ions. The model is based on partitioning of bound counterion distribution around single NA duplex into “external” and “internal” ion binding shells distinguished by the proximity to duplex helical axis. The duplex aggregation free energy is de- composed into attraction and repulsion components represented by simple analytic expressions. The source of the short-range attraction between NA duplexes in the aggregated phase is the in- teraction of CoHex ions in the overlapping regions of the “external” shells with the oppositely charged duplexes. The attraction depends on CoHex binding affinity to the “external” shell of nearly neutralized duplex and the number of ions in the shell overlapping volume. For a given NA duplex sequence and structure, these parameters are estimated from molecular dynamics simula- tion. The attraction is opposed by the residual repulsion of nearly neutralized duplexes as well as duplex configurational entropy loss upon aggregation. The estimates of the aggregation free energy are consistent with the experimental range of NA duplex condensation propensities, including the unusually poor condensation of RNA structures and subtle sequence effects upon DNA conden- sation. The model predicts that, in contrast to DNA, RNA duplexes may condense into tighter packed aggregates with a higher degree of duplex neutralization. The model also predicts that longer NA fragments will condense easier than shorter ones. The ability of this model to explain experimentally observed trends in NA condensation, lends support to proposed NA condensation picture based on the multivalent “ion binding shells”.

  14. An ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical nucleic acid biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhiqiang; Tansil, Natalia C.

    2005-01-01

    A simple and ultrasensitive procedure for non-labeling detection of nucleic acids is described in this study. It is based on the photoelectrochemical detection of target nucleic acids by forming a nucleic acid/photoreporter adduct layer on an ITO electrode. The target nucleic acids were hybridized with immobilized oligonucleotide capture probes on the ITO electrode. A subsequent binding of a photoreporter—a photoactive threading bis-intercalator consisting of two N,N′-bis(3-propyl-imidazole)-1,4,5,8-naphthalene diimides (PIND) linked by a Ru(bpy)22+ (bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine) complex (PIND–Ru–PIND)—allowed for photoelectrochemical detection of the target nucleic acids. The extremely low dissociation rate of the adduct and the highly reversible photoelectrochemical response under visible light illumination (490 nm) make it possible to conduct nucleic acid detection, with a sensitivity enhancement of four orders of magnitude over voltammetry. These results demonstrate for the first time the potential of photoelectrochemical biosensors for PCR-free ultrasensitive detection of nucleic acids. PMID:16061935

  15. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  16. Dendrimers as Nanovectors for Nucleic Acid Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Qi; Peng, Ling

    2013-09-01

    Nucleic acid based gene therapy holds great promise in the treatment of various diseases. However, the success of both DNA- and siRNAbased gene therapies depends critically on safe and efficient nucleic acid delivery systems. Owing to their well-defined structure and multivalent cooperativity, dendrimers have attracted particular attention as ideal nanocarriers for nucleic acid delivery. The present chapter highlights the current status of dendrimers as non-viral nanovectors for both DNA and siRNA delivery, focusing on the different dendrimers investigated for their delivery efficiency with respect to structural alterations in the view to developing safe and efficient nanovectors for gene therapy application.

  17. Ribozyme-Spherical Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Liangliang; Kouri, Fotini M.; Briley, William E.; Stegh, Alexander H.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Ribozymes are highly structured RNA sequences that can be tailored to recognize and cleave specific stretches of mRNA. Their current therapeutic efficacy remains low due to their large size and structural instability compared to shorter therapeutically relevant RNA such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA). Herein, a synthetic strategy that makes use of the spherical nucleic acid (SNA) architecture to stabilize ribozymes and transfect them into live cells is reported. The properties of this novel ribozyme SNA are characterized in the context of the targeted knockdown of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair protein involved in chemotherapeutic resistance of solid tumors, foremost glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Data showing the direct cleavage of full-length MGMT mRNA, knockdown of MGMT protein, and increased sensitization of GBM cells to therapy-mediated apoptosis, independent of transfection agents, provide compelling evidence for the promising properties of this new chemical architecture. PMID:26271335

  18. Nucleic acids, proteins, and chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, D. A.; Profy, A. T.; Walstrum, S. A.; Needels, M. C.; Bulack, S. C.; Lo, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with experimental results related, in one case, to the chirality of nucleotides, and, in another case, to the possibility of a link between the chirality of nucleic acids, and that of peptides. It has been found that aminoacylation of the 'internal' hydroxyl group of a dinucleoside monophosphate can occur stereoselectively. However, this reaction has not yet been made a part of a working peptide synthesis scheme. The formation and cleavage of oligonucleotides is considered. In the event of the formation of a helical complex between the oligonucleotide and the polymer, 1-prime,5-prime-bonds in the oligomer are found to become more resistant towards cleavage. The conditions required for peptide bond formation are examined, taking into account the known structures of RNA and possible mechanisms for prebiotic peptide bond formation. The possibility is considered that the 2-prime,5-prime-internucleotide linkage could have played an important part in the early days of biological peptide synthesis.

  19. Stability of free and mineral-protected nucleic acids: Implications for the RNA world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swadling, Jacob B.; Coveney, Peter V.; Christopher Greenwell, H.

    2012-04-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we study the structural stability of three different nucleic acids intercalated within a magnesium aluminium layered double hydroxide (LDH) mineral, at varying degrees of hydration, and free in aqueous solution. The nucleotides investigated are ribose nucleic acid (RNA), deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA), all in duplex form. Our simulations show that DNA has enhanced Watson-Crick hydrogen-bonding when intercalated within the LDH clay interlayers, compared with intercalated RNA and PNA, whilst the reverse trend is found for the nucleic acids in bulk water. The tendency for LDH to alter the stability of the three nucleic acids persists for higher temperature and pressure conditions. The uncharged protein backbone of PNA is found to have a detrimental effect on the overall stability of the duplex, as it experiences a greatly reduced electrostatic interaction with the charged LDH sheets compared to RNA and DNA. Assuming an RNA world, in which RNA preceded the DNA/protein world, at some point in time DNA must have taken over the role as the information storage molecule from RNA. These results suggest that a mineral based origin of life may have favoured DNA as the information-storage biomolecule over potentially competing RNA and PNA, providing a route to modern biology from the RNA world.

  20. Refinement of Generalized Born Implicit Solvation Parameters for Nucleic Acids and Their Complexes with Proteins.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai; Pérez, Alberto; Bermeo, Sherry; Simmerling, Carlos

    2015-08-11

    The Generalized Born (GB) implicit solvent model has undergone significant improvements in accuracy for modeling of proteins and small molecules. However, GB still remains a less widely explored option for nucleic acid simulations, in part because fast GB models are often unable to maintain stable nucleic acid structures or they introduce structural bias in proteins, leading to difficulty in application of GB models in simulations of protein-nucleic acid complexes. Recently, GB-neck2 was developed to improve the behavior of protein simulations. In an effort to create a more accurate model for nucleic acids, a similar procedure to the development of GB-neck2 is described here for nucleic acids. The resulting parameter set significantly reduces absolute and relative energy error relative to Poisson-Boltzmann for both nucleic acids and nucleic acid-protein complexes, when compared to its predecessor GB-neck model. This improvement in solvation energy calculation translates to increased structural stability for simulations of DNA and RNA duplexes, quadruplexes, and protein-nucleic acid complexes. The GB-neck2 model also enables successful folding of small DNA and RNA hairpins to near native structures as determined from comparison with experiment. The functional form and all required parameters are provided here and also implemented in the AMBER software.

  1. Refinement of Generalized Born Implicit Solvation Parameters for Nucleic Acids and their Complexes with Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hai; Pérez, Alberto; Bermeo, Sherry; Simmerling, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The Generalized Born (GB) implicit solvent model has undergone significant improvements in accuracy for modeling of proteins and small molecules. However, GB still remains a less widely explored option for nucleic acid simulations, in part because fast GB models are often unable to maintain stable nucleic acid structures, or they introduce structural bias in proteins, leading to difficulty in application of GB models in simulations of protein-nucleic acid complexes. Recently, GB-neck2 was developed to improve the behavior of protein simulations. In an effort to create a more accurate model for nucleic acids, a similar procedure to the development of GB-neck2 is described here for nucleic acids. The resulting parameter set significantly reduces absolute and relative energy error relative to Poisson Boltzmann for both nucleic acids and nucleic acid-protein complexes, when compared to its predecessor GB-neck model. This improvement in solvation energy calculation translates to increased structural stability for simulations of DNA and RNA duplexes, quadruplexes, and protein-nucleic acid complexes. The GB-neck2 model also enables successful folding of small DNA and RNA hairpins to near native structures as determined from comparison with experiment. The functional form and all required parameters are provided here and also implemented in the AMBER software. PMID:26574454

  2. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Mitra, Robi D.

    2010-08-31

    Disclosed are improved methods of making and using immobilized arrays of nucleic acids, particularly methods for producing replicas of such arrays. Included are methods for producing high density arrays of nucleic acids and replicas of such arrays, as well as methods for preserving the resolution of arrays through rounds of replication. Also included are methods which take advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays for increased sensitivity in detection of sequences on arrays. Improved methods of sequencing nucleic acids immobilized on arrays utilizing single copies of arrays and methods taking further advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays are disclosed. The improvements lead to higher fidelity and longer read lengths of sequences immobilized on arrays. Methods are also disclosed which improve the efficiency of multiplex PCR using arrays of immobilized nucleic acids.

  3. Methods for analyzing nucleic acid sequences

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid. The method provides a complex comprising a polymerase enzyme, a target nucleic acid molecule, and a primer, wherein the complex is immobilized on a support Fluorescent label is attached to a terminal phosphate group of the nucleotide or nucleotide analog. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The time duration of the signal from labeled nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated is distinguished from freely diffusing labels by a longer retention in the observation volume for the nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated than for the freely diffusing labels.

  4. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2013-12-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner.

  5. Multi-shell model of ion-induced nucleic acid condensation

    PubMed Central

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Drozdetski, Aleksander V.; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2016-01-01

    We present a semi-quantitative model of condensation of short nucleic acid (NA) duplexes induced by trivalent cobalt(iii) hexammine (CoHex) ions. The model is based on partitioning of bound counterion distribution around single NA duplex into “external” and “internal” ion binding shells distinguished by the proximity to duplex helical axis. In the aggregated phase the shells overlap, which leads to significantly increased attraction of CoHex ions in these overlaps with the neighboring duplexes. The duplex aggregation free energy is decomposed into attractive and repulsive components in such a way that they can be represented by simple analytical expressions with parameters derived from molecular dynamic simulations and numerical solutions of Poisson equation. The attractive term depends on the fractions of bound ions in the overlapping shells and affinity of CoHex to the “external” shell of nearly neutralized duplex. The repulsive components of the free energy are duplex configurational entropy loss upon the aggregation and the electrostatic repulsion of the duplexes that remains after neutralization by bound CoHex ions. The estimates of the aggregation free energy are consistent with the experimental range of NA duplex condensation propensities, including the unusually poor condensation of RNA structures and subtle sequence effects upon DNA condensation. The model predicts that, in contrast to DNA, RNA duplexes may condense into tighter packed aggregates with a higher degree of duplex neutralization. An appreciable CoHex mediated RNA-RNA attraction requires closer inter-duplex separation to engage CoHex ions (bound mostly in the “internal” shell of RNA) into short-range attractive interactions. The model also predicts that longer NA fragments will condense more readily than shorter ones. The ability of this model to explain experimentally observed trends in NA condensation lends support to proposed NA condensation picture based on the multivalent

  6. Multi-shell model of ion-induced nucleic acid condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Drozdetski, Aleksander V.; Pollack, Lois; Baker, Nathan A.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2016-04-01

    We present a semi-quantitative model of condensation of short nucleic acid (NA) duplexes induced by trivalent cobalt(iii) hexammine (CoHex) ions. The model is based on partitioning of bound counterion distribution around single NA duplex into "external" and "internal" ion binding shells distinguished by the proximity to duplex helical axis. In the aggregated phase the shells overlap, which leads to significantly increased attraction of CoHex ions in these overlaps with the neighboring duplexes. The duplex aggregation free energy is decomposed into attractive and repulsive components in such a way that they can be represented by simple analytical expressions with parameters derived from molecular dynamic simulations and numerical solutions of Poisson equation. The attractive term depends on the fractions of bound ions in the overlapping shells and affinity of CoHex to the "external" shell of nearly neutralized duplex. The repulsive components of the free energy are duplex configurational entropy loss upon the aggregation and the electrostatic repulsion of the duplexes that remains after neutralization by bound CoHex ions. The estimates of the aggregation free energy are consistent with the experimental range of NA duplex condensation propensities, including the unusually poor condensation of RNA structures and subtle sequence effects upon DNA condensation. The model predicts that, in contrast to DNA, RNA duplexes may condense into tighter packed aggregates with a higher degree of duplex neutralization. An appreciable CoHex mediated RNA-RNA attraction requires closer inter-duplex separation to engage CoHex ions (bound mostly in the "internal" shell of RNA) into short-range attractive interactions. The model also predicts that longer NA fragments will condense more readily than shorter ones. The ability of this model to explain experimentally observed trends in NA condensation lends support to proposed NA condensation picture based on the multivalent "ion binding

  7. Perfect Strangers: Inorganic Photochemistry and Nucleic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Pamela J.; Ciftan, Suzanne A.; Sistare, Mark F.; Holden Thorp, H.

    1997-06-01

    The applications of inorganic photochemistry to nucleic acid chemistry are discussed. A brief review of nucleic acid structure is given. Methods for probing DNA using emissive inorganic complexes are discussed. Photoreactions that damage DNA by hydrogen atom transfer from sugar or electron abstraction from guanine are presented. The method of photochemical footprinting using a diplatinum photocatalyst is described. The final section discusses advances in combinatorial selection experiments that increase the urgency for rapid screening methods such as those derived from inorganic photochemistry.

  8. Amplification of trace amounts of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M [Brookline, MA; Zhang, Kun [Brighton, MA

    2008-06-17

    Methods of reducing background during amplification of small amounts of nucleic acids employ careful analysis of sources of low level contamination. Ultraviolet light can be used to reduce nucleic acid contaminants in reagents and equipment. "Primer-dimer" background can be reduced by judicious design of primers. We have shown clean signal-to-noise with as little as starting material as one single human cell (.about.6 picogram), E. coli cell (.about.5 femtogram) or Prochlorococcus cell (.about.3 femtogram).

  9. In vitro evolution of nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The author reviews recent published reports of in vitro selection and evolution of nucleic acids. These nucleic acids will bind to a target ligand or catalyze a specific chemical reaction. The terms aptamers and systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) are explained. The review focuses on protein binders, small molecule binders, and ribozymes obtained by directed evolution. The reference list identifies articles of special or outstanding interest.

  10. Rapid nuclear import of short nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Mai; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2016-10-01

    Exogenous short-chain nucleic acids undergo rapid import into the nucleus. Fluorescence-labeled dT1-13 DNA microinjected into the cytoplasm domain of a HeLa cell was rapidly imported into the nucleus domain within 1min. This is much more rapid than what has been observed for intracellular diffusion of small molecules. In contrast, import of longer nucleic acids with a length of over 30nt into the nucleus was suppressed.

  11. 21 CFR 866.3225 - Enterovirus nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Enterovirus nucleic acid assay. 866.3225 Section... nucleic acid assay. (a) Identification. An enterovirus nucleic acid assay is a device that consists of... Special Controls Guidance Document: Nucleic Acid Amplification Assay for the Detection of Enterovirus...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3225 - Enterovirus nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Enterovirus nucleic acid assay. 866.3225 Section... nucleic acid assay. (a) Identification. An enterovirus nucleic acid assay is a device that consists of... Special Controls Guidance Document: Nucleic Acid Amplification Assay for the Detection of Enterovirus...

  13. Coupling translocation with nucleic acid unwinding by NS3 helicase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin; Cheng, Wei; Bustamante, Carlos; Oster, George

    2010-12-03

    We present a semiquantitative model for translocation and unwinding activities of monomeric nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) helicase. The model is based on structural, biochemical, and single-molecule measurements. The model predicts that the NS3 helicase actively unwinds duplex by reducing more than 50% the free energy that stabilizes base pairing/stacking. The unwinding activity slows the movement of the helicase in a sequence-dependent manner, lowering the average unwinding efficiency to less than 1 bp per ATP cycle. When bound with ATP, the NS3 helicase can display significant translocational diffusion. This increases displacement fluctuations of the helicase, decreases the average unwinding efficiency, and enhances the sequence dependence. Also, interactions between the helicase and the duplex stabilize the helicase at the junction, facilitating the helicase's unwinding activity while preventing it from dissociating. In the presence of translocational diffusion during active unwinding, the dissociation rate of the helicase also exhibits sequence dependence. Based on unwinding velocity fluctuations measured from single-molecule experiments, we estimate the diffusion rate to be on the order of 10 s(-1). The generic features of coupling single-stranded nucleic acid translocation with duplex unwinding presented in this work may apply generally to a class of helicases.

  14. Recent Advances in Developing Small Molecules Targeting Nucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Maolin; Yu, Yuanyuan; Liang, Chao; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acids participate in a large number of biological processes. However, current approaches for small molecules targeting protein are incompatible with nucleic acids. On the other hand, the lack of crystallization of nucleic acid is the limiting factor for nucleic acid drug design. Because of the improvements in crystallization in recent years, a great many structures of nucleic acids have been reported, providing basic information for nucleic acid drug discovery. This review focuses on the discovery and development of small molecules targeting nucleic acids. PMID:27248995

  15. Modeling Electrical Transport through Nucleic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianqing

    Nucleic acids play a vital role in many biological systems and activities. In recent years, engineers and scientists have been interested in studying their electrical properties. The motivation for these studies stems from the following facts: (1) the bases, which form the building blocks of nucleic acids, have unique ionization potentials. Further, nucleic acids are one of the few nanomaterials that can be reproducibly manufactured with a high degree of accuracy (though admittedly their placement at desired locations remains a challenge). As a result, designed strands with specific sequences may offer unique device properties; (2) electrical methods offer potential for sequencing nucleic acids based on a single molecule; (3) electrical methods for disease detection based on the current flowing through nucleic acids are beginning to be demonstrated. While experiments in the above mentioned areas is promising, a deeper understanding of the electrical current flow through the nucleic acids needs to be developed. The modeling of current flowing in these molecules is complex because: (1) they are based on atomic scale contacts between nucleic acids and metal, which cannot be reproducibly built; (2) the conductivity of nucleic acids is easily influenced by the environment, which is constantly changing; and (3) the nucleic acids by themselves are floppy. This thesis focuses on the modeling of electrical transport through nucleic acids that are connected to two metal electrodes at nanoscale. We first develop a decoherent transport model for the double-stranded helix based on the Landauer-Buttiker framework. This model is rationalized by comparison with an experiment that measured the conductance of four different DNA strands. The developed model is then used to study the: (1) potential to make barriers and wells for quantum transport using specifically engineered sequences; (2) change in the electrical properties of a specific DNA strand with and without methylation; (3

  16. Pyrene-functionalized oligonucleotides and locked nucleic acids (LNAs): tools for fundamental research, diagnostics, and nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, Michael E; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2011-12-01

    Pyrene-functionalized oligonucleotides (PFOs) are increasingly explored as tools in fundamental research, diagnostics and nanotechnology. Their popularity is linked to the ability of pyrenes to function as polarity-sensitive and quenchable fluorophores, excimer-generating units, aromatic stacking moieties and nucleic acid duplex intercalators. These characteristics have enabled development of PFOs for detection of complementary DNA/RNA targets, discrimination of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and generation of π-arrays on nucleic acid scaffolds. This critical review will highlight the physical properties and applications of PFOs that are likely to provide high degree of positional control of the chromophore in nucleic acid complexes. Particular emphasis will be placed on pyrene-functionalized Locked Nucleic Acids (LNAs) since these materials display interesting properties such as fluorescence quantum yields approaching unity and recognition of mixed-sequence double stranded DNA (144 references).

  17. Method of Identifying a Base in a Nucleic Acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    1999-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  18. Probe kit for identifying a base in a nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  19. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  20. Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity of the ORF1 Protein from the Mouse LINE-1 Retrotransposon

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sandra L.; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2001-01-01

    Non-LTR retrotransposons such as L1 elements are major components of the mammalian genome, but their mechanism of replication is incompletely understood. Like retroviruses and LTR-containing retrotransposons, non-LTR retrotransposons replicate by reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate. The details of cDNA priming and integration, however, differ between these two classes. In retroviruses, the nucleocapsid (NC) protein has been shown to assist reverse transcription by acting as a “nucleic acid chaperone,” promoting the formation of the most stable duplexes between nucleic acid molecules. A protein-coding region with an NC-like sequence is present in most non-LTR retrotransposons, but no such sequence is evident in mammalian L1 elements or other members of its class. Here we investigated the ORF1 protein from mouse L1 and found that it does in fact display nucleic acid chaperone activities in vitro. L1 ORF1p (i) promoted annealing of complementary DNA strands, (ii) facilitated strand exchange to form the most stable hybrids in competitive displacement assays, and (iii) facilitated melting of an imperfect duplex but stabilized perfect duplexes. These findings suggest a role for L1 ORF1p in mediating nucleic acid strand transfer steps during L1 reverse transcription. PMID:11134335

  1. Applications of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and locked nucleic acids (LNAs) in biosensor development.

    PubMed

    Briones, Carlos; Moreno, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Nucleic acid biosensors have a growing number of applications in genetics and biomedicine. This contribution is a critical review of the current state of the art concerning the use of nucleic acid analogues, in particular peptide nucleic acids (PNA) and locked nucleic acids (LNA), for the development of high-performance affinity biosensors. Both PNA and LNA have outstanding affinity for natural nucleic acids, and the destabilizing effect of base mismatches in PNA- or LNA-containing heterodimers is much higher than in double-stranded DNA or RNA. Therefore, PNA- and LNA-based biosensors have unprecedented sensitivity and specificity, with special applicability in DNA genotyping. Herein, the most relevant PNA- and LNA-based biosensors are presented, and their advantages and their current limitations are discussed. Some of the reviewed technology, while promising, still needs to bridge the gap between experimental status and the harder reality of biotechnological or biomedical applications.

  2. Nucleic acid visualization with UCSF Chimera

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Gregory S.; Hendrix, Donna K.; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    With the increase in the number of large, 3D, high-resolution nucleic acid structures, particularly of the 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits and the intact bacterial ribosome, advancements in the visualization of nucleic acid structural features are essential. Large molecular structures are complicated and detailed, and one goal of visualization software is to allow the user to simplify the display of some features and accent others. We describe an extension to the UCSF Chimera molecular visualization system for the purpose of displaying and highlighting nucleic acid characteristics, including a new representation of sugar pucker, several options for abstraction of base geometries that emphasize stacking and base pairing, and an adaptation of the ribbon backbone to accommodate the nucleic acid backbone. Molecules are displayed and manipulated interactively, allowing the user to change the representations as desired for small molecules, proteins and nucleic acids. This software is available as part of the UCSF Chimera molecular visualization system and thus is integrated with a suite of existing tools for molecular graphics. PMID:16478715

  3. The graphene/nucleic acid nanobiointerface.

    PubMed

    Tang, Longhua; Wang, Ying; Li, Jinghong

    2015-10-07

    The combination of nanomaterials with biomolecules yields functional nanostructured biointerfaces with synergistic properties and functions. Owing to a unique combination of its crystallographic and electronic structure, graphene and its derivatives exhibit several superior and typical properties, and has emerged as an attractive candidate for the fabrication of novel nanobiointerfaces with different kinds of unique applications. As is known, nucleic acids are stable and can easily handle modification, and can recognize a wide range of targets with high selectivity, specificity, and affinity. The integration of nucleic acids with graphene-based materials has been substantially advanced over the past few years, achieving amazing properties and functions, thereby exhibiting attractive potential applications in biosensing, diagnostics, drug screening and biomedicine. Herein, this review addresses the recent progress on the design and fabrication of graphene/nucleic acid nanostructured biointerfaces, and the fundamental understanding of their interfacial properties, as well as the various nanobiotechnological applications. To begin with, we summarize the basic features of the graphene and nucleic acid-based nanobiointerface, especially the interfacial interaction mechanism and the resulting biological effects. Then, the fabrication and characterization methodology of graphene and nucleic acid-based nanobiointerfaces are discussed. Next, particular emphasis is directed towards the exploration of their biosensing and biomedical applications, including small molecule detection, protein and DNA sensing/sequencing, as well as gene delivery and therapy. Finally, some significant prospects, further opportunities and challenges in this emerging field are also suggested.

  4. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  5. BIOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF NUCLEIC ACIDS AT SURFACES RELEVANT TO MICROARRAY PERFORMANCE.

    PubMed

    Rao, Archana N; Grainger, David W

    2014-04-01

    Both clinical and analytical metrics produced by microarray-based assay technology have recognized problems in reproducibility, reliability and analytical sensitivity. These issues are often attributed to poor understanding and control of nucleic acid behaviors and properties at solid-liquid interfaces. Nucleic acid hybridization, central to DNA and RNA microarray formats, depends on the properties and behaviors of single strand (ss) nucleic acids (e.g., probe oligomeric DNA) bound to surfaces. ssDNA's persistence length, radius of gyration, electrostatics, conformations on different surfaces and under various assay conditions, its chain flexibility and curvature, charging effects in ionic solutions, and fluorescent labeling all influence its physical chemistry and hybridization under assay conditions. Nucleic acid (e.g., both RNA and DNA) target interactions with immobilized ssDNA strands are highly impacted by these biophysical states. Furthermore, the kinetics, thermodynamics, and enthalpic and entropic contributions to DNA hybridization reflect global probe/target structures and interaction dynamics. Here we review several biophysical issues relevant to oligomeric nucleic acid molecular behaviors at surfaces and their influences on duplex formation that influence microarray assay performance. Correlation of biophysical aspects of single and double-stranded nucleic acids with their complexes in bulk solution is common. Such analysis at surfaces is not commonly reported, despite its importance to microarray assays. We seek to provide further insight into nucleic acid-surface challenges facing microarray diagnostic formats that have hindered their clinical adoption and compromise their research quality and value as genomics tools.

  6. BIOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF NUCLEIC ACIDS AT SURFACES RELEVANT TO MICROARRAY PERFORMANCE

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Archana N.; Grainger, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Both clinical and analytical metrics produced by microarray-based assay technology have recognized problems in reproducibility, reliability and analytical sensitivity. These issues are often attributed to poor understanding and control of nucleic acid behaviors and properties at solid-liquid interfaces. Nucleic acid hybridization, central to DNA and RNA microarray formats, depends on the properties and behaviors of single strand (ss) nucleic acids (e.g., probe oligomeric DNA) bound to surfaces. ssDNA’s persistence length, radius of gyration, electrostatics, conformations on different surfaces and under various assay conditions, its chain flexibility and curvature, charging effects in ionic solutions, and fluorescent labeling all influence its physical chemistry and hybridization under assay conditions. Nucleic acid (e.g., both RNA and DNA) target interactions with immobilized ssDNA strands are highly impacted by these biophysical states. Furthermore, the kinetics, thermodynamics, and enthalpic and entropic contributions to DNA hybridization reflect global probe/target structures and interaction dynamics. Here we review several biophysical issues relevant to oligomeric nucleic acid molecular behaviors at surfaces and their influences on duplex formation that influence microarray assay performance. Correlation of biophysical aspects of single and double-stranded nucleic acids with their complexes in bulk solution is common. Such analysis at surfaces is not commonly reported, despite its importance to microarray assays. We seek to provide further insight into nucleic acid-surface challenges facing microarray diagnostic formats that have hindered their clinical adoption and compromise their research quality and value as genomics tools. PMID:24765522

  7. A nucleotide-independent cyclic nitroxide label for monitoring segmental motions in nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong H; Popova, Anna M; Hideg, Kálmán; Qin, Peter Z

    2015-01-01

    Spin labels, which are chemically stable radicals attached at specific sites of a bio-molecule, enable investigations on structure and dynamics of proteins and nucleic acids using techniques such as site-directed spin labeling and paramagnetic NMR. Among spin labels developed, the class of rigid labels have limited or no independent motions between the radical bearing moiety and the target, and afford a number of advantages in measuring distances and monitoring local dynamics within the parent bio-molecule. However, a general method for attaching a rigid label to nucleic acids in a nucleotide-independent manner has not been reported. We developed an approach for installing a nearly rigid nitroxide spin label, designated as R5c, at a specific site of the nucleic acid backbone in a nucleotide-independent manner. The method uses a post-synthesis approach to covalently attach the nitroxide moiety in a cyclic fashion to phosphorothioate groups introduced at two consecutive nucleotides of the target strand. R5c-labeled nucleic acids are capable of pairing with their respective complementary strands, and the cyclic nature of R5c attachment significantly reduced independence motions of the label with respect to the parent duplex, although it may cause distortion of the local environment at the site of labeling. R5c yields enhanced sensitivity to the collective motions of the duplex, as demonstrated by its capability to reveal changes in collective motions of the substrate recognition duplex of the 120-kDa Tetrahymena group I ribozyme, which elude detection by a flexible label. The cyclic R5c nitroxide can be efficiently attached to a target nucleic acid site using a post-synthetic coupling approach conducted under mild biochemical conditions, and serves as a viable label for experimental investigation of segmental motions in nucleic acids, including large folded RNAs.

  8. Sodium and Potassium Interactions with Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Auffinger, Pascal; D'Ascenzo, Luigi; Ennifar, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions are essential cofactors for the structure and functions of nucleic acids. Yet, the early discovery in the 70s of the crucial role of Mg(2+) in stabilizing tRNA structures has occulted for a long time the importance of monovalent cations. Renewed interest in these ions was brought in the late 90s by the discovery of specific potassium metal ions in the core of a group I intron. Their importance in nucleic acid folding and catalytic activity is now well established. However, detection of K(+) and Na(+) ions is notoriously problematic and the question about their specificity is recurrent. Here we review the different methods that can be used to detect K(+) and Na(+) ions in nucleic acid structures such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance or molecular dynamics simulations. We also discuss specific versus non-specific binding to different structures through various examples.

  9. Novel biochip platform for nucleic acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Pernagallo, Salvatore; Ventimiglia, Giorgio; Cavalluzzo, Claudia; Alessi, Enrico; Ilyine, Hugh; Bradley, Mark; Diaz-Mochon, Juan J

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript describes the use of a novel biochip platform for the rapid analysis/identification of nucleic acids, including DNA and microRNAs, with very high specificity. This approach combines a unique dynamic chemistry approach for nucleic acid testing and analysis developed by DestiNA Genomics with the STMicroelectronics In-Check platform, which comprises two microfluidic optimized and independent PCR reaction chambers, and a sequential microarray area for nucleic acid capture and identification by fluorescence. With its compact bench-top "footprint" requiring only a single technician to operate, the biochip system promises to transform and expand routine clinical diagnostic testing and screening for genetic diseases, cancers, drug toxicology and heart disease, as well as employment in the emerging companion diagnostics market.

  10. Imaging Functional Nucleic Acid Delivery to Skin.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Roger L; Hickerson, Robyn P; González-González, Emilio; Flores, Manuel A; Speaker, Tycho P; Rogers, Faye A; Milstone, Leonard M; Contag, Christopher H

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic skin diseases arise from well-defined single gene mutations, and in some cases a single point mutation. As the target cells are superficial, these diseases are ideally suited for treatment by nucleic acid-based therapies as well as monitoring through a variety of noninvasive imaging technologies. Despite the accessibility of the skin, there remain formidable barriers for functional delivery of nucleic acids to the target cells within the dermis and epidermis. These barriers include the stratum corneum and the layered structure of the skin, as well as more locally, the cellular, endosomal and nuclear membranes. A wide range of technologies for traversing these barriers has been described and moderate success has been reported for several approaches. The lessons learned from these studies include the need for combinations of approaches to facilitate nucleic acid delivery across these skin barriers and then functional delivery across the cellular and nuclear membranes for expression (e.g., reporter genes, DNA oligonucleotides or shRNA) or into the cytoplasm for regulation (e.g., siRNA, miRNA, antisense oligos). The tools for topical delivery that have been evaluated include chemical, physical and electrical methods, and the development and testing of each of these approaches has been greatly enabled by imaging tools. These techniques allow delivery and real time monitoring of reporter genes, therapeutic nucleic acids and also triplex nucleic acids for gene editing. Optical imaging is comprised of a number of modalities based on properties of light-tissue interaction (e.g., scattering, autofluorescence, and reflectance), the interaction of light with specific molecules (e.g., absorbtion, fluorescence), or enzymatic reactions that produce light (bioluminescence). Optical imaging technologies operate over a range of scales from macroscopic to microscopic and if necessary, nanoscopic, and thus can be used to assess nucleic acid delivery to organs, regions, cells

  11. The world of catalytic nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Luc

    2001-08-01

    The finding by Tom Cech and Sydney Altman that RNA can be both informational and catalytic is the pillar on which the RNA world hypothesis stands. This hypothesis relies on the premise that RNA can catalyze its own replication, can synthesize proteins and can chemically sustain a primitive metabolism. This paper presents an overview of the catalytic potential of nucleic acids that have been uncovered the past 10 years by in vitro evolution techniques. Besides the fact that new catalytic nucleic acids uphold the prevalence of RNA at an early stage of life, they can have interesting applications in therapeutics, biotechnology and nanotechnology.

  12. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  13. Nonenzymatic synthesis of RNA and DNA oligomers on hexitol nucleic acid templates: the importance of the A structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Politis, P. K.; Van Aerschot, A.; Busson, R.; Herdewijn, P.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Dolan, M. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Hexitol nucleic acid (HNA) is an analogue of DNA containing the standard nucleoside bases, but with a phosphorylated 1,5-anhydrohexitol backbone. HNA oligomers form duplexes having the nucleic acid A structure with complementary DNA or RNA oligomers. The HNA decacytidylate oligomer is an efficient template for the oligomerization of the 5'-phosphoroimidazolides of guanosine or deoxyguanosine. Comparison of the oligomerization efficiencies on HNA, RNA, and DNA decacytidylate templates under various conditions suggests strongly that only nucleic acid double helices with the A structure support efficient template-directed synthesis when 5'-phosphoroimidazolides of nucleosides are used as substrates.

  14. Nonenzymatic synthesis of RNA and DNA oligomers on hexitol nucleic acid templates: the importance of the A structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Politis, P. K.; Van Aerschot, A.; Busson, R.; Herdewijn, P.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Dolan, M. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Hexitol nucleic acid (HNA) is an analogue of DNA containing the standard nucleoside bases, but with a phosphorylated 1,5-anhydrohexitol backbone. HNA oligomers form duplexes having the nucleic acid A structure with complementary DNA or RNA oligomers. The HNA decacytidylate oligomer is an efficient template for the oligomerization of the 5'-phosphoroimidazolides of guanosine or deoxyguanosine. Comparison of the oligomerization efficiencies on HNA, RNA, and DNA decacytidylate templates under various conditions suggests strongly that only nucleic acid double helices with the A structure support efficient template-directed synthesis when 5'-phosphoroimidazolides of nucleosides are used as substrates.

  15. 21 CFR 866.3225 - Enterovirus nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enterovirus nucleic acid assay. 866.3225 Section... nucleic acid assay. (a) Identification. An enterovirus nucleic acid assay is a device that consists of primers, probes, enzymes, and controls for the amplification and detection of enterovirus ribonucleic acid...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3225 - Enterovirus nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Enterovirus nucleic acid assay. 866.3225 Section... nucleic acid assay. (a) Identification. An enterovirus nucleic acid assay is a device that consists of primers, probes, enzymes, and controls for the amplification and detection of enterovirus ribonucleic acid...

  17. Determination of Three-Bond1H3‧-31P Couplings in Nucleic Acids and Protein-Nucleic Acid Complexes by QuantitativeJCorrelation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clore, G. Marius; Murphy, Elizabeth C.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Bax, Ad

    1998-09-01

    A new sensitive two-dimensional quantitativeJcorrelation experiment is described for measuring3JH3‧-Pcouplings in nucleic acids and protein-nucleic acid complexes. The method is based on measuring the change in intensity of the1H-1H cross peaks in a constant-time1H-1H COSY experiment which occurs in the presence and absence of3JH3‧-Pdephasing during the constant-time evolution period. For protein-nucleic acid complexes where the protein is13C-labeled but the nucleic acid is not,12C-filtering is readily achieved by the application of a series of13C purge pulses during the constant time evolution period without any loss of signal-to-noise of the nucleic acid cross peaks. The method is demonstrated for the Dickerson DNA dodecamer and a 19 kDa complex of the transcription factor SRY with a 14mer DNA duplex. The same approach should be equally applicable to numerous other problems, including the measurement ofJH-Cdcouplings in cadmium-ligated proteins, or3JCHcouplings in other selectively enriched compounds.

  18. Non-instrumented nucleic acid amplification assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigl, Bernhard H.; Domingo, Gonzalo; Gerlach, Jay; Tang, Dennis; Harvey, Darrel; Talwar, Nick; Fichtenholz, Alex; van Lew, Bill; LaBarre, Paul

    2008-02-01

    We have developed components of a diagnostic disposable platform that has the dual purpose of providing molecular diagnostics at the point of care (POC) as well as stabilizing specimens for further analysis via a centralized surveillance system. This diagnostic is targeted for use in low-resource settings by minimally trained health workers. The disposable device does not require any additional instrumentation and will be almost as rapid and simple to use as a lateral flow strip test - yet will offer the sensitivity and specificity of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). The low-cost integrated device is composed of three functional components: (1) a sample-processing subunit that generates clean and stabilized DNA from raw samples containing nucleic acids, (2) a NA amplification subunit, and (3) visual amplicon detection sub-unit. The device integrates chemical exothermic heating, temperature stabilization using phase-change materials, and isothermal nucleic acid amplification. The aim of developing this system is to provide pathogen detection with NAAT-level sensitivity in low-resource settings where there is no access to instrumentation. If a disease occurs, patients would be tested with the disposable in the field. A nucleic acid sample would be preserved within the spent disposable which could be sent to a central laboratory facility for further analysis if needed.

  19. Optical Melting Measurements of Nucleic Acid Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Douglas H.

    2014-01-01

    Optical melting experiments provide measurements of thermodynamic parameters for nucleic acids. These thermodynamic parameters are widely used in RNA structure prediction programs and DNA primer design software. This review briefly summarizes the theory and underlying assumptions of the method and provides practical details for instrument calibration, experimental design, and data interpretation. PMID:20946778

  20. Nucleic acid amplification using microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chen-Min; Chang, Wen-Hsin; Wang, Chih-Hung; Wang, Jung-Hao; Mai, John D; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2013-04-07

    In the post-human-genome-project era, the development of molecular diagnostic techniques has advanced the frontiers of biomedical research. Nucleic-acid-based technology (NAT) plays an especially important role in molecular diagnosis. However, most research and clinical protocols still rely on the manual analysis of individual samples by skilled technicians which is a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. Recently, with advances in microfluidic designs, integrated micro total-analysis-systems have emerged to overcome the limitations of traditional detection assays. These microfluidic systems have the capability to rapidly perform experiments in parallel and with a high-throughput which allows a NAT analysis to be completed in a few hours or even a few minutes. These features have a significant beneficial influence on many aspects of traditional biological or biochemical research and this new technology is promising for improving molecular diagnosis. Thus, in the foreseeable future, microfluidic systems developed for molecular diagnosis using NAT will become an important tool in clinical diagnosis. One of the critical issues for NAT is nucleic acid amplification. In this review article, recent advances in nucleic acid amplification techniques using microfluidic systems will be reviewed. Different approaches for fast amplification of nucleic acids for molecular diagnosis will be highlighted.

  1. Nucleic acid-coupled colorimetric analyte detectors

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah H.; Jonas, Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for the direct detection of analytes and membrane conformational changes through the detection of color changes in biopolymeric materials. In particular, the present invention provide for the direct colorimetric detection of analytes using nucleic acid ligands at surfaces of polydiacetylene liposomes and related molecular layer systems.

  2. Enzyme-assisted target recycling (EATR) for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, Yulia V; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2014-09-07

    Fast, reliable and sensitive methods for nucleic acid detection are of growing practical interest with respect to molecular diagnostics of cancer, infectious and genetic diseases. Currently, PCR-based and other target amplification strategies are most extensively used in practice. At the same time, such assays have limitations that can be overcome by alternative approaches. There is a recent explosion in the design of methods that amplify the signal produced by a nucleic acid target, without changing its copy number. This review aims at systematization and critical analysis of the enzyme-assisted target recycling (EATR) signal amplification technique. The approach uses nucleases to recognize and cleave the probe-target complex. Cleavage reactions produce a detectable signal. The advantages of such techniques are potentially low sensitivity to contamination and lack of the requirement of a thermal cycler. Nucleases used for EATR include sequence-dependent restriction or nicking endonucleases or sequence independent exonuclease III, lambda exonuclease, RNase H, RNase HII, AP endonuclease, duplex-specific nuclease, DNase I, or T7 exonuclease. EATR-based assays are potentially useful for point-of-care diagnostics, single nucleotide polymorphisms genotyping and microRNA analysis. Specificity, limit of detection and the potential impact of EATR strategies on molecular diagnostics are discussed.

  3. Nucleic-acid Structural Deformability Deduced from Anisotropic Displacement Parameters†

    PubMed Central

    Peckham, Heather E.; Olson, Wilma K.

    2011-01-01

    The growing numbers of very well resolved nucleic-acid crystal structures with anisotropic displacement parameters provide an unprecedented opportunity to learn about the natural motions of DNA and RNA. Here we report a new Monte-Carlo approach that takes direct account of this information to extract the distortions of covalent structure, base pairing, and dinucleotide geometry intrinsic to regularly organized double-helical molecules. We present new methods to test the validity of the anisotropic parameters and examine the apparent deformability of a variety of structures, including several A, B, and Z DNA duplexes, an AB helical intermediate, an RNA, a ligand-DNA complex, and an enzyme-bound DNA. The rigid-body parameters characterizing the positions of the bases in the structures mirror the mean parameters found when atomic motion is taken into account. The base-pair fluctuations intrinsic to a single structure, however, differ from those extracted from collections of nucleic-acid structures, although selected base-pair steps undergo conformational excursions along routes suggested by the ensembles. The computations reveal surprising new molecular insights, such as the stiffening of DNA and concomitant separation of motions of contacted nucleotides on opposite strands by the binding of Escherichia coli endonuclease VIII, that suggest how the protein may direct enzymatic action. PMID:21280021

  4. Nucleic-acid structural deformability deduced from anisotropic displacement parameters.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Heather E; Olson, Wilma K

    2011-04-01

    The growing numbers of very well resolved nucleic-acid crystal structures with anisotropic displacement parameters provide an unprecedented opportunity to learn about the natural motions of DNA and RNA. Here we report a new Monte-Carlo approach that takes direct account of this information to extract the distortions of covalent structure, base pairing, and dinucleotide geometry intrinsic to regularly organized double-helical molecules. We present new methods to test the validity of the anisotropic parameters and examine the apparent deformability of a variety of structures, including several A, B, and Z DNA duplexes, an AB helical intermediate, an RNA, a ligand-DNA complex, and an enzyme-bound DNA. The rigid-body parameters characterizing the positions of the bases in the structures mirror the mean parameters found when atomic motion is taken into account. The base-pair fluctuations intrinsic to a single structure, however, differ from those extracted from collections of nucleic-acid structures, although selected base-pair steps undergo conformational excursions along routes suggested by the ensembles. The computations reveal surprising new molecular insights, such as the stiffening of DNA and concomitant separation of motions of contacted nucleotides on opposite strands by the binding of Escherichia coli endonuclease VIII, which suggest how the protein may direct enzymatic action.

  5. Advances in nucleic acid-based detection methods.

    PubMed Central

    Wolcott, M J

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory techniques based on nucleic acid methods have increased in popularity over the last decade with clinical microbiologists and other laboratory scientists who are concerned with the diagnosis of infectious agents. This increase in popularity is a result primarily of advances made in nucleic acid amplification and detection techniques. Polymerase chain reaction, the original nucleic acid amplification technique, changed the way many people viewed and used nucleic acid techniques in clinical settings. After the potential of polymerase chain reaction became apparent, other methods of nucleic acid amplification and detection were developed. These alternative nucleic acid amplification methods may become serious contenders for application to routine laboratory analyses. This review presents some background information on nucleic acid analyses that might be used in clinical and anatomical laboratories and describes some recent advances in the amplification and detection of nucleic acids. PMID:1423216

  6. Nanoconstructions Based on Spatially Ordered Nucleic Acid Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevdokimov, Yu. M.

    Different strategies for the design of nanoconstructions whose building blocks are both linear molecules of double-stranded nucleic acids and nucleic acid molecules fixed in the spatial structure of particles of liquid-crystalline dispersions are described.

  7. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method is disclosed for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe. 11 figs.

  8. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe.

  9. Improved nucleic acid descriptors for siRNA efficacy prediction

    PubMed Central

    Sciabola, Simone; Cao, Qing; Orozco, Modesto; Faustino, Ignacio; Stanton, Robert V.

    2013-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been made recently in understanding how gene silencing is mediated by the RNAi pathway, the rational design of effective sequences is still a challenging task. In this article, we demonstrate that including three-dimensional descriptors improved the discrimination between active and inactive small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in a statistical model. Five descriptor types were used: (i) nucleotide position along the siRNA sequence, (ii) nucleotide composition in terms of presence/absence of specific combinations of di- and trinucleotides, (iii) nucleotide interactions by means of a modified auto- and cross-covariance function, (iv) nucleotide thermodynamic stability derived by the nearest neighbor model representation and (v) nucleic acid structure flexibility. The duplex flexibility descriptors are derived from extended molecular dynamics simulations, which are able to describe the sequence-dependent elastic properties of RNA duplexes, even for non-standard oligonucleotides. The matrix of descriptors was analysed using three statistical packages in R (partial least squares, random forest, and support vector machine), and the most predictive model was implemented in a modeling tool we have made publicly available through SourceForge. Our implementation of new RNA descriptors coupled with appropriate statistical algorithms resulted in improved model performance for the selection of siRNA candidates when compared with publicly available siRNA prediction tools and previously published test sets. Additional validation studies based on in-house RNA interference projects confirmed the robustness of the scoring procedure in prospective studies. PMID:23241392

  10. Polymerization and nucleic acid-binding properties of human L1 ORF1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Kathryn E.; Hickman, Alison B.; Jones, Charles E.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Furano, Anthony V.

    2012-01-01

    The L1 (LINE 1) retrotransposable element encodes two proteins, ORF1p and ORF2p. ORF2p is the L1 replicase, but the role of ORF1p is unknown. Mouse ORF1p, a coiled-coil-mediated trimer of ∼42-kDa monomers, binds nucleic acids and has nucleic acid chaperone activity. We purified human L1 ORF1p expressed in insect cells and made two findings that significantly advance our knowledge of the protein. First, in the absence of nucleic acids, the protein polymerizes under the very conditions (0.05 M NaCl) that are optimal for high (∼1 nM)-affinity nucleic acid binding. The non-coiled-coil C-terminal half mediates formation of the polymer, an active conformer that is instantly resolved to trimers, or multimers thereof, by nucleic acid. Second, the protein has a biphasic effect on mismatched double-stranded DNA, a proxy chaperone substrate. It protects the duplex from dissociation at 37°C before eventually melting it when largely polymeric. Therefore, polymerization of ORF1p seemingly affects its interaction with nucleic acids. Additionally, polymerization of ORF1p at its translation site could explain the heretofore-inexplicable phenomenon of cis preference—the favored retrotransposition of the actively translated L1 transcript, which is essential for L1 survival. PMID:21937507

  11. Silver ions-mediated conformational switch: facile design of structure-controllable nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongxiang; Li, Jishan; Wang, Hao; Jin, Jianyu; Liu, Jinhua; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong; Yang, Ronghua

    2010-08-01

    Conformationally constraint nucleic acid probes were usually designed by forming an intramolecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. The disadvantages of these approaches are the inflexibility and instability in complex environment of the Watson-Crick-based duplex. We report that this hydrogen bonding pattern can be replaced by metal-ligation between specific metal ions and the natural bases. To demonstrate the feasibility of this principle, two linear oligonucleotides and silver ions were examined as models for DNA hybridization assay and adenosine triphosphate detection. The both nucleic acids contain target binding sequences in the middle and cytosine (C)-rich sequences at the lateral portions. The strong interaction between Ag(+) ions and cytosines forms stable C-Ag(+)-C structures, which promises the oligonucleotides to form conformationally constraint formations. In the presence of its target, interaction between the loop sequences and the target unfolds the C-Ag(+)-C structures, and the corresponding probes unfolding can be detected by a change in their fluorescence emission. We discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic opportunities that are provided by using Ag(+) ion complexes instead of traditional Watson-Crick-based duplex. In particular, the intrinsic feature of the metal-ligation motif facilitates the design of functional nucleic acids probes by independently varying the concentration of Ag(+) ions in the medium.

  12. Leukocyte protease binding to nucleic acids promotes nuclear localization and cleavage of nucleic acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marshall P; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron J; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein targets, whereas adding RNA to recombinant RNA binding protein substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Preincubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G. During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps, which bind NE and cathepsin G. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and neutrophil extracellular traps in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high-affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation.

  13. Leukocyte Protease Binding to Nucleic Acids Promotes Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Marshall P.; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein (RBP) targets, while adding RNA to recombinant RBP substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Pre-incubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G (CATG). During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which bind NE and CATG. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and NETs in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation. PMID:24771851

  14. Method for nucleic acid isolation using supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Nivens, David E.; Applegate, Bruce M.

    1999-01-01

    A method for detecting the presence of a microorganism in an environmental sample involves contacting the sample with a supercritical fluid to isolate nucleic acid from the microorganism, then detecting the presence of a particular sequence within the isolated nucleic acid. The nucleic acid may optionally be subjected to further purification.

  15. Method for nucleic acid isolation using supercritical fluids

    DOEpatents

    Nivens, D.E.; Applegate, B.M.

    1999-07-13

    A method is disclosed for detecting the presence of a microorganism in an environmental sample involves contacting the sample with a supercritical fluid to isolate nucleic acid from the microorganism, then detecting the presence of a particular sequence within the isolated nucleic acid. The nucleic acid may optionally be subjected to further purification. 4 figs.

  16. Peptide nucleic acid probe for protein affinity purification based on biotin-streptavidin interaction and peptide nucleic acid strand hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tse, Jenny; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zengeya, Thomas; Rozners, Eriks; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2015-02-01

    We describe a new method for protein affinity purification that capitalizes on the high affinity of streptavidin for biotin but does not require dissociation of the biotin-streptavidin complex for protein retrieval. Conventional reagents place both the selectively reacting group (the "warhead") and the biotin on the same molecule. We place the warhead and the biotin on separate molecules, each linked to a short strand of peptide nucleic acid (PNA), synthetic polymers that use the same bases as DNA but attached to a backbone that is resistant to attack by proteases and nucleases. As in DNA, PNA strands with complementary base sequences hybridize. In conditions that favor PNA duplex formation, the warhead strand (carrying the tagged protein) and the biotin strand form a complex that is held onto immobilized streptavidin. As in DNA, the PNA duplex dissociates at moderately elevated temperature; therefore, retrieval of the tagged protein is accomplished by a brief exposure to heat. Using iodoacetate as the warhead, 8-base PNA strands, biotin, and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, we demonstrate retrieval of the cysteine protease papain. We were also able to use our iodoacetyl-PNA:PNA-biotin probe for retrieval and identification of a thiol reductase and a glutathione transferase from soybean seedling cotyledons.

  17. Cytoplasmic nucleic acid sensors in antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Priya; Bowzard, J Bradford; Schwerzmann, Joy W; Jeisy-Scott, Victoria; Fujita, Takashi; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2009-08-01

    The innate immune system uses pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to sense invading microbes and initiate a rapid protective response. PRRs bind and are activated by structural motifs, such as nucleic acids or bacterial and fungal cell wall components, collectively known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. PRRs that recognize pathogen-derived nucleic acids are present in vesicular compartments and in the cytosol of most cell types. Here, we review recent studies of these cytosolic sensors, focusing on the nature of the ligands for DNA-dependent activator of interferon (DAI)-regulatory factors, absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2), and the retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like helicase (RLH) family of receptors, the basis of ligand recognition and the signaling pathways triggered by the activation of these receptors. An increased understanding of these molecular aspects of innate immunity will guide the development of novel antiviral therapeutics.

  18. Nucleic acid analysis using terminal-phosphate-labeled nucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas [Ithaca, NY; Webb, Watt W [Ithaca, NY; Levene, Michael [Ithaca, NY; Turner, Stephen [Ithaca, NY; Craighead, Harold G [Ithaca, NY; Foquet, Mathieu [Ithaca, NY

    2008-04-22

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  19. Counting the ions surrounding nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Nucleic acids are strongly negatively charged, and thus electrostatic interactions—screened by ions in solution—play an important role in governing their ability to fold and participate in biomolecular interactions. The negative charge creates a region, known as the ion atmosphere, in which cation and anion concentrations are perturbed from their bulk values. Ion counting experiments quantify the ion atmosphere by measuring the preferential ion interaction coefficient: the net total number of excess ions above, or below, the number expected due to the bulk concentration. The results of such studies provide important constraints on theories, which typically predict the full three-dimensional distribution of the screening cloud. This article reviews the state of nucleic acid ion counting measurements and critically analyzes their ability to test both analytical and simulation-based models. PMID:28034959

  20. Enzyme-free nucleic acid logic circuits.

    PubMed

    Seelig, Georg; Soloveichik, David; Zhang, David Yu; Winfree, Erik

    2006-12-08

    Biological organisms perform complex information processing and control tasks using sophisticated biochemical circuits, yet the engineering of such circuits remains ineffective compared with that of electronic circuits. To systematically create complex yet reliable circuits, electrical engineers use digital logic, wherein gates and subcircuits are composed modularly and signal restoration prevents signal degradation. We report the design and experimental implementation of DNA-based digital logic circuits. We demonstrate AND, OR, and NOT gates, signal restoration, amplification, feedback, and cascading. Gate design and circuit construction is modular. The gates use single-stranded nucleic acids as inputs and outputs, and the mechanism relies exclusively on sequence recognition and strand displacement. Biological nucleic acids such as microRNAs can serve as inputs, suggesting applications in biotechnology and bioengineering.

  1. Digital Microfluidics for Nucleic Acid Amplification.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Beatriz; Veigas, Bruno; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo; Águas, Hugo; Igreja, Rui; Baptista, Pedro V

    2017-06-25

    Digital Microfluidics (DMF) has emerged as a disruptive methodology for the control and manipulation of low volume droplets. In DMF, each droplet acts as a single reactor, which allows for extensive multiparallelization of biological and chemical reactions at a much smaller scale. DMF devices open entirely new and promising pathways for multiplex analysis and reaction occurring in a miniaturized format, thus allowing for healthcare decentralization from major laboratories to point-of-care with accurate, robust and inexpensive molecular diagnostics. Here, we shall focus on DMF platforms specifically designed for nucleic acid amplification, which is key for molecular diagnostics of several diseases and conditions, from pathogen identification to cancer mutations detection. Particular attention will be given to the device architecture, materials and nucleic acid amplification applications in validated settings.

  2. Digital Microfluidics for Nucleic Acid Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Veigas, Bruno; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo; Águas, Hugo; Igreja, Rui; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2017-01-01

    Digital Microfluidics (DMF) has emerged as a disruptive methodology for the control and manipulation of low volume droplets. In DMF, each droplet acts as a single reactor, which allows for extensive multiparallelization of biological and chemical reactions at a much smaller scale. DMF devices open entirely new and promising pathways for multiplex analysis and reaction occurring in a miniaturized format, thus allowing for healthcare decentralization from major laboratories to point-of-care with accurate, robust and inexpensive molecular diagnostics. Here, we shall focus on DMF platforms specifically designed for nucleic acid amplification, which is key for molecular diagnostics of several diseases and conditions, from pathogen identification to cancer mutations detection. Particular attention will be given to the device architecture, materials and nucleic acid amplification applications in validated settings. PMID:28672827

  3. Rapid hybridization of nucleic acids using isotachophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Bercovici, Moran; Han, Crystal M.; Liao, Joseph C.; Santiago, Juan G.

    2012-01-01

    We use isotachophoresis (ITP) to control and increase the rate of nucleic acid hybridization reactions in free solution. We present a new physical model, validation experiments, and demonstrations of this assay. We studied the coupled physicochemical processes of preconcentration, mixing, and chemical reaction kinetics under ITP. Our experimentally validated model enables a closed form solution for ITP-aided reaction kinetics, and reveals a new characteristic time scale which correctly predicts order 10,000-fold speed-up of chemical reaction rate for order 100 pM reactants, and greater enhancement at lower concentrations. At 500 pM concentration, we measured a reaction time which is 14,000-fold lower than that predicted for standard second-order hybridization. The model and method are generally applicable to acceleration of reactions involving nucleic acids, and may be applicable to a wide range of reactions involving ionic reactants. PMID:22733732

  4. Nucleic Acid Templated Reactions for Chemical Biology.

    PubMed

    Di Pisa, Margherita; Seitz, Oliver

    2017-06-21

    Nucleic acid directed bioorthogonal reactions offer the fascinating opportunity to unveil and redirect a plethora of intracellular mechanisms. Nano- to picomolar amounts of specific RNA molecules serve as templates and catalyze the selective formation of molecules that 1) exert biological effects, or 2) provide measurable signals for RNA detection. Turnover of reactants on the template is a valuable asset when concentrations of RNA templates are low. The idea is to use RNA-templated reactions to fully control the biodistribution of drugs and to push the detection limits of DNA or RNA analytes to extraordinary sensitivities. Herein we review recent and instructive examples of conditional synthesis or release of compounds for in cellulo protein interference and intracellular nucleic acid imaging. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  5. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    DOEpatents

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  6. Nucleic acids, compositions and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia [Gainesville, FL; Nong, Guang [Gainesville, FL; Rice, John D [Gainesville, FL; John, Franz J [Baltimore, MD

    2012-02-21

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  7. Nanotechnology for delivery of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anisha; Bahal, Raman; Gupta, Meera; Glazer, Peter M; Saltzman, W Mark

    2016-10-28

    Over the past three decades, peptide nucleic acids have been employed in numerous chemical and biological applications. Peptide nucleic acids possess enormous potential because of their superior biophysical properties, compared to other oligonucleotide chemistries. However, for therapeutic applications, intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acids remains a challenge. In this review, we summarize the progress that has been made in delivering peptide nucleic acids to intracellular targets. In addition, we emphasize recent nanoparticle-based strategies for efficient delivery of conventional and chemically-modified peptides nucleic acids.

  8. Spectrofluorimetric study of the binding of codeine to nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Huang, Wei; Su, Liang; Dong, Zijia; Zhang, Shuai

    2009-06-01

    The characteristics of the interaction between codeine (CD) and nucleic acids were studied by ultraviolet-visible spectra and fluorescent spectra. It shows that there is a powerful ability in nucleic acids to quench the fluorescence intensity of codeine. The fluorescence quenching data were analyzed according to Stern-Volmer equation and Förster's nonradiative energy transfer mechanism. Thus the binding constant and the thermodynamic parameters between codeine and nucleic acids were obtained. The results show that codeine interacts with nucleic acids in a mode of groove binding and -OCH 3 of the codeine molecular combines with the groove of nucleic acids through hydrogen bond or van der Waals force.

  9. Yellow lupine cyclophilin interacts with nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Nuc, Katarzyna; Leśniewicz, Krzysztof; Nuc, Przemysław; Słomski, Ryszard

    2008-01-01

    To investigate properties of yellow lupine cytosolic cyclophilin, an expression vector pET15CYP was constructed. The CyP cDNA (GenBank accession no.Y16088) reveals an open reading frame of 172 amino acids with the conserved tryptophan residue at position 128 and an insertion of seven amino acids spanning positions 48-54. Yellow lupine cyclophilin, purified after expression in E. coli cells, exhibits peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity when assayed with a synthetic oligopeptide. We have demonstrated that the recombinant cyclophilin is able to interact with nucleic acids, both single and double stranded DNA fragments as well as RNA.

  10. Orthogonal Synthesis of Xeno Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Fiers, Guillaume; Chouikhi, Dalila; Oswald, Laurence; Al Ouahabi, Abdelaziz; Chan-Seng, Delphine; Charles, Laurence; Lutz, Jean-François

    2016-12-12

    Sequence-defined peptide triazole nucleic acids (PTzNA) were synthesized by means of a solid-phase orthogonal "AB+CD" iterative strategy. In this approach, AB and CD building blocks containing carboxylic acid (A), azide (B), alkyne (C), and primary amine (D) functions are assembled together by successive copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) and acid-amine coupling steps. Different PTzNA genetic sequences were prepared using a library of eight building blocks (i.e., four AB and four CD building blocks).

  11. Molecular Recognition and Structural Influences on Function in Bio-nanosystems of Nucleic Acids and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethaphong, Latsavongsakda

    This work examines smart material properties of rational self-assembly and molecular recognition found in nano-biosystems. Exploiting the sequence and structural information encoded within nucleic acids and proteins will permit programmed synthesis of nanomaterials and help create molecular machines that may carry out new roles involving chemical catalysis and bioenergy. Responsive to different ionic environments thru self-reorgnization, nucleic acids (NA) are nature's signature smart material; organisms such as viruses and bacteria use features of NAs to react to their environment and orchestrate their lifecycle. Furthermore, nucleic acid systems (both RNA and DNA) are currently exploited as scaffolds; recent applications have been showcased to build bioelectronics and biotemplated nanostructures via directed assembly of multidimensional nanoelectronic devices 1. Since the most stable and rudimentary structure of nucleic acids is the helical duplex, these were modeled in order to examine the influence of the microenvironment, sequence, and cation-dependent perturbations of their canonical forms. Due to their negatively charged phosphate backbone, NA's rely on counterions to overcome the inherent repulsive forces that arise from the assembly of two complementary strands. As a realistic model system, we chose the HIV-TAR helix (PDB ID: 397D) to study specific sequence motifs on cation sequestration. At physiologically relevant concentrations of sodium and potassium ions, we observed sequence based effects where purine stretches were adept in retaining high residency cations. The transitional space between adenine and guanosine nucleotides (ApG step) in a sequence proved the most favorable. This work was the first to directly show these subtle interactions of sequence based cationic sequestration and may be useful for controlling metallization of nucleic acids in conductive nanowires. Extending the study further, we explored the degree to which the structure of NA

  12. Optimizing the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, David Yu; Chen, Sherry Xi; Yin, Peng

    2012-03-01

    The specific hybridization of complementary sequences is an essential property of nucleic acids, enabling diverse biological and biotechnological reactions and functions. However, the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization is compromised for long strands, except near the melting temperature. Here, we analytically derived the thermodynamic properties of a hybridization probe that would enable near-optimal single-base discrimination and perform robustly across diverse temperature, salt and concentration conditions. We rationally designed ‘toehold exchange’ probes that approximate these properties, and comprehensively tested them against five different DNA targets and 55 spurious analogues with energetically representative single-base changes (replacements, deletions and insertions). These probes produced discrimination factors between 3 and 100+ (median, 26). Without retuning, our probes function robustly from 10 °C to 37 °C, from 1 mM Mg2+ to 47 mM Mg2+, and with nucleic acid concentrations from 1 nM to 5 µM. Experiments with RNA also showed effective single-base change discrimination.

  13. Optimizing the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, David Yu; Chen, Sherry Xi; Yin, Peng

    2012-01-22

    The specific hybridization of complementary sequences is an essential property of nucleic acids, enabling diverse biological and biotechnological reactions and functions. However, the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization is compromised for long strands, except near the melting temperature. Here, we analytically derived the thermodynamic properties of a hybridization probe that would enable near-optimal single-base discrimination and perform robustly across diverse temperature, salt and concentration conditions. We rationally designed 'toehold exchange' probes that approximate these properties, and comprehensively tested them against five different DNA targets and 55 spurious analogues with energetically representative single-base changes (replacements, deletions and insertions). These probes produced discrimination factors between 3 and 100+ (median, 26). Without retuning, our probes function robustly from 10 °C to 37 °C, from 1 mM Mg(2+) to 47 mM Mg(2+), and with nucleic acid concentrations from 1 nM to 5 µM. Experiments with RNA also showed effective single-base change discrimination.

  14. Carbohydrate Polymers for Nonviral Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sizovs, Antons; McLendon, Patrick M.; Srinivasachari, Sathya

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates have been investigated and developed as delivery vehicles for shuttling nucleic acids into cells. In this review, we present the state of the art in carbohydrate-based polymeric vehicles for nucleic acid delivery, with the focus on the recent successes in preclinical models, both in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric scaffolds based on the natural polysaccharides chitosan, hyaluronan, pullulan, dextran, and schizophyllan each have unique properties and potential for modification, and these results are discussed with the focus on facile synthetic routes and favorable performance in biological systems. Many of these carbohydrates have been used to develop alternative types of biomaterials for nucleic acid delivery to typical polyplexes, and these novel materials are discussed. Also presented are polymeric vehicles that incorporate copolymerized carbohydrates into polymer backbones based on polyethylenimine and polylysine and their effect on transfection and biocompatibility. Unique scaffolds, such as clusters and polymers based on cyclodextrin (CD), are also discussed, with the focus on recent successes in vivo and in the clinic. These results are presented with the emphasis on the role of carbohydrate and charge on transfection. Use of carbohydrates as molecular recognition ligands for cell-type specific delivery is also briefly reviewed. We contend that carbohydrates have contributed significantly to progress in the field of non-viral DNA delivery, and these new discoveries are impactful for developing new vehicles and materials for treatment of human disease. PMID:21504102

  15. Optimizing the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, David Yu; Chen, Sherry Xi; Yin, Peng

    2014-01-01

    The specific hybridization of complementary sequences is an essential property of nucleic acids, enabling diverse biological and biotechnological reactions and functions. However, the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization is compromised for long strands, except near the melting temperature. Here, we analytically derived the thermodynamic properties of a hybridization probe that would enable near-optimal single-base discrimination and perform robustly across diverse temperature, salt and concentration conditions. We rationally designed ‘toehold exchange’ probes that approximate these properties, and comprehensively tested them against five different DNA targets and 55 spurious analogues with energetically representative single-base changes (replacements, deletions and insertions). These probes produced discrimination factors between 3 and 100+ (median, 26). Without retuning, our probes function robustly from 10 °C to 37 °C, from 1 mM Mg2+ to 47 mM Mg2+, and with nucleic acid concentrations from 1 nM to 5 μM. Experiments with RNA also showed effective single-base change discrimination. PMID:22354435

  16. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G; Lyamichev, Victor I; Mast, Andrea L; Brow, Mary Ann D

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  17. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  18. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages 02

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  19. Control of stability and structure of nucleic acids using cosolutes.

    PubMed

    Tateishi-Karimta, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-05-15

    The stabilities, structures, and functions of nucleic acids are responsive to surrounding conditions. Living cells contain biomolecules, including nucleic acids, proteins, polysaccharides, and other soluble and insoluble low-molecular weight components, that occupy a significant fraction of the cellular volume (up to 40%), resulting in a highly crowded intracellular environment. We have proven that conditions that mimic features of this intra-cellular environment alter the physical properties affect the stability, structure, and function of nucleic acids. The ability to control structure of nucleic acids by mimicking intra-cellular conditions will be useful in nanotechnology applications of nucleic acids. This paper describes methods that can be used to analyze quantitatively the intra-cellular environment effects caused by cosolutes on nucleic acid structures and to regulate properties of nucleic acids using cosolutes.

  20. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2003-12-09

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  1. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  2. Immunological detection of nucleic acids and antibodies to nucleic acids and nuclear antigens by counterimmunoelectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Schur, P. H.; De Angelis, Diane; Jackson, Jean M.

    1974-01-01

    A counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP) technique has been developed for the rapid, simple, specific detection of nucleic acids as antigens, or for the detection of precipitating antibodies to nucleic acids or nuclear antigens. The majority of precipitins could be detected within 1 hr. As little as 0·0015 μg of antigen per ml (e.g. poly A: poly U) could be detected. Specificity of rabbit antisera to nucleic acids was demonstrated by selective reactions using a panel of polynucleotides. 1091 patient sera were examined for precipitins to DNA, single-stranded DNA, nucleoprotein and calf thymus nucleoprotein. Precipitins to DNA were found in 42% of systemic lupus erythematosus sera, 9% of rheumatoid arthritis sera and 4% of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis sera. Results with the CIEP method showed equal sensitivity as results obtained by complement fixation or binding assays, but were more sensitive than double diffusion in agar (Ouchterlony). PMID:4549570

  3. Nucleic Acid Database: a Repository of Three-Dimensional Information about Nucleic Acids

    DOE Data Explorer

    Berman, H. M.; Olson, W. K.; Beveridge, D. L.; Westbrook, J.; Gelbin, A.; Demeny, T.; Hsieh, S. H.; Srinivasan, A. R.; Schneider, B.

    The Nucleic Acid Database (NDB) provides 3-D structural information about nucleic acids.  It is a relational database designed to facilitate the easy search for nucleic acid structures using any of the stored primary or derived structural features. Reports can then be created describing any properties of the selected structures and structures may be viewed in several different formats, including the mmCIF format, the NDB Atlas format, the NDB coordinate format, or the PDB coordinate format. Browsing structure images created directly from coordinates in the repository can also be done. More than 7000 structures have been released as of May 2014. This website also includes a number of specialized tools and interfaces. The NDB Project is funded by the National Institutes of Health and has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy in the past.

  4. Coarse-Grained Modeling of Nucleic Acids Using Anisotropic Gay-Berne and Electric Multipole Potentials.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohui; Shen, Hujun; Zhang, Dinglin; Li, Yan; Wang, Honglei

    2016-02-09

    In this work, we attempt to apply a coarse-grained (CG) model, which is based on anisotropic Gay-Berne and electric multipole (EMP) potentials, to the modeling of nucleic acids. First, a comparison has been made between the CG and atomistic models (AMBER point-charge model) in the modeling of DNA and RNA hairpin structures. The CG results have demonstrated a good quality in maintaining the nucleic acid hairpin structures, in reproducing the dynamics of backbone atoms of nucleic acids, and in describing the hydrogen-bonding interactions between nucleic acid base pairs. Second, the CG and atomistic AMBER models yield comparable results in modeling double-stranded DNA and RNA molecules. It is encouraging that our CG model is capable of reproducing many elastic features of nucleic acid base pairs in terms of the distributions of the interbase pair step parameters (such as shift, slide, tilt, and twist) and the intrabase pair parameters (such as buckle, propeller, shear, and stretch). Finally, The GBEMP model has shown a promising ability to predict the melting temperatures of DNA duplexes with different lengths.

  5. Critical Analysis of Rate Constants and Turnover Frequency in Nucleic Acid-Templated Reactions: Reaching Terminal Velocity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dalu; Lindberg, Eric; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Nucleic acid-templated reactions have attracted significant attention for nucleic acid sensing and imaging. The level of signal amplification obtained from templated reactions is a function of the template turnover, wherein the template acts as the catalyst. Herein, we report the application of a pyridinium linker that immolates upon photocatalytic reduction with a ruthenium complex to yield the fastest nucleic acid templated reaction reported to date. We show that the templated reaction turnover is limited by the duplex dissociation kinetics beyond probes longer than a 6-mer and proceeded fastest for a 5-mer PNA probe. Using a beacon architecture that masks the catalytic template, we show that this methodology can be used for nucleic acid sensing extending the analyte recognition beyond a 5-mer. The system proceeds with a catalytic efficiency of 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and achieves turnover frequency of >100 h(-1).

  6. Nucleic acid extraction from Agrobacterium strains.

    PubMed

    Wise, Arlene A; Liu, Zhenying; Binns, Andrew N

    2006-01-01

    Agrobacterium is routinely used as a tool for moving genetic constructs into plant cells. The successful use of Agrobacterium as a tool for the genetic engineering of plant cells often requires the manipulation and analysis of nucleic acids present in recombinant Agrobacterium strains. Here we present dependable methods for the isolation of genomic (total) DNA, mega-plasmid DNA, shuttle or binary plasmid DNA, and RNA. In addition, we provide a simple method for the electronic transfer of shuttle plasmids from Agrobacterium to E. coli for use when their low copy number in Agrobacterium impedes plasmid isolation from that strain.

  7. Nucleic acid amplification using modular branched primers

    DOEpatents

    Ulanovsky, Levy

    2001-01-01

    Methods and compositions expand the options for making primers for use in amplifying nucleic acid segments. The invention eliminates the step of custom synthesis of primers for Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). Instead of being custom-synthesized, a primer is replaced by a combination of several oligonucleotide modules selected from a pre-synthesized library. A modular combination of just a few oligonucleotides essentially mimics the performance of a conventional, custom-made primer by matching the sequence of the priming site in the template. Each oligonucleotide module has a segment that matches one of the stretches within the priming site.

  8. Kinetics of ligand binding to nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Arakelyan, V B; Babayan, S Y; Tairyan, V I; Arakelyan, A V; Parsadanyan, M A; Vardevanyan, P O

    2006-02-01

    Ligand binding to nucleic acids (NA) is considered as a stationary Markov process. It is shown that the probabilistic description of ligand-NA binding allows one to describe not only the kinetics of the change of number of bound ligands at arbitrary fillings but also to calculate stationary values of the number of bound ligands and its dispersion. The general analysis of absorption isotherms and kinetics of ligand binding to NA make it possible to determine of rate constants of ligand-NA complex formation and dissociation.

  9. Nucleic acid probes in diagnostic medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberry, Phillip A.

    1991-01-01

    The need for improved diagnostic procedures is outlined and variations in probe technology are briefly reviewed. A discussion of the application of probe technology to the diagnosis of disease in animals and humans is presented. A comparison of probe versus nonprobe diagnostics and isotopic versus nonisotopic probes is made and the current state of sequence amplification is described. The current market status of nucleic acid probes is reviewed with respect to their diagnostic application in human and veterinary medicine. Representative product examples are described and information on probes being developed that offer promise as future products is discussed.

  10. Nucleic acid amplification using modular branched primers

    DOEpatents

    Ulanovsky, Levy; Raja, Mugasimangalam C.

    2001-01-01

    Methods and compositions expand the options for making primers for use in amplifying nucleic acid segments. The invention eliminates the step of custom synthesis of primers for Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). Instead of being custom-synthesized, a primer is replaced by a combination of several oligonucleotide modules selected from a pre-synthesized library. A modular combination of just a few oligonucleotides essentially mimics the performance of a conventional, custom-made primer by matching the sequence of the priming site in the template. Each oligonucleotide module has a segment that matches one of the stretches within the priming site.

  11. Electrocatalysis in proteins, nucleic acids and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Paleček, Emil; Bartošík, Martin; Ostatná, Veronika; Trefulka, Mojmír

    2012-02-01

    The ability of proteins to catalyze hydrogen evolution has been known for more than 80 years, but the poorly developed d.c. polarographic "pre-sodium wave" was of little analytical use. Recently, we have shown that by using constant current chronopotentiometric stripping analysis, proteins produce a well-developed peak H at hanging mercury drop and solid amalgam electrodes. Peak H sensitively reflects changes in protein structures due to protein denaturation, single amino acid exchange, etc. at the picomole level. Unmodified DNA and RNA do not yield such a peak, but they produce electrocatalytic voltammetric signals after modification with osmium tetroxide complexes with nitrogen ligands [Os(VIII)L], binding covalently to pyrimidine bases in nucleic acids. Recently, it has been shown that six-valent [Os(VI)L] complexes bind to 1,2-diols in polysaccharides and oligosaccharides, producing voltammetric responses similar to those of DNA-Os(VIII)L adducts. Electrocatalytic peaks produced by Os-modified nucleic acids, proteins (reaction with tryptophan residues) and carbohydrates are due to the catalytic hydrogen evolution, allowing determination of oligomers at the picomolar level.

  12. Lipid and polymeric carrier-mediated nucleic acid delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Mahato, Ram I

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Nucleic acids such as plasmid DNA, antisense oligonucleotide, and RNA interference (RNAi) molecules, have a great potential to be used as therapeutics for the treatment of various genetic and acquired diseases. To design a successful nucleic acid delivery system, the pharmacological effect of nucleic acids, the physiological condition of the subjects or sites, and the physicochemical properties of nucleic acid and carriers have to be thoroughly examined. Areas covered in this review The commonly used lipids, polymers and corresponding delivery systems are reviewed in terms of their characteristics, applications, advantages and limitations. What the reader will gain This article aims to provide an overview of biological barriers and strategies to overcome these barriers by properly designing effective synthetic carriers for nucleic acid delivery. Take home message A thorough understanding of biological barriers and the structure–activity relationship of lipid and polymeric carriers is the key for effective nucleic acid therapy. PMID:20836625

  13. Designer nucleic acids to probe and program the cell.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Yamuna; Bathe, Mark

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in nucleic acid sequencing, structural, and computational technologies have resulted in dramatic progress in our understanding of nucleic acid structure and function in the cell. This knowledge, together with the predictable base-pairing of nucleic acids and powerful synthesis and expression capabilities now offers the unique ability to program nucleic acids to form precise 3D architectures with diverse applications in synthetic and cell biology. The unique modularity of structural motifs that include aptamers, DNAzymes, and ribozymes, together with their well-defined construction rules, enables the synthesis of functional higher-order nucleic acid complexes from these subcomponents. As we illustrate here, these highly programmable, smart complexes are increasingly enabling researchers to probe and program the cell in a sophisticated manner that moves well beyond the use of nucleic acids for conventional genetic manipulation alone.

  14. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  15. SnapShot: Nucleic acid immune sensors, part 2.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Veit

    2014-12-18

    The innate immune system has evolved sensors that can detect specific molecular fingerprints of non-self RNA or DNA. At the same time, some receptors respond to nucleic acids of both exogenous and endogenous origin, yet they are spatially segregated from endogenous nucleic acids. This SnapShot schematizes families and individual members of nucleic acid sensors with a focus on their ligands and the signaling pathways they employ.

  16. [Kinetics of ligand binding to nucleic acids at random fillings].

    PubMed

    Arakelian, V B; Babaian, S Iu; Tairian, V I; Arakelian, A V; Parsadanian, M A; Vardevanian, P O

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding with nucleic acids is described in frames of the theory of random processes. It is shown that the probabilistic description of binding of a ligand to nucleic acid allows one to describe not only the kinetics of changes in the number of bound ligands at arbitrary fillings but also to calculate stationary values of the number of bound ligands and its dispersion. A general analysis of absorption isotherms and the kinetics of ligand binding with nucleic acids allows one to determine the rate constants of formation and decomposition of the ligand-nucleic acid complex. A comparison of the results obtained with the case of low fillings is conducted.

  17. CRC handbook of chromatography: Nucleic acids and related compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Krstulovic, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book's contents include: Structure Elucidation of Nucleic Acid Components; Fundamentals of HPLC; Analysis of Nucleic Acids and Oligonucleotides; Extraction of Nucleic Acids from Tissues; Gel Filtration Chromatography of RNAs and DNS Fragments; Separation of tRNAs and Oligonucleotides by Mixed Mode Chromatography; Anion-Exchange and Reversed-Phase HPLC of Synthetic Oligonucleotides; Nucleic Acid Components in Biological Fluids; RPLC Separation of RNA and DNA Hydrolysates; Nucleotides in Tissue Extracts; and Determination of Adenine Nucleotides and Creatine Phosphate in Various Mammalian Tissues.

  18. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php.

  19. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php PMID:26896846

  20. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2012-02-14

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  1. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2015-04-14

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  2. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2014-02-25

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  3. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2013-07-16

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  4. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2009-05-05

    The present invention provides an endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  5. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2008-04-01

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  6. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2010-10-05

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  7. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2008-11-11

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  8. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2010-10-12

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  9. Unlocked nucleic acids with a pyrene-modified uracil: synthesis, hybridization studies, fluorescent properties and i-motif stability.

    PubMed

    Perlíková, Pavla; Karlsen, Kasper K; Pedersen, Erik B; Wengel, Jesper

    2014-01-03

    The synthesis of two new phosphoramidite building blocks for the incorporation of 5-(pyren-1-yl)uracilyl unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) monomers into oligonucleotides has been developed. Monomers containing a pyrene-modified nucleobase component were found to destabilize an i-motif structure at pH 5.2, both under molecular crowding and noncrowding conditions. The presence of the pyrene-modified UNA monomers in DNA strands led to decreases in the thermal stabilities of DNA*/DNA and DNA*/RNA duplexes, but these duplexes' thermal stabilities were better than those of duplexes containing unmodified UNA monomers. Pyrene-modified UNA monomers incorporated in bulges were able to stabilize DNA*/DNA duplexes due to intercalation of the pyrene moiety into the duplexes. Steady-state fluorescence emission studies of oligonucleotides containing pyrene-modified UNA monomers revealed decreases in fluorescence intensities upon hybridization to DNA or RNA. Efficient quenching of fluorescence of pyrene-modified UNA monomers was observed after formation of i-motif structures at pH 5.2. The stabilizing/destabilizing effect of pyrene-modified nucleic acids might be useful for designing antisense oligonucleotides and hybridization probes.

  10. Spectroscopic studies of nucleic acid additions during seed-mediated growth of gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tapp, Maeling; Sullivan, Rick; Dennis, Patrick; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of adding nucleic acids to gold seeds during the growth stage of either nanospheres or nanorods was investigated using UV-Vis spectroscopy to reveal any oligonucleotide base or structure-specific effects on nanoparticle growth kinetics or plasmonic signatures. Spectral data indicate that the presence of DNA duplexes during seed ageing drastically accelerated nanosphere growth while the addition of single-stranded polyadenine at any point during seed ageing induces nanosphere aggregation. For seeds added to a gold nanorod growth solution, single-stranded polythymine induces a modest blue-shift in the longitudinal peak wavelength. Moreover, a particular sequence comprised of 50% thymine bases was found to induce a faster, more dramatic blue-shift in the longitudinal peak wavelength compared to any of the homopolymer incubation cases. Monomeric forms of the nucleic acids, however, do not yield discernable spectral differences in any of the gold suspensions studied. PMID:25960601

  11. Cytosolic nucleic acid sensors and innate immune regulation.

    PubMed

    Ori, Daisuke; Murase, Motoya; Kawai, Taro

    2017-03-04

    During viral and bacterial infections, pathogen-derived cytosolic nucleic acids are recognized by the intracellular RNA sensors retinoic acid-inducible gene I and melanoma-differentiated gene 5 and intracellular DNA sensors, including cyclic-di-GMP-AMP synthase, absent in melanoma 2, interferon (IFN)-gamma inducible protein 16, polymerase III, and so on. Binding of intracellular nucleic acids to these sensors activates downstream signaling cascades, resulting in the production of type I IFNs and pro-inflammatory cytokines to induce appropriate systematic immune responses. While these sensors also recognize endogenous nucleic acids and activate immune responses, they can discriminate between self- and non-self-nucleic acids. However, dysfunction of these sensors or failure of regulatory mechanisms causes aberrant activation of immune response and autoimmune disorders. In this review, we focus on how intracellular immune sensors recognize exogenous nucleic acids and activate the innate immune system, and furthermore, how autoimmune diseases result from dysfunction of these sensors.

  12. Modification of nucleic acids by azobenzene derivatives and their applications in biotechnology and nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Xingyu; Liang, Xingguo

    2014-12-01

    Azobenzene has been widely used as a photoregulator due to its reversible photoisomerization, large structural change between E and Z isomers, high photoisomerization yield, and high chemical stability. On the other hand, some azobenzene derivatives can be used as universal quenchers for many fluorophores. Nucleic acid is a good candidate to be modified because it is not only the template of gene expression but also widely used for building well-organized nanostructures and nanodevices. Because the size and polarity distribution of the azobenzene molecule is similar to a nucleobase pair, the introduction of azobenzene into nucleic acids has been shown to be an ingenious molecular design for constructing light-switching biosystems or light-driven nanomachines. Here we review recent advances in azobenzene-modified nucleic acids and their applications for artificial regulation of gene expression and enzymatic reactions, construction of photoresponsive nanostructures and nanodevices, molecular beacons, as well as obtaining structural information using the introduced azobenzene as an internal probe. In particular, nucleic acids bearing multiple azobenzenes can be used as a novel artificial nanomaterial with merits of high sequence specificity, regular duplex structure, and high photoregulation efficiency. The combination of functional groups with biomolecules may further advance the development of chemical biotechnology and biomolecular engineering.

  13. The 'helix clamp' in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: a new nucleic acid binding motif common in nucleic acid polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, T; Meier, T; Götte, M; Heumann, H

    1994-01-01

    Amino acid sequences homologous to 259KLVGKL (X)16KLLR284 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) are conserved in several nucleotide polymerizing enzymes. This amino acid motif has been identified in the crystal structure model as an element of the enzyme's nucleic acid binding apparatus. It is part of the helix-turn-helix structure, alpha H-turn-alpha I, within the 'thumb' region of HIV-1 RT. The motif grasps the complexed nucleic acid at one side. Molecular modeling studies on HIV-1 RT in complex with a nucleic acid fragment suggest that the motif has binding function in the p66 subunit as well as in the p51 subunit, acting as a kind of 'helix clamp'. Given its wide distribution within the nucleic acid polymerases, the helix clamp motif is assumed to be a structure of general significance for nucleic acid binding. Images PMID:7527138

  14. Nucleic Acid Aptamers for Living Cell Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiangling; Lv, Yifan; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xiaobing; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong

    2014-06-01

    Cells as the building blocks of life determine the basic functions and properties of a living organism. Understanding the structure and components of a cell aids in the elucidation of its biological functions. Moreover, knowledge of the similarities and differences between diseased and healthy cells is essential to understanding pathological mechanisms, identifying diagnostic markers, and designing therapeutic molecules. However, monitoring the structures and activities of a living cell remains a challenging task in bioanalytical and life science research. To meet the requirements of this task, aptamers, as “chemical antibodies,” have become increasingly powerful tools for cellular analysis. This article reviews recent advances in the development of nucleic acid aptamers in the areas of cell membrane analysis, cell detection and isolation, real-time monitoring of cell secretion, and intracellular delivery and analysis with living cell models. Limitations of aptamers and possible solutions are also discussed.

  15. Multiplexed detection of fungal nucleic acid signatures.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Mara R; Dunbar, Sherry A; Jacobson, James W

    2008-04-01

    Diagnoses of opportunistic mycotic infections constitute an increasing clinical problem. Conventional diagnostic tests are time consuming and lack specificity and sensitivity for accurate and timely prognoses. This unit provides a comprehensive description of a fungal detection method that combines nucleic acid signatures with flow cytometry. The multiplexed assay, which uses xMAP technology, consists of unique fluorescent microspheres covalently bound to species-specific fungal oligonucleotide probes. In the presence of the complementary target sequence, the probe hybridizes to its biotinylated target. Quantification of the reaction is based on the fluorescence signal of the reporter molecule that binds to the biotin moieties of the target. The assay can be expanded to include other microorganisms and has the capability to simultaneously test 100 different fungal probes per tube/well. The speed, flexibility in design, and high-throughput capability makes this assay an attractive diagnostic tool for fungal infections and other related maladies.

  16. Towards biomedical applications for nucleic acid nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Simmel, Friedrich C

    2007-12-01

    DNA and RNA can be used to construct artificial nanodevices with strong potential for future biomedical applications. DNA nanodevices can function as biosensors, which detect and report the presence of proteins and naturally occurring nucleic acids, such as mRNA or microRNAs. Complex sensors can be realized by supporting DNA devices with DNA-based information processing. Artificial DNA-based reaction networks can be created that amplify molecular signals or evaluate logical functions to report the simultaneous presence of several disease-related molecules. Other applications for DNA nanodevices are found in controlled release and drug delivery. DNA can be used to build nanocontainers for drugs or switchable hydrogels, which can trap and release compounds. For in vivo applications of DNA nanodevices, techniques for efficient packaging and delivery have been developed and the first examples of intracellular RNA-based nanodevices have already been demonstrated.

  17. Solid phase sequencing of double-stranded nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Cantor, Charles R.; Koster, Hubert; Smith, Cassandra L.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing of target double-stranded nucleic acid sequences, to nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probe comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include nucleic acids in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated determination of molecular weights and identification of the target sequence.

  18. Nucleic acids encoding metal uptake transporters and their uses

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, Julian I.; Antosiewicz, Danuta M.; Schachtman, Daniel P.; Clemens, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    The invention provides LCT1 nucleic acids which encode metal ion uptake transporters. The invention also provides methods of modulating heavy metal and alkali metal uptake in plants. The methods involve producing transgenic plants comprising a recombinant expression cassette containing an LCT1 nucleic acid linked to a plant promoter.

  19. Nucleic Acid Amplification Testing in Suspected Child Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esernio-Jenssen, Debra; Barnes, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that site-specific cultures be obtained, when indicated, for sexually victimized children. Nucleic acid amplification testing is a highly sensitive and specific methodology for identifying sexually transmitted infections. Nucleic acid amplification tests are also less invasive than culture, and this…

  20. Detecting Microbial Nucleic Acids within Nematode Bodies: A Photo Essay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We developed a taxa-specific, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique to localize microbial nucleic acids within nematode bodies. This technique involves hybridization of a nucleic acid probe to target microbial sequences. Hybridization is detected microscopically, as the probes have f...

  1. Nucleic Acid Amplification Testing in Suspected Child Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esernio-Jenssen, Debra; Barnes, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that site-specific cultures be obtained, when indicated, for sexually victimized children. Nucleic acid amplification testing is a highly sensitive and specific methodology for identifying sexually transmitted infections. Nucleic acid amplification tests are also less invasive than culture, and this…

  2. Fluorescence upconversion microbarcodes for multiplexed biological detection: nucleic acid encoding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Shi, Qihui; Zhang, Yichi; Shi, Yifeng; Ding, Kunlun; Zhao, Dongyuan; Stucky, Galen D

    2011-09-01

    Fluoride rare-earth-doped upconversion microbarcodes have been successfully developed for multiplexed signaling and nucleic-acid encoding. This kind of novel barcode material can be used for rapid and sensitive analysis of nucleic acids and antigens, which would have many potential applications in clinical, food, and environment detection.

  3. Assembly of barcode-like nucleic acid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Tian, Cheng; Li, Xiang; Mao, Chengde

    2014-10-15

    Barcode-like (BC) nanopatterns from programmed self-assembly of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) are reported. BC nanostructures are generated by the introduction of open spaces at selected sites to an otherwise closely packed, plain, rectangle nucleic acid nanostructure. This strategy is applied to nanostructures assembled from both origami approach and single stranded tile approach.

  4. Nucleic acid based fluorescent sensor for mercury detection

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Juewen

    2013-02-05

    A nucleic acid enzyme comprises an oligonucleotide containing thymine bases. The nucleic acid enzyme is dependent on both Hg.sup.2+and a second ion as cofactors, to produce a product from a substrate. The substrate comprises a ribonucleotide, a deoxyribonucleotide, or both.

  5. Ferrocene-containing nucleic acids. Synthesis and electrochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, Timofei S.; Andreev, Sergei Yu; Hianik, T.; Oretskaya, Tat'yana S.

    2003-06-01

    The published data on the synthesis of ferrocene-containing nucleic acid fragments are generalised. The known methods are systematised and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The use of nucleoside, nucleotide and oligonucleotide conjugates with ferrocene in the design of systems for electrochemical detection of nucleic acids is considered.

  6. Through-Bond Correlation of Sugar and Base Protons in Unlabeled Nucleic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Anh Tuân

    2001-12-01

    This work presents two methods for through-bond correlation between sugar and base protons in view of model-independent assignment in unlabeled or slightly enriched nucleic acids. Each method uses a combination of multiple-bond and one-bond heteronuclear J-couplings to the aromatic carbon C6 for pyrimidines (3JH1‧,C6 and 1JH6,C6) or C8 for purines (3JH1‧,C8 and 1JH8,C8). The techniques are demonstrated in the duplex [d(CGCGAATTCGCG)]2 and the dimeric G-quadruplex [d(GGGTTCAGG)]2 at natural abundance.

  7. Single and double stranded DNA detection using locked nucleic acid (LNA) functionalized nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Fiona; Stokes, Robert; Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan

    2008-08-01

    Gold and silver nanoparticles functionalized with oligonucleotides can be used for the detection of specific sequences of DNA. We show that gold nanoparticles modified with locked nucleic acid (LNA) form stronger duplexes with a single stranded DNA target and offer better discrimination against single base pair mismatches than analogous DNA probes. Our LNA nanoparticle probes have also been used to detect double stranded DNA through triplex formation, whilst still maintaining selectivity for only complementary targets. Nanoparticle conjugates embedded with suitable surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) labels have been synthesized enabling simultaneous detection and identification of multiple DNA targets.

  8. Synthesis and hybridization property of a boat-shaped pyranosyl nucleic acid containing an exocyclic methylene group in the sugar moiety.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazuto; Kodama, Tetsuya; Obika, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    A boat-shaped pyranosyl nucleic acid (BsNA) having an exocyclic methylene group in the sugar moiety was synthesized to investigate the possibility that the axial H3' of original BsNA is the cause of its duplex destabilization. The synthesized BsNA analog was chemically stable against various nucleophiles. From the thermal stability of duplex oligonucleotides including the BsNA analog, it was found that the duplex-forming ability can be sensitive to the size of functional groups at the 3'-position.

  9. Nucleic Acid-Based Nanodevices in Biological Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kasturi; Veetil, Aneesh T; Jaffrey, Samie R; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2016-06-02

    The nanoscale engineering of nucleic acids has led to exciting molecular technologies for high-end biological imaging. The predictable base pairing, high programmability, and superior new chemical and biological methods used to access nucleic acids with diverse lengths and in high purity, coupled with computational tools for their design, have allowed the creation of a stunning diversity of nucleic acid-based nanodevices. Given their biological origin, such synthetic devices have a tremendous capacity to interface with the biological world, and this capacity lies at the heart of several nucleic acid-based technologies that are finding applications in biological systems. We discuss these diverse applications and emphasize the advantage, in terms of physicochemical properties, that the nucleic acid scaffold brings to these contexts. As our ability to engineer this versatile scaffold increases, its applications in structural, cellular, and organismal biology are clearly poised to massively expand.

  10. Nucleic Acid--Based Nanodevices in Biological Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Kasturi; Veetil, Aneesh T.

    2017-01-01

    The nanoscale engineering of nucleic acids has led to exciting molecular technologies for high-end biological imaging. The predictable base pairing, high programmability, and superior new chemical and biological methods used to access nucleic acids with diverse lengths and in high purity, coupled with computational tools for their design, have allowed the creation of a stunning diversity of nucleic acid--based nanodevices. Given their biological origin, such synthetic devices have a tremendous capacity to interface with the biological world, and this capacity lies at the heart of several nucleic acid--based technologies that are finding applications in biological systems. We discuss these diverse applications and emphasize the advantage, in terms of physicochemical properties, that the nucleic acid scaffold brings to these contexts. As our ability to engineer this versatile scaffold increases, its applications in structural, cellular, and organismal biology are clearly poised to massively expand. PMID:27294440

  11. Cellular nucleic acid binding protein binds G-rich single-stranded nucleic acids and may function as a nucleic acid chaperone.

    PubMed

    Armas, Pablo; Nasif, Sofía; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2008-02-15

    Cellular nucleic acid binding protein (CNBP) is a small single-stranded nucleic acid binding protein made of seven Zn knuckles and an Arg-Gly rich box. CNBP is strikingly conserved among vertebrates and was reported to play broad-spectrum functions in eukaryotic cells biology. Neither its biological function nor its mechanisms of action were elucidated yet. The main goal of this work was to gain further insights into the CNBP biochemical and molecular features. We studied Bufo arenarum CNBP (bCNBP) binding to single-stranded nucleic acid probes representing the main reported CNBP putative targets. We report that, although bCNBP is able to bind RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes in vitro, it binds RNA as a preformed dimer whereas both monomer and dimer are able to bind to ssDNA. A systematic analysis of variant probes shows that the preferred bCNBP targets contain unpaired guanosine-rich stretches. These data expand the knowledge about CNBP binding stoichiometry and begins to dissect the main features of CNBP nucleic acid targets. Besides, we show that bCNBP presents a highly disordered predicted structure and promotes the annealing and melting of nucleic acids in vitro. These features are typical of proteins that function as nucleic acid chaperones. Based on these data, we propose that CNBP may function as a nucleic acid chaperone through binding, remodeling, and stabilizing nucleic acids secondary structures. This novel CNBP biochemical activity broadens the field of study about its biological function and may be the basis to understand the diverse ways in which CNBP controls gene expression. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Nucleic acid nanomaterials: Silver-wired DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffinger, Pascal; Ennifar, Eric

    2017-10-01

    DNA double helical structures are supramolecular assemblies that are typically held together by classical Watson-Crick pairing. Now, nucleotide chelation of silver ions supports an extended silver-DNA hybrid duplex featuring an uninterrupted silver array.

  13. Comparison of the acetylation of proteins and nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Woon Ki; Kim, Sangduk

    1970-01-01

    The possibility of acetylation of nucleic acids was examined. Although protein is actively acetylated with [1-14C]acetic acid in rat liver systems in vivo and in vitro and in a frog liver system in vivo, nucleic acids are not acetylated under these conditions; nucleic acids purified from these sources are without radioactivity. Requirements for acetylation in vitro of protein in rat liver are different from those in frog liver; GSH has no effect in the rat liver system and is inhibitory in the frog liver system. Among various acetylated proteins, proteins insoluble in 0.1m-sulphuric acid have the highest radioactivity. PMID:5435491

  14. Fluorescent complexes of nucleic acids/8-hydroxyquinoline/lanthanum(III) and the fluorometry of nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Zhi Huang; Ke An Li; Shen Yang Tong

    1996-07-01

    The ternary fluorescent complexes of nucleic acids/8-hydroxyquinoline/lanthanum (III) were studied. Nucleic acids in the study involve natured and thermally denatured calf thymus DNA, fish sperm DNA and yeast RNA. In the range of PH 8.0-8.4 (controlled by NH{sub 3}-NH{sub 4}Cl buffer) ternary fluorescent complexes are formed which emit at 485.0 nm for calf thymus DNA and at 480.0 nm for fish sperm DNA when excited at 265.0 nm. Based on the fluorescence reactions sensitive fluorometric methods for nucleic acids were proposed. Using optimal conditions, the calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.4 --3.6 {mu}g{sup .}ml{sup -1} for calf thymus DNA, 0.4 -- 4.0 {mu}g{sup .}ml{sup -1} for fish sperm DNA and 0.4 --4.0{mu}g{sup .}ml{sup -1} for yeast RNA, respectively. Five synthetic samples were determined with satisfaction.

  15. Gamma Peptide Nucleic Acids: As Orthogonal Nucleic Acid Recognition Codes for Organizing Molecular Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Sacui, Iulia; Hsieh, Wei-Che; Manna, Arunava; Sahu, Bichismita; Ly, Danith H

    2015-07-08

    Nucleic acids are an attractive platform for organizing molecular self-assembly because of their specific nucleobase interactions and defined length scale. Routinely employed in the organization and assembly of materials in vitro, however, they have rarely been exploited in vivo, due to the concerns for enzymatic degradation and cross-hybridization with the host's genetic materials. Herein we report the development of a tight-binding, orthogonal, synthetically versatile, and informationally interfaced nucleic acid platform for programming molecular interactions, with implications for in vivo molecular assembly and computing. The system consists of three molecular entities: the right-handed and left-handed conformers and a nonhelical domain. The first two are orthogonal to each other in recognition, while the third is capable of binding to both, providing a means for interfacing the two conformers as well as the natural nucleic acid biopolymers (i.e., DNA and RNA). The three molecular entities are prepared from the same monomeric chemical scaffold, with the exception of the stereochemistry or lack thereof at the γ-backbone that determines if the corresponding oligo adopts a right-handed or left-handed helix, or a nonhelical motif. These conformers hybridize to each other with exquisite affinity, sequence selectivity, and level of orthogonality. Recognition modules as short as five nucleotides in length are capable of organizing molecular assembly.

  16. Characteristics of Cell-Penetrating Peptide/Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Margus, Helerin; Arukuusk, Piret; Langel, Ülo; Pooga, Margus

    2016-01-04

    Nucleic acids are highly promising candidates for the treatment of various genetic diseases. However, due to the large size and negative charge, nucleic acids are not efficiently taken up by cells, and thus, their clinical potential remains limited so far. Therefore, various delivery vehicles have been designed to assist the cellular uptake of nucleic acids. Among these, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have gained increasing popularity as efficient and nontoxic delivery vectors. CPPs can be coupled to nucleic acids either by covalent or noncovalent association. Noncovalent coupling, which is based on the formation of nanoparticle-like nanocomplexes (NP), has received much attention in recent years, and the number of studies employing the strategy is explosively increasing due to the high therapeutic potential. However, the properties of CPP/nucleic acid NPs have not been characterized in sufficient detail yet. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the size and morphology of nucleic acid nanoparticles with novel transfection peptides, PepFects (PFs) and NickFects (NFs), using negative staining transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In addition, we examined whether the attachment of fluorescence or (nano)gold label to nucleic acid affects the nanocomplex formation or its morphology. We demonstrated that transportan-10-based new generation CPPs from PF and NF families condense nucleic acids to NPs of homogeneous size and shape. The size and shape of assembled nanoparticles depend on the type of the complexed nucleic acid and the sequence of the used peptide, whereas the label on the nucleic acid does not influence the gross characteristics of formed NPs.

  17. Quantitative thermodynamic predication of interactions between nucleic acid and non-nucleic acid species using Microsoft excel.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jiaqi; Li, Na

    2013-09-01

    Proper design of nucleic acid sequences is crucial for many applications. We have previously established a thermodynamics-based quantitative model to help design aptamer-based nucleic acid probes by predicting equilibrium concentrations of all interacting species. To facilitate customization of this thermodynamic model for different applications, here we present a generic and easy-to-use platform to implement the algorithm of the model with Microsoft(®) Excel formulas and VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) macros. Two Excel spreadsheets have been developed: one for the applications involving only nucleic acid species, the other for the applications involving both nucleic acid and non-nucleic acid species. The spreadsheets take the nucleic acid sequences and the initial concentrations of all species as input, guide the user to retrieve the necessary thermodynamic constants, and finally calculate equilibrium concentrations for all species in various bound and unbound conformations. The validity of both spreadsheets has been verified by comparing the modeling results with the experimental results on nucleic acid sequences reported in the literature. This Excel-based platform described here will allow biomedical researchers to rationalize the sequence design of nucleic acid probes using the thermodynamics-based modeling even without relevant theoretical and computational skills. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Nucleic Acid Probe and Method for the Rapid Detection of Typhoid Fever Bacteria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This invention relates to a nucleic acid probe and method for the rapid detection of typhoid fever bacteria by use of a nucleic acid hybridization...a nucleic acid hybridization reaction with a clinical specimen containing typhoid fever bacteria.

  19. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E.; ...

    2014-09-10

    In this paper, we summarize recent progress in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insightsmore » gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed.« less

  20. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E.; Tan, Li Huey; Lu, Yi

    2014-09-10

    In this paper, we summarize recent progress in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insights gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed.

  1. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E.; Tan, Li Huey

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insights gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed. PMID:25205057

  2. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E; Tan, Li Huey; Lu, Yi

    2014-12-10

    In this review, we summarize recent progress in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insights gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed.

  3. Effect of Backbone Design on Hybridization Thermodynamics of Oligo-nucleic Acids: A Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Jayaraman, Arthi

    DNA hybridization is the basis of various bio-nano technologies, such as DNA origami and assembly of DNA-functionalized nanoparticles. A hybridized double stranded (ds) DNA is formed when complementary nucleobases on hybridizing strands exhibit specific and directional hydrogen bonds through canonical Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions. In recent years, the need for cheaper alternatives and significant synthetic advances have driven design of DNA mimics with new backbone chemistries. However, a fundamental understanding of how these backbone modifications in the oligo-nucleic acids impact the hybridization and melting behavior of the duplex is still lacking. In this talk, we present our recent findings on impact of varying backbone chemistry on hybridization of oligo-nucleic acid duplexes. We use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to isolate the effect of strand flexibility, electrostatic interactions and nucleobase spacing on the melting curves for duplexes with various strand sequences and concentrations. Since conjugation of oligo-nucleic acids with polymers serve as building blocks for thermo-responsive polymer networks and gels, we also present the effect of such conjugation on hybridization thermodynamics and polymer conformation.

  4. Computational Approaches to Nucleic Acid Origami.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Hosna; Aminpour, Maral; Montemagno, Carlo

    2015-10-12

    Recent advances in experimental DNA origami have dramatically expanded the horizon of DNA nanotechnology. Complex 3D suprastructures have been designed and developed using DNA origami with applications in biomaterial science, nanomedicine, nanorobotics, and molecular computation. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) origami has recently been realized as a new approach. Similar to DNA, RNA molecules can be designed to form complex 3D structures through complementary base pairings. RNA origami structures are, however, more compact and more thermodynamically stable due to RNA's non-canonical base pairing and tertiary interactions. With all these advantages, the development of RNA origami lags behind DNA origami by a large gap. Furthermore, although computational methods have proven to be effective in designing DNA and RNA origami structures and in their evaluation, advances in computational nucleic acid origami is even more limited. In this paper, we review major milestones in experimental and computational DNA and RNA origami and present current challenges in these fields. We believe collaboration between experimental nanotechnologists and computer scientists are critical for advancing these new research paradigms.

  5. Entrapment of nucleic acids in liposomes.

    PubMed

    Monnard, P A; Oberholzer, T; Luisi, P

    1997-10-02

    The entrapment efficiency of three main methods used in the literature for the encapsulation of nucleic acids in liposomes were studied using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) liposomes. In particular the reverse phase method, the dehydration/rehydration method, and the freeze/thawing method were compared to each other under standardised conditions, i.e. using in every case the same concentration of guest molecules (DNA, tRNA and ATP as low molecular weight analogue) and equally extruded liposomes. The percentage of entrapment strictly referred to the material localized inside the liposomes, i.e. particular care was devoted to ruling out the contribution of the nucleic acid material bound to the outer surface of the liposomes: this was eliminated by extensive enzymatic digestion prior to column chromatography. Depending on the conditions used, the percentage of the entrapped material varied between 10 and 54% of the initial amount. Further, the encapsulation efficiency was markedly affected by the salt concentration, by the size of liposomes, but to a lower degree by the molecular weight of the guest molecules. In general, we observed that the freeze/thawing encapsulation procedure was the most efficient one. In a second part of the work the freeze/thawing method was applied to encapsulate DNA (369 bp and 3368 bp, respectively) using liposomes obtained from POPC mixed with 1-10% charged cosurfactant, i.e. phosphatidylserine (PS) or didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), respectively. Whereas PS had no significant effect, the entrapment efficiency went up to 60% in POPC/DDAB (97.5:2.5) liposomes. The large entrapment efficiency of DNA permits spectroscopic investigations of the DNA encapsulated in the water pool of the liposomes. UV absorption and circular dichroism spectra were practically the same as in water, indicating no appreciable perturbation of the electronic transitions or of the conformation of the entrapped biopolymer. This was

  6. Nucleic acid-binding polymers as anti-inflammatory agents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaewoo; Sohn, Jang Wook; Zhang, Ying; Leong, Kam W.; Pisetsky, David; Sullenger, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Dead and dying cells release nucleic acids. These extracellular RNAs and DNAs can be taken up by inflammatory cells and activate multiple nucleic acid-sensing toll-like receptors (TLR3, 7, 8, and 9). The inappropriate activation of these TLRs can engender a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The redundancy of the TLR family encouraged us to seek materials that can neutralize the proinflammatory effects of any nucleic acid regardless of its sequence, structure or chemistry. Herein we demonstrate that certain nucleic acid-binding polymers can inhibit activation of all nucleic acid-sensing TLRs irrespective of whether they recognize ssRNA, dsRNA or hypomethylated DNA. Furthermore, systemic administration of such polymers can prevent fatal liver injury engendered by proinflammatory nucleic acids in an acute toxic shock model in mice. Therefore these polymers represent a novel class of anti-inflammatory agent that can act as molecular scavengers to neutralize the proinflammatory effects of various nucleic acids. PMID:21844380

  7. Cell-free fetal nucleic acids in amniotic fluid

    PubMed Central

    Hui, L.; Bianchi, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Research into cell-free fetal (cff) nucleic acids has primarily focused on maternal plasma; however, cff DNA and RNA are also detectable in other body fluids such as amniotic fluid (AF). In AF, cff DNA is present in much greater concentrations than in maternal plasma and represents a pure fetal sample uncontaminated by maternal- and trophoblast-derived nucleic acids. The aim of this review was to summarize the current knowledge on cff nucleic acids in AF and to outline future research directions. METHODS MEDLINE and PREMEDLINE were searched up to August 2010 for original investigations of cell-free RNA or DNA in AF. Sixteen studies were included in the review. RESULTS AF cff DNA represents a physiologically separate pool from cff DNA in maternal plasma. The placenta is not a major source of nucleic acids in AF. It is feasible to isolate cff nucleic acids from small volumes of discarded AF supernatant in sufficient quality and quantity to perform microarray studies and downstream applications such as pathway analysis. This ‘discovery-driven approach’ has resulted in new information on the pathogenesis of Down syndrome and polyhydramnios. There is otherwise a paucity of information relating to the basic biology and clinical applications of cff nucleic acids in AF. CONCLUSIONS AF supernatant is a valuable and widely available but under-utilized biological resource. Further studies of cff nucleic acids in AF may lead to new insights into human fetal development and ultimately new approaches to antenatal treatment of human disease. PMID:20923874

  8. ATR-IR spectroscopy as applied to nucleic acid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanyugin, Andriy V.; Samijlenko, Svitlana P.; Martynenko, Olena I.; Hovorun, Dmytro M.

    2005-07-01

    For the first time the ATR technique was applied to obtain IR absorption spectra of DNA and RNA dry films. There was worked out procedure of the nucleic acid removal from germanium plate, which obviously was a main obstacle to application of ATR-IR spectroscopy to nucleic acids. This technique of IR spectroscopy was applied to confirmation of RNA tropism of aurin tricarboxylic acid observed by molecular biological methods.

  9. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  10. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2006-07-04

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  11. Nucleic acid detection system and method for detecting influenza

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Hong; Song, Jian

    2015-03-17

    The invention provides a rapid, sensitive and specific nucleic acid detection system which utilizes isothermal nucleic acid amplification in combination with a lateral flow chromatographic device, or DNA dipstick, for DNA-hybridization detection. The system of the invention requires no complex instrumentation or electronic hardware, and provides a low cost nucleic acid detection system suitable for highly sensitive pathogen detection. Hybridization to single-stranded DNA amplification products using the system of the invention provides a sensitive and specific means by which assays can be multiplexed for the detection of multiple target sequences.

  12. Lateral flow biosensors for the detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingwen; Lie, Puchang; Fang, Zhiyuan; Xiao, Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    The detection of nucleic acid is of central importance for the diagnosis of genetic diseases, infectious agents, and biowarfare agents. Traditional strategies and technologies for nucleic acid detection are time-consuming and labor-intensive. Recently, isothermal strand-displacement reaction-based lateral flow biosensors have attracted a great deal of research interest because they are sensitive, simple, fast, and easy to use. Here, we describe a lateral flow biosensor based on isothermal strand-displacement polymerase reaction and gold nanoparticles for the visual detection of nucleic acid.

  13. Properties of nucleic acid staining dyes used in gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Haines, Alicia M; Tobe, Shanan S; Kobus, Hilton J; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    Nucleic acid staining dyes are used for detecting nucleic acids in electrophoresis gels. Historically, the most common dye used for gel staining is ethidium bromide, however due to its toxicity and mutagenicity other dyes that are safer to the user and the environment are preferred. This Short Communication details the properties of dyes now available and their sensitivity for detection of DNA and their ability to permeate the cell membrane. It was found that GelRed™ was the most sensitive and safest dye to use with UV light excitation, and both GelGreen™ and Diamond™ Nucleic Acid Dye were sensitive and the safer dyes using blue light excitation.

  14. In vitro selection of functional nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. S.; Szostak, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    In vitro selection allows rare functional RNA or DNA molecules to be isolated from pools of over 10(15) different sequences. This approach has been used to identify RNA and DNA ligands for numerous small molecules, and recent three-dimensional structure solutions have revealed the basis for ligand recognition in several cases. By selecting high-affinity and -specificity nucleic acid ligands for proteins, promising new therapeutic and diagnostic reagents have been identified. Selection experiments have also been carried out to identify ribozymes that catalyze a variety of chemical transformations, including RNA cleavage, ligation, and synthesis, as well as alkylation and acyl-transfer reactions and N-glycosidic and peptide bond formation. The existence of such RNA enzymes supports the notion that ribozymes could have directed a primitive metabolism before the evolution of protein synthesis. New in vitro protein selection techniques should allow for a direct comparison of the frequency of ligand binding and catalytic structures in pools of random sequence polynucleotides versus polypeptides.

  15. In vitro selection of functional nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. S.; Szostak, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    In vitro selection allows rare functional RNA or DNA molecules to be isolated from pools of over 10(15) different sequences. This approach has been used to identify RNA and DNA ligands for numerous small molecules, and recent three-dimensional structure solutions have revealed the basis for ligand recognition in several cases. By selecting high-affinity and -specificity nucleic acid ligands for proteins, promising new therapeutic and diagnostic reagents have been identified. Selection experiments have also been carried out to identify ribozymes that catalyze a variety of chemical transformations, including RNA cleavage, ligation, and synthesis, as well as alkylation and acyl-transfer reactions and N-glycosidic and peptide bond formation. The existence of such RNA enzymes supports the notion that ribozymes could have directed a primitive metabolism before the evolution of protein synthesis. New in vitro protein selection techniques should allow for a direct comparison of the frequency of ligand binding and catalytic structures in pools of random sequence polynucleotides versus polypeptides.

  16. Continuously tunable nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lucia R; Wang, Juexiao Sherry; Fang, John Z; Evans, Emily R; Pinto, Alessandro; Pekker, Irena; Boykin, Richard; Ngouenet, Celine; Webster, Philippa J; Beechem, Joseph; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-12-01

    In silico-designed nucleic acid probes and primers often do not achieve favorable specificity and sensitivity tradeoffs on the first try, and iterative empirical sequence-based optimization is needed, particularly in multiplexed assays. We present a novel, on-the-fly method of tuning probe affinity and selectivity by adjusting the stoichiometry of auxiliary species, which allows for independent and decoupled adjustment of the hybridization yield for different probes in multiplexed assays. Using this method, we achieved near-continuous tuning of probe effective free energy. To demonstrate our approach, we enforced uniform capture efficiency of 31 DNA molecules (GC content, 0-100%), maximized the signal difference for 11 pairs of single-nucleotide variants and performed tunable hybrid capture of mRNA from total RNA. Using the Nanostring nCounter platform, we applied stoichiometric tuning to simultaneously adjust yields for a 24-plex assay, and we show multiplexed quantitation of RNA sequences and variants from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples.

  17. Fluorescent hybridization probes for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Ju, Jingyue; Turro, Nicholas J

    2012-04-01

    Due to their high sensitivity and selectivity, minimum interference with living biological systems, and ease of design and synthesis, fluorescent hybridization probes have been widely used to detect nucleic acids both in vivo and in vitro. Molecular beacons (MBs) and binary probes (BPs) are two very important hybridization probes that are designed based on well-established photophysical principles. These probes have shown particular applicability in a variety of studies, such as mRNA tracking, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) monitoring, and microorganism identification. Molecular beacons are hairpin oligonucleotide probes that present distinctive fluorescent signatures in the presence and absence of their target. Binary probes consist of two fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide strands that can hybridize to adjacent regions of their target and generate distinctive fluorescence signals. These probes have been extensively studied and modified for different applications by modulating their structures or using various combinations of fluorophores, excimer-forming molecules, and metal complexes. This review describes the applicability and advantages of various hybridization probes that utilize novel and creative design to enhance their target detection sensitivity and specificity.

  18. Selenium Derivatization of Nucleic Acids for Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang,J.; Sheng, J.; Carrasco, N.; Huang, Z.

    2007-01-01

    The high-resolution structure of the DNA (5'-GTGTACA-C-3') with the selenium derivatization at the 2'-position of T2 was determined via MAD and SAD phasing. The selenium-derivatized structure (1.28 {angstrom} resolution) with the 2'-Se modification in the minor groove is isomorphorous to the native structure (2.0 {angstrom}). To directly compare with the conventional bromine derivatization, we incorporated bromine into the 5-postion of T4, determined the bromine-derivatized DNA structure at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution, and found that the local backbone torsion angles and solvent hydration patterns were altered in the structure with the Br incorporation in the major groove. Furthermore, while the native and Br-derivatized DNAs needed over a week to form reasonable-size crystals, we observed that the Se-derivatized DNAs grew crystals overnight with high-diffraction quality, suggesting that the Se derivatization facilitated the crystal formation. In addition, the Se-derivatized DNA sequences crystallized under a broader range of buffer conditions, and generally had a faster crystal growth rate. Our experimental results indicate that the selenium derivatization of DNAs may facilitate the determination of nucleic acid X-ray crystal structures in phasing and high-quality crystal growth. In addition, our results suggest that the Se derivatization can be an alternative to the conventional Br derivatization.

  19. NAPP: the Nucleic Acid Phylogenetic Profile Database.

    PubMed

    Ott, Alban; Idali, Anouar; Marchais, Antonin; Gautheret, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acid phylogenetic profiling (NAPP) classifies coding and non-coding sequences in a genome according to their pattern of conservation across other genomes. This procedure efficiently distinguishes clusters of functional non-coding elements in bacteria, particularly small RNAs and cis-regulatory RNAs, from other conserved sequences. In contrast to other non-coding RNA detection pipelines, NAPP does not require the presence of conserved RNA secondary structure and therefore is likely to identify previously undetected RNA genes or elements. Furthermore, as NAPP clusters contain both coding and non-coding sequences with similar occurrence profiles, they can be analyzed under a functional perspective. We recently improved the NAPP pipeline and applied it to a collection of 949 bacterial and 68 archaeal species. The database and web interface available at http://napp.u-psud.fr/ enable detailed analysis of NAPP clusters enriched in non-coding RNAs, graphical display of phylogenetic profiles, visualization of predicted RNAs in their genome context and extraction of predicted RNAs for use with genome browsers or other software.

  20. NAPP: the Nucleic Acid Phylogenetic Profile Database

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Alban; Idali, Anouar; Marchais, Antonin; Gautheret, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acid phylogenetic profiling (NAPP) classifies coding and non-coding sequences in a genome according to their pattern of conservation across other genomes. This procedure efficiently distinguishes clusters of functional non-coding elements in bacteria, particularly small RNAs and cis-regulatory RNAs, from other conserved sequences. In contrast to other non-coding RNA detection pipelines, NAPP does not require the presence of conserved RNA secondary structure and therefore is likely to identify previously undetected RNA genes or elements. Furthermore, as NAPP clusters contain both coding and non-coding sequences with similar occurrence profiles, they can be analyzed under a functional perspective. We recently improved the NAPP pipeline and applied it to a collection of 949 bacterial and 68 archaeal species. The database and web interface available at http://napp.u-psud.fr/ enable detailed analysis of NAPP clusters enriched in non-coding RNAs, graphical display of phylogenetic profiles, visualization of predicted RNAs in their genome context and extraction of predicted RNAs for use with genome browsers or other software. PMID:21984475

  1. Continuously Tunable Nucleic Acid Hybridization Probes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lucia R.; Wang, J. Sherry; Fang, John Z.; Reiser, Emily; Pinto, Alessandro; Pekker, Irena; Boykin, Richard; Ngouenet, Celine; Webster, Philippa J.; Beechem, Joseph; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-01-01

    In silico designed nucleic acid probes and primers often fail to achieve favorable specificity and sensitivity tradeoffs on the first try, and iterative empirical sequence-based optimization is needed, particularly in multiplexed assays. Here, we present a novel, on-the-fly method of tuning probe affinity and selectivity via the stoichiometry of auxiliary species, allowing independent and decoupled adjustment of hybridization yield for different probes in multiplexed assays. Using this method, we achieve near-continuous tuning of probe effective free energy (0.03 kcal·mol−1 granularity). As applications, we enforced uniform capture efficiency of 31 DNA molecules (GC content 0% – 100%), maximized signal difference for 11 pairs of single nucleotide variants, and performed tunable hybrid-capture of mRNA from total RNA. Using the Nanostring nCounter platform, we applied stoichiometric tuning to simultaneously adjust yields for a 24-plex assay, and we show multiplexed quantitation of RNA sequences and variants from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples (FFPE). PMID:26480474

  2. Nucleic Acid Amplification Testing for Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, David M.; Tapsall, John W.; Sloots, Theo P.

    2006-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) for the detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae became available in the early 1990s. Although offering several advantages over traditional detection methods, N. gonorrhoeae NAATs do have some limitations. These include cost, risk of carryover contamination, inhibition, and inability to provide antibiotic resistance data. In addition, there are sequence-related limitations that are unique to N. gonorrhoeae NAATs. In particular, false-positive results are a major consideration. These primarily stem from the frequent horizontal genetic exchange occurring within the Neisseria genus, leading to commensal Neisseria species acquiring N. gonorrhoeae genes. Furthermore, some N. gonorrhoeae subtypes may lack specific sequences targeted by a particular NAAT. Therefore, NAAT false-negative results because of sequence variation may occur in some gonococcal populations. Overall, the N. gonorrhoeae species continues to present a considerable challenge for molecular diagnostics. The need to evaluate N. gonorrhoeae NAATs before their use in any new patient population and to educate physicians on the limitations of these tests is emphasized in this review. PMID:16436629

  3. Synthesis and optical properties of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid carrying a clicked Nile red label.

    PubMed

    Yotapan, Nattawut; Charoenpakdee, Chayan; Wathanathavorn, Pawinee; Ditmangklo, Boonsong; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2014-01-01

    DNA or its analogues with an environment-sensitive fluorescent label are potentially useful as a probe for studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids. In this work, pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA) was labeled at its backbone with Nile red, a solvatochromic benzophenoxazine dye, by means of click chemistry. The optical properties of the Nile red-labeled acpcPNA were investigated by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy in the absence and in the presence of DNA. In contrast to the usual quenching observed in Nile red-labeled DNA, the hybridization with DNA resulted in blue shifting and an enhanced fluorescence regardless of the neighboring bases. More pronounced blue shifts and fluorescence enhancements were observed when the DNA target carried a base insertion in close proximity to the Nile red label. The results indicate that the Nile red label is located in a more hydrophobic environment in acpcPNA-DNA duplexes than in the single-stranded acpcPNA. The different fluorescence properties of the acpcPNA hybrids of complementary DNA and DNA carrying a base insertion are suggestive of different interactions between the Nile red label and the duplexes.

  4. Synthesis and optical properties of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid carrying a clicked Nile red label

    PubMed Central

    Yotapan, Nattawut; Charoenpakdee, Chayan; Wathanathavorn, Pawinee; Ditmangklo, Boonsong

    2014-01-01

    Summary DNA or its analogues with an environment-sensitive fluorescent label are potentially useful as a probe for studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids. In this work, pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA) was labeled at its backbone with Nile red, a solvatochromic benzophenoxazine dye, by means of click chemistry. The optical properties of the Nile red-labeled acpcPNA were investigated by UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy in the absence and in the presence of DNA. In contrast to the usual quenching observed in Nile red-labeled DNA, the hybridization with DNA resulted in blue shifting and an enhanced fluorescence regardless of the neighboring bases. More pronounced blue shifts and fluorescence enhancements were observed when the DNA target carried a base insertion in close proximity to the Nile red label. The results indicate that the Nile red label is located in a more hydrophobic environment in acpcPNA–DNA duplexes than in the single-stranded acpcPNA. The different fluorescence properties of the acpcPNA hybrids of complementary DNA and DNA carrying a base insertion are suggestive of different interactions between the Nile red label and the duplexes. PMID:25246975

  5. Nucleic Acid Conjugated Nanomaterials for Enhanced Molecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Ronghua; Yang, Liu; Tan, Weihong

    2009-01-01

    Nucleic acids, whether designed or selected in vitro, play important roles in biosensing, medical diagnostics and therapy. Specifically, the conjugation of functional nucleic acid-based probe molecules and nanomaterials has resulted in an unprecedented improvement in the field of molecular recognition. With their unique physical and chemical properties, nanomaterials facilitate the sensing process and amplify the signal of recognition events. Thus, the coupling of nucleic acids with various nanomaterials opens up a promising future for molecular recognition. The literature offers a broad spectrum of recent advances in biosensing by employing different nano-platforms with designed nucleic acids, especially gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, silica nanoparticles and quantum dots. The advantages of these novel combinations are discussed from the perspective of molecular recognition in chemistry, biology and medicine, along with the problems confronting future applications. PMID:19658387

  6. Flexibility of nucleic acids: From DNA to RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Bao; Xi, Zhang; Lei, Jin; Zhi-Jie, Tan

    2016-01-01

    The structural flexibility of nucleic acids plays a key role in many fundamental life processes, such as gene replication and expression, DNA-protein recognition, and gene regulation. To obtain a thorough understanding of nucleic acid flexibility, extensive studies have been performed using various experimental methods and theoretical models. In this review, we will introduce the progress that has been made in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids including DNAs and RNAs, and will emphasize the experimental findings and the effects of salt, temperature, and sequence. Finally, we will discuss the major unanswered questions in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB933600), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175132, 11575128, and 11374234), and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents, China (Grant No. NCET 08-0408).

  7. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  8. Chemical processes induced by OH attack on nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwabara, Mikinori

    Recent studies concerning the chemical processes in nucleic acids starting with OH attack to produce free radicals and ending with the formation of stable products were reviewed. Using nucleosides, nucleotides and homopolynucleotides as model compounds, and DNA itself, free radicals produced by OH attack on nucleic acids have been mainly studied by a method combining ESR, spin trapping and high-performance liquid chromatography. For identification of final products in both base and sugar moieties of nucleic acids, mass and NMR spectroscopies combined with gas chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography are usually employed. Kinetic measurements of structural alterations in the polynucleotides and DNA after OH attack have been made by a method combining electron-pulse irradiation and laser-light scattering. From these studies, the chemical reaction processes from the generation of free radicals in nucleic acids by OH attack, through the formation of unstable intermediates, to the formation of final products can be described.

  9. Changes of nucleic acids of wheat seedlings under spaceflight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sytnyk, K. M.; Musatenko, L. I.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of space flight on the growth of wheat seedlings and their nucleic acid content were studied. It was shown that both space and ground seedlings have almost the same appearance, dry weight and nucleic acid content in the root, coleoptile and leaves. The only difference found is in the RNA and DNA content, which is twice as much in the ground seedling apices as in the space-grown seedlings.

  10. Nucleic Acid Delivery for Endothelial Dysfunction in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Dipti; Janero, David R.; Segura-Ibarra, Victor; Blanco, Elvin; Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple cardiovascular diseases and involves components of both innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Identifying signature patterns and targets associated with endothelial dysfunction can help in the development of novel nanotherapeutic platforms for treatment of vascular diseases. This review discusses nucleic acid-based regulation of endothelial function and the different nucleic acid-based nanotherapeutic approaches designed to target endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular disorders. PMID:27826366

  11. Molecular beacons: nucleic acid hybridization and emerging applications.

    PubMed

    Antony, T; Subramaniam, V

    2001-12-01

    Molecular beacons (MBs) are a novel class of nucleic acid probes that become fluorescent when bound to a complementary sequence. Because of this characteristic, coupled with the sequence specificity of nucleic acid hybridization and the sensitivity of fluorescence techniques, MBs are very useful probes for a variety of applications requiring the detection of DNA or RNA. We survey various applications of MBs, including the monitoring of DNA triplex formation, and describe recent developments in MB design that enhance their sensitivity.

  12. Nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Mo, Liuting; Li, Juan; Liu, Qiaoling; Qiu, Liping; Tan, Weihong

    2017-03-15

    In clinical diagnostics, as well as food and environmental safety practices, biosensors are powerful tools for monitoring biological or biochemical processes. Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal nanomaterials, including transition metal chalcogenides (TMCs) and transition metal oxides (TMOs), are receiving growing interest for their use in biosensing applications based on such unique properties as high surface area and fluorescence quenching abilities. Meanwhile, nucleic acid probes based on Watson-Crick base-pairing rules are also being widely applied in biosensing based on their excellent recognition capability. In particular, the emergence of functional nucleic acids in the 1980s, especially aptamers, has substantially extended the recognition capability of nucleic acids to various targets, ranging from small organic molecules and metal ions to proteins and cells. Based on π-π stacking interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids, biosensing systems can be easily assembled. Therefore, the combination of 2D transition metal nanomaterials and nucleic acids brings intriguing opportunities in bioanalysis and biomedicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets in biosensing applications. The structure and properties of 2D transition metal nanomaterials are first discussed, emphasizing the interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids. Then, the applications of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheet-based biosensors are discussed in the context of different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical and electrochemical approaches. Finally, we provide our perspectives on the current challenges and opportunities in this promising field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Digital PCR analysis of circulating nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Hudecova, Irena

    2015-10-01

    Detection of plasma circulating nucleic acids (CNAs) requires the use of extremely sensitive and precise methods. The commonly used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) poses certain technical limitations in relation to the precise measurement of CNAs whereas the costs of massively parallel sequencing are still relatively high. Digital PCR (dPCR) now represents an affordable and powerful single molecule counting strategy to detect minute amounts of genetic material with performance surpassing many quantitative methods. Microfluidic (chip) and emulsion (droplet)-based technologies have already been integrated into platforms offering hundreds to millions of nanoliter- or even picoliter-scale reaction partitions. The compelling observations reported in the field of cancer research, prenatal testing, transplantation medicine and virology support translation of this technology into routine use. Extremely sensitive plasma detection of rare mutations originating from tumor or placental cells among a large background of homologous sequences facilitates unraveling of the early stages of cancer or the detection of fetal mutations. Digital measurement of quantitative changes in plasma CNAs associated with cancer or graft rejection provides valuable information on the monitoring of disease burden or the recipient's immune response and subsequent therapy treatment. Furthermore, careful quantitative assessment of the viral load offers great value for effective monitoring of antiviral therapy for immunosuppressed or transplant patients. The present review describes the inherent features of dPCR that make it exceptionally robust in precise and sensitive quantification of CNAs. Moreover, I provide an insight into the types of potential clinical applications that have been developed by researchers to date.

  14. Non-viral nucleic acid containing nanoparticles as cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kozielski, Kristen L.; Rui, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The delivery of nucleic acids such as DNA and short interfering RNA (siRNA) is promising for the treatment of many diseases, including cancer, by enabling novel biological mechanisms of action. Non-viral nanoparticles are a promising class of nucleic acid carriers that can be designed to be safer and more versatile than traditional viral vectors. Areas covered In this review, recent advances in the intracellular delivery of DNA and siRNA are described with a focus on non-viral nanoparticle-based delivery methods. Material properties that have enabled successful delivery are discussed as well as applications that have directly been applied to cancer therapy. Strategies to co-deliver different nucleic acids are highlighted, as are novel targets for nucleic acid co-delivery. Expert opinion The treatment of complex genetically-based diseases such as cancer can be enabled by safe and effective intracellular delivery of multiple nucleic acids. Non-viral nanoparticles can be fabricated to deliver multiple nucleic acids to the same cell simultaneously to prevent tumor cells from easily compensating for the knockdown or overexpression of one genetic target. The continued innovation of new therapeutic modalities and non-viral nanotechnologies to provide target-specific and personalized forms of gene therapy hold promise for genetic medicine to treat diseases like cancer in the clinic. PMID:27248202

  15. Scavenging nucleic acid debris to combat autoimmunity and infectious disease

    PubMed Central

    Holl, Eda K.; Shumansky, Kara L.; Borst, Luke B.; Burnette, Angela D.; Sample, Christopher J.; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A.; Sullenger, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid-containing debris released from dead and dying cells can be recognized as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or pattern-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by the innate immune system. Inappropriate activation of the innate immune response can engender pathological inflammation and autoimmune disease. To combat such diseases, major efforts have been made to therapeutically target the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize such DAMPs and PAMPs, or the downstream effector molecules they engender, to limit inflammation. Unfortunately, such strategies can limit the ability of the immune system to combat infection. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleic acid-binding polymers can act as molecular scavengers and limit the ability of artificial nucleic acid ligands to activate PRRs. Herein, we demonstrate that nucleic acid scavengers (NASs) can limit pathological inflammation and nucleic acid-associated autoimmunity in lupus-prone mice. Moreover, we observe that such NASs do not limit an animal’s ability to combat viral infection, but rather their administration improves survival when animals are challenged with lethal doses of influenza. These results indicate that molecules that scavenge extracellular nucleic acid debris represent potentially safer agents to control pathological inflammation associated with a wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases. PMID:27528673

  16. Scavenging nucleic acid debris to combat autoimmunity and infectious disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, Eda K.; Shumansky, Kara L.; Borst, Luke B.; Burnette, Angela D.; Sample, Christopher J.; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A.; Sullenger, Bruce A.

    2016-08-01

    Nucleic acid-containing debris released from dead and dying cells can be recognized as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or pattern-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by the innate immune system. Inappropriate activation of the innate immune response can engender pathological inflammation and autoimmune disease. To combat such diseases, major efforts have been made to therapeutically target the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize such DAMPs and PAMPs, or the downstream effector molecules they engender, to limit inflammation. Unfortunately, such strategies can limit the ability of the immune system to combat infection. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleic acid-binding polymers can act as molecular scavengers and limit the ability of artificial nucleic acid ligands to activate PRRs. Herein, we demonstrate that nucleic acid scavengers (NASs) can limit pathological inflammation and nucleic acid-associated autoimmunity in lupus-prone mice. Moreover, we observe that such NASs do not limit an animal’s ability to combat viral infection, but rather their administration improves survival when animals are challenged with lethal doses of influenza. These results indicate that molecules that scavenge extracellular nucleic acid debris represent potentially safer agents to control pathological inflammation associated with a wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases.

  17. Bioanalytical applications of isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huimin; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The most popular in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques like polymerase chain reaction (PCR) including real-time PCR are costly and require thermocycling, rendering them unsuitable for uses at point-of-care. Highly efficient in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques using simple, portable and low-cost instruments are crucial in disease diagnosis, mutation detection and biodefense. Toward this goal, isothermal amplification techniques that represent a group of attractive in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques for bioanalysis have been developed. Unlike PCR where polymerases are easily deactivated by thermally labile constituents in a sample, some of the isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques, such as helicase-dependent amplification and nucleic acid sequence-based amplification, enable the detection of bioanalytes with much simplified protocols and with minimal sample preparations since the entire amplification processes are performed isothermally. This review focuses on the isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques and their applications in bioanalytical chemistry. Starting off from their amplification mechanisms and significant properties, the adoption of isothermal amplification techniques in bioanalytical chemistry and their future perspectives are discussed. Representative examples illustrating the performance and advantages of each isothermal amplification technique are discussed along with some discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of each technique.

  18. Sensors of Infection: Viral Nucleic Acid PRRs in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Poynter, Sarah; Lisser, Graeme; Monjo, Andrea; DeWitte-Orr, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Viruses produce nucleic acids during their replication, either during genomic replication or transcription. These nucleic acids are present in the cytoplasm or endosome of an infected cell, or in the extracellular space to be sensed by neighboring cells during lytic infections. Cells have mechanisms of sensing virus-generated nucleic acids; these nucleic acids act as flags to the cell, indicating an infection requiring defense mechanisms. The viral nucleic acids are called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and the sensors that bind them are called pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). This review article focuses on the most recent findings regarding nucleic acids PRRs in fish, including: Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), cytoplasmic DNA sensors (CDSs) and class A scavenger receptors (SR-As). It also discusses what is currently known of the downstream signaling molecules for each PRR family and the resulting antiviral response, either type I interferons (IFNs) or pro-inflammatory cytokine production. The review highlights what is known but also defines what still requires elucidation in this economically important animal. Understanding innate immune systems to virus infections will aid in the development of better antiviral therapies and vaccines for the future. PMID:26184332

  19. Non-viral nucleic acid containing nanoparticles as cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kozielski, Kristen L; Rui, Yuan; Green, Jordan J

    2016-10-01

    The delivery of nucleic acids such as DNA and short interfering RNA (siRNA) is promising for the treatment of many diseases, including cancer, by enabling novel biological mechanisms of action. Non-viral nanoparticles are a promising class of nucleic acid carriers that can be designed to be safer and more versatile than traditional viral vectors. In this review, recent advances in the intracellular delivery of DNA and siRNA are described with a focus on non-viral nanoparticle-based delivery methods. Material properties that have enabled successful delivery are discussed as well as applications that have directly been applied to cancer therapy. Strategies to co-deliver different nucleic acids are highlighted, as are novel targets for nucleic acid co-delivery. The treatment of complex genetically-based diseases such as cancer can be enabled by safe and effective intracellular delivery of multiple nucleic acids. Non-viral nanoparticles can be fabricated to deliver multiple nucleic acids to the same cell simultaneously to prevent tumor cells from easily compensating for the knockdown or overexpression of one genetic target. The continued innovation of new therapeutic modalities and non-viral nanotechnologies to provide target-specific and personalized forms of gene therapy hold promise for genetic medicine to treat diseases like cancer in the clinic.

  20. Nucleic acid in-situ hybridization detection of infectious agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Curtis T.

    2000-04-01

    Limitations of traditional culture methods and newer polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection and speciation of infectious agents demonstrate the need for more rapid and better diagnostics. Nucleic acid hybridization is a detection technology that has gained wide acceptance in cancer and prenatal cytogenetics. Using a modification of the nucleic acid hybridization technique known as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, infectious agents can be detected in a variety of specimens with high sensitivity and specificity. The specimens derive from all types of human and animal sources including body fluids, tissue aspirates and biopsy material. Nucleic acid hybridization can be performed in less than one hour. The result can be interpreted either using traditional fluorescence microscopy or automated platforms such as micro arrays. This paper demonstrates proof of concept for nucleic acid hybridization detection of different infectious agents. Interpretation within a cytologic and histologic context is possible with fluorescence microscopic analysis, thereby providing confirmatory evidence of hybridization. With careful probe selection, nucleic acid hybridization promises to be a highly sensitive and specific practical diagnostic alternative to culture, traditional staining methods, immunohistochemistry and complicated nucleic acid amplification tests.

  1. Superior structure stability and selectivity of hairpin nucleic acid probes with an l-DNA stem

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngmi; Yang, Chaoyong James; Tan, Weihong

    2007-01-01

    Hairpin nucleic acid probes have been highly useful in many areas, especially for intracellular and in vitro nucleic acid detection. The success of these probes can be attributed to the ease with which their conformational change upon target binding can be coupled to a variety of signal transduction mechanisms. However, false-positive signals arise from the opening of the hairpin due mainly to thermal fluctuations and stem invasions. Stem invasions occur when the stem interacts with its complementary sequence and are especially problematic in complex biological samples. To address the problem of stem invasions in hairpin probes, we have created a modified molecular beacon that incorporates unnatural enantiomeric l-DNA in the stem and natural d-DNA or 2′-O-Me-modified RNA in the loop. l-DNA has the same physical characteristics as d-DNA except that l-DNA cannot form stable duplexes with d-DNA. Here we show that incorporating l-DNA into the stem region of a molecular beacon reduces intra- and intermolecular stem invasions, increases the melting temperature, improves selectivity to its target, and leads to enhanced bio-stability. Our results suggest that l-DNA is useful for designing functional nucleic acid probes especially for biological applications. PMID:17959649

  2. Terbium fluorescence as a sensitive, inexpensive probe for UV-induced damage in nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    El-Yazbi, Amira F; Loppnow, Glen R

    2013-07-05

    Much effort has been focused on developing methods for detecting damaged nucleic acids. However, almost all of the proposed methods consist of multi-step procedures, are limited, require expensive instruments, or suffer from a high level of interferences. In this paper, we present a novel simple, inexpensive, mix-and-read assay that is generally applicable to nucleic acid damage and uses the enhanced luminescence due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to terbium(III) (Tb(3+)). Single-stranded oligonucleotides greatly enhance the Tb(3+) emission, but duplex DNA does not. With the use of a DNA hairpin probe complementary to the oligonucleotide of interest, the Tb(3+)/hairpin probe is applied to detect ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage. The hairpin probe hybridizes only with the undamaged DNA. However, the damaged DNA remains single-stranded and enhances the intrinsic fluorescence of Tb(3+), producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of DNA damage. This allows the Tb(3+)/hairpin probe to be used for sensitive quantification of UV-induced DNA damage. The Tb(3+)/hairpin probe showed superior selectivity to DNA damage compared to conventional molecular beacons probes (MBs) and its sensitivity is more than 2.5 times higher than MBs with a limit of detection of 4.36±1.2 nM. In addition, this probe is easier to synthesize and more than eight times cheaper than MBs, which makes its use recommended for high-throughput, quantitative analysis of DNA damage.

  3. A new class of homogeneous nucleic acid probes based on specific displacement hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingge; Luan, Guoyan; Guo, Qiuping; Liang, Jixuan

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new class of probes for homogeneous nucleic acid detection based on the proposed displacement hybridization. Our probes consist of two complementary oligodeoxyribonucleotides of different length labeled with a fluorophore and a quencher in close proximity in the duplex. The probes on their own are quenched, but they become fluorescent upon displacement hybridization with the target. These probes display complete discrimination between a perfectly matched target and single nucleotide mismatch targets. A comparison of double-stranded probes with corresponding linear probes confirms that the presence of the complementary strand significantly enhances their specificity. Using four such probes labeled with different color fluorophores, each designed to recognize a different target, we have demonstrated that multiple targets can be distinguished in the same solution, even if they differ from one another by as little as a single nucleotide. Double-stranded probes were used in real-time nucleic acid amplifications as either probes or as primers. In addition to its extreme specificity and flexibility, the new class of probes is simple to design and synthesize, has low cost and high sensitivity and is accessible to a wide range of labels. This class of probes should find applications in a variety of areas wherever high specificity of nucleic acid hybridization is relevant. PMID:11788731

  4. Oligonucleoside alkyl or arylphosphonate derivatives capable of crosslinking with or cleaving nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Paul S.; Ts'o, Paul O.P.

    1999-06-15

    A composition for inactivating a target nucleic acid which comprises an oligonucleoside alkyl or arylphosphonate analogue which is complementary to the sequence of the target nucleic acid and includes a functional group which reacts with the target nucleic acid to render the target nucleic acid inactive or nonfunctional.

  5. Oligonucleoside alkyl or arylphosphonate derivatives capable of crosslinking with or cleaving nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Miller, P.S.; Ts'o, P.O.P.

    1999-06-15

    A composition for inactivating a target nucleic acid which comprises an oligonucleoside alkyl or arylphosphonate analogue which is complementary to the sequence of the target nucleic acid is provided. It includes a functional group which reacts with the target nucleic acid to render the target nucleic acid inactive or nonfunctional. 16 figs.

  6. Sodium sulphite inhibition of potato and cherry polyphenolics in nucleic acid extraction for virus detection by RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Nie, X; Singh, M; Coffin, R; Duplessis, P

    2002-01-01

    Phenolic compounds from plant tissues inhibit reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Multiple-step protocols using several additives to inhibit polyphenolic compounds during nucleic acid extraction are common, but time consuming and laborious. The current research highlights that the inclusion of 0.65 to 0.70% of sodium sulphite in the extraction buffer minimizes the pigmentation of nucleic acid extracts and improves the RT-PCR detection of Potato virus Y (PVY) and Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers and Prune dwarf virus (PDV) and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) in leaves and bark in the sweet cherry (Prunus avium) tree. Substituting sodium sulphite in the nucleic acid extraction buffer eliminated the use of proteinase K during extraction. Reagents phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-Tween 20 and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were also no longer required during RT or PCR phase. The resultant nucleic acid extracts were suitable for both duplex and multiplex RT-PCR. This simple and less expensive nucleic acid extraction protocol has proved very effective for potato cv. Russet Norkotah, which contains a high amount of polyphenolics. Comparing commercially available RNA extraction kits (Catrimox and RNeasy), the sodium sulphite based extraction protocol yielded two to three times higher amounts of RNA, while maintaining comparable virus detection by RT-PCR. The sodium sulphite based extraction protocol was equally effective in potato tubers, and in leaves and bark from the cherry tree.

  7. Effects of hypoxanthine substitution in peptide nucleic acids targeting KRAS2 oncogenic mRNA molecules: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Jeffrey M; Wampole, Matthew E; Chen, Chang-Po; Sethi, Dalip; Singh, Amrita; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Wang, Fan; Gray, Brian D; Thakur, Mathew L; Wickstrom, Eric

    2013-10-03

    Genetic disorders can arise from single base substitutions in a single gene. A single base substitution for wild type guanine in the twelfth codon of KRAS2 mRNA occurs frequently to initiate lung, pancreatic, and colon cancer. We have observed single base mismatch specificity in radioimaging of mutant KRAS2 mRNA in tumors in mice by in vivo hybridization with radiolabeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) dodecamers. We hypothesized that multimutant specificity could be achieved with a PNA dodecamer incorporating hypoxanthine, which can form Watson-Crick base pairs with adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we show that hypoxanthine substitutions in PNAs are tolerated in KRAS2 RNA:PNA duplexes where wild type guanine is replaced by mutant uracil or adenine in RNA. To validate our predictions, we synthesized PNA dodecamers with hypoxanthine, and then measured the thermal stability of RNA:PNA duplexes. Circular dichroism thermal melting results showed that hypoxanthine-containing PNAs are more stable in duplexes where hypoxanthine-adenine and hypoxanthine-uracil base pairs are formed than single mismatch duplexes or duplexes containing hypoxanthine-guanine opposition.

  8. Microbial Nucleic Acid Sensing in Oral and Systemic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Crump, K E; Sahingur, S E

    2016-01-01

    One challenge in studying chronic infectious and inflammatory disorders is understanding how host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), specifically toll-like receptors (TLRs), sense and respond to pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns, their communication with each other and different components of the immune system, and their role in propagating inflammatory stages of disease. The discovery of innate immune activation through nucleic acid recognition by intracellular PRRs such as endosomal TLRs (TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9) and cytoplasmic proteins (absent in melanoma 2 and DNA-dependent activator of interferon regulatory factor) opened a new paradigm: Nucleic acid sensing is now implicated in multiple immune and inflammatory conditions (e.g., atherosclerosis, cancer), viral (e.g., human papillomavirus, herpes virus) and bacterial (e.g., Helicobacter pylori, pneumonia) diseases, and autoimmune disorders (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis). Clinical investigations reveal the overexpression of specific nucleic acid sensors in diseased tissues. In vivo animal models show enhanced disease progression associated with receptor activation. The involvement of nucleic acid sensors in various systemic conditions is further supported by studies reporting receptor knockout mice being either protected from or prone to disease. TLR9-mediated inflammation is also implicated in periodontal diseases. Considering that persistent inflammation in the oral cavity is associated with systemic diseases and that oral microbial DNA is isolated at distal sites, nucleic acid sensing may potentially be a link between oral and systemic diseases. In this review, we discuss recent advances in how intracellular PRRs respond to microbial nucleic acids and emerging views on the role of nucleic acid sensors in various systemic diseases. We also highlight new information on the role of intracellular PRRs in the pathogenesis of oral diseases including periodontitis

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Benzylidene Acetal-Type Bridged Nucleic Acids (BA-BNA).

    PubMed

    Kodama, Tetsuya; Morihiro, Kunihiko; Obika, Satoshi

    2014-09-08

    Benzylidene acetal-type bridged nucleic acids (BA-BNAs) have a bridged structure that cleaves upon exposure to appropriate external stimuli, which induces changes in oligonucleotide properties. In particular, duplex stability and resistance to enzymatic digestion vary depending on the incorporation number and/or position of BA-BNAs. This unit describes the synthesis of some types of BA-BNA thymine nucleosides and the corresponding BA-BNA phosphoramidites, as well as the incorporation of BA-BNA nucleosides into oligonucleotides. Moreover, typical procedures that induce property changes in each BA-BNA are described. 6-Nitroveratrylidene and 2-nitrobenzylidene acetal type BA-BNA respond to photoirradiation and subsequent thiol treatment. Benzylidene and 4-nitrobenzylidene acetal type BA-BNAs respond to acids and reducing agents, respectively. Every BA-BNA is derivatized into 4'-C-hydroxymethyl RNA by hydrolysis of the acetal-bridged structure. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Nucleic acid modifications in regulation of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; He, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acids carry a wide range of different chemical modifications. In contrast to previous views that these modifications are static and only play fine-tuning functions, recent research advances paint a much more dynamic picture. Nucleic acids carry diverse modifications and employ these chemical marks to exert essential or critical influences in a variety of cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms. This review covers several nucleic acid modifications that play important regulatory roles in biological systems, especially in regulation of gene expression: 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and its oxidative derivatives, and N6 -methyladenine (6mA) in DNA; N6 -methyladenosine (m6A), pseudouridine (), and 5-methylcytosine (m5C) in messenger RNA and long non-coding RNA. Modifications in other non-coding RNAs, such as tRNA, miRNA, and snRNA, are also briefly summarized. We provide brief historical perspective of the field, and highlight recent progress in identifying diverse nucleic acid modifications and exploring their functions in different organisms. Overall, we believe that work in this field will yield additional layers of both chemical and biological complexity as we continue to uncover functional consequences of known nucleic acid modifications and discover new ones. PMID:26933737

  11. Plant viral and bacteriophage delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lam, Patricia; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2017-07-18

    Nucleic acid therapeutics have emerged as a powerful method for treatment of many diseases. However, the challenge lies in safe and efficient delivery of nucleic acids to their target site, as they need to cross various extracellular and intracellular barriers. Mammalian viruses have initially been favored for delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics, but safety concerns regarding their immunogenicity and potential of integration have fueled the search for alternative delivery strategies. For example, chemistry and bioengineering have led to advances in the use of nonviral vectors composed of lipids and other polymers; nevertheless, the synthetic systems often do not match the efficiency achieved using the biological systems. More recently, researchers have turned toward the development of plant viruses and bacteriophages and virus-like particles as an alternative or complementary approach. These systems unite the properties of both the viral and nonviral systems and as such are a new exciting avenue toward nucleic acid delivery. This review highlights the benefits of plant viral and bacteriophage delivery of nucleic acids and provides a summary of the current progress in research in this field. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Nucleic Acid Modifications in Regulation of Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; He, Chuan

    2016-01-21

    Nucleic acids carry a wide range of different chemical modifications. In contrast to previous views that these modifications are static and only play fine-tuning functions, recent research advances paint a much more dynamic picture. Nucleic acids carry diverse modifications and employ these chemical marks to exert essential or critical influences in a variety of cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms. This review covers several nucleic acid modifications that play important regulatory roles in biological systems, especially in regulation of gene expression: 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and its oxidative derivatives, and N(6)-methyladenine (6mA) in DNA; N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A), pseudouridine (Ψ), and 5-methylcytidine (m(5)C) in mRNA and long non-coding RNA. Modifications in other non-coding RNAs, such as tRNA, miRNA, and snRNA, are also briefly summarized. We provide brief historical perspective of the field, and highlight recent progress in identifying diverse nucleic acid modifications and exploring their functions in different organisms. Overall, we believe that work in this field will yield additional layers of both chemical and biological complexity as we continue to uncover functional consequences of known nucleic acid modifications and discover new ones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nucleic acid detection and quantification in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Huggett, Jim; Green, Clare; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2009-04-01

    Techniques using nucleic acid amplification have not had the same amount of impact on research and clinical diagnosis in the developing world as that observed in the West. This is unsurprising when the costs and infrastructure required to perform nucleic acid amplification are considered. Despite this, nucleic acid amplification is being increasingly used in both research and diagnosis in countries such as Zambia and Tanzania. Scientific research in the developing world is made possible through the support and development of the necessary laboratory infrastructure and the establishment of special transport for the reagents and samples. This has enabled world-leading country-relevant research to be performed by local scientists on subjects ranging from rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases to measuring the RNA gene expression in an immune response. Concomitantly, the challenge presented by the need for tests that are more appropriate for a resource-poor setting has led to a number of newer methodologies for nucleic acid detection, which can be tailored to be performed in the field without the need for training in molecular biology. As nucleic acid amplification techniques become both simpler and cheaper, their impact is likely to play an increasingly crucial role in research and diagnosis in the developing world.

  14. Nucleic acid-based nanoengineering: novel structures for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanying; LaBean, Thomas H.; Leong, Kam W.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoengineering exploits the interactions of materials at the nanometre scale to create functional nanostructures. It relies on the precise organization of nanomaterials to achieve unique functionality. There are no interactions more elegant than those governing nucleic acids via Watson–Crick base-pairing rules. The infinite combinations of DNA/RNA base pairs and their remarkable molecular recognition capability can give rise to interesting nanostructures that are only limited by our imagination. Over the past years, creative assembly of nucleic acids has fashioned a plethora of two-dimensional and three-dimensional nanostructures with precisely controlled size, shape and spatial functionalization. These nanostructures have been precisely patterned with molecules, proteins and gold nanoparticles for the observation of chemical reactions at the single molecule level, activation of enzymatic cascade and novel modality of photonic detection, respectively. Recently, they have also been engineered to encapsulate and release bioactive agents in a stimulus-responsive manner for therapeutic applications. The future of nucleic acid-based nanoengineering is bright and exciting. In this review, we will discuss the strategies to control the assembly of nucleic acids and highlight the recent efforts to build functional nucleic acid nanodevices for nanomedicine. PMID:23050076

  15. Carbon nanotubes and nucleic acids: tools and targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoa, Bibiana; Zheng, Ming; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Diner, Bruce A.

    2006-05-01

    Nucleic acids, with their intrinsic structural properties as well as their high specificity, are playing an important role in the rapid development of nano-technologies. In turn, these new technologies and their efficient performance enable fast and precise methods for detection of nucleic acids, improving the diagnosis of diseases and identification of pathogens. We discuss the use of nucleic acids to disperse and sort single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), and carbon nanotube-based field effect transistors (CNT-FETs) to electrically detect specific nucleic acid sequences. Both DNA and RNA are efficient agents for dispersion and separation of SWNTs by diameter and chirality. Fractions enriched in a narrow band gap distribution of DNA:SWNT hybrids do not alter the electronic performance of field effect transistors. A CNT-FET fulfills the requirements for a nanosensing device that can greatly exceed the existing technologies. Electrical detection of specific nucleic acid sequence could potentially overcome the current limitations of optical detection, by increasing sensitivity and speed, while reducing sample manipulation, size, and cost.

  16. Plasmonics-based SERS nanobiosensor for homogeneous nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsin-Neng; Fales, Andrew M; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-05-01

    Developing a simple and efficient nucleic acid detection technology is essential for clinical diagnostics. Here, we describe a new conceptually simple and selective "turn on" plasmonics-based nanobiosensor, which integrates non-enzymatic DNA strand-displacement hybridization for specific nucleic acid target identification with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection. This SERS nanobiosensor is a target label-free, and rapid nanoparticle-based biosensing system using a homogeneous assay format that offers a simple and efficient tool for nucleic acid diagnostics. Our results showed that the nanobiosensor provided a limit of detection of ~0.1nM (200amol) in the current bioassay system, and exhibited high specificity for single nucleotide mismatch discrimination. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a sensitive technique that enhances Raman scattering by molecules adsorbed on rough metal surfaces. The enhancement means that the technique may even detect single molecules. In this article, the authors describe a simple and efficient nucleic acid detection technology using SERS, with "OFF-to-ON" signal switch upon nucleic acid target identification and capture, which provides high sensitivity and specificity for single nucleotide mismatch discrimination. This new technology will be most welcomed in clinical diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Challenges and Perspectives in Nucleic Acid Enzyme Engineering.

    PubMed

    Balke, Darko; Hieronymus, Robert; Müller, Sabine

    2017-08-04

    Engineering of nucleic acids has been a goal in research for many years. Since the discovery of catalytic nucleic acids (ribozymes and DNAzymes), this field has attracted even more attention. One reason for the increased interest is that a large number of ribozymes have been engineered that catalyze a broad range of reactions of relevance to the origin of life. Another reason is that the structures of ribozymes or DNAzymes have been modulated such that activity is dependent on allosteric regulation by an external cofactor. Such constructs have great potential for application as biosensors in medicinal or environmental diagnostics, and as molecular tools for control of cellular processes. In addition to the development of nucleic acid enzymes by in vitro selection, rational design is a powerful strategy for the engineering of ribozymes or DNAzymes with tailored features. The structures and mechanisms of a large number of nucleic acid catalysts are now well understood. Therefore, specific design of their functional properties by structural modulation is a good option for the development of custom-made molecular tools. For rational design, several parameters have to be considered, and a number of tools are available to help/guide sequence design. Here, we discuss sequence, structural and functional design using the example of hairpin ribozyme variants to highlight the challenges and opportunities of rational nucleic enzyme engineering. Graphical Abstract.

  18. Hybrids of Nucleic Acids and Carbon Nanotubes for Nanobiotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Umemura, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the combination of nucleic acids and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been briefly reviewed here. Since discovering the hybridization phenomenon of DNA molecules and CNTs in 2003, a large amount of fundamental and applied research has been carried out. Among thousands of papers published since 2003, approximately 240 papers focused on biological applications were selected and categorized based on the types of nucleic acids used, but not the types of CNTs. This survey revealed that the hybridization phenomenon is strongly affected by various factors, such as DNA sequences, and for this reason, fundamental studies on the hybridization phenomenon are important. Additionally, many research groups have proposed numerous practical applications, such as nanobiosensors. The goal of this review is to provide perspective on biological applications using hybrids of nucleic acids and CNTs. PMID:28347014

  19. Geometric properties of nucleic acids with potential for autobuilding

    PubMed Central

    Gruene, Tim; Sheldrick, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Medium- to high-resolution X-ray structures of DNA and RNA molecules were investigated to find geometric properties useful for automated model building in crystallographic electron-density maps. We describe a simple method, starting from a list of electron-density ‘blobs’, for identifying backbone phosphates and nucleic acid bases based on properties of the local electron-density distribution. This knowledge should be useful for the automated building of nucleic acid models into electron-density maps. We show that the distances and angles involving C1′ and the P atoms, using the pseudo-torsion angles and that describe the …P—C1′—P—C1′… chain, provide a promising basis for building the nucleic acid polymer. These quantities show reasonably narrow distributions with asymmetry that should allow the direction of the phosphate backbone to be established. PMID:21173468

  20. Beyond DNA origami: the unfolding prospects of nucleic acid nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Michelotti, Nicole; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Manzo, Anthony J; Walter, Nils G

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acid nanotechnology exploits the programmable molecular recognition properties of natural and synthetic nucleic acids to assemble structures with nanometer-scale precision. In 2006, DNA origami transformed the field by providing a versatile platform for self-assembly of arbitrary shapes from one long DNA strand held in place by hundreds of short, site-specific (spatially addressable) DNA 'staples'. This revolutionary approach has led to the creation of a multitude of two-dimensional and three-dimensional scaffolds that form the basis for functional nanodevices. Not limited to nucleic acids, these nanodevices can incorporate other structural and functional materials, such as proteins and nanoparticles, making them broadly useful for current and future applications in emerging fields such as nanomedicine, nanoelectronics, and alternative energy.

  1. Innate immune sensing of nucleic acids from pathogens.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sergio C

    2014-12-01

    The innate immune system is important as the first line of defense to sense invading pathogens. Nucleic acids represent critical pathogen signatures that trigger a host proinflammatory immune response. Much progress has been made in understanding how DNA and RNA trigger host defense countermeasures, however, several aspects of how cytosolic nucleic acids are sensed remain unclear. This special issue reviews how the host innate immune system senses nucleic acids from Brucella abortus, Mycobacterium sp and Legionella pneumophila, viral DNA, the role of STING in DNA sensing and inflammatory diseases and the mechanism of viral RNA recognition by the small interfering RNA pathway in Drosophila melanogaster. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Inorganic nanoparticles as nucleic acid transporters into eukaryotic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirkhanov, R. N.; Zarytova, V. F.; Zenkova, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    The review is concerned with inorganic nanoparticles (gold, titanium dioxide, silica, iron oxides, calcium phosphate) used as nucleic acid transporters into mammalian cells. Methods for the synthesis of nanoparticles and approaches to surface modification through covalent or noncovalent attachment of low- or high-molecular-weight compounds are considered. The data available from the literature on biological action of nucleic acids delivered into the cells by nanoparticles and on the effect of nanoparticles and their conjugates and complexes on the cell survival are summarized. Pathways of cellular internalization of nanoparticles and the mechanism of their excretion, as well as the ways of release of nucleic acids from their complexes with nanoparticles after the cellular uptake are described. The bibliography includes 161 references.

  3. Vibrational Raman optical activity of proteins, nucleic acids, and viruses.

    PubMed

    Blanch, Ewan W; Hecht, Lutz; Barron, Laurence D

    2003-02-01

    Due to its sensitivity to chirality, Raman optical activity (ROA), which may be measured as a small difference in vibrational Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarized incident light, is a powerful probe of biomolecular structure in solution. Protein ROA spectra provide information on the secondary and tertiary structures of the polypeptide backbone, hydration, side-chain conformation, and structural elements present in denatured states. Nucleic acid ROA spectra yield information on the sugar ring conformation, the base stacking arrangement, and the mutual orientation of the sugar and base rings around the C-N glycosidic linkage. ROA is able to simultaneously probe the structures of both the protein and the nucleic acid components of intact viruses. This article gives a brief account of the theory and measurement of ROA and presents the ROA spectra of a selection of proteins, nucleic acids, and viruses which illustrate the applications of ROA spectroscopy in biomolecular research.

  4. Soni-removal of nucleic acids from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Mysore, Sumukh; Gandham, Sai Hari A

    2014-05-23

    Inclusion bodies (IBs) are commonly formed in Escherichia coli due to over expression of recombinant proteins in non-native state. Isolation, denaturation and refolding of these IBs is generally performed to obtain functional protein. However, during this process IBs tend to form non-specific interactions with sheared nucleic acids from the genome, thus getting carried over into downstream processes. This may hinder the refolding of IBs into their native state. To circumvent this, we demonstrate a methodology termed soni-removal which involves disruption of nucleic acid-inclusion body interaction using sonication; followed by solvent based separation. As opposed to conventional techniques that use enzymes and column-based separations, soni-removal is a cost effective alternative for complete elimination of buried and/or strongly bound short nucleic acid contaminants from IBs. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pyrophosphate-condensing activity linked to nucleic acid synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Volloch, V Z; Rits, S; Tumerman, L

    1979-01-01

    In some preparations of DNA dependent RNA polymerase a new enzymatic activity has been found which catalyzes the condensation of two pyrophosphate molecules, liberated in the process of RNA synthesis, to one molecule of orthophosphate and one molecule of Mg (or Mn) - chelate complex with trimetaphosphate. This activity can also cooperate with DNA-polymerase, on condition that both enzymes originate from the same cells. These results point to two general conclusions. First, energy is conserved in the overall process of nucleic acid synthesis and turnover, so that the process does not require an energy influx from the cell's general resources. Second, the synthesis of nucleic acids is catalyzed by a complex enzyme system which contains at least two separate enzymes, one responsible for nucleic acid polymerization and the other for energy conservation via pyrophosphate condensation. Images PMID:88040

  6. A Polyaniline-based Sensor of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Partha Pratim; Gloria, Jared N; Parker, Marcus K; Flynt, Alex S

    2016-11-01

    Detection of nucleic acids is at the center of diagnostic technologies used in research and the clinic. Standard approaches used in these technologies rely on enzymatic modification that can introduce bias and artifacts. A critical element of next generation detection platforms will be direct molecular sensing, thereby avoiding a need for amplification or labels. Advanced nanomaterials may provide the suitable chemical modalities to realize label-free sensors. Conjugated polymers are ideal for biological sensing, possessing properties compatible with biomolecules and exhibit high sensitivity to localized environmental changes. In this article, a method is presented for detecting nucleic acids using the electroconductive polymer polyaniline. Simple DNA "probe" oligonucleotides complementary to target nucleic acids are attached electrostatically to the polymer, creating a sensor system that can differentiate single nucleotide differences in target molecules. Outside the specific and unbiased nature of this technology, it is highly cost effective.

  7. Importance of Nucleic Acid Recognition in Inflammation and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Barrat, Franck J; Elkon, Keith B; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2016-01-01

    An important concept in immunology is the classification of immune responses as either innate or adaptive, based on whether the antigen receptors are encoded in the germline or generated somatically by gene rearrangement. The innate immune system is an ancient mode of immunity, and by being a first layer in our defense against infectious agents, it is essential for our ability to develop rapid and sustained responses to pathogens. We discuss the importance of nucleic acid recognition by the innate immune system to mounting an appropriate immune response to pathogens and also how inflammation driven by uncontrolled recognition of self-nucleic acids can lead to autoimmune diseases. We also summarize current efforts to either harness the immune system using agonists of nucleic acid-specific innate sensors or, on the contrary, by using inhibitors in autoimmune situations.

  8. Iron-sulphur clusters in nucleic acid processing enzymes.

    PubMed

    White, Malcolm F; Dillingham, Mark S

    2012-02-01

    Several unexpected reports of iron-sulphur clusters in nucleic acid binding proteins have recently appeared in the literature. Once thought to be relatively rare in these systems, iron-sulphur clusters are now known to be essential components of diverse nucleic acid processing machinery including glycosylases, primases, helicases, nucleases, transcription factors, RNA polymerases and RNA methyltransferases. In many cases, the function of the cluster is poorly understood and crystal structures of these iron-sulphur enzymes reveal little in common between them. In this article, we review the recent developments in the field and discuss to what extent there might exist common mechanistic roles for iron-sulphur clusters in nucleic acid enzymes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Method for nucleic acid hybridization using single-stranded DNA binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Method of nucleic acid hybridization for detecting the presence of a specific nucleic acid sequence in a population of different nucleic acid sequences using a nucleic acid probe. The nucleic acid probe hybridizes with the specific nucleic acid sequence but not with other nucleic acid sequences in the population. The method includes contacting a sample (potentially including the nucleic acid sequence) with the nucleic acid probe under hybridizing conditions in the presence of a single-stranded DNA binding protein provided in an amount which stimulates renaturation of a dilute solution (i.e., one in which the t.sub.1/2 of renaturation is longer than 3 weeks) of single-stranded DNA greater than 500 fold (i.e., to a t.sub.1/2 less than 60 min, preferably less than 5 min, and most preferably about 1 min.) in the absence of nucleotide triphosphates.

  10. Accurate ab initio prediction of NMR chemical shifts of nucleic acids and nucleic acids/protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Victora, Andrea; Möller, Heiko M.; Exner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    NMR chemical shift predictions based on empirical methods are nowadays indispensable tools during resonance assignment and 3D structure calculation of proteins. However, owing to the very limited statistical data basis, such methods are still in their infancy in the field of nucleic acids, especially when non-canonical structures and nucleic acid complexes are considered. Here, we present an ab initio approach for predicting proton chemical shifts of arbitrary nucleic acid structures based on state-of-the-art fragment-based quantum chemical calculations. We tested our prediction method on a diverse set of nucleic acid structures including double-stranded DNA, hairpins, DNA/protein complexes and chemically-modified DNA. Overall, our quantum chemical calculations yield highly/very accurate predictions with mean absolute deviations of 0.3–0.6 ppm and correlation coefficients (r2) usually above 0.9. This will allow for identifying misassignments and validating 3D structures. Furthermore, our calculations reveal that chemical shifts of protons involved in hydrogen bonding are predicted significantly less accurately. This is in part caused by insufficient inclusion of solvation effects. However, it also points toward shortcomings of current force fields used for structure determination of nucleic acids. Our quantum chemical calculations could therefore provide input for force field optimization. PMID:25404135

  11. Nucleic acid structure analysis: Local, mathematically rigorous, comparable

    SciTech Connect

    Babcock, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    A more sophisticated mathematical treatments for analyzing nucleic acid coordinate data is presented. The methodology is both rigorous and comparable for parameterizing nucleic acids in terms of the local structural morphology of complementary and neighboring base pairs. Chapter 1 clearly defines the problems of nucleic acid structure parameterization by examining the consequences of the EMBO workshop guidelines published in 1989. Chapter 2 defines mathematics to rigorously and comparably calculate all of the parameters for nucleic acid structure from a local viewpoint. The mathematics satisfies all EMBO guidelines for local structural parameters. One of the main features making this program flexible is that any base pair relationship can be rigorously analyzed. This is because the meaning of zero for the complementary base parameters is clearly definable for any base pairing relationship. Chapter 3 analyses and explains why certain pairwise parameter correlations were observed between rotational and translational parameters. It was observed that the method of calculating the rotational parameters greatly affected the calculated translational parameters. As a result of our analysis, we determined the optimum location about which rotations should be performed in order to reduce and/or eliminate the correlations which are artifacts of the mathematics employed and do not reflect true structural properties of nucleic acids. Chapter 4 presents an analysis of the available nucleic acid X-ray crystallographic structural data, showing that the experimental base pairs do not generally have the ideal Watson-Crick structure. By utilizing a hybrid between helical and Cartesian parameterization methods, the relative distribution of the complementary base parameters was examined as a function of the nearest neighboring base pairs. The final chapter includes a review article explaining each of the available methods in plain English as well as giving the mathematics.

  12. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  13. Towards Improved Accuracy of Bordetella pertussis Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In many clinical microbiology laboratories, nucleic acid amplification tests such as PCR have become the routine methods for the diagnosis of pertussis. While PCR has greatly increased the ability of laboratories to detect Bordetella pertussis infections, it has also been associated with false-positive results that can, given the tendency of B. pertussis to cause outbreaks, result in unnecessary and costly control measures. The species specificity of Bordetella gene targets and their number of copies per genome greatly impact the performance characteristics of nucleic acid amplification tests for B. pertussis. It is crucial that laboratorians recognize these characteristics, to limit false-positive test results and prevent pseudo-outbreaks. PMID:22442315

  14. Biomimetic high density lipoprotein nanoparticles for nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Kaylin M; Mutharasan, R Kannan; Tripathy, Sushant; Veliceasa, Dorina; Bobeica, Mariana; Shumaker, Dale K; Luthi, Andrea J; Helfand, Brian T; Ardehali, Hossein; Mirkin, Chad A; Volpert, Olga; Thaxton, C Shad

    2011-03-09

    We report a gold nanoparticle-templated high density lipoprotein (HDL AuNP) platform for gene therapy that combines lipid-based nucleic acid transfection strategies with HDL biomimicry. For proof-of-concept, HDL AuNPs are shown to adsorb antisense cholesterylated DNA. The conjugates are internalized by human cells, can be tracked within cells using transmission electron microscopy, and regulate target gene expression. Overall, the ability to directly image the AuNP core within cells, the chemical tailorability of the HDL AuNP platform, and the potential for cell-specific targeting afforded by HDL biomimicry make this platform appealing for nucleic acid delivery.

  15. Methods of introducing nucleic acids into cellular DNA

    DOEpatents

    Lajoie, Marc J.; Gregg, Christopher J.; Mosberg, Joshua A.; Church, George M.

    2017-06-27

    A method of introducing a nucleic acid sequence into a cell is provided where the cell has impaired or inhibited or disrupted DnaG primase activity or impaired or inhibited or disrupted DnaB helicase activity, or larger or increased gaps or distance between Okazaki fragments or lowered or reduced frequency of Okazaki fragment initiation, or the cell has increased single stranded DNA (ssDNA) on the lagging strand of the replication fork including transforming the cell through recombination with a nucleic acid oligomer.

  16. Nanopores and nucleic acids: prospects for ultrarapid sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Akeson, M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA and RNA molecules can be detected as they are driven through a nanopore by an applied electric field at rates ranging from several hundred microseconds to a few milliseconds per molecule. The nanopore can rapidly discriminate between pyrimidine and purine segments along a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule. Nanopore detection and characterization of single molecules represents a new method for directly reading information encoded in linear polymers. If single-nucleotide resolution can be achieved, it is possible that nucleic acid sequences can be determined at rates exceeding a thousand bases per second.

  17. Nanopores and nucleic acids: prospects for ultrarapid sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Akeson, M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA and RNA molecules can be detected as they are driven through a nanopore by an applied electric field at rates ranging from several hundred microseconds to a few milliseconds per molecule. The nanopore can rapidly discriminate between pyrimidine and purine segments along a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule. Nanopore detection and characterization of single molecules represents a new method for directly reading information encoded in linear polymers. If single-nucleotide resolution can be achieved, it is possible that nucleic acid sequences can be determined at rates exceeding a thousand bases per second.

  18. Biomimetic High Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles For Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Kaylin M.; Mutharasan, R. Kannan; Tripathy, Sushant; Veliceasa, Dorina; Bobeica, Mariana; Shumaker, Dale K.; Luthi, Andrea J.; Helfand, Brian T.; Ardehali, Hossein; Mirkin, Chad A.; Volpert, Olga; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2014-01-01

    We report a gold nanoparticle-templated high density lipoprotein (HDL AuNP) platform for gene therapy which combines lipid-based nucleic acid transfection strategies with HDL biomimicry. For proof-of-concept, HDL AuNPs are shown to adsorb antisense cholesterylated DNA. The conjugates are internalized by human cells, can be tracked within cells using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and regulate target gene expression. Overall, the ability to directly image the AuNP core within cells, the chemical tailorability of the HDL AuNP platform, and the potential for cell-specific targeting afforded by HDL biomimicry make this platform appealing for nucleic acid delivery. PMID:21319839

  19. Nucleic acid hybridization-an alternative tool in diagnostic microbiology.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, U; Hyypiä, T

    1985-09-01

    The use of radioimmunoossays (RIAs) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) has revolutionized diagnostic microbiology. Their high specificity and sensitivity make them versatile, they are simple to carry out either for direct detection of microorganisms in specimens or for serological diagnosis, and they can easily and reliably be standardized. Monoclonal antibodies have further improved these immunoassays. However, the development of simple and highly sensitive detection methods for nucleic acids has nevertheless promoted an interest also in diagnostic methods based on nucleic acid hybridization. Here Ulf Pettersson and Timo Hyypiä discuss methods which are likely to become a useful complement to the immunoassays in the near future.

  20. Functional nucleic acids in high throughput screening and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Srivatsan, Seergazhi G; Famulok, Michael

    2007-09-01

    In vitro selection can be used to generate functional nucleic acids such as aptamers and ribozymes that can recognize a variety of molecules with high affinity and specificity. Most often these recognition events are associated with structural alterations that can be converted into detectable signals. Several signaling aptamers and ribozymes constructed by both design and selection have been successfully utilized as sensitive detection reagents. Here we summarize the development of different types of signaling nucleic acids, and approaches that have been implemented in the screening format.

  1. Nanopore-based sequencing and detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Ying, Yi-Lun; Zhang, Junji; Gao, Rui; Long, Yi-Tao

    2013-12-09

    Nanopore-based techniques, which mimic the functions of natural ion channels, have attracted increasing attention as unique methods for single-molecule detection. The technology allows the real-time, selective, high-throughput analysis of nucleic acids through both biological and solid-state nanopores. In this Minireview, the background and latest progress in nanopore-based sequencing and detection of nucleic acids are summarized, and light is shed on a novel platform for nanopore-based detection. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Nucleic acid aptamers: an emerging frontier in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guizhi; Ye, Mao; Donovan, Michael J; Song, Erqun; Zhao, Zilong; Tan, Weihong

    2012-11-04

    The last two decades have witnessed the development and application of nucleic acid aptamers in a variety of fields, including target analysis, disease therapy, and molecular and cellular engineering. The efficient and widely applicable aptamer selection, reproducible chemical synthesis and modification, generally impressive target binding selectivity and affinity, relatively rapid tissue penetration, low immunogenicity, and rapid systemic clearance make aptamers ideal recognition elements for use as therapeutics or for in vivo delivery of therapeutics. In this feature article, we discuss the development and biomedical application of nucleic acid aptamers, with emphasis on cancer cell aptamer isolation, targeted cancer therapy, oncology biomarker identification and drug discovery.

  3. Multifunctional combinatorial-designed nanoparticles for nucleic acid therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in biomedical sciences, especially in the field of human genetics, is increasingly considered to facilitate a new frontier in development of novel disease-modifying therapeutics. One of major challenges in the development of nucleic acid therapeutics is efficient and specific delivery of the molecules to the target tissue and cell upon systemic administration. In this report, I discuss our strategy to develop combinatorial-designed multifunctional nanoparticle assemblies based on natural biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for nucleic acid delivery in: (1) overcoming tumor drug resistance and (2) genetic modulation of macrophage functional phenotype from M1 to M2 in treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  4. Spherical Nucleic Acids as Intracellular Agents for Nucleic Acid Based Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liangliang

    Recent functional discoveries on the noncoding sequences of human genome and transcriptome could lead to revolutionary treatment modalities because the noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) can be applied as therapeutic agents to manipulate disease-causing genes. To date few nucleic acid-based therapeutics have been translated into the clinic due to challenges in the delivery of the oligonucleotide agents in an effective, cell specific, and non-toxic fashion. Unmodified oligonucleotide agents are destroyed rapidly in biological fluids by enzymatic degradation and have difficulty crossing the plasma membrane without the aid of transfection reagents, which often cause inflammatory, cytotoxic, or immunogenic side effects. Spherical nucleic acids (SNAs), nanoparticles consisting of densely organized and highly oriented oligonucleotides, pose one possible solution to circumventing these problems in both the antisense and RNA interference (RNAi) pathways. The unique three dimensional architecture of SNAs protects the bioactive oligonucleotides from unspecific degradation during delivery and supports their targeting of class A scavenger receptors and endocytosis via a lipid-raft-dependent, caveolae-mediated pathway. Owing to their unique structure, SNAs are able to cross cell membranes and regulate target genes expression as a single entity, without triggering the cellular innate immune response. Herein, my thesis has focused on understanding the interactions between SNAs and cellular components and developing SNA-based nanostructures to improve therapeutic capabilities. Specifically, I developed a novel SNA-based, nanoscale agent for delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides to manipulate microRNAs (miRNAs), the endogenous post-transcriptional gene regulators. I investigated the role of SNAs involving miRNAs in anti-cancer or anti-inflammation responses in cells and in in vivo murine disease models via systemic injection. Furthermore, I explored using different strategies to construct

  5. Site-Selective Binding of Nanoparticles to Double-Stranded DNA via Peptide Nucleic Acid "Invasion"

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, A.L.; van der Lelie, D.; Sun, D.; Maye, M. M.; Gang, O.

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a novel method for by-design placement of nano-objects along double-stranded (ds) DNA. A molecular intercalator, designed as a peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-DNA chimera, is able to invade dsDNA at the PNA-side due to the hybridization specificity between PNA and one of the duplex strands. At the same time, the single-stranded (ss) DNA tail of the chimera, allows for anchoring of nano-objects that have been functionalized with complementary ssDNA. The developed method is applied for interparticle attachment and for the fabrication of particle clusters using a dsDNA template. This method significantly broadens the molecular toolbox for constructing nanoscale systems by including the most conventional not yet utilized DNA motif, double helix DNA.

  6. Structure-based Drug Design: From Nucleic Acid to Membrane Protein Targets

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Magdalena M.; Hait, Chayanendu; Holt, Patrick A.; Maguire, Jon M.; Meier, Jason B.; Miller, M. Clarke; Petraccone, Luigi; Trent, John O.

    2009-01-01

    The in silico methods for drug discovery are becoming increasingly powerful and useful. That, in combination with increasing computer processor power, in our case using a novel distributed computing grid, has enabled us to greatly enhance our virtual screening efforts. Herein we review some of these efforts using both receptor and ligand-based virtual screening, with the goal of finding new anticancer agents. In particular, nucleic acids are a neglected set of targets, especially the different morphologies of duplex, triplex, and quadruplex DNA, many of which have increasing biological relevance. We also review examples of molecular modeling to understand receptors and using virtual screening against G-protein coupled receptor membrane proteins. PMID:19454265

  7. Development of Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Detection of the HER2 Oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young K.; Evangelista, Jennifer; Aschenbach, Konrad; Johansson, Peter; Wen, Xinyu; Chen, Qingrong; Lee, Albert; Hempel, Heidi; Gheeya, Jinesh S.; Getty, Stephanie; Gomez, Romel; Khan, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have gained much interest as molecular recognition tools in biology, medicine and chemistry. This is due to high hybridization efficiency to complimentary oligonucleotides and stability of the duplexes with RNA or DNA. We have synthesized 15/16-mer PNA probes to detect the HER2 mRNA. The performance of these probes to detect the HER2 target was evaluated by fluorescence imaging and fluorescence bead assays. The PNA probes have sufficiently discriminated between the wild type HER2 target and the mutant target with single base mismatches. Furthermore, the probes exhibited excellent linear concentration dependence between 0.4 to 400 fmol for the target gene. The results demonstrate potential application of PNAs as diagnostic probes with high specificity for quantitative measurements of amplifications or over-expressions of oncogenes. PMID:23593123

  8. High physiological thermal triplex stability optimization of twisted intercalating nucleic acids (TINA).

    PubMed

    Bomholt, Niels; Osman, Amany M A; Pedersen, Erik B

    2008-10-21

    The structure of the monomer (R)-1-O-[4-(1-pyrenylethynyl)phenylmethyl]glycerol () in twisted intercalating nucleic acids (TINA) was optimized for stabilizing interactions between the intercalator and surrounding nucleobases when used as a triplex forming oligonucleotide (TFO). Enhancement of pi-pi interactions with nucleobases of the TFO was achieved by increasing the aromatic surface using the (R)-1-O-[4-(1-pyrenylethynyl)naphthylmethyl]glycerol monomer (). Bulge insertion of in the middle of a Hoogsteen-type triplex increased the triplex thermal stability, DeltaT(m) = +2.0 degrees C compared with at pH 7.2. Syntheses and thermal denaturation studies of triplexes and duplexes are described for three novel TINA monomers. The influence of pi-pi interactions, link length and the positioning of the ether in the linker in the TINA derivatives are described.

  9. The free energy of locking a ring: Changing a deoxyribonucleoside to a locked nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Xu, You; Villa, Alessandra; Nilsson, Lennart

    2017-01-19

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA), a modified nucleoside which contains a bridging group across the ribose ring, improves the stability of DNA/RNA duplexes significantly, and therefore is of interest in biotechnology and gene therapy applications. In this study, we investigate the free energy change between LNA and DNA nucleosides. The transformation requires the breaking of the bridging group across the ribose ring, a problematic transformation in free energy calculations. To address this, we have developed a 3-step (easy to implement) and a 1-step protocol (more efficient, but more complicated to setup), for single and dual topologies in classical molecular dynamics simulations, using the Bennett Acceptance Ratio method to calculate the free energy. We validate the approach on the solvation free energy difference for the nucleosides thymidine, cytosine, and 5-methyl-cytosine. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Stepwise translocation of nucleic acid motors

    PubMed Central

    Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recent single molecule studies have made a significant contribution to the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in the movement of motor proteins which process DNA and RNA. Measurement of stepsize in two disparate motors, NS3 helicase and ribosome both revealed three basepair steps which consist of three hidden substeps. Combined with previous structural studies, NS3 is likely taking a single nucleotide step of translocation coupled to one ATP binding event and this mode may be conserved in multitude of helicases. Such a stepwise translocation movement appears to occur through main contacts with the phosphate backbone. Double stranded RNA and DNA motor, RIG-I and Φ29 respectively showed translocation on a duplex while tracking exclusively a single stranded RNA/DNA in a directional manner, 5′ to 3′ in both cases. Spontaneous dynamics displayed by ribosome ratcheting and SSB (single stranded DNA binding protein) diffusing on DNA were rectified by interacting cofactors and proteins, EF-G and RecA respectively. PMID:20061135

  11. Stepwise translocation of nucleic acid motors.

    PubMed

    Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip

    2010-02-01

    Recent single molecule studies have made a significant contribution to the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in the movement of motor proteins which process DNA and RNA. Measurement of stepsize in two disparate motors, NS3 helicase and ribosome both revealed 3-bp steps, which consist of three hidden substeps. Combined with previous structural studies, NS3 is likely taking a single nucleotide step of translocation coupled to one ATP binding event and this mode may be conserved in multitude of helicases. Such a stepwise translocation movement appears to occur through main contacts with the phosphate backbone. Double stranded RNA and DNA motor, RIG-I and phi29, respectively, showed translocation on a duplex while tracking exclusively a single strand of RNA or DNA in a directional manner, 5'-3' in both cases. Spontaneous dynamics displayed by ribosome ratcheting and SSB (single stranded DNA binding protein) diffusing on DNA were rectified by interacting cofactors and proteins, EF-G and RecA, respectively. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Submicrometer-Sized Thermometer Particles Exploiting Selective Nucleic Acid Stability.

    PubMed

    Puddu, Michela; Mikutis, Gediminas; Stark, Wendelin J; Grass, Robert N

    2016-01-27

    Encapsulated nucleic acid selective damage quantification by real-time polymerase chain reaction is used as sensing mechanism to build a novel class of submicrometer size thermometer. Thanks to the high thermal and chemical stability, and the capability of storing the read accumulated thermal history, the sensor overcomes some of current limitations in small scale thermometry.

  13. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2010-06-22

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  14. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  15. Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding of unlocked nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Langkjær, Niels; Wengel, Jesper; Pasternak, Anna

    2015-11-15

    We herein describe the synthesis of two new unlocked nucleic acid building blocks containing hypoxanthine and 2,6-diaminopurine as nucleobase moieties and their incorporation into oligonucleotides. The modified oligonucleotides were used to examine the thermodynamic properties of UNA against unmodified oligonucleotides and the resulting thermodynamic data support that the hydrogen bonding face of UNA is Watson-Crick like.

  16. Cell cycle nucleic acids, polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Lowe, Keith S.; Larkins, Brian A.; Dilkes, Brian R.; Sun, Yuejin

    2007-08-14

    The invention provides isolated nucleic acids and their encoded proteins that are involved in cell cycle regulation. The invention further provides recombinant expression cassettes, host cells, transgenic plants, and antibody compositions. The present invention provides methods and compositions relating to altering cell cycle protein content, cell cycle progression, cell number and/or composition of plants.

  17. Nucleic acid separations using superficially porous silica particles.

    PubMed

    Close, Elizabeth D; Nwokeoji, Alison O; Milton, Dafydd; Cook, Ken; Hindocha, Darsha M; Hook, Elliot C; Wood, Helen; Dickman, Mark J

    2016-04-01

    Ion pair reverse-phase liquid chromatography has been widely employed for nucleic acid separations. A wide range of alternative stationary phases have been utilised in conjunction with ion pair reverse-phase chromatography, including totally porous particles, non-porous particles, macroporous particles and monolithic stationary phases. In this study we have utilised superficially porous silica particles in conjunction with ion pair reverse-phase liquid chromatography for the analysis of nucleic acids. We have investigated a range of different pore-sizes and phases for the analysis of a diverse range of nucleic acids including oligonucleotides, oligoribonucleotides, phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and high molecular weight dsDNA and RNA. The pore size of the superficially porous silica particles was shown to significantly affect the resolution of the nucleic acids. Optimum separations of small oligonucleotides such as those generated in RNase mapping experiments were obtained with 80Å pore sizes and can readily be interfaced with mass spectrometry analysis. Improved resolution of larger oligonucleotides (>19mers) was observed with pore sizes of 150Å. The optimum resolution for larger dsDNA/RNA molecules was achieved using superficially porous silica particles with pore sizes of 400Å. Furthermore, we have utilised 150Å pore size solid-core particles to separate typical impurities of a fully phosphorothioated oligonucleotide, which are often generated in the synthesis of this important class of therapeutic oligonucleotide.

  18. Mouse Vk gene classification by nucleic acid sequence similarity.

    PubMed

    Strohal, R; Helmberg, A; Kroemer, G; Kofler, R

    1989-01-01

    Analyses of immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) region gene usage in the immune response, estimates of V gene germline complexity, and other nucleic acid hybridization-based studies depend on the extent to which such genes are related (i.e., sequence similarity) and their organization in gene families. While mouse Igh heavy chain V region (VH) gene families are relatively well-established, a corresponding systematic classification of Igk light chain V region (Vk) genes has not been reported. The present analysis, in the course of which we reviewed the known extent of the Vk germline gene repertoire and Vk gene usage in a variety of responses to foreign and self antigens, provides a classification of mouse Vk genes in gene families composed of members with greater than 80% overall nucleic acid sequence similarity. This classification differed in several aspects from that of VH genes: only some Vk gene families were as clearly separated (by greater than 25% sequence dissimilarity) as typical VH gene families; most Vk gene families were closely related and, in several instances, members from different families were very similar (greater than 80%) over large sequence portions; frequently, classification by nucleic acid sequence similarity diverged from existing classifications based on amino-terminal protein sequence similarity. Our data have implications for Vk gene analyses by nucleic acid hybridization and describe potentially important differences in sequence organization between VH and Vk genes.

  19. Computer analysis and structure prediction of nucleic acids and proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kanehisa, M; Klein, P; Greif, P; DeLisi, C

    1984-01-01

    We have developed an integrated computer system for analysis of nucleic acid and protein sequences, which consists of sequence and structure databases, a relational database, and software for structural analysis. The system is potentially applicable to a number of problems in structural biology including predictive classification of the function and location of oncogene products. PMID:6546426

  20. Circulating nucleic acids: An analysis of their occurrence in malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Suraj, Shankar; Dhar, Chirag; Srivastava, Sweta

    2017-01-01

    Through a regulated or fortuitous phenomenon, small portions of cell nucleic acids are thrown into circulation. Since the discovery of these circulating nucleic acids (CNAs) in 1948, numerous studies have been published to elucidate their clinical implications in multifarious diseases. Scientists have now discovered disease-specific genetic aberrations, such as mutations, microsatellite alterations, epigenetic modulations (including aberrant methylation), as well as viral DNA/RNA from nucleic acids in plasma and serum. CNAs have become increasingly popular due to their potential for use as a liquid biopsy, which is a tool for non-invasive diagnosis and monitoring of diseases, such as cancer, stroke, trauma, myocardial infarction, autoimmune disorders, and pregnancy-associated complications. While the diagnostic potential of CNAs has been investigated extensively, there is a paucity of understanding of their pathophysiological functions. Are these CNAs part of the cell's regular framework of functioning? Or do they act as molecular players in disease initiation and progression? The aim of this review is to investigate the origins and functions of the circulating cell-free nucleic acids in the plasma and serum of patients with various malignancies, and propose areas of study, which may elucidate the novel underlying mechanisms that are functioning during cancer initiation/progression. PMID:28123700

  1. Potentiometric sensing of nucleic acids using chemically modified nanopores.

    PubMed

    Makra, István; Brajnovits, Alexandra; Jágerszki, Gyula; Fürjes, Péter; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E

    2017-01-05

    Unlike the overwhelming majority of nanopore sensors that are based on the measurement of a transpore ionic current, here we introduce a potentiometric sensing scheme and demonstrate its application for the selective detection of nucleic acids. The sensing concept uses the charge inversion that occurs in the sensing zone of a nanopore upon binding of negatively charged microRNA strands to positively charged peptide-nucleic acid (PNA) modified nanopores. The initial anionic permselectivity of PNA-modified nanopores is thus gradually changed to cationic permselectivity, which can be detected simply by measuring the nanoporous membrane potential. A quantitative theoretical treatment of the potentiometric microRNA response is provided based on the Nernst-Planck/Poisson model for the nanopore system assuming first order kinetics for the nucleic acid hybridization. An excellent correlation between the theoretical and experimental results was observed, which revealed that the binding process is focused at the nanopore entrance with contributions from both in pore and out of pore sections of the nanoporous membrane. The theoretical treatment is able to give clear guidelines for further optimization of potentiometric nanopore-based nucleic acid sensors by predicting the effect of the most important experimental parameters on the potential response.

  2. Mosaic protein and nucleic acid vaccines against hepatitis C virus

    DOEpatents

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette T. M.; Kuiken, Carla L.; Fischer, William M.

    2013-06-11

    The invention relates to immunogenic compositions useful as HCV vaccines. Provided are HCV mosaic polypeptide and nucleic acid compositions which provide higher levels of T-cell epitope coverage while minimizing the occurrence of unnatural and rare epitopes compared to natural HCV polypeptides and consensus HCV sequences.

  3. Circulating nucleic acids: An analysis of their occurrence in malignancies.

    PubMed

    Suraj, Shankar; Dhar, Chirag; Srivastava, Sweta

    2017-01-01

    Through a regulated or fortuitous phenomenon, small portions of cell nucleic acids are thrown into circulation. Since the discovery of these circulating nucleic acids (CNAs) in 1948, numerous studies have been published to elucidate their clinical implications in multifarious diseases. Scientists have now discovered disease-specific genetic aberrations, such as mutations, microsatellite alterations, epigenetic modulations (including aberrant methylation), as well as viral DNA/RNA from nucleic acids in plasma and serum. CNAs have become increasingly popular due to their potential for use as a liquid biopsy, which is a tool for non-invasive diagnosis and monitoring of diseases, such as cancer, stroke, trauma, myocardial infarction, autoimmune disorders, and pregnancy-associated complications. While the diagnostic potential of CNAs has been investigated extensively, there is a paucity of understanding of their pathophysiological functions. Are these CNAs part of the cell's regular framework of functioning? Or do they act as molecular players in disease initiation and progression? The aim of this review is to investigate the origins and functions of the circulating cell-free nucleic acids in the plasma and serum of patients with various malignancies, and propose areas of study, which may elucidate the novel underlying mechanisms that are functioning during cancer initiation/progression.

  4. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2016-08-09

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  5. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2014-09-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  6. A DNA origami nanorobot controlled by nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Emanuela; Marini, Monica; Palmano, Sabrina; Piantanida, Luca; Polano, Cesare; Scarpellini, Alice; Lazzarino, Marco; Firrao, Giuseppe

    2014-07-23

    A prototype for a DNA origami nanorobot is designed, produced, and tested. The cylindrical nanorobot (diameter of 14 nm and length of 48 nm) with a switchable flap, is able to respond to an external stimulus and reacts by a physical switch from a disarmed to an armed configuration able to deliver a cellular compatible message. In the tested design the robot weapon is a nucleic acid fully contained in the inner of the tube and linked to a single point of the internal face of the flap. Upon actuation the nanorobot moves the flap extracting the nucleic acid that assembles into a hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme catalyzing a colorimetric reaction or chemiluminescence generation. The actuation switch is triggered by an external nucleic acid (target) that interacts with a complementary nucleic acid that is beard externally by the nanorobot (probe). Hybridization of probe and target produces a localized structural change that results in flap opening. The flap movement is studied on a two-dimensional prototype origami using Förster resonance energy transfer and is shown to be triggered by a variety of targets, including natural RNAs. The nanorobot has potential for in vivo biosensing and intelligent delivery of biological activators.

  7. Caged molecular beacons: controlling nucleic acid hybridization with light.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunming; Zhu, Zhi; Song, Yanling; Lin, Hui; Yang, Chaoyong James; Tan, Weihong

    2011-05-28

    We have constructed a novel class of light-activatable caged molecular beacons (cMBs) that are caged by locking two stems with a photo-labile biomolecular interaction or covalent bond. With the cMBs, the nucleic acid hybridization process can be easily controlled with light, which offers the possibility for a high spatiotemporal resolution study of intracellular mRNAs.

  8. Nucleic acid amplification: Alternative methods of polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Fakruddin, Md; Mannan, Khanjada Shahnewaj Bin; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Mazumdar, Reaz Mohammad; Hossain, Md Nur; Islam, Sumaiya; Chowdhury, Md Alimuddin

    2013-10-01

    Nucleic acid amplification is a valuable molecular tool not only in basic research but also in application oriented fields, such as clinical medicine development, infectious diseases diagnosis, gene cloning and industrial quality control. A comperehensive review of the literature on the principles, applications, challenges and prospects of different alternative methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed. PCR was the first nucleic acid amplification method. With the advancement of research, a no of alternative nucleic acid amplification methods has been developed such as loop mediated isothermal amplification, nucleic acid sequence based amplification, strand displacement amplification, multiple displacement amplification. Most of the alternative methods are isothermal obviating the need for thermal cyclers. Though principles of most of the alternate methods are relatively complex than that of PCR, they offer better applicability and sensitivity in cases where PCR has limitations. Most of the alternate methods still have to prove themselves through extensive validation studies and are not available in commercial form; they pose the potentiality to be used as replacements of PCR. Continuous research is going on in different parts of the world to make these methods viable technically and economically.

  9. [Photochemistry and UV Spectroscopy of Proteins and Nucleic Acids].

    PubMed

    Wierzchowski, Kazimierz Lech

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a short history of David Shugar studies in the field of photochemistry and UV spectroscopy of proteins and nucleic acids, carried out since the late 1940s. to the beginning of the 1970s. of the 20th century, with some references to the state of related research in those days.

  10. Nucleic acid amplification: Alternative methods of polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Fakruddin, Md; Mannan, Khanjada Shahnewaj Bin; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Mazumdar, Reaz Mohammad; Hossain, Md. Nur; Islam, Sumaiya; Chowdhury, Md. Alimuddin

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification is a valuable molecular tool not only in basic research but also in application oriented fields, such as clinical medicine development, infectious diseases diagnosis, gene cloning and industrial quality control. A comperehensive review of the literature on the principles, applications, challenges and prospects of different alternative methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed. PCR was the first nucleic acid amplification method. With the advancement of research, a no of alternative nucleic acid amplification methods has been developed such as loop mediated isothermal amplification, nucleic acid sequence based amplification, strand displacement amplification, multiple displacement amplification. Most of the alternative methods are isothermal obviating the need for thermal cyclers. Though principles of most of the alternate methods are relatively complex than that of PCR, they offer better applicability and sensitivity in cases where PCR has limitations. Most of the alternate methods still have to prove themselves through extensive validation studies and are not available in commercial form; they pose the potentiality to be used as replacements of PCR. Continuous research is going on in different parts of the world to make these methods viable technically and economically. PMID:24302831

  11. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2011-01-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared to patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. PMID:22086767

  12. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins.

    PubMed

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2012-02-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However, the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three-dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared with patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Progress in nucleic acid research and molecular biology

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, W.E. . Biology Div.); Moldave, K. )

    1989-01-01

    This book contain the proceedings on progress in nucleic acid research and molecular biology. Topics covered include: polynucleotide-protein cross-links induced by ultraviolet light and their use for structural investigation of nucleoproteins; left-handed Z-DNA and genetic recombination, and structure and function of signal recognition particle RNA.

  14. Structure, stability and behaviour of nucleic acids in ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acids have become a powerful tool in nanotechnology because of their conformational polymorphism. However, lack of a medium in which nucleic acid structures exhibit long-term stability has been a bottleneck. Ionic liquids (ILs) are potential solvents in the nanotechnology field. Hydrated ILs, such as choline dihydrogen phosphate (choline dhp) and deep eutectic solvent (DES) prepared from choline chloride and urea, are ‘green’ solvents that ensure long-term stability of biomolecules. An understanding of the behaviour of nucleic acids in hydrated ILs is necessary for developing DNA materials. We here review current knowledge about the structures and stabilities of nucleic acids in choline dhp and DES. Interestingly, in choline dhp, A–T base pairs are more stable than G–C base pairs, the reverse of the situation in buffered NaCl solution. Moreover, DNA triplex formation is markedly stabilized in hydrated ILs compared with aqueous solution. In choline dhp, the stability of Hoogsteen base pairs is comparable to that of Watson–Crick base pairs. Moreover, the parallel form of the G-quadruplex is stabilized in DES compared with aqueous solution. The behaviours of various DNA molecules in ILs detailed here should be useful for designing oligonucleotides for the development of nanomaterials and nanodevices. PMID:25013178

  15. 21 CFR 866.3225 - Enterovirus nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Enterovirus nucleic acid assay. 866.3225 Section 866.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3225 Enterovirus...

  16. Electricity-free, sequential nucleic acid and protein isolation.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, David R; Karalus, Richard J

    2012-05-15

    Traditional and emerging pathogens such as Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), Yersinia pestis, or prion-based diseases are of significant concern for governments, industries and medical professionals worldwide. For example, EHECs, combined with Shigella, are responsible for the deaths of approximately 325,000 children each year and are particularly prevalent in the developing world where laboratory-based identification, common in the United States, is unavailable (1). The development and distribution of low cost, field-based, point-of-care tools to aid in the rapid identification and/or diagnosis of pathogens or disease markers could dramatically alter disease progression and patient prognosis. We have developed a tool to isolate nucleic acids and proteins from a sample by solid-phase extraction (SPE) without electricity or associated laboratory equipment (2). The isolated macromolecules can be used for diagnosis either in a forward lab or using field-based point-of-care platforms. Importantly, this method provides for the direct comparison of nucleic acid and protein data from an un-split sample, offering a confidence through corroboration of genomic and proteomic analysis. Our isolation tool utilizes the industry standard for solid-phase nucleic acid isolation, the BOOM technology, which isolates nucleic acids from a chaotropic salt solution, usually guanidine isothiocyanate, through binding to silica-based particles or filters (3). CUBRC's proprietary solid-phase extraction chemistry is used to purify protein from chaotropic salt solutions, in this case, from the waste or flow-thru following nucleic acid isolation(4). By packaging well-characterized chemistries into a small, inexpensive and simple platform, we have generated a portable system for nucleic acid and protein extraction that can be performed under a variety of conditions. The isolated nucleic acids are stable and can be transported to a position where power is available for PCR amplification

  17. Mechanism of Nucleic Acid Chaperone Function of Retroviral Nuceleocapsid (NC) Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouzina, Ioulia; Vo, My-Nuong; Stewart, Kristen; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Cruceanu, Margareta; Williams, Mark

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted two main activities of HIV-1 NC protein contributing to its function as a universal nucleic acid chaperone. Firstly, it is the ability of NC to weakly destabilize all nucleic acid,(NA), secondary structures, thus resolving the kinetic traps for NA refolding, while leaving the annealed state stable. Secondly, it is the ability of NC to aggregate NA, facilitating the nucleation step of bi-molecular annealing by increasing the local NA concentration. In this work we use single molecule DNA stretching and gel-based annealing assays to characterize these two chaperone activities of NC by using various HIV-1 NC mutants and several other retroviral NC proteins. Our results suggest that two NC functions are associated with its zinc fingers and cationic residues, respectively. NC proteins from other retroviruses have similar activities, although expressed to a different degree. Thus, NA aggregating ability improves, and NA duplex destabilizing activity decreases in the sequence: MLV NC, HIV NC, RSV NC. In contrast, HTLV NC protein works very differently from other NC proteins, and similarly to typical single stranded NA binding proteins. These features of retroviral NCs co-evolved with the structure of their genomes.

  18. Label-Free Potentiometry for Detecting DNA Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid and DNA Probes

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Tatsuro; Singi, Ankit Balram; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Akira; Torimura, Masaki; Aoki, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry. PMID:23435052

  19. Label-free potentiometry for detecting DNA hybridization using peptide nucleic acid and DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Goda, Tatsuro; Singi, Ankit Balram; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Akira; Torimura, Masaki; Aoki, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2013-02-07

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry.

  20. The use of solid supports to generate nucleic acid carriers.

    PubMed

    Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Díaz-Mochón, Juan José; Sánchez-Martín, Rosario M; Bradley, Mark

    2012-07-17

    Nucleic acids are the foundation stone of all cellular processes. Consequently, the use of DNA or RNA to treat genetic and acquired disorders (so called gene therapy) offers enormous potential benefits. The restitution of defective genes or the suppression of malignant genes could target a range of diseases, including cancers, inherited diseases (cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy, etc.), and viral infections. However, this strategy has a major barrier: the size and charge of nucleic acids largely restricts their transit into eukaryotic cells. Potential strategies to solve this problem include the use of a variety of natural and synthetic nucleic acid carriers. Driven by the aim and ambition of translating this promising therapeutic approach into the clinic, researchers have been actively developing advanced delivery systems for nucleic acids for more than 20 years. A decade ago we began our investigations of solid-phase techniques to construct families of novel nucleic acid carriers for transfection. We envisaged that the solid-phase synthesis of polycationic dendrimers and derivatized polyamimes would offer distinct advantages over solution phase techniques. Notably in solid phase synthesis we could take advantage of mass action and streamlined purification procedures, while simplifying the handling of compounds with high polarities and plurality of functional groups. Parallel synthesis methods would also allow rapid access to libraries of compounds with improved purities and yields over comparable solution methodologies and facilitate the development of structure activity relationships. We also twisted the concept of the solid-phase support on its head: we devised miniaturized solid supports that provided an innovative cell delivery vehicle in their own right, carrying covalently conjugated cargos (biomolecules) into cells. In this Account, we summarize the main outcomes of this series of chemically related projects.

  1. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz [Livermore, CA

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  2. Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as Carriers for Intracellular Delivery of Nucleic Acids and Subsequent Therapeutic Applications.

    PubMed

    Cha, Wenzhang; Fan, Rengen; Miao, Yufeng; Zhou, Yong; Qin, Chenglin; Shan, Xiangxiang; Wan, Xinqiang; Li, Jinbo

    2017-05-11

    Nucleic acids, including DNA, microRNA (miRNA), small interfering RNA (siRNA), and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO), are powerful gene regulators, which have been demonstrated as promising drug candidates for therapeutic treatments. Nevertheless, poor cellular membrane permeability and serum stability have greatly hindered the applications of nucleic acids in biomedicine. To address these issues, associate carriers that can encapsulate and protect nucleic acids are urgently required. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs or MSNPs), which are nanomaterials with excellent biocompatibility, large surface area for functionalization, and tunable pore size for encapsulating different cargos, are emerging as novel and ideal biomaterials for different biomedical applications. In this review paper, we focus on the applications of MSNs in nucleic acid delivery and nucleic acid-guided therapeutic treatments. General strategies for the preparation of nucleic acid-MSN complexes will be firstly introduced, followed by a summary of recent applications of MSNs in nucleic acid delivery and nucleic acid-guided therapeutics.

  3. Recombinase-based isothermal amplification of nucleic acids with self-avoiding molecular recognition systems (SAMRS).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nidhi; Hoshika, Shuichi; Hutter, Daniel; Bradley, Kevin M; Benner, Steven A

    2014-10-13

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an isothermal method to amplify nucleic acid sequences without the temperature cycling that classical PCR uses. Instead of using heat to denature the DNA duplex, RPA uses recombination enzymes to swap single-stranded primers into the duplex DNA product; these are then extended using a strand-displacing polymerase to complete the cycle. Because RPA runs at low temperatures, it never forces the system to recreate base-pairs following Watson-Crick rules, and therefore it produces undesired products that impede the amplification of the desired product, complicating downstream analysis. Herein, we show that most of these undesired side products can be avoided if the primers contain components of a self-avoiding molecular recognition system (SAMRS). Given the precision that is necessary in the recombination systems for them to function biologically, it is surprising that they accept SAMRS. SAMRS-RPA is expected to be a powerful tool within the range of amplification techniques available to scientists.

  4. Application of locked nucleic acids to improve aptamer in vivo stability and targeting function

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Kathrin S.; Borkowski, Sandra; Kurreck, Jens; Stephens, Andrew W.; Bald, Rolf; Hecht, Maren; Friebe, Matthias; Dinkelborg, Ludger; Erdmann, Volker A.

    2004-01-01

    Aptamers are powerful candidates for molecular imaging applications due to a number of attractive features, including rapid blood clearance and tumor penetration. We carried out structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies with the Tenascin-C binding aptamer TTA1, which is a promising candidate for application in tumor imaging with radioisotopes. The aim was to improve its in vivo stability and target binding. We investigated the effect of thermal stabilization of the presumed non-binding double-stranded stem region on binding affinity and resistance against nucleolytic degradation. To achieve maximal thermal stem stabilization melting experiments with model hexanucleotide duplexes consisting of unmodified RNA, 2′-O-methyl RNA (2′-OMe), 2′-Fluoro RNA (2′-F) or Locked Nucleic Acids (LNAs) were initially carried out. Extremely high melting temperatures have been found for an LNA/LNA duplex. TTA1 derivatives with LNA and 2′-OMe modifications within the non-binding stem have subsequently been synthesized. Especially, the LNA-modified TTA1 derivative exhibited significant stem stabilization and markedly improved plasma stability while maintaining its binding affinity to the target. In addition, higher tumor uptake and longer blood retention was found in tumor-bearing nude mice. Thus, our strategy to introduce LNA modifications after the selection procedure is likely to be generally applicable to improve the in vivo stability of aptamers without compromising their binding properties. PMID:15509871

  5. Peptide nucleic acid probes with charged photocleavable mass markers

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Rachel J; Green, Philip S; Gale, Nittaya; Langley, G John

    2010-01-01

    Halogen-labelled peptide organic acid (HPOA) monomers have been synthesised and incorporated into sequence-specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes. Three different types of probe have been prepared; the unmodified PNA probe, the PNA probe with a mass marker, and the PNA probe with photocleavable mass marker. All three types of probe have been used in model studies to develop a mass spectrometry-based hybridisation assay for detection of point mutations in DNA. PMID:21687524

  6. Evidence of Liquid Crystal-Assisted Abiotic Ligation of Nucleic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraccia, Tommaso P.; Zanchetta, Giuliano; Rimoldi, Valeria; Clark, Noel A.; Bellini, Tommaso

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of early life must have been marked by the appearance in the prebiotic era of complex molecular structures and systems, motivating the investigation of conditions that could not only facilitate appropriate chemical synthesis, but also provide the mechanisms of molecular selection and structural templating necessary to pilot the complexification toward specific molecular patterns. We recently proposed and demonstrated that these functions could be afforded by the spontaneous ordering of ultrashort nucleic acids oligomers into Liquid Crystal (LC) phases. In such supramolecular assemblies, duplex-forming oligomers are held in average end-to-end contact to form chemically discontinuous but physically continuous double helices. Using blunt ended duplexes, we found that LC formation could both provide molecular selection mechanisms and boost inter-oligomer ligation. This paper provides an essential extension to this notion by investigating the catalytic effects of LC ordering in duplexes with mutually interacting overhangs. Specifically, we studied the influence of LC ordering of 5'-hydroxy-3'-phosphate partially self-complementary DNA 14mers with 3'-CG sticky-ends, on the efficiency of non-enzymatic ligation reaction induced by water-soluble carbodiimide EDC as condensing agent. We investigated the ligation products in mixtures of DNA with poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) at three PEG concentrations at which the system phase separates creating DNA-rich droplets that organize into isotropic, nematic LC and columnar LC phases. We observe remarkable LC-enhanced chain lengthening, and we demonstrate that such lengthening effectively promotes and stabilizes LC domains, providing the kernel of a positive feedback cycle by which LC ordering promotes elongation, in turn stabilizing the LC ordering.

  7. Evidence of liquid crystal-assisted abiotic ligation of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Fraccia, Tommaso P; Zanchetta, Giuliano; Rimoldi, Valeria; Clark, Noel A; Bellini, Tommaso

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of early life must have been marked by the appearance in the prebiotic era of complex molecular structures and systems, motivating the investigation of conditions that could not only facilitate appropriate chemical synthesis, but also provide the mechanisms of molecular selection and structural templating necessary to pilot the complexification toward specific molecular patterns. We recently proposed and demonstrated that these functions could be afforded by the spontaneous ordering of ultrashort nucleic acids oligomers into Liquid Crystal (LC) phases. In such supramolecular assemblies, duplex-forming oligomers are held in average end-to-end contact to form chemically discontinuous but physically continuous double helices. Using blunt ended duplexes, we found that LC formation could both provide molecular selection mechanisms and boost inter-oligomer ligation. This paper provides an essential extension to this notion by investigating the catalytic effects of LC ordering in duplexes with mutually interacting overhangs. Specifically, we studied the influence of LC ordering of 5'-hydroxy-3'-phosphate partially self-complementary DNA 14mers with 3'-CG sticky-ends, on the efficiency of non-enzymatic ligation reaction induced by water-soluble carbodiimide EDC as condensing agent. We investigated the ligation products in mixtures of DNA with poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) at three PEG concentrations at which the system phase separates creating DNA-rich droplets that organize into isotropic, nematic LC and columnar LC phases. We observe remarkable LC-enhanced chain lengthening, and we demonstrate that such lengthening effectively promotes and stabilizes LC domains, providing the kernel of a positive feedback cycle by which LC ordering promotes elongation, in turn stabilizing the LC ordering.

  8. 77 FR 16126 - Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Nucleic Acid-Based Systems for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Nucleic Acid...: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to reclassify nucleic acid... effectiveness of the device for its intended use. II. Regulatory Background of the Device Nucleic acid-based in...

  9. 78 FR 36698 - Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Nucleic Acid-Based Systems for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... Nucleic Acid-Based Systems for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Respiratory Specimens AGENCY: Food...) is proposing to reclassify nucleic acid-based in vitro diagnostic devices for the detection of... Controls Guideline: Nucleic Acid-Based In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for the Detection of Mycobacterium...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... nucleic acid assays. 866.5910 Section 866.5910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a) Identification. Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. A quality control material...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... nucleic acid assays. 866.5910 Section 866.5910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a) Identification. Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. A quality control material...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... nucleic acid assays. 866.5910 Section 866.5910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a) Identification. Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. A quality control material...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3980 - Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid... § 866.3980 Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay. (a) Identification. A respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay is a qualitative in vitro diagnostic device intended...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3980 - Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid... § 866.3980 Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay. (a) Identification. A respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay is a qualitative in vitro diagnostic device intended...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3980 - Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid... § 866.3980 Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay. (a) Identification. A respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay is a qualitative in vitro diagnostic device intended...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3980 - Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid... § 866.3980 Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay. (a) Identification. A respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay is a qualitative in vitro diagnostic device intended...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3980 - Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid... § 866.3980 Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay. (a) Identification. A respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay is a qualitative in vitro diagnostic device intended...

  18. Nucleic acids encoding antifungal polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Altier, Daniel J.; Ellanskaya, I. A.; Gilliam, Jacob T.; Hunter-Cevera, Jennie; Presnail, James K; Schepers, Eric; Simmons, Carl R.; Torok, Tamas; Yalpani, Nasser

    2010-11-02

    Compositions and methods for protecting a plant from a pathogen, particularly a fungal pathogen, are provided. Compositions include an amino acid sequence, and variants and fragments thereof, for an antipathogenic polypeptide that was isolated from a fungal fermentation broth. Nucleic acid molecules that encode the antipathogenic polypeptides of the invention, and antipathogenic domains thereof, are also provided. A method for inducing pathogen resistance in a plant using the nucleotide sequences disclosed herein is further provided. The method comprises introducing into a plant an expression cassette comprising a promoter operably linked to a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention. Compositions comprising an antipathogenic polypeptide or a transformed microorganism comprising a nucleic acid of the invention in combination with a carrier and methods of using these compositions to protect a plant from a pathogen are further provided. Transformed plants, plant cells, seeds, and microorganisms comprising a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention are also disclosed.

  19. Isolated nucleic acids encoding antipathogenic polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Altier, Daniel J.; Crane, Virginia C.; Ellanskaya, Irina; Ellanskaya, Natalia; Gilliam, Jacob T.; Hunter-Cevera, Jennie; Presnail, James K.; Schepers, Eric J.; Simmons, Carl R.; Torok, Tamas; Yalpani, Nasser

    2010-04-20

    Compositions and methods for protecting a plant from a pathogen, particularly a fungal pathogen, are provided. Compositions include amino acid sequences, and variants and fragments thereof, for antipathogenic polypeptides that were isolated from fungal fermentation broths. Nucleic acids that encode the antipathogenic polypeptides are also provided. A method for inducing pathogen resistance in a plant using the nucleotide sequences disclosed herein is further provided. The method comprises introducing into a plant an expression cassette comprising a promoter operably linked to a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention. Compositions comprising an antipathogenic polypeptide or a transformed microorganism comprising a nucleic acid of the invention in combination with a carrier and methods of using these compositions to protect a plant from a pathogen are further provided. Transformed plants, plant cells, seeds, and microorganisms comprising a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention are also disclosed.

  20. Recent Developments in Peptide-Based Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Veldhoen, Sandra; Laufer, Sandra D.; Restle, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    Despite the fact that non-viral nucleic acid delivery systems are generally considered to be less efficient than viral vectors, they have gained much interest in recent years due to their superior safety profile compared to their viral counterpart. Among these synthetic vectors are cationic polymers, branched dendrimers, cationic liposomes and cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). The latter represent an assortment of fairly unrelated sequences essentially characterised by a high content of basic amino acids and a length of 10–30 residues. CPPs are capable of mediating the cellular uptake of hydrophilic macromolecules like peptides and nucleic acids (e.g. siRNAs, aptamers and antisense-oligonucleotides), which are internalised by cells at a very low rate when applied alone. Up to now, numerous sequences have been reported to show cell-penetrating properties and many of them have been used to successfully transport a variety of different cargos into mammalian cells. In recent years, it has become apparent that endocytosis is a major route of internalisation even though the mechanisms underlying the cellular translocation of CPPs are poorly understood and still subject to controversial discussions. In this review, we will summarise the latest developments in peptide-based cellular delivery of nucleic acid cargos. We will discuss different mechanisms of entry, the intracellular fate of the cargo, correlation studies of uptake versus biological activity of the cargo as well as technical problems and pitfalls. PMID:19325804

  1. Bioreducible polyethylenimine nanoparticles for the efficient delivery of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ruby; Tayal, Shweta; Gupta, K C; Kumar, Pradeep

    2015-03-14

    Recently, non-viral vectors for nucleic acid delivery have received considerable attention. Among the various non-viral vectors, branched polyethylenimine (bPEI, 25 kDa) has been one of the most widely used carrier systems due to its high transfection efficiency, however, it imparts high cytotoxicity. In this study, we have crosslinked bPEI with a bioreducible linker, 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid (DTPA), via electrostatic interactions to obtain DTPA crosslinked bPEI (DP) nanoparticles. The crosslinking significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles. To arrive at the best formulation in terms of nucleic acid transfection, a series of DP nanoparticles were prepared by varying the percentage of crosslinking. The dual action of DTPA, i.e. partial blocking of the charge density as well as crosslinking to convert bPEI into its nanoparticles, did not alter the pDNA condensation ability of the so-formed nanoparticles, rather the strategy favoured the unpackaging of the complexes inside the cells improving the release of pDNA, which resulted in a higher transfection efficiency. All the formulations carried nucleic acids inside the cells and exhibited significantly higher transfection efficiencies than native bPEI and the commercial transfection reagent, Lipofectamine™. Sequential siRNA delivery displayed significant suppression in the target gene expression. All together, the evaluation of the delivery systems demonstrates that the newly synthesized DP NPs are quite promising as non-viral gene carriers.

  2. A viscous solvent enables information transfer from gene-length nucleic acids in a model prebiotic replication cycle.

    PubMed

    He, Christine; Gállego, Isaac; Laughlin, Brandon; Grover, Martha A; Hud, Nicholas V

    2017-04-01

    Many hypotheses concerning the nature of early life assume that genetic information was once transferred through the template-directed synthesis of RNA, before the emergence of coded enzymes. However, attempts to demonstrate enzyme-free, template-directed synthesis of nucleic acids have been limited by 'strand inhibition', whereby transferring information from a template strand in the presence of its complementary strand is inhibited by the stability of the template duplex. Here, we use solvent viscosity to circumvent strand inhibition, demonstrating information transfer from a gene-length template (>300 nt) within a longer (545 bp or 3 kb) duplex. These results suggest that viscous environments on the prebiotic Earth, generated periodically by water evaporation, could have facilitated nucleic acid replication-particularly of long, structured sequences such as ribozymes. Our approach works with DNA and RNA, suggesting that viscosity-mediated replication is possible for a range of genetic polymers, perhaps even for informational polymers that may have preceded RNA.

  3. A viscous solvent enables information transfer from gene-length nucleic acids in a model prebiotic replication cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Christine; Gállego, Isaac; Laughlin, Brandon; Grover, Martha A.; Hud, Nicholas V.

    2016-10-01

    Many hypotheses concerning the nature of early life assume that genetic information was once transferred through the template-directed synthesis of RNA, before the emergence of coded enzymes. However, attempts to demonstrate enzyme-free, template-directed synthesis of nucleic acids have been limited by 'strand inhibition', whereby transferring information from a template strand in the presence of its complementary strand is inhibited by the stability of the template duplex. Here, we use solvent viscosity to circumvent strand inhibition, demonstrating information transfer from a gene-length template (>300 nt) within a longer (545 bp or 3 kb) duplex. These results suggest that viscous environments on the prebiotic Earth, generated periodically by water evaporation, could have facilitated nucleic acid replication—particularly of long, structured sequences such as ribozymes. Our approach works with DNA and RNA, suggesting that viscosity-mediated replication is possible for a range of genetic polymers, perhaps even for informational polymers that may have preceded RNA.

  4. A viscous solvent enables information transfer from gene-length nucleic acids in a model prebiotic replication cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Christine; Gállego, Isaac; Laughlin, Brandon; Grover, Martha A.; Hud, Nicholas V.

    2017-04-01

    Many hypotheses concerning the nature of early life assume that genetic information was once transferred through the template-directed synthesis of RNA, before the emergence of coded enzymes. However, attempts to demonstrate enzyme-free, template-directed synthesis of nucleic acids have been limited by 'strand inhibition', whereby transferring information from a template strand in the presence of its complementary strand is inhibited by the stability of the template duplex. Here, we use solvent viscosity to circumvent strand inhibition, demonstrating information transfer from a gene-length template (>300 nt) within a longer (545 bp or 3 kb) duplex. These results suggest that viscous environments on the prebiotic Earth, generated periodically by water evaporation, could have facilitated nucleic acid replication—particularly of long, structured sequences such as ribozymes. Our approach works with DNA and RNA, suggesting that viscosity-mediated replication is possible for a range of genetic polymers, perhaps even for informational polymers that may have preceded RNA.

  5. Physical chemistry of nucleic acids and their complexes.

    PubMed

    Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2013-12-01

    Studies of the physical properties of nucleic acids began almost immediately following the discovery of the DNA structure. Early investigations focused on the stability and specificity of multi-strand polynucleotide complexes, then gradually on their interaction with other molecules, particularly proteins. As molecular and structural biology expanded to provide detailed information about biochemical mechanisms, physical studies eventually acquired the additional constraint that they should be relevant to functioning biological systems. We describe work in our laboratory that began with investigations of relatively simple questions about the role of electrostatic interactions in the stabilization of multi-strand nucleic acid structures, and evolved to studies of chromatin structure in vitro and within the nucleus. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Nucleic Acid Engineering: RNA Following the Trail of DNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejin; Park, Yongkuk; Kim, Jieun; Jeong, Jaepil; Han, Sangwoo; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-02-08

    The self-assembly feature of the naturally occurring biopolymer, DNA, has fascinated researchers in the fields of materials science and bioengineering. With the improved understanding of the chemical and structural nature of DNA, DNA-based constructs have been designed and fabricated from two-dimensional arbitrary shapes to reconfigurable three-dimensional nanodevices. Although DNA has been used successfully as a building block in a finely organized and controlled manner, its applications need to be explored. Hence, with the myriad of biological functions, RNA has recently attracted considerable attention to further the application of nucleic acid-based structures. This Review categorizes different approaches of engineering nucleic acid-based structures and introduces the concepts, principles, and applications of each technique, focusing on how DNA engineering is applied as a guide to RNA engineering.

  7. Reaction mechanisms of riboflavin triplet state with nucleic acid bases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weizhen; Lu, Changyuan; Du, Fuqiang; Shao, Zhiyong; Han, Zhenhui; Tu, Tiecheng; Yao, Side; Lin, Nianyun

    2006-04-01

    ESR and laser flash photolysis studies have determined a reasonable order of reactivity of nucleotides with triplet riboflavin (3Rb*) for the first time. ESR detection of triplet state reactivity of Rb with nucleoside, polynucleotide and DNA has been obtained simultaneously. In addition, ESR spin elimination measurement of the reactivity of 3Rb* with nucleotides in good accord with laser flash photolysis determination of the corresponding rate constants offers a simple and reliable method to detect the reactivities of nucleic acids and its components with photoexcited flavins. Kinetic, ESR and thermodynamic studies have demonstrated that Rb should be a strong endogenous photosensitizer capable of oxidizing all nucleic acid bases, and preferentially two purine nucleotides with high rate constants.

  8. Microwave-Assisted Rapid Enzymatic Synthesis of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Hari Das, Rakha; Ahirwar, Rajesh; Kumar, Saroj; Nahar, Pradip

    2016-07-02

    Herein we report microwave-induced enhancement of the reactions catalyzed by Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I and avian myeloblastosis virus-reverse transcriptase. The reactions induced by microwaves result in a highly selective synthesis of nucleic acids in 10-50 seconds. In contrast, same reactions failed to give desired reaction products when carried out in the same time periods, but without microwave irradiation. Each of the reactions was carried out for different duration of microwave exposure time to find the optimum reaction time. The products produced by the respective enzyme upon microwave irradiation of the reaction mixtures were identical to that produced by the conventional procedures. As the microwave-assisted reactions are rapid, microwave could be a useful alternative to the conventional and time consuming procedures of enzymatic synthesis of nucleic acids.

  9. Selected Nucleic Acid Precursors in Studies of Aquatic Microbial Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Karl, David M.

    1982-01-01

    The use of radiolabeled nucleosides and nucleic acid bases to estimate the rates of RNA and DNA synthesis in naturally occurring microbial assemblages requires numerous assumptions, several of which are evaluated herein. Comparative time series analyses of the uptake and incorporation, labeling specificity, and extent of catabolism of [2-3H]adenine, [methyl-3H]thymidine, and [5-3H]uridine were performed with pure bacterial and algal cultures, as well as with environmental samples. [3H]thymidine yielded the most variable results, especially with regard to the extent of nonspecific macromolecular labeling. The pathways of [3H]thymidine and [3H]adenine metabolism were further evaluated by isotope dilution methods and by comparing incorporation patterns of thymidine labeled at different sites of the molecule. The advantages, uncertainties, and limitations of the use of radiolabeled nucleic acid precursors in studies of aquatic microbial ecology are discussed and a prospectus for future studies presented. PMID:16346114

  10. Nucleic acid aptamers: research tools in disease diagnostics and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Santosh, Baby; Yadava, Pramod K

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short sequences of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) or peptide molecules which adopt a conformation and bind cognate ligands with high affinity and specificity in a manner akin to antibody-antigen interactions. It has been globally acknowledged that aptamers promise a plethora of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Although use of nucleic acid aptamers as targeted therapeutics or mediators of targeted drug delivery is a relatively new avenue of research, one aptamer-based drug "Macugen" is FDA approved and a series of aptamer-based drugs are in clinical pipelines. The present review discusses the aspects of design, unique properties, applications, and development of different aptamers to aid in cancer diagnosis, prevention, and/or treatment under defined conditions.

  11. Optimization of encoded hydrogel particles for nucleic acid quantification.

    PubMed

    Pregibon, Daniel C; Doyle, Patrick S

    2009-06-15

    The accurate quantification of nucleic acids is of utmost importance for clinical diagnostics, drug discovery, and basic science research. These applications require the concurrent measurement of multiple targets while demanding high-throughput analysis, high sensitivity, specificity between closely related targets, and a wide dynamic range. In attempt to create a technology that can simultaneously meet these demands, we recently developed a method of multiplexed analysis using encoded hydrogel particles. Here, we demonstrate tuning of hydrogel porosity with semi-interpenetrating networks of poly(ethylene glycol), develop a quantitative model to understand hybridization kinetics, and use the findings from these studies to enhance particle design for nucleic acid detection. With an optimized particle design and efficient fluorescent labeling scheme, we demonstrate subattomole sensitivity and single-nucleotide specificity for small RNA targets.

  12. Ultrasensitive nucleic acid sequence detection by single-molecule electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A; Shera, E.B.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year laboratory-directed research and development project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. There has been considerable interest in the development of very sensitive clinical diagnostic techniques over the last few years. Many pathogenic agents are often present in extremely small concentrations in clinical samples, especially at the initial stages of infection, making their detection very difficult. This project sought to develop a new technique for the detection and accurate quantification of specific bacterial and viral nucleic acid sequences in clinical samples. The scheme involved the use of novel hybridization probes for the detection of nucleic acids combined with our recently developed technique of single-molecule electrophoresis. This project is directly relevant to the DOE`s Defense Programs strategic directions in the area of biological warfare counter-proliferation.

  13. A quantitative measure of chirality inside nucleic acid databank.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Adriana; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-08-01

    We show the capability of a chirality index (Pietropaolo et al., Proteins 2008;70:667-677) to investigate nucleic acid structures because of its high sensitivity to helical conformations. By analyzing selected structures of DNA and RNA, we have found that sequences rich in cytosine and guanine have a tendency to left-handed chirality, in contrast to regions rich in adenine or thymine which show strong negative, right-handed, chirality values. We also analyze RNA structures, where specific loops and hairpin motifs are characterized by a well-defined chirality value. We find that in nucleosome the chirality is exalted, whereas in ribosome it is reduced. Our results illustrate the sensitivity of this descriptor for nucleic acid conformations.

  14. A nanoliter-scale nucleic acid processor with parallel architecture.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jong Wook; Studer, Vincent; Hang, Giao; Anderson, W French; Quake, Stephen R

    2004-04-01

    The purification of nucleic acids from microbial and mammalian cells is a crucial step in many biological and medical applications. We have developed microfluidic chips for automated nucleic acid purification from small numbers of bacterial or mammalian cells. All processes, such as cell isolation, cell lysis, DNA or mRNA purification, and recovery, were carried out on a single microfluidic chip in nanoliter volumes without any pre- or postsample treatment. Measurable amounts of mRNA were extracted in an automated fashion from as little as a single mammalian cell and recovered from the chip. These microfluidic chips are capable of processing different samples in parallel, thereby illustrating how highly parallel microfluidic architectures can be constructed to perform integrated batch-processing functionalities for biological and medical applications.

  15. Nucleic Acid Aptamers: Research Tools in Disease Diagnostics and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Yadava, Pramod K.

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short sequences of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) or peptide molecules which adopt a conformation and bind cognate ligands with high affinity and specificity in a manner akin to antibody-antigen interactions. It has been globally acknowledged that aptamers promise a plethora of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Although use of nucleic acid aptamers as targeted therapeutics or mediators of targeted drug delivery is a relatively new avenue of research, one aptamer-based drug “Macugen” is FDA approved and a series of aptamer-based drugs are in clinical pipelines. The present review discusses the aspects of design, unique properties, applications, and development of different aptamers to aid in cancer diagnosis, prevention, and/or treatment under defined conditions. PMID:25050359

  16. The oral microbiota: general overview, taxonomy, and nucleic acid techniques.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2010-01-01

    Application of nucleic acid technology to the analysis of the bacterial diversity in the oral cavity in conditions of health and disease has not only confirmed the findings from early culture studies but also significantly expanded the list of oral inhabitants and candidate pathogens associated with the major oral diseases. Over 800 bacterial distinct species-level taxa have been detected in the oral cavity and recent studies using high-throughput technology suggest that the breadth of bacterial diversity can be much larger. This chapter provides an overview of the diversity and taxonomy of oral bacteria. Emphasis is also given on nucleic acid technologies that have been widely used for the study of the oral microbiota.

  17. Nonviral Approaches for Neuronal Delivery of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Jamie M.; Park, In-Kyu; Horner, Philip J.

    2007-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids to neurons has the potential to treat neurological disease and spinal cord injury. While select viral vectors have shown promise as gene carriers to neurons, their potential as therapeutic agents is limited by their toxicity and immunogenicity, their broad tropism, and the cost of large-scale formulation. Nonviral vectors are an attractive alternative in that they offer improved safety profiles compared to viruses, are less expensive to produce, and can be targeted to specific neuronal subpopulations. However, most nonviral vectors suffer from significantly lower transfection efficiencies than neurotropic viruses, severely limiting their utility in neuron-targeted delivery applications. To realize the potential of nonviral delivery technology in neurons, vectors must be designed to overcome a series of extra- and intracellular barriers. In this article, we describe the challenges preventing successful nonviral delivery of nucleic acids to neurons and review strategies aimed at overcoming these challenges. PMID:17932730

  18. Hands-free sample preparation platform for nucleic acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Baier, T; Hansen-Hagge, T E; Gransee, R; Crombé, A; Schmahl, S; Paulus, C; Drese, K S; Keegan, H; Martin, C; O'Leary, J J; Furuberg, L; Solli, L; Grønn, P; Falang, I M; Karlgård, A; Gulliksen, A; Karlsen, F

    2009-12-07

    A Lab-On-Chip system with an instrument is presented which is capable of performing total sample preparation and automated extraction of nucleic acid from human cell samples fixed in a methanol based solution. The target application is extraction of mRNA from cervical liquid based cytology specimens for detection of transformed HPV-infections. The device accepts 3 ml of sample and performs the extraction in a disposable polymer chip of credit card size. All necessary reagents for cell lysis, washing, and elution are stored on-chip and the extraction is performed in two filter stages; one for cell pre-concentration and the other for nucleic acid capture. Tests performed using cancer cell lines and cervical liquid based cytology specimens confirm the extraction of HPV-mRNA by the system.

  19. Advancing polymeric delivery systems amidst a nucleic acid therapy renaissance

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Paul A.; Pun, Suzie H.; Reineke, Theresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid therapeutics are attracting renewed interest due to recent clinical advances and product approvals. Most leading programs use chemical conjugates, or viral vectors in the case of gene therapy, while several use no delivery system at all. Polymer systems, which have been at the periphery of this renaissance, often involve greater molecular complexity than competing approaches, which must be justified by their advantages. Advanced analytical methods, along with biological tools for characterizing biotransformation and intracellular trafficking, are increasingly being applied to nucleic acid delivery systems including those based on polymers. These frontiers of investigation create the opportunity for an era where highly defined polymer compositions are optimized based on mechanistic insights in a way that has not been previously possible, offering the prospect of greater differentiation from alternatives. This will require integrated collaboration between polymer scientists and those from other disciplines. PMID:24683504

  20. Method for promoting specific alignment of short oligonucleotides on nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Kieleczawa, Jan; Dunn, John J.

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for promoting specific alignment of short oligonucleotides on a nucleic acid polymer. The nucleic acid polymer is incubated in a solution containing a single-stranded DNA-binding protein and a plurality of oligonucleotides which are perfectly complementary to distinct but adjacent regions of a predetermined contiguous nucleotide sequence in the nucleic acid polymer. The plurality of oligonucleotides anneal to the nucleic acid polymer to form a contiguous region of double stranded nucleic acid. Specific application of the methods disclosed include priming DNA synthesis and template-directed ligation.

  1. Developing nucleic acid-based electrical detection systems

    PubMed Central

    Gabig-Ciminska, Magdalena

    2006-01-01

    Development of nucleic acid-based detection systems is the main focus of many research groups and high technology companies. The enormous work done in this field is particularly due to the broad versatility and variety of these sensing devices. From optical to electrical systems, from label-dependent to label-free approaches, from single to multi-analyte and array formats, this wide range of possibilities makes the research field very diversified and competitive. New challenges and requirements for an ideal detector suitable for nucleic acid analysis include high sensitivity and high specificity protocol that can be completed in a relatively short time offering at the same time low detection limit. Moreover, systems that can be miniaturized and automated present a significant advantage over conventional technology, especially if detection is needed in the field. Electrical system technology for nucleic acid-based detection is an enabling mode for making miniaturized to micro- and nanometer scale bio-monitoring devices via the fusion of modern micro- and nanofabrication technology and molecular biotechnology. The electrical biosensors that rely on the conversion of the Watson-Crick base-pair recognition event into a useful electrical signal are advancing rapidly, and recently are receiving much attention as a valuable tool for microbial pathogen detection. Pathogens may pose a serious threat to humans, animal and plants, thus their detection and analysis is a significant element of public health. Although different conventional methods for detection of pathogenic microorganisms and their toxins exist and are currently being applied, improvements of molecular-based detection methodologies have changed these traditional detection techniques and introduced a new era of rapid, miniaturized and automated electrical chip detection technologies into pathogen identification sector. In this review some developments and current directions in nucleic acid-based electrical

  2. Nucleic acid oxidation: an early feature of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bradley-Whitman, Melissa A; Timmons, Michael D; Beckett, Tina L; Murphy, Michael P; Lynn, Bert C; Lovell, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Studies of oxidative damage during the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) suggest its central role in disease pathogenesis. To investigate levels of nucleic acid oxidation in both early and late stages of AD, levels of multiple base adducts were quantified in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA from the superior and middle temporal gyri (SMTG), inferior parietal lobule (IPL), and cerebellum (CER) of age-matched normal control subjects, subjects with mild cognitive impairment, preclinical AD, late-stage AD, and non-AD neurological disorders (diseased control; DC) using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Median levels of multiple DNA adducts in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA were significantly (p ≤ 0.05) elevated in the SMTG, IPL, and CER in multiple stages of AD and in DC subjects. Elevated levels of fapyguanine and fapyadenine in mitochondrial DNA suggest a hypoxic environment early in the progression of AD and in DC subjects. Overall, these data suggest that oxidative damage is an early event not only in the pathogenesis of AD but is also present in neurodegenerative diseases in general. Levels of oxidized nucleic acids in nDNA and mtDNA were found to be significantly elevated in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), preclinical Alzheimer's disease (PCAD), late-stage AD (LAD), and a pooled diseased control group (DC) of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) subjects compared to normal control (NC) subjects. Nucleic acid oxidation peaked early in disease progression and remained elevated. The study suggests nucleic acid oxidation is a general event in neurodegeneration.

  3. Method and apparatus for staining immobilized nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.; Jacobson, Stephen C.

    2000-01-01

    A method for staining immobilized nucleic acids includes the steps of affixing DNA probes to a solid substrate, moving target DNA material into proximity with the DNA probes, whereby the target DNA hybridized with specific ones of the DNA probes, and moving a fluorescent dye into proximity with the hybridized target DNA, whereby the fluorescent dye binds to the hybridized DNA to enable subsequent detection of fluorescence.

  4. Silicon dioxide thin film mediated single cell nucleic acid isolation.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, Evgeny; Dominova, Irina; Shusharina, Natalia; Botman, Stepan; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Patrushev, Maksim

    2013-01-01

    A limited amount of DNA extracted from single cells, and the development of single cell diagnostics make it necessary to create a new highly effective method for the single cells nucleic acids isolation. In this paper, we propose the DNA isolation method from biomaterials with limited DNA quantity in sample, and from samples with degradable DNA based on the use of solid-phase adsorbent silicon dioxide nanofilm deposited on the inner surface of PCR tube.

  5. Silicon Dioxide Thin Film Mediated Single Cell Nucleic Acid Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, Evgeny; Dominova, Irina; Shusharina, Natalia; Botman, Stepan; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Patrushev, Maksim

    2013-01-01

    A limited amount of DNA extracted from single cells, and the development of single cell diagnostics make it necessary to create a new highly effective method for the single cells nucleic acids isolation. In this paper, we propose the DNA isolation method from biomaterials with limited DNA quantity in sample, and from samples with degradable DNA based on the use of solid-phase adsorbent silicon dioxide nanofilm deposited on the inner surface of PCR tube. PMID:23874571

  6. NanoDrop microvolume quantitation of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Philippe; Conklin, Deborah

    2010-11-22

    Biomolecular assays are continually being developed that use progressively smaller amounts of material, often precluding the use of conventional cuvette-based instruments for nucleic acid quantitation for those that can perform microvolume quantitation. The NanoDrop microvolume sample retention system (Thermo Scientific NanoDrop Products) functions by combining fiber optic technology and natural surface tension properties to capture and retain minute amounts of sample independent of traditional containment apparatus such as cuvettes or capillaries. Furthermore, the system employs shorter path lengths, which result in a broad range of nucleic acid concentration measurements, essentially eliminating the need to perform dilutions. Reducing the volume of sample required for spectroscopic analysis also facilitates the inclusion of additional quality control steps throughout many molecular workflows, increasing efficiency and ultimately leading to greater confidence in downstream results. The need for high-sensitivity fluorescent analysis of limited mass has also emerged with recent experimental advances. Using the same microvolume sample retention technology, fluorescent measurements may be performed with 2 μL of material, allowing fluorescent assays volume requirements to be significantly reduced. Such microreactions of 10 μL or less are now possible using a dedicated microvolume fluorospectrometer. Two microvolume nucleic acid quantitation protocols will be demonstrated that use integrated sample retention systems as practical alternatives to traditional cuvette-based protocols. First, a direct A260 absorbance method using a microvolume spectrophotometer is described. This is followed by a demonstration of a fluorescence-based method that enables reduced-volume fluorescence reactions with a microvolume fluorospectrometer. These novel techniques enable the assessment of nucleic acid concentrations ranging from 1 pg/ μL to 15,000 ng/ μL with minimal consumption of

  7. System for portable nucleic acid testing in low resource settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hsiang-Wei; Roskos, Kristina; Hickerson, Anna I.; Carey, Thomas; Niemz, Angelika

    2013-03-01

    Our overall goal is to enable timely diagnosis of infectious diseases through nucleic acid testing at the point-of-care and in low resource settings, via a compact system that integrates nucleic acid sample preparation, isothermal DNA amplification, and nucleic acid lateral flow (NALF) detection. We herein present an interim milestone, the design of the amplification and detection subsystem, and the characterization of thermal and fluidic control and assay execution within this system. Using an earlier prototype of the amplification and detection unit, comprised of a disposable cartridge containing flexible pouches, passive valves, and electrolysis-driven pumps, in conjunction with a small heater, we have demonstrated successful execution of an established and clinically validated isothermal loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) reaction targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) DNA, coupled to NALF detection. The refined design presented herein incorporates miniaturized and integrated electrolytic pumps, novel passive valves, overall design changes to facilitate integration with an upstream sample preparation unit, and a refined instrument design that automates pumping, heating, and timing. Nucleic acid amplification occurs in a two-layer pouch that facilitates fluid handling and appropriate thermal control. The disposable cartridge is manufactured using low-cost and scalable techniques and forms a closed system to prevent workplace contamination by amplicons. In a parallel effort, we are developing a sample preparation unit based on similar design principles, which performs mechanical lysis of mycobacteria and DNA extraction from liquefied and disinfected sputum. Our next step is to combine sample preparation, amplification, and detection in a final integrated cartridge and device, to enable fully automated sample-in to answer-out diagnosis of active tuberculosis in primary care facilities of low-resource and high-burden countries.

  8. Histidine-lysine peptides as carriers of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Leng, Qixin; Goldgeier, Lisa; Zhu, Jingsong; Cambell, Patricia; Ambulos, Nicholas; Mixson, A James

    2007-03-01

    With their biodegradability and diversity of permutations, peptides have significant potential as carriers of nucleic acids. This review will focus on the sequence and branching patterns of peptide carriers composed primarily of histidines and lysines. While lysines within peptides are important for binding to the negatively charged phosphates, histidines are critical for endosomal lysis enabling nucleic acids to reach the cytosol. Histidine-lysine (HK) polymers by either covalent or ionic bonds with liposomes augment transfection compared to liposome carriers alone. More recently, we have examined peptides as sole carriers of nucleic acids because of their intrinsic advantages compared to the bipartite HK/liposome carriers. With a protocol change and addition of a histidine-rich tail, HK peptides as sole carriers were more effective than liposomes alone in several cell lines. While four-branched polymers with a primary repeating sequence pattern of -HHK- were more effective as carriers of plasmids, eight-branched polymers with a sequence pattern of -HHHK- were more effective as carriers of siRNA. Compared to polyethylenimine, HK carriers of siRNA and plasmids had reduced toxicity. When injected intravenously, HK polymers in complex with plasmids encoding antiangiogenic proteins significantly decreased tumor growth. Furthermore, modification of HK polymers with polyethylene glycol and vascular-specific ligands increased specificity of the polyplex to the tumor by more than 40-fold. Together with further development and insight on the structure of HK polyplexes, HK peptides may prove to be useful as carriers of different forms of nucleic acids both in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Application of living free radical polymerization for nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    Chu, David S H; Schellinger, Joan G; Shi, Julie; Convertine, Anthony J; Stayton, Patrick S; Pun, Suzie H

    2012-07-17

    Therapeutic gene delivery can alter protein function either through the replacement of nonfunctional genes to restore cellular health or through RNA interference (RNAi) to mask mutated and harmful genes. Researchers have investigated a range of nucleic acid-based therapeutics as potential treatments for hereditary, acquired, and infectious diseases. Candidate drugs include plasmids that induce gene expression and small, interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that silence target genes. Because of their self-assembly with nucleic acids into virus-sized nanoparticles and high transfection efficiency in vitro, cationic polymers have been extensively studied for nucleic acid delivery applications, but toxicity and particle stability have limited the clinical applications of these systems. The advent of living free radical polymerization has improved the quality, control, and reproducibility of these synthesized materials. This process yields well-defined, narrowly disperse materials with designed architectures and molecular weights. As a result, researchers can study the effects of polymer architecture and molecular weight on transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity, which will improve the design of next-generation vectors. In this Account, we review findings from structure-function studies that have elucidated key design motifs necessary for the development of effective nucleic acid vectors. Researchers have used robust methods such as atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), reverse addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT), and ring-opening metastasis polymerization (ROMP) to engineer materials that enhance extracellular stability and cellular specificity and decrease toxicity. In addition, we discuss polymers that are biodegradable, form supramolecular structures, target specific cells, or facilitate endosomal release. Finally, we describe promising materials with a range of in vivo applications from pulmonary gene delivery to DNA vaccines.

  10. Computational design of nucleic acid feedback control circuits.

    PubMed

    Yordanov, Boyan; Kim, Jongmin; Petersen, Rasmus L; Shudy, Angelina; Kulkarni, Vishwesh V; Phillips, Andrew

    2014-08-15

    The design of synthetic circuits for controlling molecular-scale processes is an important goal of synthetic biology, with potential applications in future in vitro and in vivo biotechnology. In this paper, we present a computational approach for designing feedback control circuits constructed from nucleic acids. Our approach relies on an existing methodology for expressing signal processing and control circuits as biomolecular reactions. We first extend the methodology so that circuits can be expressed using just two classes of reactions: catalysis and annihilation. We then propose implementations of these reactions in three distinct classes of nucleic acid circuits, which rely on DNA strand displacement, DNA enzyme and RNA enzyme mechanisms, respectively. We use these implementations to design a Proportional Integral controller, capable of regulating the output of a system according to a given reference signal, and discuss the trade-offs between the different approaches. As a proof of principle, we implement our methodology as an extension to a DNA strand displacement software tool, thus allowing a broad range of nucleic acid circuits to be designed and analyzed within a common modeling framework.

  11. Nucleic acid-binding specificity of human FUS protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueyin; Schwartz, Jacob C.; Cech, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    FUS, a nuclear RNA-binding protein, plays multiple roles in RNA processing. Five specific FUS-binding RNA sequence/structure motifs have been proposed, but their affinities for FUS have not been directly compared. Here we find that human FUS binds all these sequences with Kdapp values spanning a 10-fold range. Furthermore, some RNAs that do not contain any of these motifs bind FUS with similar affinity. FUS binds RNA in a length-dependent manner, consistent with a substantial non-specific component to binding. Finally, investigation of FUS binding to different nucleic acids shows that it binds single-stranded DNA with three-fold lower affinity than ssRNA of the same length and sequence, while binding to double-stranded nucleic acids is weaker. We conclude that FUS has quite general nucleic acid-binding activity, with the various proposed RNA motifs being neither necessary for FUS binding nor sufficient to explain its diverse binding partners. PMID:26150427

  12. IR-UV photochemistry of protein-nucleic acid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kozub, J.; Edwards, G.

    1995-12-31

    UV light has often been used to induce the formation of covalent bonds between DNA (or RNA) and tightly-bound protein molecules. However, the internal photoreactions of nucleic acids and proteins limit the yield and complicate the analysis of intermolecular crosslinks. In an ongoing search for improved reaction specificity or new photoreactions in these systems, we have employed UV photons from a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser and mid-IR photons from the Vanderbilt FEL. Having crosslinked several protein-nucleic acid systems with nanosecond UV laser pulses, we are currently studying the effect of various IR wavelengths on a model system (gene 32 protein and poly[dT]). We have found that irradiation with sufficiently intense FEL macropulses creates an altered form of gene 32 protein which was not observed with UV-only irradiation. The electrophoretic nobility of the product is consistent with the formation of a specific protein-protein crosslink. No evidence of the non-specific protein damage typically induced by UV light is found. The yield of the new photoproduct is apparently enhanced by exposure to FEL macropulses which are synchronized with UV laser pulses. With ideal exposure parameters, the two-color reaction effectively competes with UV-only reactions. Experiments designed to determine the reaction mechanism and to demonstrate FEL-induced reactions in other protein-nucleic acid systems are currently underway.

  13. Nucleic Acid Sample Preparation using Spontaneous Biphasic Plug Flow

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Peter C.; Strotman, Lindsay N.; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Berthier, Erwin; O’Connell, Rachel; Loeb, Jennifer M.; Berry, Scott M.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid (NA) extraction and purification has become a common technique in both research and clinical laboratories. Current methods require repetitive wash steps with a pipette that is laborious and time consuming making it inefficient for clinical settings. We present here a simple technique that relies on spontaneous biphasic plug flow inside a capillary to achieve sample preparation. By filling the sample with oil, aqueous contaminants were displaced from the captured NA without pipetting wash buffers or use of external force and equipment. mRNA from mammalian cell culture was purified and PCR amplification showed similar threshold cycle values as those obtained from a commercially available kit. HIV viral like particles were spiked into serum and a 5-fold increase in viral RNA extraction yield was achieved compared to the conventional wash method. In addition, viral RNA was successfully purified from human whole blood, and a limit of detection of approximately 14 copies of RNA extracted per sample. The results demonstrate the utility of the current technique for nucleic acid purification for clinical purposes, and the overall approach provides a potential method to implement nucleic acid testing in low resource settings. PMID:23941230

  14. Nucleic acid sample preparation using spontaneous biphasic plug flow.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Peter C; Strotman, Lindsay N; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Berthier, Erwin; O'Connell, Rachel; Loeb, Jennifer M; Berry, Scott M; Beebe, David J

    2013-09-17

    Nucleic acid (NA) extraction and purification has become a common technique in both research and clinical laboratories. Current methods require repetitive wash steps with a pipet that are laborious and time-consuming, making the procedure inefficient for clinical settings. We present here a simple technique that relies on spontaneous biphasic plug flow inside a capillary to achieve sample preparation. By filling the sample with oil, aqueous contaminants were displaced from the captured NA without pipetting wash buffers or use of external force and equipment. mRNA from mammalian cell culture was purified, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification showed similar threshold cycle values as those obtained from a commercially available kit. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral-like particles were spiked into serum and a 5-fold increase in viral RNA extraction yield was achieved compared to the conventional wash method. In addition, viral RNA was successfully purified from human whole blood, and a limit of detection of approximately 14 copies of RNA extracted per sample was determined. The results demonstrate the utility of the current technique for nucleic acid purification for clinical purposes, and the overall approach provides a potential method to implement nucleic acid testing in low-resource settings.

  15. Nucleic acid-lipid membrane interactions studied by DSC.

    PubMed

    Giatrellis, Sarantis; Nounesis, George

    2011-01-01

    The interactions of nucleic acids with lipid membranes are of great importance for biological mechanisms as well as for biotechnological applications in gene delivery and drug carriers. The optimization of liposomal vectors for clinical use is absolutely dependent upon the formation mechanisms, the morphology, and the molecular organization of the lipoplexes, that is, the complexes of lipid membranes with DNA. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has emerged as an efficient and relatively easy-to-operate experimental technique that can straightforwardly provide data related to the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the DNA-lipid complexation and especially to the lipid organization and phase transitions within the membrane. In this review, we summarize DSC studies considering nucleic acid-membrane systems, accentuating DSC capabilities, and data analysis. Published work involving cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic lipids as well as lipid mixtures interacting with RNA and DNA of different sizes and conformations are included. It is shown that despite limitations, issues such as DNA- or RNA-induced phase separation and microdomain lipid segregation, liposomal aggregation and fusion, alterations of the lipid long-range molecular order, as well as membrane-induced structural changes of the nucleic acids can be efficiently treated by systematic high-sensitivity DSC studies.

  16. A homogeneous nucleic acid hybridization assay based on strand displacement.

    PubMed Central

    Vary, C P

    1987-01-01

    A homogeneous nucleic acid hybridization assay which is conducted in solution and requires no separation steps is described. The assay is based on the concept of strand displacement. In the strand displacement assay, an RNA "signal strand" is hybridized within a larger DNA strand termed the "probe strand", which is, in turn, complementary to the target nucleic acid of interest. Hybridization of the target nucleic acid with the probe strand ultimately results in displacement of the RNA signal strand. Strand displacement, therefore, causes conversion of the RNA from double to single-stranded form. The single-strand specificity of polynucleotide phosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.8) allows discrimination between double-helical and single-stranded forms of the RNA signal strand. As displacement proceeds, free RNA signal strands are preferentially phosphorolyzed to component nucleoside diphosphates, including adenosine diphosphate. The latter nucleotide is converted to ATP by pyruvate kinase(EC 2.7.1.40). Luciferase catalyzed bioluminescence is employed to measure the ATP generated as a result of strand displacement. Images PMID:3309890

  17. A microarray-based method to perform nucleic acid selections.

    PubMed

    Aminova, Olga; Disney, Matthew D

    2010-01-01

    This method describes a microarray-based platform to perform nucleic acid selections. Chemical ligands to which a nucleic acid binder is desired are immobilized onto an agarose microarray surface; the array is then incubated with an RNA library. Bound RNA library members are harvested directly from the array surface via gel excision at the position on the array where a ligand was immobilized. The RNA is then amplified via RT-PCR, cloned, and sequenced. This method has the following advantages over traditional resin-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX): (1) multiple selections can be completed in parallel on a single microarray surface; (2) kinetic biases in the selections are mitigated since all RNA binders are harvested from an array via gel excision; (3) the amount of chemical ligand needed to perform a selection is minimized; (4) selections do not require expensive resins or equipment; and (5) the matrix used for selections is inexpensive and easy to prepare. Although this protocol was demonstrated for RNA selections, it should be applicable for any nucleic acid selection.

  18. Molecular Modeling of Nucleic Acid Structure: Electrostatics and Solvation

    PubMed Central

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand the structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as means to sample conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. From this discussion, the major limitations with modeling, in general, were highlighted. These are the difficult issues in sampling conformational space effectively—the multiple minima or conformational sampling problems—and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These are discussed in detail in this unit. PMID:18428877

  19. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: electrostatics and solvation.

    PubMed

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-12-19

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand its structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as a way of sampling conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. This discussion highlighted the major limitations with modeling in general. When sampling conformational space effectively, difficult issues are encountered, such as multiple minima or conformational sampling problems, and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These subjects are discussed in detail in this unit. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Bioluminescence regenerative cycle (BRC) system for nucleic acid quantification assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassibi, Arjang; Lee, Thomas H.; Davis, Ronald W.; Pourmand, Nader

    2003-07-01

    A new label-free methodology for nucleic acid quantification has been developed where the number of pyrophosphate molecules (PPi) released during polymerization of the target nucleic acid is counted and correlated to DNA copy number. The technique uses the enzymatic complex of ATP-sulfurylase and firefly luciferase to generate photons from PPi. An enzymatic unity gain positive feedback is also implemented to regenerate the photon generation process and compensate any decay in light intensity by self regulation. Due to this positive feedback, the total number of photons generated by the bioluminescence regenerative cycle (BRC) can potentially be orders of magnitude higher than typical chemiluminescent processes. A system level kinetic model that incorporates the effects of contaminations and detector noise was used to show that the photon generation process is in fact steady and also proportional to the nucleic acid quantity. Here we show that BRC is capable of detecting quantities of DNA as low as 1 amol (10-18 mole) in 40μlit aqueous solutions, and this enzymatic assay has a controllable dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude. The sensitivity of this technology, due to the excess number of photons generated by the regenerative cycle, is not constrained by detector performance, but rather by possible PPi or ATP (adenosine triphosphate) contamination, or background bioluminescence of the enzymatic complex.

  1. Universal nucleic acids sample preparation method for cells, spores and their mixture

    DOEpatents

    Bavykin, Sergei [Darien, IL

    2011-01-18

    The present invention relates to a method for extracting nucleic acids from biological samples. More specifically the invention relates to a universal method for extracting nucleic acids from unidentified biological samples. An advantage of the presently invented method is its ability to effectively and efficiently extract nucleic acids from a variety of different cell types including but not limited to prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells and/or recalcitrant organisms (i.e. spores). Unlike prior art methods which are focused on extracting nucleic acids from vegetative cell or spores, the present invention effectively extracts nucleic acids from spores, multiple cell types or mixtures thereof using a single method. Important that the invented method has demonstrated an ability to extract nucleic acids from spores and vegetative bacterial cells with similar levels effectiveness. The invented method employs a multi-step protocol which erodes the cell structure of the biological sample, isolates, labels, fragments nucleic acids and purifies labeled samples from the excess of dye.

  2. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  3. Nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided signal amplification strategy for biochemical analysis: status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Qing, Taiping; He, Dinggeng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Wen, Li; Shangguan, Jingfang; Mao, Zhengui; Lei, Yanli

    2016-04-01

    Owing to their highly efficient catalytic effects and substrate specificity, the nucleic acid tool enzymes are applied as 'nano-tools' for manipulating different nucleic acid substrates both in the test-tube and in living organisms. In addition to the function as molecular scissors and molecular glue in genetic engineering, the application of nucleic acid tool enzymes in biochemical analysis has also been extensively developed in the past few decades. Used as amplifying labels for biorecognition events, the nucleic acid tool enzymes are mainly applied in nucleic acids amplification sensing, as well as the amplification sensing of biorelated variations of nucleic acids. With the introduction of aptamers, which can bind different target molecules, the nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided signal amplification strategies can also be used to sense non-nucleic targets (e.g., ions, small molecules, proteins, and cells). This review describes and discusses the amplification strategies of nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided biosensors for biochemical analysis applications. Various analytes, including nucleic acids, ions, small molecules, proteins, and cells, are reviewed briefly. This work also addresses the future trends and outlooks for signal amplification in nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided biosensors.

  4. Increasing the Analytical Sensitivity by Oligonucleotides Modified with Para- and Ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acids – TINA

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Uffe V.; Géci, Imrich; Jøhnk, Nina; Mikkelsen, Nikolaj D.; Pedersen, Erik B.; Lisby, Gorm

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of clinical diagnostic assays using DNA hybridization techniques are limited by the dissociation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) antiparallel duplex helices. This situation can be improved by addition of DNA stabilizing molecules such as nucleic acid intercalators. Here, we report the synthesis of a novel ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (TINA) amidite utilizing the phosphoramidite approach, and examine the stabilizing effect of ortho- and para-TINA molecules in antiparallel DNA duplex formation. In a thermal stability assay, ortho- and para-TINA molecules increased the melting point (Tm) of Watson-Crick based antiparallel DNA duplexes. The increase in Tm was greatest when the intercalators were placed at the 5′ and 3′ termini (preferable) or, if placed internally, for each half or whole helix turn. Terminally positioned TINA molecules improved analytical sensitivity in a DNA hybridization capture assay targeting the Escherichia coli rrs gene. The corresponding sequence from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa rrs gene was used as cross-reactivity control. At 150 mM ionic strength, analytical sensitivity was improved 27-fold by addition of ortho-TINA molecules and 7-fold by addition of para-TINA molecules (versus the unmodified DNA oligonucleotide), with a 4-fold increase retained at 1 M ionic strength. Both intercalators sustained the discrimination of mismatches in the dsDNA (indicated by ΔTm), unless placed directly adjacent to the mismatch – in which case they partly concealed ΔTm (most pronounced for para-TINA molecules). We anticipate that the presented rules for placement of TINA molecules will be broadly applicable in hybridization capture assays and target amplification systems. PMID:21673988

  5. Human jagged polypeptide, encoding nucleic acids and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Li, Linheng; Hood, Leroy

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides an isolated polypeptide exhibiting substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the polypeptide does not have the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. The invention further provides an isolated nucleic acid molecule containing a nucleotide sequence encoding substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the nucleotide sequence does not encode the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. Also provided herein is a method of inhibiting differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells by contacting the progenitor cells with an isolated JAGGED polypeptide, or active fragment thereof. The invention additionally provides a method of diagnosing Alagille Syndrome in an individual. The method consists of detecting an Alagille Syndrome disease-associated mutation linked to a JAGGED locus.

  6. Azide-alkyne cycloaddition for universal post-synthetic modifications of nucleic acids and effective synthesis of bioactive nucleic acid conjugates.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Chih; Lo, Yu-Lun; Hwang, Chi-Ching; Wang, Li-Fang; Wu, Min Hui; Wang, Eng-Chi; Wang, Yun-Ming; Wang, Tzu-Pin

    2014-09-14

    The regioselective post-synthetic modifications of nucleic acids are essential to studies of these molecules for science and applications. Here we report a facile universal approach by harnessing versatile phosphoramidation reactions to regioselectively incorporate alkynyl/azido groups into post-synthetic nucleic acids primed with phosphate at the 5' termini. With and without the presence of copper, the modified nucleic acids were subjected to azide-alkyne cycloaddition to afford various nucleic acid conjugates including a peptide-oligonucleotide conjugate (POC) with high yield. The POC was inoculated with human A549 cells and demonstrated excellent cell-penetrating ability despite cell deformation caused by a small amount of residual copper chelated to the POC. The combination of phosphoramidation and azide-alkyne cycloaddition reactions thus provides a universal regioselective strategy to post-synthetically modify nucleic acids. This study also explicated the toxicity of residual copper in synthesized bioconjugates destined for biological systems.

  7. Metal ion-catalyzed nucleic acid alkylation and fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Browne, Kenneth A

    2002-07-10

    Nucleic acid microarrays are a growing technology in which high densities of known sequences are attached to a substrate in known locations (addressed). Hybridization of complementary sequences leads to a detectable signal such as an electrical impulse or fluorescence. This combination of sequence addressing, hybridization, and detection increases the efficiency of a variety of genomic disciplines including those that profile genetic expression, search for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), or diagnose infectious diseases by sequencing portions of microbial or viral genomes. Incorporation of reporter molecules into nucleic acids is essential for the sensitive detection of minute amounts of nucleic acids on most types of microarrays. Furthermore, polynucleic acid size reduction increases hybridization because of increased diffusion rates and decreased competing secondary structure of the target nucleic acids. Typically, these reactions would be performed as two separate processes. An improvement to past techniques, termed labeling-during-cleavage (LDC), is presented in which DNA or RNA is alkylated with fluorescent tags and fragmented in the same reaction mixture. In model studies with 26 nucleotide-long RNA and DNA oligomers using ultraviolet/visible and fluorescence spectroscopies as well as high-pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, addition of both alkylating agents (5-(bromomethyl)fluorescein, 5- or 6-iodoacetamidofluorescein) and select metal ions (of 21 tested) to nucleic acids in aqueous solutions was critical for significant increases in both labeling and fragmentation, with >or=100-fold increases in alkylation possible relative to metal ion-free reactions. Lanthanide series metal ions, Pb(2+), and Zn(2+) were the most reactive ions in terms of catalyzing alkylation and fragmentation. While oligonucleotides were particularly susceptible to fragmentation at sites containing phosphorothioate moieties, labeling and cleavage reactions

  8. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Robert E.

    2015-12-08

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  9. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone.

    PubMed

    Qualley, Dominic F; Sokolove, Victoria L; Ross, James L

    2015-03-13

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Qualley, Dominic F. Sokolove, Victoria L.; Ross, James L.

    2015-03-13

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. - Highlights: • BLV NC binds strongly to DNA and RNA. • BLV NC promotes mini-TAR annealing as well as HIV-1 NC. • Annealing kinetics suggest a low degree of similarity between BLV NC and HTLV-1 NC.

  11. Sequence specificity of mutagen-nucleic acid complexes in solution: intercalation and mutagen-base pair overlap geometries for proflavine binding to dC-dC-dG-dG and dG-dG-dC-dC self-complementary duplexes.

    PubMed

    Patel, D J; Canuel, L L

    1977-07-01

    The complex formed between the mutagen proflavine and the dC-dC-dG-dG and dG-dG-dC-dC self-complementary tetranucleotide duplexes has been monitored by proton high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 0.1 M phosphate solution at high nucleotide/drug ratios. The large upfield shifts (0.5 to 0.85 ppm) observed at all the proflavine ring nonexchangeable protons on complex formation are consistent with intercalation of the mutagen between base pairs of the tetranucleotide duplex. We have proposed an approximate overlap geometry between the proflavine ring and nearest neighbor base pairs at the intercalation site from a comparison between experimental shifts and those calculated for various stacking orientations. We have compared the binding of actinomycin D, propidium diiodide, and proflavine to self-complementary tetranucleotide sequences dC-dC-dG-dG and dG-dG-dC-dC by UV absorbance changes in the drug bands between 400 and 500 nm. Actinomycin D exhibits a pronounced specificity for sequences with dG-dC sites (dG-dG-dC-dC), while propidium diiodide and proflavine exhibit a specificity for sequences with dC-dG sites (dC-dC-dG-dG). Actinomycin D binds more strongly than propidium diiodide and proflavine to dC-dG-dC-dG (contains dC-dG and dG-dC binding sites), indicative of the additional stabilization from hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions between the pentapeptide lactone rings of actinomycin D and the base pair edges and sugar-phosphate backbone of the tetranucleotide duplex.

  12. Ion-mediated nucleic acid helix-helix interactions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-07-15

    Salt ions are essential for the folding of nucleic acids. We use the tightly bound ion (TBI) model, which can account for the correlations and fluctuations for the ions bound to the nucleic acids, to investigate the electrostatic free-energy landscape for two parallel nucleic acid helices in the solution of added salt. The theory is based on realistic atomic structures of the helices. In monovalent salt, the helices are predicted to repel each other. For divalent salt, while the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann theory predicts only the repulsion, the TBI theory predicts an effective attraction between the helices. The helices are predicted to be stabilized at an interhelix distance approximately 26-36 A, and the strength of the attractive force can reach -0.37 k(B)T/bp for helix length in the range of 9-12 bp. Both the stable helix-helix distance and the strength of the attraction are strongly dependent on the salt concentration and ion size. With the increase of the salt concentration, the helix-helix attraction becomes stronger and the most stable helix-helix separation distance becomes smaller. For divalent ions, at very high ion concentration, further addition of ions leads to the weakening of the attraction. Smaller ion size causes stronger helix-helix attraction and stabilizes the helices at a shorter distance. In addition, the TBI model shows that a decrease in the solvent dielectric constant would enhance the ion-mediated attraction. The theoretical findings from the TBI theory agree with the experimental measurements on the osmotic pressure of DNA array as well as the results from the computer simulations.

  13. Functional nucleic-acid-based sensors for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sett, Arghya; Das, Suradip; Bora, Utpal

    2014-10-01

    Efforts to replace conventional chromatographic methods for environmental monitoring with cheaper and easy to use biosensors for precise detection and estimation of hazardous environmental toxicants, water or air borne pathogens as well as various other chemicals and biologics are gaining momentum. Out of the various types of biosensors classified according to their bio-recognition principle, nucleic-acid-based sensors have shown high potential in terms of cost, sensitivity, and specificity. The discovery of catalytic activities of RNA (ribozymes) and DNA (DNAzymes) which could be triggered by divalent metallic ions paved the way for their extensive use in detection of heavy metal contaminants in environment. This was followed with the invention of small oligonucleotide sequences called aptamers which can fold into specific 3D conformation under suitable conditions after binding to target molecules. Due to their high affinity, specificity, reusability, stability, and non-immunogenicity to vast array of targets like small and macromolecules from organic, inorganic, and biological origin, they can often be exploited as sensors in industrial waste management, pollution control, and environmental toxicology. Further, rational combination of the catalytic activity of DNAzymes and RNAzymes along with the sequence-specific binding ability of aptamers have given rise to the most advanced form of functional nucleic-acid-based sensors called aptazymes. Functional nucleic-acid-based sensors (FNASs) can be conjugated with fluorescent molecules, metallic nanoparticles, or quantum dots to aid in rapid detection of a variety of target molecules by target-induced structure switch (TISS) mode. Although intensive research is being carried out for further improvements of FNAs as sensors, challenges remain in integrating such bio-recognition element with advanced transduction platform to enable its use as a networked analytical system for tailor made analysis of environmental

  14. Interaction of nucleic acids with carbon nanotubes and dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Bidisha; Santosh, Mogurampelly; Maiti, Prabal K

    2012-07-01

    Nucleic acid interaction with nanoscale objects like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and dendrimers is of fundamental interest because of their potential application in CNT separation, gene therapy and antisense therapy. Combining nucleic acids with CNTs and dendrimers also opens the door towards controllable self-assembly to generate various supra-molecular and nano-structures with desired morphologies. The interaction between these nanoscale objects also serve as a model system for studying DNA compaction, which is a fundamental process in chromatin organization. By using fully atomistic simulations, here we report various aspects of the interactions and binding modes of DNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) with CNTs, graphene and dendrimers. Our results give a microscopic picture and mechanism of the adsorption of single- and double-strand DNA (ssDNA and dsDNA) on CNT and graphene. The nucleic acid-CNT interaction is dominated by the dispersive van der Waals (vdW) interaction. In contrast, the complexation of DNA (both ssDNA and dsDNA) and siRNA with various generations of poly-amido-amine (PAMAM) dendrimers is governed by electrostatic interactions. Our results reveal that both the DNA and siRNA form stable complex with the PAMAM dendrimer at a physiological pH when the dendrimer is positively charged due to the protonation of the primary amines. The size and binding energy of the complex increase with increase in dendrimer generation. We also give a summary of the current status in these fields and discuss future prospects.

  15. Immobilization-free electrochemical DNA detection with anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Kongpeth, Jutatip; Jampasa, Sakda; Chaumpluk, Piyasak; Chailapakul, Orawon; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical detection provides a simple, rapid, sensitive and inexpensive method for DNA detection. In traditional electrochemical DNA biosensors, the probe is immobilized onto the electrode. Hybridization with the DNA target causes a change in electrochemical signal, either from the intrinsic signal of the probe/target or through a label or a redox indicator. The major drawback of this approach is the requirement for probe immobilization in a controlled fashion. In this research, we take the advantage of different electrostatic properties between PNA and DNA to develop an immobilization-free approach for highly sequence-specific electrochemical DNA sensing on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) using a square-wave voltammetric (SWV) technique. Anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (AQ-PNA) was employed as a probe together with an SPCE that was modified with a positively-charged polymer (poly quaternized-(dimethylamino-ethyl)methacrylate, PQDMAEMA). The electrostatic attraction between the negatively-charged PNA-DNA duplex and the positively-charged modified SPCE attributes to the higher signal of PNA-DNA duplex than that of the electrostatically neutral PNA probe, resulting in a signal change. The calibration curve of this proposed method exhibited a linear range between 0.35 and 50 nM of DNA target with a limit of detection of 0.13 nM (3SD(blank)/Slope). The sub-nanomolar detection limit together with a small sample volume required (20 μL) allowed detection of <10 fmol (<1 ng) of DNA. With the high specificity of the pyrrolidinyl PNA probe used, excellent discrimination between complementary and various single-mismatched DNA targets was obtained. An application of this new platform for a sensitive and specific detection of isothermally-amplified shrimp's white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) DNA was successfully demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Peptide nucleic acid - an opportunity for bio-nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Anstaett, Philipp; Gasser, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    DNA is a major player in the field of bio-nanotechnology and many interesting applications have been realized using this oligonucleotide. In contrast, the use of peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which is a non-natural, neutral analogue of DNA with superior hybridization strengths compared to DNA, is still in its infancy in bio-nanotechnology. However, as demonstrated in this short review using selected studies, promising examples demonstrating the tremendous opportunities that PNA can offer for bio-nanotechnology were recently described.

  17. Structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, S. A.; Oretskaya, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    The review summarizes published data on the results and achievements in the field of structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes by means of main physical and biochemical methods, including X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron and atomic force microscopy, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, footprinting and cross-linking. Special attention is given to combined approaches. The advantages and limitations of each method are considered, and the prospects of their application for wide-scale structural studies in vivo are discussed. The bibliography includes 145 references.

  18. Nucleic acid programmed polymeric nanomaterials for biological communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rush, Anthony Michael

    A number of nucleic acid-polymer conjugates were synthesized, resulting in amphiphilic polymer-nucleic acid conjugates with the capability to self-assemble into a range of discrete nanoscale architectures. These nanomaterials, termed DNA-polymer amphiphile nanoparticles (DPA NPs), were studied with respect to their enzymatic processing by both endo- and exonucleases and further deployed as antisense genetic regulatory elements in live cultured human cells. DPA NPs were designed to act as substrates for both non sequence-specific exonucleases and a sequence-specific endonuclease. In all cases, nucleic acids arranged in the corona of spherical nanoparticles exhibited increased resistance to nucleolytic cleavage as compared to native single- or double-stranded analogues. For the exonucleases studied (Exonuclease III from E. Coli and phosphodiesterase I from Crotalus adamanteus), nanoparticle display retarded enzymatic processing by roughly a factor of five. For the endonuclease studied (Nt.CviPII), nanoparticle display prohibited virtually all enzyme activity on oligonucleotides within the nanoparticle shell. To test the ability of these materials to regulate mRNA levels in live cultured human cells, LPA (LNA-polymer amphiphile) NPs were designed to be perfectly complementary to a 20-base region of mRNA encoding the anti-apoptosis protein survivin. In this study two key observations were made. The first observation is that packaging LNA into spherical micellar nanoparticles serves to dramatically enhance cellular uptake of LNA based on flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy data. The second observation is that LPA NPs are capable of regulating mRNA levels by what is hypothesized to be activation of target mRNA for catalytic RNase H-mediated degradation. These materials represent a unique class of DNA delivery system capable of rendering nucleic acids with natural backbone chemistry resistant to nuclease degradation and further serving to deliver DNA into cells to

  19. Generating non-overlapping displays of nucleic acid secondary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, B A; Maizel, J; Lipkin, L E; Currey, K; Whitney, C

    1984-01-01

    A new algorithm is presented which permits the display of nucleic acid secondary structure by computer. This algorithm circumvents the problem of overlapping portions of the molecule which is inherent in some other drawing programs. The results from this algorithm may also be used as input to the drawing algorithm previously reported in this journal [1] to untangle most of a drawing. The algorithm also represents the molecule in a form which makes visual comparisons for similarity quite easy since it guarantees that comparable features will reside in the same relative position in the drawings when the drawings are normalized. PMID:6694904

  20. Single-Molecule Studies of Nucleic Acid Interactions Using Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanunu, Meni; Soni, Gautam V.; Meller, Amit

    This chapter presents biophysical studies of single biopolymers using nanopores. Starting from the fundamental process of voltage-driven biopolymer translocation, the understanding of which is a prerequisite for virtually all nanopore applications, the chapter describes recent experiments that resolve nucleic acid structure and its interaction with enzymes, such as exonucleases and polymerases. It then outlines progress made with solid-state nanopores fabricated in ultrathin membranes and discusses experiments describing biopolymer dynamics in synthetic pores. The chapter concludes with a discussion on some of the main challenges facing nanopore technology, as well as on some of the future prospects associated with nanopore-based tools.

  1. Kinetic Monte Carlo method applied to nucleic acid hairpin folding.

    PubMed

    Sauerwine, Ben; Widom, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Kinetic Monte Carlo on coarse-grained systems, such as nucleic acid secondary structure, is advantageous for being able to access behavior at long time scales, even minutes or hours. Transition rates between coarse-grained states depend upon intermediate barriers, which are not directly simulated. We propose an Arrhenius rate model and an intermediate energy model that incorporates the effects of the barrier between simulated states without enlarging the state space itself. Applying our Arrhenius rate model to DNA hairpin folding, we demonstrate improved agreement with experiment compared to the usual kinetic Monte Carlo model. Further improvement results from including rigidity of single-stranded stacking.

  2. X-ray crystal structure of N-6 adenine deoxyribose nucleic acid methyltransferase from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Phidung Hong

    X-ray diffraction by using resonant anomalous scattering has become a popular tool for solving crystal structures in the last ten years with the expanded availability of tunable synchrotron radiation for protein crystallography. Mercury atoms were used for phasing. The crystal structure of N-6 deoxyribose nucleic acid methyltransferase from Streptoccocus pneumoniae (DpnM) was solved by using the Multiple Anomalous Diffraction technique. The crystal structure reveals the formation of mercaptide between the mercury ion and the thiol group on the cysteine amino acid in a hydrophobic environment. The crystal structure contains the bound ligand, S- adenosyl-l-methionine on the surface of the concave opening. The direction of the β-strands on the beta sheets are identical to other solved methyltransferases. The highly conserved motifs, DPPY and the FxGxG, are found to be important in ligand binding and possibly in methyl group transfer. The structure has a concave cleft with an opening on the order of 30 Å that can accommodate a DNA duplex. By molecular modelling coupled to sequence alignment, two other highly conserved residues Arg21 and Gly19 are found to be important in catalysis.

  3. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

  4. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-03-24

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. 14 figs.

  5. Design Considerations for RNA Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs).

    PubMed

    Barnaby, Stacey N; Perelman, Grant A; Kohlstedt, Kevin L; Chinen, Alyssa B; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-09-21

    Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are key components in many cellular processes such as cell division, differentiation, growth, aging, and death. RNA spherical nucleic acids (RNA-SNAs), which consist of dense shells of double-stranded RNA on nanoparticle surfaces, are powerful and promising therapeutic modalities because they confer advantages over linear RNA such as high cellular uptake and enhanced stability. Due to their three-dimensional shell of oligonucleotides, SNAs, in comparison to linear nucleic acids, interact with the biological environment in unique ways. Herein, the modularity of the RNA-SNA is used to systematically study structure-function relationships in order to understand how the oligonucleotide shell affects interactions with a specific type of biological environment, namely, one that contains serum nucleases. We use a combination of experiment and theory to determine the key architectural properties (i.e., sequence, density, spacer moiety, and backfill molecule) that affect how RNA-SNAs interact with serum nucleases. These data establish a set of design parameters for SNA architectures that are optimized in terms of stability.

  6. Design Considerations for RNA Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are key components in many cellular processes such as cell division, differentiation, growth, aging, and death. RNA spherical nucleic acids (RNA-SNAs), which consist of dense shells of double-stranded RNA on nanoparticle surfaces, are powerful and promising therapeutic modalities because they confer advantages over linear RNA such as high cellular uptake and enhanced stability. Due to their three-dimensional shell of oligonucleotides, SNAs, in comparison to linear nucleic acids, interact with the biological environment in unique ways. Herein, the modularity of the RNA-SNA is used to systematically study structure–function relationships in order to understand how the oligonucleotide shell affects interactions with a specific type of biological environment, namely, one that contains serum nucleases. We use a combination of experiment and theory to determine the key architectural properties (i.e., sequence, density, spacer moiety, and backfill molecule) that affect how RNA-SNAs interact with serum nucleases. These data establish a set of design parameters for SNA architectures that are optimized in terms of stability. PMID:27523252

  7. Introduction of structural affinity handles as a tool in selective nucleic acid separations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, III, Richard Coale (Inventor); Cano, Luis Antonio (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The method is used for separating nucleic acids and other similar constructs. It involves selective introduction, enhancement, or stabilization of affinity handles such as single-strandedness in the undesired (or desired) nucleic acids as compared to the usual structure (e.g., double-strandedness) of the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids. The undesired (or desired) nucleic acids are separated from the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids due to capture by methods including but not limited to immobilized metal affinity chromatography, immobilized single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) protein, and immobilized oligonucleotides. The invention is useful to: remove contaminating genomic DNA from plasmid DNA; remove genomic DNA from plasmids, BACs, and similar constructs; selectively separate oligonucleotides and similar DNA fragments from their partner strands; purification of aptamers, (deoxy)-ribozymes and other highly structured nucleic acids; Separation of restriction fragments without using agarose gels; manufacture recombinant Taq polymerase or similar products that are sensitive to host genomic DNA contamination; and other applications.

  8. Solving nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement: examples from group II intron studies

    SciTech Connect

    Marcia, Marco Humphris-Narayanan, Elisabeth; Keating, Kevin S.; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2013-11-01

    Strategies for phasing nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement, using both experimental and de novo designed models, are discussed. Structured RNA molecules are key players in ensuring cellular viability. It is now emerging that, like proteins, the functions of many nucleic acids are dictated by their tertiary folds. At the same time, the number of known crystal structures of nucleic acids is also increasing rapidly. In this context, molecular replacement will become an increasingly useful technique for phasing nucleic acid crystallographic data in the near future. Here, strategies to select, create and refine molecular-replacement search models for nucleic acids are discussed. Using examples taken primarily from research on group II introns, it is shown that nucleic acids are amenable to different and potentially more flexible and sophisticated molecular-replacement searches than proteins. These observations specifically aim to encourage future crystallographic studies on the newly discovered repertoire of noncoding transcripts.

  9. Real-time assays with molecular beacons and other fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Marras, Salvatore A E; Tyagi, Sanjay; Kramer, Fred Russell

    2006-01-01

    A number of formats for nucleic acid hybridization have been developed to identify DNA and RNA sequences that are involved in cellular processes and that aid in the diagnosis of genetic and infectious diseases. The introduction of hybridization probes with interactive fluorophore pairs has enabled the development of homogeneous hybridization assays for the direct identification of nucleic acids. A change in the fluorescence of these probes indicates the presence of a target nucleic acid, and there is no need to separate unbound probes from hybridized probes. The advantages of homogeneous hybridization assays are their speed and simplicity. In addition, homogeneous assays can be combined with nucleic acid amplification, enabling the detection of rare target nucleic acids. These assays can be followed in real time, providing quantitative determination of target nucleic acids over a broad range of concentrations.

  10. A Nucleic Acid Probe and Method for the Detection of Shigella and Enteroinvasive E. coli Bacteria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This invention relates to nucleic acid probes and a method for the rapid detection of Shigella and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, the causative agents of bacterial dysentery, by use of a nucleic acid hybridization probe, equivalent to a plasmid DNA region encoding one of 4 specific invasion-associated, peptides of all strains of Shigella and enterinvasive E . coli , in a nucleic acid hybridization reaction with a clinical specimen containing dysentery bacteria.

  11. Prebiotic synthesis of carboxylic acids, amino acids and nucleic acid bases from formamide under photochemical conditions⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Lorenzo; Mattia Bizzarri, Bruno; Piccinino, Davide; Fornaro, Teresa; Robert Brucato, John; Saladino, Raffaele

    2017-07-01

    The photochemical transformation of formamide in the presence of a mixture of TiO2 and ZnO metal oxides as catalysts afforded a large panel of molecules of biological relevance, including carboxylic acids, amino acids and nucleic acid bases. The reaction was less effective when performed in the presence of only one mineral, highlighting the role of synergic effects between the photoactive catalysts. Taken together, these results suggest that the synthesis of chemical precursors for both the genetic and the metabolic apparatuses might have occurred in a simple environment, consisting of formamide, photoactive metal oxides and UV-radiation.

  12. Design, preparation and application of nucleic acid delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Liu, Hongmei; Zhang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Gene delivery vectors must deliver their cargoes into the cytosol or the nucleus, where DNA or siRNA functions in vivo. Therefore it is crucial for the rational design of the nucleic acid delivery carriers. Compared with viral vectors, non-viral vectors have overcome some fatal defections in gene therapy. Whereas the most important issue for the non-viral vectors is the low transfection efficiency, which hinders the progress of non-viral carriers. Sparked by the structures of the virus and understanding of the process of virus infection, various biomimic structures of non-viral carriers were designed and prepared to improve the transfection issues in vitro and in vivo. However, less impressive results are achieved. In this review, we will investigate the evolution of the virus-mimicking carriers of nucleic acids for gene therapy, especially in cancer therapy; explore and discuss the relationship between the structures, materials and functions of the carriers, to provide guidance for establishing safe and highly efficient non-viral carriers for gene therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reaction of diethyl pyrocarbonate with nucleic acid components. I. Adenine.

    PubMed

    Leonard, N J; McDonald, J J; Reichmann, M E

    1970-09-01

    The use of diethyl pyrocarbonate as a nuclease inhibitor in the preparation of RNA of high molecular weight has prompted a study of the possible reactions of this compound with nucleic acid components under the conditions generally employed for providing inhibition. The first substrate investigated was adenine, which has been found to undergo ring opening with the formation of 5(4)-N-carbethoxyaminoimidazole-4(5)-N'- carbethoxycarboxamidine (II). This product was converted efficiently to isoguanine by treatment with ammonia. The structure of II was established by spectroscopy. For comparisons of reactivity and of spectroscopic and chromatographic properties with the adenine-diethyl pyrocarbonate product, the compounds 9-carbethoxyadenine, 6-N-carbethoxyaminopurine (V), and 6-ethylaminopurine were made; compound V was made by employing the 1-ethoxyethyl protecting group in the synthetic sequence. Purine compounds can be converted to 9-(1-ethoxyethyl) derivatives simply by refluxing in acetal. The facile reaction of adenine with diethyl pyrocarbonate illustrates the importance of gaining information as to the fate of various nucleic acid components in the presence of diethyl pyrocarbonate.

  14. Reaction of Diethyl Pyrocarbonate with Nucleic Acid Components, I. Adenine*

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Nelson J.; McDonald, Jerome J.; Reichmann, M. E.

    1970-01-01

    The use of diethyl pyrocarbonate as a nuclease inhibitor in the preparation of RNA of high molecular weight has prompted a study of the possible reactions of this compound with nucleic acid components under the conditions generally employed for providing inhibition. The first substrate investigated was adenine, which has been found to undergo ring opening with the formation of 5(4)-N-carbethoxyaminoimidazole-4(5)-N′- carbethoxycarboxamidine (II). This product was converted efficiently to isoguanine by treatment with ammonia. The structure of II was established by spectroscopy. For comparisons of reactivity and of spectroscopic and chromatographic properties with the adenine-diethyl pyrocarbonate product, the compounds 9-carbethoxyadenine, 6-N-carbethoxyaminopurine (V), and 6-ethylaminopurine were made; compound V was made by employing the 1-ethoxyethyl protecting group in the synthetic sequence. Purine compounds can be converted to 9-(1-ethoxyethyl) derivatives simply by refluxing in acetal. The facile reaction of adenine with diethyl pyrocarbonate illustrates the importance of gaining information as to the fate of various nucleic acid components in the presence of diethyl pyrocarbonate. PMID:5272333

  15. Constrained Multistate Sequence Design for Nucleic Acid Reaction Pathway Engineering.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Brian R; Porubsky, Nicholas J; Zadeh, Joseph N; Dirks, Robert M; Pierce, Niles A

    2017-03-01

    We describe a framework for designing the sequences of multiple nucleic acid strands intended to hybridize in solution via a prescribed reaction pathway. Sequence design is formulated as a multistate optimization problem using a set of target test tubes to represent reactant, intermediate, and product states of the system, as well as to model crosstalk between components. Each target test tube contains a set of desired "on-target" complexes, each with a target secondary structure and target concentration, and a set of undesired "off-target" complexes, each with vanishing target concentration. Optimization of the equilibrium ensemble properties of the target test tubes implements both a positive design paradigm, explicitly designing for on-pathway elementary steps, and a negative design paradigm, explicitly designing against off-pathway crosstalk. Sequence design is performed subject to diverse user-specified sequence constraints including composition constraints, complementarity constraints, pattern prevention constraints, and biological constraints. Constrained multistate sequence design facilitates nucleic acid reaction pathway engineering for diverse applications in molecular programming and synthetic biology. Design jobs can be run online via the NUPACK web application.

  16. Functional nucleic acids as in vivo metabolite and ion biosensors.

    PubMed

    Alsaafin, Alaa; McKeague, Maureen

    2017-08-15

    Characterizing the role of metabolites, metals, and proteins is required to understand normal cell function, and ultimately, elucidate the mechanism of disease. Metabolite concentration and transformation results collected from cell lysates or fixed-cells conceal important dynamic information and differences between individual cells that often have profound functional consequences. Functional nucleic acid-based biosensors are emerging tools that are capable of monitoring ions and metabolites in cell populations or whole animals. Functional nucleic acids (FNAs) are a class of biomolecules that can exhibit either ligand binding or enzymatic activity. Unlike their protein analogues or the use of instrument-based analysis, FNA-based biosensors are capable of entering cells without disruption to the cellular environment and can report on the concentration, dynamics, and spatial localization of molecules in cells. Here, we review the types of FNAs that have been used as in vivo biosensors, and how FNAs can be coupled to transduction systems and delivered inside cells. We also provide examples from the literature that demonstrate their impact in practical applications. Finally, we comment on the critical limitations that need to be addressed to enable their use for single-cell dynamic tracking of metabolites and ions in vivo. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Roles of intrinsic disorder in protein-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Dyson, H Jane

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and nucleic acids typify the role of disordered segments, linkers, tails and other entities in the function of complexes that must form with high affinity and specificity but which must be capable of dissociating when no longer needed. While much of the emphasis in the literature has been on the interactions of disordered proteins with other proteins, disorder is also frequently observed in nucleic acids (particularly RNA) and in the proteins that interact with them. The interactions of disordered proteins with DNA most often manifest as molding of the protein onto the B-form DNA structure, although some well-known instances involve remodeling of the DNA structure that seems to require that the interacting proteins be disordered to various extents in the free state. By contrast, induced fit in RNA-protein interactions has been recognized for many years-the existence and prevalence of this phenomenon provides the clearest possible evidence that RNA and its interactions with proteins must be considered as highly dynamic, and the dynamic nature of RNA and its multiplicity of folded and unfolded states is an integral part of its nature and function.

  18. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  19. Archaeal Nucleic Acid Ligases and Their Potential in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Cecilia R.; Patrick, Wayne M.

    2015-01-01

    With their ability to catalyse the formation of phosphodiester linkages, DNA ligases and RNA ligases are essential tools for many protocols in molecular biology and biotechnology. Currently, the nucleic acid ligases from bacteriophage T4 are used extensively in these protocols. In this review, we argue that the nucleic acid ligases from Archaea represent a largely untapped pool of enzymes with diverse and potentially favourable properties for new and emerging biotechnological applications. We summarise the current state of knowledge on archaeal DNA and RNA ligases, which makes apparent the relative scarcity of information on in vitro activities that are of most relevance to biotechnologists (such as the ability to join blunt- or cohesive-ended, double-stranded DNA fragments). We highlight the existing biotechnological applications of archaeal DNA ligases and RNA ligases. Finally, we draw attention to recent experiments in which protein engineering was used to modify the activities of the DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus and the RNA ligase from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, thus demonstrating the potential for further work in this area. PMID:26494982

  20. Archaeal Nucleic Acid Ligases and Their Potential in Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Cecilia R; Patrick, Wayne M

    2015-01-01

    With their ability to catalyse the formation of phosphodiester linkages, DNA ligases and RNA ligases are essential tools for many protocols in molecular biology and biotechnology. Currently, the nucleic acid ligases from bacteriophage T4 are used extensively in these protocols. In this review, we argue that the nucleic acid ligases from Archaea represent a largely untapped pool of enzymes with diverse and potentially favourable properties for new and emerging biotechnological applications. We summarise the current state of knowledge on archaeal DNA and RNA ligases, which makes apparent the relative scarcity of information on in vitro activities that are of most relevance to biotechnologists (such as the ability to join blunt- or cohesive-ended, double-stranded DNA fragments). We highlight the existing biotechnological applications of archaeal DNA ligases and RNA ligases. Finally, we draw attention to recent experiments in which protein engineering was used to modify the activities of the DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus and the RNA ligase from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, thus demonstrating the potential for further work in this area.

  1. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  2. Foamy Virus Protein—Nucleic Acid Interactions during Particle Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Martin V.; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Compared with orthoretroviruses, our understanding of the molecular and cellular replication mechanism of foamy viruses (FVs), a subfamily of retroviruses, is less advanced. The FV replication cycle differs in several key aspects from orthoretroviruses, which leaves established retroviral models debatable for FVs. Here, we review the general aspect of the FV protein-nucleic acid interactions during virus morphogenesis. We provide a summary of the current knowledge of the FV genome structure and essential sequence motifs required for RNA encapsidation as well as Gag and Pol binding in combination with details about the Gag and Pol biosynthesis. This leads us to address open questions in FV RNA engagement, binding and packaging. Based on recent findings, we propose to shift the point of view from individual glycine-arginine-rich motifs having functions in RNA interactions towards envisioning the FV Gag C-terminus as a general RNA binding protein module. We encourage further investigating a potential new retroviral RNA packaging mechanism, which seems more complex in terms of the components that need to be gathered to form an infectious particle. Additional molecular insights into retroviral protein-nucleic acid interactions help us to develop safer, more specific and more efficient vectors in an era of booming genome engineering and gene therapy approaches. PMID:27589786

  3. Fast hybridization solution for the detection of immobilized nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Yang, T T; Kain, S R

    1995-03-01

    We have developed a fast hybridization solution, termed ExpressHyb, for the rapid and sensitive detection of nucleic acids immobilized on membrane supports. This solution reduces typical hybridization times of 12-24 h to as little as 1 h while simultaneously increasing the sensitivity of detection in many applications. Using ExpressHyb, human beta-actin mRNA was detected on a human multiple tissue Northern (MTN) blot following a 30-min hybridization, with optimal detection occurring with a 1-h hybridization interval. The moderately abundant human glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) mRNA was detected using similar hybridization conditions and yielded improved signal-to-background characteristics relative to overnight hybridizations in conventional solutions. ExpressHyb can be used with either 32P- or digoxigenin-labeled probes and works effectively with both cDNA and oligonucleotide probes. For non-isotopic detection in particular, ExpressHyb reduces the nonspecific background commonly encountered with this technique. In cDNA library screening, ExpressHyb was found to both reduce the time required for effective hybridizations and to increase the number of positive colonies obtained relative to conventional overnight procedures. Taken together, these results illustrate the broad capability of ExpressHyb Hybridization Solution to improve nucleic acid detection in a variety of important techniques.

  4. Boron and nucleic acid chemistries: merging the best of both worlds.

    PubMed

    Martin, Anthony R; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Smietana, Michael

    2013-07-07

    At the intersection of nucleic acid and boron chemistries lies a thriving world of possibilities. During the past decades, the merging of these research domains has led to fascinating discoveries in different fields ranging from material to medical sciences. In recent years the interplay of these two worlds has gained a lot of attention, as can be judged by the increasing number of articles in which boron and nucleic acids stand out for their potential medicinal, biotechnological or analytical applications. In this review, we present an outline of this crossroads by focusing on both the interaction of boronated compounds with nucleic acids and the modification of nucleic acids by boron containing moieties.

  5. Enzyme-free, signal-amplified nucleic acid circuits for biosensing and bioimaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiyun; Tang, Lijuan; Chu, Xia; Jiang, Jianhui

    2017-08-21

    Enzyme-free, signal-amplified nucleic acid circuits utilize programmed assembly reactions between nucleic acid substrates to transduce a chemical input into an amplified detection signal. These circuits have shown great potential for developing biosensors for high-sensitivity and high-selectivity detection of varying targets including nucleic acids, small molecules and proteins in vitro and for high-contrast in situ visualization and imaging of these targets in tissues and living cells. We review the background of the enzyme-free, signal-amplified nucleic acid circuits, including their mechanism, significance, types and development. We also review current applications of these circuits for biosensors and bioimaging.

  6. Prefibrillar Tau oligomers alter the nucleic acid protective function of Tau in hippocampal neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Violet, Marie; Chauderlier, Alban; Delattre, Lucie; Tardivel, Meryem; Chouala, Meliza Sendid; Sultan, Audrey; Marciniak, Elodie; Humez, Sandrine; Binder, Lester; Kayed, Rakez; Lefebvre, Bruno; Bonnefoy, Eliette; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of DNA and RNA oxidative damage is observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons from Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains at early stages of pathology. We recently reported that Tau is a key nuclear player in the protection of neuronal nucleic acid integrity in vivo under physiological conditions and hyperthermia, a strong inducer of oxidative stress. In a mouse model of tauopathy (THY-Tau22), we demonstrate that hyperthermia selectively induces nucleic acid oxidative damage and nucleic acid strand breaks in the nucleus and cytoplasm of hippocampal neurons that display early Tau phosphorylation but no Tau fibrils. Nucleic acid-damaged neurons were exclusively immunoreactive for prefibrillar Tau oligomers. A similar association between prefibrillar Tau oligomers and nucleic acid oxidative damage was observed in AD brains. Pretreatment with Methylene Blue (MB), a Tau aggregation inhibitor and a redox cycler, reduced hyperthermia-induced Tau oligomerization as well as nucleic acid damage. This study clearly highlights the existence of an early and critical time frame for hyperthermia-induced Tau oligomerization, which most likely occurs through increased oxidative stress, and nucleic acid vulnerability during the progression of Tau pathology. These results suggest that at early stages of AD, Tau oligomerization triggers the loss of the nucleic acid protective function of monomeric Tau. This study highlights the existence of a short therapeutic window in which to prevent the formation of pathological forms of Tau and their harmful consequences on nucleic acid integrity during the progression of Tau pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Antibodies specific for nucleic acids and applications in genomic detection and clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zonglin; Leppla, Stephen H; Li, Baoguang; Elkins, Christopher A

    2014-09-01

    Detection of nucleic acids using antibodies is uncommon. This is in part because nucleic acids are poor immunogens and it is difficult to elicit antibodies having high affinity to each type of nucleic acid while lacking cross-reactivity to others. We describe the origins and applications of a variety of anti-nucleic acid antibodies, including ones reacting with modified nucleosides and nucleotides, single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA, RNA, DNA:RNA hybrids, locked-nucleic acids or peptide nucleic acid:nucleic acid hybrids. Carefully selected antibodies can be excellent reagents for detecting bacteria, viruses, small RNAs, microRNAs, R-loops, cancer cells, stem cells, apoptotic cells and so on. The detection may be sensitive, simple, rapid, specific, reproducible, quantitative and cost-effective. Current microarray and diagnostic methods that depend on cDNA or cRNA can be replaced by using antibody detection of nucleic acids. Therefore, development should be encouraged to explore new utilities and create a robust arsenal of new anti-nucleic acid antibodies.

  8. Accelerated digestion of nucleic acids by pepsin from the stomach of chicken.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Zhang, Y; Guo, H; Wu, W; Dong, P; Liang, X

    2016-10-01

    Nucleic acids have become an important nutritional supplement in poultry feed; however, the digestion of nucleic acids in poultry is unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the digestion of nucleic acids by chicken pepsin in vitro. The extracted pepsinogen from the stomach of the chicken was purified to homogeneity. Upon activation at pH 2.0, chicken pepsinogen was converted to its active form. Nucleic acids, including λ-DNA, salmon sperm DNA and single-strand DNA (ssDNA), can be used as substrates and digested into short-chain oligonucleotides by pepsin. Interestingly, the digestion of the nucleic acids was inhibited when pepsin was treated by alkaline solution (pH 8.0) or pepstatin A. Also, the digestion of the nucleic acids was not affected by the addition of haemoglobin or bovine serum albumin. The results suggested that nucleic acids could be digested by chicken pepsin. Thus pepsin may have a role in digesting nucleic acids in vivo. Nucleic acids added to poultry fed may be digested, starting from the stomach.

  9. Prediction of nucleic acid binding probability in proteins: a neighboring residue network based score.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2015-06-23

    We describe a general binding score for predicting the nucleic acid binding probability in proteins. The score is directly derived from physicochemical and evolutionary features and integrates a residue neighboring network approach. Our process achieves stable and high accuracies on both DNA- and RNA-binding proteins and illustrates how the main driving forces for nucleic acid binding are common. Because of the effective integration of the synergetic effects of the network of neighboring residues and the fact that the prediction yields a hierarchical scoring on the protein surface, energy funnels for nucleic acid binding appear on protein surfaces, pointing to the dynamic process occurring in the binding of nucleic acids to proteins.

  10. Versatile phosphoramidation reactions for nucleic acid conjugations with peptides, proteins, chromophores, and biotin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Pin; Chiou, Yi-Jang; Chen, Yi; Wang, Eng-Chi; Hwang, Long-Chih; Chen, Bing-Hung; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Ko, Chun-Han

    2010-09-15

    Chemical conjugations of nucleic acids with macromolecules or small molecules are common approaches to study nucleic acids in chemistry and biology and to exploit nucleic acids for medical applications. The conjugation of nucleic acids such as oligonucleotides with peptides is especially useful to circumvent cell delivery and specificity problems of oligonucleotides as therapeutic agents. However, current approaches are limited and inefficient in their ability to afford peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs). Here, we report an effective and reproducible approach to prepare POCs and other nucleic acid conjugates based on a newly developed nucleic acid phosphoramidation method. The development of a new nucleic acid phosphoramidation reaction was achieved by our successful synthesis of a novel amine-containing biotin derivative used to systematically optimize the reactions. The improved phosphoramidation reactions dramatically increased yields of nucleic acid-biotin conjugates up to 80% after 3 h reaction. Any nucleic acids with a terminal phosphate group are suitable reactants in phosphoramidation reactions to conjugate with amine-containing molecules such as biotin and fluorescein derivatives, proteins, and, most importantly, peptides to enable the synthesis of POCs for therapeutic applications. Polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to study incorporation of biotin or fluorescein-tagged DNA primers into the reaction products demonstrated that appropriate controls of nucleic acid phosphoramidation reactions incur minimum adverse effects on inherited base-pairing characteristics of nucleotides in nucleic acids. The phosphoramidation approach preserves the integrity of hybridization specificity in nucleic acids when preparing POCs. By retaining integrity of the nucleic acids, their effectiveness as therapeutic reagents for gene silencing, gene therapy, and RNA interference is ensured. The potential for POC use was demonstrated by two-step phosphoramidation reactions to

  11. Nucleic acid delivery: the missing pieces of the puzzle?

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Juliane; Szoka, Francis C.

    2012-01-01

    Conspectus The ability of gene or RNA interference (RNAi) delivery to increase or decrease virtually any protein in a cell opens the path for cures to most diseases that afflict humans. However, their high molecular weight, anionic nature, and instability in the presence of enzymes, pose major obstacles to nucleic acid delivery and frustrates their use as human therapies. This Account describes current ideas on the mechanisms in non-viral nucleic acid delivery and how lipidic and polymeric carriers overcome some of the critical barriers to delivery. A multitude of polymeric and lipidic vectors have been developed over the last 20 years, only a small fraction of them have progressed into clinical trials. Given that none of these vectors has received FDA approval, indicates that the current vectors do not yet have suitable properties for effective in vivo nucleic acid delivery. Nucleic acid delivery is a multistep process and inefficiencies at any stage result in a dramatic decrease in gene delivery or gene silencing. Despite this, the majority of studies investigating synthetic vectors focus solely on optimization of endosomal escape. A small number of studies address how to improve uptake via targeted delivery. A smaller fraction examine the intracellular fate of the delivery systems and nucleic acid cargo. The internalization of genes into the cell nucleus remains an inefficient and mysterious process. In the case of DNA delivery, strategies to increase and accelerate the migration of DNA through the cytoplasm and transport it through the nuclear membrane are required. The barriers to siRNA delivery are fewer: siRNA is more readily released from the carrier, siRNA is more resistant to enzymatic degradation and the target is in the cytoplasm; hence, siRNA delivery systems are becoming a clinical reality. With regard to siRNA therapy, the exact cytoplasmic location of RISC formation and activity is unknown. This makes specific targeting of the RISC for more

  12. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2007-09-25

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  13. BGL4 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2008-01-22

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl4, and the corresponding BGL4 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL4, recombinant BGL4 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  14. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2015-04-14

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  15. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2015-08-11

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  16. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2014-03-25

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  17. BGL6 .beta.-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2012-10-02

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  18. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2013-01-29

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  19. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2012-10-30

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  20. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2014-03-04

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  1. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2008-04-01

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  2. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2008-08-05

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  3. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2011-06-14

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  4. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2009-09-01

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  5. BGL4 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2011-12-06

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl4, and the corresponding BGL4 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL4, recombinant BGL4 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  6. BGL5 .beta.-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2008-03-18

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl5, and the corresponding BGL5 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL5, recombinant BGL5 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  7. Digestion of Nucleic Acids Starts in the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yanfang; Dong, Ping; An, Ran; Xue, Changhu; Ge, Yinlin; Wei, Liangzhou; Liang, Xingguo

    2015-07-14

    The ingestion of nucleic acids (NAs) as a nutritional supplement or in genetically modified food has attracted the attention of researchers in recent years. Discussions over the fate of NAs led us to study their digestion in the stomach. Interestingly, we found that NAs are digested efficiently by human gastric juice. By performing digests with commercial, recombinant and mutant pepsin, a protein-specific enzyme, we learned that the digestion of NAs could be attributed to pepsin rather than to the acidity of the stomach. Further study showed that pepsin cleaved NAs in a moderately site-specific manner to yield 3'-phosphorylated fragments and the active site to digest NAs is probably the same as that used to digest protein. Our results rectify the misunderstandings that the digestion of NAs in the gastric tract begins in the intestine and that pepsin can only digest protein, shedding new light on NA metabolism and pepsin enzymology.

  8. Digestion of Nucleic Acids Starts in the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yanfang; Dong, Ping; An, Ran; Xue, Changhu; Ge, Yinlin; Wei, Liangzhou; Liang, Xingguo

    2015-01-01

    The ingestion of nucleic acids (NAs) as a nutritional supplement or in genetically modified food has attracted the attention of researchers in recent years. Discussions over the fate of NAs led us to study their digestion in the stomach. Interestingly, we found that NAs are digested efficiently by human gastric juice. By performing digests with commercial, recombinant and mutant pepsin, a protein-specific enzyme, we learned that the digestion of NAs could be attributed to pepsin rather than to the acidity of the stomach. Further study showed that pepsin cleaved NAs in a moderately site-specific manner to yield 3′-phosphorylated fragments and the active site to digest NAs is probably the same as that used to digest protein. Our results rectify the misunderstandings that the digestion of NAs in the gastric tract begins in the intestine and that pepsin can only digest protein, shedding new light on NA metabolism and pepsin enzymology. PMID:26168909

  9. Inclusion of nucleic acid contribution into assessment of protein 3d-1D compatibility and prediction of binding sites for nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Fujii, S; Yamagata, Y

    1997-01-01

    The novel three dimensional structure(3D)-amino acid sequence(1D) compatibility program, 3d-1D method has developed and expanded into protein-nucleic acid system. The environment characteristics are determined using the coordinates of backbone atoms and C beta atom. This simplified estimation allows the expanded application to monitor the change of environment class depending on different sequence alignment. This method has improved the detective performance of the different protein into the similar folds. If protein has a wide contact with nucleic acid molecule, the compatibility profile goes down in the contact region without ligand molecule. This phenomenon becomes useful to monitor the binding sites of the bulky ligand such as nucleic acid and to model the protein-nucleic acid complex.

  10. Optimal design of parallel triplex forming oligonucleotides containing Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acids--TINA.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uffe V; Mikkelsen, Nikolaj D; Jøhnk, Nina; Okkels, Limei M; Westh, Henrik; Lisby, Gorm

    2010-07-01

    Twisted intercalating nucleic acid (TINA) is a novel intercalator and stabilizer of Hoogsteen type parallel triplex formations (PT). Specific design rules for position of TINA in triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) have not previously been presented. We describe a complete collection of easy and robust design rules based upon more than 2500 melting points (T(m)) determined by FRET. To increase the sensitivity of PT, multiple TINAs should be placed with at least 3 nt in-between or preferable one TINA for each half helixturn and/or whole helixturn. We find that Delta T(m) of base mismatches on PT is remarkably high (between 7.4 and 15.2 degrees C) compared to antiparallel duplexes (between 3.8 and 9.4 degrees C). The specificity of PT by Delta T(m) increases when shorter TFOs and higher pH are chosen. To increase Delta Tms, base mismatches should be placed in the center of the TFO and when feasible, A, C or T to G base mismatches should be avoided. Base mismatches can be neutralized by intercalation of a TINA on each side of the base mismatch and masked by a TINA intercalating direct 3' (preferable) or 5' of it. We predict that TINA stabilized PT will improve the sensitivity and specificity of DNA based clinical diagnostic assays.

  11. Study of nucleic acid metabolism in two astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, L. D.; Keresztes, P.; Pallos, J. P.; Csató, E.; Predmerszky, T.

    During the last years data have evidenced that alteration in nucleic acid metabolism, expecially increased urinary excretion of modified nucleosides reflects physiological changes in living organism. In relation with the Soyuz-36-Salyut-6-Soyuz-35 mission in 1980 urinary nucleoside excretion of two astronauts /B.F., V.K./ were traced. Individual daily urine samples were collected for 4 days before starting and 6 days after landing and were analysed with improved analytical procedures /affinity chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography/. Levels of 1-methylinosine, 1-methylguanosine and N,2,2-dimethylguanosine in urine were determined. Thus recorded changes differ considerably at two astronauts. One of the /V.K./ excreted nucleosides normally, another /B.F./ showed increase to 200-400 % levels excretion of above nucleosides on the second day after landing. The peak values disappeared on the 3-6 days after. To interpret this phenomenon extreme factors of space-flight /weightlessness, stress, radiations, etc./ have to be taken into consideration. However, we attach importance to training of astronauts. During the last decade data have evidenced that alterations in the metabolism of nucleic acids especial increased urinary excretion of modified nucleosides reflects physiological and in some cases pathological changes in living organism /1, 2, 3/. In relation with the Soyuz-36-Salyut-6-Soyuz-35 mission urinary excretion of certain modified nucleosides of two astronauts /B.F. and V.K./ were measured. The aim of the measurements was: how the metabolism of transfer ribonucleic acids /tRNAs/ refering to cosmic flight, how it is reflected in urinary excretions of modified nucleosides. For these purposes we studied the excretion of methylguanosine, dimethylguanosine and methylinosine. These nucleosides are the normal minor components of tRNA.

  12. [The substance of genetic information--nucleic acids].

    PubMed

    Brdička, R

    2012-01-01

    If we look at the history of our knowledge of nucleic acids, we would see in the distant past of 140 years Friedrich Miescher who had identified the acidic substance within the cell nucleus, which he called nuclein. About 70 years after his initial observation, this substance was connected with genetic information. This very substantial finding happened during the World War II. This was the impulse that research of nucleic acids received to speed up continuously growing mountain of information, which is more and more difficult to understand. Another eruption of new information about our genome was the result of ten years of intensive cooperation of many manufacturers divided into two competitive blocks which offered us knowledge of nucleotide sequence of all 46 DNA molecules. The year 2000 became the landmark marking the start of the postgenomic era. It did not mean that human genome was totally explored, but the cornerstone has been settled. Since then, we could concentrate our efforts on variability; use of the project of 1,000 genomes brought many important findings, eg. copy number variability (CNV) exceeds the single nucleotide polymophisms (SNP). Also intergenomic relationships, studies on function and pathways began to be much more understandable by elucidation of the genome primary structure. NGS as a tool also accelerated the epigenetic research. All this improved molecular diagnostics by discovering many new markers playing their role in disease and treatment and allowed us to enter the field of multifactorial illnesses including cancer. The progress in diagnostic technologies which has happened during the last decade forced our research teams to include other professions - eg. bioinformatics.

  13. Microgel Tethering For Microarray-Based Nucleic Acid Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiaoguang

    Molecular diagnostics (MDx) have radically changed the process of clinical microbial identification based on identifying genetic information, MDx approaches are both specific and fast. They can identify microbes to the species and strain level over a time scale that can be as short as one hour. With such information clinicians can administer the most effective and appropriate antimicrobial treatment at an early time point with substantial implications both for patient well-being and for easing the burden on the health-care system. Among the different MDx approaches, such as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, microarrays, next-generation sequencing, and mass spectrometry, point-of-care MDx platforms are drawing particular interest due to their low cost, robustness, and wide application. This dissertation develops a novel MDx technology platform capable of high target amplification and detection performance. For nucleic acid target detection, we fabricate an array of electron-beam-patterned microgels on a standard glass microscope slide. The microgels can be as small as a few hundred nanometers. The unique way of energy deposition during electron-beam lithography provides the microgels with a very diffuse water -gel interface that enables them to not only serve as substrates to immobilize DNA probes but do so while preserving them in a highly hydrated environment that optimizes their performance. Benefiting from the high spatial resolution provided by such techniques as position-sensitive microspotting and dip-pen nanolithography, multiple oligonucleotide probes known as molecular beacons (MBs) can be patterned on microgels. Furthermore, nucleic acid target amplification can be conducted in direct contact with the microgel-tethered detection array. Specifically, we use an isothermal RNA amplification reaction - nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA). ssRNA amplicons of from the NASBA reaction can directly hybridize with microgel-tethered MBs, and the

  14. Compatible solute influence on nucleic acids: Many questions but few answers

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Compatible solutes are small organic osmolytes including but not limited to sugars, polyols, amino acids, and their derivatives. They are compatible with cell metabolism even at molar concentrations. A variety of organisms synthesize or take up compatible solutes for adaptation to extreme environments. In addition to their protective action on whole cells, compatible solutes display significant effects on biomolecules in vitro. These include stabilization of native protein and nucleic acid structures. They are used as additives in polymerase chain reactions to increase product yield and specificity, but also in other nucleic acid and protein applications. Interactions of compatible solutes with nucleic acids and protein-nucleic acid complexes are much less understood than the corresponding interactions of compatible solutes with proteins. Although we may begin to understand solute/nucleic acid interactions there are only few answers to the many questions we have. I summarize here the current state of knowledge and discuss possible molecular mechanisms and thermodynamics. PMID:18522725

  15. Clinical applications of nucleic acid aptamers in cancer.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jie

    2014-05-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers are small single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotide segments, which bind to their targets with high affinity and specificity via unique three-dimensional structures. Aptamers are generated by an iterative in vitro selection process, termed as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. Owing to their specificity, non-immunogenicity, non-toxicity, easily modified chemical structure and wide range of targets, aptamers appear to be ideal candidates for various clinical applications (diagnosis or treatment), such as cell detection, target diagnosis, molecular imaging and drug delivery. Several aptamers have entered the clinical pipeline for applications in diseases such as macular degeneration, coronary artery bypass graft surgery and various types of cancer. The aim of this review was to summarize and highlight the clinical applications of aptamers in cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Imaging of nucleic acids with atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Ando, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a key tool of nanotechnology with great importance in applications to DNA nanotechnology and to the recently emerging field of RNA nanotechnology. Advances in the methodology of AFM now enable reliable and reproducible imaging of DNA of various structures, topologies, and DNA and RNA nanostructures. These advances are reviewed here with emphasis on methods utilizing modification of mica to prepare the surfaces enabling reliable and reproducible imaging of DNA and RNA nanostructures. Since the AFM technology for DNA is more mature, AFM imaging of DNA is introduced in this review to provide experience and background for the improvement of AFM imaging of RNA. Examples of imaging different structures of RNA and DNA are discussed and illustrated. Special attention is given to the potential use of AFM to image the dynamics of nucleic acids at the nanometer scale. As such, we review recent advances with the use of time-lapse AFM. PMID:21310240

  17. Spherical Nucleic Acids: A New Form of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Joshua Isaac

    Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs) are a new class of nucleic acid-based nanomaterials that exhibit unique properties currently being explored in the contexts of gene-based cancer therapies and in the design of programmable nanoparticle-based materials. The properties of SNAs differ from canonical, linear nucleic acids by virtue of their dense packing into an oriented 3-dimensional array. SNAs can be synthesized from a number of useful nanoparticle templates, such as plasmonic gold and silver, magnetic oxides, luminescent semi-conductor quantum dots, and silica. In addition, by crosslinking the oligonucleotides and dissolving the core, they can be made in a hollow form as well. This dissertation describes the evolution of SNAs from initial studies of inorganic nanoparticle-based materials densely functionalized with oligonucleotides to the proving of a hypothesis that their unique properties can be observed in a core-less structure if the nucleic acids are densely packed and highly oriented. Chapter two describes the synthesis of densely functionalized polyvalent oligonucleotide superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. These particles are shown to exhibit cooperative binding in a density- and salt concentration-dependent fashion, with nearly identical behaviors to those of SNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles. Importantly, these particles are the first non-gold particles shown to be capable of entering cells in high numbers via the SNA-mediated cellular uptake pathway, and provided the first evidence that SNA-mediated cellular uptake is core-independent. In the third chapter, a gold nanoparticle catalyzed alkyne cross-linking reaction is described that is capable of forming hollow organic nanoparticles using polymers with alkyne-functionalized backbones. With this method, the alkyne-modified polymers adsorb to the particle surfaces, cross-link on the surface, allowing the gold nanoparticle to be

  18. Availability: A Metric for Nucleic Acid Strand Displacement Systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    DNA strand displacement systems have transformative potential in synthetic biology. While powerful examples have been reported in DNA nanotechnology, such systems are plagued by leakage, which limits network stability, sensitivity, and scalability. An approach to mitigate leakage in DNA nanotechnology, which is applicable to synthetic biology, is to introduce mismatches to complementary fuel sequences at key locations. However, this method overlooks nuances in the secondary structure of the fuel and substrate that impact the leakage reaction kinetics in strand displacement systems. In an effort to quantify the impact of secondary structure on leakage, we introduce the concepts of availability and mutual availability and demonstrate their utility for network analysis. Our approach exposes vulnerable locations on the substrate and quantifies the secondary structure of fuel strands. Using these concepts, a 4-fold reduction in leakage has been achieved. The result is a rational design process that efficiently suppresses leakage and provides new insight into dynamic nucleic acid networks. PMID:26875531

  19. Drug delivery systems based on nucleic acid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jan Willem; Zhang, Feng; Herrmann, Andreas

    2013-12-10

    The field of DNA nanotechnology has progressed rapidly in recent years and hence a large variety of 1D-, 2D- and 3D DNA nanostructures with various sizes, geometries and shapes is readily accessible. DNA-based nanoobjects are fabricated by straight forward design and self-assembly processes allowing the exact positioning of functional moieties and the integration of other materials. At the same time some of these nanosystems are characterized by a low toxicity profile. As a consequence, the use of these architectures in a biomedical context has been explored. In this review the progress and possibilities of pristine nucleic acid nanostructures and DNA hybrid materials for drug delivery will be discussed. For the latter class of structures, a distinction is made between carriers with an inorganic core composed of gold or silica and amphiphilic DNA block copolymers that exhibit a soft hydrophobic interior.

  20. Nucleic Acid-Based Therapy Approaches for Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vagner, Tatyana; Young, Deborah; Mouravlev, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a dominant mutation that results in an unstable expansion of a CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene leading to a toxic gain of function in huntingtin protein which causes massive neurodegeneration mainly in the striatum and clinical symptoms associated with the disease. Since the mutation has multiple effects in the cell and the precise mechanism of the disease remains to be elucidated, gene therapy approaches have been developed that intervene in different aspects of the condition. These approaches include increasing expression of growth factors, decreasing levels of mutant huntingtin, and restoring cell metabolism and transcriptional balance. The aim of this paper is to outline the nucleic acid-based therapeutic strategies that have been tested to date. PMID:22288011