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Sample records for nucleocapsid protein expressed

  1. Expression from baculovirus and serological reactivity of the nucleocapsid protein of dolphin morbillivirus.

    PubMed

    Grant, Rebecca J; Kelley, Karen L; Maruniak, James E; Garcia-Maruniak, Alejandra; Barrett, Tom; Manire, Charles A; Romero, Carlos H

    2010-07-14

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) was expressed from a baculovirus (Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus) vector and shown by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis to be about 57 kDa. Transmission electron microscopy revealed fully assembled nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) exhibiting the typical helical herringbone morphology. These NLPs were approximately 20-22 nm in diameter and varied in length from 50 to 100 nm. Purified DMV-N protein was used as antigen in an indirect ELISA (iELISA) and shown to react with rabbit and human antisera to measles virus (MV) and dog sera with antibodies to canine distemper virus (CDV). The iELISA was used for the demonstration of morbillivirus antibodies in the serum of cetaceans and manatees, showing potential as a serological tool for the mass screening of morbillivirus antibodies in marine mammals. PMID:20005643

  2. Expression, purification and crystallization of the Crimean–Congo haemorrhagic fever virus nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Carter, S. D.; Barr, J. N.; Edwards, T. A.

    2012-01-01

    Crimean–Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a member of the Nairovirus genus within the Bunyaviridae family of segmented negative-sense RNA viruses. This paper describes the expression, purification and crystallization of full-length CCHFV nucleocapsid (N) protein and the collection of a 2.1 Å resolution X-ray diffraction data set using synchrotron radiation. Crystals of the CCHFV N protein belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 150.38, b = 72.06, c = 101.23 Å, β = 110.70° and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Circular-dichroism analysis provided insight into the secondary structure, whilst gel-filtration analysis revealed possible oligomeric states of the N protein. Structural determination is ongoing. PMID:22691790

  3. Relationship between the intrahepatic expression of 'e' and 'c' epitopes of the nucleocapsid protein of hepatitis B virus and viraemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ballaré, M; Lavarini, C; Brunetto, M R; Petruzzelli, E; Dovis, M; Molino, G; Bonino, F

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between hepatitis B viraemia and intrahepatic HBV nucleocapsid proteins (HBcAg and HBeAg) was studied in 18 patients with chronic hepatitis B. Monoclonal antibodies (MoABs) were obtained in BALB/c mice primed with recombinant HBV nucleocapsid proteins. Four MoABs reacting with recombinant proteins gave positive results in competitive assays. Two reacted as anti-HBc and two as anti-HBe. One of them showed a strong affinity for the cytoplasmic, membrane-bound antigen (P23e) of infected hepatocytes while the latter showed a higher specificity for serum HBeAg than for the intrahepatic antigen. Anti-HBc MoABs had a staining capacity for liver cell nuclei comparable with that of polyclonal antibodies. Overall the anti-HBc MoABs stained the liver cell nuclei in 86% of cases, while anti-HBe MoABs stained in 58% of cases. The hepatocyte cytoplasm was stained by anti-HBc MoABs and anti-HBe MoABs in 64% and 72% of cases respectively. Not one of 12 control liver biopsies was stained. Viraemia (HBV-DNA) was measured by dot blot hybridization and was correlated with the number of hepatocytes containing the nucleocapsid antigen. The highest levels of HBV-DNA (greater than 10(8) genomes/ml) were detected in patients with prevalent nuclear staining while the lowest ones were observed in those with prevalent cytoplasmic expression of this antigen. The application of anti-HBV-nucleocapsid MoABs in diagnostics requires careful scrutiny since some are specific for the circulating antigen while others show a higher affinity for the intrahepatic antigen. PMID:2467769

  4. Cloning and expression of a codon-optimized gene encoding the influenza A virus nucleocapsid protein in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Suebwongsa, Namfon; Panya, Marutpong; Namwat, Wises; Sookprasert, Saovaluk; Redruello, Begoña; Mayo, Baltasar; Alvarez, Miguel A; Lulitanond, Viraphong

    2013-06-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species are envisioned as promising vehicles for the mucosal delivery of therapeutic and prophylactic molecules, including the development of oral vaccines. In this study, we report on the expression of a synthetic nucleocapsid (NP) gene of influenza A virus in Lactobacillus casei. The NP gene was re-designed based on the tRNA pool and the codon usage preference of L. casei BL23. The codon-optimized NP gene was then cloned and expressed in L. casei RCEID02 under the control of a constitutive promoter, that of the lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) gene. The synthetic NP gene was further expressed in L. casei EM116 under the control of an inducible promoter, that of the structural gene of nisin (nisA) from Lactococcus lactis. Based on Western blot analysis, the specific protein band of NP, with a molecular mass of 56.0 kDa, was clearly detected in both expression systems. Thus, our study demonstrates the success of expressing a codon-optimized influenza A viral gene in L. casei. The suitability of the recombinant LAB strains for immunization purposes is currently under evaluation. PMID:24400527

  5. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus nucleocapsid protein: mRNA sequence analysis and expression from recombinant vaccinia virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Amann, V L; Lerch, R A; Anderson, K; Wertz, G W

    1992-04-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the mRNA encoding the nucleocapsid (N) protein of bovine respiratory syncytial (BRS) virus, strain 391-2, was determined. Recombinant vectors containing a cDNA of the complete N gene were constructed, and expression of the N protein in eukaryotic cells was demonstrated using two different vector systems. The BRS virus N mRNA was 1197 nucleotides in length, exclusive of poly(A), and had a single major open reading frame that encoded a polypeptide of 391 amino acids with a calculated M(r) of 42.6K. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the BRS virus N gene were compared to those of human respiratory syncytial (HRS) virus strains A2 and 18537, and to BRS virus strain A51908. The level of nucleic acid identity between the N mRNA of BRS virus 391-2 and both HRS virus subtypes was 80 to 81%, whereas the identity between the two BRS virus strains was 97%. A 93 to 94% level of identity was observed between the deduced amino acid sequences of the N protein of BRS virus 391-2 and the corresponding sequences of the two HRS virus strains. The two BRS virus N proteins differed in amino acid sequence at only three positions. Recombinant BRS virus N protein was expressed using two different vector systems: in cells from a plasmid using the vaccinia virus/T7 polymerase expression system or from a recombinant vaccinia virus. N proteins synthesized by the two vector systems migrated with an electrophoretic mobility identical to that of authentic BRS virus N protein, and were precipitated by anti-BRS virus antibodies.

  6. Structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy and immunoreactivity of recombinant Hendra virus nucleocapsid protein expressed and purified from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lesley A; Yu, Meng; Waddington, Lynne J; Barr, Jennifer A; Scoble, Judith A; Crameri, Gary S; McKinstry, William J

    2015-12-01

    Hendra virus (family Paramyxoviridae) is a negative sense single-stranded RNA virus (NSRV) which has been found to cause disease in humans, horses, and experimentally in other animals, e.g. pigs and cats. Pteropid bats commonly known as flying foxes have been identified as the natural host reservoir. The Hendra virus nucleocapsid protein (HeV N) represents the most abundant viral protein produced by the host cell, and is highly immunogenic with naturally infected humans and horses producing specific antibodies towards this protein. The purpose of this study was to express and purify soluble, functionally active recombinant HeV N, suitable for use as an immunodiagnostic reagent to detect antibodies against HeV. We expressed both full-length HeV N, (HeV NFL), and a C-terminal truncated form, (HeV NCORE), using a bacterial heterologous expression system. Both HeV N constructs were engineered with an N-terminal Hisx6 tag, and purified using a combination of immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Purified recombinant HeV N proteins self-assembled into soluble higher order oligomers as determined by SEC and negative-stain transmission electron microscopy. Both HeV N proteins were highly immuno-reactive with sera from animals and humans infected with either HeV or the closely related Nipah virus (NiV), but displayed no immuno-reactivity towards sera from animals infected with a non-pathogenic paramyxovirus (CedPV), or animals receiving Equivac® (HeV G glycoprotein subunit vaccine), using a Luminex-based multiplexed microsphere assay.

  7. Structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy and immunoreactivity of recombinant Hendra virus nucleocapsid protein expressed and purified from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lesley A; Yu, Meng; Waddington, Lynne J; Barr, Jennifer A; Scoble, Judith A; Crameri, Gary S; McKinstry, William J

    2015-12-01

    Hendra virus (family Paramyxoviridae) is a negative sense single-stranded RNA virus (NSRV) which has been found to cause disease in humans, horses, and experimentally in other animals, e.g. pigs and cats. Pteropid bats commonly known as flying foxes have been identified as the natural host reservoir. The Hendra virus nucleocapsid protein (HeV N) represents the most abundant viral protein produced by the host cell, and is highly immunogenic with naturally infected humans and horses producing specific antibodies towards this protein. The purpose of this study was to express and purify soluble, functionally active recombinant HeV N, suitable for use as an immunodiagnostic reagent to detect antibodies against HeV. We expressed both full-length HeV N, (HeV NFL), and a C-terminal truncated form, (HeV NCORE), using a bacterial heterologous expression system. Both HeV N constructs were engineered with an N-terminal Hisx6 tag, and purified using a combination of immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Purified recombinant HeV N proteins self-assembled into soluble higher order oligomers as determined by SEC and negative-stain transmission electron microscopy. Both HeV N proteins were highly immuno-reactive with sera from animals and humans infected with either HeV or the closely related Nipah virus (NiV), but displayed no immuno-reactivity towards sera from animals infected with a non-pathogenic paramyxovirus (CedPV), or animals receiving Equivac® (HeV G glycoprotein subunit vaccine), using a Luminex-based multiplexed microsphere assay. PMID:26196500

  8. Conformational maturation of measles virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gombart, A F; Hirano, A; Wong, T C

    1993-01-01

    We have obtained a polyclonal antiserum, N-BE, against the denatured, amino-terminal half of the measles virus (MV) nucleocapsid (N) protein and a monoclonal antibody (MAb), N46, which recognizes a conformation-dependent epitope in the same region. Amino acid residues 23 to 239 were required and sufficient for the formation of the conformational epitope. Using these antibodies, we show that the N protein of MV is synthesized as a relatively unfolded protein which first appears in the free-protein pool. This nascent N protein undergoes a conformational change into a more folded mature form. This change does not require the participation of other viral proteins or genomic RNA. The mature N protein does not accumulate in the free-protein pool but is quickly and selectively incorporated into the viral nucleocapsids. The mature N protein is a target for interaction with the phosphoprotein (P protein) of MV. This interaction interferes with the recognition of the N protein by the N46 MAb. This suggests that the association with the P protein may mask the binding site for the N46 MAb or that it induces a conformational change in the N protein. Images PMID:7685410

  9. The Nucleocapsid Protein of Human Coronavirus NL63

    PubMed Central

    Zuwała, Kaja; Golda, Anna; Kabala, Wojciech; Burmistrz, Michał; Zdzalik, Michal; Nowak, Paulina; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Zarebski, Mirosław; Dobrucki, Jerzy; Florek, Dominik; Zeglen, Sławomir; Wojarski, Jacek; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Grzegorz; Pyrc, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Human coronavirus (HCoV) NL63 was first described in 2004 and is associated with respiratory tract disease of varying severity. At the genetic and structural level, HCoV-NL63 is similar to other members of the Coronavirinae subfamily, especially human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E). Detailed analysis, however, reveals several unique features of the pathogen. The coronaviral nucleocapsid protein is abundantly present in infected cells. It is a multi-domain, multi-functional protein important for viral replication and a number of cellular processes. The aim of the present study was to characterize the HCoV-NL63 nucleocapsid protein. Biochemical analyses revealed that the protein shares characteristics with homologous proteins encoded in other coronaviral genomes, with the N-terminal domain responsible for nucleic acid binding and the C-terminal domain involved in protein oligomerization. Surprisingly, analysis of the subcellular localization of the N protein of HCoV-NL63 revealed that, differently than homologous proteins from other coronaviral species except for SARS-CoV, it is not present in the nucleus of infected or transfected cells. Furthermore, no significant alteration in cell cycle progression in cells expressing the protein was observed. This is in stark contrast with results obtained for other coronaviruses, except for the SARS-CoV. PMID:25700263

  10. The nucleocapsid protein of human coronavirus NL63.

    PubMed

    Zuwała, Kaja; Golda, Anna; Kabala, Wojciech; Burmistrz, Michał; Zdzalik, Michal; Nowak, Paulina; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Zarebski, Mirosław; Dobrucki, Jerzy; Florek, Dominik; Zeglen, Sławomir; Wojarski, Jacek; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Grzegorz; Pyrc, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Human coronavirus (HCoV) NL63 was first described in 2004 and is associated with respiratory tract disease of varying severity. At the genetic and structural level, HCoV-NL63 is similar to other members of the Coronavirinae subfamily, especially human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E). Detailed analysis, however, reveals several unique features of the pathogen. The coronaviral nucleocapsid protein is abundantly present in infected cells. It is a multi-domain, multi-functional protein important for viral replication and a number of cellular processes. The aim of the present study was to characterize the HCoV-NL63 nucleocapsid protein. Biochemical analyses revealed that the protein shares characteristics with homologous proteins encoded in other coronaviral genomes, with the N-terminal domain responsible for nucleic acid binding and the C-terminal domain involved in protein oligomerization. Surprisingly, analysis of the subcellular localization of the N protein of HCoV-NL63 revealed that, differently than homologous proteins from other coronaviral species except for SARS-CoV, it is not present in the nucleus of infected or transfected cells. Furthermore, no significant alteration in cell cycle progression in cells expressing the protein was observed. This is in stark contrast with results obtained for other coronaviruses, except for the SARS-CoV.

  11. Expression and inheritance of hypersensitive resistance to rice hoja blanca virus mediated by the viral nucleocapsid protein gene in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Lentini, Z; Lozano, I; Tabares, E; Fory, L; Domínguez, J; Cuervo, M; Calvert, L

    2003-04-01

    Rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV) is a major virus disease of economic importance affecting rice in northern South America, Central America and the Caribbean. This is the first report of transgenic resistance to RHBV and the transformation of an indica rice variety from Latin America. Rice transformed with the RHBV nucleocapsid protein ( N) gene had a significant reduction in disease development. Several reactions were observed that ranged from susceptible to completely resistant plants (immunity). The resistant reactions were characterized by the production of local lesions like a hypersensitive reaction or a recovery phenotype with the emergence of symptom-less new leaves. These transgenic RHBV-resistant rice lines expressed the N gene RNA at low levels that were below the detection limit by Northern blots and only resolved by RT-PCR. The nucleocapsid protein could not be detected in any of the transgenic plants either by Western or ELISA tests. These results suggest that the resistance encoded by the N gene in these plants appears to be mediated by RNA. When challenged with RHBV, the resistant transgenic lines showed a significant increased performance for important agronomic traits including the number of tillers, the number of grains per plant and the yield as compared to the susceptible control. Furthermore, upon inoculation some of the most-resistant transgenic lines showed agronomic traits similar to the uninoculated non-transgenic Cica 8 control. Using both agronomic traits and disease severity as criteria, several of the most-resistant lines were followed through the R(4) generation and demonstrated that the N gene and RHBV resistance was inherited in a stable manner. These transgenic rice lines could become a new genetic resource in developing RHBV-resistant cultivars. PMID:12671749

  12. Heterogeneity in Retroviral Nucleocapsid Protein Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, Christy

    2009-03-01

    Time-resolved single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) chaperone activity as compared to that of the HIV-1 NC protein. HTLV-1 NC contains two zinc fingers with each having a CCHC binding motif similar to HIV-1 NC. HIV-1 NC is required for recognition and packaging of the viral RNA and is also a nucleic acid chaperone protein that facilitates nucleic acid restructuring during reverse transcription. Because of similarities in structures between the two retroviruses, we have used single-molecule fluorescence energy transfer to investigate the chaperoning activity of HTLV-1 NC protein. The results indicate that HTLV-1 NC protein induces structural changes by opening the transactivation response (TAR)-DNA hairpin to an even greater extent than HIV-1 NC. However, unlike HIV-1 NC, HTLV-1 NC does not chaperone the strand-transfer reaction involving TAR-DNA. These results suggest that despite its effective destabilization capability, HTLV-1 NC is not as effective at overall chaperone function as is its HIV-1 counterpart.

  13. Measles virus nucleocapsid protein protects rats from encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Bankamp, B; Brinckmann, U G; Reich, A; Niewiesk, S; ter Meulen, V; Liebert, U G

    1991-01-01

    Lewis rats immunized with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the nucleocapsid (N) protein of measles virus were protected from encephalitis when subsequently challenged by intracerebral infection with neurotropic measles virus. Immunized rats revealed polyvalent antibodies to the N protein of measles virus in the absence of any neutralizing antibodies as well as an N protein-specific proliferative lymphocyte response. Depletion of CD8+ T lymphocytes did not abrogate the protective potential of the N protein-specific cell-mediated immune response in rats, while protection could be adoptively transferred with N protein-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes. These results indicate that a CD4+ cell-mediated immune response specific for the N protein of measles virus is sufficient to control measles virus infections of the central nervous system. Images PMID:1825854

  14. Competitive ELISA for detection of antibodies to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus using recombinant E. coli-expressed nucleocapsid protein as antigen.

    PubMed

    Dea, S; Wilson, L; Therrien, D; Cornaglia, E

    2000-06-01

    The 15 kDa nucleocapsid (N) protein is the most abundant protein of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and is highly antigenic, which therefore makes it a suitable candidate for the detection of virus-specific antibodies and diagnosis of the disease. In this study, complementary DNA corresponding to the entire N gene of the IAF-Klop strain of PRRSV was cloned into the pGEX-4T-1 vector, and the N protein was expressed in Escherichia coli fused to the glutathione S-transferase (GST) protein. The resulting GST-N recombinant fusion protein was purified by affinity chromatography and used as antigen for serological testing by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Two anti-N specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (IAF-K8 and IAF-2B4), obtained following fusion experiments with spleen cells of BAlb/c mice that were immunized with the purified virus, were used in a competitive assay to increase the specificity of the ELISA. Both MAbs were found to be directed against highly conserved conformational epitopes of North American isolates of PRRSV. Optimal concentration of GST-N protein was determined by checkerboard titration, using hyperimmune pig antiserum to the homologous PRRSV strain, and corresponded to a range of 0.1-0.5 microg protein per well. When tested on 95 sera from pigs that were experimentally infected with the IAF-Klop strain, the competitive ELISA (K8-ELISA) was capable of detecting anti-PRRSV antibodies in 86.7% (65/75) and 92.6% (63/68) of pig sera known to be seropositive by indirect immunofluorescence (antibody titers >16) and a currently used commercial ELISA (HerdCheck(R); Idexx), with specificity values of 100 and 96.2%, respectively. When tested on clinical samples (542 sera) from 28 positive and 28 negative pig herds, the K8-ELISA performed in a similar way to HerdCheck(R) and immunofluorescence (IF) tests as shown by kappa values of 0.762 and 0.803. The sensitivity and specificity of K8-ELISA were 100% on a

  15. HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress mediated by UL31 in association with UL34 is impeded by cellular transmembrane protein 140

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Ying; Guo, Lei; Yang, Erxia; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Che, Yanchun; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Qihan

    2014-09-15

    During HSV-1 infection, the viral UL31 protein forms a complex with the UL34 protein at the cellular nuclear membrane, where both proteins play important roles in the envelopment of viral nucleocapsids and their egress into the cytoplasm. To characterize the mechanism of HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress, we screened host proteins to identify proteins that interacted with UL31 via yeast two-hybrid analysis. Transmembrane protein 140 (TMEM140), was identified and confirmed to bind to and co-localize with UL31 during viral infection. Further studies indicated that TMEM140 inhibits HSV-1 proliferation through selectively blocking viral nucleocapsid egress during the viral assembly process. The blockage function of TMEM140 is mediated by impeding the formation of the UL31–UL34 complex due to competitive binding to UL31. Collectively, these data suggest the essentiality of the UL31–UL34 interaction in the viral nucleocapsid egress process and provide a new anti-HSV-1 strategy in viral assembly process of nucleocapsid egress. - Highlights: • Cellular TMEM140 protein interacts with HSV-1 UL31 protein during viral infection. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 leads to inhibition of HSV-1 proliferation. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 blocks HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress process. • Binding to UL31 of TMEM140 impedes formation of HSV-1 UL31–UL34 complex.

  16. Low stability of nucleocapsid protein in SARS virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulong; Wu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Yihua; Li, Bing; Zhou, Hao; Yuan, Guiyong; Fu, Yan; Luo, Yongzhang

    2004-08-31

    The nucleocapsid protein (N protein) is one of the major virion structural proteins of a newly identified coronavirus, which has been confirmed as the causative agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The major function of N protein is to assemble the RNA of coronavirus. In the present study, the gene encoding the N protein was cloned and the protein was expressed, purified, and refolded as shown by (1)H NMR measurement. The maximal Trp emission wavelength occurs near 331 nm, suggesting substantial burial of Trp residues. Circular dichroism measurements indicate that N protein contains little alpha-helical structure. Acid titration shows that N protein begins to unfold near pH 5 and is fully denatured near pH 2.7, and the acid unfolding process is reversible. The physical and chemical properties of N protein indicate that its stability is low. N protein is denatured reversibly at pH 7.4 either by urea (with C(m) of 2.77 M and m value of 2.74 kcal mol(-1) M(-1)) or GdmCl (with C(m) of 1.46 M and m value of 4.50 kcal mol(-1) M(-1)). In the heat-induced denaturation in phosphate-buffered saline buffer, N-protein starts to unfold at 35 degrees C and is completely denatured at 55 degrees C, where SARS virus was also reported to be inactivated. We propose that the low stability of N protein may be critical for the stability and function of SARS virus.

  17. Identification of in vivo-interacting domains of the murine coronavirus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Kelley R; Koetzner, Cheri A; Masters, Paul S

    2009-07-01

    The coronavirus nucleocapsid protein (N), together with the large, positive-strand RNA viral genome, forms a helically symmetric nucleocapsid. This ribonucleoprotein structure becomes packaged into virions through association with the carboxy-terminal endodomain of the membrane protein (M), which is the principal constituent of the virion envelope. Previous work with the prototype coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) has shown that a major determinant of the N-M interaction maps to the carboxy-terminal domain 3 of the N protein. To explore other domain interactions of the MHV N protein, we expressed a series of segments of the MHV N protein as fusions with green fluorescent protein (GFP) during the course of viral infection. We found that two of these GFP-N-domain fusion proteins were selectively packaged into virions as the result of tight binding to the N protein in the viral nucleocapsid, in a manner that did not involve association with either M protein or RNA. The nature of each type of binding was further explored through genetic analysis. Our results defined two strongly interacting regions of the N protein. One is the same domain 3 that is critical for M protein recognition during assembly. The other is domain N1b, which corresponds to the N-terminal domain that has been structurally characterized in detail for two other coronaviruses, infectious bronchitis virus and the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

  18. Trafficking motifs in the SARS-coronavirus nucleocapsid protein

    SciTech Connect

    You, Jae-Hwan; Reed, Mark L.; Hiscox, Julian A. . E-mail: j.a.hiscox@leeds.ac.uk

    2007-07-13

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is involved in virus replication and modulation of cell processes. In this latter respect control may in part be achieved through the sub-cellular localisation of the protein. N protein predominately localises in the cytoplasm (the site of virus replication and assembly) but also in the nucleus/nucleolus. Using a combination of live-cell and confocal microscopy coupled to mutagenesis we identified a cryptic nucleolar localisation signal in the central part of the N protein. In addition, based on structural comparison to the avian coronavirus N protein, a nuclear export signal was identified in the C-terminal region of the protein.

  19. Modulation of apoptosis and immune signaling pathways by the Hantaan virus nucleocapsid protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ontiveros, Steven J.; Li Qianjun; Jonsson, Colleen B.

    2010-06-05

    Herein, we show a direct relationship between the Hantaan virus (HTNV) nucleocapsid (N) protein and the modulation of apoptosis. We observed an increase in caspase-7 and -8, but not -9 in cells expressing HTNV N protein mutants lacking amino acids 270-330. Similar results were observed for the New World hantavirus, Andes virus. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) was sequestered in the cytoplasm after tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) stimulation in cells expressing HTNV N protein. Further, TNFR stimulated cells expressing HTNV N protein inhibited caspase activation. In contrast, cells expressing N protein truncations lacking the region from amino acids 270-330 were unable to inhibit nuclear import of NF-kappaB and the mutants also triggered caspase activity. These results suggest that the HTNV circumvents host antiviral signaling and apoptotic response mediated by the TNFR pathway through host interactions with the N protein.

  20. Sequences of the vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein involved in binding to nucleocapsids.

    PubMed

    Kaptur, P E; Rhodes, R B; Lyles, D S

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to study the physical structure of the nucleocapsid-M protein complex of vesicular stomatitis virus by analysis of nucleocapsid binding by wild-type and mutant M proteins and by limited proteolysis. We used the temperature-sensitive M protein mutant tsO23 and six temperature-stable revertants of tsO23 to test the effect of sequence changes on M protein binding to the nucleocapsid as a function of NaCl concentration. The results showed that M proteins from wild-type, mutant, and three of the revertant viruses had similar NaCl titration curves, while the curve for M proteins from the other three revertants differed significantly. The altered NaCl dependence of M protein was correlated with a single amino acid substitution from Phe to Leu at position 111 compared with the original temperature-sensitive mutant and was not correlated with a substitution of Gly to Glu at position 21 in tsO23 and the revertants. To determine whether protease cleavage sites in the M protein were protected by interaction with the nucleocapsid, nucleocapsid-M protein complexes were subjected to limited proteolysis with trypsin, chymotrypsin, or Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease. The initial trypsin and chymotrypsin cleavage sites, located after amino acids 19 and 20, respectively, were as accessible to proteases when M protein was bound to the nucleocapsid as when it was purified, indicating that this region of the protein does not interact directly with the nucleocapsid. Furthermore, trypsin or chymotrypsin treatment released the M protein fragments from the nucleocapsid, presumably due to conformational changes following proteolysis. V8 protease cleaved the M protein at position 34 or 50, producing two distinct fragments. The M protein fragment produced by V8 protease cleavage at position 34 remained associated with the nucleocapsid, while the fragment produced by cleavage at position 50 was released from the nucleocapsid. These results suggest that the

  1. Construction of murine coronavirus mutants containing interspecies chimeric nucleocapsid proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Peng, D; Koetzner, C A; McMahon, T; Zhu, Y; Masters, P S

    1995-01-01

    Targeted RNA recombination was used to construct mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) mutants containing chimeric nucleocapsid (N) protein genes in which segments of the bovine coronavirus N gene were substituted in place of their corresponding MHV sequences. This defined portions of the two N proteins that, despite evolutionary divergence, have remained functionally equivalent. These regions included most of the centrally located RNA-binding domain and two putative spacers that link the three domains of the N protein. By contrast, the amino terminus of N, the acidic carboxy-terminal domain, and a serine- and arginine-rich segment of the central domain could not be transferred from bovine coronavirus to MHV, presumably because these parts of the molecule participate in protein-protein interactions that are specific for each virus (or, possibly, each host). Our results demonstrate that targeted recombination can be used to make extensive substitutions in the coronavirus genome and can generate recombinants that could not otherwise be made between two viruses separated by a species barrier. The implications of these findings for N protein structure and function as well as for coronavirus RNA recombination are discussed. PMID:7636993

  2. Antibody study in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein gene-immunized mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, B; Li, X Y; Zhu, T; Yuan, L; Hu, J P; Chen, J; Gao, W; Ren, W Z

    2015-01-01

    The gene for the nucleocapsid (N) protein of canine distemper virus was cloned into the pMD-18T vector, and positive recombinant plasmids were obtained by enzyme digestion and sequencing. After digestion by both EcoRI and KpnI, the plasmid was directionally cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA; the positive clone pcDNA-N was screened by electrophoresis and then transfected into COS-7 cells. Immunofluorescence analysis results showed that the canine distemper virus N protein was expressed in the cytoplasm of transfected COS-7 cells. After emulsification in Freund's adjuvant, the recombinant plasmid pcDNA-N was injected into the abdominal cavity of 8-week-old BABL/c mice, with the pcDNA original vector used as a negative control. Mice were immunized 3 times every 2 weeks. The blood of immunized mice was drawn 2 weeks after completing the immunizations to measure titer levels. The antibody titer in the pcDNA-N test was 10(1.62 ± 0.164), while in the control group this value was 10(0.52 ± 0.56), indicating that specific humoral immunity was induced in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein-immunized mice. PMID:25966074

  3. Specific interaction between coronavirus leader RNA and nucleocapsid protein

    SciTech Connect

    Stohlman, S.A.; Baric, R.S.; Nelson, G.N.; Soe, L.H.; Welter, L.M.; Deans, R.J.

    1988-11-01

    Northwestern blot analysis in the presence of competitor RNA was used to examine the interaction between the mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) nucleocapsid protein (N) and virus-specific RNAs. The authors accompanying article demonstrates that anti-N monoclonal antibodies immunoprecipitated all seven MHV-specific RNAs as well as the small leader-containing RNAs from infected cells. In this article the authors report that a Northwestern blotting protocol using radiolabeled viral RNAs in the presence of host cell competitor RNA can be used to demonstrate a high-affinity interaction between the MHV N protein and the virus-specific RNAs. Further, RNA probes prepared by in vitro transcription were used to define the sequences that participate in such high-affinity binding. A specific interaction occurs between the N protein and sequences contained with the leader RNA which is conserved at the 5' end of all MHV RNAs. They have further defined the binding sites to the area of nucleotides 56 to 65 at the 3' end of the leader RNA and suggest that this interaction may play an important role in the discontinuous nonprocessive RNA transcriptional process unique to coronaviruses.

  4. Synthesis of human parainfluenza virus 2 nucleocapsid protein in yeast as nucleocapsid-like particles and investigation of its antigenic structure.

    PubMed

    Bulavaitė, Aistė; Lasickienė, Rita; Vaitiekaitė, Aušra; Sasnauskas, Kęstutis; Žvirblienė, Aurelija

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expression system for the production of human parainfluenza virus type 2 (HPIV2) nucleocapsid (N) protein in the form of nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) and to characterize its antigenic structure. The gene encoding HPIV2 N amino acid (aa) sequence RefSeq NP_598401.1 was cloned into the galactose-inducible S. cerevisiae expression vector and its high-level expression was achieved. However, this recombinant HPIV2 N protein did not form NLPs. The PCR mutagenesis was carried out to change the encoded aa residues to the ones conserved across HPIV2 isolates. Synthesis of the modified proteins in yeast demonstrated that the single aa substitution NP_598401.1:p.D331V was sufficient for the self-assembly of NLPs. The significance of certain aa residues in this position was confirmed by analysing HPIV2 N protein structure models. To characterize the antigenic structure of NLP-forming HPIV2 N protein, a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was generated. The majority of the MAbs raised against the recombinant NLPs recognized HPIV2-infected cells suggesting the antigenic similarity between the recombinant and virus-derived HPIV2 N protein. Fine epitope mapping revealed the C-terminal part (aa 386-504) as the main antigenic region of the HPIV2 N protein. In conclusion, the current study provides new data on the impact of HPIV2 N protein sequence variants on the NLP self-assembly and demonstrates an efficient production of recombinant HPIV2 N protein in the form of NLPs. PMID:26821928

  5. Complex interactions of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein with oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert J; Fivash, Matthew J; Stephen, Andrew G; Hagan, Nathan A; Shenoy, Shilpa R; Medaglia, Maxine V; Smith, Lindsey R; Worthy, Karen M; Simpson, John T; Shoemaker, Robert; McNitt, Karen L; Johnson, Donald G; Hixson, Catherine V; Gorelick, Robert J; Fabris, Daniele; Henderson, Louis E; Rein, Alan

    2006-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) protein is a small, basic protein containing two retroviral zinc fingers. It is a highly active nucleic acid chaperone; because of this activity, it plays a crucial role in virus replication as a cofactor during reverse transcription, and is probably important in other steps of the replication cycle as well. We previously reported that NC binds with high-affinity to the repeating sequence d(TG)n. We have now analyzed the interaction between NC and d(TG)4 in considerable detail, using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), tryptophan fluorescence quenching (TFQ), fluorescence anisotropy (FA), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and electrospray ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ESI-FTMS). Our results show that the interactions between these two molecules are surprisngly complex: while the K(d) for binding of a single d(TG)4 molecule to NC is only approximately 5 nM in 150 mM NaCl, a single NC molecule is capable of interacting with more than one d(TG)4 molecule, and conversely, more than one NC molecule can bind to a single d(TG)4 molecule. The strengths of these additional binding reactions are quantitated. The implications of this multivalency for the functions of NC in virus replication are discussed.

  6. Vaccine efficacy of a cell lysate with recombinant baculovirus-expressed feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) virus nucleocapsid protein against progression of FIP.

    PubMed

    Hohdatsu, Tsutomu; Yamato, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Tasuku; Kaneko, Miyuki; Motokawa, Kenji; Kusuhara, Hajime; Kaneshima, Takashi; Arai, Setsuo; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2003-12-01

    The Type II feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection of feline macrophages is enhanced by a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to the S protein of FIPV. This antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) activity increased with the MAb that showed a neutralizing activity with feline kidney cells, suggesting that there was a distinct correlation between ADE activity and the neutralizing activity. The close association between enhancing and neutralizing epitopes is an obstacle to developing a vaccine containing only neutralizing epitopes without enhancing epitopes. In this study, we immunized cats with cell lysate with recombinant baculovirus-expressed N protein of the Type I FIPV strain KU-2 with an adjuvant and investigated its preventive effect on the progression of FIP. Cats immunized with this vaccine produced antibodies against FIPV virion-derived N protein but did not produce virus-neutralizing antibodies. A delayed type hypersensitivity skin response to N protein was observed in these vaccinated cats, showing that cell mediated immunity against the FIPV antigen was induced. When these vaccinated cats were challenged with a high dose of heterologous FIPV, the survival rate was 75% (6/8), while the survival rate in the control group immunized with SF-9 cell-derived antigen was 12.5% (1/8). This study showed that immunization with the cell lysate with baculovirus-expressed N protein was effective in preventing the progression of FIP without inducing ADE of FIPV infection in cats.

  7. The RNA-binding properties and domain of Rice stripe virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuling; Xue, Yanan; Hao, Jiahui; Liang, Changyong

    2015-10-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (NP) of rice stripe virus (RSV) encapsidates viral genomic RNAs to form virion. The binding of NP with RNA is essential for the formation of virus particle. In this study, the binding specificity of RSV NP to RNA and the domains within the NP that mediate this interaction were investigated by gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays and Northwestern blot analysis. The results demonstrated that RSV NP was able to bind to all synthetic RNAs and DNAs without sequence specificity. Using a series of truncated NPs expressed in E. coli and synthetic peptides, we mapped the RNA-binding domain of NP to the central region from amino acid residues 201-232. Further alanine substitution analysis revealed that Lys(206), Lys(207), Lys(220), and Tyr(221) in the RNA-binding domain were essential for NP to bind with RNA.

  8. TGEV nucleocapsid protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through activation of p53 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Li; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Dong, Feng; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Xu, Xingang; Tong, Dewen

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • TGEV N protein reduces cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. • TGEV N protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by regulating p53 signaling. • TGEV N protein plays important roles in TGEV-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. - Abstract: Our previous studies showed that TGEV infection could induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via activation of p53 signaling in cultured host cells. However, it is unclear which viral gene causes these effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of TGEV nucleocapsid (N) protein on PK-15 cells. We found that TGEV N protein suppressed cell proliferation by causing cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis. Characterization of various cellular proteins that are involved in regulating cell cycle progression demonstrated that the expression of N gene resulted in an accumulation of p53 and p21, which suppressed cyclin B1, cdc2 and cdk2 expression. Moreover, the expression of TGEV N gene promoted translocation of Bax to mitochondria, which in turn caused the release of cytochrome c, followed by activation of caspase-3, resulting in cell apoptosis in the transfected PK-15 cells following cell cycle arrest. Further studies showed that p53 inhibitor attenuated TGEV N protein induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and apoptosis through reversing the expression changes of cdc2, cdk2 and cyclin B1 and the translocation changes of Bax and cytochrome c induced by TGEV N protein. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TGEV N protein might play an important role in TGEV infection-induced p53 activation and cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis occurrence.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of Puumala virus subtype Bavaria, characterization and diagnostic use of its recombinant nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Marc; Kindler, Eveline; Emmerich, Petra; Esser, Jutta; Wagner-Wiening, Christiane; Wölfel, Roman; Petraityte-Burneikiene, Rasa; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Groschup, Martin H; Dobler, Gerhard; Pfeffer, Martin; Heckel, Gerald; Ulrich, Rainer G; Essbauer, Sandra S

    2011-10-01

    Puumala virus (PUUV) is the predominant hantavirus species in Germany causing large numbers of mild to moderate cases of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). During an outbreak in South-East Germany in 2004 a novel PUUV subtype designated Bavaria was identified as the causative agent of HFRS in humans [1]. Here we present a molecular characterization of this PUUV strain by investigating novel partial and almost entire nucleocapsid (N) protein-encoding small (S-) segment sequences and partial medium (M-) segment sequences from bank voles (Myodes glareolus) trapped in Lower Bavaria during 2004 and 2005. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed their classification as subtype Bavaria, which is further subdivided into four geographical clusters. The entire N protein, harbouring an amino-terminal hexahistidine tag, of the Bavarian strain was produced in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and showed a slightly different reactivity with N-specific monoclonal antibodies, compared to the yeast-expressed N protein of the PUUV strain Vranica/Hällnäs. Endpoint titration of human sera from different parts of Germany and from Finland revealed only very slight differences in the diagnostic value of the different recombinant proteins. Based on the novel N antigen indirect and monoclonal antibody capture IgG-ELISAs were established. By using serum panels from Germany and Finland their validation demonstrated a high sensitivity and specificity. In summary, our investigations demonstrated the Bavarian PUUV strain to be genetically divergent from other PUUV strains and the potential of its N protein for diagnostic applications.

  10. A model for the dynamic nuclear/nucleolar/cytoplasmic trafficking of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) nucleocapsid protein based on live cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    You, Jae-Hwan; Howell, Gareth; Pattnaik, Asit K.; Osorio, Fernando A.; Hiscox, Julian A.

    2008-08-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), an arterivirus, in common with many other positive strand RNA viruses, encodes a nucleocapsid (N) protein which can localise not only to the cytoplasm but also to the nucleolus in virus-infected cells and cells over-expressing N protein. The dynamic trafficking of positive strand RNA virus nucleocapsid proteins and PRRSV N protein in particular between the cytoplasm and nucleolus is unknown. In this study live imaging of permissive and non-permissive cell lines, in conjunction with photo-bleaching (FRAP and FLIP), was used to investigate the trafficking of fluorescent labeled (EGFP) PRRSV-N protein. The data indicated that EGFP-PRRSV-N protein was not permanently sequestered to the nucleolus and had equivalent mobility to cellular nucleolar proteins. Further the nuclear import of N protein appeared to occur faster than nuclear export, which may account for the observed relative distribution of N protein between the cytoplasm and the nucleolus.

  11. Trichoplusia ni Kinesin-1 Associates with Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus Nucleocapsid Proteins and Is Required for Production of Budded Virus

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Siddhartha; Blissard, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanism by which nucleocapsids of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) egress from the nucleus to the plasma membrane, leading to the formation of budded virus (BV), is not known. AC141 is a nucleocapsid-associated protein required for BV egress and has previously been shown to be associated with β-tubulin. In addition, AC141 and VP39 were previously shown by fluorescence resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging to interact directly with the Drosophila melanogaster kinesin-1 light chain (KLC) tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. These results suggested that microtubule transport systems may be involved in baculovirus nucleocapsid egress and BV formation. In this study, we investigated the role of lepidopteran microtubule transport using coimmunoprecipitation, colocalization, yeast two-hybrid, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) analyses. We show that nucleocapsid AC141 associates with the lepidopteran Trichoplusia ni KLC and kinesin-1 heavy chain (KHC) by coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization. Kinesin-1, AC141, and microtubules colocalized predominantly at the plasma membrane. In addition, the nucleocapsid proteins VP39, FP25, and BV/ODV-C42 were also coimmunoprecipitated with T. ni KLC. Direct analysis of the role of T. ni kinesin-1 by downregulation of KLC by siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in BV production. Nucleocapsids labeled with VP39 fused with three copies of the mCherry fluorescent protein also colocalized with microtubules. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed no evidence of a direct interaction between kinesin-1 and AC141 or VP39, suggesting that either other nucleocapsid proteins or adaptor proteins may be required. These results further support the conclusion that microtubule transport is required for AcMNPV BV formation. IMPORTANCE In two key processes of the replication cycle of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), nucleocapsids are

  12. The Andes Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Directs Basal Endothelial Cell Permeability by Activating RhoA

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunova, Elena E.; Simons, Matthew J.; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Andes virus (ANDV) predominantly infects microvascular endothelial cells (MECs) and nonlytically causes an acute pulmonary edema termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). In HPS patients, virtually every pulmonary MEC is infected, MECs are enlarged, and infection results in vascular leakage and highly lethal pulmonary edema. We observed that MECs infected with the ANDV hantavirus or expressing the ANDV nucleocapsid (N) protein showed increased size and permeability by activating the Rheb and RhoA GTPases. Expression of ANDV N in MECs increased cell size by preventing tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) repression of Rheb-mTOR-pS6K. N selectively bound the TSC2 N terminus (1 to 1403) within a complex containing TSC2/TSC1/TBC1D7, and endogenous TSC2 reciprocally coprecipitated N protein from ANDV-infected MECs. TSCs normally restrict RhoA-induced MEC permeability, and we found that ANDV infection or N protein expression constitutively activated RhoA. This suggests that the ANDV N protein alone is sufficient to activate signaling pathways that control MEC size and permeability. Further, RhoA small interfering RNA, dominant-negative RhoA(N19), and the RhoA/Rho kinase inhibitors fasudil and Y27632 dramatically reduced the permeability of ANDV-infected MECs by 80 to 90%. Fasudil also reduced the bradykinin-directed permeability of ANDV and Hantaan virus-infected MECs to control levels. These findings demonstrate that ANDV activation of RhoA causes MEC permeability and reveal a potential edemagenic mechanism for ANDV to constitutively inhibit the basal barrier integrity of infected MECs. The central importance of RhoA activation in MEC permeability further suggests therapeutically targeting RhoA, TSCs, and Rac1 as potential means of resolving capillary leakage during hantavirus infections. PMID:27795403

  13. Characterization of Mapuera virus: structure, proteins and nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Henderson, G W; Laird, C; Dermott, E; Rima, B K

    1995-10-01

    The molecular biology of Mapuera virus was studied at both the protein and nucleic acid levels. Seven virus-encoded proteins were detected in infected Vero cells. The sizes and characteristics of each of the proteins determined from various radiolabelling experiments allowed preliminary identification of the proteins as the large (L; 190 kDa), haemagglutinin neuraminidase (HN; 74 kDa), nucleocapsid (N; 66 kDa), fusion (F0; 63 kDa), phosphoprotein (P; 49 kDa), matrix (M; 43 kDa) and non-structural (V; 35 kDa) proteins. Western blot analysis showed that the HN, N and P proteins were major antigens recognized in the mouse. A cDNA library of total virus-infected cellular mRNA was created and screening of the library resulted in the detection of cDNA sequences representing the N mRNA transcript of Mapuera virus. The N mRNA sequence determined from the clones was 1731 nt in length and contained an ORF that encoded 537 amino acids, the complete 3' untranslated region and part of the 5' non-coding region. The calculated M(r) of the N protein was 59 kDa, which is close to the 66 kDa protein observed by SDS-PAGE. PMID:7595354

  14. Structure of the Rift Valley fever virus nucleocapsid protein reveals another architecture for RNA encapsidation

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Donald D.; Piper, Mary E.; Gerrard, Sonja R.; Smith, Janet L.

    2010-07-13

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a negative-sense RNA virus (genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) that infects livestock and humans and is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Like all negative-sense viruses, the segmented RNA genome of RVFV is encapsidated by a nucleocapsid protein (N). The 1.93-{angstrom} crystal structure of RVFV N and electron micrographs of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) reveal an encapsidated genome of substantially different organization than in other negative-sense RNA virus families. The RNP polymer, viewed in electron micrographs of both virus RNP and RNP reconstituted from purified N with a defined RNA, has an extended structure without helical symmetry. N-RNA species of {approx}100-kDa apparent molecular weight and heterogeneous composition were obtained by exhaustive ribonuclease treatment of virus RNP, by recombinant expression of N, and by reconstitution from purified N and an RNA oligomer. RNA-free N, obtained by denaturation and refolding, has a novel all-helical fold that is compact and well ordered at both the N and C termini. Unlike N of other negative-sense RNA viruses, RVFV N has no positively charged surface cleft for RNA binding and no protruding termini or loops to stabilize a defined N-RNA oligomer or RNP helix. A potential protein interaction site was identified in a conserved hydrophobic pocket. The nonhelical appearance of phlebovirus RNP, the heterogeneous {approx}100-kDa N-RNA multimer, and the N fold differ substantially from the RNP and N of other negative-sense RNA virus families and provide valuable insights into the structure of the encapsidated phlebovirus genome.

  15. The Nucleocapsid Protein of Coronaviruses Acts as a Viral Suppressor of RNA Silencing in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lei; Wang, Haiying; Ji, Yanxi; Yang, Jie; Xu, Shan; Huang, Xingyu; Wang, Zidao; Qin, Lei; Tien, Po; Zhou, Xi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA interference (RNAi) is a process of eukaryotic posttranscriptional gene silencing that functions in antiviral immunity in plants, nematodes, and insects. However, recent studies provided strong supports that RNAi also plays a role in antiviral mechanism in mammalian cells. To combat RNAi-mediated antiviral responses, many viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSR) to facilitate their replication. VSRs have been widely studied for plant and insect viruses, but only a few have been defined for mammalian viruses currently. We identified a novel VSR from coronaviruses, a group of medically important mammalian viruses including Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and showed that the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of coronaviruses suppresses RNAi triggered by either short hairpin RNAs or small interfering RNAs in mammalian cells. Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) is closely related to SARS-CoV in the family Coronaviridae and was used as a coronavirus replication model. The replication of MHV increased when the N proteins were expressed in trans, while knockdown of Dicer1 or Ago2 transcripts facilitated the MHV replication in mammalian cells. These results support the hypothesis that RNAi is a part of the antiviral immunity responses in mammalian cells. IMPORTANCE RNAi has been well known to play important antiviral roles from plants to invertebrates. However, recent studies provided strong supports that RNAi is also involved in antiviral response in mammalian cells. An important indication for RNAi-mediated antiviral activity in mammals is the fact that a number of mammalian viruses encode potent suppressors of RNA silencing. Our results demonstrate that coronavirus N protein could function as a VSR through its double-stranded RNA binding activity. Mutational analysis of N protein allowed us to find out the critical residues for the VSR activity. Using the MHV-A59 as the coronavirus replication model, we showed that ectopic

  16. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

    SciTech Connect

    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2012-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-{alpha}/{beta} and {gamma}-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  17. Single-molecule Study of Nucleocapsid Protein Chaperoned DNA Hairpin Structural Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yining; Cosa, Gonzalo; Liu, Hsiao-Wei; Landes, Christy; Makarov, Dmitrii; Barbara, Paul; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2006-03-01

    In HIV-1 reverse transcription, the nucleocapsid protein, NC, induces secondary structure fluctuations in the transactivation response (TAR) region of DNA and RNA hairpins. Time resolved single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer was used to study NC chaperoned secondary fluctuations of DNA hairpins. The experiments reveal that the NC induced secondary fluctuations are limited to the terminal stems, and the mechanism for the fluctuations is complex. The dynamic processes occur over a wide time range, i.e. ˜5 to >250 milliseconds and involve long-lived intermediates. The dynamic role of DNA loop regions and NC binding/dissociation events are discussed.

  18. Detection of Antibodies to U.S. Isolates of Avian Pneumovirus by a Recombinant Nucleocapsid Protein-Based Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Baldev R.; Munir, Shirin; Patnayak, Devi P.; Goyal, Sagar M.; Kapur, Vivek

    2001-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of subgroup C (United States-specific) avian pneumovirus (APV/US) was expressed in Escherichia coli, and antibodies to the recombinant N protein were shown to specifically recognize the ≈47-kDa N protein of APV/US by Western immunoblot analysis. The recombinant APV/US N protein was used in a sandwich-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the resulting assay was found to be more sensitive and specific than the routine indirect ELISA for the detection of APV/US antibodies in turkey sera. PMID:11474024

  19. Characterization of Two Monoclonal Antibodies That Recognize Linker Region and Carboxyl Terminal Domain of Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yunnuan; Shi, Hongyan; Chen, Jianfei; Shi, Da; Feng, Li

    2016-01-01

    The transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) nucleocapsid (N) protein plays important roles in the replication and translation of viral RNA. The present study provides the first description of two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (5E8 and 3D7) directed against the TGEV N protein linker region (LKR) and carboxyl terminal domain (CTD). The mAbs 5E8 and 3D7 reacted with native N protein in western blotting and immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Two linear epitopes, 189SVEQAVLAALKKLG202 and 246VTRFYGARSSSA257, located in the LKR and CTD of TGEV N protein, respectively, were identified after truncating the protein and applying a peptide scanning technique. Using mAb 5E8, we observed that the N protein was expressed in the cytoplasm during TGEV replication and that the protein could be immunoprecipitated from TGEV-infected PK-15 cells. The mAb 5E8 can be applied for different approaches to diagnosis of TGEV infection. In addition, the antibodies represent useful tools for investigating the antigenic properties of the N protein. PMID:27689694

  20. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein localizes efficiently to the nucleus and nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kyung Lee; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Eun Soo; You, Ji Chang

    2016-05-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) is an essential viral protein containing two highly conserved retroviral-type zinc finger (ZF) motifs, which functions in multiple stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. Although a number of functions for NC either in its mature form or as a domain of Gag have been revealed, little is known about the intracellular localization of NC and, moreover, its role in Gag protein trafficking. Here, we have investigated various forms of HIV-1 NC protein for its cellular localization and found that the NC has a strong nuclear and nucleolar localization activity. The linker region, composed of a stretch of basic amino acids between the two ZF motifs, was necessary and sufficient for the activity.

  1. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein localizes efficiently to the nucleus and nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kyung Lee; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Eun Soo; You, Ji Chang

    2016-05-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) is an essential viral protein containing two highly conserved retroviral-type zinc finger (ZF) motifs, which functions in multiple stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. Although a number of functions for NC either in its mature form or as a domain of Gag have been revealed, little is known about the intracellular localization of NC and, moreover, its role in Gag protein trafficking. Here, we have investigated various forms of HIV-1 NC protein for its cellular localization and found that the NC has a strong nuclear and nucleolar localization activity. The linker region, composed of a stretch of basic amino acids between the two ZF motifs, was necessary and sufficient for the activity. PMID:26967976

  2. Characterization of the Interaction between Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Protein (N) and Ribosomal Protein S19 (RPS19)*

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Erdong; Haque, Absarul; Rimmer, Mary Ashley; Hussein, Islam T. M.; Sheema, Sheema; Little, Alex; Mir, Mohammad A.

    2011-01-01

    Hantaviruses, members of the Bunyaviridae family, are negative-stranded emerging RNA viruses and category A pathogens that cause serious illness when transmitted to humans through aerosolized excreta of infected rodent hosts. Hantaviruses have evolved a novel translation initiation mechanism, operated by nucleocapsid protein (N), which preferentially facilitates the translation of viral mRNAs. N binds to the ribosomal protein S19 (RPS19), a structural component of the 40 S ribosomal subunit. In addition, N also binds to both the viral mRNA 5′ cap and a highly conserved triplet repeat sequence of the viral mRNA 5′ UTR. The simultaneous binding of N at both the terminal cap and the 5′ UTR favors ribosome loading on viral transcripts during translation initiation. We characterized the binding between N and RPS19 and demonstrate the role of the N-RPS19 interaction in N-mediated translation initiation mechanism. We show that N specifically binds to RPS19 with high affinity and a binding stoichiometry of 1:1. The N-RPS19 interaction is an enthalpy-driven process. RPS19 undergoes a conformational change after binding to N. Using T7 RNA polymerase, we synthesized the hantavirus S segment mRNA, which matches the transcript generated by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in cells. We show that the N-RPS19 interaction plays a critical role in the translation of this mRNA both in cells and rabbit reticulocyte lysates. Our results demonstrate that the N-mediated translation initiation mechanism, which lures the host translation machinery for the preferential translation of viral transcripts, primarily depends on the N-RPS19 interaction. We suggest that the N-RPS19 interaction is a novel target to shut down the N-mediated translation strategy and hence virus replication in cells. PMID:21296889

  3. The Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus ac54 Gene Is Crucial for Localization of the Major Capsid Protein VP39 at the Site of Nucleocapsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhanwen; Zhong, Ling; Li, Chunyan; Wu, Wenbi; Yuan, Meijin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Baculovirus DNAs are synthesized and inserted into preformed capsids to form nucleocapsids at a site in the infected cell nucleus, termed the virogenic stroma. Nucleocapsid assembly of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) requires the major capsid protein VP39 and nine minor capsid proteins, including VP1054. However, how VP1054 participates in nucleocapsid assembly remains elusive. In this study, the VP1054-encoding gene (ac54) was deleted to generate the ac54-knockout AcMNPV (vAc54KO). In vAc54KO-transfected cells, nucleocapsid assembly was disrupted, leading to the formation of abnormally elongated capsid structures. Interestingly, unlike cells transfected with AcMNPV mutants lacking other minor capsid proteins, in which capsid structures were distributed within the virogenic stroma, ac54 ablation resulted in a distinctive location of capsid structures and VP39 at the periphery of the nucleus. The altered distribution pattern of capsid structures was also observed in cells transfected with AcMNPV lacking BV/ODV-C42 or in cytochalasin d-treated AcMNPV-infected cells. BV/ODV-C42, along with PP78/83, has been shown to promote nuclear filamentous actin (F-actin) formation, which is another requisite for nucleocapsid assembly. Immunofluorescence using phalloidin indicated that the formation and distribution of nuclear F-actin were not affected by ac54 deletion. However, immunoelectron microscopy revealed that BV/ODV-C42, PP78/83, and 38K failed to integrate into capsid structures in the absence of VP1054, and immunoprecipitation further demonstrated that in transient expression assays, VP1054 interacted with BV/ODV-C42 and VP80 but not VP39. Our findings suggest that VP1054 plays an important role in the transport of capsid proteins to the nucleocapsid assembly site prior to the process of nucleocapsid assembly. IMPORTANCE Baculoviruses are large DNA viruses whose replication occurs within the host nucleus. The localization of

  4. A NEW ROLE FOR HIV NUCLEOCAPSID PROTEIN IN MODULATING THE SPECIFICITY OF PLUS STRAND PRIMING

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Deena T.; DeStefano, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    The current study indicates a new role for HIV nucleocapsid protein (NC) in modulating the specificity of plus strand priming. RNase H cleavage by reverse transcriptase (RT) during minus strand synthesis gives rise to RNA fragments that could potentially be used as primers for synthesis of the plus strand, leading to the initiation of priming from multiple points as has been observed for other retroviruses. For HIV, the central and 3′ polypurine tracts (PPTs) are the major sites of plus strand initiation. Using reconstituted in vitro assays, results showed that NC greatly reduced the efficiency of extension of non-PPT RNA primers, but not PPT. Experiments mimicking HIV replication showed that RT generated and used both PPT and non-PPT RNAs to initiate “plus strand” synthesis, but non-PPT usage was strongly inhibited by NC. The results support a role for NC in specifying primer usage during plus strand synthesis. PMID:18632127

  5. An Eriophyid Mite-Transmitted Plant Virus Contains Eight Genomic RNA Segments with Unusual Heterogeneity in the Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    McMechan, Anthony J.; Wosula, Everlyne N.; Wegulo, Stephen N.; Graybosch, Robert A.; French, Roy; Hein, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eriophyid mite-transmitted, multipartite, negative-sense RNA plant viruses with membrane-bound spherical virions are classified in the genus Emaravirus. We report here that the eriophyid mite-transmitted Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), an Emaravirus, contains eight genomic RNA segments, the most in a known negative-sense RNA plant virus. Remarkably, two RNA 3 consensus sequences, encoding the nucleocapsid protein, were found with 12.5% sequence divergence, while no heterogeneity was observed in the consensus sequences of additional genomic RNA segments. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, glycoprotein precursor, nucleocapsid, and P4 proteins of WMoV exhibited limited sequence homology with the orthologous proteins of other emaraviruses, while proteins encoded by additional genomic RNA segments displayed no significant homology with proteins reported in GenBank, suggesting that the genus Emaravirus evolved further with a divergent octapartite genome. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that WMoV formed an evolutionary link between members of the Emaravirus genus and the family Bunyaviridae. Furthermore, genomic-length virus- and virus-complementary (vc)-sense strands of all WMoV genomic RNAs accumulated asymmetrically in infected wheat, with 10- to 20-fold more virus-sense genomic RNAs than vc-sense RNAs. These data further confirm the octapartite negative-sense polarity of the WMoV genome. In WMoV-infected wheat, subgenomic-length mRNAs of vc sense were detected for genomic RNAs 3, 4, 7, and 8 but not for other RNA species, suggesting that the open reading frames present in the complementary sense of genomic RNAs are expressed through subgenomic- or near-genomic-length vc-sense mRNAs. IMPORTANCE Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), an Emaravirus, is the causal agent of High Plains disease of wheat and maize. In this study, we demonstrated that the genome of WMoV comprises eight negative-sense RNA segments with an unusual sequence polymorphism in an RNA encoding the nucleocapsid

  6. Three of the four nucleocapsid proteins of Marburg virus, NP, VP35, and L, are sufficient to mediate replication and transcription of Marburg virus-specific monocistronic minigenomes.

    PubMed

    Mühlberger, E; Lötfering, B; Klenk, H D; Becker, S

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes the first reconstituted replication system established for a member of the Filoviridae, Marburg virus (MBGV). MBGV minigenomes containing the leader and trailer regions of the MBGV genome and the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene were constructed. In MBGV-infected cells, these minigenomes were replicated and encapsidated and could be passaged. Unlike most other members of the order Mononegavirales, filoviruses possess four proteins presumed to be components of the nucleocapsid (NP, VP35, VP30, and L). To determine the protein requirements for replication and transcription, a reverse genetic system was established for MBGV based on the vaccinia virus T7 expression system. Northern blot analysis of viral RNA revealed that three nucleocapsid proteins (NP, VP35, and L) were essential and sufficient for transcription as well as replication and encapsidation. These data indicate that VP35, rather than VP30, is the functional homologue of rhabdo- and paramyxovirus P proteins. The reconstituted replication system was profoundly affected by the NP-to-VP35 expression ratio. To investigate whether CAT gene expression was achieved entirely by mRNA or in part by full-length plus-strand minigenomes, a copy-back minireplicon containing the CAT gene but lacking MBGV-specific transcriptional start sites was employed in the artificial replication system. This construct was replicated without accompanying CAT activity. It was concluded that the CAT activity reflected MBGV-specific transcription and not replication. PMID:9765419

  7. The RNA Binding Specificity of Human APOBEC3 Proteins Resembles That of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid.

    PubMed

    York, Ashley; Kutluay, Sebla B; Errando, Manel; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    The APOBEC3 (A3) cytidine deaminases are antiretroviral proteins, whose targets include human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Their incorporation into viral particles is critical for antiviral activity and is driven by interactions with the RNA molecules that are packaged into virions. However, it is unclear whether A3 proteins preferentially target RNA molecules that are destined to be packaged and if so, how. Using cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq), we determined the RNA binding preferences of the A3F, A3G and A3H proteins. We found that A3 proteins bind preferentially to RNA segments with particular properties, both in cells and in virions. Specifically, A3 proteins target RNA sequences that are G-rich and/or A-rich and are not scanned by ribosomes during translation. Comparative analyses of HIV-1 Gag, nucleocapsid (NC) and A3 RNA binding to HIV-1 RNA in cells and virions revealed the striking finding that A3 proteins partially mimic the RNA binding specificity of the HIV-1 NC protein. These findings suggest a model for A3 incorporation into HIV-1 virions in which an NC-like RNA binding specificity is determined by nucleotide composition rather than sequence. This model reconciles the promiscuity of A3 RNA binding that has been observed in previous studies with a presumed advantage that would accompany selective binding to RNAs that are destined to be packaged into virions. PMID:27541140

  8. The RNA Binding Specificity of Human APOBEC3 Proteins Resembles That of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Errando, Manel; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    The APOBEC3 (A3) cytidine deaminases are antiretroviral proteins, whose targets include human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Their incorporation into viral particles is critical for antiviral activity and is driven by interactions with the RNA molecules that are packaged into virions. However, it is unclear whether A3 proteins preferentially target RNA molecules that are destined to be packaged and if so, how. Using cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq), we determined the RNA binding preferences of the A3F, A3G and A3H proteins. We found that A3 proteins bind preferentially to RNA segments with particular properties, both in cells and in virions. Specifically, A3 proteins target RNA sequences that are G-rich and/or A-rich and are not scanned by ribosomes during translation. Comparative analyses of HIV-1 Gag, nucleocapsid (NC) and A3 RNA binding to HIV-1 RNA in cells and virions revealed the striking finding that A3 proteins partially mimic the RNA binding specificity of the HIV-1 NC protein. These findings suggest a model for A3 incorporation into HIV-1 virions in which an NC-like RNA binding specificity is determined by nucleotide composition rather than sequence. This model reconciles the promiscuity of A3 RNA binding that has been observed in previous studies with a presumed advantage that would accompany selective binding to RNAs that are destined to be packaged into virions. PMID:27541140

  9. Nucleocapsid protein structures from orthobunyaviruses reveal insight into ribonucleoprotein architecture and RNA polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Antonio; Tanner, Sian J.; Walter, Cheryl T.; Dent, Kyle C.; Shepherd, Dale A.; Wu, Weining; Matthews, Susan V.; Hiscox, Julian A.; Green, Todd J.; Luo, Ming; Elliott, Richard M.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Stonehouse, Nicola J.; Ranson, Neil A.; Barr, John N.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    All orthobunyaviruses possess three genome segments of single-stranded negative sense RNA that are encapsidated with the virus-encoded nucleocapsid (N) protein to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, which is uncharacterized at high resolution. We report the crystal structure of both the Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) N–RNA complex and the unbound Schmallenberg virus (SBV) N protein, at resolutions of 3.20 and 2.75 Å, respectively. Both N proteins crystallized as ring-like tetramers and exhibit a high degree of structural similarity despite classification into different orthobunyavirus serogroups. The structures represent a new RNA-binding protein fold. BUNV N possesses a positively charged groove into which RNA is deeply sequestered, with the bases facing away from the solvent. This location is highly inaccessible, implying that RNA polymerization and other critical base pairing events in the virus life cycle require RNP disassembly. Mutational analysis of N protein supports a correlation between structure and function. Comparison between these crystal structures and electron microscopy images of both soluble tetramers and authentic RNPs suggests the N protein does not bind RNA as a repeating monomer; thus, it represents a newly described architecture for bunyavirus RNP assembly, with implications for many other segmented negative-strand RNA viruses. PMID:23595147

  10. Conformational and nucleic acid binding studies on the synthetic nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Surovoy, A; Dannull, J; Moelling, K; Jung, G

    1993-01-01

    A 55 residue peptide corresponding to the nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1 (NCp7) containing two zinc binding domains as well as three truncated peptides were synthesized by Fmoc-based solid phase synthesis using the fragment condensation approach. Circular dichroism (CD) data support a conformational model in trifluoroethanol/buffer solution consisting of two helical segments at the chain ends with two Zn-modules in the center of the molecule. CD titration experiments show that the synthetic protein binds two equivalents of Zn2+ stoichiometrically, and the Zn2+ induced conformational changes are completely reversible by addition of EDTA. NCp7 and its S-acetamidomethylated analog (NCp7-Acm), devoid of the zinc co-ordination centers, exhibit preferential binding to RNA with a Kd = approximately 10(-9) M irrespective of the cysteine modification as determined by filter binding assays. The binding affinity of the NCp7 protein to single-stranded DNA is lower than to RNA. Binding to double-stranded DNA is lower than to ssDNA. The NCp7-Acm protein exhibits reduced single-stranded DNA binding affinity compared to the unmodified protein. Nucleic acid binding analyses with the fragments of NCp7 protein suggest that two basic amino acid stretches are involved in RNA binding of the NCp7.

  11. A major determinant for membrane protein interaction localizes to the carboxy-terminal domain of the mouse coronavirus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Kelley R; Kuo, Lili; Koetzner, Cheri A; Ye, Rong; Hsue, Bilan; Masters, Paul S

    2005-11-01

    The two major constituents of coronavirus virions are the membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins. The M protein is anchored in the viral envelope by three transmembrane segments flanked by a short amino-terminal ectodomain and a large carboxy-terminal endodomain. The M endodomain interacts with the viral nucleocapsid, which consists of the positive-strand RNA genome helically encapsidated by N protein monomers. In previous work with the coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a highly defective M protein mutant, MDelta2, was constructed. This mutant contained a 2-amino-acid carboxy-terminal truncation of the M protein. Analysis of second-site revertants of MDelta2 revealed mutations in the carboxy-terminal region of the N protein that compensated for the defect in the M protein. To seek further genetic evidence corroborating this interaction, we generated a comprehensive set of clustered charged-to-alanine mutants in the carboxy-terminal domain 3 of N protein. One of these mutants, CCA4, had a highly defective phenotype similar to that of MDelta2. Transfer of the CCA4 mutation into a partially diploid MHV genome showed that CCA4 was a loss-of-function mutation rather than a dominant-negative mutation. Analysis of multiple second-site revertants of CCA4 revealed mutations in both the M protein and the N protein that could compensate for the original lesion in N. These data more precisely define the region of the N protein that interacts with the M protein. Further, we found that fusion of domain 3 of the N protein to the carboxy terminus of a heterologous protein caused it to be incorporated into MHV virions.

  12. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Antagonizes Beta Interferon Production by Sequestering the Interaction between IRF3 and TBK1

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhen; Jing, Huiyuan; Zeng, Songlin; Wang, Dang; Liu, Lianzeng; Zhang, Huan; Luo, Rui; Chen, Huanchun

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), a porcine enteropathogenic coronavirus, causes lethal watery diarrhea in piglets and results in large economic losses in many Asian and European countries. A large-scale outbreak of porcine epidemic diarrhea occurred in China in 2010, and the virus emerged in the United States in 2013 and spread rapidly, posing significant economic and public health concerns. Previous studies have shown that PEDV infection inhibits the synthesis of type I interferon (IFN), and viral papain-like protease 2 has been identified as an IFN antagonist. In this study, we found that the PEDV-encoded nucleocapsid (N) protein also inhibits Sendai virus-induced IFN-β production, IFN-stimulated gene expression, and activation of the transcription factors IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and NF-κB. We also found that N protein significantly impedes the activation of the IFN-β promoter stimulated by TBK1 or its upstream molecules (RIG-I, MDA5, IPS-1, and TRAF3) but does not counteract its activation by IRF3. A detailed analysis revealed that the PEDV N protein targets TBK1 by direct interaction and that this binding sequesters the association between TBK1 and IRF3, which in turn inhibits both IRF3 activation and type I IFN production. Together, our findings demonstrate a new mechanism evolved by PEDV to circumvent the host's antiviral immunity. IMPORTANCE PEDV has received increasing attention since the emergence of a PEDV variant in China and the United States. Here, we identify nucleocapsid (N) protein as a novel PEDV-encoded interferon (IFN) antagonist and demonstrate that N protein antagonizes IFN production by sequestering the interaction between IRF3 and TBK1, a critical step in type I IFN signaling. This adds another layer of complexity to the immune evasion strategies evolved by this economically important viral pathogen. An understanding of its immune evasion mechanism may direct us to novel therapeutic targets and more effective

  13. FRET-based assay to screen inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kamal K.; Przybilla, Frédéric; Restle, Tobias; Godet, Julien; Mély, Yves

    2016-01-01

    During HIV-1 reverse transcription, the single-stranded RNA genome is converted into proviral double stranded DNA by Reverse Transcriptase (RT) within a reverse transcription complex composed of the genomic RNA and a number of HIV-1 encoded proteins, including the nucleocapsid protein NCp7. Here, we developed a one-step and one-pot RT polymerization assay. In this in vitro assay, RT polymerization is monitored in real-time by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) using a commercially available doubly-labeled primer/template DNA. The assay can monitor and quantify RT polymerization activity as well as its promotion by NCp7. Z-factor values as high as 0.89 were obtained, indicating that the assay is suitable for high-throughput drug screening. Using Nevirapine and AZT as prototypical RT inhibitors, reliable IC50 values were obtained from the changes in the RT polymerization kinetics. Interestingly, the assay can also detect NCp7 inhibitors, making it suitable for high-throughput screening of drugs targeting RT, NCp7 or simultaneously, both proteins. PMID:26762982

  14. HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Proteins as Molecular Chaperones for Tetramolecular Antiparallel G-Quadruplex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Arivazhagan; Endo, Masayuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Tran, Phong Lan Thao; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Gorelick, Robert J.; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 nucleocapsid proteins (NCps) facilitate remodeling of nucleic acids to fold thermodynamically stable conformations, and thus called nucleic acid chaperones. To date only little is known on the stoichiometry, NCp-NCp interactions, chaperone activity on G-quadruplex formation, and so on. We report here the direct and real-time analysis on such properties of proteolytic intermediate NCp15 and mature NCp7 using DNA origami. The protein particles were found to predominantly exist in monomeric form, while dimeric and multimeric forms were also observed both in free solution and bound to the quadruplex structure. The formation and the dissociation events of the G-quadruplexes were well documented in real-time and the intermediate-like states were also visualized. We anticipate that this pioneering study will strengthen our understanding on the chaperone activity of HIV-1 proteins which in turn will be helpful for the drug design based on G-quadruplex and also for the development of drugs against AIDS. PMID:24224650

  15. Insights into the mechanisms of RNA secondary structure destabilization by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Belfetmi, Anissa; Zargarian, Loussiné; Tisné, Carine; Sleiman, Dona; Morellet, Nelly; Lescop, Ewen; Maskri, Ouerdia; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The mature HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7 (NC) plays a key role in reverse transcription facilitating the two obligatory strand transfers. Several properties contribute to its efficient chaperon activity: preferential binding to single-stranded regions, nucleic acid aggregation, helix destabilization, and rapid dissociation from nucleic acids. However, little is known about the relationships between these different properties, which are complicated by the ability of the protein to recognize particular HIV-1 stem-loops, such as SL1, SL2, and SL3, with high affinity and without destabilizing them. These latter properties are important in the context of genome packaging, during which NC is part of the Gag precursor. We used NMR to investigate destabilization of the full-length TAR (trans activating response element) RNA by NC, which is involved in the first strand transfer step of reverse transcription. NC was used at a low protein:nucleotide (nt) ratio of 1:59 in these experiments. NMR data for the imino protons of TAR identified most of the base pairs destabilized by NC. These base pairs were adjacent to the loops in the upper part of the TAR hairpin rather than randomly distributed. Gel retardation assays showed that conversion from the initial TAR-cTAR complex to the fully annealed form occurred much more slowly at the 1:59 ratio than at the higher ratios classically used. Nevertheless, NC significantly accelerated the formation of the initial complex at a ratio of 1:59.

  16. Sin Nombre hantavirus nucleocapsid protein exhibits a metal-dependent DNA-specific endonucleolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Möncke-Buchner, Elisabeth; Szczepek, Michal; Bokelmann, Marcel; Heinemann, Patrick; Raftery, Martin J; Krüger, Detlev H; Reuter, Monika

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that the nucleocapsid protein of Sin Nombre hantavirus (SNV-N) has a DNA-specific endonuclease activity. Upon incubation of SNV-N with DNA in the presence of magnesium or manganese, we observed DNA digestion in sequence-unspecific manner. In contrast, RNA was not affected under the same conditions. Moreover, pre-treatment of SNV-N with RNase before DNA cleavage increased the endonucleolytic activity. Structure-based protein fold prediction using known structures from the PDB database revealed that Asp residues in positions 88 and 103 of SNV-N show sequence similarity with the active site of the restriction endonuclease HindIII. Crystal structure of HindIII predicts that residues Asp93 and Asp108 are essential for coordination of the metal ions required for HindIII DNA cleavage. Therefore, we hypothesized that homologous residues in SNV-N, Asp88 and Asp103, may have a similar function. Replacing Asp88 and Asp103 by alanine led to an SNV-N protein almost completely abrogated for endonuclease activity. PMID:27261891

  17. Solution structure and backbone dynamics of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Y.; Kaluarachchi, K.; Giedroc, D. P.

    1998-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid proteins (NCPs) are CCHC-type zinc finger proteins that mediate virion RNA binding activities associated with retrovirus assembly and genomic RNA encapsidation. Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV), a type D retrovirus, encodes a 96-amino acid nucleocapsid protein, which contains two Cys-X2-Cys-X4-His-X4-Cys (CCHC) zinc fingers connected by an unusually long 15-amino acid linker. Homonuclear, two-dimensional sensitivity-enhanced 15N-1H, three-dimensional 15N-1H, and triple resonance NMR spectroscopy have been used to determine the solution structure and residue-specific backbone dynamics of the structured core domain of MPMV NCP containing residues 21-80. Structure calculations and spectral density mapping of N-H bond vector mobility reveal that MPMV NCP 21-80 is best described as two independently folded, rotationally uncorrelated globular domains connected by a seven-residue flexible linker consisting of residues 42-48. The N-terminal CCHC zinc finger domain (residues 24-37) appears to adopt a fold like that described previously for HIV-1 NCP; however, residues within this domain and the immediately adjacent linker region (residues 38-41) are characterized by extensive conformational averaging on the micros-ms time scale at 25 degrees C. In contrast to other NCPs, residues 49-77, which includes the C-terminal CCHC zinc-finger (residues 53-66), comprise a well-folded globular domain with the Val49-Pro-Gly-Leu52 sequence and C-terminal tail residues 67-77 characterized by amide proton exchange properties and 15N R1, R2, and (1H-15N) NOE values indistinguishable to residues in the core C-terminal finger. Twelve refined structural models of MPMV NCP residues 49-80 (pairwise backbone RMSD of 0.77 A) reveal that the side chains of the conserved Pro50 and Trp62 are in van der Waals contact with one another. Residues 70-73 in the C-terminal tail adopt a reverse turn-like structure. Ile77 is involved in extensive van der Waals contact with the core

  18. Quantitative Characterization of Configurational Space Sampled by HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Using Solution NMR, X-ray Scattering and Protein Engineering.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Lalit; Schwieters, Charles D; Grishaev, Alexander; Clore, G Marius

    2016-06-01

    Nucleic-acid-related events in the HIV-1 replication cycle are mediated by nucleocapsid, a small protein comprising two zinc knuckles connected by a short flexible linker and flanked by disordered termini. Combining experimental NMR residual dipolar couplings, solution X-ray scattering and protein engineering with ensemble simulated annealing, we obtain a quantitative description of the configurational space sampled by the two zinc knuckles, the linker and disordered termini in the absence of nucleic acids. We first compute the conformational ensemble (with an optimal size of three members) of an engineered nucleocapsid construct lacking the N- and C-termini that satisfies the experimental restraints, and then validate this ensemble, as well as characterize the disordered termini, using the experimental data from the full-length nucleocapsid construct. The experimental and computational strategy is generally applicable to multidomain proteins. Differential flexibility within the linker results in asymmetric motion of the zinc knuckles which may explain their functionally distinct roles despite high sequence identity. One of the configurations (populated at a level of ≈40 %) closely resembles that observed in various ligand-bound forms, providing evidence for conformational selection and a mechanistic link between protein dynamics and function.

  19. Protection of cats from infectious peritonitis by vaccination with a recombinant raccoon poxvirus expressing the nucleocapsid gene of feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    PubMed

    Wasmoen, T L; Kadakia, N P; Unfer, R C; Fickbohm, B L; Cook, C P; Chu, H J; Acree, W M

    1995-01-01

    Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus (FIPV) is a coronavirus that induces an often fatal, systemic infection in cats. Various vaccines designed to prevent FIPV infection have been shown to exacerbate the disease, probably due to immune enhancement mediated by virus-specific immunoglobulins against the outer envelope (S) protein. An effective vaccine would be one that induces cell-mediated immunity without disease enhancing antibodies. In this report, we describe the use of a recombinant raccoon poxvirus that expresses the gene encoding the nucleocapsid protein of FIPV (rRCNV-FIPV N) as an effective vaccine against FIPV-induced disease. Cats were parenterally or orally vaccinated twice, three weeks apart. Cats were then orally challenged with Feline Enteric Coronavirus (FECV), which induces a subclinical infection that can cause enhancement of subsequent FIPV infection. Three weeks later, cats were orally challenged with FIPV. The FIPV challenge induced a fatal infection in 4/5 (80%) of the controls. On the other hand, all five cats vaccinated subcutaneously with rRCNV-FIPV N showed no signs of disease after challenge with FIPV. Four of the five subcutaneous vaccinates survived an additional FIPV challenge. Vaccination with rRCNV-FIPV N induced serum IgG antibody responses to FIPV nucleocapsid protein, but few, if any, FIPV neutralizing antibodies. In contrast to the controls, protected vaccinates maintained low FIPV serum neutralizing antibody titers after FIPV challenge. This suggests that the protective immune response involves a mechanism other than humoral immunity consisting of FIPV neutralizing antibodies.

  20. Vaccinia virus protein A3 is required for the production of normal immature virions and for the encapsidation of the nucleocapsid protein L4.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Desyree Murta; Moussatche, Nissin; McFadden, Baron B D; Nielsen, Casey Paulasue; D'Costa, Susan M; Condit, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    Maturation of the vaccinia virion is an intricate process that results in the organization of the viroplasm contained in immature virions into the lateral bodies, core wall and nucleocapsid observed in the mature particles. It is unclear how this organization takes place and studies with mutants are indispensable in understanding this process. By characterizing an inducible mutant in the A3L gene, we revealed that A3, an inner core wall protein, is important for formation of normal immature viruses and also for the correct localization of L4, a nucleocapsid protein. L4 did not accumulate in the viral factories in the absence of A3 and was not encapsidated in the particles that do not contain A3. These data strengthen our previously suggested hypothesis that A3 and L4 interact and that this interaction is critical for proper formation of the core wall and nucleocapsid.

  1. Vaccinia virus protein A3 is required for the production of normal immature virions and for the encapsidation of the nucleocapsid protein L4

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, Desyree Murta; Moussatche, Nissin; McFadden, Baron D.; Nielsen, Casey Paulasue; D’Costa, Susan M.; Condit, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Maturation of the vaccinia virion is an intricate process that results in the organization of the viroplasm contained in immature virions into the lateral bodies, core wall and nucleocapsid observed in the mature particles. It is unclear how this organization takes place and studies with mutants are indispensable in understanding this process. By characterizing an inducible mutant in the A3L gene, we revealed that A3, an inner core wall protein, is important for formation of normal immature viruses and also for the correct localization of L4, a nucleocapsid protein. L4 did not accumulate in the viral factories in the absence of A3 and was not encapsidated in the particles that do not contain A3. These data strengthen our previously suggested hypothesis that A3 and L4 interact and that this interaction is critical for proper formation of the core wall and nucleocapsid. PMID:25765002

  2. Observation of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein induced TAR DNA melting at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosa, Gonzalo; Harbron, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Donald; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Barbara, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Reverse transcription of the HIV-1 RNA genome involves several nucleic acid rearrangement steps, and the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a key role in this process. NC is a nucleic acid chaperone protein, which facilitates the formation of the most stable nucleic acid structures. Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (SM-FRET) measurements enable us to observe the NC-induced conformational fluctuations of a transactivation response region (TAR) DNA hairpin, which is part of the initial product of reverse transcription known as minus-strand strong-stop DNA. SM-FRET studies show that the majority of conformational fluctuations of the fluorescently-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the presence of NC occur in <100 ms. A single molecule explores a wide range of confomations unpon NC binding, with fluctuations encompassing as many as 40 bases in both arms of the hairpin. No conformational fluctuations are observed with the dye-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the absence of NC or when a labeled TAR DNA hairpin variant lacking bulges and internal loops is analyzed in the presence of NC. This study represents the first real-time observation of NC-mediated nucleic acid conformational fluctuations, revealing new insights into NC's nucleic acid chaperone activity.

  3. HIV-1 matrix protein repositioning in nucleocapsid region fails to confer virus-like particle assembly.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Yuan; Chang, Yu-Fen; Wang, Shiu-Mei; Tseng, Ying-Tzu; Huang, Kuo-Jung; Wang, Chin-Tien

    2008-08-15

    The HIV-1 matrix (MA) protein is similar to nucleocapsid (NC) proteins in its propensity for self-interaction and association with RNA. Here we report on our finding that replacing MA with NC results in the production of wild type (wt)-level RNA and virus-like particles (VLPs). In contrast, constructs containing MA as a substitute for NC are markedly defective in VLP production and form virions with lower densities than wt, even though their RNA content is over 50% that of wt level. We also noted that a DeltaMN mutant lacking both MA and NC produces a relatively higher amount of VLPs than those in which MA was substituted for NC. Although DeltaMN contains approximately 30% the RNA of wt, it still exhibits virion densities equal (or very similar) to those of wt. The data suggest that neither NC nor RNA are major virion density determinants. Furthermore, we noted that NC(ZIP)--a NC replacement with a leucine zipper dimerization motif--produces VLPs as efficiently as wt. However, the markedly reduced assembly efficiency of NC(ZIP) is associated with the formation of VLPs with densities slightly lower than those of wt following MA removal, suggesting that (a) MA is required to help the inserted leucine zipper motif perform efficient Gag multimerization, and (b) MA plays a role in the virus assembly process. PMID:18550141

  4. Development of novel immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgA, and IgM enzyme immunoassays based on recombinant Puumala and Dobrava hantavirus nucleocapsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Helga; Wolbert, Anne; Razanskiene, Ausra; Marg, Andreas; Kazaks, Andris; Sasnauskas, Kestutis; Pauli, Georg; Ulrich, Rainer; Krüger, Detlev H

    2006-12-01

    Human infections with Asian and European hantaviruses can result in hemorrhagic fever with renal syndromes of differing severities characterized by renal dysfunction and sometimes by pulmonary symptoms. For the serological detection of human infections by hantaviruses relevant for Europe, we developed monoclonal antibody capture immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on yeast-expressed nucleocapsid proteins of Puumala and Dobrava hantaviruses. Moreover, for diagnosis of acute infections, mu-capture IgM ELISAs were established with nucleocapsid proteins expressed in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider S2 cells. The cutoff values of the ELISAs were determined by investigation of up to 500 human anti-hantavirus-negative serum samples. The specificities of the Puumala and Dobrava virus-specific IgM, IgA, and IgG ELISAs were found to be 100%. The sensitivities of these ELISAs were determined to be 100% with panels of characterized anti-Puumala or anti-Dobrava virus-positive human serum samples. In most cases, Puumala and Dobrava virus infections could be differentiated by ELISA reactivity alone, i.e., endpoint titration with homologous and heterologous antigens.

  5. Recombinant nucleocapsid protein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibody to turkey coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Mohamed; Loa, Chien Chang; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2015-06-01

    Nucleocapsid (N) protein gene of turkey coronavirus (TCoV) was expressed in a prokaryotic system and used to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of antibody to TCoV. Anti-TCoV hyperimmune turkey serum and normal turkey serum were used as positive or negative controls for optimization of the ELISA. Goat anti-turkey IgG (H+L) conjugated with horseradish peroxidase was used as detector antibody. Three hundred and twenty two turkey sera from the field were used to evaluate the performance of ELISA and determine the cut-off point of ELISA. The established ELISA was also examined with serum samples obtained from turkeys experimentally infected with TCoV. Those serum samples were collected at various time intervals from 1 to 63 days post-infection. The optimum conditions for differentiation between anti-TCoV hyperimmune serum and normal turkey serum were recombinant TCoV N protein concentration at 20 μg/ml, serum dilution at 1:800, and conjugate dilution at 1:10,000. Of the 322 sera from the field, 101 were positive for TCoV by immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA). The sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA relative to IFA test were 86.0% and 96.8%, respectively, using the optimum cut-off point of 0.2 as determined by logistic regression method. Reactivity of anti-rotavirus, anti-reovirus, anti-adenovirus, or anti-enterovirus antibodies with the recombinant N protein coated on the ELISA plates was not detected. These results indicated that the established antibody-capture ELISA in conjunction with recombinant TCoV N protein as the coating protein can be utilized for detection of antibodies to TCoV in turkey flocks.

  6. Osteoclasts expressing the measles virus nucleocapsid gene display a pagetic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, N; Reddy, S V; Menaa, C; Anderson, D; Roodman, G D

    2000-03-01

    Osteoclasts (OCLs) in Paget's disease are markedly increased in number and size, have increased numbers of nuclei per multinucleated cell, and demonstrate increased resorption capacity and increased sensitivity to 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3), the active form of vitamin D. These cells also contain nuclear inclusions, reminiscent of those seen in paramyxovirus-infected cells, which cross-react with antibodies to measles virus nucleocapsid (MVNP) antigen. To elucidate the role of MV in the abnormal OCL phenotype of Paget's disease, we transduced normal OCL precursors with retroviral vectors expressing MVNP and the MV matrix (MVM) genes. The transduced cells were then cultured with 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) for14 or 21 days to induce formation of OCL-like multinucleated cells. The MVNP-transduced cells formed increased numbers of multinucleated cells, which contained many more nuclei and had increased resorption capacity compared with multinucleated cells derived from empty vector-transduced (EV-transduced) and MVM-transduced or normal bone marrow cells. Furthermore, MVNP-transduced cells showed increased sensitivity to 1, 25-(OH)(2)D(3), and formed OCLs at concentrations of 1, 25-(OH)(2)D(3) that were 1 log lower than that required for normal, EV-transduced, or MVM-transduced cells. These results demonstrate that expression of the MVNP gene in normal OCL precursors stimulates OCL formation and induces OCLs that express a phenotype similar to that of pagetic OCLs. These results support a potential pathophysiologic role for MV infection in the abnormal OCL activity and morphology that are characteristic of pagetic OCLs.

  7. Recombinant nucleocapsid protein based single serum dilution ELISA for the detection of antibodies to infectious bronchitis virus in poultry.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sunil K; Kamble, Nitin M; Pillai, Aravind S; Gaikwad, Satish S; Khulape, Sagar A; Reddy, M R; Mohan, C Madhan; Kataria, Jag Mohan; Dey, Sohini

    2014-12-01

    Avian infectious bronchitis is ubiquitous and highly contagious disease of poultry, with profound effect on commercial poultry production. For effective control of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), quick and specific diagnosis is of utmost importance. In this study, the virus was isolated from clinical samples from India and the full length nucleocapsid (N) gene was amplified, cloned and expressed in a prokaryotic system. The purified recombinant N protein based single serum dilution enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for IBV to measure specific antibody in the sera of chickens. A total of 310 chicken sera samples were tested using the commercial IDEXX kit along with the assay developed. A linear correlation was obtained between predicted antibody titres at a single working dilution of 1:100 and the corresponding serum titres observed as determined by the standard serial dilution method. Regression analysis was used to construct a standard curve from which an equation was derived which confirmed their correlation. The developed equation was then used to extrapolate predicated ELISA antibody titer from corrected absorbance readings of the single working dilution. The assay proved to be specific (95.8%) and sensitive (96.8%) when compared to the commercial IDEXX ELISA test.

  8. Identification of phosphorylation sites in the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of SARS-coronavirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liang; Shao, Jianmin; Sun, Maomao; Liu, Jinxiu; Xu, Gongjin; Zhang, Xumin; Xu, Ningzhi; Wang, Rong; Liu, Siqi

    2007-12-01

    After decoding the genome of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV), next challenge is to understand how this virus causes the illness at molecular bases. Of the viral structural proteins, the N protein plays a pivot role in assembly process of viral particles as well as viral replication and transcription. The SARS-CoV N proteins expressed in the eukaryotes, such as yeast and HEK293 cells, appeared in the multiple spots on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE), whereas the proteins expressed in E. coli showed a single 2DE spotE These 2DE spots were further examined by Western blot and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, and identified as the N proteins with differently apparent pI values and similar molecular mass of 50 kDa. In the light of the observations and other evidences, a hypothesis was postulated that the SARS-CoV N protein could be phosphorylated in eukaryotes. To locate the plausible regions of phosphorylation in the N protein, two truncated N proteins were generated in E. coli and treated with PKC[alpha]. The two truncated N proteins after incubation of PKC[alpha] exhibited the differently electrophoretic behaviors on 2DE, suggesting that the region of 1-256 aa in the N protein was the possible target for PKC[alpha] phosphorylation. Moreover, the SARS-CoV N protein expressed in yeast were partially digested with trypsin and carefully analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. In contrast to the completely tryptic digestion, these partially digested fragments generated two new peptide mass signals with neutral loss, and MS/MS analysis revealed two phosphorylated peptides located at the "dense serine" island in the N protein with amino acid sequences, GFYAEGSRGGSQASSRSSSR and GNSGNSTPGSSRGNSPARMASGGGK. With the PKC[alpha] phosphorylation treatment and the partially tryptic digestion, the N protein expressed in E. coli released the same peptides as observed in yeast cells. Thus, this investigation provided the preliminary data to determine the phosphorylation sites in the SARS-CoV N protein, and

  9. Identification of a high affinity nucleocapsid protein binding element from the bovine leukemia virus genome.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, F Zehra; Babalola, Kathlene; Summers, Michael F

    2013-02-01

    Retroviral genome recognition is mediated by interactions between the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of the virally encoded Gag polyprotein and cognate RNA packaging elements that, for most retroviruses, appear to reside primarily within the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the genome. Recent studies suggest that a major packaging determinant of bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a member of the human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)/BLV family and a non-primate animal model for HTLV-induced leukemogenesis, resides within the gag open reading frame. We have prepared and purified the recombinant BLV NC protein and conducted electrophoretic mobility shift and isothermal titration calorimetry studies with RNA fragments corresponding to these proposed packaging elements. The gag-derived RNAs did not exhibit significant affinity for NC, suggesting an alternate role in packaging. However, an 83-nucleotide fragment of the 5'-UTR that resides just upstream of the gag start codon binds NC stoichiometrically and with high affinity (K(d)=136±21 nM). These nucleotides were predicted to form tandem hairpin structures, and studies with smaller fragments indicate that the NC binding site resides exclusively within the distal hairpin (residues G369-U399, K(d)=67±8 nM at physiological ionic strength). Unlike all other structurally characterized retroviral NC binding RNAs, this fragment is not expected to contain exposed guanosines, suggesting that RNA binding may be mediated by a previously uncharacterized mechanism.

  10. Comparative anti-infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) activity of (-)-pinene: effect on nucleocapsid (N) protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiwei; Wu, Nan; Zu, Yuangang; Fu, Yujie

    2011-01-25

    In the present study, anti-IBV (infectious bronchitis virus) activities of (-)-pinenes were studied by MTT assay, as well as docking and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. The CC₅₀ values of (-)-α-pinene and (-)-β-pinene were above 10 mM. And the maximum noncytotoxic concentrations (TD₀) of (-)-α-pinene and (-)-β-pinene were determined as 7.88 ± 0.06 and 6.09 ± 0.31 mM, respectively. The two compounds were found to inhibit IBV with an IC₅₀ of 0.98 ± 0.25 and 1.32 ± 0.11 mM. The MTT assay showed that the inhibitions of (-)-pinenes against IBV appear to occur moderately before entering the cell but are much stronger occur after penetration of the virus into the cell. Molecular simulations indicated that (-)-α-pinene and (-)-β-pinene specifically interact with the active site which is located at the N terminus of phosphorylated nucleocapsid (N) protein, with the former being more potent than the latter. The binding energies of them are -36.83 and -35.59 kcal mol-1, respectively. Results presented here may suggest that (-)-α-pinene and (-)-β-pinene possess anti-IBV properties, and therefore are a potential source of anti-IBV ingredients for the pharmaceutical industry.

  11. Identification of a binding site for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, K; Zambrano, N; Baldwin, E T; Shapiro, B A; Erickson, J W; Omichinski, J G; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M; Appella, E

    1993-06-01

    The nucleocapsid (NC) protein NCp7 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is important for encapsidation of the virus genome, RNA dimerization, and primer tRNA annealing in vitro. Here we present evidence from gel mobility-shift experiments indicating that NCp7 binds specifically to an RNA sequence. Two complexes were identified in native gels. The more slowly migrating complex contained two RNA molecules and one peptide, while the more rapidly migrating one is composed of one RNA and one peptide. Further, mutational analysis of the RNA shows that the predicted stem and loop structure of stem-loop 1 plays a critical role. Our results show that NCp7 binds to a unique RNA structure within the psi region; in addition, this structure is necessary for RNA dimerization. We propose that NCp7 binds to the RNA via a direct interaction of one zinc-binding motif to stem-loop 1 followed by binding of the other zinc-binding motif to stem-loop 1, stem-loop 2, or the linker region of the second RNA molecule, forming a bridge between the two RNAs. PMID:8506369

  12. Kinetic analysis of the effect of HIV nucleocapsid protein (NCp) on internal strand transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Raja, A; DeStefano, J J

    1999-04-20

    The mechanism of HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) catalyzed strand transfer synthesis (i.e., switching of the primer to a new template) from internal regions on RNA templates in the presence and absence of HIV nucleocapsid protein (NCp) was investigated. Two different systems each consisting of DNA-primed RNA donor (on which primer extension initiated) and acceptor (to which DNAs initiated on the donor could transfer) templates were used to determine kinetic parameters of strand transfer. The donor and acceptor shared an internal region of homology where homologous strand transfer could occur. The rate of strand transfer at various acceptor concentrations was determined by monitoring the production of transfer products over time. These rates were used to construct Lineweaver-Burk plots. In each system, NCp increased the Vmax about 3-fold while the Km for acceptor template was decreased severalfold. NCp's effects on RT extension ranged from no effect to inhibition depending on the primer-template used. The lowered Km shows that NCp increases the affinity of the acceptor template for the transferring DNA. Vmax increases despite the inhibition of RT extension. The increased Vmax implies a stimulatory mechanism that cannot be mimicked by high acceptor concentrations. Therefore, NCp does not act by merely increasing the effective concentration of nucleic acids.

  13. Specific zinc-finger architecture required for HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein's nucleic acid chaperone function

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Mark C.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2002-01-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (NC) of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) is a nucleic acid chaperone that facilitates the rearrangement of nucleic acid secondary structure during reverse transcription. HIV-1 NC contains two CCHC-type zinc binding domains. Here, we use optical tweezers to stretch single λ-DNA molecules through the helix-to-coil transition in the presence of wild-type and several mutant forms of HIV-1 NC with altered zinc-finger domains. Although all forms of NC lowered the cooperativity of the DNA helix–coil transition, subtle changes in the zinc-finger structures reduced NC's effect on the transition. The change in cooperativity of the DNA helix–coil transition correlates strongly with in vitro nucleic acid chaperone activity measurements and in vivo HIV-1 replication studies using the same NC mutants. Moreover, Moloney murine leukemia virus NC, which contains a single zinc finger, had little effect on transition cooperativity. These results suggest that a specific two-zinc-finger architecture is required to destabilize nucleic acids for optimal chaperone activity during reverse transcription in complex retroviruses such as HIV-1. PMID:12084921

  14. Probing the RNA binding surface of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Wei; Okaine, Stephen; McPike, Mark P; Lin, Yong; Borer, Philip N

    2013-05-14

    The highly conserved nucleocapsid protein domain in HIV-1 recognizes and binds SL3 in genomic RNA. In this work, we used the structure of the NCp7-SL3 RNA complex to guide the construction of 16 NCp7 mutants to probe the RNA binding surface of the protein [De Guzman, R. N., et al. (1998) Science 279, 384-388]. Thirteen residues with functional or structural significance were mutated individually to Ala (Asn(5), Phe(6), Val(13), Phe(16), Asn(17), Gly(19), Glu(21), Ile(24), Gln(45), Met(46), Gly(22), Pro(31), and Gly(40)), and three salt bridge switch mutants exchanged Lys and Glu (Lys(14)-Glu(21), Lys(33)-Glu(42), and Lys(38)-Glu(51)). Dissociation constants (Kd) determined by fluorescence titration and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to compare affinities of SL3 for the variant proteins to that for the wild type. The F16A (Phe(16) to Ala) variant showed a 25-fold reduction in affinity, consistent with a loss of organized structure in f1, the protein's first zinc finger. I24A, Q45A, and M46A reduced affinity by 2-5-fold; these residues occupy nearly equivalent positions in f1 and f2. E21A increased affinity by 3-fold, perhaps because of the mutant's increased net positive charge. Among the salt bridge switch mutants, only K14E/E21K in f1 caused a substantial change in affinity (5-fold reduction), binding SL3 with a biphasic binding isotherm. Aside from these six variants, most of the mutations studied have relatively minor effects on the stability of the complex. We conclude that many side chain interactions in the wild-type complex contribute little to stability or can be compensated by new contacts in the mutants.

  15. Nucleocapsid Protein: A Desirable Target for Future Therapies Against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Mori, Mattia; Kovalenko, Lesia; Lyonnais, Sébastien; Antaki, Danny; Torbett, Bruce E; Botta, Maurizio; Mirambeau, Gilles; Mély, Yves

    2015-01-01

    The currently available anti-HIV-1 therapeutics is highly beneficial to infected patients. However, clinical failures occur as a result of the ability of HIV-1 to rapidly mutate. One approach to overcome drug resistance is to target HIV-1 proteins that are highly conserved among phylogenetically distant viral strains and currently not targeted by available therapies. In this respect, the nucleocapsid (NC) protein, a zinc finger protein, is particularly attractive, as it is highly conserved and plays a central role in virus replication, mainly by interacting with nucleic acids. The compelling rationale for considering NC as a viable drug target is illustrated by the fact that point mutants of this protein lead to noninfectious viruses and by the inability to select viruses resistant to a first generation of anti-NC drugs. In our review, we discuss the most relevant properties and functions of NC, as well as recent developments of small molecules targeting NC. Zinc ejectors show strong antiviral activity, but are endowed with a low therapeutic index due to their lack of specificity, which has resulted in toxicity. Currently, they are mainly being investigated for use as topical microbicides. Greater specificity may be achieved by using non-covalent NC inhibitors (NCIs) targeting the hydrophobic platform at the top of the zinc fingers or key nucleic acid partners of NC. Within the last few years, innovative methodologies have been developed to identify NCIs. Though the antiviral activity of the identified NCIs needs still to be improved, these compounds strongly support the druggability of NC and pave the way for future structure-based design and optimization of efficient NCIs. PMID:25749978

  16. Investigating the Cellular Distribution and Interactions of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein by Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Halina; Taha, Nedal; Boutant, Emmanuel; Richert, Ludovic; Khatter, Heena; Klaholz, Bruno; Rondé, Philippe; Réal, Eléonore; de Rocquigny, Hugues; Mély, Yves

    2015-01-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) of the Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a small basic protein containing two zinc fingers. About 2000 NCp7 molecules coat the genomic RNA in the HIV-1 virion. After infection of a target cell, the viral core enters into the cytoplasm, where NCp7 chaperones the reverse transcription of the genomic RNA into the proviral DNA. As a consequence of their much lower affinity for double-stranded DNA as compared to single-stranded RNAs, NCp7 molecules are thought to be released in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of infected cells in the late steps of reverse transcription. Yet, little is known on the cellular distribution of the released NCp7 molecules and on their possible interactions with cell components. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify potential cellular partners of NCp7 and to monitor its intracellular distribution and dynamics by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, fluorescence correlation and cross-correlation spectroscopy, and raster imaging correlation spectroscopy. HeLa cells transfected with eGFP-labeled NCp7 were used as a model system. We found that NCp7-eGFP localizes mainly in the cytoplasm and the nucleoli, where it binds to cellular RNAs, and notably to ribosomal RNAs which are the most abundant. The binding of NCp7 to ribosomes was further substantiated by the intracellular co-diffusion of NCp7 with the ribosomal protein 26, a component of the large ribosomal subunit. Finally, gradient centrifugation experiments demonstrate a direct association of NCp7 with purified 80S ribosomes. Thus, our data suggest that NCp7 molecules released in newly infected cells may primarily bind to ribosomes, where they may exert a new potential role in HIV-1 infection. PMID:25723396

  17. Binding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocapsid protein to psi-RNA-SL3.

    PubMed

    Shubsda, M F; Kirk, C A; Goodisman, J; Dabrowiak, J C

    2000-10-30

    The interaction of the nucleocapsid protein NCp7, from the pNL4-3 isolate of HIV-1, with psi-RNA-SL3, with the sequence 5'-GGACUAGCGGAGGCUAGUCC, was studied using non-denaturing gel electrophoresis. Two kinds of experiments were performed, using buffered solutions of radiolabeled RNA and unlabeled protein. In the 'dilution' experiments, the total RNA concentration, RT, was varied for a series of solutions, but kept equal to the total protein concentration, PT, In the 'titration' experiments, solutions having RT constant but with varying PT were analyzed. The solutions were electrophoresed and the autoradiographic spot intensities, proportional to the amounts of the different species present, were measured. The intensities were fit to a number of equilibrium models, differing in species stoichiometries, by finding the best values of the binding constants. It was shown that NCp7 protein and SL3 RNA combine to form at least two complexes. When PT is below approximately 10 microM, a complex that contains two RNAs and one protein forms. Increasing PT to approximately 100 microM causes the 2:1 complex to oligomerize, forming a species having eight RNAs and four proteins. For the dilution experiments, run at 5 degrees C at an ionic strength of 31 mM, we found K1 for the 2:1 complex is approximately 10(11) M(-2) and K2 for the 8:4 complex is approximately 10(16) M(-3). The titration experiments returned K1 approximately 10(7) M(-2) (poorly determined) and K2 approximately 10(19) M(-3). The analysis was complicated by the loss of RNA at higher protein concentrations, due to formation of an insoluble species containing both RNA and protein, which does not enter the gel. Correcting for this changes the calculated values of equilibrium constants, but not the molecularities determined by our analysis. The observation that a small complex can oligomerize to form a larger species is consistent with the fact that NCp7 organizes and condenses the genome in the virus particle.

  18. Characterization of the inhibition mechanism of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein chaperone activities by methylated oligoribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Avilov, Sergiy V; Boudier, Christian; Gottikh, Marina; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Mély, Yves

    2012-02-01

    Since currently available therapies against HIV/AIDS still show important drawbacks, the development of novel anti-HIV treatments is a key issue. We recently characterized methylated oligoribonucleotides (mONs) that extensively inhibit HIV-1 replication in primary T cells at nanomolar concentrations. The mONs were shown to target both HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and the nucleocapsid protein (NC), which is an essential partner of RT during viral DNA synthesis. To further understand the mechanism of such mONs, we studied by isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence-based techniques their NC binding properties and ability to inhibit the nucleic acid chaperone properties of NC. Notably, we investigated the ability of mONs to inhibit the NC-induced destabilization of the HIV-1 cTAR (complementary DNA sequence to TAR [transactivation response element]) stem-loop and the NC-promoted cTAR annealing to its complementary sequence, required at the early stage of HIV-1 viral DNA synthesis. Moreover, we compared the activity of the mONs to that of a number of modified and nonmodified oligonucleotides. Results show that the mONs inhibit NC by a competitive mechanism whereby the mONs tightly bind the NC peptide, mainly through nonelectrostatic interactions with the hydrophobic platform at the top of the NC zinc fingers. Taken together, these results favor the notion that the mONs impair the process of the RT-directed viral DNA synthesis by sequestering NC molecules, thus preventing the chaperoning of viral DNA synthesis by NC. These findings contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis for NC inhibition by mONs, which could be used for the rational design of antiretroviral compounds targeting HIV-1 NC protein.

  19. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Antigen Detection Using Monoclonal Antibodies to the Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fukuma, Aiko; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Tani, Hideki; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Kurosu, Takeshi; Egawa, Kazutaka; Suda, Yuto; Singh, Harpal; Nomachi, Taro; Gokuden, Mutsuyo; Ando, Katsuyuki; Kida, Kouji; Kan, Miki; Kato, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Akira; Kitamoto, Hiroaki; Sato, Yuko; Suzuki, Tadaki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morikawa, Shigeru; Shimojima, Masayuki; Saijo, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is a tick-borne infectious disease with a high case fatality rate, and is caused by the SFTS virus (SFTSV). SFTS is endemic to China, South Korea, and Japan. The viral RNA level in sera of patients with SFTS is known to be strongly associated with outcomes. Virological SFTS diagnosis with high sensitivity and specificity are required in disease endemic areas. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated novel monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the SFTSV nucleocapsid (N) protein and developed a sandwich antigen (Ag)-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of N protein of SFTSV using MAb and polyclonal antibody as capture and detection antibodies, respectively. The Ag-capture system was capable of detecting at least 350–1220 TCID50/100 μl/well from the culture supernatants of various SFTSV strains. The efficacy of the Ag-capture ELISA in SFTS diagnosis was evaluated using serum samples collected from patients suspected of having SFTS in Japan. All 24 serum samples (100%) containing high copy numbers of viral RNA (>105 copies/ml) showed a positive reaction in the Ag-capture ELISA, whereas 12 out of 15 serum samples (80%) containing low copy numbers of viral RNA (<105 copies/ml) showed a negative reaction in the Ag-capture ELISA. Among these Ag-capture ELISA-negative 12 samples, 9 (75%) were positive for IgG antibodies against SFTSV. Conclusions The newly developed Ag-capture ELISA is useful for SFTS diagnosis in acute phase patients with high levels of viremia. PMID:27045364

  20. C-Terminal DxD-Containing Sequences within Paramyxovirus Nucleocapsid Proteins Determine Matrix Protein Compatibility and Can Direct Foreign Proteins into Budding Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Greeshma; Schmitt, Phuong Tieu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxovirus particles are formed by a budding process coordinated by viral matrix (M) proteins. M proteins coalesce at sites underlying infected cell membranes and induce other viral components, including viral glycoproteins and viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), to assemble at these locations from which particles bud. M proteins interact with the nucleocapsid (NP or N) components of vRNPs, and these interactions enable production of infectious, genome-containing virions. For the paramyxoviruses parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) and mumps virus, M-NP interaction also contributes to efficient production of virus-like particles (VLPs) in transfected cells. A DLD sequence near the C-terminal end of PIV5 NP protein was previously found to be necessary for M-NP interaction and efficient VLP production. Here, we demonstrate that 15-residue-long, DLD-containing sequences derived from either the PIV5 or Nipah virus nucleocapsid protein C-terminal ends are sufficient to direct packaging of a foreign protein, Renilla luciferase, into budding VLPs. Mumps virus NP protein harbors DWD in place of the DLD sequence found in PIV5 NP protein, and consequently, PIV5 NP protein is incompatible with mumps virus M protein. A single amino acid change converting DLD to DWD within PIV5 NP protein induced compatibility between these proteins and allowed efficient production of mumps VLPs. Our data suggest a model in which paramyxoviruses share an overall common strategy for directing M-NP interactions but with important variations contained within DLD-like sequences that play key roles in defining M/NP protein compatibilities. IMPORTANCE Paramyxoviruses are responsible for a wide range of diseases that affect both humans and animals. Paramyxovirus pathogens include measles virus, mumps virus, human respiratory syncytial virus, and the zoonotic paramyxoviruses Nipah virus and Hendra virus. Infectivity of paramyxovirus particles depends on matrix-nucleocapsid protein

  1. Solution structure of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) nsp3a and determinants of the interaction with MHV nucleocapsid (N) protein.

    PubMed

    Keane, Sarah C; Giedroc, David P

    2013-03-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are positive-sense, single-stranded, enveloped RNA viruses that infect a variety of vertebrate hosts. The CoV nucleocapsid (N) protein contains two structurally independent RNA binding domains, designated the N-terminal domain (NTD) and the dimeric C-terminal domain (CTD), joined by a charged linker region rich in serine and arginine residues (SR-rich linker). An important goal in unraveling N function is to molecularly characterize N-protein interactions. Recent genetic evidence suggests that N interacts with nsp3a, a component of the viral replicase. Here we present the solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) nsp3a and show, using isothermal titration calorimetry, that MHV N219, an N construct that extends into the SR-rich linker (residues 60 to 219), binds cognate nsp3a with high affinity (equilibrium association constant [K(a)], [1.4 ± 0.3] × 10(6) M(-1)). In contrast, neither N197, an N construct containing only the folded NTD (residues 60 to 197), nor the CTD dimer (residues 260 to 380) binds nsp3a with detectable affinity. This indicates that the key nsp3a binding determinants localize to the SR-rich linker, a finding consistent with those of reverse genetics studies. NMR chemical shift perturbation analysis reveals that the N-terminal region of an MHV N SR-rich linker peptide (residues 198 to 230) binds to the acidic face of MHV nsp3a containing the acidic α2 helix with an affinity (expressed as K(a)) of 8.1 × 10(3) M(-1). These studies reveal that the SR-rich linker of MHV N is necessary but not sufficient to maintain this high-affinity binding to N.

  2. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Qualley, Dominic F. Sokolove, Victoria L.; Ross, James L.

    2015-03-13

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. - Highlights: • BLV NC binds strongly to DNA and RNA. • BLV NC promotes mini-TAR annealing as well as HIV-1 NC. • Annealing kinetics suggest a low degree of similarity between BLV NC and HTLV-1 NC.

  3. A versatile building block: the structures and functions of negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus nucleocapsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuna; Guo, Yu; Lou, Zhiyong

    2012-12-01

    Nucleocapsid protein (NPs) of negative-sense single-stranded RNA (-ssRNA) viruses function in different stages of viral replication, transcription, and maturation. Structural investigations show that -ssRNA viruses that encode NPs preliminarily serve as structural building blocks that encapsidate and protect the viral genomic RNA and mediate the interaction between genomic RNA and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. However, recent structural results have revealed other biological functions of -ssRNA viruses that extend our understanding of the versatile roles of virally encoded NPs. PMID:23136065

  4. A key role for the carboxy-terminal tail of the murine coronavirus nucleocapsid protein in coordination of genome packaging.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Lili; Koetzner, Cheri A; Masters, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    The prototype coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) exhibits highly selective packaging of its genomic positive-stranded RNA into assembled virions, despite the presence in infected cells of a large excess of subgenomic viral mRNAs. One component of this selectivity is the MHV packaging signal (PS), an RNA structure found only in genomic RNA and not in subgenomic RNAs. It was previously shown that a major determinant of PS recognition is the second of the two RNA-binding domains of the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein. We have now found that PS recognition additionally depends upon a segment of the carboxy-terminal tail (domain N3) of the N protein. Since domain N3 is also the region of N protein that interacts with the membrane (M) protein, this finding suggests a mechanism by which selective genome packaging is accomplished, through the coupling of genome encapsidation to virion assembly.

  5. The Nucleocapsid Protein of Rift Valley Fever Virus Is a Potent Human CD8+ T Cell Antigen and Elicits Memory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weidong; Watts, Douglas M.; Costanzo, Margaret C.; Tang, Xiaolei; Venegas, Leon A.; Jiao, Feng; Sette, Alessandro; Sidney, John; Sewell, Andrew K.; Wooldridge, Linda; Makino, Shinji; Morrill, John C.; Peters, Clarence J.; Kan-Mitchell, June

    2013-01-01

    There is no licensed human vaccine currently available for Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVFV), a Category A high priority pathogen and a serious zoonotic threat. While neutralizing antibodies targeting the viral glycoproteins are protective, they appear late in the course of infection, and may not be induced in time to prevent a natural or bioterrorism-induced outbreak. Here we examined the immunogenicity of RVFV nucleocapsid (N) protein as a CD8+ T cell antigen with the potential for inducing rapid protection after vaccination. HLA-A*0201 (A2)-restricted epitopic determinants were identified with N-specific CD8+ T cells from eight healthy donors that were primed with dendritic cells transduced to express N, and subsequently expanded in vitro by weekly re-stimulations with monocytes pulsed with 59 15mer overlapping peptides (OLPs) across N. Two immunodominant epitopes, VT9 (VLSEWLPVT, N121–129) and IL9 (ILDAHSLYL, N165–173), were defined. VT9- and IL9-specific CD8+ T cells identified by tetramer staining were cytotoxic and polyfunctional, characteristics deemed important for viral control in vivo. These peptides induced specific CD8+ T cell responses in A2-transgenic mice, and more importantly, potent N-specific CD8+ T cell reactivities, including VT9- and IL9-specific ones, were mounted by mice after a booster vaccination with the live attenuated RVF MP-12. Our data suggest that the RVFV N protein is a potent human T cell immunogen capable of eliciting broad, immunodominant CD8+ T cell responses that are potentially protective. Understanding the immune responses to the nucleocapsid is central to the design of an effective RVFV vaccine irrespective of whether this viral protein is effective as a stand-alone immunogen or only in combination with other RVFV antigens. PMID:23527138

  6. Primary structure of the membrane and nucleocapsid protein genes of feline infectious peritonitis virus and immunogenicity of recombinant vaccinia viruses in kittens.

    PubMed

    Vennema, H; de Groot, R J; Harbour, D A; Horzinek, M C; Spaan, W J

    1991-03-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) causes a mostly fatal, immunologically mediated disease in cats. Previously, we demonstrated that immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the FIPV spike protein (S) induced early death after challenge with FIPV (Vennema et al., 1990, J. Virol. 64, 1407-1409). In this paper we describe similar immunizations with the FIPV membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins. The genes encoding these proteins were cloned and sequenced. Comparison of the amino acid sequences with the corresponding sequences of porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus revealed 84.7 and 77% identity for M and N, respectively. Vaccinia virus recombinants expressing the cloned genes induced antibodies in immunized kittens. Immunization with neither recombinant induced early death after challenge with FIPV, strongly suggesting that antibody-dependent enhancement is mediated by antibodies against S only. Immunization with the N protein recombinant had no apparent effect on the outcome of challenge. However, three of eight kittens immunized with the M protein recombinant survived the challenge, as compared to one of eight kittens of the control group.

  7. Measles virus nucleocapsid transcript expression is not restricted to the osteoclast lineage in patients with Paget's disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S V; Menaa, C; Singer, F R; Cundy, T; Cornish, J; Whyte, M P; Roodman, G D

    1999-10-01

    Abundant evidence supports a viral etiology for Paget's disease of bone (PD), however, an infectious virus has not been isolated from PD patients. Thus, it is unclear how the virus is maintained for the many years that the disease persists in patients. We considered if a primitive multipotential hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), which is self-renewing, passes the virus to its differentiated progeny and serves as a reservoir for the pathogen. If a primitive stem cell harbored measles virus (MV), then other hematopoietic lineages derived from this stem cell in PD patients should also express MV transcripts. Therefore, because the human hematopoietic stem cell has not been clearly identified or isolated in large numbers, we isolated RNA from highly purified erythroid and multipotential hematopoietic progenitors that are the precursors for erythroid, granulocyte, megakaryocyte and macrophages (CFU-GEMM), and used RT-PCR to determine if MV nucleocapsid transcripts were present. MV transcripts were detected in PD patients in early erythroid (BFU-E) and more primitive multipotential myeloid progenitors (CFU-GEMM). Nonhematopoietic stromal cells from PD patients did not express MV transcripts. The expression of MV transcripts in erythroid progenitors was further confirmed by in situ hybridization using antisense riboprobes to MV nucleocapsid transcripts. Thus, our findings suggest that the pluripotent HSCs may be a potential reservoir for the virus. We propose that when HSCs, which contain MV, divide they produce a second HSC that serves as a reservoir for the virus and also transmit the virus to their more differentiated progeny in the erythroid and myeloid lineages. This mechanism would permit a defective virus to persist in HSCs of PD patients for many years, since HSCs are usually in G0 phase, and then be transmitted to more differentiated cells. This model further suggests that a mature complete virus that affects cell function could only act pathogenetically in the

  8. Identification of functionally important negatively charged residues in the carboxy end of mouse hepatitis coronavirus A59 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sandhya; Bednar, Valerie; Blount, Andrew; Hogue, Brenda G

    2006-05-01

    The coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is a multifunctional viral gene product that encapsidates the RNA genome and also plays some as yet not fully defined role in viral RNA replication and/or transcription. A number of conserved negatively charged amino acids are located within domain III in the carboxy end of all coronavirus N proteins. Previous studies suggested that the negatively charged residues are involved in virus assembly by mediating interaction between the membrane (M) protein carboxy tail and nucleocapsids. To determine the importance of these negatively charged residues, a series of alanine and other charged-residue substitutions were introduced in place of those in the N gene within a mouse hepatitis coronavirus A59 infectious clone. Aspartic acid residues 440 and 441 were identified as functionally important. Viruses could not be isolated when both residues were replaced by positively charged amino acids. When either amino acid was replaced by a positively charged residue or both were changed to alanine, viruses were recovered that contained second-site changes within N, but not in the M or envelope protein. The compensatory role of the new changes was confirmed by the construction of new viruses. A few viruses were recovered that retained the D441-to-arginine change and no compensatory changes. These viruses exhibited a small-plaque phenotype and produced significantly less virus. Overall, results from our analysis of a large panel of plaque-purified recovered viruses indicate that the negatively charged residues at positions 440 and 441 are key residues that appear to be involved in virus assembly. PMID:16611893

  9. Nucleocapsid assembly in pneumoviruses is regulated by conformational switching of the N protein

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Max; Bertinelli, Mattia; Leyrat, Cédric; Paesen, Guido C; Saraiva de Oliveira, Laura Freitas; Huiskonen, Juha T; Grimes, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    Non-segmented, (-)RNA viruses cause serious human diseases. Human metapneumovirus (HMPV), an emerging pathogen of this order of viruses (Mononegavirales) is one of the main causes of respiratory tract illness in children. To help elucidate the assembly mechanism of the nucleocapsid (the viral RNA genome packaged by the nucleoprotein N) we present crystallographic structures of HMPV N in its assembled RNA-bound state and in a monomeric state, bound to the polymerase cofactor P. Our structures reveal molecular details of how P inhibits the self-assembly of N and how N transitions between the RNA-free and RNA-bound conformational state. Notably, we observe a role for the C-terminal extension of N in directly preventing premature uptake of RNA by folding into the RNA-binding cleft. Our structures suggest a common mechanism of how the growth of the nucleocapsid is orchestrated, and highlight an interaction site representing an important target for antivirals. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12627.001 PMID:26880565

  10. Structure-based virtual screening and experimental validation of the discovery of inhibitors targeted towards the human coronavirus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-ke; Jeyachandran, Sivakamavalli; Hu, Nien-Jen; Liu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Shing-Yen; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Chang, Yu-Ming; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2016-01-01

    Nucleocapsid protein (NP), an essential RNA-binding viral protein in human coronavirus (CoV)-infected cells, is required for the replication and transcription of viral RNA. Recent studies suggested that human CoV NP is a valid target for antiviral drug development. Based on this aspect, structure-based virtual screening targeting nucleocapsid protein (NP) was performed to identify good chemical starting points for medicinal chemistry. The present study utilized structure-based virtual screening against human CoV-OC43 using the Zinc database, which is performed through docking with varying precisions and computational intensities to identify eight potential compounds. The chosen potential leads were further validated experimentally using biophysical means. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis indicated that one among the potential leads, 6-chloro-7-(2-morpholin-4-yl-ethylamino) quinoxaline-5,8-dione (small-compound H3), exhibited a significant decrease of RNA-binding capacity of NP by more than 20%. The loss of binding activity was manifested as a 20% decrease in the minimum on-rate accompanied with a 70% increase in the maximum off-rate. Fluorescence titration and X-ray crystallography studies indicated that H3 antagonizes the binding between HCoV-OC43 NP and RNA by interacting with the N-terminal domain of the NP. Our findings provide insight into the development of new therapeutics that disrupt the interaction between RNA and viral NP in the HCoV. The discovery of the new compound would be an impetus to design novel NP inhibitors against human CoV.

  11. Identification of Rift Valley Fever Virus Nucleocapsid Protein-RNA Binding Inhibitors Using a High-Throughput Screening Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbecker, Mary; Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Lodmell, J. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging infectious pathogen that causes severe disease in humans and livestock and has the potential for global spread. Currently, there is no proven effective treatment for RVFV infection and there is no licensed vaccine. Inhibition of RNA binding to the essential viral nucleocapsid (N) protein represents a potential anti-viral therapeutic strategy because all of the functions performed by N during infection involve RNA binding. To target this interaction, we developed a fluorescence polarization-based high-throughput drug screening assay and tested 26,424 chemical compounds for their ability to disrupt an N-RNA complex. From libraries of FDA approved drugs, drug-like molecules and natural products extracts we identified several lead compounds that are promising candidates for medicinal chemistry. PMID:22644268

  12. Structure and Function Analysis of Nucleocapsid Protein of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Interacting with RNA Using Homology Modeling*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Feng, Zhike; Wu, Jianyan; Huang, Ying; Lu, Gang; Zhu, Min; Wang, Bi; Mao, Xiang; Tao, Xiaorong

    2015-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) plays key roles in assembling genomic RNA into ribonucleoprotein (RNP), which serves as a template for both viral gene transcription and genome replication. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of how TSWV N interacts with genomic RNA. In this study, we demonstrated that TSWV N protein forms a range of higher ordered oligomers. Analysis of the RNA binding behavior of N protein revealed that no specific oligomer binds to RNA preferentially, instead each type of N oligomer is able to bind RNA. To better characterize the structure and function of N protein interacting with RNA, we constructed homology models of TSWV N and N-RNA complexes. Based on these homology models, we demonstrated that the positively charged and polar amino acids in its predicted surface cleft of TSWV N are critical for RNA binding. Moreover, by N-RNA homology modeling, we found that the RNA component is deeply embedded in the predicted protein cleft; consistently, TSWV N-RNA complexes are relatively resistant to digestion by RNase. Collectively, using homology modeling, we determined the RNA binding sites on N and found a new protective feature for N protein. Our findings also provide novel insights into the molecular details of the interaction of TSWV N with RNA components. PMID:25540203

  13. A protein ballet around the viral genome orchestrated by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase leads to an architectural switch: from nucleocapsid-condensed RNA to Vpr-bridged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lyonnais, Sébastien; Gorelick, Robert J.; Heniche-Boukhalfa, Fatima; Bouaziz, Serge; Parissi, Vincent; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Restle, Tobias; Gatell, Jose Maria; Le Cam, Eric; Mirambeau, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Summary HIV-1 reverse transcription is achieved in the newly infected cell before viral DNA (vDNA) nuclear import. Reverse transcriptase (RT) has previously been shown to function as a molecular motor, dismantling the nucleocapsid complex that binds the viral genome as soon as plus-strand DNA synthesis initiates. We first propose a detailed model of this dismantling in close relationship with the sequential conversion from RNA to double-stranded (ds) DNA, focusing on the nucleocapsid protein (NCp7). The HIV-1 DNA-containing preintegration complex (PIC) resulting from completion of reverse transcription is translocated through the nuclear pore. The PIC nucleoprotein architecture is poorly understood but contains at least two HIV-1 proteins initially from the virion core, namely Integrase (IN) and the viral protein r (Vpr). We next present a set of electron micrographs supporting that Vpr behaves as a DNA architectural protein, initiating multiple DNA bridges over more than 500 base pairs (bp). These complexes are shown to interact with NCp7 bound to single-stranded nucleic acid regions that are thought to maintain IN binding during dsDNA synthesis, concurrently with nucleocapsid complex dismantling. This unexpected binding of Vpr conveniently leads to a compacted but filamentous folding of the vDNA that should favor its nuclear import. Finally, nucleocapsid-like aggregates engaged in dsDNA synthesis appear to efficiently bind to F-actin filaments, a property that may be involved in targeting complexes to the nuclear envelope. More generally, this article highlights unique possibilities offered by in vitro reconstitution approaches combined with macromolecular imaging to gain insights into the mechanisms that alter the nucleoprotein architecture of the HIV-1 genome, ultimately enabling its insertion into the nuclear chromatin. PMID:23017337

  14. Sequence of the nucleocapsid protein gene of Machupo virus: close relationship with another South American pathogenic arenavirus, Junín.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, C M; Wilson, S M; Clegg, J C

    1992-01-01

    The sequence of the nucleocapsid (N) protein of Machupo virus (causative agent of Bolivian haemorrhagic fever) has been determined, and used to infer a phylogenetic relationship to other arenaviruses. The relationship of the virus to Junín and Tacaribe viruses, together with previous demonstrations of antigenic similarity and cross-protection by heterologous viruses, suggest that vaccines developed against Argentine haemorrhagic fever might also be effective against the Bolivian disease.

  15. The ϕ6 Cystovirus Protein P7 Becomes Accessible to Antibodies in the Transcribing Nucleocapsid: A Probe for Viral Structural Elements

    PubMed Central

    Alimova, Alexandra; Wei, Hui; Katz, Al; Spatz, Linda; Gottlieb, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Protein P7 is a component of the cystovirus viral polymerase complex. In the unpackaged procapsid, the protein is situated in close proximity to the viral directed RNA polymerase, P2. Cryo-electron microscopy difference maps from the species ϕ6 procapsid have demonstrated that P7 and P2 likely interact prior to viral RNA packaging. The location of P7 in the post-packaged nucleocapsid (NC) remains unknown. P7 may translocate closer to the five-fold axis of a filled procapsid but this has not been directly visualized. We propose that monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) can be selected that serve as probe- reagents for viral assembly and structure. A set of Mabs have been isolated that recognize and bind to the ϕ6 P7. The antibody set contains five unique Mabs, four of which recognize a linear epitope and one which recognizes a conformational epitope. The four unique Mabs that recognize a linear epitope display restricted utilization of Vκ and VH genes. The restricted genetic range among 4 of the 5 antibodies implies that the antibody repertoire is limited. The limitation could be the consequence of a paucity of exposed antigenic sites on the ϕ6 P7 surface. It is further demonstrated that within ϕ6 nucleocapsids that are primed for early-phase transcription, P7 is partially accessible to the Mabs, indicating that the nucleocapsid shell (protein P8) has undergone partial disassembly exposing the protein’s antigenic sites. PMID:25799314

  16. Fundamental differences between the nucleic acid chaperone activities of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein and Gag or Gag-derived proteins: Biological implications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tiyun; Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Mitra, Mithun; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rein, Alan; Levin, Judith G.

    2010-01-01

    The HIV-1 Gag polyprotein precursor has multiple domains including nucleocapsid (NC). Although mature NC and NC embedded in Gag are nucleic acid chaperones (proteins that remodel nucleic acid structure), few studies include detailed analysis of the chaperone activity of partially processed Gag proteins and comparison with NC and Gag. Here we address this issue by using a reconstituted minus-strand transfer system. NC and NC-containing Gag proteins exhibited annealing and duplex destabilizing activities required for strand transfer. Surprisingly, unlike NC, with increasing concentrations, Gag proteins drastically inhibited the DNA elongation step. This result is consistent with “nucleic acid-driven multimerization” of Gag and the reported slow dissociation of Gag from bound nucleic acid, which prevent reverse transcriptase from traversing the template (“roadblock” mechanism). Our findings illustrate one reason why NC (and not Gag) has evolved as a critical cofactor in reverse transcription, a paradigm that might also extend to other retrovirus systems. PMID:20655566

  17. A recombinant nucleocapsid protein-based indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect antibodies against porcine deltacoronavirus.

    PubMed

    Su, Mingjun; Li, Chunqiu; Guo, Donghua; Wei, Shan; Wang, Xinyu; Geng, Yufei; Yao, Shuang; Gao, Jing; Wang, Enyu; Zhao, Xiwen; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Jianfa; Wu, Rui; Feng, Li; Sun, Dongbo

    2016-05-01

    Recently, porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) has been proven to be associated with enteric disease in piglets. Diagnostic tools for serological surveys of PDCoV remain in the developmental stage when compared with those for other porcine coronaviruses. In our study, an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (rPDCoV-N-ELISA) was developed to detect antibodies against PDCoV using a histidine-tagged recombinant nucleocapsid (N) protein as an antigen. The rPDCoV-N-ELISA did not cross-react with antisera against porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, swine transmissible gastroenteritis virus, porcine group A rotavirus, classical swine fever virus, porcine circovirus-2, porcine pseudorabies virus, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus; the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed 100% sensitivity and 90.4% specificity of the rPDCoV-N-ELISA based on samples of known status (n=62). Analyses of field samples (n=319) using the rPDCoV-N-ELISA indicated that 11.59% of samples were positive for antibodies against PDCoV. These data demonstrated that the rPDCoV-N-ELISA can be used for epidemiological investigations of PDCoV and that PDCoV had a low serum prevalence in pig population in Heilongjiang province, northeast China. PMID:26668175

  18. Dynamics of linker residues modulate the nucleic acid binding properties of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein zinc fingers.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, Loussiné; Tisné, Carine; Barraud, Pierre; Xu, Xiaoqian; Morellet, Nelly; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) is a small basic protein containing two zinc fingers (ZF) separated by a short linker. It is involved in several steps of the replication cycle and acts as a nucleic acid chaperone protein in facilitating nucleic acid strand transfers occurring during reverse transcription. Recent analysis of three-dimensional structures of NC-nucleic acids complexes established a new property: the unpaired guanines targeted by NC are more often inserted in the C-terminal zinc finger (ZF2) than in the N-terminal zinc finger (ZF1). Although previous NMR dynamic studies were performed with NC, the dynamic behavior of the linker residues connecting the two ZF domains remains unclear. This prompted us to investigate the dynamic behavior of the linker residues. Here, we collected 15N NMR relaxation data and used for the first time data at several fields to probe the protein dynamics. The analysis at two fields allows us to detect a slow motion occurring between the two domains around a hinge located in the linker at the G35 position. However, the amplitude of motion appears limited in our conditions. In addition, we showed that the neighboring linker residues R29, A30, P31, R32, K33 displayed restricted motion and numerous contacts with residues of ZF1. Our results are fully consistent with a model in which the ZF1-linker contacts prevent the ZF1 domain to interact with unpaired guanines, whereas the ZF2 domain is more accessible and competent to interact with unpaired guanines. In contrast, ZF1 with its large hydrophobic plateau is able to destabilize the double-stranded regions adjacent to the guanines bound by ZF2. The linker residues and the internal dynamics of NC regulate therefore the different functions of the two zinc fingers that are required for an optimal chaperone activity.

  19. Mutations within the nuclear localization signal of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nucleocapsid protein attenuate virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changhee; Hodgins, Douglas; Calvert, Jay G.; Welch, Siao-Kun W.; Jolie, Rika; Yoo, Dongwan . E-mail: dyoo@uoguelph.ca

    2006-03-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an RNA virus replicating in the cytoplasm, but the nucleocapsid (N) protein is specifically localized to the nucleus and nucleolus in virus-infected cells. A 'pat7' motif of 41-PGKK(N/S)KK has previously been identified in the N protein as the functional nuclear localization signal (NLS); however, the biological consequences of N protein nuclear localization are unknown. In the present study, the role of N protein nuclear localization during infection was investigated in pigs using an NLS-null mutant virus. When two lysines at 43 and 44 at the NLS locus were substituted to glycines, the modified NLS with 41-PGGGNKK restricted the N protein to the cytoplasm. This NLS-null mutation was introduced into a full-length infectious cDNA clone of PRRSV. Upon transfection of cells, the NLS-null full-length clone induced cytopathic effects and produced infectious progeny. The NLS-null virus grew to a titer 100-fold lower than that of wild-type virus. To examine the response to NLS-null PRRSV in the natural host, three groups of pigs, consisting of seven animals per group, were intranasally inoculated with wild-type, placebo, or NLS-null virus, and the animals were maintained for 4 weeks. The NLS-null-infected pigs had a significantly shorter mean duration of viremia than wild-type-infected pigs but developed significantly higher titers of neutralizing antibodies. Mutations occurred at the NLS locus in one pig during viremia, and four types of mutations were identified: 41-PGRGNKK, 41-PGGRNKK, and 41-PGRRNKK, and 41-PGKKSKK. Both wild-type and NLS-null viruses persisted in the tonsils for at least 4 weeks, and the NLS-null virus persisting in the tonsils was found to be mutated to either 41-PGRGNKK or 41-PGGRNKK in all pigs. No other mutation was found in the N gene. All types of reversions which occurred during viremia and persistence were able to translocate the mutated N proteins to the nucleus, indicating a

  20. Mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the fusion peptide of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus F protein.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Manli; Yin, Feifei; Deng, Fei; Liu, Maili; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin

    2008-08-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into cells is normally mediated by fusion between viral and cellular membranes, in which the fusion peptide plays a crucial role. The fusion peptides of group II nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) F proteins are quite conserved, with a hydrophobic region located at the N terminal of the F(1) fragment. For this report, we used mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study the structure and function of the fusion peptide of the Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid NPV (HearNPV) F protein (HaF). Five mutations in the fusion peptide of HaF, N(1)G, N(1)L, I(2)N, G(3)L, and D(11)L, were generated separately, and the mutated f genes were transformed into the f-null HearNPV bacmid. The mutations N(1)L, I(2)N, and D(11)L were found to completely abolish the ability of the recombinant bacmids to produce infectious budded virus, while the mutations N(1)G and G(3)L did not. The low-pH-induced envelope fusion assay demonstrated that the N(1)G substitution increased the fusogenicity of HaF, while the G(3)L substitution reduced its fusogenicity. NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of a synthetic fusion peptide of HaF in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles at pH 5.0. The fusion peptide appeared to be an amphiphilic structure composed of a flexible coil in the N terminus from N(1) to N(5), a 3(10)-helix from F(6) to G(8), a turn at S(9), and a regular alpha-helix from V(10) to D(19). The data provide the first NMR structure of a baculovirus fusion peptide and allow us to further understand the relationship of structure and function of the fusion peptide.

  1. Studies on the mechanism of inactivation of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7 with 2-mercaptobenzamide thioesters.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Lisa M Miller; Byrd, J Calvin; Hara, Toshiaki; Srivastava, Pratibha; Mazur, Sharlyn J; Stahl, Stephen J; Inman, John K; Appella, Ettore; Omichinski, James G; Legault, Pascale

    2005-04-21

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) is a small basic protein with two CysCysHisCys zinc-binding domains that specifically recognizes the Psi-site of the viral RNA. NCp7 plays a number of crucial roles in the viral lifecycle, including reverse transcription and RNA encapsidation. Several classes of potential anti-HIV compounds have been designed to inactivate NCp7 through zinc ejection, including a special class of thioester compounds. We have investigated the mechanism of action of two N-substituted-S-acyl-2-mercaptobenzamide compounds (compounds 1 and 2) that target NCp7. UV/Visible spectroscopy studies demonstrated that both thioesters were able to eject metal from NCp7. NMR and mass spectroscopy studies showed that the thioester compounds specifically ejected zinc from the carboxyl-terminal zinc-binding domain of NCp7 by covalent modification of Cys(39). Exposure of NCp7 to compounds 1 and 2 destroyed its ability to specifically bind RNA, whereas NCp7 already bound to RNA was protected from zinc ejection by the thioesters. The thiol component of the thioesters (compound 3, 2-mercaptobenzoyl-beta-alaninamide) did not eject zinc from NCp7, but when compound 3 was incubated with acetyl CoA prior to incubation with NCp7, we observed extensive metal ejection. Thus, the thiol released by the reaction of compounds 1 and 2 could be re-acylated in vivo by acyl CoA to form a new thioester compound that is able to react with NCp7. These studies provide a better understanding of the mechanism of action of thioester compounds, which is important for future design of anti-HIV-1 compounds that target NCp7. PMID:15828823

  2. Composition and sequence-dependent binding of RNA to the nucleocapsid protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Dey, Anwesha; York, Danielle; Smalls-Mantey, Adjoa; Summers, Michael F

    2005-03-15

    All retroviruses package two copies of their genomes during virus assembly, both of which are required for strand transfer-mediated recombination during reverse transcription. Genome packaging is mediated by interactions between the nucleocapsid (NC) domains of assembling Gag polyproteins and an RNA packaging signal, located near the 5' end of the genome, called Psi. We recently discovered that the NC protein of the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) can bind with high affinity to conserved UCUG elements within the MLV packaging signal [D'Souza, V., and Summers, M. F. (2004) Nature 431, 586-590]. Selective binding to dimeric RNA is regulated by a conformational RNA switch, in which the UCUG elements are sequestered by base pairing in the monomeric RNA and do not bind NC, but become exposed for NC binding upon dimerization. Dimerization-dependent structural changes occur in other regions of the Psi-site, exposing guanosine-containing segments that might also bind NC. Here we demonstrate that short RNAs containing three such sequences, ACAG, UUUG, and UCCG, can bind NC with significant affinity (K(d) = 94-315 nM). Titration experiments with oligoribonucleotides of varying lengths and compositions, combined with NMR-based structural studies, reveal that binding is strictly dependent on the presence of an unpaired guanosine, and that relative binding affinities can vary by more than 1 order of magnitude depending on the nature of the three upstream nucleotides. Binding is enhanced in short RNAs containing terminal phosphates, indicating that electrostatic interactions contribute significantly to binding. Our findings extend a previously published model for genome recognition, in which the NC domains of assembling Gag molecules interact with multiple X(i-3)-X(i-2)-X(i-1)-G(i) elements (X is a variable nucleotide) that appear to be preferentially exposed in the dimeric RNA.

  3. Identification by high throughput screening of small compounds inhibiting the nucleic acid destabilization activity of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Shvadchak, Volodymyr; Sanglier, Sarah; Rocle, Sandrine; Villa, Pascal; Haiech, Jacques; Hibert, Marcel; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Mély, Yves; de Rocquigny, Hugues

    2009-07-01

    Due to its highly conserved zinc fingers and its nucleic acid chaperone properties which are critical for HIV-1 replication, the nucleocapsid protein (NC) constitutes a major target in AIDS therapy. Different families of molecules targeting NC zinc fingers and/or inhibiting the binding of NC with its target nucleic acids have been developed. However, their limited specificity and their cellular toxicity prompted us to develop a screening assay to target molecules able to inhibit NC chaperone properties, and more specifically the initial NC-promoted destabilization of the nucleic acid secondary structure. Since this destabilization is critically dependent on the properly folded fingers, the developed assay is thought to be highly specific. The assay was based on the use of cTAR DNA, a stem-loop sequence complementary to the transactivation response element, doubly labelled at its 5' and 3' ends by a rhodamine 6G fluorophore and a fluorescence quencher, respectively. Addition of NC(12-55), a peptide corresponding to the zinc finger domain of NC, to this doubly-labelled cTAR, led to a partial melting of the cTAR stem, which increases the distance between the two labels and thus, restores the rhodamine 6G fluorescence. Thus, positive hits were detected through the decrease of rhodamine 6G fluorescence. An "in-house" chemical library of 4800 molecules was screened and five compounds with IC(50) values in the micromolar range have been selected. The hits were shown by mass spectrometry and fluorescence anisotropy titration to prevent binding of NC(12-55) to cTAR through direct interaction with the NC folded fingers, but without promoting zinc ejection. These non-zinc ejecting NC binders are a new series of anti-NC molecules that could be used to rationally design molecules with potential anti-viral activities.

  4. Nucleocapsid Protein Annealing of a Primer-Template Enhances (+)-Strand DNA Synthesis and Fidelity by HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase†

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiae; Roberts, Anne; Yuan, Hua; Xiong, Yong; Anderson, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) requires reverse transcriptase (RT) and HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) for proper viral replication. HIV-1 NCp7 has been shown to enhance various steps in reverse transcription including tRNA initiation and strand transfer which may be mediated through interactions with RT as well as RNA and DNA oligonucleotides. With the use of DNA oligonucleotides, we have examined the interaction of NCp7 with RT and the kinetics of reverse transcription during (+)-strand synthesis with an NCp7-facilitated annealed primer-template. Using a pre-steady state kinetics approach, the NCp7-annealed primer-template has a substantial increase (3-7 fold) in the rate of incorporation (kpol) by RT as compared to heat annealed primer-template with single nucleotide incorporation. There was also a 2-fold increase in the binding affinity constant (Kd) of the nucleotide. These differences in kpol and Kd were not through direct interactions between HIV-1 RT and NCp7. When examining extension by RT, the data suggests that the NCp7-annealed primer-template facilitates the formation of a longer product more quickly compared to the heat annealed primer-template. This enhancement in rate is mediated through interactions with NCp7’s zinc fingers and N-terminal domain and nucleic acids. The NCp7-annealed primer-template also enhances the fidelity of RT (3-fold) by slowing the rate of incorporation of an incorrect nucleotide. Taken together, this study elucidates a new role of NCp7 by facilitating DNA-directed DNA synthesis during reverse transcription by HIV-1 RT that may translate into enhanced viral fitness and offers an avenue to exploit for targeted therapeutic intervention against HIV. PMID:22210155

  5. Zinc Finger Structures in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nucleocapsid Protein Facilitate Efficient Minus- and Plus-Strand Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jianhui; Wu, Tiyun; Anderson, Jada; Kane, Bradley F.; Johnson, Donald G.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Henderson, Louis E.; Levin, Judith G.

    2000-01-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (NC) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has two zinc fingers, each containing the invariant metal ion binding residues CCHC. Recent reports indicate that mutations in the CCHC motifs are deleterious for reverse transcription in vivo. To identify reverse transcriptase (RT) reactions affected by such changes, we have probed zinc finger functions in NC-dependent RT-catalyzed HIV-1 minus- and plus-strand transfer model systems. Our approach was to examine the activities of wild-type NC and a mutant in which all six cysteine residues were replaced by serine (SSHS NC); this mutation severely disrupts zinc coordination. We find that the zinc fingers contribute to the role of NC in complete tRNA primer removal from minus-strand DNA during plus-strand transfer. Annealing of the primer binding site sequences in plus-strand strong-stop DNA [(+) SSDNA] to its complement in minus-strand acceptor DNA is not dependent on NC zinc fingers. In contrast, the rate of annealing of the complementary R regions in (−) SSDNA and 3′ viral RNA during minus-strand transfer is approximately eightfold lower when SSHS NC is used in place of wild-type NC. Moreover, unlike wild-type NC, SSHS NC has only a small stimulatory effect on minus-strand transfer and is essentially unable to block TAR-induced self-priming from (−) SSDNA. Our results strongly suggest that NC zinc finger structures are needed to unfold highly structured RNA and DNA strand transfer intermediates. Thus, it appears that in these cases, zinc finger interactions are important components of NC nucleic acid chaperone activity. PMID:10982342

  6. Vaccinia virions deficient in transcription enzymes lack a nucleocapsid

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, Baron D.H.; Moussatche, Nissin; Kelley, Karen; Kang, Byung-Ho; Condit, Richard C.

    2012-12-05

    The poxvirus virion contains an inner tubular nucleocapsid structure. The nucleocapsid is apparently labile to conventional electron microscopy fixation procedures and has therefore been largely ignored for decades. Advancements in electron microscopy sample preparation, notably high pressure freezing, better preserve the nucleocapsid structure. Using high pressure freezing and electron microscopy, we have compared the virion structures of wt virus and mutant viruses known to be deficient in packaging of viral transcription enzymes. We show that the mutant viruses lack a defined nucleocapsid. These results support the hypothesis that the nucleocapsid contains the viral DNA genome complexed with viral transcription enzymes and structural proteins. The studies open the door to further investigation of the composition and ultrastructure of the poxvirus nucleocapsid.

  7. Tyrosine phosphorylation of measles virus nucleocapsid protein in persistently infected neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Y; Ofir, R; Salzberg, S; Heller, A; Weinstein, Y; Isakov, N; Udem, S; Wolfson, M; Rager-Zisman, B

    1995-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a slowly progressing fatal human disease of the central nervous system which is a delayed sequel of measles virus (MV) infection. A typical pathological feature of this disease is the presence of viral ribonucleocapsid structures in the form of inclusion bodies and the absence of infectious virus or budding viral particles. The mechanisms governing the establishment and maintenance of a persistent MV infection in brain cells are still largely unknown. To understand the mechanisms underlying MV persistence in neuronal cells, a tissue culture model was studied. Clone NS20Y/MS of the murine neuroblastoma C1300 persistently infected with the wild-type Edmonston strain of MV secretes relatively high levels of alpha/beta interferon (IFN). As shown previously, treatment of the persistently infected cultures with anti-IFN serum converted the persistent state into a productive infection indicated by the appearance of multinucleated giant cells. In this study, we have investigated whether alpha/beta IFN produced by NS20Y/MS cells activates cellular protein tyrosine kinases which will induce tyrosine phosphorylating activity specific to virus-infected cells. We present data to show augmented protein tyrosine kinase activity in the persistently infected cells. We demonstrate that the MV N protein is phosphorylated on tyrosine in addition to serine and threonine in the persistent state but not in NS20Y cells acutely infected with MV. PMID:7884896

  8. Tyrosine phosphorylation of measles virus nucleocapsid protein in persistently infected neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Segev, Y; Ofir, R; Salzberg, S; Heller, A; Weinstein, Y; Isakov, N; Udem, S; Wolfson, M; Rager-Zisman, B

    1995-04-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a slowly progressing fatal human disease of the central nervous system which is a delayed sequel of measles virus (MV) infection. A typical pathological feature of this disease is the presence of viral ribonucleocapsid structures in the form of inclusion bodies and the absence of infectious virus or budding viral particles. The mechanisms governing the establishment and maintenance of a persistent MV infection in brain cells are still largely unknown. To understand the mechanisms underlying MV persistence in neuronal cells, a tissue culture model was studied. Clone NS20Y/MS of the murine neuroblastoma C1300 persistently infected with the wild-type Edmonston strain of MV secretes relatively high levels of alpha/beta interferon (IFN). As shown previously, treatment of the persistently infected cultures with anti-IFN serum converted the persistent state into a productive infection indicated by the appearance of multinucleated giant cells. In this study, we have investigated whether alpha/beta IFN produced by NS20Y/MS cells activates cellular protein tyrosine kinases which will induce tyrosine phosphorylating activity specific to virus-infected cells. We present data to show augmented protein tyrosine kinase activity in the persistently infected cells. We demonstrate that the MV N protein is phosphorylated on tyrosine in addition to serine and threonine in the persistent state but not in NS20Y cells acutely infected with MV.

  9. Crystal Structure of the Core Region of Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Protein Reveals the Mechanism for Ribonucleoprotein Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Wang, Wenming; Sun, Yuna; Ma, Chao; Wang, Xu; Wang, Xin; Liu, Pi; Shen, Shu; Li, Baobin; Lin, Jianping; Deng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantaviruses, which belong to the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae, infect mammals, including humans, causing either hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in humans with high mortality. Hantavirus encodes a nucleocapsid protein (NP) to encapsidate the genome and form a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) together with viral polymerase. Here, we report the crystal structure of the core domains of NP (NPcore) encoded by Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV), which are two representative members that cause HCPS in the New World. The constructs of SNV and ANDV NPcore exclude the N- and C-terminal portions of full polypeptide to obtain stable proteins for crystallographic study. The structure features an N lobe and a C lobe to clamp RNA-binding crevice and exhibits two protruding extensions in both lobes. The positively charged residues located in the RNA-binding crevice play a key role in RNA binding and virus replication. We further demonstrated that the C-terminal helix and the linker region connecting the N-terminal coiled-coil domain and NPcore are essential for hantavirus NP oligomerization through contacts made with two adjacent protomers. Moreover, electron microscopy (EM) visualization of native RNPs extracted from the virions revealed that a monomer-sized NP-RNA complex is the building block of viral RNP. This work provides insight into the formation of hantavirus RNP and provides an understanding of the evolutionary connections that exist among bunyaviruses. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses are distributed across a wide and increasing range of host reservoirs throughout the world. In particular, hantaviruses can be transmitted via aerosols of rodent excreta to humans or from human to human and cause HFRS and HCPS, with mortalities of 15% and 50%, respectively. Hantavirus is therefore listed as a category C pathogen. Hantavirus encodes an NP that plays essential roles both in RNP formation and

  10. Form-determining functions in Sindbis virus nucleocapsids: nucleosomelike organization of the nucleocapsid.

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, K M; Brown, D T

    1989-01-01

    Purified intact Sindbis virus nucleocapsids were treated at different pH values or with various concentrations of divalent cations, cation chelators, salt, or formamide. The resulting structures were examined by velocity sedimentation, electron microscopy, and protein-protein cross-linking. Changes in each of the test conditions led to alterations in the sedimentation profile of treated nucleocapsids. Appropriate concentrations of formamide or divalent cations generated beaded strandlike structures similar in morphology to those generated from adenovirus cores and nucleosomes. The capsid protein and RNA remained associated with each other at NaCl concentrations less than or equal to 1 M or after treatment of the structures with alkaline pH up to and including pH 10.7. Protein and RNA were dissociated by salt concentrations of greater than 1 M, suggesting that the arginine-rich, amino-terminal portion of the capsid protein is responsible for binding the RNA. Protein-protein cross-linking also indicated that the capsid proteins remained associated in small aggregates under some of the conditions that caused dissociation of the nucleocapsid and suggested the presence of more than one type of protein-protein interaction in the nucleocapsids. Collectively, these data suggest that, like histones and adenovirus core proteins, the Sindbis virus capsid protein serves to package segments of the genome into nucleoprotein beads which are capable of interacting with each other to form the nucleocapsid structure. Images PMID:2911124

  11. Hepatitis B Virus Nucleocapsids Formed by Carboxy-Terminally Mutated Core Proteins Contain Spliced Viral Genomes but Lack Full-Size DNA

    PubMed Central

    Köck, Josef; Nassal, Michael; Deres, Karl; Blum, Hubert E.; von Weizsäcker, Fritz

    2004-01-01

    The carboxy-terminal sequence of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein constitutes a nucleic acid binding domain that is rich in arginine residues and contains three serine phosphorylation sites. While dispensable for capsid assembly, this domain is involved in viral replication, as demonstrated by the effects of mutations on RNA packaging and/or reverse transcription; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we tested a series of core protein mutants in which the three serine phosphorylation sites were replaced by glutamic acid, in parallel with a previously described deletion variant lacking the 19 C-terminal amino acid residues, for their ability to support viral replication in transfected hepatoma cells. Replacement of all serines and the deletion gave rise to nucleocapsids containing a smaller than wild-type DNA genome. Rather than a single-stranded DNA intermediate, as previously thought, this was a 2.0-kbp double-stranded DNA molecule derived from spliced pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). Interestingly, full-length pgRNA was associated with nucleocapsids but was found to be sensitive to nuclease digestion, while encapsidated spliced RNA and 3′ truncated RNA species were nuclease resistant. These findings suggest that HBV pgRNA encapsidation is directional and that a packaging limit is determined by the C-terminal portion of the core protein. PMID:15564489

  12. The Herpes Simplex Virus Protein pUL31 Escorts Nucleocapsids to Sites of Nuclear Egress, a Process Coordinated by Its N-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Claus-Henning; Binz, Anne; Sodeik, Beate; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Bailer, Susanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Progeny capsids of herpesviruses leave the nucleus by budding through the nuclear envelope. Two viral proteins, the membrane protein pUL34 and the nucleo-phosphoprotein pUL31 form the nuclear egress complex that is required for capsid egress out of the nucleus. All pUL31 orthologs are composed of a diverse N-terminal domain with 1 to 3 basic patches and a conserved C-terminal domain. To decipher the functions of the N-terminal domain, we have generated several Herpes simplex virus mutants and show here that the N-terminal domain of pUL31 is essential with basic patches being critical for viral propagation. pUL31 and pUL34 entered the nucleus independently of each other via separate routes and the N-terminal domain of pUL31 was required to prevent their premature interaction in the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal embedded in this domain was not required for nuclear import of pUL31. In the nucleus, pUL31 associated with the nuclear envelope and newly formed capsids. Viral mutants lacking the N-terminal domain or with its basic patches neutralized still associated with nucleocapsids but were unable to translocate them to the nuclear envelope. Replacing the authentic basic patches with a novel artificial one resulted in HSV1(17+)Lox-UL31-hbpmp1mp2, that was viable but delayed in nuclear egress and compromised in viral production. Thus, while the C-terminal domain of pUL31 is sufficient for the interaction with nucleocapsids, the N-terminal domain was essential for capsid translocation to sites of nuclear egress and a coordinated interaction with pUL34. Our data indicate an orchestrated sequence of events with pUL31 binding to nucleocapsids and escorting them to the inner nuclear envelope. We propose a common mechanism for herpesviral nuclear egress: pUL31 is required for intranuclear translocation of nucleocapsids and subsequent interaction with pUL34 thereby coupling capsid maturation with primary envelopment. PMID:26083367

  13. The Herpes Simplex Virus Protein pUL31 Escorts Nucleocapsids to Sites of Nuclear Egress, a Process Coordinated by Its N-Terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Funk, Christina; Ott, Melanie; Raschbichler, Verena; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Binz, Anne; Sodeik, Beate; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Bailer, Susanne M

    2015-06-01

    Progeny capsids of herpesviruses leave the nucleus by budding through the nuclear envelope. Two viral proteins, the membrane protein pUL34 and the nucleo-phosphoprotein pUL31 form the nuclear egress complex that is required for capsid egress out of the nucleus. All pUL31 orthologs are composed of a diverse N-terminal domain with 1 to 3 basic patches and a conserved C-terminal domain. To decipher the functions of the N-terminal domain, we have generated several Herpes simplex virus mutants and show here that the N-terminal domain of pUL31 is essential with basic patches being critical for viral propagation. pUL31 and pUL34 entered the nucleus independently of each other via separate routes and the N-terminal domain of pUL31 was required to prevent their premature interaction in the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal embedded in this domain was not required for nuclear import of pUL31. In the nucleus, pUL31 associated with the nuclear envelope and newly formed capsids. Viral mutants lacking the N-terminal domain or with its basic patches neutralized still associated with nucleocapsids but were unable to translocate them to the nuclear envelope. Replacing the authentic basic patches with a novel artificial one resulted in HSV1(17+)Lox-UL31-hbpmp1mp2, that was viable but delayed in nuclear egress and compromised in viral production. Thus, while the C-terminal domain of pUL31 is sufficient for the interaction with nucleocapsids, the N-terminal domain was essential for capsid translocation to sites of nuclear egress and a coordinated interaction with pUL34. Our data indicate an orchestrated sequence of events with pUL31 binding to nucleocapsids and escorting them to the inner nuclear envelope. We propose a common mechanism for herpesviral nuclear egress: pUL31 is required for intranuclear translocation of nucleocapsids and subsequent interaction with pUL34 thereby coupling capsid maturation with primary envelopment. PMID:26083367

  14. Structure of the vesicular stomatitis virus nucleocapsid in complex with the nucleocapsid-binding domain of the small polymerase cofactor, P

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Todd J.; Luo, Ming

    2009-10-05

    The negative-strand RNA viruses (NSRVs) are unique because their nucleocapsid, not the naked RNA, is the active template for transcription and replication. The viral polymerase of nonsegmented NSRVs contains a large polymerase catalytic subunit (L) and a nonenzymatic cofactor, the phosphoprotein (P). Insight into how P delivers the polymerase complex to the nucleocapsid has long been pursued by reverse genetics and biochemical approaches. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of P of vesicular stomatitis virus, a prototypic nonsegmented NSRV, bound to nucleocapsid-like particles. P binds primarily to the C-terminal lobe of 2 adjacent N proteins within the nucleocapsid. This binding mode is exclusive to the nucleocapsid, not the nucleocapsid (N) protein in other existing forms. Localization of phosphorylation sites within P and their proximity to the RNA cavity give insight into how the L protein might be oriented to access the RNA template.

  15. The zinc fingers of HIV nucleocapsid protein NCp7 direct interactions with the viral regulatory protein Vpr.

    PubMed

    de Rocquigny, H; Petitjean, P; Tanchou, V; Decimo, D; Drouot, L; Delaunay, T; Darlix, J L; Roques, B P

    1997-12-01

    The 96-amino acid protein Vpr functions as a regulator of cellular processes involved in human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) life cycle, in particular by interrupting cells division in the G2 phase. Incorporation of Vpr in the virion was reported to be mediated by the C-terminal domain of the Pr55(Gag) polyprotein precursor, which includes NCp7, a protein involved in the genomic RNA encapsidation and p6, a protein required for particle budding. To precisely define the Gag and Vpr sequences involved in this protein-protein interaction, NCp7, p6, and Vpr as well as a series of derived peptides were synthesized using Fmoc (N-(9-fluorenyl)methoxycarbonyl) chemistry. Binding assays were carried out by Far Western experiments and by competition studies using (52-96)Vpr immobilized onto agarose beads. The results show that interaction between NCp7 and Vpr occurs in vitro by a recognition mechanism requiring the zinc fingers of NCp7 and the last 16 amino acids of Vpr. Moreover, NCp10, the equivalent of NCp7 in Moloney murine leukemia virus but not polysine inhibits Vpr-NCp7 complexation. Interestingly enough, Vpr was found to interact with Gag, NCp15, and NCp7 but not with mature p6 in vitro. In vivo mutations in NCp7 zinc fingers in an HIV-1 molecular clone led to viruses with important defects in Vpr encapsidation. Together, these results suggest that NCp7 cooperates with p6 to induce Vpr encapsidation in HIV-1 mature particles. The NCp7-Vpr complex could also be important for interaction of Vpr with cellular proteins involved in cell division.

  16. The N-terminus of the Montano virus nucleocapsid protein possesses broadly cross-reactive conformation-dependent epitopes conserved in rodent-borne hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Saasa, Ngonda; Yoshida, Haruka; Shimizu, Kenta; Sánchez-Hernández, Cornelio; Romero-Almaraz, María de Lourdes; Koma, Takaaki; Sanada, Takahiro; Seto, Takahiro; Yoshii, Kentaro; Ramos, Celso; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro; Takashima, Ikuo; Kariwa, Hiroaki

    2012-06-20

    The hantavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is an important immunogen that stimulates a strong and cross-reactive immune response in humans and rodents. A large proportion of the response to N protein has been found to target its N-terminus. However, the exact nature of this bias towards the N-terminus is not yet fully understood. We characterized six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the N protein of Montano virus (MTNV), a Mexican hantavirus. Five of these mAbs recognized eight American hantaviruses and six European and Asian hantaviruses, but not the Soricomorpha-borne Thottapalayam hantavirus. The N protein-reactive binding regions of the five mAbs were mapped to discontinuous epitopes within the N-terminal 13-51 amino acid residues, while a single serotype-specific mAb was mapped to residues 1-25 and 49-75. Our findings suggest that discontinuous epitopes at the N-terminus are conserved, at least in rodent-borne hantaviruses, and that they contribute considerably to N protein cross-reactivity.

  17. C terminal retroviral-type zinc finger domain from the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein is structurally similar to the N-terminal zinc finger domain

    SciTech Connect

    South, T.L.; Blake, P.R. ); Hare, D.R.; Summers, M.F. )

    1991-06-25

    Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic and computational methods were employed for the structure determination of an 18-residue peptide with the amino acid sequence of the C-terminal retriviral-type (r.t.) zinc finger domain from the nucleocapsid protein (NCP) of HIV-1 (Zn(HIV1-F2)). Unlike results obtained for the first retroviral-type zinc finger peptide, Zn (HIV1-F1) broad signals indicative of confomational lability were observed in the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of An(HIV1-F2) at 25 C. The NMR signals narrowed upon cooling to {minus}2 C, enabling complete {sup 1}H NMR signal assignment via standard two-dimensional (2D) NMR methods. Distance restraints obtained from qualitative analysis of 2D nuclear Overhauser effect (NOESY) data were sued to generate 30 distance geometry (DG) structures with penalties in the range 0.02-0.03 {angstrom}{sup 2}. All structures were qualitatively consistent with the experimental NOESY spectrum based on comparisons with 2D NOESY back-calculated spectra. These results indicate that the r.t. zinc finger sequences observed in retroviral NCPs, simple plant virus coat proteins, and in a human single-stranded nucleic acid binding protein share a common structural motif.

  18. Detection of IgM antibodies against a recombinant nucleocapsid protein of canine distemper virus in dog sera using a dot-blot assay.

    PubMed

    Barben, G; Stettler, M; Jaggy, A; Vandevelde, M; Zurbriggen, A

    1999-03-01

    A dot-blot assay for the detection of IgM antibodies (ABs) against canine distemper virus (CDV) in canine serum is described. The diagnostic potential of this technique was evaluated by analysing sera from three test groups: (i) specific pathogen-free (SPF) beagle dogs experimentally infected with virulent CDV; (ii) SPF dogs immunized with a combined vaccine containing CDV, and (iii) SPF dogs immunized with a CDV-free vaccine. As antigen for the dot-blot assay we used the recombinant nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of the virulent A75/17 CDV strain. All 12 dogs of group 1, infected with virulent CDV, showed detectable CDV-specific IgM levels in their serum. All dogs of group 2 were also positive for anti-CDV IgM after the first immunization with the CDV-containing vaccine. The four dogs immunized with a CDV-free vaccine (group iii) remained negative throughout the course of the experiment. From these results, we conclude that the IgM detection test, which requires only a single serum sample, is a useful method for diagnosing current or recent CDV infection in CDV-infected or CDV-immunized dogs under experimental conditions. PMID:10216448

  19. Structural characterization of a 39-residue synthetic peptide containing the two zinc binding domains from the HIV-1 p7 nucleocapsid protein by CD and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Omichinski, J G; Clore, G M; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Gronenborn, A M

    1991-11-01

    A 39-residue peptide (p7-DF) containing the two zinc binding domains of the p7 nucleocapsid protein was prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The solution structure of the peptide was characterized using circular dichroic and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in both the presence and absence of zinc ions. Circular dichroic spectroscopy indicates that the peptide exhibits a random coil conformation in the absence of zinc but appears to form an ordered structure in the presence of zinc. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy indicates that the two zinc binding domains within the peptide form stable, but independent, units upon the addition of 2 equivalents of ZnCl2 per equivalent of peptide. Structure calculations on the basis of nuclear Overhauser (NOE) data indicate that the two zinc binding domains have the same polypeptide fold within the errors of the coordinates (approximately 0.5 A for the backbone atoms, the zinc atoms and the coordinating cysteine and histidine ligands). The linker region (Arg17-Gly23) is characterized by a very limited number of sequential NOEs and the absence of any non-sequential NOEs suggest that this region of polypeptide chain is highly flexible. The latter coupled with the occurrence of a large number of basic residues (four out of seven) in the linker region suggests that it may serve to allow adaptable positioning of the nucleic acid recognition sequences within the protein. PMID:1959614

  20. Metal binding to the HIV nucleocapsid peptide.

    PubMed

    McLendon, G; Hull, H; Larkin, K; Chang, W

    1999-04-01

    Co(II) and Zn(II) binding constants have been measured for binding to the HIV-1 nucleocapsid N-terminal metal binding domain (residues 1-18), using competition titration methods and monitoring Co(II) binding by visible absorbance spectroscopy. Enthalpies for binding were directly measured by isothermal titration colorimetry. The results are compared with recent studies of related systems, including a study of Zn(II) binding by the full length protein.

  1. Site-selective probing of cTAR destabilization highlights the necessary plasticity of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein to chaperone the first strand transfer

    PubMed Central

    Godet, Julien; Kenfack, Cyril; Przybilla, Frédéric; Richert, Ludovic; Duportail, Guy; Mély, Yves

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) is a nucleic acid chaperone required during reverse transcription. During the first strand transfer, NCp7 is thought to destabilize cTAR, the (−)DNA copy of the TAR RNA hairpin, and subsequently direct the TAR/cTAR annealing through the zipping of their destabilized stem ends. To further characterize the destabilizing activity of NCp7, we locally probe the structure and dynamics of cTAR by steady-state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. NC(11–55), a truncated NCp7 version corresponding to its zinc-finger domain, was found to bind all over the sequence and to preferentially destabilize the penultimate double-stranded segment in the lower part of the cTAR stem. This destabilization is achieved through zinc-finger–dependent binding of NC to the G10 and G50 residues. Sequence comparison further revealed that C•A mismatches close to the two G residues were critical for fine tuning the stability of the lower part of the cTAR stem and conferring to G10 and G50 the appropriate mobility and accessibility for specific recognition by NC. Our data also highlight the necessary plasticity of NCp7 to adapt to the sequence and structure variability of cTAR to chaperone its annealing with TAR through a specific pathway. PMID:23511968

  2. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies to Junin virus nucleocapsid protein and application to the diagnosis of hemorrhagic fever caused by South American arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Nakauchi, Mina; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Saijo, Masayuki; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Ure, Agustín E; Romanowski, Victor; Kurane, Ichiro; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2009-08-01

    Junin virus (JUNV), Machupo virus, Guanarito virus, Sabia virus, and Chapare virus are members of New World arenavirus clade B and are the etiological agents of viral hemorrhagic fevers that occur in South America. In this study, we produced three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the recombinant nucleocapsid protein of JUNV, designated C6-9, C11-12, and E4-2. The specificity of these MAbs was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), indirect immunofluorescence assay, and an epitope-mapping method. Using these MAbs, we developed antigen (Ag) capture ELISA systems. We showed that by using MAb C6-9, JUNV Ag was specifically detected. On the other hand, by using MAb C11-12 or E-4-2, the Ags of all human pathogenic South American arenaviruses were detected. The combined use of these Ag capture ELISA systems in the present study may be useful for the diagnosis of acute-phase viral hemorrhagic fever due to infection by a South American arenavirus.

  3. Effect of Mg(2+) and Na(+) on the nucleic acid chaperone activity of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein: implications for reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Vo, My-Nuong; Barany, George; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2009-02-27

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) is an essential protein for retroviral replication. Among its numerous functions, NC is a nucleic acid (NA) chaperone protein that catalyzes NA rearrangements leading to the formation of thermodynamically more stable conformations. In vitro, NC chaperone activity is typically assayed under conditions of low or no Mg(2+), even though reverse transcription requires the presence of divalent cations. Here, the chaperone activity of HIV-1 NC was studied as a function of varying Na(+) and Mg(2+) concentrations by investigating the annealing of complementary DNA and RNA hairpins derived from the trans-activation response domain of the HIV genome. This reaction mimics the annealing step of the minus-strand transfer process in reverse transcription. Gel-shift annealing and sedimentation assays were used to monitor the annealing kinetics and aggregation activity of NC, respectively. In the absence of protein, a limited ability of Na(+) and Mg(2+) cations to facilitate hairpin annealing was observed, whereas NC stimulated the annealing 10(3)- to 10(5)-fold. The major effect of either NC or the cations is on the rate of bimolecular association of the hairpins. This effect is especially strong under conditions wherein NC induces NA aggregation. Titration with NC and NC/Mg(2+) competition studies showed that the annealing kinetics depends only on the level of NA saturation with NC. NC competes with Mg(2+) or Na(+) for sequence-nonspecific NA binding similar to a simple trivalent cation. Upon saturation, NC induces attraction between NA molecules corresponding to approximately 0.3 kcal/mol/nucleotide, in agreement with an electrostatic mechanism of NC-induced NA aggregation. These data provide insights into the variable effects of NC's chaperone activity observed during in vitro studies of divalent metal-dependent reverse transcription reactions and suggest the feasibility of NC-facilitated proviral DNA

  4. Distribution and Redistribution of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein in Immature, Mature, and Integrase-Inhibited Virions: a Role for Integrase in Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Juan; Jurado, Kellie A.; Cheng, Naiqian; Ly, Ngoc L.; Fuchs, James R.; Gorelick, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During virion maturation, HIV-1 capsid protein assembles into a conical core containing the viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complex, thought to be composed mainly of the viral RNA and nucleocapsid protein (NC). After infection, the viral RNA is reverse transcribed into double-stranded DNA, which is then incorporated into host chromosomes by integrase (IN) catalysis. Certain IN mutations (class II) and antiviral drugs (allosteric IN inhibitors [ALLINIs]) adversely affect maturation, resulting in virions that contain “eccentric condensates,” electron-dense aggregates located outside seemingly empty capsids. Here we demonstrate that in addition to this mislocalization of electron density, a class II IN mutation and ALLINIs each increase the fraction of virions with malformed capsids (from ∼12% to ∼53%). Eccentric condensates have a high NC content, as demonstrated by “tomo-bubblegram” imaging, a novel labeling technique that exploits the susceptibility of NC to radiation damage. Tomo-bubblegrams also localized NC inside wild-type cores and lining the spherical Gag shell in immature virions. We conclude that eccentric condensates represent nonpackaged vRNPs and that either genetic or pharmacological inhibition of IN can impair vRNP incorporation into mature cores. Supplying IN in trans as part of a Vpr-IN fusion protein partially restored the formation of conical cores with internal electron density and the infectivity of a class II IN deletion mutant virus. Moreover, the ability of ALLINIs to induce eccentric condensate formation required both IN and viral RNA. Based on these observations, we propose a role for IN in initiating core morphogenesis and vRNP incorporation into the mature core during HIV-1 maturation. IMPORTANCE Maturation, a process essential for HIV-1 infectivity, involves core assembly, whereby the viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP, composed of vRNA and nucleocapsid protein [NC]) is packaged into a conical capsid. Allosteric integrase

  5. Preparation and evaluation of recombinant severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus nucleocapsid protein for detection of total antibodies in human and animal sera by double-antigen sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yongjun; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Guo, Xiling; Qi, Xian; Zhang, Xiao; Shi, Zhiyang; Zhou, Minghao; Bao, Changjun; Zhang, Wenshuai; Xu, Yan; Wang, Hua

    2012-02-01

    The recent emergence of the human infection confirmed to be caused by severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) in China is of global concern. Safe diagnostic immunoreagents for determination of human and animal seroprevalence in epidemiological investigations are urgently needed. This paper describes the cloning and expression of the nucleocapsid (N) protein of SFTSV. An N-protein-based double-antigen sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system was set up to detect the total antibodies in human and animal sera. We reasoned that as the double-antigen sandwich ELISA detected total antibodies with a higher sensitivity than traditional indirect ELISA, it could be used to detect SFTSV-specific antibodies from different animal species. The serum neutralization test was used to validate the performance of this ELISA system. All human and animal sera that tested positive in the neutralization test were also positive in the sandwich ELISA, and there was a high correlation between serum neutralizing titers and ELISA readings. Cross-reactivity was evaluated, and the system was found to be highly specific to SFTSV; all hantavirus- and dengue virus-confirmed patient samples were negative. SFTSV-confirmed human and animal sera from both Anhui and Hubei Provinces in China reacted with N protein in this ELISA, suggesting no major antigenic variation between geographically disparate virus isolates and the suitability of this assay in nationwide application. ELISA results showed that 3.6% of the human serum samples and 47.7% of the animal field serum samples were positive for SFTSV antibodies, indicating that SFTSV has circulated widely in China. This assay, which is simple to operate, poses no biohazard risk, does not require sophisticated equipment, and can be used in disease surveillance programs, particularly in the screening of large numbers of samples from various animal species.

  6. Spatial proximity of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein zinc fingers investigated by time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Mély, Y; Jullian, N; Morellet, N; De Rocquigny, H; Dong, C Z; Piémont, E; Roques, B P; Gérard, D

    1994-10-11

    The three-dimensional structure of peptides encompassing the two zinc-saturated finger motifs of the nucleocapsid protein NCp7 of HIV-1 has been reported by several groups. Whereas the folded structures of the finger motifs were in good agreement, discrepancies existed concerning their spatial relationship since the fingers were found either close to each other [Morellet, N., Jullian, N., De Rocquigny, H., Maigret, B., Darlix, J. L., & Roques, B. P. (1992) Embo J. 11, 3059-3065] or independently folded [Omichinski, J. G., Clore, G. M., Sakaguchi, K., Appella, E., & Gronenborn, A. M. (1991) FEBS Lett. 292, 25-30, Summers, M. F., Henderson, L. E., Chance, M. R., Bess, J. W., Jr., South, T. L., Blake, P. R., Sagi, I., Perez-Alvarado, G., Sowder, R.C., III, Hare, D.R., & Arthur, L. O. (1992) Protein Sci. 1, 563-574]. As in the interacting finger model, Phe16 in the NH2-terminal finger and Trp37 in the COOH-terminal finger were found to be spatially close, the fluorescence properties of the aromatic residues at positions 16 and 37 in the wild-type and two conservatively substituted (12-53) NCp7 peptides were investigated and compared with those of three negative control derivatives where the finger motifs were not in close contact. Direct distance measurements by Tyr-Trp fluorescence resonance energy transfer of the former derivatives yielded a 7-12 A interchromophore distance range which is clearly inconsistent with the 12.5-18 A range measured for the negative controls and thus a random orientation of the zinc finger motifs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Spatial proximity of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein zinc fingers investigated by time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Mély, Y; Jullian, N; Morellet, N; De Rocquigny, H; Dong, C Z; Piémont, E; Roques, B P; Gérard, D

    1994-10-11

    The three-dimensional structure of peptides encompassing the two zinc-saturated finger motifs of the nucleocapsid protein NCp7 of HIV-1 has been reported by several groups. Whereas the folded structures of the finger motifs were in good agreement, discrepancies existed concerning their spatial relationship since the fingers were found either close to each other [Morellet, N., Jullian, N., De Rocquigny, H., Maigret, B., Darlix, J. L., & Roques, B. P. (1992) Embo J. 11, 3059-3065] or independently folded [Omichinski, J. G., Clore, G. M., Sakaguchi, K., Appella, E., & Gronenborn, A. M. (1991) FEBS Lett. 292, 25-30, Summers, M. F., Henderson, L. E., Chance, M. R., Bess, J. W., Jr., South, T. L., Blake, P. R., Sagi, I., Perez-Alvarado, G., Sowder, R.C., III, Hare, D.R., & Arthur, L. O. (1992) Protein Sci. 1, 563-574]. As in the interacting finger model, Phe16 in the NH2-terminal finger and Trp37 in the COOH-terminal finger were found to be spatially close, the fluorescence properties of the aromatic residues at positions 16 and 37 in the wild-type and two conservatively substituted (12-53) NCp7 peptides were investigated and compared with those of three negative control derivatives where the finger motifs were not in close contact. Direct distance measurements by Tyr-Trp fluorescence resonance energy transfer of the former derivatives yielded a 7-12 A interchromophore distance range which is clearly inconsistent with the 12.5-18 A range measured for the negative controls and thus a random orientation of the zinc finger motifs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7918429

  8. [Protein expression and purification].

    PubMed

    Růčková, E; Müller, P; Vojtěšek, B

    2014-01-01

    Production of recombinant proteins is essential for many applications in both basic research and also in medicine, where recombinant proteins are used as pharmaceuticals. This review summarizes procedures involved in recombinant protein expression and purification, including molecular cloning of target genes into expression vectors, selection of the appropriate expression system, and protein purification techniques. Recombinant DNA technology allows protein engineering to modify protein stability, activity and function or to facilitate protein purification by affinity tag fusions. A wide range of cloning systems enabling fast and effective design of expression vectors is currently available. A first choice of protein expression system is usually the bacteria Escherichia coli. The main advantages of this prokaryotic expression system are low cost and simplicity; on the other hand this system is often unsuitable for production of complex mammalian proteins. Protein expression mediated by eukaryotic cells (yeast, insect and mammalian cells) usually produces properly folded and posttranslationally modified proteins. How-ever, cultivation of insect and, especially, mammalian cells is time consuming and expensive. Affinity tagged recombinant proteins are purified efficiently using affinity chromatography. An affinity tag is a protein or peptide that mediates specific binding to a chromatography column, unbound proteins are removed during a washing step and pure protein is subsequently eluted. PMID:24945544

  9. The RING domain and the L79 residue of Z protein are involved in both the rescue of nucleocapsids and the incorporation of glycoproteins into infectious chimeric arenavirus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Casabona, Juan Cruz; Levingston Macleod, Jesica M; Loureiro, Maria Eugenia; Gomez, Guillermo A; Lopez, Nora

    2009-07-01

    Arenaviruses, such as Tacaribe virus (TacV) and its closely related pathogenic Junin virus (JunV), are enveloped viruses with a bipartite negative-sense RNA genome that encodes the nucleocapsid protein (N), the precursor of the envelope glycoprotein complex (GP), the polymerase (L), and a RING finger protein (Z), which is the driving force of arenavirus budding. We have established a plasmid-based system which allowed the successful packaging of TacV-like nucleocapsids along with Z and GP of JunV into infectious virus-like particles (VLPs). By coexpressing different combinations of the system components, followed by biochemical analysis of the VLPs, the requirements for the assembly of both N and GP into particles were defined. We found that coexpression of N with Z protein in the absence of minigenome and other viral proteins was sufficient to recruit N within lipid-enveloped Z-containing VLPs. In addition, whereas GP was not required for the incorporation of N, coexpression of N substantially enhanced the ratio of GP to Z into VLPs. Disruption of the RING structure or mutation of residue L79 to alanine within Z protein, although it had no effect on Z self-budding, severely impaired VLP infectivity. These mutations drastically altered intracellular Z-N interactions and the incorporation of both N and GP into VLPs. Our results support the conclusion that the interaction between Z and N is required for assembly of both the nucleocapsids and the glycoproteins into infectious arenavirus budding particles. PMID:19420075

  10. The RING Domain and the L79 Residue of Z Protein Are Involved in both the Rescue of Nucleocapsids and the Incorporation of Glycoproteins into Infectious Chimeric Arenavirus-Like Particles ▿

    PubMed Central

    Casabona, Juan Cruz; Levingston Macleod, Jesica M.; Loureiro, Maria Eugenia; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Lopez, Nora

    2009-01-01

    Arenaviruses, such as Tacaribe virus (TacV) and its closely related pathogenic Junin virus (JunV), are enveloped viruses with a bipartite negative-sense RNA genome that encodes the nucleocapsid protein (N), the precursor of the envelope glycoprotein complex (GP), the polymerase (L), and a RING finger protein (Z), which is the driving force of arenavirus budding. We have established a plasmid-based system which allowed the successful packaging of TacV-like nucleocapsids along with Z and GP of JunV into infectious virus-like particles (VLPs). By coexpressing different combinations of the system components, followed by biochemical analysis of the VLPs, the requirements for the assembly of both N and GP into particles were defined. We found that coexpression of N with Z protein in the absence of minigenome and other viral proteins was sufficient to recruit N within lipid-enveloped Z-containing VLPs. In addition, whereas GP was not required for the incorporation of N, coexpression of N substantially enhanced the ratio of GP to Z into VLPs. Disruption of the RING structure or mutation of residue L79 to alanine within Z protein, although it had no effect on Z self-budding, severely impaired VLP infectivity. These mutations drastically altered intracellular Z-N interactions and the incorporation of both N and GP into VLPs. Our results support the conclusion that the interaction between Z and N is required for assembly of both the nucleocapsids and the glycoproteins into infectious arenavirus budding particles. PMID:19420075

  11. An alphavirus temperature-sensitive capsid mutant reveals stages of nucleocapsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yan Kielian, Margaret

    2015-10-15

    Alphaviruses have a nucleocapsid core composed of the RNA genome surrounded by an icosahedral lattice of capsid protein. An insertion after position 186 in the capsid protein produced a strongly temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. Even when the structural proteins were synthesized at the permissive temperature (28 °C), subsequent incubation of the cells at the non-permissive temperature (37 °C) dramatically decreased mutant capsid protein stability and particle assembly. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids in mutant-infected cells cultured at the permissive temperature, but these nucleocapsids were not stable to sucrose gradient separation. In contrast, nucleocapsids isolated from mutant virus particles had similar stability to that of wildtype virus. Our data support a model in which cytoplasmic nucleocapsids go through a maturation step during packaging into virus particles. The insertion site lies in the interface between capsid proteins in the assembled nucleocapsid, suggesting the region where such a stabilizing transition occurs. - Highlights: • We characterize an alphavirus capsid insertion mutation. • These capsid mutants are highly temperature sensitive for growth. • The insertion affects nucleocapsid stability. • Results suggest that the nucleocapsid is stabilized during virus budding.

  12. HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Switches the Pathway of TAR RNA/DNA Annealing from Loop-Loop “Kissing” to “Zipper”

    PubMed Central

    Vo, My-Nuong; Barany, George; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Summary The chaperone activity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) facilitates multiple nucleic acid rearrangements that are critical for reverse transcription of the single-stranded RNA genome into double-stranded DNA. Annealing of the trans-activation response element (TAR) RNA hairpin to a complementary TAR DNA hairpin is an essential step in the minus-strand transfer step of reverse transcription. Previously, we used truncated 27-nucleotide (nt) mini-TAR RNA and DNA constructs to investigate this annealing reaction pathway in the presence and absence of HIV-1 NC. In this work, full-length 59-nt TAR RNA and TAR DNA constructs were used to systematically study TAR hairpin annealing kinetics. In the absence of NC, full-length TAR hairpin annealing is ∼10-fold slower than mini-TAR annealing. Similar to mini-TAR annealing, the reaction pathway for TAR in the absence of NC involves the fast formation of an unstable “kissing” loop intermediate, followed by a slower conversion to an extended duplex. NC facilitates the annealing of TAR by ∼105-fold by stabilizing the bimolecular intermediate (∼104-fold) and promoting the subsequent exchange reaction (∼10-fold). In contrast to the mini-TAR annealing pathway, wherein NC-mediated annealing can initiate through both loop-loop kissing and a distinct “zipper” pathway involving nucleation at the 3′/5′ terminal ends, full-length TAR hairpin annealing switches predominantly to the zipper pathway in the presence of saturated NC. PMID:19154737

  13. Stem-loop SL4 of the HIV-1 psi RNA packaging signal exhibits weak affinity for the nucleocapsid protein. structural studies and implications for genome recognition.

    PubMed

    Amarasinghe, G K; Zhou, J; Miskimon, M; Chancellor, K J; McDonald, J A; Matthews, A G; Miller, R R; Rouse, M D; Summers, M F

    2001-12-14

    Encapsidation of the genome of the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) during retrovirus assembly is mediated by interactions between the nucleocapsid (NC) domains of assembling Gag polyproteins and a approximately 110 nucleotide segment of the genome known as the Psi-site. The HIV-1 Psi-site contains four stem-loops (SL1 through SL4), all of which are important for genome packaging. Recent isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies have demonstrated that SL2 and SL3 are capable of binding NC with high affinity (K(d) approximately 140 nM), consistent with proposals for protein-interactive functions during packaging. To determine if SL4 may have a similar function, NC-interactive studies were conducted by NMR and gel-shift methods. In contrast to previous reports, we find that SL4 binds weakly to NC (K(d)=(+/-14 microM), suggesting an alternative function. NMR studies indicate that the GAGA tetraloop of SL4 adopts a classical GNRA-type fold (R=purine, N=G, C, A or U), a motif that stabilizes RNA tertiary structures in other systems. In combination with previously reported gel mobility studies of Psi-site deletion mutants, these findings suggest that SL4 functions in genome recognition not by binding to Gag, but by stabilizing the structure of the Psi-site. Differences in the affinities of NC for SL2, SL3 and SL4 stem-loops can now be rationalized in terms of the different structural properties of stem loops that contain GGNG (SL2 and SL3) and GNRA (SL4) sequences.

  14. Antigenic cross-reactivity among avian pneumoviruses of subgroups A, B, and C at the matrix but not nucleocapsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Lwamba, Humphrey C M; Halvorson, David A; Nagaraja, Kakambi V; Turpin, Elizabeth A; Swayne, David; Seal, Bruce S; Njenga, M Kariuki

    2002-01-01

    Earlier findings from our laboratory based on analysis of nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence identities of 15 avian pneumoviruses (APVs) isolated from the United States (subgroup C) demonstrated that the viruses were phylogenetically separated from the European subgroup A and subgroup B viruses. Here, we investigated whether viruses from the three subgroups were cross-reactive by testing field sera positive for each of the APV subgroups in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test with recombinant matrix (M) and nucleoprotein (N) proteins generated from a Minnesota APV isolate (APV/MN2A). Sera from turkeys infected with APV subgroup A, B, or C reacted with recombinant M protein derived from APV/MN2A. In contrast, recombinant N protein from APV/MN2A virus was reactive with sera from subtypes A and C viruses but not from subtype B virus. The results illustrate that viruses from the three APV subtypes share antigenic homology, and the M protein-based ELISA is adequate for monitoring APV outbreaks but not for distinguishing between different subtypes.

  15. HLA-A*0201 T-cell epitopes in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus nucleocapsid and spike proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, Y.-P.; Lin, J.-Y.; Jan, J.-T.; Leng, C.-H.; Chu, C.-C.; Yang, Y.-C.; Chen, S.-L. . E-mail: showlic@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2006-05-26

    The immunogenicity of HLA-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) peptide in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nuclear capsid (N) and spike (S) proteins was determined by testing the proteins' ability to elicit a specific cellular immune response after immunization of HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice and in vitro vaccination of HLA-A2.1 positive human peripheral blood mononuclearcytes (PBMCs). First, we screened SARS N and S amino acid sequences for allele-specific motif matching those in human HLA-A2.1 MHC-I molecules. From HLA peptide binding predictions (http://thr.cit.nih.gov/molbio/hla{sub b}ind/), ten each potential N- and S-specific HLA-A2.1-binding peptides were synthesized. The high affinity HLA-A2.1 peptides were validated by T2-cell stabilization assays, with immunogenicity assays revealing peptides N223-231, N227-235, and N317-325 to be First identified HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes of SARS-CoV N protein. In addition, previous reports identified three HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes of S protein (S978-986, S1203-1211, and S1167-1175), here we found two novel peptides S787-795 and S1042-1050 as S-specific CTL epitopes. Moreover, our identified N317-325 and S1042-1050 CTL epitopes could induce recall responses when IFN-{gamma} stimulation of blood CD8{sup +} T-cells revealed significant difference between normal healthy donors and SARS-recovered patients after those PBMCs were in vitro vaccinated with their cognate antigen. Our results would provide a new insight into the development of therapeutic vaccine in SARS.

  16. Identification of a high affinity nucleocapsid protein binding element within the Moloney murine leukemia virus Psi-RNA packaging signal: implications for genome recognition.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, V; Melamed, J; Habib, D; Pullen, K; Wallace, K; Summers, M F

    2001-11-23

    Murine leukemia virus (MLV) is currently the most widely used gene delivery system in gene therapy trials. The simple retrovirus packages two copies of its RNA genome by a mechanism that involves interactions between the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of a virally-encoded Gag polyprotein and a segment of the RNA genome located just upstream of the Gag initiation codon, known as the Psi-site. Previous studies indicated that the MLV Psi-site contains three stem loops (SLB-SLD), and that stem loops SLC and SLD play prominent roles in packaging. We have developed a method for the preparation and purification of large quantities of recombinant Moloney MLV NC protein, and have studied its interactions with a series of oligoribonucleotides that contain one or more of the Psi-RNA stem loops. At RNA concentrations above approximately 0.3 mM, isolated stem loop SLB forms a duplex and stem loops SL-C and SL-D form kissing complexes, as expected from previous studies. However, neither the monomeric nor the dimeric forms of these isolated stem loops binds NC with significant affinity. Longer constructs containing two stem loops (SL-BC and SL-CD) also exhibit low affinities for NC. However, NC binds with high affinity and stoichiometrically to both the monomeric and dimeric forms of an RNA construct that contains all three stem loops (SL-BCD; K(d)=132(+/-55) nM). Titration of SL-BCD with NC also shifts monomer-dimer equilibrium toward the dimer. Mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that the conserved GACG tetraloops of stem loops C and D do not influence the monomer-dimer equilibrium of SL-BCD, that the tetraloop of stem loop B does not participate directly in NC binding, and that the tetraloops of stem loops C and D probably also do not bind to NC. These surprising results differ considerably from those observed for HIV-1, where NC binds to individual stem loops with high affinity via interactions with exposed residues of the tetraloops. The present results indicate that MLV NC binds

  17. Expression of functional Bunyamwera virus L protein by recombinant vaccinia viruses.

    PubMed

    Jin, H; Elliott, R M

    1991-08-01

    A cDNA containing the complete coding sequence of the Bunyamwera virus (family Bunyaviridae) L genome segment has been constructed and cloned into two recombinant vaccinia virus expression systems. In the first, the L gene is under control of vaccinia virus P7.5 promoter; in the second, the L gene is under control of the bacteriophage T7 phi 10 promoter, and expression of the L gene requires coinfection with a second recombinant vaccinia virus which synthesizes T7 RNA polymerase. Both systems express a protein which is the same size as the Bunyamwera virus L protein and is recognized by a monospecific L antiserum. The expressed L protein was shown to be functional in synthesizing Bunyamwera virus RNA in a nucleocapsid transfection assay: recombinant vaccinia virus-infected cells were transfected with purified Bunyamwera virus nucleocapsids, and subsequently, total cellular RNA was analyzed by Northern (RNA) blotting. No Bunyamwera virus RNA was detected in control transfections, but in cells which had previously been infected with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the L protein, both positive- and negative-sense Bunyamwera virus S segment RNA was detected. The suitability of this system to delineate functional domains within the Bunyamwera virus L protein is discussed.

  18. Characterization of nucleocapsid binding by the measles virus and mumps virus phosphoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kingston, Richard L; Baase, Walter A; Gay, Leslie S

    2004-08-01

    We report an analysis of the interaction between the P protein and the RNA-associated N protein (N-RNA) for both measles and mumps viruses with proteins produced in a bacterial expression system. During this study, we verified that the C-terminal tail of the N protein is not required for nucleocapsid formation. For both measles and mumps virus N, truncated proteins encompassing amino acids 1 to 375 assemble into nucleocapsid-like particles within the bacterial cell. For measles virus N, the binding site for the P protein maps to residues 477 to 505 within the tail of the molecule, a sequence relatively conserved among the morbilliviruses. For mumps virus N, a binding site for the P protein maps to the assembly domain of N (residues 1 to 398), while no strong binding of the P protein to the tail of N was detected. These results suggest that the site of attachment for the polymerase varies among the paramyxoviruses. Pulldown experiments demonstrate that the last 50 amino acids of both measles virus and mumps virus P (measles virus P, 457 to 507; mumps virus P, 343 to 391) by themselves constitute the nucleocapsid-binding domain (NBD). Spectroscopic studies show that the NBD is predominantly alpha-helical in both viruses. However, only in measles virus P is the NBD stable and folded, having a lesser degree of tertiary organization in mumps virus P. With isothermal titration calorimetry, we demonstrate that the measles virus P NBD binds to residues 477 to 505 of measles virus N with 1:1 stoichiometry. The dissociation constant (K(d)) was determined to be 13 microM at 20 degrees C and 35 microM at 37 degrees C. Our data are consistent with a model in which an alpha-helical nucleocapsid binding domain, located at the C terminus of P, is responsible for tethering the viral polymerase to its template yet also suggest that, in detail, polymerase binding in morbilliviruses and rubulaviruses differs significantly.

  19. The Andes Hantavirus NSs Protein Is Expressed from the Viral Small mRNA by a Leaky Scanning Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Solis, Loretto; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Ricci, Emiliano P.; Pino, Karla; Tischler, Nicole D.; Ohlmann, Théophile; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    The small mRNA (SmRNA) of all Bunyaviridae encodes the nucleocapsid (N) protein. In 4 out of 5 genera in the Bunyaviridae, the smRNA encodes an additional nonstructural protein denominated NSs. In this study, we show that Andes hantavirus (ANDV) SmRNA encodes an NSs protein. Data show that the NSs protein is expressed in the context of an ANDV infection. Additionally, our results suggest that translation initiation from the NSs initiation codon is mediated by ribosomal subunits that have bypassed the upstream N protein initiation codon through a leaky scanning mechanism. PMID:22156529

  20. Quantitative investigation of murine cytomegalovirus nucleocapsid interaction.

    PubMed

    Buser, Christopher; Fleischer, Frank; Mertens, Thomas; Michel, Detlef; Schmidt, Volker; Walther, Paul

    2007-10-01

    In this study, we quantitatively investigate the role of the M97 protein for viral morphogenesis in murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-infected fibroblast cells. For this purpose, a statistical analysis is performed for the spatial distribution of nuclear B-capsids (devoid of DNA, containing the scaffold) and C-capsids (filled with DNA). Cell nuclei infected with either wild-type or an M97 deletion mutant were compared. Univariate and multivariate point process characteristics (like Ripley's K-function, the L-function and the nearest neighbour distance distribution function) are investigated in order to describe and quantify the effects that the deletion of M97 causes to the process of DNA packaging into nucleocapsids. The estimation of the function L(r) -r reveals that with respect to the wild type there is an increased frequency of point pairs at a very short distance (less than approximately 100 nm) for both the B-capsids as well as for the C-capsids. For the M97 deletion mutant type this is no longer true. Here only the C-capsids show such a clustering behaviour, whereas for B-capsids it is almost nonexistant. Estimations of functionals such as the nearest neighbour distance distribution function confirmed these results. Thereby, a quantification is provided for the effect that the deletion of M97 leads to a loss of typical nucleocapsid clustering in MCMV-infected nuclei. PMID:17910700

  1. Rapid and sensitive detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibodies against canine distemper virus by a new recombinant nucleocapsid protein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    von Messling, V; Harder, T C; Moennig, V; Rautenberg, P; Nolte, I; Haas, L

    1999-04-01

    Canine distemper morbillivirus (CDV) infection causes a frequently fatal systemic disease in a broad range of carnivore species, including domestic dogs. In CDV infection, classical serology provides data of diagnostic and prognostic values (kinetics of seroconversion) and is also used to predict the optimal vaccination age of pups. Routine CDV serology is still based on time- and cost-intensive virus neutralization assays (V-NA). Here, we describe a new capture-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that uses recombinant baculovirus-expressed nucleocapsid (N) protein of a recent CDV wild-type isolate (2544/Han95) for the detection of CDV-specific antibodies in canine sera. Recombinant antigen was produced with high efficacy in Heliothis virescens larvae. The capture-sandwich ELISA enabled a clear-cut qualitative evaluation of the CDV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM serostatuses of 196 and 35 dog sera, respectively. Inter-rater agreement analysis (kappa = 0.988) indicated that the ELISA can be used unrestrictedly as a substitute for the V-NA for the qualitative determination of CDV-specific IgG serostatus. In an attempt to semiquantify N-specific antibodies, a one-step-dilution (alpha method) IgG-specific ELISA was implemented. Alpha values of >/=50% showed very good inter-rater agreement (kappa = 0.968) with V-NA titers of >/=1/100 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) as measured against the central European CDV wild-type isolate 2544/Han95 in canine sera originating from northern Germany. An ND50 titer of 1/100 is considered a threshold, and titers of >/=1/100 indicate a resilient, protective immunity. CDV N-specific antibodies of the IgM class were detected by the newly developed ELISA in 9 of 15 sera obtained from dogs with symptoms of acute distemper. In leucocytes of 5 of the 15 dogs (all of which were also IgM positive) CDV RNA was detected by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The recombinant capture-sandwich ELISA detecting N-specific antibodies

  2. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG Antibodies against Canine Distemper Virus by a New Recombinant Nucleocapsid Protein-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    von Messling, Veronika; Harder, Timm C.; Moennig, Volker; Rautenberg, Peter; Nolte, Ingo; Haas, Ludwig

    1999-01-01

    Canine distemper morbillivirus (CDV) infection causes a frequently fatal systemic disease in a broad range of carnivore species, including domestic dogs. In CDV infection, classical serology provides data of diagnostic and prognostic values (kinetics of seroconversion) and is also used to predict the optimal vaccination age of pups. Routine CDV serology is still based on time- and cost-intensive virus neutralization assays (V-NA). Here, we describe a new capture-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that uses recombinant baculovirus-expressed nucleocapsid (N) protein of a recent CDV wild-type isolate (2544/Han95) for the detection of CDV-specific antibodies in canine sera. Recombinant antigen was produced with high efficacy in Heliothis virescens larvae. The capture-sandwich ELISA enabled a clear-cut qualitative evaluation of the CDV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM serostatuses of 196 and 35 dog sera, respectively. Inter-rater agreement analysis (κ = 0.988) indicated that the ELISA can be used unrestrictedly as a substitute for the V-NA for the qualitative determination of CDV-specific IgG serostatus. In an attempt to semiquantify N-specific antibodies, a one-step-dilution (alpha method) IgG-specific ELISA was implemented. Alpha values of ≥50% showed very good inter-rater agreement (κ = 0.968) with V-NA titers of ≥1/100 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) as measured against the central European CDV wild-type isolate 2544/Han95 in canine sera originating from northern Germany. An ND50 titer of 1/100 is considered a threshold, and titers of ≥1/100 indicate a resilient, protective immunity. CDV N-specific antibodies of the IgM class were detected by the newly developed ELISA in 9 of 15 sera obtained from dogs with symptoms of acute distemper. In leucocytes of 5 of the 15 dogs (all of which were also IgM positive) CDV RNA was detected by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The recombinant capture-sandwich ELISA detecting N-specific antibodies of the

  3. Resolution of the cellular proteome of the nucleocapsid protein from a highly pathogenic isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus identifies PARP-1 as a cellular target whose interaction is critical for virus biology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Lear, Zoe; Hughes, David J; Wu, Weining; Zhou, En-min; Whitehouse, Adrian; Chen, Hongying; Hiscox, Julian A

    2015-03-23

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major threat to the swine industry and food security worldwide. The nucleocapsid (N) protein is a major structural protein of PRRSV. The primary function of this protein is to encapsidate the viral RNA genome, and it is also thought to participate in the modulation of host cell biology and recruitment of cellular factors to facilitate virus infection. In order to the better understand these latter roles the cellular interactome of PRRSV N protein was defined using label free quantitative proteomics. This identified several cellular factors that could interact with the N protein including poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a cellular protein, which can add adenosine diphosphate ribose to a protein. Use of the PARP-1 small molecule inhibitor, 3-AB, in PRRSV infected cells demonstrated that PARP-1 was required and acted as an enhancer factor for virus biology. Serial growth of PRRSV in different concentrations of 3-AB did not yield viruses that were able to grow with wild type kinetics, suggesting that by targeting a cellular protein crucial for virus biology, resistant phenotypes did not emerge. This study provides further evidence that cellular proteins, which are critical for virus biology, can also be targeted to ablate virus growth and provide a high barrier for the emergence of drug resistance.

  4. Expression of the rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV) non-structural protein 3 (NS3) in Escherichia coli and its in situ localization in RHBV-infected rice tissues.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Miguel; Bolaños, Isela; Arrieta-Espinoza, Griselda; Espinoza, Ana M

    2004-09-01

    The non-structural NS3 protein gene from the rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV) was fused to the glutathione-S-transferase carboxilic end and expressed in Escherichia coli strain JM83. Large quantities of fusion protein were produced in insoluble form. The fusion protein was fractionated in SDS-PAGE and purified by electroelution, polyclonal antibodies were raised in rabbit and the antiserum was absorbed with bacterial crude extract. A band of similar size as that of NS3 protein was observed in Western blots using extracts from RHBV-infected rice plants. Immunoelectron microscopy with colloidal gold-labeled antibodies against NS3 protein and the viral nucleocapsid protein revealed in situ accumulation of NS3 protein in the cytoplasm but not in the viral inclusion bodies, vacuoles or chloroplasts of RHBV-infected plants, following the same pattern of distribution as the RHBV nucleocapsid protein. PMID:17361569

  5. Human T-lymphotrophic virus type I nucleocapsid protein NCp15: structural study and stability of the N-terminal zinc-finger.

    PubMed Central

    Bertola, F; Manigand, C; Picard, P; Belghazi, M; Precigoux, G

    2000-01-01

    An 18-residue peptide, corresponding to the minimum sequence of the N-terminal zinc-finger domain in the nucleocapsid of human T-lymphotrophic virus type I, was synthesized by a solid-phase method and fully characterized. Its ability to complex metal ions (Co(2+) and Zn(2+)) was clearly established by UV-visible spectroscopy and MS. The stability of these complexes was investigated by an original method with HPLC chromatography. Our results show that, even in the presence of air, the Zn(2+) complex is highly stable. In contrast, the Co(2+) complex undergoes a relatively fast degradation due to an intramolecular oxidation leading to the formation of a disulphide bridge between two cysteine residues. The (1)H-NMR analysis indicates that Zn(2+) binds to the Ndelta atom of the histidine residue rather than to the Nepsilon atom. Two-dimensional NMR techniques were used to determine the solution structure of the zinc-finger, illustrated by the existence of turns in the overall conformation. PMID:11085921

  6. Heat Shock Protein 70 Family Members Interact with Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus and Hazara Virus Nucleocapsid Proteins and Perform a Functional Role in the Nairovirus Replication Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Surtees, Rebecca; Dowall, Stuart D.; Shaw, Amelia; Armstrong, Stuart; Hewson, Roger; Carroll, Miles W.; Mankouri, Jamel; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Nairovirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family contains serious human and animal pathogens classified within multiple serogroups and species. Of these serogroups, the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) serogroup comprises sole members CCHFV and Hazara virus (HAZV). CCHFV is an emerging zoonotic virus that causes often-fatal hemorrhagic fever in infected humans for which preventative or therapeutic strategies are not available. In contrast, HAZV is nonpathogenic to humans and thus represents an excellent model to study aspects of CCHFV biology under conditions of more-accessible biological containment. The three RNA segments that form the nairovirus genome are encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein (N) to form ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes that are substrates for RNA synthesis and packaging into virus particles. We used quantitative proteomics to identify cellular interaction partners of CCHFV N and identified robust interactions with cellular chaperones. These interactions were validated using immunological methods, and the specific interaction between native CCHFV N and cellular chaperones of the HSP70 family was confirmed during live CCHFV infection. Using infectious HAZV, we showed for the first time that the nairovirus N-HSP70 association was maintained within both infected cells and virus particles, where N is assembled as RNPs. Reduction of active HSP70 levels in cells by the use of small-molecule inhibitors significantly reduced HAZV titers, and a model for chaperone function in the context of high genetic variability is proposed. These results suggest that chaperones of the HSP70 family are required for nairovirus replication and thus represent a genetically stable cellular therapeutic target for preventing nairovirus-mediated disease. IMPORTANCE Nairoviruses compose a group of human and animal viruses that are transmitted by ticks and associated with serious or fatal disease. One member is Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever

  7. An improved high pressure freezing and freeze substitution method to preserve the labile vaccinia virus nucleocapsid.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Desyree Murta; Moussatche, Nissin; Condit, Richard C

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, high pressure freezing and freeze substitution have been widely used for electron microscopy to reveal viral and cellular structures that are difficult to preserve. Vaccinia virus, a member of the Poxviridae family, presents one of the most complex viral structures. The classical view of vaccinia virus structure consists of an envelope surrounding a biconcave core, with a lateral body in each concavity of the core. This classical view was challenged by Peters and Muller (1963), who demonstrated the presence of a folded tubular structure inside the virus core and stated the difficulty in visualizing this structure, possibly because it is labile and cannot be preserved by conventional sample preparation. Therefore, this tubular structure, now called the nucleocapsid, has been mostly neglected over the years. Earlier studies were able to preserve the nucleocapsid, but with low efficiency. In this study, we report the protocol (and troubleshooting) that resulted in preservation of the highest numbers of nucleocapsids in several independent preparations. Using this protocol, we were able to demonstrate an interdependence between the formation of the virus core wall and the nucleocapsid, leading to the hypothesis that an interaction exists between the major protein constituents of these compartments, A3 (core wall) and L4 (nucleocapsid). Our results show that high pressure freezing and freeze substitution can be used in more in-depth studies concerning the nucleocapsid structure and function.

  8. Determination of the pK(a) of the four Zn2+-coordinating residues of the distal finger motif of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein: consequences on the binding of Zn2+.

    PubMed

    Bombarda, E; Morellet, N; Cherradi, H; Spiess, B; Bouaziz, S; Grell, E; Roques, B P; Mély, Y

    2001-07-13

    The nucleocapsid protein NCp7 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is characterized by two highly conserved CCHC motifs that bind Zn2+ strongly. To elucidate the striking pH-dependence of the apparent Zn2+-binding constants of these motifs further, we investigated, using 1H NMR, potentiometry and fluorescence spectroscopy, the acid-base properties of the four Zn2+-coordinating residues of (35-50)NCp7, a peptide corresponding to the distal finger motif of NCp7. With the exception of the H(beta2) proton of Cys39, the pH-dependence of the H(beta) proton resonances of the three Cys residues and, the H(delta) and H(epsilon) resonances of His44 in the apopeptide could be fitted adequately with a single pK(a). This suggests that the protonating groups are non-interacting, a feature that was confirmed by a potentiometric titration. The pK(a) of His44, Cys36, Cys39, and Cys49 in the apopeptide were found to be 6.4, 8.0, 8.8 and 9.3, respectively. Accordingly, the deprotonation is almost sequential and may thus induce a sequential binding of Zn2+ to the four coordinating residues. The high pK(a) of Cys49 is probably related to the negative charge of the neighboring Asp48. Such a high pK(a) may be a general feature in nucleocapsid proteins (NCs), since an acidic residue generally occupies the (i-1) position of the C-terminal Cys residue of single-finger NCs and distal finger motifs in two-finger NCs. Molecular dynamics simulation suggested the formation of a hydrogen bonded network that weakly structured the Cys36-Cys39 segment in the apopeptide. This network depends on the protonation state of Cys36 and may thus explain the biphasic behavior of the pH-dependence of the Cys39 H(beta2) resonance. Finally, the pK(a) values were used to build up a model describing the coordination of Zn2+ to (35-50)NCp7 at equilibrium. It appears that each protonation step of the coordination complex decreases the Zn2+-binding constant by about four orders of magnitude and that a significant

  9. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac53 plays a role in nucleocapsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chao; Li Zhaofei Wu Wenbi; Li Lingling; Yuan Meijin; Pan Lijing; Yang Kai Pang Yi

    2008-12-05

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) orf53 (ac53) is a highly conserved gene existing in all sequenced Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera baculoviruses, but its function remains unknown. To investigate its role in the baculovirus life cycle, an ac53 deletion virus (vAc{sup ac53KO-PH-GFP}) was generated through homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Fluorescence and light microscopy and titration analysis revealed that vAc{sup ac53KO-PH-GFP} could not produce infectious budded virus in infected Sf9 cells. Real-time PCR demonstrated that the ac53 deletion did not affect the levels of viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy showed that many lucent tubular shells devoid of the nucleoprotein core are present in the virogenic stroma and ring zone, indicating that the ac53 knockout affected nucleocapsid assembly. With a recombinant virus expressing an Ac53-GFP fusion protein, we observed that Ac53 was distributed within the cytoplasm and nucleus at 24 h post-infection, but afterwards accumulated predominantly near the nucleus-cytoplasm boundary. These data demonstrate that ac53 is involved in nucleocapsid assembly and is an essential gene for virus production.

  10. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac53 plays a role in nucleocapsid assembly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Li, Zhaofei; Wu, Wenbi; Li, Lingling; Yuan, Meijin; Pan, Lijing; Yang, Kai; Pang, Yi

    2008-12-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) orf53 (ac53) is a highly conserved gene existing in all sequenced Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera baculoviruses, but its function remains unknown. To investigate its role in the baculovirus life cycle, an ac53 deletion virus (vAc(ac53KO-PH-GFP)) was generated through homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Fluorescence and light microscopy and titration analysis revealed that vAc(ac53KO-PH-GFP) could not produce infectious budded virus in infected Sf9 cells. Real-time PCR demonstrated that the ac53 deletion did not affect the levels of viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy showed that many lucent tubular shells devoid of the nucleoprotein core are present in the virogenic stroma and ring zone, indicating that the ac53 knockout affected nucleocapsid assembly. With a recombinant virus expressing an Ac53-GFP fusion protein, we observed that Ac53 was distributed within the cytoplasm and nucleus at 24 h post-infection, but afterwards accumulated predominantly near the nucleus-cytoplasm boundary. These data demonstrate that ac53 is involved in nucleocapsid assembly and is an essential gene for virus production.

  11. Apical Budding of a Recombinant Influenza A Virus Expressing a Hemagglutinin Protein with a Basolateral Localization Signal

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Rosalia; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2002-01-01

    Influenza virions bud preferentially from the apical plasma membrane of infected epithelial cells, by enveloping viral nucleocapsids located in the cytosol with its viral integral membrane proteins, i.e., hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA), and M2 proteins, located at the plasma membrane. Because individually expressed HA, NA, and M2 proteins are targeted to the apical surface of the cell, guided by apical sorting signals in their transmembrane or cytoplasmic domains, it has been proposed that the polarized budding of influenza virions depends on the interaction of nucleocapsids and matrix proteins with the cytoplasmic domains of HA, NA, and/or M2 proteins. Since HA is the major protein component of the viral envelope, its polarized surface delivery may be a major force that drives polarized viral budding. We investigated this hypothesis by infecting MDCK cells with a transfectant influenza virus carrying a mutant form of HA (C560Y) with a basolateral sorting signal in its cytoplasmic domain. C560Y HA was expressed nonpolarly on the surface of infected MDCK cells. Interestingly, viral budding remained apical in C560Y virus-infected cells, and so did the location of NP and M1 proteins at late times of infection. These results are consistent with a model in which apical viral budding is a shared function of various viral components rather than a role of the major viral envelope glycoprotein HA. PMID:11884578

  12. Leptospira Protein Expression During Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are characterizing protein expression in vivo during experimental leptospirosis using immunofluorescence microscopy. Coding regions for several proteins were identified through analysis of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni and L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo genomes. In addition, codi...

  13. Production of cocktail of polyclonal antibodies using bacterial expressed recombinant protein for multiple virus detection.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Reetika; Mandal, Bikash; Paul, Prabir Kumar; Chigurupati, Phaneendra; Jain, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Cocktail of polyclonal antibodies (PAb) were produced that will help in multiple virus detection and overcome the limitation of individual virus purification, protein expression and purification as well as immunization in multiple rabbits. A dual fusion construct was developed using conserved coat protein (CP) sequences of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) in an expression vector, pET-28a(+). The fusion protein (∼40kDa) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Likewise, a triple fusion construct was developed by fusing conserved CP sequences of CMV and PRSV with conserved nucleocapsid protein (N) sequence of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) and expressed as a fusion protein (∼50kDa) in pET-28a(+). PAb made separately to each of these three viruses recognized the double and triple fusion proteins in Western blot indicating retention of desired epitopes for binding with target antibodies. The fusion proteins (∼40kDa and ∼50kDa) were used to produce cocktail of PAb by immunizing rabbits, which simultaneously detected natural infection of CMV and PRSV or CMV, PRSV and GBNV in Cucurbitaceous, Solanaceous and other hosts in DAC-ELISA. This is the first report on production of a cocktail of PAb to recombinant fusion protein of two or three distinct viruses.

  14. Some physico-chemical properties of the rigid form of the Sendai virus nucleocapsid.

    PubMed

    Repanovici, R; Hristova, M; Popa, L M

    1989-01-01

    The effect of some dissociation agents (SDS, beta-mercaptoethanol, urea, EDTA) on the rigid form of the Sendai virus nucleocapsid was studied. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of lytic mixture (1% SDS, 2% beta-mercaptoethanol, 5 M urea, for 2 min at 100 degrees C) revealed two types of polypeptide subunits (mol. wts. 46,000 and 14,000), as well as the dissociation in the presence of 0.1% SDS only. The EDTA treatment leads to a disorganization of the protein part (10(-2) M) or of the nucleocapsid structure (5 x 10(-2) M). PMID:2556836

  15. Zinc- and sequence-dependent binding to nucleic acids by the N-terminal zinc finger of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein: NMR structure of the complex with the Psi-site analog, dACGCC.

    PubMed

    South, T L; Summers, M F

    1993-01-01

    The nucleic acid interactive properties of a synthetic peptide with sequence of the N-terminal CCHC zinc finger (CCHC = Cys-X2-Cys-X4-His-X4-Cys; X = variable amino acid) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) nucleocapsid protein, Zn(HIV1-F1), have been studied by 1H NMR spectroscopy. Titration of Zn(HIV1-F1) with oligodeoxyribonucleic acids containing different nucleotide sequences reveals, for the first time, sequence-dependent binding that requires the presence of at least one guanosine residue for tight complex formation. The dynamics of complex formation are sensitive to the nature of the residues adjacent to guanosine, with residues on the 3' side of guanosine having the largest influence. An oligodeoxyribonucleotide with sequence corresponding to a portion of the HIV-1 psi-packaging signal, d(ACGCC), forms a relatively tight complex with Zn(HIV1-F1) (Kd = 5 x 10(-6) M). Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect (NOESY) data indicate that the bound nucleic acid exists predominantly in a single-stranded, A-helical conformation, and the presence of more than a dozen intermolecular NOE cross peaks enabled three-dimensional modeling of the complex. The nucleic acid binds within a hydrophobic cleft on the peptide surface. This hydrophobic cleft is defined by the side chains of residues Val1, Phe4, Ile12, and Ala13. Backbone amide protons of Phe4 and Ala13 and the backbone carbonyl oxygen of Lys2 that lie within this cleft appear to form hydrogen bonds with the guanosine O6 and N1H atoms, respectively. In addition, the positively charged side chain of Arg14 is ideally positioned for electrostatic interactions with the phosphodiester backbone of the nucleic acid. The structural findings provide a rationalization for the general conservation of these hydrophobic and basic residues in CCHC zinc fingers, and are consistent with site-directed mutagenesis results that implicate these residues as direct participants in viral genome recognition.

  16. Direct mass spectrometric determination of the stoichiometry and binding affinity of the complexes between nucleocapsid protein and RNA stem-loop hairpins of the HIV-1 Psi-recognition element.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Nathan; Fabris, Daniele

    2003-09-16

    The formation of noncovalent complexes between the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein p7 (NC) and RNA hairpins SL2-SL4 of the Psi-recognition element was investigated by direct infusion electrospray ionization-Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ESI-FTMS). The high resolution afforded by this method provided the unambiguous characterization of the stoichiometry and composition of complexes formed by multiple equilibria in solution. For each hairpin, the formation of a 1:1 complex was found to be the primary binding mode in solutions of intermediate salt content (150 mM ammonium acetate). Binding of multiple units of NC was observed with lower affinity and a maximum stoichiometry matching the limit calculated from the number of nucleotides in the construct and the size of the footprint of NC onto single-stranded nucleic acids, thus implying the defolding of the hairpin three-dimensional (3D) structure. Dissociation constants of 62 +/- 22 nM, 178 +/- 64 nM, and 1.3 +/- 0.5 microM were determined for SL2, SL3-2, and SL4, respectively, which are similar to values obtained by spectroscopic and calorimetric methods with the additional confidence offered by a direct, rather than inferred, knowledge of the binding stoichiometry. Competitive binding experiments carried out in solutions of intermediate ionic strength, which has the effect of weakening the electrostatic interactions in solution, provided a direct way of evaluating the stabilizing contributions of H-bonding and hydrophobic interactions that are more sensitive to the sequence and structural context of the different hairpins. The relative scale of binding affinity obtained in this environment reflects the combination of contributions provided by the different structures of both the tetraloop and the double-stranded stem. The importance of the stem 3D structure in modulating the binding activity was tested by a competitive binding experiment that included the SL3-2 RNA construct, a DNA analogue of SL3 (SL3(DNA)), and a

  17. Modeling Protein Expression and Protein Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Müller, Peter; Kornblau, Steven M.; Suchard, Marc A.; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput functional proteomic technologies provide a way to quantify the expression of proteins of interest. Statistical inference centers on identifying the activation state of proteins and their patterns of molecular interaction formalized as dependence structure. Inference on dependence structure is particularly important when proteins are selected because they are part of a common molecular pathway. In that case, inference on dependence structure reveals properties of the underlying pathway. We propose a probability model that represents molecular interactions at the level of hidden binary latent variables that can be interpreted as indicators for active versus inactive states of the proteins. The proposed approach exploits available expert knowledge about the target pathway to define an informative prior on the hidden conditional dependence structure. An important feature of this prior is that it provides an instrument to explicitly anchor the model space to a set of interactions of interest, favoring a local search approach to model determination. We apply our model to reverse-phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia. Our inference identifies relevant subpathways in relation to the unfolding of the biological process under study. PMID:26246646

  18. Detection of measles virus nucleocapsid transcripts in circulating blood cells from patients with Paget disease.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S V; Singer, F R; Mallette, L; Roodman, G D

    1996-11-01

    Paget disease of bone is characterized by abnormalities in all phases of bone remodeling, but the fundamental cellular abnormality resides in the osteoclast (OCL). Osteoclasts in bone involved by Paget disease contain viral-like nuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions that react with antibodies directed against paramyxovirus nucleocapsid proteins, such as measles virus, respiratory syncytial virus, or canine distemper virus. However, the identity of the virus or the mechanisms responsible for its persistence or pathologic role in Paget disease is unclear. Furthermore, although Paget disease persists for many years, it remains a highly localized process with new lesions rarely if ever developing in previously unaffected bones. Since osteoclasts are formed by fusion of mononuclear precursors derived from colony forming unit-granulocyte macrophage (CFU-GM), the granulocyte-macrophage progenitor, we used reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis to determine if CFU-GM, more differentiated osteoclast precursors, and peripheral blood cells derived from CFU-GM express measles virus nucleocapsid (MV-N) transcripts. We found that osteoclast precursors, as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells, express MV transcripts in 9 of 13 patients. Sequence analysis of the PCR amplified products confirmed nucleotide identity of MV-N transcripts expressed in peripheral blood and bone marrow-derived cells from the same patient. In contrast, MV-N transcripts were not detected in OCL precursors or the peripheral blood from 10 normal subjects. In situ hybridization studies using 35S-labeled antisense riboprobes to MV-N transcripts further confirmed the expression of MV transcripts in these cells. Sequence analysis of the PCR amplified product from one of these patients also identified a novel mutation that converted lysine441 to glutamic acid441 in the MV-N transcript. These data demonstrate that OCL precursors and circulating peripheral blood cells also express MV

  19. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus PK-1 is essential for nucleocapsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Changyong; Li, Min; Dai, Xuejuan; Zhao, Shuling; Hou, Yanling; Zhang, Yongli; Lan, Dandan; Wang, Yun; Chen, Xinwen

    2013-09-01

    PK-1 (Ac10) is a baculovirus-encoded serine/threonine kinase and its function is unclear. Our results showed that a pk-1 knockout AcMNPV failed to produce infectious progeny, while the pk-1 repair virus could rescue this defect. qPCR analysis demonstrated that pk-1 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. Analysis of the repaired recombinants with truncated pk-1 mutants demonstrated that the catalytic domain of protein kinases of PK-1 was essential to viral infectivity. Moreover, those PK-1 mutants that could rescue the infectious BV production defect exhibited kinase activity in vitro. Therefore, it is suggested that the kinase activity of PK-1 is essential in regulating viral propagation. Electron microscopy revealed that pk-1 deletion affected the formation of normal nucleocapsids. Masses of electron-lucent tubular structures were present in cell transfected with pk-1 knockout bacmid. Therefore, PK-1 appears to phosphorylate some viral or cellular proteins that are essential for DNA packaging to regulate nucleocapsid assembly. - Highlights: • A pk-1 knockout AcMNPV failed to produce infectious progeny. • The pk-1 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. • The catalytic domain of protein kinases (PKc) of PK-1 was essential to viral infectivity. • The kinase activity of PK-1 is essential in regulating viral propagation. • PK-1 appears to phosphorylate some viral proteins that are essential for DNA packaging to regulate nucleocapsid assembly.

  20. Data Mining for Expressivity of Recombinant Protein Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Satoshi; Isoai, Atsushi; Yamamura, Masayuki

    We analyzed the expressivity of recombinant proteins by using data mining methods. The expression technique of recombinant protein is a key step towards elucidating the functions of genes discovered through genomic sequence projects. We have studied the productive efficiency of recombinant proteins in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S.pombe), by mining the expression results. We gathered 57 proteins whose expression levels were known roughly in the host. Correlation analysis, principal component analysis and decision tree analysis were applied to these expression data. Analysis featuring codon usage and amino acid composition clarified that the amino acid composition affected to the expression levels of a recombinant protein strongly than the effect of codon usage. Furthermore, analysis of amino acid composition showed that protein solubility and the metabolism cost of amino acids correlated with a protein expressivity. Codon usage was often interesting in the field of recombinant expressions. However, our analysis found the weak correlation codon features with expressivities. These results indicated that ready-made indices of codon bias were irrelevant ones for modeling the expressivities of recombinant proteins. Our data driven approach was an easy and powerful method to improve recombinant protein expression, and this approach should be concentrated attention with the huge amount of expression data accumulating through the post-genome era.

  1. Nucleocapsid Gene-Mediated Transgenic Resistance Provides Protection Against Tomato spotted wilt virus Epidemics in the Field.

    PubMed

    Herrero, S; Culbreath, A K; Csinos, A S; Pappu, H R; Rufty, R C; Daub, M E

    2000-02-01

    ABSTRACT Transformation of plants with the nucleocapsid (N) gene of Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV) provides resistance to disease development; however, information is lacking on the response of plants to natural inoculum in the field. Three tobacco cultivars were transformed with the N gene of a dahlia isolate of TSWV (TSWV-D), and plants were evaluated over several generations in the greenhouse. The resistant phenotype was more frequently observed in 'Burley 21' than in 'KY-14' or 'K-326', but highly resistant 'Burley 21' transgenic lines were resistant to only 44% of the heterologous TSWV isolates tested. Advanced generation (R(3) and R(4)) transgenic resistant lines of 'Burley 21' and a 'K-326' F(1) hybrid containing the N genes of two TSWV isolates were evaluated in the field near Tifton, GA, where TSWV is endemic. Disease development was monitored by symptom expression and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. Whereas incidence of TSWV infection in 'Burley 21' susceptible controls was 20% in 1996 and 62% in 1997, the mean incidence in transgenic lines was reduced to 4 and 31%, respectively. Three transgenic 'Burley 21' lines were identified that had significantly lower incidence of disease than susceptible controls over the two years of the study. In addition, the rate of disease increase at the onset of the 1997 epidemic was reduced for all the 'Burley 21' transgenic lines compared with the susceptible controls. The 'K-326' F(1) hybrid was as susceptible as the 'K-326' nontransformed control. ELISA analysis demonstrated that symptomless plants from the most resistant 'Burley 21' transgenic lines accumulated detectable nucleocapsid protein, whereas symptomless plants from more susceptible lines did not. We conclude that transgenic resistance to TSWV is effective in reducing incidence of the disease in the field, and that accumulation of transgene protein may be important in broad-spectrum resistance. PMID:18944602

  2. Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants

    DOEpatents

    Vierstra, Richard D.; Walker, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

  3. Differential Contributions of Tacaribe Arenavirus Nucleoprotein N-Terminal and C-Terminal Residues to Nucleocapsid Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    D'Antuono, Alejandra; Loureiro, Maria Eugenia; Foscaldi, Sabrina; Marino-Buslje, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) is the main protein component of viral nucleocapsids and is strictly required for viral genome replication mediated by the L polymerase. Homo-oligomerization of NP is presumed to play an important role in nucleocapsid assembly, albeit the underlying mechanism and the relevance of NP-NP interaction in nucleocapsid activity are still poorly understood. Here, we evaluate the contribution of the New World Tacaribe virus (TCRV) NP self-interaction to nucleocapsid functional activity. We show that alanine substitution of N-terminal residues predicted to be available for NP-NP interaction strongly affected NP self-association, as determined by coimmunoprecipitation assays, produced a drastic inhibition of transcription and replication of a TCRV minigenome RNA, and impaired NP binding to RNA. Mutagenesis and functional analysis also revealed that, while dispensable for NP self-interaction, key amino acids at the C-terminal domain were essential for RNA synthesis. Furthermore, mutations at these C-terminal residues rendered NP unable to bind RNA both in vivo and in vitro but had no effect on the interaction with the L polymerase. In addition, while all oligomerization-defective variants tested exhibited unaltered capacities to sustain NP-L interaction, NP deletion mutants were fully incompetent to bind L, suggesting that, whereas NP self-association is dispensable, the integrity of both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains is required for binding the L polymerase. Overall, our results suggest that NP self-interaction mediated by the N-terminal domain may play a critical role in TCRV nucleocapsid assembly and activity and that the C-terminal domain of NP is implicated in RNA binding. IMPORTANCE The mechanism of arenavirus functional nucleocapsid assembly is still poorly understood. No detailed information is available on the nucleocapsid structure, and the regions of full-length NP involved in binding to viral RNA remain to be

  4. Virions and intracellular nucleocapsids produced during mixed heterotypic influenza infection of MDCK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sklyanskaya, E.I.; Varich, N.L.; Amvrosieva, T.V.; Kaverin, N.V.

    1985-02-01

    Phenotypically mixed virus yields, obtained by coinfection of MDCK cells with influenza A/WSN/33 and B/Lee/40 viruses, contained both A/WSN/33 and B/Lee/40 NP proteins, as revealed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified /sup 14/C-amino acids-labeled virus. Virions were lysed with 0.6 M KCl-Triton X-100 buffer, and nucleocapsids were immunoprecipitated with antibodies against NP protein of influenza A virus. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the immunoprecipitate revealed NP protein of A/WSN/33 but not of B/Lee/40 virus. However, in similar experiments with the lysates of doubly infected cells, the band of B/Lee/40 NP protein was revealed in the polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis patterns of the immunoprecipitates. In an attempt to analyze the RNA content of the immune complexes, the authors absorbed the lysates of doubly infected (/sup 3/H)uridine-labeled cells with protein A-containing Staphylococcus aureus covered with antibodies against the NP protein of influenza A virus. RNA extracted from the immune complexes contained genomic RNA segments of both A/WSN/33 and B/Lee/40 viruses. In control samples containing an artificial mixture of cell lysates separately infected with each virus, the analysis revealed homologous components (i.e., A/WSN/33 NP protein or RNA segments) in the immune complexes. The results suggest the presence of phenotypically mixed nucleocapsids in the cells doubly infected with influenza A and B viruses; in the course of the virion formation, the nucleocapsids lacking the heterologous NP protein are selected.

  5. Development of an Escherichia coli-Lactobacillus casei shuttle vector for heterologous protein expression in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Suebwongsa, Namfon; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Mayo, Baltasar; Yotpanya, Panjamaporn; Panya, Marutpong

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing interest to develop various lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species as mucosal delivery vehicles, for which the development of a variety of cloning and expression systems for these bacteria is of primary importance. This study reports the complete nucleotide sequence of the cryptic plasmid pRCEID7.6 derived from the chicken probiotic LAB strain Lactobacillus casei TISTR1341. Sequence analysis and comparison showed that pRCEID7.6 is composed of nine putative open reading frames. The replicon origin of pRCEID7.6 consisted of untranslated origin of replication and translated replication protein B sequences. This region was used to construct Escherichia coli/L. casei shuttle vectors carrying erythromycin and chloramphenicol resistance genes as selective markers. Segregation and structural stability of the vectors in L. casei was sufficient for most genetic applications. The feasibility of this vector for heterologous protein expression in L. casei was determined by cloning in pRCEID-LC7.6, the gene encoding the nucleocapsid protein (NP), from the influenza A virus under the control of the homologous promoter from the lactate dehydrogenase gene. L. casei carrying this recombinant plasmid was shown to successfully express the NP protein. Therefore, this shuttle vector can be used for further study in the development of mucosal delivery vehicles. PMID:27026866

  6. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  7. An SH3 binding motif within the nucleocapsid protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus interacts with the host cellular signaling proteins STAMI, TXK, Fyn, Hck, and cortactin.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Scott P; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes an economically important global swine disease, and has a complicated virus-host immunomodulation that often leads to a weak Th2 immune response and viral persistence. In this study, we identified a Src homology 3 (SH3) binding motif, PxxPxxP, that is conserved within the N protein of PRRSV strains. Subsequently, we identified five host cellular proteins [signal transducing adaptor molecule (STAM)I, TXK tyrosine kinase (TXK), protein tyrosine kinase fyn (Fyn), hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), and cortactin] that interact with this SH3 motif. We demonstrated that binding of SH3 proteins with PRRSV N protein depends on at least one intact PxxP motif as disruption of P53 within the motif significantly reduced interaction of each of the 5 proteins. The first PxxP motif appears to be more important for STAMI-N protein interactions whereas the second PxxP motif was more important for Hck interaction. Both STAMI and Hck interactions with PRRSV N protein required an unhindered C-terminal domain as the interaction was only observed with STAMI and Hck proteins with N-terminal but not C-terminal fluorescent tags. We showed that the P56 residue within the SH3 motif is critical for virus lifecycle as mutation resulted in a loss of virus infectivity, however the P50 and P53 mutations did not abolish virus infectivity suggesting that these highly conserved proline residues within the SH3 motif may provide a selective growth advantage through interactions with the host rather than a vital functional element. These results have important implications in understanding PRRSV-host interactions.

  8. Development of Monoclonal Antibody and Diagnostic Test for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Using Cell-Free Synthesized Nucleocapsid Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Yutaro; Matsuyama, Shutoku; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Matsunaga, Satoko; Matsushima, Yuki; Kuroyama, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Hirokazu; Takeda, Makoto; Chimuro, Tomoyuki; Ryo, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    Protein nativity is one of the most critical factors for the quality of antigens used as immunogens and the reactivities of the resultant antibodies. The preparation and purification of native viral antigens in conventional cell-based protein expression systems are often accompanied by technical hardships. These challenges are attributable mainly to protein aggregation and insolubility during expression and purification, as well as to very low expression levels associated with the toxicity of some viral proteins. Here, we describe a novel approach for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against nucleocapsid protein (NP) of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system, we successfully prepared large amounts of MERS-CoV NP antigen in a state that was highly soluble and intact for immunization. Following mouse immunization and hybridoma generation, we selected seven hybridoma clones that produced mAbs with exclusive reactivity against MERS-CoV NP. Epitope mapping and subsequent bioinformatic analysis revealed that these mAbs recognized epitopes located within relatively highly conserved regions of the MERS-CoV amino-acid sequence. Consistently, the mAbs exhibited no obvious cross-reactivity with NPs derived from other related viruses, including SARS coronavirus. After determining the optimal combinations of these mAbs, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a rapid immunochromatographic antigen detection test that can be reliably used for laboratory diagnosis of MERS-CoV. Thus, this study provides strong evidence that the wheat germ cell-free system is useful for the production of diagnostic mAbs against emerging pathogens. PMID:27148198

  9. Development of Monoclonal Antibody and Diagnostic Test for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Using Cell-Free Synthesized Nucleocapsid Antigen.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yutaro; Matsuyama, Shutoku; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Matsunaga, Satoko; Matsushima, Yuki; Kuroyama, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Hirokazu; Takeda, Makoto; Chimuro, Tomoyuki; Ryo, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    Protein nativity is one of the most critical factors for the quality of antigens used as immunogens and the reactivities of the resultant antibodies. The preparation and purification of native viral antigens in conventional cell-based protein expression systems are often accompanied by technical hardships. These challenges are attributable mainly to protein aggregation and insolubility during expression and purification, as well as to very low expression levels associated with the toxicity of some viral proteins. Here, we describe a novel approach for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against nucleocapsid protein (NP) of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system, we successfully prepared large amounts of MERS-CoV NP antigen in a state that was highly soluble and intact for immunization. Following mouse immunization and hybridoma generation, we selected seven hybridoma clones that produced mAbs with exclusive reactivity against MERS-CoV NP. Epitope mapping and subsequent bioinformatic analysis revealed that these mAbs recognized epitopes located within relatively highly conserved regions of the MERS-CoV amino-acid sequence. Consistently, the mAbs exhibited no obvious cross-reactivity with NPs derived from other related viruses, including SARS coronavirus. After determining the optimal combinations of these mAbs, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a rapid immunochromatographic antigen detection test that can be reliably used for laboratory diagnosis of MERS-CoV. Thus, this study provides strong evidence that the wheat germ cell-free system is useful for the production of diagnostic mAbs against emerging pathogens. PMID:27148198

  10. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits E6AP expression via DNA methylation to escape from ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Juri; Shim, Joo Hee; Tiwari, Indira; Jang, Kyung Lib

    2016-09-28

    The E6-associated protein (E6AP) is a ubiquitin ligase that mediates ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Given the role of HCV core protein as a major component of the viral nucleocapsid, as well as a multifunctional protein involved in viral pathogenesis and hepatocarcinogenesis, HCV has likely evolved a strategy to counteract the host anti-viral defense mechanism of E6AP and maximize its potential to produce infectious virus particles. In the present study, we found that HCV core protein derived from either ectopic expression or HCV infection inhibits E6AP expression via promoter hypermethylation in human hepatocytes. As a result, the potential of E6AP to ubiquitinate and degrade HCV core protein through the ubiquitin-proteasome system was severely impaired, which in turn led to stimulation of virus propagation. The effects of HCV core protein were almost completely abolished when the E6AP level was restored by ectopic expression of E6AP, treatment with a universal DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor, 5-Aza-2'dC, or knock-down of DNMT1. In conclusion, HCV core protein inhibits E6AP expression via DNA methylation to protect itself from ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation and stimulate virus propagation, providing a potential target for the development of anti-viral drugs against HCV.

  11. Protein expression strategies for identification of novel target proteins.

    PubMed

    Schuster, M; Wasserbauer, E; Einhauer, A; Ortner, C; Jungbauer, A; Hammerschmid, F; Werner, G

    2000-04-01

    Identification of new target proteins is a novel paradigm in drug discovery. A major bottleneck of this strategy is the rapid and simultaneous expression of proteins from differential gene expression to identify eligible candidates. By searching for a generic system enabling high throughput expression analysis and purification of unknown cDNAs, we evaluated the YEpFLAG-1 yeast expression system. We have selected cDNAs encoding model proteins (eukaryotic initiation factor-5A [eIF-5A] and Homo sapiens differentiation-dependent protein-A4) and cDNA encoding an unknown protein (UP-1) for overexpression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using fusions with a peptide that changes its conformation in the presence of Ca2+ ions, the FLAG tag (Eastman Kodak, Rochester, NY). The cDNAs encoding unknown proteins originating from a directionally cloned cDNA library were expressed in all three possible reading frames. The expressed proteins were detected by an antibody directed against the FLAG tag and/or by antibodies against the model proteins. The alpha-leader sequence, encoding a yeast mating pheromone, upstream of the gene fusion site facilitates secretion into the culture supernatant. EIF-5A could be highly overexpressed and was secreted into the culture supernatant. In contrast, the Homo sapiens differentiation-dependent protein-A4 as well as the protein UP-1, whose cDNA did not match to any known gene, could not be detected in the culture supernatant. The expression product of the correct frame remained in the cells, whereas the FLAG-tagged proteins secreted into the supernatant were short, out-of-frame products. The presence of transmembrane domains or patches of hydrophobic amino acids may preclude secretion of these proteins into the culture supernatant. Subsequently, isolation and purification of the various proteins was accomplished by affinity chromatography or affinity extraction using magnetizable beads coated with the anti-FLAG monoclonal antibody. The purity of

  12. Generation of replication-competent hepatitis B virus nucleocapsids in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Seifer, M; Hamatake, R; Bifano, M; Standring, D N

    1998-04-01

    The double-stranded DNA genome of human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and related hepadnaviruses is reverse transcribed from a pregenomic RNA by a viral polymerase (Pol) harboring both priming and RNA- and DNA-dependent elongation activities. Although hepadnavirus replication occurs inside viral nucleocapsids, or cores, biochemical systems for analyzing this reaction are currently limited to unencapsidated Pols expressed in heterologous systems. Here, we describe cis and trans classes of replicative HBV cores, produced in the recombinant baculovirus system via coexpression of HBV core and Pol proteins from either a single RNA (i.e., in cis) or two distinct RNAs (in trans). Upon isolation from insect cells, cis and trans cores contained Pol-linked HBV minus-strand DNA with 5' ends mapping to the authentic elongation origin DR1 and also plus-strand DNA species. Only trans cores, however, were highly active for the de novo priming and reverse transcription of authentic HBV minus strands in in vitro endogenous polymerase assays. This reaction strictly required HBV Pol but not the epsilon stem-loop element, although the presence of one epsilon, or better, two epsilons, enhanced minus-strand synthesis up to 10-fold. Compared to unencapsidated Pol enzymes, encapsidated Pol appeared to be (i) highly processive, able to extend minus-strand DNAs of 400 nucleotides from DR1 in vitro, and (ii) more active for HBV plus-strand synthesis. These observations suggest possible contributions to the replication process from the HBV core protein. These novel core reagents should facilitate the analysis of HBV replication in its natural environment, the interior of the capsid, and also fuel the development of new anti-HBV drug screens.

  13. The humoral immune response to recombinant nucleocapsid antigen of canine distemper virus in dogs vaccinated with attenuated distemper virus or DNA encoding the nucleocapsid of wild-type virus.

    PubMed

    Griot-Wenk, M E; Cherpillod, P; Koch, A; Zurbriggen, R; Bruckner, L; Wittek, R; Zurbriggen, A

    2001-06-01

    This study compared the humoral immune response against the nucleocapsid-(N) protein of canine distemper virus (CDV) of dogs vaccinated with a multivalent vaccine against parvo-, adeno-, and parainfluenza virus and leptospira combined with either the attenuated CDV Onderstepoort strain (n = 15) or an expression plasmid containing the N-gene of CDV (n = 30). The vaccinations were applied intramuscularly three times at 2-week intervals beginning at the age of 6 weeks. None of the pre-immune sera recognized the recombinant N-protein, confirming the lack of maternal antibodies at this age. Immunization with DNA vaccine for CDV resulted in positive serum N-specific IgG response. However, their IgG (and IgA) titres were lower than those of CDV-vaccinated dogs. Likewise, DNA-vaccinated dogs did not show an IgM peak. There was no increase in N-specific serum IgE titres in either group. Serum titres to the other multivalent vaccine components were similar in both groups. PMID:11475904

  14. Induced degradation of Tat by nucleocapsid (NC) via the proteasome pathway and its effect on HIV transcription.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hye-Won; Lee, Seong-Wook; Myung, Heejoon

    2013-04-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV-1 Tat protein upregulates transcriptional transactivation. The nucleocapsid protein NC of HIV-1 is a component of virion and plays a key role in genome packaging. Herein, we have demonstrated the interaction between NC and Tat by means of a yeast two-hybrid assay, GST pull-down analysis, co-immunoprecipitation and subcellular colocalization analysis. We observed that the level of Tat was significantly reduced in the presence of NC. But NC did not affect mRNA expression level of Tat. The level of Tat in the presence of NC was increased by treating cells with a proteasome inhibitor, MG132. The ubiquitination state of Tat was not seen to increase in the presence of NC, suggesting the proteasomal degradation was independent of ubiquitination. Lowered level of Tat in the presence of NC led to a decrease in Tat-mediated transcriptional transactivation. PMID:23611845

  15. Induced Degradation of Tat by Nucleocapsid (NC) via the Proteasome Pathway and Its Effect on HIV Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hye-Won; Lee, Seong-Wook; Myung, Heejoon

    2013-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV-1 Tat protein upregulates transcriptional transactivation. The nucleocapsid protein NC of HIV-1 is a component of virion and plays a key role in genome packaging. Herein, we have demonstrated the interaction between NC and Tat by means of a yeast two-hybrid assay, GST pull-down analysis, co-immunoprecipitation and subcellular colocalization analysis. We observed that the level of Tat was significantly reduced in the presence of NC. But NC did not affect mRNA expression level of Tat. The level of Tat in the presence of NC was increased by treating cells with a proteasome inhibitor, MG132. The ubiquitination state of Tat was not seen to increase in the presence of NC, suggesting the proteasomal degradation was independent of ubiquitination. Lowered level of Tat in the presence of NC led to a decrease in Tat-mediated transcriptional transactivation. PMID:23611845

  16. MOPED: Model Organism Protein Expression Database.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Eugene; Higdon, Roger; Haynes, Winston; Welch, Dean; Broomall, William; Lancet, Doron; Stanberry, Larissa; Kolker, Natali

    2012-01-01

    Large numbers of mass spectrometry proteomics studies are being conducted to understand all types of biological processes. The size and complexity of proteomics data hinders efforts to easily share, integrate, query and compare the studies. The Model Organism Protein Expression Database (MOPED, htttp://moped.proteinspire.org) is a new and expanding proteomics resource that enables rapid browsing of protein expression information from publicly available studies on humans and model organisms. MOPED is designed to simplify the comparison and sharing of proteomics data for the greater research community. MOPED uniquely provides protein level expression data, meta-analysis capabilities and quantitative data from standardized analysis. Data can be queried for specific proteins, browsed based on organism, tissue, localization and condition and sorted by false discovery rate and expression. MOPED empowers users to visualize their own expression data and compare it with existing studies. Further, MOPED links to various protein and pathway databases, including GeneCards, Entrez, UniProt, KEGG and Reactome. The current version of MOPED contains over 43,000 proteins with at least one spectral match and more than 11 million high certainty spectra.

  17. Expression of clock proteins in developing tooth.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Papagerakis, Silvana; Schnell, Santiago D; Hoogerwerf, Willemijntje A; Papagerakis, Petros

    2011-01-01

    Morphological and functional changes during ameloblast and odontoblast differentiation suggest that enamel and dentin formation is under circadian control. Circadian rhythms are endogenous self-sustained oscillations with periods of 24h that control diverse physiological and metabolic processes. Mammalian clock genes play a key role in synchronizing circadian functions in many organs. However, close to nothing is known on clock genes expression during tooth development. In this work, we investigated the expression of four clock genes during tooth development. Our results showed that circadian clock genes Bmal1, clock, per1, and per2 mRNAs were detected in teeth by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry showed that clock protein expression was first detected in teeth at the bell stage (E17), being expressed in EOE and dental papilla cells. At post-natal day four (PN4), all four clock proteins continued to be expressed in teeth but with different intensities, being strongly expressed within the nucleus of ameloblasts and odontoblasts and down-regulated in dental pulp cells. Interestingly, at PN21 incisor, expression of clock proteins was down-regulated in odontoblasts of the crown-analogue side but expression was persisting in root-analogue side odontoblasts. In contrast, both crown and root odontoblasts were strongly stained for all four clock proteins in first molars at PN21. Within the periodontal ligament (PDL) space, epithelial rests of Malassez (ERM) showed the strongest expression among other PDL cells. Our data suggests that clock genes might be involved in the regulation of ameloblast and odontoblast functions, such as enamel and dentin protein secretion and matrix mineralization.

  18. Transient Protein Expression by Agroinfiltration in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Dent, Matthew; Hurtado, Jonathan; Stahnke, Jake; McNulty, Alyssa; Leuzinger, Kahlin; Lai, Huafang

    2016-01-01

    Current systems of recombinant protein production include bacterial, insect, and mammalian cell culture. However, these platforms are expensive to build and operate at commercial scales and/or have limited abilities to produce complex proteins. In recent years, plant-based expression systems have become top candidates for the production of recombinant proteins as they are highly scalable, robust, safe, and can produce complex proteins due to having a eukaryotic endomembrane system. Newly developed "deconstructed" viral vectors delivered via Agrobacterium tumefaciens (agroinfiltration) have enabled robust plant-based production of proteins with a wide range of applications. The leafy Lactuca sativa (lettuce) plant with its strong foundation in agriculture is an excellent host for pharmaceutical protein production. Here, we describe a method for agroinfiltration of lettuce that can rapidly produce high levels of recombinant proteins in a matter of days and has the potential to be scaled up to an agricultural level. PMID:26614281

  19. Biotechnology Protein Expression and Purification Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the Project Scientist Core Facility is to provide purified proteins, both recombinant and natural, to the Biotechnology Science Team Project Scientists and the NRA-Structural Biology Test Investigators. Having a core facility for this purpose obviates the need for each scientist to develop the necessary expertise and equipment for molecular biology, protein expression, and protein purification. Because of this, they are able to focus their energies as well as their funding on the crystallization and structure determination of their target proteins.

  20. Membrane protein expression in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    King, Martin S; Boes, Christoph; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis has many properties that are ideal for the overproduction of membrane proteins in a functional form. Growth of lactococci is rapid, proceeds to high cell densities, and does not require aeration, which facilitates large-scale fermentation. The available promoter systems are strong and tightly regulated, allowing expression of toxic gene products in a controlled manner. Expressed membrane proteins are targeted exclusively to the cytoplasmic membrane, allowing the use of ionophores, ligands, and inhibitors to study activity of the membrane protein in whole cells. Constructed plasmids are stable and expression levels are highly reproducible. The relatively small genome size of the organism causes little redundancy, which facilitates complementation studies and allows for easier purification. The produced membrane proteins are often stable, as the organism has limited proteolytic capability, and they are readily solubilized from the membrane with mild detergents. Lactococci are multiple amino acid auxotrophs, allowing the incorporation of labels, such as selenomethionine. Among the few disadvantages are the low transformation frequency, AT-rich codon usage, and resistance to lysis by mechanical means, but these problems can be overcome fairly easily. We will describe in detail the protocols used to express membrane proteins in L. lactis, from cloning of the target gene to the isolation of membrane vesicles for the determination of expression levels. PMID:25857778

  1. Protein expression in the baculovirus system.

    PubMed

    Bernard, A; Payton, M; Radford, K R

    2001-05-01

    Insect cell-recombinant baculovirus co-cultures offer a protein production system that complements microbial systems by providing recombinant proteins in soluble form and with most post-translational modifications. Moreover, the large size of the viral genome enables cloning of large segments of DNA and consequent expression of complex protein aggregates. This unit describes methods associated with the large-scale production of recombinant proteins in the baculovirus expression system. A method for large-scale production of viral stocks is described and methods for titration of virus are provided (a plaque assay and an end-point assay). Once viral stocks have been prepared and titered, a protocol for testing the virus in small-scale cultures is provided to determine the kinetics of expression, which allows evaluation of various cell culture and infection conditions aimed at developing optimal levels of protein production (e.g., comparisons of different host cell lines, media, and environmental parameters). Support protocols provide instructions for preparing culture samples for protein analysis by SDS-PAGE and discuss analytical methods for monitoring nutrient levels in cell culture fluids. Once optimal process parameters are identified, protocols describe production of the target protein on a large scale in fermentors using either regular batch production in bioreactors or a fed-batch procedure of production in perfusion cultures. Techniques for harvesting cultures from bioreactors are also provided.

  2. Expression of human milk proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2002-06-01

    Human milk proteins are believed to have a multitude of biological activities benefiting the newborn infant. Such functions include antibacterial and antiviral activities, enhancement of the immune system and increased nutrient absorption. To date, only breast-fed infants have been exposed to these proteins. However, by using genetic engineering it is now possible to express these proteins in plants, such as rice, at very high levels. Recombinant human milk proteins can subsequently be added to infant formula and baby foods. Prior to such addition, safety tests and efficacy trials need to be conducted. The safety tests will initially be done in rats and then in humans. The efficacy trials should also evaluate stability against heat treatment (processing), pH (stomach conditions) and proteolytic enzymes (digestion). To date, we have expressed recombinant human lactoferrin, lysozyme and alpha1-antitrypsin in rice at very high expression levels. These recombinant proteins showed a stability and activities similar to those of the native milk proteins, suggesting that they may be able to exert biological activities in infants when added to formula or baby foods.

  3. Enhanced expression of adenovirus transforming proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gaynor, R B; Tsukamoto, A; Montell, C; Berk, A J

    1982-01-01

    Proteins encoded in regions EIA and EIB of human adenoviruses cause transformation of rodent cells. One protein from EIA also stimulates transcription of other early regions at early times in a productive infection. In the past, direct analysis of these proteins synthesized in vivo has been difficult because of the low levels produced in both transformed cells and productively infected cells. We present a simple method which leads to expression of EIA and EIB mRNAs and proteins at 30-fold greater levels than those observed during the early phase of a standard productive infection. Under these conditions, these proteins are among the most prominent translation products of infected cells. This allowed direct visualization of EIA and EIB proteins on two-dimensional gels of pulse-labeled total cell protein. Experiments with EIA and EIB mutants confirm that the identified proteins are indeed encoded in these regions. Two EIA proteins are observed, one translated from each of the major early EIA mRNAs. Both of these EIA proteins are phosphorylated. Images PMID:7143568

  4. Translocation of Incoming Pseudorabies Virus Capsids to the Cell Nucleus Is Delayed in the Absence of Tegument Protein pUL37▿

    PubMed Central

    Krautwald, Mirjam; Fuchs, Walter; Klupp, Barbara G.; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    After fusion of the envelope of herpesvirus particles with the host cell plasma membrane, incoming nucleocapsids are transported to nuclear pores. Inner tegument proteins pUL36, pUL37, and pUS3 remain attached to the nucleocapsid after entry and therefore might mediate interactions between the nucleocapsid and cellular microtubule-associated motor proteins during transport. To assay for the role of pUL37 in this process, we constructed a pUL37-deleted pseudorabies virus mutant, PrV-ΔUL37/UL35GFP, which expresses a fusion protein of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the nonessential small capsid protein pUL35, resulting in the formation of fluorescently labeled capsids. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy of rabbit kidney cells infected with PrV-ΔUL37/UL35GFP revealed that, whereas penetration was not affected in the absence of pUL37, nuclear translocation of incoming particles was delayed by approximately 1 h compared to PrV-UL35GFP, but not abolished. In contrast, phenotypically complemented pUL37-containing virions of PrV-ΔUL37/UL35GFP exhibited wild type-like entry kinetics. Thus, the presence of pUL37 is required for rapid nuclear translocation of incoming nucleocapsids. PMID:19144717

  5. Translocation of incoming pseudorabies virus capsids to the cell nucleus is delayed in the absence of tegument protein pUL37.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, Mirjam; Fuchs, Walter; Klupp, Barbara G; Mettenleiter, Thomas C

    2009-04-01

    After fusion of the envelope of herpesvirus particles with the host cell plasma membrane, incoming nucleocapsids are transported to nuclear pores. Inner tegument proteins pUL36, pUL37, and pUS3 remain attached to the nucleocapsid after entry and therefore might mediate interactions between the nucleocapsid and cellular microtubule-associated motor proteins during transport. To assay for the role of pUL37 in this process, we constructed a pUL37-deleted pseudorabies virus mutant, PrV-DeltaUL37/UL35GFP, which expresses a fusion protein of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the nonessential small capsid protein pUL35, resulting in the formation of fluorescently labeled capsids. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy of rabbit kidney cells infected with PrV-DeltaUL37/UL35GFP revealed that, whereas penetration was not affected in the absence of pUL37, nuclear translocation of incoming particles was delayed by approximately 1 h compared to PrV-UL35GFP, but not abolished. In contrast, phenotypically complemented pUL37-containing virions of PrV-DeltaUL37/UL35GFP exhibited wild type-like entry kinetics. Thus, the presence of pUL37 is required for rapid nuclear translocation of incoming nucleocapsids. PMID:19144717

  6. Expression, purification, and crystallisationof membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Bernadette

    Approximately, 29,000 protein structures are deposited in the Protein Databank (January 2005), but only about 90 of which are independent membrane protein structures. This represents a significant increase in knowledge compared with a matter of only 5 years ago when a mere handful of membrane protein structures were available. Despite the advances, our understanding of the structure-function relationships and mechanism of action of many membrane proteins is still lacking. This is particularly true of many of the more clinically relevant membrane proteins, such as the G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The GPCRs regulate cellular responses to a wide range of biologically active molecules including hormones and drugs and are thus important targets for therapeutic intervention in a number of disease states. However, the increasing number of membrane protein structures has provided a critical mass of information which has yielded a more rational approach to the process of obtaining diffraction quality crystals. It is the different stages of this process; expression, solubilisation, purification, and crystallisation that will be covered in this lecture.

  7. Replicative RNA synthesis and nucleocapsid assembly in vesicular stomatitis virus-infected permeable cells.

    PubMed Central

    Condra, J H; Lazzarini, R A

    1980-01-01

    A permeable-cell system has been developed to study the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus. When vesicular stomatitis virus-infected BHK cells were permeabilized by lysolecithin treatment, they incorporated nucleoside triphosphates into RNA and amino acids into proteins at nearly normal rates. The viral mRNA's synthesized appeared normal in polarity, size distribution, and polyadenylation, and all five viral proteins were synthesized. Replication of the viral genome proceeded, and full-length RNA strands were synthesized in amounts and polarities resembling those found in intact cells. These full-length RNAs associated with viral N proteins to form RNase-resistant nucleocapsids of normal buoyant density. Permeable cells appear to represent ideal hosts for studying vesicular stomatitis virus replication since they closely mimic in vivo conditions while retaining much of the experimental flexibility of current in vitro systems. Images PMID:6257927

  8. Sequence analysis and expression of the M1 and M2 matrix protein genes of hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishizawa, T.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a 2318 nucleotide region of the genomic RNA of hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV), an important viral pathogen of Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus. This region comprises approximately two-thirds of the 3' end of the nucleocapsid protein (N) gene and the complete matrix protein (M1 and M2) genes with the associated intergenic regions. The partial N gene sequence was 812 nucleotides in length with an open reading frame (ORF) that encoded the carboxyl-terminal 250 amino acids of the N protein. The M1 and M2 genes were 771 and 700 nucleotides in length, respectively, with ORFs encoding proteins of 227 and 193 amino acids. The M1 gene sequence contained an additional small ORF that could encode a highly basic, arginine-rich protein of 25 amino acids. Comparisons of the N, M1, and M2 gene sequences of HIRRV with the corresponding sequences of the fish rhabdoviruses, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) or viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) indicated that HIRRV was more closely related to IHNV than to VHSV, but was clearly distinct from either. The putative consensus gene termination sequence for IHNV and VHSV, AGAYAG(A)(7), was present in the N-M1, M1-M2, and M2-G intergenic regions of HIRRV as were the putative transcription initiation sequences YGGCAC and AACA. An Escherichia coli expression system was used to produce recombinant proteins from the M1 and M2 genes of HIRRV. These were the same size as the authentic M1 and M2 proteins and reacted with anti-HIRRV rabbit serum in western blots. These reagents can be used for further study of the fish immune response and to test novel control methods.

  9. RNA and Nucleocapsid Are Dispensable for Mature HIV-1 Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Simone; Flemming, Annica; Anders-Össwein, Maria; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is released from infected cells in an immature, noninfectious form in which the structural polyprotein Gag is arranged in a hexameric lattice, forming an incomplete spherical shell. Maturation to the infectious form is mediated by the viral protease, which cleaves Gag at five sites, releasing the CA (capsid) protein, which forms a conical capsid encasing the condensed RNA genome. The pathway of this structural rearrangement is currently not understood, and it is unclear how cone assembly is initiated. RNA represents an integral structural component of retroviruses, and the viral nucleoprotein core has previously been proposed to nucleate mature capsid assembly. We addressed this hypothesis by replacing the RNA-binding NC (nucleocapsid) domain of HIV-1 Gag and the adjacent spacer peptide 2 (SP2) by a leucine zipper (LZ) protein-protein interaction domain [Gag(LZ)] in the viral context. We found that Gag(LZ)-carrying virus [HIV(LZ)] was efficiently released and viral polyproteins were proteolytically processed, though with reduced efficiency. Cryo-electron tomography revealed that the particles lacked a condensed nucleoprotein and contained an increased proportion of aberrant core morphologies caused either by the absence of RNA or by altered Gag processing. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of HIV(LZ) particles contained mature capsids with the wild-type morphology. These results clearly demonstrate that the nucleoprotein complex is dispensable as a nucleator for mature HIV-1 capsid assembly in the viral context. IMPORTANCE Formation of a closed conical capsid encasing the viral RNA genome is essential for HIV-1 infectivity. It is currently unclear what viral components initiate and regulate the formation of the capsid during virus morphogenesis, but it has been proposed that the ribonucleoprotein complex plays a role. To test this, we prepared virus-like particles lacking the viral nucleocapsid protein and

  10. Expression Differentiation Is Constrained to Low-Expression Proteins over Ecological Timescales.

    PubMed

    Margres, Mark J; Wray, Kenneth P; Seavy, Margaret; McGivern, James J; Herrera, Nathanael D; Rokyta, Darin R

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression level is one of the strongest predictors of protein sequence evolutionary rate, with high-expression protein sequences evolving at slower rates than low-expression protein sequences largely because of constraints on protein folding and function. Expression evolutionary rates also have been shown to be negatively correlated with expression level across human and mouse orthologs over relatively long divergence times (i.e., ∼100 million years). Long-term evolutionary patterns, however, often cannot be extrapolated to microevolutionary processes (and vice versa), and whether this relationship holds for traits evolving under directional selection within a single species over ecological timescales (i.e., <5000 years) is unknown and not necessarily expected. Expression is a metabolically costly process, and the expression level of a particular protein is predicted to be a tradeoff between the benefit of its function and the costs of its expression. Selection should drive the expression level of all proteins close to values that maximize fitness, particularly for high-expression proteins because of the increased energetic cost of production. Therefore, stabilizing selection may reduce the amount of standing expression variation for high-expression proteins, and in combination with physiological constraints that may place an upper bound on the range of beneficial expression variation, these constraints could severely limit the availability of beneficial expression variants. To determine whether rapid-expression evolution was restricted to low-expression proteins owing to these constraints on highly expressed proteins over ecological timescales, we compared venom protein expression levels across mainland and island populations for three species of pit vipers. We detected significant differentiation in protein expression levels in two of the three species and found that rapid-expression differentiation was restricted to low-expression proteins. Our

  11. Microgravity alters the expression of salivary proteins.

    PubMed

    Mednieks, Maija; Khatri, Aditi; Rubenstein, Renee; Burleson, Joseph A; Hand, Arthur R

    2014-06-01

    Spaceflight provides a unique opportunity to study how physiologic responses are influenced by the external environment. Microgravity has been shown to alter the function of a number of tissues and organ systems. Very little, however, is known about how microgravity affects the oral cavity. The rodent model is useful for study in that their salivary gland morphology and physiology is similar to that of humans. Useful also is the fact that saliva, a product of the salivary glands with a major role in maintaining oral health, can be easily collected in humans whereas the glands can be studied in experimental animals. Our working hypothesis is that expression of secretory proteins in saliva will respond to microgravity and will be indicative of the nature of physiologic reactions to travel in space. This study was designed to determine which components of the salivary proteome are altered in mice flown on the US space shuttle missions and to determine if a subset with predictive value can be identified using microscopy and biochemistry methods. The results showed that the expression of secretory proteins associated with beta-adrenergic hormone regulated responses and mediated via the cyclic AMP pathway was significantly altered, whereas that of a number of unrelated proteins was not. The findings are potentially applicable to designing a biochemical test system whereby specific salivary proteins can be biomarkers for stress associated with travel in space and eventually for monitoring responses to conditions on earth.

  12. Microgravity alters the expression of salivary proteins.

    PubMed

    Mednieks, Maija; Khatri, Aditi; Rubenstein, Renee; Burleson, Joseph A; Hand, Arthur R

    2014-06-01

    Spaceflight provides a unique opportunity to study how physiologic responses are influenced by the external environment. Microgravity has been shown to alter the function of a number of tissues and organ systems. Very little, however, is known about how microgravity affects the oral cavity. The rodent model is useful for study in that their salivary gland morphology and physiology is similar to that of humans. Useful also is the fact that saliva, a product of the salivary glands with a major role in maintaining oral health, can be easily collected in humans whereas the glands can be studied in experimental animals. Our working hypothesis is that expression of secretory proteins in saliva will respond to microgravity and will be indicative of the nature of physiologic reactions to travel in space. This study was designed to determine which components of the salivary proteome are altered in mice flown on the US space shuttle missions and to determine if a subset with predictive value can be identified using microscopy and biochemistry methods. The results showed that the expression of secretory proteins associated with beta-adrenergic hormone regulated responses and mediated via the cyclic AMP pathway was significantly altered, whereas that of a number of unrelated proteins was not. The findings are potentially applicable to designing a biochemical test system whereby specific salivary proteins can be biomarkers for stress associated with travel in space and eventually for monitoring responses to conditions on earth. PMID:24984624

  13. Bone marrow mononuclear cells from patients with Paget's disease contain measles virus nucleocapsid messenger ribonucleic acid that has mutations in a specific region of the sequence.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S V; Singer, F R; Roodman, G D

    1995-07-01

    Ultrastructural, immunocytochemical, and in situ hybridization studies have suggested that paramyxoviruses, such as measles virus (MV), are present in Pagetic osteoclasts and may contribute to the abnormality in osteoclast function. However, little additional information is known about potential viruses present in Pagetic osteoclasts. As there are increased numbers of osteoclast precursors among the marrow mononuclear cells of Paget's patients, we used the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to amplify the nucleocapsid sequence of MV from freshly isolated bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells to examine the potential role of these viruses in cells in the osteoclast lineage. We detected MV nucleocapsid transcripts in 5 of 6 individual Paget's patients' marrow samples. MV transcripts were not detected in marrow samples from 10 normal subjects. Sequence analysis of the PCR products revealed that 1 patient had the same sequence as the Edmonston strain of MV. The remaining 4 patients had point mutations clustered between position 1360-1371 base pairs. Two of the patients exhibited identical mutations at this region. In total, 3 different point mutations were identified that resulted in amino acid substitutions. These data show that 1) unlike those from normal subjects, marrow mononuclear cells from Paget's patients express MV nucleocapsid messenger ribonucleic acid; and 2) mutations of a specific region of the MV nucleocapsid gene were present in 4 of 5 patients and suggest a persistent MV infection in Pagetic osteoclast precursors. These data further suggest that osteoclasts are infected by fusion with infected precursors.

  14. The Nucleocapsid Domain of Gag Is Dispensable for Actin Incorporation into HIV-1 and for Association of Viral Budding Sites with Cortical F-Actin

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Sarah; Rahman, Sheikh Abdul; de Marco, Alex; Carlson, Lars-Anders; Glass, Bärbel; Oberwinkler, Heike; Herold, Nikolas; Briggs, John A. G.; Müller, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Actin and actin-binding proteins are incorporated into HIV-1 particles, and F-actin has been suggested to bind the NC domain in HIV-1 Gag. Furthermore, F-actin has been frequently observed in the vicinity of HIV-1 budding sites by cryo-electron tomography (cET). Filamentous structures emanating from viral buds and suggested to correspond to actin filaments have been observed by atomic force microscopy. To determine whether the NC domain of Gag is required for actin association with viral buds and for actin incorporation into HIV-1, we performed comparative analyses of virus-like particles (VLPs) obtained by expression of wild-type HIV-1 Gag or a Gag variant where the entire NC domain had been replaced by a dimerizing leucine zipper [Gag(LZ)]. The latter protein yielded efficient production of VLPs with near-wild-type assembly kinetics and size and exhibited a regular immature Gag lattice. Typical HIV-1 budding sites were detected by using cET in cells expressing either Gag or Gag(LZ), and no difference was observed regarding the association of buds with the F-actin network. Furthermore, actin was equally incorporated into wild-type HIV-1 and Gag- or Gag(LZ)-derived VLPs, with less actin per particle observed than had been reported previously. Incorporation appeared to correlate with the relative intracellular actin concentration, suggesting an uptake of cytosol rather than a specific recruitment of actin. Thus, the NC domain in HIV-1 Gag does not appear to have a role in actin recruitment or actin incorporation into HIV-1 particles. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 particles bud from the plasma membrane, which is lined by a network of actin filaments. Actin was found to interact with the nucleocapsid domain of the viral structural protein Gag and is incorporated in significant amounts into HIV-1 particles, suggesting that it may play an active role in virus release. Using electron microscopy techniques, we previously observed bundles of actin filaments near HIV-1 buds

  15. Reliable protein production in a Pseudomonas fluorescens expression system.

    PubMed

    Retallack, Diane M; Jin, Hongfan; Chew, Lawrence

    2012-02-01

    A bottleneck to product development can be reliable expression of active target protein. A wide array of recombinant proteins in development, including an ever growing number of non-natural proteins, is being expressed in a variety of expression systems. A Pseudomonas fluorescens expression platform has been developed specifically for recombinant protein production. The development of an integrated molecular toolbox of expression elements and host strains, along with automation of strain screening is described. Examples of strain screening and scale-up experiments show rapid development of expression strains producing a wide variety of proteins in a soluble active form.

  16. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation. PMID:26734569

  17. Expression of Contractile Protein Isoforms in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Page A. W.

    1996-01-01

    The general objective of this experiment is to determine the effect of space flight parameters, including microgravity, on ontogenesis and embryogenesis of Japanese quail. Nine U.S. and two Russian investigators are cooperating in this study. Specific objectives of the participating scientists include assessing the gross and microscopic morphological and histological development of the embryo, as well as the temporal and spacial development of specific cells, tissues, and organs. Temporally regulated production of specific proteins is also being investigated. Our objective is to determine the effects of microgravity on developmentally programmed expression of Troponin T and I isoforms known to regulate cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction.

  18. Translational inactivation of RNA function: discrimination against a subset of genomic transcripts during HBV nucleocapsid assembly.

    PubMed

    Nassal, M; Junker-Niepmann, M; Schaller, H

    1990-12-21

    Hepatitis B virus (HVB) is the prototype member of the hepadnaviridae, a family of small enveloped DNA viruses that replicate by reverse transcription. Assembly of replication-competent HBV nucleocapsids is based on specific interactions between the core protein, the product(s) of the P gene, and the RNA pregenome, which is marked for encapsidation by containing a sequence near its 5' end that acts in cis as an encapsidation signal. However, HBV produces several additional, almost identical, genomic transcripts that also bear the encapsidation sequence, but that are not encapsidated. The mechanism underlying this selection process has remained mysterious. Here we demonstrate that translating 80S ribosomes (but not scanning 40S ribosomal subunits) advancing into the encapsidation signal prevent its functioning. This finding reveals translational modulation of RNA function as a further regulatory mechanism employed by hepadnaviruses to utilize efficiently the restricted coding capacity of their extremely compact genome. PMID:2261646

  19. Self-Assembly of Measles Virus Nucleocapsid-like Particles: Kinetics and RNA Sequence Dependence.

    PubMed

    Milles, Sigrid; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Communie, Guillaume; Maurin, Damien; Schoehn, Guy; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Blackledge, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Measles virus RNA genomes are packaged into helical nucleocapsids (NCs), comprising thousands of nucleo-proteins (N) that bind the entire genome. N-RNA provides the template for replication and transcription by the viral polymerase and is a promising target for viral inhibition. Elucidation of mechanisms regulating this process has been severely hampered by the inability to controllably assemble NCs. Here, we demonstrate self-organization of N into NC-like particles in vitro upon addition of RNA, providing a simple and versatile tool for investigating assembly. Real-time NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy reveals biphasic assembly kinetics. Remarkably, assembly depends strongly on the RNA-sequence, with the genomic 5' end and poly-Adenine sequences assembling efficiently, while sequences such as poly-Uracil are incompetent for NC formation. This observation has important consequences for understanding the assembly process.

  20. Expressed protein ligation-mediated template protein extension.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Ayako; Hauser, Paul S; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Weers, Paul M M; Ryan, Robert O

    2012-06-01

    Expressed protein ligation (EPL) was performed to investigate sequence requirements for a variant human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) to adopt a folded structure. A C-terminal truncated apoA-I, corresponding to residues 1-172, was expressed and isolated from Escherichia coli. Compared to full length apoA-I (243 amino acids), apoA-I(1-172) displayed less α-helix secondary structure and lower stability in solution. To determine if extension of this polypeptide would confer secondary structure content and/or stability, 20 residues were added to the C-terminus of apoA-I(1-172) by EPL, creating apoA-I(Milano)(1-192). The EPL product displayed biophysical properties similar to full-length apoA-I(Milano). The results provide a general protein engineering strategy to modify the length of a recombinant template polypeptide using synthetic peptides as well as a convenient, cost effective way to investigate the structure/function relations in apolipoprotein fragments or domains of different size.

  1. Effects of immunosuppressive treatment on protein expression in rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Kędzierska, Karolina; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna; Sindrewicz, Krzysztof; Bober, Joanna; Domański, Leszek; Parafiniuk, Mirosław; Urasińska, Elżbieta; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Domański, Maciej; Smektała, Tomasz; Masiuk, Marek; Skrzypczak, Wiesław; Ożgo, Małgorzata; Kabat-Koperska, Joanna; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz

    2014-01-01

    The structural proteins of renal tubular epithelial cells may become a target for the toxic metabolites of immunosuppressants. These metabolites can modify the properties of the proteins, thereby affecting cell function, which is a possible explanation for the mechanism of immunosuppressive agents’ toxicity. In our study, we evaluated the effect of two immunosuppressive strategies on protein expression in the kidneys of Wistar rats. Fragments of the rat kidneys were homogenized after cooling in liquid nitrogen and then dissolved in lysis buffer. The protein concentration in the samples was determined using a protein assay kit, and the proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The obtained gels were then stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue, and their images were analyzed to evaluate differences in protein expression. Identification of selected proteins was then performed using mass spectrometry. We found that the immunosuppressive drugs used in popular regimens induce a series of changes in protein expression in target organs. The expression of proteins involved in drug, glucose, amino acid, and lipid metabolism was pronounced. However, to a lesser extent, we also observed changes in nuclear, structural, and transport proteins’ synthesis. Very slight differences were observed between the group receiving cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and glucocorticoids (CMG) and the control group. In contrast, compared to the control group, animals receiving tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and glucocorticoids (TMG) exhibited higher expression of proteins responsible for renal drug metabolism and lower expression levels of cytoplasmic actin and the major urinary protein. In the TMG group, we observed higher expression of proteins responsible for drug metabolism and a decrease in the expression of respiratory chain enzymes (thioredoxin-2) and markers of distal renal tubular damage (heart fatty acid-binding protein) compared to expression in the CMG

  2. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  3. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplast

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-13

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery of proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  4. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in chlamydomonas chloroplast

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2010-03-16

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery or proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  5. Purify First: rapid expression and purification of proteins from XMRV.

    PubMed

    Gillette, William K; Esposito, Dominic; Taylor, Troy E; Hopkins, Ralph F; Bagni, Rachel K; Hartley, James L

    2011-04-01

    Purifying proteins from recombinant sources is often difficult, time-consuming, and costly. We have recently instituted a series of improvements in our protein purification pipeline that allows much more accurate choice of expression host and conditions and purification protocols. The key elements are parallel cloning, small scale parallel expression and lysate preparation, and small scale parallel protein purification. Compared to analyzing expression data only, results from multiple small scale protein purifications predict success at scale-up with greatly improved reliability. Using these new procedures we purified eight of nine proteins from xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) on the first attempt at large scale. PMID:21146612

  6. Efficient protein production method for NMR using soluble protein tags with cold shock expression vector.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kokoro; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-11-01

    The E. coli protein expression system is one of the most useful methods employed for NMR sample preparation. However, the production of some recombinant proteins in E. coli is often hampered by difficulties such as low expression level and low solubility. To address these problems, a modified cold-shock expression system containing a glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag, the pCold-GST system, was investigated. The pCold-GST system successfully expressed 9 out of 10 proteins that otherwise could not be expressed using a conventional E. coli expression system. Here, we applied the pCold-GST system to 84 proteins and 78 proteins were successfully expressed in the soluble fraction. Three other cold-shock expression systems containing a maltose binding protein tag (pCold-MBP), protein G B1 domain tag (pCold-GB1) or thioredoxin tag (pCold-Trx) were also developed to improve the yield. Additionally, we show that a C-terminal proline tag, which is invisible in ¹H-¹⁵N HSQC spectra, inhibits protein degradation and increases the final yield of unstable proteins. The purified proteins were amenable to NMR analyses. These data suggest that pCold expression systems combined with soluble protein tags can be utilized to improve the expression and purification of various proteins for NMR analysis.

  7. Post-expression strategies for structural investigations of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Linda

    2015-06-01

    Currently, membrane proteins only comprise 1.5% of the protein data bank and, thus, still remain a challenge for structural biologists. Expression, stabilization in membrane mimics (e.g. detergent), heterogeneity (conformational and chemical), and crystallization in the presence of a membrane mimic are four major bottlenecks encountered. In response, several post-expression protein modifications have been utilized to facilitate structure determination of membrane proteins. This review highlights four approaches: limited proteolysis, deglycosylation, cysteine alkylation, and lysine methylation. Combined these approaches have facilitated the structure determination of more than 40 membrane proteins and, therefore, are a useful addition to the membrane protein structural biologist's toolkit.

  8. Data presenting a modified bacterial expression vector for expressing and purifying Nus solubility-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nidhi; Wu, Heng; Terman, Jonathan R

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria are the predominant source for producing recombinant proteins but while many exogenous proteins are expressed, only a fraction of those are soluble. We have found that a new actin regulatory enzyme Mical is poorly soluble when expressed in bacteria but the use of a Nus fusion protein tag greatly increases its solubility. However, available vectors containing a Nus tag have been engineered in a way that hinders the separation of target proteins from the Nus tag during protein purification. We have now used recombinant DNA approaches to overcome these issues and reengineer a Nus solubility tag-containing bacterial expression vector. The data herein present a modified bacterial expression vector useful for expressing proteins fused to the Nus solubility tag and separating such target proteins from the Nus tag during protein purification. PMID:27547802

  9. Cloning and expression of special F protein from human liver

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu-Ye; Yu, Xin-Da; Song, Chun-Juan; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Shi, Xin-Rong; Duan, Ying; Zhang, Ju

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To clone human liver special F protein and to express it in a prokaryotic system. METHODS: Total RNA was isolated from human liver tissue and first-strand cDNA was reverse transcribed using the PCR reverse primer. Following this, cDNA of the F protein was ligated into the clone vector pUCm-T. The segment of F protein’s cDNA was subcloned into the expression vector pET-15b and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) pLyss. Isopropy-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) was then used to induce expression of the target protein. RESULTS: The cDNA clone of human liver special F protein (1134bp) was successfully produced, with the cDNA sequence being published in Gene-bank: DQ188836. We confirmed the expression of F protein by Western blot with a molecular weight of 43 kDa. The expressed protein accounted for 40% of the total protein extracted. CONCLUSION: F protein expresses cDNA clone in a prokaryotic system, which offers a relatively simple way of producing sufficient quantities of F protein and contributes to understanding the principal biological functions of this protein. PMID:17465469

  10. Relating protein adduction to gene expression changes: a systems approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bing; Shi, Zhiao; Duncan, Dexter T; Prodduturi, Naresh; Marnett, Lawrence J; Liebler, Daniel C

    2013-01-01

    Modification of proteins by reactive electrophiles such as the 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) plays a critical role in oxidant-associated human diseases. However, little is known about protein adduction and the mechanism by which protein damage elicits adaptive effects and toxicity. We developed a systems approach for relating protein adduction to gene expression changes through the integration of protein adduction, gene expression, protein-DNA interaction, and protein-protein interaction data. Using a random walk strategy, we expanded a list of responsive transcription factors inferred from gene expression studies to upstream signaling networks, which in turn allowed overlaying protein adduction data on the network for the prediction of stress sensors and their associated regulatory mechanisms. We demonstrated the general applicability of transcription factor-based signaling network inference using 103 known pathways. Applying our workflow on gene expression and protein adduction data from HNE-treatment not only rediscovered known mechanisms of electrophile stress but also generated novel hypotheses regarding protein damage sensors. Although developed for analyzing protein adduction data, the framework can be easily adapted for phosphoproteomics and other types of protein modification data. PMID:21594272

  11. Transient Expression of Viral Proteins in Plants Using Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Hitzeroth, Inga I; van Zyl, Albertha R

    2016-01-01

    Transient expression of viral proteins in plants is a novel alternative to other expression platforms. The viral proteins can be used as potential vaccines or in diagnostics. Nicotiana benthamiana leaves or whole plants are infiltrated with recombinant Agrobacterium that harbor the gene of interest. Protein expression in the plants is rapid and results are obtained within 2-7 days. Here we describe how to make electrocompetent Agrobacterium, how to transform Agrobacterium, how to infiltrate leaves or plants with the recombinant Agrobacterium, and lastly how to extract the protein for analysis by gel electrophoresis. PMID:27076324

  12. Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP), a Secretion-Enhancing Tag for Mammalian Protein Expression Systems.

    PubMed

    Reuten, Raphael; Nikodemus, Denise; Oliveira, Maria B; Patel, Trushar R; Brachvogel, Bent; Breloy, Isabelle; Stetefeld, Jörg; Koch, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are commonly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems to ensure the formation of disulfide bridges and proper glycosylation. Although many proteins can be expressed easily, some proteins, sub-domains, and mutant protein versions can cause problems. Here, we investigated expression levels of recombinant extracellular, intracellular as well as transmembrane proteins tethered to different polypeptides in mammalian cell lines. Strikingly, fusion of proteins to the prokaryotic maltose-binding protein (MBP) generally enhanced protein production. MBP fusion proteins consistently exhibited the most robust increase in protein production in comparison to commonly used tags, e.g., the Fc, Glutathione S-transferase (GST), SlyD, and serum albumin (ser alb) tag. Moreover, proteins tethered to MBP revealed reduced numbers of dying cells upon transient transfection. In contrast to the Fc tag, MBP is a stable monomer and does not promote protein aggregation. Therefore, the MBP tag does not induce artificial dimerization of tethered proteins and provides a beneficial fusion tag for binding as well as cell adhesion studies. Using MBP we were able to secret a disease causing laminin β2 mutant protein (congenital nephrotic syndrome), which is normally retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. In summary, this study establishes MBP as a versatile expression tag for protein production in eukaryotic expression systems. PMID:27029048

  13. Expression strategies for structural studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph A; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Paulsen, Peter Aasted; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2016-06-01

    Integral membrane proteins in eukaryotes are central to various cellular processes and key targets in structural biology, biotechnology and drug development. However, the number of available structures for eukaryotic membrane protein belies their physiological importance. Recently, the number of available eukaryotic membrane protein structures has been steadily increasing due to the development of novel strategies in construct design, expression and structure determination. Here, we examine the major expression systems exploited for eukaryotic membrane proteins. Additionally we strive to tabulate and describe the recent expression strategies in eukaryotic membrane protein structural biology. We find that a majority of targets have been expressed in advanced host systems and modified from their wild-type form with distinct focus on conformation and thermostabilisation. However, strategies for native protein purification should also be considered where possible, particularly in light of the recent advances in single particle cryo electron microscopy.

  14. Expression strategies for structural studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph A; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Paulsen, Peter Aasted; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2016-06-01

    Integral membrane proteins in eukaryotes are central to various cellular processes and key targets in structural biology, biotechnology and drug development. However, the number of available structures for eukaryotic membrane protein belies their physiological importance. Recently, the number of available eukaryotic membrane protein structures has been steadily increasing due to the development of novel strategies in construct design, expression and structure determination. Here, we examine the major expression systems exploited for eukaryotic membrane proteins. Additionally we strive to tabulate and describe the recent expression strategies in eukaryotic membrane protein structural biology. We find that a majority of targets have been expressed in advanced host systems and modified from their wild-type form with distinct focus on conformation and thermostabilisation. However, strategies for native protein purification should also be considered where possible, particularly in light of the recent advances in single particle cryo electron microscopy. PMID:27362979

  15. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, William C.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional sodium doedocyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  16. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, W. C.; Brown, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional SDS PAGE and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  17. Expression of heat shock protein genes in insect stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heat shock proteins (HSPs) that are abundantly expressed in insects are important modulators of insect survival. Expression of HSP genes in insects is not only developmentally regulated, but also induced by various stressors in order to confer protection against such stressors. The expression o...

  18. Evolution, diversification, and expression of KNOX proteins in plants

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Yang, Xue; Zhao, Wei; Lang, Tiange; Samuelsson, Tore

    2015-01-01

    The KNOX (KNOTTED1-like homeobox) transcription factors play a pivotal role in leaf and meristem development. The majority of these proteins are characterized by the KNOX1, KNOX2, ELK, and homeobox domains whereas the proteins of the KNATM family contain only the KNOX domains. We carried out an extensive inventory of these proteins and here report on a total of 394 KNOX proteins from 48 species. The land plant proteins fall into two classes (I and II) as previously shown where the class I family seems to be most closely related to the green algae homologs. The KNATM proteins are restricted to Eudicots and some species have multiple paralogs of this protein. Certain plants are characterized by a significant increase in the number of KNOX paralogs; one example is Glycine max. Through the analysis of public gene expression data we show that the class II proteins of this plant have a relatively broad expression specificity as compared to class I proteins, consistent with previous studies of other plants. In G. max, class I protein are mainly distributed in axis tissues and KNATM paralogs are overall poorly expressed; highest expression is in the early plumular axis. Overall, analysis of gene expression in G. max demonstrates clearly that the expansion in gene number is associated with functional diversification. PMID:26557129

  19. Differential protein expression analysis following olfactory learning in Apis cerana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Zhen; Yan, Wei-Yu; Wang, Zi-Long; Guo, Ya-Hui; Yi, Yao; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Zeng, Zhi-Jiang

    2015-11-01

    Studies of olfactory learning in honeybees have helped to elucidate the neurobiological basis of learning and memory. In this study, protein expression changes following olfactory learning in Apis cerana were investigated using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) technology. A total of 2406 proteins were identified from the trained and untrained groups. Among these proteins, 147 were differentially expressed, with 87 up-regulated and 60 down-regulated in the trained group compared with the untrained group. These results suggest that the differentially expressed proteins may be involved in the regulation of olfactory learning and memory in A. cerana. The iTRAQ data can provide information on the global protein expression patterns associated with olfactory learning, which will facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of learning and memory of honeybees. PMID:26427996

  20. Differential protein expression analysis following olfactory learning in Apis cerana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Zhen; Yan, Wei-Yu; Wang, Zi-Long; Guo, Ya-Hui; Yi, Yao; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Zeng, Zhi-Jiang

    2015-11-01

    Studies of olfactory learning in honeybees have helped to elucidate the neurobiological basis of learning and memory. In this study, protein expression changes following olfactory learning in Apis cerana were investigated using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) technology. A total of 2406 proteins were identified from the trained and untrained groups. Among these proteins, 147 were differentially expressed, with 87 up-regulated and 60 down-regulated in the trained group compared with the untrained group. These results suggest that the differentially expressed proteins may be involved in the regulation of olfactory learning and memory in A. cerana. The iTRAQ data can provide information on the global protein expression patterns associated with olfactory learning, which will facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of learning and memory of honeybees.

  1. Major cancer protein amplifies global gene expression

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists may have discovered why a protein called MYC can provoke a variety of cancers. Like many proteins associated with cancer, MYC helps regulate cell growth. A new study carried out by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and colleagues

  2. Optimizing transient recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Ralph F; Wall, Vanessa E; Esposito, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    Transient gene expression (TGE) in mammalian cells has become a routine process for expressing recombinant proteins in cell lines such as human embryonic kidney 293 and Chinese hamster ovary cells. The rapidly increasing need for recombinant proteins requires further improvements in TGE technology. While a great deal of focus has been directed toward optimizing the secretion of antibodies and other naturally secreted targets, much less work has been done on ways to improve cytoplasmic expression in mammalian cells. The benefits to protein production in mammalian cells, particularly for eukaryotic proteins, should be very significant - glycosylation and other posttranslational modifications will likely be native or near-native, solubility and protein folding would likely improve overexpression in heterologous hosts, and expression of proteins in their proper intracellular compartments is much more likely to occur. Improvements in this area have been slow, however, due to limited development of the cell culture processes needed for low-cost, higher-throughput expression in mammalian cells, and the relatively low diversity of DNA vectors for protein production in these systems. Here, we describe how the use of recombinational cloning, coupled with improvements in transfection protocols which increase speed and lower cost, can be combined to make mammalian cells much more amenable for routine recombinant protein expression. PMID:21987258

  3. Comparative Protein Profiling of Intraphagosomal Expressed Proteins of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Neelja; Kumar, Manish; Sharma, Divakar; Bisht, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    BCG, the only available vaccine against tuberculosis affords a variable protection which wanes with time. In this study we have analyzed and compared the proteins which are expressed differentially during broth-culture and intraphagosomal growth of M.bovis BCG. Eight proteins which showed increased expression during the intraphagosomal growth were identified by MALDI-TOF/MS. These were - a precursor of alanine and proline-rich secreted protein apa, isoforms of malate dehydrogenase, large subunit alpha (Alpha-ETF) of electron transfer flavoprotein, immunogenic protein MPB64 precursor, UPF0036 protein, and two proteins with unknown function. Based on these findings we speculate that higher expression of these proteins has a probable role in intracellular survival, adaptation and/or immunoprotective effect of BCG. Further, these proteins might also be used as gene expression markers for endosome trafficking events of BCG.

  4. Insulin influenced expression of myelin proteins in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rachana, Kuruvanthe S; Manu, Mallahalli S; Advirao, Gopal M

    2016-08-26

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the downstream complications of diabetes. This complication is caused by the deficiency of insulin action and subsequent hyperglycemia, but the details of their pathogenesis remain unclear. Hence, it is of critical importance to understand how such hormonal variation affects the expression of myelin proteins such as myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in the peripheral nerve. An earlier report from our lab has demonstrated the expression of insulin receptors (IR) in Schwann cells (SCs) of sciatic nerve. To assess the neurotrophic role of insulin in diabetic neuropathy, we studied the expression of these myelin proteins under control, DPN and insulin treated DPN subjects at developmental stages. Further, the expression of these myelin proteins was correlated with the expression of insulin receptor. Expression of myelin proteins was significantly reduced in the diabetic model compared to normal, and upregulated in insulin treated diabetic rats. Similarly, an in vitro study was also carried out in SCs grown at high glucose and insulin treated conditions. The expression pattern of myelin proteins in SCs was comparable to that of in vivo samples. In addition, quantitative study of myelin genes by real time PCR has also showed the significant expression pattern change in the insulin treated and non-treated DPN subjects. Taken together, these results corroborate the critical importance of insulin as a neurotrophic factor in demyelinized neurons in diabetic neuropathy.

  5. Murine Leukemia Virus Nucleocapsid Mutant Particles Lacking Viral RNA Encapsidate Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Muriaux, Delphine; Mirro, Jane; Nagashima, Kunio; Harvin, Demetria; Rein, Alan

    2002-01-01

    A single retroviral protein, termed Gag, is sufficient for assembly of retrovirus-like particles in mammalian cells. Gag normally selects the genomic RNA of the virus with high specificity; the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of Gag plays a crucial role in this selection process. However, encapsidation of the viral RNA is completely unnecessary for particle assembly. We previously showed that mutant murine leukemia virus (MuLV) particles that lack viral RNA because of a deletion in the cis-acting packaging signal (“Ψ”) in the genomic RNA compensate for the loss of the viral RNA by incorporating cellular mRNA. The RNA in wild-type and Ψ− particles was also found to be necessary for virion core structure. In the present work, we explored the role of RNA in MuLV particles that lack genomic RNA because of mutations in the NC domain of Gag. Using a fluorescent dye assay, we observed that NC mutant particles contain the same amount of RNA that wild-type virions do. Surprisingly enough, these particles contained large amounts of rRNAs. Furthermore, ribosomal proteins were detected by immunoblotting, and ribosomes were observed inside the particles by electron microscopy. The biological significance of the presence of ribosomes in NC mutant particles lacking genomic RNA is discussed. PMID:12388701

  6. Transient protein expression in three Pisum sativum (green pea) varieties.

    PubMed

    Green, Brian J; Fujiki, Masaaki; Mett, Valentina; Kaczmarczyk, Jon; Shamloul, Moneim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Underkoffler, Susan; Yusibov, Vidadi; Mett, Vadim

    2009-02-01

    The expression of proteins in plants both transiently and via permanently transformed lines has been demonstrated by a number of groups. Transient plant expression systems, due to high expression levels and speed of production, show greater promise for the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals when compared to permanent transformants. Expression vectors based on a tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are the most commonly utilized and the primary plant used, Nicotiana benthamiana, has demonstrated the ability to express a wide range of proteins at levels amenable to purification. N. benthamiana has two limitations for its use; one is its relatively slow growth, and the other is its low biomass. To address these limitations we screened a number of legumes for transient protein expression. Using the alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) vectors, delivered via Agrobacterium, we were able to identify three Pisum sativum varieties that demonstrated protein expression transiently. Expression levels of 420 +/- 26.24 mg GFP/kgFW in the green pea variety speckled pea were achieved. We were also able to express three therapeutic proteins indicating promise for this system in the production of biopharmaceuticals.

  7. Effective isotope labeling of proteins in a mammalian expression system.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Mallika; Bewley, Carole A; Kwong, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Isotope labeling of biologically interesting proteins is a prerequisite for structural and dynamics studies by NMR spectroscopy. Many of these proteins require mammalian cofactors, chaperons, or posttranslational modifications such as myristoylation, glypiation, disulfide bond formation, or N- or O-linked glycosylation; and mammalian cells have the necessary machinery to produce them in their functional forms. Here, we describe recent advances in mammalian expression, including an efficient adenoviral vector-based system, for the production of isotopically labeled proteins. This system enables expression of mammalian proteins and their complexes, including proteins that require posttranslational modifications. We describe a roadmap to produce isotopically labeled (15)N and (13)C posttranslationally modified proteins, such as the outer domain of HIV-1 gp120, which has four disulfide bonds and 15 potential sites of N-linked glycosylation. These methods should allow NMR spectroscopic analysis of the structure and function of posttranslationally modified and secreted, cytoplasmic, or membrane-bound proteins.

  8. Differential Expression of Potato Tuber Protein Genes 1

    PubMed Central

    Hannapel, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Patatin and the 22-kilodalton protein complex make up more than 50% of the soluble protein present in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers and these two proteins are coordinately regulated during tuber development. Although genomic sequences related to these tuber genes exist in the genome of potato species that do not bear tubers, they cannot be induced into expression under the tested conditions. These genes are not expressed during substantial starch accumulation in petioles from a model petiole-leaf cutting system in nontuber-bearing plants, indicating that starch accumulation and synthesis of the major tuber proteins occur independently. Tuber protein gene expression also has been examined in hybrid potato plants that contain genomes from both tuberizing and nontuberizing species. One such triploid hybrid produced only stolons, whereas a pentaploid hybrid with an increased number of tuber genomes produced tubers. It was shown, using immunoblotting and Northern blot hybridization, that these two hybrids actively expressed both patatin and the 22-kilodalton tuber protein in induced petioles from the leaf-cutting system. The induced accumulation of patatin transcripts was consistent in all genotypes containing some tuberizing genome. The induced accumulation of the 22-kilodalton protein transcripts, however, was lower in genotypes containing some nontuberizing genome. Sucrose induction of these genes in leaves corroborates the induction patterns in petioles. A correlation exists between 22-kilodalton protein gene expression and a potato plant's ability to produce stolons or tubers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:16667872

  9. Network Clustering Revealed the Systemic Alterations of Mitochondrial Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyun-Jung; Park, Wook-Ha; Yang, Jae-Seong; Yu, Myeong-Hee; Kim, Sanguk; Pak, Youngmi Kim

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrial protein repertoire varies depending on the cellular state. Protein component modifications caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion are related to a wide range of human diseases; however, little is known about how nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins (mt proteome) changes under such dysfunctional states. In this study, we investigated the systemic alterations of mtDNA-depleted (ρ0) mitochondria by using network analysis of gene expression data. By modularizing the quantified proteomics data into protein functional networks, systemic properties of mitochondrial dysfunction were analyzed. We discovered that up-regulated and down-regulated proteins were organized into two predominant subnetworks that exhibited distinct biological processes. The down-regulated network modules are involved in typical mitochondrial functions, while up-regulated proteins are responsible for mtDNA repair and regulation of mt protein expression and transport. Furthermore, comparisons of proteome and transcriptome data revealed that ρ0 cells attempted to compensate for mtDNA depletion by modulating the coordinated expression/transport of mt proteins. Our results demonstrate that mt protein composition changed to remodel the functional organization of mitochondrial protein networks in response to dysfunctional cellular states. Human mt protein functional networks provide a framework for understanding how cells respond to mitochondrial dysfunctions. PMID:21738461

  10. Attenuated influenza virus construct with enhanced hemagglutinin protein expression.

    PubMed

    Maamary, Jad; Pica, Natalie; Belicha-Villanueva, Alan; Chou, Yi-ying; Krammer, Florian; Gao, Qinshan; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Palese, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Influenza A viruses encoding an altered viral NS1 protein have emerged as promising live attenuated vaccine platforms. A carboxy-terminal truncation in the NS1 protein compromises its interferon antagonism activity, making these viruses attenuated in the host yet still able to induce protection from challenge with wild-type viruses. However, specific viral protein expression by NS1-truncated viruses is known to be decreased in infected cells. In this report, we show that recombinant H5N1 and H1N1 influenza viruses encoding a truncated NS1 protein expressed lower levels of hemagglutinin (HA) protein in infected cells than did wild-type viruses. This reduction in HA protein expression correlated with a reduction in HA mRNA levels in infected cells. NS1 truncation affected the expression of HA protein but not that of the nucleoprotein (NP). This segment specificity was mapped to the terminal sequences of their specific viral RNAs. Since the HA protein is the major immunogenic component in influenza virus vaccines, we sought to restore its expression levels in NS1-truncated viruses in order to improve their vaccine efficacy. For this purpose, we generated an NS1-truncated recombinant influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (rPR8) virus carrying the G3A C8U "superpromoter" mutations in the HA genomic RNA segment. This strategy retained the attenuation properties of the recombinant virus but enhanced the expression level of HA protein in infected cells. Finally, mice immunized with rPR8 viruses encoding a truncated NS1 protein and carrying the G3A C8U mutations in the HA segment demonstrated enhanced protection from wild-type virus challenge over that for mice vaccinated with an rPR8 virus encoding the truncated NS1 protein alone.

  11. Protein Production for Structural Genomics Using E. coli Expression

    PubMed Central

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Li, Hui; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The goal of structural biology is to reveal details of the molecular structure of proteins in order to understand their function and mechanism. X-ray crystallography and NMR are the two best methods for atomic level structure determination. However, these methods require milligram quantities of proteins. In this chapter a reproducible methodology for large-scale protein production applicable to a diverse set of proteins is described. The approach is based on protein expression in E. coli as a fusion with a cleavable affinity tag that was tested on over 20,000 proteins. Specifically, a protocol for fermentation of large quantities of native proteins in disposable culture vessels is presented. A modified protocol that allows for the production of selenium-labeled proteins in defined media is also offered. Finally, a method for the purification of His6-tagged proteins on immobilized metal affinity chromatography columns that generates high-purity material is described in detail. PMID:24590711

  12. Protein Expression Dynamics During Postnatal Mouse Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Laeremans, Annelies; Van de Plas, Babs; Clerens, Stefan; Van den Bergh, Gert; Arckens, Lutgarde; Hu, Tjing-Tjing

    2013-01-01

    We explored differential protein expression profiles in the mouse forebrain at different stages of postnatal development, including 10-day (P10), 30-day (P30), and adult (Ad) mice, by large-scale screening of proteome maps using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry analysis resulted in the identification of 251 differentially expressed proteins. Most molecular changes were observed between P10 compared to both P30 and Ad. Computational ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) confirmed these proteins as crucial molecules in the biological function of nervous system development. Moreover, IPA revealed Semaphorin signaling in neurons and the protein ubiquitination pathway as essential canonical pathways in the mouse forebrain during postnatal development. For these main biological pathways, the transcriptional regulation of the age-dependent expression of selected proteins was validated by means of in situ hybridization. In conclusion, we suggest that proteolysis and neurite outgrowth guidance are key biological processes, particularly during early brain maturation. PMID:25157209

  13. Surface protein expression in group B streptococcal invasive isolates.

    PubMed

    Ferrieri, P; Flores, A E

    1997-01-01

    Results from characterization of 211 GBS isolates from early-onset disease indicated that serotypes Ia, III and V accounted for almost 80% of the isolates, and that alpha was the protein most often expressed. Each of the common polysaccharide types had a characteristic predominant protein expression pattern: alpha for Ia, R4 for type III and R1+R4 for type V isolates. Expression of alpha protein was always mutually exclusive of R proteins. The presence of more than one species of R by a given isolate was confirmed by IEP. In addition, PAGE/WB studies verified the multiple MW forms of R1, and the variation from strain to strain in the highest form of R4 that we had previously reported. Our data not only showed the great complexity of the GBS cell surface but also demonstrated the advantage of using both type polysaccharides and surface-localized proteins as markers for characterization of GBS strains.

  14. Expression of Yes-associated protein modulates Survivin expression in primary liver malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bai, Haibo; Gayyed, Mariana F; Lam-Himlin, Dora M; Klein, Alison P; Nayar, Suresh K; Xu, Yang; Khan, Mehtab; Argani, Pedram; Pan, Duojia; Anders, Robert A

    2012-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma account for 95% of primary liver cancer. For each of these malignancies, the outcome is dismal; incidence is rapidly increasing, and mechanistic understanding is limited. We observed abnormal proliferation of both biliary epithelium and hepatocytes in mice after genetic manipulation of Yes-associated protein, a transcription coactivator. Here, we comprehensively documented Yes-associated protein expression in the human liver and primary liver cancers. We showed that nuclear Yes-associated protein expression is significantly increased in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. We found that increased Yes-associated protein levels in hepatocellular carcinoma are due to multiple mechanisms including gene amplification and transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation. Survivin, a member of the inhibitors-of-apoptosis protein family, has been reported as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival in both hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. We found that nuclear Yes-associated protein expression correlates significantly with nuclear Survivin expression for both intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, using mice engineered to conditionally overexpress Yes-associated protein in the liver, we found that Survivin messenger RNA expression depends upon Yes-associated protein levels. Our findings suggested that Yes-associated protein contributes to primary liver tumorigenesis and likely mediates its oncogenic effects through modulating Survivin expression.

  15. Performance benchmarking of four cell-free protein expression systems.

    PubMed

    Gagoski, Dejan; Polinkovsky, Mark E; Mureev, Sergey; Kunert, Anne; Johnston, Wayne; Gambin, Yann; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2016-02-01

    Over the last half century, a range of cell-free protein expression systems based on pro- and eukaryotic organisms have been developed and have found a range of applications, from structural biology to directed protein evolution. While it is generally accepted that significant differences in performance among systems exist, there is a paucity of systematic experimental studies supporting this notion. Here, we took advantage of the species-independent translation initiation sequence to express and characterize 87 N-terminally GFP-tagged human cytosolic proteins of different sizes in E. coli, wheat germ (WGE), HeLa, and Leishmania-based (LTE) cell-free systems. Using a combination of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis, we assessed the expression yields, the fraction of full-length translation product, and aggregation propensity for each of these systems. Our results demonstrate that the E. coli system has the highest expression yields. However, we observe that high expression levels are accompanied by production of truncated species-particularly pronounced in the case of proteins larger than 70 kDa. Furthermore, proteins produced in the E. coli system display high aggregation propensity, with only 10% of tested proteins being produced in predominantly monodispersed form. The WGE system was the most productive among eukaryotic systems tested. Finally, HeLa and LTE show comparable protein yields that are considerably lower than the ones achieved in the E. coli and WGE systems. The protein products produced in the HeLa system display slightly higher integrity, whereas the LTE-produced proteins have the lowest aggregation propensity among the systems analyzed. The high quality of HeLa- and LTE-produced proteins enable their analysis without purification and make them suitable for analysis of multi-domain eukaryotic proteins.

  16. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus gene ac81 is required for nucleocapsid envelopment.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Wang, Jinwen; Deng, Riqiang; Wang, Xunzhang

    2016-08-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is a highly pathogenic Baculoviridae that targets insects, whose core gene, ac81, has an unknown function. To determine the role of ac81 in the life cycle of AcMNPV, an ac81-knockout (Ac-81KO-GP) was constructed through homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. We determined that no budded virions were produced in Ac-81KO-GP-transfected Sf9 cells, while there was no effect on viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy (EM) analysis revealed that occlusion-derived virions (ODVs) envelopment and the subsequent embedding of virions into occlusion bodies (OBs) were aborted due to ac81 deletion. Interestingly, confocal microscopy and immunofluorescence analysis revealed that Ac81 was predominantly localized to the ring zone of nuclei during the late phase of infection. In addition, Ac81 was localized to the mature and premature ODVs in virus-infected cells within the ring zone as revealed by immuno-electron microscopy (IEM) analysis. Furthermore, we determined that Ac81 contained a functional hydrophobic transmembrane (TM) domain, whose deletion resulted in a phenotype similar to that of Ac-81KO-GP. These results suggest that Ac81 might be a TM protein that played an important role in nucleocapsid envelopment. PMID:27212683

  17. Advances in targeting nucleocapsid-nucleic acid interactions in HIV-1 therapy

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Divita; Torbett, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    The continuing challenge of HIV-1 treatment resistance in patients creates a need for the development of new antiretroviral inhibitors. The HIV nucleocapsid (NC) protein is a potential therapeutic target. NC is necessary for viral RNA packaging and in the early stages of viral infection. The high level of NC amino acid conservation among all HIV-1 clades suggests a low tolerance for mutations. Thus, NC mutations that could arise during inhibitor treatment to provide resistance may render the virus less fit. Disruption of NC function provides a unique opportunity to strongly dampen replication at multiple points during the viral life cycle with a single inhibitor. Although NC exhibits desirable features for a potential antiviral target, the structural flexibility, size, and the presence of two zinc fingers makes small molecule targeting of NC a challenging task. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in strategies to develop inhibitors of NC function and present a perspective on potential novel approaches that may help to overcome some of the current challenges in the field. PMID:25026536

  18. The respiratory syncytial virus nucleoprotein-RNA complex forms a left-handed helical nucleocapsid.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Saskia E; Duquerroy, Stéphane; Galloux, Marie; Loney, Colin; Conner, Edward; Eléouët, Jean-François; Rey, Félix A; Bhella, David

    2013-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important human pathogen. Its nucleocapsid (NC), which comprises the negative sense RNA viral genome coated by the viral nucleoprotein N, is a critical assembly that serves as template for both mRNA synthesis and genome replication. We have previously described the X-ray structure of an NC-like structure: a decameric ring formed of N-RNA that mimics one turn of the helical NC. In the absence of experimental data we had hypothesized that the NC helix would be right-handed, as the N-N contacts in the ring appeared to more easily adapt to that conformation. We now unambiguously show that the RSV NC is a left-handed helix. We further show that the contacts in the ring can be distorted to maintain key N-N-protein interactions in a left-handed helix, and discuss the implications of the resulting atomic model of the helical NC for viral replication and transcription.

  19. Small-scale expression of proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zerbs, Sarah; Giuliani, Sarah; Collart, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Proteins participate in virtually every cellular activity, and a knowledge of protein function is essential for an understanding of biological systems. However, protein diversity necessitates the application of an array of in vivo and in vitro approaches for characterization of the functional and biochemical properties of proteins. Methods that enable production of proteins for in vitro studies are critical for determination of the molecular, kinetic, and thermodynamic properties of these molecules. Ideally, proteins could be purified from the original source; however, the native host is often unsuitable for a number of reasons. Consequently, systems for heterologous protein production are commonly used to produce large amounts of protein. Heterologous expression hosts are chosen using a number of criteria, including genetic tractability, advantageous production or processing characteristics (secretion or posttranslational modifications), or economy of time and growth requirements. The subcloning process also provides an opportunity to introduce purification tags, epitope tags, fusions, truncations, and mutations into the coding sequence that may be useful in downstream purification or characterization applications. Bacterial systems for heterologous protein expression have advantages in ease of use, cost, short generation times, and scalability. These expression systems have been widely used by high-throughput protein production projects and often represent an initial experiment for any expression target. Escherichia coli has been studied for many years as a model bacterial organism and is one of the most popular hosts for heterologous protein expression (Terpe, 2006). Its protein production capabilities have been intensively studied, and the ease of genetic manipulation in this organism has led to the development of strains engineered exclusively for use in protein expression. These resources are widely available from commercial sources and public repositories

  20. Small-scale expression of proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zerbs, Sarah; Giuliani, Sarah; Collart, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Proteins participate in virtually every cellular activity, and a knowledge of protein function is essential for an understanding of biological systems. However, protein diversity necessitates the application of an array of in vivo and in vitro approaches for characterization of the functional and biochemical properties of proteins. Methods that enable production of proteins for in vitro studies are critical for determination of the molecular, kinetic, and thermodynamic properties of these molecules. Ideally, proteins could be purified from the original source; however, the native host is often unsuitable for a number of reasons. Consequently, systems for heterologous protein production are commonly used to produce large amounts of protein. Heterologous expression hosts are chosen using a number of criteria, including genetic tractability, advantageous production or processing characteristics (secretion or posttranslational modifications), or economy of time and growth requirements. The subcloning process also provides an opportunity to introduce purification tags, epitope tags, fusions, truncations, and mutations into the coding sequence that may be useful in downstream purification or characterization applications. Bacterial systems for heterologous protein expression have advantages in ease of use, cost, short generation times, and scalability. These expression systems have been widely used by high-throughput protein production projects and often represent an initial experiment for any expression target. Escherichia coli has been studied for many years as a model bacterial organism and is one of the most popular hosts for heterologous protein expression (Terpe, 2006). Its protein production capabilities have been intensively studied, and the ease of genetic manipulation in this organism has led to the development of strains engineered exclusively for use in protein expression. These resources are widely available from commercial sources and public repositories

  1. High-Throughput Baculovirus Expression System for Membrane Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Kalathur, Ravi C; Panganiban, Marinela; Bruni, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The ease of use, robustness, cost-effectiveness, and posttranslational machinery make baculovirus expression system a popular choice for production of eukaryotic membrane proteins. This system can be readily adapted for high-throughput operations. This chapter outlines the techniques and procedures for cloning, transfection, small-scale production, and purification of membrane protein samples in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27485337

  2. The Proteome Response to Amyloid Protein Expression In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ricardo A.; Franco, Catarina; Da Costa, Gonçalo; Planchon, Sébastien; Renaut, Jenny; Ribeiro, Raquel M.; Pinto, Francisco; Silva, Marta Sousa; Coelho, Ana Varela; Freire, Ana Ponces; Cordeiro, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Protein misfolding disorders such as Alzheimer, Parkinson and transthyretin amyloidosis are characterized by the formation of protein amyloid deposits. Although the nature and location of the aggregated proteins varies between different diseases, they all share similar molecular pathways of protein unfolding, aggregation and amyloid deposition. Most effects of these proteins are likely to occur at the proteome level, a virtually unexplored reality. To investigate the effects of an amyloid protein expression on the cellular proteome, we created a yeast expression system using human transthyretin (TTR) as a model amyloidogenic protein. We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a living test tube, to express native TTR (non-amyloidogenic) and the amyloidogenic TTR variant L55P, the later forming aggregates when expressed in yeast. Differential proteome changes were quantitatively analyzed by 2D-differential in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). We show that the expression of the amyloidogenic TTR-L55P causes a metabolic shift towards energy production, increased superoxide dismutase expression as well as of several molecular chaperones involved in protein refolding. Among these chaperones, members of the HSP70 family and the peptidyl-prolyl-cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) were identified. The latter is highly relevant considering that it was previously found to be a TTR interacting partner in the plasma of ATTR patients but not in healthy or asymptomatic subjects. The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) expression is also increased. Our findings suggest that refolding and degradation pathways are activated, causing an increased demand of energetic resources, thus the metabolic shift. Additionally, oxidative stress appears to be a consequence of the amyloidogenic process, posing an enhanced threat to cell survival. PMID:23185553

  3. Enhanced membrane protein expression by engineering increased intracellular membrane production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Membrane protein research is frequently hampered by the low natural abundance of these proteins in cells and typically relies on recombinant gene expression. Different expression systems, like mammalian cells, insect cells, bacteria and yeast are being used, but very few research efforts have been directed towards specific host cell customization for enhanced expression of membrane proteins. Here we show that by increasing the intracellular membrane production by interfering with a key enzymatic step of lipid synthesis, enhanced expression of membrane proteins in yeast is achieved. Results We engineered the oleotrophic yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, by deleting the phosphatidic acid phosphatase, PAH1, which led to massive proliferation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. For all eight tested representatives of different integral membrane protein families, we obtained enhanced protein accumulation levels and in some cases enhanced proteolytic integrity in the ∆pah1 strain. We analysed the adenosine A2AR G-protein coupled receptor case in more detail and found that concomitant induction of the unfolded protein response in the ∆pah1 strain enhanced the specific ligand binding activity of the receptor. These data indicate an improved quality control mechanism for membrane proteins accumulating in yeast cells with proliferated ER. Conclusions We conclude that redirecting the metabolic flux of fatty acids away from triacylglycerol- and sterylester-storage towards membrane phospholipid synthesis by PAH1 gene inactivation, provides a valuable approach to enhance eukaryotic membrane protein production. Complementary to this improvement in membrane protein quantity, UPR co-induction further enhances the quality of the membrane protein in terms of its proper folding and biological activity. Importantly, since these pathways are conserved in all eukaryotes, it will be of interest to investigate similar engineering approaches in other cell types of

  4. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, Germán L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the organisms of choice for the production of recombinant proteins. Its use as a cell factory is well-established and it has become the most popular expression platform. For this reason, there are many molecular tools and protocols at hand for the high-level production of heterologous proteins, such as a vast catalog of expression plasmids, a great number of engineered strains and many cultivation strategies. We review the different approaches for the synthesis of recombinant proteins in E. coli and discuss recent progress in this ever-growing field. PMID:24860555

  5. Detecting protein complexes from active protein interaction networks constructed with dynamic gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein interaction networks (PINs) are known to be useful to detect protein complexes. However, most available PINs are static, which cannot reflect the dynamic changes in real networks. At present, some researchers have tried to construct dynamic networks by incorporating time-course (dynamic) gene expression data with PINs. However, the inevitable background noise exists in the gene expression array, which could degrade the quality of dynamic networkds. Therefore, it is needed to filter out contaminated gene expression data before further data integration and analysis. Results Firstly, we adopt a dynamic model-based method to filter noisy data from dynamic expression profiles. Then a new method is proposed for identifying active proteins from dynamic gene expression profiles. An active protein at a time point is defined as the protein the expression level of whose corresponding gene at that time point is higher than a threshold determined by a standard variance involved threshold function. Furthermore, a noise-filtered active protein interaction network (NF-APIN) is constructed. To demonstrate the efficiency of our method, we detect protein complexes from the NF-APIN, compared with those from other dynamic PINs. Conclusion A dynamic model based method can effectively filter out noises in dynamic gene expression data. Our method to compute a threshold for determining the active time points of noise-filtered genes can make the dynamic construction more accuracy and provide a high quality framework for network analysis, such as protein complex prediction. PMID:24565281

  6. Cell-Free Expression of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Segers, Kenneth; Masure, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The large-scale production of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is one of the major bottlenecks that hamper functional and structural studies of this important class of integral membrane proteins. Heterologous overexpression of GPCRs often results in low yields of active protein, usually due to a combination of several factors, such as low expression levels, protein insolubility, host cell toxicity, and the need to use harsh and often denaturing detergents (e.g., SDS, LDAO, OG, and DDM, among others) to extract the recombinant receptor from the host cell membrane. Many of these problematic issues are inherently linked to cell-based expression systems and can therefore be circumvented by the use of cell-free systems. In this unit, we provide a range of protocols for the production of GPCRs in a cell-free expression system. Using this system, we typically obtain GPCR expression levels of ∼1 mg per ml of reaction mixture in the continuous-exchange configuration. Although the protocols in this unit have been optimized for the cell-free expression of GPCRs, they should provide a good starting point for the production of other classes of membrane proteins, such as ion channels, aquaporins, carrier proteins, membrane-bound enzymes, and even large molecular complexes.

  7. Hypoxic-induced stress protein expression in rat cardiac myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, G.; Geoghegan, T.E.

    1986-05-01

    Mammalian stress proteins can be induced in cells and tissues exposed to a variety of conditions including hyperthermia and diminished O/sub 2/ supply. The authors have previously shown that the expression of three stress proteins (71, 85, and 95 kDa) was induced in cardiac tissue from mice exposed to hypoxic conditions. The expression of mRNAs coding for the 85 and 95 kDa proteins increase with time of exposure to hypoxia, while the mRNA coding for the 71 kDa protein is transiently induced. The authors extended these studies to investigate the expression of stress proteins in isolated rat cardiac myocytes. Freshly prepared myocytes were exposed to control, hypoxic, anoxic, or heat-shock environments for up to 16 h. The proteins were then labeled for 6 hours with (/sup 35/S)methionine. Analysis of the solubilized proteins by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography showed that there was a 6-fold increase in synthesis of the 85 kDa protein upon exposure to hypoxia but not heat-shock conditions. The 71 kDa protein was present at high levels in both control and treated myocyte protein preparations, and presumably had been induced during the isolation procedure. Total RNA isolated from intact rat heart and isolated myocytes was compared by cell-free translation analysis and showed induction of RNAs coding for several stress proteins in the myocyte preparation. The induced proteins at 85 and 95 kDa have molecular weights similar to reported cell stress and/or glucose-regulated proteins.

  8. Expression of rabies virus G protein in carrots (Daucus carota).

    PubMed

    Rojas-Anaya, Edith; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Olivera-Flores, Maria Teresa; Gomez-Lim, Miguel

    2009-12-01

    Antigens derived from various pathogens can readily be synthesized at high levels in plants in their authentic forms. Such antigens administered orally can induce an immune response and, in some cases, result in protection against a subsequent challenge. We here report the expression of rabies virus G protein into carrots. The G gene was subcloned into the pUCpSSrabG vector and then used to transform carrot embryogenic cells by particle bombardment. The carrot cells were selected in liquid medium, a method previously unreported. The presence of the transgene was verified by PCR, and by RT-PCR. By western blot, G protein transgene was identified in 93.3% of adult carrot roots. The G protein was quantified by densitometric analysis (range 0.4-1.2%). The expressed protein was antigenic in mice. This confirms that the carrot is an adequate system for antigen expression.

  9. Expression of Eukaryotic Membrane Proteins in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Lucie; Kugler, Valérie; Wagner, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    A key point when it comes to heterologous expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins (EMPs) is the choice of the best-suited expression platform. The yeast Pichia pastoris has proven to be a very versatile system showing promising results in a growing number of cases. Indeed, its particular methylotrophic characteristics combined to the very simple handling of a eukaryotic microorganism that possesses the majority of mammalian-like machineries make it a very competitive expression system for various complex proteins, in amounts compatible with functional and structural studies. This chapter describes a set of robust methodologies routinely used for the successful expression of a variety of EMPs, going from yeast transformation with the recombinant plasmid to the analysis of the quality and quantity of the proteins produced. PMID:27485335

  10. Expression of Eukaryotic Membrane Proteins in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Lucie; Kugler, Valérie; Wagner, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    A key point when it comes to heterologous expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins (EMPs) is the choice of the best-suited expression platform. The yeast Pichia pastoris has proven to be a very versatile system showing promising results in a growing number of cases. Indeed, its particular methylotrophic characteristics combined to the very simple handling of a eukaryotic microorganism that possesses the majority of mammalian-like machineries make it a very competitive expression system for various complex proteins, in amounts compatible with functional and structural studies. This chapter describes a set of robust methodologies routinely used for the successful expression of a variety of EMPs, going from yeast transformation with the recombinant plasmid to the analysis of the quality and quantity of the proteins produced.

  11. Variation in Protein Intake Induces Variation in Spider Silk Expression

    PubMed Central

    Blamires, Sean J.; Wu, Chun-Lin; Tso, I-Min

    2012-01-01

    Background It is energetically expensive to synthesize certain amino acids. The proteins (spidroins) of spider major ampullate (MA) silk, MaSp1 and MaSp2, differ in amino acid composition. Glutamine and proline are prevalent in MaSp2 and are expensive to synthesize. Since most orb web spiders express high proline silk they might preferentially attain the amino acids needed for silk from food and shift toward expressing more MaSp1 in their MA silk when starved. Methodology/Principal Findings We fed three spiders; Argiope aetherea, Cyrtophora moluccensis and Leucauge blanda, high protein, low protein or no protein solutions. A. aetherea and L. blanda MA silks are high in proline, while C. moluccesnsis MA silks are low in proline. After 10 days of feeding we determined the amino acid compositions and mechanical properties of each species' MA silk and compared them between species and treatments with pre-treatment samples, accounting for ancestry. We found that the proline and glutamine of A. aetherea and L. blanda silks were affected by protein intake; significantly decreasing under the low and no protein intake treatments. Glutmaine composition in C. moluccensis silk was likewise affected by protein intake. However, the composition of proline in their MA silk was not significantly affected by protein intake. Conclusions Our results suggest that protein limitation induces a shift toward different silk proteins with lower glutamine and/or proline content. Contradictions to the MaSp model lie in the findings that C. moluccensis MA silks did not experience a significant reduction in proline and A. aetherea did not experience a significant reduction in serine on low/no protein. The mechanical properties of the silks could not be explained by a MaSp1 expressional shift. Factors other than MaSp expression, such as the expression of spidroin-like orthologues, may impact on silk amino acid composition and spinning and glandular processes may impact mechanics. PMID:22363691

  12. Differential Protein Expression in Congenital and Acquired Cholesteatomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Huhn; Choi, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cholesteatomas are epithelial lesions that present as an epithelial pearl behind an intact eardrum. Congenital and acquired cholesteatomas progress quite differently from each other and progress patterns can provide clues about the unique origin and pathogenesis of the abnormality. However, the exact pathogenic mechanisms by which cholesteatomas develop remain unknown. In this study, key proteins that directly affect cholesteatoma pathogenesis are investigated with proteomics and immunohistochemistry. Congenital cholesteatoma matrices and retroauricular skin were harvested during surgery in 4 patients diagnosed with a congenital cholesteatoma. Tissue was also harvested from the retraction pocket in an additional 2 patients during middle ear surgery. We performed 2-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis to detect and analyze spots that are expressed only in congenital cholesteatoma and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) to separate proteins by molecular weight. Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. The image analysis of 2D electrophoresis showed that 4 congenital cholesteatoma samples had very similar protein expression patterns and that 127 spots were exclusively expressed in congenital cholesteatomas. Of these 127 spots, 10 major spots revealed the presence of titin, forkhead transcription activator homolog (FKH 5–3), plectin 1, keratin 10, and leucine zipper protein 5 by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that FKH 5–3 and titin were expressed in congenital cholesteatoma matrices, but not in acquired cholesteatomas. Our study shows that protein expression patterns are completely different in congenital cholesteatomas, acquired cholesteatomas, and skin. Moreover, non-epithelial proteins, including FKH 5–3 and titin, were unexpectedly expressed in congenital cholesteatoma tissue. Our data indicates that congenital cholesteatoma origins may differ

  13. Quorum-sensing Salmonella selectively trigger protein expression within tumors

    PubMed Central

    Swofford, Charles A.; Van Dessel, Nele; Forbes, Neil S.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella that secrete anticancer proteins have the potential to eliminate tumors, but nonspecific expression causes damage to healthy tissue. We hypothesize that Salmonella, integrated with a density-dependent switch, would only express proteins in tightly packed colonies within tumors. To test this hypothesis, we cloned the lux quorum-sensing (QS) system and a GFP reporter into nonpathogenic Salmonella. Fluorescence and bacterial density were measured in culture and in a tumor-on-a-chip device to determine the critical density necessary to initiate expression. QS Salmonella were injected into 4T1 tumor-bearing mice to quantify GFP expression in vivo using immunofluorescence. At densities below 0.6 × 1010 cfu/g in tumors, less than 3% of QS Salmonella expressed GFP. Above densities of 4.2 × 1010 cfu/g, QS Salmonella had similar expression levels to constitutive controls. GFP expression by QS colonies was dependent upon the distance to neighboring bacteria. No colonies expressed GFP when the average distance to neighbors was greater than 155 µm. Calculations of autoinducer concentrations showed that expression was sigmoidally dependent on density and inversely dependent on average radial distance. Based on bacterial counts from excised tissue, the liver density (0.0079 × 1010 cfu/g) was less than the critical density (0.11 × 1010 cfu/g) necessary to initiate expression. QS Salmonella are a promising tool for cancer treatment that will target drugs to tumors while preventing damage to healthy tissue. PMID:25737556

  14. Expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins: a macroarray study.

    PubMed

    Futyma, Konrad; Miotła, Paweł; Różyńska, Krystyna; Zdunek, Małgorzata; Semczuk, Andrzej; Rechberger, Tomasz; Wojcierowski, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies in Poland, with well-established risk factors. Genetic instability and molecular alterations responsible for endometrial carcinogenesis have been systematically investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate, by means of cDNA macroarrays, the expression profiles of genes encoding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in ECs. Tissue specimens were collected during surgical procedures from 40 patients with EC, and control tissue was collected from 9 patients with uterine leiomyomas. RNA was isolated and RT-PCR with radioisotope-labeled cDNA was performed. The levels of ECM protein gene expression in normal endometrial tissues were compared to the expression of these genes in EC specimens. Statistically significant differences in gene expression, stratified by clinical stage of the ECs, were detected for aggrecan, vitronectin, tenascin R, nidogen and two collagen proteins: type VIII chain α1 and type XI chain α2. All of these proteins were overexpressed in stage III endometrial carcinomas compared to levels in stage I and II uterine neoplasms. In conclusion, increased expression of genes encoding ECM proteins may play an important role in facilitating accelerated disease progression of human ECs.

  15. High-throughput insect cell protein expression applications.

    PubMed

    Buchs, Mirjam; Kim, Ernie; Pouliquen, Yann; Sachs, Michael; Geisse, Sabine; Mahnke, Marion; Hunt, Ian

    2009-01-01

    The Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS) is one of the most efficient systems for production of recombinant proteins and consequently its application is wide-spread in industry as well as in academia. Since the early 1970s, when the first stable insect cell lines were established and the infectivity of bacu-lovirus in an in vitro culture system was demonstrated (1, 2), virtually thousands of reports have been published on the successful expression of proteins using this system as well as on method improvement. However, despite its popularity the system is labor intensive and time consuming. Moreover, adaptation of the system to multi-parallel (high-throughput) expression is much more difficult to achieve than with E. coli due to its far more complex nature. However, recent years have seen the development of strategies that have greatly enhanced the stream-lining and speed of baculovirus protein expression for increased throughput via use of automation and miniaturization. This chapter therefore tries to collate these developments in a series of protocols (which are modifications to standard procedure plus several new approaches) that will allow the user to expedite the speed and throughput of baculovirus-mediated protein expression and facilitate true multi-parallel, high-throughput protein expression profiling in insect cells. In addition we also provide a series of optimized protocols for small and large-scale transient insect cell expression that allow for both the rapid analysis of multiple constructs and the concomitant scale-up of those selected for on-going analysis. Since this approach is independent of viral propagation, the timelines for this approach are markedly shorter and offer a significant advantage over standard bacu-lovirus expression approach strategies in the context of HT applications.

  16. Enhanced Expression of Hedgehog Pathway Proteins in Oral Epithelial Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Dias, Rosane Borges; Valverde, Ludmila de Faro; Sales, Caroline Brandi Schlaepfer; Guimarães, Vanessa Sousa Nazaré; Cabral, Márcia Grillo; de Aquino Xavier, Flávia Caló; Dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Ramos, Eduardo Antônio Gonçalves; Gurgel Rocha, Clarissa Araújo

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the profile of the proteins involved in the Hedgehog signaling pathway to aid in the understanding of the pathogenesis of oral epithelial dysplasia (OED). The proteins SHH, PTCH1, HHIP, SUFU, GLI1, and cyclin D1 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 25 cases of OED, 4 of non-neoplasic oral mucosa, 8 of inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia and 5 of hyperkeratosis. SHH proteins were predominant in OED cases. Although PTCH1 protein was observed in all cases, this molecule was more highly expressed in OED. The inhibitor protein SUFU was present in OED and HHIP protein was overexpressed in OED. GLI1 proteins were predominantly found in the nuclei of epithelial cells in OED. Basal and suprabasal cells in the epithelial lining were positive for cyclin D1 only in OED. In conclusion, comparative analysis of the proteins involved in the Hedgehog pathway suggests that enhanced expression of these proteins can play an important role in the biological behavior of OED. PMID:26371433

  17. Subcellular localization of transiently expressed fluorescent fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Collings, David A

    2013-01-01

    The recent and massive expansion in plant genomics data has generated a large number of gene sequences for which two seemingly simple questions need to be answered: where do the proteins encoded by these genes localize in cells, and what do they do? One widespread approach to answering the localization question has been to use particle bombardment to transiently express unknown proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) or its numerous derivatives. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is then used to monitor the localization of the fluorescent protein as it hitches a ride through the cell. The subcellular localization of the fusion protein, if not immediately apparent, can then be determined by comparison to localizations generated by fluorescent protein fusions to known signalling sequences and proteins, or by direct comparison with fluorescent dyes. This review aims to be a tour guide for researchers wanting to travel this hitch-hiker's path, and for reviewers and readers who wish to understand their travel reports. It will describe some of the technology available for visualizing protein localizations, and some of the experimental approaches for optimizing and confirming localizations generated by particle bombardment in onion epidermal cells, the most commonly used experimental system. As the non-conservation of signal sequences in heterologous expression systems such as onion, and consequent mis-targeting of fusion proteins, is always a potential problem, the epidermal cells of the Argenteum mutant of pea are proposed as a model system.

  18. Subcellular localization of transiently expressed fluorescent fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Collings, David A

    2013-01-01

    The recent and massive expansion in plant genomics data has generated a large number of gene sequences for which two seemingly simple questions need to be answered: where do the proteins encoded by these genes localize in cells, and what do they do? One widespread approach to answering the localization question has been to use particle bombardment to transiently express unknown proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) or its numerous derivatives. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is then used to monitor the localization of the fluorescent protein as it hitches a ride through the cell. The subcellular localization of the fusion protein, if not immediately apparent, can then be determined by comparison to localizations generated by fluorescent protein fusions to known signalling sequences and proteins, or by direct comparison with fluorescent dyes. This review aims to be a tour guide for researchers wanting to travel this hitch-hiker's path, and for reviewers and readers who wish to understand their travel reports. It will describe some of the technology available for visualizing protein localizations, and some of the experimental approaches for optimizing and confirming localizations generated by particle bombardment in onion epidermal cells, the most commonly used experimental system. As the non-conservation of signal sequences in heterologous expression systems such as onion, and consequent mis-targeting of fusion proteins, is always a potential problem, the epidermal cells of the Argenteum mutant of pea are proposed as a model system. PMID:23996319

  19. Protein Co-Expression Network Analysis (ProCoNA)

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, David L.; Baratt, Arie; Baric, Ralph; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Smith, Richard D.; Orwoll, Eric S.; Katze, Michael G.; Mcweeney, Shannon K.

    2013-06-01

    Biological networks are important for elucidating disease etiology due to their ability to model complex high dimensional data and biological systems. Proteomics provides a critical data source for such models, but currently lacks robust de novo methods for network construction, which could bring important insights in systems biology. We have evaluated the construction of network models using methods derived from weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). We show that approximately scale-free peptide networks, composed of statistically significant modules, are feasible and biologically meaningful using two mouse lung experiments and one human plasma experiment. Within each network, peptides derived from the same protein are shown to have a statistically higher topological overlap and concordance in abundance, which is potentially important for inferring protein abundance. The module representatives, called eigenpeptides, correlate significantly with biological phenotypes. Furthermore, within modules, we find significant enrichment for biological function and known interactions (gene ontology and protein-protein interactions). Biological networks are important tools in the analysis of complex systems. In this paper we evaluate the application of weighted co-expression network analysis to quantitative proteomics data. Protein co-expression networks allow novel approaches for biological interpretation, quality control, inference of protein abundance, a framework for potentially resolving degenerate peptide-protein mappings, and a biomarker signature discovery.

  20. Effects of Chemically Modified Messenger RNA on Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-03-16

    Chemically modified nucleotides play significant roles in the effectiveness of mRNA translation. Here, we describe the synthesis of two sets of chemically modified mRNAs [encoding firefly Luciferase (FLuc) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), respectively], evaluation of protein expression, and correlation analysis of expression level under various conditions. The results indicate that chemical modifications of mRNAs are able to significantly improve protein expression, which is dependent on cell types and coding sequences. Moreover, eGFP mRNAs with N1-methylpseudouridine (me(1)ψ), 5-methoxyuridine (5moU), and pseudouridine (ψ) modifications ranked top three in cell lines tested. Interestingly, 5moU-modified eGFP mRNA was more stable than other eGFP mRNAs. Consequently, me(1)ψ, 5moU, and ψ are promising nucleotides for chemical modification of mRNAs. PMID:26906521

  1. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation. PMID

  2. Green Fluorescent Protein-based Expression Screening of Membrane Proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Louise E.; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation. PMID

  3. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-06

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation.

  4. Combining in Vitro Folding with Cell Free Protein Synthesis for Membrane Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Focke, Paul J; Hein, Christopher; Hoffmann, Beate; Matulef, Kimberly; Bernhard, Frank; Dötsch, Volker; Valiyaveetil, Francis I

    2016-08-01

    Cell free protein synthesis (CFPS) has emerged as a promising methodology for protein expression. While polypeptide production is very reliable and efficient using CFPS, the correct cotranslational folding of membrane proteins during CFPS is still a challenge. In this contribution, we describe a two-step protocol in which the integral membrane protein is initially expressed by CFPS as a precipitate followed by an in vitro folding procedure using lipid vesicles for converting the protein precipitate to the correctly folded protein. We demonstrate the feasibility of using this approach for the K(+) channels KcsA and MVP and the amino acid transporter LeuT. We determine the crystal structure of the KcsA channel obtained by CFPS and in vitro folding to show the structural similarity to the cellular expressed KcsA channel and to establish the feasibility of using this two-step approach for membrane protein production for structural studies. Our studies show that the correct folding of these membrane proteins with complex topologies can take place in vitro without the involvement of the cellular machinery for membrane protein biogenesis. This indicates that the folding instructions for these complex membrane proteins are contained entirely within the protein sequence. PMID:27384110

  5. Expression and export: recombinant protein production systems for Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Fleissner, André; Dersch, Petra

    2010-07-01

    Several Aspergillus species, in particular Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae, are widely used as protein production hosts in various biotechnological applications. In order to improve the expression and secretion of recombinant proteins in these filamentous fungi, several novel genetic engineering strategies have been developed in recent years. This review describes state-of-the-art genetic manipulation technologies used for strain improvement, as well as recent advances in designing the most appropriate engineering strategy for a particular protein production process. Furthermore, current developments in identifying bottlenecks in the protein production and secretion pathways are described and novel approaches to overcome these limitations are introduced. An appropriate combination of expression vectors and optimized host strains will provide cell factories customized for each production process and expand the great potential of Aspergilli as biotechnology workhorses to more complex multi-step industrial applications.

  6. Expression, delivery and function of insecticidal proteins expressed by recombinant baculoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since the development of methods for inserting and expressing genes in baculoviruses, a line of research has focused on developing recombinant baculoviruses that express insecticidal peptides and proteins. These recombinant viruses have been engineered with the goal of improving their pesticidal po...

  7. [PPR proteins--modular factors regulating expression of organellar genomes].

    PubMed

    Zapisek, Bartosz; Piątkowski, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    PPR proteins make up the most numerous family of RNA-binding proteins identified to date. They localize almost exclusively to plastids and mitochondria of eukaryotic organisms. The most striking feature of this family is the expansion of PPR protein-encoding genes in vascular plants, which likely coincided with plants colonizing land. PPR proteins participate in stabilizing, editing, splicing, degradation and processing of policistronic transcripts, as well as translation activation in mitochondria and plastids. Although the number of PPR proteins in non-plant organisms is significantly smaller than in plants, they still play a crucial role in regulating the expression of mtDNA. Disruptions of PPR protein-encoding genes usually result in severe phenotypic consequences. Plant PPR proteins bind RNA in a sequence-specific manner, where a single PPR motif recognizes an individual nucleotide in a given sequence. This opens up possibilities for engineering de novo synthetic protein sequences that would interact with precisely determined organellar sequences, thus enabling modulation of mtDNA and ctDNA expression.

  8. Beyond protein expression, MOPED goes multi-omics.

    PubMed

    Montague, Elizabeth; Janko, Imre; Stanberry, Larissa; Lee, Elaine; Choiniere, John; Anderson, Nathaniel; Stewart, Elizabeth; Broomall, William; Higdon, Roger; Kolker, Natali; Kolker, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    MOPED (Multi-Omics Profiling Expression Database; http://moped.proteinspire.org) has transitioned from solely a protein expression database to a multi-omics resource for human and model organisms. Through a web-based interface, MOPED presents consistently processed data for gene, protein and pathway expression. To improve data quality, consistency and use, MOPED includes metadata detailing experimental design and analysis methods. The multi-omics data are integrated through direct links between genes and proteins and further connected to pathways and experiments. MOPED now contains over 5 million records, information for approximately 75,000 genes and 50,000 proteins from four organisms (human, mouse, worm, yeast). These records correspond to 670 unique combinations of experiment, condition, localization and tissue. MOPED includes the following new features: pathway expression, Pathway Details pages, experimental metadata checklists, experiment summary statistics and more advanced searching tools. Advanced searching enables querying for genes, proteins, experiments, pathways and keywords of interest. The system is enhanced with visualizations for comparing across different data types. In the future MOPED will expand the number of organisms, increase integration with pathways and provide connections to disease.

  9. Argonaute Family Protein Expression in Normal Tissue and Cancer Entities

    PubMed Central

    Bruckmann, Astrid; Hauptmann, Judith; Deutzmann, Rainer; Meister, Gunter; Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin

    2016-01-01

    The members of the Argonaute (AGO) protein family are key players in miRNA-guided gene silencing. They enable the interaction between small RNAs and their respective target mRNA(s) and support the catalytic destruction of the gene transcript or recruit additional proteins for downstream gene silencing. The human AGO family consists of four AGO proteins (AGO1-AGO4), but only AGO2 harbors nuclease activity. In this study, we characterized the expression of the four AGO proteins in cancer cell lines and normal tissues with a new mass spectrometry approach called AGO-APP (AGO Affinity Purification by Peptides). In all analyzed normal tissues, AGO1 and AGO2 were most prominent, but marked tissue-specific differences were identified. Furthermore, considerable changes during development were observed by comparing fetal and adult tissues. We also identified decreased overall AGO expression in melanoma derived cell lines compared to other tumor cell lines and normal tissues, with the largest differences in AGO2 expression. The experiments described in this study suggest that reduced amounts of AGO proteins, as key players in miRNA processing, have impact on several cellular processes. Deregulated miRNA expression has been attributed to chromosomal aberrations, promoter regulation and it is known to have a major impact on tumor development and progression. Our findings will further increase our basic understanding of the molecular basis of miRNA processing and its relevance for disease. PMID:27518285

  10. Interfacial polymerization for colorimetric labeling of protein expression in cells.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Jacob L; Sheldon, Phillip R; Hoversten, Liv J; Romero, Gabriela; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Berron, Brad J

    2014-01-01

    Determining the location of rare proteins in cells typically requires the use of on-sample amplification. Antibody based recognition and enzymatic amplification is used to produce large amounts of visible label at the site of protein expression, but these techniques suffer from the presence of nonspecific reactivity in the biological sample and from poor spatial control over the label. Polymerization based amplification is a recently developed alternative means of creating an on-sample amplification for fluorescence applications, while not suffering from endogenous labels or loss of signal localization. This manuscript builds upon polymerization based amplification by developing a stable, archivable, and colorimetric mode of amplification termed Polymer Dye Labeling. The basic concept involves an interfacial polymer grown at the site of protein expression and subsequent staining of this polymer with an appropriate dye. The dyes Evans Blue and eosin were initially investigated for colorimetric response in a microarray setting, where both specifically stained polymer films on glass. The process was translated to the staining of protein expression in human dermal fibroblast cells, and Polymer Dye Labeling was specific to regions consistent with desired protein expression. The labeling is stable for over 200 days in ambient conditions and is also compatible with modern mounting medium.

  11. Genomic and expression analysis of transition proteins in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Alvi, Zain A; Chu, Tin-Chun; Schawaroch, Valerie; Klaus, Angela V

    2015-01-01

    The current study was aimed at analyzing putative protein sequences of the transition protein-like proteins in 12 Drosophila species based on the reference sequences of transition protein-like protein (Tpl (94D) ) expressed in Drosophila melanogaster sperm nuclei. Transition proteins aid in transforming chromatin from a histone-based nucleosome structure to a protamine-based structure during spermiogenesis - the post-meiotic stage of spermatogenesis. Sequences were obtained from NCBI Ref-Seq database using NCBI ORF-Finder (PSI-BLAST). Sequence alignments and analysis of the amino acid content indicate that orthologs for Tpl (94D) are present in the melanogaster species subgroup (D. simulans, D. sechellia, D. erecta, and D. yakuba), D. ananassae, and D. pseudoobscura, but absent in D. persmilis, D. willistoni, D. mojavensis, D. virilis, and D. grimshawi. Transcriptome next generation sequence (RNA-Seq) data for testes and ovaries was used to conduct differential gene expression analysis for Tpl (94D) in D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. yakuba, D. ananassae, and D. pseudoobscura. The identified Tpl (94D) orthologs show high expression in the testes as compared to the ovaries. Additionally, 2 isoforms of Tpl (94D) were detected in D. melanogaster with isoform A being much more highly expressed than isoform B. Functional analyses of the conserved region revealed that the same high mobility group (HMG) box/DNA binding region is conserved for both Drosophila Tpl (94D) and Drosophila protamine-like proteins (MST35Ba and MST35Bb). Based on the rigorous bioinformatic approach and the conservation of the HMG box reported in this work, we suggest that the Drosophila Tpl (94D) orthologs should be classified as their own transition protein group.

  12. Human Cementum Protein 1 induces expression of bone and cementum proteins by human gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona-Rodriguez, Bruno; Alvarez-Perez, Marco Antonio; Narayanan, A. Sampath; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Reyes-Gasga, Jose; Molina-Guarneros, Juan; Garcia-Hernandez, Ana Lilia; Suarez-Franco, Jose Luis; Chavarria, Ivet Gil; Villarreal-Ramirez, Eduardo; Arzate, Higinio . E-mail: harzate@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-07-06

    We recently presented evidence showing that a human cementoblastoma-derived protein, named Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) may play a role as a local regulator of cementoblast differentiation and cementum-matrix mineralization. This protein was shown to be expressed by cementoblasts and progenitor cells localized in the periodontal ligament. In this study we demonstrate that transfection of CEMP1 into human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) induces mineralization and expression of bone and cementum-matrix proteins. The transfected HGF cells had higher alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation rate and they expressed genes for alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, the transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1, and cementum attachment protein (CAP). They also produced biological-type hydroxyapatite. These findings indicate that the CEMP1 might participate in differentiation and mineralization of nonosteogenic cells, and that it might have a potential function in cementum and bone formation.

  13. Co-expression of four baculovirus proteins, IE1, LEF3, P143, and PP31, elicits a cellular chromatin-containing reticulate structure in the nuclei of uninfected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamine, Toshihiro; Abe, Atsushi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2011-08-15

    Baculovirus DNA replication, transcription, and nucleocapsid assembly occur within a subnuclear structure called the virogenic stroma (VS) that consists of two subcompartments. Specific components of the VS sub-compartments have not been identified except for PP31, a DNA-binding protein that localizes specifically to the electron-dense region of VS. Here, we investigate the dynamic structure of VS using a GFP-tagged PP31 molecule (GFP-PP31). GFP-PP31 localizes to the VS throughout the course of infection. At later times post-infection, a PP31 reticulum distributed within VS was also apparent, indicating that VS sub-compartments compose a reticulate structure. Transient expression of PP31 with the viral proteins, IE1, LEF3, and P143, in uninfected cells resulted in the formation of a reticulate structure containing cellular chromatin and the spatial arrangements of the four proteins within the induced reticulum were the same as those within VS reticulum, suggesting that the two reticula are formed by a similar mechanism.

  14. Controlling for gene expression changes in transcription factor protein networks.

    PubMed

    Banks, Charles A S; Lee, Zachary T; Boanca, Gina; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Groppe, Brad D; Wen, Zhihui; Hattem, Gaye L; Seidel, Chris W; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P

    2014-06-01

    The development of affinity purification technologies combined with mass spectrometric analysis of purified protein mixtures has been used both to identify new protein-protein interactions and to define the subunit composition of protein complexes. Transcription factor protein interactions, however, have not been systematically analyzed using these approaches. Here, we investigated whether ectopic expression of an affinity tagged transcription factor as bait in affinity purification mass spectrometry experiments perturbs gene expression in cells, resulting in the false positive identification of bait-associated proteins when typical experimental controls are used. Using quantitative proteomics and RNA sequencing, we determined that the increase in the abundance of a set of proteins caused by overexpression of the transcription factor RelA is not sufficient for these proteins to then co-purify non-specifically and be misidentified as bait-associated proteins. Therefore, typical controls should be sufficient, and a number of different baits can be compared with a common set of controls. This is of practical interest when identifying bait interactors from a large number of different baits. As expected, we found several known RelA interactors enriched in our RelA purifications (NFκB1, NFκB2, Rel, RelB, IκBα, IκBβ, and IκBε). We also found several proteins not previously described in association with RelA, including the small mitochondrial chaperone Tim13. Using a variety of biochemical approaches, we further investigated the nature of the association between Tim13 and NFκB family transcription factors. This work therefore provides a conceptual and experimental framework for analyzing transcription factor protein interactions.

  15. Identifying subcellular protein localization with fluorescent protein fusions after transient expression in onion epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Nebenführ, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Most biochemical functions of plant cells are carried out by proteins which act at very specific places within these cells, for example, within different organelles. Identifying the subcellular localization of proteins is therefore a useful tool to narrow down the possible functions that a novel or unknown protein may carry out. The discovery of genetically encoded fluorescent markers has made it possible to tag specific proteins and visualize them in vivo under a variety of conditions. This chapter describes a simple method to use transient expression of such fluorescently tagged proteins in onion epidermal cells to determine their subcellular localization relative to known markers.

  16. The sf32 Unique Gene of Spodoptera frugiperda Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV) Is a Non-Essential Gene That Could Be Involved in Nucleocapsid Organization in Occlusion-Derived Virions

    PubMed Central

    Beperet, Inés; Barrera, Gloria; Simón, Oihane; Williams, Trevor; López-Ferber, Miguel; Gasmi, Laila; Herrero, Salvador; Caballero, Primitivo

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant virus lacking the sf32 gene (Sf32null), unique to the Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV), was generated by homologous recombination from a bacmid comprising the complete viral genome (Sfbac). Transcriptional analysis revealed that sf32 is an early gene. Occlusion bodies (OBs) of Sf32null contained 62% more genomic DNA than viruses containing the sf32 gene, Sfbac and Sf32null-repair, although Sf32null DNA was three-fold less infective when injected in vivo. Sf32null OBs were 18% larger in diameter and contained 17% more nucleocapsids within ODVs than those of Sfbac. No significant differences were detected in OB pathogenicity (50% lethal concentration), speed-of-kill or budded virus production in vivo. In contrast, the production of OBs/larva was reduced by 39% in insects infected by Sf32null compared to those infected by Sfbac. The SF32 predicted protein sequence showed homology (25% identity, 44% similarity) to two adhesion proteins from Streptococcus pyogenes and a single N-mirystoylation site was predicted. We conclude that SF32 is a non-essential protein that could be involved in nucleocapsid organization during ODV assembly and occlusion, resulting in increased numbers of nucleocapsids within ODVs. PMID:24204916

  17. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or…

  18. Expression of pokeweed antiviral proteins in creeping bentgrass.

    PubMed

    Dai, W D; Bonos, S; Guo, Z; Meyer, W A; Day, P R; Belanger, F C

    2003-01-01

    Fungal diseases of creeping bentgrass, an important amenity grass used extensively on golf courses, are a serious problem in golf course management. Transgenic approaches to improving disease resistance to fungal diseases are being explored in many species, and in some cases ribosome-inactivating proteins have been found to be effective. We have generated transgenic creeping bentgrass plants expressing three forms of ribosome-inactivating proteins from pokeweed, which are termed pokeweed antiviral proteins (PAP). PAP-Y and PAP-C are nontoxic mutants of PAP; PAPII is the native form of another ribosome-inactivating protein from pokeweed. In creeping bentgrass, PAP-C transformants did not accumulate the protein, suggesting that it is unstable, and in a field test these plants were not protected from infection by the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia homoeocarpa, the causal agent of dollar spot disease. PAPII transformants could accumulate stable levels of the protein but had symptoms of toxicity; one low-expressing line exhibited good disease resistance. PAP-Y transformants accumulated stable levels of protein, and under greenhouse conditions they appeared to be phenotypically normal.

  19. The protein expression landscape of the Arabidopsis root

    PubMed Central

    Petricka, Jalean J.; Schauer, Monica A.; Megraw, Molly; Breakfield, Natalie W.; Thompson, J. Will; Georgiev, Stoyan; Soderblom, Erik J.; Ohler, Uwe; Moseley, Martin Arthur; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Benfey, Philip N.

    2012-01-01

    Because proteins are the major functional components of cells, knowledge of their cellular localization is crucial to gaining an understanding of the biology of multicellular organisms. We have generated a protein expression map of the Arabidopsis root providing the identity and cell type-specific localization of nearly 2,000 proteins. Grouping proteins into functional categories revealed unique cellular functions and identified cell type-specific biomarkers. Cellular colocalization provided support for numerous protein–protein interactions. With a binary comparison, we found that RNA and protein expression profiles are weakly correlated. We then performed peak integration at cell type-specific resolution and found an improved correlation with transcriptome data using continuous values. We performed GeLC-MS/MS (in-gel tryptic digestion followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) proteomic experiments on mutants with ectopic and no root hairs, providing complementary proteomic data. Finally, among our root hair-specific proteins we identified two unique regulators of root hair development. PMID:22447775

  20. Function of PPR proteins in plastid gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shikanai, Toshiharu; Fujii, Sota

    2013-01-01

    PPR proteins form a huge family in flowering plants and are involved in RNA maturation in plastids and mitochondria. These proteins are sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins that recruit the machinery of RNA processing. We summarize progress in the research on the functional mechanisms of divergent RNA maturation and on the mechanism by which RNA sequences are recognized. We further focus on two topics. RNA editing is an enigmatic process of RNA maturation in organelles, in which members of the PLS subfamily contribute to target site recognition. As the first topic, we speculate on why the PLS subfamily was selected by the RNA editing machinery. Second, we discuss how the regulation of plastid gene expression contributes to efficient photosynthesis. Although the molecular functions of PPR proteins have been studied extensively, information on the physiological significance of regulation by these proteins remains very limited.

  1. Heterologous expression of G-protein-coupled receptors in yeast.

    PubMed

    Bertheleme, Nicolas; Singh, Shweta; Dowell, Simon; Byrne, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Heterologous yeast expression systems have been successfully used for the production of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for both structural and functional studies. Yeast combine comparatively low cost and short culture times with straightforward generation of expression clones. They also perform some key posttranslational modifications not possible in bacterial systems. There are two major yeast expression systems, Pichia pastoris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, both of which have been used for the production of GPCRs. P. pastoris has a proven track record for the production of large amounts of GPCR for structural studies. High-resolution crystal structures of both the adenosine A2A and the histamine H1 receptors have been obtained using protein expressed in this system. S. cerevisiae is relatively easy to engineer and this has resulted in the development of sophisticated tools for the functional characterization of GPCRs. In this chapter, we provide protocols for both large-scale receptor expression in P. pastoris for structural studies and small-scale receptor expression in S. cerevisiae for functional characterization. In both cases, the receptor used is the human adenosine A2A receptor. The results that both we and others have obtained using these protocols show the wide utility of the yeast expression systems for the production of GPCRs.

  2. Correlation of protein and gene expression profiles of inflammatory proteins after endotoxin challenge in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Uma; Conway, Theresa M; Murdock, Paul; Mooney, Jeff L; Clark, Steve; Hedge, Priti; Bond, Brian C; Jazwinska, Elizabeth C; Barnes, Michael R; Tobin, Frank; Damian-Iordachi, Valeriu; Greller, Larry; Hurle, Mark; Stubbs, Andrew P; Li, Zhong; Valoret, Elizabeth I; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Cass, Lisa; Levitt, Blanche; Davis, Hugh M; Jorkasky, Diane K; Williams, William V

    2005-07-01

    Administration of endotoxin (LPS) in humans results in profound physiological responses, including activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the release of inflammatory factors. The time course of the response of selected inflammatory proteins was examined in healthy subjects (n = 6) administered a single intravenous dose of the purified derivative of endotoxin (3.0 ng/kg). Microarray analysis demonstrated changes in the expression of a number of genes, which were confirmed in separate in vitro endotoxin stimulation experiments. Subsequent TaqMan analysis of genes of interest indicated time-dependent changes in the expression of many of these genes. This included pre-B cell enhancing factor, which was identified on microarray analysis as being markedly upregulated following endotoxin stimulation. Protein expression of the genes examined by TaqMan analysis was measured and demonstrated the appearance of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and sTNF-R proteins in the plasma beginning within 1 h after dosing, followed by other cytokines/ inflammatory markers (e.g., IL-1ra, G-CSF, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10) and suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS-1 and SOCS-3). In general, cytokine protein expression correlated well with gene expression; however, the temporal profile of expression of some genes did not correlate well with the protein data. For many of these proteins, the lack of correlation was attributable to alternate tissue sources, which were demonstrated on TaqMan analysis. Principal component analysis indicated that cytokines could be grouped according to their temporal pattern of response, with most transcript levels returning to baseline 24 h following endotoxin administration. The combination of cDNA microarray and TaqMan analysis to identify and quantify changes in gene expression, along with the analysis of protein expression, can be useful in investigating inflammatory and other diseases.

  3. Escherichia coli Protein Expression System for Acetylcholine Binding Proteins (AChBPs)

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Nikita; Paul, Blessy; Ragnarsson, Lotten; Lewis, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand gated ion channels, identified as therapeutic targets for a range of human diseases. Drug design for nAChR related disorders is increasingly using structure-based approaches. Many of these structural insights for therapeutic lead development have been obtained from co-crystal structures of nAChR agonists and antagonists with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP). AChBP is a water soluble, structural and functional homolog of the extracellular, ligand-binding domain of nAChRs. Currently, AChBPs are recombinantly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems for structural and biophysical studies. Here, we report the establishment of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system that significantly reduces the cost and time of production compared to the existing expression systems. E. coli can efficiently express unglycosylated AChBP for crystallography and makes the expression of isotopically labelled forms feasible for NMR. We used a pHUE vector containing an N-terminal His-tagged ubiquitin fusion protein to facilitate AChBP expression in the soluble fractions, and thus avoid the need to recover protein from inclusion bodies. The purified protein yield obtained from the E. coli expression system is comparable to that obtained from existing AChBP expression systems. E. coli expressed AChBP bound nAChR agonists and antagonists with affinities matching those previously reported. Thus, the E. coli expression system significantly simplifies the expression and purification of functional AChBP for structural and biophysical studies. PMID:27304486

  4. Methods and constructs for expression of foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms

    DOEpatents

    Laible, Philip D.; Hanson, Deborah K.

    2002-01-01

    A method for expressing and purifying foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms comprising the simultaneous expression of both the heterologous protein and a means for compartmentalizing or sequestering of the protein.

  5. Quorum-sensing Salmonella selectively trigger protein expression within tumors.

    PubMed

    Swofford, Charles A; Van Dessel, Nele; Forbes, Neil S

    2015-03-17

    Salmonella that secrete anticancer proteins have the potential to eliminate tumors, but nonspecific expression causes damage to healthy tissue. We hypothesize that Salmonella, integrated with a density-dependent switch, would only express proteins in tightly packed colonies within tumors. To test this hypothesis, we cloned the lux quorum-sensing (QS) system and a GFP reporter into nonpathogenic Salmonella. Fluorescence and bacterial density were measured in culture and in a tumor-on-a-chip device to determine the critical density necessary to initiate expression. QS Salmonella were injected into 4T1 tumor-bearing mice to quantify GFP expression in vivo using immunofluorescence. At densities below 0.6 × 10(10) cfu/g in tumors, less than 3% of QS Salmonella expressed GFP. Above densities of 4.2 × 10(10) cfu/g, QS Salmonella had similar expression levels to constitutive controls. GFP expression by QS colonies was dependent upon the distance to neighboring bacteria. No colonies expressed GFP when the average distance to neighbors was greater than 155 µm. Calculations of autoinducer concentrations showed that expression was sigmoidally dependent on density and inversely dependent on average radial distance. Based on bacterial counts from excised tissue, the liver density (0.0079 × 10(10) cfu/g) was less than the critical density (0.11 × 10(10) cfu/g) necessary to initiate expression. QS Salmonella are a promising tool for cancer treatment that will target drugs to tumors while preventing damage to healthy tissue.

  6. Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein expression in thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Gou Young; Lim, Sung-Jig; Kim, Youn Wha

    2010-12-01

    Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) has been implicated in several fundamental signal transduction pathways that control cellular growth, differentiation, apoptosis and migration. RKIP is reduced in a variety of human carcinomas, but RKIP expression in thyroid carcinomas has not been analyzed at the protein level. In this study, we examined the immunohistochemical expression of RKIP in various subtypes of thyroid carcinoma. Immunostaining for RKIP was performed on 104 cases of primary thyroid carcinoma (40 papillary, 29 follicular, 11 medullary, 11 poorly differentiated, and 13 anaplastic carcinomas) and 26 cases of nodal metastatic tumor (17 papillary, 4 medullary, and 5 anaplastic carcinomas). Normal thyroid tissue and all cases of follicular, papillary, and medullary carcinomas showed uniform, strong cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for RKIP. With the exception of one case, poorly differentiated carcinomas also revealed strong RKIP expression. In contrast, RKIP expression was completely absent in all anaplastic carcinomas. The transition zone from the differentiated carcinoma component (strong RKIP expression) to the anaplastic carcinoma component (no RKIP expression) demonstrated a completely opposite pattern of RKIP immunoreactivity. This reduction of RKIP expression in anaplastic carcinoma was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Additionally, RKIP expression of nodal metastatic tumors corresponded with that of primary tumors: metastatic papillary and medullary carcinomas showed uniform, strong cytoplasmic RKIP immunoreactivity, in contrast, in metastatic anaplastic carcinomas, RKIP expression was completely absent. RKIP expression is significantly reduced in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma as compared to other subtypes of thyroid carcinoma. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the precise mechanism of RKIP action in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

  7. Combined protein construct and synthetic gene engineering for heterologous protein expression and crystallization using Gene Composer

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Amy; Lovell, Scott; Lorimer, Don; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Wallace, Ellen; Thompkins, Kaitlin; Archer, Kimberly; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-12-01

    With the goal of improving yield and success rates of heterologous protein production for structural studies we have developed the database and algorithm software package Gene Composer. This freely available electronic tool facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their engineered synthetic gene sequences, as detailed in the accompanying manuscript. In this report, we compare heterologous protein expression levels from native sequences to that of codon engineered synthetic gene constructs designed by Gene Composer. A test set of proteins including a human kinase (P38{alpha}), viral polymerase (HCV NS5B), and bacterial structural protein (FtsZ) were expressed in both E. coli and a cell-free wheat germ translation system. We also compare the protein expression levels in E. coli for a set of 11 different proteins with greatly varied G:C content and codon bias. The results consistently demonstrate that protein yields from codon engineered Gene Composer designs are as good as or better than those achieved from the synonymous native genes. Moreover, structure guided N- and C-terminal deletion constructs designed with the aid of Gene Composer can lead to greater success in gene to structure work as exemplified by the X-ray crystallographic structure determination of FtsZ from Bacillus subtilis. These results validate the Gene Composer algorithms, and suggest that using a combination of synthetic gene and protein construct engineering tools can improve the economics of gene to structure research.

  8. Heterologous expression of the lipid transfer protein CERT increases therapeutic protein productivity of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Florin, Lore; Pegel, Antje; Becker, Eric; Hausser, Angelika; Olayioye, Monilola A; Kaufmann, Hitto

    2009-04-20

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the introduction of transgenes regulating protein transport or affecting post-translational modifications can further improve industrial processes for the production of therapeutic proteins in mammalian cells. Our study on improving therapeutic protein production in CHO cells by heterologous expression of the ceramide transfer protein (CERT) was initiated by the recent discovery that CERT is involved in protein kinase D (PKD)-dependent protein transport from the Golgi to the plasma membrane. We generated a set of CHO DG44 cell lines by stable integration of constructs expressing either CERT wild-type or CERT S132A, a mutant conferring increased lipid transfer activity, or a mock plasmid. CHO cells expressing heterologous CERT demonstrated significantly higher specific productivities of the therapeutic protein HSA when grown in inoculum suspension cultures. This effect translated into significantly increased overall HSA titers in a fed-batch format where cells are grown in chemically defined serum-free media. Furthermore, we could show that CERT also enhanced monoclonal antibody secretion in two IgG production cell lines with different basal productivities. The data demonstrate the potential of CERT engineering to improve mammalian cell culture production processes to yield high amounts of a therapeutic protein product of desired quality. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing a bottle neck in recombinant protein secretion at the Golgi complex in mammalian cells. PMID:19428735

  9. Optimization of translation profiles enhances protein expression and solubility.

    PubMed

    Hess, Anne-Katrin; Saffert, Paul; Liebeton, Klaus; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    mRNA is translated with a non-uniform speed that actively coordinates co-translational folding of protein domains. Using structure-based homology we identified the structural domains in epoxide hydrolases (EHs) and introduced slow-translating codons to delineate the translation of single domains. These changes in translation speed dramatically improved the solubility of two EHs of metagenomic origin in Escherichia coli. Conversely, the importance of transient attenuation for the folding, and consequently solubility, of EH was evidenced with a member of the EH family from Agrobacterium radiobacter, which partitions in the soluble fraction when expressed in E. coli. Synonymous substitutions of codons shaping the slow-transiting regions to fast-translating codons render this protein insoluble. Furthermore, we show that low protein yield can be enhanced by decreasing the free folding energy of the initial 5'-coding region, which can disrupt mRNA secondary structure and enhance ribosomal loading. This study provides direct experimental evidence that mRNA is not a mere messenger for translation of codons into amino acids but bears an additional layer of information for folding, solubility and expression level of the encoded protein. Furthermore, it provides a general frame on how to modulate and fine-tune gene expression of a target protein.

  10. Optimization of Translation Profiles Enhances Protein Expression and Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Anne-Katrin; Saffert, Paul; Liebeton, Klaus; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    mRNA is translated with a non-uniform speed that actively coordinates co-translational folding of protein domains. Using structure-based homology we identified the structural domains in epoxide hydrolases (EHs) and introduced slow-translating codons to delineate the translation of single domains. These changes in translation speed dramatically improved the solubility of two EHs of metagenomic origin in Escherichia coli. Conversely, the importance of transient attenuation for the folding, and consequently solubility, of EH was evidenced with a member of the EH family from Agrobacterium radiobacter, which partitions in the soluble fraction when expressed in E. coli. Synonymous substitutions of codons shaping the slow-transiting regions to fast-translating codons render this protein insoluble. Furthermore, we show that low protein yield can be enhanced by decreasing the free folding energy of the initial 5’-coding region, which can disrupt mRNA secondary structure and enhance ribosomal loading. This study provides direct experimental evidence that mRNA is not a mere messenger for translation of codons into amino acids but bears an additional layer of information for folding, solubility and expression level of the encoded protein. Furthermore, it provides a general frame on how to modulate and fine-tune gene expression of a target protein. PMID:25965266

  11. Easy mammalian expression and crystallography of maltose-binding protein-fused human proteins.

    PubMed

    Bokhove, Marcel; Sadat Al Hosseini, Hamed; Saito, Takako; Dioguardi, Elisa; Gegenschatz-Schmid, Katharina; Nishimura, Kaoru; Raj, Isha; de Sanctis, Daniele; Han, Ling; Jovine, Luca

    2016-04-01

    We present a strategy to obtain milligrams of highly post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins, transiently expressed in mammalian cells as rigid or cleavable fusions with a mammalianized version of bacterial maltose-binding protein (mMBP). This variant was engineered to combine mutations that enhance MBP solubility and affinity purification, as well as provide crystal-packing interactions for increased crystallizability. Using this cell type-independent approach, we could increase the expression of secreted and intracellular human proteins up to 200-fold. By molecular replacement with MBP, we readily determined five novel high-resolution structures of rigid fusions of targets that otherwise defied crystallization. PMID:26850170

  12. Easy mammalian expression and crystallography of maltose-binding protein-fused human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bokhove, Marcel; Sadat Al Hosseini, Hamed; Saito, Takako; Dioguardi, Elisa; Gegenschatz-Schmid, Katharina; Nishimura, Kaoru; Raj, Isha; de Sanctis, Daniele; Han, Ling; Jovine, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We present a strategy to obtain milligrams of highly post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins, transiently expressed in mammalian cells as rigid or cleavable fusions with a mammalianized version of bacterial maltose-binding protein (mMBP). This variant was engineered to combine mutations that enhance MBP solubility and affinity purification, as well as provide crystal-packing interactions for increased crystallizability. Using this cell type-independent approach, we could increase the expression of secreted and intracellular human proteins up to 200-fold. By molecular replacement with MBP, we readily determined five novel high-resolution structures of rigid fusions of targets that otherwise defied crystallization. PMID:26850170

  13. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    SciTech Connect

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-15

    The papillomavirus E4 open reading frame (ORF) is contained within the E2 ORF, with the primary E4 gene-product (E1{sup ∧}E4) being translated from a spliced mRNA that includes the E1 initiation codon and adjacent sequences. E4 is located centrally within the E2 gene, in a region that encodes the E2 protein′s flexible hinge domain. Although a number of minor E4 transcripts have been reported, it is the product of the abundant E1{sup ∧}E4 mRNA that has been most extensively analysed. During the papillomavirus life cycle, the E1{sup ∧}E4 gene products generally become detectable at the onset of vegetative viral genome amplification as the late stages of infection begin. E4 contributes to genome amplification success and virus synthesis, with its high level of expression suggesting additional roles in virus release and/or transmission. In general, E4 is easily visualised in biopsy material by immunostaining, and can be detected in lesions caused by diverse papillomavirus types, including those of dogs, rabbits and cattle as well as humans. The E4 protein can serve as a biomarker of active virus infection, and in the case of high-risk human types also disease severity. In some cutaneous lesions, E4 can be expressed at higher levels than the virion coat proteins, and can account for as much as 30% of total lesional protein content. The E4 proteins of the Beta, Gamma and Mu HPV types assemble into distinctive cytoplasmic, and sometimes nuclear, inclusion granules. In general, the E4 proteins are expressed before L2 and L1, with their structure and function being modified, first by kinases as the infected cell progresses through the S and G2 cell cycle phases, but also by proteases as the cell exits the cell cycle and undergoes true terminal differentiation. The kinases that regulate E4 also affect other viral proteins simultaneously, and include protein kinase A, Cyclin-dependent kinase, members of the MAP Kinase family and protein kinase C. For HPV16 E1{sup

  14. Altered Expression of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Accessory Proteins in Murine and Human Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Noelle; Gaynor, Katherine U; Rowan, Simon C; Walsh, Sinead M; Fabre, Aurelie; Boylan, John; Keane, Michael P; McLoughlin, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic, progressive fibrotic disease with a poor prognosis. The balance between transforming growth factor β1 and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling plays an important role in tissue homeostasis, and alterations can result in pulmonary fibrosis. We hypothesized that multiple BMP accessory proteins may be responsible for maintaining this balance in the lung. Using the bleomycin mouse model for fibrosis, we examined an array of BMP accessory proteins for changes in mRNA expression. We report significant increases in mRNA expression of gremlin 1, noggin, follistatin, and follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1), and significant decreases in mRNA expression of chordin, kielin/chordin-like protein, nephroblastoma overexpressed gene, and BMP and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI). Protein expression studies demonstrated increased levels of noggin, BAMBI, and FSTL1 in the lungs of bleomycin-treated mice and in the lungs of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that transforming growth factor β stimulation resulted in increased expression of noggin, BAMBI, and FSTL1 in human small airway epithelial cells. These results provide the first evidence that multiple BMP accessory proteins are altered in fibrosis and may play a role in promoting fibrotic injury.

  15. Expression and localization of X11 family proteins in neurons.

    PubMed

    Motodate, Rika; Saito, Yuhki; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2016-09-01

    The X11/Mint family of proteins comprises X11/X11α/Mint1, X11L/X11β/Mint2, and X11L2/X11γ/Mint3. Each of these molecules is an adaptor protein that contains a phosphotyrosine interaction/binding (PI/PTB) and two PDZ domains in its carboxy-terminal region. X11/Mint family members associate with a broad spectrum of membrane proteins, including Alzheimer's β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), alcadeins, and low density lipoprotein receptor proteins, as well as various cytoplasmic proteins including Arf, kalirin-7, and Munc18. In particular, X11 and X11L are thought to play various roles in the regulation of neural functions in brain. Nevertheless, the protein levels and respective localization of individual family members remain controversial. We analyzed the protein levels of X11 and X11L in the corresponding single- and double-knockout mice. X11 and X11L did not exhibit obvious changes of their protein levels when the other was absent, especially in cerebrum in which they were widely co-expressed. In cerebellum, X11 and X11L localized in characteristic patterns in various types of neurons, and X11 protein level increased without an obvious ectopic localization in X11L-knockout mice. Interestingly, only X11L protein existed specifically in brain, whereas, contrary to the accepted view, X11 protein was detected at the highest levels in brain but was also strongly detected in pancreas, testis, and paranephros. Together, our results indicate that both X11 and X11L exert largely in brain neurons, but X11 may also function in peripheral tissues. PMID:27268412

  16. LC–MS Based Detection of Differential Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Leepika; Ressom, Habtom W.

    2010-01-01

    While several techniques are available in proteomics, LC-MS based analysis of complex protein/peptide mixtures has turned out to be a mainstream analytical technique for quantitative proteomics. Significant technical advances at both sample preparation/separation and mass spectrometry levels have revolutionized comprehensive proteome analysis. Moreover, automation and robotics for sample handling process permit multiple sampling with high throughput. For LC-MS based quantitative proteomics, sample preparation turns out to be critical step, as it can significantly influence sensitivity of downstream analysis. Several sample preparation strategies exist, including depletion of high abundant proteins or enrichment steps that facilitate protein quantification but with a compromise of focusing on a smaller subset of a proteome. While several experimental strategies have emerged, certain limitations such as physiochemical properties of a peptide/protein, protein turnover in a sample, analytical platform used for sample analysis and data processing, still imply challenges to quantitative proteomics. Other aspects that make analysis of a proteome a challenging task include dynamic nature of a proteome, need for efficient and fast analysis of protein due to its constant modifications inside a cell, concentration range of proteins that exceed dynamic range of a single analytical method, and absence of appropriate bioinformatics tools for analysis of large volume and high dimensional data. This paper gives an overview of various LC-MS methods currently used in quantitative proteomics and their potential for detecting differential protein expression. Fundamental steps such as sample preparation, LC separation, mass spectrometry, quantitative assessment and protein identification are discussed. For quantitative assessment of protein expression, both label and label free approaches are evaluated for their set of merits and demerits. While most of these methods edge on providing

  17. Expression, Delivery and Function of Insecticidal Proteins Expressed by Recombinant Baculoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, Jeremy A.; Bonning, Bryony C.; Harrison, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Since the development of methods for inserting and expressing genes in baculoviruses, a line of research has focused on developing recombinant baculoviruses that express insecticidal peptides and proteins. These recombinant viruses have been engineered with the goal of improving their pesticidal potential by shortening the time required for infection to kill or incapacitate insect pests and reducing the quantity of crop damage as a consequence. A wide variety of neurotoxic peptides, proteins that regulate insect physiology, degradative enzymes, and other potentially insecticidal proteins have been evaluated for their capacity to reduce the survival time of baculovirus-infected lepidopteran host larvae. Researchers have investigated the factors involved in the efficient expression and delivery of baculovirus-encoded insecticidal peptides and proteins, with much effort dedicated to identifying ideal promoters for driving transcription and signal peptides that mediate secretion of the expressed target protein. Other factors, particularly translational efficiency of transcripts derived from recombinant insecticidal genes and post-translational folding and processing of insecticidal proteins, remain relatively unexplored. The discovery of RNA interference as a gene-specific regulation mechanism offers a new approach for improvement of baculovirus biopesticidal efficacy through genetic modification. PMID:25609310

  18. Expression and Targeting of Secreted Proteins from Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Bauler, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular pathogen that replicates in a vacuole termed the inclusion. Many of the interactions of chlamydiae with the host cell are dependent upon bacterial protein synthesis and presumably exposure of these proteins to the cytosol. Because of the dearth of genetic tools for chlamydiae, previous studies examining secreted proteins required the use of heterologous bacterial systems. Recent advances in genetic manipulation of chlamydia now allow for transformation of the bacteria with plasmids. We describe here a shuttle vector system, pBOMB4, that permits expression of recombinant proteins under constitutive or conditional promoter control. We show that the inclusion membrane protein IncD is secreted in a type III-dependent manner from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and also secreted from C. trachomatis in infected cells where it localizes appropriately to the inclusion membrane. IncD truncated of the first 30 amino acids containing the secretion signal is no longer secreted and is retained by the bacteria. Cytosolic exposure of secreted proteins can be confirmed by using CyaA, GSK, or microinjection assays. A protein predicted to be retained within the bacteria, NrdB is indeed localized to the chlamydia. In addition, we have shown that the chlamydial effector protein, CPAF, which is secreted into the host cell cytosol by a Sec-dependent pathway, also accesses the cytosol when expressed from this system. These assays should prove useful to assess the secretion of other chlamydial proteins that are potentially exposed to the cytosol of the host cell. PMID:24443531

  19. Changes in protein expression during honey bee larval development

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Queenie WT; Foster, Leonard J

    2008-01-01

    Background The honey bee (Apis mellifera), besides its role in pollination and honey production, serves as a model for studying the biochemistry of development, metabolism, and immunity in a social organism. Here we use mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics to quantify nearly 800 proteins during the 5- to 6-day larval developmental stage, tracking their expression profiles. Results We report that honey bee larval growth is marked by an age-correlated increase of protein transporters and receptors, as well as protein nutrient stores, while opposite trends in protein translation activity and turnover were observed. Levels of the immunity factors prophenoloxidase and apismin are positively correlated with development, while others surprisingly were not significantly age-regulated, suggesting a molecular explanation for why bees are susceptible to major age-associated bee bacterial infections such as American Foulbrood or fungal diseases such as chalkbrood. Previously unreported findings include the reduction of antioxidant and G proteins in aging larvae. Conclusion These data have allowed us to integrate disparate findings in previous studies to build a model of metabolism and maturity of the immune system during larval development. This publicly accessible resource for protein expression trends will help generate new hypotheses in the increasingly important field of honey bee research. PMID:18959778

  20. G-protein coupled receptor expression patterns delineate medulloblastoma subgroups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Genetic profiling has identified four principle tumor subgroups; each subgroup is characterized by different initiating mutations, genetic and clinical profiles, and prognoses. The two most well-defined subgroups are caused by overactive signaling in the WNT and SHH mitogenic pathways; less is understood about Groups 3 and 4 medulloblastoma. Identification of tumor subgroup using molecular classification is set to become an important component of medulloblastoma diagnosis and staging, and will likely guide therapeutic options. However, thus far, few druggable targets have emerged. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) possess characteristics that make them ideal targets for molecular imaging and therapeutics; drugs targeting GPCRs account for 30-40% of all current pharmaceuticals. While expression patterns of many proteins in human medulloblastoma subgroups have been discerned, the expression pattern of GPCRs in medulloblastoma has not been investigated. We hypothesized that analysis of GPCR expression would identify clear subsets of medulloblastoma and suggest distinct GPCRs that might serve as molecular targets for both imaging and therapy. Results Our study found that medulloblastoma tumors fall into distinct clusters based solely on GPCR expression patterns. Normal cerebellum clustered separately from the tumor samples. Further, two of the tumor clusters correspond with high fidelity to the WNT and SHH subgroups of medulloblastoma. Distinct over-expressed GPCRs emerge; for example, LGR5 and GPR64 are significantly and uniquely over-expressed in the WNT subgroup of tumors, while PTGER4 is over-expressed in the SHH subgroup. Uniquely under-expressed GPCRs were also observed. Our key findings were independently validated using a large international dataset. Conclusions Our results identify GPCRs with potential to act as imaging and therapeutic targets. Elucidating tumorigenic pathways

  1. Tools to cope with difficult-to-express proteins.

    PubMed

    Saccardo, Paolo; Corchero, José Luís; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus

    2016-05-01

    The identification of DNA coding sequences contained in the genome of many organisms coupled to the use of high throughput approaches has fueled the field of recombinant protein production. Apart from basic research interests, the growing relevance of this field is highlighted by the global sales of the top ten biopharmaceuticals on the market, which exceeds the trillion USD in a steady increasing tendency. Therefore, the demand of biological compounds seems to have a long run on the market. One of the most popular expression systems is based on Escherichia coli cells which apart from being cost-effective counts with a large selection of resources. However, a significant percentage of the genes of interest are not efficiently expressed in this system, or the expressed proteins are accumulated within aggregates, degraded or lacking the desired biological activity, being finally discarded. In some instances, expressing the gene in a homologous expression system might alleviate those drawbacks but then the process usually increases in complexity and is not as cost-effective as the prokaryotic systems. An increasing toolbox is available to approach the production and purification of those difficult-to-express proteins, including different expression systems, promoters with different strengths, cultivation media and conditions, solubilization tags and chaperone coexpression, among others. However, in most cases, the process follows a non-integrative trial and error strategy with discrete success. This review is focused on the design of the whole process by using an integrative approach, taken into account the accumulated knowledge of the pivotal factors that affect any of the key processes, in an attempt to rationalize the efforts made in this appealing field. PMID:27079572

  2. Differential Expression of Borrelia burgdorferi Proteins during Growth In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Philipp, Mario T.

    1998-01-01

    In an earlier paper we described the transcriptionally regulated differential levels of expression of two lipoproteins of Borrelia burgdorferi, P35 and P7.5, during growth of the spirochetes in culture from logarithmic phase to stationary phase (K. J. Indest, R. Ramamoorthy, M. Solé, R. D. Gilmore, B. J. B. Johnson, and M. T. Philipp, Infect. Immun. 65:1165–1171, 1997). Here we further assess this phenomenon by investigating whether the expression of other antigens of B. burgdorferi, including some well-characterized ones, are also regulated in a growth-phase-dependent manner in vitro. These studies revealed 13 additional antigens, including OspC, BmpD, and GroEL, that were upregulated 2- to 66-fold and a 28-kDa protein that was downregulated 2- to 10-fold, during the interval between the logarithmic- and stationary-growth phases. Unlike with these in vitro-regulated proteins, the levels of expression of OspA, OspB, P72, flagellin, and BmpA remained unchanged throughout growth of the spirochetes in culture. Furthermore, ospAB, bmpAB, groEL, and fla all exhibited similar mRNA profiles, which is consistent with the constitutive expression of these genes. By contrast, the mRNA and protein profiles of ospC and bmpD indicated regulated expression of these genes. While bmpD exhibited a spike in mRNA expression in early stationary phase, ospC maintained a relatively higher level of mRNA throughout culture. These findings demonstrate that there are additional genes besides P7.5 and P35 whose regulated expression can be investigated in vitro and which may thus serve as models to facilitate the study of regulatory mechanisms in an organism that cycles between an arthropod and a vertebrate host. PMID:9784512

  3. Expression of bone morphogenetic proteins of human neoplastic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, S; Gao, Y H; Ohara-Nemoto, Y; Kataoka, H; Satoh, M

    1997-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are crucial factors of osteogenesis. We investigated the expressions of BMP subtypes in human salivary adenocarcinoma cell line (HSG-S8), tongue squamous cell (HSC-4) and gingival squamous cell (Ca9-22) carcinoma cell lines, gastric poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma cell (MNK45) and signet ring cell (KATOIII) carcinoma cell lines, rectal adenocarcinoma (RCM-1, RCM-2, and RCM-3), and thyroid (8505C) and bladder (T24) carcinoma cell lines by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RT-PCR disclosed that BMP-1 was expressed in all cell lines examined, and BMP-2 was amplified in almost all cells except MKN45. Two squamous cell carcinomas, HSC-4 and Ca9-22, and KATOIII expressed only BMP-1 and BMP-2. MKN45 did not express BMP-2, but expressed BMP-7 and weakly BMP-4 and BMP-5. In addition to the expression BMP-7, and HSG-S8 expressed BMP-6. These findings indicated that the neoplastic epithelial cells possessed a rather great potency to express BMP mRNAs. On the other hand, among these carcinoma cells, HSG-S8 solely induced bone in nude mouse tumors, and HSC-4 and KATOIII contained many calcified masses in tumors while the rest did not induce either. PMID:9247707

  4. Thermostable tag (TST) protein expression system: engineering thermotolerant recombinant proteins and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Luke, Jeremy M; Carnes, Aaron E; Sun, Ping; Hodgson, Clague P; Waugh, David S; Williams, James A

    2011-02-10

    Methods to increase temperature stability of vaccines and adjuvants are needed to reduce dependence on cold chain storage. We report herein creation and application of pVEX expression vectors to improve vaccine and adjuvant manufacture and thermostability. Defined media fermentation yields of 6g/L thermostable toll-like receptor 5 agonist flagellin were obtained using an IPTG inducible pVEX-flagellin expression vector. Alternative pVEX vectors encoding Pyrococcus furiosus maltodextrin-binding protein (pfMBP) as a fusion partner improved Influenza hemagglutinin antigen vaccine solubility and thermostability. A pfMBP hemagglutinin HA2 domain fusion protein was a potent immunogen. Manufacturing processes that combined up to 5 g/L defined media fermentation yields with rapid, selective, thermostable pfMBP fusion protein purification were developed. The pVEX pfMBP-based thermostable tag (TST) platform is a generic protein engineering approach to enable high yield manufacture of thermostable recombinant protein vaccine components.

  5. Expression of low molecular weight proteins in patients with leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, N; Abid, R; Qureshi, A W; Basheer, T

    2012-06-01

    The current study is conducted to observe the differences in the level of low molecular weight proteins in the sera of patients with leukaemia in comparison to healthy subjects (control group). The sera of patients with leukaemia showed 15 peaks in the densitometric curve in comparison to the seven peaks of the controls. The peaks in the experimental samples that coincide with those in the control were of 134.14, 113.15, 76.06, 63.25, 48.07, 22.85 and 16.47 kDa molecular weights, respectively. Most of the new peaks appeared between the proteins of molecular weight 36-29 kDa in the experimental groups. Mean density of the 134.14 kDa protein band showed an increase in the protein in experimental groups I and II only whereas 113.15 and 22.85 kDa protein were increased in all experimental groups of patients with leukaemia. The expression of 76.06 and 63.25 kDa protein fraction was downregulated in the patients with leukaemia. A decline in the level of the protein of 48.07 kDa was observed in patients with leukaemia except in group I. Unlike the other protein fractions, the level of the protein of 16.47 kDa was significantly (p < 0.05) increased with a maximum density in group II. Intergroup experimental) comparison revealed an increasing pattern of 95.44 and 89.21 kDa with maximum level in group III sera. However the protein fractions of 38.07 and 34.94 kDa varied in the serum with maximum density in Group IV Protein fractions of 32.92 and 31.24 kDa were expressed in all age groups of patients with leukaemia with a maximum density in group III whereas the percentage densities of 14.42 and 13.56 kDa protein were quite different. This preliminary study will provide a basis to study the role of different proteins in patients with leukaemia.

  6. Effects of influenza A virus NS1 protein on protein expression: the NS1 protein enhances translation and is not required for shutoff of host protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Mirella; Basler, Christopher F; Parisien, Jean-Patrick; Horvath, Curt M; Bourmakina, Svetlana; Zheng, Hongyong; Muster, Thomas; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2002-02-01

    The influenza A virus NS1 protein, a virus-encoded alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) antagonist, appears to be a key regulator of protein expression in infected cells. We now show that NS1 protein expression results in enhancement of reporter gene activity from transfected plasmids. This effect appears to be mediated at the translational level, and it is reminiscent of the activity of the adenoviral virus-associated I (VAI) RNA, a known inhibitor of the antiviral, IFN-induced, PKR protein. To study the effects of the NS1 protein on viral and cellular protein synthesis during influenza A virus infection, we used recombinant influenza viruses lacking the NS1 gene (delNS1) or expressing truncated NS1 proteins. Our results demonstrate that the NS1 protein is required for efficient viral protein synthesis in COS-7 cells. This activity maps to the amino-terminal domain of the NS1 protein, since cells infected with wild-type virus or with a mutant virus expressing a truncated NS1 protein-lacking approximately half of its carboxy-terminal end-showed similar kinetics of viral and cellular protein expression. Interestingly, no major differences in host cell protein synthesis shutoff or in viral protein expression were found among NS1 mutant viruses in Vero cells. Thus, another viral component(s) different from the NS1 protein is responsible for the inhibition of host protein synthesis during viral infection. In contrast to the earlier proposal suggesting that the NS1 protein regulates the levels of spliced M2 mRNA, no effects on M2 protein accumulation were seen in Vero cells infected with delNS1 virus.

  7. Survivin and related proteins in canine mammary tumors: immunohistochemical expression.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, L; Romanucci, M; Malatesta, D; D'Andrea, A; Ciccarelli, A; Della Salda, L

    2015-03-01

    Survivin is reexpressed in most human breast cancers, where its expression has been associated with tumor aggressiveness, poor prognosis, and poor response to therapy. Survivin expression was evaluated in 41 malignant canine mammary tumors (CMTs) by immunohistochemistry, in relation to histological grade and stage, and correlated with that of some related molecules (β-catenin, caspase 3, heat shock proteins) to understand their possible role in canine mammary tumorigenesis. An increase in nuclear survivin expression, compared with healthy mammary glands, was observed in CMTs, where nuclear immunolabeling was related to the presence of necrosis. No statistically significant relation was found between the expression of the investigated molecules and the histological grade or stage. The present study may suggest an important involvement of survivin in CMT tumorigenesis. Its overexpression in most of the cases evaluated might suggest that targeting survivin in CMTs may be a valid anticancer therapy. PMID:24686389

  8. Expression of Tyrosine Hydroxylase is Negatively Regulated Via Prion Protein.

    PubMed

    da Luz, Marcio Henrique Mello; Glezer, Isaias; Xavier, Andre Machado; da Silva, Marcelo Alberti Paiva; Pino, Jessica Monteiro Volejnik; Zamith, Thiago Panaro; Vieira, Taynara Fernanda; Antonio, Bruno Brito; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Martins, Vilma Regina; Lee, Kil Sun

    2016-07-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is a glycoprotein of the plasma membrane that plays pleiotropic functions by interacting with multiple signaling complexes at the cell surface. Recently, a number of studies have reported the involvement of PrP(C) in dopamine metabolism and signaling, including its interactions with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine receptors. However, the outcomes reported by independent studies are still debatable. Therefore in this study, we investigated the effects of PrP(C) on the TH expression during the differentiation of N2a cells with dibutyryl-cAMP, a well-known cAMP analog that activates TH transcription. Upon differentiation, TH was induced with concomitant reduction of PrP(C) at protein level, but not at mRNA level. shRNA-mediated PrP(C) reduction increased the basal level of TH at both mRNA and protein levels without dibutyryl-cAMP treatment. This phenotype was reversed by re-expression of PrP(C). PrP(C) knockdown also potentiated the effect of dibutyryl-cAMP on TH expression. Our findings suggest that PrP(C) has suppressive effects on TH expression. As a consequence, altered PrP(C) functions may affect the regulation of dopamine metabolism and related neurological disorders.

  9. Determination of protein markers in human serum: Analysis of protein expression in toxic oil syndrome studies.

    PubMed

    Quero, Carmen; Colomé, Nuria; Prieto, Maria Rosario; Carrascal, Montserrat; Posada, Manuel; Gelpí, Emilio; Abian, Joaquin

    2004-02-01

    Toxic oil syndrome (TOS) is a disease that appeared in Spain in 1981. It affected more than 20 000 people and produced over 300 deaths in the first 2 years. In this paper, a prospective study on the differences in gene expression in sera between a control versus a TOS-affected population, both originally exposed to the toxic oil, is presented. Differential protein expression was analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Several problems related with serum analysis by 2-DE were addressed in order to improve protein detection in the gel images. Three new commercial systems for albumin depletion were tested to optimize the detection of minor proteins that can be obscured by the presence of a few families of high abundance proteins (albumin, immunoglobulins). Other factors, such as the use of nonionic reductants or the presence of thiourea in the gels, were also tested. From these optimized images, a group of 329 major gel spots was located, matched and compared in serum samples. Thirty-five of these protein spots were found to be under- or overexpressed in TOS patients (> three-fold increase or decrease). Proteins in the differential spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight peptide map fingerprinting and database search. Several haptoglobin isoforms were found to be differentially expressed, showing expression phenotypes that could be related with TOS affection. Haptoglobin phenotypes have been previously reported to have important biological and clinical consequences and have been described as risk factors for several diseases.

  10. Alternative Eukaryotic Expression Systems for the Production of Proteins and Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Sara; López-Estepa, Miguel; Fernández, Francisco J; Suárez, Teresa; Vega, M Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Besides the most established expression hosts, several eukaryotic microorganisms and filamentous fungi have also been successfully used as platforms for the production of foreign proteins. Filamentous fungi and Dictyostelium discoideum are two prominent examples. Filamentous fungi, typically Aspergillus and Trichoderma, are usually employed for the industrial production of enzymes and secondary metabolites for food processing, pharmaceutical drugs production, and textile and paper applications, with multiple products already accepted for their commercialization. The low cost of culture medium components, high secretion capability directly to the extracellular medium, and the intrinsic ability to produce post-translational modifications similar to the mammalian type, have promoted this group as successful hosts for the expression of proteins, including examples from phylogenetically distant groups: humans proteins such as IL-2, IL-6 or epithelial growth factor; α-galactosidase from plants; or endoglucanase from Cellulomonas fimi, among others. D. discoideum is a social amoeba that can be used as an expression platform for a variety of proteins, which has been extensively illustrated for cytoskeletal proteins. New vectors for heterologous expression in D. discoideum have been recently developed that might increase the usefulness of this system and expand the range of protein classes that can be tackled. Continuous developments are ongoing to improve strains, promoters, production and downstream processes for filamentous fungi, D. discoideum, and other alternative eukaryotic hosts. Either for the overexpression of individual genes, or in the coexpression of multiples genes, this chapter illustrates the enormous possibilities offered by these groups of eukaryotic organisms. PMID:27165325

  11. Alternative Eukaryotic Expression Systems for the Production of Proteins and Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Sara; López-Estepa, Miguel; Fernández, Francisco J; Suárez, Teresa; Vega, M Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Besides the most established expression hosts, several eukaryotic microorganisms and filamentous fungi have also been successfully used as platforms for the production of foreign proteins. Filamentous fungi and Dictyostelium discoideum are two prominent examples. Filamentous fungi, typically Aspergillus and Trichoderma, are usually employed for the industrial production of enzymes and secondary metabolites for food processing, pharmaceutical drugs production, and textile and paper applications, with multiple products already accepted for their commercialization. The low cost of culture medium components, high secretion capability directly to the extracellular medium, and the intrinsic ability to produce post-translational modifications similar to the mammalian type, have promoted this group as successful hosts for the expression of proteins, including examples from phylogenetically distant groups: humans proteins such as IL-2, IL-6 or epithelial growth factor; α-galactosidase from plants; or endoglucanase from Cellulomonas fimi, among others. D. discoideum is a social amoeba that can be used as an expression platform for a variety of proteins, which has been extensively illustrated for cytoskeletal proteins. New vectors for heterologous expression in D. discoideum have been recently developed that might increase the usefulness of this system and expand the range of protein classes that can be tackled. Continuous developments are ongoing to improve strains, promoters, production and downstream processes for filamentous fungi, D. discoideum, and other alternative eukaryotic hosts. Either for the overexpression of individual genes, or in the coexpression of multiples genes, this chapter illustrates the enormous possibilities offered by these groups of eukaryotic organisms.

  12. Expression, purification and crystallization of a lyssavirus matrix (M) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Assenberg, René; Delmas, Olivier; Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Berrow, Nick; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J.; Bourhy, Hervé; Grimes, Jonathan M.

    2008-04-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of the full-length matrix protein from three lyssaviruses is described. The matrix (M) proteins of lyssaviruses (family Rhabdoviridae) are crucial to viral morphogenesis as well as in modulating replication and transcription of the viral genome. To date, no high-resolution structural information has been obtained for full-length rhabdovirus M. Here, the cloning, expression and purification of the matrix proteins from three lyssaviruses, Lagos bat virus (LAG), Mokola virus and Thailand dog virus, are described. Crystals have been obtained for the full-length M protein from Lagos bat virus (LAG M). Successful crystallization depended on a number of factors, in particular the addition of an N-terminal SUMO fusion tag to increase protein solubility. Diffraction data have been recorded from crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled LAG M to 2.75 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that these crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9–57.2, c = 187.9–188.6 Å, consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, and structure determination is currently in progress.

  13. Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) Expression and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zagouri, Flora; Bournakis, Evangelos; Koutsoukos, Konstantinos; Papadimitriou, Christos A.

    2012-01-01

    Hsp90 is an abundant protein in mammalian cells. It forms several discrete complexes, each containing distinct groups of co-chaperones that assist protein folding and refolding during stress, protein transport and degradation. It interacts with a variety of proteins that play key roles in breast neoplasia including estrogen receptors, tumor suppressor p53 protein, angiogenesis transcription factor HIF-1alpha, antiapoptotic kinase Akt, Raf-1 MAP kinase and a variety of receptor tyrosine kinases of the erbB family. Elevated Hsp90 expression has been documented in breast ductal carcinomas contributing to the proliferative activity of breast cancer cells; whilst a significantly decreased Hsp90 expression has been shown in infiltrative lobular carcinomas and lobular neoplasia. Hsp90 overexpression has been proposed as a component of a mechanism through which breast cancer cells become resistant to various stress stimuli. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of HSPs can provide therapeutic opportunities in the field of cancer treatment. 17-allylamino,17-demethoxygeldanamycin is the first Hsp90 inhibitor that has clinically been investigated in phase II trial, yielding promising results in patients with HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer, whilst other Hsp90 inhibitors (retaspimycin HCL, NVP-AUY922, NVP-BEP800, CNF2024/BIIB021, SNX-5422, STA-9090, etc.) are currently under evaluation. PMID:24280702

  14. Stepwise optimization of a low-temperature Bacillus subtilis expression system for "difficult to express" proteins.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Norma; Homuth, Georg; Schweder, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve the overproduction of "difficult to express" proteins, a low-temperature expression system for Bacillus subtilis based on the cold-inducible promoter of the desaturase-encoding des gene was constructed. Selected regulatory DNA sequence elements from B. subtilis genes known to be cold-inducible were fused to different model genes. It could be demonstrated that these regulatory elements are able to mediate increased heterologous gene expression, either by improved translation efficiency or by higher messenger RNA (mRNA) stability. In case of a cold-adapted β-galactosidase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAE79A serving as the model, significantly higher expression was achieved by fusing its coding sequence to the so-called "downstream box" sequence of cspB encoding the major B. subtilis cold-shock protein. The combination of this fusion with a cspB 5'-UTR stem-loop structure resulted in further enhancement of the β-galactosidase expression. In addition, integration of the transcription terminator of the B. subtilis cold-inducible bkd operon downstream of the target genes caused a higher mRNA stability and enabled thus a further significant increase in expression. Finally, the fully optimized expression system was validated by overproducing a B. subtilis xylanase as well as an α-glucosidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the latter known for tending to form inclusion bodies. These analyses verified the applicability of the engineered expression system for extracellular and intracellular protein synthesis in B. subtilis, thereby confirming the suitability of this host organism for the overproduction of critical, poorly soluble proteins. PMID:25851716

  15. tincar encodes a novel transmembrane protein expressed in the Tinman-expressing cardioblasts of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Yuki; Sawamoto, Kazunobu; Okano, Hideyuki

    2002-12-01

    We cloned and characterized the Drosophila gene, tincar (tinc), which encodes a novel protein with eight putative transmembrane domains. The tinc mRNA was expressed specifically in four of the six pairs of cardioblasts in each segment, in a pattern identical to that of tinman (tin), a homeobox gene required for the specification of the dorsal vessel. In the non-Tin-expressing pairs of cardioblasts, tinc transcription seemed to be repressed by Seven-up. PMID:14516698

  16. tincar encodes a novel transmembrane protein expressed in the Tinman-expressing cardioblasts of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Yuki; Sawamoto, Kazunobu; Okano, Hideyuki

    2002-12-01

    We cloned and characterized the Drosophila gene, tincar (tinc), which encodes a novel protein with eight putative transmembrane domains. The tinc mRNA was expressed specifically in four of the six pairs of cardioblasts in each segment, in a pattern identical to that of tinman (tin), a homeobox gene required for the specification of the dorsal vessel. In the non-Tin-expressing pairs of cardioblasts, tinc transcription seemed to be repressed by Seven-up. PMID:12617821

  17. Stepwise optimization of a low-temperature Bacillus subtilis expression system for "difficult to express" proteins.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Norma; Homuth, Georg; Schweder, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve the overproduction of "difficult to express" proteins, a low-temperature expression system for Bacillus subtilis based on the cold-inducible promoter of the desaturase-encoding des gene was constructed. Selected regulatory DNA sequence elements from B. subtilis genes known to be cold-inducible were fused to different model genes. It could be demonstrated that these regulatory elements are able to mediate increased heterologous gene expression, either by improved translation efficiency or by higher messenger RNA (mRNA) stability. In case of a cold-adapted β-galactosidase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAE79A serving as the model, significantly higher expression was achieved by fusing its coding sequence to the so-called "downstream box" sequence of cspB encoding the major B. subtilis cold-shock protein. The combination of this fusion with a cspB 5'-UTR stem-loop structure resulted in further enhancement of the β-galactosidase expression. In addition, integration of the transcription terminator of the B. subtilis cold-inducible bkd operon downstream of the target genes caused a higher mRNA stability and enabled thus a further significant increase in expression. Finally, the fully optimized expression system was validated by overproducing a B. subtilis xylanase as well as an α-glucosidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the latter known for tending to form inclusion bodies. These analyses verified the applicability of the engineered expression system for extracellular and intracellular protein synthesis in B. subtilis, thereby confirming the suitability of this host organism for the overproduction of critical, poorly soluble proteins.

  18. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  19. Expression of Superficial Zone Protein in Mandibular Condyle Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, S; Schmid, T; Tanne, Y; Kamiya, T; Honda, K; Ohno-Nakahara, M; Swentko, N; Desai, T A; Tanne, K; Knudson, CB; Knudson, W

    2011-01-01

    Objective Superficial zone protein (SZP) has been shown to function in the boundary lubrication of articular cartilages of the extremities. However, the expression of SZP has not been clarified in mandibular cartilage which is a tissue that includes a thick fibrous layer on the surface. This study was conducted to clarify the distribution of SZP on the mandibular condyle and the regulatory effects of humoral factors on the expression in both explants and fibroblasts derived from mandibular condyle. Methods The distribution of SZP was determined in bovine mandibular condyle cartilage, and the effects of IL-1β and TGF-β on SZP expression were examined in condyle explants and, fibroblasts derived from the fibrous zone of condyle cartilage. Results SZP was highly distributed in the superficial zone of intact condyle cartilage. The SZP expression was up-regulated by TGF-β in both explants and cultured fibroblasts, whereas the expression was slightly down-regulated by IL-1β. A significant increase in accumulation of SZP protein was also observed in the culture medium of the fibroblasts treated with TGF-β. Conclusions These results suggest that SZP plays an important role in boundary lubrication of mandible condylar cartilage, is synthesized locally within the condyle itself and, exhibits differential regulation by cell mediators relevant to mandibular condyle repairing and pathologies. PMID:16563813

  20. Heterogeneity mapping of protein expression in tumors using quantitative immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Faratian, Dana; Christiansen, Jason; Gustavson, Mark; Jones, Christine; Scott, Christopher; Um, InHwa; Harrison, David J

    2011-10-25

    Morphologic heterogeneity within an individual tumor is well-recognized by histopathologists in surgical practice. While this often takes the form of areas of distinct differentiation into recognized histological subtypes, or different pathological grade, often there are more subtle differences in phenotype which defy accurate classification (Figure 1). Ultimately, since morphology is dictated by the underlying molecular phenotype, areas with visible differences are likely to be accompanied by differences in the expression of proteins which orchestrate cellular function and behavior, and therefore, appearance. The significance of visible and invisible (molecular) heterogeneity for prognosis is unknown, but recent evidence suggests that, at least at the genetic level, heterogeneity exists in the primary tumor(1,2), and some of these sub-clones give rise to metastatic (and therefore lethal) disease. Moreover, some proteins are measured as biomarkers because they are the targets of therapy (for instance ER and HER2 for tamoxifen and trastuzumab (Herceptin), respectively). If these proteins show variable expression within a tumor then therapeutic responses may also be variable. The widely used histopathologic scoring schemes for immunohistochemistry either ignore, or numerically homogenize the quantification of protein expression. Similarly, in destructive techniques, where the tumor samples are homogenized (such as gene expression profiling), quantitative information can be elucidated, but spatial information is lost. Genetic heterogeneity mapping approaches in pancreatic cancer have relied either on generation of a single cell suspension(3), or on macrodissection(4). A recent study has used quantum dots in order to map morphologic and molecular heterogeneity in prostate cancer tissue(5), providing proof of principle that morphology and molecular mapping is feasible, but falling short of quantifying the heterogeneity. Since immunohistochemistry is, at best, only semi

  1. HIV-1 Tat Protein Enhances Expression and Function of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yancong; Zhang, Kun; Yin, Xiaojie; Nie, Qichang; Ma, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters can transfer a variety of antiviral agents from the cytoplasm to body fluid, which results in a reduced intracellular concentration of the drugs. Proteins of HIV-1, e.g., Tat and gp120, altered some types of ABC transporter expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells and astrocytes. However, the effect of Tat on ABC transporters in T lymphocytes is unclear. In this study the status of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) in Tat expressing cell lines was examined with real-time PCR and flow cytometry. It was found that HIV-1 Tat protein upregulated BCRP expression and enhanced efflux mediated by BCRP significantly, which could inhibit antiviral drugs from entering infected cells and interfere with the therapeutic effect of HAART. PMID:26367065

  2. Bacteriophage membrane protein P9 as a fusion partner for the efficient expression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yuna; Jung, Hyeim; Lim, Dongbin

    2015-12-01

    Despite their important roles and economic values, studies of membrane proteins have been hampered by the difficulties associated with obtaining sufficient amounts of protein. Here, we report a novel membrane protein expression system that uses the major envelope protein (P9) of phage φ6 as an N-terminal fusion partner. Phage membrane protein P9 facilitated the synthesis of target proteins and their integration into the Escherichia coli cell membrane. This system was used to produce various multi-pass transmembrane proteins, including G-protein-coupled receptors, transporters, and ion channels of human origin. Green fluorescent protein fusion was used to confirm the correct folding of the expressed proteins. Of the 14 membrane proteins tested, eight were highly expressed, three were moderately expressed, and three were barely expressed in E. coli. Seven of the eight highly expressed proteins could be purified after extraction with the mild detergent lauryldimethylamine-oxide. Although a few proteins have previously been developed as fusion partners to augment membrane protein production, we believe that the major envelope protein P9 described here is better suited to the efficient expression of eukaryotic transmembrane proteins in E. coli.

  3. Flunitrazepam rapidly reduces GABAA receptor subunit protein expression via a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jonathan D; Price, Sally A; Bristow, David R

    1998-01-01

    Acute flunitrazepam (1 μM) exposure for 1 h reduced GABAA receptor α1 (22±4%, mean±s.e.mean) and β2/3 (21±4%) subunit protein levels in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells. This rapid decrease in subunit proteins was completely prevented by bisindolymaleimide 1 (1 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, but not by N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89, 4.8 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinases A and G. These results suggest the existence of a benzodiazepine-induced mechanism to rapidly alter GABAA receptor protein expression, that appears to be dependent on protein kinase C activity. PMID:9723942

  4. Expression data on liver metabolic pathway genes and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Raja Gopal Reddy, Mooli; Pavan Kumar, Chodisetti; Mahesh, Malleswarapu; Sravan Kumar, Manchiryala; Jeyakumar, Shanmugam M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the expression data on various metabolic pathways of liver with special emphasize on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis, both at gene and protein levels. The data were obtained to understand the effect of vitamin A deficiency on the expression status (both gene and protein levels) of some of the key factors involved in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, triglyceride secretion, long chain PUFA, resolvin D1 synthesis, glucose transport and glycogen synthesis of liver, using modern biology tools, such as quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting techniques. This data article provides the supporting evidence to the article “Vitamin A deficiency suppresses high fructose-induced triglyceride synthesis and elevates resolvin D1 levels” [1] and therefore, these data may be referred back, for comprehensive understanding and interpretations and for future studies. PMID:26909377

  5. Recombinant Dragline Silk-Like Proteins-Expression and Purification.

    PubMed

    Gaines, William A; Marcotte, William R

    2011-03-01

    Spider dragline silk is a proteinaceous fiber with impressive physical characteristics making it attractive for use in advanced materials. The fiber is composed of two proteins (spidroins MaSp1 and MaSp2), each of which contains a large central repeat array flanked by non-repetitive N- and C-terminal domains. The repeat arrays appear to be largely responsible for the tensile properties of the fiber, suggesting that the N- and C-terminal domains may be involved in self-assembly. We recently isolated the MaSp1 and MaSp2 N-terminal domains from Nephila clavipes and have incorporated these into mini-silk genes for expression in transgenic systems. Current efforts involve the development of expression vectors that will allow purification using a removable affinity tag for scalable protein purification.

  6. Disposable bioreactors for inoculum production and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Eibl, Regine; Löffelholz, Christian; Eibl, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Disposable bioreactors have been increasingly implemented over the past ten years. This relates to both R & D and commercial manufacture, in particular, in animal cell-based processes. Among the numerous disposable bioreactors which are available today, wave-mixed bag bioreactors and stirred bioreactors are predominant. Whereas wave-mixed bag bioreactors represent the system of choice for inoculum production, stirred systems are often preferred for protein expression. For this reason, the authors present protocols instructing the reader how to use the wave-mixed BIOSTAT CultiBag RM 20 L for inoculum production and the stirred UniVessel SU 2 L for recombinant protein production at benchtop scale. All methods described are based on a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) suspension cell line expressing the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP).

  7. Ribozymes, riboswitches and beyond: regulation of gene expression without proteins

    PubMed Central

    Serganov, Alexander; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Although various functions of RNA are carried out in conjunction with proteins, some catalytic RNAs, or ribozymes, which contribute to a range of cellular processes, require little or no assistance from proteins. Furthermore, the discovery of metabolite-sensing riboswitches and other types of RNA sensors has revealed RNA-based mechanisms that cells use to regulate gene expression in response to internal and external changes. Structural studies have shown how these RNAs can carry out a range of functions. In addition, the contribution of ribozymes and riboswitches to gene expression is being revealed as far more widespread than was previously appreciated. These findings have implications for understanding how cellular functions might have evolved from RNA-based origins. PMID:17846637

  8. Human ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas express extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Löhr, M.; Trautmann, B.; Göttler, M.; Peters, S.; Zauner, I.; Maillet, B.; Klöppel, G.

    1994-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas are characterised by a dense connective tissue reaction. To test the hypothesis that stroma components are synthesised and produced by the tumour cells themselves, eight cell lines as well as six xenografted tumours from human ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas were examined for the expression of extracellular matrix proteins (ECM), using cDNA probes and antibodies to collagen types I, III and IV, vitronectin, fibronectin, undulin and laminin. All tumour cell lines (CAPAN-1, CAPAN-2, AsPC-1, BxPC-3, PANC-1, PaCa-2, PaCa-3, PaCa-44) and xenografted human pancreatic tumours expressed at least one of the examined ECM at the RNA (collagen type IV > laminin = fibronectin = vitronectin > collagen type III > undulin > collagen type I) or protein level (collagen type IV = collagen type III > vitronectin > laminin > collagen type I = fibronectin > undulin). In nude mouse tumours expression of laminin and collagen I was most pronounced in well-differentiated carcinomas. In a few tumours, collagen type III, vitronectin and undulin were expressed on the luminal side of the neoplastic glands, suggesting loss of normal polar differentiation. Incubation with fetal calf serum modulated ECM RNA levels to a varying extent in all but one cell line (AsPC-1). The results suggest that human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas cells are capable of synthesising and producing extracellular matrix proteins in vitro and in vivo, but that the extent and pattern of ECM expression differs between the various tumours and conditions tested. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8286197

  9. Differential rates of gene expression monitored by green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Lu, Canghai; Albano, C Renee; Bentley, William E; Rao, Govind

    2002-08-20

    The use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter gene has made a broad impact in several areas, especially in studies of protein trafficking, localization, and expression analysis. GFP's many advantages are that it is small, autocatalytic, and does not require fixation, cell disruption, or the addition of cofactors or substrates. Two characteristics of GFP, extreme stability and chromophore cyclization lag time, pose a hindrance to the application of GFP as a real-time gene expression reporter in bioprocess applications. In this report, we present analytical methods that overcome these problems and enable the temporal visualization of discrete gene regulatory events. The approach we present measures the rate of change in GFP fluorescence, which in turn reflects the rate of gene expression. We conducted fermentation and microplate experiments using a protein synthesis inhibitor to illustrate the feasibility of this system. Additional experiments using the classic gene regulation of the araBAD operon show the utility of GFP as a near real-time indicator of gene regulation. With repetitive induction and repression of the arabinose promoter, the differential rate of GFP fluorescence emission shows corresponding cyclical changes during the culture.

  10. Differential expression of ribosomal proteins in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Elizabeth B; Dueber, Julie C; Qualtieri, Julianne; Tedesco, Jason; Erdogan, Begum; Bosompem, Amma; Kim, Annette S

    2016-02-01

    Aberrations of ribosomal biogenesis have been implicated in several congenital bone marrow failure syndromes, such as Diamond-Blackfan anaemia, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and Dyskeratosis Congenita. Recent studies have identified haploinsufficiency of RPS14 in the acquired bone marrow disease isolated 5q minus syndrome, a subtype of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, the expression of various proteins comprising the ribosomal subunits and other proteins enzymatically involved in the synthesis of the ribosome has not been explored in non-5q minus MDS. Furthermore, differences in the effects of these expression alterations among myeloid, erythroid and megakaryocyte lineages have not been well elucidated. We examined the expression of several proteins related to ribosomal biogenesis in bone marrow biopsy specimens from patients with MDS (5q minus patients excluded) and controls with no known myeloid disease. Specifically, we found that there is overexpression of RPS24, DKC1 and SBDS in MDS. This overexpression is in contrast to the haploinsufficiency identified in the congenital bone marrow failure syndromes and in acquired 5q minus MDS. Potential mechanisms for these differences and aetiology for these findings in MDS are discussed.

  11. Proteasome inhibitors suppress the protein expression of mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Halasi, Marianna; Pandit, Bulbul; Gartel, Andrei L

    2014-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in cancer, with almost 50% of all types of cancer expressing a mutant form of p53. p53 transactivates the expression of its primary negative regulator, HDM2. HDM2 is a ubiquitin ligase, which initiates the proteasomal degradation of p53 following ubiquitination. Proteasome inhibitors, by targeting the ubiquitin proteasome pathway inhibit the degradation of the majority of cellular proteins including wild-type p53. In contrast, in this study we found that the protein expression of mutant p53 was suppressed following treatment with established or novel proteasome inhibitors. Furthermore, for the first time we demonstrated that Arsenic trioxide, which was previously shown to suppress mutant p53 protein level, exhibits proteasome inhibitory activity. Proteasome inhibitor-mediated suppression of mutant p53 was partially rescued by the knockdown of HDM2, suggesting that the stabilization of HDM2 by proteasome inhibitors might be responsible for mutant p53 suppression to some extent. This study suggests that suppression of mutant p53 is a general property of proteasome inhibitors and it provides additional rationale to use proteasome inhibitors for the treatment of tumors with mutant p53.

  12. Proteasome inhibitors suppress the protein expression of mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Halasi, Marianna; Pandit, Bulbul; Gartel, Andrei L

    2014-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in cancer, with almost 50% of all types of cancer expressing a mutant form of p53. p53 transactivates the expression of its primary negative regulator, HDM2. HDM2 is a ubiquitin ligase, which initiates the proteasomal degradation of p53 following ubiquitination. Proteasome inhibitors, by targeting the ubiquitin proteasome pathway inhibit the degradation of the majority of cellular proteins including wild-type p53. In contrast, in this study we found that the protein expression of mutant p53 was suppressed following treatment with established or novel proteasome inhibitors. Furthermore, for the first time we demonstrated that Arsenic trioxide, which was previously shown to suppress mutant p53 protein level, exhibits proteasome inhibitory activity. Proteasome inhibitor-mediated suppression of mutant p53 was partially rescued by the knockdown of HDM2, suggesting that the stabilization of HDM2 by proteasome inhibitors might be responsible for mutant p53 suppression to some extent. This study suggests that suppression of mutant p53 is a general property of proteasome inhibitors and it provides additional rationale to use proteasome inhibitors for the treatment of tumors with mutant p53. PMID:25485499

  13. Axons modulate the expression of proteolipid protein in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Scherer, S S; Vogelbacker, H H; Kamholz, J

    1992-06-01

    We examined the expression of mRNA encoding proteolipid protein (PLP), the major myelin protein in the CNS, in developing rat cerebrum, and in normal and degenerating optic nerves. PLP transcripts were initiated at two clusters of start sites that were separated by about 30 base pairs. During the peak of PLP mRNA expression in developing cerebrum, a higher proportion of PLP transcripts were initiated from the distal start site, furthest from the open reading frame, than in mature cerebrum. We enucleated one eye of immature rats to cause Wallerian degeneration in the optic nerve. In these degenerating optic nerves, the steady state levels of PLP mRNA fell markedly, and the proportion of distally initiated PLP transcripts declined to the same proportion found in normal adult nerves. Changes in myelin gene expression were not limited to PLP mRNA, as the steady-state levels of myelin basic protein (MBP) mRNA paralleled those of PLP mRNA in the developing cerebrum and in degenerating optic nerves. Thus, oligodendrocytes require axons to maintain their normal levels of PLP and MBP transcripts and the high proportion of distally initiated PLP transcripts that characterize early myelination.

  14. Mutational Analysis of the Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Precursor Proteins for Gn Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Phoenix, Inaia; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Nishiyama, Shoko; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) M-segment encodes the 78 kD, NSm, Gn, and Gc proteins. The 1st AUG generates the 78 kD-Gc precursor, the 2nd AUG generates the NSm-Gn-Gc precursor, and the 3rd AUG makes the NSm’-Gn-Gc precursor. To understand biological changes due to abolishment of the precursors, we quantitatively measured Gn secretion using a reporter assay, in which a Gaussia luciferase (gLuc) protein is fused to the RVFV M-segment pre-Gn region. Using the reporter assay, the relative expression of Gn/gLuc fusion proteins was analyzed among various AUG mutants. The reporter assay showed efficient secretion of Gn/gLuc protein from the precursor made from the 2nd AUG, while the removal of the untranslated region upstream of the 2nd AUG (AUG2-M) increased the secretion of the Gn/gLuc protein. Subsequently, recombinant MP-12 strains encoding mutations in the pre-Gn region were rescued, and virological phenotypes were characterized. Recombinant MP-12 encoding the AUG2-M mutation replicated slightly less efficiently than the control, indicating that viral replication is further influenced by the biological processes occurring after Gn expression, rather than the Gn abundance. This study showed that, not only the abolishment of AUG, but also the truncation of viral UTR, affects the expression of Gn protein by the RVFV M-segment. PMID:27231931

  15. Efficient expression and purification of biologically active human cystatin proteins.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Sakshi; Tomar, Raghuvir S

    2016-02-01

    Cystatins are reversible cysteine protease inhibitor proteins. They are known to play important roles in controlling cathepsins, neurodegenerative disease, and in immune system regulation. Production of recombinant cystatin proteins is important for biochemical and function characterization. In this study, we cloned and expressed human stefin A, stefin B and cystatin C in Escherichia coli. Human stefin A, stefin B and cystatin C were purified from soluble fraction. For cystatin C, we used various chaperone plasmids to make cystatin C soluble, as it is reported to localize in inclusion bodies. Trigger factor, GroES-GroEL, DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE chaperones lead to the presence of cystatin C in the soluble fraction. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography, glutathione sepharose and anion exchange chromatography techniques were employed for efficient purification of these proteins. Their biological activities were tested by inhibition assays against cathepsin L and H3 protease.

  16. The expression and induction of heat shock proteins in molluscs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongwu; Chen, Zhiwei

    2013-05-01

    Living cells respond to stress stimuli by triggering rapid changes in the protein profiles, and the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) plays an important part in this process. HSPs, mainly acting as molecular chaperones, are constitutively expressed in cells and involved in protein folding, assembly, degradation, and intracellular localization. The overexpression of HSPs represents a ubiquitous molecular mechanism to cope with stress. Compared to vertebrates, molluscs have a biphasic life cycle where pelagic larvae go through settlement and metamorphosis. HSPs may play an important role in the survival strategy of molluscs during the biphasic life stages. Since aquatic environments are highly dynamic, molluscs may be subject to a variety of sources of stress and HSPs might play a more important role in the adaptation of these animals. Moreover, the mechanisms of stress tolerance in molluscs can offer fundamental insights into the adaptation of organisms for a wide range of environmental challenges. The cDNA of HSPs has been cloned from some molluscs, and HSPs can be induced by heat stress, hypoxia, heavy metal contamination, and aestivation, etc. The expression of HSPs was detected in the neuroendocrine system, mollusc development, and reproductive process. Furthermore, the induction of HSPs is related with the phosphorylation of stress-activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and cJun-N-terminal kinases (JNKs) in molluscs.

  17. Grizzly bear corticosteroid binding globulin: Cloning and serum protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chow, Brian A; Hamilton, Jason; Alsop, Derek; Cattet, Marc R L; Stenhouse, Gordon; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2010-06-01

    Serum corticosteroid levels are routinely measured as markers of stress in wild animals. However, corticosteroid levels rise rapidly in response to the acute stress of capture and restraint for sampling, limiting its use as an indicator of chronic stress. We hypothesized that serum corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the primary transport protein for corticosteroids in circulation, may be a better marker of the stress status prior to capture in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos). To test this, a full-length CBG cDNA was cloned and sequenced from grizzly bear testis and polyclonal antibodies were generated for detection of this protein in bear sera. The deduced nucleotide and protein sequences were 1218 bp and 405 amino acids, respectively. Multiple sequence alignments showed that grizzly bear CBG (gbCBG) was 90% and 83% identical to the dog CBG nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. The affinity purified rabbit gbCBG antiserum detected grizzly bear but not human CBG. There were no sex differences in serum total cortisol concentration, while CBG expression was significantly higher in adult females compared to males. Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in bears captured by leg-hold snare compared to those captured by remote drug delivery from helicopter. However, serum CBG expression between these two groups did not differ significantly. Overall, serum CBG levels may be a better marker of chronic stress, especially because this protein is not modulated by the stress of capture and restraint in grizzly bears.

  18. Grizzly bear corticosteroid binding globulin: Cloning and serum protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chow, Brian A; Hamilton, Jason; Alsop, Derek; Cattet, Marc R L; Stenhouse, Gordon; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2010-06-01

    Serum corticosteroid levels are routinely measured as markers of stress in wild animals. However, corticosteroid levels rise rapidly in response to the acute stress of capture and restraint for sampling, limiting its use as an indicator of chronic stress. We hypothesized that serum corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the primary transport protein for corticosteroids in circulation, may be a better marker of the stress status prior to capture in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos). To test this, a full-length CBG cDNA was cloned and sequenced from grizzly bear testis and polyclonal antibodies were generated for detection of this protein in bear sera. The deduced nucleotide and protein sequences were 1218 bp and 405 amino acids, respectively. Multiple sequence alignments showed that grizzly bear CBG (gbCBG) was 90% and 83% identical to the dog CBG nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. The affinity purified rabbit gbCBG antiserum detected grizzly bear but not human CBG. There were no sex differences in serum total cortisol concentration, while CBG expression was significantly higher in adult females compared to males. Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in bears captured by leg-hold snare compared to those captured by remote drug delivery from helicopter. However, serum CBG expression between these two groups did not differ significantly. Overall, serum CBG levels may be a better marker of chronic stress, especially because this protein is not modulated by the stress of capture and restraint in grizzly bears. PMID:20347821

  19. Expression cloning of genes encoding human peroxisomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Spathaky, J.M.; Tate, A.W.; Cox, T.M.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous metabolic disorders associated with diverse peroxisomal defects have been identified but their molecular characterization has been hampered by difficulties associated with the purification of proteins from this fragile organelle. We have utilized antibodies directed against the C-terminal tripeptide peroxisomal targeting signal to detect hitherto unknown peroxisomal proteins in tissue fractions and to isolate genes encoding peroxisonal proteins from human expression libraries. We immunized rabbits with a peptide conjugate encompassing the C-terminal nine amino acids of rat peroxisomal acyl CoA oxidase. Immunoprecipitation assays using radio-labelled peptide showed that the antibody specifically recognizes the terminal SKL motif as well as C-terminal SHL and SRL but not SHL at an internal position. Affinity-purified antibody was used to probe Western blots of crude and peroxisome-enriched monkey liver preparations and detected 8-10 proteins specifically in the peroxisome fractions. 100 positive clones were identified on screening a human liver cDNA expression library in {lambda}-gt11. Sequence analysis has confirmed the identity of cDNA clones for human acyl CoA oxidase and epoxide hydrolase. Four clones show no sequence identity and their putative role in the human peroxisome is being explored.

  20. Phylogeny and expression of carbonic anhydrase-related proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are found in many organisms, in which they contribute to several important biological processes. The vertebrate α-CA family consists of 16 subfamilies, three of which (VIII, X and XI) consist of acatalytic proteins. These are named carbonic anhydrase related proteins (CARPs), and their inactivity is due to absence of one or more Zn-binding histidine residues. In this study, we analyzed and evaluated the distribution of genes encoding CARPs in different organisms using bioinformatic methods, and studied their expression in mouse tissues using immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative PCR. Results We collected 84 sequences, of which 22 came from novel or improved gene models which we created from genome data. The distribution of CARP VIII covers vertebrates and deuterostomes, and CARP X appears to be universal in the animal kingdom. CA10-like genes have had a separate history of duplications in the tetrapod and fish lineages. Our phylogenetic analysis showed that duplication of CA10 into CA11 has occurred only in tetrapods (found in mammals, frogs, and lizards), whereas an independent duplication of CA10 was found in fishes. We suggest the name CA10b for the second fish isoform. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a high expression level of CARP VIII in the mouse cerebellum, cerebrum, and also moderate expression in the lung, liver, salivary gland, and stomach. These results also demonstrated low expression in the colon, kidney, and Langerhans islets. CARP X was moderately expressed in the cerebral capillaries and the lung and very weakly in the stomach and heart. Positive signals for CARP XI were observed in the cerebellum, cerebrum, liver, stomach, small intestine, colon, kidney, and testis. In addition, the results of real-time quantitative PCR confirmed a wide distribution for the Car8 and Car11 mRNAs, whereas the expression of the Car10 mRNA was restricted to the frontal cortex, parietal cortex, cerebellum, midbrain

  1. Expression of odorant-binding proteins and chemosensory proteins in some Hymenoptera.

    PubMed

    Calvello, M; Brandazza, A; Navarrini, A; Dani, F R; Turillazzi, S; Felicioli, A; Pelosi, P

    2005-04-01

    The expression of chemosensory proteins (CSPs) and odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) in individuals of different castes and ages have been monitored in three species of social hymenopterans, Polistes dominulus (Hymenoptera, Vespidae), Vespa crabro (Hymenoptera, Vespidae) and Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera, Apidae), using PCR with specific primers and polyclonal antibodies. In the paper wasp P. dominulus, OBP is equally expressed in antennae, wings and legs of all castes and ages, while CSP is often specifically present in antennae and in some cases also in legs. In the vespine species V. crabro CSP is antennal specific, while OBP is also expressed in legs and wings. The three CSPs and the five OBPs of A. mellifera show a complex pattern of expression, where both classes of proteins include members specifically expressed in antennae and others present in other parts of the body. These data indicate that at least in some hymenopteran species CSPs are specifically expressed in antennae and could perform roles in chemosensory perception so far assigned only to OBPs. PMID:15763466

  2. Abscisic acid (ABA) regulation of Arabidopsis SR protein gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Tiago M D; Carvalho, Raquel F; Richardson, Dale N; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are major modulators of alternative splicing, a key generator of proteomic diversity and flexible means of regulating gene expression likely to be crucial in plant environmental responses. Indeed, mounting evidence implicates splicing factors in signal transduction of the abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone, which plays pivotal roles in the response to various abiotic stresses. Using real-time RT-qPCR, we analyzed total steady-state transcript levels of the 18 SR and two SR-like genes from Arabidopsis thaliana in seedlings treated with ABA and in genetic backgrounds with altered expression of the ABA-biosynthesis ABA2 and the ABA-signaling ABI1 and ABI4 genes. We also searched for ABA-responsive cis elements in the upstream regions of the 20 genes. We found that members of the plant-specific SC35-Like (SCL) Arabidopsis SR protein subfamily are distinctively responsive to exogenous ABA, while the expression of seven SR and SR-related genes is affected by alterations in key components of the ABA pathway. Finally, despite pervasiveness of established ABA-responsive promoter elements in Arabidopsis SR and SR-like genes, their expression is likely governed by additional, yet unidentified cis-acting elements. Overall, this study pinpoints SR34, SR34b, SCL30a, SCL28, SCL33, RS40, SR45 and SR45a as promising candidates for involvement in ABA-mediated stress responses. PMID:25268622

  3. Cullin-3 protein expression levels correlate with breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Haagenson, Kelly K.; Tait, Larry; Wang, Juan; Shekhar, Malathy P.; Polin, Lisa; Chen, Wei; Wu, Gen Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Cullin-3 is a component of the Cullin-Ring ubiquitin ligase (CRL) family that plays an important role in mediating protein degradation. Deregulation of Cullin-3 expression has been observed in human cancers; however, a role for Cullin-3 in tumor progression has not been previously recognized. Using the MCF10DCIS.com human breast cancer xenograft model, we show that Cullin-3 is increasingly expressed during progression from comedo ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive carcinomas. Cullin-3 protein is not detected in early lesions but is noticeably increased in DCIS tumors and significantly overexpressed in invasive cancers. In experimental metastasis assays, high expression of Cullin-3 was observed in the lung site. Importantly, Cullin-3 staining is detected in human breast cancer tissues, not in normal breast tissues and its expression level positively correlates with tumor stage. These data suggest that Cullin-3 may play an important role in tumor progression from DCIS to invasive cancer and may serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis of aggressive breast cancer. PMID:22825334

  4. Regulation of RAG-2 protein expression in avian thymocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, S E; Accavitti, M A; Wang, D D; Chen, C L; Thompson, C B

    1994-01-01

    The recombinase-activating genes, RAG-1 and RAG-2, have been shown to be necessary to initiate the process of V(D)J recombination during the ontogeny of lymphocytes. While much is known about the end products of this rearrangement process, little is known about the function or regulation of the components of the recombinase system. To this end, we have generated a monoclonal antibody to the chicken RAG-2 protein. Chicken thymocytes were found to express high levels of RAG-2, part of which is phosphorylated. Within thymocytes, RAG-2 is expressed primarily within the nucleus. RAG-2 protein levels are high in the CD4- CD8- and CD4+ CD8+ immature thymocytes but absent at the single-positive CD4+ CD8- or CD4- CD8+ stage of thymocyte development. Mitogenic stimulation of thymocytes with phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin results in down-regulation of RAG-2 expression. Consistent with these data, in vivo levels of RAG-2 are markedly lower in proliferating thymocytes than in smaller, G0/G1 cells. Down-regulation of RAG-2 expression appears to occur before cells enter S phase, suggesting that RAG-2 function may be limited to noncycling cells. Images PMID:7935443

  5. Abscisic Acid (ABA) Regulation of Arabidopsis SR Protein Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Tiago M. D.; Carvalho, Raquel F.; Richardson, Dale N.; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are major modulators of alternative splicing, a key generator of proteomic diversity and flexible means of regulating gene expression likely to be crucial in plant environmental responses. Indeed, mounting evidence implicates splicing factors in signal transduction of the abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone, which plays pivotal roles in the response to various abiotic stresses. Using real-time RT-qPCR, we analyzed total steady-state transcript levels of the 18 SR and two SR-like genes from Arabidopsis thaliana in seedlings treated with ABA and in genetic backgrounds with altered expression of the ABA-biosynthesis ABA2 and the ABA-signaling ABI1 and ABI4 genes. We also searched for ABA-responsive cis elements in the upstream regions of the 20 genes. We found that members of the plant-specific SC35-Like (SCL) Arabidopsis SR protein subfamily are distinctively responsive to exogenous ABA, while the expression of seven SR and SR-related genes is affected by alterations in key components of the ABA pathway. Finally, despite pervasiveness of established ABA-responsive promoter elements in Arabidopsis SR and SR-like genes, their expression is likely governed by additional, yet unidentified cis-acting elements. Overall, this study pinpoints SR34, SR34b, SCL30a, SCL28, SCL33, RS40, SR45 and SR45a as promising candidates for involvement in ABA-mediated stress responses. PMID:25268622

  6. Purification by reflux electrophoresis of whey proteins and of a recombinant protein expressed in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Corthals, G L; Collins, B M; Mabbutt, B C; Williams, K L; Gooley, A A

    1997-06-27

    Protein purification that combines the use of molecular mass exclusion membranes with electrophoresis is particularly powerful as it uses properties inherent to both techniques. The use of membranes allows efficient processing and is easily scaled up, while electrophoresis permits high resolution separation under mild conditions. The Gradiflow apparatus combines these two technologies as it uses polyacrylamide membranes to influence electrokinetic separations. The reflux electrophoresis process consists of a series of cycles incorporating a forward phase and a reverse phase. The forward phase involves collection of a target protein that passes through a separation membrane before trailing proteins in the same solution. The forward phase is repeated following clearance of the membrane in the reverse phase by reversing the current. We have devised a strategy to establish optimal reflux separation parameters, where membranes are chosen for a particular operating range and protein transfer is monitored at different pH values. In addition, forward and reverse phase times are determined during this process. Two examples of the reflux method are described. In the first case, we described the purification strategy for proteins from a complex mixture which contains proteins of higher electrophoretic mobility than the target protein. This is a two-step procedure, where first proteins of higher mobility than the target protein are removed from the solution by a series of reflux cycles, so that the target protein remains as the leading fraction. In the second step the target protein is collected, as it has become the leading fraction of the remaining proteins. In the second example we report the development of a reflux strategy which allowed a rapid one-step preparative purification of a recombinant protein, expressed in Dictyostelium discoideum. These strategies demonstrate that the Gradiflow is amenable to a wide range of applications, as the protein of interest is not

  7. Expression and Localization of Lung Surfactant Proteins in Human Testis

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Walter; Matthies, Cord; Ruf, Christian; Hartmann, Arndt; Garreis, Fabian; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    Background Surfactant proteins (SPs) have been described in various tissues and fluids including tissues of the nasolacrimal apparatus, airways and digestive tract. Human testis have a glandular function as a part of the reproductive and the endocrine system, but no data are available on SPs in human testis and prostate under healthy and pathologic conditions. Objective The aim of the study was the detection and characterization of the surfactant proteins A, B, C and D (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D) in human testis. Additionally tissue samples affected by testicular cancer were investigated. Results Surfactant proteins A, B, C and D were detected using RT-PCR in healthy testis. By means of Western blot analysis, these SPs were detected at the protein level in normal testis, seminoma and seminal fluid, but not in spermatozoa. Expression of SPs was weaker in seminoma compared to normal testicular tissue. SPs were localized in combination with vimentin immunohistochemically in cells of Sertoli and Leydig. Conclusion Surfactant proteins seem to be inherent part of the human testis. By means of physicochemical properties the proteins appear to play a role during immunological and rheological process of the testicular tissue. The presence of SP-B and SP-C in cells of Sertoli correlates with their function of fluid secretion and may support transportation of spermatozoa. In seminoma the expression of all SP's was generally weaker compared to normal germ cells. This could lead to a reduction of immunomodulatory and rheology processes in the germ cell tumor. PMID:26599233

  8. Expression of heterologous proteins in Pichia pastoris: a useful experimental tool in protein engineering and production.

    PubMed

    Daly, Rachel; Hearn, Milton T W

    2005-01-01

    The use of the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris, as a cellular host for the expression of recombinant proteins has become increasing popular in recent times. P. pastoris is easier to genetically manipulate and culture than mammalian cells and can be grown to high cell densities. Equally important, P. pastoris is also a eukaryote, and thereby provides the potential for producing soluble, correctly folded recombinant proteins that have undergone all the post-translational modifications required for functionality. Additionally, linearized foreign DNA can be inserted in high efficiency via homologous recombination procedures to generate stable cell lines whilst expression vectors can be readily prepared that allow multiple copies of the target protein, multimeric proteins with different subunit structures, or alternatively the target protein and its cognate binding partners, to be expressed. A further benefit of the P. pastoris system is that strong promoters are available to drive the expression of a foreign gene(s) of interest, thus enabling production of large amounts of the target protein(s) with relative technical ease and at a lower cost than most other eukaryotic systems. The purpose of this review is to summarize important developments and features of this expression system and, in particular, to examine from an experimental perspective the genetic engineering, protein chemical and molecular design considerations that have to be taken into account for the successful expression of the target recombinant protein. Included in these considerations are the influences of P. pastoris strain selection; the choice of expression vectors and promoters; procedures for the transformation and integration of the vectors into the P. pastoris genome; the consequences of rare codon usage and truncated transcripts; and techniques employed to achieve multi-copy integration numbers. The impact of the alcohol oxidase (AOX) pathways in terms of the mut+ and mut(s) phenotypes

  9. Identification of differentially expressed serum proteins in gastric adenocarcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Mir, Sartaj Ahmad; Renuse, Santosh; Manda, Srikanth S.; Pinto, Sneha M.; Puttamallesh, Vinuth N.; Solanki, Hitendra Singh; Manju, H.C.; Syed, Nazia; Sharma, Rakesh; Christopher, Rita; Vijayakumar, M.; Kumar, K.V. Veerendra; Prasad, T.S. Keshava; Ramaswamy, Girija; Kumar, Rekha V.; Chatterjee, Aditi; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha

    2015-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is an aggressive cancer with poor prognosis. Blood based biomarkers of gastric cancer have the potential to improve diagnosis and monitoring of these tumors. Proteins that show altered levels in the circulation of gastric cancer patients could prove useful as putative biomarkers. We used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to identify proteins that show altered levels in the sera of patients with gastric cancer. Our study resulted in identification of 643 proteins, of which 48 proteins showed increased levels and 11 proteins showed decreased levels in serum from gastric cancer patients compared to age and sex matched healthy controls. Proteins that showed increased expression in gastric cancer included inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITIH4), Mannose-binding protein C (MBL2), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2), serum amyloid A protein (SAA1), Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1) and extracellular superoxide dismutase [Cu–Zn] (SOD3). We used multiple reaction monitoring assays and validated elevated levels of ITIH4 and SAA1 proteins in serum from gastric cancer patients. Biological significance Gastric cancer is a highly aggressive cancer associated with high mortality. Serum-based biomarkers are of considerable interest in diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases including cancers. Gastric cancer is often diagnosed at advanced stages resulting in poor prognosis and high mortality. Pathological diagnosis using biopsy specimens remains the gold standard for diagnosis of gastric cancer. Serum-based biomarkers are of considerable importance as they are minimally invasive. In this study, we carried out quantitative proteomic profiling of serum from gastric cancer patients to identify proteins that show altered levels in gastric cancer patients. We identified more than 50 proteins that showed altered levels in gastric cancer patient sera. Validation in a large cohort of well

  10. An inducible expression system for high-level expression of recombinant proteins in slow growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Lisa; Spratt, Joanne M; Kong, Carlyn U; Triccas, James A

    2015-09-01

    A novel protein expression vector utilising the inducible hspX promoter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was constructed and evaluated in this study. High-level induction of three mycobacterial antigens, comprising up to 9% of bacterial sonicate, was demonstrated in recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG when grown under low-oxygen tension, which serves to enhance hspX promoter activity. Recombinant proteins were efficiently purified from bacterial lysates in a soluble form by virtue of a C-terminal 6-histidine tag. Purification of the immunodominant M. tuberculosis Ag85B antigen using this system resulted in a recombinant protein that stimulated significant IFN-γ release from Ag85B-reactive T cells generated after vaccination of mice with an Ag85B-expressing vaccine. Further, the M. tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) protein purified from recombinant BCG displayed strong enzymatic activity in recombinant form. This study demonstrated that high levels of native-like recombinant mycobacterial proteins can be produced in mycobacterial hosts, and this may aid the analysis of mycobacterial protein function and the development of new treatments. PMID:26021569

  11. Protein body formation in stable transgenic tobacco expressing elastin-like polypeptide and hydrophobin fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plants are recognized as an efficient and inexpensive system to produce valuable recombinant proteins. Two different strategies have been commonly used for the expression of recombinant proteins in plants: transient expression mediated by Agrobacterium; or stable transformation of the plant genome. However, the use of plants as bioreactors still faces two main limitations: low accumulation levels of some recombinant proteins and lack of efficient purification methods. Elastin-like polypeptide (ELP), hydrophobin I (HFBI) and Zera® are three fusion partners found to increase the accumulation levels of recombinant proteins and induce the formation of protein bodies (PBs) in leaves when targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in transient expression assays. In this study the effects of ELP and HFBI fusion tags on recombinant protein accumulation levels and PB formation was examined in stable transgenic Nicotiana tabacum. Results The accumulation of recombinant protein and PB formation was evaluated in two cultivars of Nicotiana tabacum transformed with green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to ELP or HFBI, both targeted and retrieved to the ER. The ELP and HFBI tags increased the accumulation of the recombinant protein and induced the formation of PBs in leaves of stable transgenic plants from both cultivars. Furthermore, these tags induced the formation of PBs in a concentration-dependent manner, where a specific level of recombinant protein accumulation was required for PBs to appear. Moreover, agro-infiltration of plants accumulating low levels of recombinant protein with p19, a suppressor of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), increased accumulation levels in four independent transgenic lines, suggesting that PTGS might have caused the low accumulation levels in these plants. Conclusion The use of ELP and HFBI tags as fusion partners in stable transgenic plants of tobacco is feasible and promising. In a constitutive environment, these tags

  12. Expression of P53 protein after exposure to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, A. M.; Salvador, C.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Ostrosky, P.; Brandan, M. E.

    2001-10-01

    One of the most important tumor suppressor genes is p53 gene, which is involved in apoptotic cell death, cell differentiation and cell cycle arrest. The expression of p53 gene can be evaluated by determining the presence of P53 protein in cells using Western Blot assay with a chemiluminescent method. This technique has shown variabilities that are due to biological factors. Film developing process can influence the quality of the p53 bands obtained. We irradiated tumor cell lines and human peripheral lymphocytes with 137Cs and 60Co gamma rays to standardize irradiation conditions, to compare ionizing radiation with actinomycin D and to reduce the observed variability of P53 protein induction levels. We found that increasing radiation doses increase P53 protein induction while it decreases viability. We also conclude that ionizing radiation could serve as a positive control for Western Blot analysis of protein P53. In addition, our results show that the developing process may play an important role in the quality of P53 protein bands and data interpretation.

  13. Protein expression and characterization of SEP3 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Zhou, J; Wang, P; Lin, X; Xu, Y

    2015-01-01

    SEPALLATA (SEP) MADS-box genes play crucial roles in the regulation of floral growth and development. They are required for the specification of sepals, petals, stamens, and carpels as well as for floral determinacy. SEPs perform their functions through the formation of homo- or hetero-polymers, which are the molecular basis of floral quartets. In vitro assays indicated that SEP3 forms a tetramer after binding to DNA, but it is unclear whether DNA binding induces the tetramer, because SEP3 is often reported to form a dimer. Here, we analyzed the oligomeric status of SEP3 domains in the absence of the DNA-binding MADS-box domain. The truncated SEP3 was constructed as a fusion protein and expressed in prokaryotic cells. The purified protein fragment displayed as a tetramer in the size exclusion chromatographic column, and a glutaraldehyde cross-linking assay demonstrated that the protein contained a dimer unit. Yeast two-hybrid tests further verified that the fragments form homologous polymers in vivo, and that the K domain is involved in tetramer formation. Current results imply that the SEP3 protein regulates the formation of flower meristems using the tetramer as a unit, and that the DNA-binding MADS-box is dispensable for polymer formation. The C-terminal region does not contribute to homo-tetramer formation, but it may be reserved to glue other proteins. PMID:26505403

  14. Cyclin D1 expression is regulated by the retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, H; Lukas, J; Schneider, A; Warthoe, P; Bartek, J; Eilers, M; Strauss, M

    1994-01-01

    The product of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene, pRb, acts as a tumor suppressor and loss of its function is involved in the development of various types of cancer. DNA tumor viruses are supposed to disturb the normal regulation of the cell cycle by inactivating pRb. However, a direct function of pRb in regulation of the cell cycle has hitherto not been shown. We demonstrate here that the cell cycle-dependent expression of one of the G1-phase cyclins, cyclin D1, is dependent on the presence of a functional Rb protein. Rb-deficient tumor cell lines as well as cells expressing viral oncoproteins (large tumor antigen of simian virus 40, early region 1A of adenovirus, early region 7 of papillomavirus) have low or barely detectable levels of cyclin D1. Expression of cyclin D1, but not of cyclins A and E, is induced by transfection of the Rb gene into Rb-deficient tumor cells. Cotransfection of a reporter gene under the control of the D1 promoter, together with the Rb gene, into Rb-deficient cell lines demonstrates stimulation of the D1 promoter by Rb, which parallels the stimulation of endogenous cyclin D1 gene expression. Our finding that pRb stimulates expression of a key component of cell cycle control, cyclin D1, suggests the existence of a regulatory loop between pRb and cyclin D1 and extends existing models of tumor suppressor function. Images PMID:8159685

  15. A molecular clock regulates angiopoietin-like protein 2 expression.

    PubMed

    Kadomatsu, Tsuyoshi; Uragami, Shota; Akashi, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Yoshiki; Nakajima, Hiroo; Nakashima, Yukiko; Endo, Motoyoshi; Miyata, Keishi; Terada, Kazutoyo; Todo, Takeshi; Node, Koichi; Oike, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Various physiological and behavioral processes exhibit circadian rhythmicity. These rhythms are usually maintained by negative feedback loops of core clock genes, namely, CLOCK, BMAL, PER, and CRY. Recently, dysfunction in the circadian clock has been recognized as an important foundation for the pathophysiology of lifestyle-related diseases, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. We have reported that angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) contributes to the pathogenesis of these lifestyle-related diseases by inducing chronic inflammation. However, molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of ANGPTL2 expression are poorly understood. Here, we assess circadian rhythmicity of ANGPTL2 expression in various mouse tissues. We observed that ANGPTL2 rhythmicity was similar to that of the PER2 gene, which is regulated by the CLOCK/BMAL1 complex. Promoter activity of the human ANGPTL2 gene was significantly induced by CLOCK and BMAL1, an induction markedly attenuated by CRY co-expression. We also identified functional E-boxes in the ANGPTL2 promoter and observed occupancy of these sites by endogenous CLOCK in human osteosarcoma cells. Furthermore, Cry-deficient mice exhibited arrhythmic Angptl2 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that periodic expression of ANGPTL2 is regulated by a molecular clock.

  16. Expression of recombinant green fluorescent protein in Bacillus methanolicus.

    PubMed

    Nilasari, Dewi; Dover, Nir; Rech, Sabine; Komives, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biocatalysts are used in a wide range of industries to produce large scale quantities of proteins, amino acids, and commodity chemicals. While the majority of these processes use glucose or other low-cost sugars as the substrate, Bacillus methanolicus is one example of a biocatalyst that has shown sustained growth on methanol as a carbon source at elevated temperature (50-53°C optimum) resulting in reduced feed and utility costs. Specifically, the complete chemical process enabled by this approach takes methane from natural gas, and following a low-cost conversion to methanol, can be used for the production of high value products. In this study, production of recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) by B. methanolicus is explored. A plasmid was constructed that incorporates the methanol dehydrogenase (mdh) promoter of B. methanolicus MGA3 together with the GFPuv gene. The plasmid, pNW33N, was shown to be effective for expression in other Bacillus strains, although not previously in B. methanolicus. A published electroporation protocol for transformation of B. methanolicus was modified to result in expression of GFP using plasmid pNW33N-mdh-GFPuv (pNmG). Transformation was confirmed by both agarose gel electrophoresis and by observation of green fluorescence under UV light exposure. The mass yield of cells and protein were measured in shake flask experiments. The optimum concentration of methanol for protein production was found to be at 200 mM. Higher concentrations than 200 mM resulted in slightly higher biomass production but lower amounts of recombinant protein. PMID:22275315

  17. Requirements for nucleocapsid-mediated regulation of reverse transcription during the late steps of HIV-1 assembly

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Pierre-Jean; Chamontin, Célia; de Rocquigny, Hugues; Bernacchi, Serena; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Mougel, Marylène

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 is a retrovirus replicating within cells by reverse transcribing its genomic RNA (gRNA) into DNA. Within cells, virus assembly requires the structural Gag proteins with few accessory proteins, notably the viral infectivity factor (Vif) and two copies of gRNA as well as cellular factors to converge to the plasma membrane. In this process, the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of Gag binds to the packaging signal of gRNA which consists of a series of stem-loops (SL1-SL3) ensuring gRNA selection and packaging into virions. Interestingly, mutating NC activates a late-occurring reverse transcription (RT) step in producer cells, leading to the release of DNA-containing HIV-1 particles. In order to decipher the molecular mechanism regulating this late RT, we explored the role of several key partners of NC, such as Vif, gRNA and the cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G that restricts HIV-1 infection by targeting the RT. By studying combinations of deletions of these putative players, we revealed that NC, SL1-SL3 and in lesser extent Vif, but not APOBEC3G, interplay regulates the late RT. PMID:27273064

  18. Deletion of a Cys-His motif from the Alpharetrovirus nucleocapsid domain reveals late domain mutant-like budding defects

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun-Gyung; Linial, Maxine L. . E-mail: mlinial@fhcrc.org

    2006-03-30

    The Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag polyprotein is the only protein required for virus assembly and release. We previously found that deletion of either one of the two Cys-His (CH) motifs in the RSV nucleocapsid (NC) protein did not abrogate Gag-Gag interactions, RNA binding, or packaging but greatly reduced virus production (E-G. Lee, A. Alidina et al., J. Virol. 77: 2010-2020, 2003). In this report, we have further investigated the effects of mutations in the CH motifs on virus assembly and release. Precise deletion of either CH motif, without affecting surrounding basic residues, reduced virus production by approximately 10-fold, similar to levels seen for late (L) domain mutants. Strikingly, transmission electron microscopy revealed that virions of both {delta}CH1 and {delta}CH2 mutants were assembled normally at the plasma membrane but were arrested in budding. Virus particles remained tethered to the membrane or to each other, reminiscent of L domain mutants, although the release defect appears to be independent of the L domain functions. Therefore, two CH motifs are likely to be required for budding independent of a requirement for either Gag-Gag interactions or RNA packaging.

  19. Requirements for nucleocapsid-mediated regulation of reverse transcription during the late steps of HIV-1 assembly.

    PubMed

    Racine, Pierre-Jean; Chamontin, Célia; de Rocquigny, Hugues; Bernacchi, Serena; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Mougel, Marylène

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 is a retrovirus replicating within cells by reverse transcribing its genomic RNA (gRNA) into DNA. Within cells, virus assembly requires the structural Gag proteins with few accessory proteins, notably the viral infectivity factor (Vif) and two copies of gRNA as well as cellular factors to converge to the plasma membrane. In this process, the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of Gag binds to the packaging signal of gRNA which consists of a series of stem-loops (SL1-SL3) ensuring gRNA selection and packaging into virions. Interestingly, mutating NC activates a late-occurring reverse transcription (RT) step in producer cells, leading to the release of DNA-containing HIV-1 particles. In order to decipher the molecular mechanism regulating this late RT, we explored the role of several key partners of NC, such as Vif, gRNA and the cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G that restricts HIV-1 infection by targeting the RT. By studying combinations of deletions of these putative players, we revealed that NC, SL1-SL3 and in lesser extent Vif, but not APOBEC3G, interplay regulates the late RT. PMID:27273064

  20. Blue Light Modulates Murine Microglial Gene Expression in the Absence of Optogenetic Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kevin P.; Kiernan, Elizabeth A.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Williams, Justin C.; Watters, Jyoti J.

    2016-01-01

    Neural optogenetic applications over the past decade have steadily increased; however the effects of commonly used blue light paradigms on surrounding, non-optogenetic protein-expressing CNS cells are rarely considered, despite their simultaneous exposure. Here we report that blue light (450 nm) repetitively delivered in both long-duration boluses and rapid optogenetic bursts gene-specifically altered basal expression of inflammatory and neurotrophic genes in immortalized and primary murine wild type microglial cultures. In addition, blue light reduced pro-inflammatory gene expression in microglia activated with lipopolysaccharide. These results demonstrate previously unreported, off-target effects of blue light in cells not expressing optogenetic constructs. The unexpected gene modulatory effects of blue light on wild type CNS resident immune cells have novel and important implications for the neuro-optogenetic field. Further studies are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and potential therapeutic utility of blue light modulation of the wild type CNS. PMID:26883795

  1. Heat shock protein 70-hom gene polymorphism and protein expression in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Boiocchi, C; Monti, M C; Osera, C; Mallucci, G; Pistono, C; Ferraro, O E; Nosari, G; Romani, A; Cuccia, M; Govoni, S; Pascale, A; Montomoli, C; Bergamaschi, R

    2016-09-15

    Immune-mediated and neurodegenerative mechanisms are involved in multiple sclerosis (MS). Growing evidences highlight the role of HSP70 genes in the susceptibility of some neurological diseases. In this explorative study we analyzed a polymorphism (i.e. HSP70-hom rs2227956) of the gene HSPA1L, which encodes for the protein hsp70-hom. We sequenced the polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in 191 MS patients and 365 healthy controls. The hsp70-hom protein expression was quantified by western blotting. We reported a strong association between rs2227956 polymorphism and MS risk, which is independent from the association with HSP70-2 rs1061581, and a significant link between hsp70-hom protein expression and MS severity. PMID:27609295

  2. Simvastatin enhances bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hong; Sung, Arthur; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Lingfang; Qiu Daoming; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Kao, Peter N. . E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

    2006-01-06

    Statins confer therapeutic benefits in systemic and pulmonary vascular diseases. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors serve essential signaling functions in cardiovascular development and skeletal morphogenesis. Mutations in BMP receptor type II (BMPR2) are associated with human familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pathologic neointimal proliferation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells within small pulmonary arteries. In severe experimental pulmonary hypertension, simvastatin reversed disease and conferred a 100% survival advantage. Here, modulation of BMPR2 gene expression by simvastatin is characterized in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T, pulmonary artery smooth muscle, and lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). A 1.4 kb BMPR2 promoter containing Egr-1 binding sites confers reporter gene activation in 293T cells which is partially inhibited by simvastatin. Simvastatin enhances steady-state BMPR2 mRNA and protein expression in HLMVEC, through posttranscriptional mRNA stabilization. Simvastatin induction of BMPR2 expression may improve BMP-BMPR2 signaling thereby enhancing endothelial differentiation and function.

  3. Transformation of Escherichia coli and protein expression using lipoplex mimicry.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chul-Ho; Bae, Chun-Sik; Ahn, Taeho

    2016-11-01

    We investigated a "one-step" method for transformation of and protein expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) using a complex of n-stearylamine, a cationic lipid, and plasmid DNA, which mimics lipoplex-based approaches. When E. coli cells were treated with the cationic lipid-plasmid complex, the transformation efficiencies were in the range of approximately 2-3 × 10(6) colony-forming units. Further increase in the efficiency was obtained by co-treatment with calcium chloride (or rubidium chloride) and the complexes. Moreover, after DNA transfer, E. coli cells successfully expressed plasmid-encoded proteins such as cytochrome P450s and glutathione-S-transferase without overnight incubation of the cells to form colonies, an indispensable step in other bacterial transformation methods. In this study, we provide a simple method for E. coli transformation, which does not require the preparation of competent cells. The present method also shortens the overall procedures for transformation and gene expression in E. coli by omitting the colony-forming step. PMID:27416742

  4. Transformation of Escherichia coli and protein expression using lipoplex mimicry.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chul-Ho; Bae, Chun-Sik; Ahn, Taeho

    2016-11-01

    We investigated a "one-step" method for transformation of and protein expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) using a complex of n-stearylamine, a cationic lipid, and plasmid DNA, which mimics lipoplex-based approaches. When E. coli cells were treated with the cationic lipid-plasmid complex, the transformation efficiencies were in the range of approximately 2-3 × 10(6) colony-forming units. Further increase in the efficiency was obtained by co-treatment with calcium chloride (or rubidium chloride) and the complexes. Moreover, after DNA transfer, E. coli cells successfully expressed plasmid-encoded proteins such as cytochrome P450s and glutathione-S-transferase without overnight incubation of the cells to form colonies, an indispensable step in other bacterial transformation methods. In this study, we provide a simple method for E. coli transformation, which does not require the preparation of competent cells. The present method also shortens the overall procedures for transformation and gene expression in E. coli by omitting the colony-forming step.

  5. Structure and expression of a novel compact myelin protein – Small VCP-interacting protein (SVIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiawen; Peng, Dungeng; Voehler, Markus; Sanders, Charles R.; Li, Jun

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •SVIP (small p97/VCP-interacting protein) co-localizes with myelin basic protein (MBP) in compact myelin. •We determined that SVIP is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). •The helical content of SVIP increases dramatically during its interaction with negatively charged lipid membrane. •This study provides structural insight into interactions between SVIP and myelin membranes. -- Abstract: SVIP (small p97/VCP-interacting protein) was initially identified as one of many cofactors regulating the valosin containing protein (VCP), an AAA+ ATPase involved in endoplasmic-reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD). Our previous study showed that SVIP is expressed exclusively in the nervous system. In the present study, SVIP and VCP were seen to be co-localized in neuronal cell bodies. Interestingly, we also observed that SVIP co-localizes with myelin basic protein (MBP) in compact myelin, where VCP was absent. Furthermore, using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic measurements, we determined that SVIP is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). However, upon binding to the surface of membranes containing a net negative charge, the helical content of SVIP increases dramatically. These findings provide structural insight into interactions between SVIP and myelin membranes.

  6. Modular Broad-Host-Range Expression Vectors for Single-Protein and Protein Complex Purification

    PubMed Central

    Fodor, Barna D.; Kovács, Ákos T.; Csáki, Róbert; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Klement, Éva; Maróti, Gergely; Mészáros, Lívia S.; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Rákhely, Gábor; Kovács, Kornél L.

    2004-01-01

    A set of modular broad-host-range expression vectors with various affinity tags (six-His-tag, FLAG-tag, Strep-tag II, T7-tag) was created. The complete nucleotide sequences of the vectors are known, and these small vectors can be mobilized by conjugation. They are useful in the purification of proteins and protein complexes from gram-negative bacterial species. The plasmids were easily customized for Thiocapsa roseopersicina, Rhodobacter capsulatus, and Methylococcus capsulatus by inserting an appropriate promoter. These examples demonstrate the versatility and flexibility of the vectors. The constructs harbor the T7 promoter for easy overproduction of the desired protein in an appropriate Escherichia coli host. The vectors were useful in purifying different proteins from T. roseopersicina. The FLAG-tag-Strep-tag II combination was utilized for isolation of the HynL-HypC2 protein complex involved in hydrogenase maturation. These tools should be useful for protein purification and for studying protein-protein interactions in a range of bacterial species. PMID:14766546

  7. Detecting Protein Complexes in Protein Interaction Networks Modeled as Gene Expression Biclusters

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Eileen Marie; Zaki, Nazar; Amin, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Developing suitable methods for the detection of protein complexes in protein interaction networks continues to be an intriguing area of research. The importance of this objective originates from the fact that protein complexes are key players in most cellular processes. The more complexes we identify, the better we can understand normal as well as abnormal molecular events. Up till now, various computational methods were designed for this purpose. However, despite their notable performance, questions arise regarding potential ways to improve them, in addition to ameliorative guidelines to introduce novel approaches. A close interpretation leads to the assent that the way in which protein interaction networks are initially viewed should be adjusted. These networks are dynamic in reality and it is necessary to consider this fact to enhance the detection of protein complexes. In this paper, we present “DyCluster”, a framework to model the dynamic aspect of protein interaction networks by incorporating gene expression data, through biclustering techniques, prior to applying complex-detection algorithms. The experimental results show that DyCluster leads to higher numbers of correctly-detected complexes with better evaluation scores. The high accuracy achieved by DyCluster in detecting protein complexes is a valid argument in favor of the proposed method. DyCluster is also able to detect biologically meaningful protein groups. The code and datasets used in the study are downloadable from https://github.com/emhanna/DyCluster. PMID:26641660

  8. Expression of goose parvovirus whole VP3 protein and its epitopes in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Tarasiuk, K; Woźniakowski, G; Holec-Gąsior, L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was the expression of goose parvovirus capsid protein (VP3) and its epitopes in Escherichia coli cells. Expression of the whole VP3 protein provided an insufficient amount of protein. In contrast, the expression of two VP3 epitopes (VP3ep4, VP3ep6) in E. coli, resulted in very high expression levels. This may suggest that smaller parts of the GPV antigenic determinants are more efficiently expressed than the complete VP3 gene.

  9. Design of riboregulators for control of cyanobacterial (Synechocystis) protein expression.

    PubMed

    Abe, Koichi; Sakai, Yuta; Nakashima, Saki; Araki, Masataka; Yoshida, Wataru; Sode, Koji; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2014-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are attractive host bacteria for biofuel production because they can covert CO2 to biofuel lipids using only sunlight, water, and inorganic ions. For genetically engineering an ideal cyanobacterium, a synthetic biological approach is promising but few genetic components have been characterized in cyanobacteria. Here for controlling cyanobacterial protein expression, we constructed riboregulators, that one of the post-transcriptional regulators composed of RNAs. Riboregulators harboring a ribosome-binding site suitable for Synechocystis sp. were designed by trial and error using Escherichia coli as host bacteria. The designed riboregulators were effective in Synechocystis sp. as well as E. coli with slight interference on growth only observed in E. coli. They will therefore be useful tools for controlling target gene expression. PMID:24068508

  10. Altered gravity downregulates aquaporin-1 protein expression in choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Masseguin, C; Corcoran, M; Carcenac, C; Daunton, N G; Güell, A; Verkman, A S; Gabrion, J

    2000-03-01

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is a water channel expressed abundantly at the apical pole of choroidal epithelial cells. The protein expression was quantified by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy in adult rats adapted to altered gravity. AQP1 expression was decreased by 64% at the apical pole of choroidal cells in rats dissected 5.5-8 h after a 14-day spaceflight. AQP1 was significantly overexpressed in rats readapted for 2 days to Earth's gravity after an 11-day flight (48% overshoot, when compared with the value measured in control rats). In a ground-based model that simulates some effects of weightlessness and alters choroidal structures and functions, apical AQP1 expression was reduced by 44% in choroid plexus from rats suspended head down for 14 days and by 69% in rats suspended for 28 days. Apical AQP1 was rapidly enhanced in choroid plexus of rats dissected 6 h after a 14-day suspension (57% overshoot, in comparison with control rats) and restored to the control level when rats were dissected 2 days after the end of a 14-day suspension. Decreases in the apical expression of choroidal AQP1 were also noted in rats adapted to hypergravity in the NASA 24-ft centrifuge: AQP1 expression was reduced by 47% and 85% in rats adapted for 14 days to 2 G and 3 G, respectively. AQP1 is downregulated in the apical membrane of choroidal cells in response to altered gravity and is rapidly restored after readaptation to normal gravity. This suggests that water transport, which is partly involved in the choroidal production of cerebrospinal fluid, might be decreased during spaceflight and after chronic hypergravity.

  11. Photoregulated gene expression may involve ubiquitous DNA binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, U; Cashmore, A R

    1990-01-01

    Several promoter elements have previously been shown to influence the expression of the cab-E gene in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Here we demonstrate, by electrophoretic mobility shift and methylation interference assays, that a complex pattern of protein-DNA interactions characterizes this promoter. Among the multiple proteins identified, we focused on five different factors which either occupied important regulatory elements and/or were present in relatively large amounts in nuclear extracts. All of these proteins were distinguished on the basis of their recognition sequence and other biochemical parameters. One, GBF, interacted with a single sequence within the cab-E promoter homologous to the G-box found in many photoregulated and other plant promoters. A second factor, GA-1, bound to the GATA element which is located between the CAAT and TATA boxes of the cab-E and all other LHCII Type I CAB promoters. GA-1 also interacted in vitro with the I-boxes of the Arabidopsis rbcS-1A promoter and the as-2 site of the CaMV 35S promoter. Two other factors, GC-1 and AT-1, bound to multiple recognition sites localized within the GC-rich and AT-rich elements, respectively. GT-1, a protein which interacts with promoters of other light-regulated genes, bound to seven distinct sites distributed throughout the cab-E promoter. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig.5 Fig.6 Fig.7 PMID:2209551

  12. Expressed protein ligation for metalloprotein design and engineering.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin M; van der Donk, Wilfred A; Lu, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Metalloproteins contain highly specialized metal-binding sites that are designed to accept specific metal ions to maintain correct function. Although many of the sites have been modified with success, the relative paucity of functional group availability within proteinogenic amino acids can sometimes leave open questions about specific functions of the metal binding ligands. Attaining a more thorough analysis of individual amino acid function within metalloproteins has been realized using expressed protein ligation (EPL). Here we describe our recent efforts using EPL to incorporate nonproteinogenic cysteine and methionine analogues into the type 1 copper site found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin.

  13. RNA viruses as vectors for the expression of heterologous proteins.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, S

    1995-04-01

    RNA viruses comprise a wide variety of infectious agents, some of which are the cause of disease in humans, animals, and plants. Recombinant DNA technology is now making it feasible to modify these genomes and engineer them to express heterologous proteins. Several different schemes are being employed that depend on the genome organization of the virus and on the strategy of replication of the particular virus. Several different examples are illustrated and potential uses as well as possible problems are discussed. In the future reverse genetics may convert some of these viruses from agents of disease to agents of cure. PMID:7620976

  14. Expressed Protein Ligation: A Resourceful Tool to Study Protein Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Berrade, Luis; Camarero, Julio A.

    2013-01-01

    This review outlines the use of expressed protein ligation (EPL) to study protein structure, function and stability. EPL is a chemoselective ligation method that allows the selective ligation of unprotected polypeptides from synthetic and recombinant origin for the production of semi-synthetic protein samples of well-defined and homogeneous chemical composition. This method has been extensively used for the site-specific introduction of biophysical probes, unnatural amino acids, and increasingly complex post-translational modifications. Since it was introduced 10 years ago, EPL applications have grown increasingly more sophisticated in order to address even more complex biological questions. In this review we highlight how this powerful technology combined with standard biochemical analysis techniques has been used to improve our ability to understand protein structure and function. PMID:19685006

  15. Differential regulation of dentin matrix protein 1 expression during odontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongbo; Zhang, Shubin; Xie, Yixia; Pi, Yuli; Feng, Jian Q

    2005-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is highly expressed in mineralized tooth and bone. Both in vitro and in vivo data show that DMP1 is critical for mineralization and tooth morphogenesis (growth and development). In this study, we studied Dmp1 gene regulation. The in vitro transient transfection assay identified two important DNA fragments, the 2.4- and 9.6-kb promoter regions. We next generated and analyzed transgenic mice bearing the beta-galactosidase (lacZ) reporter gene driven by the 2.4- or 9.6-kb promoter with the complete 4-kb intron 1. The 9.6-kb Dmp1-lacZ mice conferred a DMP1 expression pattern in odontoblasts identical to that in the endogenous Dmp1 gene. This is reflected by lacZ expression in Dmp1-lacZ knock-in mice during all stages of odontogenesis. In contrast, the 2.4-kb Dmp1-lacZ mice display activity in odontoblast cells only at the early stage of odontogenesis. Thus, we propose that different transcription factors regulate early or later cis-regulatory domains of the Dmp1 promoter, which gives rise to the unique spatial and temporal expression pattern of Dmp1 gene at different stages of tooth development.

  16. AR-v7 protein expression is regulated by protein kinase and phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinan; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E.; Rennie, Paul S.; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-01-01

    Failure of androgen-targeted therapy and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are often attributed to sustained expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and its major splice variant, AR-v7. Although the new generation of anti-androgens such as enzalutamide effectively inhibits AR activity, accumulating pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that AR-v7 remains constitutively active in driving CRPC progression. However, molecular mechanisms which control AR-v7 protein expression remain unclear. We apply multiple prostate cancer cell models to demonstrate that enzalutamide induces differential activation of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) and Akt kinase depending on the gene context of cancer cells. The balance between PP-1 and Akt activation governs AR phosphorylation status and activation of the Mdm2 ubiquitin ligase. Mdm2 recognizes phosphorylated serine 213 of AR-v7, and induces AR-v7 ubiquitination and protein degradation. These findings highlight the decisive roles of PP-1 and Akt for AR-v7 protein expression and activities when AR is functionally blocked. PMID:26378044

  17. AR-v7 protein expression is regulated by protein kinase and phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinan; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E; Rennie, Paul S; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-10-20

    Failure of androgen-targeted therapy and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are often attributed to sustained expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and its major splice variant, AR-v7. Although the new generation of anti-androgens such as enzalutamide effectively inhibits AR activity, accumulating pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that AR-v7 remains constitutively active in driving CRPC progression. However, molecular mechanisms which control AR-v7 protein expression remain unclear. We apply multiple prostate cancer cell models to demonstrate that enzalutamide induces differential activation of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) and Akt kinase depending on the gene context of cancer cells. The balance between PP-1 and Akt activation governs AR phosphorylation status and activation of the Mdm2 ubiquitin ligase. Mdm2 recognizes phosphorylated serine 213 of AR-v7, and induces AR-v7 ubiquitination and protein degradation. These findings highlight the decisive roles of PP-1 and Akt for AR-v7 protein expression and activities when AR is functionally blocked.

  18. Trichohyalin-like 1 protein, a member of fused S100 proteins, is expressed in normal and pathologic human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakoshi, Takako; Makino, Teruhiko; Ur Rehman, Mati; Yoshihisa, Yoko; Sugimori, Michiya; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► Trichohyalin-like 1 protein is a member of the fused-type S100 protein gene family. ► Specific antibodies against the C-terminus of the TCHHL1 protein were generated. ► TCHHL1 proteins were expressed in the basal layer of the normal epidermis. ► TCHHL1 proteins were strongly expressed in tumor nests of BCC and SCC. ► The expression of TCHHL1 proteins increased in epidermis of psoriasis vulgaris. - Abstract: Trichohyalin-like 1 (TCHHL1) protein is a novel member of the fused-type S100 protein gene family. The deduced amino acid sequence of TCHHL1 contains an EF-hand domain in the N-terminus, one trans-membrane domain and a nuclear localization signal. We generated specific antibodies against the C-terminus of the TCHHL1 protein and examined the expression of TCHHL1 proteins in normal and pathological human skin. An immunohistochemical study showed that TCHHL1 proteins were expressed in the basal layer of the normal epidermis. In addition, signals of TCHHL1 proteins were observed around the nuclei of cultured growing keratinocytes. Accordingly, TCHHL1 mRNA has been detected in normal skin and cultured growing keratinocytes. Furthermore, TCHHL1 proteins were strongly expressed in the peripheral areas of tumor nests in basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. A dramatic increase in the number of Ki67 positive cells was observed in TCHHL1-expressing areas. The expression of TCHHL1 proteins also increased in non-cancerous hyperproliferative epidermal tissues such as those of psoriasis vulgaris and lichen planus. These findings highlight the possibility that TCHHL1 proteins are expressed in growing keratinocytes of the epidermis and might be associated with the proliferation of keratinocytes.

  19. Antigenic assessment of a recombinant human CD90 protein expressed in prokaryotic expression system.

    PubMed

    Yousefi-Rad, Narges; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Behdani, Mahdi; Moradi-Kalbolandi, Shima; Motamedi-Rad, Mahdieh; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi

    2015-12-01

    Cluster of Differentiation 90 (CD90, Thy-1) has been proposed as one of the most important biomarkers in several cancer cells including cancer stem cells (CSCs). CD90 is considered as a potential normal stem cell and CSCs biomarker and also has been identified in lung cancer stem cells, hepatocellular carcinoma cells and high-grade gliomas. Using eukaryotic host systems involves complex procedures and frequently results in low protein yields. The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is comparatively easier than eukaryotic host cells. The potential of large scale production of recombinant protein has made this system an economic production platform. In this study we expressed the extra-membrane domain of human CD90 (exCD90) antigen (Gln15-Cys130) in E. coli expression host cells. The epitope integrity of purified recombinant antigen was confirmed by antibody-antigen interaction using 5E10 anti-CD90 monoclonal antibody and binding study through ELISA and florescent staining of CD90(+) cells in a flow cytometry experiment. PMID:26297626

  20. Antigenic assessment of a recombinant human CD90 protein expressed in prokaryotic expression system.

    PubMed

    Yousefi-Rad, Narges; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Behdani, Mahdi; Moradi-Kalbolandi, Shima; Motamedi-Rad, Mahdieh; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi

    2015-12-01

    Cluster of Differentiation 90 (CD90, Thy-1) has been proposed as one of the most important biomarkers in several cancer cells including cancer stem cells (CSCs). CD90 is considered as a potential normal stem cell and CSCs biomarker and also has been identified in lung cancer stem cells, hepatocellular carcinoma cells and high-grade gliomas. Using eukaryotic host systems involves complex procedures and frequently results in low protein yields. The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is comparatively easier than eukaryotic host cells. The potential of large scale production of recombinant protein has made this system an economic production platform. In this study we expressed the extra-membrane domain of human CD90 (exCD90) antigen (Gln15-Cys130) in E. coli expression host cells. The epitope integrity of purified recombinant antigen was confirmed by antibody-antigen interaction using 5E10 anti-CD90 monoclonal antibody and binding study through ELISA and florescent staining of CD90(+) cells in a flow cytometry experiment.

  1. Expression and purification of recombinant polyomavirus VP2 protein and its interactions with polyomavirus proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, X.; Chang, D.; Rottinghaus, S.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant polyomavirus VP2 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448), using the recombinant expression system pFPYV2. Recombinant VP2 was purified to near homogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, electroelution, and Extracti-Gel chromatography. Polyclonal serum to this protein which reacted specifically with recombinant VP2 as well as polyomavirus virion VP2 and VP3 on Western blots (immunoblots) was produced. Purified VP2 was used to establish an in vitro protein-protein interaction assay with polyomavirus structural proteins and purified recombinant VP1. Recombinant VP2 interacted with recombinant VP1, virion VP1, and the four virion histones. Recombinant VP1 coimmunoprecipitated with recombinant VP2 or truncated VP2 (delta C12VP2), which lacked the carboxy-terminal 12 amino acids. These experiments confirmed the interaction between VP1 and VP2 and revealed that the carboxyterminal 12 amino acids of VP2 and VP3 were not necessary for formation of this interaction. In vivo VP1-VP2 interaction study accomplished by cotransfection of COS-7 cells with VP2 and truncated VP1 (delta N11VP1) lacking the nuclear localization signal demonstrated that VP2 was capable of translocating delta N11VP1 into the nucleus. These studies suggest that complexes of VP1 and VP2 may be formed in the cytoplasm and cotransported to the nucleus for virion assembly to occur.

  2. Characterization of protein expression levels with label-free detected reverse phase protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuexue; Deng, Yihong; Zhu, Chenggang; Cai, Junlong; Zhu, Xiangdong; Landry, James P; Zheng, Fengyun; Cheng, Xunjia; Fei, Yiyan

    2016-09-15

    In reverse-phase protein arrays (RPPA), one immobilizes complex samples (e.g., cellular lysate, tissue lysate or serum etc.) on solid supports and performs parallel reactions of antibodies with immobilized protein targets from the complex samples. In this work, we describe a label-free detection of RPPA that enables quantification of RPPA data and thus facilitates comparison of studies performed on different samples and on different solid supports. We applied this detection platform to characterization of phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT) expression levels in Acanthamoeba lysates treated with artemether and the results were confirmed by Western blot studies. PMID:27372609

  3. Preferential expression and immunogenicity of HIV-1 Tat fusion protein expressed in tomato plant.

    PubMed

    Cueno, Marni E; Hibi, Yurina; Karamatsu, Katsuo; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Imai, Kenichi; Laurena, Antonio C; Okamoto, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    HIV-1 Tat plays a major role in viral replication and is essential for AIDS development making it an ideal vaccine target providing that both humoral and cellular immune responses are induced. Plant-based antigen production, due to its cheaper cost, appears ideal for vaccine production. In this study, we created a plant-optimized tat and mutant (Cys30Ala/Lys41Ala) tat (mtat) gene and ligated each into a pBI121 expression vector with a stop codon and a gusA gene positioned immediately downstream. The vector construct was bombarded into tomato leaf calli and allowed to develop. We thus generated recombinant tomato plants preferentially expressing a Tat-GUS fusion protein over a Tat-only protein. In addition, plants bombarded with either tat or mtat genes showed no phenotypic difference and produced 2-4 microg Tat-GUS fusion protein per milligram soluble plant protein. Furthermore, tomato extracts intradermally inoculated into mice were found to induce a humoral and, most importantly, cellular immunity. PMID:20072815

  4. Cell-Free Protein Expression under Macromolecular Crowding Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xumeng; Luo, Dan; Xu, Jianfeng

    2011-01-01

    Background Cell-free protein expression (CFPE) comprised of in vitro transcription and translation is currently manipulated in relatively dilute solutions, in which the macromolecular crowding effects present in living cells are largely ignored. This may not only affect the efficiency of protein synthesis in vitro, but also limit our understanding of the functions and interactions of biomolecules involved in this fundamental biological process. Methodology/Principal Findings Using cell-free synthesis of Renilla luciferase in wheat germ extract as a model system, we investigated the CFPE under macromolecular crowding environments emulated with three different crowding agents: PEG-8000, Ficoll-70 and Ficoll-400, which vary in chemical properties and molecular size. We found that transcription was substantially enhanced in the macromolecular crowding solutions; up to 4-fold increase in the mRNA production was detected in the presence of 20% (w/v) of Ficoll-70. In contrast, translation was generally inhibited by the addition of each of the three crowding agents. This might be due to PEG-induced protein precipitation and non-specific binding of translation factors to Ficoll molecules. We further explored a two-stage CFPE in which transcription and translation was carried out under high then low macromolecular crowding conditions, respectively. It produced 2.2-fold higher protein yield than the coupled CFPE control. The macromolecular crowding effects on CFPE were subsequently confirmed by cell-free synthesis of an approximately two-fold larger protein, Firefly luciferase, under macromolecular crowding environments. Conclusions/Significance Three macromolecular crowding agents used in this research had opposite effects on transcription and translation. The results of this study should aid researchers in their choice of macromolecular crowding agents and shows that two-stage CFPE is more efficient than coupled CFPE. PMID:22174874

  5. Neurotoxocarosis alters myelin protein gene transcription and expression.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Lea; Beyerbach, Martin; Lühder, Fred; Beineke, Andreas; Strube, Christina

    2015-06-01

    Neurotoxocarosis is an infection of the central nervous system caused by migrating larvae of the common dog and cat roundworms (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), which are zoonotic agents. As these parasites are prevalent worldwide and neuropathological and molecular investigations on neurotoxocarosis are scare, this study aims to characterise nerve fibre demyelination associated with neurotoxocarosis on a molecular level. Transcription of eight myelin-associated genes (Cnp, Mag, Mbp, Mog, Mrf-1, Nogo-A, Plp1, Olig2) was determined in the mouse model during six time points of the chronic phase of infection using qRT-PCR. Expression of selected proteins was analysed by Western blotting or immunohistochemistry. Additionally, demyelination and neuronal damage were investigated histologically. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between transcription rates of T. canis-infected and uninfected control mice were detected for all analysed genes while T. cati affected five of eight investigated genes. Interestingly, 2', 3 ´-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (Cnp) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog) were upregulated in both T. canis- and T. cati-infected mice preceding demyelination. Later, CNPase expression was additionally enhanced. As expected, myelin basic protein (Mbp) was downregulated in cerebra and cerebella of T. canis-infected mice when severe demyelination was present 120 days post infectionem (dpi). The transcriptional pattern observed in the present study appears to reflect direct traumatic and hypoxic effects of larval migration as well as secondary processes including host immune reactions, demyelination and attempts to remyelinate damaged areas.

  6. PPAR-β/δ activation promotes phospholipid transfer protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chehaibi, Khouloud; Cedó, Lídia; Metso, Jari; Palomer, Xavier; Santos, David; Quesada, Helena; Naceur Slimane, Mohamed; Wahli, Walter; Julve, Josep; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel; Jauhiainen, Matti; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles

    2015-03-15

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-β/δ has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for treating dyslipidemia, including beneficial effects on HDL cholesterol (HDL-C). In the current study, we determined the effects of the PPAR-β/δ agonist GW0742 on HDL composition and the expression of liver HDL-related genes in mice and cultured human cells. The experiments were carried out in C57BL/6 wild-type, LDL receptor (LDLR)-deficient mice and PPAR-β/δ-deficient mice treated with GW0742 (10mg/kg/day) or a vehicle solution for 14 days. GW0742 upregulated liver phospholipid transfer protein (Pltp) gene expression and increased serum PLTP activity in mice. When given to wild-type mice, GW0742 significantly increased serum HDL-C and HDL phospholipids; GW0742 also raised serum potential to generate preβ-HDL formation. The GW0742-mediated effects on liver Pltp expression and serum enzyme activity were completely abolished in PPAR-β/δ-deficient mice. GW0742 also stimulated PLTP mRNA expression in mouse J774 macrophages, differentiated human THP-1 macrophages and human hepatoma Huh7. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a common transcriptional upregulation by GW0742-activated PPAR-β/δ of Pltp expression in cultured cells and in mouse liver resulting in enhanced serum PLTP activity. Our results also indicate that PPAR-β/δ activation may modulate PLTP-mediated preβ-HDL formation and macrophage cholesterol efflux.

  7. Ras protein expression as a marker for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    CALAF, GLORIA M.; ABARCA-QUINONES, JORGE

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, the most common neoplasm in women of all ages, is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in women worldwide. Markers to help to predict the risk of progression and ultimately provide non-surgical treatment options would be of great benefit. At present, there are no available molecular markers to predict the risk of carcinoma in situ progression to invasive cancer; therefore, all women diagnosed with this type of malignancy must undergo surgery. Breast cancer is a heterogeneous complex disease, and different patients respond differently to different treatments. In breast cancer, analysis using immunohistochemical markers remains an essential component of routine pathological examinations, and plays an import role in the management of the disease by providing diagnostic and prognostic strategies. The aim of the present study was to identify a marker that can be used as a prognostic tool for breast cancer. For this purpose, we firstly used an established breast cancer model. MCF-10F, a spontaneously immortalized breast epithelial cell line was transformed by exposure to estrogen and radiation. MCF-10F cells were exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) α particles (150 keV/μm) of radiation, and subsequently cultured in the presence of 17β-estradiol. Three cell lines were used: i) MCF-10F cells as a control; ii) Alpha5 cells, a malignant and tumorigenic cell line; and iii) Tumor2 cells derived from Alpha5 cells injected into nude mice. Secondly, we also used normal, benign and malignant breast specimens obtained from biopsies. The results revealed that the MCF-10F cells were negative for c-Ha-Ras protein expression; however, the Alpha5 and Tumor2 cell lines were positive for c-Ha-Ras protein expression. The malignant breast samples were also strongly positive for c-Ha-Ras expression. The findings of our study indicate that c-Ha-Ras protein expression may be used as a marker to predict the progression of breast cancer; this

  8. mRNA expression and protein localization of dentin matrix protein 1 during dental root formation.

    PubMed

    Toyosawa, S; Okabayashi, K; Komori, T; Ijuhin, N

    2004-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is an acidic phosphoprotein. DMP1 was initially detected in dentin and later in other mineralized tissues including cementum and bone, but the DMP1 expression pattern in tooth is still controversial. To determine the precise localization of DMP1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and the protein in the tooth, we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses using rat molars and incisors during various stages of root formation. During root dentin formation of molars, DMP1 mRNA was detected in root odontoblasts in parallel with mineralization of the dentin. However, the level of DMP1 mRNA expression in root odontoblasts decreased near the coronal part and was absent in coronal odontoblasts. DMP1 protein was localized along dentinal tubules and their branches in mineralized root dentin, and the distribution of DMP1 shifted from the end of dentinal tubules to the base of the tubules as dentin formation progressed. During the formation of the acellular cementum, DMP1 mRNA was detected in cementoblasts lining the acellular cementum where its protein was localized. During the formation of the cellular cementum, DMP1 mRNA was detected in cementocytes embedded in the cellular cementum but not in cementoblasts, and its protein was localized in the pericellular cementum of cementocytes including their processes. During dentin formation of incisors, DMP1 mRNA was detected in odontoblasts on the cementum-related dentin, where its protein was localized along dentinal tubules near the mineralization front. The localization of DMP1 mRNA and protein in dentin and cementum was related to their mineralization, suggesting that one of the functions of DMP1 may be involved in the mineralization of dentin and cementum during root formation. PMID:14751569

  9. HIV-1 nucleocapsid and ESCRT-component Tsg101 interplay prevents HIV from turning into a DNA-containing virus

    PubMed Central

    Chamontin, Célia; Rassam, Patrice; Ferrer, Mireia; Racine, Pierre-Jean; Neyret, Aymeric; Lainé, Sébastien; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Mougel, Marylène

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1, the agent of the AIDS pandemic, is an RNA virus that reverse transcribes its RNA genome (gRNA) into DNA, shortly after its entry into cells. Within cells, retroviral assembly requires thousands of structural Gag proteins and two copies of gRNA as well as cellular factors, which converge to the plasma membrane in a finely regulated timeline. In this process, the nucleocapsid domain of Gag (GagNC) ensures gRNA selection and packaging into virions. Subsequent budding and virus release require the recruitment of the cellular ESCRT machinery. Interestingly, mutating GagNC results into the release of DNA-containing viruses, by promo-ting reverse transcription (RTion) prior to virus release, through an unknown mechanism. Therefore, we explored the biogenesis of these DNA-containing particles, combining live-cell total internal-reflection fluorescent microscopy, electron microscopy, trans-complementation assays and biochemical characterization of viral particles. Our results reveal that DNA virus production is the consequence of budding defects associated with Gag aggregation at the plasma membrane and deficiency in the recruitment of Tsg101, a key ESCRT-I component. Indeed, targeting Tsg101 to virus assembly sites restores budding, restricts RTion and favors RNA packaging into viruses. Altogether, our results highlight the role of GagNC in the spatiotemporal control of RTion, via an ESCRT-I-dependent mechanism. PMID:25488808

  10. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters.

    PubMed

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise. PMID:27098003

  11. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters

    PubMed Central

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise. PMID:27098003

  12. Protein expression patterns of the yeast mating response.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haiyu; Zhang, Rongfei; Shao, Bin; Wang, Xuan; Ouyang, Qi; Hao, Nan; Luo, Chunxiong

    2016-06-13

    Microfluidics, in combination with time-lapse microscopy, is a transformative technology that significantly enhances our ability to monitor and probe biological processes in living cells. However, high-throughput microfluidic devices mostly require sophisticated preparatory and setup work and are thus hard to adopt by non-experts. In this work, we designed an easy-to-use microfluidic chip, which enables tracking of 48 GFP-tagged yeast strains, with each strain under two different stimulus conditions, in a single experiment. We used this technology to investigate the dynamic pattern of protein expression during the yeast mating differentiation response. High doses of pheromone induce cell cycle arrest and the shmoo morphology, whereas low doses of pheromone lead to elongation and chemotrophic growth. By systematically analyzing the protein dynamics of 156 pheromone-regulated genes, we identified groups of genes that are preferentially induced in response to low-dose pheromone (elongation during growth) or high-dose pheromone (shmoo formation and cell cycle arrest). The protein dynamics of these genes may provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the differentiation switch induced by different doses of pheromone. PMID:27177258

  13. Expression of Water Channel Proteins in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum1

    PubMed Central

    Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Golldack, Dortje; Quigley, Francoise; Michalowski, Christine B.; Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Bohnert, Hans J.

    2000-01-01

    We have characterized transcripts for nine major intrinsic proteins (MIPs), some of which function as water channels (aquaporins), from the ice plant Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. To determine the cellular distribution and expression of these MIPs, oligopeptide-based antibodies were generated against MIP-A, MIP-B, MIP-C, or MIP-F, which, according to sequence and functional characteristics, are located in the plasma membrane (PM) and tonoplast, respectively. MIPs were most abundant in cells involved in bulk water flow and solute flux. The tonoplast MIP-F was found in all cells, while signature cell types identified different PM-MIPs: MIP-A predominantly in phloem-associated cells, MIP-B in xylem parenchyma, and MIP-C in the epidermis and endodermis of immature roots. Membrane protein analysis confirmed MIP-F as tonoplast located. MIP-A and MIP-B were found in tonoplast fractions and also in fractions distinct from either the tonoplast or PM. MIP-C was most abundant but not exclusive to PM fractions, where it is expected based on its sequence signature. We suggest that within the cell, MIPs are mobile, which is similar to aquaporins cycling through animal endosomes. MIP cycling and the differential regulation of these proteins observed under conditions of salt stress may be fundamental for the control of tissue water flux. PMID:10806230

  14. Nonnative proteins induce expression of the Bacillus subtilis CIRCE regulon.

    PubMed

    Mogk, A; Völker, A; Engelmann, S; Hecker, M; Schumann, W; Völker, U

    1998-06-01

    The chaperone-encoding groESL and dnaK operons constitute the CIRCE regulon of Bacillus subtilis. Both operons are under negative control of the repressor protein HrcA, which interacts with the CIRCE operator and whose activity is modulated by the GroESL chaperone machine. In this report, we demonstrate that induction of the CIRCE regulon can also be accomplished by ethanol stress and puromycin. Introduction of the hrcA gene and a transcriptional fusion under the control of the CIRCE operator into Escherichia coli allowed induction of this fusion by heat shock, ethanol stress, and overproduction of GroESL substrates. The expression level of this hrcA-bgaB fusion inversely correlated with the amount of GroE machinery present in the cells. Therefore, all inducing conditions seem to lead to induction via titration of the GroE chaperonins by the increased level of nonnative proteins formed. Puromycin treatment failed to induce the sigmaB-dependent general stress regulon, indicating that nonnative proteins in general do not trigger this response. Reconstitution of HrcA-dependent heat shock regulation of B. subtilis in E. coli and complementation of E. coli groESL mutants by B. subtilis groESL indicate that the GroE chaperonin systems of the two bacterial species are functionally exchangeable. PMID:9603878

  15. Discrete phosphorylated Retinoblastoma protein isoform expression in mouse tooth development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weibo; Vazquez, Betsy; Andreeva, Viktoria; Spear, Daisy; Kong, Elizabeth; Hinds, Philip W.; Yelick, Pamela C.

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that Retinoblastoma protein (pRb) phosphorylation plays a central role in mediating cell cycle G1/S stage transition, together with E2 promoter-binding factors (E2F). The binding of pRb to E2F is controlled by the sequential and cumulative phosphorylation of pRb at various amino acids. In addition to the well characterized roles for pRb as a tumor suppressor, pRb has more recently been implicated in osteoprogenitor and other types of stem cell maintenance, proliferation and differentiation, thereby influencing the morphogenesis of developing organs. In this study, we present data characterizing the expression of three phosphorylated pRb (ppRb) isoforms - ppRbS780, ppRbS795, and ppRbS807/811- in developing mouse molar and incisor tooth buds. Also, we analyzed the co-localization of pRb isoforms and histone H3 expression in incisor tooth buds. Our results reveal distinct developmental expression patterns for individual ppRb isoforms in differentiating dental epithelial and dental mesenchymal cells, suggesting discrete functions for each in tooth development. PMID:22476877

  16. Improved protein quality in transgenic soybean expressing a de novo synthetic protein, MB-16.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfang; Schernthaner, Johann; Labbé, Natalie; Hefford, Mary A; Zhao, Jiping; Simmonds, Daina H

    2014-06-01

    To improve soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] seed nutritional quality, a synthetic gene, MB-16 was introduced into the soybean genome to boost seed methionine content. MB-16, an 11 kDa de novo protein enriched in the essential amino acids (EAAs) methionine, threonine, lysine and leucine, was originally developed for expression in rumen bacteria. For efficient seed expression, constructs were designed using the soybean codon bias, with and without the KDEL ER retention sequence, and β-conglycinin or cruciferin seed specific protein storage promoters. Homozygous lines, with single locus integrations, were identified for several transgenic events. Transgene transmission and MB-16 protein expression were confirmed to the T5 and T7 generations, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of developing seed showed that the transcript peaked in growing seed, 5-6 mm long, remained at this peak level to the full-sized green seed and then was significantly reduced in maturing yellow seed. Transformed events carrying constructs with the rumen bacteria codon preference showed the same transcription pattern as those with the soybean codon preference, but the transcript levels were lower at each developmental stage. MB-16 protein levels, as determined by immunoblots, were highest in full-sized green seed but the protein virtually disappeared in mature seed. However, amino acid analysis of mature seed, in the best transgenic line, showed a significant increase of 16.2 and 65.9 % in methionine and cysteine, respectively, as compared to the parent. This indicates that MB-16 elevated the sulfur amino acids, improved the EAA seed profile and confirms that a de novo synthetic gene can enhance the nutritional quality of soybean.

  17. Natural history of restricted synthesis and expression of measles virus genes in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Haase, A T; Gantz, D; Eble, B; Walker, D; Stowring, L; Ventura, P; Blum, H; Wietgrefe, S; Zupancic, M; Tourtellotte, W

    1985-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a slow infection caused by measles virus in which several years separate recovery from typical acute measles and the development of a slowly progressive neurological disease. We have investigated replication of measles virus in brain tissue obtained after the onset of neurological disease and in the terminal phase. With a hybridization tomographic technique that combines in situ hybridization with macroradioautographic screening of large areas of tissue, we analyzed the spatial and temporal distribution of virus genes in vivo, using region- and strand-specific probes for the nucleocapsid and matrix genes. We show that early in the course of SSPE there is a global repression in the synthesis and expression of the genome. In the final stage of SSPE most infected cells still have depressed levels of plus- and minus-strand viral RNA and contain nucleocapsid protein but lack matrix protein. These findings provide further evidence for a unified view of slow infections of the nervous system, where the general constraints on virus gene expression provide an explanation for persistence of virus in the face of the host's immune response, and the slow evolution of pathological change. In the final phases of SSPE the more specific block in virus replication accounts for the cell-associated state of the virus and the difficulty in virus isolation. Images PMID:3857631

  18. Regulation of RE1 protein silencing transcription factor (REST) expression by HIP1 protein interactor (HIPPI).

    PubMed

    Datta, Moumita; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P

    2011-09-30

    Earlier we have shown that the proapoptotic protein HIPPI (huntingtin interacting protein 1 (HIP1) protein interactor) along with its molecular partner HIP1 could regulate transcription of the caspase-1 gene. Here we report that RE1-silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF) is a new transcriptional target of HIPPI. HIPPI could bind to the promoter of REST and increased its expression in neuronal as well as non-neuronal cells. Such activation of REST down-regulated expression of REST target genes, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or proenkephalin (PENK). The ability of HIPPI to activate REST gene transcription was dependent on HIP1, the nuclear transporter of HIPPI. Using a Huntington disease cell model, we have demonstrated that feeble interaction of HIP1 with mutant huntingtin protein resulted in increased nuclear accumulation of HIPPI and HIP1, leading to higher occupancy of HIPPI at the REST promoter, triggering its transcriptional activation and consequent repression of REST target genes. This novel transcription regulatory mechanism of REST by HIPPI may contribute to the deregulation of transcription observed in the cell model of Huntington disease. PMID:21832040

  19. Differentially expressed protein markers in human submandibular and sublingual secretions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shen; Denny, Patricia; Denny, Paul; Xie, Yongming; Loo, Joseph A; Wolinsky, Lawrence E; Li, Yang; McBride, Jim; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R; Navazesh, Mavash; Wong, David T

    2004-11-01

    Proteome analysis of secretions from individual salivary glands is important for understanding the health of the oral cavity and pathogenesis of certain diseases. However, cross-contamination of submandibular (SM) and sublingual (SL) glandular secretions can occur. The close anatomic relationship of the SM and SL ductal orifices can lead to such contamination. Additionally, these glands may share common ducts. To insure the purity of SM/SL secretions for proteomic analysis, it is important to develop unique biomarkers which could be used to verify the integrity of the individual glandular saliva. In this study, a proteomics approach based on mass spectrometry and gel electrophoresis techniques was utilized to identify and verify a set of proteins (cystatin C, calgranulin B and MUC5B mucin), which are differentially expressed in SM/SL secretions. SM/SL fluids were obtained from nine healthy subjects. Cystatin C was found to be an SM-selective protein as it was found in all SM fluids but not detected in two SL fluids. MUC5B mucin and calgranulin B, on the other hand, were found to be SL-selective proteins. All SL samples contained MUC5B mucin, whereas MUC5B mucin was not detected in four SM samples. Eight of the SL samples contained calgranulin B; however, calgranulin B was absent in eight SM samples. This set of protein markers, especially calgranulin B, can be used to determine the purity of SM/SL samples, and therefore identify potential individuals who do not exhibit cross-contaminated SM/SL secretions, an important requirement for subsequent proteome analysis of pure SM and SL secretions.

  20. Production of soluble mammalian proteins in Escherichia coli: identification of protein features that correlate with successful expression

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Michael R; Shadbolt, S Paul; Vincent, Karen J; Perera, Rajika L; McCafferty, John

    2004-01-01

    Background In the search for generic expression strategies for mammalian protein families several bacterial expression vectors were examined for their ability to promote high yields of soluble protein. Proteins studied included cell surface receptors (Ephrins and Eph receptors, CD44), kinases (EGFR-cytoplasmic domain, CDK2 and 4), proteases (MMP1, CASP2), signal transduction proteins (GRB2, RAF1, HRAS) and transcription factors (GATA2, Fli1, Trp53, Mdm2, JUN, FOS, MAD, MAX). Over 400 experiments were performed where expression of 30 full-length proteins and protein domains were evaluated with 6 different N-terminal and 8 C-terminal fusion partners. Expression of an additional set of 95 mammalian proteins was also performed to test the conclusions of this study. Results Several protein features correlated with soluble protein expression yield including molecular weight and the number of contiguous hydrophobic residues and low complexity regions. There was no relationship between successful expression and protein pI, grand average of hydropathicity (GRAVY), or sub-cellular location. Only small globular cytoplasmic proteins with an average molecular weight of 23 kDa did not require a solubility enhancing tag for high level soluble expression. Thioredoxin (Trx) and maltose binding protein (MBP) were the best N-terminal protein fusions to promote soluble expression, but MBP was most effective as a C-terminal fusion. 63 of 95 mammalian proteins expressed at soluble levels of greater than 1 mg/l as N-terminal H10-MBP fusions and those that failed possessed, on average, a higher molecular weight and greater number of contiguous hydrophobic amino acids and low complexity regions. Conclusions By analysis of the protein features identified here, this study will help predict which mammalian proteins and domains can be successfully expressed in E. coli as soluble product and also which are best targeted for a eukaryotic expression system. In some cases proteins may be truncated

  1. The Sendai virus V protein interacts with the NP protein to regulate viral genome RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Horikami, S M; Smallwood, S; Moyer, S A

    1996-08-15

    The interactions of Sendai virus proteins required for viral RNA synthesis have been characterized both by the yeast two-hybrid system and through the use of glutathione S-transferase (gst)-viral fusion proteins synthesized in mammalian cells. Using the two-hybrid system we have confirmed the previously identified P-L (RNA polymerase), NPo-P (encapsidation substrate), and P-P complexes and now demonstrate NP-NP and NPo-V protein interactions. Expression of gstP and P proteins and binding to glutathione-Sepharose beads as a measure of complex formation confirmed the P-P interaction. The P-gstP binding occurred only on expression of the proteins in the same cell and was mapped to amino acids 345-411. We also show that full-length and deletion gstV and gstW proteins bound NPo protein when these sets of proteins were coexpressed and have identified one required region from amino acids 78-316. Neither gstV nor gstW bound NP assembled into nucleocapsids. Furthermore, both V and W proteins lacking the N-terminal 77 amino acids inhibited DI-H genome replication in vitro, showing the biological relevance of the remaining region. We propose that the specific inhibition of genome replication by V and W proteins occurs through interference with either the formation or the use of the NPo-P encapsidation substrate.

  2. [Eukaryotic Expression and Immunogenic Research of Recombination Ebola Virus Membrane Protein Gp-Fc].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Yang, Ren; Wang, Jiao; Wang, Xuan; Hou, Mieling; An, Lina; Zhu, Ying; Cao, Yuxi; Zeng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We used 293 cells to express the recombinant membrane protein of the Ebola virus. Then, the immunogenicity of the recombinant protein was studied by immunized BALB/c mice. According to the codon use frequency of humans, the gene encoding the extracellular domain of the Ebola virus membrane protein was optimized, synthesized, and inserted into the eukaryotic expression plasmid pXG-Fc to construct the human IgG Fc and Ebola GP fusion protein expression plasmid pXG-modGP-Fc. To achieve expression, the fusion protein expression vector was transfected into high-density 293 cells using transient transfection technology. The recombinant protein was purified by protein A affinity chromatography. BALB/c mice were immunized with the purified fusion protein, and serum antibody titers evaluated by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Purification and analyses of the protein revealed that the eukaryotic expression vector could express the recombinant protein GP-Fc effectively, and that the recombinant protein in the supernatant of the cell culture was present as a dimer. After immunization with the purified recombinant protein, a high titer of antigen-specific IgG could be detected in the serum of immunized mice by indirect ELISA, showing that the recombinant protein had good immunogenicity. These data suggest that we obtained a recombinant protein with good immunogenicity. Our study is the basis for development of a vaccine against the Ebola virus and for screening of monoclonal antibodies.

  3. Kinetics of Incorporation of Structural Proteins into Sindbis Virions

    PubMed Central

    Scheele, Christina M.; Pfefferkorn, E. R.

    1969-01-01

    The morphogenesis of Sindbis virus was studied by determining the kinetics with which newly synthesized nucleocapsid and envelope proteins appeared in virions released into the extracellular medium. Assembly of the nucleocapsid was more rapid than modification of the cellular membrane by the addition of the viral envelope protein. However, both viral structural proteins were efficiently incorporated into virions; a 0.5-hr pulse-labeling period resulted in the release of maximally labeled virus during the next hour. When protein synthesis was inhibited, release of virus soon declined even though large amounts of both viral structural proteins were present within the cell and ribonucleic acid replication was unaffected. PMID:5771964

  4. Lytic Promoters Express Protein during Herpes Simplex Virus Latency

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Tiffany A.; Tscharke, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has provided the prototype for viral latency with previously well-defined acute or lytic and latent phases. More recently, the deep quiescence of HSV latency has been questioned with evidence that lytic genes can be transcribed in this state. However, to date the only evidence that these transcripts might be translated has come from immunological studies that show activated T cells persist in the nervous system during latency. Here we use a highly sensitive Cre-marking model to show that lytic and latent phases are less clearly defined in two significant ways. First, around half of the HSV spread leading to latently infected sites occurred beyond the initial acute infection and second, we show direct evidence that lytic promoters can drive protein expression during latency. PMID:27348812

  5. Phytomonas: A non-pathogenic trypanosomatid model for functional expression of proteins.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Mariana R; Sayé, Melisa; Reigada, Chantal; Carrillo, Carolina; Pereira, Claudio A

    2015-10-01

    Phytomonas are protozoan parasites from the Trypanosomatidae family which infect a wide variety of plants. Herein, Phytomonas Jma was tested as a model for functional expression of heterologous proteins. Green fluorescent protein expression was evaluated in Phytomonas and compared with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Phytomonas was able to express GFP at levels similar to T. cruzi although the transgenic selection time was higher. It was possible to establish an efficient transfection and selection protocol for protein expression. These results demonstrate that Phytomonas can be a good model for functional expression of proteins from other trypanosomatids, presenting the advantage of being completely safe for humans. PMID:26142019

  6. Phytomonas: A non-pathogenic trypanosomatid model for functional expression of proteins.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Mariana R; Sayé, Melisa; Reigada, Chantal; Carrillo, Carolina; Pereira, Claudio A

    2015-10-01

    Phytomonas are protozoan parasites from the Trypanosomatidae family which infect a wide variety of plants. Herein, Phytomonas Jma was tested as a model for functional expression of heterologous proteins. Green fluorescent protein expression was evaluated in Phytomonas and compared with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Phytomonas was able to express GFP at levels similar to T. cruzi although the transgenic selection time was higher. It was possible to establish an efficient transfection and selection protocol for protein expression. These results demonstrate that Phytomonas can be a good model for functional expression of proteins from other trypanosomatids, presenting the advantage of being completely safe for humans.

  7. Neurotoxocarosis alters myelin protein gene transcription and expression.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Lea; Beyerbach, Martin; Lühder, Fred; Beineke, Andreas; Strube, Christina

    2015-06-01

    Neurotoxocarosis is an infection of the central nervous system caused by migrating larvae of the common dog and cat roundworms (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), which are zoonotic agents. As these parasites are prevalent worldwide and neuropathological and molecular investigations on neurotoxocarosis are scare, this study aims to characterise nerve fibre demyelination associated with neurotoxocarosis on a molecular level. Transcription of eight myelin-associated genes (Cnp, Mag, Mbp, Mog, Mrf-1, Nogo-A, Plp1, Olig2) was determined in the mouse model during six time points of the chronic phase of infection using qRT-PCR. Expression of selected proteins was analysed by Western blotting or immunohistochemistry. Additionally, demyelination and neuronal damage were investigated histologically. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between transcription rates of T. canis-infected and uninfected control mice were detected for all analysed genes while T. cati affected five of eight investigated genes. Interestingly, 2', 3 ´-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (Cnp) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog) were upregulated in both T. canis- and T. cati-infected mice preceding demyelination. Later, CNPase expression was additionally enhanced. As expected, myelin basic protein (Mbp) was downregulated in cerebra and cerebella of T. canis-infected mice when severe demyelination was present 120 days post infectionem (dpi). The transcriptional pattern observed in the present study appears to reflect direct traumatic and hypoxic effects of larval migration as well as secondary processes including host immune reactions, demyelination and attempts to remyelinate damaged areas. PMID:25773181

  8. Integrating clinical, gene expression, protein expression and preanalytical data for in silico cancer research.

    PubMed

    Rossille, Delphine; Burgun, Anita; Pangault-Lorho, Céline; Fest, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    We present the phase I development of an integrative platform for the analysis of clinical, gene expression, protein expression and pre-analytical data. The platform is aimed at providing transparent access and analysis tools to researchers investigating new biomarkers and prognosis factors in the particular field of lymphoma diseases. In this article, we report on the data integration phase. The platform's principal advantage is its completeness as it integrates in a single environment clinical, genomic and proteomic data, allowing for their combined analysis. The architecture consists in a data warehouse including data on patients, clinical trials and array platforms and a DeMilitarized Zone for data exchange. A secure web-based platform allows any collaborative team to request the data warehouse and access basic statistics on integrated data. The presented system is currently in use.

  9. Recombinant Bovine/Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 (B/HPIV3) Expressing the Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) G and F Proteins Can Be Used To Achieve Simultaneous Mucosal Immunization against RSV and HPIV3

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Alexander C.; McAuliffe, Josephine M.; Murphy, Brian R.; Collins, Peter L.

    2001-01-01

    Recombinant bovine/human parainfluenza virus type 3 (rB/HPIV3), a recombinant bovine PIV3 (rBPIV3) in which the F and HN genes were replaced with their HPIV3 counterparts, was used to express the major protective antigens of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in order to create a bivalent mucosal vaccine against RSV and HPIV3. The attenuation of rB/HPIV3 is provided by the host range restriction of the BPIV3 backbone in primates. RSV G and F open reading frames (ORFs) were placed under the control of PIV3 transcription signals and inserted individually into the rB/HPIV3 genome in the promoter-proximal position preceding the nucleocapsid protein gene. The recombinant PIV3 expressing the RSV G ORF (rB/HPIV3-G1) was not restricted in its replication in vitro, whereas the virus expressing the RSV F ORF (rB/HPIV3-F1) was eightfold restricted compared to its rB/HPIV3 parent. Both viruses replicated efficiently in the respiratory tract of hamsters, and each induced RSV serum antibody titers similar to those induced by RSV infection and anti-HPIV3 titers similar to those induced by HPIV3 infection. Immunization of hamsters with rB/HPIV3-G1, rB/HPIV3-F1, or a combination of both viruses resulted in a high level of resistance to challenge with RSV or HPIV3 28 days later. These results describe a vaccine strategy that obviates the technical challenges associated with a live attenuated RSV vaccine, providing, against the two leading viral agents of pediatric respiratory tract disease, a bivalent vaccine whose attenuation phenotype is based on the extensive host range sequence differences of BPIV3. PMID:11312329

  10. Fast plasmid based protein expression analysis in insect cells using an automated SplitGFP screen

    PubMed Central

    Bleckmann, Maren; Schmelz, Stefan; Schinkowski, Christian; Scrima, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombinant protein expression often presents a bottleneck for the production of proteins for use in many areas of animal‐cell biotechnology. Difficult‐to‐express proteins require the generation of numerous expression constructs, where popular prokaryotic screening systems often fail to identify expression of multi domain or full‐length protein constructs. Post‐translational modified mammalian proteins require an alternative host system such as insect cells using the Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS). Unfortunately this is time‐, labor‐, and cost‐intensive. It is clearly desirable to find an automated and miniaturized fast multi‐sample screening method for protein expression in such systems. With this in mind, in this paper a high‐throughput initial expression screening method is described using an automated Microcultivation system in conjunction with fast plasmid based transient transfection in insect cells for the efficient generation of protein constructs. The applicability of the system is demonstrated for the difficult to express Nucleotide‐binding Oligomerization Domain‐containing protein 2 (NOD2). To enable detection of proper protein expression the rather weak plasmid based expression has been improved by a sensitive inline detection system. Here we present the functionality and application of the sensitive SplitGFP (split green fluorescent protein) detection system in insect cells. The successful expression of constructs is monitored by direct measurement of the fluorescence in the BioLector Microcultivation system. Additionally, we show that the results obtained with our plasmid‐based SplitGFP protein expression screen correlate directly to the level of soluble protein produced in BEVS. In conclusion our automated SplitGFP screen outlines a sensitive, fast and reliable method reducing the time and costs required for identifying the optimal expression construct prior to large scale protein production in

  11. RNA protein interactions governing expression of the most abundant protein in human body, type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Branko

    2013-01-01

    Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in human body. The protein turns over slowly and its replacement synthesis is low. However, in wound healing or in pathological fibrosis the cells can increase production of type I collagen several hundred fold. This increase is predominantly due to posttranscriptional regulation, including increased half-life of collagen messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and their increased translatability. Type I collagen is composed of two α1 and one α2 polypeptides that fold into a triple helix. This stoichiometry is strictly regulated to prevent detrimental synthesis of α1 homotrimers. Collagen polypeptides are co-translationally modified and the rate of modifications is in dynamic equilibrium with the rate of folding, suggesting coordinated translation of collagen α1(I) and α2(I) polypeptides. Collagen α1(I) mRNA has in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) a C-rich sequence that binds protein αCP, this binding stabilizes the mRNA in collagen producing cells. In the 5' UTR both collagen mRNAs have a conserved stem-loop (5' SL) structure. The 5' SL is critical for high collagen expression, knock in mice with disruption of the 5' SL are resistant to liver fibrosis. the 5' SL binds protein LARP6 with strict sequence specificity and high affinity. LARP6 recruits RNA helicase A to facilitate translation initiation and associates collagen mRNAs with vimentin and nonmuscle myosin filaments. Binding to vimentin stabilizes collagen mRNAs, while nonmuscle myosin regulates coordinated translation of α1(I) and α2(I) mRNAs. When nonmuscle myosin filaments are disrupted the cells secrete only α1 homotrimers. Thus, the mechanism governing high collagen expression involves two RNA binding proteins and development of cytoskeletal filaments.

  12. Ozone inhalation stimulates expression of a neutrophil chemotactic protein, macrophage inflammatory protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, K.E.; Simpson, L.; Carter, J.; Hassenbein, D.; Leikauf, G.D. )

    1993-04-01

    Short-term exposure of humans and animals to ozone results in increased lung neutrophils; however, the mechanisms underlying this response are not completely understood. We examined the potential involvement of the neutrophil chemotactic factor, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), in ozone-induced inflammation. Exposure-response relationships for ozone and MIP-2 expression were characterized by exposing C57B1/6 mice to 0.1-2 ppm ozone for 3 hr and determining lung levels of MIP-2 mRNA 6 hr after exposure. Temporal relationships between ozone and MIP-2 were determined by exposing mice (2 ppm ozone x 3 hr) and characterizing MIP-2 mRNA expression 0, 2, 6, and 24 hr after exposure. Neutrophils in lung lavage fluid were determined in both exposure-response and time course studies. Ozone concentrations > or = 1.0 ppm increased MIP-2 mRNA and this increase corresponded with recruitment of neutrophils. MIP-2 mRNA was increased immediately after ozone exposure and decreased to control levels by 24 hr. To examine the role of direct oxidant effects in ozone-induced MIP-2 expression, alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro for 4 hr to 10(-10)-10(-5) M hydrogen peroxide and MIP-2 expression was characterized. MIP-2 mRNA levels in lung macrophages were increased by > or = 10(-9) M hydrogen peroxide. In summary, our findings suggest the chemotactic protein MIP-2 may be responsible, at least in part, for ozone-induced increases in lung neutrophils and indicate that direct exposure of alveolar macrophages to an oxidant is sufficient to induce MIP-2 expression.

  13. RNA-binding protein QKI regulates Glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Radomska, Katarzyna J; Halvardson, Jonatan; Reinius, Björn; Lindholm Carlström, Eva; Emilsson, Lina; Feuk, Lars; Jazin, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Linkage, association and expression studies previously pointed to the human QKI, KH domain containing, RNA-binding (QKI) as a candidate gene for schizophrenia. Functional studies of the mouse orthologue Qk focused mainly on its role in oligodendrocyte development and myelination, while its function in astroglia remained unexplored. Here, we show that QKI is highly expressed in human primary astrocytes and that its splice forms encode proteins targeting different subcellular localizations. Uncovering the role of QKI in astrocytes is of interest in light of growing evidence implicating astrocyte dysfunction in the pathogenesis of several disorders of the central nervous system. We selectively silenced QKI splice variants in human primary astrocytes and used RNA sequencing to identify differential expression and splice variant composition at the genome-wide level. We found that an mRNA expression of Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), encoding a major component of astrocyte intermediate filaments, was down-regulated after QKI7 splice variant silencing. Moreover, we identified a potential QKI-binding site within the 3' untranslated region of human GFAP. This sequence was not conserved between mice and humans, raising the possibility that GFAP is a target for QKI in humans but not rodents. Haloperidol treatment of primary astrocytes resulted in coordinated increases in QKI7 and GFAP expression. Taken together, our results provide the first link between QKI and GFAP, two genes with alterations previously observed independently in schizophrenic patients. Our findings for QKI, together with its well-known role in myelination, suggest that QKI is a hub regulator of glia function in humans.

  14. Patagonfibrase modifies protein expression of tissue factor and protein disulfide isomerase in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Peichoto, María Elisa; Santoro, Marcelo Larami

    2016-09-01

    Patagonfibrase is a hemorrhagic metalloproteinase isolated from the venom of the South American rear-fanged snake Philodryas patagoniensis, and is an important contributor to local lesions inflicted by this species. The tissue factor (TF)-factor VIIa complex, besides triggering the coagulation cascade, has been demonstrated to be involved in inflammatory events. Our aim was to determine whether patagonfibrase affects the expression of TF and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an enzyme that controls TF biological activity, at the site of patagonfibrase injection, and thus if they may play a role in hemostatic and inflammatory events induced by snake venoms. Patagonfibrase (60 μg/kg) was administered s.c. to rats, and after 3 h blood was collected to evaluate hemostasis parameters, and skin fragments close to the site of injection were taken to assess TF and PDI expression. Patagonfibrase did not alter blood cell counts, plasma fibrinogen levels, or levels of TF activity in plasma. However, by semiquantitative Western blotting, patagonfibrase increased TF expression by 2-fold, and decreased PDI expression by 3-fold in skin samples. In agreement, by immunohistochemical analyses, prominent TF expression was observed in the subcutaneous tissue. Thus, patagonfibrase affects the local expression of TF and PDI without inducing any systemic hemostatic disturbance, although that they may be involved in the local inflammatory events induced by hemorrhagic metalloproteinases. Once antivenom therapy is not totally effective to treat the local injury induced by snake venoms, modulation of the activity and expression of TF and/or PDI might become a strategy for treating snake envenomation. PMID:27390042

  15. Multidrug resistance protein gene expression in Trichoplusia ni caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Jason; D'Souza, Olivia; Rheault, Mark; Donly, Cam

    2013-02-01

    Many insect species exhibit pesticide-resistant phenotypes. One of the mechanisms capable of contributing to resistance is the overexpression of multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter proteins. Here we describe the cloning of three genes encoding MDR proteins from Trichoplusia ni: trnMDR1, trnMDR2 and trnMDR3. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) detected trnMDR mRNA in the whole nervous system, midgut and Malpighian tubules of final instar T. ni caterpillars. To test whether these genes are upregulated in response to chemical challenge in this insect, qPCR was used to compare trnMDR mRNA levels in unchallenged insects with those of insects fed the synthetic pyrethroid, deltamethrin. Only limited increases were detected in a single gene, trnMDR2, which is the most weakly expressed of the three MDR genes, suggesting that increased multidrug resistance of this type is not a significant part of the response to deltamethrin exposure.

  16. Coat protein expression strategy of oat blue dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Michael C; Weiland, John J

    2014-02-01

    Oat blue dwarf virus (OBDV) is a member of the genus Marafivirus whose genome encodes a 227 kDa polyprotein (p227) ostensibly processed post-translationally into its functional components. Encoded near the 3' terminus and coterminal with the p227 ORF are ORFs specifying major and minor capsid proteins (CP). Since the CP expression strategy of marafiviruses has not been thoroughly investigated, we produced a series of point mutants in the OBDV CP encoding gene and examined expression in protoplasts. Results support a model in which the 21 kDa major CP is the product of direct translation of a sgRNA, while the 24 kDa minor CP is a cleavage product derived from both the polyprotein and a larger ~26 kDa precursor translated directly from the sgRNA. Cleavage occurs at an LXG[G/A] motif conserved in many viruses that use papain-like proteases for polyprotein processing and protection against degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  17. Human Articular Chondrocytes Express Multiple Gap Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mayan, Maria D.; Carpintero-Fernandez, Paula; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Martinez-de-Ilarduya, Oskar; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease and involves progressive degeneration of articular cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate if chondrocytes from human articular cartilage express gap junction proteins called connexins (Cxs). We show that human chondrocytes in tissue express Cx43, Cx45, Cx32, and Cx46. We also find that primary chondrocytes from adults retain the capacity to form functional voltage-dependent gap junctions. Immunohistochemistry experiments in cartilage from OA patients revealed significantly elevated levels of Cx43 and Cx45 in the superficial zone and down through the next approximately 1000 μm of tissue. These zones corresponded with regions damaged in OA that also had high levels of proliferative cell nuclear antigen. An increased number of Cxs may help explain the increased proliferation of cells in clusters that finally lead to tissue homeostasis loss. Conversely, high levels of Cxs in OA cartilage reflect the increased number of adjacent cells in clusters that are able to interact directly by gap junctions as compared with hemichannels on single cells in normal cartilage. Our data provide strong evidence that OA patients have a loss of the usual ordered distribution of Cxs in the damaged zones and that the reductions in Cx43 levels are accompanied by the loss of correct Cx localization in the nondamaged areas. PMID:23416160

  18. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF.

    PubMed

    Cantu-Bustos, J Enrique; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Galbraith, David W; McEvoy, Megan M; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-05-01

    Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli has been improved considerably through the use of fusion proteins, because they increase protein solubility and facilitate purification via affinity chromatography. In this article, we propose the use of CusF as a new fusion partner for expression and purification of recombinant proteins in E. coli. Using a cell-free protein expression system, based on the E. coli S30 extract, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was expressed with a series of different N-terminal tags, immobilized on self-assembled protein microarrays, and its fluorescence quantified. GFP tagged with CusF showed the highest fluorescence intensity, and this was greater than the intensities from corresponding GFP constructs that contained MBP or GST tags. Analysis of protein production in vivo showed that CusF produces large amounts of soluble protein with low levels of inclusion bodies. Furthermore, fusion proteins can be exported to the cellular periplasm, if CusF contains the signal sequence. Taking advantage of its ability to bind copper ions, recombinant proteins can be purified with readily available IMAC resins charged with this metal ion, producing pure proteins after purification and tag removal. We therefore recommend the use of CusF as a viable alternative to MBP or GST as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli. PMID:26805756

  19. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF.

    PubMed

    Cantu-Bustos, J Enrique; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Galbraith, David W; McEvoy, Megan M; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-05-01

    Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli has been improved considerably through the use of fusion proteins, because they increase protein solubility and facilitate purification via affinity chromatography. In this article, we propose the use of CusF as a new fusion partner for expression and purification of recombinant proteins in E. coli. Using a cell-free protein expression system, based on the E. coli S30 extract, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was expressed with a series of different N-terminal tags, immobilized on self-assembled protein microarrays, and its fluorescence quantified. GFP tagged with CusF showed the highest fluorescence intensity, and this was greater than the intensities from corresponding GFP constructs that contained MBP or GST tags. Analysis of protein production in vivo showed that CusF produces large amounts of soluble protein with low levels of inclusion bodies. Furthermore, fusion proteins can be exported to the cellular periplasm, if CusF contains the signal sequence. Taking advantage of its ability to bind copper ions, recombinant proteins can be purified with readily available IMAC resins charged with this metal ion, producing pure proteins after purification and tag removal. We therefore recommend the use of CusF as a viable alternative to MBP or GST as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli.

  20. Neuroendocrine secretory protein 7B2: structure, expression and functions.

    PubMed Central

    Mbikay, M; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M

    2001-01-01

    7B2 is an acidic protein residing in the secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Its sequence has been elucidated in many phyla and species. It shows high similarity among mammals. A Pro-Pro-Asn-Pro-Cys-Pro polyproline motif is its most conserved feature, being carried by both vertebrate and invertebrate sequences. It is biosynthesized as a precursor protein that is cleaved into an N-terminal fragment and a C-terminal peptide. In neuroendocrine cells, 7B2 functions as a specific chaperone for the proprotein convertase (PC) 2. Through the sequence around its Pro-Pro-Asn-Pro-Cys-Pro motif, it binds to an inactive proPC2 and facilitates its transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to later compartments of the secretory pathway where the zymogen is proteolytically matured and activated. Its C-terminal peptide can inhibit PC2 in vitro and may contribute to keep the enzyme transiently inactive in vivo. The PC2-7B2 model defines a new neuroendocrine paradigm whereby proteolytic activation of prohormones and proneuropeptides in the secretory pathway is spatially and temporally regulated by the dynamics of interactions between converting enzymes and their binding proteins. Interestingly, unlike PC2-null mice, which are viable, 7B2-null mutants die early in life from Cushing's disease due to corticotropin ('ACTH') hypersecretion by the neurointermediate lobe, suggesting a possible involvement of 7B2 in secretory granule formation and in secretion regulation. The mechanism of this regulation is yet to be elucidated. 7B2 has been shown to be a good marker of several neuroendocrine cell dysfunctions in humans. The possibility that anomalies in its structure and expression could be aetiological causes of some of these dysfunctions warrants investigation. PMID:11439082

  1. Expression of epithelial adhesion proteins and integrins in chronic inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Haapasalmi, K.; Mäkelä, M.; Oksala, O.; Heino, J.; Yamada, K. M.; Uitto, V. J.; Larjava, H.

    1995-01-01

    Epithelial cell behavior in chronic inflammation is poorly characterized. During inflammation of tooth-supporting structures (periodontal disease), increased proliferation of epithelial cells into the inflamed connective tissue stroma is commonly seen. In some areas ulceration and degeneration take place. We studied alterations in the expression of adhesion molecules and integrins during chronic periodontal inflammation. In inflamed tissue, laminin-1 and type IV collagen were still present in the basement membrane and surrounding blood vessels, but they were also found extravascularly in inflamed connective tissue stroma. Type VII collagen and laminin-5 (also known as kalinin, epiligrin, or nicein) were poorly preserved in the basement membrane zone, but both were found in unusual streak-like distributions in the subepithelial connective tissue stroma in inflamed tissue. Both fibronectin and tenascin were substantially decreased in chronically inflamed connective tissue, showing only punctate staining at the basement membrane zone. Integrins of the beta 1 family showed two distinct staining patterns in epithelial cells during chronic inflammation; focal losses of beta 1 integrins (alpha 2 beta 1 and alpha 3 beta 1) were found in most areas, while in other areas the entire pocket epithelium was found to be strongly positive for beta 1 integrins. No members of the alpha v integrin family were found in any epithelia studied. Expression of the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin was high in basal cells of healthy tissue, but weak in epithelium associated with chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation therefore involves alterations in both adhesion proteins and integrins expressed by epithelial cells. Basement membrane components found at abnormal sites in stroma in chronic inflammation might serve as new adhesive ligands for various cell types in inflamed stroma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7541610

  2. Trichohyalin-like 1 protein, a member of fused S100 proteins, is expressed in normal and pathologic human skin.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, Takako; Makino, Teruhiko; Ur Rehman, Mati; Yoshihisa, Yoko; Sugimori, Michiya; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2013-03-01

    Trichohyalin-like 1 (TCHHL1) protein is a novel member of the fused-type S100 protein gene family. The deduced amino acid sequence of TCHHL1 contains an EF-hand domain in the N-terminus, one trans-membrane domain and a nuclear localization signal. We generated specific antibodies against the C-terminus of the TCHHL1 protein and examined the expression of TCHHL1 proteins in normal and pathological human skin. An immunohistochemical study showed that TCHHL1 proteins were expressed in the basal layer of the normal epidermis. In addition, signals of TCHHL1 proteins were observed around the nuclei of cultured growing keratinocytes. Accordingly, TCHHL1 mRNA has been detected in normal skin and cultured growing keratinocytes. Furthermore, TCHHL1 proteins were strongly expressed in the peripheral areas of tumor nests in basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. A dramatic increase in the number of Ki67 positive cells was observed in TCHHL1-expressing areas. The expression of TCHHL1 proteins also increased in non-cancerous hyperproliferative epidermal tissues such as those of psoriasis vulgaris and lichen planus. These findings highlight the possibility that TCHHL1 proteins are expressed in growing keratinocytes of the epidermis and might be associated with the proliferation of keratinocytes. PMID:23376073

  3. Expression and purification of toxic anti-breast cancer p28-NRC chimeric protein

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Meysam; Mirmohammad-Sadeghi, Hamid; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chimeric proteins consisting of a targeting moiety and a cytotoxic moiety are now under intense research focus for targeted therapy of cancer. Here, we report cloning, expression, and purification of such a targeted chimeric protein made up of p28 peptide as both targeting and anticancer moiety fused to NRC peptide as a cytotoxic moiety. However, since the antimicrobial activity of the NRC peptide would intervene expression of the chimeric protein in Escherichia coli, we evaluated the effects of two fusion tags, that is, thioredoxin (Trx) and 6x-His tags, and various expression conditions, on the expression of p28-NRC chimeric protein. Materials and Methods: In order to express the chimeric protein with only 6x-His tag, pET28 expression plasmid was used. Cloning in pET32 expression plasmid was performed to add both Trx and 6x-His tags to the chimeric protein. Expression of the chimeric protein with both plasmids was evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis following optimization of expression conditions and host strains. Results: Expression of the chimeric protein in pET28a was performed. However, expression yield of the chimeric protein was low. Optimization of culture conditions and host strains led to reasonable expression yield of the toxic chimeric protein in pET32a vector. In cases of both plasmids, approximately 10 kDa deviation of the apparent molecular weight from the theoretical one was seen in SDS-PAGE of purified chimeric proteins. Conclusions: The study leads to proper expression and purification yield of p28-NRC chimeric protein with Trx tag following optimizing culture conditions and host strains. PMID:27169101

  4. The Up-Regulation of Ribosomal Proteins Further Regulates Protein Expression Profile in Female Schistosoma japonicum after Pairing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jun; Li, Chen; Wang, Suwen

    2015-01-01

    Background Pairing of Schistosoma males and females leads to and maintains female sexual maturation. However, the mechanism by which pairing facilitates sexual maturation of females is not clear. An increasing body of evidence suggests that ribosomal proteins have regulatory rather than constitutive roles in protein translation. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the effect of ribosome regulation on female sex maturation, Solexa and iTRAQ techniques were used to analyze the relationship between ribosomal gene or protein expression and sexual development of Schistosoma females. In the present study, considerably higher number of ribosomal genes or proteins were found to be differentially expressed in paired 23-day-old females. Moreover, mature female-specific proteins associated with egg production, such as ferritin-1 heavy chain and superoxide dismutase, were selectively highly expressed in paired females, rather than higher level of protein synthesis of all transcripts compared with those in unpaired 23-day-old females. Furthermore, other developmental stages were utilized to investigate different expression pattern of ribosomal proteins in females by analysing 18-day-old female schistosomula from single- or double-sex infections to determine the relationship between ribosomal protein expression pattern and development. Results showed that undeveloped 18-day-old females from single- and double-sex infections, as well as 23-day-old unpaired females, possessed similar ribosomal protein expression patterns, which were distinct from those in 23-day-old paired females. Conclusions/Significance Our findings reveal that the pairing of females and males triggers a specialized ribosomal protein expression profile which further regulates the protein profile for sexual maturation in Schistosoma japonicum, based on its gene expression profile. PMID:26070205

  5. Use of high-throughput protein array for profiling of differentially expressed proteins in normal and malignant breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Hudelist, Gernot; Pacher-Zavisin, Margit; Singer, Christian F; Holper, Tina; Kubista, Ernst; Schreiber, Martin; Manavi, Mahmood; Bilban, Martin; Czerwenka, Klaus

    2004-08-01

    cDNA arrays provide a powerful tool to identify gene expression pattern that are potentially associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. However, genes work at the protein level and, since the transcriptional activity of a gene does not necessarily reflect cellular protein expression, the identification and quantification of proteins is essential for the understanding of molecular events leading to malignant transformation. We have therefore employed a high-throughput protein microarray system which contains 378 well-characterized monoclonal antibodies in order to compare the gene expression pattern of malignant and adjacent normal breast tissue in a patient with primary breast cancer. Using this technique, we have identified a number of proteins that show increased expression levels in malignant breast tissues such as casein kinase Ie, p53, annexin XI, CDC25C, eIF-4E and MAP kinase 7. The expression of other proteins, such as the multifunctional regulator 14-3-3e was found to be decreased in malignant breast tissue, whereas the majority of proteins remained unchanged when compared to the corresponding non-malignant samples. The protein expression pattern was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, in which antibodies against 8 representative proteins known to be involved in carcinogenesis were employed in paraffin-embedded normal and malignant tissue sections deriving from the same patient. In each case, the results obtained by IHC matched the data obtained by antibody microarray system. Taken together, we have described for the first time a tumor cell specificity protein expression pattern by use of a novel commercially available antibody microarray system. We have thus demonstrated the feasibility of high-throughput protein arrays in the proteomic analysis of human breast tissue. We hypothesize that the use of protein arrays will not only increase our understanding of the molecular events, but could prove useful in evaluating prognosis and in determining optimal

  6. Can "normal" protein expression ranges be estimated with high-throughput proteomics?

    PubMed

    Higdon, Roger; Kolker, Eugene

    2015-06-01

    Although biological science discovery often involves comparing conditions to a normal state, in proteomics little is actually known about normal. Two Human Proteome studies featured in Nature offer new insights into protein expression and an opportunity to assess how high-throughput proteomics measures normal protein ranges. We use data from these studies to estimate technical and biological variability in protein expression and compare them to other expression data sets from normal tissue. Results show that measured protein expression across same-tissue replicates vary by ±4- to 10-fold for most proteins. Coefficients of variation (CV) for protein expression measurements range from 62% to 117% across different tissue experiments; however, adjusting for technical variation reduced this variability by as much as 50%. In addition, the CV could also be reduced by limiting comparisons to proteins with at least 3 or more unique peptide identifications as the CV was on average 33% lower than for proteins with 2 or fewer peptide identifications. We also selected 13 housekeeping proteins and genes that were expressed across all tissues with low variability to determine their utility as a reference set for normalization and comparative purposes. These results present the first step toward estimating normal protein ranges by determining the variability in expression measurements through combining publicly available data. They support an approach that combines standard protocols with replicates of normal tissues to estimate normal protein ranges for large numbers of proteins and tissues. This would be a tremendous resource for normal cellular physiology and comparisons of proteomics studies.

  7. Analysis of the nucleocapsid gene brings new insights to the classification of Sigmodontinae-borne hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Souza, William M; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu M

    2014-09-01

    Hantaviruses, members of the family Bunyaviridae, are the causative agents of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome in South America. Hantaviruses are currently classified into species based on the guidelines provided by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. However, a new taxonomic system was proposed recently to classify Sigmodontinae-borne hantaviruses, which are divided currently into three phylogenetic clades corresponding to Andes, Laguna Negra, and Rio Mamore. Analyzing complete nucleocapsid gene sequences of all Sigmodontinae-borne hantaviruses, we propose the addition of a new clade and a fourth group to the already established Andes clade, allowing a better classification of the Sigmodontinae-borne hantaviruses.

  8. A phenyl-thiadiazolylidene-amine derivative ejects zinc from retroviral nucleocapsid zinc fingers and inactivates HIV virions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sexual acquisition of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through mucosal transmission may be prevented by using topically applied agents that block HIV transmission from one individual to another. Therefore, virucidal agents that inactivate HIV virions may be used as a component in topical microbicides. Results Here, we have identified 2-methyl-3-phenyl-2H-[1,2,4]thiadiazol-5-ylideneamine (WDO-217) as a low-molecular-weight molecule that inactivates HIV particles. Both HIV-1 and HIV-2 virions pretreated with this compound were unable to infect permissive cells. Moreover, WDO-217 was able to inhibit infections of a wide spectrum of wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1, including clinical isolates, HIV-2 and SIV strains. Whereas the capture of virus by DC-SIGN was unaffected by the compound, it efficiently prevented the transmission of DC-SIGN-captured virus to CD4+ T-lymphocytes. Interestingly, exposure of virions to WDO-217 reduced the amount of virion-associated genomic RNA as measured by real-time RT-qPCR. Further mechanism-of-action studies demonstrated that WDO-217 efficiently ejects zinc from the zinc fingers of the retroviral nucleocapsid protein NCp7 and inhibits the cTAR destabilization properties of this protein. Importantly, WDO-217 was able to eject zinc from both zinc fingers, even when NCp7 was bound to oligonucleotides, while no covalent interaction between NCp7 and WDO-217 could be observed. Conclusion This compound is a new lead structure that can be used for the development of a new series of NCp7 zinc ejectors as candidate topical microbicide agents. PMID:23146561

  9. PTEN protein expression correlates with PTEN gene molecular changes but not with VEGF expression in astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Idoate, M A; Soria, E; Lozano, M D; Sola, J J; Panizo, A; de Alava, E; Manrique, M; Pardo-Mindán, F J

    2003-09-01

    PTEN gene (10q23) is a relevant tumor suppressor gene whose protein is a phosphatase involved in the control of angiogenesis of some tumors including astrocytomas. There are no studies correlating molecular changes of PTEN and the immunohistochemical expression of its protein (pPTEN) with the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in astrocytomas. Fifty-six surgically resected brain gliomas, 10 grade 2, 16 grade 3, and 30 grade 4, were studied by a combined approach, consisting of (1) PCR analysis using four microsatellite markers against the PTEN gene region (10q23), (2) the FISH technique to test chromosome 10 using a pericentromeric probe, and (3) immunohistochemical evaluation of pPTEN and VEGF. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of PTEN was observed in 10% of fibrillary grade 2 astrocytomas and all gemistocytic ones. In high-grade tumors, LOH was more frequent in grade 4 than in grade 3 (> or =2 loci deleted, 83% and 56%, respectively). Monosomy for chromosome 10 was observed especially in high-grade tumors (6% of grade 3 and 50% of grade 4) and in 20% of grade 2 tumors, corresponding to gemistocytic astrocytomas. Results with both antibodies against PTEN were concordant: loss of cytoplasmic immunoreactivity was frequently observed according to homogeneous or heterogeneous patterns in 70% and 50% of grades 4 and 3, respectively, but not in grade 2. Immunonegativity of pPTEN was associated with PTEN gene deletion (> or =2 loci deleted) (P = 0.04) but not with monosomy. Cytoplasmic immunoreactivity against VEGF was observed in high-grade and in gemistocytic astrocytomas, but not in conventional grade 2 tumors. Tumor expression of pPTEN was not associated with immunoreactivity against VEGF when the same areas were considered. In conclusion, loss of PTEN expression is frequent in high-grade astrocytomas, but not in grade 2 tumors, and correlates with PTEN deletion and loss of chromosome 10. PTEN immunoreactivity does not correlate with VEGF expression

  10. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release

    SciTech Connect

    López, Claudia S.; Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel; Kozak, Susan L.; Kabat, David; Barklis, Eric

    2014-08-15

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. - Highlights: • At the protein level, full-length HIV-1 Env alters Gag protein expression. • HIV-1 Env RNA expression reduces Gag levels and virus release. • Env RNA effects on Gag are dependent on the RRE. • RRE-containing Env RNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export.

  11. Heterochromatin Protein 1 Binding Protein 3 Expression as a Candidate Marker of Intrinsic 5-Fluorouracil Resistance

    PubMed Central

    HADAC, JAMIE N.; MILLER, DEVON D.; GRIMES, IAN C.; CLIPSON, LINDA; NEWTON, MICHAEL A.; SCHELMAN, WILLIAM R.; HALBERG, RICHARD B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite receiving post-operative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy, approximately 50% of patients with stage IIIC colon cancer experience recurrence. Currently, no molecular signature can predict response to 5-FU. Materials and Methods Mouse models of colon cancer have been developed and characterized. Individual tumors in these mice can be longitudinally monitored and assessed to identify differences between those that are responsive and those that are resistant to therapy. Gene expression was analyzed in serial biopsies that were collected before and after treatment with 5-FU. Colon tumors had heterogeneous responses to treatment with 5-FU. Microarray analysis of pretreatment biopsies revealed that Hp1bp3, a gene encoding heterochromatin protein 1 binding protein 3, was differentially expressed between sensitive and resistant tumors. Conclusion Using mouse models of human colorectal cancer, Hp1bp3 was identified as a candidate marker of intrinsic 5-FU resistance and may represent a potential biomarker for patient stratification or a target of clinical importance. PMID:26976970

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection and expression of DNA mismatch repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaee, Vahid; Molaei, Mahsa; Shalmani, Hamid Mohaghegh; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the expression of DNA (MMR) proteins, including hMLH1 and hMSH2, in gastric epithelial cells in the patients with or without Helicobacter pylori (H pylori)-infected gastritis. METHODS: Fifty H pylori-positive patients and 50 H pylori-negative patients were enrolled in the study. During endoscopy of patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia, two antral and two corpus biopsies were taken for histological examination (Giemsa stain) and for immunohistochemical staining of hMLH1 and hMSH2. RESULTS: The percentage of epithelial cell nuclei that demonstrated positivity for hMLH1 staining was 84.14 ± 7.32% in H pylori-negative patients, while it was 73.34 ± 10.10% in H pylori-positive patients (P < 0.0001). No significant difference was seen between the two groups regarding the percentage of epithelial cell nuclei that demonstrated positivity for hMSH2 staining (81.16 ± 8.32% in H pylori-negative versus 78.24 ± 8.71% in H pylori-positive patients; P = 0.09). CONCLUSION: This study indicates that H pylori might promote development of gastric carcinoma at least in part through its ability to affect the DNA MMR system. PMID:19034977

  13. Connexin expression in human acute myeloid leukemia cells: Identification of patient subsets based on protein and global gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    REIKVAM, HÅKON; RYNINGEN, ANITA; SÆTERDAL, LARS RUNE; NEPSTAD, INA; FOSS, BRYNJAR; BRUSERUD, ØYSTEIN

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells support both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Τhis support is mediated through the local cytokine network and by direct cell-cell interactions mediated via adhesion molecules and the formation of gap junctions by connexins. Previous studies on connexins in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have mainly focused on the investigation of leukemia cell lines. In the present study, we therefore investigated the expression of various connexins at the protein (i.e., cell surface expression) and mRNA level in primary human AML cells. The cell surface expression of the connexins, Cx26, Cx32, Cx37, Cx43 and Cx45, varied considerably between patients, and detectable levels were observed only for subsets of patients. On the whole, Cx43 and Cx45 showed the highest cell surface expression. Connexin expression was dependent on AML cell differentiation, but showed no association with cytogenetic abnormalities or mutations of the fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) or nucleophosmin (NPM)‑1 genes. By contrast, only Cx45 showed a significant variation between patients at the mRNA level. A high Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon-γ], whereas a low Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of protein functions (i.e., ligase activity, protein folding and catabolism). There was no significant correlation observed between the connexin mRNA and protein levels. Thus, differences in connexin expression can be used to subclassify AML patients. Differences in connexin cell surface expression profiles are not reflected at the mRNA level and have to be directly examined, whereas variations in Cx45 mRNA expression are associated with differences in cell signaling and the regulation of protein functions. PMID:25529637

  14. Connexin expression in human acute myeloid leukemia cells: identification of patient subsets based on protein and global gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Reikvam, Håkon; Ryningen, Anita; Sæterdal, Lars Rune; Nepstad, Ina; Foss, Brynjar; Bruserud, Øystein

    2015-03-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells support both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Τhis support is mediated through the local cytokine network and by direct cell‑cell interactions mediated via adhesion molecules and the formation of gap junctions by connexins. Previous studies on connexins in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have mainly focused on the investigation of leukemia cell lines. In the present study, we therefore investigated the expression of various connexins at the protein (i.e., cell surface expression) and mRNA level in primary human AML cells. The cell surface expression of the connexins, Cx26, Cx32, Cx37, Cx43 and Cx45, varied considerably between patients, and detectable levels were observed only for subsets of patients. On the whole, Cx43 and Cx45 showed the highest cell surface expression. Connexin expression was dependent on AML cell differentiation, but showed no association with cytogenetic abnormalities or mutations of the fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) or nucleophosmin (NPM)‑1 genes. By contrast, only Cx45 showed a significant variation between patients at the mRNA level. A high Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of the mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)‑17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon‑γ], whereas a low Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of protein functions (i.e., ligase activity, protein folding and catabolism). There was no significant correlation observed between the connexin mRNA and protein levels. Thus, differences in connexin expression can be used to subclassify AML patients. Differences in connexin cell surface expression profiles are not reflected at the mRNA level and have to be directly examined, whereas variations in Cx45 mRNA expression are associated with differences in cell signaling and the regulation of protein functions.

  15. Analysis of the protein-protein interaction networks of differentially expressed genes in pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Yinghua; Duan, Qianglin; Gong, Zhu; Liang, Aibin; Song, Haoming; Wang, Lemin

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the function and interaction of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in pulmonary embolism (PE). The gene expression profile GSE13535, was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. The DEGs 2 and 18 h post‑PE initiation were identified using the affy package in R software. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways of the DEGs were analyzed using Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) online analytical tools. In addition, protein‑protein interaction (PPI) networks of the DEGs were constructed using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins. The PPI network at 18 h was modularized using Clusterone, and a functional enrichment analysis of the DEGs in the top three modules was performed with DAVID. Overall, 80 and 346 DEGs were identified 2 and 18 h after PE initiation, respectively. The KEGG pathways, including chemokine signaling and toll‑like receptor signaling, were shown to be significantly enriched. The five highest degree nodes in the PPI networks at 2 or 18 h were screened. The module analysis of the PPI network at 18 h revealed 11 hub nodes. A Gene Ontology terms analysis demonstrated that the DEGs in the top three modules were associated with the inflammatory, defense and immune responses. The results of the present study suggest that the DEGs identified, including chemokine‑related genes TFPI2 and TNF, may be potential target genes for the treatment of PE. The chemokine signaling pathway, inflammatory response and immune response were explored, and it may be suggested that these pathways have important roles in PE.

  16. Expression Screening of Integral Membrane Proteins by Fusion to Fluorescent Reporters.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Nettleship, Joanne E; Järvinen, Valtteri; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Owens, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    The production of recombinant integral membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to their relatively low levels of expression. To address this problem, screening strategies have been developed to identify the optimal membrane sequence and expression host for protein production. A common approach is to genetically fuse the membrane protein to a fluorescent reporter, typically Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) enabling expression levels, localization and detergent solubilisation to be assessed. Initially developed for screening the heterologous expression of bacterial membrane proteins in Escherichia coli, the method has been extended to eukaryotic hosts, including insect and mammalian cells. Overall, GFP-based expression screening has made a major impact on the number of membrane protein structures that have been determined in the last few years. PMID:27553231

  17. Proteomics Based Identification of Cell Migration Related Proteins in HBV Expressing HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Huixing; Li, Xi; Chan, Vincent; Chen, Wei Ning

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics study was performed to investigate the specific protein expression profiles of HepG2 cells transfected with mutant HBV compared with wildtype HBV genome, aiming to identify the specific functions of SH3 binding domain (proline rich region) located in HBx. In addition to the cell movement and kinetics changes due to the expression of HBV genome we have observed previously, here we further targeted to explore the specific changes of cellular proteins and potential intracellular protein interactions, which might provide more information of the potential cellular mechanism of the differentiated cell movements. Specific changes of a number of proteins were shown in global protein profiling in HepG2 cells expressing wildtype HBV, including cell migration related proteins, and interestingly the changes were found recovered by SH3 binding domain mutated HBV. The distinctive expressions of proteins were validated by Western blot analysis. PMID:24763314

  18. Variation in cell signaling protein expression may introduce sampling bias in primary epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mittermeyer, Gabriele; Malinowsky, Katharina; Beese, Christian; Höfler, Heinz; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Avril, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Although the expression of cell signaling proteins is used as prognostic and predictive biomarker, variability of protein levels within tumors is not well studied. We assessed intratumoral heterogeneity of protein expression within primary ovarian cancer. Full-length proteins were extracted from 88 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 13 primary high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas with 5-9 samples each. In addition, 14 samples of normal fallopian tube epithelium served as reference. Quantitative reverse phase protein arrays were used to analyze the expression of 36 cell signaling proteins including HER2, EGFR, PI3K/Akt, and angiogenic pathways as well as 15 activated (phosphorylated) proteins. We found considerable intratumoral heterogeneity in the expression of proteins with a mean coefficient of variation of 25% (range 17-53%). The extent of intratumoral heterogeneity differed between proteins (p<0.005). Interestingly, there were no significant differences in the extent of heterogeneity between phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated proteins. In comparison, we assessed the variation of protein levels amongst tumors from different patients, which revealed a similar mean coefficient of variation of 21% (range 12-48%). Based on hierarchical clustering, samples from the same patient clustered more closely together compared to samples from different patients. However, a clear separation of tumor versus normal tissue by clustering was only achieved when mean expression values of all individual samples per tumor were analyzed. While differential expression of some proteins was detected independently of the sampling method used, the majority of proteins only demonstrated differential expression when mean expression values of multiple samples per tumor were analyzed. Our data indicate that assessment of established and novel cell signaling proteins as diagnostic or prognostic markers may require sampling of serous ovarian cancers at several distinct

  19. Variation in Cell Signaling Protein Expression May Introduce Sampling Bias in Primary Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beese, Christian; Höfler, Heinz; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Avril, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Although the expression of cell signaling proteins is used as prognostic and predictive biomarker, variability of protein levels within tumors is not well studied. We assessed intratumoral heterogeneity of protein expression within primary ovarian cancer. Full-length proteins were extracted from 88 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 13 primary high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas with 5–9 samples each. In addition, 14 samples of normal fallopian tube epithelium served as reference. Quantitative reverse phase protein arrays were used to analyze the expression of 36 cell signaling proteins including HER2, EGFR, PI3K/Akt, and angiogenic pathways as well as 15 activated (phosphorylated) proteins. We found considerable intratumoral heterogeneity in the expression of proteins with a mean coefficient of variation of 25% (range 17–53%). The extent of intratumoral heterogeneity differed between proteins (p<0.005). Interestingly, there were no significant differences in the extent of heterogeneity between phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated proteins. In comparison, we assessed the variation of protein levels amongst tumors from different patients, which revealed a similar mean coefficient of variation of 21% (range 12–48%). Based on hierarchical clustering, samples from the same patient clustered more closely together compared to samples from different patients. However, a clear separation of tumor versus normal tissue by clustering was only achieved when mean expression values of all individual samples per tumor were analyzed. While differential expression of some proteins was detected independently of the sampling method used, the majority of proteins only demonstrated differential expression when mean expression values of multiple samples per tumor were analyzed. Our data indicate that assessment of established and novel cell signaling proteins as diagnostic or prognostic markers may require sampling of serous ovarian cancers at several

  20. Expressing the human proteome for affinity proteomics: optimising expression of soluble protein domains and in vivo biotinylation

    PubMed Central

    Keates, Tracy; Cooper, Christopher D.O.; Savitsky, Pavel; Allerston, Charles K.; Phillips, Claire; Hammarström, Martin; Daga, Neha; Berridge, Georgina; Mahajan, Pravin; Burgess-Brown, Nicola A.; Müller, Susanne; Gräslund, Susanne; Gileadi, Opher

    2012-01-01

    The generation of affinity reagents to large numbers of human proteins depends on the ability to express the target proteins as high-quality antigens. The Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) focuses on the production and structure determination of human proteins. In a 7-year period, the SGC has deposited crystal structures of >800 human protein domains, and has additionally expressed and purified a similar number of protein domains that have not yet been crystallised. The targets include a diversity of protein domains, with an attempt to provide high coverage of protein families. The family approach provides an excellent basis for characterising the selectivity of affinity reagents. We present a summary of the approaches used to generate purified human proteins or protein domains, a test case demonstrating the ability to rapidly generate new proteins, and an optimisation study on the modification of >70 proteins by biotinylation in vivo. These results provide a unique synergy between large-scale structural projects and the recent efforts to produce a wide coverage of affinity reagents to the human proteome. PMID:22027370

  1. Predicting protein-protein interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana through integration of orthology, gene ontology and co-expression

    PubMed Central

    De Bodt, Stefanie; Proost, Sebastian; Vandepoele, Klaas; Rouzé, Pierre; Van de Peer, Yves

    2009-01-01

    Background Large-scale identification of the interrelationships between different components of the cell, such as the interactions between proteins, has recently gained great interest. However, unraveling large-scale protein-protein interaction maps is laborious and expensive. Moreover, assessing the reliability of the interactions can be cumbersome. Results In this study, we have developed a computational method that exploits the existing knowledge on protein-protein interactions in diverse species through orthologous relations on the one hand, and functional association data on the other hand to predict and filter protein-protein interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana. A highly reliable set of protein-protein interactions is predicted through this integrative approach making use of existing protein-protein interaction data from yeast, human, C. elegans and D. melanogaster. Localization, biological process, and co-expression data are used as powerful indicators for protein-protein interactions. The functional repertoire of the identified interactome reveals interactions between proteins functioning in well-conserved as well as plant-specific biological processes. We observe that although common mechanisms (e.g. actin polymerization) and components (e.g. ARPs, actin-related proteins) exist between different lineages, they are active in specific processes such as growth, cancer metastasis and trichome development in yeast, human and Arabidopsis, respectively. Conclusion We conclude that the integration of orthology with functional association data is adequate to predict protein-protein interactions. Through this approach, a high number of novel protein-protein interactions with diverse biological roles is discovered. Overall, we have predicted a reliable set of protein-protein interactions suitable for further computational as well as experimental analyses. PMID:19563678

  2. Interaction between Brome mosaic virus proteins and RNAs: effects on RNA replication, protein expression, and RNA stability.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, K; Dragnea, B; Kao, C

    2005-11-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA replication has been examined in a number of systems, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We developed an efficient T-DNA-based gene delivery system using Agrobacterium tumefaciens to transiently express BMV RNAs in Nicotiana benthamiana. The expressed RNAs can systemically infect plants and provide material to extract BMV replicase that can perform template-dependent RNA-dependent RNA synthesis in vitro. We also expressed the four BMV-encoded proteins from nonreplicating RNAs and analyzed their effects on BMV RNA accumulation. The capsid protein that coinfiltrated with constructs expressing RNA1 and RNA2 suppressed minus-strand levels but increased plus-strand RNA accumulation. The replication proteins 1a and 2a could function in trans to replicate and transcribe the BMV RNAs. None of the BMV proteins or RNA could efficiently suppress posttranscriptional silencing. However, 1a expressed in trans will suppress the production of a recombinant green fluorescent protein expressed from the nontranslated portions of BMV RNA1 and RNA2, suggesting that 1a may regulate translation from BMV RNAs. BMV replicase proteins 1a did not affect the accumulation of the BMV RNAs in the absence of RNA replication, unlike the situation reported for S. cerevisiae. This work demonstrates that the Agrobacterium-mediated gene delivery system can be used to study the cis- and trans-acting requirements for BMV RNA replication in plants and that significant differences can exist for BMV RNA replication in different hosts.

  3. Protein-protein interaction and gene co-expression maps of ARFs and Aux/IAAs in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Piya, Sarbottam; Shrestha, Sandesh K.; Binder, Brad; Stewart, C. Neal; Hewezi, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin regulates nearly all aspects of plant growth and development. Based on the current model in Arabidopsis thaliana, Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) proteins repress auxin-inducible genes by inhibiting auxin response transcription factors (ARFs). Experimental evidence suggests that heterodimerization between Aux/IAA and ARF proteins are related to their unique biological functions. The objective of this study was to generate the Aux/IAA-ARF protein-protein interaction map using full length sequences and locate the interacting protein pairs to specific gene co-expression networks in order to define tissue-specific responses of the Aux/IAA-ARF interactome. Pairwise interactions between 19 ARFs and 29 Aux/IAAs resulted in the identification of 213 specific interactions of which 79 interactions were previously unknown. The incorporation of co-expression profiles with protein-protein interaction data revealed a strong correlation of gene co-expression for 70% of the ARF-Aux/IAA interacting pairs in at least one tissue/organ, indicative of the biological significance of these interactions. Importantly, ARF4-8 and 19, which were found to interact with almost all Aux-Aux/IAA showed broad co-expression relationships with Aux/IAA genes, thus, formed the central hubs of the co-expression network. Our analyses provide new insights into the biological significance of ARF-Aux/IAA associations in the morphogenesis and development of various plant tissues and organs. PMID:25566309

  4. Teaching Molecular Biology to Undergraduate Biology Students: An Illustration of Protein Expression and Purification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Cesar Adolfo; Silva, Flavio Henrique; Novo, Maria Teresa Marques

    2004-01-01

    Practical classes on protein expression and purification were given to undergraduate biology students enrolled in the elective course "Introduction to Genetic Engineering." The heterologous expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)* of "Aequorea victoria" is an interesting system for didactic purposes because it can be viewed easily during…

  5. Expression of chicken CTCF gene in COS-1 cells and partial purification of CTCF protein.

    PubMed

    Kotova, E S; Sorokina, I V; Akopov, S B; Nikolaev, L G; Sverdlov, E D

    2013-08-01

    The chicken gene for transcription factor CTCF was expressed in COS-1 mammalian cells. The CTCF protein containing polyhistidine tag was partially purified using metallo-affinity and ion-exchange chromatography. The expressed protein localized in the cell nucleus and was shown to be functionally active in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and specifically interacted with anti-CTCF antibodies. PMID:24228875

  6. Borrelia burgdorferi Proteins Whose Expression Is Similarly Affected by Culture Temperature and pH

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Scholl-Meeker, Dorothy

    2001-01-01

    Previously, we had demonstrated the upregulation in the expression of several proteins, including the lipoproteins OspC and P35, of Borrelia burgdorferi in the stationary growth phase. Since the expression of OspC is also known to be affected by culture temperature and pH, we examined the effects of both variables on the expression of the remaining stationary-phase-upregulated proteins. Our study revealed that the expression of each of the remaining stationary-phase-upregulated proteins, P35 included, was also influenced by culture temperature; these proteins were selectively expressed at 34°C but not at 24°C. Significantly, the expression of a majority of these proteins was also affected by culture pH, since they were abundantly expressed at pH 7.0 (resembling the tick midgut pH of 6.8 during feeding) but only sparsely at pH 8.0 (a condition closer to that of the unfed tick midgut pH of 7.4). We propose that this group of B. burgdorferi proteins, which in culture is selectively expressed under conditions of 34°C and pH 7.0, may be induced in the tick midgut during the feeding event. Furthermore, the differential and coordinate expression of these proteins under different environmental conditions suggests that the encoding genes may be coregulated. PMID:11254645

  7. Correct interpretation of comprehensive phosphorylation dynamics requires normalization by protein expression changes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ronghu; Dephoure, Noah; Haas, Wilhelm; Huttlin, Edward L; Zhai, Bo; Sowa, Mathew E; Gygi, Steven P

    2011-08-01

    The interpretation of quantitative phosphopro