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Sample records for nucleocapsid protein-rna decameric

  1. Identification of Rift Valley Fever Virus Nucleocapsid Protein-RNA Binding Inhibitors Using a High-Throughput Screening Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbecker, Mary; Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Lodmell, J. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging infectious pathogen that causes severe disease in humans and livestock and has the potential for global spread. Currently, there is no proven effective treatment for RVFV infection and there is no licensed vaccine. Inhibition of RNA binding to the essential viral nucleocapsid (N) protein represents a potential anti-viral therapeutic strategy because all of the functions performed by N during infection involve RNA binding. To target this interaction, we developed a fluorescence polarization-based high-throughput drug screening assay and tested 26,424 chemical compounds for their ability to disrupt an N-RNA complex. From libraries of FDA approved drugs, drug-like molecules and natural products extracts we identified several lead compounds that are promising candidates for medicinal chemistry. PMID:22644268

  2. Decavanadate interactions with actin: inhibition of G-actin polymerization and stabilization of decameric vanadate.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Susana; Manuel, Miguel; Tiago, Teresa; Duarte, Rui; Martins, Jorge; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos; Moura, José J G; Aureliano, Manuel

    2006-11-01

    Decameric vanadate species (V10) inhibit the rate and the extent of G-actin polymerization with an IC50 of 68+/-22 microM and 17+/-2 microM, respectively, whilst they induce F-actin depolymerization at a lower extent. On contrary, no effect on actin polymerization and depolymerization was detected for 2mM concentration of "metavanadate" solution that contains ortho and metavanadate species, as observed by combining kinetic with (51)V NMR spectroscopy studies. Although at 25 degrees C, decameric vanadate (10 microM) is unstable in the assay medium, and decomposes following a first-order kinetic, in the presence of G-actin (up to 8 microM), the half-life increases 5-fold (from 5 to 27 h). However, the addition of ATP (0.2mM) in the medium not only prevents the inhibition of G-actin polymerization by V10 but it also decreases the half-life of decomposition of decameric vanadate species from 27 to 10h. Decameric vanadate is also stabilized by the sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, which raise the half-life time from 5 to 18h whereas no effects were observed in the presence of phosphatidylcholine liposomes, myosin or G-actin alone. It is proposed that the "decavanadate" interaction with G-actin, favored by the G-actin polymerization, stabilizes decameric vanadate species and induces inhibition of G-actin polymerization. Decameric vanadate stabilization by cytoskeletal and transmembrane proteins can account, at least in part, for decavanadate toxicity reported in the evaluation of vanadium (V) effects in biological systems.

  3. Geometric similarity between protein-RNA interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Zou, Jianwei; Tian, Feifei; Shang, Zhicai

    2009-12-01

    A new method is described to measure the geometric similarity between protein-RNA interfaces quantitatively. The method is based on a procedure that dissects the interface geometry in terms of the spatial relationships between individual amino acid nucleotide pairs. Using this technique, we performed an all-on-all comparison of 586 protein-RNA interfaces deposited in the current Protein Data Bank, as the result, an interface-interface similarity score matrix was obtained. Based upon this matrix, hierarchical clustering was carried out which yielded a complete clustering tree for the 586 protein-RNA interfaces. By investigating the organizing behavior of the clustering tree and the SCOP classification of protein partners in complexes, a geometrically nonredundant, diverse data set (representative data set) consisting of 45 distinct protein-RNA interfaces was extracted for the purpose of studying protein-RNA interactions, RNA regulations, and drug design. We classified protein-RNA interfaces into three types. In type I, the families and interface structural classes of the protein partners, as well as the interface geometries are all similar. In type II, the interface geometries and the interface structural classes are similar, whereas the protein families are different. In type III, only the interface geometries are similar but the protein families and the interface structural classes are distinct. Furthermore, we also show two new RNA recognition themes derived from the representative data set.

  4. Self-assembly of nucleocapsid-like particles from recombinant hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, M; Lorinczi, M; Rijnbrand, R; Lemon, S M; Watowich, S J

    2001-03-01

    Little is known about the assembly pathway and structure of hepatitis C virus (HCV) since insufficient quantities of purified virus are available for detailed biophysical and structural studies. Here, we show that bacterially expressed HCV core proteins can efficiently self-assemble in vitro into nucleocapsid-like particles. These particles have a regular, spherical morphology with a modal distribution of diameters of approximately 60 nm. Self-assembly of nucleocapsid-like particles requires structured RNA molecules. The 124 N-terminal residues of the core protein are sufficient for self-assembly into nucleocapsid-like particles. Inclusion of the carboxy-terminal domain of the core protein modifies the core assembly pathway such that the resultant particles have an irregular outline. However, these particles are similar in size and shape to those assembled from the 124 N-terminal residues of the core protein. These results provide novel opportunities to delineate protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions critical for HCV assembly, to study the molecular details of HCV assembly, and for performing high-throughput screening of assembly inhibitors.

  5. Assembly principles of a unique cage formed by hexameric and decameric E. coli proteins.

    PubMed

    Malet, Hélène; Liu, Kaiyin; El Bakkouri, Majida; Chan, Sze Wah Samuel; Effantin, Gregory; Bacia, Maria; Houry, Walid A; Gutsche, Irina

    2014-08-05

    A 3.3 MDa macromolecular cage between two Escherichia coli proteins with seemingly incompatible symmetries-the hexameric AAA+ ATPase RavA and the decameric inducible lysine decarboxylase LdcI-is reconstructed by cryo-electron microscopy to 11 Å resolution. Combined with a 7.5 Å resolution reconstruction of the minimal complex between LdcI and the LdcI-binding domain of RavA, and the previously solved crystal structures of the individual components, this work enables to build a reliable pseudoatomic model of this unusual architecture and to identify conformational rearrangements and specific elements essential for complex formation. The design of the cage created via lateral interactions between five RavA rings is unique for the diverse AAA+ ATPase superfamily.

  6. Data of protein-RNA binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wook; Park, Byungkyu; Choi, Daesik; Han, Kyungsook

    2017-02-01

    Despite the increasing number of protein-RNA complexes in structure databases, few data resources have been made available which can be readily used in developing or testing a method for predicting either protein-binding sites in RNA sequences or RNA-binding sites in protein sequences. The problem of predicting protein-binding sites in RNA has received much less attention than the problem of predicting RNA-binding sites in protein. The data presented in this paper are related to the article entitled "PRIdictor: Protein-RNA Interaction predictor" (Tuvshinjargal et al. 2016) [1]. PRIdictor can predict protein-binding sites in RNA as well as RNA-binding sites in protein at the nucleotide- and residue-levels. This paper presents four datasets that were used to test four prediction models of PRIdictor: (1) model RP for predicting protein-binding sites in RNA from protein and RNA sequences, (2) model RaP for predicting protein-binding sites in RNA from RNA sequence alone, (3) model PR for predicting RNA-binding sites in protein from protein and RNA sequences, and (4) model PaR for predicting RNA-binding sites in protein from protein sequence alone. The datasets supplied in this article can be used as a valuable resource to evaluate and compare different methods for predicting protein-RNA binding sites.

  7. Template-Based Modeling of Protein-RNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jinfang; Kundrotas, Petras J.; Vakser, Ilya A.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-RNA complexes formed by specific recognition between RNA and RNA-binding proteins play an important role in biological processes. More than a thousand of such proteins in human are curated and many novel RNA-binding proteins are to be discovered. Due to limitations of experimental approaches, computational techniques are needed for characterization of protein-RNA interactions. Although much progress has been made, adequate methodologies reliably providing atomic resolution structural details are still lacking. Although protein-RNA free docking approaches proved to be useful, in general, the template-based approaches provide higher quality of predictions. Templates are key to building a high quality model. Sequence/structure relationships were studied based on a representative set of binary protein-RNA complexes from PDB. Several approaches were tested for pairwise target/template alignment. The analysis revealed a transition point between random and correct binding modes. The results showed that structural alignment is better than sequence alignment in identifying good templates, suitable for generating protein-RNA complexes close to the native structure, and outperforms free docking, successfully predicting complexes where the free docking fails, including cases of significant conformational change upon binding. A template-based protein-RNA interaction modeling protocol PRIME was developed and benchmarked on a representative set of complexes. PMID:27662342

  8. Template-Based Modeling of Protein-RNA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinfang; Kundrotas, Petras J; Vakser, Ilya A; Liu, Shiyong

    2016-09-01

    Protein-RNA complexes formed by specific recognition between RNA and RNA-binding proteins play an important role in biological processes. More than a thousand of such proteins in human are curated and many novel RNA-binding proteins are to be discovered. Due to limitations of experimental approaches, computational techniques are needed for characterization of protein-RNA interactions. Although much progress has been made, adequate methodologies reliably providing atomic resolution structural details are still lacking. Although protein-RNA free docking approaches proved to be useful, in general, the template-based approaches provide higher quality of predictions. Templates are key to building a high quality model. Sequence/structure relationships were studied based on a representative set of binary protein-RNA complexes from PDB. Several approaches were tested for pairwise target/template alignment. The analysis revealed a transition point between random and correct binding modes. The results showed that structural alignment is better than sequence alignment in identifying good templates, suitable for generating protein-RNA complexes close to the native structure, and outperforms free docking, successfully predicting complexes where the free docking fails, including cases of significant conformational change upon binding. A template-based protein-RNA interaction modeling protocol PRIME was developed and benchmarked on a representative set of complexes.

  9. Generation of henipavirus nucleocapsid proteins in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Serva, Andrius; Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Slibinskas, Rimantas; Staniulis, Juozas; Sasnauskas, Kestutis; Shiell, Brian J; Wang, Lin-Fa; Michalski, Wojtek P

    2007-03-01

    Hendra and Nipah viruses are newly emerged, zoonotic viruses and their genomes have nucleotide and predicted amino acid homologies placing them in the family Paramyxoviridae. Currently these viruses are classified in the new genus Henipavirus, within the subfamily Paramyxovirinae, family Paramyxoviridae. The genes encoding HeV and NiV nucleocapsid proteins were cloned into the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expression vector pFGG3 under control of GAL7 promoter. A high level of expression of these proteins (18-20 mg l(-1) of yeast culture) was obtained. Mass spectrometric analysis confirmed the primary structure of both proteins with 92% sequence coverage obtained using MS/MS analysis. Electron microscopy demonstrated the assembly of typical herring-bone structures of purified recombinant nucleocapsid proteins, characteristic for other paramyxoviruses. The nucleocapsid proteins revealed stability in yeast and can be easily purified by cesium chloride gradient ultracentrifugation. HeV nucleocapsid protein was detected by sera derived from fruit bats, humans, horses infected with HeV, and NiV nucleocapsid protein was immunodetected with sera from, fruit bats, humans and pigs. The development of an efficient and cost-effective system for generation of henipavirus nucleocapsid proteins might help to improve reagents for diagnosis of viruses.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of decameric and monomeric forms of C49S mutant thioredoxin-dependent AhpC from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Supangat; Seo, Kyung Hye; Furqoni, Ahmad; Kwon, Young-Chul; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kon Ho

    2008-05-01

    Decameric and monomeric forms of recombinant C49S mutant AhpC from H. pylori have been crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 and 2.25 Å, respectively. Cys49Ser mutant Helicobacter pylori alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (C49S HpAhpC) was purified under reducing conditions in monomeric and decameric forms. The monomeric form was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.25 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 245.8, b = 140.7, c = 189.5 Å, β = 127°, and contained 20 molecules in the asymmetric unit. A crystal of the decameric form was obtained by the microbatch crystallization method and diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. It belonged to space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 257.5, b = 417.5, c = 95.6 Å. The structure of the monomeric form of C49S HpAhpC has been solved by the molecular-replacement method.

  11. Modeling of the water network at protein-RNA interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiyu; Sutch, Brian T; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Gallaher, Timothy K; Haworth, Ian S

    2011-06-27

    Water plays an important role in the mediation of biomolecular interactions. Thus, accurate prediction and evaluation of water-mediated interactions is an important element in the computational design of interfaces involving proteins, RNA, and DNA. Here, we use an algorithm (WATGEN) to predict the locations of interfacial water molecules for a data set of 224 protein-RNA interfaces. The accuracy of the prediction is validated against water molecules present in the X-ray structures of 105 of these complexes. The complexity of the water networks is deconvoluted through definition of the characteristics of each water molecule based on its bridging properties between the protein and RNA and on its depth in the interface with respect to the bulk solvent. This approach has the potential for scoring the water network for incorporation into the computational design of protein-RNA complexes.

  12. Structure of a bacterial virus DNA-injection protein complex reveals a decameric assembly with a constricted molecular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haiyan; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Lin, Zihan; Liang, Lingfei; Lynn, Anna Y.; Varnado, Brittany; Weiss, Thomas M.; Tang, Liang; Schuch, Raymond

    2016-02-16

    The multi-layered cell envelope structure of Gram-negative bacteria represents significant physical and chemical barriers for short-tailed phages to inject phage DNA into the host cytoplasm. Here we show that a DNA-injection protein of bacteriophage Sf6, gp12, forms a 465-kDa, decameric assembly in vitro. The electron microscopic structure of the gp12 assembly shows a ~150-Å, mushroom-like architecture consisting of a crown domain and a tube-like domain, which embraces a 25-Å-wide channel that could precisely accommodate dsDNA. The constricted channel suggests that gp12 mediates rapid, uni-directional injection of phage DNA into host cells by providing a molecular conduit for DNA translocation. The assembly exhibits a 10-fold symmetry, which may be a common feature among DNA-injection proteins of P22-like phages and may suggest a symmetry mismatch with respect to the 6-fold symmetric phage tail. As a result, the gp12 monomer is highly flexible in solution, supporting a mechanism for translocation of the protein through the conduit of the phage tail toward the host cell envelope, where it assembles into a DNA-injection device.

  13. Structure of a bacterial virus DNA-injection protein complex reveals a decameric assembly with a constricted molecular channel

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Haiyan; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Matsui, Tsutomu; ...

    2016-02-16

    The multi-layered cell envelope structure of Gram-negative bacteria represents significant physical and chemical barriers for short-tailed phages to inject phage DNA into the host cytoplasm. Here we show that a DNA-injection protein of bacteriophage Sf6, gp12, forms a 465-kDa, decameric assembly in vitro. The electron microscopic structure of the gp12 assembly shows a ~150-Å, mushroom-like architecture consisting of a crown domain and a tube-like domain, which embraces a 25-Å-wide channel that could precisely accommodate dsDNA. The constricted channel suggests that gp12 mediates rapid, uni-directional injection of phage DNA into host cells by providing a molecular conduit for DNA translocation. Themore » assembly exhibits a 10-fold symmetry, which may be a common feature among DNA-injection proteins of P22-like phages and may suggest a symmetry mismatch with respect to the 6-fold symmetric phage tail. As a result, the gp12 monomer is highly flexible in solution, supporting a mechanism for translocation of the protein through the conduit of the phage tail toward the host cell envelope, where it assembles into a DNA-injection device.« less

  14. Heterogeneity in Retroviral Nucleocapsid Protein Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, Christy

    2009-03-01

    Time-resolved single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) chaperone activity as compared to that of the HIV-1 NC protein. HTLV-1 NC contains two zinc fingers with each having a CCHC binding motif similar to HIV-1 NC. HIV-1 NC is required for recognition and packaging of the viral RNA and is also a nucleic acid chaperone protein that facilitates nucleic acid restructuring during reverse transcription. Because of similarities in structures between the two retroviruses, we have used single-molecule fluorescence energy transfer to investigate the chaperoning activity of HTLV-1 NC protein. The results indicate that HTLV-1 NC protein induces structural changes by opening the transactivation response (TAR)-DNA hairpin to an even greater extent than HIV-1 NC. However, unlike HIV-1 NC, HTLV-1 NC does not chaperone the strand-transfer reaction involving TAR-DNA. These results suggest that despite its effective destabilization capability, HTLV-1 NC is not as effective at overall chaperone function as is its HIV-1 counterpart.

  15. Probing binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites.

    PubMed

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-29

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein-RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein-protein and protein-RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein-RNA recognition sites with desired affinity.

  16. Structure of the vesicular stomatitis virus nucleocapsid in complex with the nucleocapsid-binding domain of the small polymerase cofactor, P

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Todd J.; Luo, Ming

    2009-10-05

    The negative-strand RNA viruses (NSRVs) are unique because their nucleocapsid, not the naked RNA, is the active template for transcription and replication. The viral polymerase of nonsegmented NSRVs contains a large polymerase catalytic subunit (L) and a nonenzymatic cofactor, the phosphoprotein (P). Insight into how P delivers the polymerase complex to the nucleocapsid has long been pursued by reverse genetics and biochemical approaches. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of P of vesicular stomatitis virus, a prototypic nonsegmented NSRV, bound to nucleocapsid-like particles. P binds primarily to the C-terminal lobe of 2 adjacent N proteins within the nucleocapsid. This binding mode is exclusive to the nucleocapsid, not the nucleocapsid (N) protein in other existing forms. Localization of phosphorylation sites within P and their proximity to the RNA cavity give insight into how the L protein might be oriented to access the RNA template.

  17. A combinatorial scoring function for protein-RNA docking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Yue; Hua Li, Chun; Wang, Cun Xin; Zhang, Xiao Yi; Tan, Jian Jun

    2017-04-01

    Protein-RNA docking is still an open question. One of the main challenges is to develop an effective scoring function that can discriminate near-native structures from the incorrect ones. To solve the problem, we have constructed a knowledge-based residue-nucleotide pairwise potential with secondary structure information considered for nonribosomal protein-RNA docking. Here we developed a weighted combined scoring function RpveScore that consists of the pairwise potential and six physics-based energy terms. The weights were optimized using the multiple linear regression method by fitting the scoring function to L_rmsd for the bound docking decoys from Benchmark II. The scoring functions were tested on 35 unbound docking cases. The results show that the scoring function RpveScore including all terms performs best. Also RpveScore was compared with the statistical mechanics-based method derived potential ITScore-PR, and the united atom-based statistical potentials QUASI-RNP and DARS-RNP. The success rate of RpveScore is 71.6% for the top 1000 structures and the number of cases where a near-native structure is ranked in top 30 is 25 out of 35 cases. For 32 systems (91.4%), RpveScore can find the binding mode in top 5 that has no lower than 50% native interface residues on protein and nucleotides on RNA. Additionally, it was found that the long-range electrostatic attractive energy plays an important role in distinguishing near-native structures from the incorrect ones. This work can be helpful for the development of protein-RNA docking methods and for the understanding of protein-RNA interactions. RpveScore program is available to the public at http://life.bjut.edu.cn/kxyj/kycg/2017116/14845362285362368_1.html Proteins 2017; 85:741-752. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of nucleocapsid proteins of enveloped RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wulan, Wahyu N.; Heydet, Deborah; Walker, Erin J.; Gahan, Michelle E.; Ghildyal, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Most viruses with non-segmented single stranded RNA genomes complete their life cycle in the cytoplasm of infected cells. However, despite undergoing replication in the cytoplasm, the structural proteins of some of these RNA viruses localize to the nucleus at specific times in the virus life cycle, primarily early in infection. Limited evidence suggests that this enhances successful viral replication by interfering with or inhibiting the host antiviral response. Nucleocapsid proteins of RNA viruses have a well-established, essential cytoplasmic role in virus replication and assembly. Intriguingly, nucleocapsid proteins of some RNA viruses also localize to the nucleus/nucleolus of infected cells. Their nuclear function is less well understood although significant advances have been made in recent years. This review will focus on the nucleocapsid protein of cytoplasmic enveloped RNA viruses, including their localization to the nucleus/nucleolus and function therein. A greater understanding of the nuclear localization of nucleocapsid proteins has the potential to enhance therapeutic strategies as it can be a target for the development of live-attenuated vaccines or antiviral drugs. PMID:26082769

  19. Protein-RNA networks revealed through covalent RNA marks

    PubMed Central

    Lapointe, Christopher P.; Wilinski, Daniel; Saunders, Harriet A. J.; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Protein-RNA networks are ubiquitous and central in biological control. We present an approach, termed “RNA Tagging,” that identifies protein-RNA interactions in vivo by analyzing purified cellular RNA, without protein purification or crosslinking. An RNA-binding protein of interest is fused to an enzyme that adds uridines to the end of RNA. RNA targets bound by the chimeric protein in vivo are covalently marked with uridines and subsequently identified from extracted RNA using high-throughput sequencing. We used this approach to identify hundreds of RNAs bound by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf3p. The method revealed that while RNA-binding proteins productively bind specific RNAs to control their function, they also “sample” RNAs without exerting a regulatory effect. We exploited the method to uncover hundreds of new and likely regulated targets for a protein without canonical RNA-binding domains, Bfr1p. The RNA Tagging approach is well-suited to detect and analyze protein-RNA networks in vivo. PMID:26524240

  20. The role of nucleocapsid of HIV-1 in virus assembly.

    PubMed

    Dawson, L; Yu, X F

    1998-11-10

    The role of the nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1 Gag in virus assembly was investigated using Gag truncation mutants, a nucleocapsid deletion mutant, and point mutations in the nucleocapsid region of Gag, in transfected COS cells, and in stable T-cell lines. Consistent with previous investigations, a truncation containing only the matrix and capsid regions of Gag was unable to assemble efficiently into particles; also, the pelletable material released was lighter than the density of wild-type HIV-1. A deletion mutant lacking p7 nucleocapsid but containing the C-terminal p6 protein was also inefficient in particle release and released lighter particles, while a truncation containing only the first zinc finger of p7 could assemble more efficiently into virions. These results clearly show that p7 is indispensable for virus assembly and release. Some point mutations in the N-terminal basic domain and in the basic linker region between the two zinc fingers, which had been previously shown to have reduced RNA binding in vitro [Schmalzbauer, E., Strack, B., Dannull, J., Guehmann, S., and Moelling, K. (1996). J. Virol. 70: 771-777], were shown to reduce virus assembly dramatically when expressed in full-length viral clones. A fusion protein consisting of matrix and capsid fused to a heterologous viral protein known to have nonspecific RNA binding activity [Ribas, J. C., Fujimura, T., and Wickner, R. B. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269: 28420-28428] released pelletable material slightly more efficiently than matrix and capsid alone, and these particles had density higher than matrix and capsid alone. These results demonstrate the essential role of HIV-1 nucleocapsid in the virus assembly process and show that the positively charged N terminus of p7 is critical for this role.

  1. An alphavirus temperature-sensitive capsid mutant reveals stages of nucleocapsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yan Kielian, Margaret

    2015-10-15

    Alphaviruses have a nucleocapsid core composed of the RNA genome surrounded by an icosahedral lattice of capsid protein. An insertion after position 186 in the capsid protein produced a strongly temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. Even when the structural proteins were synthesized at the permissive temperature (28 °C), subsequent incubation of the cells at the non-permissive temperature (37 °C) dramatically decreased mutant capsid protein stability and particle assembly. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids in mutant-infected cells cultured at the permissive temperature, but these nucleocapsids were not stable to sucrose gradient separation. In contrast, nucleocapsids isolated from mutant virus particles had similar stability to that of wildtype virus. Our data support a model in which cytoplasmic nucleocapsids go through a maturation step during packaging into virus particles. The insertion site lies in the interface between capsid proteins in the assembled nucleocapsid, suggesting the region where such a stabilizing transition occurs. - Highlights: • We characterize an alphavirus capsid insertion mutation. • These capsid mutants are highly temperature sensitive for growth. • The insertion affects nucleocapsid stability. • Results suggest that the nucleocapsid is stabilized during virus budding.

  2. Ribonucleic Acid Polymerase Activity in Sendai Virions and Nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, William S.

    1971-01-01

    After dissociation of purified Sendai virus with the neutral detergent Nonidet P-40 and 2-mercaptoethanol, it catalyzed the incorporation of ribonucleoside triphosphates into an acid-insoluble product. The enzyme activity was associated with viral nucleocapsid as well as whole virions. The reaction product was ribonucleic acid (RNA) which annealed specifically with virion RNA. Sedimentation of the 3H-RNA reaction product revealed two components, a 45S component with properties of double-stranded RNA and 4 to 6S component which appeared to be mostly single-stranded RNA. PMID:4328418

  3. The nucleocapsid protein of human coronavirus NL63.

    PubMed

    Zuwała, Kaja; Golda, Anna; Kabala, Wojciech; Burmistrz, Michał; Zdzalik, Michal; Nowak, Paulina; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Zarebski, Mirosław; Dobrucki, Jerzy; Florek, Dominik; Zeglen, Sławomir; Wojarski, Jacek; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Grzegorz; Pyrc, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Human coronavirus (HCoV) NL63 was first described in 2004 and is associated with respiratory tract disease of varying severity. At the genetic and structural level, HCoV-NL63 is similar to other members of the Coronavirinae subfamily, especially human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E). Detailed analysis, however, reveals several unique features of the pathogen. The coronaviral nucleocapsid protein is abundantly present in infected cells. It is a multi-domain, multi-functional protein important for viral replication and a number of cellular processes. The aim of the present study was to characterize the HCoV-NL63 nucleocapsid protein. Biochemical analyses revealed that the protein shares characteristics with homologous proteins encoded in other coronaviral genomes, with the N-terminal domain responsible for nucleic acid binding and the C-terminal domain involved in protein oligomerization. Surprisingly, analysis of the subcellular localization of the N protein of HCoV-NL63 revealed that, differently than homologous proteins from other coronaviral species except for SARS-CoV, it is not present in the nucleus of infected or transfected cells. Furthermore, no significant alteration in cell cycle progression in cells expressing the protein was observed. This is in stark contrast with results obtained for other coronaviruses, except for the SARS-CoV.

  4. Trafficking motifs in the SARS-coronavirus nucleocapsid protein

    SciTech Connect

    You, Jae-Hwan; Reed, Mark L.; Hiscox, Julian A. . E-mail: j.a.hiscox@leeds.ac.uk

    2007-07-13

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is involved in virus replication and modulation of cell processes. In this latter respect control may in part be achieved through the sub-cellular localisation of the protein. N protein predominately localises in the cytoplasm (the site of virus replication and assembly) but also in the nucleus/nucleolus. Using a combination of live-cell and confocal microscopy coupled to mutagenesis we identified a cryptic nucleolar localisation signal in the central part of the N protein. In addition, based on structural comparison to the avian coronavirus N protein, a nuclear export signal was identified in the C-terminal region of the protein.

  5. Studies on the Nucleocapsid Structure of a Group A Arbovirus

    PubMed Central

    Horzinek, Marian; Mussgay, Manfred

    1969-01-01

    When Sindbis virus (273S) was treated with sodium desoxycholate, a nonhemagglutinating 136S particle was liberated from the virion, representing the viral nucleocapsid (core). Electron microscopically it appeared as a spherical particle 35 nm in diameter, showing ringlike morphological units 12 to 14 nm in diameter on its surface. When the one- and two-sided images of core particles were correlated, their structure could be demonstrated to have the T = 3 arrangement of 32 hexamer-pentamer morphological units within a symmetrical surface lattice. The core contained a further spherical structure (12 to 16 nm in diameter) which was designated as the central core component. Two proteins were found associated with the core, a third viral protein belonged to the hemagglutinating surface structures. The significance of these findings for virus classification is discussed. Images PMID:4186278

  6. Interfacial interactions involved in the biological assembly of Chandipura virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, R; Gulati, Sahil; Gupta, Sanjay

    2013-06-01

    The biological assembly of Chandipura virus nucleocapsid (N) protein has been modeled and the amino acid residues involved in specific intermolecular interactions among N monomers during oligomerisation have been predicted.

  7. Synthesis of recombinant human parainfluenza virus 1 and 3 nucleocapsid proteins in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Kucinskaite, Indre; Sezaite, Indre; Slibinskas, Rimantas; Coiras, Mayte; de Ory Manchon, Fernando; López-Huertas, María Rosa; Pérez-Breña, Pilar; Staniulis, Juozas; Narkeviciute, Irena; Sasnauskas, Kestutis

    2008-05-01

    Human parainfluenza virus types 1 and 3 (HPIV1 and HPIV3, respectively), members of the virus family Paramyxoviridae, are common causes of lower respiratory tract infections in infants, young children, the immunocompromised, the chronically ill, and the elderly. In order to synthesize recombinant HPIV1 and HPIV3 nucleocapsid proteins, the coding sequences were cloned into the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expression vector pFGG3 under control of GAL7 promoter. A high level of recombinant virus nucleocapsid proteins expression (20-24 mg l(-1) of yeast culture) was obtained. Electron microscopy demonstrated the assembly of typical herring-bone structures of purified recombinant nucleocapsid proteins, characteristic for other paramyxoviruses. These structures contained host RNA, which was resistant to RNase treatment. The nucleocapsid proteins were stable in yeast and were easily purified by caesium chloride gradient ultracentrifugation. Therefore, this system proved to be simple, efficient and cost-effective, suitable for high-level production of parainfluenza virus nucleocapsids as nucleocapsid-like particles. When used as coating antigens in an indirect ELISA, the recombinant N proteins reacted with sera of patients infected with HPIV1 or 3. Serological assays to detect HPIV-specific antibodies could be designed on this basis.

  8. SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein interacts with cellular pyruvate kinase protein and inhibits its activity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei-Yen; Li, Hui-Chun; Chen, Chiung-Yao; Yang, Chee-Hing; Lee, Shen-Kao; Wang, Chia-Wen; Ma, Hsin-Chieh; Juang, Yue-Li; Lo, Shih-Yen

    2012-04-01

    The pathogenesis of SARS-CoV remains largely unknown. To study the function of the SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein, we have conducted a yeast two-hybrid screening experiment to identify cellular proteins that may interact with the SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein. Pyruvate kinase (liver) was found to interact with SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein in this experiment. The binding domains of these two proteins were also determined using the yeast two-hybrid system. The physical interaction between the SARS-CoV nucleocapsid and cellular pyruvate kinase (liver) proteins was further confirmed by GST pull-down assay, co-immunoprecipitation assay and confocal microscopy. Cellular pyruvate kinase activity in hepatoma cells was repressed by SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein in either transiently transfected or stably transfected cells. PK deficiency in red blood cells is known to result in human hereditary non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia. It is reasonable to assume that an inhibition of PKL activity due to interaction with SARS-CoV N protein is likely to cause the death of the hepatocytes, which results in the elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase and liver dysfunction noted in most SARS patients. Thus, our results suggest that SARS-CoV could reduce pyruvate kinase activity via its nucleocapsid protein, and this may in turn cause disease.

  9. Migration of Nucleocapsids in Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Infected Cells Is Dependent on both Microtubules and Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Yacovone, Shalane K.; Smelser, Amanda M.; Macosko, Jed C.; Holzwarth, George; Ornelles, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The distribution of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) nucleocapsids in the cytoplasm of infected cells was analyzed by scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy using a newly developed quantitative approach called the border-to-border distribution method. Nucleocapsids were located near the cell nucleus at early times postinfection (2 h) but were redistributed during infection toward the edges of the cell. This redistribution was inhibited by treatment with nocodazole, colcemid, or cytochalasin D, indicating it is dependent on both microtubules and actin filaments. The role of actin filaments in nucleocapsid mobility was also confirmed by live-cell imaging of fluorescent nucleocapsids of a virus containing P protein fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein. However, in contrast to the overall redistribution in the cytoplasm, the incorporation of nucleocapsids into virions as determined in pulse-chase experiments was dependent on the activity of actin filaments with little if any effect on inhibition of microtubule function. These results indicate that the mechanisms by which nucleocapsids are transported to the farthest reaches of the cell differ from those required for incorporation into virions. This is likely due to the ability of nucleocapsids to follow shorter paths to the plasma membrane mediated by actin filaments. IMPORTANCE Nucleocapsids of nonsegmented negative-strand viruses like VSV are assembled in the cytoplasm during genome RNA replication and must migrate to the plasma membrane for assembly into virions. Nucleocapsids are too large to diffuse in the cytoplasm in the time required for virus assembly and must be transported by cytoskeletal elements. Previous results suggested that microtubules were responsible for migration of VSV nucleocapsids to the plasma membrane for virus assembly. Data presented here show that both microtubules and actin filaments are responsible for mobility of nucleocapsids in the cytoplasm, but that actin filaments

  10. Live-cell imaging of Marburg virus-infected cells uncovers actin-dependent transport of nucleocapsids over long distances.

    PubMed

    Schudt, Gordian; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Dolnik, Olga; Sodeik, Beate; Becker, Stephan

    2013-08-27

    Transport of large viral nucleocapsids from replication centers to assembly sites requires contributions from the host cytoskeleton via cellular adaptor and motor proteins. For the Marburg and Ebola viruses, related viruses that cause severe hemorrhagic fevers, the mechanism of nucleocapsid transport remains poorly understood. Here we developed and used live-cell imaging of fluorescently labeled viral and host proteins to characterize the dynamics and molecular requirements of nucleocapsid transport in Marburg virus-infected cells under biosafety level 4 conditions. The study showed a complex actin-based transport of nucleocapsids over long distances from the viral replication centers to the budding sites. Only after the nucleocapsids had associated with the matrix viral protein VP40 at the plasma membrane were they recruited into filopodia and cotransported with host motor myosin 10 toward the budding sites at the tip or side of the long cellular protrusions. Three different transport modes and velocities were identified: (i) Along actin filaments in the cytosol, nucleocapsids were transported at ∼200 nm/s; (ii) nucleocapsids migrated from one actin filament to another at ∼400 nm/s; and (iii) VP40-associated nucleocapsids moved inside filopodia at 100 nm/s. Unique insights into the spatiotemporal dynamics of nucleocapsids and their interaction with the cytoskeleton and motor proteins can lead to novel classes of antivirals that interfere with the trafficking and subsequent release of the Marburg virus from infected cells.

  11. FastRNABindR: Fast and Accurate Prediction of Protein-RNA Interface Residues.

    PubMed

    El-Manzalawy, Yasser; Abbas, Mostafa; Malluhi, Qutaibah; Honavar, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of biological processes, including regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and replication and assembly of many viruses are mediated by RNA-protein interactions. However, experimental determination of the structures of protein-RNA complexes is expensive and technically challenging. Hence, a number of computational tools have been developed for predicting protein-RNA interfaces. Some of the state-of-the-art protein-RNA interface predictors rely on position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based encoding of the protein sequences. The computational efforts needed for generating PSSMs severely limits the practical utility of protein-RNA interface prediction servers. In this work, we experiment with two approaches, random sampling and sequence similarity reduction, for extracting a representative reference database of protein sequences from more than 50 million protein sequences in UniRef100. Our results suggest that random sampled databases produce better PSSM profiles (in terms of the number of hits used to generate the profile and the distance of the generated profile to the corresponding profile generated using the entire UniRef100 data as well as the accuracy of the machine learning classifier trained using these profiles). Based on our results, we developed FastRNABindR, an improved version of RNABindR for predicting protein-RNA interface residues using PSSM profiles generated using 1% of the UniRef100 sequences sampled uniformly at random. To the best of our knowledge, FastRNABindR is the only protein-RNA interface residue prediction online server that requires generation of PSSM profiles for query sequences and accepts hundreds of protein sequences per submission. Our approach for determining the optimal BLAST database for a protein-RNA interface residue classification task has the potential of substantially speeding up, and hence increasing the practical utility of, other amino acid sequence based predictors of protein-protein and protein

  12. The nucleocapsid protein gene of bovine coronavirus is bicistronic.

    PubMed Central

    Senanayake, S D; Hofmann, M A; Maki, J L; Brian, D A

    1992-01-01

    For animal RNA viruses that replicate through an RNA intermediate, reported examples of bicistronic mRNAs with overlapping open reading frames in which one cistron is contained entirely within another have been made only for those with negative-strand or double-stranded genomes. In this report, we demonstrate for the positive-strand bovine coronavirus that an overlapping open reading frame potentially encoding a 23-kDa protein (names the I [for internal open reading frame] protein) and lying entirely within the gene for the 49-kDa nucleocapsid phosphoprotein is expressed during virus replication from a single species of unedited mRNA. The I protein was specifically immunoprecipitated from virus-infected cells with an I-specific antipeptide serum and was shown to be membrane associated. Many features of I protein synthesis conform to the leaky ribosomal scanning model for regulation of translation. This, to our knowledge, is the first example of a bicistronic mRNA for a cytoplasmically replicating, positive-strand animal RNA virus in which one cistron entirely overlaps another. Images PMID:1501275

  13. Specific interaction between coronavirus leader RNA and nucleocapsid protein

    SciTech Connect

    Stohlman, S.A.; Baric, R.S.; Nelson, G.N.; Soe, L.H.; Welter, L.M.; Deans, R.J.

    1988-11-01

    Northwestern blot analysis in the presence of competitor RNA was used to examine the interaction between the mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) nucleocapsid protein (N) and virus-specific RNAs. The authors accompanying article demonstrates that anti-N monoclonal antibodies immunoprecipitated all seven MHV-specific RNAs as well as the small leader-containing RNAs from infected cells. In this article the authors report that a Northwestern blotting protocol using radiolabeled viral RNAs in the presence of host cell competitor RNA can be used to demonstrate a high-affinity interaction between the MHV N protein and the virus-specific RNAs. Further, RNA probes prepared by in vitro transcription were used to define the sequences that participate in such high-affinity binding. A specific interaction occurs between the N protein and sequences contained with the leader RNA which is conserved at the 5' end of all MHV RNAs. They have further defined the binding sites to the area of nucleotides 56 to 65 at the 3' end of the leader RNA and suggest that this interaction may play an important role in the discontinuous nonprocessive RNA transcriptional process unique to coronaviruses.

  14. The SARS coronavirus nucleocapsid protein--forms and functions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-ke; Hou, Ming-Hon; Chang, Chi-Fon; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Huang, Tai-huang

    2014-03-01

    The nucleocapsid phosphoprotein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV N protein) packages the viral genome into a helical ribonucleocapsid (RNP) and plays a fundamental role during viral self-assembly. It is a protein with multifarious activities. In this article we will review our current understanding of the N protein structure and its interaction with nucleic acid. Highlights of the progresses include uncovering the modular organization, determining the structures of the structural domains, realizing the roles of protein disorder in protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, and visualizing the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) structure inside the virions. It was also demonstrated that N-protein binds to nucleic acid at multiple sites with a coupled-allostery manner. We propose a SARS-CoV RNP model that conforms to existing data and bears resemblance to the existing RNP structures of RNA viruses. The model highlights the critical role of modular organization and intrinsic disorder of the N protein in the formation and functions of the dynamic RNP capsid in RNA viruses. This paper forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10 years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses."

  15. The metastable state of nucleocapsids of enveloped viruses as probed by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, L P; Terezan, A F; Pinheiro, A S; Foguel, D; Rebello, M A; Silva, J L

    2001-03-09

    Enveloped viruses fuse their membranes with cellular membranes to transfer their genomes into cells at the beginning of infection. What is not clear, however, is the role of the envelope (lipid bilayer and glycoproteins) in the stability of the viral particle. To address this question, we compared the stability between enveloped and nucleocapsid particles of the alphavirus Mayaro using hydrostatic pressure and urea. The effects were monitored by intrinsic fluorescence, light scattering, and binding of fluorescent dyes, including bis(8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate) and ethidium bromide. Pressure caused a drastic dissociation of the nucleocapsids as determined by tryptophan fluorescence, light scattering, and gel filtration chromatography. Pressure-induced dissociation of the nucleocapsids was poorly reversible. In contrast, when the envelope was present, pressure effects were much less marked and were highly reversible. Binding of ethidium bromide occurred when nucleocapsids were dissociated under pressure, indicating exposure of the nucleic acid, whereas enveloped particles underwent no changes. Overall, our results demonstrate that removal of the envelope with the glycoproteins leads the particle to a metastable state and, during infection, may serve as the trigger for disassembly and delivery of the genome. The envelope acts as a "Trojan horse," gaining entry into the host cell to allow release of a metastable nucleocapsid prone to disassembly.

  16. Retroviral nucleocapsid proteins possess potent nucleic acid strand renaturation activity.

    PubMed Central

    Dib-Hajj, F.; Khan, R.; Giedroc, D. P.

    1993-01-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (NC) is the major genomic RNA binding protein that plays integral roles in the structure and replication of all animal retroviruses. In this report, select biochemical properties of recombinant Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) and HIV-1 NCs are compared. Evidence is presented that two types of saturated Zn2 NC-polynucleotide complexes can be formed under conditions of low [NaCl] that differ in apparent site-size (n = 8 vs. n = 14). The formation of one or the other complex appears dependent on the molar ratio of NC to RNA nucleotide with the putative low site-size mode apparently predominating under conditions of protein excess. Both MPMV and HIV-1 NCs kinetically facilitate the renaturation of two complementary DNA strands, suggesting that this is a general property of retroviral NCs. NC proteins increase the second-order rate constant for renaturation of a 149-bp DNA fragment by more than four orders of magnitude over that obtained in the absence of protein at 37 degrees C. The protein-assisted rate is 100-200-fold faster than that obtained at 68 degrees C, 1 M NaCl, solution conditions considered to be optimal for strand renaturation. Provided that sufficient NC is present to coat all strands, the presence of 400-1,000-fold excess nonhomologous DNA does not greatly affect the reaction rate. The HIV-1 NC-mediated renaturation reaction functions stoichiometrically, requiring a saturated strand of DNA nucleotide:NC ratio of about 7-8, rather than 14. Under conditions of less protein, the rate acceleration is not realized. The finding of significant nucleic acid strand renaturation activity may have important implications for various events of reverse transcription particularly in initiation and cDNA strand transfer. PMID:8443601

  17. Some physico-chemical properties of the rigid form of the Sendai virus nucleocapsid.

    PubMed

    Repanovici, R; Hristova, M; Popa, L M

    1989-01-01

    The effect of some dissociation agents (SDS, beta-mercaptoethanol, urea, EDTA) on the rigid form of the Sendai virus nucleocapsid was studied. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of lytic mixture (1% SDS, 2% beta-mercaptoethanol, 5 M urea, for 2 min at 100 degrees C) revealed two types of polypeptide subunits (mol. wts. 46,000 and 14,000), as well as the dissociation in the presence of 0.1% SDS only. The EDTA treatment leads to a disorganization of the protein part (10(-2) M) or of the nucleocapsid structure (5 x 10(-2) M).

  18. Protein-RNA Complexes and Efficient Automatic Docking: Expanding RosettaDock Possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Guilhot-Gaudeffroy, Adrien; Froidevaux, Christine; Azé, Jérôme; Bernauer, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Protein-RNA complexes provide a wide range of essential functions in the cell. Their atomic experimental structure solving, despite essential to the understanding of these functions, is often difficult and expensive. Docking approaches that have been developed for proteins are often challenging to adapt for RNA because of its inherent flexibility and the structural data available being relatively scarce. In this study we adapted the RosettaDock protocol for protein-RNA complexes both at the nucleotide and atomic levels. Using a genetic algorithm-based strategy, and a non-redundant protein-RNA dataset, we derived a RosettaDock scoring scheme able not only to discriminate but also score efficiently docking decoys. The approach proved to be both efficient and robust for generating and identifying suitable structures when applied to two protein-RNA docking benchmarks in both bound and unbound settings. It also compares well to existing strategies. This is the first approach that currently offers a multi-level optimized scoring approach integrated in a full docking suite, leading the way to adaptive fully flexible strategies. PMID:25268579

  19. Protein-RNA complexes and efficient automatic docking: expanding RosettaDock possibilities.

    PubMed

    Guilhot-Gaudeffroy, Adrien; Froidevaux, Christine; Azé, Jérôme; Bernauer, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Protein-RNA complexes provide a wide range of essential functions in the cell. Their atomic experimental structure solving, despite essential to the understanding of these functions, is often difficult and expensive. Docking approaches that have been developed for proteins are often challenging to adapt for RNA because of its inherent flexibility and the structural data available being relatively scarce. In this study we adapted the RosettaDock protocol for protein-RNA complexes both at the nucleotide and atomic levels. Using a genetic algorithm-based strategy, and a non-redundant protein-RNA dataset, we derived a RosettaDock scoring scheme able not only to discriminate but also score efficiently docking decoys. The approach proved to be both efficient and robust for generating and identifying suitable structures when applied to two protein-RNA docking benchmarks in both bound and unbound settings. It also compares well to existing strategies. This is the first approach that currently offers a multi-level optimized scoring approach integrated in a full docking suite, leading the way to adaptive fully flexible strategies.

  20. Trichoplusia ni Kinesin-1 Associates with Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus Nucleocapsid Proteins and Is Required for Production of Budded Virus

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Siddhartha; Blissard, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanism by which nucleocapsids of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) egress from the nucleus to the plasma membrane, leading to the formation of budded virus (BV), is not known. AC141 is a nucleocapsid-associated protein required for BV egress and has previously been shown to be associated with β-tubulin. In addition, AC141 and VP39 were previously shown by fluorescence resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging to interact directly with the Drosophila melanogaster kinesin-1 light chain (KLC) tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. These results suggested that microtubule transport systems may be involved in baculovirus nucleocapsid egress and BV formation. In this study, we investigated the role of lepidopteran microtubule transport using coimmunoprecipitation, colocalization, yeast two-hybrid, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) analyses. We show that nucleocapsid AC141 associates with the lepidopteran Trichoplusia ni KLC and kinesin-1 heavy chain (KHC) by coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization. Kinesin-1, AC141, and microtubules colocalized predominantly at the plasma membrane. In addition, the nucleocapsid proteins VP39, FP25, and BV/ODV-C42 were also coimmunoprecipitated with T. ni KLC. Direct analysis of the role of T. ni kinesin-1 by downregulation of KLC by siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in BV production. Nucleocapsids labeled with VP39 fused with three copies of the mCherry fluorescent protein also colocalized with microtubules. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed no evidence of a direct interaction between kinesin-1 and AC141 or VP39, suggesting that either other nucleocapsid proteins or adaptor proteins may be required. These results further support the conclusion that microtubule transport is required for AcMNPV BV formation. IMPORTANCE In two key processes of the replication cycle of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), nucleocapsids are

  1. Influenza virus adaptation PB2-627K modulates nucleocapsid inhibition by the pathogen sensor RIG-I

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Michaela; Sediri, Hanna; Felgenhauer, Ulrike; Binzen, Ina; Bänfer, Sebastian; Jacob, Ralf; Brunotte, Linda; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L.; Schmidt, Tobias; Hornung, Veit; Kochs, Georg; Schwemmle, Martin; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Weber, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cytoplasmic RNA helicase RIG-I mediates innate sensing of RNA viruses. The genomes of influenza A virus (FLUAV) are encapsidated by the nucleoprotein and associated with RNA polymerase, posing potential barriers to RIG-I sensing. We show that RIG-I recognizes the 5’-triphosphorylated dsRNA on FLUAV nucleocapsids but that polymorphisms at position 627 of the viral polymerase subunit PB2 modulate RIG-I sensing. Compared to mammalian-adapted PB2-627K, avian FLUAV nucleocapsids possessing PB2-627E are prone to increased RIG-I recognition, and RIG-I-deficiency partially restores PB2-627E virus infection of mammalian cells. Heightened RIG-I sensing of PB2-627E nucleocapsids correlates with previously established lower affinity of 627E-containing PB2 for nucleoprotein and is increased by further nucleocapsid instability. The effect of RIG-I on PB2-627E nucleocapsids is independent of antiviral signaling, suggesting that RIG-I-nucleocapsid binding alone can inhibit infection. These results indicate that RIG-I is a direct avian FLUAV restriction factor and highlight nucleocapsid disruption as an antiviral strategy. PMID:25704008

  2. Multiple nucleocapsid packaging of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus accelerates the onset of systemic infection in Trichoplusia ni.

    PubMed

    Washburn, J O; Lyons, E H; Haas-Stapleton, E J; Volkman, L E

    1999-01-01

    Among the nucleopolyhedroviruses (Baculoviridae), the occlusion-derived virus (ODV), which initiates infection in host insects, may contain only a single nucleocapsid per virion (the SNPVs) or one to many nucleocapsids per virion (the MNPVs), but the significance of this difference is unclear. To gain insight into the biological relevance of these different packaging strategies, we compared pathogenesis induced by ODV fractions enriched for multiple nucleocapsids (ODV-M) or single nucleocapsids (ODV-S) of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) containing a beta-galactosidase reporter gene. In time course experiments wherein newly molted fourth-instar Trichoplusia ni were challenged with doses of ODV-S or ODV-M that yielded the same final mortality ( approximately 70%), we characterized viral foci as either being restricted to the midgut or involving tracheal cells (the secondary target tissue, indicative of systemic infection). We found that while the timing of primary infection by ODV-S and ODV-M was similar, ODV-S established significantly more primary midgut cell foci than ODV-M, but ODV-M infected tracheal cells at twice the rate of ODV-S. The more efficient establishment of tracheal infections by ODV-M decreased the probability that infections were lost by midgut cell sloughing, explaining why higher numbers of primary infections established by ODV-S within larvae were needed to achieve the same final mortality. These results showed that the multiple nucleocapsid packaging strategy of AcMNPV accelerates the onset of irreversible systemic infections and may indicate why MNPVs have wider individual host ranges than SNPVs.

  3. Integrated structural biology to unravel molecular mechanisms of protein-RNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Schlundt, Andreas; Tants, Jan-Niklas; Sattler, Michael

    2017-03-16

    Recent advances in RNA sequencing technologies have greatly expanded our knowledge of the RNA landscape in cells, often with spatiotemporal resolution. These techniques identified many new (often non-coding) RNA molecules. Large-scale studies have also discovered novel RNA binding proteins (RBPs), which exhibit single or multiple RNA binding domains (RBDs) for recognition of specific sequence or structured motifs in RNA. Starting from these large-scale approaches it is crucial to unravel the molecular principles of protein-RNA recognition in ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) to understand the underlying mechanisms of gene regulation. Structural biology and biophysical studies at highest possible resolution are key to elucidate molecular mechanisms of RNA recognition by RBPs and how conformational dynamics, weak interactions and cooperative binding contribute to the formation of specific, context-dependent RNPs. While large compact RNPs can be well studied by X-ray crystallography and cryo-EM, analysis of dynamics and weak interaction necessitates the use of solution methods to capture these properties. Here, we illustrate methods to study the structure and conformational dynamics of protein-RNA complexes in solution starting from the identification of interaction partners in a given RNP. Biophysical and biochemical techniques support the characterization of a protein-RNA complex and identify regions relevant in structural analysis. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to gain information on folding, stability and dynamics of RNAs and characterize RNPs in solution. It provides crucial information that is complementary to the static pictures derived from other techniques. NMR can be readily combined with other solution techniques, such as small angle X-ray and/or neutron scattering (SAXS/SANS), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), which provide information about overall shapes, internal domain

  4. A non-redundant protein-RNA docking benchmark version 2.0.

    PubMed

    Nithin, Chandran; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2017-02-01

    We present an updated version of the protein-RNA docking benchmark, which we first published four years back. The non-redundant protein-RNA docking benchmark version 2.0 consists of 126 test cases, a threefold increase in number compared to its previous version. The present version consists of 21 unbound-unbound cases, of which, in 12 cases, the unbound RNAs are taken from another complex. It also consists of 95 unbound-bound cases where only the protein is available in the unbound state. Besides, we introduce 10 new bound-unbound cases where only the RNA is found in the unbound state. Based on the degree of conformational change of the interface residues upon complex formation the benchmark is classified into 72 rigid-body cases, 25 semiflexible cases and 19 full flexible cases. It also covers a wide range of conformational flexibility including small side chain movement to large domain swapping in protein structures as well as flipping and restacking in RNA bases. This benchmark should provide the docking community with more test cases for evaluating rigid-body as well as flexible docking algorithms. Besides, it will also facilitate the development of new algorithms that require large number of training set. The protein-RNA docking benchmark version 2.0 can be freely downloaded from http://www.csb.iitkgp.ernet.in/applications/PRDBv2. Proteins 2017; 85:256-267. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Crystal structure-based exploration of the important role of Arg106 in the RNA-binding domain of human coronavirus OC43 nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, I-Jung; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P.; Chang, Yu-Ming; Lin, Shing-Yen; Zhao, Jincun; Perlman, Stanley; Shen, Yo-Yu; Huang, Tai-Huang; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2013-01-01

    Human coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) is a causative agent of the common cold. The nucleocapsid (N) protein, which is a major structural protein of CoVs, binds to the viral RNA genome to form the virion core and results in the formation of the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex. We have solved the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of HCoV-OC43 N protein (N-NTD) (residues 58 to 195) to a resolution of 2.0Å. The HCoV-OC43 N-NTD is a single domain protein composed of a five-stranded β-sheet core and a long extended loop, similar to that observed in the structures of N-NTDs from other coronaviruses. The positively charged loop of the HCoV-OC43 N-NTD contains a structurally well-conserved positively charged residue, R106. To assess the role of R106 in RNA binding, we undertook a series of site-directed mutagenesis experiments and docking simulations to characterize the interaction between R106 and RNA. The results show that R106 plays an important role in the interaction between the N protein and RNA. In addition, we showed that, in cells transfected with plasmids that encoded the mutant (R106A) N protein and infected with virus, the level of the matrix protein gene was decreased by 7-fold compared to cells that were transfected with the wild-type N protein. This finding suggests that R106, by enhancing binding of the N protein to viral RNA plays a critical role in the viral replication. The results also indicate that the strength of N protein/RNA interactions is critical for HCoV-OC43 replication. PMID:23501675

  6. HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress mediated by UL31 in association with UL34 is impeded by cellular transmembrane protein 140

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Ying; Guo, Lei; Yang, Erxia; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Che, Yanchun; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Qihan

    2014-09-15

    During HSV-1 infection, the viral UL31 protein forms a complex with the UL34 protein at the cellular nuclear membrane, where both proteins play important roles in the envelopment of viral nucleocapsids and their egress into the cytoplasm. To characterize the mechanism of HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress, we screened host proteins to identify proteins that interacted with UL31 via yeast two-hybrid analysis. Transmembrane protein 140 (TMEM140), was identified and confirmed to bind to and co-localize with UL31 during viral infection. Further studies indicated that TMEM140 inhibits HSV-1 proliferation through selectively blocking viral nucleocapsid egress during the viral assembly process. The blockage function of TMEM140 is mediated by impeding the formation of the UL31–UL34 complex due to competitive binding to UL31. Collectively, these data suggest the essentiality of the UL31–UL34 interaction in the viral nucleocapsid egress process and provide a new anti-HSV-1 strategy in viral assembly process of nucleocapsid egress. - Highlights: • Cellular TMEM140 protein interacts with HSV-1 UL31 protein during viral infection. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 leads to inhibition of HSV-1 proliferation. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 blocks HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress process. • Binding to UL31 of TMEM140 impedes formation of HSV-1 UL31–UL34 complex.

  7. Expression from baculovirus and serological reactivity of the nucleocapsid protein of dolphin morbillivirus.

    PubMed

    Grant, Rebecca J; Kelley, Karen L; Maruniak, James E; Garcia-Maruniak, Alejandra; Barrett, Tom; Manire, Charles A; Romero, Carlos H

    2010-07-14

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) was expressed from a baculovirus (Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus) vector and shown by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis to be about 57 kDa. Transmission electron microscopy revealed fully assembled nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) exhibiting the typical helical herringbone morphology. These NLPs were approximately 20-22 nm in diameter and varied in length from 50 to 100 nm. Purified DMV-N protein was used as antigen in an indirect ELISA (iELISA) and shown to react with rabbit and human antisera to measles virus (MV) and dog sera with antibodies to canine distemper virus (CDV). The iELISA was used for the demonstration of morbillivirus antibodies in the serum of cetaceans and manatees, showing potential as a serological tool for the mass screening of morbillivirus antibodies in marine mammals.

  8. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus PK-1 is essential for nucleocapsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Changyong; Li, Min; Dai, Xuejuan; Zhao, Shuling; Hou, Yanling; Zhang, Yongli; Lan, Dandan; Wang, Yun; Chen, Xinwen

    2013-09-01

    PK-1 (Ac10) is a baculovirus-encoded serine/threonine kinase and its function is unclear. Our results showed that a pk-1 knockout AcMNPV failed to produce infectious progeny, while the pk-1 repair virus could rescue this defect. qPCR analysis demonstrated that pk-1 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. Analysis of the repaired recombinants with truncated pk-1 mutants demonstrated that the catalytic domain of protein kinases of PK-1 was essential to viral infectivity. Moreover, those PK-1 mutants that could rescue the infectious BV production defect exhibited kinase activity in vitro. Therefore, it is suggested that the kinase activity of PK-1 is essential in regulating viral propagation. Electron microscopy revealed that pk-1 deletion affected the formation of normal nucleocapsids. Masses of electron-lucent tubular structures were present in cell transfected with pk-1 knockout bacmid. Therefore, PK-1 appears to phosphorylate some viral or cellular proteins that are essential for DNA packaging to regulate nucleocapsid assembly. - Highlights: • A pk-1 knockout AcMNPV failed to produce infectious progeny. • The pk-1 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. • The catalytic domain of protein kinases (PKc) of PK-1 was essential to viral infectivity. • The kinase activity of PK-1 is essential in regulating viral propagation. • PK-1 appears to phosphorylate some viral proteins that are essential for DNA packaging to regulate nucleocapsid assembly.

  9. Pentagalloylglucose Blocks the Nuclear Transport and the Process of Nucleocapsid Egress to Inhibit HSV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fujun; Ma, Kaiqi; Chen, Maoyun; Zou, Muping; Wu, Yanting; Li, Feng; Wang, Yifei

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a widespread virus, causes a variety of human viral diseases worldwide. The serious threat of drug-resistance highlights the extreme urgency to develop novel antiviral drugs with different mechanisms of action. Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a natural polyphenolic compound with significant anti-HSV activity; however, the mechanisms underlying its antiviral activity need to be defined by further studies. In this study, we found that PGG treatment delays the nuclear transport process of HSV-1 particles by inhibiting the upregulation of dynein (a cellular major motor protein) induced by HSV-1 infection. Furthermore, PGG treatment affects the nucleocapsid egress of HSV-1 by inhibiting the expression and disrupting the cellular localization of pEGFP-UL31 and pEGFP-UL34, which are indispensable for HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress from the nucleus. However, the over-expression of pEGFP-UL31 and pEGFP-UL34 could decrease the antiviral effect of PGG. In this study, for the first time, the antiviral activity of PGG against acyclovir-resistant virus was demonstrated in vitro, and the possible mechanisms of its anti-HSV activities were identified based on the inhibition of nuclear transport and nucleocapsid egress in HSV-1. It was further confirmed that PGG could be a promising candidate for HSV therapy, especially for drug-resistant strains.

  10. Viral Membrane Fusion and Nucleocapsid Delivery into the Cytoplasm are Distinct Events in Some Flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Nour, Adel M.; Li, Yue; Wolenski, Joseph; Modis, Yorgo

    2013-01-01

    Flaviviruses deliver their genome into the cell by fusing the viral lipid membrane to an endosomal membrane. The sequence and kinetics of the steps required for nucleocapsid delivery into the cytoplasm remain unclear. Here we dissect the cell entry pathway of virions and virus-like particles from two flaviviruses using single-particle tracking in live cells, a biochemical membrane fusion assay and virus infectivity assays. We show that the virus particles fuse with a small endosomal compartment in which the nucleocapsid remains trapped for several minutes. Endosomal maturation inhibitors inhibit infectivity but not membrane fusion. We propose a flavivirus cell entry mechanism in which the virus particles fuse preferentially with small endosomal carrier vesicles and depend on back-fusion of the vesicles with the late endosomal membrane to deliver the nucleocapsid into the cytoplasm. Virus entry modulates intracellular calcium release and phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase signaling. Moreover, the broadly cross-reactive therapeutic antibody scFv11 binds to virus-like particles and inhibits fusion. PMID:24039574

  11. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies directed against the canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Munemitsu; Sato, Hiroki; Kamata, Hiroshi; Katsuo, Tomoe; Takenaka, Akiko; Miura, Ryuichi; Yoneda, Misako; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Mizumoto, Kiyohisa; Kai, Chieko

    2006-01-01

    We have established four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of canine distemper virus (CDV). A competitive binding assay has revealed that the MAbs are directed against two antigenic domains. An immunofluorescence assay using a series of deletion clones of the NP and an immunoprecipitation assay using the NP have revealed that two of the MAbs recognize the C-terminal region of the NP while the other two recognize the tertiary structure of the N-terminal domain. These MAbs reacted with all eight strains of CDV used in this study, but showed different reactivities against measles virus and rinderpest virus.

  12. Analysis of the nucleocapsid gene brings new insights to the classification of Sigmodontinae-borne hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Souza, William M; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu M

    2014-09-01

    Hantaviruses, members of the family Bunyaviridae, are the causative agents of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome in South America. Hantaviruses are currently classified into species based on the guidelines provided by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. However, a new taxonomic system was proposed recently to classify Sigmodontinae-borne hantaviruses, which are divided currently into three phylogenetic clades corresponding to Andes, Laguna Negra, and Rio Mamore. Analyzing complete nucleocapsid gene sequences of all Sigmodontinae-borne hantaviruses, we propose the addition of a new clade and a fourth group to the already established Andes clade, allowing a better classification of the Sigmodontinae-borne hantaviruses.

  13. Biomolecular interactions in HCV nucleocapsid-like particles as revealed by vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Casado, Arantxa; Molina, Marina; Carmona, Pedro

    2007-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) occurs in the form of 55-65 nm spherical particles, but the structure of the virion remains to be clarified. Structural studies of HCV have been hampered by the lack of an appropriate cell culture system. However, structural analyses of HCV components can provide an essential framework for understanding of the molecular mechanism of virion assembly. This article reviews the potential of vibrational spectroscopy aimed at the knowledge of HCV structural biology, particularly regarding biomolecular interactions in nucleocapsid-like particles obtained in vitro.

  14. Inhibitors of HIV nucleocapsid protein zinc fingers as candidates for the treatment of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Rice, W G; Supko, J G; Malspeis, L; Buckheit, R W; Clanton, D; Bu, M; Graham, L; Schaeffer, C A; Turpin, J A; Domagala, J; Gogliotti, R; Bader, J P; Halliday, S M; Coren, L; Sowder, R C; Arthur, L O; Henderson, L E

    1995-11-17

    Strategies for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) infection must contend with the obstacle of drug resistance. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein zinc fingers are prime antiviral targets because they are mutationally intolerant and are required both for acute infection and virion assembly. Nontoxic disulfide-substituted benzamides were identified that attack the zinc fingers, inactivate cell-free virions, inhibit acute and chronic infections, and exhibit broad antiretroviral activity. The compounds were highly synergistic with other antiviral agents, and resistant mutants have not been detected. Zinc finger-reactive compounds may offer an anti-HIV strategy that restricts drug-resistance development.

  15. Effect of seven days of spaceflight on hindlimb muscle protein, RNA and DNA in adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of seven days of spaceflight on skeletal muscle (soleus, gastrocnemius, EDL) content of protein, RNA and DNA were determined in adult rats. Whereas total protein contents were reduced in parallel with muscle weights, myofibrillar protein appeared to be more affected. There were no significant changes in absolute DNA contents, but a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in DNA concentration (microgram/milligram) in soleus muscles from flight rats. Absolute RNA contents were significantly (P less than 0.025) decreased in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of flight rats, with RNA concentrations reduced 15-30 percent. These results agree with previous ground-based observations on the suspended rat with unloaded hindlimbs and support continued use of this model.

  16. Structure of a low-population binding intermediate in protein-RNA recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bardaro, Michael F.; Aprile, Francesco A.; Varani, Gabriele; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of the HIV-1 protein transactivator of transcription (Tat) and its cognate transactivation response element (TAR) RNA transactivates viral transcription and represents a paradigm for the widespread occurrence of conformational rearrangements in protein-RNA recognition. Although the structures of free and bound forms of TAR are well characterized, the conformations of the intermediates in the binding process are still unknown. By determining the free energy landscape of the complex using NMR residual dipolar couplings in replica-averaged metadynamics simulations, we observe two low-population intermediates. We then rationally design two mutants, one in the protein and another in the RNA, that weaken specific nonnative interactions that stabilize one of the intermediates. By using surface plasmon resonance, we show that these mutations lower the release rate of Tat, as predicted. These results identify the structure of an intermediate for RNA-protein binding and illustrate a general strategy to achieve this goal with high resolution. PMID:27286828

  17. Structural Analysis of Protein-RNA Complexes in Solution Using NMR Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancements.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Janosch; Warner, Lisa R; Simon, Bernd; Geerlof, Arie; Mackereth, Cameron D; Sattler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Biological activity in the cell is predominantly mediated by large multiprotein and protein-nucleic acid complexes that act together to ensure functional fidelity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the only method that can provide information for high-resolution three-dimensional structures and the conformational dynamics of these complexes in solution. Mapping of binding interfaces and molecular interactions along with the characterization of conformational dynamics is possible for very large protein complexes. In contrast, de novo structure determination by NMR becomes very time consuming and difficult for protein complexes larger than 30 kDa as data are noisy and sparse. Fortunately, high-resolution structures are often available for individual domains or subunits of a protein complex and thus sparse data can be used to define their arrangement and dynamics within the assembled complex. In these cases, NMR can therefore be efficiently combined with complementary solution techniques, such as small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering, to provide a comprehensive description of the structure and dynamics of protein complexes in solution. Particularly useful are NMR-derived paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs), which provide long-range distance restraints (ca. 20Å) for structural analysis of large complexes and also report on conformational dynamics in solution. Here, we describe the use of PREs from sample production to structure calculation, focusing on protein-RNA complexes. On the basis of recent examples from our own research, we demonstrate the utility, present protocols, and discuss potential pitfalls when using PREs for studying the structure and dynamic features of protein-RNA complexes.

  18. Differential Contributions of Tacaribe Arenavirus Nucleoprotein N-Terminal and C-Terminal Residues to Nucleocapsid Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    D'Antuono, Alejandra; Loureiro, Maria Eugenia; Foscaldi, Sabrina; Marino-Buslje, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) is the main protein component of viral nucleocapsids and is strictly required for viral genome replication mediated by the L polymerase. Homo-oligomerization of NP is presumed to play an important role in nucleocapsid assembly, albeit the underlying mechanism and the relevance of NP-NP interaction in nucleocapsid activity are still poorly understood. Here, we evaluate the contribution of the New World Tacaribe virus (TCRV) NP self-interaction to nucleocapsid functional activity. We show that alanine substitution of N-terminal residues predicted to be available for NP-NP interaction strongly affected NP self-association, as determined by coimmunoprecipitation assays, produced a drastic inhibition of transcription and replication of a TCRV minigenome RNA, and impaired NP binding to RNA. Mutagenesis and functional analysis also revealed that, while dispensable for NP self-interaction, key amino acids at the C-terminal domain were essential for RNA synthesis. Furthermore, mutations at these C-terminal residues rendered NP unable to bind RNA both in vivo and in vitro but had no effect on the interaction with the L polymerase. In addition, while all oligomerization-defective variants tested exhibited unaltered capacities to sustain NP-L interaction, NP deletion mutants were fully incompetent to bind L, suggesting that, whereas NP self-association is dispensable, the integrity of both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains is required for binding the L polymerase. Overall, our results suggest that NP self-interaction mediated by the N-terminal domain may play a critical role in TCRV nucleocapsid assembly and activity and that the C-terminal domain of NP is implicated in RNA binding. IMPORTANCE The mechanism of arenavirus functional nucleocapsid assembly is still poorly understood. No detailed information is available on the nucleocapsid structure, and the regions of full-length NP involved in binding to viral RNA remain to be

  19. Protein, RNA, and DNA synthesis in cultures of skin fibroblasts from healthy subjects and patients with rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Abakumova, O.Y.; Kutsenko, N.G.; Panasyuk, A.F.

    1985-07-01

    To study the mechanism of the lasting disturbance of fibroblast function, protein, RNA and DNA synthesis was investigated in skin fibroblasts from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic scleroderma (SS). The labeled precursors used to analyze synthesis of protein, RNA, and DNA were /sup 14/C-protein hydrolysate, (/sup 14/C)uridine, and (/sup 14/C) thymidine. Stimulation was determined by measuring incorporation of (/sup 14/C)proline into fibroblast proteins. During analysis of stability of fast-labeled RNA tests were carried out to discover whether all measurable radioactivity belonged to RNA molecules.

  20. Structural studies on the authentic mumps virus nucleocapsid showing uncoiling by the phosphoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Robert; Pickar, Adrian; Qiu, Shihong; Tsao, Jun; Rodenburg, Cynthia; Dokland, Terje; Elson, Andrew; He, Biao; Luo, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Mumps virus (MuV) is a highly contagious pathogen, and despite extensive vaccination campaigns, outbreaks continue to occur worldwide. The virus has a negative-sense, single-stranded RNA genome that is encapsidated by the nucleocapsid protein (N) to form the nucleocapsid (NC). NC serves as the template for both transcription and replication. In this paper we solved an 18-Å–resolution structure of the authentic MuV NC using cryo-electron microscopy. We also observed the effects of phosphoprotein (P) binding on the MuV NC structure. The N-terminal domain of P (PNTD) has been shown to bind NC and appeared to induce uncoiling of the helical NC. Additionally, we solved a 25-Å–resolution structure of the authentic MuV NC bound with the C-terminal domain of P (PCTD). The location of the encapsidated viral genomic RNA was defined by modeling crystal structures of homologous negative strand RNA virus Ns in NC. Both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of MuV P bind NC to participate in access to the genomic RNA by the viral RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase. These results provide critical insights on the structure-function of the MuV NC and the structural alterations that occur through its interactions with P. PMID:25288750

  1. Antibody study in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein gene-immunized mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, B; Li, X Y; Zhu, T; Yuan, L; Hu, J P; Chen, J; Gao, W; Ren, W Z

    2015-04-10

    The gene for the nucleocapsid (N) protein of canine distemper virus was cloned into the pMD-18T vector, and positive recombinant plasmids were obtained by enzyme digestion and sequencing. After digestion by both EcoRI and KpnI, the plasmid was directionally cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA; the positive clone pcDNA-N was screened by electrophoresis and then transfected into COS-7 cells. Immunofluorescence analysis results showed that the canine distemper virus N protein was expressed in the cytoplasm of transfected COS-7 cells. After emulsification in Freund's adjuvant, the recombinant plasmid pcDNA-N was injected into the abdominal cavity of 8-week-old BABL/c mice, with the pcDNA original vector used as a negative control. Mice were immunized 3 times every 2 weeks. The blood of immunized mice was drawn 2 weeks after completing the immunizations to measure titer levels. The antibody titer in the pcDNA-N test was 10(1.62 ± 0.164), while in the control group this value was 10(0.52 ± 0.56), indicating that specific humoral immunity was induced in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein-immunized mice.

  2. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac53 plays a role in nucleocapsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chao; Li Zhaofei Wu Wenbi; Li Lingling; Yuan Meijin; Pan Lijing; Yang Kai Pang Yi

    2008-12-05

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) orf53 (ac53) is a highly conserved gene existing in all sequenced Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera baculoviruses, but its function remains unknown. To investigate its role in the baculovirus life cycle, an ac53 deletion virus (vAc{sup ac53KO-PH-GFP}) was generated through homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Fluorescence and light microscopy and titration analysis revealed that vAc{sup ac53KO-PH-GFP} could not produce infectious budded virus in infected Sf9 cells. Real-time PCR demonstrated that the ac53 deletion did not affect the levels of viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy showed that many lucent tubular shells devoid of the nucleoprotein core are present in the virogenic stroma and ring zone, indicating that the ac53 knockout affected nucleocapsid assembly. With a recombinant virus expressing an Ac53-GFP fusion protein, we observed that Ac53 was distributed within the cytoplasm and nucleus at 24 h post-infection, but afterwards accumulated predominantly near the nucleus-cytoplasm boundary. These data demonstrate that ac53 is involved in nucleocapsid assembly and is an essential gene for virus production.

  3. Nucleocapsid assembly in pneumoviruses is regulated by conformational switching of the N protein

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Max; Bertinelli, Mattia; Leyrat, Cédric; Paesen, Guido C; Saraiva de Oliveira, Laura Freitas; Huiskonen, Juha T; Grimes, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    Non-segmented, (-)RNA viruses cause serious human diseases. Human metapneumovirus (HMPV), an emerging pathogen of this order of viruses (Mononegavirales) is one of the main causes of respiratory tract illness in children. To help elucidate the assembly mechanism of the nucleocapsid (the viral RNA genome packaged by the nucleoprotein N) we present crystallographic structures of HMPV N in its assembled RNA-bound state and in a monomeric state, bound to the polymerase cofactor P. Our structures reveal molecular details of how P inhibits the self-assembly of N and how N transitions between the RNA-free and RNA-bound conformational state. Notably, we observe a role for the C-terminal extension of N in directly preventing premature uptake of RNA by folding into the RNA-binding cleft. Our structures suggest a common mechanism of how the growth of the nucleocapsid is orchestrated, and highlight an interaction site representing an important target for antivirals. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12627.001 PMID:26880565

  4. Development of recombinant nucleocapsid protein based IgM-ELISA for the early detection of distemper infection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Latha, D; Geetha, M; Ramadass, P; Narayanan, R B

    2007-10-15

    An IgM-ELISA based on a 16-kDa recombinant protein produced for the conserved and functional middle region of nucleocapsid protein of Canine distemper virus was developed. Out of 70 serum samples from distemper-suspected and vaccinated dogs analyzed, 34 serum samples (49%) were positive. The specificity of this ELISA was confirmed by blocking and adsorption experiments. The IgM-ELISA based on the recombinant nucleocapsid protein showed a strong correlation (r=0.857, p<0.0001 at 95% CI) and good agreement (kappa=0.714) with the conventional Vero cell culture distemper antigen based IgM-ELISA. The percent positivity was more in dogs with systemic signs (62%) by recombinant nucleocapsid protein IgM-ELISA. Out of 70 clinical serum samples, 69 samples were used along with 4 control sera used in the IgM-ELISA for the detection of viral RNA by Slot blot hybridization and 26 of them (36%) were positive. Fifty-one percent agreement was observed between the recombinant nucleocapsid protein IgM-ELISA and Slot blot hybridization. The analysis of clinical history of the dogs with systemic signs supported the application of IgM-ELISA over Slot blot hybridization in the early detection of distemper infection.

  5. PRince: a web server for structural and physicochemical analysis of Protein-RNA interface

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Amita; Mishra, Abhishek; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a web server, PRince, which analyzes the structural features and physicochemical properties of the protein–RNA interface. Users need to submit a PDB file containing the atomic coordinates of both the protein and the RNA molecules in complex form (in ‘.pdb’ format). They should also mention the chain identifiers of interacting protein and RNA molecules. The size of the protein–RNA interface is estimated by measuring the solvent accessible surface area buried in contact. For a given protein–RNA complex, PRince calculates structural, physicochemical and hydration properties of the interacting surfaces. All these parameters generated by the server are presented in a tabular format. The interacting surfaces can also be visualized with software plug-in like Jmol. In addition, the output files containing the list of the atomic coordinates of the interacting protein, RNA and interface water molecules can be downloaded. The parameters generated by PRince are novel, and users can correlate them with the experimentally determined biophysical and biochemical parameters for better understanding the specificity of the protein–RNA recognition process. This server will be continuously upgraded to include more parameters. PRince is publicly accessible and free for use. Available at http://www.facweb.iitkgp.ernet.in/~rbahadur/prince/home.html. PMID:22689640

  6. The impact of CRISPR repeat sequence on structures of a Cas6 protein-RNA complex

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ruiying; Zheng, Han; Preamplume, Gan; Shao, Yaming; Li, Hong

    2012-03-15

    The repeat-associated mysterious proteins (RAMPs) comprise the most abundant family of proteins involved in prokaryotic immunity against invading genetic elements conferred by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system. Cas6 is one of the first characterized RAMP proteins and is a key enzyme required for CRISPR RNA maturation. Despite a strong structural homology with other RAMP proteins that bind hairpin RNA, Cas6 distinctly recognizes single-stranded RNA. Previous structural and biochemical studies show that Cas6 captures the 5' end while cleaving the 3' end of the CRISPR RNA. Here, we describe three structures and complementary biochemical analysis of a noncatalytic Cas6 homolog from Pyrococcus horikoshii bound to CRISPR repeat RNA of different sequences. Our study confirms the specificity of the Cas6 protein for single-stranded RNA and further reveals the importance of the bases at Positions 5-7 in Cas6-RNA interactions. Substitutions of these bases result in structural changes in the protein-RNA complex including its oligomerization state.

  7. HITS-CLIP: panoramic views of protein-RNA regulation in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    The study of gene regulation in cells has recently begun to shift from a period dominated by the study of transcription factor-DNA interactions to a new focus on RNA regulation. This was sparked by the still-emerging recognition of the central role for RNA in cellular complexity emanating from the RNA World hypothesis, and has been facilitated by technologic advances, in particular high throughput RNA sequencing and crosslinking methods (RNA-Seq, CLIP, and HITS-CLIP). This article will place these advances in context, and, focusing on CLIP, will explain the method, what it can be used for, and how to approach using it. Examples of the successes, limitations and future of the technique will be discussed. Crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP), coupled with high throughput sequencing (HITS-CLIP), has caught the attention of the RNA community as a means of achieving a new depth of understanding about how protein-RNA complexes interactions regulate gene expression in living cells1–4. This review will describe the context in which CLIP was developed, and provide an up-to-date review of its uses in developing genome-wide maps of RNA-protein interactions and, more recently, microRNA (miRNA) binding sites. The uses, limitations, and future of CLIP will be discussed. PMID:21935890

  8. Modulation of apoptosis and immune signaling pathways by the Hantaan virus nucleocapsid protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ontiveros, Steven J.; Li Qianjun; Jonsson, Colleen B.

    2010-06-05

    Herein, we show a direct relationship between the Hantaan virus (HTNV) nucleocapsid (N) protein and the modulation of apoptosis. We observed an increase in caspase-7 and -8, but not -9 in cells expressing HTNV N protein mutants lacking amino acids 270-330. Similar results were observed for the New World hantavirus, Andes virus. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) was sequestered in the cytoplasm after tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) stimulation in cells expressing HTNV N protein. Further, TNFR stimulated cells expressing HTNV N protein inhibited caspase activation. In contrast, cells expressing N protein truncations lacking the region from amino acids 270-330 were unable to inhibit nuclear import of NF-kappaB and the mutants also triggered caspase activity. These results suggest that the HTNV circumvents host antiviral signaling and apoptotic response mediated by the TNFR pathway through host interactions with the N protein.

  9. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein localizes efficiently to the nucleus and nucleolus

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kyung Lee; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Eun Soo; You, Ji Chang

    2016-05-15

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) is an essential viral protein containing two highly conserved retroviral-type zinc finger (ZF) motifs, which functions in multiple stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. Although a number of functions for NC either in its mature form or as a domain of Gag have been revealed, little is known about the intracellular localization of NC and, moreover, its role in Gag protein trafficking. Here, we have investigated various forms of HIV-1 NC protein for its cellular localization and found that the NC has a strong nuclear and nucleolar localization activity. The linker region, composed of a stretch of basic amino acids between the two ZF motifs, was necessary and sufficient for the activity. - Highlights: • HIV-1 NC possess a NLS and leads to nuclear and nucleolus localization. • Mutations in basic residues between two ZFs in NC decrease the nucleus localization. • ZFs of NC affect cytoplasmic organelles localization rather than nucleus localization.

  10. switchSENSE: A new technology to study protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Cléry, Antoine; Sohier, Thibault J M; Welte, Thomas; Langer, Andreas; Allain, Frédéric H T

    2017-03-09

    Characterization of RNA-binding protein interactions with RNA became inevitable to properly understand the cellular mechanisms involved in gene expression regulation. Structural investigations bring information at the atomic level on these interactions and complementary methods such as Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) are commonly used to quantify the affinity of these RNA-protein complexes and evaluate the effect of mutations affecting these interactions. The switchSENSE technology has recently been developed and already successfully used to investigate protein interactions with different types of binding partners (DNA, protein/peptide or even small molecules). In this study, we show that this method is also well suited to study RNA binding proteins (RBPs). We could successfully investigate the binding to RNA of three different RBPs (Fox-1, SRSF1 and Tra2-β1) and obtained KD values very close to the ones determined previously by SPR or ITC for these complexes. These results show that the switchSENSE technology can be used as an alternative method to study protein-RNA interactions with KD values in the low micromolar (10(-6)) to nanomolar (10(-7)-10(-9)) and probably picomolar (10(-10)-10(-12)) range. The absence of labelling requirement for the analyte molecules and the use of very low amounts of protein and RNA molecules make the switchSENSE approach very attractive compared to other methods. Finally, we discuss about the potential of this approach in obtaining more sophisticated information such as structural conformational changes upon RBP binding to RNA.

  11. Interaction with Tsg101 is necessary for the efficient transport and release of nucleocapsids in marburg virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Dolnik, Olga; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Welsch, Sonja; Strecker, Thomas; Schudt, Gordian; Becker, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery supports the efficient budding of Marburg virus (MARV) and many other enveloped viruses. Interaction between components of the ESCRT machinery and viral proteins is predominantly mediated by short tetrapeptide motifs, known as late domains. MARV contains late domain motifs in the matrix protein VP40 and in the genome-encapsidating nucleoprotein (NP). The PSAP late domain motif of NP recruits the ESCRT-I protein tumor susceptibility gene 101 (Tsg101). Here, we generated a recombinant MARV encoding NP with a mutated PSAP late domain (rMARV(PSAPmut)). rMARV(PSAPmut) was attenuated by up to one log compared with recombinant wild-type MARV (rMARV(wt)), formed smaller plaques and exhibited delayed virus release. Nucleocapsids in rMARV(PSAPmut)-infected cells were more densely packed inside viral inclusions and more abundant in the cytoplasm than in rMARV(wt)-infected cells. A similar phenotype was detected when MARV-infected cells were depleted of Tsg101. Live-cell imaging analyses revealed that Tsg101 accumulated in inclusions of rMARV(wt)-infected cells and was co-transported together with nucleocapsids. In contrast, rMARV(PSAPmut) nucleocapsids did not display co-localization with Tsg101, had significantly shorter transport trajectories, and migration close to the plasma membrane was severely impaired, resulting in reduced recruitment into filopodia, the major budding sites of MARV. We further show that the Tsg101 interacting protein IQGAP1, an actin cytoskeleton regulator, was recruited into inclusions and to individual nucleocapsids together with Tsg101. Moreover, IQGAP1 was detected in a contrail-like structure at the rear end of migrating nucleocapsids. Down regulation of IQGAP1 impaired release of MARV. These results indicate that the PSAP motif in NP, which enables binding to Tsg101, is important for the efficient actin-dependent transport of nucleocapsids to the sites of budding. Thus, the

  12. Structural modeling of protein-RNA complexes using crosslinking of segmentally isotope-labeled RNA and MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Georg; Leitner, Alexander; Boudet, Julien; Campagne, Sébastien; von Schroetter, Christine; Moursy, Ahmed; Aebersold, Ruedi; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2017-03-27

    Ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) are key regulators of cellular function. We established an efficient approach, crosslinking of segmentally isotope-labeled RNA and tandem mass spectrometry (CLIR-MS/MS), to localize protein-RNA interactions simultaneously at amino acid and nucleotide resolution. The approach was tested on polypyrimidine tract binding protein 1 and U1 small nuclear RNP. Our method provides distance restraints to support integrative atomic-scale structural modeling and to gain mechanistic insights into RNP-regulated processes.

  13. Analysis of sequencing data for probing RNA secondary structures and protein-RNA binding in studying posttranscriptional regulations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xihao; Wu, Yang; Lu, Zhi John; Yip, Kevin Y

    2016-11-01

    High-throughput sequencing has been used to study posttranscriptional regulations, where the identification of protein-RNA binding is a major and fast-developing sub-area, which is in turn benefited by the sequencing methods for whole-transcriptome probing of RNA secondary structures. In the study of RNA secondary structures using high-throughput sequencing, bases are modified or cleaved according to their structural features, which alter the resulting composition of sequencing reads. In the study of protein-RNA binding, methods have been proposed to immuno-precipitate (IP) protein-bound RNA transcripts in vitro or in vivo By sequencing these transcripts, the protein-RNA interactions and the binding locations can be identified. For both types of data, read counts are affected by a combination of confounding factors, including expression levels of transcripts, sequence biases, mapping errors and the probing or IP efficiency of the experimental protocols. Careful processing of the sequencing data and proper extraction of important features are fundamentally important to a successful analysis. Here we review and compare different experimental methods for probing RNA secondary structures and binding sites of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), and the computational methods proposed for analyzing the corresponding sequencing data. We suggest how these two types of data should be integrated to study the structural properties of RBP binding sites as a systematic way to better understand posttranscriptional regulations.

  14. N:P stoichiometry and protein:RNA ratios in vascular plants: an evaluation of the growth-rate hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Matzek, Virginia; Vitousek, Peter M

    2009-08-01

    The growth-rate hypothesis states that fast-growing organisms need relatively more phosphorus-rich RNA to support rapid rates of protein synthesis, and therefore predicts, within and among taxa, increases in RNA and phosphorus content (relative to protein and nitrogen content) with increased growth rate. Here, we present a test of this hypothesis in vascular plants. We determined nitrogen : phosphorus ratios and protein:RNA ratios in pines growing at different rates due to nutrient conditions. In general, when comparing leaves of the same species at low and high growth rates, the faster-growing plants had higher RNA content, higher %N and %P, and lower protein:RNA ratios, but not consistently lower N:P ratios. We found no link between growth rate and foliar N:P or protein:RNA when comparing multiple species of different inherent growth rates. We conclude that plants adjust the balance of protein and RNA to favour either speed or efficiency of protein synthesis, but this balance does not alone dictate leaf stoichiometry.

  15. Quantitative Characterization of Configurational Space Sampled by HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Using Solution NMR, X-ray Scattering and Protein Engineering.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Lalit; Schwieters, Charles D; Grishaev, Alexander; Clore, G Marius

    2016-06-03

    Nucleic-acid-related events in the HIV-1 replication cycle are mediated by nucleocapsid, a small protein comprising two zinc knuckles connected by a short flexible linker and flanked by disordered termini. Combining experimental NMR residual dipolar couplings, solution X-ray scattering and protein engineering with ensemble simulated annealing, we obtain a quantitative description of the configurational space sampled by the two zinc knuckles, the linker and disordered termini in the absence of nucleic acids. We first compute the conformational ensemble (with an optimal size of three members) of an engineered nucleocapsid construct lacking the N- and C-termini that satisfies the experimental restraints, and then validate this ensemble, as well as characterize the disordered termini, using the experimental data from the full-length nucleocapsid construct. The experimental and computational strategy is generally applicable to multidomain proteins. Differential flexibility within the linker results in asymmetric motion of the zinc knuckles which may explain their functionally distinct roles despite high sequence identity. One of the configurations (populated at a level of ≈40 %) closely resembles that observed in various ligand-bound forms, providing evidence for conformational selection and a mechanistic link between protein dynamics and function.

  16. Analyses of Coronavirus Assembly Interactions with Interspecies Membrane and Nucleocapsid Protein Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Lili; Hurst-Hess, Kelley R.; Koetzner, Cheri A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The coronavirus membrane (M) protein is the central actor in virion morphogenesis. M organizes the components of the viral membrane, and interactions of M with itself and with the nucleocapsid (N) protein drive virus assembly and budding. In order to further define M-M and M-N interactions, we constructed mutants of the model coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) in which all or part of the M protein was replaced by its phylogenetically divergent counterpart from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We were able to obtain viable chimeras containing the entire SARS-CoV M protein as well as mutants with intramolecular substitutions that partitioned M protein at the boundaries between the ectodomain, transmembrane domains, or endodomain. Our results show that the carboxy-terminal domain of N protein, N3, is necessary and sufficient for interaction with M protein. However, despite some previous genetic and biochemical evidence that mapped interactions with N to the carboxy terminus of M, it was not possible to define a short linear region of M protein sufficient for assembly with N. Thus, interactions with N protein likely involve multiple linearly discontiguous regions of the M endodomain. The SARS-CoV M chimera exhibited a conditional growth defect that was partially suppressed by mutations in the envelope (E) protein. Moreover, virions of the M chimera were markedly deficient in spike (S) protein incorporation. These findings suggest that the interactions of M protein with both E and S protein are more complex than previously thought. IMPORTANCE The assembly of coronavirus virions entails concerted interactions among the viral structural proteins and the RNA genome. One strategy to study this process is through construction of interspecies chimeras that preserve or disrupt particular inter- or intramolecular associations. In this work, we replaced the membrane (M) protein of the model coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus with its

  17. Nucleocapsid Protein from Fig Mosaic Virus Forms Cytoplasmic Agglomerates That Are Hauled by Endoplasmic Reticulum Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Miura, Chihiro; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Fukuoka, Misato; Yusa, Akira; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although many studies have demonstrated intracellular movement of viral proteins or viral replication complexes, little is known about the mechanisms of their motility. In this study, we analyzed the localization and motility of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Fig mosaic virus (FMV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the recently established genus Emaravirus. Electron microscopy of FMV-infected cells using immunogold labeling showed that NPs formed cytoplasmic agglomerates that were predominantly enveloped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, while nonenveloped NP agglomerates also localized along the ER. Likewise, transiently expressed NPs formed agglomerates, designated NP bodies (NBs), in close proximity to the ER, as was the case in FMV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation and electron microscopic analyses of NP-expressing cells revealed that NBs localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that NBs moved rapidly with the streaming of the ER in an actomyosin-dependent manner. Brefeldin A treatment at a high concentration to disturb the ER network configuration induced aberrant accumulation of NBs in the perinuclear region, indicating that the ER network configuration is related to NB localization. Dominant negative inhibition of the class XI myosins, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, affected both ER streaming and NB movement in a similar pattern. Taken together, these results showed that NBs localize in the cytoplasm but in close proximity to the ER membrane to form enveloped particles and that this causes passive movements of cytoplasmic NBs by ER streaming. IMPORTANCE Intracellular trafficking is a primary and essential step for the cell-to-cell movement of viruses. To date, many studies have demonstrated the rapid intracellular movement of viral factors but have failed to provide evidence for the mechanism or biological significance of this motility. Here, we observed that agglomerates of nucleocapsid protein (NP) moved rapidly

  18. The SD1 Subdomain of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Capsid Protein Plays a Critical Role in Nucleocapsid and Particle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Reynaud, Josephine M.; Lulla, Valeria; Kim, Dal Young; Frolova, Elena I.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is an important human and animal pathogen, for which no safe and efficient vaccines or therapeutic means have been developed. Viral particle assembly and budding processes represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention. However, our understanding of the mechanistic process of VEEV assembly, RNA encapsidation, and the roles of different capsid-specific domains in these events remain to be described. The results of this new study demonstrate that the very amino-terminal VEEV capsid-specific subdomain SD1 is a critical player in the particle assembly process. It functions in a virus-specific mode, and its deletion, mutation, or replacement by the same subdomain derived from other alphaviruses has strong negative effects on infectious virus release. VEEV variants with mutated SD1 accumulate adaptive mutations in both SD1 and SD2, which result in a more efficiently replicating phenotype. Moreover, efficient nucleocapsid and particle assembly proceeds only when the two subdomains, SD1 and SD2, are derived from the same alphavirus. These two subdomains together appear to form the central core of VEEV nucleocapsids, and their interaction is one of the driving forces of virion assembly and budding. The similar domain structures of alphavirus capsid proteins suggest that this new knowledge can be applied to other alphaviruses. IMPORTANCE Alphaviruses are a group of human and animal pathogens which cause periodic outbreaks of highly debilitating diseases. Despite significant progress made in understanding the overall structure of alphavirus and VEEV virions, and glycoprotein spikes in particular, the mechanistic process of nucleocapsid assembly, RNA encapsidation, and the roles of different capsid-specific domains in these processes remain to be described. Our new data demonstrate that the very amino-terminal subdomain of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus capsid protein, SD1, plays a critical role in the

  19. Inhibition of Rift Valley Fever Virus Replication and Perturbation of Nucleocapsid-RNA Interactions by Suramin

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbecker, Mary; Lanchy, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging infectious pathogen that causes severe disease in humans and livestock and has the potential for global spread. There are currently no proven safe and effective treatment options for RVFV infection. Inhibition of RNA binding to RVFV nucleocapsid protein (N) represents an attractive antiviral therapeutic strategy because several essential steps in the RVFV replication cycle involve N binding to viral RNA. In this study, we demonstrate the therapeutic potential of the drug suramin by showing that it functions well as an inhibitor of RVFV replication at multiple stages in human cell culture. Suramin has been used previously to treat trypanosomiasis in Africa. We characterize the dynamic and cooperative nature of N-RNA binding interactions and the dissociation of high-molecular-mass ribonucleoprotein complexes using suramin, which we previously identified as an N-RNA binding inhibitor in a high-throughput screen. Finally, we elucidate the molecular mechanism used by suramin in vitro to disrupt both specific and nonspecific binding events important for ribonucleoprotein formation. PMID:25267680

  20. Hepatitis B virus nucleocapsid but not free core antigen controls viral clearance in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Jiun; Wu, Hui-Lin; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Chen, Pei-Jer

    2012-09-01

    We have recently shown that hepatitis B virus (HBV) core antigen (HBcAg) is the major viral factor for HBV clearance using a hydrodynamics-based mouse model. Knockout of HBcAg hampers the development of antiviral immune responses and thus promotes HBV persistence. Here, we further demonstrated that only in the capsid form, but not the free or dimer form, can HBcAg exert its contributory role in HBV clearance. HBcAg is the main structural protein of HBV icosahedral nucleocapsid. A mutant HBV DNA which expresses an assembly-defective HBcAg, HBcAgY132A, surprisingly prolonged HBV surface antigenemia in both C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice without affecting viral transcription and translation. This result was not due to a loss of the possible immune epitope caused by the single-amino-acid substitution of HBcAg. Moreover, the particular HBV mutant failed to induce robust humoral and cellular immunity against HBV. These data revealed the requirement of capsid structure for inducing adequate immunity that leads to HBV clearance in mice.

  1. Mapping of the interaction domains of the Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, Jesica M. Levingston; Marmor, Hannah; Frias-Staheli, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a member of the genus Nairovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, that can cause severe haemorrhagic fever in humans, with mortality rates above 30 %. CCHFV is the most widespread of the tick-borne human viruses and it is endemic in areas of central Asia, the Middle East, Africa and southern Europe. Its viral genome consists of three negative-sense RNA segments. The large segment (L) encodes a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L protein), the small segment (S) encodes the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) and the medium segment (M) encodes the envelope proteins. The N protein of bunyaviruses binds genomic RNA, forming the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex. The L protein interacts with these RNP structures, allowing the initiation of viral replication. The N protein also interacts with actin, although the regions and specific residues involved in these interactions have not yet been described. Here, by means of immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assays, we identified the regions within the CCHFV N protein implicated in homo-oligomerization and actin binding. We describe the interaction of the N protein with the CCHFV L protein, and identify the N- and C-terminal regions within the L protein that might be necessary for the formation of these N–L protein complexes. These results may guide the development of potent inhibitors of these complexes that could potentially block CCHFV replication. PMID:25389186

  2. Targeted binding of nucleocapsid protein transforms the folding landscape of HIV-1 TAR RNA

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Micah J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Manthei, Kelly A.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Williams, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are nucleic acid chaperones that play a key role in the viral life cycle. During reverse transcription, HIV-1 NC facilitates the rearrangement of nucleic acid secondary structure, allowing the transactivation response (TAR) RNA hairpin to be transiently destabilized and annealed to a cDNA hairpin. It is not clear how NC specifically destabilizes TAR RNA but does not strongly destabilize the resulting annealed RNA–DNA hybrid structure, which must be formed for reverse transcription to continue. By combining single-molecule optical tweezers measurements with a quantitative mfold-based model, we characterize the equilibrium TAR stability and unfolding barrier for TAR RNA. Experiments show that adding NC lowers the transition state barrier height while also dramatically shifting the barrier location. Incorporating TAR destabilization by NC into the mfold-based model reveals that a subset of preferential protein binding sites is responsible for the observed changes in the unfolding landscape, including the unusual shift in the transition state. We measure the destabilization induced at these NC binding sites and find that NC preferentially targets TAR RNA by binding to specific sequence contexts that are not present on the final annealed RNA–DNA hybrid structure. Thus, specific binding alters the entire RNA unfolding landscape, resulting in the dramatic destabilization of this specific structure that is required for reverse transcription. PMID:26483503

  3. Antigenic properties and diagnostic potential of puumala virus nucleocapsid protein expressed in insect cells.

    PubMed Central

    Vapalahti, O; Lundkvist, A; Kallio-Kokko, H; Paukku, K; Julkunen, I; Lankinen, H; Vaheri, A

    1996-01-01

    Puumala virus (PUU) is a member of the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae and the causative agent of nephropathia epidemica, a European form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Sera of nephropathia epidemica patients react specifically with PUU nucleocapsid (N) protein. In order to safely provide large quantities of antigen for diagnostic purposes, PUU Sotkamo strain N protein was expressed by using the baculovirus system in Sf9 insect cells to up to 30 to 50% of the total cellular protein. The recombinant N protein (bac-PUU-N) was solubilized with 6 M urea, dialyzed, and purified by anion-exchange liquid chromatography. In an immunoglobulin M mu-capture assay purified and unpurified bac-PUU-N antigen showed identical results compared with the results of a similar assay based on native PUU antigen grown in Vero E6 cells. An immunoglobulin G monoclonal antibody-capture assay based on unpurified bac-PUU-N also showed results identical to those of an assay with native PUU-N antigen. Moreover, a panel of monoclonal antibodies reactive with eight different epitopes showed identical reactivity patterns with both natural and bac-PUU-N antigen, while two epitopes in PUU-N expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli were not recognized. Puumala hantavirus N protein expressed by the baculovirus system offers a safe and inexpensive source of specific antigen for large-scale diagnostic and seroepidemiological purposes. PMID:8748286

  4. High-resolution structure of HLA-A*1101 in complex with SARS nucleocapsid peptide.

    PubMed

    Blicher, Thomas; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm; Buus, Søren; Gajhede, Michael

    2005-08-01

    The structure of the human MHC-I molecule HLA-A*1101 in complex with a nonameric peptide (KTFPPTEPK) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.45 A resolution. The peptide is derived from the SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein positions 362-370 (SNP362-370). It is conserved in all known isolates of SARS-CoV and has been verified by in vitro peptide-binding studies to be a good to intermediate binder to HLA-A*0301 and HLA-A*1101, with IC50 values of 70 and 186 nM, respectively [Sylvester-Hvid et al. (2004), Tissue Antigens, 63, 395-400]. In terms of the residues lining the peptide-binding groove, the HLA-A*1101-SNP362-370 complex is very similar to other known structures of HLA-A*1101 and HLA-A*6801. The SNP362-370 peptide is held in place by 17 hydrogen bonds to the alpha-chain residues and by nine water molecules which are also tightly bound in the peptide-binding groove. Thr6 of the peptide (Thr6p) does not make efficient use of the middle (E) pocket. For vaccine development, there seems to be a potential for optimization targeted at this position. All residues except Thr2p and Lys9p are accessible for T-cell recognition.

  5. The RNA Binding Specificity of Human APOBEC3 Proteins Resembles That of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Errando, Manel; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    The APOBEC3 (A3) cytidine deaminases are antiretroviral proteins, whose targets include human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Their incorporation into viral particles is critical for antiviral activity and is driven by interactions with the RNA molecules that are packaged into virions. However, it is unclear whether A3 proteins preferentially target RNA molecules that are destined to be packaged and if so, how. Using cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq), we determined the RNA binding preferences of the A3F, A3G and A3H proteins. We found that A3 proteins bind preferentially to RNA segments with particular properties, both in cells and in virions. Specifically, A3 proteins target RNA sequences that are G-rich and/or A-rich and are not scanned by ribosomes during translation. Comparative analyses of HIV-1 Gag, nucleocapsid (NC) and A3 RNA binding to HIV-1 RNA in cells and virions revealed the striking finding that A3 proteins partially mimic the RNA binding specificity of the HIV-1 NC protein. These findings suggest a model for A3 incorporation into HIV-1 virions in which an NC-like RNA binding specificity is determined by nucleotide composition rather than sequence. This model reconciles the promiscuity of A3 RNA binding that has been observed in previous studies with a presumed advantage that would accompany selective binding to RNAs that are destined to be packaged into virions. PMID:27541140

  6. Diagnosis of Oropouche Virus Infection Using a Recombinant Nucleocapsid Protein-Based Enzyme Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Mohammad F.; Nunes, Marcio; Vasconcelos, Pedro F.; Travassos Da Rosa, Amelia P. A.; Watts, Douglas M.; Russell, Kevin; Shope, Robert E.; Tesh, Robert B.; Barrett, Alan D. T.

    2001-01-01

    Oropouche (ORO) virus is an emerging infectious agent that has caused numerous outbreaks of an acute febrile (dengue-like) illness among humans in Brazil, Peru, and Panama. Diagnosis of ORO virus infection is based mainly on serology. Two different antigens, hamster serum antigen (HSA) and Vero cell lysate antigen (VCLA), are currently used in enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) in Brazil and Peru, respectively, to investigate the epidemiology of ORO virus infection. Both antigens involve use of infectious virus, and for this reason their use is restricted. Consequently, the frequency and distribution of ORO virus infection are largely unexplored in other countries of South America. This report describes the use of a bacterially expressed recombinant nucleocapsid (rN) protein of ORO virus in EIAs for the diagnosis of ORO virus infection. The data revealed that the purified rN protein is comparable to the authentic viral N protein in its antigenic characteristics and is highly sensitive and specific in EIAs. Among 183 serum samples tested, a high degree of concordance was found between rN protein-based EIA and HSA- and VCLA-based EIAs for the detection of both ORO virus-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibodies. The high sensitivity, specificity, and safety of the rN protein-based EIA make it a useful diagnostic technique that can be widely used to detect ORO virus infection in South America. PMID:11427552

  7. Biolistic transformation of chrysanthemum with the nucleocapsid gene of tomato spotted wilt virus.

    PubMed

    Yepes, L M; Mittak, V; Pang, S Z; Gonsalves, C; Slightom, J L; Gonsalves, D

    1995-08-01

    In vitro regeneration and biolistic transformation procedures were developed for several commercial chrysanthemum Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev, syn. Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat. cultivars using leaf and stem explants. Studies on the effect of several growth regulators and kanamycin on chrysanthemum regeneration were conducted, and a step-wise procedure to optimize kanamycin selection and recovery of transgenic plants was developed. A population of putative transformed chrysanthemum plants cvs. Blush, Dark Bronze Charm, Iridon, and Tara, was obtained after bombardment with tungsten microprojectiles coated with the binary plasmid pBIN19 containing the nucleocapsid (N) gene of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and the marker gene neomycin phosphotransferase (NPT II). PCR analysis of 82 putative transgenic plants selected on kanamycin indicated that the majority of the lines (89%) were transformed and contained both genes (71%). However, some transgenic lines contained only one of the genes: either the NPT II (15%) or the TSWV (N) gene (14%). Southern blot analysis on selected transgenic lines confirmed the integration of the TSWV (N) gene into the chrysanthemum genome. These results demonstrate the development of an efficient procedure to transfer genetic material into the chrysanthemum genome and selectively regenerate transgenic chrysanthemum plants at frequencies higher than previously reported.

  8. Insights into the mechanisms of RNA secondary structure destabilization by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Belfetmi, Anissa; Zargarian, Loussiné; Tisné, Carine; Sleiman, Dona; Morellet, Nelly; Lescop, Ewen; Maskri, Ouerdia; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The mature HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7 (NC) plays a key role in reverse transcription facilitating the two obligatory strand transfers. Several properties contribute to its efficient chaperon activity: preferential binding to single-stranded regions, nucleic acid aggregation, helix destabilization, and rapid dissociation from nucleic acids. However, little is known about the relationships between these different properties, which are complicated by the ability of the protein to recognize particular HIV-1 stem–loops, such as SL1, SL2, and SL3, with high affinity and without destabilizing them. These latter properties are important in the context of genome packaging, during which NC is part of the Gag precursor. We used NMR to investigate destabilization of the full-length TAR (trans activating response element) RNA by NC, which is involved in the first strand transfer step of reverse transcription. NC was used at a low protein:nucleotide (nt) ratio of 1:59 in these experiments. NMR data for the imino protons of TAR identified most of the base pairs destabilized by NC. These base pairs were adjacent to the loops in the upper part of the TAR hairpin rather than randomly distributed. Gel retardation assays showed that conversion from the initial TAR–cTAR complex to the fully annealed form occurred much more slowly at the 1:59 ratio than at the higher ratios classically used. Nevertheless, NC significantly accelerated the formation of the initial complex at a ratio of 1:59. PMID:26826129

  9. Insights into the mechanisms of RNA secondary structure destabilization by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Belfetmi, Anissa; Zargarian, Loussiné; Tisné, Carine; Sleiman, Dona; Morellet, Nelly; Lescop, Ewen; Maskri, Ouerdia; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The mature HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7 (NC) plays a key role in reverse transcription facilitating the two obligatory strand transfers. Several properties contribute to its efficient chaperon activity: preferential binding to single-stranded regions, nucleic acid aggregation, helix destabilization, and rapid dissociation from nucleic acids. However, little is known about the relationships between these different properties, which are complicated by the ability of the protein to recognize particular HIV-1 stem-loops, such as SL1, SL2, and SL3, with high affinity and without destabilizing them. These latter properties are important in the context of genome packaging, during which NC is part of the Gag precursor. We used NMR to investigate destabilization of the full-length TAR (trans activating response element) RNA by NC, which is involved in the first strand transfer step of reverse transcription. NC was used at a low protein:nucleotide (nt) ratio of 1:59 in these experiments. NMR data for the imino protons of TAR identified most of the base pairs destabilized by NC. These base pairs were adjacent to the loops in the upper part of the TAR hairpin rather than randomly distributed. Gel retardation assays showed that conversion from the initial TAR-cTAR complex to the fully annealed form occurred much more slowly at the 1:59 ratio than at the higher ratios classically used. Nevertheless, NC significantly accelerated the formation of the initial complex at a ratio of 1:59.

  10. Production of hantavirus Puumala nucleocapsid protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for vaccine and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Antoniukas, L; Grammel, H; Reichl, U

    2006-07-13

    The production of hantavirus Puumala nucleocapsid (N) protein for potential applications as a vaccine and for diagnostic purposes was investigated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a recombinant host. The N protein gene and the hexahistidine tagged N (h-N) protein gene were expressed intracellular from a 2-microm plasmid vectors under the control of a fused galactose inducible GAL10-PYK promoter. For monitoring the recombinant gene expression, a h-N and a GFP fusion protein was used. Different cultivation strategies and growth media compositions were tested in shake flasks and a 5 l bioreactor. When using defined YNB growth medium, we found the biomass yield to be unsatisfactorily low. Higher concentrated YNB medium, promoted cell growth but showed a pronounced inhibitory effect on heterologous gene expression. This phenomenon could not be attributed to plasmid losses, as we could demonstrate high stability of the vector under the applied cultivation conditions. Supplementation of YNB medium with extracts of plant origin resulted in increased biomass yields with concomitant high expression levels of the recombinant gene. The modified medium was used for fed-batch cultivations where basic metabolic features as well as growth parameters were determined in addition to recombinant gene expression. The maximal volumetric yield of N protein was 316 mg l(-1), the respective yield of h-N protein was 284 mg l(-1). Our study provides a basis for large-scale production of hantavirus vaccines, which satisfies economic efficiency as well as biosafety regulations for human applications.

  11. Comparative anti-infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) activity of (-)-pinene: effect on nucleocapsid (N) protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiwei; Wu, Nan; Zu, Yuangang; Fu, Yujie

    2011-01-25

    In the present study, anti-IBV (infectious bronchitis virus) activities of (-)-pinenes were studied by MTT assay, as well as docking and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. The CC₅₀ values of (-)-α-pinene and (-)-β-pinene were above 10 mM. And the maximum noncytotoxic concentrations (TD₀) of (-)-α-pinene and (-)-β-pinene were determined as 7.88 ± 0.06 and 6.09 ± 0.31 mM, respectively. The two compounds were found to inhibit IBV with an IC₅₀ of 0.98 ± 0.25 and 1.32 ± 0.11 mM. The MTT assay showed that the inhibitions of (-)-pinenes against IBV appear to occur moderately before entering the cell but are much stronger occur after penetration of the virus into the cell. Molecular simulations indicated that (-)-α-pinene and (-)-β-pinene specifically interact with the active site which is located at the N terminus of phosphorylated nucleocapsid (N) protein, with the former being more potent than the latter. The binding energies of them are -36.83 and -35.59 kcal mol-1, respectively. Results presented here may suggest that (-)-α-pinene and (-)-β-pinene possess anti-IBV properties, and therefore are a potential source of anti-IBV ingredients for the pharmaceutical industry.

  12. Observation of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein induced TAR DNA melting at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosa, Gonzalo; Harbron, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Donald; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Barbara, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Reverse transcription of the HIV-1 RNA genome involves several nucleic acid rearrangement steps, and the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a key role in this process. NC is a nucleic acid chaperone protein, which facilitates the formation of the most stable nucleic acid structures. Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (SM-FRET) measurements enable us to observe the NC-induced conformational fluctuations of a transactivation response region (TAR) DNA hairpin, which is part of the initial product of reverse transcription known as minus-strand strong-stop DNA. SM-FRET studies show that the majority of conformational fluctuations of the fluorescently-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the presence of NC occur in <100 ms. A single molecule explores a wide range of confomations unpon NC binding, with fluctuations encompassing as many as 40 bases in both arms of the hairpin. No conformational fluctuations are observed with the dye-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the absence of NC or when a labeled TAR DNA hairpin variant lacking bulges and internal loops is analyzed in the presence of NC. This study represents the first real-time observation of NC-mediated nucleic acid conformational fluctuations, revealing new insights into NC's nucleic acid chaperone activity.

  13. Nucleocapsid protein structures from orthobunyaviruses reveal insight into ribonucleoprotein architecture and RNA polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Antonio; Tanner, Sian J; Walter, Cheryl T; Dent, Kyle C; Shepherd, Dale A; Wu, Weining; Matthews, Susan V; Hiscox, Julian A; Green, Todd J; Luo, Ming; Elliott, Richard M; Fooks, Anthony R; Ashcroft, Alison E; Stonehouse, Nicola J; Ranson, Neil A; Barr, John N; Edwards, Thomas A

    2013-06-01

    All orthobunyaviruses possess three genome segments of single-stranded negative sense RNA that are encapsidated with the virus-encoded nucleocapsid (N) protein to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, which is uncharacterized at high resolution. We report the crystal structure of both the Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) N-RNA complex and the unbound Schmallenberg virus (SBV) N protein, at resolutions of 3.20 and 2.75 Å, respectively. Both N proteins crystallized as ring-like tetramers and exhibit a high degree of structural similarity despite classification into different orthobunyavirus serogroups. The structures represent a new RNA-binding protein fold. BUNV N possesses a positively charged groove into which RNA is deeply sequestered, with the bases facing away from the solvent. This location is highly inaccessible, implying that RNA polymerization and other critical base pairing events in the virus life cycle require RNP disassembly. Mutational analysis of N protein supports a correlation between structure and function. Comparison between these crystal structures and electron microscopy images of both soluble tetramers and authentic RNPs suggests the N protein does not bind RNA as a repeating monomer; thus, it represents a newly described architecture for bunyavirus RNP assembly, with implications for many other segmented negative-strand RNA viruses.

  14. Computational prediction and biochemical characterization of novel RNA aptamers to Rift Valley fever virus nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbecker, Mary; St. Goddard, Jeremy; Sundet, Alec; Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Raiford, Douglas; Lodmell, J. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a potent human and livestock pathogen endemic to sub-Saharan Africa and the Arabian Peninsula that has potential to spread to other parts of the world. Although there is no proven effective and safe treatment for RVFV infections, a potential therapeutic target is the virally encoded nucleocapsid protein (N). During the course of infection, N binds to viral RNA, and perturbation of this interaction can inhibit viral replication. To gain insight into how N recognizes viral RNA specifically, we designed an algorithm that uses a distance matrix and multidimensional scaling to compare the predicted secondary structures of known N-binding RNAs, or aptamers, that were isolated and characterized in previous in vitro evolution experiment. These aptamers did not exhibit overt sequence or predicted structure similarity, so we employed bioinformatic methods to propose novel aptamers based on analysis and clustering of secondary structures. We screened and scored the predicted secondary structures of novel randomly generated RNA sequences in silico and selected several of these putative N-binding RNAs whose secondary structures were similar to those of known N-binding RNAs. We found that overall the in silico generated RNA sequences bound well to N in vitro. Furthermore, introduction of these RNAs into cells prior to infection with RVFV inhibited viral replication in cell culture. This proof of concept study demonstrates how the predictive power of bioinformatics and the empirical power of biochemistry can be jointly harnessed to discover, synthesize, and test new RNA sequences that bind tightly to RVFV N protein. The approach would be easily generalizable to other applications. PMID:26141677

  15. TGEV nucleocapsid protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through activation of p53 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Li; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Dong, Feng; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Xu, Xingang; Tong, Dewen

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • TGEV N protein reduces cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. • TGEV N protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by regulating p53 signaling. • TGEV N protein plays important roles in TGEV-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. - Abstract: Our previous studies showed that TGEV infection could induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via activation of p53 signaling in cultured host cells. However, it is unclear which viral gene causes these effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of TGEV nucleocapsid (N) protein on PK-15 cells. We found that TGEV N protein suppressed cell proliferation by causing cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis. Characterization of various cellular proteins that are involved in regulating cell cycle progression demonstrated that the expression of N gene resulted in an accumulation of p53 and p21, which suppressed cyclin B1, cdc2 and cdk2 expression. Moreover, the expression of TGEV N gene promoted translocation of Bax to mitochondria, which in turn caused the release of cytochrome c, followed by activation of caspase-3, resulting in cell apoptosis in the transfected PK-15 cells following cell cycle arrest. Further studies showed that p53 inhibitor attenuated TGEV N protein induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and apoptosis through reversing the expression changes of cdc2, cdk2 and cyclin B1 and the translocation changes of Bax and cytochrome c induced by TGEV N protein. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TGEV N protein might play an important role in TGEV infection-induced p53 activation and cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis occurrence.

  16. Specificity of Rous sarcoma virus nucleocapsid protein in genomic RNA packaging.

    PubMed Central

    Dupraz, P; Spahr, P F

    1992-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis has shown that the nucleocapsid (NC) protein of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) is required for packaging and dimerization of viral RNA. However, it has not been possible to demonstrate, in vivo or in vitro, specific binding of viral RNA sequences by NC. To determine whether specific packaging of viral RNA is mediated by NC in vivo, we have constructed RSV mutants carrying sequences of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV). Either the NC coding region alone, the psi RNA packaging sequence, or both the NC and psi sequences of MoMuLV were substituted for the corresponding regions of a full-length RSV clone to yield chimeric plasmid pAPrcMNC, pAPrc psi M, or pAPrcM psi M, respectively. In addition, a mutant of RSV in which the NC is completely deleted was tested as a control. Upon transfection, each of the chimeric mutants produced viral particles containing processed core proteins but were noninfectious. Thus, MoMuLV NC can replace RSV NC functionally in the assembly and release of mature virions but not in infectivity. Surprisingly, the full-deletion mutant showed a strong block in virus release, suggesting that NC is involved in virus assembly. Mutant PrcMNC packaged 50- to 100-fold less RSV RNA than did the wild type; in cotransfection experiments, MoMuLV RNA was preferentially packaged. This result suggests that the specific recognition of viral RNA during virus assembly involves, at least in part, the NC protein. Images PMID:1378506

  17. Structure, Function, and Evolution of the Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Stephen D.; Surtees, Rebecca; Walter, Cheryl T.; Ariza, Antonio; Bergeron, Éric; Nichol, Stuart T.; Hiscox, Julian A.

    2012-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is an emerging tick-borne virus of the Bunyaviridae family that is responsible for a fatal human disease for which preventative or therapeutic measures do not exist. We solved the crystal structure of the CCHFV strain Baghdad-12 nucleocapsid protein (N), a potential therapeutic target, at a resolution of 2.1 Å. N comprises a large globular domain composed of both N- and C-terminal sequences, likely involved in RNA binding, and a protruding arm domain with a conserved DEVD caspase-3 cleavage site at its apex. Alignment of our structure with that of the recently reported N protein from strain YL04057 shows a close correspondence of all folds but significant transposition of the arm through a rotation of 180 degrees and a translation of 40 Å. These observations suggest a structural flexibility that may provide the basis for switching between alternative N protein conformations during important functions such as RNA binding and oligomerization. Our structure reveals surfaces likely involved in RNA binding and oligomerization, and functionally critical residues within these domains were identified using a minigenome system able to recapitulate CCHFV-specific RNA synthesis in cells. Caspase-3 cleaves the polypeptide chain at the exposed DEVD motif; however, the cleaved N protein remains an intact unit, likely due to the intimate association of N- and C-terminal fragments in the globular domain. Structural alignment with existing N proteins reveals that the closest CCHFV relative is not another bunyavirus but the arenavirus Lassa virus instead, suggesting that current segmented negative-strand RNA virus taxonomy may need revision. PMID:22875964

  18. Structure of the Rift Valley fever virus nucleocapsid protein reveals another architecture for RNA encapsidation

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Donald D.; Piper, Mary E.; Gerrard, Sonja R.; Smith, Janet L.

    2010-07-13

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a negative-sense RNA virus (genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) that infects livestock and humans and is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Like all negative-sense viruses, the segmented RNA genome of RVFV is encapsidated by a nucleocapsid protein (N). The 1.93-{angstrom} crystal structure of RVFV N and electron micrographs of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) reveal an encapsidated genome of substantially different organization than in other negative-sense RNA virus families. The RNP polymer, viewed in electron micrographs of both virus RNP and RNP reconstituted from purified N with a defined RNA, has an extended structure without helical symmetry. N-RNA species of {approx}100-kDa apparent molecular weight and heterogeneous composition were obtained by exhaustive ribonuclease treatment of virus RNP, by recombinant expression of N, and by reconstitution from purified N and an RNA oligomer. RNA-free N, obtained by denaturation and refolding, has a novel all-helical fold that is compact and well ordered at both the N and C termini. Unlike N of other negative-sense RNA viruses, RVFV N has no positively charged surface cleft for RNA binding and no protruding termini or loops to stabilize a defined N-RNA oligomer or RNP helix. A potential protein interaction site was identified in a conserved hydrophobic pocket. The nonhelical appearance of phlebovirus RNP, the heterogeneous {approx}100-kDa N-RNA multimer, and the N fold differ substantially from the RNP and N of other negative-sense RNA virus families and provide valuable insights into the structure of the encapsidated phlebovirus genome.

  19. Computational prediction and biochemical characterization of novel RNA aptamers to Rift Valley fever virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Ellenbecker, Mary; St Goddard, Jeremy; Sundet, Alec; Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Raiford, Douglas; Lodmell, J Stephen

    2015-10-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a potent human and livestock pathogen endemic to sub-Saharan Africa and the Arabian Peninsula that has potential to spread to other parts of the world. Although there is no proven effective and safe treatment for RVFV infections, a potential therapeutic target is the virally encoded nucleocapsid protein (N). During the course of infection, N binds to viral RNA, and perturbation of this interaction can inhibit viral replication. To gain insight into how N recognizes viral RNA specifically, we designed an algorithm that uses a distance matrix and multidimensional scaling to compare the predicted secondary structures of known N-binding RNAs, or aptamers, that were isolated and characterized in previous in vitro evolution experiment. These aptamers did not exhibit overt sequence or predicted structure similarity, so we employed bioinformatic methods to propose novel aptamers based on analysis and clustering of secondary structures. We screened and scored the predicted secondary structures of novel randomly generated RNA sequences in silico and selected several of these putative N-binding RNAs whose secondary structures were similar to those of known N-binding RNAs. We found that overall the in silico generated RNA sequences bound well to N in vitro. Furthermore, introduction of these RNAs into cells prior to infection with RVFV inhibited viral replication in cell culture. This proof of concept study demonstrates how the predictive power of bioinformatics and the empirical power of biochemistry can be jointly harnessed to discover, synthesize, and test new RNA sequences that bind tightly to RVFV N protein. The approach would be easily generalizable to other applications.

  20. Nucleocapsid and matrix protein contributions to selective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genomic RNA packaging.

    PubMed

    Poon, D T; Li, G; Aldovini, A

    1998-03-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (NC) of retroviruses plays a major role in genomic RNA packaging, and some evidence has implicated the matrix protein (MA) of certain retroviruses in viral RNA binding. To further investigate the role of NC in the selective recognition of genomic viral RNA and to address the potential contribution of MA in this process, we constructed chimeric and deletion human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mutants that alter the NC or MA protein. Both HIV and mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) NC proteins have two zinc-binding domains and similar basic amino acid compositions but differ substantially in total length, amino acid sequence, and spacing of the zinc-binding motifs. When the entire NC coding sequence of HIV was replaced with the MMTV NC coding sequence, we found that the HIV genome was incorporated into virions at 50% of wild-type levels. Viruses produced from chimeric HIV genomes with complete NC replacements, or with the two NC zinc-binding domains replaced with MMTV sequences, preferentially incorporated HIV genomes when both HIV and MMTV genomes were simultaneously present in the cell. Viruses produced from chimeric MMTV genomes in which the MMTV NC had been replaced with HIV NC preferentially incorporated MMTV genomes when both HIV and MMTV genomes were simultaneously present in the cell. In contrast, viruses produced from chimeric HIV genomes containing the Moloney NC, which contains a single zinc-binding motif, were previously shown to preferentially incorporate Moloney genomic RNA. Taken together, these results indicate that an NC protein with two zinc-binding motifs is required for specific HIV RNA packaging and that the amino acid context of these motifs, while contributing to the process, is less crucial for specificity. The data also suggest that HIV NC may not be the exclusive determinant of RNA selectivity. Analysis of an HIV MA mutant revealed that specific RNA packaging does not require MA protein.

  1. Development of an immunochromatography strip test based on truncated nucleocapsid antigens of three representative hantaviruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hantaviruses are causative agents of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and nephropathia epidemica (NE) in the Old World and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in the New World. There is a need for time-saving diagnostic methods. In the present study, recombinant N antigens were used as antigens in an immunochromatography strip (ICG) test to detect specific IgG antibodies. Methods The N-terminal 103 amino acids (aa) of Hantaan virus (HTNV), Puumala virus (PUUV) and Andes virus (ANDV) nucleocapsid (N) protein were expressed in E. coli as representative antigens of three groups (HFRS, NE and HPS-causing viruses) of hantavirus. Five different types of ICG test strips, one antigen line on one strip for each of the three selected hantaviruses (HTNV, PUUV and ANDV), three antigen lines on one strip and a mixed antigen line on one strip, were developed and sensitivities were compared. Results A total of 87 convalescent-phase patient sera, including sera from 35 HFRS patients, 36 NE patients and 16 HPS patients, and 25 sera from healthy seronegative people as negative controls were used to evaluate the ICG test. Sensitivities of the three-line strip and mixed-line strip were similar to those of the single antigen strip (97.2 to 100%). On the other hand, all of the ICG test strips showed high specificities to healthy donors. Conclusion These results indicated that the ICG test with the three representative antigens is an effective serodiagnostic tool for screening and typing of hantavirus infection in humans. PMID:24885901

  2. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Antigen Detection Using Monoclonal Antibodies to the Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fukuma, Aiko; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Tani, Hideki; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Kurosu, Takeshi; Egawa, Kazutaka; Suda, Yuto; Singh, Harpal; Nomachi, Taro; Gokuden, Mutsuyo; Ando, Katsuyuki; Kida, Kouji; Kan, Miki; Kato, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Akira; Kitamoto, Hiroaki; Sato, Yuko; Suzuki, Tadaki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morikawa, Shigeru; Shimojima, Masayuki; Saijo, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is a tick-borne infectious disease with a high case fatality rate, and is caused by the SFTS virus (SFTSV). SFTS is endemic to China, South Korea, and Japan. The viral RNA level in sera of patients with SFTS is known to be strongly associated with outcomes. Virological SFTS diagnosis with high sensitivity and specificity are required in disease endemic areas. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated novel monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the SFTSV nucleocapsid (N) protein and developed a sandwich antigen (Ag)-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of N protein of SFTSV using MAb and polyclonal antibody as capture and detection antibodies, respectively. The Ag-capture system was capable of detecting at least 350–1220 TCID50/100 μl/well from the culture supernatants of various SFTSV strains. The efficacy of the Ag-capture ELISA in SFTS diagnosis was evaluated using serum samples collected from patients suspected of having SFTS in Japan. All 24 serum samples (100%) containing high copy numbers of viral RNA (>105 copies/ml) showed a positive reaction in the Ag-capture ELISA, whereas 12 out of 15 serum samples (80%) containing low copy numbers of viral RNA (<105 copies/ml) showed a negative reaction in the Ag-capture ELISA. Among these Ag-capture ELISA-negative 12 samples, 9 (75%) were positive for IgG antibodies against SFTSV. Conclusions The newly developed Ag-capture ELISA is useful for SFTS diagnosis in acute phase patients with high levels of viremia. PMID:27045364

  3. The Andes Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Directs Basal Endothelial Cell Permeability by Activating RhoA

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunova, Elena E.; Simons, Matthew J.; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Andes virus (ANDV) predominantly infects microvascular endothelial cells (MECs) and nonlytically causes an acute pulmonary edema termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). In HPS patients, virtually every pulmonary MEC is infected, MECs are enlarged, and infection results in vascular leakage and highly lethal pulmonary edema. We observed that MECs infected with the ANDV hantavirus or expressing the ANDV nucleocapsid (N) protein showed increased size and permeability by activating the Rheb and RhoA GTPases. Expression of ANDV N in MECs increased cell size by preventing tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) repression of Rheb-mTOR-pS6K. N selectively bound the TSC2 N terminus (1 to 1403) within a complex containing TSC2/TSC1/TBC1D7, and endogenous TSC2 reciprocally coprecipitated N protein from ANDV-infected MECs. TSCs normally restrict RhoA-induced MEC permeability, and we found that ANDV infection or N protein expression constitutively activated RhoA. This suggests that the ANDV N protein alone is sufficient to activate signaling pathways that control MEC size and permeability. Further, RhoA small interfering RNA, dominant-negative RhoA(N19), and the RhoA/Rho kinase inhibitors fasudil and Y27632 dramatically reduced the permeability of ANDV-infected MECs by 80 to 90%. Fasudil also reduced the bradykinin-directed permeability of ANDV and Hantaan virus-infected MECs to control levels. These findings demonstrate that ANDV activation of RhoA causes MEC permeability and reveal a potential edemagenic mechanism for ANDV to constitutively inhibit the basal barrier integrity of infected MECs. The central importance of RhoA activation in MEC permeability further suggests therapeutically targeting RhoA, TSCs, and Rac1 as potential means of resolving capillary leakage during hantavirus infections. PMID:27795403

  4. Serologic Cross-Reactions between Nucleocapsid Proteins of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yange; Pohl, Jan; Brooks, W. Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) share virologic and epidemiologic features and cause clinically similar respiratory illness predominantly in young children. In a previous study of acute febrile respiratory illness in Bangladesh, we tested paired serum specimens from 852 children presenting fever and cough for diagnostic increases in titers of antibody to hRSV and hMPV by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Unexpectedly, of 93 serum pairs that showed a ≥4-fold increase in titers of antibody to hRSV, 24 (25.8%) showed a concurrent increase in titers of antibody to hMPV; of 91 pairs showing an increase to hMPV, 13 (14.3%) showed a concurrent increase to hRSV. We speculated that common antigens shared by these viruses explain this finding. Since the nucleocapsid (N) proteins of these viruses show the greatest sequence homology, we tested hyperimmune antisera prepared for each virus against baculovirus-expressed recombinant N (recN) proteins for potential cross-reactivity. The antisera were reciprocally reactive with both proteins. To localize common antigenic regions, we first expressed the carboxy domain of the hMPV N protein that was the most highly conserved region within the hRSV N protein. Although reciprocally reactive with antisera by Western blotting, this truncated protein did not react with hMPV IgG-positive human sera by EIA. Using 5 synthetic peptides that spanned the amino-terminal portion of the hMPV N protein, we identified a single peptide that was cross-reactive with human sera positive for either virus. Antiserum prepared for this peptide was reactive with recN proteins of both viruses, indicating that a common immunoreactive site exists in this region. PMID:25740767

  5. Dendritic Cell Targeted Chitosan Nanoparticles for Nasal DNA Immunization against SARS CoV Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Raghuwanshi, Dharmendra; Mishra, Vivek; Das, Dipankar; Kaur, Kamaljit; Suresh, Mavanur R.

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the formulation and in vivo efficacy of dendritic cell (DC) targeted plasmid DNA loaded biotinylated chitosan nanoparticles for nasal immunization against nucleocapsid (N) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as antigen. The induction of antigen-specific mucosal and systemic immune response at the site of virus entry is a major challenge for vaccine design. Here, we designed a strategy for non-invasive receptor mediated gene delivery to nasal resident DCs. The pDNA loaded biotinylated chitosan nanoparticles were prepared using a complex coacervation process and characterized for size, shape, surface charge, plasmid loading and protection against nuclease digestion. The pDNA loaded biotinylated chitosan nanoparticles were targeted with bifunctional fusion protein (bfFp) vector for achieving DC selective targeting. The bfFp is a recombinant fusion protein consisting of truncated core-streptavidin fused with anti-DEC-205 single chain antibody (scFv). The core-streptavidin arm of fusion protein binds with biotinylated nanoparticles, while anti-DEC-205 scFv imparts targeting specificity to DC DEC-205 receptor. We demonstrate that intranasal administration of bfFp targeted formulations along with anti-CD40 DC maturation stimuli enhanced magnitude of mucosal IgA as well as systemic IgG against N protein. The strategy led to the detection of augmented levels of N protein specific systemic IgG and nasal IgA antibodies. However, following intranasal delivery of naked pDNA no mucosal and systemic immune responses were detected. A parallel comparison of targeted formulations using intramuscular and intranasal route showed that the intramuscular route is superior for induction of systemic IgG responses compared with the intranasal route. Our results suggest that targeted pDNA delivery through non-invasive intranasal route can be a strategy for designing low-dose vaccines. PMID:22356166

  6. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Qualley, Dominic F. Sokolove, Victoria L.; Ross, James L.

    2015-03-13

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. - Highlights: • BLV NC binds strongly to DNA and RNA. • BLV NC promotes mini-TAR annealing as well as HIV-1 NC. • Annealing kinetics suggest a low degree of similarity between BLV NC and HTLV-1 NC.

  7. Chemical modification of nucleotide bases and mRNA editing depend on hexamer or nucleoprotein phase in Sendai virus nucleocapsids.

    PubMed Central

    Iseni, Frédéric; Baudin, Florence; Garcin, Dominique; Marq, Jean-Baptiste; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Kolakofsky, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The minus-strand genome of Sendai virus is an assembly of the nucleocapsid protein (N) and RNA, in which each N subunit is associated with precisely 6 nt. Only genomes that are a multiple of 6 nt long replicate efficiently or are found naturally, and their replication promoters contain sequence elements with hexamer repeats. Paramyxoviruses that are governed by this hexamer rule also edit their P gene mRNA during its synthesis, by G insertions, via a controlled form of viral RNA polymerase "stuttering" (pseudo-templated transcription). This stuttering is directed by a cis-acting sequence (3' UNN UUUUUU CCC), whose hexamer phase is conserved within each virus group. To determine whether the hexamer phase of a given nucleotide sequence within nucleocapsids affected its sensitivity to chemical modification, and whether hexamer phase of the mRNA editing site was important for the editing process, we prepared a matched set of viruses in which a model editing site was displaced 1 nt at a time relative to the genome ends. The relative abilities of these Sendai viruses to edit their mRNAs in cell culture infections were examined, and the ability of DMS to chemically modify the nucleotides of this cis-acting signal within resting viral nucleocapsids was also studied. Cytidines at hexamer phases 1 and 6 were the most accessible to chemical modification, whereas mRNA editing was most extensive when the stutter-site C was in positions 2 to 5. Apparently, the N subunit imprints the nucleotide sequence it is associated with, and affects both the initiation of viral RNA synthesis and mRNA editing. The N-subunit assembly thus appears to superimpose another code upon the genetic code. PMID:12212849

  8. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus nucleocapsid protein BV/ODV-C42 mediates the nuclear entry of P78/83.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Wang, Qian; Liang, Changyong; Song, Jianhua; Li, Ni; Shi, Hui; Chen, Xinwen

    2008-05-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) BV/ODV-c42 (orf101; c42), which encodes a 41.5-kDa viral nucleocapsid protein with a putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) motif at the C terminus, is a highly conserved gene among members of the Baculoviridae family. C42 is demonstrated to be essential for AcMNPV propagation and can bind to nucleocapsid protein P78/83, a viral activator for the actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3) complex to initiate nuclear actin polymerization, which is essential for viral nucleocapsid morphogenesis during AcMNPV infection. Here, we report the identification of a novel pathway through which c42 functions in nucleocapsid assembly. Cotransfection of Sf9 cells with c42 and p78/83 plasmids demonstrated that C42 was capable of recruiting P78/83 to the nuclei of uninfected cells and that the NLS motif of C42 was essential for this process. To validate this nuclear relocation mode in bacmid-transfected cells, a c42-disrupted bacmid (vAc(c42ko-gfp)) and rescued bacmids with wild-type c42 (vAc(c42res-gfp)) or with NLS coding sequence-mutated c42 (vAc(c42nls-gfp)) were prepared. By immuno-staining, P78/83 was found to be localized in the cytoplasm of either vAc(c42ko-gfp)- or vAc(c42nls-gfp)-transfected cells, whereas P78/83 was relocated to the nuclei of vAc(c42res-gfp)-transfected cells. Furthermore, F-actin-specific staining confirmed that there was no actin polymerization activity in the nuclei of either vAc(c42ko-gfp)- or vAc(c42nls-gfp)-transfected cells, which might be attributed to the absence of nuclear P78/83, an activator of the ARP2/3 complex to initiate nuclear actin polymerization. We therefore hypothesize a mode of action where C42 binds to P78/83 in the cytoplasm to form a protein complex and cotransports to the nucleus under the direction of the NLS motif in C42 during AcMNPV infection.

  9. A versatile building block: the structures and functions of negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus nucleocapsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuna; Guo, Yu; Lou, Zhiyong

    2012-12-01

    Nucleocapsid protein (NPs) of negative-sense single-stranded RNA (-ssRNA) viruses function in different stages of viral replication, transcription, and maturation. Structural investigations show that -ssRNA viruses that encode NPs preliminarily serve as structural building blocks that encapsidate and protect the viral genomic RNA and mediate the interaction between genomic RNA and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. However, recent structural results have revealed other biological functions of -ssRNA viruses that extend our understanding of the versatile roles of virally encoded NPs.

  10. Resolving Individual Components in Protein-RNA Complexes Using Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Experiments.

    PubMed

    Rambo, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of protein-RNA complexes has developed into an efficient and economical approach for determining low-resolution shapes of particles in solution. Here, we demonstrate a mutliphase volumetric modeling approach capable of resolving individual components within a low-resolution shape. Through three case studies, we describe the SAXS data collecting strategies, premodeling analysis, and computational methods required for deconstructing complexes into their respective components. This chapter presents an approach using the programs ScÅtter and MONSA and custom scripts for averaging and aligning of multiple independent modeling runs. The method can image small (7kDa) masses within the context of complex and is capable of visualizing ligand-induced conformational changes. Nevertheless, computational algorithms are not without error, and we describe specific considerations during SAXS data reduction and modeling to mitigate possible false positives.

  11. Truncated Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins for Serotyping Sin Nombre, Andes, and Laguna Negra Hantavirus Infections in Humans and Rodents▿

    PubMed Central

    Koma, Takaaki; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Pini, Noemi; Safronetz, David; Taruishi, Midori; Levis, Silvana; Endo, Rika; Shimizu, Kenta; Yasuda, Shumpei P.; Ebihara, Hideki; Feldmann, Heinz; Enria, Delia; Arikawa, Jiro

    2010-01-01

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV), Andes virus (ANDV), and Laguna Negra virus (LANV) have been known as the dominant causative agents of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). ANDV and LANV, with different patterns of pathogenicity, exist in a sympatric relationship. Moreover, there is documented evidence of person-to-person transmission of ANDV. Therefore, it is important in clinical medicine and epidemiology to know the serotype of a hantavirus causing infection. Truncated SNV, ANDV, and LANV recombinant nucleocapsid proteins (trNs) missing 99 N-terminal amino acids (trN100) were expressed using a baculovirus system, and their applicability for serotyping SNV, ANDV, and LANV infection by the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) was examined. HPS patient sera and natural-reservoir rodent sera infected with SNV, ANDV, and LANV showed the highest optical density (OD) values for homologous trN100 antigens. Since even patient sera with lower IgM and IgG antibody titers were serotyped, the trN100s are therefore considered useful for serotyping with early-acute-phase sera. In contrast, assays testing whole recombinant nucleocapsid protein antigens of SNV, ANDV, and LANV expressed in Escherichia coli detected homologous and heterologous antibodies equally. These results indicated that a screening ELISA using an E. coli-expressed antigen followed by a serotyping ELISA using trN100s is useful for epidemiological surveillance in regions where two or more hantavirus species cocirculate. PMID:20335425

  12. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus 3C-Like Protease-Mediated Nucleocapsid Processing: Possible Link to Viral Cell Culture Adaptability.

    PubMed

    Jaru-Ampornpan, Peera; Jengarn, Juggragarn; Wanitchang, Asawin; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2017-01-15

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) causes severe diarrhea and high mortality rates in newborn piglets, leading to massive losses to the swine industry worldwide during recent epidemics. Intense research efforts are now focusing on defining viral characteristics that confer a growth advantage, pathogenicity, or cell adaptability in order to better understand the PEDV life cycle and identify suitable targets for antiviral or vaccine development. Here, we report a unique phenomenon of PEDV nucleocapsid (N) cleavage by the PEDV-encoded 3C-like protease (3Cpro) during infection. The identification of the 3Cpro cleavage site at the C terminus of N supported previous observations that PEDV 3Cpro showed a substrate requirement slightly different from that of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) 3Cpro and revealed a greater flexibility in its substrate recognition site. This cleavage motif is present in the majority of cell culture-adapted PEDV strains but is missing in emerging field isolates. Remarkably, reverse-genetics-derived cell culture-adapted PEDVAVCT12 harboring uncleavable N displayed growth retardation in Vero E6-APN cells compared to the wild-type virus. These observations altogether shed new light on the investigation and characterization of the PEDV nucleocapsid protein and its possible link to cell culture adaptation.

  13. The Nucleocapsid Protein of Coronaviruses Acts as a Viral Suppressor of RNA Silencing in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lei; Wang, Haiying; Ji, Yanxi; Yang, Jie; Xu, Shan; Huang, Xingyu; Wang, Zidao; Qin, Lei; Tien, Po; Zhou, Xi; Guo, Deyin; Chen, Yu

    2015-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a process of eukaryotic posttranscriptional gene silencing that functions in antiviral immunity in plants, nematodes, and insects. However, recent studies provided strong supports that RNAi also plays a role in antiviral mechanism in mammalian cells. To combat RNAi-mediated antiviral responses, many viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSR) to facilitate their replication. VSRs have been widely studied for plant and insect viruses, but only a few have been defined for mammalian viruses currently. We identified a novel VSR from coronaviruses, a group of medically important mammalian viruses including Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and showed that the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of coronaviruses suppresses RNAi triggered by either short hairpin RNAs or small interfering RNAs in mammalian cells. Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) is closely related to SARS-CoV in the family Coronaviridae and was used as a coronavirus replication model. The replication of MHV increased when the N proteins were expressed in trans, while knockdown of Dicer1 or Ago2 transcripts facilitated the MHV replication in mammalian cells. These results support the hypothesis that RNAi is a part of the antiviral immunity responses in mammalian cells. IMPORTANCE RNAi has been well known to play important antiviral roles from plants to invertebrates. However, recent studies provided strong supports that RNAi is also involved in antiviral response in mammalian cells. An important indication for RNAi-mediated antiviral activity in mammals is the fact that a number of mammalian viruses encode potent suppressors of RNA silencing. Our results demonstrate that coronavirus N protein could function as a VSR through its double-stranded RNA binding activity. Mutational analysis of N protein allowed us to find out the critical residues for the VSR activity. Using the MHV-A59 as the coronavirus replication model, we showed that ectopic expression

  14. Single aromatic residue location alters nucleic acid binding and chaperone function of FIV nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Wei; Naiyer, Nada; Fichtenbaum, Eric; Qualley, Dominic F.; McCauley, Micah J.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Williams, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a retrovirus that infects domestic cats, and is an excellent animal model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis. The nucleocapsid (NC) protein is critical for replication in both retroviruses. FIV NC has several structural features that differ from HIV-1 NC. While both NC proteins have a single conserved aromatic residue in each of the two zinc fingers, the aromatic residue on the second finger of FIV NC is located on the opposite C-terminal side relative to its location in HIV-1 NC. In addition, whereas HIV-1 NC has a highly charged cationic N-terminal tail and a relatively short C-terminal extension, the opposite is true for FIV NC. To probe the impact of these differences on the nucleic acid (NA) binding and chaperone properties of FIV NC, we carried out ensemble and single-molecule assays with wild-type (WT) and mutant proteins. The ensemble studies show that FIV NC binding to DNA is strongly electrostatic, with a higher effective charge than that observed for HIV-1 NC. The C-terminal basic domain contributes significantly to the NA binding capability of FIV NC. In addition, the non-electrostatic component of DNA binding is much weaker for FIV NC than for HIV-1 NC. Mutation of both aromatic residues in the zinc fingers to Ala (F12A/W44A) further increases the effective charge of FIV NC and reduces its non-electrostatic binding affinity. Interestingly, switching the location of the C-terminal aromatic residue to mimic the HIV-1 NC sequence (N31W/W44A) reduces the effective charge of FIV NC and increases its non-electrostatic binding affinity to values similar to HIV-1 NC. Consistent with the results of these ensemble studies, single-molecule DNA stretching studies show that while WT FIV NC has reduced stacking capability relative to HIV-1 NC, the aromatic switch mutant recovers the ability to intercalate between the DNA bases. Our results demonstrate that altering the position of a single aromatic

  15. Identification of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus ac93 as a core gene and its requirement for intranuclear microvesicle formation and nuclear egress of nucleocapsids.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Meijin; Huang, Zhenqiu; Wei, Denghui; Hu, Zhaoyang; Yang, Kai; Pang, Yi

    2011-11-01

    Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) orf93 (ac93) is a highly conserved uncharacterized gene that is found in all of the sequenced baculovirus genomes except for Culex nigripalpus NPV. In this report, using bioinformatics analyses, ac93 and odv-e25 (ac94) were identified as baculovirus core genes and thus p33-ac93-odv-e25 represent a cluster of core genes. To investigate the role of ac93 in the baculovirus life cycle, an ac93 knockout AcMNPV bacmid was constructed via homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Fluorescence and light microscopy showed that the AcMNPV ac93 knockout did not spread by infection, and titration assays confirmed a defect in budded virus (BV) production. However, deletion of ac93 did not affect viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy indicated that ac93 was required for the egress of nucleocapsids from the nucleus and the formation of intranuclear microvesicles, which are precursor structures of occlusion-derived virus (ODV) envelopes. Immunofluorescence analyses showed that Ac93 was concentrated toward the cytoplasmic membrane in the cytoplasm and in the nuclear ring zone in the nucleus. Western blot analyses showed that Ac93 was associated with both nucleocapsid and envelope fractions of BV, but only the nucleocapsid fraction of ODV. Our results suggest that ac93, although not previously recognized as a core gene, is one that plays an essential role in the formation of the ODV envelope and the egress of nucleocapsids from the nucleus.

  16. An eriophyid mite-transmitted plant virus contains eight genomic RNA segments with unusual heterogeneity in the nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; McMechan, Anthony J; Wosula, Everlyne N; Wegulo, Stephen N; Graybosch, Robert A; French, Roy; Hein, Gary L

    2014-10-01

    Eriophyid mite-transmitted, multipartite, negative-sense RNA plant viruses with membrane-bound spherical virions are classified in the genus Emaravirus. We report here that the eriophyid mite-transmitted Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), an Emaravirus, contains eight genomic RNA segments, the most in a known negative-sense RNA plant virus. Remarkably, two RNA 3 consensus sequences, encoding the nucleocapsid protein, were found with 12.5% sequence divergence, while no heterogeneity was observed in the consensus sequences of additional genomic RNA segments. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, glycoprotein precursor, nucleocapsid, and P4 proteins of WMoV exhibited limited sequence homology with the orthologous proteins of other emaraviruses, while proteins encoded by additional genomic RNA segments displayed no significant homology with proteins reported in GenBank, suggesting that the genus Emaravirus evolved further with a divergent octapartite genome. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that WMoV formed an evolutionary link between members of the Emaravirus genus and the family Bunyaviridae. Furthermore, genomic-length virus- and virus-complementary (vc)-sense strands of all WMoV genomic RNAs accumulated asymmetrically in infected wheat, with 10- to 20-fold more virus-sense genomic RNAs than vc-sense RNAs. These data further confirm the octapartite negative-sense polarity of the WMoV genome. In WMoV-infected wheat, subgenomic-length mRNAs of vc sense were detected for genomic RNAs 3, 4, 7, and 8 but not for other RNA species, suggesting that the open reading frames present in the complementary sense of genomic RNAs are expressed through subgenomic- or near-genomic-length vc-sense mRNAs. Importance: Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), an Emaravirus, is the causal agent of High Plains disease of wheat and maize. In this study, we demonstrated that the genome of WMoV comprises eight negative-sense RNA segments with an unusual sequence polymorphism in an RNA encoding the nucleocapsid protein

  17. Model-based structural and functional characterization of the Rice stripe tenuivirus nucleocapsid protein interacting with viral genomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; Li, Jia; Zhou, Yijun; Zhou, Xueping; Tao, Xiaorong

    2017-03-27

    Rice stripe tenuivirus (RSV) is a filamentous, negative-strand RNA virus causing severe diseases on rice in Asian countries. The viral particle is composed predominantly of a nucleocapsid protein (NP) and genomic RNA. However, the molecular details of how the RSV NP interacts with genomic RNA during particle assembly remain largely unknown. Here, we modeled the NP-RNA complex and show that polar amino acids within a predicted groove of NP are critical for RNA binding and protecting the RNA from RNase digestion. RSV NP formed pentamers, hexamers, heptamers, and octamers. By modeling the higher-order structures, we found that oligomer formation was driven by the N-terminal amino arm of the NP. Deletion of this arm abolished oligomerization; the N-terminally truncated NP was less able to interact with RNA and protect RNA than was the wild type. These findings afford valuable new insights into molecular mechanism of RSV NPs interacting with genomic RNA.

  18. Epitopes and nuclear localization analyses of canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein by expression of its deletion mutants.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, E; Shin, Y S; Iwatsuki, K; Gemma, T; Miyashita, N; Tomonaga, K; Hirayama, N; Mikami, T; Kai, C

    1999-05-01

    A series of nucleocapsid protein (NP)-deleted genes of the Onderstepoort strain was constructed in order to locate antigenic regions of the NP of canine distemper virus. The expression of proteins from 5'-deleted NP genes was examined in COS-7 cells by indirect immunofluorescence assay using three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), c-5, f-5 and h-6, and a rabbit serum against NP. These MAbs reacted with two regions of NP. Amino acid residues from 1 to 80, and 337-358, were necessary and sufficient for formation of the epitopes identified by MAbs f-5 and h-6, and c-5, respectively. The proteins translated from intact or 3'-deleted genes were found to be localized in the nuclei of COS-7 cells, whereas the proteins from the 5'-deleted genes were mainly detected in the cytoplasm. These results suggested that 80 amino acid residues at the N-terminus are required for transportation of NP into the nucleus.

  19. Evaluation of ELISA based on the conserved and functional middle region of nucleocapsid protein to detect distemper infection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Latha, D; Geetha, M; Ramadass, P; Narayanan, R B

    2007-03-10

    A 287bp fragment from the middle region of the nucleocapsid protein of canine distemper virus (CDV) was amplified from the conjunctival samples of distemper-infected dogs and was cloned into pRSET B vector. The recombinant protein was expressed as a 16-kDa-fusion protein with histidine tag in E. coli. Sera of distemper-infected and vaccinated dogs contained IgG antibodies against the purified recombinant protein as observed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and showed a strong correlation (r=0.882, p<0.0001 at 95% CI) and good agreement (kappa=0.718) with the conventional tissue culture viral antigen based ELISA. Further, the results of recombinant protein based ELISA and Western blotting with the sera from the infected and vaccinated dogs correlated well (kappa=0.8226). These findings recommend the use of the recombinant protein in the serodiagnosis of canine distemper virus infection in dogs.

  20. Cloning and characterization of DNA complementary to the canine distemper virus mRNA encoding matrix, phosphoprotein, and nucleocapsid protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenblatt, S.; Eizenberg, O.; Englund, G.; Bellini, W.J.

    1985-02-01

    Double-stranded cDNA synthesized from total polyadenylate-containing mRNA, extracted from monkey kidney cells infected with canine distemper virus (CDV), has been cloned into the PstI site of Escherichia coli plasmid pBR322. Clones containing canine distemper virus DNA were identified by hybridization to a canine distemper virus-specific, /sup 32/P-labeled cDNA. Four specific clones containing different classes of sequences have been identified. The cloned plasmids contain inserts of 800 (clone 44-80), 960 (clone 74-16), 1700 (clone 364), and 950 (clone 40-9) base pairs. The sizes of the mRNA species complementary to these inserts are 1500, 1850, 1850 and 2500 nucleotides, respectively, as determined by the Northern technique. Three of the cloned DNA fragments were further identified as the reverse transcripts of the mRNA coding for the matrix, phosphoprotein, and nucleocapsid protein of CDV.

  1. Roles of Phosphorylation of the Nucleocapsid Protein of Mumps Virus in Regulating Viral RNA Transcription and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Zengel, James; Pickar, Adrian; Xu, Pei; Lin, Alita

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mumps virus (MuV) is a paramyxovirus with a negative-sense nonsegmented RNA genome. The viral RNA genome is encapsidated by the nucleocapsid protein (NP) to form the ribonucleoprotein (RNP), which serves as a template for transcription and replication. In this study, we investigated the roles of phosphorylation sites of NP in MuV RNA synthesis. Using radioactive labeling, we first demonstrated that NP was phosphorylated in MuV-infected cells. Using both liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and in silico modeling, we identified nine putative phosphorylated residues within NP. We mutated these nine residues to alanine. Mutation of the serine residue at position 439 to alanine (S439A) was found to reduce the phosphorylation of NP in transfected cells by over 90%. The effects of these mutations on the MuV minigenome system were examined. The S439A mutant was found to have higher activity, four mutants had lower activity, and four mutants had similar activity compared to wild-type NP. MuV containing the S439A mutation had 90% reduced phosphorylation of NP and enhanced viral RNA synthesis and viral protein expression at early time points after infection, indicating that S439 is the major phosphorylation site of NP and its phosphorylation plays an important role in downregulating viral RNA synthesis. IMPORTANCE Mumps virus (MuV), a paramyxovirus, is an important human pathogen that is reemerging in human populations. Nucleocapsid protein (NP) of MuV is essential for viral RNA synthesis. We have identified the major phosphorylation site of NP. We have found that phosphorylation of NP plays a critical role in regulating viral RNA synthesis. The work will lead to a better understanding of viral RNA synthesis and possible novel targets for antiviral drug development. PMID:25948749

  2. Molecular basis for the wide range of affinity found in Csr/Rsm protein-RNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Duss, Olivier; Michel, Erich; Diarra dit Konté, Nana; Schubert, Mario; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2014-04-01

    The carbon storage regulator/regulator of secondary metabolism (Csr/Rsm) type of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) is widespread throughout bacteria and acts by sequestering the global translation repressor protein CsrA/RsmE from the ribosome binding site of a subset of mRNAs. Although we have previously described the molecular basis of a high affinity RNA target bound to RsmE, it remains unknown how other lower affinity targets are recognized by the same protein. Here, we have determined the nuclear magnetic resonance solution structures of five separate GGA binding motifs of the sRNA RsmZ of Pseudomonas fluorescens in complex with RsmE. The structures explain how the variation of sequence and structural context of the GGA binding motifs modulate the binding affinity for RsmE by five orders of magnitude (∼10 nM to ∼3 mM, Kd). Furthermore, we see that conformational adaptation of protein side-chains and RNA enable recognition of different RNA sequences by the same protein contributing to binding affinity without conferring specificity. Overall, our findings illustrate how the variability in the Csr/Rsm protein-RNA recognition allows a fine-tuning of the competition between mRNAs and sRNAs for the CsrA/RsmE protein.

  3. A model for the dynamic nuclear/nucleolar/cytoplasmic trafficking of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) nucleocapsid protein based on live cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    You, Jae-Hwan; Howell, Gareth; Pattnaik, Asit K.; Osorio, Fernando A.; Hiscox, Julian A.

    2008-08-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), an arterivirus, in common with many other positive strand RNA viruses, encodes a nucleocapsid (N) protein which can localise not only to the cytoplasm but also to the nucleolus in virus-infected cells and cells over-expressing N protein. The dynamic trafficking of positive strand RNA virus nucleocapsid proteins and PRRSV N protein in particular between the cytoplasm and nucleolus is unknown. In this study live imaging of permissive and non-permissive cell lines, in conjunction with photo-bleaching (FRAP and FLIP), was used to investigate the trafficking of fluorescent labeled (EGFP) PRRSV-N protein. The data indicated that EGFP-PRRSV-N protein was not permanently sequestered to the nucleolus and had equivalent mobility to cellular nucleolar proteins. Further the nuclear import of N protein appeared to occur faster than nuclear export, which may account for the observed relative distribution of N protein between the cytoplasm and the nucleolus.

  4. Development and Application of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Expressed Nucleocapsid Protein-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detection of Antibodies against Infectious Bronchitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gibertoni, Aliandra M.; Montassier, Maria de Fátima S.; Sena, Janete A. D.; Givisiez, Patrícia E. N.; Furuyama, Cibele R. A. G.; Montassier, Hélio J.

    2005-01-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae-expressed nucleocapsid (N) polypeptide of the M41 strain of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) was used as antigen in a recombinant yeast-expressed N protein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Y-N-ELISA). The Y-N-ELISA was rapid, sensitive, and specific for detecting chicken serum antibodies to IBV, and it compared favorably with a commercial ELISA. PMID:15815038

  5. Baculovirus Expression of the Small Genome Segment of Hantaan Virus and Potential Use of the Expressed Nucleocapsid Protein as a Diagnostic Antigen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    to hantaviruses have been detected in rodents throughout most of the world, both in areas where HFRS is endemic and in regions where it has not been...evidence that the expressed nucleocapsid protein may be useful for the detection of antibodies to hantaviruses . METHODS Viruses, cells, and cDNA clones...sera (Table 1). Diagnostic potential of the expressed protein for hantaviruses other than Hantaan virus More than one hantavirus capable of causing HFRS

  6. A protein ballet around the viral genome orchestrated by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase leads to an architectural switch: from nucleocapsid-condensed RNA to Vpr-bridged DNA.

    PubMed

    Lyonnais, Sébastien; Gorelick, Robert J; Heniche-Boukhalfa, Fatima; Bouaziz, Serge; Parissi, Vincent; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Restle, Tobias; Gatell, Jose Maria; Le Cam, Eric; Mirambeau, Gilles

    2013-02-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcription is achieved in the newly infected cell before viral DNA (vDNA) nuclear import. Reverse transcriptase (RT) has previously been shown to function as a molecular motor, dismantling the nucleocapsid complex that binds the viral genome as soon as plus-strand DNA synthesis initiates. We first propose a detailed model of this dismantling in close relationship with the sequential conversion from RNA to double-stranded (ds) DNA, focusing on the nucleocapsid protein (NCp7). The HIV-1 DNA-containing pre-integration complex (PIC) resulting from completion of reverse transcription is translocated through the nuclear pore. The PIC nucleoprotein architecture is poorly understood but contains at least two HIV-1 proteins initially from the virion core, namely integrase (IN) and the viral protein r (Vpr). We next present a set of electron micrographs supporting that Vpr behaves as a DNA architectural protein, initiating multiple DNA bridges over more than 500 base pairs (bp). These complexes are shown to interact with NCp7 bound to single-stranded nucleic acid regions that are thought to maintain IN binding during dsDNA synthesis, concurrently with nucleocapsid complex dismantling. This unexpected binding of Vpr conveniently leads to a compacted but filamentous folding of the vDNA that should favor its nuclear import. Finally, nucleocapsid-like aggregates engaged in dsDNA synthesis appear to efficiently bind to F-actin filaments, a property that may be involved in targeting complexes to the nuclear envelope. More generally, this article highlights unique possibilities offered by in vitro reconstitution approaches combined with macromolecular imaging to gain insights into the mechanisms that alter the nucleoprotein architecture of the HIV-1 genome, ultimately enabling its insertion into the nuclear chromatin.

  7. Label-Free Protein-RNA Interactome Analysis Identifies Khsrp Signaling Downstream of the p38/Mk2 Kinase Complex as a Critical Modulator of Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Anna; Riabinska, Arina; Thelen, Lisa; Peifer, Martin; Leeser, Uschi; Nuernberg, Peter; Altmueller, Janine; Gaestel, Matthias; Dieterich, Christoph; Reinhardt, H. Christian

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a key role for RNA binding proteins (RBPs) in genome stability programs. Additionally, recent developments in RNA sequencing technologies, as well as mass-spectrometry techniques, have greatly expanded our knowledge on protein-RNA interactions. We here use full transcriptome sequencing and label-free LC/MS/MS to identify global changes in protein-RNA interactions in response to etoposide-induced genotoxic stress. We show that RBPs have distinct binding patterns in response to genotoxic stress and that inactivation of the RBP regulator module, p38/MK2, can affect the entire spectrum of protein-RNA interactions that take place in response to stress. In addition to validating the role of known RBPs like Srsf1, Srsf2, Elavl1 in the genotoxic stress response, we add a new collection of RBPs to the DNA damage response. We identify Khsrp as a highly regulated RBP in response to genotoxic stress and further validate its role as a driver of the G1/S transition through the suppression of Cdkn1aP21 transcripts. Finally, we identify KHSRP as an indicator of overall survival, as well as disease free survival in glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:25993413

  8. SPOT-Seq-RNA: predicting protein-RNA complex structure and RNA-binding function by fold recognition and binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuedong; Zhao, Huiying; Wang, Jihua; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play key roles in RNA metabolism and post-transcriptional regulation. Computational methods have been developed separately for prediction of RBPs and RNA-binding residues by machine-learning techniques and prediction of protein-RNA complex structures by rigid or semiflexible structure-to-structure docking. Here, we describe a template-based technique called SPOT-Seq-RNA that integrates prediction of RBPs, RNA-binding residues, and protein-RNA complex structures into a single package. This integration is achieved by combining template-based structure-prediction software, SPARKS X, with binding affinity prediction software, DRNA. This tool yields reasonable sensitivity (46 %) and high precision (84 %) for an independent test set of 215 RBPs and 5,766 non-RBPs. SPOT-Seq-RNA is computationally efficient for genome-scale prediction of RBPs and protein-RNA complex structures. Its application to human genome study has revealed a similar sensitivity and ability to uncover hundreds of novel RBPs beyond simple homology. The online server and downloadable version of SPOT-Seq-RNA are available at http://sparks-lab.org/server/SPOT-Seq-RNA/.

  9. The ϕ6 Cystovirus Protein P7 Becomes Accessible to Antibodies in the Transcribing Nucleocapsid: A Probe for Viral Structural Elements

    PubMed Central

    Alimova, Alexandra; Wei, Hui; Katz, Al; Spatz, Linda; Gottlieb, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Protein P7 is a component of the cystovirus viral polymerase complex. In the unpackaged procapsid, the protein is situated in close proximity to the viral directed RNA polymerase, P2. Cryo-electron microscopy difference maps from the species ϕ6 procapsid have demonstrated that P7 and P2 likely interact prior to viral RNA packaging. The location of P7 in the post-packaged nucleocapsid (NC) remains unknown. P7 may translocate closer to the five-fold axis of a filled procapsid but this has not been directly visualized. We propose that monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) can be selected that serve as probe- reagents for viral assembly and structure. A set of Mabs have been isolated that recognize and bind to the ϕ6 P7. The antibody set contains five unique Mabs, four of which recognize a linear epitope and one which recognizes a conformational epitope. The four unique Mabs that recognize a linear epitope display restricted utilization of Vκ and VH genes. The restricted genetic range among 4 of the 5 antibodies implies that the antibody repertoire is limited. The limitation could be the consequence of a paucity of exposed antigenic sites on the ϕ6 P7 surface. It is further demonstrated that within ϕ6 nucleocapsids that are primed for early-phase transcription, P7 is partially accessible to the Mabs, indicating that the nucleocapsid shell (protein P8) has undergone partial disassembly exposing the protein’s antigenic sites. PMID:25799314

  10. Open reading frame 94 of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus encodes a novel conserved occlusion-derived virion protein, ODV-EC43.

    PubMed

    Fang, Minggang; Wang, Hanzhong; Wang, Hualin; Yuan, Li; Chen, Xinwen; Vlak, Just M; Hu, Zhihong

    2003-11-01

    Open reading frame 94 (Ha94) of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HaSNPV) is 1086 bp long and a homologue of Autographa californica multiple NPV ORF109. The gene is conserved among all baculoviruses whose genomes have been completely sequenced so far and is thus considered a baculovirus core gene. Ha94 transcripts were detected from 24 to 96 h post-infection (p.i.) of HzAM1 cells with HaSNPV. Polyclonal antiserum raised to a GST-HA94 fusion protein recognized a 43 kDa protein, HA94, in infected cell lysates from 36 to 96 h p.i., suggesting that Ha94 is a late gene. Western blot analysis of proteins present in budded virus and occlusion-derived virus (ODV) showed that Ha94 encodes a structural component of ODV. When ODVs were fractionated further into nucleocapsid and envelope components, Western blot analysis indicated that the encoded protein was associated with both the nucleocapsid and the envelope. In summary, data available indicated that Ha94 encodes a novel ODV-specific protein of HaSNPV, designated ODV-EC43.

  11. The humoral immune response to recombinant nucleocapsid antigen of canine distemper virus in dogs vaccinated with attenuated distemper virus or DNA encoding the nucleocapsid of wild-type virus.

    PubMed

    Griot-Wenk, M E; Cherpillod, P; Koch, A; Zurbriggen, R; Bruckner, L; Wittek, R; Zurbriggen, A

    2001-06-01

    This study compared the humoral immune response against the nucleocapsid-(N) protein of canine distemper virus (CDV) of dogs vaccinated with a multivalent vaccine against parvo-, adeno-, and parainfluenza virus and leptospira combined with either the attenuated CDV Onderstepoort strain (n = 15) or an expression plasmid containing the N-gene of CDV (n = 30). The vaccinations were applied intramuscularly three times at 2-week intervals beginning at the age of 6 weeks. None of the pre-immune sera recognized the recombinant N-protein, confirming the lack of maternal antibodies at this age. Immunization with DNA vaccine for CDV resulted in positive serum N-specific IgG response. However, their IgG (and IgA) titres were lower than those of CDV-vaccinated dogs. Likewise, DNA-vaccinated dogs did not show an IgM peak. There was no increase in N-specific serum IgE titres in either group. Serum titres to the other multivalent vaccine components were similar in both groups.

  12. Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus orf132 Encodes a Nucleocapsid-Associated Protein Required for Budded-Virus and Multiply Enveloped Occlusion-Derived Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Wang, Shuo; Yue, Xiu-Li

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus orf132 (named ac132) has homologs in all genome-sequenced group I nucleopolyhedroviruses. Its role in the viral replication cycle is unknown. In this study, ac132 was shown to express a protein of around 28 kDa, which was determined to be associated with the nucleocapsids of both occlusion-derived virus and budded virus. Confocal microscopy showed that AC132 protein appeared in central region of the nucleus as early as 12 h postinfection with the virus. It formed a ring zone at the periphery of the nucleus by 24 h postinfection. To investigate its role in virus replication, ac132 was deleted from the viral genome by using a bacmid system. In the Sf9 cell culture transfected by the ac132 knockout bacmid, infection was restricted to single cells, and the titer of infectious budded virus was reduced to an undetectable level. However, viral DNA replication and the expression of late genes vp39 and odv-e25 and a reporter gene under the control of the very late gene p10 promoter were unaffected. Electron microscopy showed that nucleocapsids, virions, and occlusion bodies were synthesized in the cells transfected by an ac132 knockout bacmid, but the formation of the virogenic stroma and occlusion bodies was delayed, the numbers of enveloped nucleocapsids were reduced, and the occlusion bodies contained mainly singly enveloped nucleocapsids. AC132 was found to interact with envelope protein ODV-E18 and the viral DNA-binding protein P6.9. The data from this study suggest that ac132 possibly plays an important role in the assembly and envelopment of nucleocapsids. IMPORTANCE To our knowledge, this is the first report on a functional analysis of ac132. The data presented here demonstrate that ac132 is required for production of the budded virus and multiply enveloped occlusion-derived virus of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus. This article reveals unique phenotypic changes induced by ac132

  13. The Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus ac54 Gene Is Crucial for Localization of the Major Capsid Protein VP39 at the Site of Nucleocapsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhanwen; Zhong, Ling; Li, Chunyan; Wu, Wenbi; Yuan, Meijin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Baculovirus DNAs are synthesized and inserted into preformed capsids to form nucleocapsids at a site in the infected cell nucleus, termed the virogenic stroma. Nucleocapsid assembly of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) requires the major capsid protein VP39 and nine minor capsid proteins, including VP1054. However, how VP1054 participates in nucleocapsid assembly remains elusive. In this study, the VP1054-encoding gene (ac54) was deleted to generate the ac54-knockout AcMNPV (vAc54KO). In vAc54KO-transfected cells, nucleocapsid assembly was disrupted, leading to the formation of abnormally elongated capsid structures. Interestingly, unlike cells transfected with AcMNPV mutants lacking other minor capsid proteins, in which capsid structures were distributed within the virogenic stroma, ac54 ablation resulted in a distinctive location of capsid structures and VP39 at the periphery of the nucleus. The altered distribution pattern of capsid structures was also observed in cells transfected with AcMNPV lacking BV/ODV-C42 or in cytochalasin d-treated AcMNPV-infected cells. BV/ODV-C42, along with PP78/83, has been shown to promote nuclear filamentous actin (F-actin) formation, which is another requisite for nucleocapsid assembly. Immunofluorescence using phalloidin indicated that the formation and distribution of nuclear F-actin were not affected by ac54 deletion. However, immunoelectron microscopy revealed that BV/ODV-C42, PP78/83, and 38K failed to integrate into capsid structures in the absence of VP1054, and immunoprecipitation further demonstrated that in transient expression assays, VP1054 interacted with BV/ODV-C42 and VP80 but not VP39. Our findings suggest that VP1054 plays an important role in the transport of capsid proteins to the nucleocapsid assembly site prior to the process of nucleocapsid assembly. IMPORTANCE Baculoviruses are large DNA viruses whose replication occurs within the host nucleus. The localization of

  14. Intra-tRNA distance measurements for nucleocapsid proteindependent tRNA unwinding during priming of HIV reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Chan, B; Weidemaier, K; Yip, W T; Barbara, P F; Musier-Forsyth, K

    1999-01-19

    We report here the direct measurement of intra-tRNA distances during annealing of the tRNA primer to the HIV RNA genome. This key step in the initiation of retroviral reverse transcription involves hybridization of one strand of the acceptor arm of a specific lysine tRNA to the primer binding site on the RNA genome. Although the mechanism of tRNA unwinding and annealing is not known, previous studies have shown that HIV nucleocapsid protein (NC) greatly accelerates primer/template binary complex formation in vitro. An open question is whether NC alone unwinds the primer or whether unwinding by NC requires the RNA genome. We monitored the annealing process in solution by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Distance measurements demonstrate unequivocally that the tRNA acceptor stem is not substantially unwound by NC in the absence of the RNA genome, that is, unwinding is not separable from hybridization. Moreover, FRET measurements show that both heat- and NC-mediated annealing result in an approximately 40-A increase in the separation of the two ends of the tRNA acceptor arm on binding to the template. This large increase in separation of the two ends suggests a complete displacement of the nonhybridized strand of the acceptor stem in the initiation complex.

  15. The Identification and Characterization of Two Novel Epitopes on the Nucleocapsid Protein of the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kang; Xie, Chun; Zhang, Jianan; Zhang, Wenchao; Yang, Deqiang; Yu, Lingxue; Jiang, Yifeng; Yang, Shen; Gao, Fei; Yang, Zhibiao; Zhou, Yanjun; Tong, Guangzhi

    2016-01-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a highly contagious coronavirus that causes severe diarrhea and death, particularly in neonatal piglets. The nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of PEDV presents strong immunogenicity and contributes to the cross-reactivity between PEDV and TGEV. However, the characterization of epitopes on the PEDV N protein remains largely unknown. Here, two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to the N protein of a PEDV strain, FJzz1/2011, were generated and screened against a partially overlapping library of 24 GST-fusion N protein-truncated constructs. We confirmed that residues 18–133 (designated NEP-D4) and residues 252–262 (designated NEP-D6) were the epitopes targeted by MAbs PN-D4 and PN-D6, respectively. Sequence analysis revealed that these two epitopes were highly conserved among PEDV strains but were significantly different from other members of the Coronavirinae subfamily. Western blot analysis showed that they could be specifically recognized by PEDV antisera but could not be recognized by TGEV hyperimmune antisera. Indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) assays confirmed no cross-reaction between these two MAbs and TGEV. In addition, the freeze-thaw cycle and protease treatment results indicated that NEP-D4 was intrinsically disordered. All these results suggest that these two novel epitopes and their cognate MAbs could serve as the basis for the development of precise diagnostic assays for PEDV. PMID:27991537

  16. Identification of a novel canine distemper virus B-cell epitope using a monoclonal antibody against nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Li; Cheng, Yuening; Zhang, Miao; Cao, Zhigang; Tong, Mingwei; Wang, Jianke; Zhao, Hang; Lin, Peng; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-02-02

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a member of the genus Morbillivirus within the family Paramyxoviridae and has caused severe economic losses in China. Nucleocapsid protein (N) is the major structural viral protein and can be used to diagnose CDV and other morbilliviruses. In this study, a specific monoclonal antibody, 1N8, was produced against the CDV N protein (amino acids 277-471). A linear N protein epitope was identified by subjecting a series of partially overlapping synthesized peptides to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. The results indicated that (350)LNFGRSYFDPA(360) was the minimal linear epitope that could be recognized by mAb 1N8. ELISA assays revealed that mouse anti-CDV sera could also recognize the minimal linear epitope. Alignment analysis of the amino acid sequences indicated that the epitope was highly conserved among CDV strains. Furthermore, the epitope was conserved among other morbilliviruses, which was confirmed with PRRV using western blotting. Taken together, the results of this study may have potential applications in the development of suitable diagnostic techniques for CDV or other morbilliviruses.

  17. Synergistic inhibition in cell-cell fusion mediated by the matrix and nucleocapsid protein of canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Dominique; Plattet, Philippe; Cherpillod, Pascal; Zipperle, Ljerka; Doherr, Marcus G; Vandevelde, Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas

    2007-11-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes a chronic, demyelinating, progressive or relapsing neurological disease in dogs, because CDV persists in the CNS. Persistence of virulent CDV, such as the A75/17 strain has been reproduced in cell cultures where it is associated with a non-cytolytic infection with very limited cell-cell fusion. This is in sharp contrast to attenuated CDV infection in cell cultures, such as the Onderstepoort (OP) CDV strain, which produces extensive fusion activity and cytolysis. Fusion efficiency may be determined by the structure of the viral fusion protein per se but also by its interaction with other structural proteins of CDV. This was studied by combining genes derived from persistent and non-persistent CDV strains in transient transfection experiments. It was found that fusion efficiency was markedly attenuated by the structure of the fusion protein of the neurovirulent A75/17-CDV. Moreover, we showed that the interaction of the surface glycoproteins with the M protein of the persistent strain greatly influenced fusion activity. Site directed mutagenesis showed that the c-terminus of the M protein is of particular importance in this respect. Interestingly, although the nucleocapsid protein alone did not affect F/H-induced cell-cell fusion, maximal inhibition occurred when the latter was added to combined glycoproteins with matrix protein. Thus, the present study suggests that very limited fusogenicity in virulent CDV infection, which favours persistence by limiting cell destruction involves complex interactions between all viral structural proteins.

  18. HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Mimics the Membrane Adaptor Syntenin PDZ to Gain Access to ESCRTs and Promote Virus Budding.

    PubMed

    Sette, Paola; O'Connor, Sarah K; Yerramilli, V Siddartha; Dussupt, Vincent; Nagashima, Kunio; Chutiraka, Kasana; Lingappa, Jaisri; Scarlata, Suzanne; Bouamr, Fadila

    2016-03-09

    HIV-1 recruits cellular endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) to bud virions from the membrane. Disruption of the viral nucleocapsid (NC) domain integrity affects HIV-1 budding. However, the molecular mechanisms of NC's involvement in HIV budding remain unclear. We find that NC mimics the PDZ domains of syntenin, a membrane-binding adaptor involved in cell-to-cell contact/communication, to capture the Bro1 domain of ALIX, which is an ESCRTs recruiting cellular adaptor. NC binds membranes via basic residues in either the distal or proximal zinc fingers, and NC-membrane binding is essential for Bro1 capture and HIV-1 budding. Removal of RNA enhances NC membrane binding, suggesting a dynamic competition between membrane lipids and RNA for the same binding sites in NC. Remarkably, syntenin PDZ can substitute for NC function in HIV-1 budding. Thus, NC mimics syntenin PDZs to function as a membrane-binding adaptor critical for HIV-1 budding at specific microdomains of the membrane.

  19. HIV-1 Nucleocapsid mimics the membrane adaptor Syntenin to gain access to ESCRTs and promote virus budding

    PubMed Central

    Sette, Paola; O’Connor, Sarah K.; Yerramilli, V. Siddartha; Dussupt, Vincent; Nagashima, Kunio; Chutiraka, Kasana; Lingappa, Jaisri; Scarlata, Suzanne; Bouamr, Fadila

    2016-01-01

    Summary HIV-1 recruits cellular Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport (ESCRTs) to bud virions from the membrane. Disruption of the viral nucleocapsid (NC) domain integrity affects HIV-1 budding. However, the molecular mechanisms of NC’s involvement in HIV budding remain unclear. We find that NC mimics the PDZ domains of syntenin, a membrane-binding adaptor involved in cell-to-cell contact/communication, to capture the Bro1 domain of ALIX, which is an ESCRTs recruiting cellular adaptor. NC binds membranes via basic residues in either the distal or proximal zinc fingers and NC-membrane binding is essential for Bro1 capture and HIV-1 budding. Removal of RNA enhances NC membrane binding suggesting a dynamic competition between membrane lipids and RNA for same binding sites in NC. Remarkably, syntenin PDZ can substitute for NC function in HIV-1 budding. Thus, NC mimics syntenin PDZs to function as a membrane-binding adaptor critical for HIV-1 budding at microdomains of the membrane. PMID:26962944

  20. Structure and Function Analysis of Nucleocapsid Protein of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Interacting with RNA Using Homology Modeling*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Feng, Zhike; Wu, Jianyan; Huang, Ying; Lu, Gang; Zhu, Min; Wang, Bi; Mao, Xiang; Tao, Xiaorong

    2015-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) plays key roles in assembling genomic RNA into ribonucleoprotein (RNP), which serves as a template for both viral gene transcription and genome replication. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of how TSWV N interacts with genomic RNA. In this study, we demonstrated that TSWV N protein forms a range of higher ordered oligomers. Analysis of the RNA binding behavior of N protein revealed that no specific oligomer binds to RNA preferentially, instead each type of N oligomer is able to bind RNA. To better characterize the structure and function of N protein interacting with RNA, we constructed homology models of TSWV N and N-RNA complexes. Based on these homology models, we demonstrated that the positively charged and polar amino acids in its predicted surface cleft of TSWV N are critical for RNA binding. Moreover, by N-RNA homology modeling, we found that the RNA component is deeply embedded in the predicted protein cleft; consistently, TSWV N-RNA complexes are relatively resistant to digestion by RNase. Collectively, using homology modeling, we determined the RNA binding sites on N and found a new protective feature for N protein. Our findings also provide novel insights into the molecular details of the interaction of TSWV N with RNA components. PMID:25540203

  1. Functional and Structural Characterization of Novel Type of Linker Connecting Capsid and Nucleocapsid Protein Domains in Murine Leukemia Virus.

    PubMed

    Doležal, Michal; Hadravová, Romana; Kožíšek, Milan; Bednárová, Lucie; Langerová, Hana; Ruml, Tomáš; Rumlová, Michaela

    2016-09-23

    The assembly of immature retroviral particles is initiated in the cytoplasm by the binding of the structural polyprotein precursor Gag with viral genomic RNA. The protein interactions necessary for assembly are mediated predominantly by the capsid (CA) and nucleocapsid (NC) domains, which have conserved structures. In contrast, the structural arrangement of the CA-NC connecting region differs between retroviral species. In HIV-1 and Rous sarcoma virus, this region forms a rod-like structure that separates the CA and NC domains, whereas in Mason-Pfizer monkey virus, this region is densely packed, thus holding the CA and NC domains in close proximity. Interestingly, the sequence connecting the CA and NC domains in gammaretroviruses, such as murine leukemia virus (MLV), is unique. The sequence is called a charged assembly helix (CAH) due to a high number of positively and negatively charged residues. Although both computational and deletion analyses suggested that the MLV CAH forms a helical conformation, no structural or biochemical data supporting this hypothesis have been published. Using an in vitro assembly assay, alanine scanning mutagenesis, and biophysical techniques (circular dichroism, NMR, microcalorimetry, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay), we have characterized the structure and function of the MLV CAH. We provide experimental evidence that the MLV CAH belongs to a group of charged, E(R/K)-rich, single α-helices. This is the first single α-helix motif identified in viral proteins.

  2. Development of a recombinant truncated nucleocapsid protein based immunoassay for detection of antibodies against human coronavirus OC43.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Elisabeth G; Miao, Congrong; Haupt, Thomas E; Anderson, Larry J; Haynes, Lia M

    2011-10-01

    Human coronaviruses are one of the main causes of upper respiratory tract infections in humans. While more often responsible for mild illness, they have been associated with illnesses that require hospitalization. In this study, an assay for one of the human coronaviruses, OC43, was developed using a truncated recombinant nucleocapsid (N) protein antigen in an enzyme immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and evaluated using serum collected from HCoV-OC43-infected patients, healthy adults, and patients with other respiratory virus infections. Results showed that the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the assay were 90.9% (10/11) and 82.9% (39/47), respectively. To evaluate the clinical utility of the ELISA, serum samples collected from patients during an outbreak of HCoV-OC43 infection and previously identified as positive by HCoV-OC43 whole N ELISA were screened resulting in 100% diagnosis agreement between the testing methods. These results suggest that this assay offers a reliable method to detect HCoV-OC43 infection and may be a useful tool in coronavirus seroepidemiological studies.

  3. A comparative indirect ELISA for the detection of henipavirus antibodies based on a recombinant nucleocapsid protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Ming; Yu, Meng; Morrissy, Chris; Zhao, Yong-Gang; Meehan, Greer; Sun, Ying-Xue; Wang, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Lin-Fa; Wang, Zhi-Liang

    2006-09-01

    The indirect ELISA is a simple and useful method for detection of pathogen-specific antibodies in animal sera. However, non-specific or background binding is often a problem, especially when recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli are used. In this study, a comparative indirect ELISA in which the total reactivity and the background binding were determined simultaneously on the same ELISA plate was reported. The background was determined by incubation of the test sera with excess free antigen to block specific binding. The sample was considered positive only when its total reactivity reading was higher than a pre-determined cut-off value and the ratio of the total reactivity to the background reading was more than 2.0. Using this approach, an antibody assay for henipaviruses using a recombinant Nipah virus nucleocapsid protein expressed in E. coli was developed. A total of 919 negative serum samples were tested in this assay and the specificity was 95.8%. In addition, eight positive experimental serum samples all tested positive. The use of recombinant protein as the ELISA antigen, instead of inactivated virus antigens, will be of significant advantage for countries where there is no facility of Biosafety level 4 to handle this group of zoonotic viruses.

  4. Characterization of Two Monoclonal Antibodies That Recognize Linker Region and Carboxyl Terminal Domain of Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yunnuan; Shi, Hongyan; Chen, Jianfei; Shi, Da; Feng, Li

    2016-01-01

    The transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) nucleocapsid (N) protein plays important roles in the replication and translation of viral RNA. The present study provides the first description of two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (5E8 and 3D7) directed against the TGEV N protein linker region (LKR) and carboxyl terminal domain (CTD). The mAbs 5E8 and 3D7 reacted with native N protein in western blotting and immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Two linear epitopes, 189SVEQAVLAALKKLG202 and 246VTRFYGARSSSA257, located in the LKR and CTD of TGEV N protein, respectively, were identified after truncating the protein and applying a peptide scanning technique. Using mAb 5E8, we observed that the N protein was expressed in the cytoplasm during TGEV replication and that the protein could be immunoprecipitated from TGEV-infected PK-15 cells. The mAb 5E8 can be applied for different approaches to diagnosis of TGEV infection. In addition, the antibodies represent useful tools for investigating the antigenic properties of the N protein. PMID:27689694

  5. Diagnostics of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nucleocapsid antigen using chicken immunoglobulin Y.

    PubMed

    Palaniyappan, A; Das, D; Kammila, S; Suresh, M R; Sunwoo, H H

    2012-03-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative detection system for severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV), targeting the nucleocapsid protein (NP), to determine the presence and degree of infection in suspected individuals. Because the NP is the viral protein shed during infection and its template mRNA is the most abundant subgenomic RNA, it is a suitable candidate for developing antibodies for diagnostic applications. In this study, we have prepared full-length SARS-CoV NP expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Full-length NP was used for the preparation of mouse monoclonal antibody and chicken polyclonal IgY antibodies for the development of heterosandwich ELISA for early diagnostics of SARS-suspected individuals. The sensitivity of the developed heterosandwich ELISA can detect the viral antigen at 18.5 pg/mL of recombinant NP. This study describes ultrasensitive ELISA using 19B6 monoclonal antibody as the capture antibody and IgY as the detecting antibody against the most abundant SARS-CoV NP antigens. One of the most important findings was the use of inexpensive polyclonal IgY antibody to increase the sensitivity of the detection system for SARS-CoV at the picogram level. Furthermore, the immunoassay of SARS-CoV NP antigen developed could be an effective and sensitive method of diagnosing SARS-suspected individuals during a future SARS-CoV outbreak.

  6. SARS Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Inhibits Type I Interferon Production by Interfering with TRIM25-Mediated RIG-I Ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Li, Wei; Gao, Ting; Cui, Yan; Jin, Yanwen; Li, Ping; Ma, Qingjun; Liu, Xuan; Cao, Cheng

    2017-02-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a respiratory disease caused by a coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that is characterized by atypical pneumonia. The nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of SARS-CoV plays an important role in inhibition of type I interferon (IFN) production via an unknown mechanism. In this study, the SARS-CoV N protein was found to bind to the SPRY domain of the tripartite motif protein 25 (TRIM25) E3 ubiquitin ligase, thereby interfering with the association between TRIM25 and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and inhibiting TRIM25-mediated RIG-I ubiquitination and activation. Type I IFN production induced by poly I:C or Sendai virus (SeV) was suppressed by the SARS-CoV N protein. SARS-CoV replication was increased by over-expression of the full-length N protein but not N (1-361), which could not interact with TRIM25. These findings provide an insightful interpretation of the SARS-CoV-mediated host innate immune suppression caused by the N protein.

  7. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize an HLA-A2-restricted epitope within the hepatitis B virus nucleocapsid antigen

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The absence of readily manipulable experimental systems to study the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response against hepatitis B virus (HBV) antigens has thus far precluded a definitive demonstration of the role played by this response in the pathogenesis of liver cell injury and viral clearance during HBV infection. To circumvent the problem that HBV infection of human cells in vitro for production of stimulator/target systems for CTL analysis is not feasible, a panel of 22 overlapping synthetic peptides covering the entire amino acid sequence of the HBV core (HBcAg) and e (HBeAg) antigens were used to induce and to analyze the HBV nucleocapsid-specific CTL response in nine patients with acute hepatitis B, six patients with chronic active hepatitis B, and eight normal controls. By using this approach, we have identified an HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope, located within the NH2- terminal region of the HBV core molecule, which is shared with the e antigen and is readily recognized by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with self-limited acute hepatitis B but less efficiently in chronic HBV infection. Our study provides the first direct evidence of HLA class I-restricted T cell cytotoxicity against HBV in humans. Furthermore, the different response in HBV-infected subjects who successfully clear the virus (acute patients) in comparison with patients who do not succeed (chronic patients) suggests a pathogenetic role for this CTL activity in the clearance of HBV infection. PMID:1720813

  8. Requirements for nucleocapsid-mediated regulation of reverse transcription during the late steps of HIV-1 assembly

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Pierre-Jean; Chamontin, Célia; de Rocquigny, Hugues; Bernacchi, Serena; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Mougel, Marylène

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 is a retrovirus replicating within cells by reverse transcribing its genomic RNA (gRNA) into DNA. Within cells, virus assembly requires the structural Gag proteins with few accessory proteins, notably the viral infectivity factor (Vif) and two copies of gRNA as well as cellular factors to converge to the plasma membrane. In this process, the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of Gag binds to the packaging signal of gRNA which consists of a series of stem-loops (SL1-SL3) ensuring gRNA selection and packaging into virions. Interestingly, mutating NC activates a late-occurring reverse transcription (RT) step in producer cells, leading to the release of DNA-containing HIV-1 particles. In order to decipher the molecular mechanism regulating this late RT, we explored the role of several key partners of NC, such as Vif, gRNA and the cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G that restricts HIV-1 infection by targeting the RT. By studying combinations of deletions of these putative players, we revealed that NC, SL1-SL3 and in lesser extent Vif, but not APOBEC3G, interplay regulates the late RT. PMID:27273064

  9. Purification and serological analyses of tospoviral nucleocapsid proteins expressed by Zucchini yellow mosaic virus vector in squash.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Hsu, Hei-Ti; Jain, Rekesh K; Huang, Ching-Wen; Lin, Chen-Hsuan; Liu, Fang-Lin; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2005-11-01

    A plant viral vector engineered from an in vivo infectious clone of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) was used to express the nucleocapsid proteins (NPs) of tospoviruses in planta. The open reading frames (ORFs) of NPs of different serogroups of tospoviruses, including Tomato spotted wilt virus, Impatiens necrotic spot virus, Watermelon silver mottle virus, Peanut bud necrosis virus, and Watermelon bud necrosis virus (WBNV), were in frame inserted in between the P1 and HC-Pro genes of the ZYMV vector. Six histidine residues and an NIa protease cleavage site were added at the C-terminal region of the inserts to facilitate purification and process of free form of the expressed NPs, respectively. Approximately 1.2-2.5 mg/NPs 100 g tissues were purified from leaf extracts of zucchini squash. The expressed WBNV NP was used as an immunogen for the production of highly specific polyclonal antisera and monoclonal antibodies. The procedure provides a convenient and fast way for production of large quantities of pure NPs of tospoviruses in planta. The system also has a potential for production of any proteins of interest in cucurbits.

  10. Prediction of Pan-Specific B-Cell Epitopes From Nucleocapsid Protein of Hantaviruses Causing Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalaiselvan, Sagadevan; Sankar, Sathish; Ramamurthy, Mageshbabu; Ghosh, Asit Ranjan; Nandagopal, Balaji; Sridharan, Gopalan

    2017-01-20

    Hantaviruses are emerging viral pathogens that causes hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in the Americas, a severe, sometimes fatal, respiratory disease in humans with a case fatality rate of ≥50%. IgM and IgG-based serological detection methods are the most common approaches used for laboratory diagnosis of hantaviruses. Such emerging viral pathogens emphasizes the need for improved rapid diagnostic devices and vaccines incorporating pan-specific epitopes of genotypes. We predicted linear B-cell epitopes for hantaviruses that are specific to genotypes causing HCPS in humans using in silico prediction servers. We modeled the Andes and Sin Nombre hantavirus nucleocapsid protein to locate the identified epitopes. Based on the mean percent prediction probability score, epitope IMASKSVGS/TAEEKLKKKSAF was identified as the best candidate B-cell epitope specific for hantaviruses causing HCPS. Promiscuous epitopes were identified in the C-terminal of the protein. Our study for the first time has reported pan-specific B-cell epitopes for developing immunoassays in the detection of antibodies to hantaviruses causing HCPS. Identification of epitopes with pan-specific recognition of all genotypes causing HCPS could be valuable for the development of immunodiagnositic tools toward pan-detection of hantavirus antibodies in ELISA. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-5, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Generation and characterization of a potentially applicable Vero cell line constitutively expressing the Schmallenberg virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongning; Wu, Shaoqiang; Song, Shanshan; Lv, Jizhou; Feng, Chunyan; Lin, Xiangmei

    2017-02-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is a Culicoides-transmitted orthobunyavirus that poses a threat to susceptible livestock species such as cattle, sheep and goats. The nucleocapsid (N) protein of SBV is an ideal diagnostic antigen for the detection of viral infection. In this study, a stable Vero cell line, Vero-EGFP-SBV-N, constitutively expressing the SBV-N protein was established using a lentivirus system combined with puromycin selection. This cell line spontaneously emitted green fluorescent signals distributed throughout the cytoplasm, in which the expression of SBV-N fusion protein was confirmed by western blot analysis. The expression of SBV-N protein in Vero-EGFP-SBV-N cells was stable for more than fifty passages without puromycin pressure. The SBV-N fusion protein contained both an N-terminal enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) tag and a C-terminal hexa-histidine (6 × His) tag, by which the N protein was successfully purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The cell line was further demonstrated to be reactive with SBV antisera and an anti-SBV monoclonal antibody in indirect immunofluorescence assays. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the Vero-EGFP-SBV-N cell line has potential for application in the serological diagnosis of SBV infection.

  12. Nucleocapsid Interacts with NPM1 and Protects it from Proteolytic Cleavage, Enhancing Cell Survival, and is Involved in PEDV Growth

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Da; Shi, Hongyan; Sun, Dongbo; Chen, Jianfei; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Jialin; Ji, Zhaoyang; Liu, Jianbo; Cao, Liyan; Zhu, Xiangdong; Yuan, Jing; Dong, Hui; Wang, Xin; Chang, Tiecheng; Liu, Ye; Feng, Li

    2017-01-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) replicates in the cytoplasm of infected cells, but its nucleocapsid (N) protein localizes specifically to the nucleolus. The mechanism of nuclear translocation, and whether N protein associates with particular nucleolar components, is unknown. In this study, we confirm that a nucleolar phosphoprotein nucleophosmin (NPM1) interacts and co-localizes with the N protein in the nucleolus. In vitro binding studies indicated that aa 148–294 of N and aa 118–188 of NPM1 were required for binding. Interestingly, N protein importation into the nucleolus is independent of the ability of NPM1 to shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Furthermore, overexpression of NPM1 promoted PEDV growth, while knockdown of NPM1 suppressed PEDV growth. In addition, binding of N protein to NPM1 protects it from proteolytic degradation by caspase-3, leading to increased cell survival. Taken together, our studies demonstrate a specific interaction of the N protein with the host cell protein NPM1 in the nucleolus. The results suggest potential linkages among viral strategies for the regulation of cell survival activities, possibly through an interaction of N protein with NPM1 which prevents its proteolytic cleavage and enhances cell survival, thus ultimately promoting the replication of PEDV. PMID:28045037

  13. Nucleocapsid-like particles of dengue-2 virus enhance the immune response against a recombinant protein of dengue-4 virus.

    PubMed

    Lazo, Laura; Gil, Lázaro; Lopez, Carlos; Valdes, Iris; Marcos, Ernesto; Alvarez, Mayling; Blanco, Aracelys; Romero, Yaremis; Falcon, Viviana; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2010-10-01

    In this study, we evaluate in mice a novel formulation containing nucleocapsid-like particles of dengue-2 virus (recNLP) co-immunized with a chimeric protein composed of the dengue-4 envelope domain III fused twice within the meningococcal P64k protein of Neisseria meningitidis (PD24). The animals receiving the PD24-recNLP mixture showed the highest levels of antiviral antibodies. Similar results were obtained for IFNγ secretion levels, indicating a functional Th1 cellular response. Consistently, the percentage of mice surviving after viral challenge was significantly higher for those immunized with the mixture than for those inoculated with PD24 protein alone. In addition, in vivo depletion experiments demonstrated the decisive role of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells in the protection conferred by immunization with PD24-recNLP. In conclusion, this report demonstrates for the first time the adjuvant capacity of dengue-2 virus recNLP. Additionally, the evidence presented highlights the potential of these particles for enhancing the immune response against heterologous recombinant proteins.

  14. Differential contribution of basic residues to HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein’s nucleic acid chaperone function and retroviral replication

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Mitra, Mithun; Naufer, M. Nabuan; McCauley, Micah J.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Williams, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid (NC) protein contains 15 basic residues located throughout its 55-amino acid sequence, as well as one aromatic residue in each of its two CCHC-type zinc finger motifs. NC facilitates nucleic acid (NA) rearrangements via its chaperone activity, but the structural basis for this activity and its consequences in vivo are not completely understood. Here, we investigate the role played by basic residues in the N-terminal domain, the N-terminal zinc finger and the linker region between the two zinc fingers. We use in vitro ensemble and single-molecule DNA stretching experiments to measure the characteristics of wild-type and mutant HIV-1 NC proteins, and correlate these results with cell-based HIV-1 replication assays. All of the cationic residue mutations lead to NA interaction defects, as well as reduced HIV-1 infectivity, and these effects are most pronounced on neutralizing all five N-terminal cationic residues. HIV-1 infectivity in cells is correlated most strongly with NC’s NA annealing capabilities as well as its ability to intercalate the DNA duplex. Although NC’s aromatic residues participate directly in DNA intercalation, our findings suggest that specific basic residues enhance these interactions, resulting in optimal NA chaperone activity. PMID:24293648

  15. Mechanistic studies of mini-TAR RNA/DNA annealing in the absence and presence of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Vo, My-Nuong; Barany, George; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2006-10-13

    HIV-1 reverse transcription involves several nucleic acid rearrangements, which are catalyzed by the nucleocapsid protein (NC). Annealing of the trans-activation response element (TAR) DNA hairpin to a complementary TAR RNA hairpin, resulting in the formation of an extended 98-base-pair duplex, is an essential step in the minus-strand transfer step of reverse transcription. To elucidate the TAR RNA/DNA annealing reaction pathway, annealing kinetics were studied systematically by gel-shift assays performed in the presence or absence of HIV-1 NC. Truncated 27 nucleotide mini-TAR RNA and DNA constructs were used in this work. In the absence of NC, the annealing is slow, and involves the fast formation of an unstable extended "kissing" loop intermediate, followed by a slower strand exchange between the terminal stems. This annealing is very sensitive to loop-loop complementarity, as well as to nucleic acid concentration, ionic strength and temperature. NC stimulates the annealing approximately 5000-fold by stabilizing the bimolecular intermediate approximately 100 to 200-fold, and promoting the subsequent strand exchange reaction approximately 10 to 20-fold. NC concentration dependence studies suggest that there is a direct correlation between the amount of NC required to stabilize the intermediate and the amount needed to induce mini-TAR aggregation. Whereas saturating levels of NC are required to efficiently aggregate nucleic acids, sub-saturating NC is sufficient to significantly enhance duplex destabilization. Equilibrium levels of mini-TAR RNA/DNA annealing were also measured under a variety of conditions. Taken together, the results presented here provide a quantitative accounting of HIV-1 NC's aggregation and duplex destabilizing activity, and provide insights into the universal nucleic acid chaperone activity of this essential viral protein.

  16. The structurally disordered paramyxovirus nucleocapsid protein tail domain is a regulator of the mRNA transcription gradient

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Robert M.; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Thakkar, Vidhi D.; Sohn, Maximilian; Plemper, Richard K.

    2017-01-01

    The paramyxovirus RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp) complex loads onto the nucleocapsid protein (N)–encapsidated viral N:RNA genome for RNA synthesis. Binding of the RdRp of measles virus (MeV), a paramyxovirus archetype, is mediated through interaction with a molecular recognition element (MoRE) located near the end of the carboxyl-terminal Ntail domain. The structurally disordered central Ntail section is thought to add positional flexibility to MoRE, but the functional importance of this Ntail region for RNA polymerization is unclear. To address this question, we dissected functional elements of Ntail by relocating MoRE into the RNA-encapsidating Ncore domain. Linker-scanning mutagenesis identified a microdomain in Ncore that tolerates insertions. MoRE relocated to Ncore supported efficient interaction with N, MoRE-deficient Ntails had a dominant-negative effect on bioactivity that was alleviated by insertion of MoRE into Ncore, and recombinant MeV encoding N with relocated MoRE grew efficiently and remained capable of mRNA editing. MoRE in Ncore also restored viability of a recombinant lacking the disordered central Ntail section, but this recombinant was temperature-sensitive, with reduced RdRp loading efficiency and a flattened transcription gradient. These results demonstrate that virus replication requires high-affinity RdRp binding sites in N:RNA, but productive RdRp binding is independent of positional flexibility of MoRE and cis-acting elements in Ntail. Rather, the disordered central Ntail section independent of the presence of MoRE in Ntail steepens the paramyxovirus transcription gradient by promoting RdRp loading and preventing the formation of nonproductive polycistronic viral mRNAs. Disordered Ntails may have evolved as a regulatory element to adjust paramyxovirus gene expression. PMID:28168220

  17. Structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy and immunoreactivity of recombinant Hendra virus nucleocapsid protein expressed and purified from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lesley A; Yu, Meng; Waddington, Lynne J; Barr, Jennifer A; Scoble, Judith A; Crameri, Gary S; McKinstry, William J

    2015-12-01

    Hendra virus (family Paramyxoviridae) is a negative sense single-stranded RNA virus (NSRV) which has been found to cause disease in humans, horses, and experimentally in other animals, e.g. pigs and cats. Pteropid bats commonly known as flying foxes have been identified as the natural host reservoir. The Hendra virus nucleocapsid protein (HeV N) represents the most abundant viral protein produced by the host cell, and is highly immunogenic with naturally infected humans and horses producing specific antibodies towards this protein. The purpose of this study was to express and purify soluble, functionally active recombinant HeV N, suitable for use as an immunodiagnostic reagent to detect antibodies against HeV. We expressed both full-length HeV N, (HeV NFL), and a C-terminal truncated form, (HeV NCORE), using a bacterial heterologous expression system. Both HeV N constructs were engineered with an N-terminal Hisx6 tag, and purified using a combination of immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Purified recombinant HeV N proteins self-assembled into soluble higher order oligomers as determined by SEC and negative-stain transmission electron microscopy. Both HeV N proteins were highly immuno-reactive with sera from animals and humans infected with either HeV or the closely related Nipah virus (NiV), but displayed no immuno-reactivity towards sera from animals infected with a non-pathogenic paramyxovirus (CedPV), or animals receiving Equivac® (HeV G glycoprotein subunit vaccine), using a Luminex-based multiplexed microsphere assay.

  18. A Chrysodeixis chalcites single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus population from the Canary Islands is genotypically structured to maximize survival.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Alexandra; Simón, Oihane; Williams, Trevor; Muñoz, Delia; Caballero, Primitivo

    2013-12-01

    A Chrysodeixis chalcites single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus wild-type isolate from the Canary Islands, Spain, named ChchSNPV-TF1 (ChchTF1-wt), appears to have great potential as the basis for a biological insecticide for control of the pest. An improved understanding of the genotypic structure of this wild-type strain population should facilitate the selection of genotypes for inclusion in a bioinsecticidal product. Eight genetically distinct genotypes were cloned in vitro: ChchTF1-A to ChchTF1-H. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis confirmed that ChchTF1-A accounted for 36% of the genotypes in the wild-type population. In bioassays, ChchTF1-wt occlusion bodies (OBs) were significantly more pathogenic than any of the component single-genotype OBs, indicating that genotype interactions were likely responsible for the pathogenicity phenotype of wild-type OBs. However, the wild-type population was slower killing and produced higher OB yields than any of the single genotypes alone. These results strongly suggested that the ChchTF1-wt population is structured to maximize its transmission efficiency. Experimental OB mixtures and cooccluded genotype mixtures containing the most abundant and the rarest genotypes, at frequencies similar to those at which they were isolated, revealed a mutualistic interaction that restored the pathogenicity of OBs. In OB and cooccluded mixtures containing only the most abundant genotypes, ChchTF1-ABC, OB pathogenicity was even greater than that of wild-type OBs. The ChchTF1-ABC cooccluded mixture killed larvae 33 h faster than the wild-type population and remained genotypically and biologically stable throughout five successive passages in vivo. In conclusion, the ChchTF1-ABC mixture shows great potential as the active ingredient of a bioinsecticide to control C. chalcites in the Canary Islands.

  19. Dynamics of linker residues modulate the nucleic acid binding properties of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein zinc fingers.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, Loussiné; Tisné, Carine; Barraud, Pierre; Xu, Xiaoqian; Morellet, Nelly; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) is a small basic protein containing two zinc fingers (ZF) separated by a short linker. It is involved in several steps of the replication cycle and acts as a nucleic acid chaperone protein in facilitating nucleic acid strand transfers occurring during reverse transcription. Recent analysis of three-dimensional structures of NC-nucleic acids complexes established a new property: the unpaired guanines targeted by NC are more often inserted in the C-terminal zinc finger (ZF2) than in the N-terminal zinc finger (ZF1). Although previous NMR dynamic studies were performed with NC, the dynamic behavior of the linker residues connecting the two ZF domains remains unclear. This prompted us to investigate the dynamic behavior of the linker residues. Here, we collected 15N NMR relaxation data and used for the first time data at several fields to probe the protein dynamics. The analysis at two fields allows us to detect a slow motion occurring between the two domains around a hinge located in the linker at the G35 position. However, the amplitude of motion appears limited in our conditions. In addition, we showed that the neighboring linker residues R29, A30, P31, R32, K33 displayed restricted motion and numerous contacts with residues of ZF1. Our results are fully consistent with a model in which the ZF1-linker contacts prevent the ZF1 domain to interact with unpaired guanines, whereas the ZF2 domain is more accessible and competent to interact with unpaired guanines. In contrast, ZF1 with its large hydrophobic plateau is able to destabilize the double-stranded regions adjacent to the guanines bound by ZF2. The linker residues and the internal dynamics of NC regulate therefore the different functions of the two zinc fingers that are required for an optimal chaperone activity.

  20. Recombinant nucleocapsid-like particles from dengue-2 induce functional serotype-specific cell-mediated immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Gil, Lázaro; Bernardo, Lídice; Pavón, Alequis; Izquierdo, Alienys; Valdés, Iris; Lazo, Laura; Marcos, Ernesto; Romero, Yaremis; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2012-06-01

    The interplay of different inflammatory cytokines induced during dengue virus infection plays a role in either protection or increased disease severity. In this sense, vaccine strategies incorporating whole virus are able to elicit both functional and pathological responses. Therefore, an ideal tetravalent vaccine candidate against dengue should be focused on serotype-specific sequences. In the present work, a new formulation of nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) obtained from the recombinant dengue-2 capsid protein was evaluated in mice to determine the level of protection against homologous and heterologous viral challenge and to measure the cytotoxicity and cytokine-secretion profiles induced upon heterologous viral stimulation. As a result, a significant protection rate was achieved after challenge with lethal dengue-2 virus, which was dependent on CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. In turn, no protection was observed after heterologous challenge. In accordance, in vitro-stimulated spleen cells from mice immunized with NLPs from the four dengue serotypes showed a serotype-specific response of gamma interferon- and tumour necrosis factor alpha-secreting cells. A similar pattern was detected when spleen cells from dengue-immunized animals were stimulated with the capsid protein. Taking these data together, we can assert that NLPs constitute an attractive vaccine candidate against dengue. They induce a functional immune response mediated by CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells in mice, which is protective against viral challenge. In turn, they are potentially safe due to two important facts: induction of serotype specific cell-mediated immunity and lack of induction of antiviral antibodies. Further studies in non-human primates or humanized mice should be carried out to elucidate the usefulness of the NLPs as a potential vaccine candidate against dengue disease.

  1. Development of Monoclonal Antibody and Diagnostic Test for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Using Cell-Free Synthesized Nucleocapsid Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Yutaro; Matsuyama, Shutoku; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Matsunaga, Satoko; Matsushima, Yuki; Kuroyama, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Hirokazu; Takeda, Makoto; Chimuro, Tomoyuki; Ryo, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    Protein nativity is one of the most critical factors for the quality of antigens used as immunogens and the reactivities of the resultant antibodies. The preparation and purification of native viral antigens in conventional cell-based protein expression systems are often accompanied by technical hardships. These challenges are attributable mainly to protein aggregation and insolubility during expression and purification, as well as to very low expression levels associated with the toxicity of some viral proteins. Here, we describe a novel approach for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against nucleocapsid protein (NP) of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system, we successfully prepared large amounts of MERS-CoV NP antigen in a state that was highly soluble and intact for immunization. Following mouse immunization and hybridoma generation, we selected seven hybridoma clones that produced mAbs with exclusive reactivity against MERS-CoV NP. Epitope mapping and subsequent bioinformatic analysis revealed that these mAbs recognized epitopes located within relatively highly conserved regions of the MERS-CoV amino-acid sequence. Consistently, the mAbs exhibited no obvious cross-reactivity with NPs derived from other related viruses, including SARS coronavirus. After determining the optimal combinations of these mAbs, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a rapid immunochromatographic antigen detection test that can be reliably used for laboratory diagnosis of MERS-CoV. Thus, this study provides strong evidence that the wheat germ cell-free system is useful for the production of diagnostic mAbs against emerging pathogens. PMID:27148198

  2. Mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the fusion peptide of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus F protein.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Manli; Yin, Feifei; Deng, Fei; Liu, Maili; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin

    2008-08-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into cells is normally mediated by fusion between viral and cellular membranes, in which the fusion peptide plays a crucial role. The fusion peptides of group II nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) F proteins are quite conserved, with a hydrophobic region located at the N terminal of the F(1) fragment. For this report, we used mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study the structure and function of the fusion peptide of the Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid NPV (HearNPV) F protein (HaF). Five mutations in the fusion peptide of HaF, N(1)G, N(1)L, I(2)N, G(3)L, and D(11)L, were generated separately, and the mutated f genes were transformed into the f-null HearNPV bacmid. The mutations N(1)L, I(2)N, and D(11)L were found to completely abolish the ability of the recombinant bacmids to produce infectious budded virus, while the mutations N(1)G and G(3)L did not. The low-pH-induced envelope fusion assay demonstrated that the N(1)G substitution increased the fusogenicity of HaF, while the G(3)L substitution reduced its fusogenicity. NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of a synthetic fusion peptide of HaF in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles at pH 5.0. The fusion peptide appeared to be an amphiphilic structure composed of a flexible coil in the N terminus from N(1) to N(5), a 3(10)-helix from F(6) to G(8), a turn at S(9), and a regular alpha-helix from V(10) to D(19). The data provide the first NMR structure of a baculovirus fusion peptide and allow us to further understand the relationship of structure and function of the fusion peptide.

  3. A nine-base nucleotide sequence in the porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) nucleocapsid gene determines viral replication and virulence.

    PubMed

    Krakowka, Steven; Allan, Gordon; Ellis, John; Hamberg, Alexander; Charreyre, Catherine; Kaufmann, Eva; Brooks, Charles; Meehan, Brian

    2012-03-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) was retrospectively identified by serology in swine populations as an asymptomatic infection at least 25 years prior to the first reported case of PCV2-associated postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). To investigate the sudden emergence of PMWS, viral sequences were amplified from frozen archived (1970-1971) porcine tissues and the complete genome of archival PCV2 was determined. The ORF1 gene product (viral DNA replicase) was homologous to contemporary PCV2 ORF1. In ORF2 (viral nucleocapsid gene) archival PCV2, a consistent linear nine-base sequence difference at base positions 1331 through 1339 was observed. The deduced amino acid sequence from these base changes alters the nucleocapsid conformation within the second immunogenic epitope from a hydrophobic (contemporary PCV2) to a hydrophilic (archival PCV2) configuration. To test the hypothesis that archival PCV2 was avirulent, cloned engineered archival and contemporary PCV2 genomes were constructed wherein the ORF1 gene was identical in each clone and the ORF2 gene (nucleocapsid protein) was sequence-identical in both clones except for the nine-base difference (bases 1331-1339), corresponding to archival and contemporary PCV2 viruses respectively. Clones were transfected into porcine kidney (PK) 15 cells and, after sequence confirmation, further passed in PK15 and 3D4/2 porcine alveolar macrophage cell cultures. Virulence trials in gnotobiotic piglets were conducted with cloned PCV2s. The data show that archival PCV2 is avirulent when compared to contemporary PCV2 and supports the hypothesis that the emergence of virulent contemporary PCV2 was a result of mutational events within this critical epitope after 1971.

  4. Charge neutralization as the major factor for the assembly of nucleocapsid-like particles from C-terminal truncated hepatitis C virus core protein

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Vanessa L. de Azevedo; Peabody, David S.; Ferreira, Davis Fernandes; Bianconi, M. Lucia; Gomes, Andre Marco de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein, in addition to its structural role to form the nucleocapsid assembly, plays a critical role in HCV pathogenesis by interfering in several cellular processes, including microRNA and mRNA homeostasis. The C-terminal truncated HCV core protein (C124) is intrinsically unstructured in solution and is able to interact with unspecific nucleic acids, in the micromolar range, and to assemble into nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) in vitro. The specificity and propensity of C124 to the assembly and its implications on HCV pathogenesis are not well understood. Methods Spectroscopic techniques, transmission electron microscopy and calorimetry were used to better understand the propensity of C124 to fold or to multimerize into NLPs when subjected to different conditions or in the presence of unspecific nucleic acids of equivalent size to cellular microRNAs. Results The structural analysis indicated that C124 has low propensity to self-folding. On the other hand, for the first time, we show that C124, in the absence of nucleic acids, multimerizes into empty NLPs when subjected to a pH close to its isoelectric point (pH ≈ 12), indicating that assembly is mainly driven by charge neutralization. Isothermal calorimetry data showed that the assembly of NLPs promoted by nucleic acids is enthalpy driven. Additionally, data obtained from fluorescence correlation spectroscopy show that C124, in nanomolar range, was able to interact and to sequester a large number of short unspecific nucleic acids into NLPs. Discussion Together, our data showed that the charge neutralization is the major factor for the nucleocapsid-like particles assembly from C-terminal truncated HCV core protein. This finding suggests that HCV core protein may physically interact with unspecific cellular polyanions, which may correspond to microRNAs and mRNAs in a host cell infected by HCV, triggering their confinement into infectious particles. PMID:27867765

  5. Proteomics analysis of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus identified two new occlusion-derived virus-associated proteins, HA44 and HA100.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fei; Wang, Ranran; Fang, Minggang; Jiang, Yue; Xu, Xushi; Wang, Hanzhong; Chen, Xinwen; Arif, Basil M; Guo, Lin; Wang, Hualin; Hu, Zhihong

    2007-09-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to analyze the structural proteins of the occlusion-derived virus (ODV) of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV), a group II NPV. Twenty-three structural proteins of HearNPV ODV were identified, 21 of which have been reported previously as structural proteins or ODV-associated proteins in other baculoviruses. These include polyhedrin, P78/83, P49, ODV-E18, ODV-EC27, ODV-E56, P74, LEF-3, HA66 (AC66), DNA polymerase, GP41, VP39, P33, ODV-E25, helicase, P6.9, ODV/BV-C42, VP80, ODV-EC43, ODV-E66, and PIF-1. Two proteins encoded by HearNPV ORF44 (ha44) and ORF100 (ha100) were discovered as ODV-associated proteins for the first time. ha44 encodes a protein of 378 aa with a predicted mass of 42.8 kDa. ha100 encodes a protein of 510 aa with a predicted mass of 58.1 kDa and is a homologue of the gene for poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (parg). Western blot analysis and immunoelectron microscopy confirmed that HA44 is associated with the nucleocapsid and HA100 is associated with both the nucleocapsid and the envelope of HearNPV ODV. HA44 is conserved in group II NPVs and granuloviruses but does not exist in group I NPVs, while HA100 is conserved only in group II NPVs.

  6. Synthesis of human parainfluenza virus 4 nucleocapsid-like particles in yeast and their use for detection of virus-specific antibodies in human serum.

    PubMed

    Bulavaitė, Aistė; Lasickienė, Rita; Tamošiūnas, Paulius Lukas; Simanavičius, Martynas; Sasnauskas, Kęstutis; Žvirblienė, Aurelija

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to produce human parainfluenza virus type 4 (HPIV4) nucleocapsid (N) protein in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expression system, to explore its structural and antigenic properties and to evaluate its applicability in serology. The use of an optimized gene encoding HPIV4 N protein amino acid (aa) sequence GenBank AGU90031.1 allowed high yield of recombinant N protein forming nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) in yeast. A substitution L332D disrupted self-assembly of NLPs, confirming the role of this position in the N proteins of Paramyxovirinae. Three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were generated against the NLP-forming HPIV4 N protein. They recognised HPIV4-infected cells, demonstrating the antigenic similarity between the recombinant and virus-derived N proteins. HPIV4 N protein was used as a coating antigen in an indirect IgG ELISA with serum specimens of 154 patients with respiratory tract infection. The same serum specimens were tested with previously generated N protein of a closely related HPIV2, another representative of genus Rubulavirus. Competitive ELISA was developed using related yeast-produced viral antigens to deplete the cross-reactive serum antibodies. In the ELISA either without or with competition using heterologous HPIV (2 or 4) N or mumps virus N proteins, the seroprevalence of HPIV4 N-specific IgG was, respectively, 46.8, 39.6 and 40.3% and the seroprevalence of HPIV2 N-specific IgG-47.4, 39.0 and 37.7%. In conclusion, yeast-produced HPIV4 N protein shares structural and antigenic properties of the native virus nucleocapsids. Yeast-produced HPIV4 and HPIV2 NLPs are prospective tools in serology.

  7. Human Memory Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte (CTL) Responses to Hantaan Virus Infection: Identification of Virus-Specific and Cross-Reactive CD8+ CTL Epitopes on Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Van Epps, Heather L.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.; Ennis, Francis A.

    1999-01-01

    Hantaan virus, the prototypic member of the Hantavirus genus, causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans. We examined the human memory T-lymphocyte responses of three donors who had previous laboratory-acquired infections with Hantaan virus. We demonstrated virus-specific responses in bulk cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from all donors. Bulk T-cell responses were directed against either Hantaan virus nucleocapsid (N) or G1 protein, and these responses varied between donors. We established both CD4+ and CD8+ N-specific cell lines from two donors and CD4+ G1-specific cell lines from a third donor. All CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) lines recognized one of two epitopes on the nucleocapsid protein: one epitope spanning amino acids 12 to 20 and the other spanning amino acids 421 to 429. The CTL lines specific for amino acids 12 to 20 were restricted by HLA B51, and those specific for amino acids 421 to 429 were restricted by HLA A1. The N-specific CTL lines isolated from these two donors included both Hantaan virus-specific CTLs and hantavirus cross-reactive CTLs. Responses to both epitopes are detectable in short-term bulk cultures of PBMC from one donor, and precursor frequency analysis confirms that CTLs specific for these epitopes are present at relatively high precursor frequencies in the peripheral T-cell pool. These data suggest that infection with Hantaan virus results in the generation of CTL to limited epitopes on the nucleocapsid protein and that infection also results in the generation of cross-reactive T-cell responses to distantly related hantaviruses which cause the distinct hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. This is the first demonstration of human T-lymphocyte responses to Hantaan virus. PMID:10364276

  8. Comparative analysis of the gene encoding the nucleocapsid protein of dolphin morbillivirus reveals its distant evolutionary relationship to measles virus and ruminant morbilliviruses.

    PubMed

    Blixenkrone-Møller, M; Bolt, G; Gottschalck, E; Kenter, M

    1994-10-01

    A morbillivirus of uncertain origin recently killed hundreds of Mediterranean dolphins. This is the first report of the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of a dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) gene. The sequence of the nucleocapsid (N) gene including boundaries was determined. When the DMV N gene coding region was compared with the corresponding sequences of other morbilliviruses a distant evolutionary relationship between these viruses and DMV was apparent. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequence data provided further evidence that DMV is not closely related to any known morbillivirus, whereas phocine distemper virus exhibits a relatively close relationship to canine distemper virus.

  9. The Herpes Simplex Virus Protein pUL31 Escorts Nucleocapsids to Sites of Nuclear Egress, a Process Coordinated by Its N-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Claus-Henning; Binz, Anne; Sodeik, Beate; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Bailer, Susanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Progeny capsids of herpesviruses leave the nucleus by budding through the nuclear envelope. Two viral proteins, the membrane protein pUL34 and the nucleo-phosphoprotein pUL31 form the nuclear egress complex that is required for capsid egress out of the nucleus. All pUL31 orthologs are composed of a diverse N-terminal domain with 1 to 3 basic patches and a conserved C-terminal domain. To decipher the functions of the N-terminal domain, we have generated several Herpes simplex virus mutants and show here that the N-terminal domain of pUL31 is essential with basic patches being critical for viral propagation. pUL31 and pUL34 entered the nucleus independently of each other via separate routes and the N-terminal domain of pUL31 was required to prevent their premature interaction in the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal embedded in this domain was not required for nuclear import of pUL31. In the nucleus, pUL31 associated with the nuclear envelope and newly formed capsids. Viral mutants lacking the N-terminal domain or with its basic patches neutralized still associated with nucleocapsids but were unable to translocate them to the nuclear envelope. Replacing the authentic basic patches with a novel artificial one resulted in HSV1(17+)Lox-UL31-hbpmp1mp2, that was viable but delayed in nuclear egress and compromised in viral production. Thus, while the C-terminal domain of pUL31 is sufficient for the interaction with nucleocapsids, the N-terminal domain was essential for capsid translocation to sites of nuclear egress and a coordinated interaction with pUL34. Our data indicate an orchestrated sequence of events with pUL31 binding to nucleocapsids and escorting them to the inner nuclear envelope. We propose a common mechanism for herpesviral nuclear egress: pUL31 is required for intranuclear translocation of nucleocapsids and subsequent interaction with pUL34 thereby coupling capsid maturation with primary envelopment. PMID:26083367

  10. C-Terminal DxD-Containing Sequences within Paramyxovirus Nucleocapsid Proteins Determine Matrix Protein Compatibility and Can Direct Foreign Proteins into Budding Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Greeshma; Schmitt, Phuong Tieu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxovirus particles are formed by a budding process coordinated by viral matrix (M) proteins. M proteins coalesce at sites underlying infected cell membranes and induce other viral components, including viral glycoproteins and viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), to assemble at these locations from which particles bud. M proteins interact with the nucleocapsid (NP or N) components of vRNPs, and these interactions enable production of infectious, genome-containing virions. For the paramyxoviruses parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) and mumps virus, M-NP interaction also contributes to efficient production of virus-like particles (VLPs) in transfected cells. A DLD sequence near the C-terminal end of PIV5 NP protein was previously found to be necessary for M-NP interaction and efficient VLP production. Here, we demonstrate that 15-residue-long, DLD-containing sequences derived from either the PIV5 or Nipah virus nucleocapsid protein C-terminal ends are sufficient to direct packaging of a foreign protein, Renilla luciferase, into budding VLPs. Mumps virus NP protein harbors DWD in place of the DLD sequence found in PIV5 NP protein, and consequently, PIV5 NP protein is incompatible with mumps virus M protein. A single amino acid change converting DLD to DWD within PIV5 NP protein induced compatibility between these proteins and allowed efficient production of mumps VLPs. Our data suggest a model in which paramyxoviruses share an overall common strategy for directing M-NP interactions but with important variations contained within DLD-like sequences that play key roles in defining M/NP protein compatibilities. IMPORTANCE Paramyxoviruses are responsible for a wide range of diseases that affect both humans and animals. Paramyxovirus pathogens include measles virus, mumps virus, human respiratory syncytial virus, and the zoonotic paramyxoviruses Nipah virus and Hendra virus. Infectivity of paramyxovirus particles depends on matrix-nucleocapsid protein

  11. Fractionation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA in centrifugal precipitation chromatography using cationic surfactant CTAB containing inorganic salts NaCl and NH(4)Cl.

    PubMed

    Tomanee, Panarat; Hsu, James T; Ito, Yoichiro

    2004-10-05

    Centrifugal precipitation chromatography (CPC) is a separation system that mainly employs a moving concentration gradient of precipitating agent along a channel and solutes of interest undergo repetitive precipitation-dissolution, fractionate at different locations, and elute out from the channel according to their solubility in the precipitating agent solution. We report here for the first time the use of a CPC system for fractionation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA in clarified lysate produced from bacterial culture. The cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was initially used as a precipitating agent; however, all biomolecules showed no differential solubility in the moving concentration gradient of this surfactant and, as a result, no separation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA occurred. To overcome this problem, inorganic salts such as NaCl and NH(4)Cl were introduced into solution of CTAB. The protein and RNA were found to have higher solubility with the addition of these salts and separated from the plasmid DNA. Decreasing surface charge density of CTAB upon addition of NaCl and NH(4)Cl was believed to lead to lower surfactant complexation, and therefore caused differential solubility and fractionation of these biomolecules. Addition of CaCl(2) did not improve solubility and separation of RNA from plasmid DNA.

  12. Expression of the Lassa virus nucleocapsid protein in insect cells infected with a recombinant baculovirus: application to diagnostic assays for Lassa virus infection.

    PubMed

    Barber, G N; Clegg, J C; Lloyd, G

    1990-01-01

    The coding region of the gene for the nucleocapsid protein of Lassa virus has been inserted into the genome of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) using the transfer vector pAcYM1, so that expression of the foreign DNA is under the control of the promoter of the AcNPV polyhedrin gene. Infection of cultured Spodoptera frugiperda cells with recombinant virus resulted in the synthesis of high levels of a protein that was indistinguishable from the authentic Lassa virus protein by SDS gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with a variety of specific immune sera and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The kinetics of appearance of the protein were comparable to those of polyhedrin production in wild-type AcNPV-infected cells. The recombinant material was antigenic when used in ELISA for Lassa virus-specific antibodies, reacting well with MAbs specific for the nucleocapsid protein and with sera from experimentally infected guinea-pigs. The recombinant ELISA was able to clearly distinguish sera from human cases of Lassa fever against a panel of known negative sera of African origin. Recombinant-infected insect cells were an effective substitute for mammalian cells infected with Lassa virus itself in the immunofluorescence assay for Lassa virus-specific antibodies. This system offers attractive alternatives to the use of Lassa virus-infected materials as reagents in diagnostic procedures.

  13. [Expression and purification of different segments from HCoV-NL63 nucleocapsid protein and their application in detection of antibodies].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Zhang, Ting-Ying; Zhou, Wei-Min; Zhao, Guo-Xia; Zhang, Ling-Lin; Gao, Ji-Min; Tan, Wen-Jie

    2011-05-01

    Prokaryotic expression plasmids carrying N-terminal(1-163aa) and C-terminal(141-306aa) gene of HCoV-NL63 nucleocapsid protein were constructed with pET-30a(+) vector. Consequently, we prepared two purified proteins, Np and Cp, respectively, and established a Western blotting-based line assay (WBLA) for detection of antibodies against HCoV-NL63 using three purified proteins: Np , Cp and Nf, a full-length HCoV-NL63 nucleocapsid protein as previously reported. We detected anti-HCoV-NL63 antibodies among 50 sera samples collected from adult for health-examination by WBLA. The results showed that: 25 (50%), 27 (54%), 36 (72%) of 50 sera were indentified as anti-HCoV-NL63 antibody positive when the antigen was from Nf, Np and Cp, respectively. Among these sera with positive anti-HCoV-NL63 antibody,Cp showed highest antibody positive rate in WBLA,and consistent rates of detection were 64% between Nf and Np, 54% between Nf and Cp, 54% between Np and Cp. Our study provides the foundation for development of HCoV-NL63 serological detection reagents and an experimental tool for immunological research of HCoV-NL63 infection.

  14. Crystal Structure of the Core Region of Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Protein Reveals the Mechanism for Ribonucleoprotein Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Wang, Wenming; Sun, Yuna; Ma, Chao; Wang, Xu; Wang, Xin; Liu, Pi; Shen, Shu; Li, Baobin; Lin, Jianping; Deng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantaviruses, which belong to the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae, infect mammals, including humans, causing either hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in humans with high mortality. Hantavirus encodes a nucleocapsid protein (NP) to encapsidate the genome and form a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) together with viral polymerase. Here, we report the crystal structure of the core domains of NP (NPcore) encoded by Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV), which are two representative members that cause HCPS in the New World. The constructs of SNV and ANDV NPcore exclude the N- and C-terminal portions of full polypeptide to obtain stable proteins for crystallographic study. The structure features an N lobe and a C lobe to clamp RNA-binding crevice and exhibits two protruding extensions in both lobes. The positively charged residues located in the RNA-binding crevice play a key role in RNA binding and virus replication. We further demonstrated that the C-terminal helix and the linker region connecting the N-terminal coiled-coil domain and NPcore are essential for hantavirus NP oligomerization through contacts made with two adjacent protomers. Moreover, electron microscopy (EM) visualization of native RNPs extracted from the virions revealed that a monomer-sized NP-RNA complex is the building block of viral RNP. This work provides insight into the formation of hantavirus RNP and provides an understanding of the evolutionary connections that exist among bunyaviruses. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses are distributed across a wide and increasing range of host reservoirs throughout the world. In particular, hantaviruses can be transmitted via aerosols of rodent excreta to humans or from human to human and cause HFRS and HCPS, with mortalities of 15% and 50%, respectively. Hantavirus is therefore listed as a category C pathogen. Hantavirus encodes an NP that plays essential roles both in RNP formation and

  15. Identification of three antigen epitopes on the nucleocapsid protein of the genotype C of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jian-Le; Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Zhou, Yue-Hui; Lv, Chuang; Yan, Hao; Ma, Lei; Shi, Hong-Fei; Xue, Fei

    2015-07-09

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is an important respiratory tract pathogen for both young and adult cattle. So far, three genotypes A, B and C of BPIV3 have been described on the basis of genetic and phylogenetic analysis. But fine mapping of epitopes of BPIV3 is scant and the antigenic variations among the three genotypes of BPIV3 have not been reported. Nucleocapsid protein (NP) is the most abundant protein in the virion and highly conserved in BPIV3, which is crucial for the induction of protective immunity in host. To identify antigenic determinants of BPIV3 NP, a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was tested against a series of overlapping recombinant NP fragments expressed in Escherichia coli. Firstly, six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against NP of the genotype C of BPIV3 (BPIV3c) were generated by using the purified BPIV3c strain SD0835 as immunogen and the recombinant NP of SD0835 as screening antigen. Then three antigen epitopes were identified with the six mAbs. One epitope (91)GNNADVKYVIYM(102) was recognized by mAb 5E5. The mAbs 7G5, 7G8, 7G9, and 7H5 were reactive with another epitope (407)FYKPTGG(413). The third epitope (428)ESRGDQDQ(435) was reactive with mAb 6F8. Further analysis showed that the epitope (91-102 amino acids [aa]) was the most conserved and reactive with mAb 5E5 for all three genotypes of BPIV3 and HPIV3. The epitope (407-413 aa) was relatively conserved and reactive with mAbs 7G5, 7G8, 7G9, and 7H5 for BPIV3a, BPIV3c and HPIV3, but not reactive with BPIV3b. The epitope (428-435 aa) was less conserved and was reactive only with mAb 6F8 for BPIV3a and BPIV3c. These results suggested that there were evident antigenic variations among the three genotypes of BPIV3 and HPIV3. The mAb 6F8 could be used to detect BPIV3a and BPIV3c. The mAbs 7G5, 7G8, 7G9, and 7H5 might be used for differentiate BPIV3a, BPIV3c and HPIV3 from BPIV3b. The mAb 5E5 might be used for detecting all three types of BPIV3 and HPIV3. The results in this

  16. Antibody responses to Four Corners hantavirus infections in the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus): identification of an immunodominant region of the viral nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, T; Hjelle, B; Lanzi, R; Morris, C; Anderson, B; Jenison, S

    1995-01-01

    Antibody responses to Four Corners hantavirus (FCV) infections in the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) were characterized by using FCV nucleocapsid protein (N), glycoprotein 1 (G1), and glycoprotein 2 (G2) recombinant polypeptides in Western immunoblot assays. Strong immunoglobulin G reactivities to FCV N were observed among FCV-infected wild P. maniculatus mice (n = 34) and in laboratory-infected P. maniculatus mice (n = 11). No immunoglobulin G antibody reactivities to FCV G1 or G2 linear determinants were detected. The strongest N responses were mapped to an amino-proximal segment between amino acids 17 and 59 (QLVTARQKLKDAERAVELDPDDVNKSTLQSRRAAVSALETKLG). FCV N antibodies cross-reacted with recombinant N proteins encoded by Puumala, Seoul, and Hantaan viruses. PMID:7853538

  17. The nucleocapsid protein of Rift Valley fever virus is a potent human CD8+ T cell antigen and elicits memory responses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weidong; Watts, Douglas M; Costanzo, Margaret C; Tang, Xiaolei; Venegas, Leon A; Jiao, Feng; Sette, Alessandro; Sidney, John; Sewell, Andrew K; Wooldridge, Linda; Makino, Shinji; Morrill, John C; Peters, Clarence J; Kan-Mitchell, June

    2013-01-01

    There is no licensed human vaccine currently available for Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVFV), a Category A high priority pathogen and a serious zoonotic threat. While neutralizing antibodies targeting the viral glycoproteins are protective, they appear late in the course of infection, and may not be induced in time to prevent a natural or bioterrorism-induced outbreak. Here we examined the immunogenicity of RVFV nucleocapsid (N) protein as a CD8(+) T cell antigen with the potential for inducing rapid protection after vaccination. HLA-A*0201 (A2)-restricted epitopic determinants were identified with N-specific CD8(+) T cells from eight healthy donors that were primed with dendritic cells transduced to express N, and subsequently expanded in vitro by weekly re-stimulations with monocytes pulsed with 59 15mer overlapping peptides (OLPs) across N. Two immunodominant epitopes, VT9 (VLSEWLPVT, N(121-129)) and IL9 (ILDAHSLYL, N165-173), were defined. VT9- and IL9-specific CD8(+) T cells identified by tetramer staining were cytotoxic and polyfunctional, characteristics deemed important for viral control in vivo. These peptides induced specific CD8(+) T cell responses in A2-transgenic mice, and more importantly, potent N-specific CD8(+) T cell reactivities, including VT9- and IL9-specific ones, were mounted by mice after a booster vaccination with the live attenuated RVF MP-12. Our data suggest that the RVFV N protein is a potent human T cell immunogen capable of eliciting broad, immunodominant CD8(+) T cell responses that are potentially protective. Understanding the immune responses to the nucleocapsid is central to the design of an effective RVFV vaccine irrespective of whether this viral protein is effective as a stand-alone immunogen or only in combination with other RVFV antigens.

  18. The Nucleocapsid Protein of Rift Valley Fever Virus Is a Potent Human CD8+ T Cell Antigen and Elicits Memory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weidong; Watts, Douglas M.; Costanzo, Margaret C.; Tang, Xiaolei; Venegas, Leon A.; Jiao, Feng; Sette, Alessandro; Sidney, John; Sewell, Andrew K.; Wooldridge, Linda; Makino, Shinji; Morrill, John C.; Peters, Clarence J.; Kan-Mitchell, June

    2013-01-01

    There is no licensed human vaccine currently available for Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVFV), a Category A high priority pathogen and a serious zoonotic threat. While neutralizing antibodies targeting the viral glycoproteins are protective, they appear late in the course of infection, and may not be induced in time to prevent a natural or bioterrorism-induced outbreak. Here we examined the immunogenicity of RVFV nucleocapsid (N) protein as a CD8+ T cell antigen with the potential for inducing rapid protection after vaccination. HLA-A*0201 (A2)-restricted epitopic determinants were identified with N-specific CD8+ T cells from eight healthy donors that were primed with dendritic cells transduced to express N, and subsequently expanded in vitro by weekly re-stimulations with monocytes pulsed with 59 15mer overlapping peptides (OLPs) across N. Two immunodominant epitopes, VT9 (VLSEWLPVT, N121–129) and IL9 (ILDAHSLYL, N165–173), were defined. VT9- and IL9-specific CD8+ T cells identified by tetramer staining were cytotoxic and polyfunctional, characteristics deemed important for viral control in vivo. These peptides induced specific CD8+ T cell responses in A2-transgenic mice, and more importantly, potent N-specific CD8+ T cell reactivities, including VT9- and IL9-specific ones, were mounted by mice after a booster vaccination with the live attenuated RVF MP-12. Our data suggest that the RVFV N protein is a potent human T cell immunogen capable of eliciting broad, immunodominant CD8+ T cell responses that are potentially protective. Understanding the immune responses to the nucleocapsid is central to the design of an effective RVFV vaccine irrespective of whether this viral protein is effective as a stand-alone immunogen or only in combination with other RVFV antigens. PMID:23527138

  19. The in vitro ejection of zinc from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 nucleocapsid protein by disulfide benzamides with cellular anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed Central

    Tummino, P J; Scholten, J D; Harvey, P J; Holler, T P; Maloney, L; Gogliotti, R; Domagala, J; Hupe, D

    1996-01-01

    Several disulfide benzamides have been shown to possess wide-spectrum antiretroviral activity in cell culture at low micromolar to submicromolar concentrations, inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) clinical and drug-resistant strains along with HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus [Rice, W. G., Supko, J. G., Malspeis, L., Buckheit, R. W., Jr., Clanton, D., Bu, M., Graham, L., Schaeffer, C. A., Turpin, J. A., Domagala, J., Gogliotti, R., Bader, J. P., Halliday, S. M., Coren, L., Sowder, R. C., II, Arthur, L. O. & Henderson, L. E. (1995) Science 270, 1194-1197]. Rice and coworkers have proposed that the compounds act by "attacking" the two zinc fingers of HIV nucleocapsid protein. Shown here is evidence that low micromolar concentrations of the anti-HIV disulfide benzamides eject zinc from HIV nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) in vitro, as monitored by the zinc-specific fluorescent probe N-(6-methoxy-8-quinoyl)-p-toluenesulfonamide (TSQ). Structurally similar disulfide benzamides that do not inhibit HIV-1 in culture do not eject zinc, nor do analogs of the antiviral compounds with the disulfide replaced with a methylene sulfide. The kinetics of NCp7 zinc ejection by disulfide benzamides were found to be nonsaturable and biexponential, with the rate of ejection from the C-terminal zinc finger 7-fold faster than that from the N-terminal. The antiviral compounds were found to inhibit the zinc-dependent binding of NCp7 to HIV psi RNA, as studied by gel-shift assays, and the data correlated well with the zinc ejection data. Anti-HIV disulfide benzamides specifically eject NCp7 zinc and abolish the protein's ability to bind psi RNA in vitro, providing evidence for a possible antiretroviral mechanism of action of these compounds. Congeners of this class are under advanced preclinical evaluation as a potential chemotherapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Images Fig. 7 PMID:8577770

  20. Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF51 is a ChaB homologous gene involved in budded virus production and DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fangliang; Huang, Yi; Long, Gang; Sun, Xiulian; Wang, Hanzhong

    2011-01-01

    The baculovirus ChaB proteins are conserved in all completely sequenced Lepidopteran NPVs and are annotated as putative DNA binding proteins. Here we investigated Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV) ORF51 (ha51), one of the ChaB homologues in HearNPV. 5'-RACE revealed that Ha51 is transcribed from a conventional early promoter transcriptional initiator motif (CATT) located at 159nt upstream of ATG. RT-PCR confirmed that ha51 is an early transcribed gene. To study the function of Ha51 in the life cycle of HearNPV, Ha51 knockout and repair bacmids were generated by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Growth curve and DNA replication analyses showed that the levels of budded virus (BV) production and viral DNA accumulation were significantly higher in cells infected with Ha51 null virus than those infected with wild-type bacmid derived virus. Electron microscopy revealed that polyhedra formation was not affected by the deletion of Ha51. Bioassay demonstrated that the Ha51-deleted virus had similar oral infectivity as the wild-type and rescued virus. Western blot analyses suggested that HA51 is a component of the nucleocapsid of BV and occlusion-derived virus as well as the envelope of BV. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that HA51 protein is mainly localized in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Taken together, our results indicate that, unlike previously characterized baculovirual ChaB genes, Ha51 is involved in viral DNA replication and BV production and is transcribed in the early stage of infection.

  1. Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus AC83 is a Per Os Infectivity Factor (PIF) Protein Required for Occlusion-Derived Virus (ODV) and Budded Virus Nucleocapsid Assembly as well as Assembly of the PIF Complex in ODV Envelopes.

    PubMed

    Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Biswas, Siddhartha; Willis, Leslie G; Harris, Stephanie; Pritchard, Caitlin; van Oers, Monique M; Donly, B Cameron; Erlandson, Martin A; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Theilmann, David A

    2017-03-01

    Baculovirus occlusion-derived virus (ODV) initiates infection of lepidopteran larval hosts by binding to the midgut epithelia, which is mediated by per os infectivity factors (PIFs). Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) encodes seven PIF proteins, of which PIF1 to PIF4 form a core complex in ODV envelopes to which PIF0 and PIF6 loosely associate. Deletion of any pif gene results in ODV being unable to bind or enter midgut cells. AC83 also associates with the PIF complex, and this study further analyzed its role in oral infectivity to determine if it is a PIF protein. It had been proposed that AC83 possesses a chitin binding domain that enables transit through the peritrophic matrix; however, no chitin binding activity has ever been demonstrated. AC83 has been reported to be found only in the ODV envelopes, but in contrast, the Orgyia pseudotsugata MNPV AC83 homolog is associated with both ODV nucleocapsids and envelopes. In addition, unlike known pif genes, deletion of ac83 eliminates nucleocapsid formation. We propose a new model for AC83 function and show AC83 is associated with both ODV nucleocapsids and envelopes. We also further define the domain required for nucleocapsid assembly. The cysteine-rich region of AC83 is also shown not to be a chitin binding domain but a zinc finger domain required for the recruitment or assembly of the PIF complex to ODV envelopes. As such, AC83 has all the properties of a PIF protein and should be considered PIF8. In addition, pif7 (ac110) is reported as the 38th baculovirus core gene.IMPORTANCE ODV is essential for the per os infectivity of the baculovirus AcMNPV. To initiate infection, ODV binds to microvilli of lepidopteran midgut cells, a process which requires a group of seven virion envelope proteins called PIFs. In this study, we reexamined the function of AC83, a protein that copurifies with the ODV PIFs, to determine its role in the oral infection process. A zinc finger domain was identified and

  2. Disruption of the baculovirus core gene ac78 results in decreased production of multiple nucleocapsid-enveloped occlusion-derived virions and the failure of primary infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Sai-Nan; Wang, Jin-Yu; Yuan, Mei-Jin; Yang, Kai

    2014-10-13

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac78 gene is one of the baculovirus core genes. Recent studies showed that ac78 is essential for budded virion (BV) production and the embedding of occlusion-derived virion (ODV) into occlusion body during the AcMNPV life cycle. Here, we report that an ac78-knockout AcMNPV (vAc78KO) constructed in this study had different phenotypes than those described in the previous studies. A few infectious BVs were detected using titer assays, immunoblot analyses and plaque assays, indicating that ac78 is not essential for BV formation. Electron microscopy confirmed that the ac78 deletion did not affect nucleocapsid assembly and ODV formation. However, the numbers of multiple nucleocapsid-enveloped ODVs and ODV-embedded occlusion bodies were significantly decreased. Subsequently, the highly conserved amino acid residues 2-25 and 64-88 of Ac78, which are homologous to an oxidoreductase and cytochrome c oxidase, respectively, were demonstrated to play a crucial role in the morphogenesis of multiple nucleocapsid-enveloped ODV. Immunoblot analysis found that Ac78 was an ODV envelope-associated protein. Consistently, amino acid residues 56-93 of Ac78 were identified as an inner nuclear membrane sorting motif, which may direct the localization of Ac78 to the ODV envelope. In vivo infectivity assays showed that the occlusion bodies of vAc78KO were unable to establish primary infection in the midgut of Trichoplusia ni larvae. Taken together, our results suggest that ac78 plays an important role in BV production and proper multiple nucleocapsid-enveloped ODV formation, as well as AcMNPV primary infection in vivo.

  3. The sf32 Unique Gene of Spodoptera frugiperda Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV) Is a Non-Essential Gene That Could Be Involved in Nucleocapsid Organization in Occlusion-Derived Virions

    PubMed Central

    Beperet, Inés; Barrera, Gloria; Simón, Oihane; Williams, Trevor; López-Ferber, Miguel; Gasmi, Laila; Herrero, Salvador; Caballero, Primitivo

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant virus lacking the sf32 gene (Sf32null), unique to the Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV), was generated by homologous recombination from a bacmid comprising the complete viral genome (Sfbac). Transcriptional analysis revealed that sf32 is an early gene. Occlusion bodies (OBs) of Sf32null contained 62% more genomic DNA than viruses containing the sf32 gene, Sfbac and Sf32null-repair, although Sf32null DNA was three-fold less infective when injected in vivo. Sf32null OBs were 18% larger in diameter and contained 17% more nucleocapsids within ODVs than those of Sfbac. No significant differences were detected in OB pathogenicity (50% lethal concentration), speed-of-kill or budded virus production in vivo. In contrast, the production of OBs/larva was reduced by 39% in insects infected by Sf32null compared to those infected by Sfbac. The SF32 predicted protein sequence showed homology (25% identity, 44% similarity) to two adhesion proteins from Streptococcus pyogenes and a single N-mirystoylation site was predicted. We conclude that SF32 is a non-essential protein that could be involved in nucleocapsid organization during ODV assembly and occlusion, resulting in increased numbers of nucleocapsids within ODVs. PMID:24204916

  4. Site-selective probing of cTAR destabilization highlights the necessary plasticity of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein to chaperone the first strand transfer

    PubMed Central

    Godet, Julien; Kenfack, Cyril; Przybilla, Frédéric; Richert, Ludovic; Duportail, Guy; Mély, Yves

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) is a nucleic acid chaperone required during reverse transcription. During the first strand transfer, NCp7 is thought to destabilize cTAR, the (−)DNA copy of the TAR RNA hairpin, and subsequently direct the TAR/cTAR annealing through the zipping of their destabilized stem ends. To further characterize the destabilizing activity of NCp7, we locally probe the structure and dynamics of cTAR by steady-state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. NC(11–55), a truncated NCp7 version corresponding to its zinc-finger domain, was found to bind all over the sequence and to preferentially destabilize the penultimate double-stranded segment in the lower part of the cTAR stem. This destabilization is achieved through zinc-finger–dependent binding of NC to the G10 and G50 residues. Sequence comparison further revealed that C•A mismatches close to the two G residues were critical for fine tuning the stability of the lower part of the cTAR stem and conferring to G10 and G50 the appropriate mobility and accessibility for specific recognition by NC. Our data also highlight the necessary plasticity of NCp7 to adapt to the sequence and structure variability of cTAR to chaperone its annealing with TAR through a specific pathway. PMID:23511968

  5. Distinct functions and requirements for the Cys-His boxes of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocapsid protein during RNA encapsidation and replication.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, M D; Fiore, D; Panganiban, A T

    1997-01-01

    The process of retroviral RNA encapsidation involves interaction between trans-acting viral proteins and cis-acting RNA elements. The encapsidation signal on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA is a multipartite structure composed of functional stem-loop structures. The nucleocapsid (NC) domain of the Gag polyprotein precursor contains two copies of a Cys-His box motif that have been demonstrated to be important in RNA encapsidation. To further characterize the role of the Cys-His boxes of the HIV-1 NC protein in RNA encapsidation, the relative efficiency of RNA encapsidation for virus particles that contained mutations within the Cys-His boxes was measured. Mutations that disrupted the first Cys-His box of the NC protein resulted in virus particles that encapsidated genomic RNA less efficiently and subgenomic RNA more efficiently than did wild-type virus. Mutations within the second Cys-His box did not significantly affect RNA encapsidation. In addition, a full complement of wild-type NC protein in virus particles is not required for efficient RNA encapsidation or virus replication. Finally, both Cys-His boxes of the NC protein play additional roles in virus replication. PMID:9371588

  6. Co-interactive DNA-binding between a novel, immunophilin-like shrimp protein and VP15 nucleocapsid protein of white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Sangsuriya, Pakkakul; Senapin, Saengchan; Huang, Wei-Pang; Lo, Chu-Fang; Flegel, Timothy W

    2011-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is one of the most serious pathogens of penaeid shrimp. Although its genome has been completely characterized, the functions of most of its putative proteins are not yet known. It has been suggested that the major nucleocapsid protein VP15 is involved in packaging of the WSSV genome during virion formation. However, little is known in its relationship with shrimp host cells. Using the yeast two-hybrid approach to screen a shrimp lymphoid organ (LO) cDNA library for proteins that might interact with VP15, a protein named PmFKBP46 was identified. It had high sequence similarity to a 46 kDa-immunophilin called FKBP46 from the lepidopteran Spodoptera frugiperda (the fall armyworm). The full length PmFKBP46 consisted of a 1,257-nucleotide open reading frame with a deduced amino acid sequence of 418 residues containing a putative FKBP-PPIase domain in the C-terminal region. Results from a GST pull-down assay and histological co-localization revealed that VP15 physically interacted with PmFKBP46 and that both proteins shared the same subcellular location in the nucleus. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay indicated that PmFKBP46 possessed DNA-binding activity and functionally co-interacted with VP15 in DNA binding. The overall results suggested that host PmFKBP46 might be involved in genome packaging by viral VP15 during virion assembly.

  7. Nucleocapsid of Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus forms mobile particles that traffic on an actin/endoplasmic reticulum network driven by myosin XI-K.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhike; Chen, Xiaojiao; Bao, Yiqun; Dong, Jiahong; Zhang, Zhongkai; Tao, Xiaorong

    2013-12-01

    A number of viral proteins from plant viruses, other than movement proteins, have been shown to traffic intracellularly along actin filaments and to be involved in viral infection. However, there has been no report that a viral capsid protein may traffic within a cell by utilizing the actin/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. We used Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV) as a model virus to study the cell biological properties of a nucleocapsid (N) protein. We found that TSWV N protein was capable of forming highly motile cytoplasmic inclusions that moved along the ER and actin network. The disruption of actin filaments by latrunculin B, an actin-depolymerizing agent, almost stopped the intracellular movement of N inclusions, whereas treatment with a microtubule-depolymerizing reagent, oryzalin, did not. The over-expression of a myosin XI-K tail, functioning in a dominant-negative manner, completely halted the movement of N inclusions. Latrunculin B treatment strongly inhibited the formation of TSWV local lesions in Nicotiana tabacum cv Samsun NN and delayed systemic infection in N. benthamiana. Collectively, our findings provide the first evidence that the capsid protein of a plant virus has the novel property of intracellular trafficking. The findings add capsid protein as a new class of viral protein that traffics on the actin/ER system.

  8. The N-terminus of the Montano virus nucleocapsid protein possesses broadly cross-reactive conformation-dependent epitopes conserved in rodent-borne hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Saasa, Ngonda; Yoshida, Haruka; Shimizu, Kenta; Sánchez-Hernández, Cornelio; Romero-Almaraz, María de Lourdes; Koma, Takaaki; Sanada, Takahiro; Seto, Takahiro; Yoshii, Kentaro; Ramos, Celso; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro; Takashima, Ikuo; Kariwa, Hiroaki

    2012-06-20

    The hantavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is an important immunogen that stimulates a strong and cross-reactive immune response in humans and rodents. A large proportion of the response to N protein has been found to target its N-terminus. However, the exact nature of this bias towards the N-terminus is not yet fully understood. We characterized six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the N protein of Montano virus (MTNV), a Mexican hantavirus. Five of these mAbs recognized eight American hantaviruses and six European and Asian hantaviruses, but not the Soricomorpha-borne Thottapalayam hantavirus. The N protein-reactive binding regions of the five mAbs were mapped to discontinuous epitopes within the N-terminal 13-51 amino acid residues, while a single serotype-specific mAb was mapped to residues 1-25 and 49-75. Our findings suggest that discontinuous epitopes at the N-terminus are conserved, at least in rodent-borne hantaviruses, and that they contribute considerably to N protein cross-reactivity.

  9. Investigation by two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of the interaction of the nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1 with hairpin loop DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mely, Yves; Azoulay, Joel; Beltz, Herve; Clamme, Jean-Pierre; Bernacchi, Serena; Ficheux, Damien; Roques, Bernard P.; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2004-09-01

    The nucleocapsid protein NCp7 of HIV-1 possesses nucleic acid chaperone properties that are critical for the two strand transfer reactions required during reverse transcription. The first DNA strand transfer relies on the destabilization by NCp7 of double-stranded segments of the transactivation response element, TAR sequence, at the 3' end of the genomic RNA and the complementary sequence cTAR at the 3" terminus of the early product of reverse transcription. To characterize NCp7-mediated nucleic acid destabilization, we investigated by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and two photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, the interaction of a doubly-labelled cTAR sequence with NCp7. The conformational fluctuations observed in the absence of NCp7 were associated with the rapid opening and closing (fraying) of the double stranded terminal segment of cTAR. NCp7 destabilizes cTAR mainly through a large increase of the opening rate constant. Additionally, the various destabilizing structures (bulges, internal loop, mismatches) spread all over cTAR secondary structure were found to be critical for NCp7 chaperone activity. Taken together, our data enabled us to propose a molecular mechanism for the destabilizing activity of NCp7 on cTAR which is crucial for the formation of the cTAR-TAR complex during the first strand transfer reaction.

  10. Recombinant nucleocapsid-like particles from dengue-2 virus induce protective CD4+ and CD8+ cells against viral encephalitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gil, Lázaro; López, Carlos; Lazo, Laura; Valdés, Iris; Marcos, Ernesto; Alonso, Ruby; Gambe, Ailyn; Martín, Jorge; Romero, Yaremis; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2009-10-01

    Virus-like particles are a highly effective type of subunit vaccine that mimics the overall structure of virus particles without containing infectious genetic material. In this work, a particulate form of the recombinant capsid protein from dengue-2 was evaluated in mice to determine the level of protection against viral challenge and to measure the antigen-induced cell-mediated immunity (CMI). The nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) adjuvanted with alum did not induce antiviral antibodies. However, splenocytes from the immunized animals secreted high levels of IFN-gamma upon virus stimulation, and a significant protection rate was achieved after challenge with lethal dengue-2 virus. Finally, both IFN-gamma secretion and protection against viral encephalitis were demonstrated to be dependent on CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. This study provides new evidences regarding the protective role of the CMI in the mouse model without the induction of neutralizing antibodies. Further studies in non-human primates or humanized mice should be carried out to elucidate the usefulness of the NLPs as a potential vaccine candidate against dengue disease.

  11. A Tetravalent Formulation Based on Recombinant Nucleocapsid-like Particles from Dengue Viruses Induces a Functional Immune Response in Mice and Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Gil, Lázaro; Cobas, Karem; Lazo, Laura; Marcos, Ernesto; Hernández, Laura; Suzarte, Edith; Izquierdo, Alienys; Valdés, Iris; Blanco, Aracelys; Puentes, Pedro; Romero, Yaremis; Pérez, Yusleidi; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2016-11-01

    Despite the considerable effort that has been invested in elucidating the mechanisms of protection and immunopathogenesis associated with dengue virus infections, a reliable correlate of protection against the disease remains to be found. Neutralizing Abs, long considered the prime component of a protective response, can exacerbate disease severity when present at subprotective levels, and a growing body of data is challenging the notion that their titers are positively correlated with disease protection. Consequently, the protective role of cell-mediated immunity in the control of dengue infections has begun to be studied. Although earlier research implicated cellular immunity in dengue immunopathogenesis, a wealth of newer data demonstrated that multifunctional CD8(+) T cell responses are instrumental for avoiding the more severe manifestations of dengue disease. In this article, we describe a new tetravalent vaccine candidate based on recombinant dengue virus capsid proteins, efficiently produced in Escherichia coli and purified using a single ion-exchange chromatography step. After aggregation to form nucleocapsid-like particles upon incubation with an oligodeoxynucleotide containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs, these Ags induce, in mice and monkeys, an IFN-γ-secreting cell response that significantly reduces viral load after challenge without the contribution of antiviral Abs. Therefore, this new vaccine candidate may not carry the risk for disease enhancement associated with Ab-based formulations.

  12. HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Switches the Pathway of TAR RNA/DNA Annealing from Loop-Loop “Kissing” to “Zipper”

    PubMed Central

    Vo, My-Nuong; Barany, George; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Summary The chaperone activity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) facilitates multiple nucleic acid rearrangements that are critical for reverse transcription of the single-stranded RNA genome into double-stranded DNA. Annealing of the trans-activation response element (TAR) RNA hairpin to a complementary TAR DNA hairpin is an essential step in the minus-strand transfer step of reverse transcription. Previously, we used truncated 27-nucleotide (nt) mini-TAR RNA and DNA constructs to investigate this annealing reaction pathway in the presence and absence of HIV-1 NC. In this work, full-length 59-nt TAR RNA and TAR DNA constructs were used to systematically study TAR hairpin annealing kinetics. In the absence of NC, full-length TAR hairpin annealing is ∼10-fold slower than mini-TAR annealing. Similar to mini-TAR annealing, the reaction pathway for TAR in the absence of NC involves the fast formation of an unstable “kissing” loop intermediate, followed by a slower conversion to an extended duplex. NC facilitates the annealing of TAR by ∼105-fold by stabilizing the bimolecular intermediate (∼104-fold) and promoting the subsequent exchange reaction (∼10-fold). In contrast to the mini-TAR annealing pathway, wherein NC-mediated annealing can initiate through both loop-loop kissing and a distinct “zipper” pathway involving nucleation at the 3′/5′ terminal ends, full-length TAR hairpin annealing switches predominantly to the zipper pathway in the presence of saturated NC. PMID:19154737

  13. Nucleic acid conformational changes essential for HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein-mediated inhibition of self-priming in minus-strand transfer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Minh K; Harbron, Elizabeth J; O'Connor, Donald B; Guo, Jianhui; Barbara, Paul F; Levin, Judith G; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2003-01-03

    Reverse transcription of the HIV-1 genome is a complex multi-step process. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) is a nucleic acid chaperone protein that has been shown to greatly facilitate the nucleic acid rearrangements that precede the minus-strand transfer step in reverse transcription. NC destabilizes the highly structured transactivation response region (TAR) present in the R region of the RNA genome, as well as a complementary hairpin structure ("TAR DNA") at the 3'-end of the newly synthesized minus-strand strong-stop DNA ((-) SSDNA). Melting of the latter structure inhibits a self-priming (SP) reaction that competes with the strand transfer reaction. In an in vitro minus-strand transfer system consisting of a (-) SSDNA mimic and a TAR-containing acceptor RNA molecule, we find that when both nucleic acids are present, NC facilitates formation of the transfer product and the SP reaction is greatly reduced. In contrast, in the absence of the acceptor RNA, NC has only a small inhibitory effect on the SP reaction. To further investigate NC-mediated inhibition of SP, we developed a FRET-based assay that allows us to directly monitor conformational changes in the TAR DNA structure upon NC binding. Although the majority ( approximately 71%) of the TAR DNA molecules assume a folded hairpin conformation in the absence of NC, two minor "semi-folded" and "unfolded" populations are also observed. Upon NC binding to the TAR DNA alone, we observe a modest shift in the population towards the less-folded states. In the presence of the RNA acceptor molecule, NC binding to TAR DNA results in a shift of the majority of molecules to the unfolded state. These measurements help to explain why acceptor RNA is required for significant inhibition of the SP reaction by NC, and support the hypothesis that NC-mediated annealing of nucleic acids is a concerted process wherein the unwinding step occurs in synchrony with hybridization.

  14. Comparative structural effects of HIV-1 Gag and nucleocapsid proteins in binding to and unwinding of the viral RNA packaging signal.

    PubMed

    Bell, Neil M; Kenyon, Julia C; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Lever, Andrew M L

    2012-04-17

    The major RNA binding region of the HIV-1 Gag polyprotein is the nucleocapsid (NC) domain, which is responsible for the specific capture of the genomic RNA genome during viral assembly. The Gag polyprotein has other RNA chaperone functions, which are mirrored by the isolated NC protein after physiological cleavage from Gag. Gag, however, is suggested to have superior nucleic acid chaperone activity. Here we investigate the interaction of Gag and NC with the core RNA structure of the HIV-1 packaging signal (Ψ), using 2-aminopurine substitution to create a series of modified RNAs based on the Ψ helix loop structure. The effects of 2-aminopurine substitution on the physical and structural properties of the viral Ψ were characterized. The fluorescence properties of the 2-aminopurine substitutions showed features consistent with the native GNAR tetraloop. Dissociation constants (K(d)) of the two viral proteins, measured by fluorescence polarization (FP), were similar, and both NC and Gag affected the 2-aminopurine fluorescence of bases close to the loop binding region in a similar fashion. However, the influence of Gag on the fluorescence of the 2-aminopurine nucleotides at the base of the helix implied a much more potent helix destabilizing action on the RNA stem loop (SL) versus that seen with NC. This was further supported when the viral Ψ SL was tagged with a 5' fluorophore and 3' quencher. In the absence of any viral protein, minimal fluorescence was detected; addition of NC yielded a slight increase in fluorescence, while addition of the Gag protein yielded a large change in fluorescence, further suggesting that, compared to NC, the Gag protein has a greater propensity to affect RNA structure and that Ψ helix unwinding may be an intrinsic step in RNA encapsidation.

  15. Effects of the Nature and Concentration of Salt on the Interaction of the HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein with SL3 RNA§

    PubMed Central

    Athavale, Shreyas S.; Ouyang, Wei; McPike, Mark P.; Hudson, Bruce S.

    2010-01-01

    The mature nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1, NCp7, and the NC-domains in gag-precursors are attractive targets for anti-AIDS drug discovery. The stability of the 1:1 complex of NCp7 with a 20mer mimic of stem-loop 3 RNA (SL3, also called psi-RNA, in the packaging domain of genomic RNA) is strongly affected by changes in ionic strength. NC-domains recognize and specifically package genomic HIV-1 RNA, while electrostatic attractions and high concentrations of protein and RNA drive NCp7 to completely coat the RNA in the mature virion. The specific interactions from NCp7-binding to loop bases of SL3 produce 1:1 complexes in solutions that have [NaCl] at or above 0.2 M, while the electrostatic interactions can dominate at and below 0.15 M NaCl, leading to complexes that have mainly 1:2 RNA:protein. Persistent, non-equilibrium mixtures of 1:1 and protein-excess complexes can exist at these lower salt concentrations, where the distribution of complexes depends on the order of addition of RNA and protein. Adding salt causes rapid rearrangement of metastable multi-protein complexes to 1:1. The stability of complexes is also affected by the nature of the added salt, with 0.018 M MgCl2 and 0.200 M added NaCl producing the same Kd (21 ± 2 nM); acetate ion stabilizes the 1:1 complex by more than a factor of two compared to the same concentration of chloride ion. Maintaining a salt concentration of 0.2 M NaCl or 18 mM MgCl2 is sufficient for experiments to distinguish drug candidates that disrupt the specific SL3-NCp7 interactions in the 1:1 complex. PMID:20359247

  16. Solution structure of the c-terminal dimerization domain of SARS coronavirus nucleocapsid protein solved by the SAIL-NMR method.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Chang, Chung-ke; Ikeya, Teppei; Güntert, Peter; Chang, Yuan-hsiang; Hsu, Yen-lan; Huang, Tai-huang; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2008-07-18

    The C-terminal domain (CTD) of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nucleocapsid protein (NP) contains a potential RNA-binding region in its N-terminal portion and also serves as a dimerization domain by forming a homodimer with a molecular mass of 28 kDa. So far, the structure determination of the SARS-CoV NP CTD in solution has been impeded by the poor quality of NMR spectra, especially for aromatic resonances. We have recently developed the stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) method to overcome the size problem of NMR structure determination by utilizing a protein exclusively composed of stereo- and regio-specifically isotope-labeled amino acids. Here, we employed the SAIL method to determine the high-quality solution structure of the SARS-CoV NP CTD by NMR. The SAIL protein yielded less crowded and better resolved spectra than uniform (13)C and (15)N labeling, and enabled the homodimeric solution structure of this protein to be determined. The NMR structure is almost identical with the previously solved crystal structure, except for a disordered putative RNA-binding domain at the N-terminus. Studies of the chemical shift perturbations caused by the binding of single-stranded DNA and mutational analyses have identified the disordered region at the N-termini as the prime site for nucleic acid binding. In addition, residues in the beta-sheet region also showed significant perturbations. Mapping of the locations of these residues onto the helical model observed in the crystal revealed that these two regions are parts of the interior lining of the positively charged helical groove, supporting the hypothesis that the helical oligomer may form in solution.

  17. Binding Characteristics of Small Molecules that Mimic Nucleocapsid Protein-induced Maturation of Stem-loop-1 of HIV-1 RNA†

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Janet; Ulyanov, Nikolai B.; Guilbert, Christophe; Mujeeb, Anwer; James, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    As a retrovirus, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) packages two copies of the RNA genome as a dimer in the infectious virion. Dimerization is initiated at the dimer initiation site (DIS) which encompasses stem-loop 1 (SL1) in the 5’-UTR of the genome. Study of genomic dimerization has been facilitated by the discovery that short RNA fragments containing SL1 can dimerize spontaneously without any protein factors. Based on the palindromic nature of SL1, a kissing loop model has been proposed. First, a metastable kissing dimer is formed via standard Watson-Crick base pairs and then converted into a more stable extended dimer by the viral nucleocapsid protein (NCp7). This dimer maturation in vitro is believed to mimic initial steps in the RNA maturation in vivo, which is correlated with viral infectivity. We previously discovered a small molecule activator, Lys-Ala-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin (KA-AMC), which facilitates dimer maturation in vitro, and determined aspects of its structure-activity relationship. In this report, we present measurements of the binding affinity of the activators and characterization of their interactions with the SL1 RNA. Guanidinium groups and increasing positive charge on the side chain enhance affinity and activity, but features in the aromatic ring at least partially decouple affinity from activity. Although KA-AMC can bind to multiple structural motifs, NMR study showed KA-AMC preferentially binds to unique structural motifs, such as the palindromic loop and the G-rich internal loop in the SL1 RNA. NCp7 binds to SL1 only an order of magnitude tighter than the best small molecule ligand tested. The study presented here provides guidelines for design of superior small molecule binders to the SL1 RNA that have the potential of being developed as an antiviral by either interfering with SL1-NCp7 interaction at the packaging and/or maturation stages. PMID:20565056

  18. Antigenic characterization of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus nucleocapsid protein expressed in insect cells: The effect of phosphorylation on immunoreactivity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Shin, Gu-Choul; Chung, Yoon-Seok; Kim, In-Soo; Cho, Hae-Wol; Kang, Chun

    2007-07-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is involved in the pathological reaction to SARS and is a key antigen for the development of a sensitive diagnostic assay. However, the antigenic properties of this N protein are largely unknown. To facilitate the studies on the function and antigenicity of the SARS-CoV N protein, 6x histidine-tagged recombinant SARS-CoV N (rSARS-N) with a molecular mass of 46 and 48kDa was successfully produced using the recombinant baculovirus system in insect cells. The rSARS-N expressed in insect cells (BrSARS-N) showed remarkably higher specificity and immunoreactivity than rSARS-N expressed in E. coli (ErSARS-N). Most of all, BrSARS-N proteins were expressed as a highly phosphorylated form with a molecular mass of 48kDa, but ErSARS-N was a nonphosphorylated protein. In further analysis to determine the correlation between the phosphorylation and the antigenicity of SARS-N protein, dephosphorylated SARS-N protein treated with protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) remarkably enhanced the cross-reactivity against SARS negative serum and considerably reduced immunoreactivity with SARS-N mAb. These results suggest that the phosphorylation plays an important role in the immunoreactivity and specificity of SARS-N protein. Therefore, the BrSARS-N protein may be useful for the development of highly sensitive and specific assays to determine SARS infection and for further research of SARS-N pathology.

  19. The RING Domain and the L79 Residue of Z Protein Are Involved in both the Rescue of Nucleocapsids and the Incorporation of Glycoproteins into Infectious Chimeric Arenavirus-Like Particles ▿

    PubMed Central

    Casabona, Juan Cruz; Levingston Macleod, Jesica M.; Loureiro, Maria Eugenia; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Lopez, Nora

    2009-01-01

    Arenaviruses, such as Tacaribe virus (TacV) and its closely related pathogenic Junin virus (JunV), are enveloped viruses with a bipartite negative-sense RNA genome that encodes the nucleocapsid protein (N), the precursor of the envelope glycoprotein complex (GP), the polymerase (L), and a RING finger protein (Z), which is the driving force of arenavirus budding. We have established a plasmid-based system which allowed the successful packaging of TacV-like nucleocapsids along with Z and GP of JunV into infectious virus-like particles (VLPs). By coexpressing different combinations of the system components, followed by biochemical analysis of the VLPs, the requirements for the assembly of both N and GP into particles were defined. We found that coexpression of N with Z protein in the absence of minigenome and other viral proteins was sufficient to recruit N within lipid-enveloped Z-containing VLPs. In addition, whereas GP was not required for the incorporation of N, coexpression of N substantially enhanced the ratio of GP to Z into VLPs. Disruption of the RING structure or mutation of residue L79 to alanine within Z protein, although it had no effect on Z self-budding, severely impaired VLP infectivity. These mutations drastically altered intracellular Z-N interactions and the incorporation of both N and GP into VLPs. Our results support the conclusion that the interaction between Z and N is required for assembly of both the nucleocapsids and the glycoproteins into infectious arenavirus budding particles. PMID:19420075

  20. Resolution of the cellular proteome of the nucleocapsid protein from a highly pathogenic isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus identifies PARP-1 as a cellular target whose interaction is critical for virus biology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Lear, Zoe; Hughes, David J; Wu, Weining; Zhou, En-min; Whitehouse, Adrian; Chen, Hongying; Hiscox, Julian A

    2015-03-23

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major threat to the swine industry and food security worldwide. The nucleocapsid (N) protein is a major structural protein of PRRSV. The primary function of this protein is to encapsidate the viral RNA genome, and it is also thought to participate in the modulation of host cell biology and recruitment of cellular factors to facilitate virus infection. In order to the better understand these latter roles the cellular interactome of PRRSV N protein was defined using label free quantitative proteomics. This identified several cellular factors that could interact with the N protein including poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a cellular protein, which can add adenosine diphosphate ribose to a protein. Use of the PARP-1 small molecule inhibitor, 3-AB, in PRRSV infected cells demonstrated that PARP-1 was required and acted as an enhancer factor for virus biology. Serial growth of PRRSV in different concentrations of 3-AB did not yield viruses that were able to grow with wild type kinetics, suggesting that by targeting a cellular protein crucial for virus biology, resistant phenotypes did not emerge. This study provides further evidence that cellular proteins, which are critical for virus biology, can also be targeted to ablate virus growth and provide a high barrier for the emergence of drug resistance.

  1. Novel immunodominant peptide presentation strategy: a featured HLA-A*2402-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope stabilized by intrachain hydrogen bonds from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Wu, Peng; Gao, Feng; Qi, Jianxun; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Xie, Jing; Vavricka, Christopher J; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Li, Taisheng; Gao, George F

    2010-11-01

    Antigenic peptides recognized by virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC; or human leukocyte antigen [HLA] in humans) molecules, and the peptide selection and presentation strategy of the host has been studied to guide our understanding of cellular immunity and vaccine development. Here, a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nucleocapsid (N) protein-derived CTL epitope, N1 (QFKDNVILL), restricted by HLA-A*2402 was identified by a series of in vitro studies, including a computer-assisted algorithm for prediction, stabilization of the peptide by co-refolding with HLA-A*2402 heavy chain and β(2)-microglobulin (β(2)m), and T2-A24 cell binding. Consequently, the antigenicity of the peptide was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT), proliferation assays, and HLA-peptide complex tetramer staining using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from donors who had recovered from SARS donors. Furthermore, the crystal structure of HLA-A*2402 complexed with peptide N1 was determined, and the featured peptide was characterized with two unexpected intrachain hydrogen bonds which augment the central residues to bulge out of the binding groove. This may contribute to the T-cell receptor (TCR) interaction, showing a host immunodominant peptide presentation strategy. Meanwhile, a rapid and efficient strategy is presented for the determination of naturally presented CTL epitopes in the context of given HLA alleles of interest from long immunogenic overlapping peptides.

  2. Excitation-dependent visible fluorescence in decameric nanoparticles with monoacylglycerol cluster chromophores

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang-Ming; Cheng, Wan-Yin; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Nieh, Chih-Chun; Chou, Chen-Fu; Lee, Jia-Rong; Lee, Ya-Yun; Cheng, Chih-Yang; Chang, Sarah Y.; Yang, Thomas C.; Cheng, Mei-Ching; Lin, Bi-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Organic fluorescent nanoparticles, excitation-dependent photoluminescence, hydrogen-bonded clusters and lysobisphosphatidic acid are four interesting individual topics in materials and biological sciences. They have attracted much attention not only because of their unique properties and important applications, but also because the nature of their intriguing phenomena remained unclear. Here we report a new type of organic fluorescent nanoparticles with intense blue and excitation-dependent visible fluorescence in the range of 410–620 nm. The nanoparticles are composed of ten bis(monoacylglycerol)bisphenol-A molecules and the self-assembly occurs only in elevated concentrations of 2-monoacylglycerol via radical-catalysed 3,2-acyl migration from 3-monoacylglycerol in neat conditions. The excitation-dependent fluorescence behaviour is caused by chromophores composed of hydrogen-bonded monoacylglycerol clusters, which are linked by an extensive hydrogen-bonding network between the ester carbonyl groups and the protons of the alcohols with collective proton motion and HO···C=O (n→π*) interactions. PMID:23443572

  3. Zinc finger proteins as templates for metal ion exchange: Substitution effects on the C-finger of HIV nucleocapsid NCp7 using M(chelate) species (M=Pt, Pd, Au).

    PubMed

    de Paula, Queite A; Mangrum, John B; Farrell, Nicholas P

    2009-10-01

    The interactions of monofunctional [MCl(chelate)] compounds (M=Pt(II), Pd(II) or Au(III) and chelate=diethylenetriamine, dien or 2,2',2''-terpyridine, terpy) with the C-terminal finger of the HIV nucleocapsid NCp7 zinc finger (ZF) were studied by mass spectrometry and circular dichroism spectroscopy. In the case of [M(dien)] species, Pt(II) and Pd(II) behaved in a similar fashion with evidence of adducts caused by displacement of Pt-Cl or Pd-Cl by zinc-bound thiolate. Labilization, presumably under the influence of the strong trans influence of thiolate, resulted in loss of ligand (dien) as well as zinc ejection and formation of species with only Pd(II) or Pt(II) bound to the finger. For both Au(III) compounds the reactions were very fast and only "gold fingers" with no ancillary ligands were observed. For all terpyridine compounds ligand scrambling and metal exchange occurred with formation of [Zn(terpy)](2+). The results conform well to those proposed from the study of model Zn compounds such as N,N'-bis(2-mercapto-ethyl)-1,4-diazacycloheptanezinc(II), [Zn(bme-dach)](2). The possible structures of the adducts formed are discussed and, for Pt(II) and Pd(II), the evidence for possible expansion of the zinc coordination sphere from four- to five-coordinate is discussed. This observation reinforces the possibility of change in geometry for zinc in biology, even in common "structural" sites in metalloenzymes. The results further show that the extent and rate of zinc displacement by inorganic compounds can be modulated by the nature (metal, ligands) of the reacting compound.

  4. Preparation and evaluation of recombinant severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus nucleocapsid protein for detection of total antibodies in human and animal sera by double-antigen sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yongjun; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Guo, Xiling; Qi, Xian; Zhang, Xiao; Shi, Zhiyang; Zhou, Minghao; Bao, Changjun; Zhang, Wenshuai; Xu, Yan; Wang, Hua

    2012-02-01

    The recent emergence of the human infection confirmed to be caused by severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) in China is of global concern. Safe diagnostic immunoreagents for determination of human and animal seroprevalence in epidemiological investigations are urgently needed. This paper describes the cloning and expression of the nucleocapsid (N) protein of SFTSV. An N-protein-based double-antigen sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system was set up to detect the total antibodies in human and animal sera. We reasoned that as the double-antigen sandwich ELISA detected total antibodies with a higher sensitivity than traditional indirect ELISA, it could be used to detect SFTSV-specific antibodies from different animal species. The serum neutralization test was used to validate the performance of this ELISA system. All human and animal sera that tested positive in the neutralization test were also positive in the sandwich ELISA, and there was a high correlation between serum neutralizing titers and ELISA readings. Cross-reactivity was evaluated, and the system was found to be highly specific to SFTSV; all hantavirus- and dengue virus-confirmed patient samples were negative. SFTSV-confirmed human and animal sera from both Anhui and Hubei Provinces in China reacted with N protein in this ELISA, suggesting no major antigenic variation between geographically disparate virus isolates and the suitability of this assay in nationwide application. ELISA results showed that 3.6% of the human serum samples and 47.7% of the animal field serum samples were positive for SFTSV antibodies, indicating that SFTSV has circulated widely in China. This assay, which is simple to operate, poses no biohazard risk, does not require sophisticated equipment, and can be used in disease surveillance programs, particularly in the screening of large numbers of samples from various animal species.

  5. Heat Shock Protein 70 Family Members Interact with Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus and Hazara Virus Nucleocapsid Proteins and Perform a Functional Role in the Nairovirus Replication Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Surtees, Rebecca; Dowall, Stuart D.; Shaw, Amelia; Armstrong, Stuart; Hewson, Roger; Carroll, Miles W.; Mankouri, Jamel; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Nairovirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family contains serious human and animal pathogens classified within multiple serogroups and species. Of these serogroups, the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) serogroup comprises sole members CCHFV and Hazara virus (HAZV). CCHFV is an emerging zoonotic virus that causes often-fatal hemorrhagic fever in infected humans for which preventative or therapeutic strategies are not available. In contrast, HAZV is nonpathogenic to humans and thus represents an excellent model to study aspects of CCHFV biology under conditions of more-accessible biological containment. The three RNA segments that form the nairovirus genome are encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein (N) to form ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes that are substrates for RNA synthesis and packaging into virus particles. We used quantitative proteomics to identify cellular interaction partners of CCHFV N and identified robust interactions with cellular chaperones. These interactions were validated using immunological methods, and the specific interaction between native CCHFV N and cellular chaperones of the HSP70 family was confirmed during live CCHFV infection. Using infectious HAZV, we showed for the first time that the nairovirus N-HSP70 association was maintained within both infected cells and virus particles, where N is assembled as RNPs. Reduction of active HSP70 levels in cells by the use of small-molecule inhibitors significantly reduced HAZV titers, and a model for chaperone function in the context of high genetic variability is proposed. These results suggest that chaperones of the HSP70 family are required for nairovirus replication and thus represent a genetically stable cellular therapeutic target for preventing nairovirus-mediated disease. IMPORTANCE Nairoviruses compose a group of human and animal viruses that are transmitted by ticks and associated with serious or fatal disease. One member is Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever

  6. False-Positive Results in a Recombinant Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Associated Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) Nucleocapsid-Based Western Blot Assay Were Rectified by the Use of Two Subunits (S1 and S2) of Spike for Detection of Antibody to SARS-CoV

    PubMed Central

    Maache, Mimoun; Komurian-Pradel, Florence; Rajoharison, Alain; Perret, Magali; Berland, Jean-Luc; Pouzol, Stéphane; Bagnaud, Audrey; Duverger, Blandine; Xu, Jianguo; Osuna, Antonio; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the reactivity of the recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3), a Western blot assay was performed by using a panel of 78 serum samples obtained, respectively, from convalescent-phase patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) (30 samples) and from healthy donors (48 samples). As antigen for detection of SARS-CoV, the nucleocapsid protein (N) showed high sensitivity and strong reactivity with all samples from SARS-CoV patients and cross-reacted with all serum samples from healthy subjects, with either those obtained from China (10 samples) or those obtained from France (38 serum samples), giving then a significant rate of false positives. Specifically, our data indicated that the two subunits, S1 (residues 14 to 760) and S2 (residues 761 to 1190), resulted from the divided spike reacted with all samples from SARS-CoV patients and without any cross-reactivity with any of the healthy serum samples. Consequently, these data revealed the nonspecific nature of N protein in serodiagnosis of SARS-CoV compared with the S1 and S2, where the specificity is of 100%. Moreover, the reported results indicated that the use of one single protein as a detection antigen of SARS-CoV infection may lead to false-positive diagnosis. These may be rectified by using more than one protein for the serodiagnosis of SARS-CoV. PMID:16522785

  7. Neurodegenerative diseases: quantitative predictions of protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Davide; Agostini, Federico; Klus, Petr; Marchese, Domenica; Rodriguez, Silvia; Bolognesi, Benedetta; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano

    2013-02-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that RNA plays an active role in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. We recently introduced a theoretical framework, catRAPID, to predict the binding ability of protein and RNA molecules. Here, we use catRAPID to investigate ribonucleoprotein interactions linked to inherited intellectual disability, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Creutzfeuld-Jakob, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's diseases. We specifically focus on (1) RNA interactions with fragile X mental retardation protein FMRP; (2) protein sequestration caused by CGG repeats; (3) noncoding transcripts regulated by TAR DNA-binding protein 43 TDP-43; (4) autogenous regulation of TDP-43 and FMRP; (5) iron-mediated expression of amyloid precursor protein APP and α-synuclein; (6) interactions between prions and RNA aptamers. Our results are in striking agreement with experimental evidence and provide new insights in processes associated with neuronal function and misfunction.

  8. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

    SciTech Connect

    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2012-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-{alpha}/{beta} and {gamma}-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  9. Karyophilic properties of Semliki Forest virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Michel, M R; Elgizoli, M; Dai, Y; Jakob, R; Koblet, H; Arrigo, A P

    1990-01-01

    Semliki Forest virus capsid (C) protein molecules (Mr, 33,000) can be introduced efficiently into the cytoplasm of various target cells by electroporation, liposome, and erythrocyte ghost-mediated delivery (M. Elgizoli, Y. Dai, C. Kempf, H. Koblet, and M.R. Michel, J. Virol. 63:2921-2928, 1989). Here, we show that the transferred C protein molecules partition rapidly from the cytosolic compartment into the nucleus. Transport of the C protein molecules into the nucleus was reversibly arrested by metabolic inhibitors, indicating that the transfer process is energy dependent. Fractionation of isolated nuclei revealed that the delivered C protein preferentially associates with the nucleoli. This finding was confirmed by morphological studies, showing that in an in vitro system containing ATP isolated nuclei rapidly accumulated rhodamine-labeled C protein in their nucleoli. Furthermore, in this assay system, the lectin wheat germ agglutinin prevented transfer of C protein through nuclear pores. These results are in agreement with our observation that nucleoli contain measurable amounts of newly synthesized C protein as early as 5 h after infection of cells with SFV. Thereafter, nucleolar-associated C protein increased progressively during the course of infection. Images PMID:2398536

  10. Decameric GTP cyclohydrolase I forms complexes with two pentameric GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory proteins in the presence of phenylalanine or of a combination of tetrahydrobiopterin and GTP.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Hatakeyama, K

    1998-08-07

    The activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I is inhibited by (6R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and stimulated by phenylalanine through complex formation with GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). Gel filtration experiments as well as enzyme activity measurements showed that the number of subunits of GFRP in both the inhibitory and stimulatory complexes is equal to that of GTP cyclohydrolase I. Because GFRP is a pentamer and GTP cyclohydrolase I was shown here by cross-linking experiments to be a decamer, the results indicate that two molecules of a pentameric GFRP associate with one molecule of GTP cyclohydrolase I. Gel filtration analysis suggested that the complex has a radius of gyration similar to that of the enzyme itself. These observations support our model that one molecule of GFRP binds to each of the two outer faces of the torus-shaped GTP cyclohydrolase I. For formation of the inhibitory protein complex, both BH4 and GTP were required; the median effective concentrations of BH4 and GTP were 2 and 26 microM, respectively. BH4 was the most potent of biopterins with different oxidative states. Among GTP analogues, dGTP as well as guanosine 5'-O-(3'-thiotriphosphate) exhibited similar inducibility compared with GTP, whereas other nucleotide triphosphates had no effect. On the other hand, phenylalanine alone was enough for formation of the stimulatory protein complex, and positive cooperativity was found for the phenylalanine-induced protein complex formation. Phenylalanine was the most potent of the aromatic amino acids.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a decameric form of cytosolic thioredoxin peroxidase 1 (Tsa1), C47S mutant, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Marcos Antonio de Genu, Victor; Discola, Karen Fulan; Alves, Simone Vidigal; Netto, Luis Eduardo Soares; Guimarães, Beatriz Gomes

    2007-08-01

    A recombinant mutant (C47S) of cytosolic thioredoxin peroxidase 1 from S. cerevisiae was expressed, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method from protein previously treated with 1,4-dithiothreitol. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2 and diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytosolic thioredoxin peroxidase 1 (cTPxI or Tsa1) is a bifunctional enzyme with protective roles in cellular defence against oxidative and thermal stress that exhibits both peroxidase and chaperone activities. Protein overoxidation and/or high temperatures induce great changes in its quaternary structure and lead to its assembly into large complexes that possess chaperone activity. A recombinant mutant of Tsa1 from S. cerevisiae, with Cys47 substituted by serine, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a His{sub 6}-tagged fusion protein and purified by nickel-affinity chromatography. Crystals were obtained from protein previously treated with 1,4-dithiothreitol by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3000 as precipitant and sodium fluoride as an additive. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystal structure was solved by molecular-replacement methods and structure refinement is currently in progress.

  12. Sequence-based discrimination of protein-RNA interacting residues using a probabilistic approach.

    PubMed

    Pai, Priyadarshini P; Dash, Tirtharaj; Mondal, Sukanta

    2017-04-07

    Protein interactions with ribonucleic acids (RNA) are well-known to be crucial for a wide range of cellular processes such as transcriptional regulation, protein synthesis or translation, and post-translational modifications. Identification of the RNA-interacting residues can provide insights into these processes and aid in relevant biotechnological manipulations. Owing to their eventual potential in combating diseases and industrial production, several computational attempts have been made over years using sequence- and structure-based information. Recent comparative studies suggest that despite these developments, many problems are faced with respect to the usability, prerequisites, and accessibility of various tools, thereby calling for an alternative approach and perspective supplementation in the prediction scenario. With this motivation, in this paper, we propose the use of a simple-yet-efficient conditional probabilistic approach based on the application of local occurrence of amino acids in the interacting region in a non-numeric sequence feature space, for discriminating between RNA interacting and non-interacting residues. The proposed method has been meticulously tested for robustness using a cross-estimation method showing MCC of 0.341 and F- measure of 66.84%. Upon exploring large scale applications using benchmark datasets available to date, this approach showed an encouraging performance comparable with the state-of-art. The software is available at https://github.com/ABCgrp/DORAEMON.

  13. Pseudouridine and N-6 methyladenosine modifications weaken PUF protein/RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Pavanapuresan P; AlSadhan, Ishraq; Merriman, Dawn K; Al-Hashimi, Hashim; Herschlag, Daniel

    2017-01-30

    RNA modifications are ubiquitous in biology, with over 100 distinct modifications. While the vast majority were identified and characterized on abundant non-coding RNA such as tRNA and rRNA, the advent of sensitive sequencing-based approaches has led to the discovery of extensive and regulated modification of eukaryotic messenger RNAs as well. The two most abundant mRNA modifications -pseudouridine (Ψ) and N-6 methyladenosine (m6A)- affect diverse cellular processes including mRNA splicing, localization, translation, and decay and modulate RNA structure. Here, we test the hypothesis that RNA modifications directly affect interactions between RNA-binding proteins and target RNA. We show that Ψ and m6A weaken the binding of the human single-stranded RNA binding protein Pumilio 2 (hPUM2) to its consensus motif, with individual modifications having effects up to ~3 fold and multiple modifications giving larger effects. While there are likely to be some cases where RNA modifications essentially fully ablate protein binding, here we see modest responses that may be more common. Such modest effects could nevertheless profoundly alter the complex landscape of RNA:protein interactions, and the quantitative rather than qualitative nature of these effects underscores the need for quantitative, systems-level accounting of RNA:protein interactions to understand post-transcriptional regulation.

  14. From Protein-RNA Predictions toward a Peptide-RNA Code.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Kristopher W; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-11-03

    The RNA field is undergoing a renaissance, with a deluge of proteins being identified to bind RNA. Two reports now introduce proteome-wide approaches that identify the peptides that are crosslinked to RNA (Castello et al., 2016; He et al., 2016).

  15. Protein-RNA linkage and posttranslational modifications of feline calicivirus and murine norovirus VPg proteins.

    PubMed

    Olspert, Allan; Hosmillo, Myra; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Peil, Lauri; Truve, Erkki; Goodfellow, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Caliciviridae family of positive sense RNA viruses cause a wide range of diseases in both humans and animals. The detailed characterization of the calicivirus life cycle had been hampered due to the lack of robust cell culture systems and experimental tools for many of the members of the family. However, a number of caliciviruses replicate efficiently in cell culture and have robust reverse genetics systems available, most notably feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV). These are therefore widely used as representative members with which to examine the mechanistic details of calicivirus genome translation and replication. The replication of the calicivirus RNA genome occurs via a double-stranded RNA intermediate that is then used as a template for the production of new positive sense viral RNA, which is covalently linked to the virus-encoded protein VPg. The covalent linkage to VPg occurs during genome replication via the nucleotidylylation activity of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Using FCV and MNV, we used mass spectrometry-based approach to identify the specific amino acid linked to the 5' end of the viral nucleic acid. We observed that both VPg proteins are covalently linked to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) moieties via tyrosine positions 24 and 26 for FCV and MNV respectively. These data fit with previous observations indicating that mutations introduced into these specific amino acids are deleterious for viral replication and fail to produce infectious virus. In addition, we also detected serine phosphorylation sites within the FCV VPg protein with positions 80 and 107 found consistently phosphorylated on VPg-linked viral RNA isolated from infected cells. This work provides the first direct experimental characterization of the linkage of infectious calicivirus viral RNA to the VPg protein and highlights that post-translational modifications of VPg may also occur during the viral life cycle.

  16. Analysis of Protein-RNA and Protein-Peptide Interactions in Equine Infectious Anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Hyung

    2007-01-01

    Macromolecular interactions are essential for virtually all cellular functions including signal transduction processes, metabolic processes, regulation of gene expression and immune responses. This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two important macromolecular interactions involved in the relationship between Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) and its host cell in horse: (1) the interaction between the EIAV Rev protein and its binding site, the Rev-responsive element (RRE) and (2) interactions between equine MHC class I molecules and epitope peptides derived from EIAV proteins. EIAV, one of the most divergent members of the lentivirus family, has a single-stranded RNA genome and carries several regulatory and structural proteins within its viral particle. Rev is an essential EIAV regulatory encoded protein that interacts with the viral RRE, a specific binding site in the viral mRNA. Using a combination of experimental and computational methods, the interactions between EIAV Rev and RRE were characterized in detail. EIAV Rev was shown to have a bipartite RNA binding domain contain two arginine rich motifs (ARMs). The RRE secondary structure was determined and specific structural motifs that act as cis-regulatory elements for EIAV Rev-RRE interaction were identified. Interestingly, a structural motif located in the high affinity Rev binding site is well conserved in several diverse lentiviral genoes, including HIV-1. Macromolecular interactions involved in the immune response of the horse to EIAV infection were investigated by analyzing complexes between MHC class I proteins and epitope peptides derived from EIAV Rev, Env and Gag proteins. Computational modeling results provided a mechanistic explanation for the experimental finding that a single amino acid change in the peptide binding domain of the quine MHC class I molecule differentially affectes the recognitino of specific epitopes by EIAV-specific CTL. Together, the findings in this dissertation provide novel insights into the strategy used by EIAV to replicate itself, and provide new details about how the host cell responds to and defends against EIAV upon the infection. Moreover, they have contributed to the understanding of the macromolecular recognition events that regulate these processes.

  17. Rapid agarose gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay for quantitating protein: RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Ream, Jennifer A; Lewis, L Kevin; Lewis, Karen A

    2016-10-15

    Interactions between proteins and nucleic acids are frequently analyzed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). This technique separates bound protein:nucleic acid complexes from free nucleic acids by electrophoresis, most commonly using polyacrylamide gels. The current study utilizes recent advances in agarose gel electrophoresis technology to develop a new EMSA protocol that is simpler and faster than traditional polyacrylamide methods. Agarose gels are normally run at low voltages (∼10 V/cm) to minimize heating and gel artifacts. In this study we demonstrate that EMSAs performed using agarose gels can be run at high voltages (≥20 V/cm) with 0.5 × TB (Tris-borate) buffer, allowing for short run times while simultaneously yielding high band resolution. Several parameters affecting band and image quality were optimized for the procedure, including gel thickness, agarose percentage, and applied voltage. Association of the siRNA-binding protein p19 with its target RNA was investigated using the new system. The agarose gel and conventional polyacrylamide gel methods generated similar apparent binding constants in side-by-side experiments. A particular advantage of the new approach described here is that the short run times (5-10 min) reduce opportunities for dissociation of bound complexes, an important concern in non-equilibrium nucleic acid binding experiments.

  18. Experimental and Computational Considerations in the Study of RNA-Binding Protein-RNA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Van Nostrand, Eric L; Huelga, Stephanie C; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-01-01

    After an RNA is transcribed, it undergoes a variety of processing steps that can change the encoded protein sequence (through alternative splicing and RNA editing), regulate the stability of the RNA, and control subcellular localization, timing, and rate of translation. The recent explosion in genomics techniques has enabled transcriptome-wide profiling of RNA processing in an unbiased manner. However, it has also brought with it both experimental challenges in developing improved methods to probe distinct processing steps, as well as computational challenges in data storage, processing, and analysis tools to enable large-scale interpretation in the genomics era. In this chapter we review experimental techniques and challenges in profiling various aspects of RNA processing, as well as recent efforts to develop analyses integrating multiple data sources and techniques to infer RNA regulatory networks.

  19. Identification of mayaro virus nucleocapsid protein in nucleus of Aedes albopictus cells.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, C; de Andrade-Rozental, A F; Souto-Padrón, T; Carvalho, M G

    1997-01-01

    The modifications in the pattern of nuclear proteins of Aedes albopictus cells in response to Mayaro virus infection were analysed early and late after infection. The viral capsid (C) protein of 34 kDa (p34) could be detected in the nuclear compartment 4 h after infection, soon after its synthesis in the cytoplasm. In addition to p34, a group of high molecular weight proteins was also present in this compartment late after infection. The exposition of infected cells to supra optimal temperature of growth modifies significantly the pattern of nuclear proteins. However, the stress condition does not inhibit the transport of p34 to the nucleus. The transport of proteins into nuclei was also followed under "in vitro' conditions by incubating radiolabeled post-mitochondrial extract of infected cells with unlabeled nuclei. Under these conditions, as observed "in vivo', a specific transport of viral C protein and of a group of proteins of high molecular weight to the nuclei was also detected. These results indicate that Mayaro virus infection modifies the nuclear protein pattern in invertebrate cells.

  20. [Detection and antigenic characteristics of the recombinant nucleocapsid proteins of Lassa and Marburg viruses].

    PubMed

    Vladyko, A S; Scheslenok, E P; Fomina, E G; Semizhon, P A; Ignat'ev, G M; Shkolina, T V; Kras'ko, A G; Semenov, S F; Vinokurov, N V

    2012-01-01

    Two plasmid vectors, which allow the recombinant polypeptides of Lassa and Marburg viruses to be expressed in prokaryotic cells E. coli strain BL21 (DE3), were produced. The two recombinant polypeptides are able to bind specific antibodies. This provides an opportunity to use them as antigenic components of immunoassay diagnostic test kits.

  1. A Druggable Pocket at the Nucleocapsid/Phosphoprotein Interaction Site of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ouizougun-Oubari, Mohamed; Pereira, Nelson; Tarus, Bogdan; Galloux, Marie; Lassoued, Safa; Fix, Jenna; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Hoos, Sylviane; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick; Bontems, François; Rey, Félix A.; Eléouët, Jean-François; Slama-Schwok, Anny

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Presently, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the main cause of severe respiratory infections in infants, cannot be treated efficiently with antivirals. However, its RNA-dependent polymerase complex offers potential targets for RSV-specific drugs. This includes the recognition of its template, the ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP), consisting of genomic RNA encapsidated by the RSV nucleoprotein, N. This recognition proceeds via interaction between the phosphoprotein P, which is the main polymerase cofactor, and N. The determinant role of the C terminus of P, and more particularly of the last residue, F241, in RNP binding and viral RNA synthesis has been assessed previously. Here, we provide detailed structural insight into this crucial interaction for RSV polymerase activity. We solved the crystallographic structures of complexes between the N-terminal domain of N (N-NTD) and C-terminal peptides of P and characterized binding by biophysical approaches. Our results provide a rationale for the pivotal role of F241, which inserts into a well-defined N-NTD pocket. This primary binding site is completed by transient contacts with upstream P residues outside the pocket. Based on the structural information of the N-NTD:P complex, we identified inhibitors of this interaction, selected by in silico screening of small compounds, that efficiently bind to N and compete with P in vitro. One of the compounds displayed inhibitory activity on RSV replication, thereby strengthening the relevance of N-NTD for structure-based design of RSV-specific antivirals. IMPORTANCE Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a widespread pathogen that is a leading cause of acute lower respiratory infections in infants worldwide. RSV cannot be treated efficiently with antivirals, and no vaccine is presently available, with the development of pediatric vaccines being particularly challenging. Therefore, there is a need for new therapeutic strategies that specifically target RSV. The interaction between the RSV phosphoprotein P and the ribonucleoprotein complex is critical for viral replication. In this study, we identified the main structural determinants of this interaction, and we used them to screen potential inhibitors in silico. We found a family of molecules that were efficient competitors of P in vitro and showed inhibitory activity on RSV replication in cellular assays. These compounds provide a basis for a pharmacophore model that must be improved but that holds promises for the design of new RSV-specific antivirals. PMID:26246564

  2. RNA binding domain of Jamestown Canyon virus S segment RNAs.

    PubMed

    Ogg, Monica M; Patterson, Jean L

    2007-12-01

    Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV) is a member of the Bunyaviridae family, Orthobunyavirus genus, California serogroup. Replication and, ultimately, assembly and packaging rely on the process of encapsidation. Therefore, the ability of viral RNAs (vRNAs) (genomic and antigenomic) to interact with the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) and the location of this binding domain on the RNAs are of interest. The questions to be addressed are the following. Where is the binding domain located on both the vRNA and cRNA strands, is this RNA bound when double or single stranded, and does this identified region have the ability to transform the binding potential of nonviral RNA? Full-length viral and complementary S segment RNA, as well as 3' deletion mutants of both vRNA and cRNA, nonviral RNA, and hybrid viral/nonviral RNA, were analyzed for their ability to interact with bacterially expressed JCV N protein. RNA-nucleocapsid interactions were examined by UV cross-linking, filter binding assays, and the generation of hybrid RNA to help define the area responsible for RNA-protein binding. The assays identified the region responsible for binding to the nucleocapsid as being contained within the 5' half of both the genomic and antigenomic RNAs. This region, if placed within nonviral RNA, is capable of altering the binding potential of nonviral RNA to levels seen with wild-type vRNAs.

  3. How do ADARs bind RNA? New protein-RNA structures illuminate substrate recognition by the RNA editing ADARs.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Justin M; Beal, Peter A

    2017-04-01

    Deamination of adenosine in RNA to form inosine has wide ranging consequences on RNA function including amino acid substitution to give proteins not encoded in the genome. What determines which adenosines in an mRNA are subject to this modification reaction? The answer lies in an understanding of the mechanism and substrate recognition properties of adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs). Our recent publication of X-ray crystal structures of the human ADAR2 deaminase domain bound to RNA editing substrates shed considerable light on how the catalytic domains of these enzymes bind RNA and promote adenosine deamination. Here we review in detail the deaminase domain-RNA contact surfaces and present models of how full length ADARs, bearing double stranded RNA-binding domains (dsRBDs) and deaminase domains, could process naturally occurring substrate RNAs.

  4. Poliovirus replication proteins: RNA sequence encoding P3-1b and the sites of proteolytic processing

    SciTech Connect

    Semler, B.L.; Anderson, C.W.; Kitamura, N.; Rothberg, P.G.; Wishart, W.L.; Wimmer, E.

    1981-06-01

    A partial amino-terminal amino acid sequence of each of the major proteins encoded by the replicase region of the poliovirus genome has been determined. A comparison of this sequence information with the amino acid sequence predicted from the RNA sequence that has been determined for the 3' region of the poliovirus genome has allowed us to locate precisely the proteolytic cleavage sites at which the initial polyprotein is processed to create the poliovirus products P3-1b (NCVP1b), P3-2 (NCVP2), P3-4b (NCVP4b), and P3-7c (NCVP7c). For each of these products, as well as for the small genome-linked protein VPg, proteolytic cleavage occurs between a glutamine and a glycine residue to create the amino terminus of each protein. This result suggests that a single proteinase may be responsible for all of these cleavages. The sequence data also allow the precise positioning of the genome-linked protein VPg within the precursor P3-1b just proximal to the amino terminus of polypeptide P3-2.

  5. A Novel High Throughput Biochemical Assay to Evaluate the HuR Protein-RNA Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    D’Agostino, Vito G.; Adami, Valentina; Provenzani, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The RNA binding protein HuR/ELAVL1 binds to AU-rich elements (AREs) promoting the stabilization and translation of a number of mRNAs into the cytoplasm, dictating their fate. We applied the AlphaScreen technology using purified human HuR protein, expressed in a mammalian cell-based system, to characterize in vitro its binding performance towards a ssRNA probe whose sequence corresponds to the are present in TNFα 3’ untranslated region. We optimized the method to titrate ligands and analyzed the kinetic in saturation binding and time course experiments, including competition assays. The method revealed to be a successful tool for determination of HuR binding kinetic parameters in the nanomolar range, with calculated Kd of 2.5±0.60 nM, kon of 2.76±0.56*106 M-1 min-1, and koff of 0.007±0.005 min-1. We also tested the HuR-RNA complex formation by fluorescent probe-based RNA-EMSA. Moreover, in a 384-well plate format we obtained a Z-factor of 0.84 and an averaged coefficient of variation between controls of 8%, indicating that this biochemical assay fulfills criteria of robustness for a targeted screening approach. After a screening with 2000 small molecules and secondary verification with RNA-EMSA we identified mitoxantrone as an interfering compound with rHuR and TNFα probe complex formation. Notably, this tool has a large versatility and could be applied to other RNA Binding Proteins recognizing different RNA, DNA, or protein species. In addition, it opens new perspectives in the identification of small-molecule modulators of RNA binding proteins activity. PMID:23951323

  6. Visualization by atomic force microscopy of tobacco mosaic virus movement protein-RNA complexes formed in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kiselyova, O I; Yaminsky, I V; Karger, E M; Frolova, O Y; Dorokhov, Y L; Atabekov, J G

    2001-06-01

    The structure of complexes formed in vitro by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-coded movement protein (MP) with TMV RNA and short (890 nt) synthetic RNA transcripts was visualized by atomic force microscopy on a mica surface. MP molecules were found to be distributed along the chain of RNA and the structure of MP-RNA complexes depended on the molar MP:RNA ratios at which the complexes were formed. A rise in the molar MP:TMV RNA ratio from 20:1 to 60-100:1 resulted in an increase in the density of the MP packaging on TMV RNA and structural conversion of complexes from RNase-sensitive 'beads-on-a-string' into a 'thick string' form that was partly resistant to RNAse. The 'thick string'-type RNase-resistant complexes were also produced by short synthetic RNA transcripts at different MP:RNA ratios. The 'thick string' complexes are suggested to represent clusters of MP molecules cooperatively bound to discrete regions of TMV RNA and separated by protein-free RNA segments.

  7. Optimized RNA ISH, RNA FISH and protein-RNA double labeling (IF/FISH) in Drosophila ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Sandra G; Peters, Nathaniel C; Altaras, Ariel E; Berg, Celeste A

    2014-01-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) is a powerful technique for detecting nucleic acids in cells and tissues. Here we describe three ISH procedures that are optimized for Drosophila ovaries: whole-mount, digoxigenin-labeled RNA ISH; RNA fluorescent ISH (FISH); and protein immunofluorescence (IF)–RNA FISH double labeling (IF/FISH). Each procedure balances conflicting requirements for permeabilization, fixation and preservation of antigenicity to detect RNA and protein expression with high resolution and sensitivity. The ISH protocol uses alkaline phosphatase–conjugated digoxigenin antibodies followed by a color reaction, whereas FISH detection involves tyramide signal amplification (TSA). To simultaneously preserve antigens for protein detection and enable RNA probe penetration for IF/FISH, we perform IF before FISH and use xylenes and detergents to permeabilize the tissue rather than proteinase K, which can damage the antigens. ISH and FISH take 3 d to perform, whereas IF/FISH takes 5 d. Probe generation takes 1 or 2 d to perform. PMID:24113787

  8. Protein-RNA Networks Regulated by Normal and ALS-Associated Mutant HNRNPA2B1 in the Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Fernando J; Pratt, Gabriel A; Van Nostrand, Eric L; Batra, Ranjan; Huelga, Stephanie C; Kapeli, Katannya; Freese, Peter; Chun, Seung J; Ling, Karen; Gelboin-Burkhart, Chelsea; Fijany, Layla; Wang, Harrison C; Nussbacher, Julia K; Broski, Sara M; Kim, Hong Joo; Lardelli, Rea; Sundararaman, Balaji; Donohue, John P; Javaherian, Ashkan; Lykke-Andersen, Jens; Finkbeiner, Steven; Bennett, C Frank; Ares, Manuel; Burge, Christopher B; Taylor, J Paul; Rigo, Frank; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-11-23

    HnRNPA2B1 encodes an RNA binding protein associated with neurodegeneration. However, its function in the nervous system is unclear. Transcriptome-wide crosslinking and immunoprecipitation in mouse spinal cord discover UAGG motifs enriched within ∼2,500 hnRNP A2/B1 binding sites and an unexpected role for hnRNP A2/B1 in alternative polyadenylation. HnRNP A2/B1 loss results in alternative splicing (AS), including skipping of an exon in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-associated D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) that reduces D-serine metabolism. ALS-associated hnRNP A2/B1 D290V mutant patient fibroblasts and motor neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-MNs) demonstrate abnormal splicing changes, likely due to increased nuclear-insoluble hnRNP A2/B1. Mutant iPSC-MNs display decreased survival in long-term culture and exhibit hnRNP A2/B1 localization to cytoplasmic granules as well as exacerbated changes in gene expression and splicing upon cellular stress. Our findings provide a cellular resource and reveal RNA networks relevant to neurodegeneration, regulated by normal and mutant hnRNP A2/B1. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  9. Immunogenicity of a truncated enterovirus 71 VP1 protein fused to a Newcastle disease virus nucleocapsid protein fragment in mice.

    PubMed

    Ch'ng, W C; Saw, W T; Yusoff, K; Shafee, N

    2011-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the viruses that cause hand, foot and mouth disease. Its viral capsid protein 1 (VP1), which contains many neutralization epitopes, is an ideal target for vaccine development. Recently, we reported the induction of a strong immune response in rabbits to a truncated VP1 fragment (Nt-VP1t) displayed on a recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) capsid protein. Protective efficacy of this vaccine, however, can only be tested in mice, since all EV71 animal models thus far were developed in mouse systems. In this study, we evaluated the type of immune responses against the protein developed by adult BALB/c mice. Nt-VP1t protein induced high levels of VP1 IgG antibody production in mice. Purified VP1 antigen stimulated activation, proliferation and differentiation of splenocytes harvested from these mice. They also produced significant levels of IFN-γ, a Th1-related cytokine. Taken together, Nt-VP1t protein is a potent immunogen in adult mice and our findings provide the data needed for testing of its protective efficacy in mouse models of EV71 infections.

  10. An eriophyid mite-transmitted plant virus contains eight genomic RNA segments with unusual heterogeneity in the nucleocapsid protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eriophyid mite-transmitted, multipartite, negative-sense plant RNA viruses with membrane-bound spherical virions are classified in the genus Emaravirus. The relatively dissimilar emaraviruses evolved with 4 to 6 genomic RNAs with one open reading frame (ORF) in each genomic RNA segment. We report he...

  11. Genetic diversity of the nucleocapsid protein gene of hippeastrum chlorotic ringspot virus from Hymenocallis littoralis in southern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Xu, Y; Zhu, M; Dong, Y; Hu, J; Li, Y; Liu, Y

    2017-01-01

    Hymenocallis littoralis growing in southern China has been recently extensively damaged by virus-like symptoms of necrosis, chlorosis, and ringspot. Of 44 plant samples collected from Yunnan, Guangxi, Guangdong, and Fujian provinces in southern China, 32 were infected with hippeastrum chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRV). Phylogenetic analysis based on the N gene divided the virus samples into two branches suggesting a geographic distribution attributed to the initial stage of a founder effect. The N gene was under purifying selection pressure and most of the deleterious mutants had been removed. Both the population dynamics and genetic analyses suggested that populations of HCRV in southern China are spreading.

  12. HLA-A*0201 T-cell epitopes in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus nucleocapsid and spike proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, Y.-P.; Lin, J.-Y.; Jan, J.-T.; Leng, C.-H.; Chu, C.-C.; Yang, Y.-C.; Chen, S.-L. . E-mail: showlic@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2006-05-26

    The immunogenicity of HLA-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) peptide in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nuclear capsid (N) and spike (S) proteins was determined by testing the proteins' ability to elicit a specific cellular immune response after immunization of HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice and in vitro vaccination of HLA-A2.1 positive human peripheral blood mononuclearcytes (PBMCs). First, we screened SARS N and S amino acid sequences for allele-specific motif matching those in human HLA-A2.1 MHC-I molecules. From HLA peptide binding predictions (http://thr.cit.nih.gov/molbio/hla{sub b}ind/), ten each potential N- and S-specific HLA-A2.1-binding peptides were synthesized. The high affinity HLA-A2.1 peptides were validated by T2-cell stabilization assays, with immunogenicity assays revealing peptides N223-231, N227-235, and N317-325 to be First identified HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes of SARS-CoV N protein. In addition, previous reports identified three HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes of S protein (S978-986, S1203-1211, and S1167-1175), here we found two novel peptides S787-795 and S1042-1050 as S-specific CTL epitopes. Moreover, our identified N317-325 and S1042-1050 CTL epitopes could induce recall responses when IFN-{gamma} stimulation of blood CD8{sup +} T-cells revealed significant difference between normal healthy donors and SARS-recovered patients after those PBMCs were in vitro vaccinated with their cognate antigen. Our results would provide a new insight into the development of therapeutic vaccine in SARS.

  13. Measles Virus Nucleocapsid (MVNP) Gene Expression and RANK Receptor Signaling in Osteoclast Precursors, Osteoclast Inhibitors Peptide Therapy for Pagets Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry ( DEXA ) and values represent mean ± SD (n = 5; p < 0.05) J Pathol (2007) DOI: 10.1002/path Copyright  2007...humerus of OIP-1 mice, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) were mea- sured by DEXA . The humeral region of 4-week-old OIP-1 mice...mice. Also, DEXA analysis showed a significant increase in BMD and BMC in the humeri from OIP-1 mice. Recently it has been reported that mice lacking

  14. Measles Virus Nucleocapsid (MVNP) Gene Expression and RANK Receptor Signaling in Osteoclast Precursors, Osteoclast Inhibitors Peptide Therapy for Pagets Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Paget’s disease Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 98:1681–1688 (2006) Elevated Serum Kininogen in Patients with Paget’s Disease of Bone: A Role in...ASBMR Histomorphometry Nomenclature Com- mittee. J Bone Miner Res 2:595–610. 30. Hentunen TA, Reddy SV, Boyce BF, Devlin R, Park HR, Chung H

  15. Measles Virus Nucleocapsid (MVNP) Gene Expression and RANK Receptor Signaling in Osteoclast Precursors, Osteoclast Inhibitors Peptide Therapy for Pagets Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Reddy Paget’s disease 16 Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 98:1681–1688 (2006) Elevated Serum Kininogen in Patients with Paget’s Disease of Bone: A...TA, Reddy SV, Boyce BF, Devlin R, Park HR, Chung H, Selander KS, Dallas M, Kurihara N, Galson DL, Goldring SR, Koop BA, Windle JJ, Roodman GD 1998 Im...2005; accepted November 21, 2005. MVNP IN PAGET’S DISEASE 455 34 Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 93:688–696 (2004) Etiology of Paget’s Disease and

  16. Measles Virus Nucleocapsid (MJVNP) Gene Expression and RANK Receptor Signaling in Osteoclast Precursors. Osteoclast Inhibitors Peptide Therapy for Pagets Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-31

    Determine the sensitivity of MVNP transduced osteoclast precursors to RANK Ligand (RANKL) and TNF- alpha stimulation to form pagetic osteoclasts. -- Paget’s...herpesvirus (CLONTECH) (pVP16- hVDR) (13). To examine the interaction of TAFII-17 and VDR, 0.5 g of pM-TAFII-17, 0.5 g of pVP -16-hVDR, and 0.5 g of

  17. Characterization of anti-P monoclonal antibodies directed against the ribosomal protein-RNA complex antigen and produced using Murphy Roths large autoimmune-prone mice.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Onozuka, M; Hagiya, A; Hoshino, S; Narita, I; Uchiumi, T

    2015-02-01

    Autoantibodies, including anti-ribosomal P proteins (anti-P), are thought to be produced by an antigen-driven immune response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To test this hypothesis, we reconstituted the ribosomal antigenic complex in vitro using human P0, phosphorylated P1 and P2 and a 28S rRNA fragment covering the P0 binding site, and immunized Murphy Roths large (MRL)/lrp lupus mice with this complex without any added adjuvant to generate anti-P antibodies. Using hybridoma technology, we subsequently obtained 34 clones, each producing an anti-P monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognized the conserved C-terminal tail sequence common to all three P proteins. We also obtained two P0-specific monoclonal antibodies, but no antibody specific to P1, P2 or rRNA fragment. Two types of mAbs were found among these anti-P antibodies: one type (e.g. 9D5) reacted more strongly with the phosphorylated P1 and P2 than that with their non-phosphorylated forms, whereas the other type (e.g. 4H11) reacted equally with both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of P1/P2. Both 9D5 and 4H11 inhibited the ribosome/eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF-2)-coupled guanosine triphosphate (GTP)ase activity. However, preincubation with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal sequence common to all three P proteins, but not the peptide that lacked the last three C-terminal amino acids, mostly prevented the mAb-induced inhibition of GTPase activity. Thus, at least two types of anti-P were produced preferentially following the immunization of MRL mice with the reconstituted antigenic complex. Presence of multiple copies of the C-termini, particularly that of the last three C-terminal amino acid residues, in the antigenic complex appears to contribute to the immunogenic stimulus.

  18. Synergy between NMR measurements and MD simulations of protein/RNA complexes: application to the RRMs, the most common RNA recognition motifs

    PubMed Central

    Krepl, Miroslav; Cléry, Antoine; Blatter, Markus; Allain, Frederic H.T.; Sponer, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    RNA recognition motif (RRM) proteins represent an abundant class of proteins playing key roles in RNA biology. We present a joint atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) and experimental study of two RRM-containing proteins bound with their single-stranded target RNAs, namely the Fox-1 and SRSF1 complexes. The simulations are used in conjunction with NMR spectroscopy to interpret and expand the available structural data. We accumulate more than 50 μs of simulations and show that the MD method is robust enough to reliably describe the structural dynamics of the RRM–RNA complexes. The simulations predict unanticipated specific participation of Arg142 at the protein–RNA interface of the SRFS1 complex, which is subsequently confirmed by NMR and ITC measurements. Several segments of the protein–RNA interface may involve competition between dynamical local substates rather than firmly formed interactions, which is indirectly consistent with the primary NMR data. We demonstrate that the simulations can be used to interpret the NMR atomistic models and can provide qualified predictions. Finally, we propose a protocol for ‘MD-adapted structure ensemble’ as a way to integrate the simulation predictions and expand upon the deposited NMR structures. Unbiased μs-scale atomistic MD could become a technique routinely complementing the NMR measurements of protein–RNA complexes. PMID:27193998

  19. Protein/RNA coextraction and small two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for proteomic/gene expression analysis of renal cancer biopsies.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Giovanna; Carta, Franco; Giribaldi, Giuliana; Mandili, Giorgia; Crobu, Salvatore; Ceruti, Carlo; Fontana, Dario; Destefanis, Paolo; Turrini, Francesco

    2006-02-01

    A small amount of bioptic tissue ( approximately 5-10mg of fresh tissue) usually does not contain enough material to extract protein and RNA separately, to obtain preparative two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and to identify a large number of separated proteins by MS. We tested a method, on small renal cancer specimens, for the coextraction of protein and RNA coupled with 2-DE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) or quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) analysis. We coextracted 0.28+/-0.05mg of proteins and 2.5+/-0.33microg of RNA for each 10mg of renal carcinoma tissue. Small and large 2-DE gels were compared: they showed a similar number of spots, and it was possible to match each other; using small format gels, one-fifth of the protein amount was required to identify, by Q-TOF analysis, the same number of proteins identifiable in large-format gel using MALDI-TOF analysis. Quality of RNA coextracted with the proteins was tested by real-time PCR on a set of housekeeping genes. They were quantified with high amplification efficiency and specificity. In conclusion, using 5 to 10mg of fresh tissue, it was possible to perform comprehensive parallel proteomic and genomic analysis by high-resolution, small-format 2-DE gels, allowing approximately 300 proteins identification and 1000 genes expression analysis.

  20. LFQProfiler and RNP(xl): Open-Source Tools for Label-Free Quantification and Protein-RNA Cross-Linking Integrated into Proteome Discoverer.

    PubMed

    Veit, Johannes; Sachsenberg, Timo; Chernev, Aleksandar; Aicheler, Fabian; Urlaub, Henning; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2016-09-02

    Modern mass spectrometry setups used in today's proteomics studies generate vast amounts of raw data, calling for highly efficient data processing and analysis tools. Software for analyzing these data is either monolithic (easy to use, but sometimes too rigid) or workflow-driven (easy to customize, but sometimes complex). Thermo Proteome Discoverer (PD) is a powerful software for workflow-driven data analysis in proteomics which, in our eyes, achieves a good trade-off between flexibility and usability. Here, we present two open-source plugins for PD providing additional functionality: LFQProfiler for label-free quantification of peptides and proteins, and RNP(xl) for UV-induced peptide-RNA cross-linking data analysis. LFQProfiler interacts with existing PD nodes for peptide identification and validation and takes care of the entire quantitative part of the workflow. We show that it performs at least on par with other state-of-the-art software solutions for label-free quantification in a recently published benchmark ( Ramus, C.; J. Proteomics 2016 , 132 , 51 - 62 ). The second workflow, RNP(xl), represents the first software solution to date for identification of peptide-RNA cross-links including automatic localization of the cross-links at amino acid resolution and localization scoring. It comes with a customized integrated cross-link fragment spectrum viewer for convenient manual inspection and validation of the results.

  1. Preparative fractionation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA using centrifugal precipitation chromatography with tubular dialysis membrane inside a convoluted tubing as separation channel.

    PubMed

    Tomanee, Panarat; Hsu, James T; Ito, Yoichiro

    2006-01-01

    Fractionation of clarified E. coli lysate components in bench-scale and preparative-scale centrifugal precipitation chromatography (CPC), using a solution of cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) containing 0.5 M NaCl as precipitant, are compared here. Step gradient of CTAB from 0.50% to 0.16% (w/v) gave a successful fractionation in bench-scale CPC; however, a linear gradient of lower CTAB concentration, 0.20-0% (w/v), was used in the preparative scale and resulted in similar fractionation. The preparative-scale CPC has a superior sample loading capacity by the use of tubular dialysis membrane inside convoluted tubing as the separation channel. In this study, the quantity of the sample loaded into the preparative CPC was about 15 times more than that in the bench scale, and in a single run the preparative CPC could prepare approximately 3 mg of plasmid DNA with about 96% of RNA removed. The higher surface area per length of the separation channel in the preparative CPC was believed to benefit mass transfer of CTAB across the membrane, leading to less CTAB being required in the process.

  2. Protein-RNA and Protein-Protein Recognition by Dual KH1/2 Domains of the Neuronal Splicing Factor Nova-1

    SciTech Connect

    M Teplova; L Malinina; J Darnell; J Song; M Lu; R Abagyan; K Musunuru; A Teplov; S Burley; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Nova onconeural antigens are neuron-specific RNA-binding proteins implicated in paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia (POMA) syndrome. Nova harbors three K-homology (KH) motifs implicated in alternate splicing regulation of genes involved in inhibitory synaptic transmission. We report the crystal structure of the first two KH domains (KH1/2) of Nova-1 bound to an in vitro selected RNA hairpin, containing a UCAG-UCAC high-affinity binding site. Sequence-specific intermolecular contacts in the complex involve KH1 and the second UCAC repeat, with the RNA scaffold buttressed by interactions between repeats. Whereas the canonical RNA-binding surface of KH2 in the above complex engages in protein-protein interactions in the crystalline state, the individual KH2 domain can sequence-specifically target the UCAC RNA element in solution. The observed antiparallel alignment of KH1 and KH2 domains in the crystal structure of the complex generates a scaffold that could facilitate target pre-mRNA looping on Nova binding, thereby potentially explaining Nova's functional role in splicing regulation.

  3. The 15N and 46R Residues of Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Enhance Regulatory T Lymphocytes Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Juan; Li, Yufeng; Zhang, Qiaoya; Jiang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) negatively modulates host immune responses, resulting in persistent infection and immunosuppression. PRRSV infection increases the number of PRRSV-specific regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) in infected pigs. However, the target antigens for Tregs proliferation in PRRSV infection have not been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) induced more CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs than classical PRRSV (C-PRRSV) strain. Of the recombinant GP5, M and N proteins of HP-PRRSV expressed in baculovirus expression systems, only N protein induced Tregs proliferation. The Tregs assays showed that three amino-acid regions, 15–21, 42–48 and 88–94, in N protein played an important role in induction of Tregs proliferation with synthetic peptides covering the whole length of N protein. By using reverse genetic methods, it was firstly found that the 15N and 46R residues in PRRSV N protein were critical for induction of Tregs proliferation. The phenotype of induced Tregs closely resembled that of transforming-growth-factor-β-secreting T helper 3 Tregs in swine. These data should be useful for understanding the mechanism of immunity to PRRSV and development of infection control strategies in the future. PMID:26397116

  4. Hantaan Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Binds to Importin alpha Proteins and Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Induced Activation of Nuclear Factor Kappa B

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-19

    two dis- tinct types of human disease: hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) * Corresponding author ...School of Medicine, New York, New York 100292 Received 12 May 2008/Accepted 14 November 2008 Hantaviruses such as Hantaan virus (HTNV) and Andes virus...cause two human diseases, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, respectively. For both, disease pathogenesis is

  5. Screening and identification of T helper 1 and linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitopes in the spike 2 domain and the nucleocapsid protein of feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Ryoichi; Furukawa, Tomoko; Kotake, Masako; Takano, Tomomi; Motokawa, Kenji; Gemma, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Rie; Arai, Setsuo; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2011-02-17

    The antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection has been recognized in experimentally infected cats, and cellular immunity is considered to play an important role in preventing the onset of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). In the present study, we synthesized eighty-one kinds of peptides derived from the spike (S)2 domain of type I FIPV KU-2 strain, the S2 domain of type II FIPV 79-1146 strain, and the nucleocapcid (N) protein of FIPV KU-2 strain. To detect the T helper (Th)1 epitope, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from FIPV-infected cats were cultured with each peptide, and Th1-type immune responses were measured using feline interferon (fIFN)-γ production as an index. To detect the linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitope, we investigated the reactivity of plasma collected from FIPV-infected cats against each peptide by ELISA. Four and 2 peptides containing Th1 epitopes were identified in the heptad repeat (HR)1 and inter-helical (IH) regions of the S2 domain of type I FIPV, respectively, and these were located on the N-terminal side of the regions. In the S2 domain of type II FIPV, 2, 3, and 2 peptides containing Th1 epitopes were identified in the HR1, IH, and HR2 regions, respectively, and these were mainly located on the C-terminal side of the regions. In the S2 domain of type I FIPV, 3 and 7 peptides containing linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitopes were identified in the IH and HR2 regions, respectively. In the S2 domain of type II FIPV, 4 peptides containing linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitopes were identified in the HR2 region. The Th1 epitopes in the S2 domain of type I and II FIPV were located in different regions, but the linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitopes were mostly located in the HR2 region. Eight peptides containing Th1 epitopes were identified in N protein, and 3 peptides derived from residues 81 to 100 and 137 to 164 showed strong inductivity of fIFN-γ production in PBMCs isolated from type I FIPV- and type II FIPV-infected non-FIP cats. In N protein, 4 peptides containing linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitopes were identified, and 2 peptides derived from residues 345 to 372 showed strong reactivity with plasma of type I FIPV- and type II FIPV-infected cats. The Th1 and linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitopes were located at different positions in both the S2 domain and N protein. Our results may provide important information for the development of peptide-based vaccine against FIPV infection.

  6. Efficient Interaction between Arenavirus Nucleoprotein (NP) and RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase (L) Is Mediated by the Virus Nucleocapsid (NP-RNA) Template.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Masaharu; Ngo, Nhi; Cubitt, Beatrice; de la Torre, Juan C

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we document that efficient interaction between arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L protein), the two trans-acting viral factors required for both virus RNA replication and gene transcription, requires the presence of virus-specific RNA sequences located within the untranslated 5' and 3' termini of the viral genome.

  7. Vaccine efficacy of a cell lysate with recombinant baculovirus-expressed feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) virus nucleocapsid protein against progression of FIP.

    PubMed

    Hohdatsu, Tsutomu; Yamato, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Tasuku; Kaneko, Miyuki; Motokawa, Kenji; Kusuhara, Hajime; Kaneshima, Takashi; Arai, Setsuo; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2003-12-02

    The Type II feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection of feline macrophages is enhanced by a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to the S protein of FIPV. This antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) activity increased with the MAb that showed a neutralizing activity with feline kidney cells, suggesting that there was a distinct correlation between ADE activity and the neutralizing activity. The close association between enhancing and neutralizing epitopes is an obstacle to developing a vaccine containing only neutralizing epitopes without enhancing epitopes. In this study, we immunized cats with cell lysate with recombinant baculovirus-expressed N protein of the Type I FIPV strain KU-2 with an adjuvant and investigated its preventive effect on the progression of FIP. Cats immunized with this vaccine produced antibodies against FIPV virion-derived N protein but did not produce virus-neutralizing antibodies. A delayed type hypersensitivity skin response to N protein was observed in these vaccinated cats, showing that cell mediated immunity against the FIPV antigen was induced. When these vaccinated cats were challenged with a high dose of heterologous FIPV, the survival rate was 75% (6/8), while the survival rate in the control group immunized with SF-9 cell-derived antigen was 12.5% (1/8). This study showed that immunization with the cell lysate with baculovirus-expressed N protein was effective in preventing the progression of FIP without inducing ADE of FIPV infection in cats.

  8. Persistence of the protective immunity and kinetics of the isotype specific antibody response against the viral nucleocapsid protein after experimental Schmallenberg virus infection of sheep.

    PubMed

    Poskin, Antoine; Verite, Stephanie; Comtet, Loic; Van der Stede, Yves; Cay, Brigitte; De Regge, Nick

    2015-10-15

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is an Orthobunyavirus that induces abortion, stillbirths and congenital malformations in ruminants. SBV infection induces a long lasting seroconversion under natural conditions. The persistence of the protective immunity and the isotype specific antibody response upon SBV infection of sheep has however not been studied in detail. Five sheep were kept in BSL3 facilities for more than 16 months and subjected to repeated SBV infections. Blood was regularly sampled and organs were collected at euthanasia. The presence of SBV RNA in serum and organs was measured with quantitative real-time PCR. The appearance and persistence of neutralizing and SBV nucleoprotein (N) isotype specific antibodies was determined with virus neutralization tests (VNT) and ELISAs. The primo SBV infection protected ewes against clinical signs, viraemia and virus replication in organs upon challenge infections more than 15 months later. Production of neutralizing SBV specific antibodies was first detected around 6 days post primo-inoculation with VNT and correlated with the appearance of SBV-N specific IgM antibodies. These IgM antibodies remained present for 2 weeks. SBV-N specific IgG antibodies were first detected between 10 and 21 dpi and reached a plateau at 28 dpi. This plateau remained consistently high and no significant decrease in titre was found over a period of more than 1 year. Similar results were found for the neutralising antibody response. In conclusion, the SBV specific IgM response probably eliminates SBV from the blood and the protective immunity induced by SBV infection protects sheep against reinfection for at least 16 months.

  9. Measles Virus Nucleocapsid (MVNP) Gene Expression and RANK Receptor Signaling in Osteoclast Precursors,Osteoclast Inhibitors Peptide Therapy for Pagets Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    the patients have severe symptoms including bone pain, frac- tures, neurological complications due to spinal cord compression, deafness , and dental... hereditary hyperphos- phatasia is very different than the adult form of 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Grant sponsor: National Institutes of Health; Grant numbers

  10. Essential Amino Acids of the Hantaan Virus N Protein in Its Interaction with RNA

    PubMed Central

    Severson, William; Xu, Xiaolin; Kuhn, Michaela; Senutovitch, Nina; Thokala, Mercy; Ferron, François; Longhi, Sonia; Canard, Bruno; Jonsson, Colleen B.

    2005-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of hantavirus encapsidates viral genomic and antigenomic RNAs. Previously, deletion mapping identified a central, conserved region (amino acids 175 to 217) within the Hantaan virus (HTNV) N protein that interacts with a high affinity with these viral RNAs (vRNAs). To further define the boundaries of the RNA binding domain (RBD), several peptides were synthesized and examined for the ability to bind full-length S-segment vRNA. Peptide 195-217 retained 94% of the vRNA bound by the HTNV N protein, while peptides 175-186 and 205-217 bound only 1% of the vRNA. To further explore which residues were essential for binding vRNA, we performed a comprehensive mutational analysis of the amino acids in the RBD. Single and double Ala substitutions were constructed for 18 amino acids from amino acids 175 to 217 in the full-length N protein. In addition, Ala substitutions were made for the three R residues in peptide 185-217. An analysis of protein-RNA interactions by electrophoretic mobility shift assays implicated E192, Y206, and S217 as important for binding. Chemical modification experiments showed that lysine residues, but not arginine or cysteine residues, contribute to RNA binding, which agreed with bioinformatic predictions. Overall, these data implicate lysine residues dispersed from amino acids 175 to 429 of the protein and three amino acids located in the RBD as essential for RNA binding. PMID:16014963

  11. Structural Determinants and Mechanism of HIV-1 Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kun; Heng, Xiao; Summers, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Like all retroviruses, the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) selectively packages two copies of its unspliced RNA genome, both of which are utilized for strand-transfer mediated recombination during reverse transcription – a process that enables rapid evolution under environmental and chemotherapeutic pressures. The viral RNA appears to be selected for packaging as a dimer, and there is evidence that dimerization and packaging are mechanistically coupled. Both processes are mediated by interactions between the nucleocapsid (NC) domains of a small number of assembling viral Gag polyproteins and RNA elements within the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of the genome. A number of secondary structures have been predicted for regions of the genome that are responsible for packaging, and high-resolution structures have been determined for a few small RNA fragments and protein-RNA complexes. However, major questions remain open regarding the RNA structures, and potentially the structural changes, that are responsible for dimeric genome selection. Here we review efforts that have been made to identify the molecular determinants and mechanism of HIV-1 genome packaging. PMID:21762803

  12. Continuous and Discontinuous RNA Synthesis in Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Sola, Isabel; Almazán, Fernando; Zúñiga, Sonia; Enjuanes, Luis

    2015-11-01

    Replication of the coronavirus genome requires continuous RNA synthesis, whereas transcription is a discontinuous process unique among RNA viruses. Transcription includes a template switch during the synthesis of subgenomic negative-strand RNAs to add a copy of the leader sequence. Coronavirus transcription is regulated by multiple factors, including the extent of base-pairing between transcription-regulating sequences of positive and negative polarity, viral and cell protein-RNA binding, and high-order RNA-RNA interactions. Coronavirus RNA synthesis is performed by a replication-transcription complex that includes viral and cell proteins that recognize cis-acting RNA elements mainly located in the highly structured 5' and 3' untranslated regions. In addition to many viral nonstructural proteins, the presence of cell nuclear proteins and the viral nucleocapsid protein increases virus amplification efficacy. Coronavirus RNA synthesis is connected with the formation of double-membrane vesicles and convoluted membranes. Coronaviruses encode proofreading machinery, unique in the RNA virus world, to ensure the maintenance of their large genome size.

  13. A chicken embryo protein related to the mammalian DEAD box protein p68 is tightly associated with the highly purified protein-RNA complex of 5-MeC-DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Jost, J P; Schwarz, S; Hess, D; Angliker, H; Fuller-Pace, F V; Stahl, H; Thiry, S; Siegmann, M

    1999-08-15

    We have shown previously that DNA demethylation by chick embryo 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC)-DNA glycosylase needs both protein and RNA. Amino acid sequences of nine peptides derived from a highly purified 5-MeC-DNA glycosylase complex were identified by Nanoelectrospray ionisation mass spectrometry to be identical to the mammalian nuclear DEAD box protein p68 RNA helicase. Antibodies directed against human p68 helicase cross-reacted with the purified 5-MeC-DNA glycosylase complex and immunoprecipitated the glycosylase activity. A 2690 bp cDNA coding for the chicken homologue of mammalian p68 was isolated and sequenced. Its derived amino acid sequence is almost identical to the human p68 DEAD box protein up to amino acid position 473 (from a total of 595). This sequence contains all the essential conserved motifs from the DEAD box proteins which are the ATPase, RNA unwinding and RNA binding motifs. The rest of the 122 amino acids in the C-terminal region rather diverge from the human p68 RNA helicase sequence. The recombinant chicken DEAD box protein expressed in Escherichia coli cross-reacts with the same p68 antibodies as the purified chicken embryo 5-MeC-DNA glycosylase complex. The recombinant protein has an RNA-dependent ATPase and an ATP-dependent helicase activity. However, in the presence or absence of RNA the recombinant protein had no 5-MeC-DNA glycosylase activity. In situ hybridisation of 5 day-old chicken embryos with antisense probes of the chicken DEAD box protein shows a high abundance of its transcripts in differentiating embryonic tissues.

  14. Osteoclast Inhibitory Peptide-1 Therapy for Paget’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    1 (SQSTM1/p62) gene have been widely identified in PDB patients. We previously detected expression of measles virus nucleocapsid (MVNP) transcripts...high bone turnover in PDB. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Paget’s Disease, measles virus nucleocapsid, sequestosome1 , osteoclast, osteoclast inhibitory peptide...detected expression of measles virus nucleocapsid (MVNP) transcripts in osteoclasts from patients with PDB. Also, we have shown that MVNP gene

  15. Properties of a filamentous virus of the honey bee (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Bailey, L; Carpenter, J M; Woods, R D

    1981-10-15

    An ellipsoidal particle, measuring 450 x 150 nm, from honey bees comprises a nucleocapsid measuring 3000 x 40 nm, containing double-stranded DNA with a molecular weight of approximately 12 x 10(6), which is coiled within a membrane. The buoyant densities in CsCl of the whole particle, nucleocapsid, DNA and DNA with ethidium bromide are 1.28, 1.36, 1.71 and 1.61 g/ml, respectively. The particle contains about 12 proteins, with molecular weights ranging from 13,000 to 70,000, which are distributed approximately equally between the membrane and the nucleocapsid.

  16. Structure of Hepatitis E Virion-Sized Particle Reveals an RNA-Dependent Viral Assembly Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, L.; Wall, J.; Li, T.-C.; Mayazaki, N.; Simon, M. N.; Moore, M.; Wang, C.-Y.; Takeda, N.; Wakita, T.; Miyamura, T.; Cheng, R. H.

    2010-10-22

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) induces acute hepatitis in humans with a high fatality rate in pregnant women. There is a need for anti-HEV research to understand the assembly process of HEV native capsid. Here, we produced a large virion-sized and a small T=1 capsid by expressing the HEV capsid protein in insect cells with and without the N-terminal 111 residues, respectively, for comparative structural analysis. The virion-sized capsid demonstrates a T=3 icosahedral lattice and contains RNA fragment in contrast to the RNA-free T=1 capsid. However, both capsids shared common decameric organization. The in vitro assembly further demonstrated that HEV capsid protein had the intrinsic ability to form decameric intermediate. Our data suggest that RNA binding is the extrinsic factor essential for the assembly of HEV native capsids.

  17. 3D reconstruction of VZV infected cell nuclei and PML nuclear cages by serial section array scanning electron microscopy and electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Mike; Joubert, Lydia; Perrino, John; Koh, Ai Leen; Phanwar, Ibanri; Arvin, Ann M

    2012-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles). Like all herpesviruses, the VZV DNA genome is replicated in the nucleus and packaged into nucleocapsids that must egress across the nuclear membrane for incorporation into virus particles in the cytoplasm. Our recent work showed that VZV nucleocapsids are sequestered in nuclear cages formed from promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) in vitro and in human dorsal root ganglia and skin xenografts in vivo. We sought a method to determine the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of nucleocapsids in the nuclei of herpesvirus-infected cells as well as the 3D shape, volume and ultrastructure of these unique PML subnuclear domains. Here we report the development of a novel 3D imaging and reconstruction strategy that we term Serial Section Array-Scanning Electron Microscopy (SSA-SEM) and its application to the analysis of VZV-infected cells and these nuclear PML cages. We show that SSA-SEM permits large volume imaging and 3D reconstruction at a resolution sufficient to localize, count and distinguish different types of VZV nucleocapsids and to visualize complete PML cages. This method allowed a quantitative determination of how many nucleocapsids can be sequestered within individual PML cages (sequestration capacity), what proportion of nucleocapsids are entrapped in single nuclei (sequestration efficiency) and revealed the ultrastructural detail of the PML cages. More than 98% of all nucleocapsids in reconstructed nuclear volumes were contained in PML cages and single PML cages sequestered up to 2,780 nucleocapsids, which were shown by electron tomography to be embedded and cross-linked by an filamentous electron-dense meshwork within these unique subnuclear domains. This SSA-SEM analysis extends our recent characterization of PML cages and provides a proof of concept for this new strategy to investigate events during virion assembly at the single cell

  18. 3D Reconstruction of VZV Infected Cell Nuclei and PML Nuclear Cages by Serial Section Array Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Reichelt, Mike; Joubert, Lydia; Perrino, John; Koh, Ai Leen; Phanwar, Ibanri; Arvin, Ann M.

    2012-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles). Like all herpesviruses, the VZV DNA genome is replicated in the nucleus and packaged into nucleocapsids that must egress across the nuclear membrane for incorporation into virus particles in the cytoplasm. Our recent work showed that VZV nucleocapsids are sequestered in nuclear cages formed from promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) in vitro and in human dorsal root ganglia and skin xenografts in vivo. We sought a method to determine the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of nucleocapsids in the nuclei of herpesvirus-infected cells as well as the 3D shape, volume and ultrastructure of these unique PML subnuclear domains. Here we report the development of a novel 3D imaging and reconstruction strategy that we term Serial Section Array-Scanning Electron Microscopy (SSA-SEM) and its application to the analysis of VZV-infected cells and these nuclear PML cages. We show that SSA-SEM permits large volume imaging and 3D reconstruction at a resolution sufficient to localize, count and distinguish different types of VZV nucleocapsids and to visualize complete PML cages. This method allowed a quantitative determination of how many nucleocapsids can be sequestered within individual PML cages (sequestration capacity), what proportion of nucleocapsids are entrapped in single nuclei (sequestration efficiency) and revealed the ultrastructural detail of the PML cages. More than 98% of all nucleocapsids in reconstructed nuclear volumes were contained in PML cages and single PML cages sequestered up to 2,780 nucleocapsids, which were shown by electron tomography to be embedded and cross-linked by an filamentous electron-dense meshwork within these unique subnuclear domains. This SSA-SEM analysis extends our recent characterization of PML cages and provides a proof of concept for this new strategy to investigate events during virion assembly at the single cell

  19. The unique pentagonal structure of an archaeal Rubisco is essential for its high thermostability.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Norihiro; Kanai, Tamotsu; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2002-08-30

    We have previously determined the crystal structure of a novel pentagonal ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1. Here we have carried out biochemical studies to identify the necessities and/or advantages of this intriguing pentagonal structure. The structure indicated the presence of three neighboring residues (Glu-63, Arg-66, and Asp-69), participating in ionic interactions within unique dimer-dimer interfaces. We constructed three single mutant proteins (E63S, R66S, and D69S) and one triple mutant protein (E63S/R66S/D69S) by replacing the charged residues with serine. The wild type (WT) and all mutant proteins were purified and subjected to gel permeation chromatography at various temperatures. WT and D69S proteins were decameric at all temperatures examined between 30 and 90 degrees C. The majority of E63S and R66S were decamers at 30 degrees C but were found to gradually disassemble with the elevation in temperature. E63S/R66S/D69S was found in a dimeric form even at 30 degrees C. An interesting correlation was found between the subunit assembly and thermostability of the proteins. Circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry analyses indicated that the denaturation temperatures of dimeric enzymes (E63S, R66S, and E63S/R66S/D69S) were approximately 95 degrees C, whereas those of the enzymes retaining a decameric structure (WT and D69S) were approximately 110 degrees C. Disassembly into tetramer or dimer units did not alter the slopes of the Arrhenius plots, indicating that the decameric structure had no effect on catalytic performance per se. The results indicate that the decameric assembly of Tk-Rubisco contributes to enhance the thermostability of the enzyme. Taking into account the growth temperature of strain KOD1 (65-100 degrees C), the decameric structure of Tk-Rubisco can be considered essential for the stable presence of the enzyme in the host cells

  20. Label free detection of white spot syndrome virus using lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate piezoelectric microcantilever sensors.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, Joseph A; Shih, Wei-Heng; Leu, Jiann-Horng; Lo, Grace Chu-Fang; Shih, Wan Y

    2010-11-15

    We have investigated rapid, label free detection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) using the first longitudinal extension resonance peak of five lead-magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) piezoelectric microcantilever sensors (PEMS) 1050-700 μm long and 850-485 μm wide constructed from 8 μm thick PMN-PT freestanding films. The PMN-PT PEMS were encapsulated with a 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) insulation layer and further coated with anti-VP28 and anti-VP664 antibodies to target the WSSV virions and nucleocapsids, respectively. By inserting the antibody coated PEMS in a flowing virion or nucleocapsid suspension, label free detection of the virions and nucleocapsids were respectively achieved by monitoring the PEMS resonance frequency shift. We showed that positive label free detection of both the virion and the nucleocapsid could be achieved at a concentration of 100virions(nucleocapsids)/ml or 10 virions(nucleocapsids)/100 μl, comparable to the detection sensitivity of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, in contrast to PCR, PEMS detection was label free, in situ and rapid (less than 30 min), potentially requiring minimal or no sample preparation.

  1. Label Free Detection of White Spot Syndrome Virus Using Lead Magnesium Niobate-Lead Titanate Piezoelectric Microcantilever Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Capobianco, Joseph; Shih, Wei-Heng; Leu, Jiann-Horng; Lo, Grace Chu-Fang; Shih, Wan Y.

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated rapid, label free detection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) using the first longitudinal extension resonance peak of five lead-magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) piezoelectric microcantilever sensors (PEMS) 1050-700 μm long and 850-485 μm wide constructed from 8 μm thick PMN-PT freestanding films. The PMN-PT PEMS were encapsulated with a 3-mercaptopropltrimethoxysilane (MPS) insulation layer and further coated with anti-VP28 and anti-VP664 antibodies to target the WSSV virions and nucleocapsids, respectively. By inserting the antibody-coated PEMS in a flowing virion or nucleocapsid suspension, label-free detection of the virions and nucleocapsids were respectively achieved by monitoring the PEMS resonance frequency shift. We showed that positive label-free detection of both the virion and the nucleocapsid could be achieved at a concentration of 100 virions (nucleocapsids)/ml or 10 virions (nucleocapsids)/100μl, comparable to the detection sensitivity of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, in contrast to PCR, PEMS detection was label-free, in-situ and rapid (less than 30 min), potentially requiring minimal or no sample preparation. PMID:20863681

  2. Marburg virus inclusions: A virus-induced microcompartment and interface to multivesicular bodies and the late endosomal compartment.

    PubMed

    Dolnik, Olga; Stevermann, Lea; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Becker, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Filovirus infection of target cells leads to the formation of virally induced cytoplasmic inclusions that contain viral nucleocapsids at different stages of maturation. While the role of the inclusions has been unclear since the identification of Marburg and Ebola viruses, it recently became clear that the inclusions are the sites of viral replication, nucleocapsid formation and maturation. Live cell imaging analyses revealed that mature nucleocapsids are transported from inclusions to the filopodia, which represent the major budding sites. Moreover, inclusions recruit cellular proteins that have been shown to support the transport of nucleocapsids. For example, the tumor susceptibility gene 101 protein (Tsg101) interacts with a late domain motif in the nucleocapsid protein NP and recruits the actin-nucleation factor IQGAP1. Complexes of nucleocapsids together with Tsg101 and IQGAP1 are then co-transported along actin filaments. We detected additional proteins (Alix, Nedd4 and the AAA-type ATPase VPS4) of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) that are recruited into inclusions. Together, the results suggest that nucleocapsids recruit the machinery that enhances viral budding at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, we identified Lamp1 as a marker of the late endosomal compartment in inclusions, while ER, Golgi, TGN and early endosomal markers were absent. In addition, we observed that LC3, a marker of autophagosomal membranes, was present in inclusions. The 3D structures of inclusions show an intricate structure that seems to accommodate an intimate cooperation between cellular and viral components with the intention to support viral transport and budding.

  3. Phosphate cycling on the basic protein of Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, C. J.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The presence of infected cell-specific phosphoproteins was investigated in Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus (PiGV)-infected fat body using [32P]orthophosphoric acid labeling. One infected cell-specific phosphoprotein had a mobility similar to that of the basic protein (VP12) of PiGV. Further analysis, using immunoblotting and acid-urea gel analysis of infected fat body, confirmed that this phosphoprotein was VP12. However we did not detect phosphorylated VP12 in 32P-labeled nucleocapsids. Phosphoamino acid analysis of 32P-labeled VP12 revealed that phosphoserine was present in the basic protein. Since VP12 is phosphorylated in the infected cell, but not in the nucleocapsid, it appears that dephosphorylation of VP12 is a critical event in the life cycle of the virus. We therefore assayed virus nucleocapsids and infected fat body for the presence of phosphatase activity. Phosphatase activity was not detected in the virus, but the infected fat body had more activity than uninfected fat body. A model for nucleocapsid assembly and uncoating is presented which takes into account the phosphorylation state of VP12, the role of Zn2+ in the nucleocapsid, and the role of the capsid-associated kinase.

  4. Baculovirus VP80 protein and the F-actin cytoskeleton interact and connect the viral replication factory with the nuclear periphery.

    PubMed

    Marek, Martin; Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Galibert, Lionel; Vlak, Just M; van Oers, Monique M

    2011-06-01

    Recently, we showed that the Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) VP80 protein is essential for the formation of both virion types, budded virus (BV) and occlusion-derived virus (ODV). Deletion of the vp80 gene did not affect assembly of nucleocapsids. However, these nucleocapsids were not able to migrate from the virogenic stroma to the nuclear periphery. In the current paper, we constructed a baculovirus recombinant with enhanced-green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged VP80, allowing visualization of the VP80 distribution pattern during infection. In baculovirus-infected cells, the EGFP-VP80 protein is entirely localized in nuclei, adjacent to the virus-triggered F-actin scaffold that forms a highly organized three-dimensional network connecting the virogenic stroma physically with the nuclear envelope. Interaction between VP80 and host actin was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation. We further showed that VP80 is associated with the nucleocapsid fraction of both BVs and ODVs, typically at one end of the nucleocapsids. In addition, the presence of sequence motifs with homology to invertebrate paramyosin proteins strongly supports a role for VP80 in the polar transport of nucleocapsids to the periphery of the nucleus on their way to the plasma membrane to form BVs and for assembly in the nuclear periphery to form ODVs for embedding in viral occlusion bodies.

  5. Cryo-electron microscopy of hepatitis B virions reveals variability in envelope capsid interactions

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Stefan; Urban, Stephan; Antoni, Christoph; Böttcher, Bettina

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major human pathogen causing about 750 000 deaths per year. The virion consists of a nucleocapsid and an envelope formed by lipids, and three integral membrane proteins. Although we have detailed structural insights into the organization of the HBV core, the arrangement of the envelope in virions and its interaction with the nucleocapsid is elusive. Here we show the ultrastructure of hepatitis B virions purified from patient serum. We identified two morphological phenotypes, which appear as compact and gapped particles with nucleocapsids in distinguishable conformations. The overall structures of these nucleocapsids resemble recombinant cores with two α-helical spikes per asymmetric unit. At the charged tips the spikes are contacted by defined protrusions of the envelope proteins, probably via electrostatic interactions. The HBV envelope in the two morphotypes is to some extent variable, but the surface proteins follow a general packing scheme with up to three surface protein dimers per asymmetric unit. The variability in the structure of the envelope indicates that the nucleocapsid does not firmly constrain the arrangement of the surface proteins, but provides a general template for the packing. PMID:17762862

  6. Oxidative stress in toadfish (Halobactrachus didactylus) cardiac muscle. Acute exposure to vanadate oligomers.

    PubMed

    Aureliano, M; Joaquim, N; Sousa, A; Martins, H; Coucelo, J M

    2002-06-07

    Vanadate solutions as "metavanadate" (containing ortho and metavanadate species) and "decavanadate" (containing mainly decameric species) (5 mM; 1 mg/kg) were injected intraperitoneously in Halobatrachus didactylus (toadfish), in order to evaluate the contribution of decameric vanadate species to vanadium (V) intoxication on the cardiac tissue. Following short-term exposure (1 and 7 days), different changes on antioxidant enzyme activities-superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), selenium-glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPx), total glutathione peroxidase (GPx), lipid peroxidation and subcellular vanadium distribution were observed in mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions of heart ventricle toadfish. After 1 day of vanadium intoxication, SOD, CAT and Se-GPx activities were decreased up to 25%, by both vanadate solutions, except mitochondrial CAT activity that increased (+23%) upon decavanadate administration. After 7 days of exposure, decavanadate versus metavanadate solutions promoted different effects mainly on cytosolic CAT activity (-56% versus -5%), mitochondrial CAT activity (-10% versus +10%) and total GPx activity (+1% versus -35%), whereas lipid peroxidation products were significantly increased (+82%) upon 500 microM decavanadate intoxication. Accumulation of vanadium in total (0.137+/-0.011 microg/g) and mitochondrial (0.022+/-0.001 microg/g) fractions was observed upon 7 days of metavanadate exposure, whereas for decavanadate, the concentration of vanadium increased in cytosolic (0.020+/-0.005 microg/g) and mitochondrial (0.021+/-0.009 microg/g) fractions. It is concluded that decameric vanadate species are responsible for a strong increase on lipid peroxidation and a decrease in cytosolic catalase activity thus contributing to oxidative stress responses upon vanadate intoxication, in the toadfish heart.

  7. Vanadium distribution, lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress markers upon decavanadate in vivo administration.

    PubMed

    Soares, S S; Martins, H; Duarte, R O; Moura, J J G; Coucelo, J; Gutiérrez-Merino, C; Aureliano, M

    2007-01-01

    The contribution of decameric vanadate species to vanadate toxic effects in cardiac muscle was studied following an intravenous administration of a decavanadate solution (1mM total vanadium) in Sparus aurata. Although decameric vanadate is unstable in the assay medium, it decomposes with a half-life time of 16 allowing studying its effects not only in vitro but also in vivo. After 1, 6 and 12h upon decavanadate administration the increase of vanadium in blood plasma, red blood cells and in cardiac mitochondria and cytosol is not affected in comparison to the administration of a metavanadate solution containing labile oxovanadates. Cardiac tissue lipid peroxidation increases up to 20%, 1, 6 and 12h after metavanadate administration, whilst for decavanadate no effects were observed except 1h after treatment (+20%). Metavanadate administration clearly differs from decavanadate by enhancing, 12h after exposure, mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity (+115%) and not affecting catalase (CAT) activity whereas decavanadate increases SOD activity by 20% and decreases (-55%) mitochondrial CAT activity. At early times of exposure, 1 and 6h, the only effect observed upon decavanadate administration was the increase by 20% of SOD activity. In conclusion, decavanadate has a different response pattern of lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress markers, in spite of the same vanadium distribution in cardiac cells observed after decavanadate and metavanadate administration. It is suggested that once formed decameric vanadate species has a different reactivity than vanadate, thus, pointing out that the differential contribution of vanadium oligomers should be taken into account to rationalize in vivo vanadate toxicity.

  8. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Torreira, Eva; Seabra, Ana Rita; Marriott, Hazel; Zhou, Min; Llorca, Óscar; Robinson, Carol V.; Carvalho, Helena G.; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2014-04-01

    The experimental models of dicotyledonous cytoplasmic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases unveil a conserved eukaryotic-type decameric architecture, with subtle structural differences in M. truncatula isoenzymes that account for their distinct herbicide resistance. The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants.

  9. How pH Modulates the Dimer-Decamer Interconversion of 2-Cys Peroxiredoxins from the Prx1 Subfamily*

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Mariana A. B.; Giuseppe, Priscila O.; Souza, Tatiana A. C. B.; Alegria, Thiago G. P.; Oliveira, Marcos A.; Netto, Luis E. S.; Murakami, Mario T.

    2015-01-01

    2-Cys peroxiredoxins belonging to the Prx1 subfamily are Cys-based peroxidases that control the intracellular levels of H2O2 and seem to assume a chaperone function under oxidative stress conditions. The regulation of their peroxidase activity as well as the observed functional switch from peroxidase to chaperone involves changes in their quaternary structure. Multiple factors can modulate the oligomeric transitions of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins such as redox state, post-translational modifications, and pH. However, the molecular basis for the pH influence on the oligomeric state of these enzymes is still elusive. Herein, we solved the crystal structure of a typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin from Leishmania in the dimeric (pH 8.5) and decameric (pH 4.4) forms, showing that conformational changes in the catalytic loop are associated with the pH-induced decamerization. Mutagenesis and biophysical studies revealed that a highly conserved histidine (His113) functions as a pH sensor that, at acidic conditions, becomes protonated and forms an electrostatic pair with Asp76 from the catalytic loop, triggering the decamerization. In these 2-Cys peroxiredoxins, decamer formation is important for the catalytic efficiency and has been associated with an enhanced sensitivity to oxidative inactivation by overoxidation of the peroxidatic cysteine. In eukaryotic cells, exposure to high levels of H2O2 can trigger intracellular pH variations, suggesting that pH changes might act cooperatively with H2O2 and other oligomerization-modulator factors to regulate the structure and function of typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins in response to oxidative stress. PMID:25666622

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of mussel adhesive protein repeating peptide segment.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, M P; Wollman, R M; Alderfer, J L

    1997-12-01

    Mussel adhesive protein (MAP) is the adhesive agent used by the common blue sea mussel (Mytilus edulis) to attach the animal to various underwater surfaces. It is generally composed of 75 to 85 repeating decameric units with the reported primary sequence NH2-Ala(1)-Lyst(2)-Pro(3)-Ser(4)-Tyr(5)-Hyp(6)-Hyp(7)-Thr(8)-DOPA( 9)- Lys(10)-COOH. This study examines this peptide's solution-state conformation using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NMR and molecular modeling of the decamer before and after molecular dynamics calculations in water suggests a conformation that retains an overall bent helix.

  11. Patchwork structure-function analysis of the Sendai virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Mottet-Osman, Geneviève; Miazza, Vincent; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Roux, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Paramyxoviruses contain a bi-lipidic envelope decorated by two transmembrane glycoproteins and carpeted on the inner surface with a layer of matrix proteins (M), thought to bridge the glycoproteins with the viral nucleocapsids. To characterize M structure-function features, a set of M domains were mutated or deleted. The genes encoding these modified M were incorporated into recombinant Sendai viruses and expressed as supplemental proteins. Using a method of integrated suppression complementation system (ISCS), the functions of these M mutants were analyzed in the context of the infection. Cellular membrane association, localization at the cell periphery, nucleocapsid binding, cellular protein interactions and promotion of viral particle formation were characterized in relation with the mutations. At the end, lack of nucleocapsid binding go together with lack of cell surface localization and both features definitely correlate with loss of M global function estimated by viral particle production.

  12. Structure of the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus 5 nucleoprotein-RNA complex

    SciTech Connect

    Alayyoubi, Maher; Leser, George P.; Kors, Christopher A.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2015-05-20

    Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family of membrane-enveloped viruses with a negative-sense RNA genome that is packaged and protected by long filamentous nucleocapsid-helix structures (RNPs). These RNPs, consisting of ~2,600 protomers of nucleocapsid (N) protein, form the template for viral transcription and replication. We have determined the 3D X-ray crystal structure of the nucleoprotein (N)-RNA complex from PIV5 to 3.11-Å resolution. The structure reveals a 13-mer nucleocapsid ring whose diameter, cavity, and pitch/height dimensions agree with EM data from early studies on the Paramyxovirinae subfamily of native RNPs, indicating that it closely represents one-turn in the building block of the RNP helices. The PIV5-N nucleocapsid ring encapsidates a nuclease resistant 78-nt RNA strand in its positively charged groove formed between the N-terminal (NTD) and C-terminal (CTD) domains of its successive N protomers. Six nucleotides precisely are associated with each N protomer, with alternating three-base-in three-base-out conformation. The binding of six nucleotides per protomer is consistent with the "rule of six" that governs the genome packaging of the Paramyxovirinae subfamily of viruses. PIV5-N protomer subdomains are very similar in structure to the previously solved Nipah-N structure, but with a difference in the angle between NTD/CTD at the RNA hinge region. Based on the Nipah-N structure we modeled a PIV5-N open conformation in which the CTD rotates away from the RNA strand into the inner spacious nucleocapsid-ring cavity. This rotation would expose the RNA for the viral polymerase activity without major disruption of the nucleocapsid structure.

  13. Structure of the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus 5 nucleoprotein–RNA complex

    PubMed Central

    Alayyoubi, Maher; Leser, George P.; Kors, Christopher A.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family of membrane-enveloped viruses with a negative-sense RNA genome that is packaged and protected by long filamentous nucleocapsid-helix structures (RNPs). These RNPs, consisting of ∼2,600 protomers of nucleocapsid (N) protein, form the template for viral transcription and replication. We have determined the 3D X-ray crystal structure of the nucleoprotein (N)-RNA complex from PIV5 to 3.11-Å resolution. The structure reveals a 13-mer nucleocapsid ring whose diameter, cavity, and pitch/height dimensions agree with EM data from early studies on the Paramyxovirinae subfamily of native RNPs, indicating that it closely represents one-turn in the building block of the RNP helices. The PIV5-N nucleocapsid ring encapsidates a nuclease resistant 78-nt RNA strand in its positively charged groove formed between the N-terminal (NTD) and C-terminal (CTD) domains of its successive N protomers. Six nucleotides precisely are associated with each N protomer, with alternating three-base-in three-base-out conformation. The binding of six nucleotides per protomer is consistent with the “rule of six” that governs the genome packaging of the Paramyxovirinae subfamily of viruses. PIV5-N protomer subdomains are very similar in structure to the previously solved Nipah-N structure, but with a difference in the angle between NTD/CTD at the RNA hinge region. Based on the Nipah-N structure we modeled a PIV5-N open conformation in which the CTD rotates away from the RNA strand into the inner spacious nucleocapsid-ring cavity. This rotation would expose the RNA for the viral polymerase activity without major disruption of the nucleocapsid structure. PMID:25831513

  14. Structure of the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus 5 nucleoprotein–RNA complex

    DOE PAGES

    Alayyoubi, Maher; Leser, George P.; Kors, Christopher A.; ...

    2015-03-23

    Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family of membrane-enveloped viruses with a negative-sense RNA genome that is packaged and protected by long filamentous nucleocapsid-helix structures (RNPs). These RNPs, consisting of ~2,600 protomers of nucleocapsid (N) protein, form the template for viral transcription and replication. In this paper, we have determined the 3D X-ray crystal structure of the nucleoprotein (N)-RNA complex from PIV5 to 3.11-Å resolution. The structure reveals a 13-mer nucleocapsid ring whose diameter, cavity, and pitch/height dimensions agree with EM data from early studies on the Paramyxovirinae subfamily of native RNPs, indicating that it closelymore » represents one-turn in the building block of the RNP helices. The PIV5-N nucleocapsid ring encapsidates a nuclease resistant 78-nt RNA strand in its positively charged groove formed between the N-terminal (NTD) and C-terminal (CTD) domains of its successive N protomers. Six nucleotides precisely are associated with each N protomer, with alternating three-base-in three-base-out conformation. The binding of six nucleotides per protomer is consistent with the “rule of six” that governs the genome packaging of the Paramyxovirinae subfamily of viruses. PIV5-N protomer subdomains are very similar in structure to the previously solved Nipah-N structure, but with a difference in the angle between NTD/CTD at the RNA hinge region. Based on the Nipah-N structure we modeled a PIV5-N open conformation in which the CTD rotates away from the RNA strand into the inner spacious nucleocapsid-ring cavity. Finally, this rotation would expose the RNA for the viral polymerase activity without major disruption of the nucleocapsid structure.« less

  15. Structure of the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus 5 nucleoprotein–RNA complex

    SciTech Connect

    Alayyoubi, Maher; Leser, George P.; Kors, Christopher A.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2015-03-23

    Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family of membrane-enveloped viruses with a negative-sense RNA genome that is packaged and protected by long filamentous nucleocapsid-helix structures (RNPs). These RNPs, consisting of ~2,600 protomers of nucleocapsid (N) protein, form the template for viral transcription and replication. In this paper, we have determined the 3D X-ray crystal structure of the nucleoprotein (N)-RNA complex from PIV5 to 3.11-Å resolution. The structure reveals a 13-mer nucleocapsid ring whose diameter, cavity, and pitch/height dimensions agree with EM data from early studies on the Paramyxovirinae subfamily of native RNPs, indicating that it closely represents one-turn in the building block of the RNP helices. The PIV5-N nucleocapsid ring encapsidates a nuclease resistant 78-nt RNA strand in its positively charged groove formed between the N-terminal (NTD) and C-terminal (CTD) domains of its successive N protomers. Six nucleotides precisely are associated with each N protomer, with alternating three-base-in three-base-out conformation. The binding of six nucleotides per protomer is consistent with the “rule of six” that governs the genome packaging of the Paramyxovirinae subfamily of viruses. PIV5-N protomer subdomains are very similar in structure to the previously solved Nipah-N structure, but with a difference in the angle between NTD/CTD at the RNA hinge region. Based on the Nipah-N structure we modeled a PIV5-N open conformation in which the CTD rotates away from the RNA strand into the inner spacious nucleocapsid-ring cavity. Finally, this rotation would expose the RNA for the viral polymerase activity without major disruption of the nucleocapsid structure.

  16. Cryo-electron tomography of Marburg virus particles and their morphogenesis within infected cells.

    PubMed

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Riches, James D; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Welsch, Sonja; Krähling, Verena; Davey, Norman; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Becker, Stephan; Briggs, John A G

    2011-11-01

    Several major human pathogens, including the filoviruses, paramyxoviruses, and rhabdoviruses, package their single-stranded RNA genomes within helical nucleocapsids, which bud through the plasma membrane of the infected cell to release enveloped virions. The virions are often heterogeneous in shape, which makes it difficult to study their structure and assembly mechanisms. We have applied cryo-electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging methods to derive structures of Marburg virus, a highly pathogenic filovirus, both after release and during assembly within infected cells. The data demonstrate the potential of cryo-electron tomography methods to derive detailed structural information for intermediate steps in biological pathways within intact cells. We describe the location and arrangement of the viral proteins within the virion. We show that the N-terminal domain of the nucleoprotein contains the minimal assembly determinants for a helical nucleocapsid with variable number of proteins per turn. Lobes protruding from alternate interfaces between each nucleoprotein are formed by the C-terminal domain of the nucleoprotein, together with viral proteins VP24 and VP35. Each nucleoprotein packages six RNA bases. The nucleocapsid interacts in an unusual, flexible "Velcro-like" manner with the viral matrix protein VP40. Determination of the structures of assembly intermediates showed that the nucleocapsid has a defined orientation during transport and budding. Together the data show striking architectural homology between the nucleocapsid helix of rhabdoviruses and filoviruses, but unexpected, fundamental differences in the mechanisms by which the nucleocapsids are then assembled together with matrix proteins and initiate membrane envelopment to release infectious virions, suggesting that the viruses have evolved different solutions to these conserved assembly steps.

  17. Evidence for zinc binding by two structural proteins of Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, C. J.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Workers in our laboratory previously reported the possibility of cation involvement in the in vitro dissociation of the Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus nucleocapsids (K. A. Tweeten, L. A. Bulla, Jr., and R. A. Consigli, J. Virol. 33:866-876, 1980; M. E. Wilson and R. A. Consigli, Virology 143:516-525, 1985). The current study found zinc associated with both granulosis virus nucleocapsids and granulin by atomic absorption analysis. A blotting assay with 65Zn2+ specifically identified the radioactive cation as binding to two viral structural proteins, granulin and VP12. These findings indicate that zinc may have a critical role in maintaining virus stability.

  18. Electron microscopic analysis and structural characterization of novel NADP(H)-containing methanol: N,N'-dimethyl-4-nitrosoaniline oxidoreductases from the gram-positive methylotrophic bacteria Amycolatopsis methanolica and Mycobacterium gastri MB19.

    PubMed Central

    Bystrykh, L V; Vonck, J; van Bruggen, E F; van Beeumen, J; Samyn, B; Govorukhina, N I; Arfman, N; Duine, J A; Dijkhuizen, L

    1993-01-01

    The quaternary protein structure of two methanol:N,N'-dimethyl-4-nitrosoaniline (NDMA) oxidoreductases purified from Amycolatopsis methanolica and Mycobacterium gastri MB19 was analyzed by electron microscopy and image processing. The enzymes are decameric proteins (displaying fivefold symmetry) with estimated molecular masses of 490 to 500 kDa based on their subunit molecular masses of 49 to 50 kDa. Both methanol:NDMA oxidoreductases possess a tightly but noncovalently bound NADP(H) cofactor at an NADPH-to-subunit molar ratio of 0.7. These cofactors are redox active toward alcohol and aldehyde substrates. Both enzymes contain significant amounts of Zn2+ and Mg2+ ions. The primary amino acid sequences of the A. methanolica and M. gastri MB19 methanol:NDMA oxidoreductases share a high degree of identity, as indicated by N-terminal sequence analysis (63% identity among the first 27 N-terminal amino acids), internal peptide sequence analysis, and overall amino acid composition. The amino acid sequence analysis also revealed significant similarity to a decameric methanol dehydrogenase of Bacillus methanolicus C1. Images PMID:8449887

  19. Decavanadate effects in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Aureliano, Manuel; Gândara, Ricardo M C

    2005-05-01

    Vanadium biological studies often disregarded the formation of decameric vanadate species known to interact, in vitro, with high-affinity with many proteins such as myosin and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump and also to inhibit these biochemical systems involved in energy transduction. Moreover, very few in vivo animal studies involving vanadium consider the contribution of decavanadate to vanadium biological effects. Recently, it has been shown that an acute exposure to decavanadate but not to other vanadate oligomers induced oxidative stress and a different fate in vanadium intracellular accumulation. Several markers of oxidative stress analyzed on hepatic and cardiac tissue were monitored after in vivo effect of an acute exposure (12, 24 h and 7 days), to a sub-lethal concentration (5 mM; 1 mg/kg) of two vanadium solutions ("metavanadate" and "decavanadate"). It was observed that "decavanadate" promote different effects than other vanadate oligomers in catalase activity, glutathione content, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial superoxide anion production and vanadium accumulation, whereas both solutions seem to equally depress reactive oxygen species (ROS) production as well as total intracellular reducing power. Vanadium is accumulated in mitochondria in particular when "decavanadate" is administered. These recent findings, that are now summarized, point out the decameric vanadate species contributions to in vivo and in vitro effects induced by vanadium in biological systems.

  20. Characterization of structural and immunological properties of a fusion protein between flagellin from Salmonella and lumazine synthase from Brucella.

    PubMed

    Hiriart, Y; Rossi, A H; Biedma, M E; Errea, A J; Moreno, G; Cayet, D; Rinaldi, J; Blancá, B; Sirard, J C; Goldbaum, F; Berguer, P; Rumbo, M

    2017-03-03

    Aiming to combine the flexibility of Brucella lumazine synthase (BLS) to adapt different protein domains in a decameric structure and the capacity of BLS and flagellin to enhance the immunogenicity of peptides that are linked to their structure, we generated a chimeric protein (BLS-FliC131) by fusing flagellin from Salmonella in the N-termini of BLS. The obtained protein was recognized by anti-flagellin and anti-BLS antibodies, keeping the oligomerization capacity of BLS, without affecting the folding of the monomeric protein components determined by circular dichroism. Furthermore, the thermal stability of each fusion partner is conserved, indicating that the interactions that participate in its folding are not affected by the genetic fusion. Besides, either in vitro or in vivo using TLR5-deficient animals we could determine that BLS-FliC131 retains the capacity of triggering TLR5. The humoral response against BLS elicited by BLS-FliC131 was stronger than the one elicited by equimolar amounts of BLS + FliC. Since BLS scaffold allows the generation of hetero-decameric structures, we expect that flagellin oligomerization on this protein scaffold will generate a new vaccine platform with enhanced capacity to activate immune responses.

  1. Interaction of serum amyloid P component with hexanoyl bis(d-proline) (CPHPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Kolstoe, Simon E.; Jenvey, Michelle C.; Purvis, Alan; Light, Mark E.; Thompson, Darren; Hughes, Peter; Pepys, Mark B.; Wood, Stephen P.

    2014-08-01

    Serum amyloid P component is a pentameric plasma glycoprotein that recognizes and binds to amyloid fibres in a calcium-dependent fashion and is likely to contribute to their deposition and persistence in vivo. Five molecules of the drug CPHPC avidly cross-link pairs of protein pentamers and the decameric complex is rapidly cleared in vivo. Crystal structures of the protein in complex with a bivalent drug and cadmium ions, which improve crystal quality, allow the definition of the preferred bound drug isomers. Under physiological conditions, the pentameric human plasma protein serum amyloid P component (SAP) binds hexanoyl bis(d-proline) (R-1-(6-[R-2-carboxy-pyrrolidin-1-yl]-6-oxo-hexanoyl) pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid; CPHPC) through its d-proline head groups in a calcium-dependent interaction. Cooperative effects in binding lead to a substantial enhancement of affinity. Five molecules of the bivalent ligand cross-link and stabilize pairs of SAP molecules, forming a decameric complex that is rapidly cleared from the circulation by the liver. Here, it is reported that X-ray analysis of the SAP complex with CPHPC and cadmium ions provides higher resolution detail of the interaction than is observed with calcium ions. Conformational isomers of CPHPC observed in solution by HPLC and by X-ray analysis are compared with the protein-bound form. These are discussed in relation to the development of CPHPC to provide SAP depletion for the treatment of amyloidosis and other indications.

  2. Crystal structures and enzyme mechanisms of a dual fucose mutarotase/ribose pyranase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Kim, Min-Sung; Suh, Hye-Young; Ku, Bonsu; Song, Young-Lan; Ko, Sunggeon; Lee, Weontae; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2009-08-07

    Escherichia coli FucU (Fucose Unknown) is a dual fucose mutarotase and ribose pyranase, which shares 44% sequence identity with its human counterpart. Herein, we report the structures of E. coli FucU and mouse FucU bound to L-fucose and delineate the catalytic mechanisms underlying the interconversion between stereoisomers of fucose and ribose. E. coli FucU forms a decameric toroid with each active site formed by two adjacent subunits. While one subunit provides most of the fucose-interacting residues including a catalytic tyrosine residue, the other subunit provides a catalytic His-Asp dyad. This active-site feature is critical not only for the mutarotase activity toward L-fucose but also for the pyranase activity toward D-ribose. Structural and biochemical analyses pointed that mouse FucU assembles into four different oligomeric forms, among which the smallest homodimeric form is most abundant and would be the predominant species under physiological conditions. This homodimer has two fucose-binding sites that are devoid of the His-Asp dyad and catalytically inactive, indicating that the mutarotase and the pyranase activities appear dispensable in vertebrates. The defective assembly of the mouse FucU homodimer into the decameric form is due to an insertion of two residues at the N-terminal extreme, which is a common aspect of all the known vertebrate FucU proteins. Therefore, vertebrate FucU appears to serve for as yet unknown function through the quaternary structural alteration.

  3. Effects of the interactions of classical swine fever virus core protein with proteins of SUMOylation pathway on virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The classical swine fever virus (CSFV) nucleocapsid or Core protein serves a protective function for the viral RNA, and acts as a transcriptional regulator. However studies involving the CSFV Core protein have been limited. To gain insight into other functions of the Core protein, particularly into ...

  4. Sumoylation of the Core Protein in Classical Swine Fever Virus is Essential for Virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The classical swine fever virus core protein makes up the nucleocapsid of the virus, and is serves both as a protective function for the viral RNA and a transcriptional regulator in the host cell. To identify host proteins that interact with the viral Core protein we utilized the yeast two-hybrid to...

  5. Hantaviruses and Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, Maranhão, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Travassos da Rosa, Elizabeth S.; Sampaio de Lemos, Elba R.; Medeiros, Daniele B. de Almeida; Simith, Darlene B.; Pereira, Armando de Souza; Elkhoury, Mauro R.; Mendes, Wellington S.; Vidigal, José R.B.; de Oliveira, Renata C.; D’Andrea, Paulo S.; Bonvícino, Cibele R.; Cruz, Ana C.R.; Nunes, Márcio R.T.

    2010-01-01

    To confirm circulation of Anajatuba virus in Maranhão, Brazil, we conducted a serologic survey (immunoglobulin G ELISA) and phylogenetic studies (nucleocapsid gene sequences) of hantaviruses from wild rodents and persons with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. This virus is transmitted by Oligoryzomys fornesi rodents and is responsible for hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in this region. PMID:21122229

  6. A novel M RNA reassortant of Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus infecting vegetables in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) was recently identified using serology and nucleocapsid gene sequence from tomato plants with severe tospovirus symptoms in south Florida, which extends the geographic range of this virus from South America and South Africa to now include North America. Full genome s...

  7. Solanaceous vegetables in Florida infected with a novel M RNA reassortant of Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We recently identified Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) using serology and nucleocapsid gene sequence from tomato plants with severe tospovirus symptoms in south Florida. This extends the geographic range of this virus from South America and South Africa to now include North America. Full genome se...

  8. Hantaviruses and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, Maranhao, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Travassos da Rosa, Elizabeth S; Sampaio de Lemos, Elba R; de Almeida Medeiros, Daniele B; Simith, Darlene B; de Souza Pereira, Armando; Elkhoury, Mauro R; Mendes, Wellington S; Vidigal, José R B; de Oliveira, Renata C; D'Andrea, Paulo S; Bonvicino, Cibele R; Cruz, Ana C R; Nunes, Márcio R T; da Costa Vasconcelos, Pedro F

    2010-12-01

    To confirm circulation of Anajatuba virus in Maranhao, Brazil, we conducted a serologic survey (immunoglobulin G ELISA) and phylogenetic studies (nucleocapsid gene sequences) of hantaviruses from wild rodents and persons with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. This virus is transmitted by Oligoryzomys fornesi rodents and is responsible for hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in this region.

  9. Multiple functions of capsid protein phosphorylation in duck hepatitis B virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, M; Summers, J

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the role of phosphorylation of the capsid protein of the avian hepadnavirus duck hepatitis B virus in viral replication. We found previously that three serines and one threonine in the C-terminal 24 amino acids of the capsid protein serve as phosphorylation sites and that the pattern of phosphorylation at these sites in intracellular viral capsids is complex. In this study, we present evidence that the phosphorylation state of three of these residues affects distinct steps in viral replication. By substituting these residues with alanine in order to mimic serine, or with aspartic acid in order to mimic phosphoserine, and assaying the effects of these substitutions on various steps in virus replication, we were able to make the following inferences. (i) The presence of phosphoserines at residues 245 and 259 stimulates DNA synthesis within viral nucleocapsids. (ii) The absence of phosphoserine at residue 257 and at residues 257 and 259 stimulates covalently closed circular DNA synthesis and virus production, respectively. (iii) The presence of phosphoserine at position 259 is required for initiation of infection. The results implied that both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated capsid proteins were necessary for a nucleocapsid particle to carry out all its functions in virus replication, explaining why differential phosphorylation of the capsid protein occurs in hepadnaviruses. Whether these differentially phosphorylated proteins coexist on the same nucleocapsid, or whether the nucleocapsid acquires sequential functions through selective phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, is discussed. Images PMID:8207809

  10. Phylogenetic Relationship of Necoclí Virus to Other South American Hantaviruses (Bunyaviridae: Hantavirus).

    PubMed

    Montoya-Ruiz, Carolina; Cajimat, Maria N B; Milazzo, Mary Louise; Diaz, Francisco J; Rodas, Juan David; Valbuena, Gustavo; Fulhorst, Charles F

    2015-07-01

    The results of a previous study suggested that Cherrie's cane rat (Zygodontomys cherriei) is the principal host of Necoclí virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus) in Colombia. Bayesian analyses of complete nucleocapsid protein gene sequences and complete glycoprotein precursor gene sequences in this study confirmed that Necoclí virus is phylogenetically closely related to Maporal virus, which is principally associated with the delicate pygmy rice rat (Oligoryzomys delicatus) in western Venezuela. In pairwise comparisons, nonidentities between the complete amino acid sequence of the nucleocapsid protein of Necoclí virus and the complete amino acid sequences of the nucleocapsid proteins of other hantaviruses were ≥8.7%. Likewise, nonidentities between the complete amino acid sequence of the glycoprotein precursor of Necoclí virus and the complete amino acid sequences of the glycoprotein precursors of other hantaviruses were ≥11.7%. Collectively, the unique association of Necoclí virus with Z. cherriei in Colombia, results of the Bayesian analyses of complete nucleocapsid protein gene sequences and complete glycoprotein precursor gene sequences, and results of the pairwise comparisons of amino acid sequences strongly support the notion that Necoclí virus represents a novel species in the genus Hantavirus. Further work is needed to determine whether Calabazo virus (a hantavirus associated with Z. brevicauda cherriei in Panama) and Necoclí virus are conspecific.

  11. Phylogenetic Relationship of Necoclí Virus to Other South American Hantaviruses (Bunyaviridae: Hantavirus)

    PubMed Central

    Montoya-Ruiz, Carolina; Cajimat, Maria N. B.; Milazzo, Mary Louise; Diaz, Francisco J.; Rodas, Juan David; Valbuena, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The results of a previous study suggested that Cherrie's cane rat (Zygodontomys cherriei) is the principal host of Necoclí virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus) in Colombia. Bayesian analyses of complete nucleocapsid protein gene sequences and complete glycoprotein precursor gene sequences in this study confirmed that Necoclí virus is phylogenetically closely related to Maporal virus, which is principally associated with the delicate pygmy rice rat (Oligoryzomys delicatus) in western Venezuela. In pairwise comparisons, nonidentities between the complete amino acid sequence of the nucleocapsid protein of Necoclí virus and the complete amino acid sequences of the nucleocapsid proteins of other hantaviruses were ≥8.7%. Likewise, nonidentities between the complete amino acid sequence of the glycoprotein precursor of Necoclí virus and the complete amino acid sequences of the glycoprotein precursors of other hantaviruses were ≥11.7%. Collectively, the unique association of Necoclí virus with Z. cherriei in Colombia, results of the Bayesian analyses of complete nucleocapsid protein gene sequences and complete glycoprotein precursor gene sequences, and results of the pairwise comparisons of amino acid sequences strongly support the notion that Necoclí virus represents a novel species in the genus Hantavirus. Further work is needed to determine whether Calabazo virus (a hantavirus associated with Z. brevicauda cherriei in Panama) and Necoclí virus are conspecific. PMID:26186516

  12. The significance of the Golgi complex in envelopment of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) as revealed by cryobased electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wild, Peter; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Cantieni, Daniel; Loepfe, Eva; Walther, Paul; Müller, Martin; Engels, Monika

    2002-01-01

    Nucleocapsids of herpesviruses originate in the nucleus of host cells and bud through the inner nuclear membrane acquiring tegument and envelope. The release of the enveloped virus particle from the perinuclear space is unknown. Cryobased electron microscopic imaging revealed enveloped virus particles within cisterns associated with the perinuclear space, a pre-Golgi compartment connecting Golgi cisterns to the perinuclear space, and enveloped virus particles in Golgi cisterns where they are packaged into transport vacuoles by membrane fission. To our knowledge, our images show for the first time the connectivity from the perinuclear space to Golgi cisterns. The data strongly indicate an intracisternal transport of enveloped virus particles from the budding site to the packaging site. Budding starts by condensation at the inner membrane. Condensation involving the viral envelope and peripheral tegument was persistent in virus particles within perinuclear space and associated cisterns. Virus particles within Golgi cisterns and transport vacuoles originating by Golgi membrane fission, however, lacked condensation. Instead, spikes were clearly evident. The phenomenon of condensation is considered likely to be responsible for preventing fusion of the viral envelope with cisternal membranes and/or for driving virions from the perinuclear space to Golgi cisterns. Glycoprotein K is discussed to likely play a role in the intracisternal transportation of virions. In addition to the pathway including intracisternal transport and packaging, there were clear indications for the well-known pathway involving wrapping of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids by Golgi membranes. The origin of the cytoplasmic nucleocapsids, however, remains obscure. Lack of evidence for release of nucleocapsids at the outer nuclear membrane suggests that the process is very rapid, or that nucleocapsids pass the nucleocytoplasmic barrier via an alternative route.

  13. Association Between Preovulatory Concentrations of Estradiol and Expression of Uterine Milk Protein Precursor, Inhibin Beta A, Period 1, Proenkephalin, and Receptors for Oxytocin, Progesterone, and Estradiol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eliminating the preovulatory surge of estradiol decreased uterine weight, uterine protein, RNA to DNA ratio, rate of protein synthesis, and embryo survival following embryo transfer in sheep. Furthermore, cows that did not exhibit standing estrus (decreased preovulatory concentrations of estradiol) ...

  14. De novo prediction of RNA-protein interactions from sequence information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Xiaowei; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Huang, Qiang; Wang, Yong; Xu, Derong; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Chen, Runsheng; Chen, Luonan

    2013-01-27

    Protein-RNA interactions are fundamentally important in understanding cellular processes. In particular, non-coding RNA-protein interactions play an important role to facilitate biological functions in signalling, transcriptional regulation, and even the progression of complex diseases. However, experimental determination of protein-RNA interactions remains time-consuming and labour-intensive. Here, we develop a novel extended naïve-Bayes-classifier for de novo prediction of protein-RNA interactions, only using protein and RNA sequence information. Specifically, we first collect a set of known protein-RNA interactions as gold-standard positives and extract sequence-based features to represent each protein-RNA pair. To fill the gap between high dimensional features and scarcity of gold-standard positives, we select effective features by cutting a likelihood ratio score, which not only reduces the computational complexity but also allows transparent feature integration during prediction. An extended naïve Bayes classifier is then constructed using these effective features to train a protein-RNA interaction prediction model. Numerical experiments show that our method can achieve the prediction accuracy of 0.77 even though only a small number of protein-RNA interaction data are available. In particular, we demonstrate that the extended naïve-Bayes-classifier is superior to the naïve-Bayes-classifier by fully considering the dependences among features. Importantly, we conduct ncRNA pull-down experiments to validate the predicted novel protein-RNA interactions and identify the interacting proteins of sbRNA CeN72 in C. elegans, which further demonstrates the effectiveness of our method.

  15. A Single Mutant, A276S of p53 Turns the Switch to Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Reaz, Shams; Mossalam, Mohanad; Okal, Abood; Lim, Carol. S.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 induces apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and DNA repair along with other functions in a transcription-dependent manner1. The selection of these functions depends on sequence-specific recognition of p53 to a target decameric sequence of gene promoters2. Amino acid residues in p53 that directly bind to DNA were analyzed, and the replacement of A276 in p53 with selected amino acids elucidated its importance in promoter transcription. For most apoptotic and cell cycle gene promoters, position 9 of the target decameric sequence is a cytosine while for DNA repair gene promoters, thymine is found instead. Therefore, selective binding to the cytosine at the 9th position may transcribe apoptotic gene promoters and thus can induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Molecular modeling with PyMOL indicated that substitution of a hydrophilic residue, A276S, would prefer binding to cytosine at the 9th position of the target decameric sequence whereas substitution of a hydrophobic residue (A276F) would fail to do so. Correspondingly, A276S demonstrated higher transcription of PUMA, PERP, and p21WAF1/CIP1gene promoters containing a cytosine at the 9th position and lower transcription of GADD45 gene promoter containing a thymine at the 9th position compared to wild-type p53. Cell cycle analysis showed that A276S maintained similar G1/G0 phase arrest as wild-type p53. Additionally, A276S induced higher apoptosis than wild-type p53 as measured by DNA segmentation and 7-AAD assay. Since the status of endogenous p53 can influence the activity of the exogenous p53, we examined the activity of A276S in HeLa cells (wild-type endogenous p53) in addition to T47D cells (mutated and mislocalized endogenous p53). The same apoptotic trend in both cell lines suggested A276S can induce cell death regardless of endogenous p53 status. Cell proliferation assay depicted that A276S efficiently reduced the viability of T47D cells more than wild-type p53 over time. We

  16. A Graph Approach to Mining Biological Patterns in the Binding Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen; Yan, Changhui

    2017-01-01

    Protein-RNA interactions play important roles in the biological systems. Searching for regular patterns in the Protein-RNA binding interfaces is important for understanding how protein and RNA recognize each other and bind to form a complex. Herein, we present a graph-mining method for discovering biological patterns in the protein-RNA interfaces. We represented known protein-RNA interfaces using graphs and then discovered graph patterns enriched in the interfaces. Comparison of the discovered graph patterns with UniProt annotations showed that the graph patterns had a significant overlap with residue sites that had been proven crucial for the RNA binding by experimental methods. Using 200 patterns as input features, a support vector machine method was able to classify protein surface patches into RNA-binding sites and non-RNA-binding sites with 84.0% accuracy and 88.9% precision. We built a simple scoring function that calculated the total number of the graph patterns that occurred in a protein-RNA interface. That scoring function was able to discriminate near-native protein-RNA complexes from docking decoys with a performance comparable with that of a state-of-the-art complex scoring function. Our work also revealed possible patterns that might be important for binding affinity.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the inducible lysine decarboxylase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Alexopoulos, E.; Kanjee, U.; Snider, J.; Houry, W.A.; Pai, E.F.

    2010-02-11

    The decameric inducible lysine decarboxylase (LdcI) from Escherichia coli has been crystallized in space groups C2 and C222{sub 1}; the Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}{sup 2+} cluster was used to derivatize the C2 crystals. The method of single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS) as implemented in SHELXD was used to solve the Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}{sup 2+}-derivatized structure to 5 {angstrom} resolution. Many of the Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}{sup 2+}-binding sites had twofold and fivefold noncrystallographic symmetry. Taking advantage of this feature, phase modification was performed in DM. The electron-density map of LdcI displays many features in agreement with the low-resolution negative-stain electron-density map [Snider et al. (2006), J. Biol. Chem. 281, 1532-1546].

  18. The conformation of a B-DNA decamer is mainly determined by its sequence and not by crystal environment.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, U; Alings, C

    1991-01-01

    By comparing the conformations adopted by a double-stranded decameric B-DNA fragment in different crystal environments, we address the question of the degree of deformability of DNA helices. The three-dimensional structure of the self-complementary DNA decamer CCAGGCmeCTGG has been determined from crystals of space group P6 at 2.25 A resolution with an R value of 17.2% for 2407 1 sigma structure amplitudes. The oligonucleotide forms a B-type double helix with a characteristic sequence-dependent conformation closely resembling that of the corresponding unmethylated decamer, the structure of which is known from a high-resolution analysis of crystals of space group C2. Evidently, both the effects of single-site methylation and altered crystal environment on the DNA conformation are small. Therefore, double-helical DNA may possess sequence-determined conformational features that are less deformable than previously thought. Images PMID:1989887

  19. Cryo-EM structures of the autoinhibited E. coli ATP synthase in three rotational states.

    PubMed

    Sobti, Meghna; Smits, Callum; Wong, Andrew Sw; Ishmukhametov, Robert; Stock, Daniela; Sandin, Sara; Stewart, Alastair G

    2016-12-21

    A molecular model that provides a framework for interpreting the wealth of functional information obtained on the E. coli F-ATP synthase has been generated using cryo-electron microscopy. Three different states that relate to rotation of the enzyme were observed, with the central stalk's ε subunit in an extended autoinhibitory conformation in all three states. The Fo motor comprises of seven transmembrane helices and a decameric c-ring and invaginations on either side of the membrane indicate the entry and exit channels for protons. The proton translocating subunit contains near parallel helices inclined by ~30° to the membrane, a feature now synonymous with rotary ATPases. For the first time in this rotary ATPase subtype, the peripheral stalk is resolved over its entire length of the complex, revealing the F1 attachment points and a coiled-coil that bifurcates toward the membrane with its helices separating to embrace subunit a from two sides.

  20. Preparation and crystallization of the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Maita, N; Okada, K; Hirotsu, S; Hatakeyama, K; Hakoshima, T

    2001-08-01

    Mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is a decameric enzyme in the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, which is an essential cofactor for enzymes producing neurotransmitters such as catecholamines and for nitric oxide synthases. The enzyme is dually regulated by its feedback regulatory protein GFRP in the presence of its stimulatory effector phenylalanine and its inhibitory effector biopterin. Here, both the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes of rat GTP cyclohydrolase I bound to GFRP were crystallized by vapour diffusion. Diffraction data sets at resolutions of 3.0 and 2.64 A were collected for the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes, respectively. Each complex consists of two GTPCHI pentamer rings and two GFRP pentamer rings, with pseudo-52 point-group symmetry.

  1. Purification and identification of cell surface antigens using lamprey monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cuiling; Ali, Shabab; St. Germain, Jonathan; Liu, Yanling; Yu, Xuecong; Jaye, David L.; Moran, Michael F.; Cooper, Max D.; Ehrhardt, Götz R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) B antibodies of the evolutionary distant sea lamprey are structurally distinct from conventional mammalian antibodies. The different protein architecture and large evolutionary distance of jawless vertebrates suggest that VLR antibodies may represent promising tools for biomarker discovery. Here we report the generation of panels of monoclonal VLR antibodies from lamprey larvae immunized with human T cells and the use of a recombinant monoclonal VLR antibody for antigen purification and mass spectrometric identification. We demonstrate that despite predicted low affinity of individual VLR antigen binding units to the antigen, the high avidity resulting from decameric assembly of secreted VLR antibodies allows for efficient antigen capture and subsequent identification by mass spectometry. We show that VLR antibodies detect their antigens with high specificity and can be used in various standard laboratory application techniques. The lamprey antibodies are novel reagents that can complement conventional monoclonal antibodies in multiple scientific research disciplines. PMID:22964555

  2. Decavanadate (V10 O28 6-) and oxovanadates: oxometalates with many biological activities.

    PubMed

    Aureliano, Manuel; Crans, Debbie C

    2009-04-01

    The decameric vanadate species V(10)O(28)(6-), also referred to as decavanadate, impact proteins, lipid structures and cellular function, and show some effects in vivo on oxidative stress processes and other biological properties. The mode of action of decavanadate in many biochemical systems depends, at least in part, on the charge and size of the species and in some cases competes with the simpler oxovanadate species. The orange decavanadate that contains 10 vanadium atoms is a stable species for several days at neutral pH, but at higher pH immediately converts to the structurally and functionally distinct lower oxovanadates such as the monomer, dimer or tetramer. Although the biological effects of vanadium are generally assumed to derive from monomeric vanadate or the vanadyl cation, we show in this review that not all effects can be attributed to these simple oxovanadate forms. This topic has not previously been reviewed although background information is available [D.C. Crans, Comments Inorg. Chem. 16 (1994) 35-76; M. Aureliano (Ed.), Vanadium Biochemistry, Research Signpost Publs., Kerala, India, 2007]. In addition to pumps, channels and metabotropic receptors, lipid structures represent potential biological targets for decavanadate and some examples have been reported. Decavanadate interact with enzymes, polyphosphate, nucleotide and inositol 3-phosphate binding sites in the substrate domain or in an allosteric site, in a complex manner. In mitochondria, where vanadium was shown to accumulate following decavanadate in vivo administration, nM concentration of decavanadate induces membrane depolarization in addition to inhibiting oxygen consumption, suggesting that mitochondria may be potential targets for decameric toxicity. In vivo effects of decavanadate in piscine models demonstrated that antioxidant stress markers, lipid peroxidation and vanadium subcellular distribution is dependent upon whether or not the solutions administered contain decavanadate. The

  3. Structure of keyhole limpet hemocyanin type 1 (KLH1) at 15 A resolution by electron cryomicroscopy and angular reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Orlova, E V; Dube, P; Harris, J R; Beckman, E; Zemlin, F; Markl, J; van Heel, M

    1997-08-22

    A three-dimensional reconstruction of keyhole limpet hemocyanin type 1 (KLH1) has been obtained using electron cryomicroscopy at liquid helium temperatures and single particle image processing. The use of a high-contrast embedding medium, 1% (w/v) glucose and 2% (w/v) ammonium molybdate (pH 7.0), enables high-resolution electron micrographs to be recorded close to focus, i.e. with excellent transfer of high-resolution information, while maintaining enough image contrast to localise the individual macromolecules in the images. When low-pass filtered to approximately 45 A resolution, the new 15 A resolution reconstruction is very similar to the earlier reconstructions of gastropodan hemocyanins of specimens embedded in vitreous ice. The map shows much detail and reveals many new symmetry elements in this very large cylindrical molluscan hemocyanin. The full KLH1 didecamer has D5 pointgroup symmetry, yet within the KLH1 decameric half-molecules local 2-fold axes have emerged that make the wall of the KLH1 decamer, in spite of its having an exact C5 symmetry only, resemble the D5-symmetric wall of the decameric cephalopod hemocyanins. In fact, the outside of each tier of this six-tiered gastropodan hemocyanin was found to have an approximate D5 symmetry. Local 2-fold axes also relate the "functional units" within the dimeric "morphological units" of the wall and the collar areas of the 8 MDa KLH1 molecule. Certain local-symmetry-related surface motifs may be present up to 60 times on the outside wall of this highly symmetric cylindrical hemocyanin. Keyhole limpet hemocyanin is used clinically as an immunostimulant. The very strong immune reaction elicited by this hemocyanin may be associated with its intricate hierarchy of local-symmetry components.

  4. Putative site for the acquisition of human herpesvirus 6 virion tegument.

    PubMed Central

    Roffman, E; Albert, J P; Goff, J P; Frenkel, N

    1990-01-01

    The virion of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) contains a very distinct tegument layer, occupying the space between the nucleocapsid and the virion envelope. Ultrastructural analyses of thymocytes infected with HHV-6 revealed the presence of intranuclear spherical compartments, approximately 1.5 microns in diameter, in which tegumentation seems to take place. These compartments, termed tegusomes, were bounded by two membranes and contained ribosomes, consistent with their derivation by cytoplasmic invagination into the nucleus. Capsids located within the nucleus outside the tegusomes were all naked, while those located in the cytoplasm were uniformly tegumented. In contrast, capsids present inside the tegusomes contains teguments of variable thicknesses. In addition, nucleocapsids were documented in the process of budding into the tegusomes. We thus suggest that the tegusomes represent a cellular site in which HHV-6 virions acquire their tegument. Images PMID:2173796

  5. Diversity Among Tacaribe Serocomplex Viruses (Family Arenaviridae) Naturally Associated with the White-Throated Woodrat (Neotoma albigula) in the Southwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Milazzo, Mary Louise; Cajimat, Maria N.B.; Haynie, Michelle L.; Abbott, Ken D.; Bradley, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Bayesian analyses of glycoprotein precursor and nucleocapsid protein gene sequences indicated that arenaviruses naturally associated with white-throated woodrats in central Arizona are phylogenetically closely related to the Whitewater Arroyo virus prototype strain AV 9310135, which originally was isolated from a white-throated woodrat captured in northwestern New Mexico. Pairwise comparisons of glycoprotein precursor and nucleocapsid protein amino acid sequences revealed extensive diversity among arenaviruses isolated from white-throated woodrats captured in different counties in central Arizona and extensive diversity between these viruses and Whitewater Arroyo virus strain AV 9310135. It was concluded that the viruses isolated from the white-throated woodrats captured in Arizona represent 2 novel species (Big Brushy Tank virus and Tonto Creek virus) and that these species should be included with Whitewater Arroyo virus in a species complex within the Tacaribe serocomplex (family Arenaviridae, genus Arenavirus). PMID:18454597

  6. Structure and assembly of a paramyxovirus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Anthony J; Meng, Geng; Winkler, Dennis C; McGinnes, Lori W; Plevka, Pavel; Steven, Alasdair C; Morrison, Trudy G; Rossmann, Michael G

    2012-08-28

    Many pleomorphic, lipid-enveloped viruses encode matrix proteins that direct their assembly and budding, but the mechanism of this process is unclear. We have combined X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron tomography to show that the matrix protein of Newcastle disease virus, a paramyxovirus and relative of measles virus, forms dimers that assemble into pseudotetrameric arrays that generate the membrane curvature necessary for virus budding. We show that the glycoproteins are anchored in the gaps between the matrix proteins and that the helical nucleocapsids are associated in register with the matrix arrays. About 90% of virions lack matrix arrays, suggesting that, in agreement with previous biological observations, the matrix protein needs to dissociate from the viral membrane during maturation, as is required for fusion and release of the nucleocapsid into the host's cytoplasm. Structure and sequence conservation imply that other paramyxovirus matrix proteins function similarly.

  7. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against Rift Valley fever virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Fafetine, J M; Domingos, A; Antunes, S; Esteves, A; Paweska, J T; Coetzer, J A W; Rutten, V P M G; Neves, L

    2013-11-01

    Due to the unpredictable and explosive nature of Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks, rapid and accurate diagnostic assays for low-resource settings are urgently needed. To improve existing diagnostic assays, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the nucleocapsid protein of RVF virus (RVFV) were produced and characterized. Four IgG2a MAbs showed specific binding to denatured nucleocapsid protein, both from a recombinant source and from inactivated RVFV, in Western blot analysis and in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cross-reactivity with genetically related and non-related arboviruses including Bunyamwera and Calovo viruses (Bunyaviridae family), West Nile and Dengue-2 viruses (Flaviviridae family), and Sindbis and Chikungunya viruses (Togaviridae family) was not detected. These MAbs represent a useful tool for the development of rapid diagnostic assays for early recognition of RVF.

  8. Development of antibody to measles virus polypeptides during complicated and uncomplicated measles virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Graves, M; Griffin, D E; Johnson, R T; Hirsch, R L; de Soriano, I L; Roedenbeck, S; Vaisberg, A

    1984-01-01

    Immune precipitation of 181 sera from 152 patients with natural measles was studied to determine the temporal course and frequency of antibody responses to nucleocapsid, fusion, hemagglutinin, and matrix proteins of measles virus. Large amounts of antibody to nucleocapsid protein developed in all patients by day one of the rash. Antibody to hemagglutinin and fusion proteins developed in all patients over the next 3 weeks, the former to high levels and the latter to low levels. Antibody to matrix protein developed to very low levels and was detectable in only 41% of the patients; this poor response to matrix protein was not correlated with the age of the patient or the acute neurological complications of measles. PMID:6694263

  9. Isolation and preliminary characterization of herpes simplex virus 1 primary enveloped virions from the perinuclear space.

    PubMed

    Padula, Maryn E; Sydnor, Mariam L; Wilson, Duncan W

    2009-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) nucleocapsids exit the nucleus by budding into the inner nuclear membrane, where they exist briefly as primary enveloped virions. These virus particles subsequently fuse their envelopes with the outer nuclear membrane, permitting nucleocapsids to then enter the cytoplasm and complete assembly. We have developed a method to isolate primary enveloped virions from HSV-1-infected cells and subjected the primary enveloped virion preparation to MALDI-MS/MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-tandem mass spectrometry) analyses. We identified most capsid proteins, a tegument protein (VP22), a glycoprotein (gD), and a cellular protein (annexin A2) in the primary enveloped virion preparation. We determined that annexin A2 does not play an essential role in infection under our experimental conditions. Elucidating the structure and biochemical properties of this unique virus assembly intermediate will provide new insights into HSV-1 biology.

  10. Electron Tomography of Nascent Herpes Simplex Virus Virions▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Baines, Joel D.; Hsieh, Chyong-Ere; Wills, Elizabeth; Mannella, Carmen; Marko, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were conventionally embedded or freeze substituted after high-pressure freezing and stained with uranyl acetate. Electron tomograms of capsids attached to or undergoing envelopment at the inner nuclear membrane (INM), capsids within cytoplasmic vesicles near the nuclear membrane, and extracellular virions revealed the following phenomena. (i) Nucleocapsids undergoing envelopment at the INM, or B capsids abutting the INM, were connected to thickened patches of the INM by fibers 8 to 19 nm in length and ≤5 nm in width. The fibers contacted both fivefold symmetrical vertices (pentons) and sixfold symmetrical faces (hexons) of the nucleocapsid, although relative to the respective frequencies of these subunits in the capsid, fibers engaged pentons more frequently than hexons. (ii) Fibers of similar dimensions bridged the virion envelope and surface of the nucleocapsid in perinuclear virions. (iii) The tegument of perinuclear virions was considerably less dense than that of extracellular virions; connecting fibers were observed in the former case but not in the latter. (iv) The prominent external spikes emanating from the envelope of extracellular virions were absent from perinuclear virions. (v) The virion envelope of perinuclear virions appeared denser and thicker than that of extracellular virions. (vi) Vesicles near, but apparently distinct from, the nuclear membrane in single sections were derived from extensions of the perinuclear space as seen in the electron tomograms. These observations suggest very different mechanisms of tegumentation and envelopment in extracellular compared with perinuclear virions and are consistent with application of the final tegument to unenveloped nucleocapsids in a compartment(s) distinct from the perinuclear space. PMID:17215293

  11. Case report: epithelial intracytoplasmic herpes viral inclusions associated with an outbreak of duck virus enteritis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, B.C.; Jessup, David A.; Docherty, Douglas E.; Lownestine, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    Several muscovy ducks from a free-roaming flock of 65 muscovy and mallard ducks died over a 3-week period. Three muscovy ducks were necropsied. Gross and microscopic changes were compatible with duck virus enteritis, and the virus was isolated. In addition to intranuclear viral inclusion bodies in several tissues, intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were present in esophageal and cloacal epithelium, By electron microscopy, the membrane-bound intracytoplasmic inclusions were found to contain enveloped herpesvirus, and nuclei contained herpes viral nucleocapsids.

  12. Serological diagnosis with recombinant N antigen for hantavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro

    2014-07-17

    Hantaviruses are causative agents of two rodent-borne zoonoses, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and nephropathia epidemica (NE) in the Old World and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in the New World. Serological examinations to detect hantavirus antibodies have been most widely used for surveillance among humans and rodent reservoirs. Here, we will review antigenic structure of nucleocapsid (N) protein of hantaviruses and application of recombinant N protein as diagnostic antigen for screening and serotyping.

  13. A Thermodynamic Model for Genome Packaging in Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2015-10-20

    Understanding the fundamentals of genome packaging in viral capsids is important for finding effective antiviral strategies and for utilizing benign viral particles for gene therapy. While the structure of encapsidated genomic materials has been routinely characterized with experimental techniques such as cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction, much less is known about the molecular driving forces underlying genome assembly in an intracellular environment and its in vivo interactions with the capsid proteins. Here we study the thermodynamic basis of the pregenomic RNA encapsidation in human Hepatitis B virus in vivo using a coarse-grained molecular model that captures the essential components of nonspecific intermolecular interactions. The thermodynamic model is used to examine how the electrostatic interaction between the packaged RNA and the highly charged C-terminal domains (CTD) of capsid proteins regulate the nucleocapsid formation. The theoretical model predicts optimal RNA content in Hepatitis B virus nucleocapsids with different CTD lengths in good agreement with mutagenesis measurements, confirming the predominant role of electrostatic interactions and molecular excluded-volume effects in genome packaging. We find that the amount of encapsidated RNA is not linearly correlated with the net charge of CTD tails as suggested by earlier theoretical studies. Our thermodynamic analysis of the nucleocapsid structure and stability indicates that ∼10% of the CTD residues are free from complexation with RNA, resulting in partially exposed CTD tails. The thermodynamic model also predicts the free energy of complex formation between macromolecules, which corroborates experimental results for the impact of CTD truncation on the nucleocapsid stability.

  14. Physicochemical Study of Viral Nanoparticles at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Torres-Salgado, Jose F; Comas-Garcia, Mauricio; Villagrana-Escareño, Maria V; Durán-Meza, Ana L; Ruiz-García, Jaime; Cadena-Nava, Ruben D

    2016-07-07

    The assembly of most single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses into icosahedral nucleocapsids is a spontaneous process driven by protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions. The precise nature of these interactions results in the assembly of extremely monodisperse and structurally indistinguishable nucleocapsids. In this work, by using a ssRNA plant virus (cowpea chlorotic mottle virus [CCMV]) as a charged nanoparticle we show that the diffusion of these nanoparticles from the bulk solution to the air/water interface is an irreversible adsorption process. By using the Langmuir technique, we measured the diffusion and adsorption of viral nucleocapsids at the air/water interface at different pH conditions. The pH changes, and therefore in the net surface charge of the virions, have a great influence in the diffusion rate from the bulk solution to the air/water interface. Moreover, assembly of mesoscopic and microscopic viral aggregates at this interface depends on the net surface charge of the virions and the surface pressure. By using Brewster's angle microscopy we characterized these structures at the interface. Most common structures observed were clusters of virions and soap-frothlike micron-size structures. Furthermore, the CCMV films were compressed to form monolayers and multilayers from moderate to high surface pressures, respectively. After transferring the films from the air/water interface onto mica by using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, their morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy. These viral monolayers showed closed-packing nano- and microscopic arrangements.

  15. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel analysis of Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, D.L.; Consigli, R.A.

    1986-10-01

    The structural polypeptides of purified Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus were analyzed by three different two-dimensional gel systems. Isoelectric focusing followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis allowed resolution of 53 acidic polypeptides in the enveloped nucleocapsid of the virus ranging in molecular weight from 97,300 to 8000. Nine of these polypeptides were shown to be glycoproteins by the technique of radiolabeled lectin blotting. Separation of the granulin in this system allowed resolution of five species, all of which have identical tryptic peptide maps. This matrix protein was demonstrated to be a phosphoglycoprotein by radiolabeled lectin blotting and acid phosphatase dephosphorylation. Nonequilibrium pH gel electrophoresis followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis allowed resolution of the major basic protein of the virus, VP12, from a more acidic protein of the same molecular weight. Tryptic peptide analysis demonstrated that these two proteins were indeed different and acid urea gels followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis allowed localization of the acidic protein to the envelope and the basic protein to the nucleocapsid of the virus. Finally, probing of the separated envelope nucleocapsid proteins in both the isoelectric focusing and nonequilibrium pH gel electrophoresis two-dimensional systems after transfer to nitrocellulose with iodinated, purified viral proteins allowed further insight into reactions which may be important in the maintenance of the virion structure.

  16. Electron Tomography Reveals the Steps in Filovirus Budding

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Sonja; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Krähling, Verena; Riches, James D.; Becker, Stephan; Briggs, John A. G.

    2010-01-01

    The filoviruses, Marburg and Ebola, are non-segmented negative-strand RNA viruses causing severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality rates in humans and nonhuman primates. The sequence of events that leads to release of filovirus particles from cells is poorly understood. Two contrasting mechanisms have been proposed, one proceeding via a “submarine-like” budding with the helical nucleocapsid emerging parallel to the plasma membrane, and the other via perpendicular “rocket-like” protrusion. Here we have infected cells with Marburg virus under BSL-4 containment conditions, and reconstructed the sequence of steps in the budding process in three dimensions using electron tomography of plastic-embedded cells. We find that highly infectious filamentous particles are released at early stages in infection. Budding proceeds via lateral association of intracellular nucleocapsid along its whole length with the plasma membrane, followed by rapid envelopment initiated at one end of the nucleocapsid, leading to a protruding intermediate. Scission results in local membrane instability at the rear of the virus. After prolonged infection, increased vesiculation of the plasma membrane correlates with changes in shape and infectivity of released viruses. Our observations demonstrate a cellular determinant of virus shape. They reconcile the contrasting models of filovirus budding and allow us to describe the sequence of events taking place during budding and release of Marburg virus. We propose that this represents a general sequence of events also followed by other filamentous and rod-shaped viruses. PMID:20442788

  17. The Organisation of Ebola Virus Reveals a Capacity for Extensive, Modular Polyploidy

    PubMed Central

    Beniac, Daniel R.; Melito, Pasquale L.; deVarennes, Shauna L.; Hiebert, Shannon L.; Rabb, Melissa J.; Lamboo, Lindsey L.; Jones, Steven M.; Booth, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Filoviruses, including Ebola virus, are unusual in being filamentous animal viruses. Structural data on the arrangement, stoichiometry and organisation of the component molecules of filoviruses has until now been lacking, partially due to the need to work under level 4 biological containment. The present study provides unique insights into the structure of this deadly pathogen. Methodology and Principal Findings We have investigated the structure of Ebola virus using a combination of cryo-electron microscopy, cryo-electron tomography, sub-tomogram averaging, and single particle image processing. Here we report the three-dimensional structure and architecture of Ebola virus and establish that multiple copies of the RNA genome can be packaged to produce polyploid virus particles, through an extreme degree of length polymorphism. We show that the helical Ebola virus inner nucleocapsid containing RNA and nucleoprotein is stabilized by an outer layer of VP24-VP35 bridges. Elucidation of the structure of the membrane-associated glycoprotein in its native state indicates that the putative receptor-binding site is occluded within the molecule, while a major neutralizing epitope is exposed on its surface proximal to the viral envelope. The matrix protein VP40 forms a regular lattice within the envelope, although its contacts with the nucleocapsid are irregular. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate a modular organization in Ebola virus that accommodates a well-ordered, symmetrical nucleocapsid within a flexible, tubular membrane envelope. PMID:22247782

  18. Effect of a hepatitis B virus inhibitor, NZ-4, on capsid formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Wang, Ya-Juan; Chen, Hai-Jun; Shi, Li-Ping; Tong, Xian-Kun; Zhang, Yang-Ming; Wang, Gui-Feng; Wang, Wen-Long; Feng, Chun-Lan; He, Pei-Lan; Xu, Yi-Bin; Lu, Meng-Ji; Tang, Wei; Nan, Fa-Jun; Zuo, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    During the hepatitis B virus (HBV) life cycle, nucleocapsid assembly is essential for HBV replication. Both RNA reverse transcription and DNA replication occur within the HBV nucleocapsid. HBV nucleocapsid is consisted of core protein (HBcAg), whose carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) contains an Arg-rich domain (ARD). The ARD of HBcAg does contribute to the encapsidation of pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). Previously, we reported a small-molecule, NZ-4, which dramatically reduced the HBV DNA level in an in vitro cell setting. Here, we explore the possible mechanisms by which NZ-4 inhibits HBV function. As an HBV inhibitor, NZ-4 leads to the formation of genome-free capsids, including a new population of capsid that runs faster on agarose gels. NZ-4's activity was dependent on the presence of the ARD I, containing at least one positively charged amino acid. NZ-4 might provide a new option for further development of HBV therapeutics for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B.

  19. Storage of cellular 5' mRNA caps in P bodies for viral cap-snatching.

    PubMed

    Mir, M A; Duran, W A; Hjelle, B L; Ye, C; Panganiban, A T

    2008-12-09

    The minus strand and ambisense segmented RNA viruses include multiple important human pathogens and are divided into three families, the Orthomyxoviridae, the Bunyaviridae, and the Arenaviridae. These viruses all initiate viral transcription through the process of "cap-snatching," which involves the acquisition of capped 5' oligonucleotides from cellular mRNA. Hantaviruses are emerging pathogenic viruses of the Bunyaviridae family that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Cellular mRNAs can be actively translated in polysomes or physically sequestered in cytoplasmic processing bodies (P bodies) where they are degraded or stored for subsequent translation. Here we show that the hantavirus nucleocapsid protein binds with high affinity to the 5' cap of cellular mRNAs, protecting the 5' cap from degradation. We also show that the hantavirus nucleocapsid protein accumulates in P bodies, where it sequesters protected 5' caps. P bodies then serve as a pool of primers during the initiation of viral mRNA synthesis by the viral polymerase. We propose that minus strand segmented viruses replicating in the cytoplasm have co-opted the normal degradation machinery of P bodies for storage of cellular caps. Our data also indicate that modification of the cap-snatching model is warranted to include a role for the nucleocapsid protein in cap acquisition and storage.

  20. Molecular architecture of the nucleoprotein C-terminal domain from the Ebola and Marburg viruses.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laura E; Ellena, Jeffrey F; Handing, Katarzyna B; Derewenda, Urszula; Utepbergenov, Darkhan; Engel, Daniel A; Derewenda, Zygmunt S

    2016-01-01

    The Filoviridae family of negative-sense, single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses is comprised of two species of Marburgvirus (MARV and RAVV) and five species of Ebolavirus, i.e. Zaire (EBOV), Reston (RESTV), Sudan (SUDV), Taï Forest (TAFV) and Bundibugyo (BDBV). In each of these viruses the ssRNA encodes seven distinct proteins. One of them, the nucleoprotein (NP), is the most abundant viral protein in the infected cell and within the viral nucleocapsid. It is tightly associated with the viral RNA in the nucleocapsid, and during the lifecycle of the virus is essential for transcription, RNA replication, genome packaging and nucleocapsid assembly prior to membrane encapsulation. The structure of the unique C-terminal globular domain of the NP from EBOV has recently been determined and shown to be structurally unrelated to any other known protein [Dziubańska et al. (2014), Acta Cryst. D70, 2420-2429]. In this paper, a study of the C-terminal domains from the NP from the remaining four species of Ebolavirus, as well as from the MARV strain of Marburgvirus, is reported. As expected, the crystal structures of the BDBV and TAFV proteins show high structural similarity to that from EBOV, while the MARV protein behaves like a molten globule with a core residual structure that is significantly different from that of the EBOV protein.

  1. A disulfide-bonded dimer of the core protein of hepatitis C virus is important for virus-like particle production.

    PubMed

    Kushima, Yukihiro; Wakita, Takaji; Hijikata, Makoto

    2010-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein forms the nucleocapsid of the HCV particle. Although many functions of core protein have been reported, how the HCV particle is assembled is not well understood. Here we show that the nucleocapsid-like particle of HCV is composed of a disulfide-bonded core protein complex (dbc-complex). We also found that the disulfide-bonded dimer of the core protein (dbd-core) is formed at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where the core protein is initially produced and processed. Mutational analysis revealed that the cysteine residue at amino acid position 128 (Cys128) of the core protein, a highly conserved residue among almost all reported isolates, is responsible for dbd-core formation and virus-like particle production but has no effect on the replication of the HCV RNA genome or the several known functions of the core protein, including RNA binding ability and localization to the lipid droplet. The Cys128 mutant core protein showed a dominant negative effect in terms of HCV-like particle production. These results suggest that this disulfide bond is critical for the HCV virion. We also obtained the results that the dbc-complex in the nucleocapsid-like structure was sensitive to proteinase K but not trypsin digestion, suggesting that the capsid is built up of a tightly packed structure of the core protein, with its amino (N)-terminal arginine-rich region being concealed inside.

  2. Pervasive and dynamic protein binding sites of the mRNA transcriptome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein-RNA interactions are integral components of nearly every aspect of biology, including regulation of gene expression, assembly of cellular architectures, and pathogenesis of human diseases. However, studies in the past few decades have only uncovered a small fraction of the vast landscape of the protein-RNA interactome in any organism, and even less is known about the dynamics of protein-RNA interactions under changing developmental and environmental conditions. Results Here, we describe the gPAR-CLIP (global photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunopurification) approach for capturing regions of the untranslated, polyadenylated transcriptome bound by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) in budding yeast. We report over 13,000 RBP crosslinking sites in untranslated regions (UTRs) covering 72% of protein-coding transcripts encoded in the genome, confirming 3' UTRs as major sites for RBP interaction. Comparative genomic analyses reveal that RBP crosslinking sites are highly conserved, and RNA folding predictions indicate that secondary structural elements are constrained by protein binding and may serve as generalizable modes of RNA recognition. Finally, 38% of 3' UTR crosslinking sites show changes in RBP occupancy upon glucose or nitrogen deprivation, with major impacts on metabolic pathways as well as mitochondrial and ribosomal gene expression. Conclusions Our study offers an unprecedented view of the pervasiveness and dynamics of protein-RNA interactions in vivo. PMID:23409723

  3. Crystallization of viruses and virus proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehnke, Paul C.; Harrington, Melissa; Hosur, M. V.; Li, Yunge; Usha, R.; Craig Tucker, R.; Bomu, Wu; Stauffacher, Cynthia V.; Johnson, John E.

    1988-07-01

    Methods for crystallizing six isometric plant and insect viruses are presented. Procedures developed for modifying, purifying and crystallizing coat protein subunits isolated from a virus forming asymmetric, spheroidal particles, stabilized almost exclusively by protein-RNA interactions, are also discussed. The tertiary and quaternary structures of small RNA viruses are compared.

  4. CLIP Tool Kit (CTK): a flexible and robust pipeline to analyze CLIP sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankeeta; Qian, Yingzhi; Weyn-Vanhentenryck, Sebastien M; Zhang, Chaolin

    2016-10-22

    UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP), followed by high-throughput sequencing, is a powerful biochemical assay that maps in vivo protein-RNA interactions on a genome-wide scale. The CLIP Tool Kit (CTK) aims at providing a set of tools for flexible, streamlined and comprehensive CLIP data analysis. This software package extends the scope of our original CIMS package.

  5. RsiteDB: a database of protein binding pockets that interact with RNA nucleotide bases.

    PubMed

    Shulman-Peleg, Alexandra; Nussinov, Ruth; Wolfson, Haim J

    2009-01-01

    We present a new database and an on-line search engine, which store and query the protein binding pockets that interact with single-stranded RNA nucleotide bases. The database consists of a classification of binding sites derived from protein-RNA complexes. Each binding site is assigned to a cluster of similar binding sites in other protein-RNA complexes. Cluster members share similar spatial arrangements of physico-chemical properties, thus can reveal novel similarity between proteins and RNAs with different sequences and folds. The clusters provide 3D consensus binding patterns important for protein-nucleotide recognition. The database search engine allows two types of useful queries: first, given a PDB code of a protein-RNA complex, RsiteDB can detail and classify the properties of the protein binding pockets accommodating extruded RNA nucleotides not involved in local RNA base pairing. Second, given an unbound protein structure, RsiteDB can perform an on-line structural search against the constructed database of 3D consensus binding patterns. Regions similar to known patterns are predicted to serve as binding sites. Alignment of the query to these patterns with their corresponding RNA nucleotides allows making unique predictions of the protein-RNA interactions at the atomic level of detail. This database is accessible at http://bioinfo3d.cs.tau.ac.il/RsiteDB.

  6. Modulation of Re-initiation of Measles Virus Transcription at Intergenic Regions by PXD to NTAIL Binding Strength

    PubMed Central

    Hamon, Véronique; Erales, Jenny; Bignon, Christophe; Roche, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) and all Paramyxoviridae members rely on a complex polymerase machinery to ensure viral transcription and replication. Their polymerase associates the phosphoprotein (P) and the L protein that is endowed with all necessary enzymatic activities. To be processive, the polymerase uses as template a nucleocapsid made of genomic RNA entirely wrapped into a continuous oligomer of the nucleoprotein (N). The polymerase enters the nucleocapsid at the 3’end of the genome where are located the promoters for transcription and replication. Transcription of the six genes occurs sequentially. This implies ending and re-initiating mRNA synthesis at each intergenic region (IGR). We explored here to which extent the binding of the X domain of P (XD) to the C-terminal region of the N protein (NTAIL) is involved in maintaining the P/L complex anchored to the nucleocapsid template during the sequential transcription. Amino acid substitutions introduced in the XD-binding site on NTAIL resulted in a wide range of binding affinities as determined by combining protein complementation assays in E. coli and human cells and isothermal titration calorimetry. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that XD binding to NTAIL involves a complex network of hydrogen bonds, the disruption of which by two individual amino acid substitutions markedly reduced the binding affinity. Using a newly designed, highly sensitive dual-luciferase reporter minigenome assay, the efficiency of re-initiation through the five measles virus IGRs was found to correlate with NTAIL/XD KD. Correlatively, P transcript accumulation rate and F/N transcript ratios from recombinant viruses expressing N variants were also found to correlate with the NTAIL to XD binding strength. Altogether, our data support a key role for XD binding to NTAIL in maintaining proper anchor of the P/L complex thereby ensuring transcription re-initiation at each intergenic region. PMID:27936158

  7. Requirements for budding of paramyxovirus simian virus 5 virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Anthony P; Leser, George P; Waning, David L; Lamb, Robert A

    2002-04-01

    Enveloped viruses are released from infected cells after coalescence of viral components at cellular membranes and budding of membranes to release particles. For some negative-strand RNA viruses (e.g., vesicular stomatitis virus and Ebola virus), the viral matrix (M) protein contains all of the information needed for budding, since virus-like particles (VLPs) are efficiently released from cells when the M protein is expressed from cDNA. To investigate the requirements for budding of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5), its M protein was expressed in mammalian cells, and it was found that SV5 M protein alone could not induce vesicle budding and was not secreted from cells. Coexpression of M protein with the viral hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) or fusion (F) glycoproteins also failed to result in significant VLP release. It was found that M protein in the form of VLPs was only secreted from cells, with an efficiency comparable to authentic virus budding, when M protein was coexpressed with one of the two glycoproteins, HN or F, together with the nucleocapsid (NP) protein. The VLPs appeared similar morphologically to authentic virions by electron microscopy. CsCl density gradient centrifugation indicated that almost all of the NP protein in the cells had assembled into nucleocapsid-like structures. Deletion of the F and HN cytoplasmic tails indicated an important role of these cytoplasmic tails in VLP budding. Furthermore, truncation of the HN cytoplasmic tail was found to be inhibitory toward budding, since it prevented coexpressed wild-type (wt) F protein from directing VLP budding. Conversely, truncation of the F protein cytoplasmic tail was not inhibitory and did not affect the ability of coexpressed wt HN protein to direct the budding of particles. Taken together, these data suggest that multiple viral components, including assembled nucleocapsids, have important roles in the paramyxovirus budding process.

  8. Fcgamma receptor-like activity of hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Patrick; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Sibéril, Sophie; Faure, Grazyna; Roohvand, Farzin; Petres, Stephane; Teillaud, Jean Luc; Budkowska, Agata

    2004-01-23

    We have previously demonstrated that viral particles with the properties of nonenveloped hepatitis C virus (HCV) nucleocapsids occur in the serum of HCV-infected individuals (1). We show here that nucleocapsids purified directly from serum or isolated from HCV virions have FcgammaR-like activity and bind "nonimmune" IgG via its Fcgamma domain. HCV core proteins produced in Escherichia coli and in the baculovirus expression system also bound "nonimmune" IgG and their Fcgamma fragments. Folded conformation was required for IgG binding because the FcgammaR-like site of the core protein was inactive in denaturing conditions. Studies with synthetic core peptides showed that the region spanning amino acids 3-75 was essential for formation of the IgG-binding site. The interaction between the HCV core and human IgG is more efficient in acidic (pH 6.0) than in neutral conditions. The core protein-binding site on the IgG molecule differs from those for C1q, FcgammaRII (CD32), and FcgammaRIII (CD16) but overlaps with that for soluble protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (SpA), which is located in the CH2-CH3 interface of IgG. These characteristics of the core-IgG interaction are very similar to those of the neonatal FcRn. Surface plasmon resonance studies suggested that the binding of an anti-core antibody to HCV core protein might be "bipolar" through its paratope to the corresponding epitope and by its Fcgamma region to the FcgammaR-like motif on this protein. These features of HCV nucleocapsids and HCV core protein may confer an advantage for HCV in terms of survival by interfering with host defense mechanisms mediated by the Fcgamma part of IgG.

  9. Posttranscriptional regulation of hepatitis B virus replication by the precore protein.

    PubMed Central

    Scaglioni, P P; Melegari, M; Wands, J R

    1997-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses encode two core-related open reading frames. One directs the synthesis of the p21 core protein, which subsequently becomes a structural component of the viral nucleocapsid. The other produces a p25 precore protein that is targeted by a signal peptide to a cell secretory pathway where N-terminal processing will create a p22 species. This molecule will be further modified at the C-terminal region to generate p17, and the truncated protein is secreted from the cell as hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg). The function of the precore gene in the biology of hepadnaviruses is unknown. We found that ablation of the precore gene resulted in the generation of a hepatitis B virus (HBV) species with a high-replication-level phenotype. More important, expression in trans of physiologic levels of p25 restored viral replication to wild-type levels. Moreover, transient or stable overexpression of the precore gene resulted in striking inhibition of HBV replication. The molecular species responsible for this viral inhibitory effect was identified as the p22 nonsecreted HBeAg precursor protein. By sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis, we determined that expression of p22 leads to the formation of nucleocapsids similar to those made with wild-type p21 core protein. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that the p21 and p22 physically interact and form hybrid nucleocapsid structures devoid of pregenomic viral RNA. These experiments suggest that expression of the precore gene may be important in the regulation of HBV replication and describe a possible molecular mechanism(s) for this effect. PMID:8985356

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of dUTPase from Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Barabás, Orsolya; Németh, Veronika; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2006-04-01

    Deoxyuridine 5′-triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase from Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus (M-PMV dUTPase) is a betaretroviral member of the dUTPase enzyme family. The nucleocapsid-free dUTPase (48426 Da) was co-crystallized with a dUTP substrate analogue using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Deoxyuridine 5′-triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase from Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus (M-PMV dUTPase) is a betaretroviral member of the dUTPase enzyme family. In the mature M-PMV virion, this enzyme is present as the C-terminal domain of the fusion protein nucleocapsid-dUTPase. The homotrimeric organization characteristic of dUTPases is retained in this bifunctional fusion protein. The fusion protein supposedly plays a role in adequate localization of dUTPase activity in the vicinity of nucleic acids during reverse transcription and integration. Here, the nucleocapsid-free dUTPase (48 426 Da) was cocrystallized with a dUTP substrate analogue using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The obtained crystals belong to the primitive hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.6, b = 60.6, c = 63.6 Å, α = 90, β = 90, γ = 120°. Native and PtCl{sub 4}-derivative data sets were collected using synchrotron radiation to 1.75 and 2.3 Å, respectively. Phasing was successfully performed by isomorphous replacement combined with anomalous scattering.

  11. Identification of a novel regulatory sequence of actin nucleation promoting factor encoded by Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Zhang, Yongli; Han, Shili; Hu, Xue; Zhou, Yuan; Mu, Jingfang; Pei, Rongjuan; Wu, Chunchen; Chen, Xinwen

    2015-04-10

    Actin polymerization induced by nucleation promoting factors (NPFs) is one of the most fundamental biological processes in eukaryotic cells. NPFs contain a conserved output domain (VCA domain) near the C terminus, which interacts with and activates the cellular actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3) to induce actin polymerization and a diverse regulatory domain near the N terminus. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) nucleocapsid protein P78/83 is a virus-encoded NPF that contains a C-terminal VCA domain and induces actin polymerization in virus-infected cells. However, there is no similarity between the N terminus of P78/83 and that of other identified NPFs, suggesting that P78/83 may possess a unique regulatory mechanism. In this study, we identified a multifunctional regulatory sequence (MRS) located near the N terminus of P78/83 and determined that one of its functions is to serve as a degron to mediate P78/83 degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner. In AcMNPV-infected cells, the MRS also binds to another nucleocapsid protein, BV/ODV-C42, which stabilizes P78/83 and modulates the P78/83-Arp2/3 interaction to orchestrate actin polymerization. In addition, the MRS is also essential for the incorporation of P78/83 into the nucleocapsid, ensuring virion mobility powered by P78/83-induced actin polymerization. The triple functions of the MRS enable P78/83 to serve as an essential viral protein in the AcMNPV replication cycle, and the possible roles of the MRS in orchestrating the virus-induced actin polymerization and viral genome decapsidation are discussed.

  12. Lamivudine treatment can restore T cell responsiveness in chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Boni, C; Bertoletti, A; Penna, A; Cavalli, A; Pilli, M; Urbani, S; Scognamiglio, P; Boehme, R; Panebianco, R; Fiaccadori, F; Ferrari, C

    1998-01-01

    High viral and/or antigen load may be an important cause of the T cell hyporesponsiveness to hepatitis B virus (HBV) antigens that is often observed in patients with chronic HBV infection. Reduction of viral and antigen load by lamivudine treatment represents an ideal model for investigating this hypothesis. HLA class II restricted T cell responses and serum levels of HBV-DNA, HBsAg, and HBeAg were studied before and during lamivudine treatment in 12 patients with hepatitis B e antigen positive chronic active hepatitis B to assess possible correlations between viral and/or antigen load and vigor of the T cell response. Cell proliferation to HBV nucleocapsid antigens and peptides and frequency of circulating HBV nucleocapsid-specific T cells were assessed to characterize CD4-mediated responses. A highly significant enhancement of the CD4-mediated response to HBV nucleocapsid antigens was already detectable in most patients 7-14 d after the start of lamivudine treatment. This effect was dramatic and persistent in 10 patients but undetectable in 2. It occurred concomitant with a rapid and marked reduction of viremia. Interestingly, lamivudine also enhanced the responses to mitogens and recall antigens, showing that its effect was not limited to HBV-specific T cells. In conclusion, an efficient antiviral T cell response can be restored by lamivudine treatment in patients with chronic hepatitis B concurrently with reduction of viremia, indicating the importance of viral load in the pathogenesis of T cell hyporesponsiveness in these patients. Since lamivudine treatment can overcome T cell hyporeactivity, combining lamivudine with treatments directed to stimulate the T cell response may represent an effective strategy to induce eradication of chronic HBV infection. PMID:9727065

  13. The Andes hantavirus NSs protein is expressed from the viral small mRNA by a leaky scanning mechanism.

    PubMed

    Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Solis, Loretto; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Ricci, Emiliano P; Pino, Karla; Tischler, Nicole D; Ohlmann, Théophile; Darlix, Jean-Luc; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2012-02-01

    The small mRNA (SmRNA) of all Bunyaviridae encodes the nucleocapsid (N) protein. In 4 out of 5 genera in the Bunyaviridae, the smRNA encodes an additional nonstructural protein denominated NSs. In this study, we show that Andes hantavirus (ANDV) SmRNA encodes an NSs protein. Data show that the NSs protein is expressed in the context of an ANDV infection. Additionally, our results suggest that translation initiation from the NSs initiation codon is mediated by ribosomal subunits that have bypassed the upstream N protein initiation codon through a leaky scanning mechanism.

  14. Cell entry mechanisms of HSV: what we have learned in recent years

    PubMed Central

    Agelidis, Alex M; Shukla, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    HSV type-1 and -2 are widespread pathogens producing lifelong infection with multiple sequelae, including oral, ocular and genital disease. The process of herpesvirus entry is a highly complex process involving numerous viral and cellular factors. Entry begins with attachment of virus to the cell surface followed by interactions between viral glycoproteins and cellular receptors to facilitate capsid penetration. The nucleocapsid is then transported along microtubules to the nuclear membrane, where viral DNA is released for replication in the nucleus. The work reviewed here comprises the most recent advancements in our understanding of the mechanism involved in the herpesvirus entry process. PMID:27066105

  15. Morbillivirus infection in cetaceans of the western Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Duignan, P J; House, C; Geraci, J R; Duffy, N; Rima, B K; Walsh, M T; Early, G; St Aubin, D J; Sadove, S; Koopman, H

    1995-05-01

    We report serologic evidence of morbillivirus infection in eleven of fifteen species of odontocete cetaceans from the western Atlantic since 1986. Blood samples were obtained both from free-ranging and stranded animals. Virus neutralizing titers were higher against porpoise and dolphin morbilliviruses than against peste des petits ruminants virus, phocine distemper virus or canine distemper virus (CDV). Serum from five species, tested in a heterologous immunoprecipitation assay using radiolabelled CDV, precipitated the nucleocapsid (N) protein. Clinical morbillivirus infection may potentially impact already threatened species such as the harbour porpoise and precipitate mass strandings of socially cohesive odontocetes.

  16. Instruction at the Hopkins Marine Station

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-29

    foI homtadcodnaio.. caronavirus nucleocapsid protein. wheat germ bial ~ ~ %~H2A (5), mussel sperm nuclear protein 03 [6), and man chromofsome...wvpi,~Tninev PM"p Johne HiWA~aa Unuw~rsaty &Dio of Medicine, Balw,,.vv, Manh land 21205 The two germ -line- specific Sp histione classes Treatment of...composit conical morphology of the male pronucleus- Mal, pro- serine-proline adjacent to two basic amino acids (lyo hucl*I inhibite’d with I nsMGDMAP

  17. Copy-choice recombination by reverse transcriptases: Reshuffling of genetic markers mediated by RNA chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Negroni, Matteo; Buc, Henri

    2000-01-01

    Copy-choice recombination efficiently reshuffles genetic markers in retroviruses. In vivo, the folding of the genomic RNA is controlled by the nucleocapsid protein (NC). We show that binding of NC onto the acceptor RNA molecule is sufficient to enhance recombination, providing evidence for a mechanism where the structure of the acceptor template determines the template switch. NC as well as another RNA chaperone (StpA) converts recombination into a widespread process no longer restricted to rare hot spots, an effect maximized when both the NC and the reverse transcriptase come from HIV-1. These data suggest that RNA chaperones confer a higher genetic flexibility to retroviruses. PMID:10829081

  18. HIV Antibody Characterization as a Method to Quantify Reservoir Size During Curative Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Burbelo, Peter D.; Bayat, Ahmad; Rhodes, Craig S.; Hoh, Rebecca; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Fromentin, Rémi; Chomont, Nicolas; Hütter, Gero; Kovacs, Joseph A.; Deeks, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative humoral profiling of recent samples from a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected adult who was cured following a delta32/delta32 CCR5 stem cell transplant in 2007 revealed no antibodies against p24, matrix, nucleocapsid, integrase, protease, and gp120, but low levels of antibodies against reverse transcriptase, tat, and gp41. Antibody levels to these HIV proteins persisted at high and stable levels in most noncontrollers, elite controllers, and antiretroviral-treated subjects, but a rare subset of controllers had low levels of antibodies against matrix, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and/or protease. Comprehensive HIV antibody profiles may prove useful for monitoring curative interventions. PMID:24286982

  19. [Immunogenic and protective characteristics of recombinant Lassa virus NP protein].

    PubMed

    Ignat'ev, G M

    2002-01-01

    Recombinant fragment of Lassa virus (strain Josiah) nucleocapsid protein (corresponding to amino acid residues 141 + 569) constructed by Dr. Jan ter Meulen (Tropenmedizine, Hamburg) was used for immunizing CBA/calac mice. The preparation was injected intraperitoneally twice with 2-week interval in a dose of 10 micrograms. The parameters of the resultant specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity were comparable to those in reference animals immunized with inactivated Lassa virus. Challenge with Lassa virus (10,000 PFU) resulted in 100% death of the reference animals, while of 15 animals immunized with the recombinant NP protein 8 survived.

  20. The Andes Hantavirus NSs Protein Is Expressed from the Viral Small mRNA by a Leaky Scanning Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Solis, Loretto; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Ricci, Emiliano P.; Pino, Karla; Tischler, Nicole D.; Ohlmann, Théophile; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    The small mRNA (SmRNA) of all Bunyaviridae encodes the nucleocapsid (N) protein. In 4 out of 5 genera in the Bunyaviridae, the smRNA encodes an additional nonstructural protein denominated NSs. In this study, we show that Andes hantavirus (ANDV) SmRNA encodes an NSs protein. Data show that the NSs protein is expressed in the context of an ANDV infection. Additionally, our results suggest that translation initiation from the NSs initiation codon is mediated by ribosomal subunits that have bypassed the upstream N protein initiation codon through a leaky scanning mechanism. PMID:22156529

  1. HIV antibody characterization as a method to quantify reservoir size during curative interventions.

    PubMed

    Burbelo, Peter D; Bayat, Ahmad; Rhodes, Craig S; Hoh, Rebecca; Martin, Jeffrey N; Fromentin, Rémi; Chomont, Nicolas; Hütter, Gero; Kovacs, Joseph A; Deeks, Steven G

    2014-05-15

    Quantitative humoral profiling of recent samples from a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adult who was cured following a delta32/delta32 CCR5 stem cell transplant in 2007 revealed no antibodies against p24, matrix, nucleocapsid, integrase, protease, and gp120, but low levels of antibodies against reverse transcriptase, tat, and gp41. Antibody levels to these HIV proteins persisted at high and stable levels in most noncontrollers, elite controllers, and antiretroviral-treated subjects, but a rare subset of controllers had low levels of antibodies against matrix, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and/or protease. Comprehensive HIV antibody profiles may prove useful for monitoring curative interventions.

  2. Structures of giant icosahedral eukaryotic dsDNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chuan; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    In the last twenty years, numerous giant, dsDNA, icosahedral viruses have been discovered and assigned to the nucleocytoplasmic large dsDNA virus (NCLDV) clade. The major capsid proteins of these viruses consist of two consecutive jelly-roll domains, assembled into trimers, with pseudo 6-fold symmetry. The capsomers are assembled into arrays that have either p6 (as in Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus-1) or p3 symmetry (as in Mimivirus). Most of the NCLDV viruses have a membrane that separates the nucleocapsid from the external capsid. PMID:21909343

  3. [Hepatitis B virus core antigen as a carrier for virus-like partical vaccine: a review].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing-Yu; Bo, Hong; Shu, Yue-Long

    2012-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg) is a major viral nucleocapsid protein of HBV. It is a 21-22kD protein consisting of 183-185 amino acids. Because of its easy purification, strong immunogenicity, high expression level, and self-assembles into the virus-like particles (VLP), HBcAg could be an efficient and safe VLP carrier for developing vaccines for various pathogens. Up to now, HBcAg VLP carrier has been an important system to develop novel vaccines and many antigen epitope genes from viruses, bacteria and parasites were expressed successfully using the system.

  4. The M and N genes-based simplex and multiplex PCRs are better than the F or H gene-based simplex PCR for Peste-des-petits-ruminants virus.

    PubMed

    George, A; Dhar, P; Sreenivasa, B P; Singh, R P; Bandyopadhyay, S K

    2006-01-01

    Nucleocapsid (N), matrix (M) and hemagglutinin (H) genes-based simplex PCRs and an N and M genes-based multiplex PCR were developed for detection of Peste-des-petits-ruminants virus (PPRV). The M gene PCR was the most sensitive, followed by N, H and an already described fusion (F) gene PCRs, as they could detect the virus in samples with titers of 101, 102, 104and 105 TCID50/ml, respectively. The multiplex PCR was as sensitive as the M gene PCR, but it had the advantage of differentiating PPRV from Rinderpest virus (RPV).

  5. Modulation of signaling pathways by RNA virus capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Urbanowski, Matthew D; Ilkow, Carolina S; Hobman, Tom C

    2008-07-01

    Capsid proteins are structural components of virus particles. They are nucleic acid-binding proteins whose main recognized function is to package viral genomes into protective structures called nucleocapsids. Research over the last 10 years indicates that in addition to their role as genome guardians, viral capsid proteins modulate host cell signaling networks. Disruption or alteration of intracellular signaling pathways by viral capsids may benefit replication of the virus by affecting innate immunity and in some cases, may underlie disease progression. In this review, we describe how the capsid proteins from medically relevant RNA viruses interact with host cell signaling pathways.

  6. Different Lineage of Porcine Deltacoronavirus in Thailand, Vietnam and Lao PDR in 2015.

    PubMed

    Saeng-Chuto, K; Lorsirigool, A; Temeeyasen, G; Vui, D T; Stott, C J; Madapong, A; Tripipat, T; Wegner, M; Intrakamhaeng, M; Chongcharoen, W; Tantituvanont, A; Kaewprommal, P; Piriyapongsa, J; Nilubol, D

    2017-02-01

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) was detected by RT-PCR in 12 of 97 (12.4%) intestinal samples collected during 2015 from piglets with diarrhoea in Thailand, Vietnam and Lao PDR. Spike, membrane and nucleocapsid genes were characterized, and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that PDCoV isolates from Thai and Lao PDR form a novel cluster, separated from US and China isolates, but relatively were more closely related to China PDCoV than US isolates. Vietnam PDCoVs, however, were grouped together with US PDCoV. The analyses of amino acid changes suggested that they were from different lineage.

  7. Cryo-EM structures of the autoinhibited E. coli ATP synthase in three rotational states

    PubMed Central

    Sobti, Meghna; Smits, Callum; Wong, Andrew SW; Ishmukhametov, Robert; Stock, Daniela; Sandin, Sara; Stewart, Alastair G

    2016-01-01

    A molecular model that provides a framework for interpreting the wealth of functional information obtained on the E. coli F-ATP synthase has been generated using cryo-electron microscopy. Three different states that relate to rotation of the enzyme were observed, with the central stalk’s ε subunit in an extended autoinhibitory conformation in all three states. The Fo motor comprises of seven transmembrane helices and a decameric c-ring and invaginations on either side of the membrane indicate the entry and exit channels for protons. The proton translocating subunit contains near parallel helices inclined by ~30° to the membrane, a feature now synonymous with rotary ATPases. For the first time in this rotary ATPase subtype, the peripheral stalk is resolved over its entire length of the complex, revealing the F1 attachment points and a coiled-coil that bifurcates toward the membrane with its helices separating to embrace subunit a from two sides. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21598.001 PMID:28001127

  8. Enhancement of the Chaperone Activity of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Resulting from a Point-Specific Mutation Confers Heat Tolerance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Taek; Lee, Seung Sik; Mondal, Suvendu; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kim, Siu; Lee, Keun Woo; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaAhpC) is a member of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Here, we examined the peroxidase and molecular chaperone functions of PaAhpC using a site-directed mutagenesis approach by substitution of Ser and Thr residues with Cys at positions 78 and 105 located between two catalytic cysteines. Substitution of Ser with Cys at position 78 enhanced the chaperone activity of the mutant (S78C-PaAhpC) by approximately 9-fold compared with that of the wild-type protein (WT-PaAhpC). This increased activity may have been associated with the proportionate increase in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) fraction and enhanced hydrophobicity of S78C-PaAhpC. Homology modeling revealed that mutation of Ser78 to Cys78 resulted in a more compact decameric structure than that observed in WT-PaAhpC and decreased the atomic distance between the two neighboring sulfur atoms of Cys78 in the dimer-dimer interface of S78C-PaAhpC, which could be responsible for the enhanced hydrophobic interaction at the dimer-dimer interface. Furthermore, complementation assays showed that S78C-PaAhpC exhibited greatly improved the heat tolerance, resulting in enhanced survival under thermal stress. Thus, addition of Cys at position 78 in PaAhpC modulated the functional shifting of this protein from a peroxidase to a chaperone. PMID:27457208

  9. Homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assays for the detection of activity and inhibition of phosphatase enzymes employing phosphorescently labeled peptide substrates.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Desmond J; O'Riordan, Tomás C; O'Sullivan, Paul J; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2007-02-05

    A rapid, homogenous, antibody-free assay for phosphatase enzymes was developed using the phosphorescent platinum (II)-coproporphyrin label (PtCP) and time-resolved fluorescent detection. An internally quenched decameric peptide substrate containing a phospho-tyrosine residue, labeled with PtCP-maleimide and dabcyl-NHS at its termini was designed. Phosphatase catalysed dephosphorylation of the substrate resulted in a minor increase in PtCP signal, while subsequent cleavage by chymotrypsin at the dephosphorylated Tyr-Leu site provided a 3.5 fold enhancement of PtCP phosphorescence. This phosphorescence phosphatase enhancement assay was optimized to a 96 well plate format with detection on a commercial TR-F plate reader, and applied to measure the activity and inhibition of alkaline phosphatase, recombinant human CD45, and tyrosine phosphatases in Jurkat cell lysates within 40 min. Parameters of these enzymatic reactions such as Km's, limits of detection (L.O.D's) and IC50 values for the non-specific inhibitor sodium orthovanadate were also determined.

  10. Inter- and Intraspecific Identification of the Screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax, Using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Skoda, Steven R.; Figarola, James L.; Pornkulwat, Saowaluck; Foster, John E.

    2013-01-01

    The screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), is one of the most devastating arthropod pests of livestock in the Western Hemisphere. Early instars are very difficult to distinguish morphologically from several closely related blow fly species. Random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) markers were developed for identifying C. hominivorax from other wound inhabiting species. Forty decameric primers were screened; nine showed clear reproducible RAPD profiles suitable for distinguishing all life stages of C. hominivorax from 7 other species, including C. macellaria (Fabricius). The results from RAPD-PCR with field-collected samples of unknown first instars agreed with morphological identification that the samples were not C. hominivorax. Three different primers showed DNA polymorphisms (intraspecific) for samples originating from Mexico, Costa Rica, Panama, Jamaica, and Brazil. Therefore, RAPD-PCR may be useful for determining the geographic origin of C. hominivorax samples. Comparing products from these primers, used with known and unknown screwworm samples from an outbreak in Mexico, clearly showed that the outbreak did not originate from the mass rearing facility. Accurate identification of suspected C. hominivorax samples is possible using RAPD-PCR. Further development to identify the geographic origin of samples would benefit the ongoing surveillance programs against C. hominivorax and the decision process during suspected outbreaks of this important pest. PMID:24219502

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of a 3.8-MDa respiratory supermolecule hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Asuka; Gai, Zuoqi; Tanaka, Miyuki; Kato, Koji; Kato, Sanae; Katoh, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Takeya; Kishimura, Hideki; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Yao, Min

    2015-06-01

    Many molluscs transport oxygen using a very large cylindrical multimeric copper-containing protein named hemocyanin. The molluscan hemocyanin forms a decamer (cephalopods) or multidecamer (gastropods) of approximately 330-450kDa subunits, resulting in a molecular mass >3.3MDa. Therefore, molluscan hemocyanin is one of the largest proteins. The reason why these organisms use such a large supermolecule for oxygen transport remains unclear. Atomic-resolution X-ray crystallographic analysis is necessary to unveil the detailed molecular structure of this mysterious large molecule. However, its propensity to dissociate in solution has hampered the crystallization of its intact form. In the present study, we successfully obtained the first crystals of an intact decameric molluscan hemocyanin. The diffraction dataset at 3.0-Å resolution was collected by merging the datasets of two isomorphic crystals. Electron microscopy analysis of the dissolved crystals revealed cylindrical particles. Furthermore, self-rotation function analysis clearly showed the presence of a fivefold symmetry with several twofold symmetries perpendicular to the fivefold axis. The absorption spectrum of the crystals showed an absorption peak around 345nm. These results indicated that the crystals contain intact hemocyanin decamers in the oxygen-bound form.

  12. Vanadium distribution following decavanadate administration.

    PubMed

    Soares, S S; Martins, H; Aureliano, M

    2006-01-01

    An acute exposure of two vanadate solutions-metavanadate and decavanadate-containing different vanadate oligomers, induces different patterns of subcellular vanadium distribution in blood plasma, red blood cells (RBC), and cardiac muscle subcellular fractions of the fish Sparus aurata (gilthead seabream). The highest amount of vanadium was found in blood plasma 1 h after (5 mM) intravenous vanadate administration (295 +/- 64 and 383 +/- 104 microg V/g dry tissue, for metavanadate and decavanadate solutions, respectively), being 80-fold higher than in RBC. After 12 h of administration, the amount of vanadium in plasma, as well as in cardiac cytosol, decreased about 50%, for both vanadate solutions. During the period between 1 and 12 h, the ratio of vanadium in plasma/vanadium in RBC increased from 27 to 128 for metavanadate, whereas it remains constant (77) for decavanadate. Both vanadium solutions were primarily accumulated in the mitochondrial fraction (138 +/- 0 and 195 +/- 34 ng V/g dry tissue for metavanadate and decavanadate solutions, respectively, after 12 h exposure), rather than in cytosol. The amount of vanadium in cardiac mitochondria was twofold higher than in cytosol, earlier for metavanadate (6 h) than for decavanadate (12 h). It is concluded that, in fish cardiac muscle, the vanadium distribution is dependent on the administration of decameric vanadate, with vanadium being mainly distributed in plasma, before being accumulated into the mitochondrial fraction.

  13. Impairment of mineralization by metavanadate and decavanadate solutions in a fish bone-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Tiago, Daniel M; Laizé, Vincent; Cancela, M Leonor; Aureliano, Manuel

    2008-06-01

    Vanadium, a trace metal known to accumulate in bone and to mimic insulin, has been shown to regulate mammalian bone formation using in vitro and in vivo systems. In the present work, short- and long-term effects of metavanadate (containing monomeric, dimeric, tetrameric and pentameric vanadate species) and decavanadate (containing decameric vanadate species) solutions on the mineralization of a fish bone-derived cell line (VSa13) were studied and compared to that of insulin. After 2 h of incubation with vanadate (10 microM in monomeric vanadate), metavanadate exhibited higher accumulation rates than decavanadate (6.85 +/- 0.40 versus 3.95 +/- 0.10 microg V/g of protein, respectively) in fish VSa13 cells and was also shown to be less toxic when applied for short periods. In longer treatments with both metavanadate and decavanadate solutions, similar effects were promoted: stimulation of cell proliferation and strong impairment (75%) of extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization. The effect of both vanadate solutions (5 microM in monomeric vanadate), on ECM mineralization was increased in the presence of insulin (10 nM). It is concluded that chronic treatment with both vanadate solutions stimulated fish VSa13 cells proliferation and prevented ECM mineralization. Newly developed VSa13 fish cells appeared to be appropriate in the characterization of vanadate effects on vertebrate bone formation, representing a good alternative to mammalian systems.

  14. Influence of decavanadate on rat synaptic plasma membrane ATPases activity.

    PubMed

    Krstić, Danijela; Colović, Mirjana; Bosnjaković-Pavlović, Nada; Spasojević-De Bire, Anne; Vasić, Vesna

    2009-09-01

    The in vitro influence of decameric vanadate species on Na+/K+-ATPase, plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA)-calcium pump and ecto-ATPase activity, using rat synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) as model system was investigated, whereas the commercial porcine cerebral cortex Na+/K+-ATPase served as a reference. The thermal behaviour of the synthesized decavanadate (V10) has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, while the type of polyvanadate anion was identified using the IR spectroscopy. The concentration-dependent responses to V10 of all enzymes were obtained. The half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) of the enzyme activity was achieved at (4.74 +/- 1.15) x 10(-7) mol/l for SPM Na+/K+-ATPase, (1.30 +/- 0.10) x 10(-6) mol/l for commercial Na+/K+-ATPase and (3.13 +/- 1.70) x 10(-8) mol/l for Ca2+-ATPase, while ecto-ATPase is significantly less sensitive toward V10 (IC50 = (1.05 +/- 0.10) x 10(-4) mol/l) than investigated P-type ATPases. Kinetic analysis showed that V10 inhibited Na+/K+-ATPase by reducing the maximum enzymatic velocity and apparent affinity for ATP (increasing K(m) value), implying a mixed mode of interaction between V10 and P-type ATPases.

  15. Vanadate oligomers: in vivo effects in hepatic vanadium accumulation and stress markers.

    PubMed

    Gândara, R M C; Soares, S S; Martins, H; Gutiérrez-Merino, C; Aureliano, M

    2005-05-01

    The formation of vanadate oligomeric species is often disregarded in studies on vanadate effects in biological systems, particularly in vivo, even though they may interact with high affinity with many proteins. We report the effects in fish hepatic tissue of an acute intravenous exposure (12, 24 h and 7 days) to two vanadium(V) solutions, metavanadate and decavanadate, containing different vanadate oligomers administered at sub-lethal concentration (5 mM; 1 mg/kg). Decavanadate solution promotes a 5-fold increase (0.135 +/- 0.053 microg V(-1) dry tissues) in the vanadium content of the mitochondrial fraction 7 days after exposition, whereas no effects were observed after metavanadate solution administration. Reduced glutathione (GSH) levels did not change and the overall reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was decreased by 30% 24 h after decavanadate administration, while for metavanadate, GSH levels increased 35%, the overall ROS production was depressed by 40% and mitochondrial superoxide anion production decreased 45%. Decavanadate intoxication did not induce changes in the rate of lipid peroxidation till 12 h, but later increased 80%, which is similar to the increase observed for metavanadate after 24 h. Decameric vanadate administration clearly induces different effects than the other vanadate oligomeric species, pointing out the importance of taking into account the different vanadate oligomers in the evaluation of vanadium(V) effects in biological systems.

  16. Acute effects of vanadate oligomers on heart, kidney, and liver histology in the Lusitanian toadfish (Halobatrachus didactylus).

    PubMed

    Borges, G; Mendonça, P; Joaquim, N; Coucelo, J; Aureliano, M

    2003-10-01

    The contribution of vanadate oligomers to the acute histological effects of vanadium was analyzed in the heart, kidney, and liver of Halobatrachus didactylus (Schneider, 1801). A sublethal vanadium dose (5 mM, 1 mL/kg) in the form of metavanadate (containing ortho and metameric species) or in the form of decavanadate (containing only decameric species) was intraperitoneally administered by injection, and specimens of H. didactylus were sacrificed at one and seven days postinjection. Sections of heart ventricle and renal and hepatic tissue were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and examined by light microscopy to identify vanadium-induced tissue injury. In addition, PicroSirius-stained ventricular sections were analyzed by bipolarized light microscopy to determine the fraction of myocardium occupied by the ventricular wall structural elements (collagen I, collagen III, and cardiac muscle). Both vanadate solutions produced similar effects in the renal tissue. Morphological alterations included damaged renal tubules showing disorganized epithelial cells in different states of necrosis. Reabsorbed renal tubules and hyperchromatic interstitial tissue were also observed. The hepatic tissue presented hyperchromatic and hypertrophied nuclei, along with necrotic and hypertrophied hepatocytes, and more severe changes were observed in the liver with exposure to decavanadate. Vanadate oligomers promoted evident tissue lesions in the kidney and liver, but not in the cardiac tissue. However, cardiac tissue structural changes were produced. For example, decavanadate induced a hypertrophy of the ventricle due to a decrease in the percentage of myocardium occupied by collagen fibers. In general, decavanadate was shown to be more toxic than metavanadate.

  17. Decavanadate induces mitochondrial membrane depolarization and inhibits oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Soares, S S; Gutiérrez-Merino, C; Aureliano, M

    2007-05-01

    Decavanadate induced rat liver mitochondrial depolarization at very low concentrations, half-depolarization with 39 nM decavanadate, while it was needed a 130-fold higher concentration of monomeric vanadate (5 microM) to induce the same effect. Decavanadate also inhibits mitochondrial repolarization induced by reduced glutathione in vitro, with an inhibition constant of 1 microM, whereas no effect was observed up to 100 microM of monomeric vanadate. The oxygen consumption by mitochondria is also inhibited by lower decavanadate than monomeric vanadate concentrations, i.e. 50% inhibition is attained with 99 M decavanadate and 10 microM monomeric vanadate. Thus, decavanadate is stronger as mitochondrial depolarization agent than as inhibitor of mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Up to 5 microM, decavanadate does not alter mitochondrial NADH levels nor inhibit neither F(O)F(1)-ATPase nor cytochrome c oxidase activity, but it induces changes in the redox steady-state of mitochondrial b-type cytochromes (complex III). NMR spectra showed that decameric vanadate is the predominant vanadate species in decavanadate solutions. It is concluded that decavanadate is much more potent mitochondrial depolarization agent and a more potent inhibitor of mitochondrial oxygen consumption than monomeric vanadate, pointing out the importance to take into account the contribution of higher oligomeric species of vanadium for the biological effects of vanadate solutions.

  18. Efficient sequence-directed psoralen targeting using pseudocomplementary Peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Fan, Xue-Jun; Nielsen, Peter E

    2007-01-01

    A pair of decameric pseudocomplementary PNAs which bind to their mixed purine-pyrimidine sequence target in duplex DNA by double duplex invasion has been synthesized with a derivative of 8-methoxypsoralen conjugated to one of the PNAs. It is shown that this pair of psoralen-conjugated pseudocomplementary PNA oligomers, which target a site in the pBluescriptKS+ vector, upon irradiation with long-wavelength UV light (UVA) with high efficiency and specificity form photoadducts to an adjacent 5'-TA site, and more than 50% of these adducts are DNA interstrand cross-links. Transcription elongation by T7 or T3 RNA polymerase is specifically arrested at the psoralen cross-linking site, yielding more than 90% arrested product. These results emphasize the potential of pseudocomplementary PNA oligomers for highly specific gene targeting, in particular, with respect to sequence-directed psoralen photomodification of double-stranded DNA. Thus, such psoralen-PNA conjugates could be very useful in a range of biology and drug discovery applications.

  19. Divalent cations and heparin/heparan sulfate cooperate to control assembly and activity of the fibroblast growth factor receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Kan, M; Wang, F; To, B; Gabriel, J L; McKeehan, W L

    1996-10-18

    Polypeptides of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family are ubiquitous bioregulators within tissues whose activity is controlled by heparan sulfates within the pericellular matrix. FGF and the ectodomain of their transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors (FGFR) exhibit heparin-binding domains that when juxtaposed in a FGF middle dotFGFR complex can accommodate a single, potentially bivalent, decameric polysaccharide chain in a ternary complex. Here we show that the interaction of heparin with FGF ligands is not affected by divalent cations. In contrast, the high affinity interaction (apparent Kd = 10 nM) of heparin with FGFR requires Ca2+ or Mg2+ at physiological concentrations. Divalent cations maintain FGFR in a heparan sulfate-dependent state in respect to FGF binding and an FGF- and heparan sulfate-dependent state in respect to autophosphorylation. A model is proposed where divalent cations and heparan sulfate cooperate to maintain FGFR in a conformation that restricts trans-phosphorylation between intracellular kinase domains. The restriction is overcome by FGF or constitutively as a common consequence of diverse mutations in FGFR associated with skeletal and craniofacial abnormalities.

  20. A recombinant subunit vaccine based on the insertion of 27 amino acids from Omp31 to the N-terminus of BLS induced a similar degree of protection against B. ovis than Rev.1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Cassataro, Juliana; Pasquevich, Karina A; Estein, Silvia M; Laplagne, Diego A; Velikovsky, Carlos A; de la Barrera, Silvia; Bowden, Raúl; Fossati, Carlos A; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Goldbaum, Fernando A

    2007-05-30

    The development of an effective subunit vaccine against brucellosis is a research area of intense interest. The enzyme lumazine synthase from Brucella spp. (BLS) is highly immunogenic, presumably due to its decameric arrangement and remarkable stability. In this work we decided to develop a chimera with the scaffold protein BLS decorated with 10 copies of a known protective epitope derived from an outer membrane protein of 31kDa (Omp31) from Brucella spp. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with the chimera as a recombinant protein (rBLSOmp31) provided the best protection level against Brucella ovis, which was higher than the given by the co-delivery of both recombinant proteins (rBLS + rOmp31) and similar than the control vaccine Brucella melitensis strain Rev.1. Moreover rBLSOmp31 induced protection against Brucella melitensis but to a lesser degree than Rev.1. The chimera induced a strong humoral response against the inserted peptide. It also induced peptide- and BLS-specific T helper 1 and cytotoxic T responses. In conclusion, our results indicate that BLSOmp31 could be a useful candidate for the development of subunit vaccines against brucellosis since it elicits humoral, T helper and cytotoxic immune responses and protection against smooth and rough species of Brucella.

  1. Structural characterization of encapsulated ferritin provides insight into iron storage in bacterial nanocompartments

    PubMed Central

    He, Didi; Hughes, Sam; Vanden-Hehir, Sally; Georgiev, Atanas; Altenbach, Kirsten; Tarrant, Emma; Mackay, C Logan; Waldron, Kevin J; Clarke, David J; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Ferritins are ubiquitous proteins that oxidise and store iron within a protein shell to protect cells from oxidative damage. We have characterized the structure and function of a new member of the ferritin superfamily that is sequestered within an encapsulin capsid. We show that this encapsulated ferritin (EncFtn) has two main alpha helices, which assemble in a metal dependent manner to form a ferroxidase center at a dimer interface. EncFtn adopts an open decameric structure that is topologically distinct from other ferritins. While EncFtn acts as a ferroxidase, it cannot mineralize iron. Conversely, the encapsulin shell associates with iron, but is not enzymatically active, and we demonstrate that EncFtn must be housed within the encapsulin for iron storage. This encapsulin nanocompartment is widely distributed in bacteria and archaea and represents a distinct class of iron storage system, where the oxidation and mineralization of iron are distributed between two proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18972.001 PMID:27529188

  2. Cluster Analysis of p53 Binding Site Sequences Reveals Subsets with Different Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji-Hyun; Latysheva, Natasha S.; Iggo, Richard D.; Barker, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    p53 is an important regulator of cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis and metabolism, and is frequently mutated in tumors. It functions as a tetramer, where each component dimer binds to a decameric DNA region known as a response element. We identify p53 binding site subtypes and examine the functional and evolutionary properties of these subtypes. We start with over 1700 known binding sites and, with no prior labeling, identify two sets of response elements by unsupervised clustering. When combined, they give rise to three types of p53 binding sites. We find that probabilistic and alignment-based assessments of cross-species conservation show no strong evidence of differential conservation between types of binding sites. In contrast, functional analysis of the genes most proximal to the binding sites provides strong bioinformatic evidence of functional differentiation between the three types of binding sites. Our results are consistent with recent structural data identifying two conformations of the L1 loop in the DNA binding domain, suggesting that they reflect biologically meaningful groups imposed by the p53 protein structure. PMID:27812278

  3. Expression of the Multimeric and Highly Immunogenic Brucella spp. Lumazine Synthase Fused to Bovine Rotavirus VP8d as a Scaffold for Antigen Production in Tobacco Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, E. Federico; Lentz, Ezequiel M.; Bellido, Demian; Dus Santos, María J.; Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Wigdorovitz, Andrés; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando F.

    2015-01-01

    Lumazine synthase from Brucella spp. (BLS) is a highly immunogenic decameric protein which can accommodate foreign polypeptides or protein domains fused to its N-termini, markedly increasing their immunogenicity. The inner core domain (VP8d) of VP8 spike protein from bovine rotavirus is responsible for viral adhesion to sialic acid residues and infection. It also displays neutralizing epitopes, making it a good candidate for vaccination. In this work, the BLS scaffold was assessed for the first time in plants for recombinant vaccine development by N-terminally fusing BLS to VP8d and expressing the resulting fusion (BLSVP8d) in tobacco chloroplasts. Transplastomic plants were obtained and characterized by Southern, northern and western blot. BLSVP8d was highly expressed, representing 40% of total soluble protein (4.85 mg/g fresh tissue). BLSVP8d remained soluble and stable during all stages of plant development and even in lyophilized leaves stored at room temperature. Soluble protein extracts from fresh and lyophilized leaves were able to induce specific neutralizing IgY antibodies in a laying hen model. This work presents BLS as an interesting platform for highly immunogenic injectable, or even oral, subunit vaccines. Lyophilization of transplastomic leaves expressing stable antigenic fusions to BLS would further reduce costs and simplify downstream processing, purification and storage, allowing for more practical vaccines. PMID:26779198

  4. Phenotypic differences of human neutrophils of carriers of the PSGL-1 A and B-allele in binding to immobilised P-selectin under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Meyer dos Santos, Sascha; Klinkhardt, Ute; Lang, Katharina; Parisius, Jeannine; Kuczka, Karina; Harder, Sebastian

    2011-02-01

    P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) interacts with P-selectin expressed on endothelial cells and platelets. PSGL-1 extracellular mucin-like domain displays a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) polymorphism. The wildtype consists of 16 decameric repeats (designated A isoforms) and variants with 15 (B allele) and 14 (C allele) repeats that are assumed to be associated with reduced risk of vascular disease. We investigated the adhesion of these natural variants to P-selectin in native human neutrophils. Healthy volunteers were genotyped and the adhesion of neutrophils expressing the PSGL-1 isoforms A/A, A/B and B/B were studied under static and physiologic flow conditions. Homozygous B/B neutrophils attached significantly weaker to P-selectin at elevated shear rates from 24 up to 64 dyn/cm(2) than A/A and A/B neutrophils. No difference in adhesion rate was found under static conditions and shear stress below 24 dyn/cm(2), but B/B neutrophils rolled significantly faster than A/A neutrophils at shear stress ≥ 12 dyn/cm(2). There was no difference in the adhesive capacity between A/A an A/B neutrophils. These data support the view that the role of the decamers is to extend the ligand binding domain far above the cell surface to support stable leukocyte adhesion and rolling.

  5. Calcium and Magnesium Ions Modulate the Oligomeric State and Function of Mitochondrial 2-Cys Peroxiredoxins in Leishmania Parasites.

    PubMed

    Morais, Mariana A B; Giuseppe, Priscila O; Souza, Tatiana A C B; Castro, Helena; Honorato, Rodrigo V; Oliveira, Paulo S L; Netto, Luis E S; Tomas, Ana M; Murakami, Mario T

    2017-03-14

    Leishmania parasites have evolved a number of strategies to cope with the harsh environmental changes during mammalian infection. One of these mechanisms involves the functional gain that allowed mitochondrial 2-Cys peroxiredoxins to act as molecular chaperones when forming decamers. This function was demonstrated to be critical for the parasite infectivity in mammals and its activation was considered to be controlled exclusively by the enzyme redox state under physiological conditions. Herein, we revealed that magnesium and calcium ions play a major role in modulating the ability of these enzymes to act as molecular chaperones, surpassing the redox effect. These ions are directly involved in the mitochondrial metabolism and now also integrate a novel mechanism to stabilize the decameric form of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins in Leishmania mitochondrion. Moreover, we demonstrated that a constitutively dimeric Prx1m mutant impairs Leishmania's survival under heat stress, supporting the central role of chaperone function of Prx1m for Leishmania parasites during the transition from insect to mammalian hosts.

  6. Structure of the fucose mutarotase from Streptococcus pneumoniae in complex with L-fucose.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Melanie A; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2011-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae relies on a variety of carbohydrate-utilization pathways for both colonization of its human host and full virulence during the development of invasive disease. One such pathway is the fucose-utilization pathway, a component of which is fucose mutarotase (SpFcsU), an enzyme that performs the interconversion between α-L-fucose and β-L-fucose. This protein was crystallized and its three-dimensional structure was solved in complex with L-fucose. The structure shows a complex decameric quaternary structure with a high overall degree of structural identity to Escherichia coli FcsU (EcFcsU). Furthermore, the active-site architecture of SpFcsU is highly similar to that of EcFcsU. When considered in the context of the fucose-utilization pathway found in S. pneumoniae, SpFcsU appears to link the two halves of the pathway by enhancing the rate of conversion of the product of the final glycoside hydrolysis step, β-fucose, into the substrate for the fucose isomerase, α-fucose.

  7. X-Ray Solution Scattering Study of Four Escherichia coli Enzymes Involved in Stationary-Phase Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dadinova, Liubov A.; Shtykova, Eleonora V.; Konarev, Petr V.; Rodina, Elena V.; Snalina, Natalia E.; Vorobyeva, Natalia N.; Kurilova, Svetlana A.; Nazarova, Tatyana I.; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2016-01-01

    The structural analyses of four metabolic enzymes that maintain and regulate the stationary growth phase of Escherichia coli have been performed primarily drawing on the results obtained from solution small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and other structural techniques. The proteins are (i) class I fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FbaB); (ii) inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase); (iii) 5-keto-4-deoxyuronate isomerase (KduI); and (iv) glutamate decarboxylase (GadA). The enzyme FbaB, that until now had an unknown structure, is predicted to fold into a TIM-barrel motif that form globular protomers which SAXS experiments show associate into decameric assemblies. In agreement with previously reported crystal structures, PPase forms hexamers in solution that are similar to the previously reported X-ray crystal structure. Both KduI and GadA that are responsible for carbohydrate (pectin) metabolism and acid stress responses, respectively, form polydisperse mixtures consisting of different oligomeric states. Overall the SAXS experiments yield additional insights into shape and organization of these metabolic enzymes and further demonstrate the utility of hybrid methods, i.e., solution SAXS combined with X-ray crystallography, bioinformatics and predictive 3D-structural modeling, as tools to enrich structural studies. The results highlight the structural complexity that the protein components of metabolic networks may adopt which cannot be fully captured using individual structural biology techniques. PMID:27227414

  8. Crystal Structure of Reduced and of Oxidized Peroxiredoxin IV Enzyme Reveals a Stable Oxidized Decamer and a Non-disulfide-bonded Intermediate in the Catalytic Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhenbo; Tavender, Timothy J.; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Bulleid, Neil J.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin IV (PrxIV) is an endoplasmic reticulum-localized enzyme that metabolizes the hydrogen peroxide produced by endoplasmic reticulum oxidase 1 (Ero1). It has been shown to play a role in de novo disulfide formation, oxidizing members of the protein disulfide isomerase family of enzymes, and is a member of the typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. We have determined the crystal structure of both reduced and disulfide-bonded, as well as a resolving cysteine mutant of human PrxIV. We show that PrxIV has a similar structure to other typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins and undergoes a conformational change from a fully folded to a locally unfolded form following the formation of a disulfide between the peroxidatic and resolving cysteine residues. Unlike other mammalian typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins, we show that human PrxIV forms a stable decameric structure even in its disulfide-bonded state. In addition, the structure of a resolving cysteine mutant reveals an intermediate in the reaction cycle that adopts the locally unfolded conformation. Interestingly the peroxidatic cysteine in the crystal structure is sulfenylated rather than sulfinylated or sulfonylated. In addition, the peroxidatic cysteine in the resolving cysteine mutant is resistant to hyper-oxidation following incubation with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. These results highlight some unique properties of PrxIV and suggest that the equilibrium between the fully folded and locally unfolded forms favors the locally unfolded conformation upon sulfenylation of the peroxidatic cysteine residue. PMID:21994946

  9. A new nidovirus (NamDinh virus NDiV): Its ultrastructural characterization in the C6/36 mosquito cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Thuy, Nguyen Thanh; Huy, Tran Quang; Nga, Phan Thi; Morita, Kouichi; Dunia, Irene; Benedetti, Lucio

    2013-09-15

    We describe the ultrastructure of the NamDinh virus (NDiV), a new member of the order Nidovirales grown in the C6/36 mosquito cell line. Uninfected and NDiV-infected cells were investigated by electron microscopy 24–48 h after infection. The results show that the viral nucleocapsid-like particles form clusters concentrated in the vacuoles, the endoplasmic reticulum, and are scattered in the cytoplasm. Mature virions of NDiV were released as budding particles on the cell surface where viral components appear to lie beneath and along the plasma membrane. Free homogeneous virus particles were obtained by ultracentrifugation on sucrose gradients of culture fluids. The size of the round-shaped particles with a complete internal structure was 80 nm in diameter. This is the first study to provide information on the morphogenesis and ultrastructure of the first insect nidovirus NDiV, a missing evolutionary link in the emergence of the viruses with the largest RNA genomes. - Highlights: • NamDinh virus (NDiV), a new member of the order Nidovirales was tested in cultured cell line. • The morphogenesis and ultrastructure of NDiV were investigated by electron microscopy. • The viral nucleocapsid-like particles clustered and scattered in the cytoplasm. • NDiVs were released as budding particles on the cell surface. • The size of the viral particles with a complete internal structure was 80 nm in diameter.

  10. The Trichoplusia ni single nucleopolyhedrovirus tn79 gene encodes a functional sulfhydryl oxidase enzyme that is able to support the replication of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus lacking the sulfhydryl oxidase ac92 gene

    PubMed Central

    Clem, Stian A.; Wu, Wenbi; Lorena Passarelli, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac92 is a conserved baculovirus gene with homology to flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked sulfhydryl oxidases. Its product, Ac92, is a functional sulfhydryl oxidase. Deletion of ac92 results in almost negligible levels of budded virus (BV) production, defects in occlusion-derived virus (ODV) co-envelopment and their inefficient incorporation into occlusion bodies. To determine the role of sulfhydryl oxidation in the production of BV, envelopment of nucleocapsids, and nucleocapsid incorporation into occlusion bodies, the Trichoplusia ni single nucleopolyhedrovirus ortholog, Tn79, was substituted for ac92. Tn79 was found to be an active sulfhydryl oxidase that substituted for Ac92, resulting in the production of infectious BV, albeit about 10-fold less than an ac92-containing virus. Tn79 rescued defects in ODV morphogenesis caused by a lack of ac92. Active Tn79 sulfhydryl oxidase activity is required for efficient BV production, ODV envelopment, and their subsequent incorporation into occlusion bodies in the absence of ac92. PMID:25010286

  11. Complexes of Sendai virus NP-P and P-L proteins are required for defective interfering particle genome replication in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Horikami, S M; Curran, J; Kolakofsky, D; Moyer, S A

    1992-01-01

    We present evidence that the formation of NP-P and P-L protein complexes is essential for replication of the genome of Sendai defective interfering (DI-H) virus in vitro, using extracts of cells expressing these viral proteins from plasmids. Optimal replication of DI-H nucleocapsid RNA required extracts of cells transfected with critical amounts and ratios of each of the plasmids and was three- to fivefold better than replication with a control extract prepared from a natural virus infection. Extracts in which NP and P proteins were coexpressed supported replication of the genome of purified DI-H virus which contained endogenous polymerase proteins, but extracts in which NP and P were expressed separately and then mixed were inactive. Similarly, the P and L proteins must be coexpressed for biological activity. The replication data thus suggest that two protein complexes, NP-P and P-L, are required for nucleocapsid RNA replication and that these complexes must form during or soon after synthesis of the proteins. Biochemical evidence in support of the formation of each complex includes coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins of each complex with an antibody specific for one component and cosedimentation of the subunits of each complex. We propose that the P-L complex serves as the RNA polymerase and NP-P is required for encapsidation of newly synthesized RNA. Images PMID:1321276

  12. Synthesis of Tacaribe virus polypeptides in an in vitro coupled transcription and translation system.

    PubMed

    Boersma, D P; Compans, R W

    1985-04-01

    We have analyzed polypeptides synthesized in a coupled in vitro transcription and translation system in response to detergent-disrupted Tacaribe virus. Analysis of the major Tacaribe virus-specified product by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that it had an isoelectric point similar to that of the Tacaribe nucleocapsid polypeptide N; however, the in vitro product had an approximate mol. wt. of 73 000, compared to a mol. wt. of 68 000 for the N protein. The 73 000 dalton product was found to yield proteolytic cleavage products with similar electrophoretic mobilities to those obtained from the virion P and N proteins. These results, as well as pulse-chase experiments in Tacaribe virus-infected cells, suggest that a 73 000 dalton polypeptide may be processed to yield the N polypeptide. The polypeptides synthesized in the coupled system depended on the amount and type of virus added; addition of purified Shark River (SR) virus, a member of the Patois group of bunyaviruses, resulted in synthesis of a polypeptide of mol. wt. 22 000 which corresponds to the SR nucleocapsid protein.

  13. Epizootiology of Tacaribe Serocomplex Viruses (Arenaviridae) Associated with Neotomine Rodents (Cricetidae, Neotominae) in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Milazzo, Mary Louise; Cajimat, Maria N. B.; Mauldin, Matthew R.; Bennett, Stephen G.; Hess, Barry D.; Rood, Michael P.; Conlan, Christopher A.; Nguyen, Kiet; Wekesa, J. Wakoli; Ramos, Ronald D.; Bradley, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to advance our knowledge of the epizootiology of Bear Canyon virus and other Tacaribe serocomplex viruses (Arenaviridae) associated with wild rodents in California. Antibody (immunoglobulin G [IgG]) to a Tacaribe serocomplex virus was found in 145 (3.6%) of 3977 neotomine rodents (Cricetidae: Neotominae) captured in six counties in southern California. The majority (122 or 84.1%) of the 145 antibody-positive rodents were big-eared woodrats (Neotoma macrotis) or California mice (Peromyscus californicus). The 23 other antibody-positive rodents included a white-throated woodrat (N. albigula), desert woodrat (N. lepida), Bryant's woodrats (N. bryanti), brush mice (P. boylii), cactus mice (P. eremicus), and deer mice (P. maniculatus). Analyses of viral nucleocapsid protein gene sequence data indicated that Bear Canyon virus is associated with N. macrotis and/or P. californicus in Santa Barbara County, Los Angeles County, Orange County, and western Riverside County. Together, analyses of field data and antibody prevalence data indicated that N. macrotis is the principal host of Bear Canyon virus. Last, the analyses of viral nucleocapsid protein gene sequence data suggested that the Tacaribe serocomplex virus associated with N. albigula and N. lepida in eastern Riverside County represents a novel species (tentatively named “Palo Verde virus”) in the genus Arenavirus. PMID:25700047

  14. Location of the binding domains for the RNA polymerase L and the ribonucleocapsid template within different halves of the NS phosphoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Emerson, S.U.; Schubert, M.

    1987-08-01

    Recombinant DNA techniques were used to delete regions of a cDNA clone of the phosphoprotein NS gene of vesicular stomatitis virus. The complete NS gene and four mutant genes containing internal or terminal deletions were inserted into a modified pGem4 vector under the transcriptional control of the page T7 promoter. Run-off transcripts were synthesized and translated in vitro to provide (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled complete NS or deletion mutant NS proteins. Immune coprecipitation assays involving these proteins were developed to map the regions of the NS protein responsible for binding to the structural viral nucleocapsid protein N and the catalytic RNA polymerase protein L. The data indicate the NS protein is a bivalent protein consisting of two discrete functional domains. Contrary to previous suggestions, the negatively charged amino-terminal half of NS protein binds to L protein, while the carboxyl-terminal half of NS protein binds to both soluble recombinant nucleocapsid protein N and viral ribonucleocapsid template.

  15. Comparative proteomics reveal fundamental structural and functional differences between the two progeny phenotypes of a baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dianhai; Zhang, Leike; Deng, Fei; Fang, Wei; Wang, Ranran; Liu, Xijia; Guo, Lin; Rayner, Simon; Chen, Xinwen; Wang, Hualin; Hu, Zhihong

    2013-01-01

    The replication of lepidopteran baculoviruses is characterized by the production of two progeny phenotypes: the occlusion-derived virus (ODV), which establishes infection in midgut cells, and the budded virus (BV), which disseminates infection to different tissues within a susceptible host. To understand the structural, and hence functional, differences between BV and ODV, we employed multiple proteomic methods to reveal the protein compositions and posttranslational modifications of the two phenotypes of Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus. In addition, Western blotting and quantitative mass spectrometry were used to identify the localization of proteins in the envelope or nucleocapsid fractions. Comparative protein portfolios of BV and ODV showing the distribution of 54 proteins, encompassing the 21 proteins shared by BV and ODV, the 12 BV-specific proteins, and the 21 ODV-specific proteins, were obtained. Among the 11 ODV-specific envelope proteins, 8 either are essential for or contribute to oral infection. Twenty-three phosphorylated and 6 N-glycosylated viral proteins were also identified. While the proteins that are shared by the two phenotypes appear to be important for nucleocapsid assembly and trafficking, the structural and functional differences between the two phenotypes are evidently characterized by the envelope proteins and posttranslational modifications. This comparative proteomics study provides new insight into how BV and ODV are formed and why they function differently.

  16. Identification and analysis of an Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus structural protein of the occlusion-derived virus envelope: ODV-E56.

    PubMed

    Braunagel, S C; Elton, D M; Ma, H; Summers, M D

    1996-03-01

    An Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus gene encoding an occlusion-derived virus (ODV) envelope protein of 56 kDa was identified and sequenced. Transcription initiates from a conserved baculovirus late motif (ATAAG) with transcripts detected from 16 through 72 hr p.i. The protein is detected in infected cell extracts from 36 hr p.i. Western blot assay of ODV, BV, viral envelope, and nucleocapsid preparations coupled with immunoelectron microscopy reveal that this protein localizes to the ODV envelope. This protein is named ODV-E56 to identify its viral origin, envelope location, and apparent molecular weight. ODV-E56 is enriched in viral induced intranuclear microvesicles as determined by immunogold labeling. A mutant was constructed with the C-terminal portion of the protein replaced with beta-galactosidase. The fusion protein, E56-beta-gal, locates to the viral nucleocapsids and not to the ODV envelope or intranuclear microvesicles. This suggests that the signals necessary for transport and/or retention into these structures lies within the C-terminal portion of ODV-E56. Additionally, both ODV-E56 and E56-beta-gal are enriched in electron dense regions that cluster around the inner nuclear membrane and within the nucleoplasm.

  17. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac142, a core gene that is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Christina B; Dai, Xiaojiang; Donly, Cam; Theilmann, David A

    2008-03-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac142 is a baculovirus core gene and encodes a protein previously shown to associate with occlusion-derived virus (ODV). To determine its role in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac142 deletion virus (AcBAC(ac142KO-PH-GFP)). Fluorescence and light microscopy revealed that AcBAC(ac142KO-PH-GFP) exhibits a single-cell infection phenotype. Titration assays and Western blot confirmed that AcBAC(ac142KO-PH-GFP) is unable to produce budded virus (BV). However, viral DNA replication is unaffected and the development of occlusion bodies in AcBAC(ac142KO-PH-GFP)-transfected cells evidenced progression to very late phases of the viral infection. Western blot analysis showed that AC142 is expressed in the cytoplasm and nucleus throughout infection and that it is a structural component of BV and ODV which localizes to nucleocapsids. Electron microscopy indicates that ac142 is required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form ODV and their subsequent occlusion, a fundamental process to all baculoviruses.

  18. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac142, a core gene that is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Christina B.; Da, Xiaojiang; Donly, Cam; Theilmann, David A.

    2008-03-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac142 is a baculovirus core gene and encodes a protein previously shown to associate with occlusion-derived virus (ODV). To determine its role in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac142 deletion virus (AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP}). Fluorescence and light microscopy revealed that AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP} exhibits a single-cell infection phenotype. Titration assays and Western blot confirmed that AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP} is unable to produce budded virus (BV). However, viral DNA replication is unaffected and the development of occlusion bodies in AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP}-transfected cells evidenced progression to very late phases of the viral infection. Western blot analysis showed that AC142 is expressed in the cytoplasm and nucleus throughout infection and that it is a structural component of BV and ODV which localizes to nucleocapsids. Electron microscopy indicates that ac142 is required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form ODV and their subsequent occlusion, a fundamental process to all baculoviruses.

  19. Occlusion-derived baculovirus: interaction with human cells and evaluation of the envelope protein P74 as a surface display platform.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Anna R; Tuusa, Jenni E; Volkman, Loy E; Oker-Blom, Christian

    2008-06-01

    To develop complementary baculovirus-based tools for gene delivery and display technologies, the interaction of occlusion-derived baculovirus (ODV) with human cells, and the functionality of the P74 ODV envelope protein for display of the IgG-binding Z domains (ZZP74) were evaluated. The cellular binding of ODV was concentration-dependent and saturable. Only minority of the bound virions were internalized at both 37 and 4 degrees C, suggesting usage of direct membrane fusion as the entry mode. The intracellular transport of ODV was confined in vesicular structures peripheral to the plasma membrane, impeding subsequent nuclear entry and transgene expression. Transduction of ODV was not rescued by mimicking the preferred alkaline environment and lowered temperature of the ODV infective entry, or following treatment with the microtubule depolymerizing agent nocodazole or with the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate. Similar to unmodified P74, the ZZP74 chimera localized in the intranuclear ring zone, and was enriched in virus-induced microvesicles. However, Western blotting of ODV and budded virions (BV), as well as viral envelope and nucleocapsid fractions combined with functional infection/transduction studies revealed incorporation of the ZZP74 fusion protein into viral nucleocapsids. The ZZP74 BV preserved normal infectivity, polypeptide profile, and morphology, but became incapable of entering and transducing human cells.

  20. Characterization and interactome study of white spot syndrome virus envelope protein VP11.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wang-Jing; Shiung, Hui-Jui; Lo, Chu-Fang; Leu, Jiann-Horng; Lai, Ying-Jang; Lee, Tai-Lin; Huang, Wei-Tung; Kou, Guang-Hsiung; Chang, Yun-Shiang

    2014-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a large enveloped virus. The WSSV viral particle consists of three structural layers that surround its core DNA: an outer envelope, a tegument and a nucleocapsid. Here we characterize the WSSV structural protein VP11 (WSSV394, GenBank accession number AF440570), and use an interactome approach to analyze the possible associations between this protein and an array of other WSSV and host proteins. Temporal transcription analysis showed that vp11 is an early gene. Western blot hybridization of the intact viral particles and fractionation of the viral components, and immunoelectron microscopy showed that VP11 is an envelope protein. Membrane topology software predicted VP11 to be a type of transmembrane protein with a highly hydrophobic transmembrane domain at its N-terminal. Based on an immunofluorescence assay performed on VP11-transfected Sf9 cells and a trypsin digestion analysis of the virion, we conclude that, contrary to topology software prediction, the C-terminal of this protein is in fact inside the virion. Yeast two-hybrid screening combined with co-immunoprecipitation assays found that VP11 directly interacted with at least 12 other WSSV structural proteins as well as itself. An oligomerization assay further showed that VP11 could form dimers. VP11 is also the first reported WSSV structural protein to interact with the major nucleocapsid protein VP664.

  1. Molecular characterization of a new PToV strain. Evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, J; Jimenez, M; Luque, J; Rejas, M T; Lavazza, A; Rodriguez, D

    2009-07-01

    Toroviruses are emergent viruses, belonging to the Nidovirales order, that remain mostly ignored, despite they are able to infect different species of domestic animals and humans, causing enteric diseases and diarrhea. Thus far, only five variants of porcine torovirus (PToV) have been identified. In this report we describe the identification and partial characterization of a new strain of porcine torovirus (PToV-BRES) that was detected by RT-PCR in a swine faecal specimen from a farm in Brescia (Italy). The complete genes coding for the nucleocapsid (N), hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) and membrane (M) proteins were amplified, and sequence analysis showed that PToV-BRES is a new PToV strain that, based on the HE gene sequence, is phylogenetically related to P4 strain, that was up to now the only member of a distinct PToV lineage. The nucleocapsid protein from PToV-BRES was expressed in insect cells as a his-tagged protein, purified by affinity chromatography and used to develop an ELISA method to detect antibodies against PToV. This assay was evaluated using a serum collection including 45 samples from three commercial farms from Spain. High antibody prevalence against PToV was observed in the three farms, both in adult animals and in piglets, which could suggest that PToV might be endemic in Spanish porcine population. The ELISA method developed in this work could be useful in future epidemiological surveys about toroviruses.

  2. Parainfluenza virus 5 genomes are located in viral cytoplasmic bodies whilst the virus dismantles the interferon-induced antiviral state of cells.

    PubMed

    Carlos, T S; Young, D F; Schneider, M; Simas, J P; Randall, R E

    2009-09-01

    Although the replication cycle of parainfluenza virus type 5 (PIV5) is initially severely impaired in cells in an interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral state, the virus still targets STAT1 for degradation. As a consequence, the cells can no longer respond to IFN and after 24-48 h, they go out of the antiviral state and normal virus replication is established. Following infection of cells in an IFN-induced antiviral state, viral nucleocapsid proteins are initially localized within small cytoplasmic bodies, and appearance of these cytoplasmic bodies correlates with the loss of STAT1 from infected cells. In situ hybridization, using probes specific for the NP and L genes, demonstrated the presence of virus genomes within these cytoplasmic bodies. These viral cytoplasmic bodies do not co-localize with cellular markers for stress granules, cytoplasmic P-bodies or autophagosomes. Furthermore, they are not large insoluble aggregates of viral proteins and/or nucleocapsids, as they can simply and easily be dispersed by 'cold-shocking' live cells, a process that disrupts the cytoskeleton. Given that during in vivo infections, PIV5 will inevitably infect cells in an IFN-induced antiviral state, we suggest that these cytoplasmic bodies are areas in which PIV5 genomes reside whilst the virus dismantles the antiviral state of the cells. Consequently, viral cytoplasmic bodies may play an important part in the strategy that PIV5 uses to circumvent the IFN system.

  3. Reassortment of Avian Influenza A/H6N6 Viruses from Live Poultry Markets in Guangdong, China

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Runyu; Zou, Lirong; Kang, Yinfeng; Wu, Jie; Zeng, Xianqiao; Lu, Jing; Liang, Lijun; Song, Yingchao; Zhang, Xin; Ni, Hanzhong; Lin, Jinyan; Liao, Ming; Ke, Changwen

    2016-01-01

    Since early 2013, H7N9-subtype avian influenza virus (AIV) has caused human infection in eastern China. To evaluate AIV contamination and the public risk of infection, we systematically implemented environmental sampling from live poultry markets in Guangdong Province. Through real-time polymerase chain reaction assays and next-generation sequencing, we generated full nucleotide sequences of all 10 H6N6 AIVs isolated during sampling. Focusing on sequence analyses of hemagglutinin genes of the 10 H6N6 AIVs revealed that the viruses were low pathogenic AIVs with the typical hemagglutinin cleavage site of P-Q-I-E-T-R-G. The hemagglutinin, neuraminidase, and nucleocapsid genes of nine AIVs were of ST2853-like (H6-subtype) lineage, ST192-like (N6-subtype) lineage, and HN573-like (H6-subtype) lineage, respectively; whereas the other five genes were of ST339-like (H6-subtype) lineage. However, the polymerase PB2 and nucleocapsid genes of one strain (HZ057) were of GS/GD-like (H5N1-subtype) and ST339-like lineages. Phylogenic analysis revealed that all eight genes of the 10 viruses belonged to Eurasian avian lineage. Altogether, the 10 AIVs were reassortants of different genetic groups of exchanges with the same virus subtype, thus illustrating the genetic diversity and complexity of H6N6-subtype AIVs in Guangdong Province. PMID:26903958

  4. Actin-based motility drives baculovirus transit to the nucleus and cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Ohkawa, Taro; Volkman, Loy E.

    2010-01-01

    Most viruses move intracellularly to and from their sites of replication using microtubule-based mechanisms. In this study, we show that nucleocapsids of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus undergo intracellular motility driven by actin polymerization. Motility requires the viral P78/83 capsid protein and the host Arp2/3 complex. Surprisingly, the virus directs two sequential and coordinated phases of actin-based motility. Immediately after cell entry, motility enables exploration of the cytoplasm and collision with the nuclear periphery, speeding nuclear entry and the initiation of viral gene expression. Nuclear entry itself requires transit through nuclear pore complexes. Later, after the onset of early gene expression, motility is required for accumulation of a subpopulation of nucleocapsids in the tips of actin-rich surface spikes. Temporal coordination of actin-based nuclear and surface translocation likely enables rapid transmission to neighboring cells during infection in insects and represents a distinctive evolutionary strategy for overcoming host defenses. PMID:20660627

  5. A virus of hyperthermophilic archaea with a unique architecture among DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Rensen, Elena Ilka; Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Quemin, Emmanuelle; Schouten, Stefan; Krupovic, Mart; Prangishvili, David

    2016-03-01

    Viruses package their genetic material in diverse ways. Most known strategies include encapsulation of nucleic acids into spherical or filamentous virions with icosahedral or helical symmetry, respectively. Filamentous viruses with dsDNA genomes are currently associated exclusively with Archaea. Here, we describe a filamentous hyperthermophilic archaeal virus, Pyrobaculum filamentous virus 1 (PFV1), with a type of virion organization not previously observed in DNA viruses. The PFV1 virion, 400 ± 20 × 32 ± 3 nm, contains an envelope and an inner core consisting of two structural units: a rod-shaped helical nucleocapsid formed of two 14-kDa major virion proteins and a nucleocapsid-encompassing protein sheath composed of a single major virion protein of 18 kDa. The virion organization of PFV1 is superficially similar to that of negative-sense RNA viruses of the family Filoviridae, including Ebola virus and Marburg virus. The linear dsDNA of PFV1 carries 17,714 bp, including 60-bp-long terminal inverted repeats, and contains 39 predicted ORFs, most of which do not show similarities to sequences in public databases. PFV1 is a lytic virus that completely disrupts the host cell membrane at the end of the infection cycle.

  6. Synthesis and processing of structural and intracellular proteins of two enteric coronaviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Sardinia, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis and processing of virus-specific proteins of two economically important enteric coronaviruses, bovine enteric coronavirus (BCV) and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), were studied at the molecular level. To determine the time of appearance of virus-specific proteins, virus-infected cells were labeled with /sup 35/S-methionine at various times during infection, immunoprecipitated with specific hyperimmune ascitic fluid, and analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The peak of BCV protein synthesis was found to be at 12 hours postinfection (hpi). The appearance of all virus-specific protein was coordinated. In contrast, the peak of TGEV protein synthesis was at 8 hpi, but the nucleocapsid proteins was present as early as 4 hpi. Virus-infected cells were treated with tunicamycin to ascertain the types of glycosidic linkages of the glycoproteins. The peplomer proteins of both viruses were sensitive to inhibition by tunicamycin indicating that they possessed N-linked carbohydrates. The matrix protein of TGEV was similarly affected. The matrix protein of BCV, however, was resistant to tunicamycin treatment and, therefore, has O-linked carbohydrates. Only the nucleocapsid protein of both viruses is phosphorylated as detected by radiolabeling with /sup 32/P-orthophosphate. Pulse-chase studies and comparison of intracellular and virion proteins were done to detect precursor-product relationships.

  7. Measles virus genetic evolution throughout an imported epidemic outbreak in a highly vaccinated population.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Alía, Miguel Ángel; Fernández-Muñoz, Rafael; Casasnovas, José María; Porras-Mansilla, Rebeca; Serrano-Pardo, Ángela; Pagán, Israel; Ordobás, María; Ramírez, Rosa; Celma, María Luisa

    2015-01-22

    Measles virus circulates endemically in African and Asian large urban populations, causing outbreaks worldwide in populations with up-to-95% immune protection. We studied the natural genetic variability of genotype B3.1 in a population with 95% vaccine coverage throughout an imported six month measles outbreak. From first pass viral isolates of 47 patients we performed direct sequencing of genomic cDNA. Whilst no variation from index case sequence occurred in the Nucleocapsid gene hyper-variable carboxy end, in the Hemagglutinin gene, main target for neutralizing antibodies, we observed gradual nucleotide divergence from index case along the outbreak (0% to 0.380%, average 0.138%) with the emergence of transient and persistent non-synonymous and synonymous mutations. Little or no variation was observed between the index and last outbreak cases in Phosphoprotein, Nucleocapsid, Matrix and Fusion genes. Most of the H non-synonymous mutations were mapped on the protein surface near antigenic and receptors binding sites. We estimated a MV-Hemagglutinin nucleotide substitution rate of 7.28 × 10-6 substitutions/site/day by a Bayesian phylogenetic analysis. The dN/dS analysis did not suggest significant immune or other selective pressures on the H gene during the outbreak. These results emphasize the usefulness of MV-H sequence analysis in measles epidemiological surveillance and elimination programs, and in detection of potentially emergence of measles virus neutralization-resistant mutants.

  8. A new herpesvirus isolated from black storks (Ciconia nigra).

    PubMed

    Kaleta, E F; Mikami, T; Marschall, H J; Heffels, U; Heidenreich, M; Stiburek, B

    1980-07-01

    An infectious agent was isolated from livers, spleens and bone marrow of two black storks (Ciconia nigra L.) originating from the same source. Pathological lesions consisted of small whitish focal areas in livers, spleens and bone marrow. The isolated agent was sensitive to chloroform and its multiplication was inhibited by 5-iodine-2-deoxy-uridine. It passed filters with a pore diameter of 220 nm and greater but not 100 nm filters. Electron microscopic examination revealed numerous nucleocapsids with hollow capsomeres and few enveloped particles in the supernatant fluids of infected cultures. The nucleocapsids were calculated to have 162 capsomeres on their surface. Using the plaque reduction method for neutralisation tests no serological cross reactions could be detected between the stork herpesvirus and sera against Marek's disease virus, turkey herpesvirus, and the Lake Victoria cormorant, amazon parrot, eagle owl, and pigeon herpesviruses. It is concluded that the isolated virus is a member of the avian herpesvirus group and it is proposed to tentatively term it herpesvirus ciconiae (ciconia lat. stork).

  9. Isolation and serological differentiation of a herpesvirus from bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus, L. 1758).

    PubMed

    Kaleta, E F; Marschall, H J; Glünder, G; Stiburek, B

    1980-01-01

    An infectious agent was isolated from the liver of bobwhite quails (Colinus virginianus, L. 1758). The agent was sensitive to chloroform and its multiplication was inhibited by 5-iodine-2-deoxy-uridine. It passed filters with a pore diameter of 220 nm and more but not 100 nm filters. Electron microscopic examination revealed numerous nucleocapsids with hollow capsomeres and few enveloped particles in the supernatant fluids of infected cultures. The nucleocapsids were calculated to have 162 capsomeres on their surface. Using the plaque reduction method for neutralization tests no serological cross reactions could be detected between the quail isolate and sera against Marek's disease virus, turkey herpes-virus (HV), duck enteritis HV, infectious laryngotracheitis HV, amazon parrot HV, great horned owl HV, eagle owl HV, snowy owl HV, falcon HV, pigeon HV, Lake Victoria Cormorant HV, and stork HV. The isolate from bobwhite quail did only cross-react with antiserum against crane HV. It is concluded that the isolated virus is a member of the avian herpesvirus group and it is proposed to tentatively term it herpesvirus colinum (from Colinus virginianus = bobwhite quail).

  10. Reassortment of Avian Influenza A/H6N6 Viruses from Live Poultry Markets in Guangdong, China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Runyu; Zou, Lirong; Kang, Yinfeng; Wu, Jie; Zeng, Xianqiao; Lu, Jing; Liang, Lijun; Song, Yingchao; Zhang, Xin; Ni, Hanzhong; Lin, Jinyan; Liao, Ming; Ke, Changwen

    2016-01-01

    Since early 2013, H7N9-subtype avian influenza virus (AIV) has caused human infection in eastern China. To evaluate AIV contamination and the public risk of infection, we systematically implemented environmental sampling from live poultry markets in Guangdong Province. Through real-time polymerase chain reaction assays and next-generation sequencing, we generated full nucleotide sequences of all 10 H6N6 AIVs isolated during sampling. Focusing on sequence analyses of hemagglutinin genes of the 10 H6N6 AIVs revealed that the viruses were low pathogenic AIVs with the typical hemagglutinin cleavage site of P-Q-I-E-T-R-G. The hemagglutinin, neuraminidase, and nucleocapsid genes of nine AIVs were of ST2853-like (H6-subtype) lineage, ST192-like (N6-subtype) lineage, and HN573-like (H6-subtype) lineage, respectively; whereas the other five genes were of ST339-like (H6-subtype) lineage. However, the polymerase PB2 and nucleocapsid genes of one strain (HZ057) were of GS/GD-like (H5N1-subtype) and ST339-like lineages. Phylogenic analysis revealed that all eight genes of the 10 viruses belonged to Eurasian avian lineage. Altogether, the 10 AIVs were reassortants of different genetic groups of exchanges with the same virus subtype, thus illustrating the genetic diversity and complexity of H6N6-subtype AIVs in Guangdong Province.

  11. Shell disorder, immune evasion and transmission behaviors among human and animal retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Goh, Gerard Kian-Meng; Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-08-01

    This study involves measurements of percentages of intrinsic disorder (PIDs) in the GAG protein shells of various retroviruses. Unique patterns of shell protein disorder can be seen especially when GAG proteins (matrix M, capsid C, and nucleocapsid N) of primate and non-primate retroviruses are compared. HIV-1 presents the most unique pattern of disorder distribution with generally high levels of disorder in all three proteins, while EIAV (PIDs:: 26, 29, 13) is diametrically different from HIV-1 (N C M PIDs: 39.5 ± 3.0, 44.5 ± 2.6, 56.5 ± 10.8). The HTLV viruses (CPID: 32.8 ± 3.4) resemble HIV-2 (C PID: 26.6 ± 2.9) with a moderately disordered capsid. Totally distinct patterns, however, are seen for the non-primate retroviruses. They generally have highly disordered nucleocapsids (PID > 65%) and more ordered outer shells especially the matrix. These characteristics might be attributed to the differences in the way the retroviruses are transmitted, with non-primate viruses having greater non-sexual transmission components such as oral-fecal transmission. These differences are also evolutionarily related to the ways the viruses evade the host immune systems, and thus, have implications for oncolytic virotherapy and animal models in vaccine research. The importance of protein shell disorder in immune evasion, as related to the case of HIV-1, and the difficult search for its vaccines are highlighted.

  12. A virus of hyperthermophilic archaea with a unique architecture among DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rensen, Elena Ilka; Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Quemin, Emmanuelle; Schouten, Stefan; Krupovic, Mart; Prangishvili, David

    2016-01-01

    Viruses package their genetic material in diverse ways. Most known strategies include encapsulation of nucleic acids into spherical or filamentous virions with icosahedral or helical symmetry, respectively. Filamentous viruses with dsDNA genomes are currently associated exclusively with Archaea. Here, we describe a filamentous hyperthermophilic archaeal virus, Pyrobaculum filamentous virus 1 (PFV1), with a type of virion organization not previously observed in DNA viruses. The PFV1 virion, 400 ± 20 × 32 ± 3 nm, contains an envelope and an inner core consisting of two structural units: a rod-shaped helical nucleocapsid formed of two 14-kDa major virion proteins and a nucleocapsid-encompassing protein sheath composed of a single major virion protein of 18 kDa. The virion organization of PFV1 is superficially similar to that of negative-sense RNA viruses of the family Filoviridae, including Ebola virus and Marburg virus. The linear dsDNA of PFV1 carries 17,714 bp, including 60-bp-long terminal inverted repeats, and contains 39 predicted ORFs, most of which do not show similarities to sequences in public databases. PFV1 is a lytic virus that completely disrupts the host cell membrane at the end of the infection cycle. PMID:26884161

  13. Oleanane triterpenes from the flowers of Camellia japonica inhibit porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) replication.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-Li; Ha, Thi-Kim-Quy; Dhodary, Basanta; Pyo, Euisun; Nguyen, Ngoc Hieu; Cho, Hyomoon; Kim, Eunhee; Oh, Won Keun

    2015-02-12

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) infections have resulted in a severe economic loss in the swine industry in many countries due to no effective treatment approach. Fifteen oleanane triterpenes (1-15), including nine new ones (1-4 and 10-14), were isolated from the flowers of Camellia japonica, and their molecular structures were determined by extensive spectroscopic methods. These compounds were evaluated for their antiviral activity against PEDV replication, and the structure-activity relationships (SARs) were discussed. Compounds 6, 9, 11, and 13 showed most potent inhibitory effects on PEDV replication. They were found to inhibit PEDV genes encoding GP6 nucleocapsid, GP2 spike, and GP5 membrane protein synthesis based on RT-PCR data. Western blot analysis also demonstrated their inhibitory effects on PEDV GP6 nucleocapsid and GP2 spike protein synthesis during viral replication. The present study suggested the potential of compounds 6, 9, 11, and 13 as promising scaffolds for treating PEDV infection via inhibiting viral replication.

  14. [Development of new approaches to standartization of enzyme immunoassay test systems for detection of antibodies to respiratory syncytial virus using electron microscopy and monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Krivitskaia, V Z; Sirotkin, A K; Samoĭlovich, M P; Sominina, A A

    1999-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), strain Long, was purified through 20-60% sucrose gradient. The virions from different sucrose density zones were tested by ELISA for reactivity with monoclonal antibodies (MAB) to F- (MAB 9C5) and N- (MAB 8B10) proteins of RSV. Comparative study of the same patterns of RSV by electron microscopy after negative staining showed a close relationship between the virion morphology and MAB binding in ELISA. MAB 9C5 were highly reactive with the surface domains of both mature RSV virions and "empty" virion envelopes without formed inner nucleocapsid structures. MAB 8B10 reacted well only with mature virions with completely assembled nucleocapsids. These MAB failed to reorganize the N-protein epitope of immature and destroyed virions, which indicated a conformation dependence of the 8B10 binding site. For practical purposes, MAB tests can be used to determine the RSV patterns, which can be used in ELISA for serologic diagnosis of RSV infection. Testing with these MAB demonstrate the stability of RSV to extreme exposures (lyophilization, storage, heating), which is important for creation of sensitive ELISA test systems and their standardization.

  15. Togaviridae.

    PubMed

    Westaway, E G; Brinton, M A; Gaidamovich SYa; Horzinek, M C; Igarashi, A; Kääriäinen, L; Lvov, D K; Porterfield, J S; Russell, P K; Trent, D W

    1985-01-01

    The family Togaviridae comprises four genera: Alphavirus (with 26 species), Rubivirus (one species), Pestivirus (three species), and Arterivirus (one species). The main characteristics of the member viruses are: (i) the virus particles are spherical, 50-70 nm in diameter, including an envelope with surface projections that incorporate two or three polypeptides, usually glycosylated; (ii) the nucleocapsid comprises a core protein and a single strand of positive-sense RNA, molecular weight about 4 X 10(6); where characterized, the RNA has an m7G 'cap' at the 5' end and is polyadenylated at the 3' end; (iii) maturation occurs by budding of spherical nucleocapsids 30-35 nm in diameter, with proven or presumed icosahedral symmetry, through cytoplasmic membranes. Where characterized, translation of structural proteins occurs on subgenomic messenger RNA(s); these appear to represent the 3' end of the genome. Nearly all alphavirus species are transmitted by mosquitoes. Transmission also occurs transovarially (Alphavirus) or transplacentally (Rubivirus and Pestivirus). Members of a genus are serologically related, but are not related to members of other genera.

  16. Baculoviral mid-gut gland necrosis (BMN) of kuruma shrimp (Penaeus japonicus) larvae in Japanese intensive culture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, T.; Nishimura, T.; Fukuda, H.; Hayashida, T.; Momoyama, K.

    1984-03-01

    In many shrimp farms in the Kyushu and Chugoku areas of Japan, the so-called mid-gut gland cloudy disease of kuruma shrimp larvae (Penaeus japonicus) has occurred since 1971. The pathological changes associated with this baculoviral mid-gut gland necrosis (BMN) are extensive cellular necrosis, collapse of mid-gut gland cells, nuclear hypertrophy and finally karyorrhexis. Electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of virions and virogenic stages in the affected nuclei. Average length and diameter of the virions detected was 310 and 72 nm, respectively; nucleocapsids were 250 nm in size. Virions enclosing 2 nucleocapsids within a single envelope were rarely found. The spirally arranged capsomeres were at an angle of 37 to 38° to a horizontal line meeting at right angles with the long axis of the virion. Infectivity trials resulted in high mortality of healthy mysis and juveniles (2nd post-larval stage). Juveniles at the 9th post-larval stage showed no mortality, although they could be infected easily by the agent. Hypertrophied nuclei in squashed and stained preparations of the affected gland cells can be considered to be of reliable presumptive diagnostic character, and fluorescent antibody staining can be employed to confirm the diagnosis of BMN.

  17. Construction of yellow fever-influenza A chimeric virus particles.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, B C E P D; Liberto, M I M; Barth, O M; Cabral, M C

    2002-12-01

    In order to obtain a better understanding of the functional mechanisms involved in the fusogenesis of enveloped viruses, the influenza A (X31) and the yellow fever (17DD) virus particles were used to construct a chimeric structure based on their distinct pH requirements for fusion, and the distinct malleability of their nucleocapsids. The malleable nucleocapsid of the influenza A virus particle is characterized by a pleomorphic configuration when observed by electron microscopy. A heat inactivated preparation of X31 virus was used as a lectin to interact with the sialic acid domains present in the 17DD virus envelope. The E spikes of 17DD virus were induced to promote fusion of both envelopes, creating a double genome enveloped structure, the chimeric yellow fever-influenza A virus particle. These chimeric viral particles, originally denominated 'partículas virais quiméricas' (PVQ), were characterized by their infectious capacity for different biological systems. Cell inoculation with PVQ resulted in viral products that showed similar characteristics to those obtained after 17DD virus infections. Our findings open new opportunities towards the understanding of both virus particles and aspects of cellular physiologic quality control. The yellow fever-influenza A chimeric particles, by means of their hybrid composition, should be a valuable tool in the study of cell biology and the function of viral components.

  18. Molecular Profiling of Intraductal Carcinoma of the Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    unbiased, three-pronged set of experiments to definitively identify the molecular signature of IDC-P using a combination of protein, RNA, and DNA-based...2/7) with Gleason score 6 tumors, 29% (2/7) with a Gleason score 7 tumor, 14% (1/7) with a Gleason score 8 tumor and 29% (2/7) with definitive ...even recommend rebiopsy for isolated PIN occurring in a single needle core biopsy, most recommend definitive therapy (surgery or radiation) for

  19. Effect of Microcystin-LR on Cultured Rat Endothelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-26

    protection, silymarin, and dithioerythritol 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) Primary cultureLs of adult rat...hepatotoxicity is not known, Microcystin-LR effects do not appear to be mediated by the inhibition of macromolecular biosynthesis; i.e. protein, RNA or DNA...hepatocytes treated with a cytotoxic dose (4 wM) of microcystin-LR release factors ( mediators ) tlaL could induce changes, or cytotoxicity in endothelial 3

  20. Structural Basis for the Coevolution of a Viral RNA-Protein Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Chao,J.; Patskovsky, Y.; Almo, S.; Singer, R.

    2008-01-01

    The cocrystal structure of the PP7 bacteriophage coat protein in complex with its translational operator identifies a distinct mode of sequence-specific RNA recognition when compared to the well-characterized MS2 coat protein-RNA complex. The structure reveals the molecular basis of the PP7 coat protein's ability to selectively bind its cognate RNA, and it demonstrates that the conserved beta-sheet surface is a flexible architecture that can evolve to recognize diverse RNA hairpins.

  1. Discovery of Dual Inhibitors of MDM2 and XIAP for Cancer Treatment | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    MDM2 and XIAP are mutually regulated. Binding of MDM2 RING protein to the IRES region on XIAP mRNA results in MDM2 protein stabilization and enhanced XIAP translation. In this study, we developed a protein-RNA fluorescence polarization (FP) assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of chemical libraries. Our FP-HTS identified eight inhibitors that blocked the MDM2 protein-XIAP RNA interaction, leading to MDM2 degradation.

  2. HITS-CLIP yields genome-wide insights into brain alternative RNA processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licatalosi, Donny D.; Mele, Aldo; Fak, John J.; Ule, Jernej; Kayikci, Melis; Chi, Sung Wook; Clark, Tyson A.; Schweitzer, Anthony C.; Blume, John E.; Wang, Xuning; Darnell, Jennifer C.; Darnell, Robert B.

    2008-11-01

    Protein-RNA interactions have critical roles in all aspects of gene expression. However, applying biochemical methods to understand such interactions in living tissues has been challenging. Here we develop a genome-wide means of mapping protein-RNA binding sites in vivo, by high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by crosslinking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP). HITS-CLIP analysis of the neuron-specific splicing factor Nova revealed extremely reproducible RNA-binding maps in multiple mouse brains. These maps provide genome-wide in vivo biochemical footprints confirming the previous prediction that the position of Nova binding determines the outcome of alternative splicing; moreover, they are sufficiently powerful to predict Nova action de novo. HITS-CLIP revealed a large number of Nova-RNA interactions in 3' untranslated regions, leading to the discovery that Nova regulates alternative polyadenylation in the brain. HITS-CLIP, therefore, provides a robust, unbiased means to identify functional protein-RNA interactions in vivo.

  3. SLAM- and Nectin-4-Independent Noncytolytic Spread of Canine Distemper Virus in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Lisa; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Avila, Mislay; Ader-Ebert, Nadine; Bringolf, Fanny; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Vandevelde, Marc

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles and canine distemper viruses (MeV and CDV, respectively) first replicate in lymphatic and epithelial tissues by using SLAM and nectin-4 as entry receptors, respectively. The viruses may also invade the brain to establish persistent infections, triggering fatal complications, such as subacute sclerosis pan-encephalitis (SSPE) in MeV infection or chronic, multiple sclerosis-like, multifocal demyelinating lesions in the case of CDV infection. In both diseases, persistence is mediated by viral nucleocapsids that do not require packaging into particles for infectivity but are directly transmitted from cell to cell (neurons in SSPE or astrocytes in distemper encephalitis), presumably by relying on restricted microfusion events. Indeed, although morphological evidence of fusion remained undetectable, viral fusion machineries and, thus, a putative cellular receptor, were shown to contribute to persistent infections. Here, we first showed that nectin-4-dependent cell-cell fusion in Vero cells, triggered by a demyelinating CDV strain, remained extremely limited, thereby supporting a potential role of nectin-4 in mediating persistent infections in astrocytes. However, nectin-4 could not be detected in either primary cultured astrocytes or the white matter of tissue sections. In addition, a bioengineered “nectin-4-blind” recombinant CDV retained full cell-to-cell transmission efficacy in primary astrocytes. Combined with our previous report demonstrating the absence of SLAM expression in astrocytes, these findings are suggestive for the existence of a hitherto unrecognized third CDV receptor expressed by glial cells that contributes to the induction of noncytolytic cell-to-cell viral transmission in astrocytes. IMPORTANCE While persistent measles virus (MeV) infection induces SSPE in humans, persistent canine distemper virus (CDV) infection causes chronic progressive or relapsing demyelination in carnivores. Common to both central nervous system (CNS

  4. Comparative analysis of complete genome sequences of three avian coronaviruses reveals a novel group 3c coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Lam, Carol S F; Lai, Kenneth K Y; Huang, Yi; Lee, Paul; Luk, Geraldine S M; Dyrting, Kitman C; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2009-01-01

    In this territory-wide molecular epidemiology study of coronaviruses (CoVs) in Hong Kong involving 1,541 dead wild birds, three novel CoVs were identified in three different bird families (bulbul CoV HKU11 [BuCoV HKU11], thrush CoV HKU12 [ThCoV HKU12], and munia CoV HKU13 [MuCoV HKU13]). Four complete genomes of the three novel CoVs were sequenced. Their genomes (26,396 to 26,552 bases) represent the smallest known CoV genomes. In phylogenetic trees constructed using chymotrypsin-like protease (3CL(pro)), RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (Pol), helicase, spike, and nucleocapsid proteins, BuCoV HKU11, ThCoV HKU12, and MuCoV HKU13 formed a cluster distantly related to infectious bronchitis virus and turkey CoV (group 3a CoVs). For helicase, spike, and nucleocapsid, they were also clustered with a CoV recently discovered in Asian leopard cats, for which the complete genome sequence was not available. The 3CL(pro), Pol, helicase, and nucleocapsid of the three CoVs possessed higher amino acid identities to those of group 3a CoVs than to those of group 1 and group 2 CoVs. Unique genomic features distinguishing them from other group 3 CoVs include a distinct transcription regulatory sequence and coding potential for small open reading frames. Based on these results, we propose a novel CoV subgroup, group 3c, to describe this distinct subgroup of CoVs under the group 3 CoVs. Avian CoVs are genetically more diverse than previously thought and may be closely related to some newly identified mammalian CoVs. Further studies would be important to delineate whether the Asian leopard cat CoV was a result of interspecies jumping from birds, a situation analogous to that of bat and civet severe acute respiratory syndrome CoVs.

  5. Nucleic Acid Binding by Mason-Pfizer Monkey Virus CA Promotes Virus Assembly and Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Füzik, Tibor; Píchalová, Růžena; Schur, Florian K. M.; Strohalmová, Karolína; Křížová, Ivana; Hadravová, Romana; Rumlová, Michaela; Briggs, John A. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gag polyprotein of retroviruses drives immature virus assembly by forming hexameric protein lattices. The assembly is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions between capsid (CA) domains and by interactions between nucleocapsid (NC) domains and RNA. Specific interactions between NC and the viral RNA are required for genome packaging. Previously reported cryoelectron microscopy analysis of immature Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) particles suggested that a basic region (residues RKK) in CA may serve as an additional binding site for nucleic acids. Here, we have introduced mutations into the RKK region in both bacterial and proviral M-PMV vectors and have assessed their impact on M-PMV assembly, structure, RNA binding, budding/release, nuclear trafficking, and infectivity using in vitro and in vivo systems. Our data indicate that the RKK region binds and structures nucleic acid that serves to promote virus particle assembly in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the RKK region appears to be important for recruitment of viral genomic RNA into Gag particles, and this function could be linked to changes in nuclear trafficking. Together these observations suggest that in M-PMV, direct interactions between CA and nucleic acid play important functions in the late stages of the viral life cycle. IMPORTANCE Assembly of retrovirus particles is driven by the Gag polyprotein, which can self-assemble to form virus particles and interact with RNA to recruit the viral genome into the particles. Generally, the capsid domains of Gag contribute to essential protein-protein interactions during assembly, while the nucleocapsid domain interacts with RNA. The interactions between the nucleocapsid domain and RNA are important both for identifying the genome and for self-assembly of Gag molecules. Here, we show that a region of basic residues in the capsid protein of the betaretrovirus Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) contributes to interaction of Gag with nucleic acid. This

  6. Yeast prion-protein, sup35, fibril formation proceeds by addition and substraction of oligomers.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Saravanakumar; Walter, Stefan; Reif, Bernd

    2006-05-01

    In analogy to human prions, a domain of the translation-termination protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Sup35, can switch its conformation from a soluble functional state, [psi-], to a conformation, [PSI+], that facilitates aggregation and impairs its native function. Overexpression of the molecular chaperone Hsp104 abolishes the [PSI+] phenotype and restores the normal function of Sup35. We have recently shown that Hsp104 interacts preferably with low oligomeric species of a Sup35 derived peptide, Sup35[5-26]; however, due to possible exchange between different oligomeric states, it was not possible to obtain information on the distribution and stability of the oligomeric state. We show here, that low-molecular-weight oligomers (Sup35[5-26])n (n approximately = 4-6) are indeed important for the fibril formation and disassembly process. We find that Hsp104 is able to disaggregate Sup35[5-26] fibrils by substraction of hexameric to decameric Sup35[5-26] oligomers. This disaggregation effect does not require assistance from other chaperones and is independent of ATP at high Hsp104 concentrations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that critical oligomers have a preference for alpha-helical conformations. The conformational reorganization into beta-sheet structures seems to occur only upon incorporation of these oligomers into fibrillar structures. The results are demonstrated by using an equilibrium dialysis experiment that employed different molecular-weight cut-off membranes. A combination of thioflavin-T (ThT) fluorescence and UV measurements allowed the quantification of fibril formation and the amount of peptide diffusing out of the dialysis bag. CD and NMR spectroscopy data were combined to obtain structural information.

  7. Structural and binding studies of a C-type galactose-binding lectin from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom.

    PubMed

    Sartim, Marco A; Pinheiro, Matheus P; de Pádua, Ricardo A P; Sampaio, Suely V; Nonato, M Cristina

    2017-02-01

    BJcuL is a snake venom galactoside-binding lectin (SVgalL) isolated from Bothrops jararacussu and is involved in a wide variety of biological activities including triggering of pro-inflammatory response, disruption of microbial biofilm structure and induction of apoptosis. In the present work, we determined the crystallographic structure of BJcuL, the first holo structure of a SVgalL, and introduced the fluorescence-based thermal stability assay (Thermofluor) as a tool for screening and characterization of the binding mechanism of SVgalL ligands. BJcuL structure revealed the existence of a porous and flexible decameric arrangement composed of disulfide-linked dimers related by a five-fold symmetry. Each monomer contains the canonical carbohydrate recognition domain, a calcium ion required for BJcuL lectinic activity and a sodium ion required for protein stabilization. BJcuL thermostability was found to be induced by calcium ion and galactoside sugars which exhibit hyperbolic saturation profiles dependent on ligand concentration. Serendipitously, the gentamicin group of aminoglycoside antibiotics (gAGAs) was also identified as BJcuL ligands. On contrast, gAGAs exhibited a sigmoidal saturation profile compatible with a cooperative mechanism of binding. Thermofluor, hemagglutination inhibition assay and molecular docking strategies were used to identify a distinct binding site in BJcuL localized at the dimeric interface near the fully conserved intermolecular Cys86-Cys86 disulfide bond. The hybrid approach used in the present work provided novel insights into structural behavior and functional diversification of SVgaLs.

  8. Glutathionylation of Pea Chloroplast 2-Cys Prx and Mitochondrial Prx IIF Affects Their Structure and Peroxidase Activity and Sulfiredoxin Deglutathionylates Only the 2-Cys Prx.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Aingeru; Lázaro-Payo, Alfonso; Iglesias-Baena, Iván; Camejo, Daymi; Lázaro, Juan J; Sevilla, Francisca; Jiménez, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Together with thioredoxins (Trxs), plant peroxiredoxins (Prxs), and sulfiredoxins (Srxs) are involved in antioxidant defense and redox signaling, while their regulation by post-translational modifications (PTMs) is increasingly regarded as a key component for the transduction of the bioactivity of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Among these PTMs, S-glutathionylation is considered a protective mechanism against overoxidation, it also modulates protein activity and allows signaling. This study explores the glutathionylation of recombinant chloroplastic 2-Cys Prx and mitochondrial Prx IIF from Pisum sativum. Glutathionylation of the decameric form of 2-Cys Prx produced a change in the elution volume after FPLC chromatography and converted it to its dimeric glutathionylated form, while Prx IIF in its reduced dimeric form was glutathionylated without changing its oligomeric state. Mass spectrometry demonstrated that oxidized glutathione (GSSG) can glutathionylate resolving cysteine (Cys(174)), but not the peroxidatic equivalent (Cys(52)), in 2-Cys Prx. In contrast, GSSG was able to glutathionylate both peroxidatic (Cys(59)) and resolving (Cys(84)) cysteine in Prx IIF. Glutathionylation was seen to be dependent on the GSH/GSSG ratio, although the exact effect on the 2-Cys Prx and Prx IIF proteins differed. However, the glutathionylation provoked a similar decrease in the peroxidase activity of both peroxiredoxins. Despite growing evidence of the importance of post-translational modifications, little is known about the enzymatic systems that specifically regulate the reversal of this modification. In the present work, sulfiredoxin from P. sativum was seen to be able to deglutathionylate pea 2-Cys Prx but not pea Prx IIF. Redox changes during plant development and the response to stress influence glutathionylation/deglutathionylation processes, which may represent an important event through the modulation of peroxiredoxin and sulfiredoxin proteins.

  9. Functional properties and structural characterization of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar; Ruszkowski, Milosz; Nocek, Bogusław

    2015-07-28

    The majority of plant species accumulate high intracellular levels of proline to cope with hyperosmotic stress conditions. Proline synthesis from glutamate is tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels, yet little is known about the mechanisms for post-translational regulation of the enzymatic activities involved. The gene coding in rice (Oryza sativa L.) for δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the second and final step in this pathway, was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The structural and functional properties of the affinity-purified protein were characterized. As for most species, rice P5C reductase was able to use in vitro either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor. However, strikingly different effects of cations and anions were found depending on the pyridine nucleotide used, namely inhibition of NADH-dependent activity and stimulation of NADPH-dependent activity. Moreover, physiological concentrations of proline and NADP+ were strongly inhibitory for the NADH-dependent reaction, whereas the NADPH-dependent activity was mildly affected. Our results suggest that only NADPH may be used in vivo and that stress-dependent variations in ion homeostasis and NADPH/NADP+ ratio could modulate enzyme activity, being functional in promoting proline accumulation and potentially also adjusting NADPH consumption during the defense against hyperosmotic stress. The apparent molecular weight of the native protein observed in size exclusion chromatography indicated a high oligomerization state. We also report the first crystal structure of a plant P5C reductase at 3.40-Å resolution, showing a decameric quaternary assembly. It was possible to identify dynamic structural differences among rice, human, and bacterial enzymes.

  10. In situ AFM Study of Amelogenin Assembly and Disassembly Dynamics on Charged Surfaces Provides Insights on Matrix Protein Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Long; Bromley, Keith M.

    2012-01-01

    Because self-assembly of matrix proteins is a key step in hard tissue mineralization, developing an understanding of the assembly pathways and underlying mechanisms is likely to be important for successful hard tissue engineering. While many studies of matrix protein assembly have been performed on bulk solutions, in vivo these proteins are likely to be in contact with charged biological surfaces composed of lipids, proteins, or minerals. Here we report the results of an in situ AFM study of self-assembly by amelogenin - the principal protein of the extracellular matrix in developing enamel - in contact with two different charged substrates: hydrophilic negatively charged bare mica and positively charged 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APS) silanized mica. First we demonstrate an AFM-based protocol for determining the size of both amelogenin monomers and oligomers. Using this protocol, we find that, although amelogenin exists primarily as ∼26 nm in diameter nanospheres in bulk solution at pH8.0 studied by DLS, it behaves dramatically differently upon interacting with charged substrates at the same pH, and exhibits complex substrate-dependent assembly pathways and dynamics. On positively charged APS-treated mica surfaces, amelogenin forms a relatively uniform population of decameric oligomers which then transforms into two main populations: higher-order assemblies of oligomers and amelogenin monomers, while on negatively charged bare mica surfaces, it forms a film of monomers that exhibits tip-induced desorption and patterning. The present study represents a successful attempt to identify the size of amelogenin oligomers and to directly monitor assembly and disassembly dynamics on surfaces. The findings have implications for amelogenin-controlled calcium phosphate mineralization in vitro and may offer new insights into in vivo self-assembly of matrix proteins, as well as their control over hard tissue formation. PMID:21916473

  11. The crystal structure of the C45S mutant of annelid Arenicola marina peroxiredoxin 6 supports its assignment to the mechanistically typical 2-Cys subfamily without any formation of toroid-shaped decamers

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Aude; Loumaye, Eléonore; Clippe, André; Rees, Jean-François; Knoops, Bernard; Declercq, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    The peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) define a superfamily of thiol-dependent peroxidases able to reduce hydrogen peroxide, alkyl hydroperoxides, and peroxynitrite. Besides their cytoprotective antioxidant function, PRDXs have been implicated in redox signaling and chaperone activity, the latter depending on the formation of decameric high-molecular-weight structures. PRDXs have been mechanistically divided into three major subfamilies, namely typical 2-Cys, atypical 2-Cys, and 1-Cys PRDXs, based on the number and position of cysteines involved in the catalysis. We report the structure of the C45S mutant of annelid worm Arenicola marina PRDX6 in three different crystal forms determined at 1.6, 2.0, and 2.4 Å resolution. Although A. marina PRDX6 was cloned during the search of annelid homologs of mammalian 1-Cys PRDX6s, the crystal structures support its assignment to the mechanistically typical 2-Cys PRDX subfamily. The protein is composed of two distinct domains: a C-terminal domain and an N-terminal domain exhibiting a thioredoxin fold. The subunits are associated in dimers compatible with the formation of intersubunit disulfide bonds between the peroxidatic and the resolving cysteine residues in the wild-type enzyme. The packing of two crystal forms is very similar, with pairs of dimers associated as tetramers. The toroid-shaped decamers formed by dimer association and observed in most typical 2-Cys PRDXs is not present. Thus, A. marina PRDX6 presents structural features of typical 2-Cys PRDXs without any formation of toroid-shaped decamers, suggesting that it should function more like a cytoprotective antioxidant enzyme or a modulator of peroxide-dependent cell signaling rather than a molecular chaperone. PMID:18359859

  12. Synthesis of quasi-linear and segmented bis- to penta-2, 2'-bipyridine polytopic ligands built via a convergent approach

    PubMed

    Khatyr; Ziessel

    2000-11-17

    Reliable and practical routes for the preparation of segmented oligomeric 2,2'-bipyridine-based ligands possessing rigid and conjugated spacers are presented. The first series of ligands bears a single alkyne function as a bridge and has been built by Pd(0)-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions between ethynylated and bromo-substituted derivatives of 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy). These new ligands provide access to numerous hexameric, octameric, and decameric pyridine-based materials. Optimum conditions were found with [Pd(PPh(3))(4)] (6 mol %) in benzene containing diisopropylamine at 80 degrees C. The second series of soluble ligands was synthesized around a 1,4-diethynyl-2, 5-didodecyloxybenzene bridging unit. The synthesis required a protection/deprotection methodology, as well as a chemioselective palladium-catalyzed Sonogashira-Hagihara cross-coupling protocol to obtain the target multitopic ligands. Within this strategy, the pivotal 15b, 17, and 19b intermediates bearing one or two bipy and phenyl units are required and such entities have been isolated in excellent yield. The products are highly soluble and photostable. In each case, the final step involves a double cross-coupling reaction between the appropriate constituents, with the best preparative conditions involving [Pd(PPh(3))(4)] (6 mol %) in n-propylamine at 70 degrees C. The main advantage of this methodology lies in its synthetic versatility and adaptability for creating multitopic metal-binding scaffolds with a potentially large variety of bridging units and phenyl substituents. Spectroscopic data for the new oligomers show a steady decrease in optical energy with an increasing degree of oligomerization. The different results obtained with these ligands highlight the importance of the rigid 1, 4-diethynylphenyl linker in directing the outcome of the nanosized molecules.

  13. Control of water molecule aggregations in copper 1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylate coordination polymers containing pyridyl-piperazine type ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiblawi, Sultan H.; LaDuca, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    A series of layered divalent copper coordination polymers containing 1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylate and long-spanning pyridyl-piperazine type ligands exhibits greatly different co-crystallized water molecule aggregations depending on the specific ligands used. Both [Cu(t-14cdc)(4-bpmp)]n (1, t-14cdc = trans-1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylate, 4-bpmp = bis(4-pyridylmethyl)piperazine) and {[Cu(t-14cdc)(4-bpfp)(H2O)2]·6H2O}n (2, 4-bpfp = bis(4-pyridylformyl)piperazine) possess 2D (4,4) coordination polymer grids. However 1 lacks any co-crystallized water and has pinched grid apertures, while 2 manifests infinite water tapes with T6(2)4(2) classification and rectangular grid apertures. {[Cu2(c-14cdc)2(4-bpmp)]·2H2O}n (3, c-14cdc = cis-1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylate) has [Cu2(c-14cdc)]2 ribbons with paddlewheel dimeric units linked into 2D slabs by 4-bpmp tethers, along with isolated water molecule pairs. In contrast, {[Cu2(c-14cdc)2(4-bpfp)]·10H2O}n (4) shows a very similar underlying coordination polymer topology but entrains unique decameric water molecule clusters. The minor product {[Cu2(c-14cdcH)2(t-1,4-cdc)(4-bpfp)2(H2O)2]·2H2O}n (5) was isolated along with 4; this compound underwent some in situ cis to trans cyclohexane-dicarboxylate ligand isomerization and exhibits a ladder polymer motif.

  14. Vanadate induces necrotic death in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes through mitochondrial membrane depolarization.

    PubMed

    Soares, Sandra Sofia; Henao, Fernando; Aureliano, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos

    2008-03-01

    Besides the well-known inotropic effects of vanadium in cardiac muscle, previous studies have shown that vanadate can stimulate cell growth or induce cell death. In this work, we studied the toxicity to neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (cardiomyocytes) of two vanadate solutions containing different oligovanadates distribution, decavanadate (containing decameric vanadate, V 10) and metavanadate (containing monomeric vanadate and also di-, tetra-, and pentavanadate). Incubation for 24 h with decavanadate or metavanadate induced necrotic cell death of cardiomyocytes, without significant caspase-3 activation. Only 10 microM total vanadium of either decavanadate (1 microM V 10) or metavanadate (10 microM total vanadium) was needed to produce 50% loss of cell viability after 24 h (assessed with MTT and propidium iodide assays). Atomic absorption spectroscopy showed that vanadium accumulation in cardiomyocytes after 24 h was the same when incubation was done with decavanadate or metavanadate. A decrease of 75% of the rate of mitochondrial superoxide anion generation, monitored with dihydroethidium, and a sustained rise of cytosolic calcium (monitored with Fura-2-loaded cardiomyocytes) was observed after 24 h of incubation of cardiomyocytes with decavanadate or metavanadate concentrations close to those inducing 50% loss of cell viability produced. In addition, mitochondrial membrane depolarization within cardiomyocytes, monitored with tetramethylrhodamine ethyl esther or with 3,3',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide, were observed after only 6 h of incubation with decavanadate or metavanadate. The concentration needed for 50% mitochondrial depolarization was 6.5 +/- 1 microM total vanadium for both decavanadate (0.65 microM V 10) and metavanadate. In conclusion, mitochondrial membrane depolarization was an early event in decavanadate- and monovanadate-induced necrotic cell death of cardiomyocytes.

  15. Recent perspectives into biochemistry of decavanadate.

    PubMed

    Aureliano, Manuel

    2011-10-26

    The number of papers about decavanadate has doubled in the past decade. In the present review, new insights into decavanadate biochemistry, cell biology, and antidiabetic and antitumor activities are described. Decameric vanadate species (V(10)) clearly differs from monomeric vanadate (V(1)), and affects differently calcium pumps, and structure and function of myosin and actin. Only decavanadate inhibits calcium accumulation by calcium pump ATPase, and strongly inhibits actomyosin ATPase activity (IC(50) = 1.4 μmol/L, V(10)), whereas no such effects are detected with V(1) up to 150 μmol/L; prevents actin polymerization (IC(50) of 68 μmol/L, whereas no effects detected with up to 2 mmol/L V(1)); and interacts with actin in a way that induces cysteine oxidation and vanadate reduction to vanadyl. Moreover, in vivo decavanadate toxicity studies have revealed that acute exposure to polyoxovanadate induces different changes in antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress parameters, in comparison with vanadate. In vitro studies have clearly demonstrated that mitochondrial oxygen consumption is strongly affected by decavanadate (IC(50), 0.1 μmol/L); perhaps the most relevant biological effect. Finally, decavanadate (100 μmol/L) increases rat adipocyte glucose accumulation more potently than several vanadium complexes. Preliminary studies suggest that decavanadate does not have similar effects in human adipocytes. Although decavanadate can be a useful biochemical tool, further studies must be carried out before it can be confirmed that decavanadate and its complexes can be used as anticancer or antidiabetic agents.

  16. Actin as a potential target for decavanadate.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Susana; Moura, José J G; Aureliano, Manuel

    2010-12-01

    ATP prevents G-actin cysteine oxidation and vanadyl formation specifically induced by decavanadate, suggesting that the oxometalate-protein interaction is affected by the nucleotide. The ATP exchange rate is increased by 2-fold due to the presence of decavanadate when compared with control actin (3.1×10(-3) s(-1)), and an apparent dissociation constant (k(dapp)) of 227.4±25.7 μM and 112.3±8.7 μM was obtained in absence or presence of 20 μM V(10), respectively. Moreover, concentrations as low as 50 μM of decameric vanadate species (V(10)) increases the relative G-actin intrinsic fluorescence intensity by approximately 80% whereas for a 10-fold concentration of monomeric vanadate (V(1)) no effects were observed. Upon decavanadate titration, it was observed a linear increase in G-actin hydrophobic surface (2.6-fold), while no changes were detected for V(1) (0-200 μM). Taken together, three major ideas arise: i) ATP prevents decavanadate-induced G-actin cysteine oxidation and vanadate reduction; ii) decavanadate promotes actin conformational changes resulting on its inactivation, iii) decavanadate has an effect on actin ATP binding site. Once it is demonstrated that actin is a new potential target for decavanadate, being the ATP binding site a suitable site for decavanadate binding, it is proposed that some of the biological effects of vanadate can be, at least in part, explained by decavanadate interactions with actin.

  17. Kinetic analysis of structural influences on the susceptibility of peroxiredoxins 2 and 3 to hyperoxidation

    PubMed Central

    Poynton, Rebecca A.; Peskin, Alexander V.; Haynes, Alexina C.; Lowther, W. Todd; Hampton, Mark B.; Winterbourn, Christine C.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian 2-cysteine peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are susceptible to hyperoxidation by excess H2O2. The cytoplasmic family member Prx2 hyperoxidizes more readily than mitochondrial Prx3 due to slower dimerization of the sulfenic acid (SpOH) intermediate. Four variant amino acids near the C-terminus have been shown to contribute to this difference. We have performed kinetic analysis of the relationship between hyperoxidation and disulfide formation, using whole-protein MS and comparing wild-type (WT) Prx2 and Prx3 with tail-swap mutants in which the four amino acids were reversed. These changes make Prx3 more sensitive and Prx2 less sensitive to hyperoxidation and accounted for ~70% of the difference between the two proteins. The tail swap mutant of Prx3 was also more susceptible when expressed in the mitochondria of HeLa cells. The hyperoxidized product at lower excesses of H2O2 was a semi-hyperoxidized dimer with one active site disulfide and the other a sulfinic acid. For Prx2, increasing the H2O2 concentration resulted in complete hyperoxidation. In contrast, only approximately half the Prx3 active sites underwent hyperoxidation and, even with high H2O2, the predominant product was the hyperoxidized dimer. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) showed that the oligomeric forms of all redox states of Prx3 dissociated more readily into dimeric units than their Prx2 counterparts. Notably the species with one disulfide and one hyperoxidized active site was decameric for Prx2 and dimeric for Prx3. Reduction and re-oxidation of the hyperoxidized dimer of Prx3 produced hyperoxidized monomers, implying dissociation and rearrangement of the subunits of the functional homodimer. PMID:26614766

  18. Subunit Conformations and Assembly States of a DNA Translocating Motor: The Terminase of Bacteriophage P22

    PubMed Central

    Němeček, Daniel; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Kang, Sebyung; Prevelige, Peter E.; Casjens, Sherwood; Thomas, George J.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteriophage P22, a podovirus infecting strains of Salmonella typhimurium, packages a 42 kbp genome using a headful mechanism. DNA translocation is accomplished by the phage terminase, a powerful molecular motor consisting of large and small subunits. Although many of the structural proteins of the P22 virion have been well characterized, little is known about the terminase subunits and their molecular mechanism of DNA translocation. We report here structural and assembly properties of ectopically expressed and highly purified terminase large and small subunits. The large subunit (gp2), which contains the nuclease and ATPase activities of terminase, exists as a stable monomer with an α/β fold. The small subunit (gp3), which recognizes DNA for packaging and may regulate gp2 activity, exhibits a highly α-helical secondary structure and self-associates to form a stable oligomeric ring in solution. For wildtype gp3, the ring contains nine subunits, as demonstrated by hydrodynamic measurements, electron microscopy and native mass spectrometry. We have also characterized a gp3 mutant (Ala 112 → Thr) that forms a ten subunit ring, despite a subunit fold indistinguishable from wildtype. Both the nonameric and decameric gp3 rings exhibit nonspecific DNA binding activity, and gp2 is able to bind strongly to the DNA/gp3 complex but not to DNA alone. We propose a scheme for the roles of P22 terminase large and small subunits in the recruitment and packaging of viral DNA and discuss the model in relation to proposals for terminase-driven DNA translocation in other phages. PMID:17945256

  19. The N-terminal peptide of mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is an autoinhibitory control element and contributes to binding the allosteric regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Christina E; Gross, Steven S

    2011-04-08

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an obligate cofactor for NO synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. BH4 can limit its own synthesis by triggering decameric GTPCH to assemble in an inhibitory complex with two GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) pentamers. Subsequent phenylalanine binding to the GTPCH·GFRP inhibitory complex converts it to a stimulatory complex. An N-terminal inhibitory peptide in GTPCH may also contribute to autoregulation of GTPCH activity, but mechanisms are undefined. To characterize potential regulatory actions of the N-terminal peptide in rat GTPCH, we expressed, purified, and characterized a truncation mutant, devoid of 45 N-terminal amino acids (Δ45-GTPCH) and contrasted its catalytic and GFRP binding properties to wild type GTPCH (wt-GTPCH). Contrary to prior reports, we show that GFRP binds wt-GTPCH in the absence of any small molecule effector, resulting in allosteric stimulation of GTPCH activity: a 20% increase in Vmax, 50% decrease in KmGTP, and increase in Hill coefficient to 1.6, from 1.0. These features of GFRP-stimulated wt-GTPCH activity were phenocopied by Δ45-GTPCH in the absence of bound GFRP. Addition of GFRP to Δ45-GTPCH failed to elicit complex formation or a substantial further increase in GTPCH catalytic activity. Expression of Δ45-GTPCH in HEK-293 cells elicited 3-fold greater BH4 accumulation than an equivalent of wt-GTPCH. Together, results indicate that the N-terminal peptide exerts autoinhibitory control over rat GTPCH and is required for GFRP binding on its own. Displacement of the autoinhibitory peptide provides a molecular mechanism for physiological up-regulation of GTPCH activity.

  20. Synthesis, crystal structures and characterization of four coordination polymers based on 5-amino-2,4,6-triiodoisophthalic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Koulin; Chang Yan; Zhang Jingbo; Yuan Limin; Deng Ye; Diao Guowang; Ng, Seik Weng

    2011-05-15

    One homochiral 1D coordination polymer [Cu(ATIBDC)(2,2'-bipy)].3H{sub 2}O.CH{sub 3}OH (1) and three achiral 1D coordination polymers: [Cd(ATIBDC)(2,2'-bipy)(H{sub 2}O)].3H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd(ATIBDC)(phen)(H{sub 2}O)].4H{sub 2}O (3), and [Mn(ATIBDC)(phen){sub 2}].5H{sub 2}O (4) have been synthesized and characterized (H{sub 2}ATIBDC=5-amino-2,4,6-triiodoisophthalic acid, 2,2'-bipy=2,2'-bipyridine, and phen=1,10-phenanthroline). Extended high dimensional network architectures are further constructed with the help of weak secondary interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, aromatic stacking, and halogen bonding (C-I..{pi} and C-I...N/O). Complex 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic system with chiral space group P2(1) and exhibits a right-handed 2{sub 1} helical chain structure. The homochirality of 1 was confirmed by CD spectrum. Interestingly, two new configurations of decameric water cluster are found in 3 and 4. The acyclic tetrameric cluster (H{sub 2}O){sub 3}(CH{sub 3}OH) in 1 and (H{sub 2}O){sub 4} in 2 array into highly ordered helical infinite chains. Thermal stabilities of all the complexes have been studied. Solid state fluorescent properties of the Cd(II) complexes have been explored. -- Graphical abstract: The synthesis, crystal structures and characterization of one 1D homochiral coordination polymer and three achiral 1D coordination polymers with 5-amino-2,4,6-triiodoisophthalic acid (H{sub 2}ATIBDC) are reported. Display Omitted highlights: > Four 1D coordination polymers with 5-amino-2,4,6-triiodoisophthalate are reported. > The halogen bonds play important roles in the supramolecular assembly. > Solid state fluorescent properties of the Cd(II) complexes are explored.

  1. Structural and Kinetic Properties of Lumazine Synthase Isoenzymes in the Order Rhizobiales

    SciTech Connect

    Klinke,S.; Zylberman, V.; Bonomi, H.; Haase, I.; Guimaraes, B.; Braden, B.; Bacher, A.; Fischer, M.; Goldbaum, F.

    2007-01-01

    6, 7-Dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine synthase (lumazine synthase; LS) catalyzes the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of riboflavin in plants and microorganisms. This protein is known to exhibit different quaternary assemblies between species, existing as free pentamers, decamers (dimers of pentamers) and icosahedrally arranged dodecamers of pentamers. A phylogenetic analysis on eubacterial, fungal and plant LSs allowed us to classify them into two categories: Type I LSs (pentameric or icosahedral) and Type II LSs (decameric). The Rhizobiales represent an order of ?-proteobacteria that includes, among others, the genera Mesorhizobium, Agrobacterium and Brucella. Here, we present structural and kinetic studies on several LSs from Rhizobiales. Interestingly, Mesorhizobium and Brucella encode both a Type-I LS and a Type-II LS called RibH1 and RibH2, respectively. We show that Type II LSs appear to be almost inactive, whereas Type I LSs present a highly variable catalytic activity according to the genus. Additionally, we have solved four RibH1/RibH2 crystallographic structures from the genera Mesorhizobium and Brucella. The relationship between the active-site architecture and catalytic properties in these isoenzymes is discussed, and a model that describes the enzymatic behavior is proposed. Furthermore, sequence alignment studies allowed us to extend our results to the genus Agrobacterium. Our results suggest that the selective pressure controlling the riboflavin pathway favored the evolution of catalysts with low reaction rates, since the excess of flavins in the intracellular pool in Rhizobiales could act as a negative factor when these bacteria are exposed to oxidative or nitrosative stress.

  2. Glutathionylation of Pea Chloroplast 2-Cys Prx and Mitochondrial Prx IIF Affects Their Structure and Peroxidase Activity and Sulfiredoxin Deglutathionylates Only the 2-Cys Prx

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Aingeru; Lázaro-Payo, Alfonso; Iglesias-Baena, Iván; Camejo, Daymi; Lázaro, Juan J.; Sevilla, Francisca; Jiménez, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Together with thioredoxins (Trxs), plant peroxiredoxins (Prxs), and sulfiredoxins (Srxs) are involved in antioxidant defense and redox signaling, while their regulation by post-translational modifications (PTMs) is increasingly regarded as a key component for the transduction of the bioactivity of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Among these PTMs, S-glutathionylation is considered a protective mechanism against overoxidation, it also modulates protein activity and allows signaling. This study explores the glutathionylation of recombinant chloroplastic 2-Cys Prx and mitochondrial Prx IIF from Pisum sativum. Glutathionylation of the decameric form of 2-Cys Prx produced a change in the elution volume after FPLC chromatography and converted it to its dimeric glutathionylated form, while Prx IIF in its reduced dimeric form was glutathionylated without changing its oligomeric state. Mass spectrometry demonstrated that oxidized glutathione (GSSG) can glutathionylate resolving cysteine (Cys174), but not the peroxidatic equivalent (Cys52), in 2-Cys Prx. In contrast, GSSG was able to glutathionylate both peroxidatic (Cys59) and resolving (Cys84) cysteine in Prx IIF. Glutathionylation was seen to be dependent on the GSH/GSSG ratio, although the exact effect on the 2-Cys Prx and Prx IIF proteins differed. However, the glutathionylation provoked a similar decrease in the peroxidase activity of both peroxiredoxins. Despite growing evidence of the importance of post-translational modifications, little is known about the enzymatic systems that specifically regulate the reversal of this modification. In the present work, sulfiredoxin from P. sativum was seen to be able to deglutathionylate pea 2-Cys Prx but not pea Prx IIF. Redox changes during plant development and the response to stress influence glutathionylation/deglutathionylation processes, which may represent an important event through the modulation of peroxiredoxin and sulfiredoxin proteins. PMID:28197170

  3. Functional properties and structural characterization of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase

    DOE PAGES

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; ...

    2015-07-28

    The majority of plant species accumulate high intracellular levels of proline to cope with hyperosmotic stress conditions. Proline synthesis from glutamate is tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels, yet little is known about the mechanisms for post-translational regulation of the enzymatic activities involved. The gene coding in rice (Oryza sativa L.) for δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the second and final step in this pathway, was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The structural and functional properties of the affinity-purified protein were characterized. As for most species, rice P5C reductase was able to usemore » in vitro either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor. However, strikingly different effects of cations and anions were found depending on the pyridine nucleotide used, namely inhibition of NADH-dependent activity and stimulation of NADPH-dependent activity. Moreover, physiological concentrations of proline and NADP+ were strongly inhibitory for the NADH-dependent reaction, whereas the NADPH-dependent activity was mildly affected. Our results suggest that only NADPH may be used in vivo and that stress-dependent variations in ion homeostasis and NADPH/NADP+ ratio could modulate enzyme activity, being functional in promoting proline accumulation and potentially also adjusting NADPH consumption during the defense against hyperosmotic stress. The apparent molecular weight of the native protein observed in size exclusion chromatography indicated a high oligomerization state. We also report the first crystal structure of a plant P5C reductase at 3.40-Å resolution, showing a decameric quaternary assembly. It was possible to identify dynamic structural differences among rice, human, and bacterial enzymes.« less

  4. Decavanadate as a biochemical tool in the elucidation of muscle contraction regulation.

    PubMed

    Tiago, Teresa; Aureliano, Manuel; Moura, José J G

    2004-11-01

    Recently reported decameric vanadate (V(10)) high affinity binding site in myosin S1, suggests that it can be used as a tool in the muscle contraction regulation. In the present article, it is shown that V(10) species induces myosin S1 cleavage, upon irradiation, at the 23 and 74 kDa sites, the latter being prevented by actin and the former blocked by the presence of ATP. Identical cleavage patterns were found for meta- and decavanadate solutions, indicating that V(10) and tetrameric vanadate (V(4)) have the same binding sites in myosin S1. Concentrations as low as 50 muM decavanadate (5 muM V(10) species) induces 30% of protein cleavage, whereas 500 muM metavanadate is needed to attain the same extent of cleavage. After irradiation, V(10) species is rapidly decomposed, upon protein addition, forming vanadyl (V(4+)) species during the process. It was also observed by NMR line broadening experiments that, V(10) competes with V(4) for the myosin S1 binding sites, having a higher affinity. In addition, V(4) interaction with myosin S1 is highly affected by the products release during ATP hydrolysis in the presence or absence of actin, whereas V(10) appears to be affected at a much lower extent. From these results it is proposed that the binding of vanadate oligomers to myosin S1 at the phosphate loop (23 kDa site) is probably the cause of the actin stimulated myosin ATPase inhibition by the prevention of ATP/ADP exchange, and that this interaction is favoured for higher vanadate anions, such as V(10).

  5. The Vps4p AAA ATPase regulates membrane association of a Vps protein complex required for normal endosome function.

    PubMed Central

    Babst, M; Wendland, B; Estepa, E J; Emr, S D

    1998-01-01

    Vps4p is an AAA-type ATPase required for efficient transport of biosynthetic and endocytic cargo from an endosome to the lysosome-like vacuole of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Vps4p mutants that do not bind ATP or are defective in ATP hydrolysis were characterized both in vivo and in vitro. The nucleotide-free or ADP-bound form of Vps4p existed as a dimer, whereas in the ATP-locked state, Vps4p dimers assembled into a decameric complex. This suggests that ATP hydrolysis drives a cycle of association and dissociation of Vps4p dimers/decamers. Nucleotide binding also regulated the association of Vps4p with an endosomal compartment in vivo. This membrane association required the N-terminal coiled-coil motif of Vps4p, but deletion of the coiled-coil domain did not affect ATPase activity or oligomeric assembly of the protein. Membrane association of two previously uncharacterized class E Vps proteins, Vps24p and Vps32p/Snf7p, was also affected by mutations in VPS4. Upon inactivation of a temperature-conditional vps4 mutant, Vps24p and Vps32p/Snf7p rapidly accumulated in a large membrane-bound complex. Immunofluorescence indicated that both proteins function with Vps4p at a common endosomal compartment. Together, the data suggest that the Vps4 ATPase catalyzes the release (uncoating) of an endosomal membrane-associated class E protein complex(es) required for normal morphology and sorting activity of the endosome. PMID:9606181

  6. Cloning, molecular characterization, and phylogeny of two evolutionary distinct glutamine synthetase isoforms in the green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Reinecke, Diana L; Zarka, Aliza; Leu, Stefan; Boussiba, Sammy

    2016-12-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyta) is a widely used microalga of great economic potential, yet its molecular genetics and evolution are largely unknown. We present new detailed molecular and phylogenetic analysis of two glutamine synthetase (GS) enzymes and genes (gln) under the Astaxanthin-inducing conditions of light- and nitrogen-stress. Structure analysis identified key residues and confirmed two decameric GS2 holoenzymes, a cytoplasmic enzyme, termed GS2c , and a plastidic form, termed GS2p , due to chloroplast-transit peptides at its N-terminus. Gene expression analysis showed dissociation of mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels for both GS2 under different growth conditions, indicating the strong post-transcriptional regulation. Data-mining identified novel and specified published gln genes from Prasinophyceae, Chlorophyta, Trebouxiophyceae, Charophyceae, Bryophyta, Lycopodiophyta, Spermatophyta, and Rhodophyta. Phylogenetic analysis found homologues to the cytosolic GS2c of H. pluvialis in all other photo- and non-photosynthetic Eukaryota. The chloroplastic GS2p was restricted to Chlorophyta, Bryophyta, some Proteobacteria and Fungii; no homologues were identified in Spermatophyta or other Eukaryota. This indicates two independent prokaryotic donors for these two gln genes in H. pluvialis. Combined phylogenetic analysis of GS, chl-b synthase, elongation factor, and light harvesting complex homologues project a newly refined model of Viridiplantae evolution. Herein, a GS1 evolved into the cytosolic GS2c and was passed on to all Eukaryota. Later, the chloroplastic GS2p entered the Archaeplastida lineage via a horizontal gene transfer at the divergence of Chlorophyta and Rhodophyta lineages. GS2p persisted in Chlorophyta and Bryophyta, but was lost during Spermatophyta evolution. These data suggest the revision of GS classification and nomenclature, and extend our understanding of the photosynthetic Eukaryota evolution.

  7. Development and application of quantitative detection method for viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Oh; Kim, Wi-Sik; Kim, Si-Woo; Han, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Jin Woo; Park, Myoung Ae; Oh, Myung-Joo

    2014-05-23

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a problematic pathogen in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) aquaculture farms in Korea. Thus, it is necessary to develop a rapid and accurate diagnostic method to detect this virus. We developed a quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) method based on the nucleocapsid (N) gene sequence of Korean VHSV isolate (Genogroup IVa). The slope and R² values of the primer set developed in this study were -0.2928 (96% efficiency) and 0.9979, respectively. Its comparison with viral infectivity calculated by traditional quantifying method (TCID₅₀) showed a similar pattern of kinetic changes in vitro and in vivo. The qRT-PCR method reduced detection time compared to that of TCID₅₀, making it a very useful tool for VHSV diagnosis.

  8. Production of CCHF virus-like particle by a baculovirus-insect cell expression system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhao-Rui; Wang, Man-Li; Deng, Fei; Li, Tian-Xian; Hu, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Hua-Lin

    2011-10-01

    Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever Virus (CCHFV) is a tick-born virus of the Nairovirus genus within the Bunyaviridae family, which is widespread and causes high fatality. The nucleocapsid of CCHFV is comprised of N proteins that are encoded by the S segment. In this research, the N protein of CCHFV was expressed in insect cells using a recombinant baculovirus. Under an electron microscope, Virus-Like Particles (VLPs) with various size and morphology were observed in cytoplasmic vesicles in the infected cells. Sucrose-gradient purification of the cell lysate indicated that the VLPs were mainly located in the upper fraction after ultracentrifugation, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis and immuno-electron microscopy (IEM).

  9. Development and evaluation of a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus neutralization assay to detect antibodies to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Anna; Goldberg, Tony; Marcquenski, Susan; Olson, Wendy; Goetz, Frederick; Hershberger, Paul; Hart, Lucas M.; Toohey-Kurth, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a target of surveillance by many state and federal agencies in the United States. Currently, the detection of VHSV relies on virus isolation, which is lethal to fish and indicates only the current infection status. A serological method is required to ascertain prior exposure. Here, we report two serologic tests for VHSV that are nonlethal, rapid, and species independent, a virus neutralization (VN) assay and a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results show that the VN assay had a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 42.9%; the anti-nucleocapsid-blocking ELISA detected nonneutralizing VHSV antibodies at a specificity of 88.2% and a sensitivity of 96.4%. The VN assay and ELISA are valuable tools for assessing exposure to VHSV.

  10. Serological Survey of Hantavirus in Inhabitants from Tropical and Subtropical Areas of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Alexandre; Santo Pietro Pereira, Aparecida; Lazaro Moreli, Marcos; Marcelo Aranha Camargo, Luís; Schiavo Nardi, Marcello; Farah Tófoli, Cristina; Araujo, Jansen; Mara Dutra, Lilia; Lopes Ometto, Tatiana; Hurtado, Renata; Carmona de Jesus Maués, Fábio; Zingano Hinke, Tiene; Jaber Mahmud, Sati; Correia Lima, Monica; Tadeu Moraes Figueiredo, Luiz; Luiz Durigon, Edison

    2016-01-01

    Brazil has reported more than 1,600 cases of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HPS) since 1993, with a 39% rate of reported fatalities. Using a recombinant nucleocapsid protein of Araraquara virus, we performed ELISA to detect IgG antibodies against hantavirus in human sera. The aim of this study was to analyze hantavirus antibody levels in inhabitants from a tropical area (Amazon region) in Rondônia state and a subtropical (Atlantic Rain Forest) region in São Paulo state, Brazil. A total of 1,310 serum samples were obtained between 2003 and 2008 and tested by IgG-ELISA, and 82 samples (6.2%), of which 62 were from the tropical area (5.8%) and 20 from the subtropical area (8.3%), tested positive. Higher levels of hantavirus antibody were observed in inhabitants of the populous subtropical areas compared with those from the tropical areas in Brazil. PMID:27034670

  11. Multiplex RT-PCR detection of three common viruses infecting orchids.

    PubMed

    Ali, Raymond N; Dann, Alison L; Cross, Peter A; Wilson, Calum R

    2014-11-01

    A multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed for simultaneous detection of three orchid viruses: cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV), odontoglossum ringspot virus (ORSV), and orchid fleck virus (OFV). Primers were used to amplify nucleocapsid protein gene fragments of 845 bp (ORSV), 505 bp (CymMV) and 160 bp (OFV). A 60-bp amplicon of plant glyceraldehyde-3-phophate dehydrogenase mRNA was included as an internal control against false negatives. The assay was validated against 31 collected plants from six orchid genera and compared with results obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The RT-PCR assay proved more sensitive than TEM for detection of OFV.

  12. Linearization of baculovirus DNA enhances the recovery of recombinant virus expression vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Kitts, P A; Ayres, M D; Possee, R D

    1990-01-01

    Engineered derivatives of Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) possessing a unique restriction site provide a source of viral DNA that can be linearized by digestion with a specific endonuclease. Circular or linearized DNA from two such viruses were compared in terms of their infectivity and recombinogenic activities. The linear forms were 15- to 150-fold less infectious than the corresponding circular forms, when transfected into Spodoptera frugiperda cells using the calcium phosphate method. Linear viral DNA was, however, proficient at recombination on co-transfection with an appropriate transfer vector. Up to 30% of the progeny viruses were recombinant, a 10-fold higher fraction of recombinants than was obtained from co-transfections with circular AcMNPV DNA. The isolation of a recombinant baculovirus expression vector from any of the AcMNPV transfer vectors currently in use can thus be facilitated by linearization of the viral DNA at the appropriate location. Images PMID:2216760

  13. Timing is everything: Fine-tuned molecular machines orchestrate paramyxovirus entry

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Sayantan; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The Paramyxoviridae include some of the great and ubiquitous disease-causing viruses of humans and animals. In most paramyxoviruses, two viral membrane glycoproteins, fusion protein (F) and receptor binding protein (HN, H or G) mediate a concerted process of recognition of host cell surface molecules followed by fusion of viral and cellular membranes, resulting in viral nucleocapsid entry into the cytoplasm. The interactions between the F and HN, H or G viral glycoproteins and host molecules are critical in determining host range, virulence and spread of these viruses. Recently, atomic structures, together with biochemical and biophysical studies, have provided major insights into how these two viral glycoproteins successfully interact with host receptors on cellular membranes and initiate the membrane fusion process to gain entry into cells. These studies highlight the conserved core mechanisms of paramyxovirus entry that provide the fundamental basis for rational anti-viral drug design and vaccine development. PMID:25771804

  14. A monoclonal antibody against truncated N protein (aa 277-471) of canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Yi, Li; Cheng, Shipeng

    2014-02-01

    Canine distemper (CD) is a highly contagious, systemic, viral disease of dogs seen worldwide. The nucleocapsid protein (NP) of canine distemper virus encloses virus assembly and has some regulatory functions in viral transcription and replication. Here, we describe a procedure to generate a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against CDV N protein and investigate its characteristics. Western blot analysis showed that the MAbs produced in this study were against CDV N specifically. Indirect immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that they could recognize native N protein in CDV-infected Vero cells. The MAbs reported here may provide valuable tools for the further exploration of biological properties and functions of N protein and may also be developed for potential clinical applications.

  15. Induction of a subnuclear structure by the simultaneous expression of baculovirus proteins, IE1, LEF3, and P143 in the presence of hr

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamine, Toshihiro . E-mail: tnaga@riken.jp; Kawasaki, Yu; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2006-09-01

    Baculoviruses elicit the formation of a nuclear domain, called the virogenic stroma, in which viral DNA replication and nucleocapsid assembly occur. We had previously reported that nuclear focus formation of a transcriptional activator, IE1, is triggered by its binding to a viral DNA element, hr, and predicted that this hr-induced IE1 focus is an initial scaffold for the virogenic stroma. However, LEF3, a component of the virogenic stroma, did not localize to the IE1 foci. In exploring a mediator for its localization, we found that a baculovirus DNA helicase (P143), in combination with IE1 and hr, induced a subnuclear structure to which LEF3 localized and also that another component of the virogenic stroma, DBP, is able to localize to this structure. These results reveal that only four viral molecules are necessary to establish a nuclear domain which possesses a recruiting ability for a component of the virogenic stroma.

  16. Infection of Bergmann glia in the cerebellum of a skunk experimentally infected with street rabies virus.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, A C; Phelan, C C; Rossiter, J P

    2000-01-01

    Rabies virus is a highly neuronotropic virus and glial cell infection is not prominent in the central nervous system (CNS). Paraffin-embedded tissues from the cerebella of skunks experimentally infected with either a skunk salivary gland isolate of street rabies virus or the challenge virus standard (CVS) strain of fixed rabies virus were examined with immunoperoxidase staining for rabies virus antigen by using an anti-rabies virus nucleocapsid protein monoclonal antibody. A skunk infected with street rabies virus showed prominent infection of Bergmann glia. Although infected Purkinje cells were observed, they usually demonstrated a relatively small amount of antigen in their perikarya. A CVS-infected skunk showed many intensely labeled Purkinje cells and a relatively small number of infected Bergmann glia. These findings indicate that although rabies virus is a highly neuronotropic virus, street rabies virus strains do not always demonstrate strict neuronotropism in the central nervous system. Images Figure 1. PMID:11041500

  17. The underlying mechanisms for the "isolated positivity for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)" serological profile.

    PubMed

    Pondé, Robério Amorim de Almeida

    2011-02-01

    During HBV infection, four structural antigen/antibody systems are observed: hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and its antibody (anti-HBs); the pre-S antigens associated with HBsAg particles and their antibodies; the particulate nucleocapsid antigen (HBcAg) and anti-HBc; and an antigen structurally related to HBcAg, namely HBeAg and its antibody (anti-HBe). Through the examination of this antigen-antibodies system, hepatitis B infection is diagnosed and the course of the disorder may be observed. Isolated HBsAg seropositivity is a peculiar serological pattern in HBV infection observed some times in routine laboratory. In most cases is not clear how this profile should be interpreted neither its significance. This pattern, however, may be associated with some clinical and laboratorial situations of great relevance, some of which will be addressed in this article.

  18. Report of isolations of unusual lyssaviruses (rabies and Mokola virus) identified retrospectively from Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Bingham, J; Javangwe, S; Sabeta, C T; Wandeler, A I; Nel, L H

    2001-06-01

    Rabies isolates that had been stored between 1983 and 1997 were examined with a panel of anti-lyssavirus nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies. Out of 56 isolates from cats and various wild carnivore species, 1 isolate of Mokola virus and 5 other non-typical rabies viruses were identified. The Mokola virus isolate was diagnosed as rabies in 1993 from a cat. Genetic analysis of this isolate suggests that it falls in a distinct subgroup of the Mokola virus genotype. The 5 non-typical rabies viruses were isolated from honey badgers (Mellivora capensis), African civets (Civettictis civetta) and an unidentified mongoose (Herpestidae). These isolates are representatives of rarely-reported wildlife-associated strains of rabies, probably maintained by the slender mongoose (Galerella sanguinea). These findings indicate that both Mokola virus and the mongoose-associated variant may be more common in Zimbabwe than is apparent from routine surveillance.

  19. A distinct tospovirus causing necrotic streak on Alstroemeria sp. in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hassani-Mehraban, Afshin; Botermans, Marleen; Verhoeven, J Th J; Meekes, Ellis; Saaijer, Janneke; Peters, Dick; Goldbach, Rob; Kormelink, Richard

    2010-03-01

    A tospovirus causing necrotic streaks on leaves was isolated from Alstroemeria sp. in Colombia. Infected samples reacted positively with tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) antiserum during preliminary serological tests. Further analysis revealed a close serological relationship to tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) and groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV). A major part of the S-RNA segment, encompassing the nucleocapsid (N) protein gene, the 5' untranslated region and a part of the intergenic region 3' of the N gene, was cloned and sequenced. The deduced N protein sequence showed highest amino acid identity (82%) to that of TCSV, indicating that the virus represents a new tospovirus species, for which the name Alstroemeria necrotic streak virus (ANSV) is coined. Phylogenetic analysis based on the N protein sequence revealed that this Alstroemeria-infecting tospovirus clustered with tospoviruses from the American continent. Frankliniella occidentalis was identified as potential vector species for ANSV.

  20. Live-cell observation of cytosolic HIV-1 assembly onset reveals RNA-interacting Gag oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Jelle; Baumgärtel, Viola; Schrimpf, Waldemar; Ivanchenko, Sergey; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Müller, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of the Gag polyprotein into new viral particles in infected cells is a crucial step in the retroviral replication cycle. Currently, little is known about the onset of assembly in the cytosol. In this paper, we analyzed the cytosolic HIV-1 Gag fraction in real time in live cells using advanced fluctuation imaging methods and thereby provide detailed insights into the complex relationship between cytosolic Gag mobility, stoichiometry, and interactions. We show that Gag diffuses as a monomer on the subsecond timescale with severely reduced mobility. Reduction of mobility is associated with basic residues in its nucleocapsid (NC) domain, whereas capsid (CA) and matrix (MA) domains do not contribute significantly. Strikingly, another diffusive Gag species was observed on the seconds timescale that oligomerized in a concentration-dependent manner. Both NC- and CA-mediated interactions strongly assist this process. Our results reveal potential nucleation steps of cytosolic Gag fractions before membrane-assisted Gag assembly. PMID:26283800

  1. Development of Primer Pairs from Molecular Typing of Rabies Virus Variants Present in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Hernández, Dolores G.; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Zárate-Segura, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoprotein (N) gene from rabies virus (RABV) is a useful sequence target for variant studies. Several specific RABV variants have been characterized in different mammalian hosts such as skunk, dog, and bats by using anti-nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) via indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test, a technique not available in many laboratories in Mexico. In the present study, a total of 158 sequences of N gene from RABV were used to design eight pairs of primers (four external and four internal primers), for typing four different RABV variants (dog, skunk, vampire bat, and nonhematophagous bat) which are most common in Mexico. The results indicate that the primer and the typing variant from the brain samples, submitted to nested and/or real-time PCR, are in agreement in all four singleplex reactions, and the designed primer pairs are an alternative for use in specific variant RABV typing. PMID:27563666

  2. Fatal pulmonary edema in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) associated with adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Sorden, S D; Woods, L W; Lehmkuhl, H D

    2000-07-01

    Sporadic sudden deaths in adult white-tailed deer occurred from November 1997 through August 1998 on an Iowa game farm. Three of the 4 deer necropsied had severe pulmonary edema, widespread mild lymphocytic vasculitis, and amphophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in scattered endothelial cells in blood vessels in the lung and abdominal viscera. Immunohistochemistry with bovine adenovirus 5 antisera and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated adenoviral antigen and nucleocapsids, respectively, within endothelial cells. Adenovirus was isolated in cell culture from 1 of the affected deer. The isolate was neutralized by California black-tailed deer adenovirus antiserum. These findings indicate that adenovirus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of both black-tailed and white-tailed deer with pulmonary edema and/or hemorrhagic enteropathy.

  3. Polydnavirus DNA is integrated in the DNA of its parasitoid wasp host.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, J G; Summers, M D

    1991-01-01

    The polydnavirus Campoletis sonorensis virus (CsV) is present in the oviducts of all adult C. sonorensis female wasps and appears to be required for these wasps to parasitize hosts successfully. Physical mapping, Southern blot analysis, and nucleotide sequence analysis demonstrate that the viral DNA B-specific sequences in cloned wasp DNA are colinear with viral genomic segment DNA B from nucleocapsids and are covalently linked to nonviral wasp sequences. Integrated DNA B terminates in 59-nucleotide imperfect direct repeats, but a single repeat exists in the extrachromosomal superhelical viral DNA B. Sequences near each junction form imperfect inverted repeats with sequences near the ends of an internal viral 540-base-pair repeat element gene. CsV appears to be the first documented integrated, nonretroviral DNA virus of insects and probably is vertically transmitted as a provirus. Images PMID:1946402

  4. Cytorhabdovirus phosphoprotein shows RNA silencing suppressor activity in plants, but not in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Mann, Krin S; Johnson, Karyn N; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2015-02-01

    RNA silencing in plants and insects provides an antiviral defense and as a countermeasure most viruses encode RNA silencing suppressors (RSS). For the family Rhabdoviridae, no detailed functional RSS studies have been reported in plant hosts and insect vectors. In agroinfiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves we show for the first time for a cytorhabdovirus, lettuce necrotic yellows virus (LNYV), that one of the nucleocapsid core proteins, phosphoprotein (P) has relatively weak local RSS activity and delays systemic silencing of a GFP reporter. Analysis of GFP small RNAs indicated that the P protein did not prevent siRNA accumulation. To explore RSS activity in insects, we used a Flock House virus replicon system in Drosophila S2 cells. In contrast to the plant host, LNYV P protein did not exhibit RSS activity in the insect cells. Taken together our results suggest that P protein may target plant-specific components of RNA silencing post siRNA biogenesis.

  5. Detection and molecular characterization of porcine toroviruses in Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Jun; Park, Sang-Ik; Jeong, Young-Ju; Hosmillo, Myra; Kim, Ha-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Kwon, Hyung-Jun; Kang, Mun-Il; Park, Su-Jin; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2010-03-01

    This study examined the prevalence and genetic diversity of the porcine torovirus (PToV) in Korea. Of 295 samples, 19 (6.4%) samples tested positive for PToVs by RT-PCR. A low nucleotide sequence identity of the partial S gene was detected among the Korean PToVs (73.5%) and between the Korean and European PToVs (74.0%). Phylogenetic analysis of the spike and nucleocapsid genes showed that the Korean PToVs form distinct branches with clusters corresponding to the farm of origin, which were separate from the other known foreign PToVs. These findings suggest that genetically diverse Korean PToV strains cause sporadic infections in Korea.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Ebola VP35 interferon inhibitory domain mutant proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Daisy W.; Borek, Dominika; Farahbakhsh, Mina; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Nix, Jay C.; Wang, Tianjiao; Prins, Kathleen C.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Honzatko, Richard B.; Helgeson, Luke A.; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.

    2010-06-21

    VP35 is one of seven structural proteins encoded by the Ebola viral genome and mediates viral replication, nucleocapsid formation and host immune suppression. The C-terminal interferon inhibitory domain (IID) of VP35 is critical for dsRNA binding and interferon inhibition. The wild-type VP35 IID structure revealed several conserved residues that are important for dsRNA binding and interferon antagonism. Here, the expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant Zaire Ebola VP35 IID mutants R312A, K319A/R322A and K339A in space groups P6{sub 1}22, P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and P2{sub 1}, respectively, are described. Diffraction data were collected using synchrotron sources at the Advanced Light Source and the Advanced Photon Source.

  7. The Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory (SNL) and Recent Applications of an Aberration-Corrected Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Robert; Kempen, Paul Joseph; Chin, Richard; Koh, Ai Leen

    2014-05-01

    This article describes the establishment, over a period of ten years or so, of a multi-user, institution-wide facility for the characterization of materials and devices at the nano-scale. Emphasis is placed on the type of equipment that we have found to be most useful for our users, and the business strategy that maintains its operations. A central component of our facility is an aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscope and its application is summarized in the studies of plasmon energies of silver nanoparticles, the band gap of PbS quantum dots, atomic site occupancy near grain boundaries in yttria stabilized zirconia, the lithiation of silicon nanoparticles, in situ observations on carbon nanotube oxidation and the electron tomography of varicella zoster virus nucleocapsids.

  8. The Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory (SNL) and Recent Applications of an Aberration-Corrected Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope**

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Robert; Kempen, Paul Joseph; Chin, Richard; Koh, Ai Leen

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the establishment, over a period of ten years or so, of a multi-user, institution-wide facility for the characterization of materials and devices at the nano-scale. Emphasis is placed on the type of equipment that we have found to be most useful for our users, and the business strategy that maintains its operations. A central component of our facility is an aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscope and its application is summarized in the studies of plasmon energies of silver nanoparticles, the band gap of PbS quantum dots, atomic site occupancy near grain boundaries in yttria stabilized zirconia, the lithiation of silicon nanoparticles, in situ observations on carbon nanotube oxidation and the electron tomography of varicella zoster virus nucleocapsids. PMID:25364299

  9. Morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus in human primary nasal ciliated epithelial cells occurs at surface membrane microdomains that are distinct from cilia.

    PubMed

    Jumat, Muhammad Raihan; Yan, Yan; Ravi, Laxmi Iyer; Wong, Puisan; Huong, Tra Nguyen; Li, Chunwei; Tan, Boon Huan; Wang, De Yun; Sugrue, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of cilia and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nucleocapsid (N) protein, fusion (F) protein, attachment (G) protein, and M2-1 protein in human ciliated nasal epithelial cells was examined at between 1 and 5 days post-infection (dpi). All virus structural proteins were localized at cell surface projections that were distinct from cilia. The F protein was also trafficked into the cilia, and while its presence increased as the infection proceeded, the N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time of infection. The presence of the F protein in the cilia correlated with cellular changes in the cilia and reduced cilia function. At 5dpi extensive cilia loss and further reduced cilia function was noted. These data suggested that although RSV morphogenesis occurs at non-cilia locations on ciliated nasal epithelial cells, RSV infection induces changes in the cilia body that leads to extensive cilia loss.

  10. Clinical and pathological manifestations of human henipavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Wong, K T; Tan, C T

    2012-01-01

    The clinicopathological features of human Nipah virus and Hendra virus infections appear to be similar. The clinical manifestations may be mild, but if severe, includes acute encephalitic and pulmonary syndromes with a high mortality. The pathological features in human acute henipavirus infections comprise vasculopathy (vasculitis, endothelial multinucleated syncytia, thrombosis), microinfarcts and parenchymal cell infection in the central nervous system, lung, kidney and other major organs. Viral inclusions, antigens, nucleocapsids and RNA are readily demonstrated in blood vessel wall and numerous types of parenchymal cells. Relapsing henipavirus encephalitis is a rare complication reported in less than 10% of survivors of the acute infection and appears to be distinct from the acute encephalitic syndrome. Pathological evidence suggests viral recrudescence confined to the central nervous system as the cause.

  11. [HIV-1 p17 matrix protein is transported into the cell nucleus and binds with genomic viral RNA].

    PubMed

    Bukrinskaia, A G; Vorkunova, G K; Tentsov, Iu Iu

    1993-01-01

    We have shown that gag polyprotein p55 is cleaved in cytosol rapidly after its synthesis, during 2 h, and p17 enters the nuclei while p24 resides in cytosol. To determine whether the nascent p17 is associated with viral genomic RNA in the nuclei, the cells were fractionated, the viral complexes were immunoprecipitated by monoclonal antibodies against gag proteins, and RNA was extracted and analyzed by slot and blot hybridization. Monoclonal antibodies against p17 precipitated all the viral RNA from the nuclei including full-size genomic RNA and essential part from membranes while monoclonal antibodies against p24 did not precipitate any viral RNA from the nuclei. These data suggest that matrix protein is linked to genomic RNA in the nuclei and rise the possibility that p17 may transfer viral nucleocapsids from the nuclei to plasma membranes, the site of virus assembly.

  12. [The characteristics of the interaction of the proteins comprising the virions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1].

    PubMed

    Sharova, N K; Bukrinskaia, A G

    1990-01-01

    Treatment of virions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with ionic and nonionic detergents (NP-40, octylglucoside, sodium deoxycholate) exerted an effect on the virus uncommon for enveloped viruses: instead of solubilization, both glycoproteins (gp120 and gp41) were found in subviral particles, whereas the core protein p24 was found in the supernatant fluid after the removal of subviral particles by centrifugation. The matrix protein p17 and unprocessed molecules of the precursor protein p55 were associated with subviral particles. The above data confirm the proposed model of the HIV-I structural organization according to which glycoproteins are incorporated into the isometric matrix formed by protein p17. Our data indicate that the core protein p24 is not incorporated into the matrix and not associated with nucleocapsid proteins.

  13. Cell-dependent gag mutants of HIV-1 are crucially defective at the stage of uncoating/reverse transcription in non-permissive cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, K; Miyaura, M; Yoshida, A; Sakurai, A; Fujita, M; Adachi, A

    2000-10-01

    We have previously shown that some of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gag matrix (MA), capsid (CA), and nucleocapsid (NC) mutants display host-cell-dependent replication potential, and that they are defective at the early phase of the virus replication cycle in non-permissive cells. To determine the defective replication stage of the cell-dependent mutants precisely, the processes of virus entry into cells and virus DNA synthesis were monitored by the highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and polymerase chain reaction amplification analysis. The results obtained indicated that all the cell-dependent MA, CA and NC mutants are defective at the stage of uncoating/reverse transcription, and that a cellular factor(s) is involved in this process.

  14. [Research Progress in the Core Proteins of the Classical Swine Fever Virus].

    PubMed

    Hou, Yuzhen; Zhao, Dantong; Liu, Guoying; He, Fan; Liu, Bin; Fu, Shaoyin; Hao, Yongqing; Zhang, Wenguang

    2015-09-01

    The core protein (CP) of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is one of its structural proteins. Apart from forming the nucleocapsid to protect internal viral genomic RNA, this protein is involved in transcriptional regulation. Also, during viral infection, the CP is involved in interactions with many host proteins. In this review, we combine study of this protein with its disorders, structural/functional characteristics, as well as its interactions with the non-structural proteins NS3, NS5B and host proteins such as SUMO-1, UBC9, OS9 and IQGAP1. We also summarize the important part played by the CP in CSFV pathogenicity, virulence and replication of genomic RNA. We also provide guidelines for further studies in the CP of the CSFV.

  15. The Role of Secretory Autophagy in Zika Virus Transfer through the Placental Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Li, Zi-Lin; Yuan, Shu

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies indicated that the Zika virus genome could be detected in the amniotic fluid and the fetal brain, which confirms that the virus can cross the placental barrier. Secretory autophagy or exosome pathways may participate in this virus transfer. Autophagy modulators regulate autophagosome formation or membrane fusion with lysosomal vesicles and therefore inhibit viral nucleocapsid releasing or virus transfer to the fetus hypothetically. However, some autophagy modulators may enhance virus replication. Autophagy inhibitors may arrest placental development; while exaggeration of autophagy in human placenta may be associated with the fetal growth restriction. Therefore, autophagy modulators should be used carefully due to their complex clinical effects. Alternatively, exosome-specific inhibitors might be also considered, although their safety of both maternal and fetal conditions must be carefully assessed before any advancement to human clinical trials. PMID:28119857

  16. Development of Primer Pairs from Molecular Typing of Rabies Virus Variants Present in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bastida-González, Fernando; Ramírez-Hernández, Dolores G; Chavira-Suárez, Erika; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Zárate-Segura, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoprotein (N) gene from rabies virus (RABV) is a useful sequence target for variant studies. Several specific RABV variants have been characterized in different mammalian hosts such as skunk, dog, and bats by using anti-nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) via indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test, a technique not available in many laboratories in Mexico. In the present study, a total of 158 sequences of N gene from RABV were used to design eight pairs of primers (four external and four internal primers), for typing four different RABV variants (dog, skunk, vampire bat, and nonhematophagous bat) which are most common in Mexico. The results indicate that the primer and the typing variant from the brain samples, submitted to nested and/or real-time PCR, are in agreement in all four singleplex reactions, and the designed primer pairs are an alternative for use in specific variant RABV typing.

  17. Characterisation of the nucleic acid binding features of the PRRSV 7ap and its ability to induce antinuclear antibodies.

    PubMed

    Olasz, Ferenc; Dénes, Béla; Bálint, Ádám; Magyar, Tibor; Belák, Sándor; Zádori, Zoltán

    2017-03-01

    A short alternative open reading frame named ORF7a has recently been discovered within the nucleocapsid gene of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) genome. Proteins (7ap) translated from the ORF7a of two divergent strains - a type I and a type II - are able to completely reduce the motility of nucleic acids at relatively high molar charge ratios in gel retardation assays indicating strong dsDNA- and ssRNA-binding capability. Conserved RNA- and DNA-binding properties suggest that nucleic acid binding is a functional property of the divergent 7aps, and not an arbitrary consequence of their net positive charge. Sera from Hu7ap-immunised pigs and mice did not react with Hu7ap or Hu7ap-GFP; however, antinuclear antibodies were detected in the sera of the immunised animals, suggesting an ability of Hu7ap to interact with or mimic autoantigenic macromolecules.

  18. In vitro assembly of the feline immunodeficiency virus Gag polyprotein.

    PubMed

    Affranchino, José L; González, Silvia A

    2010-06-01

    The retroviral Gag protein is the only viral product that is necessary for the assembly of virions in mammalian cells. We have established an in vitro assembly system to study the assembly properties of purified feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Gag protein expressed in bacteria. Under fully defined conditions, the FIV Gag protein assembles into spherical particles of 33 nm in diameter which are morphologically similar to authentic immature particles, albeit smaller than virions. The in vitro assembly of FIV Gag into particles was found to be resistant to the addition of Triton X-100 and required the presence of RNA. Notably, we found that an amino acid substitution in the nucleocapsid domain of Gag that impairs RNA binding and blocks virion production in vivo, also abrogates Gag assembly in vitro. The development of an in vitro assembly system for FIV Gag protein will facilitate the study of the mechanisms by which this protein assembles into immature particles.

  19. Mechanisms of coronavirus cell entry mediated by the viral spike protein.

    PubMed

    Belouzard, Sandrine; Millet, Jean K; Licitra, Beth N; Whittaker, Gary R

    2012-06-01

    Coronaviruses are enveloped positive-stranded RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm. To deliver their nucleocapsid into the host cell, they rely on the fusion of their envelope with the host cell membrane. The spike glycoprotein (S) mediates virus entry and is a primary determinant of cell tropism and pathogenesis. It is classified as a class I fusion protein, and is responsible for binding to the receptor on the host cell as well as mediating the fusion of host and viral membranes-A process driven by major conformational changes of the S protein. This review discusses coronavirus entry mechanisms focusing on the different triggers used by coronaviruses to initiate the conformational change of the S protein: receptor binding, low pH exposure and proteolytic activation. We also highlight commonalities between coronavirus S proteins and other class I viral fusion proteins, as well as distinctive features that confer distinct tropism, pathogenicity and host interspecies transmission characteristics to coronaviruses.

  20. Full genome sequence of guinea fowl coronavirus associated with fulminating disease.

    PubMed

    Ducatez, Mariette F; Liais, Etienne; Croville, Guillaume; Guérin, Jean-Luc

    2015-06-01

    Guinea fowl coronavirus (GfCoV), a recently characterized avian coronavirus, was identified from outbreaks of fulminating disease (peracute enteritis) in guinea fowl in France. The full-length genomic sequence was determined to better understand its genetic relationship with avian coronaviruses. The full-length coding genome sequence was 26,985 nucleotides long with 11 open reading frames and no hemagglutinin-esterase gene: a genome organization identical to that of turkey coronavirus [5' untranslated region (UTR)-replicase (ORFs 1a, 1ab)-spike (S) protein-ORF3 (ORFs 3a, 3b)-small envelop (E or 3c) protein-membrane (M) protein-ORF5 (ORFs 4b, 4c, 5a, 5b)-nucleocapsid (N) protein (ORFs N and 6b)-3' UTR]. This is the first complete genome sequence of a GfCoV and confirms that the new virus belongs to group gammacoronaviruses.

  1. RNA sequence and transcriptional properties of the 3' end of the Newcastle disease virus genome

    SciTech Connect

    Kurilla, M.G.; Stone, H.O.; Keene, J.D.

    1985-09-01

    The 3' end of the genomic RNA of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has been sequenced and the leader RNA defined. Using hybridization to a 3'-end-labeled genome, leader RNA species from in vitro transcription reactions and from infected cell extracts were found to be 47 and 53 nucleotides long. In addition, the start site of the 3'-proximal mRNA was determined by sequence analysis of in vitro (beta-32P)GTP-labeled transcription products. The genomic sequence extending beyond the leader region demonstrated an open reading frame for at least 42 amino acids and probably represents the amino terminus of the nucleocapsid protein (NP). The terminal 8 nucleotides of the NDV genome were identical to those of measles virus and Sendai virus while the sequence of the distal half of the leader region was more similar to that of vesicular stomatitis virus. These data argue for strong evolutionary relatedness between the paramyxovirus and rhabdovirus groups.

  2. Determination of buoyant density and sensitivity to chloroform and freon for the etiological agent of infectious salmonid anaemia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, K.E.; Hjeltnes, B.; Uglenes , I.; Winton, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma was collected from Atlantic salmon Salrno salar with acute infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) and used to challenge Atlantic salmon parr by intraperitoneal injection. Treatment of plasma with the lipid solvent, chloroform, showed that the etiological agent of ISA contained essential lipids, probably as a viral envelope. Some infectivity remained following treatment with freon. Injection challenges using fractions from equilibrium density gradient centrifugation of plasma from fish with acute ISA revealed a band of infectivity in the range 1.184 to 1.262 g cm-3. The band was believed to conta~n both complete ISA-virus particles and infectious particles lacking a complete envelope, nucleocapsid or genome. Density gradient centrifugation of infectious plasma for enrichment of the putative ISA virus appeared to offer a suitable method for obtaining virus-specific nucleic acid for use in the construction of cDNA libraries. 

  3. Serological Survey of Hantavirus in Inhabitants from Tropical and Subtropical Areas of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Alves Morais, Felipe; Pereira, Alexandre; Santo Pietro Pereira, Aparecida; Lazaro Moreli, Marcos; Marcelo Aranha Camargo, Luís; Schiavo Nardi, Marcello; Farah Tófoli, Cristina; Araujo, Jansen; Mara Dutra, Lilia; Lopes Ometto, Tatiana; Hurtado, Renata; Carmona de Jesus Maués, Fábio; Zingano Hinke, Tiene; Jaber Mahmud, Sati; Correia Lima, Monica; Tadeu Moraes Figueiredo, Luiz; Luiz Durigon, Edison

    2016-01-01

    Brazil has reported more than 1,600 cases of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HPS) since 1993, with a 39% rate of reported fatalities. Using a recombinant nucleocapsid protein of Araraquara virus, we performed ELISA to detect IgG antibodies against hantavirus in human sera. The aim of this study was to analyze hantavirus antibody levels in inhabitants from a tropical area (Amazon region) in Rondônia state and a subtropical (Atlantic Rain Forest) region in São Paulo state, Brazil. A total of 1,310 serum samples were obtained between 2003 and 2008 and tested by IgG-ELISA, and 82 samples (6.2%), of which 62 were from the tropical area (5.8%) and 20 from the subtropical area (8.3%), tested positive. Higher levels of hantavirus antibody were observed in inhabitants of the populous subtropical areas compared with those from the tropical areas in Brazil.

  4. Characterization of murine hepatitis virus (JHM) RNA from rats with experimental encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D P; Percy, D H; Morris, V L

    1984-09-01

    When Wistar Furth rats are inoculated intracerebrally with the murine hepatitis virus JHM they often develop a demyelinating disease with resulting hind leg paralysis. Using an RNA transfer procedure and hybridization kinetic analysis, the virus-specific RNA in these rats was characterized. The pattern of JHM-specific RNA varied with individual infections of Wistar Furth rats. However, two species of JHM-specific RNA, the nucleocapsid and a 2.1-2.4 X 10(6)-Da RNA species were generally present. A general decrease in JHM-specific RNA in brains and spinal cord samples taken later than 20 days postinoculation was observed; however, JHM-specific RNA persisted in the spinal cord longer than in the brain of these rats.

  5. Infection of Bergmann glia in the cerebellum of a skunk experimentally infected with street rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Jackson, A C; Phelan, C C; Rossiter, J P

    2000-10-01

    Rabies virus is a highly neuronotropic virus and glial cell infection is not prominent in the central nervous system (CNS). Paraffin-embedded tissues from the cerebella of skunks experimentally infected with either a skunk salivary gland isolate of street rabies virus or the challenge virus standard (CVS) strain of fixed rabies virus were examined with immunoperoxidase staining for rabies virus antigen by using an anti-rabies virus nucleocapsid protein monoclonal antibody. A skunk infected with street rabies virus showed prominent infection of Bergmann glia. Although infected Purkinje cells were observed, they usually demonstrated a relatively small amount of antigen in their perikarya. A CVS-infected skunk showed many intensely labeled Purkinje cells and a relatively small number of infected Bergmann glia. These findings indicate that although rabies virus is a highly neuronotropic virus, street rabies virus strains do not always demonstrate strict neuronotropism in the central nervous system.

  6. Vesicular Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Transport—Herpesviruses as Pioneers in Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses use a vesicle-mediated transfer of intranuclearly assembled nucleocapsids through the nuclear envelope (NE) for final maturation in the cytoplasm. The molecular basis for this novel vesicular nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is beginning to be elucidated in detail. The heterodimeric viral nuclear egress complex (NEC), conserved within the classical herpesviruses, mediates vesicle formation from the inner nuclear membrane (INM) by polymerization into a hexagonal lattice followed by fusion of the vesicle membrane with the outer nuclear membrane (ONM). Mechanisms of capsid inclusion as well as vesicle-membrane fusion, however, are largely unclear. Interestingly, a similar transport mechanism through the NE has been demonstrated in nuclear export of large ribonucleoprotein complexes during Drosophila neuromuscular junction formation, indicating a widespread presence of a novel concept of cellular nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. PMID:27690080

  7. Survey for antibody to hantaviruses in Tamaulipas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Castro-Arellano, Iván; Suzán, Gerardo; León, Rita Flores; Jiménez, Ricardo Morales; Lacher, Thomas E

    2009-01-01

    Wild rodents (n=248) were trapped in two ecologically distinct sites at El Cielo Biosphere Reserve in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico, during the summer of 2003. Samples from 199 individuals were tested for Hantavirus antibodies by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Hantavirus antibodies to recombinant Sin Nombre virus nucleocapsid protein were found in seven rodents (3.5%) of a single species, Peromyscus levipes. Antibody-positive rodents were found only in the Cloud Forest site, which had lower rodent species diversity than the Tropical Subdecidous Forest site. Although the identity of the virus in P. levipes remains to be determined, our study provides further evidence that Hantavirus antibody-positive individuals are prevalent in the rodent fauna of Mexico. This is the first survey for Hantavirus antibodies in the rodent fauna of Tamaulipas and the first report of P. levipes as a potential host for a Hantavirus.

  8. Improvement of the trivalent inactivated flu vaccine using PapMV nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Savard, Christian; Guérin, Annie; Drouin, Karine; Bolduc, Marilène; Laliberté-Gagné, Marie-Eve; Dumas, Marie-Christine; Majeau, Nathalie; Leclerc, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Commercial seasonal flu vaccines induce production of antibodies directed mostly towards hemaglutinin (HA). Because HA changes rapidly in the circulating virus, the protection remains partial. Several conserved viral proteins, e.g., nucleocapsid (NP) and matrix proteins (M1), are present in the vaccine, but are not immunogenic. To improve the protection provided by these vaccines, we used nanoparticles made of the coat protein of a plant virus (papaya mosaic virus; PapMV) as an adjuvant. Immunization of mice and ferrets with the adjuvanted formulation increased the magnitude and breadth of the humoral response to NP and to highly conserved regions of HA. They also triggered a cellular mediated immune response to NP and M1, and long-lasting protection in animals challenged with a heterosubtypic influenza strain (WSN/33). Thus, seasonal flu vaccine adjuvanted with PapMV nanoparticles can induce universal protection to influenza, which is a major advancement when facing a pandemic.

  9. The flavivirus capsid protein: Structure, function and perspectives towards drug design.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Edson R A; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; de Alencastro, Ricardo B; Horta, Bruno A C

    2017-01-02

    Flaviviruses, such as dengue and zika viruses, are etiologic agents transmitted to humans mainly by arthropods and are of great epidemiological interest. The flavivirus capsid protein is a structural element required for the viral nucleocapsid assembly that presents the classical function of sheltering the viral genome. After decades of research, many reports have shown its different functionalities and influence over cell normal functioning. The subcellular distribution of this protein, which involves accumulation around lipid droplets and nuclear localization, also corroborates with its multi-functional characteristic. As flavivirus diseases are still in need of global control and in view of the possible key functionalities that the capsid protein promotes over flavivirus biology, novel considerations arise towards anti-flavivirus drug research. This review covers the main aspects concerning structural and functional features of the flavivirus C protein, ultimately, highlighting prospects in drug discovery based on this viral target.

  10. Development and validation of a rapid immunochromatographic assay for detection of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus antigen in dromedary camels.

    PubMed

    Song, Daesub; Ha, Gunwoo; Serhan, Wissam; Eltahir, Yassir; Yusof, Mohammed; Hashem, Farouq; Elsayed, Elsaeid; Marzoug, Bahaaeldin; Abdelazim, Assem; Al Muhairi, Salama

    2015-04-01

    We present here a rapid immunochromatographic assay for the detection of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) antigen in the nasal swabs of dromedary camels. The assay is based on the detection of MERS-CoV nucleocapsid protein in a short time frame using highly selective monoclonal antibodies at room temperature. The relative sensitivity and specificity of the assay were found to be 93.90% and 100%, respectively, compared to that of the UpE and open reading frame 1A (Orf1A) real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). The results suggest that the assay developed here is a useful tool for the rapid diagnosis and epidemiological surveillance of MERS-CoV infection in dromedary camels.

  11. Monoclonal antibody characterization of rabies virus strains isolated in the River Plate Basin.

    PubMed

    Delpietro, H A; Gury-Dhomen, F; Larghi, O P; Mena-Segura, C; Abramo, L

    1997-10-01

    In this study, 91 strains isolated in the River Plate Basin, South America, were examined from the epidemiological standpoint and with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the nucleocapsid of rabies virus. Such strains reacted to MAbs in accordance with nine different patterns (antigenic variants). Rabies virus was isolated from 49 cattle, 21 dogs, 11 non-haematophagous bats, four vampire bats, two foxes, two horses, one buffalo, and one human. Five of the variants had not been described previously. It was also found that two cases of rabies in wild foxes (Cerdocyon thous) which had attacked persons in the Province of Chaco, Argentina, had been caused by variants from dog and vampire bat, while two cases in frugivorous bats (Artibeus lituratus) from Argentina and Brazil, had been infected by vampire bat variants. In addition, symptoms shown by cattle infected with strains which reacted as originating in canine vectors, differed from those observed in bovines from which the variants isolated corresponded to vampire bats.

  12. Development and Application of Quantitative Detection Method for Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) Genogroup IVa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Oh; Kim, Wi-Sik; Kim, Si-Woo; Han, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Jin Woo; Park, Myoung Ae; Oh, Myung-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a problematic pathogen in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) aquaculture farms in Korea. Thus, it is necessary to develop a rapid and accurate diagnostic method to detect this virus. We developed a quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) method based on the nucleocapsid (N) gene sequence of Korean VHSV isolate (Genogroup IVa). The slope and R2 values of the primer set developed in this study were −0.2928 (96% efficiency) and 0.9979, respectively. Its comparison with viral infectivity calculated by traditional quantifying method (TCID50) showed a similar pattern of kinetic changes in vitro and in vivo. The qRT-PCR method reduced detection time compared to that of TCID50, making it a very useful tool for VHSV diagnosis. PMID:24859343

  13. HIV-1 Integrase Binds the Viral RNA Genome and Is Essential during Virion Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kessl, Jacques J; Kutluay, Sebla B; Townsend, Dana; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Slaughter, Alison; Larue, Ross C; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Bakouche, Nordine; Fuchs, James R; Bieniasz, Paul D; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-08-25

    While an essential role of HIV-1 integrase (IN) for integration of viral cDNA into human chromosome is established, studies with IN mutants and allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs) have suggested that IN can also influence viral particle maturation. However, it has remained enigmatic as to how IN contributes to virion morphogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that IN directly binds the viral RNA genome in virions. These interactions have specificity, as IN exhibits distinct preference for select viral RNA structural elements. We show that IN substitutions that selectively impair its binding to viral RNA result in eccentric, non-infectious virions without affecting nucleocapsid-RNA interactions. Likewise, ALLINIs impair IN binding to viral RNA in virions of wild-type, but not escape mutant, virus. These results reveal an unexpected biological role of IN binding to the viral RNA genome during virion morphogenesis and elucidate the mode of action of ALLINIs.

  14. High-level protein expression following single and dual gene cloning of infectious bronchitis virus N and S genes using baculovirus systems.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Moneim, Ahmed S; Giesow, Katrin; Keil, Günther M

    2014-03-01

    Baculovirus is an efficient system for the gene expression that can be used for gene transfer to both insect and different vertebrate hosts. The nucleocapsid gene (N) of the infectious bronchitis virus was cloned in a baculovirus expression system for insect cell expression. Dual expression vectors containing IBV N and spike (S) proteins of the avian infectious bronchitis virus were engineered under the control of human and murine cytomegalovirus immediate-early enhancer/promoter elements in combination with the baculoviral polyhedrin and p10 promoters for simultaneous expression in both vertebrate and insect cells. Transduction of the N gene in the insect Sf9 cells revealed a high level of protein expression. The expressed protein, used in ELISA, effectively detected chicken anti-IBV antibodies with high specificity. Transduction of mammalian and avian cells with BacMam viruses revealed that dual expression cassettes yielded high levels of protein from both transcription units.

  15. Reverse genetics of Mononegavirales: How they work, new vaccines, and new cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Christian K; Cattaneo, Roberto; Schnell, Matthias J

    2015-05-01

    The order Mononegavirales includes five families: Bornaviridae, Filoviridae, Nyamaviridae, Paramyxoviridae, and Rhabdoviridae. The genome of these viruses is one molecule of negative-sense single strand RNA coding for five to ten genes in a conserved order. The RNA is not infectious until packaged by the nucleocapsid protein and transcribed by the polymerase and co-factors. Reverse genetics approaches have answered fundamental questions about the biology of Mononegavirales. The lack of icosahedral symmetry and modular organization in the genome of these viruses has facilitated engineering of viruses expressing fluorescent proteins, and these fluorescent proteins have provided important insights about the molecular and cellular basis of tissue tropism and pathogenesis. Studies have assessed the relevance for virulence of different receptors and the interactions with cellular proteins governing the innate immune responses. Research has also analyzed the mechanisms of attenuation. Based on these findings, ongoing clinical trials are exploring new live attenuated vaccines and the use of viruses re-engineered as cancer therapeutics.

  16. Completely assembled virus particles detected by transmission electron microscopy in proximal and mid-axons of neurons infected with herpes simplex virus type 1, herpes simplex virus type 2 and pseudorabies virus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jialing Lazear, Helen M. Friedman, Harvey M.

    2011-01-05

    The morphology of alphaherpesviruses during anterograde axonal transport from the neuron cell body towards the axon terminus is controversial. Reports suggest that transport of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) nucleocapsids and envelope proteins occurs in separate compartments and that complete virions form at varicosities or axon termini (subassembly transport model), while transport of a related alphaherpesvirus, pseudorabies virus (PRV) occurs as enveloped capsids in vesicles (assembled transport model). Transmission electron microscopy of proximal and mid-axons of primary superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons was used to compare anterograde axonal transport of HSV-1, HSV-2 and PRV. SCG cell bodies were infected with HSV-1 NS and 17, HSV-2 2.12 and PRV Becker. Fully assembled virus particles were detected intracellularly within vesicles in proximal and mid-axons adjacent to microtubules after infection with each virus, indicating that assembled virions are transported anterograde within axons for all three alphaherpesviruses.

  17. Chronic eosinophilic dermatitis associated with persistent feline herpes virus infection in cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Munson, L; Wack, R; Duncan, M; Montali, R J; Boon, D; Stalis, I; Crawshaw, G J; Cameron, K N; Mortenson, J; Citino, S; Zuba, J; Junge, R E

    2004-03-01

    A chronic ulcerative and eosinophilic dermatitis occurred in 20 captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) with persistent feline herpes virus 1 (FHV1) infection. Affected animals had erythematous, ulcerated plaques primarily on the face and forelegs in sites of contact with lachrymal and salivary secretions. The dermatitis was characterized by dense infiltrates of eosinophils and plasma cells and pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia. Rare keratinocytes within the lesions had nuclei with marginated chromatin and small eosinophilic inclusions composed of herpes virus nucleocapsids. Virus isolated from lesions was confirmed to be FHV1. Lesions persisted and progressed unless removed by cryoexcision. The occurrence of this unusual reaction to FHV1 in approximately 5% of captive North American cheetahs suggests a species propensity for a Th2-dominant response to herpes virus infection. This atypical immune reaction may indicate a heritable trait or modulation of the immune response by other factors such as chronic stress.

  18. Immunofluorescent Staining for the Detection of the Hepatitis B Core Antigen in Frozen Liver Sections of Human Liver Chimeric Mice.

    PubMed

    Allweiss, Lena; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Dandri, Maura

    2017-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the causative agent for chronic hepatitis B infection, which affects an estimate of 240 million people worldwide and puts them at risk of developing terminal liver disease. The life cycle of the virus and its interactions with the host immune system are still incompletely understood, and currently available treatment options rarely achieve a cure. Therefore, basic research and new drug development are needed. One parameter for measuring the intrahepatic activity of the virus is monitoring the production of the HBV core antigen (HBcAg), which not only serves as the main structural protein of its nucleocapsid but is also recruited to the covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the nuclear HBV genome responsible for infection persistence. Here, we report a sensitive immunofluorescence staining method to detect HBcAg in cryopreserved liver sections. The method combines conventional immunofluorescence staining procedures with the Tyramide Signal Amplification (TSA) system.

  19. A Virus-Like Particle System Identifies the Endonuclease Domain of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Devignot, Stephanie; Bergeron, Eric; Nichol, Stuart; Mirazimi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV; genus Nairovirus) is an extremely pathogenic member of the Bunyaviridae family. Since handling of the virus requires a biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) facility, little is known about pathomechanisms and host interactions. Here, we describe the establishment of a transcriptionally competent virus-like particle (tc-VLP) system for CCHFV. Recombinant polymerase (L), nucleocapsid protein (N) and a reporter minigenome expressed in human HuH-7 cells resulted in formation of transcriptionally active nucleocapsids that could be packaged by coexpressed CCHFV glycoproteins into tc-VLPs. The tc-VLPs resembled authentic virus particles in their protein composition and neutralization sensitivity to anti-CCHFV antibodies and could recapitulate all steps of the viral replication cycle. Particle attachment, entry, and primary transcription were modeled by infection of naive cells. The subsequent steps of genome replication, secondary transcription, and particle assembly and release can be obtained upon passaging the tc-VLPs on cells expressing CCHFV structural proteins. The utility of the VLP system was demonstrated by showing that the endonuclease domain of L is located around amino acid D693, as was predicted in silico by B. Morin et al. (PLoS Pathog 6:e1001038, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1001038). The tc-VLP system will greatly facilitate studies and diagnostics of CCHFV under non-BSL-4 conditions. IMPORTANCE Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is an extremely virulent pathogen of humans. Since the virus can be handled only at the highest biosafety level, research is restricted to a few specialized laboratories. We developed a plasmid-based system to produce virus-like particles with the ability to infect cells and transcribe a reporter genome. Due to the absence of viral genes, the virus-like particles are unable to spread or cause disease, thus allowing study of aspects of CCHFV biology under relaxed

  20. Evidence from the anti-idiotypic network that the acetylcholine receptor is a rabies virus receptor.

    PubMed

    Hanham, C A; Zhao, F; Tignor, G H

    1993-01-01

    We have developed idiotype-anti-idiotype monoclonal antibodies that provide evidence for rabies virus binding to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Hybridoma cell lines 7.12 and 7.25 resulted after fusion of NS-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from a BALB/c mouse immunized with rabies virus strain CVS. Antibody 7.12 reacted with viral glycoprotein and neutralized virus infectivity in vivo. It also neutralized infectivity in vitro when PC12 cells, which express neuronal AChR, but not CER cells or neuroblastoma cells (clone N18), which have no AChR, were used. Antibody 7.25 reacted with nucleocapsid protein. Anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibody B9 was produced from fusion of NS-1 cells with spleen cells from a mouse immunized with 7.12 Fab. In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoprecipitation, B9 reacted with 7.12, polyclonal rabies virus immune dog serum, and purified AChR. The binding of B9 to 7.12 and immune dog serum was inhibited by AChR. B9 also inhibited the binding of 7.12 to rabies virus both in vitro and in vivo. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed that B9 reacted at neuromuscular junctions of mouse tissue. B9 also reacted in indirect immunofluorescence with distinct neurons in mouse and monkey brain tissue as well as with PC12 cells. B9 staining of neuronal elements in brain tissue of rabies virus-infected mice was greatly reduced. Rabies virus inhibited the binding of B9 to PC12 cells. Mice immunized with B9 developed low-titer rabies virus-neutralizing antibody. These mice were protected from lethal intramuscular rabies virus challenge. In contrast, anti-idiotypic antibody raised against nucleocapsid antibody 7.25 did not react with AChR.

  1. Development of a duplex Fluorescent Microsphere Immunoassay (FMIA) for the detection of antibody responses to influenza A and newcastle disease viruses.

    PubMed

    Pinette, Mathieu M; Rodriguez-Lecompte, Juan C; Pasick, John; Ojkic, Davor; Leith, Marsha; Suderman, Matthew; Berhane, Yohannes

    2014-03-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI) and virulent forms of avian paramyxovirus-1 (APMV-1) cause serious illnesses in domestic poultry, both of which are reportable to the World Organization of Animal Health (OIE). The clinical presentation of avian influenza (AI) and APMV-1 infections are difficult to differentiate, emphasizing the importance of rapid and sensitive serologic assays that are able to distinguish them. Currently, a variety of serological assays are used for the serologic diagnosis of both diseases, but these assays are not used in multiplex formats. In this study, development of a duplex fluorescent microsphere immunoassay (FMIA) based on Luminex xMAP Technology is described. The assay employs MagPlex magnetic microspheres that are covalently coated with recombinant avian influenza virus nucleoprotein and APMV-1 nucleocapsid antigens produced in a baculovirus insect cell expression system. The assay is able to detect AIV antibodies against all existing hemagglutinin (H1-H16) subtypes and simultaneously detect antibodies against APMV-1. In the process of this assay development different bead coupling conditions were compared. The assay has the capability of detecting serum antibodies from chickens and turkeys and optimization was accomplished by using 2462 chicken and 446 turkey field and experimental sera and had a comparable detection capability with currently used assays in the laboratory. Assay threshold values were calculated with Receiver Operating Characteristic Analysis (ROC) in non-parametric analysis due to a highly skewed data distribution; this analysis resulted in AIV nucleoprotein relative diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 99.7%, and 97.3% respectively. The APMV-1 nucleocapsid relative diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 95.4%, and 98.5% respectively.

  2. Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus: subcellular localization and protein trafficking of BV/ODV-E26 to intranuclear membranes and viral envelopes.

    PubMed

    Beniya, H; Braunagel, S C; Summers, M D

    1998-01-05

    The Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus da26 gene codes for an envelope protein of both budded virus (BV) and occlusion derived virus (ODV). Western blot and temporal analysis of infected cell extracts detected a protein of 26 kDa by 4 h postinfection (p.i.). The amount of protein increased by 16 h p.i. and remained at high levels throughout infection. By 36 h p.i. several additional immunoreactive proteins were detected which migrated at approximately 18 kDa and remained through 96 h p.i. Western blot analysis of purified virus envelope and nucleocapsid preparations revealed that both the 26- and 18-kDa proteins are structural proteins of the envelope of BV and ODV. Immunoelectron microscopy performed at a time when only the 26-kDa species of the protein was present confirmed that the protein located to ODV envelope. The protein was named BV/ODV-E26 to designate incorporation into viral progeny, envelope location, and apparent molecular weight. Studies designed to follow localization of BV/ODV-E26 demonstrated that early in infection, the protein was incorporated into cytoplasmic vesicles and by 16 h p.i., BV/ODV-E26 was detected in the nucleus associated with virus-induced intranuclear microvesicles and ODV envelope. Coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid assays showed that BV/ODV-E26 and FP25K were capable of interacting with each other to form a complex and coimmunoprecipitation assays indicated that cellular actin was a third component of this complex. Together, these data suggest that FP25K and cellular actin may participate in the regulation, or movement through the cell, of baculovirus proteins and/or virus nucleocapsids.

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Interaction between a Plant Virus and Its Vector Insect Reveals New Functions of Hemipteran Cuticular Protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenwen; Gray, Stewart; Huo, Yan; Li, Li; Wei, Taiyun; Wang, Xifeng

    2015-08-01

    Numerous viruses can be transmitted by their corresponding vector insects; however, the molecular mechanisms enabling virus transmission by vector insects have been poorly understood, especially the identity of vector components interacting with the virus. Here, we used the yeast two-hybrid system to study proteomic interactions of a plant virus (Rice stripe virus, RSV, genus Tenuivirus) with its vector insect, small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus). Sixty-six proteins of L. striatellus that interacted with the nucleocapsid protein (pc3) of RSV were identified. A virus-insect interaction network, constructed for pc3 and 29 protein homologs of Drosophila melanogaster, suggested that nine proteins might directly interact with pc3. Of the 66 proteins, five (atlasin, a novel cuticular protein, jagunal, NAC domain protein, and vitellogenin) were most likely to be involved in viral movement, replication, and transovarial transmission. This work also provides evidence that the novel cuticular protein, CPR1, from L. striatellus is essential for RSV transmission by its vector insect. CPR1 binds the nucleocapsid protein (pc3) of RSV both in vivo and in vitro and colocalizes with RSV in the hemocytes of L. striatellus. Knockdown of CPR1 transcription using RNA interference resulted in a decrease in the concentration of RSV in the hemolymph, salivary glands and in viral transmission efficiency. These data suggest that CPR1 binds RSV in the insect and stabilizes the viral concentration in the hemolymph, perhaps to protect the virus or to help move the virus to the salivary tissues. Our studies provide direct experimental evidence that viruses can use existing vector proteins to aid their survival in the hemolymph. Identifying these putative vector molecules should lead to a better understanding of the interactions between viruses and vector insects.

  4. Inclusion bodies are a site of ebolavirus replication.

    PubMed

    Hoenen, Thomas; Shabman, Reed S; Groseth, Allison; Herwig, Astrid; Weber, Michaela; Schudt, Gordian; Dolnik, Olga; Basler, Christopher F; Becker, Stephan; Feldmann, Heinz

    2012-11-01

    Inclusion bodies are a characteristic feature of ebolavirus infections in cells. They contain large numbers of preformed nucleocapsids, but their biological significance has been debated, and they have been suggested to be aggregates of viral proteins without any further biological function. However, recent data for other viruses that produce similar structures have suggested that inclusion bodies might be involved in genome replication and transcription. In order to study filovirus inclusion bodies, we fused mCherry to the ebolavirus polymerase L, which is found in inclusion bodies. The resulting L-mCherry fusion protein was functional in minigenome assays and incorporated into virus-like particles. Importantly, L-mCherry fluorescence in transfected cells was readily detectable and distributed in a punctate pattern characteristic for inclusion bodies. A recombinant ebolavirus encoding L-mCherry instead of L was rescued and showed virtually identical growth kinetics and endpoint titers to those for wild-type virus. Using this virus, we showed that the onset of inclusion body formation corresponds to the onset of viral genome replication, but that viral transcription occurs prior to inclusion body formation. Live-cell imaging further showed that inclusion bodies are highly dynamic structures and that they can undergo dramatic reorganization during cell division. Finally, by labeling nascent RNAs using click technology we showed that inclusion bodies are indeed the site of viral RNA synthesis. Based on these data we conclude that, rather than being inert aggregates of nucleocapsids, ebolavirus inclusion bodies are in fact complex and dynamic structures and an important site at which viral RNA replication takes place.

  5. Factors involved in the generation and replication of rhabdovirus defective T particles.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, J J; Villarreal, L P; Breindl, M

    1976-01-01

    Previous indications that cloned B virions might be genetically predisposed to generate a particular defective T particle are shown to be inaccurate. T particle generation was found to be a much more random process than was previously believed. We show that the previously observed generation of particular sizes of T particles by B virion pools is due to the random generation of T particles during preparation of first-passage pools of cloned B virions, and these breed true during the additional passages needed to produce visible quantities of T particles. It is also shown that different host cell lines selectively amplify different T particles, suggesting a strong role of host cell factors in T particle replication. Surprisingly, our line of HeLa cells did not generate or replicate detectable T particles of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) Indiana after either serial undiluted passage or direct addition of T particles, even though the added T particles strongly interfered with B virion replication. In contrast to VSV, rabies virus generates large amounts of T particles during the first passage of cloned B virions, and every rabies-infected baby hamster kidney-21 cell culture evolves into a persistent carrier state. We find that T particle RNA is biologically inactive although T particle nucleocapsid ribonucleoprotein replicates and interferes in cells coinfected with B virions. Efforts to study the mechanism of T particle generation by in vitro attempts to generate T particles or modify their size (using sheared ribonucleoprotein or chemical or UV mutagenesis) were unsuccessful. The kinetics of UV and nitrous acid inactivation of T particles indicate a smaller target size relative to B virions, even after correcting for lengths of RNA molecules. The intercalating dye proflavine does not photosensitize VSV B virions or T particles when present during replication, indicating that there is little or no RNA base pairing in the helical nucleocapsids of either. PMID

  6. Involvement of ESCRT-II in hepatitis B virus morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stieler, Jens T; Prange, Reinhild

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an enveloped DNA virus that replicates via reverse transcription of its pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). Budding of HBV is supposed to occur at intracellular membranes and requires scission functions of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) provided by ESCRT-III and VPS4. Here, we have investigated the impact of the upstream-acting ESCRT-I and ESCRT-II complexes in HBV morphogenesis. RNA interference knockdown of the ESCRT-I subunits TSG101 and VPS28 did not block, but rather stimulate virus release. In contrast, RNAi-mediated depletion of the ESCRT-II components EAP20, EAP30 and EAP45 greatly reduced virus egress. By analyzing different steps of the HBV maturation pathway, we find that the knockdown of ESCRT-II not only inhibited the production and/or release of enveloped virions, but also impaired intracellular nucleocapsid formation. Transcription/translation studies revealed that the depletion of ESCRT-II neither affected the synthesis and nuclear export of HBV-specific RNAs nor the expression of the viral core and envelope proteins. Moreover, the absence of ESCRT-II had no effects on the assembly capability and integrity of HBV core/capsids. However, the level of encapsidated pgRNA was significantly reduced in ESCRT-II-depleted cells, implicating that ESCRT-II directs steps accompanying the formation of replication-competent nucleocapsids, like e.g. assisting in RNA trafficking and encapsidation. In support of this, the capsid protein was found to interact and colocalize with ESCRT-II subunits in virus-producing cells. Together, these results indicate an essential role for ESCRT-II in the HBV life cycle and suggest that ESCRT-II functions prior to the final HBV budding reaction.

  7. Cellular VPS4 Is Required for Efficient Entry and Egress of Budded Virions of Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaofei

    2012-01-01

    Membrane budding is essential for the egress of many enveloped viruses, and this process shares similarities with the biogenesis of multivesicular bodies (MVBs). In eukaryotic cells, the budding of intraluminal vesicles (IVLs) is mediated by the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery and some viruses require ESCRT machinery components or functions to bud from host cells. Baculoviruses, such as Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), enter host cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Viral DNA replication and nucleocapsid assembly occur within the nucleus. Some progeny nucleocapsids are subsequently trafficked to, and bud from, the plasma membrane, forming budded virions (BV). To determine whether the host ESCRT machinery is important or necessary for AcMNPV replication, we cloned a cDNA of Spodoptera frugiperda VPS4, a key regulator for disassembly and recycling of ESCRT III. We then examined viral infection and budding in the presence of wild-type (WT) or dominant negative (DN) forms of VPS4. First, we used a viral complementation system, in combination with fluorescent tags, to examine the effects of transiently expressed WT or DN VPS4 on viral entry. We found that dominant negative VPS4 substantially inhibited virus entry. Entering virus was observed within aberrant compartments containing the DN VPS4 protein. We next used recombinant bacmids expressing WT or DN VPS4 proteins to examine virus egress. We found that production of infectious AcMNPV BV was substantially reduced by expression of DN VPS4 but not by WT VPS4. Together, these results indicate that a functional VPS4 is necessary for efficient AcMNPV BV entry into, and egress from, insect cells. PMID:22072775

  8. Characterization of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome in rural regions of Zhejiang, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Ye, Ling; Ojcius, David M; Lou, Xiuyu; Wang, Chengwei; feng, Cen; Sun, Yi; Wang, Zhongfa; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Yanjun

    2014-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) infections have recently been found in rural regions of Zhejiang. A severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) surveillance and sero-epidemiological investigation was conducted in the districts with outbreaks. During the study period of 2011-2014, a total of 51 SFTSV infection cases were identified and the case fatality rate was 12% (6/51). Ninety two percent of the patients (47/51) were over 50 years of age, and 63% (32/51) of laboratory confirmed cases occurred from May to July. Nine percent (11/120) of the serum samples from local healthy people without symptoms were found to be positive for antibodies to the SFTS virus. SFTSV strains were isolated by culture using Vero, and the whole genomic sequences of two SFTSV strains (01 and Zhao) were sequenced and submitted to the GenBank. Homology analysis showed that the similarity of the target nucleocapsid gene from the SFTSV strains from different geographic areas was 94.2-100%. From the constructed phylogenetic tree, it was found that all the SFTSV strains diverged into two main clusters. Only the SFTSV strains from the Zhejiang (Daishan) region of Ch