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Sample records for null mutant demonstrates

  1. α2-Null mutant mice have altered levels of neuronal activity in restricted midbrain and limbic brain regions during nicotine withdrawal as demonstrated by cfos expression.

    PubMed

    Upton, Montana; Lotfipour, Shahrdad

    2015-10-15

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the primary binding sites for nicotine within the brain. Using alpha(α)2 nAChR subunit-null mutant mice, the current study evaluates whether the absence of this gene product during mecamylamine-precipitated nicotine withdrawal eliminates neuronal activity within selective midbrain and limbic brain regions, as determined by the expression of the immediate early gene, cfos. Our results demonstrate that nicotine withdrawal enhances neuronal activity within the interpeduncular nucleus and dorsal hippocampus, which is absent in mice null for α2-containing nAChRs. In contrast, we observe that α2-null mutant mice exhibit a suppression of neuronal activity in the dentate gyrus in mice undergoing nicotine withdrawal. Interestingly, α2-null mutant mice display potentiated neuronal activity specifically within the stratum lacunosum moleculare layer of the hippocampus, independent of nicotine withdrawal. Overall, our findings demonstrate that α2-null mutant mice have altered cfos expression in distinct populations of neurons within selective midbrain and limbic brain structures that mediate baseline and nicotine withdrawal-induced neuronal activity.

  2. Rescue of Drosophila labial null mutant by the chicken ortholog Hoxb-1 demonstrates that the function of Hox genes is phylogenetically conserved.

    PubMed

    Lutz, B; Lu, H C; Eichele, G; Miller, D; Kaufman, T C

    1996-01-15

    Hox complexes are important players in the establishment of the body plan of invertebrates and vertebrates. Sequence comparison demonstrates a remarkable phylogenetic conservation of key structural features of Hox genes. The correlation between the physical order of genes along the chromosomes and their domains of function along the body axis is conserved between arthropods and vertebrates. Ectopic expression experiments suggest that the functions of homeo proteins also are conserved between invertebrates and vertebrates. However, it remains an open question whether vertebrate Hox genes expressed under the control of Drosophila regulatory sequences can substitute the function of Drosophila Hox genes. We have studied this issue with the Drosophila labial (lab) gene and its chicken ortholog gHoxb-1. We fused the entire protein-coding region of gHoxb-1 with previously identified regulatory sequences of lab. This approach places gHoxb-1 into the normal embryonic spatiotemporal context in which lab acts. Ten transgenic lines carrying gHoxb-1 were established and tested for their ability to rescue lab null mutant animals. Eight lines rescued with high efficiency, embryonic lethality, and abnormal head morphogenesis, two defects observed in lab null mutant embryos. The rescue with the gHoxb-1 minigene was close to the efficiency of that obtained with the Drosophila lab minigene. This indicates that gHoxb-1 protein can regulate lab target genes and thereby restore embryonic viability. This is striking, as Lab and gHoxb-1 proteins are divergent except for their homeo domains and a short stretch of amino acids amino-terminal to the homeo domain. Our findings demonstrate a functional conservation of the lab class homeo proteins between insects and vertebrates and support the view that function of Hox genes resides in relatively few conserved motifs and largely in the homeo domain. PMID:8566751

  3. Impairment in motor learning of somatostatin null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Zeyda, T; Diehl, N; Paylor, R; Brennan, M B; Hochgeschwender, U

    2001-07-01

    Somatostatin was first identified as a hypothalamic factor which inhibits the release of growth hormone from the anterior pituitary (somatotropin release inhibitory factor, SRIF). Both SRIF and its receptors were subsequently found widely distributed within and outside the nervous system, in the adult as well as in the developing organism. Reflecting this wide distribution, somatostatin has been implicated regulating a diverse array of biological processes. These include body growth, homeostasis, sensory perception, autonomous functions, rate of intestinal absorption, behavior, including cognition and memory, and developmental processes. We produced null mutant mice lacking somatostatin through targeted mutagenesis. The mutant mice are healthy, fertile, and superficially indistinguishable from their heterozygous and wildtype littermates. A 'first round' phenotype screen revealed that mice lacking somatostatin have elevated plasma growth hormone levels, despite normal body size, and have elevated basal plasma corticosterone levels. In order to uncover subtle and unexpected differences, we carried out a systematic behavioral phenotype screen which identified a significant impairment in motor learning revealed when increased demands were made on motor coordination. Motor coordination and motor learning require an intact cerebellum. While somatostatin is virtually absent from the adult cerebellum, the ligand and its receptor(s) are transiently expressed at high levels in the developing cerebellum. This result suggests the functional significance of transient expression of SRIF and its receptors in the development of the cerebellum. PMID:11430867

  4. Otx1 null mutant mice show partial segregation of sensory epithelia comparable to lamprey ears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, B.; Signore, M.; Simeone, A.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the development of inner ear innervation in Otx1 null mutants, which lack a horizontal canal, between embryonic day 12 (E12) and postnatal day 7 (P7) with DiI and immunostaining for acetylated tubulin. Comparable to control animals, horizontal crista-like fibers were found to cross over the utricle in Otx1 null mice. In mutants these fibers extend toward an area near the endolymphatic duct, not to a horizontal crista. Most Otx1 null mutants had a small patch of sensory hair cells at this position. Measurement of the area of the utricular macula suggested it to be enlarged in Otx1 null mutants. We suggest that parts of the horizontal canal crista remain incorporated in the utricular sensory epithelium in Otx1 null mutants. Other parts of the horizontal crista appear to be variably segregated to form the isolated patch of hair cells identifiable by the unique fiber trajectory as representing the horizontal canal crista. Comparison with lamprey ear innervation reveals similarities in the pattern of innervation with the dorsal macula, a sensory patch of unknown function. SEM data confirm that all foramina are less constricted in Otx1 null mutants. We propose that Otx1 is not directly involved in sensory hair cell formation of the horizontal canal but affects the segregation of the horizontal canal crista from the utricle. It also affects constriction of the two main foramina in the ear, but not their initial formation. Otx1 is thus causally related to horizontal canal morphogenesis as well as morphogenesis of these foramina.

  5. Status of the Visible Nulling Coronagraph Technology Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, M.; Lyon, R.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the development, sensing and control of the Vacuum Nuller Testbed to realize a Visible Nulling Coronagraphy (VNC) for exoplanet detection and characterization. The VNC is one of the few approaches that works with filled, segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescope systems. It thus spans a range of potential future NASA telescopes and could be flown as a separate instrument on such a future mission. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center has an established effort to develop VNC technologies, and an incremental sequence of testbeds to advance this approach and its critical technologies. We will highlight results demonstrating the achievement of our TDEM contrast milestones, and highlight the performance of our wavefront sensing and control concept.

  6. Reduced Excitatory Neurotransmission and Mild Autism-Relevant Phenotypes in Adolescent Shank3 Null Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mu; Bozdagi, Ozlem; Scattoni, Maria Luisa; Wöhr, Markus; Roullet, Florence I.; Katz, Adam M.; Abrams, Danielle N.; Kalikhman, David; Simon, Harrison; Woldeyohannes, Leuk; Zhang, James Y.; Harris, Mark J.; Saxena, Roheeni; Silverman, Jill L.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the synaptic scaffolding protein gene SHANK3 are strongly implicated in autism and Phelan-McDermid 22q13 deletion syndrome. The precise location of the mutation within the Shank3 gene is key to its phenotypic outcomes. Here we report the physiological and behavioral consequences of null and heterozygous mutations in the ankyrin repeat domain in Shank3 mice. Both homozygous and heterozygous mice showed reduced glutamatergic transmission and long-term potentiation in the hippocampus with more severe deficits detected in the homozygous mice. Three independent cohorts were evaluated for magnitude and replicability of behavioral endophenotypes relevant to autism and Phelan-McDermid syndrome. Mild social impairments were detected, primarily in juveniles during reciprocal interactions, while all genotypes displayed normal adult sociability on the three-chambered task. Impaired novel object recognition and rotarod performance were consistent across cohorts of null mutants. Repetitive self-grooming, reduced ultrasonic vocalizations, and deficits in reversal of water maze learning were detected only in some cohorts, emphasizing the importance of replication analyses. These results demonstrate the exquisite specificity of deletions in discrete domains within the Shank3 gene in determining severity of symptoms. PMID:22573675

  7. Impaired learning and memory in CD38 null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Somi; Kim, TaeHyun; Lee, Hye-Ryeon; Jang, Eun-Hye; Ryu, Hyun-Hee; Kang, Minkyung; Rah, So-Young; Yoo, Juyoun; Lee, Bolam; Kim, Jae-Ick; Lim, Chae Seok; Kim, Sang Jeong; Kim, Uh-Hyun; Lee, Yong-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-02-09

    CD38 is an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of cyclic ADP ribose and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate, both of which are involved in the mobilization of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores. Recently, CD38 has been shown to regulate oxytocin release from hypothalamic neurons. Importantly, CD38 mutations are associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and CD38 knockout (CD38(-/-)) mice display ASD-like behavioral phenotypes including deficient parental behavior and poor social recognition memory. Although ASD and learning deficits commonly co-occur, the role of CD38 in learning and memory has not been investigated. We report that CD38(-/-) mice show deficits in various learning and memory tasks such as the Morris water maze, contextual fear conditioning, and the object recognition test. However, either long-term potentiation or long-term depression is not impaired in the hippocampus of CD38(-/-) mice. Our results provide convincing evidence that CD38(-/-) mice show deficits in various learning and memory tasks including spatial and non-spatial memory tasks. Our data demonstrate that CD38 is critical for regulating hippocampus-dependent learning and memory without modulating synaptic plasticity.

  8. Defective flagellar assembly and length regulation in LF3 null mutants in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Lai-Wa; Dentler, William L.; Lefebvre, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    Four long-flagella (LF) genes are important for flagellar length control in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here, we characterize two new null lf3 mutants whose phenotypes are different from previously identified lf3 mutants. These null mutants have unequal-length flagella that assemble more slowly than wild-type flagella, though their flagella can also reach abnormally long lengths. Prominent bulges are found at the distal ends of short, long, and regenerating flagella of these mutants. Analysis of the flagella by electron and immunofluorescence microscopy and by Western blots revealed that the bulges contain intraflagellar transport complexes, a defect reported previously (for review see Cole, D.G., 2003. Traffic. 4:435–442) in a subset of mutants defective in intraflagellar transport. We have cloned the wild-type LF3 gene and characterized a hypomorphic mutant allele of LF3. LF3p is a novel protein located predominantly in the cell body. It cosediments with the product of the LF1 gene in sucrose density gradients, indicating that these proteins may form a functional complex to regulate flagellar length and assembly. PMID:14610061

  9. Zn2+ Uptake in Streptococcus pyogenes: Characterization of adcA and lmb Null Mutants.

    PubMed

    Tedde, Vittorio; Rosini, Roberto; Galeotti, Cesira L

    2016-01-01

    An effective regulation of metal ion homeostasis is essential for the growth of microorganisms in any environment and in pathogenic bacteria is strongly associated with their ability to invade and colonise their hosts. To gain a better insight into zinc acquisition in Group A Streptococcus (GAS) we characterized null deletion mutants of the adcA and lmb genes of Streptococcus pyogenes strain MGAS5005 encoding the orthologues of AdcA and AdcAII, the two surface lipoproteins with partly redundant roles in zinc homeostasis in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Null adcA and lmb mutants were analysed for their capability to grow in zinc-depleted conditions and were found to be more susceptible to zinc starvation, a phenotype that could be rescued by the addition of Zn2+ ions to the growth medium. Expression of AdcA, Lmb and HtpA, the polyhistidine triad protein encoded by the gene adjacent to lmb, during growth under conditions of limited zinc availability was examined by Western blot analysis in wild type and null mutant strains. In the wild type strain, AdcA was always present with little variation in expression levels between conditions of excess or limited zinc availability. In contrast, Lmb and HtpA were expressed at detectable levels only during growth in the presence of low zinc concentrations or in the null adcA mutant, when expression of lmb is required to compensate for the lack of adcA expression. In the latter case, Lmb and HtpA were overexpressed by several fold, thus indicating that also in GAS AdcA is a zinc-specific importer and, although it shares this function with Lmb, the two substrate-binding proteins do not show fully overlapping roles in zinc homeostasis.

  10. Zn2+ Uptake in Streptococcus pyogenes: Characterization of adcA and lmb Null Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Tedde, Vittorio; Rosini, Roberto; Galeotti, Cesira L.

    2016-01-01

    An effective regulation of metal ion homeostasis is essential for the growth of microorganisms in any environment and in pathogenic bacteria is strongly associated with their ability to invade and colonise their hosts. To gain a better insight into zinc acquisition in Group A Streptococcus (GAS) we characterized null deletion mutants of the adcA and lmb genes of Streptococcus pyogenes strain MGAS5005 encoding the orthologues of AdcA and AdcAII, the two surface lipoproteins with partly redundant roles in zinc homeostasis in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Null adcA and lmb mutants were analysed for their capability to grow in zinc-depleted conditions and were found to be more susceptible to zinc starvation, a phenotype that could be rescued by the addition of Zn2+ ions to the growth medium. Expression of AdcA, Lmb and HtpA, the polyhistidine triad protein encoded by the gene adjacent to lmb, during growth under conditions of limited zinc availability was examined by Western blot analysis in wild type and null mutant strains. In the wild type strain, AdcA was always present with little variation in expression levels between conditions of excess or limited zinc availability. In contrast, Lmb and HtpA were expressed at detectable levels only during growth in the presence of low zinc concentrations or in the null adcA mutant, when expression of lmb is required to compensate for the lack of adcA expression. In the latter case, Lmb and HtpA were overexpressed by several fold, thus indicating that also in GAS AdcA is a zinc-specific importer and, although it shares this function with Lmb, the two substrate-binding proteins do not show fully overlapping roles in zinc homeostasis. PMID:27031880

  11. Distorted Patterns of Dentinogenesis and Eruption in Msx2 Null Mutants: Involvement of Sost/Sclerostin.

    PubMed

    Amri, Nawel; Djolé, Stéphane X; Petit, Stéphane; Babajko, Sylvie; Coudert, Amélie E; Castaneda, Beatriz; Simon, Stéphane; Berdal, Ariane

    2016-10-01

    The muscle segment homeogenes Msx1 and Msx2 play a major role in tooth and bone formation. Periodontal osteoclast impairment also occurs in Msx2 null mutant mice, which is restored by overexpression of the receptor activator of NF-κB targeted in osteoclast lineage. Here, we investigated the role of Msx2 in dentinogenesis. Experiments were performed on Msx2(-/-) mice and the MDPC-23 odontoblastic cell line. After Msx2 gene silencing, real-time quantitative RT-PCR data showed significant overexpression of Runx2, Bglap, Dspp, and Alpl. Of three inhibitors of Wnt/β-catenin signaling (Dkk1, SostDc1, and Sost/Sclerostin), only Sost was expressed in postnatal teeth and overexpressed in Msx2(-/-) tooth samples. Initial crown dentin formation-primary dentinogenesis-occurred fairly normally in Msx2(-/-) teeth, albeit with distorted cusp patterns. Later stages of tooth development were characterized by a deviation from secondary toward tertiary dentinogenesis with osteodentin formation and impaired dentin deposition leading to limited root elongation. In Msx2(-/-)/receptor activator of NF-κB-transgenic double mutants, the dentin phenotype, notably in the roots, was rescued and sclerostin levels were normalized. These data suggest that Msx2 may act indirectly on dentinogenesis by controlling osteoclast activity and the signaling network related to eruption, supporting and further extending the concept that Msx2 controls formation of mineralized tissues by inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway; Sost in dentin and Dkk1 in bone, as previously demonstrated. PMID:27524798

  12. A mouse renin distal enhancer is essential for blood pressure homeostasis in BAC-rescued renin-null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Keiji; Kanafusa, Sumiyo; Ushiki, Aki; Matsuzaki, Hitomi; Ishida, Junji; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Renin is predominantly expressed in juxtaglomerular cells in the kidney and regulates blood pressure homeostasis. To examine possible in vivo functions of a mouse distal enhancer (mdE), we generated transgenic mice (TgM) carrying either wild-type or mdE-deficient renin BACs (bacterial artificial chromosome), integrated at the identical chromosomal site. In the kidneys of the TgM, the mdE contributed 80% to basal renin promoter activity. To test for possible physiological roles for the mdE, renin BAC transgenes were used to rescue the hypotensive renin-null mice. Interestingly, renal renin expression in the Tg(BAC):renin-null compound mice was indistinguishable between the wild-type and mutant BAC carriers. Surprisingly, however, the plasma renin activity and angiotensin I concentration in the mdE compound mutant mice were significantly lower than the same parameters in the control mice, and the mutants were consistently hypotensive, demonstrating that blood pressure homeostasis is regulated through transcriptional cis elements controlling renin activity.

  13. A Toxoplasma MORN1 Null Mutant Undergoes Repeated Divisions but Is Defective in Basal Assembly, Apicoplast Division and Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Lorestani, Alexander; Sheiner, Lilach; Yang, Kevin; Robertson, Seth D.; Sahoo, Nivedita; Brooks, Carrie F.; Ferguson, David J. P.; Striepen, Boris; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2010-01-01

    The membrane occupation and recognition nexus protein 1 (MORN1) is highly conserved among apicomplexan parasites and is associated with several structures that have a role in cell division. Here we dissected the role of MORN1 using the relatively simple budding process of Toxoplasma gondii as a model. Ablation of MORN1 in a conditional null mutant resulted in pronounced defects suggesting a central role for MORN1 in apicoplast segregation and in daughter cell budding. Lack of MORN1 resulted in double-headed parasites. These Janus-headed parasites form two complete apical complexes but fail to assemble a basal complex. Moreover, these parasites were capable of undergoing several more budding rounds resulting in the formation of up to 16-headed parasites conjoined at the basal end. Despite this segregation defect, the mother's cytoskeleton was completely disassembled in every budding round. Overall this argues that successful completion of the budding is not required for cell cycle progression. None of the known basal complex components, including a set of recently identified inner membrane complex (IMC) proteins, localized correctly in these multi-headed parasites. These data suggest that MORN1 is essential for assembly of the basal complex, and that lack of the basal complex abolishes the contractile capacity assigned to the basal complex late in daughter formation. Consistent with this hypothesis we observe that MORN1 mutants fail to efficiently constrict and divide the apicoplast. We used the null background provided by the mutant to dissect the function of subdomains of the MORN1 protein. This demonstrated that deletion of a single MORN domain already prevented the function of MORN1 whereas a critical role for the short linker between MORN domains 6 and 7 was identified. In conclusion, MORN1 is required for basal complex assembly and loss of MORN1 results in defects in apicoplast division and daughter segregation. PMID:20808817

  14. A ku70 null mutant improves gene targeting frequency in the fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiliang; Su, Xiaofeng; Guo, Huiming; Qi, Juncang; Cheng, Hongmei

    2015-12-01

    To overcome the challenges met with gene deletion in the plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae, a mutant strain with impaired non-homologous end joining DNA repair was generated to improve targeted gene replacement frequencies. A V. dahliae 991 ΔVdku70 null mutant strain was generated using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Despite having impaired non-homologous end joining DNA repair function, the ΔVdku70 strain exhibited normal growth, reproduction capability, and pathogenicity when compared with the wild-type strain. When the ΔVdku70 strain was used to delete 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase E2, ferric reductase transmembrane component 3 precursor, and ferric reductase transmembrane component 6 genes, gene replacement frequencies ranged between 22.8 and 34.7% compared with 0.3 and 0.5 % in the wild-type strain. The ΔVdku70 strain will be a valuable tool to generate deletion strains when studying factors that underlie virulence and pathogenesis in this filamentous fungus.

  15. A ku70 null mutant improves gene targeting frequency in the fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiliang; Su, Xiaofeng; Guo, Huiming; Qi, Juncang; Cheng, Hongmei

    2015-12-01

    To overcome the challenges met with gene deletion in the plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae, a mutant strain with impaired non-homologous end joining DNA repair was generated to improve targeted gene replacement frequencies. A V. dahliae 991 ΔVdku70 null mutant strain was generated using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Despite having impaired non-homologous end joining DNA repair function, the ΔVdku70 strain exhibited normal growth, reproduction capability, and pathogenicity when compared with the wild-type strain. When the ΔVdku70 strain was used to delete 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase E2, ferric reductase transmembrane component 3 precursor, and ferric reductase transmembrane component 6 genes, gene replacement frequencies ranged between 22.8 and 34.7% compared with 0.3 and 0.5 % in the wild-type strain. The ΔVdku70 strain will be a valuable tool to generate deletion strains when studying factors that underlie virulence and pathogenesis in this filamentous fungus. PMID:26475327

  16. Asexual development is increased in Neurospora crassa cat-3-null mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Michán, Shaday; Lledías, Fernando; Hansberg, Wilhelm

    2003-08-01

    We use asexual development of Neurospora crassa as a model system with which to determine the causes of cell differentiation. Air exposure of a mycelial mat induces hyphal adhesion, and adherent hyphae grow aerial hyphae that, in turn, form conidia. Previous work indicated the development of a hyperoxidant state at the start of these morphogenetic transitions and a large increase in catalase activity during conidiation. Catalase 3 (CAT-3) increases at the end of exponential growth and is induced by different stress conditions. Here we analyzed the effects of cat-3-null strains on growth and asexual development. The lack of CAT-3 was not compensated by other catalases, even under oxidative stress conditions, and cat-3(RIP) colonies were sensitive to H(2)O(2), indicating that wild-type (Wt) resistance to external H(2)O(2) was due to CAT-3. cat-3(RIP) colonies grown in the dark produced high levels of carotenes as a consequence of oxidative stress. Light exacerbated oxidative stress and further increased carotene synthesis. In the cat-3(RIP) mutant strain, increased aeration in liquid cultures led to increased hyphal adhesion and protein oxidation. Compared to the Wt, the cat-3(RIP) mutant strain produced six times more aerial hyphae and conidia in air-exposed mycelial mats, as a result of longer and more densely packed aerial hyphae. Protein oxidation in colonies was threefold higher and showed more aerial hyphae and conidia in mutant strains than did the Wt. Results indicate that oxidative stress due to lack of CAT-3 induces carotene synthesis, hyphal adhesion, and more aerial hyphae and conidia.

  17. Galanin Receptor Subtype 2 (GalR2) Null Mutant Mice Display an Anxiogenic-like Phenotype Specific to the Elevated Plus-maze

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kathleen R.; Pavlova, Maria N.; Rohde, Alex D.; Hohmann, John G.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2007-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin has been implicated in anxiety-related behaviors, cognition, analgesia, and feeding in rodents. Neuromodulatory actions of galanin are mediated by three G-protein coupled receptors, GalR1, GalR2, and GalR3. The present study investigates the role of the GalR2 receptor by evaluating behavioral phenotypes of mice with a targeted mutation in the GalR2 gene. A three-tiered behavioral phenotyping approach first examined control measures of general health, body weight, neurological reflexes, sensory abilities and motor function. Mice were then assessed on several tests for cognitive and anxiety-like behaviors. GalR2 null mutants and heterozygotes were not significantly different from wildtype littermates on two cognitive tests previously shown to be sensitive to galanin manipulation: acquisition of the Morris water maze spatial task, and trace cued and contextual fear conditioning, an emotional learning and memory task. Two independent cohorts of GalR2 null mutant mice demonstrated an anxiogenic-like phenotype in the elevated plus-maze. No genotype differences were detected on several other measures of anxiety-like behavior. The discovery of an anxiogenic phenotype specific to the elevated plus-maze, similar to findings in GalR1 null mutants, highlights the potential therapeutic efficacy of targeting GalR1 and GalR2 receptors in treating anxiety disorders. PMID:17257664

  18. Increased prevalence of mutant null alleles that cause hereditary fructose intolerance in the American population

    PubMed Central

    Coffee, Erin M.; Yerkes, Laura; Ewen, Elizabeth P.; Zee, Tiffany

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the aldolase B gene (ALDOB) impairing enzyme activity toward fructose-1-phosphate cleavage cause hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). Diagnosis of the disease is possible by identifying known mutant ALDOB alleles in suspected patients; however, the frequencies of mutant alleles can differ by population. Here, 153 American HFI patients with 268 independent alleles were analyzed to identify the prevalence of seven known HFI-causing alleles (A149P, A174D, N334K, Δ4E4, R59Op, A337V, and L256P) in this population. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization analysis was performed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified genomic DNA from these patients. In the American population, the missense mutations A149P and A174D are the two most common alleles, with frequencies of 44% and 9%, respectively. In addition, the nonsense mutations Δ4E4 and R59Op are the next most common alleles, with each having a frequency of 4%. Together, the frequencies of all seven alleles make up 65% of HFI-causing alleles in this population. Worldwide, these same alleles make up 82% of HFI-causing mutations. This difference indicates that screening for common HFI alleles is more difficult in the American population. Nevertheless, a genetic screen for diagnosing HFI in America can be improved by including all seven alleles studied here. Lastly, identification of HFI patients presenting with classic symptoms and who have homozygous null genotypes indicates that aldolase B is not required for proper development or metabolic maintenance. PMID:20033295

  19. A modified acetylcholine receptor δ-subunit enables a null mutant to survive beyond sexual maturation

    PubMed Central

    Epley, Kimberly E.; Urban, Jason M.; Ikenaga, Takanori; Ono, Fumihito

    2008-01-01

    The contraction of skeletal muscle is dependent upon synaptic transmission through acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). The lack of an AChR subunit causes a fetal akinesia in humans, leading to death in the first trimester and characteristic features of Fetal Akinesia Deformation Sequences (FADS). A corresponding null mutation of the δ-subunit in zebrafish (sofa potato; sop−/−) leads to the death of embryos around 5 days post-fertilization (dpf). In sop−/− mutants, we expressed modified δ-subunits, with one (δ1YFP) or two yellow fluorescent protein (δ2YFP) molecules fused at the intracellular loop, under the control of an α-actin promoter. AChRs containing these fusion proteins are fluorescent, assemble on the plasma membrane, make clusters under motor neuron endings, and generate synaptic current. We screened for germ-line transmission of the transgene and established a line of sop−/− fish stably expressing the δ2YFP. These δ2YFP/sop−/− embryos can mount escape behavior close to that of their wild type siblings. Synaptic currents in these embryos had a smaller amplitude, slower rise time, and slower decay when compared to wild type fish. Remarkably, these embryos grow to adulthood and display complex behaviors such as feeding and breeding. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a mutant animal corresponding to first trimester lethality in human that has been rescued by a transgene and survived to adulthood. In the rescued fish, a foreign promoter drove the transgene expression and the NMJ had altered synaptic strength. The survival of the transgenic animal delineates requirements for gene therapies of NMJ. PMID:19052214

  20. A human FSHB transgene encoding the double N-glycosylation mutant (Asn(7Δ) Asn(24Δ)) FSHβ subunit fails to rescue Fshb null mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huizhen; Butnev, Vladimir; Bousfield, George R; Kumar, T Rajendra

    2016-05-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is a gonadotrope-derived heterodimeric glycoprotein. Both the common α- and hormone-specific β subunits contain Asn-linked N-glycan chains. Recently, macroheterogeneous FSH glycoforms consisting of β-subunits that differ in N-glycan number were identified in pituitaries of several species and subsequently the recombinant human FSH glycoforms biochemically characterized. Although chemical modification and in vitro site-directed mutagenesis studies defined the roles of N-glycans on gonadotropin subunits, in vivo functional analyses in a whole-animal setting are lacking. Here, we have generated transgenic mice with gonadotrope-specific expression of either an HFSHB(WT) transgene that encodes human FSHβ WT subunit or an HFSHB(dgc) transgene that encodes a human FSHβ(Asn7Δ 24Δ) double N-glycosylation site mutant subunit, and separately introduced these transgenes onto Fshb null background using a genetic rescue strategy. We demonstrate that the human FSHβ(Asn7Δ 24Δ) double N-glycosylation site mutant subunit, unlike human FSHβ WT subunit, inefficiently combines with the mouse α-subunit in pituitaries of Fshb null mice. FSH dimer containing this mutant FSHβ subunit is inefficiently secreted with very low levels detectable in serum. Fshb null male mice expressing HFSHB(dgc) transgene are fertile and exhibit testis tubule size and sperm number similar to those of Fshb null mice. Fshb null female mice expressing the mutant, but not WT human FSHβ subunit-containing FSH dimer are infertile, demonstrate no evidence of estrus cycles, and many of the FSH-responsive genes remain suppressed in their ovaries. Thus, HFSHB(dgc) unlike HFSHB(WT) transgene does not rescue Fshb null mice. Our genetic approach provides direct in vivo evidence that N-linked glycans on FSHβ subunit are essential for its efficient assembly with the α-subunit to form FSH heterodimer in pituitary. Our studies also reveal that N-glycans on FSHβ subunit are

  1. Cognition and Mood-Related Behaviors in L3mbtl1 Null Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Erica Y.; Jiang, Yan; Mao, Wenjie; Futai, Kensuke; Hock, Hanno; Akbarian, Schahram

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in histone lysine methylation and epigenetic regulators of gene expression could play a role in the neurobiology and treatment of patients diagnosed with mood spectrum disorder, including depression and anxiety. Mutations and altered expression of various lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) and demethylases (KDMs) have been linked to changes in motivational and emotional behaviors in preclinical model systems. However, it is not known whether regulators operating downstream of histone lysine methylation could affect mood-related behavior. Malignant Brain Tumor (MBT) domain ‘chromatin reader’ proteins bind to methylated histone lysine residues and associate with chromatin remodeling complexes to facilitate or repress gene expression. MBT proteins, including the founding member, L3mbtl1, maintain high levels of expression in neurons of the mature brain. Here, we exposed L3mbtl1 null mutant mice to a wide range of tests exploring cognition and mood-relevant behaviors at baseline and in the context of social isolation, as a stressor to elicit depression-related behavior in susceptible mice. L3mbtl1 loss-of-function was associated with significant decreases in depression and and anxiety in some of the behavioral paradigms. This was not associated with a more generalized neurological dysfunction because cognition and memory remained unaltered in comparison to controls. These findings warrant further investigations on the role of MBT chromatin reader proteins in the context of emotional and affective behaviors. PMID:25849281

  2. Juvenile manifestation of ultrasound communication deficits in the neuroligin-4 null mutant mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Ju, Anes; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Tantra, Martesa; Krueger, Dilja; Brose, Nils; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2014-08-15

    Neuroligin-4 (Nlgn4) is a member of the neuroligin family of postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules. Loss-of-function mutations of NLGN4 are among the most frequent, known genetic causes of heritable autism. Adult Nlgn4 null mutant (Nlgn4(-/-)) mice are a construct valid model of human autism, with both genders displaying a remarkable autistic phenotype, including deficits in social interaction and communication as well as restricted and repetitive behaviors. In contrast to adults, autism-related abnormalities in neonatal and juvenile Nlgn4(-/-) mice have not been reported yet. The present study has been designed to systematically investigate in male and female Nlgn4(-/-) pups versus wildtype littermates (WT, Nlgn4(+/+)) developmental milestones and stimulus-induced ultrasound vocalization (USV). Neonatal development, followed daily from postnatal days (PND) 4 to 21, including physical development, neurological reflexes and neuromotor coordination, did not yield any differences between Nlgn4(-/-) and their WT littermates. USV in pups (PND8-9) in response to brief separation from their mothers revealed remarkable gender effects, and a genotype influence in females regarding latency to first call. In juveniles (PND22-23), USV monitoring upon exposure to an anesthetized female intruder mouse uncovered a clear genotype effect with reduced USV in Nlgn4(-/-) mice, and again a more prominent phenotype in females. Together, these data support an early manifestation of communication deficits in Nlgn4(-/-) mice that appear more pronounced in immature females with their overall stronger USV as compared to males.

  3. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Aumailley, Lucie; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Johnson, F Brad; Marette, André; Lebel, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice) do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles. PMID:26447695

  4. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aumailley, Lucie; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Johnson, F. Brad; Marette, André; Lebel, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice) do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles. PMID:26447695

  5. Kharon1 Null Mutants of Leishmania mexicana Are Avirulent in Mice and Exhibit a Cytokinesis Defect within Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Marco A.; Valli, Jessica; Gluenz, Eva; Landfear, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    In a variety of eukaryotes, flagella play important roles both in motility and as sensory organelles that monitor the extracellular environment. In the parasitic protozoan Leishmania mexicana, one glucose transporter isoform, LmxGT1, is targeted selectively to the flagellar membrane where it appears to play a role in glucose sensing. Trafficking of LmxGT1 to the flagellar membrane is dependent upon interaction with the KHARON1 protein that is located at the base of the flagellar axoneme. Remarkably, while Δkharon1 null mutants are viable as insect stage promastigotes, they are unable to survive as amastigotes inside host macrophages. Although Δkharon1 promastigotes enter macrophages and transform into amastigotes, these intracellular parasites are unable to execute cytokinesis and form multinucleate cells before dying. Notably, extracellular axenic amastigotes of Δkharon1 mutants replicate and divide normally, indicating a defect in the mutants that is only exhibited in the intra-macrophage environment. Although the flagella of Δkharon1 amastigotes adhere to the phagolysomal membrane of host macrophages, the morphology of the mutant flagella is often distorted. Additionally, these null mutants are completely avirulent following injection into BALB/c mice, underscoring the critical role of the KHARON1 protein for viability of intracellular amastigotes and disease in the animal model of leishmaniasis. PMID:26266938

  6. Stem cell expansion during carcinogenesis in stem cell-depleted conditional telomeric repeat factor 2 null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Bojovic, B; Ho, H-Y; Wu, J; Crowe, D L

    2013-10-24

    To examine the role of telomeric repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) in epithelial tumorigenesis, we characterized conditional loss of TRF2 expression in the basal layer of mouse epidermis. These mice exhibit some characteristics of dyskeratosis congenita, a human stem cell depletion syndrome caused by telomere dysfunction. The epidermis in conditional TRF2 null mice exhibited DNA damage response and apoptosis, which correlated with stem cell depletion. The stem cell population in conditional TRF2 null epidermis exhibited shorter telomeres than those in control mice. Squamous cell carcinomas induced in conditional TRF2 null mice developed with increased latency and slower growth due to reduced numbers of proliferating cells as the result of increased apoptosis. TRF2 null epidermal stem cells were found in both primary and metastatic tumors. Despite the low-grade phenotype of the conditional TRF2 null primary tumors, the number of metastatic lesions was similar to control cancers. Basal cells from TRF2 null tumors demonstrated extreme telomere shortening and dramatically increased numbers of telomeric signals by fluorescence in situ hybridization due to increased genomic instability and aneuploidy in these cancers. DNA damage response signals were detected at telomeres in TRF2 null tumor cells from these mice. The increased genomic instability in these tumors correlated with eightfold expansion of the transformed stem cell population compared with that in control cancers. We concluded that genomic instability resulting from loss of TRF2 expression provides biological advantages to the cancer stem cell population.

  7. Disruption of Npr1 gene differentially regulates the juxtaglomerular and distal tubular renin levels in null mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Minolfa C; Das, Subhankar; Somanna, Naveen K; Harrison-Bernard, Lisa M; Navar, L Gabriel; Pandey, Kailash N

    2012-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) exerts an inhibitory effect on juxtaglomerular (JG) renin synthesis and release by activating guanylyl cyclase/ natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA). Renin has also been localized in connecting tubule cells; however, the effect of ANP/NPRA signaling on tubular renin has not been determined. In the present study, we determined the role of NPRA in regulating both JG and tubular renin using Npr1 (coding for NPRA) gene-disrupted mice, which exhibit a hypertensive phenotype. Renin-positive immunoreactivity in Npr1-/- homozygous null mutant mice was significantly reduced compared with Npr1+/+ wild-type mice (23% vs 69% renin-positive glomeruli). However, after chronic diuretic treatment, Npr1-/- mice showed an increment of JG renin immunoreactivity compared with Npr1+/+ mice (70% vs 81% renin-positive glomeruli). There were no significant differences in the distal tubule renin between Npr1+/+ and Npr1-/- mice. However, after diuretic treatment, Npr1-/- mice showed a significant decrease in renin immunoreactivity in principal cells of cortical collecting ducts (p<0.05). The increased JG renin immunoreactivity after reduction in blood pressure in diuretic-treated Npr1-/- mice, demonstrates an inhibitory action of ANP/NPRA system on JG renin; however, a decreased expression of distal tubular renin suggests a differential effect of ANP/NPRA signaling on JG and distal tubular renin. PMID:23071870

  8. Phenotypic rescue by a bovine transgene in a Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase-null mutant of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Reveillaud, I.; Kongpachith, A.; Fleming, J.E.

    1994-02-01

    Null mutants for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) in Drosophila melanogaster are male sterile, have a greatly reduced adult life span, and are hypersensitive to paraquat. We have introduced a synthetic bovine CuZnSOD transgene under the transcriptional control of the D. melanogaster 5C actin promoter into a CuZnSOD-null mutant of D. melanogaster. This was carried out by P-element-mediated transformation of the Drosophila-bovine CuZnSOD transgene into a CuZnSOD{sup +} recipient strain followed by genetic crossing of the transgene into a strain carrying the CuZnSOD-null mutation, cSOD{sup n108}. The resulting transformants express bovine CuZnSOD exclusively to about 30% of normal Drosophila CuZnSOD levels. Expression of the Drosophila-bovine CuZnSOD transgene in the CuZnSOD-null mutant rescues male fertility and resistance to paraquat to apparently normal levels. However, adult life span is restored to only 30% of normal, and resistance to hyperoxia is 90% of that found in control flies. This striking differential restoration of pleiotropic phenotypes could be the result of a threshold of CuZnSOD expression necessary for normal male fertility and resistance to the toxicity of paraquat or hyperoxia which is lower than the threshold required to sustain a normal adult life span. Alternatively, the differential rescue of fertility, resistance to active oxygen, and life span might indicate different cell-specific transcriptional requirements for these functions which are normally provided by the control elements of the native CuZnSOD gene but are only partly compensated for by the transcriptional control elements of the actin 5C promoter. 29 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Glycine receptor knock-in mice and hyperekplexia-like phenotypes: comparisons with the null mutant.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Geoffrey S; Phelan, Rachel; Roberts, Michael T; Homanics, Gregg E; Bergeson, Susan E; Lopreato, Gregory F; Mihic, S John; Blednov, Yuri A; Harris, R Adron

    2003-09-01

    Strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors (GlyRs) inhibit neurotransmission in the spinal cord and brainstem. To better define the function of this receptor in vivo, we constructed a point mutation that impairs receptor function in the alpha1-subunit and compared these knock-in mice to oscillator (spdot) mice lacking functional GlyR alpha1-subunits. Mutation of the serine residue at amino acid 267 to glutamine (alpha1S267Q) results in a GlyR with normal glycine potency but decreased maximal currents, as shown by electrophysiological recordings using Xenopus oocytes. In addition, single-channel recordings using human embryonic kidney 293 cells indicated profoundly altered properties of the mutated GlyR. We produced knock-in mice bearing the GlyR alpha1 S267Q mutation to assess the in vivo consequences of selectively decreasing GlyR efficacy. Chloride uptake into brain synaptoneurosomes from knock-in mice revealed decreased responses to maximally effective glycine concentrations, although wild-type levels of GlyR expression were observed using 3H-strychnine binding and immunoblotting. A profound increase in the acoustic startle response was observed in knock-in mice as well as a "limb clenching" phenotype. In contrast, no changes in coordination or pain perception were observed using the rotarod or hot-plate tests, and there was no change in GABA(A)-receptor-mediated chloride uptake. Homozygous S267Q knock-in mice, like homozygous spdot mice, exhibited seizures and died within 3 weeks of birth. In heterozygous spdot mice, both decreased 3H-strychnine binding and chloride flux were observed; however, neither enhanced acoustic startle responses nor limb clenching were seen. These data demonstrate that a dominant-negative point mutation in GlyR disrupting normal function can produce a more dramatic phenotype than the corresponding recessive null mutation, and provides a new animal model to evaluate GlyR function in vivo. PMID:12954867

  10. Demonstrating Broadband Billion-to-One Contrast with the Visible Nulling Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Brian A.; Lyon, Richard G.; Petrone, Peter, III; Miller, Ian J.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Helmbrecht, Michael A.; Mallik, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    The key to broadband operation of the Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) is achieving a condition of quasi- achromatic destructive interference between combined beams. Here we present efforts towards meeting this goal using Fresnel rhombs in each interferometric arm as orthogonally aligned half wave phase retarders. The milestone goal of the demonstration is to achieve 1 × 10-9 contrast at 2/D over a 40 nm bandpass centered at 633 nm. Rhombs have been designed and fabricated, and a multi-step approach to alignment using coarse positioners for each rhomb and pair has been developed to get within range of piezo stages used for fine positioning. The previously demonstrated narrowband VNC sensing and control approach that uses a segmented deformable mirror is being adapted to broadband to include fine positioning of the piezo-mounted rhombs, all demonstrated in a low-pressure environment.

  11. Epidermal growth factor impairs palatal shelf adhesion and fusion in the Tgf-β 3 null mutant.

    PubMed

    Barrio, M Carmen; Del Río, Aurora; Murillo, Jorge; Maldonado, Estela; López-Gordillo, Yamila; Paradas-Lara, Irene; Hernandes, Luzmarina; Catón, Javier; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    The cleft palate presented by transforming growth factor-β3 (Tgf-β3) null mutant mice is caused by altered palatal shelf adhesion, cell proliferation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation and cell death. The expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-β1 (Tgf-β1) and muscle segment homeobox-1 (Msx-1) is modified in the palates of these knockout mice, and the cell proliferation defect is caused by the change in EGF expression. In this study, we aimed to determine whether this change in EGF expression has any effect on the other mechanisms altered in Tgf-β3 knockout mouse palates. We tested the effect of inhibiting EGF activity in vitro in the knockout palates via the addition of Tyrphostin AG 1478. We also investigated possible interactions between EGF, Tgf-β1 and Msx-1 in Tgf-β3 null mouse palate cultures. The results show that the inhibition of EGF activity in Tgf-β3 null mouse palate cultures improves palatal shelf adhesion and fusion, with a particular effect on cell death, and restores the normal distribution pattern of Msx-1 in the palatal mesenchyme. Inhibition of TGF-β1 does not affect either EGF or Msx-1 expression.

  12. Seizure susceptibility of neuropeptide-Y null mutant mice in amygdala kindling and chemical-induced seizure models.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Harlan E; Yang, Lijuan

    2004-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) administered exogenously is anticonvulsant, and, NPY null mutant mice are more susceptible to kainate-induced seizures. In order to better understand the potential role of NPY in epileptogenesis, the present studies investigated the development of amygdala kindling, post-kindling seizure thresholds, and anticonvulsant effects of carbamazepine and levetiracetam in 129S6/SvEv NPY(+/+) and NPY(-/-) mice. In addition, susceptibility to pilocarpine- and kainate-induced seizures was compared in NPY(+/+) and (-/-) mice. The rate of amygdala kindling development did not differ in the NPY(-/-) and NPY(+/+) mice either when kindling stimuli were presented once daily for at least 20 days, or, 12 times daily for 2 days. However, during kindling development, the NPY(-/-) mice had higher seizure severity scores and longer afterdischarge durations than the NPY(+/+) mice. Post-kindling, the NPY(-/-) mice had markedly lower afterdischarge thresholds and longer afterdischarge durations than NPY (+/+) mice. Carbamazepine and levetiracetam increased the seizure thresholds of both NPY (-/-) and (+/+) mice. In addition, NPY (-/-) mice had lower thresholds for both kainate- and pilocarpine-induced seizures. The present results in amygdala kindling and chemical seizure models suggest that NPY may play a more prominent role in determining seizure thresholds and severity of seizures than in events leading to epileptogenesis. In addition, a lack of NPY does not appear to confer drug-resistance in that carbamazepine and levetiracetam were anticonvulsant in both wild type (WT) and NPY null mutant mice.

  13. Leishmania infantum HSP70-II null mutant as candidate vaccine against leishmaniasis: a preliminary evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and no effective vaccine exists. The use of live attenuated vaccines is emerging as a promising vaccination strategy. Results In this study, we tested the ability of a Leishmania infantum deletion mutant, lacking both HSP70-II alleles (ΔHSP70-II), to provide protection against Leishmania infection in the L. major-BALB/c infection model. Administration of the mutant line by either intraperitoneal, intravenous or subcutaneous route invariably leads to the production of high levels of NO and the development in mice of type 1 immune responses, as determined by analysis of anti-Leishmania IgG subclasses. In addition, we have shown that ΔHSP70-II would be a safe live vaccine as immunodeficient SCID mice, and hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), infected with mutant parasites did not develop any sign of pathology. Conclusions The results suggest that the ΔHSP70-II mutant is a promising and safe vaccine, but further studies in more appropriate animal models (hamsters and dogs) are needed to appraise whether this attenuate mutant would be useful as vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:21794145

  14. Trks and p75 genes are differentially expressed in the inner ear of human embryos. What may Trks and p75 null mutant mice suggest on human development?

    PubMed

    Vega, J A; San José, I; Cabo, R; Rodriguez, S; Represa, J

    1999-09-10

    Recent work has shown the expression of Neurotrophins low (p75) and high affinity (Trk's A, B, and C) receptors in the developing inner ear sensory neurons of chick and mouse. Likewise the biological significance of such receptor expression was demonstrated by using both Trks and Neurotrophins null mutant mice. The present study was conducted to determine the expression of Trks and p75 proteins in the human inner ear throughout development. Hence to assess the potential role of Neurotrophins in the development of auditory and vestibular specific innervation in man. In other words, we intend to address the issue whether or not what null mutant mice for Trks and p75 have revealed on inner ear development may be relevant for human embryos. Fifty-two inner ears and their cochleovestibular ganglions (CVG) from human embryos and fetuses, ranging from 5 to 24 weeks of pregnancy were analyzed. Both Western blot and immunocytochemistry on frozen sections were used as complementary procedures. Quantitative Western blot studies revealed that Trk-B and C immunoreactivity (IR) appeared by embryonic week 5 in CVG neurons, increased at high levels between embryonic weeks 7 and 12, and later on, in 15 week-old specimens and older began to decrease to minimal levels. Trk-A IR was detected at just moderate levels during 5 and 7 weeks reflecting the presence of NGF high affinity receptors only at these earlier developmental ages. The p75 IR was detected at high degrees in the early stage of the 5th week and at abundant levels in all studied inner ears from the 7th to the 24th pregnancy week. These Western blot observations were corroborated by immunocytochemistry on frozen sections, which also revealed a major distribution of both p75 and Trks on neuronal bodies while p75 appears localized on supporting cells. Our findings reveal a tight correlation between p75 and Trks expression throughout human development and specific inner ear developmental events, such as target

  15. The immune phenotype of AhR null mouse mutants: not a simple mirror of xenobiotic receptor over-activation.

    PubMed

    Esser, Charlotte

    2009-02-15

    Intrinsic and induced cell differentiation and the cellular response to endogenous and exogenous signals are hallmarks of the immune system. Specific and common signalling cascades ensure a highly flexible and adapted response. Increasing evidence suggests that gene modulation by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, is an important part of these processes. For decades the AhR has been studied mainly for its toxic effects after artificial activation by man-made chemical pollutants such as dioxins. These studies gave important, albeit to some extent skewed, evidence for a mechanistic link between the AhR and the immune system. AhR null mutants and other mutants of the AhR signalling pathway have been generated and used to analyse the physiological function of the AhR, including for the developing and antigen-responding immune system. In this review I look at the natural immunological function(s) of the AhR.

  16. Unraveling the Mechanism for the Viability Deficiency of Shewanella oneidensis oxyR Null Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Miaomiao; Wan, Fen; Mao, Yinting

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oxidative stresses triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage various cellular components are unavoidable for virtually all living organisms. In defense, microorganisms have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense, respond to, and battle against ROS. Shewanella oneidensis, an important research model for applied and environmental microbes, employs OxyR to mediate the response to H2O2 by derepressing the production of the major H2O2 scavenger KatB as a major means toward these goals. Surprisingly, despite enhanced H2O2 degradation, the oxyR mutant carries a viability deficiency phenotype (plating defect), which can be suppressed by the addition of exogenous iron species. Experiments showed that the defect was not due to iron starvation. Rather, multiple lines of evidence suggested that H2O2 generated abiotically in lysogeny broth (LB) is responsible for the defect by quickly killing mutant cells. We then showed that the iron species suppressed the plating defect by two distinct mechanisms, either as an H2O2 scavenger without involving living cells or as an environmental cue to stimulate an OxyR-independent response to help cells cope with oxidative stress. Based on the suppression of the plating defect by overproduction of H2O2 scavengers in vivo, we propose that cellular components that are vulnerable to H2O2 and responsible for the defect may reside outside the cytoplasm. IMPORTANCE In bacteria, OxyR is the major regulator controlling the cellular response to H2O2. The loss of OxyR results in reduced viability in many species, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. We showed in S. oneidensis that this defect was due to H2O2 generated abiotically in LB. We then showed that this defect could be corrected by the addition of Fe2+ or catalase to the LB or increased intracellular production of catalase. Further analyses revealed that Fe2+ was able not only to decompose H2O2 directly but also to stimulate the activity of OxyR-independent H2O2

  17. Alternative pathways for the sorting of soluble vacuolar proteins in yeast: a vps35 null mutant missorts and secretes only a subset of vacuolar hydrolases.

    PubMed Central

    Paravicini, G; Horazdovsky, B F; Emr, S D

    1992-01-01

    vps35 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibit severe defects in the localization of carboxypeptidase Y, a soluble vacuolar hydrolase. We have cloned the wild-type VPS35 gene by complementation of the vacuolar protein sorting defect exhibited by the vps35-17 mutant. Sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame predicted to encode a protein of 937 amino acids that lacks any obvious hydrophobic domains. Subcellular fractionation studies indicated that 80% of Vps35p peripherally associates with a membranous particulate cell fraction. The association of Vps35p with this fraction appears to be saturable; when overproduced, the vast majority of Vps35p remains in a soluble fraction. Disruption of the VPS35 gene demonstrated that it is not essential for yeast cell growth. However, the null allele of VPS35 results in a differential defect in the sorting of vacuolar carboxypeptidase Y (CPY), proteinase A (PrA), proteinase B (PrB), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). proCPY was quantitatively missorted and secreted by delta vps35 cells, whereas almost all of proPrA, proPrB, and proALP were retained within the cell and converted to their mature forms, indicating delivery to the vacuole. Based on these observations, we propose that alternative pathways exist for the sorting and/or delivery of proteins to the vacuole. Images PMID:1498362

  18. Staphylococcus aureus Formyl-Methionyl Transferase Mutants Demonstrate Reduced Virulence Factor Production and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Thomas; Huang, Jianzhong; Fan, Frank; Rogers, Shannon; Gentry, Daniel; Holland, Reannon; DeMarsh, Peter; Zalacain, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of peptide deformylase (PDF) represent a new class of antibacterial agents with a novel mechanism of action. Mutations that inactivate formyl methionyl transferase (FMT), the enzyme that formylates initiator methionyl-tRNA, lead to an alternative initiation of protein synthesis that does not require deformylation and are the predominant cause of resistance to PDF inhibitors in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutations in FMT impart pleiotropic effects that include a reduced growth rate, a nonhemolytic phenotype, and a drastic reduction in production of multiple extracellular proteins, including key virulence factors, such as α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), that have been associated with S. aureus pathogenicity. Consequently, S. aureus FMT mutants are greatly attenuated in neutropenic and nonneutropenic murine pyelonephritis infection models and show very high survival rates compared with wild-type S. aureus. These newly discovered effects on extracellular virulence factor production demonstrate that FMT-null mutants have a more severe fitness cost than previously anticipated, leading to a substantial loss of pathogenicity and a restricted ability to produce an invasive infection. PMID:23571548

  19. Staphylococcus aureus formyl-methionyl transferase mutants demonstrate reduced virulence factor production and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Thomas; Huang, Jianzhong; Fan, Frank; Rogers, Shannon; Gentry, Daniel; Holland, Reannon; Demarsh, Peter; Aubart, Kelly; Zalacain, Magdalena

    2013-07-01

    Inhibitors of peptide deformylase (PDF) represent a new class of antibacterial agents with a novel mechanism of action. Mutations that inactivate formyl methionyl transferase (FMT), the enzyme that formylates initiator methionyl-tRNA, lead to an alternative initiation of protein synthesis that does not require deformylation and are the predominant cause of resistance to PDF inhibitors in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutations in FMT impart pleiotropic effects that include a reduced growth rate, a nonhemolytic phenotype, and a drastic reduction in production of multiple extracellular proteins, including key virulence factors, such as α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), that have been associated with S. aureus pathogenicity. Consequently, S. aureus FMT mutants are greatly attenuated in neutropenic and nonneutropenic murine pyelonephritis infection models and show very high survival rates compared with wild-type S. aureus. These newly discovered effects on extracellular virulence factor production demonstrate that FMT-null mutants have a more severe fitness cost than previously anticipated, leading to a substantial loss of pathogenicity and a restricted ability to produce an invasive infection.

  20. Altered expression of neuropeptides in FoxG1-null heterozygous mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Frullanti, Elisa; Amabile, Sonia; Lolli, Maria Grazia; Bartolini, Anna; Livide, Gabriella; Landucci, Elisa; Mari, Francesca; Vaccarino, Flora M; Ariani, Francesca; Massimino, Luca; Renieri, Alessandra; Meloni, Ilaria

    2016-02-01

    Foxg1 gene encodes for a transcription factor essential for telencephalon development in the embryonic mammalian forebrain. Its complete absence is embryonic lethal while Foxg1 heterozygous mice are viable but display microcephaly, altered hippocampal neurogenesis and behavioral and cognitive deficiencies. In order to evaluate the effects of Foxg1 alteration in adult brain, we performed expression profiling in total brains from Foxg1+/- heterozygous mutants and wild-type littermates. We identified statistically significant differences in expression levels for 466 transcripts (P<0.001), 29 of which showed a fold change ≥ 1.5. Among the differentially expressed genes was found a group of genes expressed in the basal ganglia and involved in the control of movements. A relevant (three to sevenfold changes) and statistically significant increase of expression, confirmed by qRT-PCR, was found in two highly correlated genes with expression restricted to the hypothalamus: Oxytocin (Oxt) and Arginine vasopressin (Avp). These neuropeptides have an important role in maternal and social behavior, and their alteration is associated with impaired social interaction and autistic behavior. In addition, Neuronatin (Nnat) levels appear significantly higher both in Foxg1+/- whole brain and in hippocampal neurons after silencing Foxg1, strongly suggesting that it is directly or indirectly repressed by Foxg1. During fetal and neonatal brain development, Nnat may regulate neuronal excitability, receptor trafficking and calcium-dependent signaling and, in the adult brain, it is predominantly expressed in parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons. Overall, these results implicate the overexpression of a group of neuropeptides in the basal ganglia, hypothalamus, cortex and hippocampus in the pathogenesis FOXG1 behavioral impairments.

  1. Urease-Null and Hydrogenase-Null Phenotypes of a Phylloplane Bacterium Reveal Altered Nickel Metabolism in Two Soybean Mutants 1

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Mark A.; Polacco, Joseph C.

    1992-01-01

    Mutation at either of two genetic loci (Eu2 or Eu3) in soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) results in a pleiotropic elimination of the activity of both major urease isozymes. Surprisingly, the phenotype of a phylloplane bacterium, Methylobacterium mesophilicum, living on the leaves of eu2/eu2 or eu3-e1/eu3-e1 mutants is also affected by these plant mutations. The bacteria isolated from leaves of these soybean mutants have transient urease- and hydrogenase-deficient phenotypes that can be corrected by the addition of nickel to free-living cultures. The same bacterium growing on wild-type soybeans or on urease mutants eu1-sun/eu1-sun or eu4/eu4, each deficient in only one urease isozyme, are urease-positive. These results suggest that the bacterium living on the eu2/eu2 or eu3-e1/eu3-e1 mutant is unable to produce an active urease or hydrogenase because it is effectively starved for nickel. We infer that mutations at Eu2 or Eu3 result in defects in nickel metabolism but not in Ni2+ uptake or transport, because eu2/eu2 and eu3-e1/eu3-e1 mutants exhibit normal uptake of 63NiCl2. Moreover, wild-type plants grafted on mutant rootstocks produce seeds with fully active urease, indicating unimpeded transport of nickel through mutant roots and stems. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:16668768

  2. Altered Body Weight Regulation in CK1ε Null and tau Mutant Mice on Regular Chow and High Fat Diets

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lili; Summa, Keith C.; Olker, Christopher; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms results in metabolic dysfunction. Casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1ε) is a canonical circadian clock gene. Null and tau mutations in CK1ε show distinct effects on circadian period. To investigate the role of CK1ε in body weight regulation under both regular chow (RC) and high fat (HF) diet conditions, we examined body weight on both RC and HF diets in CK1ε−/− and CK1εtau/tau mice on a standard 24 hr light-dark (LD) cycle. Given the abnormal entrainment of CK1εtau/tau mice on a 24 hr LD cycle, a separate set of CK1εtau/tau mice were tested under both diet conditions on a 20 hr LD cycle, which more closely matches their endogenous period length. On the RC diet, both CK1ε−/− and CK1εtau/tau mutants on a 24 hr LD cycle and CK1εtau/tau mice on a 20 hr LD cycle exhibited significantly lower body weights, despite similar overall food intake and activity levels. On the HF diet, CK1εtau/tau mice on a 20 hr LD cycle were protected against the development of HF diet-induced excess weight gain. These results provide additional evidence supporting a link between circadian rhythms and energy regulation at the genetic level, particularly highlighting CK1ε involved in the integration of circadian biology and metabolic physiology. PMID:27144030

  3. Characterization of null mutants of the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenic enzymes in S. cerevisiae through metabolic network modeling verified by chemostat cultivation.

    PubMed

    Stückrath, I; Lange, H C; Kötter, P; van Gulik, W M; Entian, K-D; Heijnen, J J

    2002-01-01

    Biomass yields for several null mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were successfully predicted with a metabolic network model. Energetic parameters of the model were obtained from growth data in C-limited aerobic chemostat cultures of the corresponding wild-type strain, which exhibited a P/O ratio of 1.46, a non-growth-related maintenance of 56 mmol ATP/C-mol biomass/h, and a growth-related requirement of 655 mmol ATP/C-mol biomass. Biomass yields and carbon uptake rates were modeled for different mutants incapacitated in their glyoxylate cycle and their gluconeogenesis. Biomass yields were calculated for different feed ratios of glucose to ethanol, and decreases for higher ethanol fractions were correctly predicted for mutants with deletions of the malate synthase, the isocitrate lyase, or the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. The growth of the fructose- 1,6-bisphosphatase deletion mutant was anticipated less accurate, but the tendency was modeled correctly.

  4. Effects on hippocampus of lifelong absence of glucocorticoids in the pro-opiomelanocortin null mutant mouse reveal complex relationship between glucocorticoids and hippocampal structure and function.

    PubMed

    Ostwald, Dirk; Karpac, Jason; Hochgeschwender, Ute

    2006-01-01

    In humans changes in serum cortisol levels have been observed with aging, stress, and with affective disorders such as major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Corticosteroids are known to influence hippocampal structure and function; specifically, plasma corticosteroid levels have been inversely correlated with hippocampal cell proliferation, cell death, and impaired memory function. The relationship between corticosteroids and structure and function of the hippocampus has been studied in experimental systems in adult animals by increasing or decreasing corticosterone levels through pharmacological supplementation and through surgical removal of the adrenal gland. Here, we utilized the genetically engineered pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) null mutant mouse, which because of the lack of all POMC peptides has no corticosterone from birth throughout life. The effect of this lifelong absence of corticosterone on the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is a decrease in granule cell density, which correlated with a decrease in cell proliferation but not an increase in cell degeneration. Fine morphology of granule cells was unaltered. Analyses of gene expression revealed no changes in POMC null mutant vs wild-type hippocampus with respect to levels of expression of corticoid receptor genes or genes known to be regulated by corticosterone. Spatial learning as tested by the Morris water maze was not altered in the POMC null mutant mouse. Taken together with findings from other studies of the effects of altered levels of corticosteroids on the hippocampus, our results argue for a complex homeostasis in which disturbances of any one factor can offset the system in varying ways.

  5. Characterization of a New Pink-Fruited Tomato Mutant Results in the Identification of a Null Allele of the SlMYB12 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Moreno, Josefina-Patricia; Tzfadia, Oren; Forment, Javier; Presa, Silvia; Rogachev, Ilana; Meir, Sagit; Orzaez, Diego; Aharoni, Aspah; Granell, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    The identification and characterization of new tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutants affected in fruit pigmentation and nutritional content can provide valuable insights into the underlying biology, as well as a source of new alleles for breeding programs. To date, all characterized pink-pigmented tomato fruit mutants appear to result from low SlMYB12 transcript levels in the fruit skin. Two new mutant lines displaying a pink fruit phenotype (pf1 and pf2) were characterized in this study. In the pf mutants, SlMYB12 transcripts accumulated to wild-type levels but exhibited the same truncation, which resulted in the absence of the essential MYB activation domain coding region. Allelism and complementation tests revealed that both pf mutants were allelic to the y locus and showed the same recessive null allele in homozygosis: Δy A set of molecular and metabolic effects, reminiscent of those observed in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) myb11 myb12 myb111 triple mutant, were found in the tomato Δy mutants. To our knowledge, these have not been described previously, and our data support the idea of their being null mutants, in contrast to previously described transcriptional hypomorphic pink fruit lines. We detected a reduction in the expression of several flavonol glycosides and some associated glycosyl transferases. Transcriptome analysis further revealed that the effects of the pf mutations extended beyond the flavonoid pathway into the interface between primary and secondary metabolism. Finally, screening for Myb-binding sites in the candidate gene promoter sequences revealed that 141 of the 152 co-down-regulated genes may be direct targets of SlMYB12 regulation. PMID:27208285

  6. Characterization of a New Pink-Fruited Tomato Mutant Results in the Identification of a Null Allele of the SlMYB12 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Moreno, Josefina-Patricia; Tzfadia, Oren; Forment, Javier; Presa, Silvia; Rogachev, Ilana; Meir, Sagit; Orzaez, Diego; Aharoni, Aspah; Granell, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    The identification and characterization of new tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutants affected in fruit pigmentation and nutritional content can provide valuable insights into the underlying biology, as well as a source of new alleles for breeding programs. To date, all characterized pink-pigmented tomato fruit mutants appear to result from low SlMYB12 transcript levels in the fruit skin. Two new mutant lines displaying a pink fruit phenotype (pf1 and pf2) were characterized in this study. In the pf mutants, SlMYB12 transcripts accumulated to wild-type levels but exhibited the same truncation, which resulted in the absence of the essential MYB activation domain coding region. Allelism and complementation tests revealed that both pf mutants were allelic to the y locus and showed the same recessive null allele in homozygosis: Δy A set of molecular and metabolic effects, reminiscent of those observed in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) myb11 myb12 myb111 triple mutant, were found in the tomato Δy mutants. To our knowledge, these have not been described previously, and our data support the idea of their being null mutants, in contrast to previously described transcriptional hypomorphic pink fruit lines. We detected a reduction in the expression of several flavonol glycosides and some associated glycosyl transferases. Transcriptome analysis further revealed that the effects of the pf mutations extended beyond the flavonoid pathway into the interface between primary and secondary metabolism. Finally, screening for Myb-binding sites in the candidate gene promoter sequences revealed that 141 of the 152 co-down-regulated genes may be direct targets of SlMYB12 regulation.

  7. An Ash1-Like Protein MoKMT2H Null Mutant Is Delayed for Conidium Germination and Pathogenesis in Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhaojun; Yin, Yue; Sun, Xuan; Han, Jun; Sun, Qing peng; Lu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Ash1 is a known H3K36-specific histone demethylase that is required for normal Hox gene expression and fertility in Drosophila and mammals. However, little is known about the expression and function of the fungal ortholog of Ash1 in phytopathogenic fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Here we report that MoKMT2H, an Ash1-like protein, is required for conidium germination and virulence in rice. We obtained MoKMT2H null mutant (ΔMoKMT2H) using a target gene replacement strategy. In the ΔMoKMT2H null mutants, global histone methyltransferase modifications (H3K4me3, H3K9me3, H3K27me3, and H3K36me2/3) of the genome were unaffected. The ΔMoKMT2H mutants showed no defect in vegetative hyphal growth, conidium morphology, conidiation, or disease lesion formation on rice leaves. However, the MoKMT2H deletion mutants were delayed for conidium germination and consequently had decreased virulence. Taken together, our results indicated that MoKMT2H plays an important role in conidium germination during appressorium formation in the rice blast fungus and perhaps other pathogenic plant fungi. PMID:27747223

  8. A (p)ppGpp-null mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi is partially attenuated in humans due to multiple conflicting phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Holley, Concerta; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Li, Wei; Fortney, Kate R; Janowicz, Diane M; Ellinger, Sheila; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2014-08-01

    (p)ppGpp responds to nutrient limitation through a global change in gene regulation patterns to increase survival. The stringent response has been implicated in the virulence of several pathogenic bacterial species. Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, has homologs of both relA and spoT, which primarily synthesize and hydrolyze (p)ppGpp in Escherichia coli. We constructed relA and relA spoT deletion mutants to assess the contribution of (p)ppGpp to H. ducreyi pathogenesis. Both the relA single mutant and the relA spoT double mutant failed to synthesize (p)ppGpp, suggesting that relA is the primary synthetase of (p)ppGpp in H. ducreyi. Compared to the parent strain, the double mutant was partially attenuated for pustule formation in human volunteers. The double mutant had several phenotypes that favored attenuation, including increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. The increased sensitivity to oxidative stress could be complemented in trans. However, the double mutant also exhibited phenotypes that favored virulence. When grown to the mid-log phase, the double mutant was significantly more resistant than its parent to being taken up by human macrophages and exhibited increased transcription of lspB, which is involved in resistance to phagocytosis. Additionally, compared to the parent, the double mutant also exhibited prolonged survival in the stationary phase. In E. coli, overexpression of DksA compensates for the loss of (p)ppGpp; the H. ducreyi double mutant expressed higher transcript levels of dksA than the parent strain. These data suggest that the partial attenuation of the double mutant is likely the net result of multiple conflicting phenotypes.

  9. Analysis of the presence of cell proliferation-related molecules in the Tgf-β3 null mutant mouse palate reveals misexpression of EGF and Msx-1.

    PubMed

    del Río, A; Barrio, M C; Murillo, J; Maldonado, E; López-Gordillo, Y; Martínez-Sanz, E; Martínez, M L; Martínez-Álvarez, C

    2011-01-01

    The Tgf-β(3) null mutant mouse palate presents several cellular anomalies that lead to the appearance of cleft palate. One of them concerns the cell proliferation of both the palatal medial edge epithelium and mesenchyme. In this work, our aim was to determine whether there was any variation in the presence/distribution of several cell proliferation-related molecules that could be responsible for the cell proliferation defects observed in these palates. Our results showed no difference in the presence of EGF-R, PDGF-A, TGF-β(2), Bmp-2, and Bmp-4, and differences were minimal for FGF-10 and Shh. However, the expression of EGF and Msx-1 changed substantially. The shift of the EGF protein expression was the one that most correlated with that of cell proliferation. This molecule is regulated by TGF-β(3), and experiments blocking its activity in culture suggest that EGF misexpression in the Tgf-β(3) null mutant mouse palate plays a role in the cell proliferation defect observed.

  10. Developmental delay in a Streptomyces venezuelae glgE null mutant is associated with the accumulation of α-maltose 1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Miah, Farzana; Bibb, Maureen J; Barclay, J Elaine; Findlay, Kim C; Bornemann, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    The GlgE pathway is thought to be responsible for the conversion of trehalose into a glycogen-like α-glucan polymer in bacteria. Trehalose is first converted to maltose, which is phosphorylated by maltose kinase Pep2 to give α-maltose 1-phosphate. This is the donor substrate of the maltosyl transferase GlgE that is known to extend α-1,4-linked maltooligosaccharides, which are thought to be branched with α-1,6 linkages. The genome of Streptomyces venezuelae contains all the genes coding for the GlgE pathway enzymes but none of those of related pathways, including glgC and glgA of the glycogen pathway. This provides an opportunity to study the GlgE pathway in isolation. The genes of the GlgE pathway were upregulated at the onset of sporulation, consistent with the known timing of α-glucan deposition. A constructed ΔglgE null mutant strain was viable but showed a delayed developmental phenotype when grown on maltose, giving less cell mass and delayed sporulation. Pre-spore cells and spores of the mutant were frequently double the length of those of the wild-type, implying impaired cross-wall formation, and spores showed reduced tolerance to stress. The mutant accumulated α-maltose 1-phosphate and maltose but no α-glucan. Therefore, the GlgE pathway is necessary and sufficient for polymer biosynthesis. Growth of the ΔglgE mutant on galactose and that of a Δpep2 mutant on maltose were analysed. In both cases, neither accumulation of α-maltose 1-phosphate/α-glucan nor a developmental delay was observed. Thus, high levels of α-maltose 1-phosphate are responsible for the developmental phenotype of the ΔglgE mutant, rather than the lack of α-glucan.

  11. Gamma Interferon (IFN-γ) Receptor Null-Mutant Mice Are More Susceptible to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection than IFN-γ Ligand Null-Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, Edouard; Tanamachi, Becky; Openshaw, Harry; Mann, Jeff; Clarke, Ken

    1999-01-01

    Mouse strains with null mutations in the gamma interferon gene (Ifng) or the gamma interferon receptor gene (Ifngr) have been engineered. The use of these strains as animal models of viral and bacterial infections has enhanced our understanding of the role of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in the host immune response. However, direct comparisons between Ifng−/− (GKO) and Ifngr−/− (RGKO) mice have been problematic because previously available strains of these mice have had different genetic backgrounds (i.e., C57BL/6 and BALB/c for GKO mice and 129/Sv//Ev for RGKO mice). To enable direct comparison of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections in GKO and RGKO mice, we introduced the IFN-γ null mutation into the 129/Sv//Ev background. We report that, after HSV-1 inoculation, mortality was significantly greater in RGKO mice than in GKO mice (38 versus 23%, P = 0.0001). Similarly, the mortality from vaccinia virus challenge was significantly greater in RGKO mice than in GKO mice. With differences in genetic background excluded as a confounding issue, these results are consistent with the existence of an alternative ligand(s) for the IFN-γ receptor that is also capable of mediating protection against viral challenge. PMID:10233988

  12. Stimulation of the Replication of ICP0-Null Mutant Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and pp71-Deficient Human Cytomegalovirus by Epstein-Barr Virus Tegument Protein BNRF1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yongxu; Orr, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is now well established that several cellular proteins that are components of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs, also known as ND10) have restrictive effects on herpesvirus infections that are countered by viral proteins that are either present in the virion particle or are expressed during the earliest stages of infection. For example, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) immediate early (IE) protein ICP0 overcomes the restrictive effects of PML-NB components PML, Sp100, hDaxx, and ATRX while human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IE protein IE1 targets PML and Sp100, and its tegument protein pp71 targets hDaxx and ATRX. The functions of these viral regulatory proteins are in part interchangeable; thus, both IE1 and pp71 stimulate the replication of ICP0-null mutant HSV-1, while ICP0 increases plaque formation by pp71-deficient HCMV. Here, we extend these studies by examining proteins that are expressed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We report that EBV tegument protein BNRF1, discovered by other investigators to target the hDaxx/ATRX complex, increases the replication of both ICP0-null mutant HSV-1 and pp71-deficient HCMV. In addition, EBV protein EBNA-LP, which targets Sp100, also augments ICP0-null mutant HSV-1 replication. The combination of these two EBV regulatory proteins had a greater effect than each one individually. These findings reinforce the concept that disruption of the functions of PML-NB proteins is important for efficient herpesvirus infections. IMPORTANCE Whether a herpesvirus initiates a lytic infection in a host cell or establishes quiescence or latency is influenced by events that occur soon after the viral genome has entered the host cell nucleus. Certain cellular proteins respond in a restrictive manner to the invading pathogen's DNA, while viral functions are expressed that counteract the cell-mediated repression. One aspect of cellular restriction of herpesvirus infections is mediated by components of nuclear structures known as

  13. FosB null mutant mice show enhanced methamphetamine neurotoxicity: potential involvement of FosB in intracellular feedback signaling and astroglial function.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kumi O; Ornthanalai, Veravej G; Kato, Tadafumi; Murphy, Niall P

    2010-02-01

    Previous studies show that (1) two members of fos family transcription factors, c-Fos and FosB, are induced in frontal brain regions by methamphetamine; (2) null mutation of c-Fos exacerbates methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity; and (3) null mutation of FosB enhances behavioral responses to cocaine. Here we sought a role of FosB in responses to methamphetamine by studying FosB null mutant (-/-) mice. After a 10 mg/kg methamphetamine injection, FosB(-/-) mice were more prone to self-injury. Concomitantly, the intracellular feedback regulators of Sprouty and Rad-Gem-Kir (RGK) family transcripts had lower expression profiles in the frontoparietal cortex and striatum of the FosB(-/-) mice. Three days after administration of four 10 mg/kg methamphetamine injections, the frontoparietal cortex and striatum of FosB(-/-) mice contained more degenerated neurons as determined by Fluoro-Jade B staining. The abundance of the small neutral amino acids, serine, alanine, and glycine, was lower and/or was poorly induced after methamphetamine administration in the frontoparietal cortex and striatum of FosB(-/-) mice. In addition, methamphetamine-treated FosB(-/-) frontoparietal and piriform cortices showed more extravasation of immunoglobulin, which is indicative of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia, brain dopamine content, and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the striatum, however, were not different between genotypes. These data indicate that FosB is involved in thermoregulation-independent protective functions against methamphetamine neurotoxicity in postsynaptic neurons. Our findings suggest two possible mechanisms of FosB-mediated neuroprotection: one is induction of negative feedback regulation within postsynaptic neurons through Sprouty and RGK. Another is supporting astroglial function such as maintenance of the blood-brain barrier, and metabolism of serine and glycine, which are important glial modulators of nerve cells

  14. Role of RANKL (TNFSF11)-Dependent Osteopetrosis in the Dental Phenotype of Msx2 Null Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Castaneda, Beatriz; Simon, Yohann; Ferbus, Didier; Robert, Benoit; Chesneau, Julie; Mueller, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The MSX2 homeoprotein is implicated in all aspects of craniofacial skeletal development. During postnatal growth, MSX2 is expressed in all cells involved in mineralized tissue formation and plays a role in their differentiation and function. Msx2 null (Msx2−/−) mice display complex craniofacial skeleton abnormalities with bone and tooth defects. A moderate form osteopetrotic phenotype is observed, along with decreased expression of RANKL (TNFSF11), the main osteoclast-differentiating factor. In order to elucidate the role of such an osteopetrosis in the Msx2−/− mouse dental phenotype, a bone resorption rescue was performed by mating Msx2−/− mice with a transgenic mouse line overexpressing Rank (Tnfrsf11a). Msx2−/− RankTg mice had significant improvement in the molar phenotype, while incisor epithelium defects were exacerbated in the enamel area, with formation of massive osteolytic tumors. Although compensation for RANKL loss of function could have potential as a therapy for osteopetrosis, but in Msx2−/− mice, this approach via RANK overexpression in monocyte-derived lineages, amplified latent epithelial tumor development in the peculiar continuously growing incisor. PMID:24278237

  15. Trypanosoma brucei (UMP synthase null mutants) are avirulent in mice, but recover virulence upon prolonged culture in vitro while retaining pyrimidine auxotrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Han B; Sienkiewicz, Natasha; Wyllie, Susan; Patterson, Stephen; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2013-01-01

    African trypanosomes are capable of both de novo synthesis and salvage of pyrimidines. The last two steps in de novo synthesis are catalysed by UMP synthase (UMPS) – a bifunctional enzyme comprising orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT) and orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC). To investigate the essentiality of pyrimidine biosynthesis in Trypanosoma brucei, we generated a umps double knockout (DKO) line by gene replacement. The DKO was unable to grow in pyrimidine-depleted medium in vitro, unless supplemented with uracil, uridine, deoxyuridine or UMP. DKO parasites were completely resistant to 5-fluoroorotate and hypersensitive to 5-fluorouracil, consistent with loss of UMPS, but remained sensitive to pyrazofurin indicating that, unlike mammalian cells, the primary target of pyrazofurin is not OMPDC. The null mutant was unable to infect mice indicating that salvage of host pyrimidines is insufficient to support growth. However, following prolonged culture in vitro, parasites regained virulence in mice despite retaining pyrimidine auxotrophy. Unlike the wild-type, both pyrimidine auxotrophs secreted substantial quantities of orotate, significantly higher in the virulent DKO line. We propose that this may be responsible for the recovery of virulence in mice, due to host metabolism converting orotate to uridine, thereby bypassing the loss of UMPS in the parasite. PMID:23980694

  16. Cell wall monoglycine cross-bridges and methicillin hypersusceptibility in a femAB null mutant of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Strandén, A M; Ehlert, K; Labischinski, H; Berger-Bächi, B

    1997-01-01

    The femAB operon is involved in the formation of the characteristic pentaglycine side chain of the staphylococcal peptidoglycan. Allele replacement of the femAB operon with the tetracycline resistance determinant tetK in a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain resulted in impaired growth, methicillin hypersusceptibility, and lysostaphin resistance. The usual pentaglycine cross-bridges were replaced by monoglycine bridges exclusively, and cross-linking of the peptidoglycan strands was drastically reduced. Complementation of the femAB null mutant by either femA or femAB resulted in the extension of the cross-bridges to a triglycine or a pentaglycine, respectively. This finding suggests that FemA is responsible for the formation of glycines 2 and 3, and FemB is responsible for formation of glycines 4 and 5, of the pentaglycine side chain of the peptidoglycan precursor. Moreover, it can be deduced that addition of the first glycine must occur by a femAB-independent mechanism. PMID:8981974

  17. Modified Clp Protease Complex in the ClpP3 Null Mutant and Consequences for Chloroplast Development and Function in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jitae; Olinares, Paul Dominic; Oh, Soo-hyun; Ghisaura, Stefania; Poliakov, Anton; Ponnala, Lalit; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2013-01-01

    The plastid ClpPRT protease consists of two heptameric rings of ClpP1/ClpR1/ClpR2/ClpR3/ClpR4 (the R-ring) and ClpP3/ClpP4/ClpP5/ClpP6 (the P-ring) and peripherally associated ClpT1/ClpT2 subunits. Here, we address the contributions of ClpP3 and ClpP4 to ClpPRT core organization and function in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). ClpP4 is strictly required for embryogenesis, similar to ClpP5. In contrast, loss of ClpP3 (clpp3-1) leads to arrest at the hypocotyl stage; this developmental arrest can be removed by supplementation with sucrose or glucose. Heterotrophically grown clpp3-1 can be transferred to soil and generate viable seed, which is surprising, since we previously showed that CLPR2 and CLPR4 null alleles are always sterile and die on soil. Based on native gels and mass spectrometry-based quantification, we show that despite the loss of ClpP3, modified ClpPR core(s) could be formed, albeit at strongly reduced levels. A large portion of ClpPR subunits accumulated in heptameric rings, with overaccumulation of ClpP1/ClpP5/ClpP6 and ClpR3. Remarkably, the association of ClpT1 to the modified Clp core was unchanged. Large-scale quantitative proteomics assays of clpp3-1 showed a 50% loss of photosynthetic capacity and the up-regulation of plastoglobules and all chloroplast stromal chaperone systems. Specific chloroplast proteases were significantly up-regulated, whereas the major thylakoid protease (FtsH1/FtsH2/FtsH5/FtsH8) was clearly unchanged, indicating a controlled protease network response. clpp3-1 showed a systematic decrease of chloroplast-encoded proteins that are part of the photosynthetic apparatus but not of chloroplast-encoded proteins with other functions. Candidate substrates and an explanation for the differential phenotypes between the CLPP3, CLPP4, and CLPP5 null mutants are discussed. PMID:23548781

  18. Early passage neonatal and adult keratinocytes are sensitive to apoptosis induced by infection with an ICP27-null mutant of herpes simplex virus 1.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Prajakta; Nguyen, Marie L

    2013-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a enveloped, double stranded DNA virus that is the causative agent of various diseases including cold sores, encephalitis, and ocular keratitis. Previous research has determined that HSV-1 modulates cellular apoptotic pathways. Apoptosis is triggered in infected cells early in infection; however, later in the infection the apoptotic response is suppressed due to the expression of several viral apoptotic antagonists. This sets us a delicate balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic processes during the lytic phase of infection. Several studies have demonstrated that the apoptotic balance can be shifted during infection of certain cell types, leading to apoptosis of the infected cells (HSV-1-dependent apoptosis). For example, HEp-2 cells infected with an ICP27-null recombinant HSV-1 virus undergo HSV-1-dependent apoptosis. Differences in the sensitivity to HSV-1-dependent apoptosis have been revealed. Although many tumor cells have been found to be highly sensitive to this apoptotic response, with the exception hematological cells, all primary human cells tested prior to this study have been shown to be resistant to HSV-1-dependent apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate that early passage neonatal and adult human keratinocytes, which are usually the first cells to encounter HSV-1 in human infection and support the lytic stage of the life cycle, display membrane blebbing and ballooning, chromatin condensation, caspase activation, and cleavage of cellular caspase substrates when infected with an ICP27-null recombinant of HSV-1. Furthermore, caspase activation is needed for the efficient apoptotic response. These results suggest that apoptotic machinery may be a target for modulating HSV-disease in patients. PMID:23090729

  19. Pathogenic potential of SLC25A15 mutations assessed by transport assays and complementation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ORT1 null mutant.

    PubMed

    Marobbio, Carlo M T; Punzi, Giuseppe; Pierri, Ciro L; Palmieri, Luigi; Calvello, Rosa; Panaro, Maria A; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2015-05-01

    HHH syndrome is an autosomal recessive urea cycle disorder caused by alterations in the SLC25A15 gene encoding the mitochondrial ornithine carrier 1, which catalyzes the transport of cytosolic ornithine into the mitochondria in exchange for intramitochondrial citrulline. In this study the functional effects of several SLC25A15 missense mutations p.G27R, p.M37R, p.N74A, p.F188L, p.F188Y, p.S200K, p.R275Q and p.R275K have been tested by transport assays in reconstituted liposomes and complementation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ORT1 null mutant in arginine-less synthetic complete medium. The HHH syndrome-causing mutations p.G27R, p.M37R, p.F188L and p.R275Q had impaired transport and did not complement ORT1∆ cells (except p.M37R slightly after 5 days in solid medium). The experimentally produced mutations p.N74A, p.S200K and p.R275K exhibited normal or considerable transport activity and complemented ORT1∆ cells after 3 days (p.N74A, p.S200K) or 5 days (p.R275K) incubation. Furthermore, the experimentally produced p.F188Y mutation displayed a substantial transport activity but did not complement the ORT1∆ cells in both liquid and solid media. In view of the disagreement in the results obtained between the two methods, it is recommended that the method of complementing the S. cerevisiae ORT1 knockout strain is used complimentary with the measurement of the catalytic activity, in order to distinguish HHH syndrome-causing mutations from isomorphisms. PMID:25818551

  20. Arabidopsis AtDjA3 Null Mutant Shows Increased Sensitivity to Abscisic Acid, Salt, and Osmotic Stress in Germination and Post-germination Stages

    PubMed Central

    Salas-Muñoz, Silvia; Rodríguez-Hernández, Aída A.; Ortega-Amaro, Maria A.; Salazar-Badillo, Fatima B.; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F.

    2016-01-01

    DnaJ proteins are essential co-chaperones involved in abiotic and biotic stress responses. Arabidopsis AtDjA3 gene encodes a molecular co-chaperone of 420 amino acids, which belongs to the J-protein family. In this study, we report the functional characterization of the AtDjA3 gene using the Arabidopsis knockout line designated j3 and the 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines. Loss of AtDjA3 function was associated with small seed production. In fact, j3 mutant seeds showed a reduction of 24% in seed weight compared to Col-0 seeds. Expression analysis showed that the AtDjA3 gene was modulated in response to NaCl, glucose, and abscisic acid (ABA). The j3 line had increased sensitivity to NaCl and glucose treatments in the germination and cotyledon development in comparison to parental Col-0. Furthermore, the j3 mutant line exhibited higher ABA sensitivity in comparison to parental Col-0 and 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines. In addition, we examined the expression of ABI3 gene, which is a central regulator in ABA signaling, in j3 mutant and 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines. Under 5 μM ABA treatment at 24 h, j3 mutant seedlings displayed higher ABI3 expression, whereas in 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines, ABI3 gene expression was repressed. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the AtDjA3 gene is involved in seed development and abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:26941772

  1. Arabidopsis AtDjA3 Null Mutant Shows Increased Sensitivity to Abscisic Acid, Salt, and Osmotic Stress in Germination and Post-germination Stages.

    PubMed

    Salas-Muñoz, Silvia; Rodríguez-Hernández, Aída A; Ortega-Amaro, Maria A; Salazar-Badillo, Fatima B; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F

    2016-01-01

    DnaJ proteins are essential co-chaperones involved in abiotic and biotic stress responses. Arabidopsis AtDjA3 gene encodes a molecular co-chaperone of 420 amino acids, which belongs to the J-protein family. In this study, we report the functional characterization of the AtDjA3 gene using the Arabidopsis knockout line designated j3 and the 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines. Loss of AtDjA3 function was associated with small seed production. In fact, j3 mutant seeds showed a reduction of 24% in seed weight compared to Col-0 seeds. Expression analysis showed that the AtDjA3 gene was modulated in response to NaCl, glucose, and abscisic acid (ABA). The j3 line had increased sensitivity to NaCl and glucose treatments in the germination and cotyledon development in comparison to parental Col-0. Furthermore, the j3 mutant line exhibited higher ABA sensitivity in comparison to parental Col-0 and 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines. In addition, we examined the expression of ABI3 gene, which is a central regulator in ABA signaling, in j3 mutant and 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines. Under 5 μM ABA treatment at 24 h, j3 mutant seedlings displayed higher ABI3 expression, whereas in 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines, ABI3 gene expression was repressed. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the AtDjA3 gene is involved in seed development and abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:26941772

  2. The achromatic chessboard, a new concept of a phase shifter for nulling interferometry. V. Experimental demonstration and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickel, D.; Pelat, D.; Rouan, D.; Reess, J.-M.; Chemla, F.; Cohen, M.; Dupuis, O.

    2013-10-01

    Context. To find evidence one day of life on extra solar planets, one will have to directly detect photons of the exoplanet to obtain spectra and to look for specific spectroscopic features. One possible technique is dark fringe interferometry with several telescopes in space. This type of interferometry requires an achromatic π phase shift in one arm of an interferometer. We have already presented a concept of a quasi-achromatic phase shifter that is made of two cellular mirrors in which each cell position and phase shift is specific, so that the behavior of the null depth as a function of the wavelength is flat within a broad range. Aims: We want to experimentally validate this concept of an achromatic phase shifter and measure its performance in two different cases: a transmissive mask, which is made in bulk optics that are machined with ion etching and a reflective one, which is made by using a commercial segmented deformable mirror that is properly controlled. Methods: We assembled a dedicated optical bench, nicknamed DAMNED, to assess the concept and characterize its performance in the visible and to determine the limitations of this phase shifter. We analyze its performance by comparing the experimental results with a numerical instrument model. Results: We tested several transmissive masks and a reflective one. We reached an attenuation of about 2 × 10-3 with a white source (Δλ = 430 to 830 nm) that proved to be the actual achromatic behavior of the phase shifter, despite its modest value. Extrapolated to mid-IR, its performance would be within typical specifications of a space mission as Darwin.

  3. Diguanylate Cyclase Null Mutant Reveals That C-Di-GMP Pathway Regulates the Motility and Adherence of the Extremophile Bacterium Acidithiobacillus caldus

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Matías; Deane, Shelly M.; Ruiz, Lina; Rawlings, Douglas E.; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of biofilm formation is relevant to the design of biological strategies to improve the efficiency of the bioleaching process and to prevent environmental damages caused by acid mine/rock drainage. For this reason, our laboratory is focused on the characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation in different biomining bacteria. In many bacteria, the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP molecules regulate the transition from the motile planktonic state to sessile community-based behaviors, such as biofilm development, through different kinds of effectors. Thus, we recently started a study of the c-di-GMP pathway in several biomining bacteria including Acidithiobacillus caldus. C-di-GMP molecules are synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). We previously reported the existence of intermediates involved in c-di-GMP pathway from different Acidithiobacillus species. Here, we report our work related to At. caldus ATCC 51756. We identified several putative-ORFs encoding DGC and PDE and effector proteins. By using total RNA extracted from At. caldus cells and RT-PCR, we demonstrated that these genes are expressed. We also demonstrated the presence of c-di-GMP by mass spectrometry and showed that genes for several of the DGC enzymes were functional by heterologous genetic complementation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants. Moreover, we developed a DGC defective mutant strain (Δc1319) that strongly indicated that the c-di-GMP pathway regulates the swarming motility and adherence to sulfur surfaces by At. caldus. Together, our results revealed that At. caldus possesses a functional c-di-GMP pathway which could be significant for ores colonization during the bioleaching process. PMID:25689133

  4. Diguanylate cyclase null mutant reveals that C-Di-GMP pathway regulates the motility and adherence of the extremophile bacterium Acidithiobacillus caldus.

    PubMed

    Castro, Matías; Deane, Shelly M; Ruiz, Lina; Rawlings, Douglas E; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of biofilm formation is relevant to the design of biological strategies to improve the efficiency of the bioleaching process and to prevent environmental damages caused by acid mine/rock drainage. For this reason, our laboratory is focused on the characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation in different biomining bacteria. In many bacteria, the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP molecules regulate the transition from the motile planktonic state to sessile community-based behaviors, such as biofilm development, through different kinds of effectors. Thus, we recently started a study of the c-di-GMP pathway in several biomining bacteria including Acidithiobacillus caldus. C-di-GMP molecules are synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). We previously reported the existence of intermediates involved in c-di-GMP pathway from different Acidithiobacillus species. Here, we report our work related to At. caldus ATCC 51756. We identified several putative-ORFs encoding DGC and PDE and effector proteins. By using total RNA extracted from At. caldus cells and RT-PCR, we demonstrated that these genes are expressed. We also demonstrated the presence of c-di-GMP by mass spectrometry and showed that genes for several of the DGC enzymes were functional by heterologous genetic complementation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants. Moreover, we developed a DGC defective mutant strain (Δc1319) that strongly indicated that the c-di-GMP pathway regulates the swarming motility and adherence to sulfur surfaces by At. caldus. Together, our results revealed that At. caldus possesses a functional c-di-GMP pathway which could be significant for ores colonization during the bioleaching process. PMID:25689133

  5. Diguanylate cyclase null mutant reveals that C-Di-GMP pathway regulates the motility and adherence of the extremophile bacterium Acidithiobacillus caldus.

    PubMed

    Castro, Matías; Deane, Shelly M; Ruiz, Lina; Rawlings, Douglas E; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of biofilm formation is relevant to the design of biological strategies to improve the efficiency of the bioleaching process and to prevent environmental damages caused by acid mine/rock drainage. For this reason, our laboratory is focused on the characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation in different biomining bacteria. In many bacteria, the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP molecules regulate the transition from the motile planktonic state to sessile community-based behaviors, such as biofilm development, through different kinds of effectors. Thus, we recently started a study of the c-di-GMP pathway in several biomining bacteria including Acidithiobacillus caldus. C-di-GMP molecules are synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). We previously reported the existence of intermediates involved in c-di-GMP pathway from different Acidithiobacillus species. Here, we report our work related to At. caldus ATCC 51756. We identified several putative-ORFs encoding DGC and PDE and effector proteins. By using total RNA extracted from At. caldus cells and RT-PCR, we demonstrated that these genes are expressed. We also demonstrated the presence of c-di-GMP by mass spectrometry and showed that genes for several of the DGC enzymes were functional by heterologous genetic complementation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants. Moreover, we developed a DGC defective mutant strain (Δc1319) that strongly indicated that the c-di-GMP pathway regulates the swarming motility and adherence to sulfur surfaces by At. caldus. Together, our results revealed that At. caldus possesses a functional c-di-GMP pathway which could be significant for ores colonization during the bioleaching process.

  6. Autism-associated gene Dlgap2 mutant mice demonstrate exacerbated aggressive behaviors and orbitofrontal cortex deficits

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As elegant structures designed for neural communication, synapses are the building bricks of our mental functions. Recently, many studies have pointed out that synaptic protein-associated mutations may lead to dysfunctions of social cognition. Dlgap2, which encodes one of the main components of scaffold proteins in postsynaptic density (PSD), has been addressed as a candidate gene in autism spectrum disorders. To elucidate the disturbance of synaptic balance arising from Dlgap2 loss-of-function in vivo, we thus generated Dlgap2 −/− mice to investigate their phenotypes of synaptic function and social behaviors. Methods The creation of Dlgap2 −/− mice was facilitated by the recombineering-based method, Cre-loxP system and serial backcross. Reversal learning in a water T-maze was used to determine repetitive behaviors. The three-chamber approach task, resident–intruder test and tube task were performed to characterize the social behaviors of mutant mice. Cortical synaptosomal fraction, Golgi-Cox staining, whole-cell patch electrophysiology and transmission electron microscopy were all applied to investigate the function and structure of synapses in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) of Dlgap2 −/− mice. Results Dlgap2 −/− mice displayed exacerbated aggressive behaviors in the resident–intruder task, and elevated social dominance in the tube test. In addition, Dlgap2 −/− mice exhibited a clear reduction of receptors and scaffold proteins in cortical synapses. Dlgap2 −/− mice also demonstrated lower spine density, decreased peak amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic current and ultra-structural deficits of PSD in the OFC. Conclusions Our findings clearly demonstrate that Dlgap2 plays a vital role in social behaviors and proper synaptic functions of the OFC. Moreover, these results may provide valuable insights into the neuropathology of autism. PMID:25071926

  7. Arabidopsis carotenoid mutants demonstrate that lutein is not essential for photosynthesis in higher plants.

    PubMed Central

    Pogson, B; McDonald, K A; Truong, M; Britton, G; DellaPenna, D

    1996-01-01

    Lutein, a dihydroxy beta, epsilon-carotenoid, is the predominant carotenoid in photosynthetic plant tissue and plays a critical role in light-harvesting complex assembly and function. To further understand lutein synthesis and function, we isolated four lutein-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis that define two loci, lut1 and lut2 (for lutein deficient). These loci are required for lutein biosynthesis but not for the biosynthesis of beta, beta-carotenoids. The lut1 mutations are recessive, accumulate high levels of zeinoxanthin, which is the immediate precursor of lutein, and define lut1 as a disruption in epsilon ring hydroxylation. The lut2 mutations are semidominant, and their biochemical phenotype is consistent with a disruption of epsilon ring cyclization. The lut2 locus cosegregates with the recently isolated epsilon cyclase gene, thus, providing additional evidence that the lut2 alleles are mutations in the epsilon cyclase gene. It appears likely that the epsilon cyclase is a key step in regulating lutein levels and the ratio of lutein to beta,beta-carotenoids. Surprisingly, despite the absence of lutein, neither the lut1 nor lut2 mutation causes a visible deleterious phenotype or altered chlorophyll content, but both mutants have significantly higher levels of beta, beta-carotenoids. In particular, there is a stable increase in the xanthophyll cycle pigments (violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin) in both lut1 and lut2 mutants as well as an increase in zeinoxanthin in lut1 and beta-carotene in lut2. The accumulation of specific carotenoids is discussed as it pertains to the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis and incorporation into the photosynthetic apparatus. Presumably, particular beta, beta-carotenoids are able to compensate functionally and structurally for lutein in the photosystems of Arabidopsis. PMID:8837513

  8. ZMVHA-B1, the gene for subunit B of vacuolar H+-ATPase from the eelgrass Zostera marina L. Is able to replace vma2 in a yeast null mutant.

    PubMed

    Alemzadeh, Abbas; Fujie, Makoto; Usami, Shoji; Yoshizaki, Tsukasa; Oyama, Keiji; Kawabata, Toyoki; Yamada, Takashi

    2006-11-01

    A vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (VHA) gene (ZMVHA-B1) was isolated from an eelgrass (Zostera marina) leaf cDNA library and was characterized to be approximately 1.4 kbp in length and to encode the B subunit protein of VHA comprising 488 amino acids. ZMVHA-B1 was highly expressed in all organs of eelgrass; the expression level was highest in the leaves. On transformation of a yeast vma2 null mutant with ZMVHA-B1, yeast cells became able to grow at pH 7.5, accompanied by the vesicular accumulation of LysoSensor green DND-189. Thus, ZMVHA-B1 expressed in yeast cells produced a functional B subunit that was efficiently incorporated into the VHA complex and eventually restored vacuolar morphology and activity. This success expedites the application of heterologous expression in yeast mutant cells to the screening of eelgrass genes involved in salt-resistance mechanisms, which are to be utilized in improving important crops.

  9. Suppression of Arabidopsis flowering by near-null magnetic field is affected by light.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunxiao; Li, Yue; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Yuxia; Wei, Shufeng

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that a near-null magnetic field suppressed Arabidopsis flowering in white light, which might be related to the function modification of cryptochrome (CRY). To further demonstrate that the effect of near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis flowering is associated with CRY, Arabidopsis wild type and CRY mutant plants were grown in the near-null magnetic field under blue or red light with different light cycle and photosynthetic photon flux density. We found that Arabidopsis flowering was significantly suppressed by near-null magnetic field in blue light with lower intensity (10 µmol/m(2) /s) and shorter cycle (12 h period: 6 h light/6 h dark). However, flowering time of CRY1/CRY2 mutants did not show any difference between plants grown in near-null magnetic field and in local geomagnetic field under detected light conditions. In red light, no significant difference was shown in Arabidopsis flowering between plants in near-null magnetic field and local geomagnetic field under detected light cycles and intensities. These results suggest that changes of blue light cycle and intensity alter the effect of near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis flowering, which is mediated by CRY.

  10. Autophagy in yeast demonstrated with proteinase-deficient mutants and conditions for its induction.

    PubMed

    Takeshige, K; Baba, M; Tsuboi, S; Noda, T; Ohsumi, Y

    1992-10-01

    For determination of the physiological role and mechanism of vacuolar proteolysis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mutant cells lacking proteinase A, B, and carboxypeptidase Y were transferred from a nutrient medium to a synthetic medium devoid of various nutrients and morphological changes of their vacuoles were investigated. After incubation for 1 h in nutrient-deficient media, a few spherical bodies appeared in the vacuoles and moved actively by Brownian movement. These bodies gradually increased in number and after 3 h they filled the vacuoles almost completely. During their accumulation, the volume of the vacuolar compartment also increased. Electron microscopic examination showed that these bodies were surrounded by a unit membrane which appeared thinner than any other intracellular membrane. The contents of the bodies were morphologically indistinguishable from the cytosol; these bodies contained cytoplasmic ribosomes, RER, mitochondria, lipid granules and glycogen granules, and the density of the cytoplasmic ribosomes in the bodies was almost the same as that of ribosomes in the cytosol. The diameter of the bodies ranged from 400 to 900 nm. Vacuoles that had accumulated these bodies were prepared by a modification of the method of Ohsumi and Anraku (Ohsumi, Y., and Y. Anraku. 1981. J. Biol. Chem. 256:2079-2082). The isolated vacuoles contained ribosomes and showed latent activity of the cytosolic enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. These results suggest that these bodies sequestered the cytosol in the vacuoles. We named these spherical bodies "autophagic bodies." Accumulation of autophagic bodies in the vacuoles was induced not only by nitrogen starvation, but also by depletion of nutrients such as carbon and single amino acids that caused cessation of the cell cycle. Genetic analysis revealed that the accumulation of autophagic bodies in the vacuoles was the result of lack of the PRB1 product proteinase B, and disruption of the PRB1 gene

  11. Demonstration of two distinct cytopathic effects with syncytium formation-defective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Dedera, D; Ratner, L

    1991-11-01

    The mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) cytopathicity is poorly understood and might involve formation of multinucleated giant cells (syncytia), single-cell lysis, or both. In order to determine the contributions of the fusion domain to syncytium formation, single-cell lysis, and viral infectivity and to clarify the molecular details of these events, insertion mutations were made in the portion of env encoding this sequence in the functional HIV-1 proviral clone HXB2. Viruses produced from these mutant clones were found to have a partial (F3) or complete (F6) loss of syncytium-forming ability in acutely infected CEM, Sup T1, and MT4 T-cell lines. During the early stage of acute infection by F6 virus, there was a loss of the syncytial cytopathic effect, which resulted in increased cell viability, and a 1.9- to 2.6-fold increase in virus yield in the cell lines tested. In the late stage of acute infection, the single-cell cytopathic effect of F6 virus was similar to that of the parental HXB2 virus. The F3 and F6 viruses were also found to have a 1.7- to 43-fold reduction in infectivity compared with the HXB2 virus. The mutant F3 and F6 and parental HXB2 envelope proteins were expressed in vaccinia virus, and the mutant envelope proteins were observed to be defective in their ability to form syncytia. BSC-40 cells infected with vaccinia virus recombinants revealed no differences in kinetics of cleavage, cell surface expression, or CD4 binding capacity of the mutant and parental envelope proteins. These results demonstrate that a loss of syncytium formation results in an attenuation of infectivity and a loss of the syncytial cytopathic effect without a loss of single-cell lysis. These mutants may reflect in tissue culture the changes observed in the HIV isolates in vivo during disease progression, which exhibit marked differences in syncytium production.

  12. Paranodal permeability in `myelin mutants'

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, S.; Mierzwa, A.; Scherer, S.S.; Peles, E.; Arevalo, J.C.; Chao, M.V.; Rosenbluth, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent dextran tracers of varying sizes have been used to assess paranodal permeability in myelinated sciatic nerve fibers from control and three `myelin mutant' mice, Caspr-null, cst-null and shaking. We demonstrate that in all of these the paranode is permeable to small tracers (3kDa, 10kDa), which penetrate most fibers, and to larger tracers (40kDa, 70kDa), which penetrate far fewer fibers and move shorter distances over longer periods of time. Despite gross diminution in transverse bands in the Caspr-null and cst-null mice, the permeability of their paranodal junctions is equivalent to that in controls. Thus, deficiency of transverse bands in these mutants does not increase the permeability of their paranodal junctions to the dextrans we used, moving from the perinodal space through the paranode to the internodal periaxonal space. In addition, we show that the shaking mice, which have thinner myelin and shorter paranodes, show increased permeability to the same tracers despite the presence of transverse bands. We conclude that the extent of penetration of these tracers does not depend on the presence or absence of transverse bands but does depend on the length of the paranode and, in turn, on the length of `pathway 3', the helical extracellular pathway that passes through the paranode parallel to the lateral edge of the myelin sheath. PMID:21618613

  13. Paranodal permeability in "myelin mutants".

    PubMed

    Shroff, Seema; Mierzwa, Amanda; Scherer, Steven S; Peles, Elior; Arevalo, Juan C; Chao, Moses V; Rosenbluth, Jack

    2011-10-01

    Fluorescent dextran tracers of varying sizes have been used to assess paranodal permeability in myelinated sciatic nerve fibers from control and three "myelin mutant" mice, Caspr-null, cst-null, and shaking. We demonstrate that in all of these the paranode is permeable to small tracers (3 kDa and 10 kDa), which penetrate most fibers, and to larger tracers (40 kDa and 70 kDa), which penetrate far fewer fibers and move shorter distances over longer periods of time. Despite gross diminution in transverse bands (TBs) in the Caspr-null and cst-null mice, the permeability of their paranodal junctions is equivalent to that in controls. Thus, deficiency of TBs in these mutants does not increase the permeability of their paranodal junctions to the dextrans we used, moving from the perinodal space through the paranode to the internodal periaxonal space. In addition, we show that the shaking mice, which have thinner myelin and shorter paranodes, show increased permeability to the same tracers despite the presence of TBs. We conclude that the extent of penetration of these tracers does not depend on the presence or absence of TBs but does depend on the length of the paranode and, in turn, on the length of "pathway 3," the helical extracellular pathway that passes through the paranode parallel to the lateral edge of the myelin sheath. PMID:21618613

  14. Broken chiral symmetry on a null plane

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas R.

    2013-10-15

    On a null-plane (light-front), all effects of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking are contained in the three Hamiltonians (dynamical Poincaré generators), while the vacuum state is a chiral invariant. This property is used to give a general proof of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane. Focusing on null-plane QCD with N degenerate flavors of light quarks, the chiral-symmetry breaking Hamiltonians are obtained, and the role of vacuum condensates is clarified. In particular, the null-plane Gell-Mann–Oakes–Renner formula is derived, and a general prescription is given for mapping all chiral-symmetry breaking QCD condensates to chiral-symmetry conserving null-plane QCD condensates. The utility of the null-plane description lies in the operator algebra that mixes the null-plane Hamiltonians and the chiral symmetry charges. It is demonstrated that in a certain non-trivial limit, the null-plane operator algebra reduces to the symmetry group SU(2N) of the constituent quark model. -- Highlights: •A proof (the first) of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane is given. •The puzzle of chiral-symmetry breaking condensates on a null-plane is solved. •The emergence of spin-flavor symmetries in null-plane QCD is demonstrated.

  15. slender rice, a constitutive gibberellin response mutant, is caused by a null mutation of the SLR1 gene, an ortholog of the height-regulating gene GAI/RGA/RHT/D8.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, A; Ueguchi-Tanaka, M; Sonoda, Y; Kitano, H; Koshioka, M; Futsuhara, Y; Matsuoka, M; Yamaguchi, J

    2001-05-01

    The rice slender mutant (slr1-1) is caused by a single recessive mutation and results in a constitutive gibberellin (GA) response phenotype. The mutant elongates as if saturated with GAs. In this mutant, (1) elongation was unaffected by an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis, (2) GA-inducible alpha-amylase was produced by the aleurone layers without gibberellic acid application, and (3) endogenous GA content was lower than in the wild-type plant. These results indicate that the product of the SLR1 gene is an intermediate of the GA signal transduction pathway. SLR1 maps to OsGAI in rice and has significant homology with height-regulating genes, such as RHT-1Da in wheat, D8 in maize, and GAI and RGA in Arabidopsis. The GAI gene family is likely to encode transcriptional factors belonging to the GRAS gene superfamily. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the slr1-1 mutation is a single basepair deletion of the nuclear localization signal domain, resulting in a frameshift mutation that abolishes protein production. Furthermore, introduction of a 6-kb genomic DNA fragment containing the wild-type SLR1 gene into the slr1-1 mutant restored GA sensitivity to normal. These results indicate that the slr1-1 mutant is caused by a loss-of-function mutation of the SLR1 gene, which is an ortholog of GAI, RGA, RHT, and D8. We also succeeded in producing GA-insensitive dwarf rice by transforming wild-type rice with a modified SLR1 gene construct that has a 17-amino acid deletion affecting the DELLA region. Thus, we demonstrate opposite GA response phenotypes depending on the type of mutations in SLR1.

  16. Identification of Yeast Mutants Exhibiting Altered Sensitivity to Valinomycin and Nigericin Demonstrate Pleiotropic Effects of Ionophores on Cellular Processes

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia-Kissova, Ingrid; Valachovic, Martin; Klobucnikova, Vlasta; Zeiselova, Lucia; Griac, Peter; Nosek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Ionophores such as valinomycin and nigericin are potent tools for studying the impact of ion perturbance on cellular functions. To obtain a broader picture about molecular components involved in mediating the effects of these drugs on yeast cells under respiratory growth conditions, we performed a screening of the haploid deletion mutant library covering the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nonessential genes. We identified nearly 130 genes whose absence leads either to resistance or to hypersensitivity to valinomycin and/or nigericin. The processes affected by their protein products range from mitochondrial functions through ribosome biogenesis and telomere maintenance to vacuolar biogenesis and stress response. Comparison of the results with independent screenings performed by our and other laboratories demonstrates that although mitochondria might represent the main target for both ionophores, cellular response to the drugs is very complex and involves an intricate network of proteins connecting mitochondria, vacuoles, and other membrane compartments. PMID:27711131

  17. Glucocorticoid Receptor Mutants Demonstrate Increased Motility Inside the Nucleus of Living Cells: Time of Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) Is an Integrated Measure of Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Kino, Tomoshige; Liou, Szu-Heng; Charmandari, Evangelia; Chrousos, George P

    2004-01-01

    Natural mutations of the human glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoform α cause the glucocorticoid resistance syndrome. Mutant receptors may have abnormal interactions with the ligand, target DNA sequences, and/or multiple intracellular proteins, as well as aberrant nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis, all GR pathologic mutant receptors examined, as well as 2 synthetic GR mutants lacking the activation function (AF)-1 or the lig-and-binding domain (and hence the AF-2), had defective transcriptional activity and dynamic motility defects inside the nucleus of living cells. In the presence of dexamethasone, these mutants displayed a curtailed 50% recovery time (t1/2) after photobleaching and, hence, significantly increased intranuclear motility and decreased “chromatin retention.” The t1/2 values of the mutants correlated positively with their transcriptional activities and depended on the GR domain affected. GRβ, a natural splice variant of the GR gene, also demonstrated a shorter t1/2 than GRα. The motility responsiveness of the natural and artificial mutant receptors examined, and of GRβ, to the proteasomal inhibitor MG-132 also depended on the mutant domain. Thus, mutant glucocorticoid receptors possess dynamic motility defects in the nucleus, possibly caused by their inability to properly interact with all key partner nuclear molecules necessary for full activation of glucocorticoid-responsive genes. PMID:16307173

  18. A Human Cytomegalovirus gO-Null Mutant Fails To Incorporate gH/gL into the Virion Envelope and Is Unable To Enter Fibroblasts and Epithelial and Endothelial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Wille, Paul T.; Knoche, Amber J.; Nelson, Jay A.; Jarvis, Michael A.; Johnson, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) depends upon a five-protein complex, gH/gL/UL128-131, to enter epithelial and endothelial cells. A separate HCMV gH/gL-containing complex, gH/gL/gO, has been described. Our prevailing model is that gH/gL/UL128-131 is required for entry into biologically important epithelial and endothelial cells and that gH/gL/gO is required for infection of fibroblasts. Genes encoding UL128-131 are rapidly mutated during laboratory propagation of HCMV on fibroblasts, apparently related to selective pressure for the fibroblast entry pathway. Arguing against this model in the accompanying paper by B. J. Ryckman et al. (J. Virol., 84:2597-2609, 2010), we describe evidence that clinical HCMV strain TR expresses a gO molecule that acts to promote endoplasmic reticulum (ER) export of gH/gL and that gO is not stably incorporated into the virus envelope. This was different from results involving fibroblast-adapted HCMV strain AD169, which incorporates gO into the virion envelope. Here, we constructed a TR gO-null mutant, TRΔgO, that replicated to low titers, spread poorly among fibroblasts, but produced normal quantities of extracellular virus particles. TRΔgO particles released from fibroblasts failed to infect fibroblasts and epithelial and endothelial cells, but the chemical fusogen polyethylene glycol (PEG) could partially overcome defects in infection. Therefore, TRΔgO is defective for entry into all three cell types. Defects in entry were explained by observations showing that TRΔgO incorporated about 5% of the quantities of gH/gL in extracellular virus particles compared with that in wild-type virions. Although TRΔgO particles could not enter cells, cell-to-cell spread involving epithelial and endothelial cells was increased relative to TR, apparently resulting from increased quantities of gH/gL/UL128-131 in virions. Together, our data suggest that TR gO acts as a chaperone to promote ER export and the incorporation of gH/gL complexes into the HCMV

  19. A human cytomegalovirus gO-null mutant fails to incorporate gH/gL into the virion envelope and is unable to enter fibroblasts and epithelial and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wille, Paul T; Knoche, Amber J; Nelson, Jay A; Jarvis, Michael A; Johnson, David C

    2010-03-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) depends upon a five-protein complex, gH/gL/UL128-131, to enter epithelial and endothelial cells. A separate HCMV gH/gL-containing complex, gH/gL/gO, has been described. Our prevailing model is that gH/gL/UL128-131 is required for entry into biologically important epithelial and endothelial cells and that gH/gL/gO is required for infection of fibroblasts. Genes encoding UL128-131 are rapidly mutated during laboratory propagation of HCMV on fibroblasts, apparently related to selective pressure for the fibroblast entry pathway. Arguing against this model in the accompanying paper by B. J. Ryckman et al. (J. Virol., 84:2597-2609, 2010), we describe evidence that clinical HCMV strain TR expresses a gO molecule that acts to promote endoplasmic reticulum (ER) export of gH/gL and that gO is not stably incorporated into the virus envelope. This was different from results involving fibroblast-adapted HCMV strain AD169, which incorporates gO into the virion envelope. Here, we constructed a TR gO-null mutant, TRDeltagO, that replicated to low titers, spread poorly among fibroblasts, but produced normal quantities of extracellular virus particles. TRDeltagO particles released from fibroblasts failed to infect fibroblasts and epithelial and endothelial cells, but the chemical fusogen polyethylene glycol (PEG) could partially overcome defects in infection. Therefore, TRDeltagO is defective for entry into all three cell types. Defects in entry were explained by observations showing that TRDeltagO incorporated about 5% of the quantities of gH/gL in extracellular virus particles compared with that in wild-type virions. Although TRDeltagO particles could not enter cells, cell-to-cell spread involving epithelial and endothelial cells was increased relative to TR, apparently resulting from increased quantities of gH/gL/UL128-131 in virions. Together, our data suggest that TR gO acts as a chaperone to promote ER export and the incorporation of g

  20. The anthocyanin reduced tomato mutant demonstrates the role of flavonols in tomato lateral root and root hair development.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Gregory S; DiNapoli, Kathleen T; Muday, Gloria K

    2014-10-01

    This study utilized tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutants with altered flavonoid biosynthesis to understand the impact of these metabolites on root development. The mutant anthocyanin reduced (are) has a mutation in the gene encoding FLAVONOID 3-HYDROXYLASE (F3H), the first step in flavonol synthesis, and accumulates higher concentrations of the F3H substrate, naringenin, and lower levels of the downstream products kaempferol, quercetin, myricetin, and anthocyanins, than the wild type. Complementation of are with the p35S:F3H transgene reduced naringenin and increased flavonols to wild-type levels. The initiation of lateral roots is reduced in are, and p35S:F3H complementation restores wild-type root formation. The flavonoid mutant anthocyanin without has a defect in the gene encoding DIHYDROFLAVONOL REDUCTASE, resulting in elevated flavonols and the absence of anthocyanins and displays increased lateral root formation. These results are consistent with a positive role of flavonols in lateral root formation. The are mutant has increased indole-3-acetic acid transport and greater sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid on lateral root formation. Expression of the auxin-induced reporter (DR5-β-glucuronidase) is reduced in initiating lateral roots and increased in primary root tips of are. Levels of reactive oxygen species are elevated in are root epidermal tissues and root hairs, and are forms more root hairs, consistent with a role of flavonols as antioxidants that modulate root hair formation. Together, these experiments identify positive roles of flavonols in the formation of lateral roots and negative roles in the formation of root hairs through the modulation of auxin transport and reactive oxygen species, respectively. PMID:25006027

  1. Medicago truncatula Mutants Demonstrate the Role of Plant Calcium Oxalate Crystals as an Effective Defense against Chewing Insects1

    PubMed Central

    Korth, Kenneth L.; Doege, Sarah J.; Park, Sang-Hyuck; Goggin, Fiona L.; Wang, Qin; Gomez, S. Karen; Liu, Guangjie; Jia, Lingling; Nakata, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    Calcium oxalate is the most abundant insoluble mineral found in plants and its crystals have been reported in more than 200 plant families. In the barrel medic Medicago truncatula Gaertn., these crystals accumulate predominantly in a sheath surrounding secondary veins of leaves. Mutants of M. truncatula with decreased levels of calcium oxalate crystals were used to assess the defensive role of this mineral against insects. Caterpillar larvae of the beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua Hübner show a clear feeding preference for tissue from calcium oxalate-defective (cod) mutant lines cod5 and cod6 in choice test comparisons with wild-type M. truncatula. Compared to their performance on mutant lines, larvae feeding on wild-type plants with abundant calcium oxalate crystals suffer significantly reduced growth and increased mortality. Induction of wound-responsive genes appears to be normal in cod5 and cod6, indicating that these lines are not deficient in induced insect defenses. Electron micrographs of insect mouthparts indicate that the prismatic crystals in M. truncatula leaves act as physical abrasives during feeding. Food utilization measurements show that, after consumption, calcium oxalate also interferes with the conversion of plant material into insect biomass during digestion. In contrast to their detrimental effects on a chewing insect, calcium oxalate crystals do not negatively affect the performance of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris, a sap-feeding insect with piercing-sucking mouthparts. The results confirm a long-held hypothesis for the defensive function of these crystals and point to the potential value of genes controlling crystal formation and localization in crop plants. PMID:16514014

  2. Nulling at the Keck Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colavita, M. Mark; Serabyn, Gene; Wizinowich, Peter L.; Akeson, Rachel L.

    2006-01-01

    The nulling mode of the Keck Interferometer is being commissioned at the Mauna Kea summit. The nuller combines the two Keck telescope apertures in a split-pupil mode to both cancel the on-axis starlight and to coherently detect the residual signal. The nuller, working at 10 um, is tightly integrated with the other interferometer subsystems including the fringe and angle trackers, the delay lines and laser metrology, and the real-time control system. Since first 10 um light in August 2004, the system integration is proceeding with increasing functionality and performance, leading to demonstration of a 100:1 on-sky null in 2005. That level of performance has now been extended to observations with longer coherent integration times. An overview of the overall system is presented, with emphasis on the observing sequence, phasing system, and differences with respect to the V2 system, along with a presentation of some recent engineering data.

  3. lagC-null and gbf-null cells define key steps in the morphogenesis of Dictyostelium mounds.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, S; Brown, J M; Firtel, R A; McNally, J G

    1998-08-01

    The transition to multicellularity is a key feature of the Dictyostelium life cycle, and two genes, gbf and lagC, are known to play pivotal roles in regulating this developmental switch. lagC-null and gbf-null cells fail to induce cell-type-specific genes ordinarily expressed during multicellular development. The null mutants also share a similar morphological phenotype: mutant cells repeatedly aggregate to form a loose mound, disperse, and reform a mound, rather than proceeding to form a tip. To characterize defects in morphogenesis in these mutants, we examined cell motion in the mutant mounds. In analogy with the failed transition in gene expression, we found that lagC-null and gbf-null mounds failed to make a morphogenetic transition from random to rotational motion normally observed in the parent strain. One reason for this was the inability of the mutant mounds to establish a single, dominant signaling-wave center. This defect of lagC-null or gbf-null cells could be overcome by the addition of adenosine, which alters cAMP signaling, but then even in the presence of apparently normal signaling waves, cell motility was still aberrant. This motility defect, as well as the signaling-wave defect, could be overcome in lagC-null cells by overexpression of GBF, suggesting that lagC is dispensable if GBF protein levels are high enough. This set of morphogenetic defects that we have observed helps define key steps in mound morphogenesis. These include the establishment of a dominant signaling-wave center and the capacity of cells to move directionally within the cell mass in response to guidance cues.

  4. Selective in vitro replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) ICP34.5 null mutants in primary human CNS tumours--evaluation of a potentially effective clinical therapy.

    PubMed Central

    McKie, E. A.; MacLean, A. R.; Lewis, A. D.; Cruickshank, G.; Rampling, R.; Barnett, S. C.; Kennedy, P. G.; Brown, S. M.

    1996-01-01

    Primary tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) are an important cause of cancer-related deaths in adults and children. CNS tumours are mostly glial cell in origin and are predominantly astrocytomas. Conventional therapy of high-grade gliomas includes maximal resection followed by radiation treatment. The addition of adjuvant chemotherapy provides little improvement in survival time and hence assessment of novel therapies is imperative. We have evaluated the potential therapeutic use of the herpes simplex virus (HSV) mutant 1716 in the treatment of primary brain tumours. The mutant is deleted in the RL1 gene and fails to produce the virulence factor ICP34.5. 1716 replication was analysed in both established human glioma cell lines and in primary cell cultures derived from human tumour biopsy material. In the majority of cultures, virus replication occurred and consequential cell death resulted. In the minority of tumour cell lines which are non-permissive for mutant replication, premature shut-off of host cell protein synthesis was induced in response to lack of expression of ICP34.5. Hence RL1-negative mutants have the distinct advantage of providing a double hit phenomenon whereby cell death could occur by either pathway. Moreover, 1716, by virtue of its ability to replicate selectively within a tumour cell, has the potential to deliver a 'suicide' gene product to the required site immediately. It is our opinion that HSV which fails to express ICP34.5 could provide an effective tumour therapy. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8795577

  5. Dominant Negative Mutants of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab Toxin Function as Anti-Toxins: Demonstration of the Role of Oligomerization in Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Almazán, Claudia; Zavala, Luis Enrique; Muñoz-Garay, Carlos; Jiménez-Juárez, Nuria; Pacheco, Sabino; Masson, Luke; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins, that are used worldwide in insect control, kill insects by a mechanism that depends on their ability to form oligomeric pores that insert into the insect-midgut cells. These toxins are being used worldwide in transgenic plants or spray to control insect pests in agriculture. However, a major concern has been the possible effects of these insecticidal proteins on non-target organisms mainly in ecosystems adjacent to agricultural fields. Methodology/Principal Findings We isolated and characterized 11 non-toxic mutants of Cry1Ab toxin affected in different steps of the mechanism of action namely binding to receptors, oligomerization and pore-formation. These mutant toxins were analyzed for their capacity to block wild type toxin activity, presenting a dominant negative phenotype. The dominant negative phenotype was analyzed at two levels, in vivo by toxicity bioassays against susceptible Manduca sexta larvae and in vitro by pore formation activity in black lipid bilayers. We demonstrate that some mutations located in helix α-4 completely block the wild type toxin activity at sub-stoichiometric level confirming a dominant negative phenotype, thereby functioning as potent antitoxins. Conclusions/Significance This is the first reported case of a Cry toxin dominant inhibitor. These data demonstrate that oligomerization is a fundamental step in Cry toxin action and represent a potential mechanism to protect special ecosystems from the possible effect of Cry toxins on non-target organisms. PMID:19440244

  6. Visible Nulling Coronagraph Testbed Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker; Woodruff, Robert; Vasudevan, Gopal; Rizzo, Maxime; Thompson, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept study and a proposed NASA Discovery mission to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC would provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres around A and F stars, observed the inner spatial structure and colors of inner Spitzer selected debris disks. EPIC would be launched to heliocentric Earth trailing drift-away orbit, with a 5-year mission lifetime. The starlight suppression approach consists of a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) that enables starlight suppression in broadband light from 480-960 nm. To demonstrate the VNC approach and advance it's technology readiness we have developed a laboratory VNC and have demonstrated white light nulling. We will discuss our ongoing VNC work and show the latest results from the VNC testbed.

  7. Screening of Streptococcus pneumoniae ABC transporter mutants demonstrates that LivJHMGF, a branched-chain amino acid ABC transporter, is necessary for disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Basavanna, Shilpa; Khandavilli, Suneeta; Yuste, Jose; Cohen, Jonathan M; Hosie, Arthur H F; Webb, Alexander J; Thomas, Gavin H; Brown, Jeremy S

    2009-08-01

    Bacterial ABC transporters are an important class of transmembrane transporters that have a wide variety of substrates and are important for the virulence of several bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, many S. pneumoniae ABC transporters have yet to be investigated for their role in virulence. Using insertional duplication mutagenesis mutants, we investigated the effects on virulence and in vitro growth of disruption of 9 S. pneumoniae ABC transporters. Several were partially attenuated in virulence compared to the wild-type parental strain in mouse models of infection. For one ABC transporter, required for full virulence and termed LivJHMGF due to its similarity to branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) transporters, a deletion mutant (DeltalivHMGF) was constructed to investigate its phenotype in more detail. When tested by competitive infection, the DeltalivHMGF strain had reduced virulence in models of both pneumonia and septicemia but was fully virulent when tested using noncompetitive experiments. The DeltalivHMGF strain had no detectable growth defect in defined or complete laboratory media. Recombinant LivJ, the substrate binding component of the LivJHMGF, was shown by both radioactive binding experiments and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy to specifically bind to leucine, isoleucine, and valine, confirming that the LivJHMGF substrates are BCAAs. These data demonstrate a previously unsuspected role for BCAA transport during infection for S. pneumoniae and provide more evidence that functioning ABC transporters are required for the full virulence of bacterial pathogens. PMID:19470745

  8. Radiant Temperature Nulling Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A self-calibrating nulling radiometer for non-contact temperature measurement of an object, such as a body of water, employs a black body source as a temperature reference, an optomechanical mechanism, e.g., a chopper, to switch back and forth between measuring the temperature of the black body source and that of a test source, and an infrared detection technique. The radiometer functions by measuring radiance of both the test and the reference black body sources; adjusting the temperature of the reference black body so that its radiance is equivalent to the test source; and, measuring the temperature of the reference black body at this point using a precision contact-type temperature sensor, to determine the radiative temperature of the test source. The radiation from both sources is detected by an infrared detector that converts the detected radiation to an electrical signal that is fed with a chopper reference signal to an error signal generator, such as a synchronous detector, that creates a precision rectified signal that is approximately proportional to the difference between the temperature of the reference black body and that of the test infrared source. This error signal is then used in a feedback loop to adjust the reference black body temperature until it equals that of the test source, at which point the error signal is nulled to zero. The chopper mechanism operates at one or more Hertz allowing minimization of l/f noise. It also provides pure chopping between the black body and the test source and allows continuous measurements.

  9. Transcriptional Fingerprint of Hypomyelination in Zfp191null and Shiverer (Mbpshi) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aaker, Joshua D.; Elbaz, Benayahu; Wu, Yuwen; Looney, Timothy J.; Zhang, Li; Lahn, Bruce T.

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptional program that controls oligodendrocyte maturation and central nervous system (CNS) myelination has not been fully characterized. In this study, we use high-throughput RNA sequencing to analyze how the loss of a key transcription factor, zinc finger protein 191 (ZFP191), results in oligodendrocyte development abnormalities and CNS hypomyelination. Using a previously described mutant mouse that is deficient in ZFP191 protein expression (Zfp191null), we demonstrate that key transcripts are reduced in the whole brain as well as within oligodendrocyte lineage cells cultured in vitro. To determine whether the loss of myelin seen in Zfp191null mice contributes indirectly to these perturbations, we also examined the transcriptome of a well-characterized mouse model of hypomyelination, in which the myelin structural protein myelin basic protein (MBP) is deficient. Interestingly, Mbpshi (shiverer) mice had far fewer transcripts perturbed with the loss of myelin alone. This study demonstrates that the loss of ZFP191 disrupts expression of genes involved in oligodendrocyte maturation and myelination, largely independent from the loss of myelin. Nevertheless, hypomyelination in both mouse mutants results in the perturbation of lipid synthesis pathways, suggesting that oligodendrocytes have a feedback system that allows them to regulate myelin lipid synthesis depending on their myelinating state. The data presented are of potential clinical relevance as the human orthologs of the Zfp191 and MBP genes reside on a region of Chromosome 18 that is deleted in childhood leukodystrophies. PMID:27683878

  10. Characterization of Brucella abortus O-polysaccharide and core lipopolysaccharide mutants and demonstration that a complete core is required for rough vaccines to be efficient against Brucella abortus and Brucella ovis in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Monreal, D; Grilló, M J; González, D; Marín, C M; De Miguel, M J; López-Goñi, I; Blasco, J M; Cloeckaert, A; Moriyón, I

    2003-06-01

    Brucella abortus rough lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutants were obtained by transposon insertion into two wbk genes (wbkA [putative glycosyltransferase; formerly rfbU] and per [perosamine synthetase]), into manB (pmm [phosphomannomutase; formerly rfbK]), and into an unassigned gene. Consistent with gene-predicted roles, electrophoretic analysis, 2-keto-3-manno-D-octulosonate measurements, and immunoblots with monoclonal antibodies to O-polysaccharide, outer and inner core epitopes showed no O-polysaccharide expression and no LPS core defects in the wbk mutants. The rough LPS of manB mutant lacked the outer core epitope and the gene was designated manB(core) to distinguish it from the wbk manB(O-Ag). The fourth gene (provisionally designated wa**) coded for a putative glycosyltransferase involved in inner core synthesis, but the mutant kept the outer core epitope. Differences in phage and polymyxin sensitivity, exposure or expression of outer membrane protein, core and lipid A epitopes, and lipid A acylation demonstrated that small changes in LPS core caused significant differences in B. abortus outer membrane topology. In mice, the mutants showed different degrees of attenuation and induced antibodies to rough LPS and outer membrane proteins. Core-defective mutants and strain RB51 were ineffective vaccines against B. abortus in mice. The mutants per and wbkA induced protection but less than the standard smooth vaccine S19, and controls suggested that anti O-polysaccharide antibodies accounted largely for the difference. Whereas no core-defective mutant was effective against B. ovis, S19, RB51, and the wbkA and per mutants afforded similar levels of protection. These results suggest that rough Brucella vaccines should carry a complete core for maximal effectiveness.

  11. ENERGY DISSIPATION IN MAGNETIC NULL POINTS AT KINETIC SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Lapenta, Giovanni; Divin, Andrey; Eriksson, Elin; Markidis, Stefano

    2015-07-10

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and MHD simulations supported by an observational data set to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of “intermittent turbulence” within a few ion gyro-periods. Reconnection events are distributed all over the simulation domain and energy dissipation is rather volume-filling. Numerous spiral null points interconnected via their spines form null lines embedded into magnetic flux ropes; null point pairs demonstrate the signatures of torsional spine reconnection. However, energy dissipation mainly happens in the shear layers formed by adjacent flux ropes with oppositely directed currents. In these regions radial null pairs are spontaneously emerging and vanishing, associated with electron streams and small-scale current sheets. The number of spiral nulls in the simulation outweighs the number of radial nulls by a factor of 5–10, in accordance with Cluster observations in the Earth's magnetosheath. Twisted magnetic fields with embedded spiral null points might indicate the regions of major energy dissipation for future space missions such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission.

  12. A GLRA1 null mutation in recessive hyperekplexia challenges the functional role of glycine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.; Saul, M.; Becker, C.M.

    1996-05-01

    Dominant missense mutations in the human glycine receptor (GlyR) {alpha}1 subunit gene (GLRA1) give rise to hereditary hyperekplexia. These mutations impair agonist affinities and change conductance states of expressed mutant channels, resulting in a partial loss of function. In a recessive case of hyperekplexia, we found a deletion of exons 1-6 of the GLRA1 gene. Born to consanguineous parents, the affected child is homozygous for this GLRA1{sup null} allele consistent with a complete loss of gene function. The child displayed exaggerated startle responses and pronounced head-retraction jerks reflecting a disinhibition of vestigial brain-stem reflexes. In contrast, proprio- and exteroceptive inhibition of muscle activity previously correlated to glycinergic mechanisms were not affected. This case demonstrates that, in contrast to the lethal effect of a null allele in the recessive mouse mutant oscillator (Glra1{sup spd-ot}), the loss of the GlyR {alpha}1 subunit is effectively compensated in man. 38 refs.

  13. Designing with null flux coils

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.R.

    1997-09-01

    Null flux were suggested by Danby and Powell in the late 1960`s as a useful means for realizing induced lift with little drag. As an array of alternating magnets is translated past a set of null flux coils, the currents induced in these coils act to vertically center the magnets on those coils. At present, one Japanese MAGLEV system company and two American-based companies are employing either null flux or flux eliminating coils in their design for high speed magnetically levitated transportation. The principle question addressed in paper is: what is the proper choice of coil length to magnet length in a null flux system? A generic analysis in the time and frequency domain is laid out with the intent of showing the optimal design specification in terms of coil parameters.

  14. Generalized Degenerative Joint Disease in Osteoprotegerin (Opg) Null Mutant Mice.

    PubMed

    Bolon, B; Grisanti, M; Villasenor, K; Morony, S; Feige, U; Simonet, W S

    2015-09-01

    Bone structure is modulated by the interaction between receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) and RANK ligand (RANKL). Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor for RANKL, modifies osteoclast-mediated bone resorption directly and spares articular cartilage indirectly in rodents with immune-mediated arthritis by preventing subchondral bone destruction. The OPG/RANKL balance also seems to be critical in maintaining joint integrity in osteoarthritis, a condition featuring articular bone and cartilage damage in the absence of profound inflammation. The current study explored the role of OPG in sparing articular cartilage by evaluating joint lesions in adult C57BL/6J mice lacking osteoprotegerin (Opg (-) (/-)). At 3, 5, 7, 9, and 12 months of age, both sexes of Opg (-) (/-) mice developed severe degenerative joint disease (DJD) characterized by progressive loss of cartilage matrix and eventually articular cartilage. Lesions developed earlier and more severely in Opg (-) (/-) mice relative to age-matched, wild-type (Opg (+) (/+)), or heterozygous (Opg (+) (/-)) littermates (P ≤ .05). The femorotibial joint was affected bilaterally at 3 months, while other key weight-bearing diarthrodial joints (eg, coxofemoral, scapulohumeral, humeroradioulnar) were affected later and unilaterally. Cortical bone in subchondral plates and long bone diaphyses of Opg (-) (/-) mice but not Opg (+/+) or Opg (+) (/-) animals was osteoporotic by 3 months of age (P ≤ .05); the extent of porosity was less than the degree of DJD. Closure of the physes in long bones (P ≤ .05) and cartilage retention in the femoral primary spongiosa (P ≤ .05) affected chiefly Opg (-) (/-) mice. These data suggest that OPG plays an essential direct role in maintaining cartilage integrity in the articular surfaces and physes.

  15. Direct demonstration of Ca2+ binding defects in sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase mutants overexpressed in COS-1 cells transfected with adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Strock, C; Cavagna, M; Peiffer, W E; Sumbilla, C; Lewis, D; Inesi, G

    1998-06-12

    Single mutations of specific amino acids within the membrane-bound region of the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ (SERCA)-1 ATPase interfere with Ca2+ inhibition of ATPase phosphorylation by Pi (1), suggesting that these residues may be involved in complexation of two Ca2+ that are known to bind to the enzyme. However, direct measurements of Ca2+ binding in the absence of ATP have been limited by the low quantities of available mutant protein. We have improved the transfection efficiency by means of recombinant adenovirus vectors, yielding sufficient expression of wild type and mutant SERCA-1 ATPase for measurements of Ca2+ binding to the microsomal fraction of the transfected cells. We find that in the presence of 20 microM Ca2+ and in the absence of ATP, the Glu771 --> Gln, Thr799 --> Ala, Asp800 --> Asn, and Glu908 --> Ala mutants exhibit negligible binding, indicating that the oxygen functions of Glu771, Thr799, Asp800, and Glu908 are involved in interactions whose single disruption causes major changes in the highly cooperative "duplex" binding. Total loss of Ca2+ binding is accompanied by loss of Ca2+ inhibition of the Pi reaction. We also find that, at pH 7.0, the Glu309 --> Gln and the Asn796 --> Ala mutants bind approximately half as much Ca2+ as the wild type ATPase and do not interfere with Ca2+ inhibition of the Pi reaction. At pH 6.2, the Glu309 --> Gln mutant does not bind any Ca2+, and its phosphorylation by Pi is not inhibited by Ca2+. On the contrary, the Asn796 --> Ala mutant retains the behavior displayed at pH 7.0. This suggests that in the Glu309 --> Gln mutant, ionization of acidic functions in other amino acids (e.g. Glu771 and Asp800) occurs as the pH is shifted, thereby rendering Ca2+ binding possible. In the Asn796 --> Ala mutant, on the other hand, the Glu309 carboxylic function allows binding of inhibitory Ca2+ even at pH 6.2. In all cases mutational interference with the inhibition of the Pi reaction by Ca2+ can be overcome by raising

  16. Gastrointestinal Mucins of Fut2-Null Mice Lack Terminal Fucosylation without Affecting Colonization by Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Elizabeth A.; Holmén, Jessica M.; Hansson, Gunnar C.; Domino, Steven E.

    2006-01-01

    Post-translational modification of apomucins by the sequential action of glycosyltransferases is required to produce mature mucins. The “Secretor” gene (FUT2) encodes an α(1,2)fucosyltransferase (E.C. 2.4.1.69) that catalyzes addition of terminal α(1,2)fucose residues on mucins and other molecules in mucosal epithelium. Mutant mice containing targeted replacement of Fut2 with the bacterial reporter gene lacZ were studied to determine the affect of the loss of Fut2 on glycosylation of mucins in the gastrointestinal tract. By whole organ X-gal staining, lacZ activity is prominently expressed in the foveolar pit and chief cells of the glandular stomach, Brunner's glands of the duodenum, and goblet cells in the large intestine of Fut2-LacZ null mice. Staining with Aleuria aurantia agglutinin demonstrates loss of l-fucosylated epithelial glycans throughout the gastrointestinal tract of Fut2-LacZ null mice, however, histologic appearance of the tissues appears normal. Analysis of oligosaccharides released from insoluble colonic mucins, largely Muc2, by mass spectrometry shows complete lack of terminal fucosylation of O-linked oligosaccharides in Fut2-LacZ null mice. Precursor glycans accumulate with no evidence of compensation by other fucosyltransferases or sialyltransferases on mucin glycosylation. Since Candida albicans has been reported to adhere to intestinal mucins creating a potential reservoir associated with vaginitis, Fut2-LacZ null and wild type mice were inoculated by gastric lavage with C. albicans. We observe no difference in colonization between genotypes suggesting mucin terminal fucosylation does not significantly influence C. albicans-host interaction in the intestine, highlighting that infections caused by the same organism at different mucosal surfaces are not equal. PMID:15958416

  17. Gradient moment nulling in fast spin echo.

    PubMed

    Hinks, R S; Constable, R T

    1994-12-01

    The fast spin echo sequence combines data from many echo signals in a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill echo train to form a single image. Much of the signal in the second and later echoes results from the coherent addition of stimulated echo signal components back to the spin echo signal. Because stimulated echoes experience no dephasing effects during the time that they are stored as Mz magnetization, they experience a different gradient first moment than does the spin echo. This leads to flow-related phase differences between different echo components and results in flow voids and ghosting, even when the first moment is nulled for the spin echo signal. A method of gradient moment nulling that correctly compensates both spin echo and stimulated echo components has been developed. The simplest solution involves nulling the first gradient moment at least at the RF pulses and preferably at both the RF pulses and the echoes. Phantom and volunteer studies demonstrate good suppression of flow-related artifacts.

  18. NULL Convention Floating Point Multiplier

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  19. Pattern nulling by reflector shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, D. A.

    1983-12-01

    The applicability of adaptive array concepts to continuous aperture antennas was studied and appropriate aperture field distributions for pattern nulling were found from them. The adaptive array weights were found to be useful as discrete points in a continuous distribution. This distribution could then be used in an aperture integration scheme to produce a nulled pattern. Also studied was the use of geometrical optics to calculate the aperture field distribution of an arbitrarily shaped reflector. Under some restrictions, geometrical optics can provide a useful approximation. Constructing the aperture field of a reflector defined by a discrete grid of points using a numerical ray tracing scheme was also investigated. Certain numerical problems were identified. Finally, an attempt was made to implement the nulled pattern by a well known beam shaping method based on geometrical optics principles. This technique was found to be inadequate. More promising techniques for implementing the aperture distributions were suggested but not pursued in this work.

  20. The anthocyanin reduced Tomato Mutant Demonstrates the Role of Flavonols in Tomato Lateral Root and Root Hair Development1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Gregory S.; DiNapoli, Kathleen T.; Muday, Gloria K.

    2014-01-01

    This study utilized tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutants with altered flavonoid biosynthesis to understand the impact of these metabolites on root development. The mutant anthocyanin reduced (are) has a mutation in the gene encoding FLAVONOID 3-HYDROXYLASE (F3H), the first step in flavonol synthesis, and accumulates higher concentrations of the F3H substrate, naringenin, and lower levels of the downstream products kaempferol, quercetin, myricetin, and anthocyanins, than the wild type. Complementation of are with the p35S:F3H transgene reduced naringenin and increased flavonols to wild-type levels. The initiation of lateral roots is reduced in are, and p35S:F3H complementation restores wild-type root formation. The flavonoid mutant anthocyanin without has a defect in the gene encoding DIHYDROFLAVONOL REDUCTASE, resulting in elevated flavonols and the absence of anthocyanins and displays increased lateral root formation. These results are consistent with a positive role of flavonols in lateral root formation. The are mutant has increased indole-3-acetic acid transport and greater sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid on lateral root formation. Expression of the auxin-induced reporter (DR5-β-glucuronidase) is reduced in initiating lateral roots and increased in primary root tips of are. Levels of reactive oxygen species are elevated in are root epidermal tissues and root hairs, and are forms more root hairs, consistent with a role of flavonols as antioxidants that modulate root hair formation. Together, these experiments identify positive roles of flavonols in the formation of lateral roots and negative roles in the formation of root hairs through the modulation of auxin transport and reactive oxygen species, respectively. PMID:25006027

  1. Characterization of a NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase mutant of Arabidopsis demonstrates the key role of this enzyme in root carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Jean-Xavier; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Armengaud, Patrick; Clément, Gilles; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pelletier, Sandra; Catterou, Manuella; Azzopardi, Marianne; Gibon, Yves; Lea, Peter J; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric

    2012-10-01

    The role of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated by studying the physiological impact of a complete lack of enzyme activity in an Arabidopsis thaliana plant deficient in three genes encoding the enzyme. This study was conducted following the discovery that a third GDH gene is expressed in the mitochondria of the root companion cells, where all three active GDH enzyme proteins were shown to be present. A gdh1-2-3 triple mutant was constructed and exhibited major differences from the wild type in gene transcription and metabolite concentrations, and these differences appeared to originate in the roots. By placing the gdh triple mutant under continuous darkness for several days and comparing it to the wild type, the evidence strongly suggested that the main physiological function of NADH-GDH is to provide 2-oxoglutarate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The differences in key metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the triple mutant versus the wild type indicated that, through metabolic processes operating mainly in roots, there was a strong impact on amino acid accumulation, in particular alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, and aspartate in both roots and leaves. These results are discussed in relation to the possible signaling and physiological functions of the enzyme at the interface of carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

  2. Fracture characterisation using geoelectric null-arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, Pierik; Negro, François; Szalai, Sándor; Milnes, Ellen

    2013-06-01

    The term "geoelectric null-array" is used for direct current electrode configurations yielding a potential difference of zero above a homogeneous half-space. This paper presents a comparative study of the behaviour of three null-arrays, midpoint null-array (MAN), Wenner-γ null-array and Schlumberger null-array in response to a fracture, both in profiling and in azimuthal mode. The main objective is to determine which array(s) best localise fractures or best identify their orientation. Forward modelling of the three null-arrays revealed that the Wenner-γ and Schlumberger null-arrays localise vertical fractures the most accurately, whilst the midpoint null-array combined with the Schlumberger null-array allows accurate orientation of a fracture. Numerical analysis then served as a basis to interpret the field results. Field test measurements were carried out above a quarry in Les Breuleux (Switzerland) with the three null-arrays and classical arrays. The results were cross-validated with quarry-wall geological mapping. In real field circumstances, the Wenner-γ null-array proved to be the most efficient and accurate in localising fractures. The orientations of the fractures according to the numerical results were most efficiently determined with the midpoint null-array, whilst the Schlumberger null-array adds accuracy to the results. This study shows that geoelectrical null-arrays are more suitable than classical arrays for the characterisation of fracture geometry.

  3. Null Energy Condition in Dynamic Wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Hochberg, D.; Visser, M.

    1998-07-01

    We extend previous proofs that violations of the null energy condition are a generic and universal feature of traversable wormholes to completely nonsymmetric time-dependent wormholes. We show that the analysis can be phrased purely in terms of local geometry at and near the wormhole throat, and we do not have to make any technical assumptions about asymptotic flatness or other global properties. A key aspect of the analysis is the demonstration that time-dependent wormholes have {ital two} throats, one for each direction through the wormhole, and that the two throats coalesce only for the case of a static wormhole. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in connexin43-null osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlan, F.; Lecanda, F.; Screen, J.; Civitelli, R.

    2001-01-01

    Osteoblasts are highly coupled by gap junctions formed primarily by connexin43 (Cx43). We have shown that interference with Cx43 expression or function disrupts transcriptional regulation of osteoblast genes, and that deletion of Cx43 in the mouse causes skeletal malformations, delayed mineralization, and osteoblast dysfunction. Here, we studied the mechanisms by which genetic deficiency of Cx43 alters osteoblast development. While cell proliferation rates were similar in osteoblastic cells derived from calvaria of Cx43-null and wild type mice, camptothecin-induced apoptosis was 3-fold higher in mutant compared to wild type osteoblasts. When grown in mineralizing medium, Cx43-null cells were able to produce mineralized matrix but it took one week longer to reach the same mineralization levels as in normal cells. Likewise, expression of alkaline phosphatase activity per cell--a marker of osteoblast differentiation--was maximal only 2 weeks later in Cx43-null relative to wild-type cells. These observations suggest that Cx43 is important for a normal and timely development of the osteoblastic phenotype. Delayed differentiation and increase programmed cell death may explain the skeletal phenotype of Cx43-null mice.

  5. Behavioral phenotype of maLPA1-null mice: increased anxiety-like behavior and spatial memory deficits

    PubMed Central

    Santin, L.J.; Bilbao, A.; Pedraza, C.; Matas-Rico, E.; López-Barroso, D.; Castilla-Ortega, E.; Sánchez-López, J.; Riquelme, R.; Varela-Nieto, I.; de la Villa, P.; Suardíaz, M.; Chun, J.; De Fonseca, F. Rodriguez; Estivill-Torrús, G.

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has emerged as a new regulatory molecule in the brain. Recently, some studies have demonstrated a role for this molecule and its LPA1 receptor in the regulation of plasticity and neurogenesis in the adult brain. However, no systematic studies have been conducted to investigate whether the LPA1 receptor is involved in behavior. Here we studied the phenotype of maLPA1–null mice, which bear a targeted deletion at the lpa1 locus, in a battery of tests examining neurologic performance, habituation in exploratory behavior in response to low and mild anxiety environments and spatial memory. MaLPA1-null mutants showed deficits in both olfaction and somesthesis, but not in retinal or auditory functions. Sensorimotor coordination was impaired only in the equilibrium and grasping reflexes. The mice also showed impairments in neuromuscular strength and analgesic response. No additional differences were observed in the rest of the tests used to study sensoriomotor orientation, limb reflexes, and coordinated limb use. At behavioral level, maLPA1-null mice showed an impaired exploration in the open field and increased anxiety-like response when exposed to the elevated plus maze. Furthermore, the mice exhibit impaired spatial memory retention and reduced use of spatial strategies in the Morris water maze. We propose that the LPA1 receptor may play a major role in both spatial memory and response to anxiety-like conditions. PMID:19689455

  6. Balloon Exoplanet Nulling Interferometer (BENI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Ford, Holland; Petro, Larry; Herman, Jay; Rinehart, Stephen; Carpenter, Kenneth; Marzouk, Joe

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of using a balloon-borne nulling interferometer to detect and characterize exosolar planets and debris disks. The existing instrument consists of a 3-telescope Fizeau imaging interferometer with 3 fast steering mirrors and 3 delay lines operating at 800 Hz for closed-loop control of wavefront errors and fine pointing. A compact visible nulling interferometer is under development which when coupled to the imaging interferometer would in-principle allow deep suppression of starlight. We have conducted atmospheric simulations of the environment above 100,000 feet and believe balloons are a feasible path forward towards detection and characterization of a limited set of exoplanets and their debris disks. Herein we will discuss the BENI instrument, the balloon environment and the feasibility of such as mission.

  7. Passive reverberation nulling for target enhancement.

    PubMed

    Song, H C; Hodgkiss, W S; Kuperman, W A; Sabra, K G; Akal, T; Stevenson, M

    2007-12-01

    Echo-to-reverberation enhancement previously has been demonstrated using time reversal focusing when knowledge of the channel response between a target and the source array elements is available. In the absence of this knowledge, direct focusing is not possible. However, active reverberation nulling still is feasible given observations of reverberation from conventional source array transmissions. For a given range of interest, the response between the source array elements and the dominant sources of boundary reverberation is provided by the corresponding reverberation from this range. Thus, an active transmission can be projected from the source array which minimizes the energy interacting with the boundaries at a given range while still ensonifying the waveguide between the boundaries. As an alternative, here a passive reverberation nulling concept is proposed. In a similar fashion, the observed reverberation defines the response between the source array elements and the dominant sources of boundary reverberation at each range and this is used to drive a range-dependent sequence of projection operators. When these projection operators subsequently are applied to the received data vectors, reverberation can be diminished. The improvement in target detectability is demonstrated using experimental data with an echo repeater simulating the presence of a target.

  8. Isolation of MECP2-null Rett Syndrome patient hiPS cells and isogenic controls through X-chromosome inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Aaron Y.L.; Horvath, Lindsay M.; Grafodatskaya, Daria; Pasceri, Peter; Weksberg, Rosanna; Hotta, Akitsu; Carrel, Laura; Ellis, James

    2011-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental autism spectrum disorder that affects girls due primarily to mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2). The majority of RTT patients carry missense and nonsense mutations leading to a hypomorphic MECP2, while null mutations leading to the complete absence of a functional protein are rare. MECP2 is an X-linked gene subject to random X-chromosome inactivation resulting in mosaic expression of mutant MECP2. The lack of human brain tissue motivates the need for alternative human cellular models to study RTT. Here we report the characterization of a MECP2 mutation in a classic female RTT patient involving rearrangements that remove exons 3 and 4 creating a functionally null mutation. To generate human neuron models of RTT, we isolated human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells from RTT patient fibroblasts. RTT-hiPS cells retained the MECP2 mutation, are pluripotent and fully reprogrammed, and retained an inactive X-chromosome in a nonrandom pattern. Taking advantage of the latter characteristic, we obtained a pair of isogenic wild-type and mutant MECP2 expressing RTT-hiPS cell lines that retained this MECP2 expression pattern upon differentiation into neurons. Phenotypic analysis of mutant RTT-hiPS cell-derived neurons demonstrated a reduction in soma size compared with the isogenic control RTT-hiPS cell-derived neurons from the same RTT patient. Analysis of isogenic control and mutant hiPS cell-derived neurons represents a promising source for understanding the pathogenesis of RTT and the role of MECP2 in human neurons. PMID:21372149

  9. Clausius entropy for arbitrary bifurcate null surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccetti, Valentina; Visser, Matt

    2014-02-01

    Jacobson’s thermodynamic derivation of the Einstein equations was originally applied only to local Rindler horizons. But at least some parts of that construction can usefully be extended to give meaningful results for arbitrary bifurcate null surfaces. As presaged in Jacobson’s original article, this more general construction sharply brings into focus the questions: is entropy objectively ‘real’? Or is entropy in some sense subjective and observer-dependent? These innocent questions open a Pandora’s box of often inconclusive debate. A consensus opinion, though certainly not universally held, seems to be that Clausius entropy (thermodynamic entropy, defined via a Clausius relation {\\rm{d}}S = \\unicode{x111} Q/T) should be objectively real, but that the ontological status of statistical entropy (Shannon or von Neumann entropy) is much more ambiguous, and much more likely to be observer-dependent. This question is particularly pressing when it comes to understanding Bekenstein entropy (black hole entropy). To perhaps further add to the confusion, we shall argue that even the Clausius entropy can often be observer-dependent. In the current article we shall conclusively demonstrate that one can meaningfully assign a notion of Clausius entropy to arbitrary bifurcate null surfaces—effectively defining a ‘virtual Clausius entropy’ for arbitrary ‘virtual (local) causal horizons’. As an application, we see that we can implement a version of the generalized second law (GSL) for this virtual Clausius entropy. This version of GSL can be related to certain (nonstandard) integral variants of the null energy condition. Because the concepts involved are rather subtle, we take some effort in being careful and explicit in developing our framework. In future work we will apply this construction to generalize Jacobson’s derivation of the Einstein equations.

  10. Role of ozone in UV-C disinfection, demonstrated by comparison between wild-type and mutant conidia of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhou, Lin; Chen, Ji-Hong; Mao, Wang; Li, Wen-Jian; Hu, Wei; Wang, Shu-Yang; Wang, Chun-Ming

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the tolerance of a melanized wild-type strain of Aspergillus niger (CON1) and its light-colored mutant (MUT1) to UV-C light and the concomitantly generated ozone. Treatments were segregated into four groups based on whether UV irradiation was used and the presence or absence of ozone: (-UV, -O3), (-UV, +O3), (+UV, -O3) and (+UV, +O3). The survival of CON1 and MUT1 conidia under +UV decreased as the exposure time increased, with CON1 showing greater resistance to UV irradiation than MUT1. Ozone induced CON1 conidium inactivation only under conditions of UV radiation exposure. While, the inactivation effect of ozone on MUT1 was always detectable regardless of the presence of UV irradiation. Furthermore, the CON1 conidial suspension showed lower UV light transmission than MUT1 when examined at the same concentration. Compared with the pigment in MUT1, the melanin in CON1 exhibited more potent radical-scavenging activity and stronger UV absorbance. These results suggested that melanin protected A. niger against UV disinfection via UV screening and free radical scavenging. The process by which UV-C disinfection induces a continual decrease in conidial survival suggests that UV irradiation and ozone exert a synergistic fungicidal effect on A. niger prior to reaching a plateau.

  11. Pisum sativum wild-type and mutant stipules and those induced by an auxin transport inhibitor demonstrate the entire diversity of laminated stipules observed in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Sharma, Vishakha; Khan, Moinuddin; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-02-01

    About a quarter of angiosperm species are stipulate. They produce stipule pairs at stem nodes in association with leaves. Stipule morphology is treated as a species-specific characteristic. Many species bear stipules as laminated organs in a variety of configurations, including laterally free large foliaceous, small, or wholly leaf-like stipules, and as fused intrapetiolar, opposite, ochreate or interpetiolar stipules. In Pisum sativum, the wild-type and stipule-reduced and cochleata mutants are known to form free large, small, and leaf-like stipules, respectively. Auxin controls initiation and development of plant organs and perturbations in its availability and distribution in the meristems, caused by auxin transport inhibitor(s) (ATIs), lead to aberrations in leaf development. The effect(s) of ATI(s) on stipule development are unexplored. To study the effect of the ATI 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) on stipule morphogenesis, P. sativum explants were grown in vitro in presence of a sublethal concentration of NPA. The NPA-treated shoots produced fused stipules of all the different types described in angiosperms. The observations indicate that (a) the gene sets for stipule differentiation may be common in angiosperms and (b) the interspecies stipule architectural differences are due to mutations, affecting gene expression or activity that got selected in the course of evolution. PMID:22456952

  12. TMV mutants with poly(A) tracts of different lengths demonstrate structural variations in 3′UTR affecting viral RNAs accumulation and symptom expression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Song; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Yi-Jun; Wong, Sek-Man

    2015-01-01

    The upstream pseudoknots domain (UPD) of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is located at the 3′-untranslated region (UTR). It plays an important role in virus replication and translation. To determine the importance of UPD and 3′-UTR, and the effects of introduced RNA elements in TMV 3′-UTR, a series of TMV mutants with internal poly(A) tract upstream of UPD was constructed for structural analysis by selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE). TMV(24A+UPD) and TMV(42A+UPD) formed a similar structure as that of TMV 3′-UTR, but TMV(62A+UPD) structures altered by the introduced poly(A) tract. In addition, TMV(24A+UPD) had a higher viral RNAs accumulation than TMV in N. benthamiana protoplasts, and induced lethal symptoms in the infected plants. TMV(62A+UPD) showed a drastically reduced accumulation, its coat protein was undetectable in protoplasts, and the inoculated plants remained symptomless. This study analyzed the structures of 3′-UTR of TMV and found that the longer poly(A) tract introduced upstream of UPD reduced viral RNAs accumulation and induced milder symptoms in N. benthamiana. In conclusion, different lengths of the internal poly(A) tract introduced into the TMV 3′UTR lead to structural variations that affect virus accumulation and symptom expression. PMID:26678425

  13. Adaptive Nulling for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeganathan, Muthu; Hirai, Akiko; Lay, Oliver P.; Peters, Robert D.

    2006-01-01

    Deep, stable starlight nulls are needed for the direct detection of Earth-like planets and require careful control of the intensity and phases of the beams that are being combined. We are testing a novel compensator based on a deformable mirror to correct the intensity and phase at each wavelength and polarization across the nulling bandwidth. We have successfully demonstrated intensity and phase control using a deformable mirror across a 100nm wide band in the near-IR, and are in the process of conducting experiments in the mid-IR wavelengths. This paper covers the current results and in the mid-IR.

  14. Interferometric nulling of four channels with integrated optics.

    PubMed

    Errmann, Ronny; Minardi, Stefano; Labadie, Lucas; Muthusubramanian, Balaji; Dreisow, Felix; Nolte, Stefan; Pertsch, Thomas

    2015-08-20

    Nulling interferometry has been identified as a competitive technique for the detection of extrasolar planets. In its basic form, the technique consists of combining out-of-phase a single pair of telescopes to effectively null the light of a bright star and reveal the dim glow of the companion. However, in order to mitigate the effect of the stellar leaks through the interferometer, a broad angular central null is required. The hierarchical combination of several pairs of telescopes can accomplish this task. We have manufactured and tested with monochromatic light an integrated optics component, which combines a linear array of four telescopes in the nulling mode envisaged by Angel and Woolf [Astroph. J.475, 373-379 (1997).10.1086/apj.1997.475.issue-1ASJOAB0004-637X]. By simulating in the laboratory the motion of a star in the sky, we could measure the expected angular transmission of the four-telescope nuller. Moreover, the tests have demonstrated a broad nulling scaling as the fourth power of the baseline delay.

  15. Interferometric nulling of four channels with integrated optics.

    PubMed

    Errmann, Ronny; Minardi, Stefano; Labadie, Lucas; Muthusubramanian, Balaji; Dreisow, Felix; Nolte, Stefan; Pertsch, Thomas

    2015-08-20

    Nulling interferometry has been identified as a competitive technique for the detection of extrasolar planets. In its basic form, the technique consists of combining out-of-phase a single pair of telescopes to effectively null the light of a bright star and reveal the dim glow of the companion. However, in order to mitigate the effect of the stellar leaks through the interferometer, a broad angular central null is required. The hierarchical combination of several pairs of telescopes can accomplish this task. We have manufactured and tested with monochromatic light an integrated optics component, which combines a linear array of four telescopes in the nulling mode envisaged by Angel and Woolf [Astroph. J.475, 373-379 (1997).10.1086/apj.1997.475.issue-1ASJOAB0004-637X]. By simulating in the laboratory the motion of a star in the sky, we could measure the expected angular transmission of the four-telescope nuller. Moreover, the tests have demonstrated a broad nulling scaling as the fourth power of the baseline delay. PMID:26368784

  16. Progress in broadband infrared nulling technology for TPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Brown, Ken; Bartos, Randall; Gappinger, Robert; Loya, Frank; Macdonald, Dan; Moser, Steve; Negron, John

    2005-01-01

    TPF-I has set for itself a host of challenging technical milestones along its path to demonstrating the feasibility of infrared nulling for planet detection Progress in each of these areas of technical development will be reviewed as well as progress in meeting the overarching technical milestones.

  17. Statefinder hierarchy: An extended null diagnostic for concordance cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Arabsalmani, Maryam; Sahni, Varun

    2011-02-15

    We show how higher derivatives of the expansion factor can be developed into a null diagnostic for concordance cosmology ({Lambda}CDM). It is well known that the Statefinder - the third derivative of the expansion factor written in dimensionless form, a{sup (3)}/aH{sup 3}, equals unity for {Lambda}CDM. We generalize this result and demonstrate that the hierarchy, a{sup (n)}/aH{sup n}, can be converted to a form that stays pegged at unity in concordance cosmology. This remarkable property of the Statefinder hierarchy enables it to be used as an extended null diagnostic for the cosmological constant. The Statefinder hierarchy combined with the growth rate of matter perturbations defines a composite null diagnostic which can distinguish evolving dark energy from {Lambda}CDM.

  18. Increased Oxidative Stress Impairs Adipose Tissue Function in Sphingomyelin Synthase 1 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Naotaka; Gotoh, Tomomi; Watanabe, Ken; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Garan, Yohei; Taguchi, Ryo; Node, Koichi; Okazaki, Toshiro; Oike, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase 1 (SMS1) catalyzes the conversion of ceramide to sphingomyelin. Here, we found that SMS1 null mice showed lipodystrophic phenotype. Mutant mice showed up-regulation of plasma triglyceride concentrations accompanied by reduction of white adipose tissue (WAT) as they aged. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was severely reduced in mutant mice. In vivo analysis indicated that fatty acid uptake in WAT but not in liver decreased in SMS1 null compared to wild-type mice. In vitro analysis using cultured cell revealed that SMS1 depletion reduced fatty acid uptake. Proteins extracted from WAT of mutant mice were severely modified by oxidative stress, and up-regulation of mRNAs related to apoptosis, redox adjustment, mitochondrial stress response and mitochondrial biogenesis was observed. ATP content of WAT was reduced in SMS1 null mice. Blue native gel analysis indicated that accumulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes was reduced. These results suggest that WAT of SMS1 null mice is severely damaged by oxidative stress and barely functional. Indeed, mutant mice treated with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) showed partial recovery of lipodystrophic phenotypes together with normalized plasma triglyceride concentrations. Altogether, our data suggest that SMS1 is crucial to control oxidative stress in order to maintain WAT function. PMID:23593476

  19. Overt vs. Null Direct Objects in Spoken Brazilian Portuguese: A Semantic/Pragmatic Account.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwenter, Scott A.; Silva, Glaucia

    2002-01-01

    Examines the semantic/pragmatic constraints on null objects spoken in Brazilian Portuguese (BP) in detail, and situates BP null objects in the broader crosslinguistic perspective of differential object marking. Demonstrates that semantic/pragmatic dimensions of animacy and specificity, and in particular their interaction, must be taken into…

  20. Over-fitting Time Series Models of Air Pollution Health Effects: Smoothing Tends to Bias Non-Null Associations Towards the Null.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Simulation studies have previously demonstrated that time-series analyses using smoothing splines correctly model null health-air pollution associations. Methods: We repeatedly simulated season, meteorology and air quality for the metropolitan area of Atlanta from cyc...

  1. DAVINCI: Dilute Aperture VIsible Nulling Coronagraphic Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Levine, B. M.; Vasisht, G.; Lane, B. F.; Woodruff, R.; Vasudevan, G.; Samuele, R.; Lloyd, C. A.; Clampin, M.; Lyon, R.; Guyon, O.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation gives an overview of DAVINCI (Dilute Aperture VIsible Nulling Coronagraphic Imager). The presentation also includes information about dilute aperture coronagraph, and lyot efficiency.

  2. Retention of crab larvae in a coastal null zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilburg, Charles E.; Dittel, Ana I.; Epifanio, Charles E.

    2007-05-01

    Alongshelf transport in the southern Middle Atlantic Bight is forced by buoyancy-driven currents originating in three large estuaries along the bight. These currents are strongest in the coastal ocean near the southern terminus of each estuary, while the analogous region on the northern side is characterized by weak subtidal flow. We used a combination of field observations and numerical modeling to test the hypothesis that these regions of weak subtidal flow are coastal null zones that serve as retention areas for larvae. The field study consisted of a four-day, shipboard investigation of the distribution of blue crab larvae ( Callinectes sapidus) near the mouth of Delaware Bay (˜39°N, 75°W) in late summer, 2004. Hydrographic surveys of the study site were conducted with a hull-mounted, surface-measuring system. Results showed a sharp boundary between the null zone and the buoyancy-driven current to the south. Blue crab larvae were collected in surface plankton tows along a 30-km transect that encompassed these two areas. Stations with higher densities of larvae were clustered in the null zone during both ebb and flood tides. A numerical model was used to examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed distribution. Model results agreed with the field survey and showed that simulated larvae are aggregated in the null zone. The simulations also demonstrated that larvae spawned within the null zone have a much greater probability of settling in juvenile nursery habitat within the bay. The close agreement between field and model results provides consistent support for the hypothesis that coastal null zones associated with the buoyancy-driven circulation of large estuaries may allow retention of larvae in the vicinity of the natal spawning population.

  3. Novel mutation of the CYP17 gene in two unrelated patients with combined 17alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency: demonstration of absent enzyme activity by expressing the mutant CYP17 gene and by three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Patocs, Attila; Liko, István; Varga, Ibolya; Gergics, Peter; Boros, Andras; Futo, Laszlo; Kun, Imre; Bertalan, Rita; Toth, Szilvia; Pazmany, Tamas; Toth, Miklós; Szücs, Nikolette; Horanyi, Janos; Glaz, Edit; Racz, Karoly

    2005-11-01

    The CYP17 gene, located on chromosome 10q24-q25, encodes the cytochrome P450c17 enzyme. Mutations of this gene cause the 17alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency, which is a rare, autosomal recessive form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Approximately 50 different mutations of the CYP17 gene have been described, of which some mutations have been identified in certain ethnic groups. In this study, we present the clinical history, hormonal findings and mutational analysis of two patients from unrelated families, who were evaluated for hypertension, hypokalemia and sexual infantilism. In the first patient, who was a 37-year-old female, additional studies showed a large myelolipoma in the left adrenal gland, and a smaller tumor in the right adrenal gland. In the second patient, who was a 31-year-old phenotypic female, clinical work-up revealed a 46,XY kariotype, absence of ovaries and presence of testes located in the inner opening of both inguinal canals. Analysis of the CYP17 gene by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing demonstrated a novel homozygous mutation of codon 440 from CGC (Arg) to TGC (Cys) in both patients. The effect of this novel mutation on 17alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase activity was assessed by in vitro studies on the mutant and wild-type P450c17 generated by site-directed mutagenesis and transfected in nonsteroidogenic COS-1 cells. These studies showed that the mutant P450c17 protein was produced in transfected COS-1 cells, but it had negligible 17alpha-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase activities. In addition, three-dimensional computerized modeling of the heme-binding site of the P450c17 enzyme indicated that replacement of Arg by Cys at amino acid position 440 predicts a loss of the catalytic activity of the enzyme, as the mutant enzyme containing Cys440 fails to form a hydrogen bond with the propionate group of heme, which renders the mutant enzyme unable to stabilize the proper position of heme. Based on these findings we

  4. The Importance of Proving the Null

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallistel, C. R.

    2009-01-01

    Null hypotheses are simple, precise, and theoretically important. Conventional statistical analysis cannot support them; Bayesian analysis can. The challenge in a Bayesian analysis is to formulate a suitably vague alternative, because the vaguer the alternative is (the more it spreads out the unit mass of prior probability), the more the null is…

  5. Electron trapping around a magnetic null

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.-S.; Zong, Q.-G.; Deng, X.-H.; Tu, C.-Y.; Xiao, C.-J.; Wang, X.-G.; Ma, Z.-W.; Pu, Z.-Y.; Lucek, E.; Pedersen, A.; Fazakerley, A.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Dunlop, M. W.; Tian, H.; Yao, S.; Tan, B.; Fu, S.-Y.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Reme, H.; Dandouras, I.; Escoubet, C. P.

    2008-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an important process in astrophysical, space and laboratory plasmas. The magnetic null pair structure is theoretically suggested to be a crucial feature of the three-dimensional magnetic reconnection. The physics around the null pair, however, has not been explored in combination with the magnetic field configuration deduced from in situ observations. Here, we report the identification of the configuration around a null pair and simultaneous electron dynamics near one null of the pair, observed by four Cluster spacecraft in the geo-magnetotail. Further, we propose a new scenario of electron dynamics in the null region, suggesting that electrons are temporarily trapped in the central reconnection region including electron diffusion region resulting in an electron density peak, accelerated possibly by parallel electric field and electron pressure gradient, and reflected from the magnetic cusp mirrors leading to the bi-directional energetic electron beams, which excite the observed high frequency electrostatic waves.

  6. Waves and null congruences in a draining bathtub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, David; Dolan, Sam R.

    2016-04-01

    We study wave propagation in a draining bathtub: a black hole analogue in fluid mechanics whose perturbations are governed by a Klein-Gordon equation on an effective Lorentzian geometry. Like the Kerr spacetime, the draining bathtub geometry possesses an (effective) horizon, an ergosphere and null circular orbits. We propose here that a ‘pulse’ disturbance may be used to map out the light-cone of the effective geometry. First, we apply the eikonal approximation to elucidate the link between wavefronts, null geodesic congruences and the Raychaudhuri equation. Next, we solve the wave equation numerically in the time domain using the method of lines. Starting with Gaussian initial data, we demonstrate that a pulse will propagate along a null congruence and thus trace out the light-cone of the effective geometry. Our new results reveal features, such as wavefront intersections, frame-dragging, winding and interference effects, that are closely associated with the presence of null circular orbits and the ergosphere.

  7. Testing the null hypothesis: the forgotten legacy of Karl Popper?

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Mick

    2013-01-01

    Testing of the null hypothesis is a fundamental aspect of the scientific method and has its basis in the falsification theory of Karl Popper. Null hypothesis testing makes use of deductive reasoning to ensure that the truth of conclusions is irrefutable. In contrast, attempting to demonstrate the new facts on the basis of testing the experimental or research hypothesis makes use of inductive reasoning and is prone to the problem of the Uniformity of Nature assumption described by David Hume in the eighteenth century. Despite this issue and the well documented solution provided by Popper's falsification theory, the majority of publications are still written such that they suggest the research hypothesis is being tested. This is contrary to accepted scientific convention and possibly highlights a poor understanding of the application of conventional significance-based data analysis approaches. Our work should remain driven by conjecture and attempted falsification such that it is always the null hypothesis that is tested. The write up of our studies should make it clear that we are indeed testing the null hypothesis and conforming to the established and accepted philosophical conventions of the scientific method.

  8. Continuous development of current sheets near and away from magnetic nulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Bhattacharyya, R.

    2016-04-01

    The presented computations compare the strength of current sheets which develop near and away from the magnetic nulls. To ensure the spontaneous generation of current sheets, the computations are performed congruently with Parker's magnetostatic theorem. The simulations evince current sheets near two dimensional and three dimensional magnetic nulls as well as away from them. An important finding of this work is in the demonstration of comparative scaling of peak current density with numerical resolution, for these different types of current sheets. The results document current sheets near two dimensional magnetic nulls to have larger strength while exhibiting a stronger scaling than the current sheets close to three dimensional magnetic nulls or away from any magnetic null. The comparative scaling points to a scenario where the magnetic topology near a developing current sheet is important for energetics of the subsequent reconnection.

  9. Why Are Flare Ribbons Associated with the Spines of Magnetic Null Points Generically Elongated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontin, David; Galsgaard, Klaus; Démoulin, Pascal

    2016-08-01

    Coronal magnetic null points exist in abundance, as demonstrated by extrapolations of the coronal field, and have been inferred to be important for a broad range of energetic events. These null points and their associated separatrix and spine field lines represent discontinuities of the field line mapping, making them preferential locations for reconnection. This field line mapping also exhibits strong gradients adjacent to the separatrix (fan) and spine field lines, which can be analysed using the "squashing factor", Q. In this article we analyse in detail the distribution of Q in the presence of magnetic nulls. While Q is formally infinite on both the spine and fan of the null, the decay of Q away from these structures is shown in general to depend strongly on the null-point structure. For the generic case of a non-radially-symmetric null, Q decays most slowly away from the spine or fan in the direction in which |{B}| increases most slowly. In particular, this demonstrates that the extended elliptical high-Q halo around the spine footpoints observed by Masson et al. ( Astrophys. J. 700, 559, 2009) is a generic feature. This extension of the Q halos around the spine or fan footpoints is important for diagnosing the regions of the photosphere that are magnetically connected to any current layer that forms at the null. In light of this, we discuss how our results can be used to interpret the geometry of observed flare ribbons in circular ribbon flares, in which typically a coronal null is implicated. We conclude that both the physics in the vicinity of the null and how this is related to the extension of Q away from the spine or fan can be used in tandem to understand observational signatures of reconnection at coronal null points.

  10. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Transforming growth factor-beta1 null mutation causes infertility in male mice associated with testosterone deficiency and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ingman, Wendy V; Robertson, Sarah A

    2007-08-01

    TGFbeta1 is a multifunctional cytokine implicated in gonad and secondary sex organ development, steroidogenesis, and spermatogenesis. To determine the physiological requirement for TGFbeta1 in male reproduction, Tgfb1 null mutant mice on a Prkdc(scid) immunodeficient background were studied. TGFbeta1-deficient males did not deposit sperm or induce pseudopregnancy in females, despite an intact reproductive tract with morphologically normal penis, seminal vesicles, and testes. Serum and intratesticular testosterone and serum androstenedione were severely diminished in TGFbeta1-deficient males. Testosterone deficiency was secondary to disrupted pituitary gonadotropin secretion because serum LH and to a lesser extent serum FSH were reduced, and exogenous LH replacement with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) induced serum testosterone to control levels. In the majority of TGFbeta1-deficient males, spermatogenesis was normal and sperm were developmentally competent as assessed by in vitro fertilization. Analysis of sexual behavior revealed that although TGFbeta1 null males showed avid interest in females and engaged in mounting activity, intromission was infrequent and brief, and ejaculation was not attained. Administration of testosterone to adult males, even after neonatal androgenization, was ineffective in restoring sexual function; however, erectile reflexes and ejaculation could be induced by electrical stimulation. These studies demonstrate the profound effect of genetic deficiency in TGFbeta1 on male fertility, implicating this cytokine in essential roles in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and in testosterone-independent regulation of mating competence.

  12. Null structure groups in eleven dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, Marco; Mac Conamhna, Oisin A. P.

    2006-02-15

    We classify all the structure groups which arise as subgroups of the isotropy group (Spin(7)xR{sup 8})xR, of a single null Killing spinor in 11 dimensions. We construct the spaces of spinors fixed by these groups. We determine the conditions under which structure subgroups of the maximal null structure group (Spin(7)xR{sup 8})xR may also be embedded in SU(5), and hence the conditions under which a supersymmetric spacetime admits only null, or both timelike and null, Killing spinors. We discuss how this purely algebraic material will facilitate the direct analysis of the Killing spinor equation of 11 dimensional supergravity, and the classification of supersymmetric spacetimes therein.

  13. On the Penrose inequality along null hypersurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mars, Marc; Soria, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    The null Penrose inequality, i.e. the Penrose inequality in terms of the Bondi energy, is studied by introducing a functional on surfaces and studying its properties along a null hypersurface Ω extending to past null infinity. We prove a general Penrose-type inequality which involves the limit at infinity of the Hawking energy along a specific class of geodesic foliations called Geodesic Asymptotically Bondi (GAB), which are shown to always exist. Whenever this foliation approaches large spheres, this inequality becomes the null Penrose inequality and we recover the results of Ludvigsen-Vickers (1983 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 16 3349-53) and Bergqvist (1997 Class. Quantum Grav. 14 2577-83). By exploiting further properties of the functional along general geodesic foliations, we introduce an approach to the null Penrose inequality called the Renormalized Area Method and find a set of two conditions which imply the validity of the null Penrose inequality. One of the conditions involves a limit at infinity and the other a restriction on the spacetime curvature along the flow. We investigate their range of applicability in two particular but interesting cases, namely the shear-free and vacuum case, where the null Penrose inequality is known to hold from the results by Sauter (2008 PhD Thesis Zürich ETH), and the case of null shells propagating in the Minkowski spacetime. Finally, a general inequality bounding the area of the quasi-local black hole in terms of an asymptotic quantity intrinsic of Ω is derived.

  14. Why are flare ribbons generically elongated in configurations with magnetic null points?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontin, David Iain; Galsgaard, Klaus; Demoulin, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Coronal magnetic null points exist in abundance as demonstrated by extrapolations of the coronal field, and have been inferred to be important for a broad range of energetic events. These null points and their associated separatrix and spine field lines represent discontinuities of the field line mapping, making them preferential locations for reconnection in the corona. In addition, the field line mapping in the vicinity of these null points exhibits strong gradients as measured by the “squashing factor”, Q. We demonstrate that the extension of the Q halos around the spine/fan footpoints is in general important for diagnosing the regions of the photosphere that are magnetically connected to any current layer that forms at the null. In light of this, we discuss the extent to which our results can be used to interpret the geometry of observed flare ribbons in events in which a coronal null is implicated. We conclude that together the physics in the vicinity of the null and how this is related to the extension of Q away from the spine/fan can be used in tandem to understand observational signatures of reconnection at coronal null points.

  15. Abnormal Mammary Development in 129:STAT1-Null Mice is Stroma-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jane Q; Mori, Hidetoshi; Cardiff, Robert D; Trott, Josephine F; Hovey, Russell C; Hubbard, Neil E; Engelberg, Jesse A; Tepper, Clifford G; Willis, Brandon J; Khan, Imran H; Ravindran, Resmi K; Chan, Szeman R; Schreiber, Robert D; Borowsky, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Female 129:Stat1-null mice (129S6/SvEvTac-Stat1(tm1Rds) homozygous) uniquely develop estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumors. Herein we report that the mammary glands (MG) of these mice have altered growth and development with abnormal terminal end buds alongside defective branching morphogenesis and ductal elongation. We also find that the 129:Stat1-null mammary fat pad (MFP) fails to sustain the growth of 129S6/SvEv wild-type and Stat1-null epithelium. These abnormalities are partially reversed by elevated serum progesterone and prolactin whereas transplantation of wild-type bone marrow into 129:Stat1-null mice does not reverse the MG developmental defects. Medium conditioned by 129:Stat1-null epithelium-cleared MFP does not stimulate epithelial proliferation, whereas it is stimulated by medium conditioned by epithelium-cleared MFP from either wild-type or 129:Stat1-null females having elevated progesterone and prolactin. Microarrays and multiplexed cytokine assays reveal that the MG of 129:Stat1-null mice has lower levels of growth factors that have been implicated in normal MG growth and development. Transplanted 129:Stat1-null tumors and their isolated cells also grow slower in 129:Stat1-null MG compared to wild-type recipient MG. These studies demonstrate that growth of normal and neoplastic 129:Stat1-null epithelium is dependent on the hormonal milieu and on factors from the mammary stroma such as cytokines. While the individual or combined effects of these factors remains to be resolved, our data supports the role of STAT1 in maintaining a tumor-suppressive MG microenvironment.

  16. Phase-only nulling for transmit antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Moayyed A.; Yu, Kai-Bor

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes a technique for transmit antenna nulling for low-cost large sparse phased array radar system. Radar system described includes an array of elemental antennas, each with a transmit/receive (T/R) module. The T/R modules are operated at or near maximum output to achieve maximum CD-to-RF efficiency. A phase controller controls the phase shift, which are imparted by each module to its signal, to form a mainbeam and its associated sidelobes. A perturbation phase generator adds phase shifts computed, to form wide nulls in the sidelobe structure. The nulls are achieved at very minimal loss of gain, in the order of fraction of a dB. The speed of obtaining these nulls in real time allows a rapid steering of these nulls in a hostile environment. The thinned aperture allow designing a light weigh mobile system. In radar context, these nulls may be placed on a source of ground clutter, a set of jammers or a set of undesirable radio sources.

  17. A phenotypic null hypothesis for the genetics of personality.

    PubMed

    Turkheimer, Eric; Pettersson, Erik; Horn, Erin E

    2014-01-01

    We review the genetically informed literature on the genetics of personality. Over the past century, quantitative genetic studies, using identical and fraternal twins, have demonstrated that differences in human personality are substantially heritable. We focus on more contemporary questions to which that basic observation has led. We examine whether differences in the heritability of personality are replicable across different traits, samples, and studies; how the heritability of personality relates to its reliability; and how behavior genetics can be employed in studies of validity, and we discuss the stability of personality in genetic and environmental variance. The appropriate null hypothesis in behavior genetics is not that genetic or environmental influence on personality is zero. Instead, we offer a phenotypic null hypothesis, which states that genetic variance is not an independent mechanism of individual differences in personality but rather a reflection of processes that are best conceptualized at the phenotypic level. PMID:24050184

  18. Time travel in transformation optics: Metamaterials with closed null geodesics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, S. Reece

    2015-06-01

    We apply the methods of transformation optics to theoretical descriptions of spacetimes that support closed null geodesic curves. The metric used is based on frame dragging spacetimes, such as the van Stockum dust or the Kerr black hole. Through transformation optics, this metric is analogous to a material that in theory should allow for communication between past and future. Presented herein is a derivation and description of the spacetime and the resulting permeability, permittivity, and magnetoelectric couplings that a material would need in order for light in the material to follow closed null geodesics. We also address the paradoxical implications of such a material and demonstrate why such a material would not actually result in a violation of causality. A full derivation of the Plebanski equations is also included.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic flows sustaining stationary magnetic nulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Vyacheslav S.; Hornig, Gunnar

    2000-09-01

    Exact solutions of the resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations are derived which describe a stationary incompressible flow near a generic null point of a three-dimensional magnetic field. The properties of the solutions depend on the topological skeleton of the corresponding magnetic field. This skeleton is formed by one-dimensional and two-dimensional invariant manifolds (so-called spine line and fan plane) of the magnetic field. It is shown that configurations of generic null points may always be sustained by stationary field-aligned flows of the stagnation type, where the null points of the magnetic and velocity fields have the same location. However, if the absolute value |j∥| of the current density component parallel to the spine line exceeds a critical value jc, the solution is not unique—there is a second nontrivial solution describing spiral flows with the stagnation point at the magnetic null. The characteristic feature of these new flows is that they cross magnetic field lines but they do not cross the corresponding spine and fan of the magnetic null. Therefore these are nonideal but nonreconnecting flows. The critical value |j∥|=jc coincides exactly with a threshold separating the topological distinct improper radial and spiral nulls. It is shown that this is not an accidental coincidence: the spiral field-crossing flows of the considered type are possible only due to the topological equivalence of the field lines forming the fan plane of the spiral magnetic null. The explicit expression for the pressure distribution of the solution is given and its iso-surfaces are found to be always ellipsoidal for the field-aligned flows, while for the field-crossing flows there are also cases with a hyperboloidal structure.

  20. Abnormal Synaptic Vesicle Biogenesis in Drosophila Synaptogyrin Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Robin J.; Akbergenova, Yulia; Jorquera, Ramon A.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2012-01-01

    Sustained neuronal communication relies on the coordinated activity of multiple proteins that regulate synaptic vesicle biogenesis and cycling within the presynaptic terminal. Synaptogyrin and synaptophysin are conserved MARVEL domain-containing transmembrane proteins that are among the most abundant synaptic vesicle constituents, although their role in the synaptic vesicle cycle has remained elusive. To further investigate the function of these proteins, we generated and characterized a synaptogyrin (gyr) null mutant in Drosophila, whose genome encodes a single synaptogyrin isoform and lacks a synaptophysin homolog. We demonstrate that Drosophila synaptogyrin plays a modulatory role in synaptic vesicle biogenesis at larval neuromuscular junctions. Drosophila lacking synaptogyrin are viable and fertile and have no overt deficits in motor function. However, ultrastructural analysis of gyr larvae revealed increased synaptic vesicle diameter and enhanced variability in the size of synaptic vesicles. In addition, the resolution of endocytic cisternae into synaptic vesicles in response to strong stimulation is defective in gyr mutants. Electrophysiological analysis demonstrated an increase in quantal size and a concomitant decrease in quantal content, suggesting functional consequences for transmission caused by the loss of synaptogyrin. Furthermore, high-frequency stimulation resulted in increased facilitation and a delay in recovery from synaptic depression, indicating that synaptic vesicle exo-endocytosis is abnormally regulated during intense stimulation conditions. These results suggest that synaptogyrin modulates the synaptic vesicle exo-endocytic cycle and is required for the proper biogenesis of synaptic vesicles at nerve terminals. PMID:23238721

  1. Some magnetic null lines of astrophysical interest. II. [in magnetic Ap stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    A list of magnetic null lines from selected spectroscopic analyses is presented for possible use in detailed studies of magnetic Ap stars. The presented data represent an extension of the magnetic null lines whose usefulness Shore and Adelman (1974) have recently demonstrated for the study of the overall physical conditions prevailing in the atmospheres of peculiar A stars and for testing the consequences of the mechanism of selective elemental diffusion.

  2. Drosophila Vesicular Monoamine Transporter Mutants Can Adapt to Reduced or Eliminated Vesicular Stores of Dopamine and Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Anne F.; Daniels, Richard; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Grygoruk, Anna; Chang, Hui-Yun; Najibi, Rod; Shamouelian, David; Salazar, Evelyn; Solomon, Mordecai; Ackerson, Larry C.; Maidment, Nigel T.; DiAntonio, Aaron; Krantz, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Physiologic and pathogenic changes in amine release induce dramatic behavioral changes, but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain unclear. To investigate these adaptive processes, we have characterized mutations in the Drosophila vesicular monoamine transporter (dVMAT), which is required for the vesicular storage of dopamine, serotonin, and octopamine. dVMAT mutant larvae show reduced locomotion and decreased electrical activity in motoneurons innervating the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) implicating central amines in the regulation of these activities. A parallel increase in evoked glutamate release by the motoneuron is consistent with a homeostatic adaptation at the NMJ. Despite the importance of aminergic signaling for regulating locomotion and other behaviors, adult dVMAT homozygous null mutants survive under conditions of low population density, thus allowing a phenotypic characterization of adult behavior. Homozygous mutant females are sterile and show defects in both egg retention and development; males also show reduced fertility. Homozygotes show an increased attraction to light but are mildly impaired in geotaxis and escape behaviors. In contrast, heterozygous mutants show an exaggerated escape response. Both hetero- and homozygous mutants demonstrate an altered behavioral response to cocaine. dVMAT mutants define potentially adaptive responses to reduced or eliminated aminergic signaling and will be useful to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:19033154

  3. Drosophila vesicular monoamine transporter mutants can adapt to reduced or eliminated vesicular stores of dopamine and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Simon, Anne F; Daniels, Richard; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Grygoruk, Anna; Chang, Hui-Yun; Najibi, Rod; Shamouelian, David; Salazar, Evelyn; Solomon, Mordecai; Ackerson, Larry C; Maidment, Nigel T; Diantonio, Aaron; Krantz, David E

    2009-02-01

    Physiologic and pathogenic changes in amine release induce dramatic behavioral changes, but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain unclear. To investigate these adaptive processes, we have characterized mutations in the Drosophila vesicular monoamine transporter (dVMAT), which is required for the vesicular storage of dopamine, serotonin, and octopamine. dVMAT mutant larvae show reduced locomotion and decreased electrical activity in motoneurons innervating the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) implicating central amines in the regulation of these activities. A parallel increase in evoked glutamate release by the motoneuron is consistent with a homeostatic adaptation at the NMJ. Despite the importance of aminergic signaling for regulating locomotion and other behaviors, adult dVMAT homozygous null mutants survive under conditions of low population density, thus allowing a phenotypic characterization of adult behavior. Homozygous mutant females are sterile and show defects in both egg retention and development; males also show reduced fertility. Homozygotes show an increased attraction to light but are mildly impaired in geotaxis and escape behaviors. In contrast, heterozygous mutants show an exaggerated escape response. Both hetero- and homozygous mutants demonstrate an altered behavioral response to cocaine. dVMAT mutants define potentially adaptive responses to reduced or eliminated aminergic signaling and will be useful to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:19033154

  4. Progesterone facilitates chromosome instability (aneuploidy) in p53 null normal mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goepfert, T. M.; McCarthy, M.; Kittrell, F. S.; Stephens, C.; Ullrich, R. L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Medina, D.

    2000-01-01

    Mammary epithelial cells from p53 null mice have been shown recently to exhibit an increased risk for tumor development. Hormonal stimulation markedly increased tumor development in p53 null mammary cells. Here we demonstrate that mammary tumors arising in p53 null mammary cells are highly aneuploid, with greater than 70% of the tumor cells containing altered chromosome number and a mean chromosome number of 56. Normal mammary cells of p53 null genotype and aged less than 14 wk do not exhibit aneuploidy in primary cell culture. Significantly, the hormone progesterone, but not estrogen, increases the incidence of aneuploidy in morphologically normal p53 null mammary epithelial cells. Such cells exhibited 40% aneuploidy and a mean chromosome number of 54. The increase in aneuploidy measured in p53 null tumor cells or hormonally stimulated normal p53 null cells was not accompanied by centrosome amplification. These results suggest that normal levels of progesterone can facilitate chromosomal instability in the absence of the tumor suppressor gene, p53. The results support the emerging hypothesis based both on human epidemiological and animal model studies that progesterone markedly enhances mammary tumorigenesis.

  5. Rac-null leukocytes are associated with increased inflammation-mediated alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Sima, Corneliu; Gastfreund, Shoshi; Sun, Chunxiang; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Periodontitis is characterized by altered host-biofilm interactions that result in irreversible inflammation-mediated alveolar bone loss. Genetic and epigenetic factors that predispose to ineffective control of biofilm composition and maintenance of tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. We elucidated how leukocytes affect the course of periodontitis in Rac-null mice. Mouse models of acute gingivitis and periodontitis were used to assess the early inflammatory response and patterns of chronicity leading to loss of alveolar bone due to inflammation in Rac-null mice. Leukocyte margination was differentially impaired in these mice during attachment in conditional Rac1-null (granulocyte/monocyte lineage) mice and during rolling and attachment in Rac2-null (all blood cells) mice. Inflammatory responses to subgingival ligatures, assessed by changes in peripheral blood differential leukocyte numbers, were altered in Rac-null compared with wild-type mice. In response to persistent subgingival ligature-mediated challenge, Rac-null mice had increased loss of alveolar bone with patterns of resorption characteristic of aggressive forms of periodontitis. These findings were partially explained by higher osteoclastic coverage of the bone-periodontal ligament interface in Rac-null compared with wild-type mice. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that leukocyte defects, such as decreased endothelial margination and tissue recruitment, are rate-limiting steps in the periodontal inflammatory process that lead to more aggressive forms of periodontitis.

  6. Genetic and Molecular Characterization of P Element-Induced Mutations Reveals That the Drosophila Ovarian Tumor Gene Has Maternal Activity and a Variable Null Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, P. K.; Patton, J. S.; Rodesch, C.; Nagoshi, R. N.

    1993-01-01

    The mutations in the ovarian tumor (otu) gene arrest oogenesis at several stages in development. A series of deletion mutations in the otu region were characterized, each of which causes the absence or reduction of the otu transcript. These alleles range from the most severe class, which results in ovaries lacking egg cysts, to relatively mild mutations that allow the development of late stage oocytes. Heteroallelic combinations of these mutations demonstrate that the phenotypic complexity of otu mutant ovaries is due to a dosage dependent requirement for otu activity. Reciprocal cross and developmental Northern blot studies suggest a maternal requirement for otu in the development of the female germline. In addition we demonstrate that the otu zygotic null phenotype is variable, ranging from the absence of cysts in the most extreme cases, to the presence of tumorous egg chambers. PMID:8436275

  7. Three-dimensional null point reconnection regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, E. R.; Pontin, D. I.

    2009-12-15

    Recent advances in theory and computational experiments have shown the need to refine the previous categorization of magnetic reconnection at three-dimensional null points--points at which the magnetic field vanishes. We propose here a division into three different types, depending on the nature of the flow near the spine and fan of the null. The spine is an isolated field line which approaches the null (or recedes from it), while the fan is a surface of field lines which recede from it (or approach it). So-called torsional spine reconnection occurs when field lines in the vicinity of the fan rotate, with current becoming concentrated along the spine so that nearby field lines undergo rotational slippage. In torsional fan reconnection field lines near the spine rotate and create a current that is concentrated in the fan with a rotational flux mismatch and rotational slippage. In both of these regimes, the spine and fan are perpendicular and there is no flux transfer across spine or fan. The third regime, called spine-fan reconnection, is the most common in practice and combines elements of the previous spine and fan models. In this case, in response to a generic shearing motion, the null point collapses to form a current sheet that is focused at the null itself, in a sheet that locally spans both the spine and fan. In this regime the spine and fan are no longer perpendicular and there is flux transfer across both of them.

  8. Lack of Major Genome Instability in Tumors of p53 Null Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hermsen, Roel; Toonen, Pim; Kuijk, Ewart; Youssef, Sameh A.; Kuiper, Raoul; van Heesch, Sebastiaan; de Bruin, Alain; Cuppen, Edwin; Simonis, Marieke

    2015-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is often associated with loss of tumor suppressor genes (such as TP53), genomic instability and telomere lengthening. Previously, we generated and characterized a rat p53 knockout model in which the homozygous rats predominantly develop hemangiosarcomas whereas the heterozygous rats mainly develop osteosarcomas. Using genome-wide analyses, we find that the tumors that arise in the heterozygous and homozygous Tp53C273X mutant animals are also different in their genomic instability profiles. While p53 was fully inactivated in both heterozygous and homozygous knockout rats, tumors from homozygous animals show very limited aneuploidy and low degrees of somatic copy number variation as compared to the tumors from heterozygous animals. In addition, complex structural rearrangements such as chromothripsis and breakage-fusion-bridge cycles were never found in tumors from homozygous animals, while these were readily detectable in tumors from heterozygous animals. Finally, we measured telomere length and telomere lengthening pathway activity and found that tumors of homozygous animals have longer telomeres but do not show clear telomerase or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) activity differences as compared to the tumors from heterozygous animals. Taken together, our results demonstrate that host p53 status in this rat p53 knockout model has a large effect on both tumor type and genomic instability characteristics, where full loss of functional p53 is not the main driver of large-scale structural variations. Our results also suggest that chromothripsis primarily occurs under p53 heterozygous rather than p53 null conditions. PMID:25811670

  9. Non-null annular subaperture stitching interferometry for aspheric test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Dong; Shi, Tu; Yang, Yongying; Chong, Shiyao; Miao, Liang; Huang, Wei; Shen, Yibing; Bai, Jian

    2015-10-01

    A non-null annular subaperture stitching interferometry (NASSI), combining the subaperture stitching idea and non-null test method, is proposed for steep aspheric testing. Compared with standard annular subaperture stitching interferometry (ASSI), a partial null lens (PNL) is employed as an alternative to the transmission sphere, to generate different aspherical wavefronts as the references. The coverage subaperture number would thus be reduced greatly for the better performance of aspherical wavefronts in matching the local slope of aspheric surfaces. Instead of various mathematical stitching algorithms, a simultaneous reverse optimizing reconstruction (SROR) method based on system modeling and ray tracing is proposed for full aperture figure error reconstruction. All the subaperture measurements are simulated simultaneously with a multi-configuration model in a ray-tracing program, including the interferometric system modeling and subaperture misalignments modeling. With the multi-configuration model, full aperture figure error would be extracted in form of Zernike polynomials from subapertures wavefront data by the SROR method. This method concurrently accomplishes subaperture retrace error and misalignment correction, requiring neither complex mathematical algorithms nor subaperture overlaps. A numerical simulation exhibits the comparison of the performance of the NASSI and standard ASSI, which demonstrates the high accuracy of the NASSI in testing steep aspheric. Experimental results of NASSI are shown to be in good agreement with that of Zygo® VerifireTM Asphere interferometer.

  10. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Reconnection Through A Moving Magnetic Null.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav; Linton, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    We model the dynamics of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic reconnection in a system where magnetic fields are observed to evolve from an unstable force-free equilibrium to a minimum energy state by way of global rearrangement of the magnetic topology. The process conserves total magnetic helicity and reconnection through a magnetic null is the dominant magnetic energy loss mechanism. During the period of most intense reconnection, the 3D localized reconnection region is observed to follow the magnetic null moving at a substantial fraction of the Alfven speed (up to 0.2 vAlf). Here, we will explore the qualitative effects of a moving 3D reconnection region on the rate of change of magnetic topology and the associated non-ideal electric fields. The quantitative impact of background plasma beta and ion inertia (the Hall effect) on the measured correlation between the motion of the magnetic null and the reconnection region will also be demonstrated. This research is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  11. Reliability assessment of null allele detection: inconsistencies between and within different methods.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, M J; Pilot, M; Kruczyk, M; Żmihorski, M; Umer, H M; Gliwicz, J

    2014-03-01

    Microsatellite loci are widely used in population genetic studies, but the presence of null alleles may lead to biased results. Here, we assessed five methods that indirectly detect null alleles and found large inconsistencies among them. Our analysis was based on 20 microsatellite loci genotyped in a natural population of Microtus oeconomus sampled during 8 years, together with 1200 simulated populations without null alleles, but experiencing bottlenecks of varying duration and intensity, and 120 simulated populations with known null alleles. In the natural population, 29% of positive results were consistent between the methods in pairwise comparisons, and in the simulated data set, this proportion was 14%. The positive results were also inconsistent between different years in the natural population. In the null-allele-free simulated data set, the number of false positives increased with increased bottleneck intensity and duration. We also found a low concordance in null allele detection between the original simulated populations and their 20% random subsets. In the populations simulated to include null alleles, between 22% and 42% of true null alleles remained undetected, which highlighted that detection errors are not restricted to false positives. None of the evaluated methods clearly outperformed the others when both false-positive and false-negative rates were considered. Accepting only the positive results consistent between at least two methods should considerably reduce the false-positive rate, but this approach may increase the false-negative rate. Our study demonstrates the need for novel null allele detection methods that could be reliably applied to natural populations.

  12. Glyoxalase I Gene Deletion Mutants of Leishmania donovani Exhibit Reduced Methylglyoxal Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Swati C.; Madhubala, Rentala

    2009-01-01

    Background Glyoxalase I is a metalloenzyme of the glyoxalase pathway that plays a central role in eliminating the toxic metabolite methyglyoxal. The protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani possesses a unique trypanothione dependent glyoxalase system. Principal Findings Analysis of the L. donovani GLOI sequence predicted a mitochondrial targeting sequence, suggesting that the enzyme is likely to be targeted to the mitochondria. In order to determine definitively the intracellular localization of GLOI in L. donovani, a full-length GLOI gene was fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene to generate a chimeric construct. Confocal microscopy of L. donovani promastigotes carrying this chimeric construct and immunofluorescence microscopy using anti-GLOI antibodies demonstrated that GLOI is localized in the kinetoplast of the parasite apart from the cytosol. To study the physiological role of GLOI in Leishmania, we first created promastigote mutants heterozygous for GLOI by targeted gene replacement using either hygromycin or neomycin phosphotransferases as selectable markers. Heterozygous mutants of L. donovani display a slower growth rate, have lower glyoxalase I activity and have reduced ability to detoxify methylglyoxal in comparison to the wild-type parasites. Complementation of the heterozygous mutant with an episomal GLOI construct showed the restoration of heterozygous mutant phenotype nearly fully to that of the wild-type. Null mutants were obtained only after GLOI was expressed from an episome in heterozygous mutants. Conclusions We for the first time report localization of GLOI in L. donovani in the kinetoplast. To study the physiological role of GLOI in Leishmania, we have generated GLOI attenuated strains by targeted gene replacement and report that GLOI is likely to be an important gene since GLOI mutants in L. donovani showed altered phenotype. The present data supports that the GLOI plays an essential role in the survival of this pathogenic organism and

  13. Characterization of the treefrog null allele, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I.

    1992-04-01

    Spring peeper (Hyla crucifer) tadpoles collected from the waste storage area during the Biological and Ecological Site Characterization of the Feed Materials Production Center (FEMP) in 1986 and 1987 appeared to be unique. A null (inactive) allele was found at the glucose phosphate isomerase enzyme locus in significant frequencies (approximately 20%) each year; this allele did not appear to occur in the offsite sample collected approximately 15km from the FEMP. Null alleles at this locus have not been reported in other amphibian populations; when they have been found in other organisms they have invariably been lethal in the homozygous condition.

  14. ON THE NATURE OF RECONNECTION AT A SOLAR CORONAL NULL POINT ABOVE A SEPARATRIX DOME

    SciTech Connect

    Pontin, D. I.; Priest, E. R.; Galsgaard, K.

    2013-09-10

    Three-dimensional magnetic null points are ubiquitous in the solar corona and in any generic mixed-polarity magnetic field. We consider magnetic reconnection at an isolated coronal null point whose fan field lines form a dome structure. Using analytical and computational models, we demonstrate several features of spine-fan reconnection at such a null, including the fact that substantial magnetic flux transfer from one region of field line connectivity to another can occur. The flux transfer occurs across the current sheet that forms around the null point during spine-fan reconnection, and there is no separator present. Also, flipping of magnetic field lines takes place in a manner similar to that observed in the quasi-separatrix layer or slip-running reconnection.

  15. High-resolution adaptive nulling performance for a lightweight agile EHF multiple beam antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenn, A. J.; Johnson, J. R.; Rispin, L. W.; Cummings, W. C.; Potts, B. M.

    The design and experimental performance of a lightweight high-resolution adaptive nulling extremely high-frequency multiple beam antenna (MBA) are addressed. A 127-beam MBA and a four-channel RF nulling network operating over the 43.5-to-45.5-GHz band were used to adaptively null a jammer in anechoic chamber measurements. Lightweight waveguide transmission lines together with ferrite switches were used to select beam ports from the 127-beam MBA. The MBA was designed to provide simultaneous coverage for three communications system users while providing pattern discrimination or nulling of jammers located within 0.1 deg of the user. Cancellation greater than 30 dB when operating in a wideband mode was experimentally demonstrated.

  16. Behavioral characterization of system xc- mutant mice.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Elizabeth A; Featherstone, David E

    2014-05-15

    The slc7a11 gene encodes xCT, an essential component of 'system xc-', a plasma membrane exchanger that imports cystine and exports glutamate. Slc7a11 is expressed primarily in the brain, but its role there is not clear. We performed behavioral tests on two different strains of homozygous slc7a11 mutant mice ('sut' and 'xCT'), as well as heteroallelic offspring of these two strains ('xCT/sut') and their associated genetic backgrounds. Homozygous sut mutant males showed reduced spontaneous alternation in spontaneous alternation tasks as well as reduced movement in an open field maze, but xCT and xCT/sut strains did not show significant changes in these tasks compared to appropriate controls. Neither xCT nor sut mutants showed differences from controls in rotarod tests. Female behavioral phenotypes were independent of estrus cycle stage. To ensure that homozygous xCT, sut, and xCT/sut strains all represent protein null alleles, we measured whole brain xCT protein levels using immunoblots. xCT, sut and xCT/sut strains showed no detectable xCT protein expression, confirming them as null alleles. Previously published microdialysis experiments showed reduced striatal glutamate in xCT mutants. Using the same methods, we measured reduced interstitial glutamate levels in the striatum but not cerebellum of sut mutants. However, we detected no glutamate change in the striatum or cerebellum of sut/xCT mice. We detected no changes in whole brain EAAT-1, -2, or -3 expression. We conclude that the behavioral and chemical differences exist between slc7a11 mutant strains, but we were unable to definitively attribute any of these differences to loss of system xc-.

  17. Polarization nulling interferometry for exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Julien; Pereira, Silvania F; Braat, Joseph J M

    2006-04-01

    We introduce a new concept of nulling interferometer without any achromatic device, using polarization properties of light. This type of interferometer should enable a high rejection ratio in a theoretically unlimited spectral band. We analyze several consequences of the proposed design, notably, the possibility of fast internal modulation.

  18. Polarization nulling interferometry for exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Julien; Pereira, Silvania F; Braat, Joseph J M

    2006-04-01

    We introduce a new concept of nulling interferometer without any achromatic device, using polarization properties of light. This type of interferometer should enable a high rejection ratio in a theoretically unlimited spectral band. We analyze several consequences of the proposed design, notably, the possibility of fast internal modulation. PMID:19516397

  19. Deficient and Null Variants of SERPINA1 Are Proteotoxic in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model of α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Erin E; O'Reilly, Linda P; King, Dale E; Silverman, Richard M; Miedel, Mark T; Luke, Cliff J; Perlmutter, David H; Silverman, Gary A; Pak, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    α1-antitrypsin deficiency (ATD) predisposes patients to both loss-of-function (emphysema) and gain-of-function (liver cirrhosis) phenotypes depending on the type of mutation. Although the Z mutation (ATZ) is the most prevalent cause of ATD, >120 mutant alleles have been identified. In general, these mutations are classified as deficient (<20% normal plasma levels) or null (<1% normal levels) alleles. The deficient alleles, like ATZ, misfold in the ER where they accumulate as toxic monomers, oligomers and aggregates. Thus, deficient alleles may predispose to both gain- and loss-of-function phenotypes. Null variants, if translated, typically yield truncated proteins that are efficiently degraded after being transiently retained in the ER. Clinically, null alleles are only associated with the loss-of-function phenotype. We recently developed a C. elegans model of ATD in order to further elucidate the mechanisms of proteotoxicity (gain-of-function phenotype) induced by the aggregation-prone deficient allele, ATZ. The goal of this study was to use this C. elegans model to determine whether different types of deficient and null alleles, which differentially affect polymerization and secretion rates, correlated to any extent with proteotoxicity. Animals expressing the deficient alleles, Mmalton, Siiyama and S (ATS), showed overall toxicity comparable to that observed in patients. Interestingly, Siiyama expressing animals had smaller intracellular inclusions than ATZ yet appeared to have a greater negative effect on animal fitness. Surprisingly, the null mutants, although efficiently degraded, showed a relatively mild gain-of-function proteotoxic phenotype. However, since null variant proteins are degraded differently and do not appear to accumulate, their mechanism of proteotoxicity is likely to be different to that of polymerizing, deficient mutants. Taken together, these studies showed that C. elegans is an inexpensive tool to assess the proteotoxicity of different AT

  20. Vaccinia virus B1 kinase: phenotypic analysis of temperature-sensitive mutants and enzymatic characterization of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, R E; Traktman, P

    1992-01-01

    The vaccinia virus B1 gene encodes a 34-kDa protein with homology to protein kinases. In L cells infected nonpermissively with mutants containing lesions in the B1 gene (ts2 and ts25), the infectious cycle arrests prior to DNA replication. In this report, we demonstrate that DNA synthesis ceases when cultures infected with these mutants at 32 degrees C are shifted to the nonpermissive temperature (39.5 degrees C) in the midst of DNA replication. We also show that B1 protein is synthesized transiently during the early phase of infection, even when the progression to later stages of gene expression is prevented. Although wild-type (wt) B1 is stable, the ts B1 proteins are markedly labile in both L and BSC40 cells at both permissive and nonpermissive temperatures. These results suggest that the ts phenotype of the mutants is complex and may in part reflect a temperature-dependent requirement for kinase activity, an induction of temperature sensitivity in B1 substrates under nonpermissive conditions, and/or ts complementation by host factors. To facilitate biochemical analyses, recombinant wt B1, ts2 B1, and ts25 B1 were produced in Escherichia coli. The wt protein was able to phosphorylate serine and threonine residues on several exogenous substrates in vitro. The activity of ts25 B1 was 3% that of the wt enzyme, and no detectable kinase activity was associated with ts2 B1. In light of the inactivity of the ts2 B1 protein in vitro and its extreme lability in vivo, we attempted to isolate a vaccinia virus B1 null mutant by targeted interruption of the B1 gene at 32 degrees C. No null mutants were isolated. These results indicate that the B1 protein kinase provides a vital function which cannot be supplied by the host or circumvented by incubation at 32 degrees C. Images PMID:1602551

  1. Brain activity mapping in Mecp2 mutant mice reveals functional deficits in forebrain circuits, including key nodes in the default mode network, that are reversed with ketamine treatment.

    PubMed

    Kron, Miriam; Howell, C James; Adams, Ian T; Ransbottom, Michael; Christian, Diana; Ogier, Michael; Katz, David M

    2012-10-01

    Excitatory-inhibitory imbalance has been identified within specific brain microcircuits in models of Rett syndrome (RTT) and other autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). However, macrocircuit dysfunction across the RTT brain as a whole has not been defined. To approach this issue, we mapped expression of the activity-dependent, immediate-early gene product Fos in the brains of wild-type (Wt) and methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (Mecp2)-null (Null) mice, a model of RTT, before and after the appearance of overt symptoms (3 and 6 weeks of age, respectively). At 6 weeks, Null mice exhibit significantly less Fos labeling than Wt in limbic cortices and subcortical structures, including key nodes in the default mode network. In contrast, Null mice exhibit significantly more Fos labeling than Wt in the hindbrain, most notably in cardiorespiratory regions of the nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS). Using nTS as a model, whole-cell recordings demonstrated that increased Fos expression in Nulls at 6 weeks of age is associated with synaptic hyperexcitability, including increased frequency of spontaneous and miniature EPSCs and increased amplitude of evoked EPSCs in Nulls. No such effect of genotype on Fos or synaptic function was seen at 3 weeks. In the mutant forebrain, reduced Fos expression, as well as abnormal sensorimotor function, were reversed by the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. In light of recent findings that the default mode network is hypoactive in autism, our data raise the possibility that hypofunction within this meta-circuit is a shared feature of RTT and other ASDs and is reversible. PMID:23035095

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of COMPLEXIN Fusion Clamp Function in Synaptic Exocytosis Revealed in a New Drosophila Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Janani; Wahlmark, Christopher J.; Kuser-Ahnert, Giselle A.; Kawasaki, Fumiko

    2013-01-01

    The COMPLEXIN (CPX) proteins play a critical role in synaptic vesicle fusion and neurotransmitter release. Previous studies demonstrated that CPX functions in both activation of evoked neurotransmitter release and inhibition/clamping of spontaneous synaptic vesicle fusion. Here we report a new cpx mutant in Drosophila melanogaster, cpx1257, revealing spatially defined and separable pools of CPX which make distinct contributions to the activation and clamping functions. In cpx1257, lack of only the last C-terminal amino acid of CPX is predicted to disrupt prenylation and membrane targeting of CPX. Immunocytochemical analysis established localization of wild-type CPX to active zone (AZ) regions containing neurotransmitter release sites as well as broader presynaptic membrane compartments including synaptic vesicles. Parallel biochemical studies confirmed CPX membrane association and demonstrated robust binding interactions of CPX with all three SNAREs. This is in contrast to the cpx1257 mutant, in which AZ localization of CPX persists but general membrane localization and, surprisingly, the bulk of CPX-SNARE protein interactions are abolished. Furthermore, electrophysiological analysis of neuromuscular synapses revealed interesting differences between cpx1257 and a cpx null mutant. The cpx null exhibited a marked decrease in the EPSC amplitude, slowed EPSC rise and decay times and an increased mEPSC frequency with respect to wild-type. In contrast, cpx1257 exhibited a wild-type EPSC with an increased mEPSC frequency and thus a selective failure to clamp spontaneous release. These results indicate that spatially distinct and separable interactions of CPX with presynaptic membranes and SNARE proteins mediate separable activation and clamping functions of CPX in neurotransmitter release. PMID:23769723

  3. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F.; Charbonneau, Noe L.; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J.; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R.; Sakai, Lynn Y.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can

  4. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F; Charbonneau, Noe L; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R; Sakai, Lynn Y

    2015-06-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can

  5. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F; Charbonneau, Noe L; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R; Sakai, Lynn Y

    2015-06-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can

  6. Experimental progress in deep and broadband infrared nulling for TPF-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Bartos, Randall; Gappinger, Robert; Loya, Frank; Moser, Steve; Negron, John

    2005-01-01

    Our activities are focused upon the experimental demonstration of deep nulling in the mid-IR over a wide bandpass. Specifically, our near-term goal is demonstrating a contrast of 10^-6 at 10 um with a 25% spectral bandwidth.

  7. Current progress on TPFI nulling architectures at Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gappinger, Robert O.; Wallace, J. Kent; Bartos, Randall D.; Macdonald, Daniel R.; Brown, Kenneth A.

    2005-01-01

    Infrared interferometric nulling is a promising technology for exoplanet detection. Nulling research for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer has been exploring a variety of interferometer architectures at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

  8. A mutant allele of BARA/LIN-9 rescues the cdk4 {sup -/-} phenotype by releasing the repression on E2F-regulated genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, Raudel; Xue Jiaping; Tian Xinyong; Barrett, Kelly; Pilkinton, Mark; Ucker, David S.; Raychaudhuri, Pradip; Kineman, Rhonda D.; Luque, Raul M.; Baida, Gleb; Zou, Xianghong; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Valli, V.E.; Cook, James L.; Colamonici, Oscar R. . E-mail: ocolamon@uic.edu

    2006-08-01

    It has been proposed that C. elegans LIN-9 functions downstream of CDK4 in a pathway that regulates cell proliferation. Here, we report that mammalian BARA/LIN-9 is a predominantly nuclear protein that inhibits cell proliferation. More importantly, we demonstrate that BARA/LIN-9 also acts downstream of cyclin D/CDK4 in mammalian cells since (i) its antiproliferative effect is partially blocked by coexpression of cyclin D1, and (ii) a mutant form that lacks the first 84 amino acids rescues several phenotypic alterations observed in mice null for cdk4. Interestingly, mutation of BARA/LIN-9 restores the expression of E2F target genes in CDK4 null MEFs, indicating that the wild-type protein plays a role in the expression of genes required for the G1/S transition.

  9. Adaptive null steering by reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofer, J. W.; Martin, G. P.; Ralph, S. E.

    The feasibility of peforming adaptive null steering by reflector antennas is investigated, and the results are reported. The implementation consists of an array of feed elements located in the focal region. The outputs of all the feeds are weighted in phase and amplitude and summed coherently. After deduction by a receiver, the signal passes to a digital algorithm computer where a decision is made as to how the weights should be adjusted, and interactive perturbational process continues until the system has arrived at an optimal weight combination. The configuration allows for multiple jammers and/or desired signals. Nulls on the order of 35 dB can be achieved with the basic limitation being amplitude and phase balance of the RF weights versus frequency. The system offers simpler, lighter weight more economically than full-phased arrays, much broader bandwidth than sidelobe cancellers, well-understood analysis procedures, and allows cancellation high up on the main beam.

  10. Adaptive Nulling for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Robert D.; Lay, Oliver P.; Jeganathan, Muthu; Hirai, Akiko

    2006-01-01

    A description of adaptive nulling for Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPFI) is presented. The topics include: 1) Nulling in TPF-I; 2) Why Do Adaptive Nulling; 3) Parallel High-Order Compensator Design; 4) Phase and Amplitude Control; 5) Development Activates; 6) Requirements; 7) Simplified Experimental Setup; 8) Intensity Correction; and 9) Intensity Dispersion Stability. A short summary is also given on adaptive nulling for the TPFI.

  11. Starlight Nulling Technology at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The current interests in extra-solar planet detection and space-based and ground-based interferometry for astronomical observations has led to the development of a number of nulling instrument designs at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and elsewhere. This paper summarizes briefly JPL's efforts in nulling interferometry to date and consists of illustrations of some key nulling activities. Basic layouts of nulling testbeds are described and key applications discussed.

  12. Gap solitons with null-scattering.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Nireekshan; Dutta Gupta, S

    2014-04-15

    In this Letter, we study the excitation of gap solitons under the conditions of coherent perfect absorption. Our system consists of a symmetric periodic structure with alternating Kerr nonlinear and linear layers illuminated from both ends. We show near-total transfer of incident light energy into the gap solitons resulting in null scattering. We also report on the nonlinear super-scattering states. Both the exact and the approximate results, which show good agreement based on nonlinear characteristic matrix methods, are presented.

  13. Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph: Visible Nulling Coronagraph Testbed Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a proposed NASA Discovery mission to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC will provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres around A and F stars, observed the inner spatial structure and colors of inner Spitzer selected debris disks. EPIC would be launched to heliocentric Earth trailing drift-away orbit, with a 3-year mission lifetime ( 5 year goal) and will revisit planets at least three times at intervals of 9 months. The starlight suppression approach consists of a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) that enables high order starlight suppression in broadband light. To demonstrate the VNC approach and advance it's technology readiness the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Lockheed-Martin have developed a laboratory VNC and have demonstrated white light nulling. We will discuss our ongoing VNC work and show the latest results from the VNC testbed,

  14. Nucleotide sequence of the yeast STE14 gene, which encodes farnesylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase, and demonstration of its essential role in a-factor export

    SciTech Connect

    Sapperstein, S.; Berkower, C.; Michaelis, S.

    1994-02-01

    Eukaryotic proteins initially synthesized with a C-terminal CAAX motif (C is Cys, A is aliphatic, and X can be one of several amino acids) undergo a series of modifications involving isoprenylation of the Cys residue, proteolysis of AAX, and {alpha}-carboxyl methyl esterification of the newly formed isoprenyl cysteine. We have previously demonstrated that STE14 encodes the enzyme which mediates carboxyl methylation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CAAX proteins a-factor, RAS1, and RAS2. Here we report the nucleotide sequence of STE14, which indicates that STE14 encodes a protein of 239 amino acids, predicted to contain multiple membrane-spanning segments. Mapping data indicate that STE14 resides on chromosome IV, tightly linked to ADE8. By analysis of ste14 null alleles, we demonstrated that MATa ste14 mutants are unable to mate but are viable and exhibit no apparent growth defects. Additional analysis of ste14 ras1 and ste14 ras2 double mutants, which grow normally, reinforces our previous conclusion that RAS function is not significantly influenced by its methylation status. We examine a-factor biogenesis in an ste14 null mutant by metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation and demonstrate that although proteolytic processing and membrane localization of a-factor are normal, the ste14 null mutant exhibits a profound block in a-factor export. This observation suggests that the methyl group is likely to be a critical recognition determinant for the a-factor transporter, STE6, thus providing insight into the substrate specificity of STE6 and also supporting the hypothesis that carboxyl methylation can have a dramatic impact on protein-protein interactions. 60 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Nucleotide sequence of the yeast STE14 gene, which encodes farnesylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase, and demonstration of its essential role in a-factor export.

    PubMed Central

    Sapperstein, S; Berkower, C; Michaelis, S

    1994-01-01

    Eukaryotic proteins initially synthesized with a C-terminal CAAX motif (C is Cys, A is aliphatic, and X can be one of several amino acids) undergo a series of modifications involving isoprenylation of the Cys residue, proteolysis of AAX, and alpha-carboxyl methyl esterification of the newly formed isoprenyl cysteine. We have previously demonstrated that STE14 encodes the enzyme which mediates carboxyl methylation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CAAX proteins a-factor, RAS1, and RAS2. Here we report the nucleotide sequence of STE14, which indicates that STE14 encodes a protein of 239 amino acids, predicted to contain multiple membrane-spanning segments. Mapping data indicate that STE14 resides on chromosome IV, tightly linked to ADE8. By analysis of ste14 null alleles, we demonstrated that MATa ste14 mutants are unable to mate but are viable and exhibit no apparent growth defects. Additional analysis of ste14 ras 1 and ste14 ras2 double mutants, which grow normally, reinforces our previous conclusion that RAS function is not significantly influenced by its methylation status. We examine a-factor biogenesis in a ste14 null mutant by metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation and demonstrate that although proteolytic processing and membrane localization of a-factor are normal, the ste14 null mutant exhibits a profound block in a-factor export. This observation suggests that the methyl group is likely to be a critical recognition determinant for the a-factor transporter, STE6, thus providing insight into the substrate specificity of STE6 and also supporting the hypothesis that carboxyl methylation can have a dramatic impact on protein-protein interactions. Images PMID:8289819

  16. Peripheral and site-specific CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients show distinct characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pieper, J; Johansson, S; Snir, O; Linton, L; Rieck, M; Buckner, J H; Winqvist, O; van Vollenhoven, R; Malmström, V

    2014-02-01

    Proinflammatory CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells are frequently found in the circulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but are less common in the rheumatic joint. In the present study, we sought to identify functional differences between CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells from blood and synovial fluid in comparison with conventional CD28-expressing CD4(+) T cells. Forty-four patients with RA, displaying a distinct CD4(+) CD28(null) T cell population in blood, were recruited for this study; the methylation status of the IFNG locus was examined in isolated T cell subsets, and intracellular cytokine production (IFN-γ, TNF, IL-17) and chemokine receptor expression (CXCR3, CCR6 and CCR7) were assessed by flow cytometry on T cells from the two compartments. Circulating CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells were significantly more hypomethylated in the CNS-1 region of the IFNG locus than conventional CD4(+) CD28(+) T cells and produced higher levels of both IFN-γ and TNF after TCR cross-linking. CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells from the site of inflammation expressed significantly more CXCR3 and CCR6 compared to their counterparts in blood. While IL-17A production could hardly be detected in CD4(+) CD28(null) cells from the blood, a significant production was observed in CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells from synovial fluid. CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells were not only found to differ from conventional CD4(+) CD28(+) T cells in the circulation, but we could also demonstrate that synovial CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells showed additional effector functions (IL-17 coproduction) as compared to the same subset in peripheral blood, suggesting an active role for these cells in the perpetuation of inflammation in the subset of patients having a CD28(null) population.

  17. Deficits in visceral pain and referred hyperalgesia in Nav1.8 (SNS/PN3)-null mice.

    PubMed

    Laird, Jennifer M A; Souslova, Veronika; Wood, John N; Cervero, Fernando

    2002-10-01

    The tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel alpha subunit Nav1.8 is expressed exclusively in primary sensory neurons and is proposed to play an important role in sensitization of nociceptors. Here we compared visceral pain and referred hyperalgesia in Nav1.8-null mice and their wild-type littermates in five tests that differ in the degree to which behavior depends on spontaneous, ongoing firing in sensitized nociceptors. Nav1.8-null mice showed normal nociceptive behavior provoked by acute noxious stimulation of abdominal viscera (intracolonic saline or intraperitoneal acetylcholine). However, Nav1.8-null mutants showed weak pain and no referred hyperalgesia to intracolonic capsaicin, a model in which behavior is sustained by ongoing activity in nociceptors sensitized by the initial application. Nav1.8-null mice also showed blunted pain and hyperalgesia to intracolonic mustard oil, which sensitizes nociceptors but also provokes tissue damage. To distinguish between a possible role for Nav1.8 in ongoing activity per se and ongoing activity after sensitization in the absence of additional stimuli, we tried a visceral model of tonic noxious chemical stimulation, cyclophosphamide cystitis. Cyclophosphamide produces cystitis by gradual accumulation of toxic metabolites in the bladder. In this model, Nav1.8-null mice showed normal responses. There were no differences between null mutants and their normal littermates in tissue damage and inflammation evoked by any of the stimuli tested, suggesting that the behavioral differences are not secondary to impairment of inflammatory responses. We conclude that there is an essential role for Nav1.8 in mediating spontaneous activity in sensitized nociceptors.

  18. System and Method for Null-Lens Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Peter C. (Inventor); Thompson, Patrick L. (Inventor); Aronstein, David L. (Inventor); Bolcar, Matthew R. (Inventor); Smith, Jeffrey S. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method of measuring aberrations in a null-lens including assembly and alignment aberrations. The null-lens may be used for measuring aberrations in an aspheric optic with the null-lens. Light propagates from the aspheric optic location through the null-lens, while sweeping a detector through the null-lens focal plane. Image data being is collected at locations about said focal plane. Light is simulated propagating to the collection locations for each collected image. Null-lens aberrations may extracted, e.g., applying image-based wavefront-sensing to collected images and simulation results. The null-lens aberrations improve accuracy in measuring aspheric optic aberrations.

  19. Displacing Unpredictable Nulls in Antenna Radiation Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, James; Schaefer, Mark

    2005-01-01

    A method of maintaining radio communication despite the emergence of unpredictable fades and nulls in the radiation pattern of an antenna has been proposed. The method was originally intended to be applied in the design and operation of a radio antenna aboard a robotic exploratory vehicle on a remote planet during communication with a spacecraft in orbit around the planet. The method could also be applied in similar terrestrial situations for example, radio communication between two ground vehicles or between a ground vehicle and an aircraft or spacecraft. The method is conceptually simple, is readily adaptable to diverse situations, and can be implemented without adding greatly to the weight, cost, power demand, or complexity of a system to which it may be applied. The unpredictable fades and nulls in an antenna radiation pattern arise because of electromagnetic interactions between the antenna and other objects within the near field of the antenna (basically, objects within a distance of a few wavelengths). These objects can include general vehicle components, masts, robotic arms, other antennas, the ground, and nearby terrain features. Figure 1 presents representative plots of signal strength versus time during a typical pass of a spacecraft or aircraft through the far field of such an antenna, showing typical nulls and fades caused by nearby objects. The traditional approach to ensuring reliability of communication in the presence of deep fades calls for increasing the effective transmitter power and/or reducing the receiver noise figure at the affected ground vehicle, possibly in combination with appropriate redesign of the equipment at the spacecraft or aircraft end of the communication link. These solutions can be expensive and/or risky and, depending on the application, can add significantly to weight, cost, and power demand. The proposed method entails none of these disadvantages.

  20. Polyhedra in spacetime from null vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiman, Yasha

    2014-01-01

    We consider convex spacelike polyhedra oriented in the Minkowski space. These are the classical analogues of spinfoam intertwiners. We point out a parametrization of these shapes using null face normals, with no constraints or redundancies. Our construction is dimension-independent. In 3+1d, it provides the spacetime picture behind a well-known property of the loop quantum gravity intertwiner space in spinor form, namely that the closure constraint is always satisfied after some SL(2, C) rotation. As a simple application of our variables, we incorporate them in a 4-simplex action that reproduces the large-spin behavior of the Barrett-Crane vertex amplitude.

  1. Alteration of medial-edge epithelium cell adhesion in two Tgf-β3 null mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sanz, Elena; Del Río, Aurora; Barrio, Carmen; Murillo, Jorge; Maldonado, Estela; Garcillán, Beatriz; Amorós, María; Fuerte, Tamara; Fernández, Álvaro; Trinidad, Eva; Rabadán, M Ángeles; López, Yamila; Martínez, M Luisa; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2008-01-01

    Although palatal shelf adhesion is a crucial event during palate development, little work has been carried out to determine which molecules are responsible for this process. Furthermore, whether altered palatal shelf adhesion causes the cleft palate presented by Tgf-β3 null mutant mice has not yet been clarified. Here, we study the presence/distribution of some extracellular matrix and cell adhesion molecules at the time of the contact of palatal shelves in both wild-type and Tgf-β3 null mutant palates of two strains of mice (C57/BL/6J (C57), and MF1) that develop cleft palates of different severity. We have performed immunohistochemistry with antibodies against collagens IV and IX, laminin, fibronectin, the α5- and β1-integrins, and ICAM-1; in situ hybridization with a Nectin-1 riboprobe; and palatal shelf cultures treated or untreated with TGF-β3 or neutralizing antibodies against fibronectin or the α5-integrin. Our results show the location of these molecules in the wild-type mouse medial edge epithelium (MEE) of both strains at the time of the contact of palatal shelves; the heavier (C57) and milder (MF1) alteration of their presence in the Tgf-β3 null mutants; the importance of TGF-β3 to restore their normal pattern of expression; and the crucial role of fibronectin and the α5-integrin in palatal shelf adhesion. We thus provide insight into the molecular bases of this important process and the cleft palate presented by Tgf-β3 null mutant mice. PMID:18431835

  2. Alteration of medial-edge epithelium cell adhesion in two Tgf-beta3 null mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sanz, Elena; Del Río, Aurora; Barrio, Carmen; Murillo, Jorge; Maldonado, Estela; Garcillán, Beatriz; Amorós, María; Fuerte, Tamara; Fernández, Alvaro; Trinidad, Eva; Rabadán, María Angeles; López, Yamila; Martínez, María Luisa; Martínez-Alvarez, Concepción

    2008-04-01

    Although palatal shelf adhesion is a crucial event during palate development, little work has been carried out to determine which molecules are responsible for this process. Furthermore, whether altered palatal shelf adhesion causes the cleft palate presented by Tgf-beta3 null mutant mice has not yet been clarified. Here, we study the presence/distribution of some extracellular matrix and cell adhesion molecules at the time of the contact of palatal shelves in both wild-type and Tgf-beta3 null mutant palates of two strains of mice (C57/BL/6J (C57), and MF1) that develop cleft palates of different severity. We have performed immunohistochemistry with antibodies against collagens IV and IX, laminin, fibronectin, the alpha5- and beta1-integrins, and ICAM-1; in situ hybridization with a Nectin-1 riboprobe; and palatal shelf cultures treated or untreated with TGF-beta3 or neutralizing antibodies against fibronectin or the alpha5-integrin. Our results show the location of these molecules in the wild-type mouse medial edge epithelium (MEE) of both strains at the time of the contact of palatal shelves; the heavier (C57) and milder (MF1) alteration of their presence in the Tgf-beta3 null mutants; the importance of TGF-beta3 to restore their normal pattern of expression; and the crucial role of fibronectin and the alpha5-integrin in palatal shelf adhesion. We thus provide insight into the molecular bases of this important process and the cleft palate presented by Tgf-beta3 null mutant mice.

  3. A mutant of the Arabidopsis thaliana Toc159 gene accumulates reduced levels of linolenic acid and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that a null mutant of Arabidopsis that lacks Toc159 receptor is impaired in chloroplast biogenesis and incapable of importing photosynthetic proteins. The mutant is referred to as plastid protein import 2 or ppi2, and has an albino phenotype. In this study, we measured ...

  4. Exo-zodi detection capability of the Ground-Based European Nulling Interferometry Experiment (GENIE) instrument.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Oswald; Flatscher, Reinhold; Ergenzinger, Klaus

    2006-06-20

    The Ground-Based European Nulling Interferometry Experiment (GENIE) is intended as an Earth-based precursor for the European Darwin mission that will prepare the Darwin science program and demonstrate the required technology at system level. We propose a compact nulling interferometer design consisting of a two-telescope aperture configuration, an optional split-pupil add-on, and only four active control loops for counteracting environmentally induced disturbances. We show by simulation that the proposed instrument is able to detect, within a few minutes of observation time, exo-zodiacal dust clouds around Sunlike stars at 20 parsecs that are 20 times stronger than the local zodiacal dust cloud density.

  5. Versatility of heme coordination demonstrated in a fungal peroxidase. Absorption and resonance Raman studies of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase and the Asp245-->Asn mutant at various pH values.

    PubMed

    Smulevich, G; Neri, F; Marzocchi, M P; Welinder, K G

    1996-08-13

    The pH dependence of the electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of FeIII and FeII forms of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and its Asp245-->Asn (D245N) mutant has been examined in detail. The spectral data were obtained in the pH range 3.8-12.0. These spectra were used to assess the spin and ligation states of the heme via the porphyrin marker band frequencies and the wavelengths of the absorption maxima, especially that of the band (CT1) due to the charge transfer from the porphyrin to the heme iron via the a' 2u(pi)-->eg (d pi) electronic transition. The RR spectra were obtained by using different excitation wavelengths and polarized light. The data obtained for ferric CIP show that two pH-induced structural transitions exist. At acid pH the Soret and the CT1 absorption maxima occur at 394 and 652 nm, respectively, compared with the values of 403 and 649 nm observed at neutral pH. The electronic data indicate that at acid pH the proximal Fe-Im bond might be weakened or ruptured, and the RR spectra show a new species (5-c HS) different from the normal neutral 5-coordinate high-spin (5-c HS) heme. At pH 12.0, the protein converts to a 6-coordinate low-spin (6-c LS) heme with a hydroxyl ligand coordinated in the sixth position of the heme iron and strongly hydrogen-bonded with the positively charged guanidinium group of the distal Arg51 residue. Replacement of the aspartate carboxylate group of Asp245, which acts as hydrogen-bond acceptor to the proximal His183 ligand of the heme Fe, with a carboxamide group of an asparagine residue has a profound influence on the heme coordination. The RR spectra of the Fe(II) form of this mutant at both neutral and alkaline pH values show a band at 204 cm-1 assigned to the Fe-His stretch associated with a fairly weak or non-hydrogen-bonded imidazole. The ferric form of the mutant shows a great variability in coordination and spin states upon pH titration. Between pH 8.8 and 3.8 the spectra are mainly

  6. Partial Müllerian Duct Retention in Smad4 Conditional Mutant Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Petit, Fabrice G; Deng, Chuxia; Jamin, Soazik P

    2016-01-01

    Müllerian duct regression is a complex process which involves the AMH signalling pathway. We have previously demonstrated that besides AMH and its specific type II receptor (AMHRII), BMPR-IA and Smad5 are two essential factors implicated in this mechanism. Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 4 (Smad4) is a transcription factor and the common Smad (co-Smad) involved in transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signalling pathway superfamily. Since Smad4 null mutants die early during gastrulation, we have inactivated Smad4 in the Müllerian duct mesenchyme. Specific inactivation of Smad4 in the urogenital ridge leads to the partial persistence of the Müllerian duct in adult male mice. Careful examination of the urogenital tract reveals that the Müllerian duct retention is randomly distributed either on one side or both sides. Histological analysis shows a uterus-like structure, which is confirmed by the expression of estrogen receptor α. As previously described in a β-catenin conditional mutant mouse model, β-catenin contributes to Müllerian duct regression. In our mutant male embryos, it appears that β-catenin expression is locally reduced along the urogenital ridge as compared to control mice. Moreover, the expression pattern is similar to those observed in control female mice. This study shows that reduced Smad4 expression disrupts the Wnt/β-catenin signalling leading to the partial persistence of Müllerian duct.

  7. Partial Müllerian Duct Retention in Smad4 Conditional Mutant Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Fabrice G.; Deng, Chuxia; Jamin, Soazik P.

    2016-01-01

    Müllerian duct regression is a complex process which involves the AMH signalling pathway. We have previously demonstrated that besides AMH and its specific type II receptor (AMHRII), BMPR-IA and Smad5 are two essential factors implicated in this mechanism. Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 4 (Smad4) is a transcription factor and the common Smad (co-Smad) involved in transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signalling pathway superfamily. Since Smad4 null mutants die early during gastrulation, we have inactivated Smad4 in the Müllerian duct mesenchyme. Specific inactivation of Smad4 in the urogenital ridge leads to the partial persistence of the Müllerian duct in adult male mice. Careful examination of the urogenital tract reveals that the Müllerian duct retention is randomly distributed either on one side or both sides. Histological analysis shows a uterus-like structure, which is confirmed by the expression of estrogen receptor α. As previously described in a β-catenin conditional mutant mouse model, β-catenin contributes to Müllerian duct regression. In our mutant male embryos, it appears that β-catenin expression is locally reduced along the urogenital ridge as compared to control mice. Moreover, the expression pattern is similar to those observed in control female mice. This study shows that reduced Smad4 expression disrupts the Wnt/β-catenin signalling leading to the partial persistence of Müllerian duct. PMID:27194944

  8. High performance testbed for four-beam infrared interferometric nulling and exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stefan; Booth, Andrew; Liewer, Kurt; Raouf, Nasrat; Loya, Frank; Tang, Hong

    2012-06-10

    Technology development for a space-based infrared nulling interferometer capable of earthlike exoplanet detection and characterization started in earnest in the last 10 years. At the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the planet detection testbed was developed to demonstrate the principal components of the beam combiner train for a high performance four-beam nulling interferometer. Early in the development of the testbed, the importance of "instability noise" for nulling interferometer sensitivity was recognized, and the four-beam testbed would produce this noise, allowing investigation of methods for mitigating this noise source. The testbed contains the required features of a four-beam combiner for a space interferometer and performs at a level matching that needed for the space mission. This paper describes in detail the design, functions, and controls of the testbed.

  9. High performance testbed for four-beam infrared interferometric nulling and exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stefan; Booth, Andrew; Liewer, Kurt; Raouf, Nasrat; Loya, Frank; Tang, Hong

    2012-06-10

    Technology development for a space-based infrared nulling interferometer capable of earthlike exoplanet detection and characterization started in earnest in the last 10 years. At the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the planet detection testbed was developed to demonstrate the principal components of the beam combiner train for a high performance four-beam nulling interferometer. Early in the development of the testbed, the importance of "instability noise" for nulling interferometer sensitivity was recognized, and the four-beam testbed would produce this noise, allowing investigation of methods for mitigating this noise source. The testbed contains the required features of a four-beam combiner for a space interferometer and performs at a level matching that needed for the space mission. This paper describes in detail the design, functions, and controls of the testbed. PMID:22695670

  10. A Nulling Coronagraph for TPF-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Levine, Bruce Martin; Wallace, James Kent; Orton, Glenn S.; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Lane, Benjamin F.; Seager, Sara; Tolls, Volker; Lyon, Richard G.; Samuele, Rocco; Tenerelli, Domenick J.; Woodruff, Robert; Ge, Jian

    2006-01-01

    The nulling coronagraph is one of 5 instrument concepts selected by NASA for study for potential use in the TPF-C mission. This concept for extreme starlight suppression has two major components, a nulling interferometer to suppress the starlight to 10(sup -10) per airy spot within 2 (lamda)/D of the star, and a calibration interferometer to measure the residual scattered starlight. The ability to work at 2 (lamda)/D dramatically improves the science throughput of a space based coronagraph like TPF-C. The calibration interferometer is an equally important part of the starlight suppression system. It measures the measures the wavefront of the scattered starlight with very high SNR, to 0.05nm in less than 5 minutes on a 5mag star. In addition, the post coronagraph wavefront sensor will be used to measure the residual scattered light after the coronagraph and subtract it in post processing to 12x10(sup -11) to enable detection of an Earthlike planet with a SNR of 510.

  11. Incidence and origin of [open quotes]Null[close quotes] alleles in the (AC)n microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, D.F.,; Thompson, A.D.; Shen, Y.; Phillips, H.A.; Richards, R.I.; Mulley, J.C.; Sutherland, G.R. )

    1993-05-01

    Twenty-three (AC)n repeat markers from chromosome 16 were typed in the parents of the 40 CEPH (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain) families. Where parents were informative, the entire families were then typed. There were seven markers in which null alleles were demonstrated, as recognized by the apparent noninheritance, by a sib, of a parental allele. Four of these markers showed a null allele in a single sibship, while in the other three at least 30% of the CEPH sibships were shown to have a null allele segregating. One null allele was sequenced and shown to be the result of an 8-bp deletion occurring within the priming sequence for PCR amplification of the (AC)n repeats. In gene mapping or in application to diagnosis, the presence of a segregating null allele will not corrupt the linkage data but could result in loss of information. In isolated instances a segregating null allele may be interpreted as nonpaternity. The presence of a null allele may generate misleading data when individuals are haplotyped to determine the presence of linkage disequilibrium with a disease gene. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Plastidic phosphoglucomutase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase mutants impair starch synthesis in rice pollen grains and cause male sterility

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Kyu; Eom, Joon-Seob; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Shin, Dongjin; An, Gynheung; Okita, Thomas W.; Jeon, Jong-Seong

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the starch synthesis pathway and the role of this reserve in rice pollen, we characterized mutations in the plastidic phosphoglucomutase, OspPGM, and the plastidic large subunit of ADP-glucose (ADP-Glc) pyrophosphorylase, OsAGPL4. Both genes were up-regulated in maturing pollen, a stage when starch begins to accumulate. Progeny analysis of self-pollinated heterozygous lines carrying the OspPGM mutant alleles, osppgm-1 and osppgm-2, or the OsAGPL4 mutant allele, osagpl4-1, as well as reciprocal crosses between the wild type (WT) and heterozygotes revealed that loss of OspPGM or OsAGPL4 caused male sterility, with the former condition rescued by the introduction of the WT OspPGM gene. While iodine staining and transmission electron microscopy analyses of pollen grains from homozygous osppgm-1 lines produced by anther culture confirmed the starch null phenotype, pollen from homozygous osagpl4 mutant lines, osagpl4-2 and osagpl4-3, generated by the CRISPR/Cas system, accumulated small amounts of starch which were sufficient to produce viable seed. Such osagpl4 mutant pollen, however, was unable to compete against WT pollen successfully, validating the important role of this reserve in fertilization. Our results demonstrate that starch is mainly polymerized from ADP-Glc synthesized from plastidic hexose phosphates in rice pollen and that starch is an essential requirement for successful fertilization in rice. PMID:27588462

  13. Dilute Aperture Visible Nulling Coronagraph Imaging (DAViNCI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Levine, B. M.; Vasisht, G.; Lane, B. F.; Woodruff, R.; Vasudevan, G.; Samuele R.; Harvey, K.; Clampin, M.; Lyon, R.; Guyon, O.; Tolls, V.

    2008-01-01

    The presentation focuses on instrument and mission overview, science case, Team X study, and technology status. Topics include DAViNCI study milestones, number of targets versus inner working angle, planet orbit and IWA, combiner/nuller instrument, DAViNCI Team X costs, technology status and near future plans, and deep laser null 1.23 x 10(exp -7) suppression. Summary points are: dilute aperture concept advantages, lower cost than a comparable 7-8m coronagraph working at 2 lambda/D, technology progress prior to 2008 was seriously limited by available funding but showed 1e-y suppression (2006) of laser light needed for 1e-9 to approximately 1e-10 contrast, and current technology effort is off to a fast date with a demonstration of less than 100pm wavefront measurement in Nov 08.

  14. Osteogenesis imperfecta type I: Molecular heterogeneity for COL1A1 null alleles of type I collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Willing, M.C.; Deschenes, S.P.; Pitts, S.H.; Arikat, H.; Roberts, E.J.; Scott, D.A.; Slayton, R.L.; Byers, P.H.

    1994-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I is the mildest form of inherited brittle-bone disease. Dermal fibroblasts from most affected individuals produce about half the usual amount of type I procollagen, as a result of a COL1A1 {open_quotes}null{close_quotes} allele. Using PCR amplification of genomic DNA from affected individuals, followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and SSCP, we identified seven different COL1A1 gene mutations in eight unrelated families with OI type I. Three families have single nucleotide substitutions that alter 5{prime} donor splice sites; two of these unrelated families have the same mutation. One family has a point mutation, in an exon, that creates a premature termination codon, and four have small deletions or insertions, within exons, that create translational frameshifts and new termination codons downstream of the mutation sites. Each mutation leads to both marked reduction in steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant allele and a quantitative decrease in type I procollagen production. Our data demonstrate that different molecular mechanisms that have the same effect on type I collagen production result in the same clinical phenotype. 58 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Off-Axis Nulling Transfer Function Measurement: A First Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedova, G. Dalla; Menut, J.-L.; Millour, F.; Petrov, R.; Cassaing, F.; Danchi, W. C.; Jacquinod, S.; Lhome, E.; Lopez, B.; Lozi, J.; Marcotto, A.; Parisot, J.; Reess, J.-M.

    2013-01-01

    We want to study a polychromatic inverse problem method with nulling interferometers to obtain information on the structures of the exozodiacal light. For this reason, during the first semester of 2013, thanks to the support of the consortium PERSEE, we launched a campaign of laboratory measurements with the nulling interferometric test bench PERSEE, operating with 9 spectral channels between J and K bands. Our objective is to characterise the transfer function, i.e. the map of the null as a function of wavelength for an off-axis source, the null being optimised on the central source or on the source photocenter. We were able to reach on-axis null depths better than 10(exp -4). This work is part of a broader project aiming at creating a simulator of a nulling interferometer in which typical noises of a real instrument are introduced. We present here our first results.

  16. The impact of the SSIIa null mutations on grain traits and composition in durum wheat

    PubMed Central

    Botticella, Ermelinda; Sestili, Francesco; Ferrazzano, Gianluca; Mantovani, Paola; Cammerata, Alessandro; D’Egidio, Maria Grazia; Lafiandra, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Starch represents a major nutrient in the human diet providing essentially a source of energy. More recently the modification of its composition has been associated with new functionalities both at the nutritional and technological level. Targeting the major starch biosynthetic enzymes has been shown to be a valuable strategy to manipulate the amylose-amylopectin ratio in reserve starch. In the present work a breeding strategy aiming to produce a set of SSIIa (starch synthases IIa) null durum wheat is described. We have characterized major traits such as seed weight, total starch, amylose, protein and β-glucan content in a set of mutant families derived from the introgression of the SSIIa null trait into Svevo, an elite Italian durum wheat cultivar. A large degree of variability was detected and used to select wheat lines with either improved quality traits or agronomic performances. Semolina of a set of two SSIIa null lines showed new rheological behavior and an increased content of all major dietary fiber components, namely arabinoxylans, β-glucans and resistant starch. Furthermore the investigation of gene expression highlighted important differences in some genes involved in starch and β-glucans biosynthesis. PMID:27795682

  17. Targeting p53 Null Neuroblastomas through RLIP76**

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Jyotsana; Yadav, Sushma; Nagaprashantha, Lokesh Dalasanur; Vatsyayan, Rit; Singhal, Sharad S; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    The search for p53-independent mechanism of cancer cell killing is highly relevant to pediatric neuroblastomas, where successful therapy is limited by its transformation into p53 mutant and a highly drug-resistant neoplasm. Our studies on the drug-resistant p53 mutant as compared with drug-resistant p53 wild-type neuroblastoma revealed a novel mechanism for resistance to apoptosis: a direct role of p53 in regulating the cellular concentration of pro-apoptotic alkenals by functioning as a specific and saturable allosteric inhibitor of the alkenal-glutathione-conjugate transporter, RLIP76. The RLIP76-p53 complex was demonstrated both using immuno-precipitation analyses of purified proteins as well as by immuno-fluorescence analysis. Drug transport studies revealed that p53 inhibited both basal and PKCα stimulated transport of glutathione-conjugates of 4HNE (GS-HNE) and cisplatin. Drug resistance was significantly greater for p53 mutant as compared with p53 wild-type neuroblastoma cell lines, but both were susceptible to depletion of RLIP76 by antisense alone. In addition, inhibition of RLIP76 significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. Taken together, these studies provide powerful evidence for a novel mechanism for drug and apoptosis resistance in p53 mutant neuroblastoma, based on a model of regulation of p53 induced apoptosis by RLIP76, where p53 is a saturable and specific allosteric inhibitor of RLIP76, and p53 loss results in over-expression of RLIP76; thus, in the absence of p53, the drug and glutathione-conjugate transport activities of RLIP76 are enhanced. Most importantly, our findings strongly indicate RLIP76 as a novel target for therapy of drug-resistant and p53 mutant neuroblastoma. PMID:21411502

  18. Exoplanet detection using a nulling interferometer.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, M; Canales, V

    2001-07-01

    The detection of extra solar planets is a topic of growing interest, which stretches current technology and knowledge to their limits. Indirect measurement confirms the existence of a considerable number. However, direct imaging is the only way to obtain information about the nature of these planets and to detect Earth-like planets, which could support life. The main problem for direct imaging is that planets are associated with a much brighter source of light. Here, we propose the use of the nulling interferometer along with a photon counting technique called Dark Speckle. Using a simple model the behavior of the technique is predicted. The signal-to-noise ratio estimated confirms that it is a promising way to detect faint objects.

  19. Nulling Infrared Radiometer for Measuring Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert

    2003-01-01

    A nulling, self-calibrating infrared radiometer is being developed for use in noncontact measurement of temperature in any of a variety of industrial and scientific applications. This instrument is expected to be especially well-suited to measurement of ambient or near-ambient temperature and, even more specifically, for measuring the surface temperature of a natural body of water. Although this radiometer would utilize the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) portion of the spectrum (wavelengths of 8 to 12 m), its basic principle of operation could also be applied to other spectral bands (corresponding to other temperature ranges) in which the atmosphere is transparent and in which design requirements for sensitivity and temperature-measurement accuracy could be satisfied.

  20. Exoplanet detection using a nulling interferometer.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, M; Canales, V

    2001-07-01

    The detection of extra solar planets is a topic of growing interest, which stretches current technology and knowledge to their limits. Indirect measurement confirms the existence of a considerable number. However, direct imaging is the only way to obtain information about the nature of these planets and to detect Earth-like planets, which could support life. The main problem for direct imaging is that planets are associated with a much brighter source of light. Here, we propose the use of the nulling interferometer along with a photon counting technique called Dark Speckle. Using a simple model the behavior of the technique is predicted. The signal-to-noise ratio estimated confirms that it is a promising way to detect faint objects. PMID:19421271

  1. String spectra near some null cosmological singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Madhu, Kallingalthodi; Narayan, K.

    2009-06-15

    We construct cosmological spacetimes with null Kasner-like singularities as purely gravitational solutions with no other background fields turned on. These can be recast as anisotropic plane-wave spacetimes by coordinate transformations. We analyze string quantization to find the spectrum of string modes in these backgrounds. The classical string modes can be solved for exactly in these time-dependent backgrounds, which enables a detailed study of the near-singularity string spectrum, (time-dependent) oscillator masses, and wave functions. We find that for low-lying string modes (finite oscillation number), the classical near-singularity string mode functions are nondivergent for various families of singularities. Furthermore, for any infinitesimal regularization of the vicinity of the singularity, we find a tower of string modes of ultrahigh oscillation number which propagate essentially freely in the background. The resulting picture suggests that string interactions are non-negligible near the singularity.

  2. Technology Advancement of the Visible Nulling Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Thompson, Patrick; Bolcar, Matt; Madison, Timothy; Woodruff, Robert; Noecker, Charley; Kendrick, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The critical high contrast imaging technology for the Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) mission concept is the visible nulling coronagraph (VNC). EPIC would be capable of imaging jovian planets, dust/debris disks, and potentially super-Earths and contribute to answering how bright the debris disks are for candidate stars. The contrast requirement for EPIC is 10(exp 9) contrast at 125 milli-arseconds inner working angle. To advance the VNC technology NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, in collaboration with Lockheed-Martin, previously developed a vacuum VNC testbed, and achieved narrowband and broadband suppression of the core of the Airy disk. Recently our group was awarded a NASA Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions to achieve two milestones: (i) 10(exp 8) contrast in narrowband light, and, (ii) 10(ecp 9) contrast in broader band light; one milestone per year, and both at 2 Lambda/D inner working angle. These will be achieved with our 2nd generation testbed known as the visible nulling testbed (VNT). It contains a MEMS based hex-packed segmented deformable mirror known as the multiple mirror array (MMA) and coherent fiber bundle, i.e. a spatial filter array (SFA). The MMA is in one interferometric arm and works to set the wavefront differences between the arms to zero. Each of the MMA segments is optically mapped to a single mode fiber of the SFA, and the SFA passively cleans the sub-aperture wavefront error leaving only piston, tip and tilt error to be controlled. The piston degree of freedom on each segment is used to correct the wavefront errors, while the tip/tilt is used to simultaneously correct the amplitude errors. Thus the VNT controls both amplitude and wavefront errors with a single MMA in closed-loop in a vacuum tank at approx.20 Hz. Herein we will discuss our ongoing progress with the VNT.

  3. The Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI) Nulling Testbed II: Closed-loop Path Length Metrology And Control Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, B. J.; Barry, R. K.; Danchi, W. C.; Hyde, T. T.; Lee, K. Y.; Martino, A. J.; Zuray, M. S.

    2006-01-01

    The Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI) is a mission concept for an imaging and nulling interferometer in the near to mid-infrared spectral region (3-8 microns), and will be a scientific and technological pathfinder for upcoming missions including TPF-I/DARWIN, SPECS, and SPIRIT. At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, we have constructed a symmetric Mach-Zehnder nulling testbed to demonstrate techniques and algorithms that can be used to establish and maintain the 10(exp 4) null depth that will be required for such a mission. Among the challenges inherent in such a system is the ability to acquire and track the null fringe to the desired depth for timescales on the order of hours in a laboratory environment. In addition, it is desirable to achieve this stability without using conventional dithering techniques. We describe recent testbed metrology and control system developments necessary to achieve these goals and present our preliminary results.

  4. Stimulation of Sigma-1 Receptor Ameliorates Depressive-like Behaviors in CaMKIV Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Yabuki, Yasushi; Sasaki, Yuzuru; Izumi, Hisanao; Zhang, Chen; Han, Feng; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2015-12-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is a molecular chaperone regulating calcium efflux from the neuronal endoplasmic reticulum to the mitochondria. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) null mice exhibit depressive-like behaviors and impaired neurogenesis as assessed by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation into newborn cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). Here, we demonstrate that chronic stimulation of Sig-1R by treatment with the agonist SA4503 or the SSRI fluvoxamine for 14 days improves depressive-like behaviors in CaMKIV null mice. By contrast, treatment with paroxetine, which lacks affinity for Sig-1R, did not alter these behaviors. Reduced numbers of BrdU-positive cells and decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression and protein kinase B (Akt; Ser-473) phosphorylation seen in the DG of CaMKIV null mice were significantly rescued by chronic Sig-1R stimulation. Interestingly, reduced ATP production observed in the DG of CaMKIV null mice was improved by chronic Sig-1R stimulation. Such stimulation also improved hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) induction and maintenance, which are impaired in the DG of CaMKIV null mice. LTP rescue was closely associated with both increases in calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) autophosphorylation and GluA1 (Ser-831) phosphorylation. Taken together, Sig-1R stimulation by SA4503 or fluvoxamine treatment increased hippocampal neurogenesis, which is closely associated with amelioration of depressive-like behaviors in CaMKIV null mice.

  5. Is the GSTM1 null polymorphism a risk factor in Primary Open Angle Glaucoma?

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Auta Viviane; Talbot, Teddy; Magalhães da Silva, Thiago; Almeida, Maria Clarinda; Menezes, Carlos Alberto; Di Pietro, Giuliano

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association of glutathione S-transferase (GST) GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 genes with the risk of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and clinical features of the disease. Methods We conducted a case-control study that included 87 Brazilian patients with POAG and 85 healthy controls matched for age, ethnicity, and sex, whose blood samples were genotyped for polymorphisms in GST genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods. Results The GSTM1 null polymorphism was significantly more common in the POAG than in the controls group (OR: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.13–3.9; p=0.018). The combined GSTM1 null/GSTT1+ genotype and GSTM1 null/GSTP1 Ile/Val or Val/Val was more prevalent in POAG patients, being a risk factor for POAG (OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.16–4.9; p=0.016 and OR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.07–6.74; p=0.033, respectively). The GSTM1 null/GSTT1+ genotype were associated with higher levels of IOP of both eyes and with more severe defect of the right eye optic nerve. The GSTM1 null/GSTP1 Ile/Val or Val/Val genotypes were associated with higher levels of IOP and more advanced defect of the right eye optic nerve and visual field. Conclusions We demonstrate that GSTM1 null polymorphism is associated with POAG in the Brazilian population. PMID:21738397

  6. Oxidative brain damage in Mecp2-mutant murine models of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Claudio; Della Ragione, Floriana; Signorini, Cinzia; Leoncini, Silvia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Ciccoli, Lucia; Scalabrì, Francesco; Marracino, Federico; Madonna, Michele; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Ricceri, Laura; De Filippis, Bianca; Laviola, Giovanni; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Durand, Thierry; Galano, Jean-Marie; Oger, Camille; Guy, Alexandre; Bultel-Poncé, Valérie; Guy, Jacky; Filosa, Stefania; Hayek, Joussef; D'Esposito, Maurizio

    2014-08-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder affecting almost exclusively females, caused in the overwhelming majority of the cases by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2). High circulating levels of oxidative stress (OS) markers in patients suggest the involvement of OS in the RTT pathogenesis. To investigate the occurrence of oxidative brain damage in Mecp2 mutant mouse models, several OS markers were evaluated in whole brains of Mecp2-null (pre-symptomatic, symptomatic, and rescued) and Mecp2-308 mutated (pre-symptomatic and symptomatic) mice, and compared to those of wild type littermates. Selected OS markers included non-protein-bound iron, isoprostanes (F2-isoprostanes, F4-neuroprostanes, F2-dihomo-isoprostanes) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal protein adducts. Our findings indicate that oxidative brain damage 1) occurs in both Mecp2-null (both -/y and stop/y) and Mecp2-308 (both 308/y males and 308/+ females) mouse models of RTT; 2) precedes the onset of symptoms in both Mecp2-null and Mecp2-308 models; and 3) is rescued by Mecp2 brain specific gene reactivation. Our data provide direct evidence of the link between Mecp2 deficiency, oxidative stress and RTT pathology, as demonstrated by the rescue of the brain oxidative homeostasis following brain-specifically Mecp2-reactivated mice. The present study indicates that oxidative brain damage is a previously unrecognized hallmark feature of murine RTT, and suggests that Mecp2 is involved in the protection of the brain from oxidative stress.

  7. GSTT1 Null Genotype Significantly Increases the Susceptibility to Urinary System Cancer: Evidences from 63,876 Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; He, Jing; Ma, Tian-Jiao; Lei, Wei; Li, Feng; Shen, Han; Shen, Zhen-Ya

    2016-01-01

    GSTT1 gene plays an important role in detoxification and clearance of reactive oxygen species(ROS). A null variant in this gene has been demonstrated to confer cancer susceptibility. Although many studies have demonstrated the association between GSTT1 null polymorphism and urinary system cancer susceptibility, several publications reported opposite conclusions. For better understanding the effects of this polymorphism on the risk of urinary system cancer, a updated meta-analysis was performed with a total of 26,666 cases and 37,210 controls extracted from 117 studies, by following the latest meta-analysis guidelines (PRISMA). The results suggested that the GSTT1 null genotype was significantly associated with an increased risk of urinary system cancer (OR=1.13, 95%CI=1.05-1.22). Furthermore, stratified analyses by the type of cancer, ethnicity, source of control and quality score presented a significantly increased risk associated with GSTT1 null genotype in bladder and prostate cancer subgroup, Caucasians and Indians subgroup, population-based(PB) subgroup, medium quality and low quality subgroup. Overall, our meta-analysis suggested that GSTT1 null genotype is a potential cancer susceptibility variant. Well-designed and large-cohort studies are needed to confirm the association between GSTT1 null genotype and urinary system cancer risk. PMID:27698905

  8. GSTT1 Null Genotype Significantly Increases the Susceptibility to Urinary System Cancer: Evidences from 63,876 Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; He, Jing; Ma, Tian-Jiao; Lei, Wei; Li, Feng; Shen, Han; Shen, Zhen-Ya

    2016-01-01

    GSTT1 gene plays an important role in detoxification and clearance of reactive oxygen species(ROS). A null variant in this gene has been demonstrated to confer cancer susceptibility. Although many studies have demonstrated the association between GSTT1 null polymorphism and urinary system cancer susceptibility, several publications reported opposite conclusions. For better understanding the effects of this polymorphism on the risk of urinary system cancer, a updated meta-analysis was performed with a total of 26,666 cases and 37,210 controls extracted from 117 studies, by following the latest meta-analysis guidelines (PRISMA). The results suggested that the GSTT1 null genotype was significantly associated with an increased risk of urinary system cancer (OR=1.13, 95%CI=1.05-1.22). Furthermore, stratified analyses by the type of cancer, ethnicity, source of control and quality score presented a significantly increased risk associated with GSTT1 null genotype in bladder and prostate cancer subgroup, Caucasians and Indians subgroup, population-based(PB) subgroup, medium quality and low quality subgroup. Overall, our meta-analysis suggested that GSTT1 null genotype is a potential cancer susceptibility variant. Well-designed and large-cohort studies are needed to confirm the association between GSTT1 null genotype and urinary system cancer risk.

  9. VAMP3 null mice display normal constitutive, insulin- and exercise-regulated vesicle trafficking.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Mora, S; Ryder, J W; Coker, K J; Hansen, P; Allen, L A; Pessin, J E

    2001-03-01

    To investigate the physiological function of the VAMP3 vesicle SNARE (v-SNARE) isoform in the regulation of GLUT4 vesicle trafficking, we generated homozygotic VAMP3 null mice by targeted gene disruption. The VAMP3 null mice had typical growth rate and weight gain, with normal maintenance of fasting serum glucose and insulin levels. Analysis of glucose disposal and insulin sensitivity demonstrated normal insulin and glucose tolerance, with no evidence for insulin resistance. Insulin stimulation of glucose uptake in isolated primary adipocytes was essentially the same for the wild-type and VAMP3 null mice. Similarly, insulin-, hypoxia-, and exercise-stimulated glucose uptake in isolated skeletal muscle did not differ significantly. In addition, other general membrane trafficking events including phagocytosis, pinocytosis, and transferrin receptor recycling were also found to be unaffected in the VAMP3 null mice. Taken together, these data demonstrate that VAMP3 function is not necessary for either regulated GLUT4 translocation or general constitutive membrane recycling. PMID:11238894

  10. Cadmium modulates adipocyte functions in metallothionein-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Takashige; Nishiyama, Kaori; Kadota, Yoshito; Sato, Masao; Inoue, Masahisa; Suzuki, Shinya

    2013-11-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, causes a reduction of adipocyte size and the modulation of adipokine expression. To further investigate the significance of the Cd action, we studied the effect of Cd on the white adipose tissue (WAT) of metallothionein null (MT{sup −/−}) mice, which cannot form atoxic Cd–MT complexes and are used for evaluating Cd as free ions, and wild type (MT{sup +/+}) mice. Cd administration more significantly reduced the adipocyte size of MT{sup −/−} mice than that of MT{sup +/+} mice. Cd exposure also induced macrophage recruitment to WAT with an increase in the expression level of Ccl2 (MCP-1) in the MT{sup −/−} mice. The in vitro exposure of Cd to adipocytes induce triglyceride release into culture medium, decrease in the expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and lipid hydrolysis at 24 h, and at 48 h increase in phosphorylation of the lipid-droplet-associated protein perilipin, which facilitates the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes. Therefore, the reduction in adipocyte size by Cd may arise from an imbalance between lipid synthesis and lipolysis. In addition, the expression levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin decreased in adipocytes. Taken together, exposure to Cd may induce unusually small adipocytes and modulate the expression of adipokines differently from the case of physiologically small adipocytes, and may accelerate the risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. - Highlights: • Cd causes a marked reduction in adipocyte size in MT-null mice. • Cd enhances macrophage migration into adipose tissue and disrupt adipokine secretion. • MT gene alleviates Cd-induced adipocyte dysfunctions. • Cd enhances the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes, mediated by perilipin. • Cd induces unusually small adipocytes and the abnormal expression of adipokines.

  11. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 null mice are sensitive to cholestatic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youcai; Csanaky, Iván L; Cheng, Xingguo; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2012-06-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 (Oatp1a1) is predominantly expressed in livers of mice and is thought to transport bile acids (BAs) from blood into liver. Because Oatp1a1 expression is markedly decreased in mice after bile duct ligation (BDL). We hypothesized that Oatp1a1-null mice would be protected against liver injury during BDL-induced cholestasis due largely to reduced hepatic uptake of BAs. To evaluate this hypothesis, BDL surgeries were performed in both male wild-type (WT) and Oatp1a1-null mice. At 24 h after BDL, Oatp1a1-null mice showed higher serum alanine aminotransferase levels and more severe liver injury than WT mice, and all Oatp1a1-null mice died within 4 days after BDL, whereas all WT mice survived. At 24 h after BDL, surprisingly Oatp1a1-null mice had higher total BA concentrations in livers than WT mice, suggesting that loss of Oatp1a1 did not prevent BA accumulation in the liver. In addition, secondary BAs dramatically increased in serum of Oatp1a1-null BDL mice but not in WT BDL mice. Oatp1a1-null BDL mice had similar basolateral BA uptake (Na(+)-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and Oatp1b2) and BA-efflux (multidrug resistance-associated protein [Mrp]-3, Mrp4, and organic solute transporter α/β) transporters, as well as BA-synthetic enzyme (Cyp7a1) in livers as WT BDL mice. Hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner Cyp3a11, Cyp4a14, and Nqo1, which are target genes of farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, and NF-E2-related factor 2, respectively, were increased in WT BDL mice but not in Oatp1a1-null BDL mice. These results demonstrate that loss of Oatp1a1 function exacerbates cholestatic liver injury in mice and suggest that Oatp1a1 plays a unique role in liver adaptive responses to obstructive cholestasis.

  12. Visual and Plastic Arts in Teaching Literacy: Null Curricula?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakeland, Robin Gay

    2010-01-01

    Visual and plastic arts in contemporary literacy instruction equal null curricula. Studies show that painting and sculpture facilitate teaching reading and writing (literacy), yet such pedagogy has not been formally adopted into USA curriculum. An example of null curriculum can be found in late 19th - early 20th century education the USA…

  13. Exact null controllability of degenerate evolution equations with scalar control

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Vladimir E; Shklyar, Benzion

    2012-12-31

    Necessary and sufficient conditions for the exact null controllability of a degenerate linear evolution equation with scalar control are obtained. These general results are used to examine the exact null controllability of the Dzektser equation in the theory of seepage. Bibliography: 13 titles.

  14. Logarithmic corrections to gravitational entropy and the null energy condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Maulik; Svesko, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Using a relation between the thermodynamics of local horizons and the null energy condition, we consider the effects of quantum corrections to the gravitational entropy. In particular, we find that the geometric form of the null energy condition is not affected by the inclusion of logarithmic corrections to the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy.

  15. Null hypersurfaces in generalized Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Matias; Palmas, Oscar; Solis, Didier A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the geometry of null hypersurfaces M in generalized Robertson-Walker spacetimes. First we characterize such null hypersurfaces as graphs of generalized eikonal functions over the fiber and use this characterization to show that such hypersurfaces are parallel if and only if their fibers are also parallel. We further use this technique to construct several examples of null hypersurfaces in both de Sitter and anti de Sitter spaces. Then we characterize all the totally umbilical null hypersurfaces M in a Lorentzian space form (viewed as a quadric in a semi-Euclidean ambient space) as intersections of the space form with a hyperplane. Finally we study the totally umbilical spacelike hypersurfaces of null hypersurfaces in space forms and characterize them as planar sections of M.

  16. Estimating Relatedness in the Presence of Null Alleles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kang; Ritland, Kermit; Dunn, Derek W; Qi, Xiaoguang; Guo, Songtao; Li, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Studies of genetics and ecology often require estimates of relatedness coefficients based on genetic marker data. However, with the presence of null alleles, an observed genotype can represent one of several possible true genotypes. This results in biased estimates of relatedness. As the numbers of marker loci are often limited, loci with null alleles cannot be abandoned without substantial loss of statistical power. Here, we show how loci with null alleles can be incorporated into six estimators of relatedness (two novel). We evaluate the performance of various estimators before and after correction for null alleles. If the frequency of a null allele is <0.1, some estimators can be used directly without adjustment; if it is >0.5, the potency of estimation is too low and such a locus should be excluded. We make available a software package entitled PolyRelatedness v1.6, which enables researchers to optimize these estimators to best fit a particular data set.

  17. Collagen VI deficiency reduces muscle pathology, but does not improve muscle function, in the γ-sarcoglycan-null mouse.

    PubMed

    de Greef, Jessica C; Hamlyn, Rebecca; Jensen, Braden S; O'Campo Landa, Raul; Levy, Jennifer R; Kobuke, Kazuhiro; Campbell, Kevin P

    2016-04-01

    Muscular dystrophy is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and dystrophic muscle exhibits degeneration and regeneration of muscle cells, inflammation and fibrosis. Skeletal muscle fibrosis is an excessive deposition of components of the extracellular matrix including an accumulation of Collagen VI. We hypothesized that a reduction of Collagen VI in a muscular dystrophy model that presents with fibrosis would result in reduced muscle pathology and improved muscle function. To test this hypothesis, we crossed γ-sarcoglycan-null mice, a model of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C, with a Col6a2-deficient mouse model. We found that the resulting γ-sarcoglycan-null/Col6a2Δex5 mice indeed exhibit reduced muscle pathology compared with γ-sarcoglycan-null mice. Specifically, fewer muscle fibers are degenerating, fiber size varies less, Evans blue dye uptake is reduced and serum creatine kinase levels are lower. Surprisingly, in spite of this reduction in muscle pathology, muscle function is not significantly improved. In fact, grip strength and maximum isometric tetanic force are even lower in γ-sarcoglycan-null/Col6a2Δex5 mice than in γ-sarcoglycan-null mice. In conclusion, our results reveal that Collagen VI-mediated fibrosis contributes to skeletal muscle pathology in γ-sarcoglycan-null mice. Importantly, however, our data also demonstrate that a reduction in skeletal muscle pathology does not necessarily lead to an improvement of skeletal muscle function, and this should be considered in future translational studies.

  18. Bodyweight assessment of enamelin null mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Albert H-L; Lertlam, Rangsiyakorn; Simmer, James P; Wang, Chia-Ning; Hu, Jan C C

    2013-01-01

    The Enam null mice appear to be smaller than wild-type mice, which prompted the hypothesis that enamel defects negatively influence nutritional intake and bodyweight gain (BWG). We compared the BWG of Enam(-/-) and wild-type mice from birth (D0) to Day 42 (D42). Wild-type (WT) and Enam(-/-) (N) mice were given either hard chow (HC) or soft chow (SC). Four experimental groups were studied: WTHC, WTSC, NHC, and NSC. The mother's bodyweight (DBW) and the average litter bodyweight (ALBW) were obtained from D0 to D21. After D21, the pups were separated from the mother and provided the same type of food. Litter bodyweights were measured until D42. ALBW was compared at 7-day intervals using one-way ANOVA, while the influence of DBW on ALBW was analyzed by mixed-model analyses. The ALBW of Enam(-/-) mice maintained on hard chow (NHC) was significantly lower than the two WT groups at D21 and the differences persisted into young adulthood. The ALBW of Enam(-/-) mice maintained on soft chow (NSC) trended lower, but was not significantly different than that of the WT groups. We conclude that genotype, which affects enamel integrity, and food hardness influence bodyweight gain in postnatal and young adult mice. PMID:23509695

  19. Wormholes minimally violating the null energy condition

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Lobo, Francisco S N; Martín-Moruno, Prado E-mail: fslobo@fc.ul.pt

    2014-11-01

    We consider novel wormhole solutions supported by a matter content that minimally violates the null energy condition. More specifically, we consider an equation of state in which the sum of the energy density and radial pressure is proportional to a constant with a value smaller than that of the inverse area characterising the system, i.e., the area of the wormhole mouth. This approach is motivated by a recently proposed cosmological event, denoted {sup t}he little sibling of the big rip{sup ,} where the Hubble rate and the scale factor blow up but the cosmic derivative of the Hubble rate does not [1]. By using the cut-and-paste approach, we match interior spherically symmetric wormhole solutions to an exterior Schwarzschild geometry, and analyse the stability of the thin-shell to linearized spherically symmetric perturbations around static solutions, by choosing suitable properties for the exotic material residing on the junction interface radius. Furthermore, we also consider an inhomogeneous generalization of the equation of state considered above and analyse the respective stability regions. In particular, we obtain a specific wormhole solution with an asymptotic behaviour corresponding to a global monopole.

  20. Null fluid collapse in brane world models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lake, Matthew J.

    2014-03-01

    The brane world description of our Universe entails a large extra dimension and a fundamental scale of gravity that may be lower than the Planck scale by several orders of magnitude. An interesting consequence of this scenario occurs in the nature of spherically symmetric vacuum solutions to the brane gravitational field equations, which often have properties quite distinct from the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. In this paper, the spherically symmetric collapse on the brane world of four types of null fluid, governed by the barotropic, polytropic, strange quark "bag" model and Hagedorn equations of state, is investigated. In each case, we solve the approximate gravitational field equations, obtained in the high-density limit, determine the equation which governs the formation of apparent horizons and investigate the conditions for the formation of naked singularities. Though, naively, one would expect the increased effective energy density on the brane to favor the formation of black holes over naked singularities, we find that, for the types of fluid considered, this is not the case. However, the black hole solutions differ substantially from their general-relativistic counterparts and brane world corrections often play a role analogous to charge in general relativity. As an astrophysical application of this work, the possibility that energy emission from a Hagedorn fluid collapsing to form a naked singularity may be a source of GRBs in the brane world is also considered.

  1. Null cosmological singularities and free strings: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, K.

    2011-01-01

    In arXiv:0909:4731 , we argued that the free string lightcone Schrodinger wavefunctional in the vicinity of null Kasner-like cosmological singularities has nonsingular time-dependence if the Kasner exponents satisfy certain relations. These backgrounds are anisotropic plane waves with singularities. We first show here that only certain singularities admit a Rosen-Kasner frame with exponents satisfying relations leading to a wavefunctional with nonsingular time-dependence. Then we build on the (Rosen) description further and study various physical observables for a time-dependent harmonic oscillator toy model and then the free string, reconciling this with the corresponding description in the conventional plane wave variables. We find that observables containing no time derivatives are identical in these variables while those with time derivatives are different. Various free string observables are still divergent, perhaps consistent with string oscillator states becoming light in the vicinity of the singularity.

  2. RXRalpha overexpression in cardiomyocytes causes dilated cardiomyopathy but fails to rescue myocardial hypoplasia in RXRalpha-null fetuses.

    PubMed

    Subbarayan, V; Mark, M; Messadeq, N; Rustin, P; Chambon, P; Kastner, P

    2000-02-01

    Retinoid X receptor alpha-null (RXRalpha-null) mutants exhibit hypoplasia of their ventricular myocardium and die at the fetal stage. In the present study, we wished to determine whether transgenic re-expression of RXRalpha in mutant cardiac myocytes could rescue these defects. Two transgenic mouse lines specifically overexpressing an RXRalpha protein in cardiomyocytes were generated, using the cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain (alpha-MHC) promoter. Breeding the high copy number transgenic line onto an RXRalpha-null genetic background did not prevent the myocardial hypoplasia and fetal lethality associated with the RXRalpha(-/-) genotype, even though the transgene was expressed in the ventricles as early as 10. 5 days post-coitum. These data suggest that the RXRalpha function involved in myocardial growth may correspond to a non-cell-autonomous requirement forsignal orchestrating the growth and differentiation of myocytes. Interestingly, the adult transgenic mice developed a dilated cardiomyopathy, associated with myofibrillar abnormalities and specific deficiencies in respiratory chain complexes I and II, thus providing an additional model for this genetically complex disease. PMID:10675365

  3. Parallel-propagated frame along null geodesics in higher-dimensional black hole spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiznak, David; Frolov, Valeri P.; Connell, Patrick; Krtous, Pavel

    2009-01-15

    In [arXiv:0803.3259] the equations describing the parallel transport of orthonormal frames along timelike (spacelike) geodesics in a spacetime admitting a nondegenerate principal conformal Killing-Yano 2-form h were solved. The construction employed is based on studying the Darboux subspaces of the 2-form F obtained as a projection of h along the geodesic trajectory. In this paper we demonstrate that, although slightly modified, a similar construction is possible also in the case of null geodesics. In particular, we explicitly construct the parallel-transported frames along null geodesics in D=4, 5, 6 Kerr-NUT-(A)dS spacetimes. We further discuss the parallel transport along principal null directions in these spacetimes. Such directions coincide with the eigenvectors of the principal conformal Killing-Yano tensor. Finally, we show how to obtain a parallel-transported frame along null geodesics in the background of the 4D Plebanski-Demianski metric which admits only a conformal generalization of the Killing-Yano tensor.

  4. Repressor mutant forms of the Azospirillum brasilense NtrC protein.

    PubMed

    Huergo, Luciano F; Assumpção, Marcelo C; Souza, Emanuel M; Steffens, M Berenice R; Yates, M Geoffrey; Chubatsu, Leda S; Pedrosa, Fábio O

    2004-10-01

    The Azospirillum brasilense mutant strains FP8 and FP9, after treatment with nitrosoguanidine, showed a null Nif phenotype and were unable to use nitrate as their sole nitrogen source. Sequencing of the ntrC genes revealed single nucleotide mutations in the NtrC nucleotide-binding site. The phenotypes of these strains are discussed in relation to their genotypes.

  5. Herpes simplex virus type 1 ICP27 deletion mutants exhibit altered patterns of transcription and are DNA deficient.

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, A M; McMahan, L; Schaffer, P A

    1989-01-01

    Infected cell polypeptide 27 (ICP27, alpha 27, IE63) is the 63-kilodalton product of an immediate-early gene of herpes simplex virus. Functional analysis of temperature-sensitive mutants in herpes simplex virus type 1 ICP27 demonstrated that this protein plays an essential role in virus replication (W. R. Sacks, C. C. Greene, D. P. Aschman, and P. A. Schaffer, J. Virol. 55:796-805, 1985). Because the temperature-sensitive forms of ICP27 induced by the mutants affected gene expression to differing degrees, these mutants were not suitable for establishing the ICP27 null phenotype. For this purpose we generated deletion mutants in ICP27--3dl1.2 and 5dl1.2--lacking the transcriptional start site as well as portions of the promoter and coding sequences of the gene. These mutants failed to specify ICP27-specific transcripts and proteins and were replication incompetent. The mutants induced the synthesis of greatly reduced levels of viral DNA (18% of wild-type levels) and were characterized by the overexpression of early proteins, reduced levels of gamma 1 proteins, and the absence of detectable gamma 2 proteins. The alterations in viral protein synthesis appeared to occur at the level of transcription. The phenotypic properties of the mutants were consistent with the results of transient expression assays demonstrating that ICP27 acts to down-regulate transcription of early genes and to further up-regulate transcription of late genes whose expression is induced by ICP0 and ICP4. Because ICP27 is not thought to be directly involved in viral DNA synthesis, it is likely that the reduced levels of viral DNA characteristic of deletion mutant-infected cells is a consequence of aberrant regulation of certain early genes whose products are involved in viral DNA synthesis and late genes whose products are required to stabilize viral DNA once synthesized. Taken together, these findings suggest an essential role for ICP27 in the modulation of early and late gene expression at the

  6. Molecular basis for the CAT-2 null phenotype in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Bethards, L.A.; Scandalios, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have described several maize lines whose developmental patterns of catalase gene expression vary from the typical maize line, W64A. Among these variants are the lines A16 and A338, both found to be null for the CAT-2 protein. Identification of a third CAT-2 null line, designated A340, is described. RNA blots and S1 nuclease protection analysis, using (/sup 32/P)-labeled dCTP, indicate that all three CAT-2 null lines produce a similarly shortened Cat2 transcript. The molecular basis for this aberrant Cat2 transcript is discussed.

  7. Null fields in the outer Jovian magnetosphere: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, P. L.; Balogh, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Southwood, D. J.; Fazakerley, A.; Smith, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports on a magnetic field phenomenon, hereafter referred to as null fields, which were discovered during the inbound pass of the recent flyby of Jupiter by the Ulysses spacecraft. These null fields which were observed in the outer dayside magnetosphere are characterised by brief but sharp decreases of the field magnitude to values less than 1 nT. The nulls are distinguished from the current sheet signatures characteristic of the middle magnetosphere by the fact that the field does not reverse across the event. A field configuration is suggested that accounts for the observed features of the events.

  8. Maternal topoisomerase II alpha, not topoisomerase II beta, enables embryonic development of zebrafish top2a-/- mutants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic alterations in human topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A) are linked to cancer susceptibility. TOP2A decatenates chromosomes and thus is necessary for multiple aspects of cell division including DNA replication, chromosome condensation and segregation. Topoisomerase II alpha is also required for embryonic development in mammals, as mouse Top2a knockouts result in embryonic lethality as early as the 4-8 cell stage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the extended developmental capability of zebrafish top2a mutants arises from maternal expression of top2a or compensation from its top2b paralogue. Results Here, we describe bloody minded (blm), a novel mutant of zebrafish top2a. In contrast to mouse Top2a nulls, zebrafish top2a mutants survive to larval stages (4-5 day post fertilization). Developmental analyses demonstrate abundant expression of maternal top2a but not top2b. Inhibition or poisoning of maternal topoisomerase II delays embryonic development by extending the cell cycle M-phase. Zygotic top2a and top2b are co-expressed in the zebrafish CNS, but endogenous or ectopic top2b RNA appear unable to prevent the blm phenotype. Conclusions We conclude that maternal top2a enables zebrafish development before the mid-zygotic transition (MZT) and that zebrafish top2a and top2b are not functionally redundant during development after activation of the zygotic genome. PMID:22111588

  9. Dmp1 Null Mice Develop a Unique Osteoarthritis-like Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Lin, Shuxian; Liu, Ying; Yuan, Baozhi; Harris, Steph E; Feng, Jian Q.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hypophosphatemia rickets (including DMP1 mutations) develop severe osteoarthritis (OA), although the mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we first identified the expression of DMP1 in hypertrophic chondrocytes using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and X-gal analysis of Dmp1-knockout-lacZ-knockin heterozygous mice. Next, we characterized the OA-like phenotype in Dmp1 null mice from 7-week-old to one-year-old using multiple techniques, including X-ray, micro-CT, H&E staining, Goldner staining, scanning electronic microscopy, IHC assays, etc. We found a classical OA-like phenotype in Dmp1 null mice such as articular cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation, and subchondral osteosclerosis. These Dmp1 null mice also developed unique pathological changes, including a biphasic change in their articular cartilage from the initial expansion of hypertrophic chondrocytes at the age of 1-month to a quick diminished articular cartilage layer at the age of 3-months. Further, these null mice displayed severe enlarged knees and poorly formed bone with an expanded osteoid area. To address whether DMP1 plays a direct role in the articular cartilage, we deleted Dmp1 specifically in hypertrophic chondrocytes by crossing the Dmp1-loxP mice with Col X Cre mice. Interestingly, these conditional knockout mice didn't display notable defects in either the articular cartilage or the growth plate. Because of the hypophosphatemia remained in the entire life span of the Dmp1 null mice, we also investigated whether a high phosphate diet would improve the OA-like phenotype. A 8-week treatment of a high phosphate diet significantly rescued the OA-like defect in Dmp1 null mice, supporting the critical role of phosphate homeostasis in maintaining the healthy joint morphology and function. Taken together, this study demonstrates a unique OA-like phenotype in Dmp1 null mice, but a lack of the direct impact of DMP1 on chondrogenesis. Instead, the regulation of phosphate homeostasis

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are presented. The first is a demonstration of chemiluminescence. The second is a demonstration using a secondary battery constructed from common household articles. (JN)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the following chemistry lecture demonstrations and experiments: (1) a versatile kinetic demonstration; (2) the Bakelite Demonstration; (3) applying Beer's law; and (4) entropy calculations. (HM)

  12. Transfer of cloned human class I major histocompatibility complex genes into HLA mutant human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Y; Koller, B; Geraghty, D; Orr, H; Shaw, S; Kavathas, P; DeMars, R

    1986-01-01

    Three new kinds of recombinant DNA constructs were used to transfer cloned human class I HLA genes (A2 and B8) into unique HLA mutant lymphoblastoid cells: pHeBo(x): a class I gene, "x," in plasmid vector pHeBo, which contains a hygromycin resistance gene and Epstein-Barr virus oriP element that sustains extrachromosomal replication; pHPT(x): gene x in a vector with a hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene; pHPTe(x): gene x in a vector with the HPRT gene and oriP element. Cell surface class I antigen expression was strong in transferents made with class I-deficient lymphoblastoid cell line mutants .144 (A-null), .53 (B-null), and .184 (A-null, B-null). Transferents expressing HLA-A2 were recognized specifically by HLA-A2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. When introduced on either of the vectors with the Epstein-Barr virus oriP element, the class I gene replicated extrachromosomally and was lost at rates of 0.2 to 0.3 per cell division. When introduced with vector pHPT (lacking Epstein-Barr virus oriP), the B8 gene was inserted at different chromosomal locations. Introduction of the HLA-B8 gene failed to restore antigen expression by HLA-B-null mutant .174, providing evidence that, unlike mutants exemplified by .53, .144, and .184, some HLA antigen loss mutants are deficient in a trans-acting function needed for class I antigen expression. Of more general interest, the results obtained with HLA class I genes in vectors that replicate extrachromosomally suggest ways of relating genic expression to chromatin structure and function and of attempting to clone functional human centromeres. Images PMID:3023867

  13. Transfer of cloned human class I major histocompatibility complex genes into HLA mutant human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y; Koller, B; Geraghty, D; Orr, H; Shaw, S; Kavathas, P; DeMars, R

    1986-04-01

    Three new kinds of recombinant DNA constructs were used to transfer cloned human class I HLA genes (A2 and B8) into unique HLA mutant lymphoblastoid cells: pHeBo(x): a class I gene, "x," in plasmid vector pHeBo, which contains a hygromycin resistance gene and Epstein-Barr virus oriP element that sustains extrachromosomal replication; pHPT(x): gene x in a vector with a hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene; pHPTe(x): gene x in a vector with the HPRT gene and oriP element. Cell surface class I antigen expression was strong in transferents made with class I-deficient lymphoblastoid cell line mutants .144 (A-null), .53 (B-null), and .184 (A-null, B-null). Transferents expressing HLA-A2 were recognized specifically by HLA-A2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. When introduced on either of the vectors with the Epstein-Barr virus oriP element, the class I gene replicated extrachromosomally and was lost at rates of 0.2 to 0.3 per cell division. When introduced with vector pHPT (lacking Epstein-Barr virus oriP), the B8 gene was inserted at different chromosomal locations. Introduction of the HLA-B8 gene failed to restore antigen expression by HLA-B-null mutant .174, providing evidence that, unlike mutants exemplified by .53, .144, and .184, some HLA antigen loss mutants are deficient in a trans-acting function needed for class I antigen expression. Of more general interest, the results obtained with HLA class I genes in vectors that replicate extrachromosomally suggest ways of relating genic expression to chromatin structure and function and of attempting to clone functional human centromeres. PMID:3023867

  14. A genetic screen for neurite outgrowth mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans reveals a new function for the F-box ubiquitin ligase component LIN-23.

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Nehal; Loria, Paula M; Hobert, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    Axon pathfinding and target recognition are highly dynamic and tightly regulated cellular processes. One of the mechanisms involved in regulating protein activity levels during axonal and synaptic development is protein ubiquitination. We describe here the isolation of several Caenorhabditis elegans mutants, termed eno (ectopic/erratic neurite outgrowth) mutants, that display defects in axon outgrowth of specific neuron classes. One retrieved mutant is characterized by abnormal termination of axon outgrowth in a subset of several distinct neuron classes, including ventral nerve cord motor neurons, head motor neurons, and mechanosensory neurons. This mutant is allelic to lin-23, which codes for an F-box-containing component of an SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that was previously shown to negatively regulate postembryonic cell divisions. We demonstrate that LIN-23 is a broadly expressed cytoplasmically localized protein that is required autonomously in neurons to affect axon outgrowth. Our newly isolated allele of lin-23, a point mutation in the C-terminal tail of the protein, displays axonal outgrowth defects similar to those observed in null alleles of this gene, but does not display defects in cell cycle regulation. We have thus defined separable activities of LIN-23 in two distinct processes, cell cycle control and axon patterning. We propose that LIN-23 targets distinct substrates for ubiquitination within each process. PMID:15082545

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details three demonstrations for use in chemistry classrooms. Includes: "A Demonstration of Corrosion by Differential Aeration"; "A Simple Demonstration of the Activation Energy Concept"; and "A Boiling Demonstration at Room Temperature." Each description includes equipment, materials, and methods. (CW)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two chemistry demonstrations including a demonstration of chemical inhibition and "The Rayleigh Fountain" which demonstrates the polarity of the water molecule. Provides instructions and explanations for each demonstration. (CW)

  17. A new dynamic null model for phylogenetic community structure

    PubMed Central

    Pigot, Alex L; Etienne, Rampal S

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenies are increasingly applied to identify the mechanisms structuring ecological communities but progress has been hindered by a reliance on statistical null models that ignore the historical process of community assembly. Here, we address this, and develop a dynamic null model of assembly by allopatric speciation, colonisation and local extinction. Incorporating these processes fundamentally alters the structure of communities expected due to chance, with speciation leading to phylogenetic overdispersion compared to a classical statistical null model assuming equal probabilities of community membership. Applying this method to bird and primate communities in South America we show that patterns of phylogenetic overdispersion – often attributed to negative biotic interactions – are instead consistent with a species neutral model of allopatric speciation, colonisation and local extinction. Our findings provide a new null expectation for phylogenetic community patterns and highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for the dynamic history of assembly when testing the mechanisms governing community structure. PMID:25560516

  18. A null-steering viewpoint of interferometric SAR

    SciTech Connect

    BICKEL,DOUGLAS L.

    2000-05-02

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) extends the two-dimensional imaging capability of traditional synthetic aperture radar to three-dimensions by using an aperture in the elevation plane to estimate the 3-D structure of the target. The operation of this additional aperture can be viewed from a null-steering point of view, rather than the traditional phase determination point of view. Knowing that IFSAR can be viewed from the null-steering perspective allows one to take advantage of the mathematical foundation developed for null-steering arrays. In addition, in some problems of interest in IFSAR the null-steering perspective provides better intuition and suggests alternative solutions. One example is the problem of estimating building height where layover is present.

  19. A new dynamic null model for phylogenetic community structure.

    PubMed

    Pigot, Alex L; Etienne, Rampal S

    2015-02-01

    Phylogenies are increasingly applied to identify the mechanisms structuring ecological communities but progress has been hindered by a reliance on statistical null models that ignore the historical process of community assembly. Here, we address this, and develop a dynamic null model of assembly by allopatric speciation, colonisation and local extinction. Incorporating these processes fundamentally alters the structure of communities expected due to chance, with speciation leading to phylogenetic overdispersion compared to a classical statistical null model assuming equal probabilities of community membership. Applying this method to bird and primate communities in South America we show that patterns of phylogenetic overdispersion - often attributed to negative biotic interactions - are instead consistent with a species neutral model of allopatric speciation, colonisation and local extinction. Our findings provide a new null expectation for phylogenetic community patterns and highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for the dynamic history of assembly when testing the mechanisms governing community structure.

  20. Antimultipath communication by injecting tone into null in signal spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A transmitter for digital radio communication creates a null by balanced encoding of data modulated on an RF carrier, and inserts a calibration tone within the null. This is accomplished by having the calibration tone coincide in phase and frequency with the transmitted radio frequency output, for coherent demodulation of data at the receiver where the tone calibration signal is extracted and used for multipath fading compensation.

  1. Another Nulling Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibodeau, Phillip E.; Sullender, Craig C.

    1993-01-01

    Lightweight, low-power circuit provides noncontact measurement of alternating or direct current of many ampheres in main conductor. Advantages of circuit over other nulling Hall-effect current-measuring circuits is stability and accuracy increased by putting both analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters in nulling feedback loop. Converters and rest of circuit designed for operation at sampling rate of 100 kHz, but rate changed to alter time or frequency response of circuit.

  2. Experimental Progress and Results of a Visible Nulling Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuele, Rocco; Wallace, J. Kent; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Shao, Mike; Levine, B. Martin; Fregoso, Santos

    2007-01-01

    The crux of visible exoplanet detection is overcoming significant star-planet contrast ratios on the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -10)-at very small angular separations. We are developing an interferometric nulling coronagraph designed to achieve a 10(exp -6) contrast ratio at a working science bandpass of 20% visible light. Achieving large, broadband suppression requires a pseudo-achromatic phase flip, while maintaining a strict error budget. Recent results from our nulling interferometer testbed yield contrast ratios at the 1.05x10(exp -6) level, with a 15% visible bandpass. This result is at 65% of our final bandpass requirement, although limitations of our current configuration make major hardware changes essential to broadening the bandpass. We make the argument that broadening the bandpass should not necessarily adversely affect the null depth until beyond the 20% visible light level. Using the same setup we are able to reach monochromatic null depths of 1.11x10(exp -7) (?= 638 nm)averaged over three seconds. This paper will describe our experimental approach for achieving deep broadband nulls, as well as error considerations and limitations, and the most recent results for our nulling coronagraph testbed.

  3. Context-specific protection of TGFα null mice from osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Usmani, Shirine E; Ulici, Veronica; Pest, Michael A; Hill, Tracy L; Welch, Ian D; Beier, Frank

    2016-07-26

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) is a growth factor involved in osteoarthritis (OA). TGFα induces an OA-like phenotype in articular chondrocytes, by inhibiting matrix synthesis and promoting catabolic factor expression. To better understand TGFα's potential as a therapeutic target, we employed two in vivo OA models: (1) post-traumatic and (2) aging related OA. Ten-week old and six-month old male Tgfa null mice and their heterozygous (control) littermates underwent destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Disease progression was assessed histologically using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. As well, spontaneous disease progression was analyzed in eighteen-month-old Tgfa null and heterozygous mice. Ten-week old Tgfa null mice were protected from OA progression at both seven and fourteen weeks post-surgery. No protection was seen however in six-month old null mice after DMM surgery, and no differences were observed between genotypes in the aging model. Thus, young Tgfa null mice are protected from OA progression in the DMM model, while older mice are not. In addition, Tgfa null mice are equally susceptible to spontaneous OA development during aging. Thus, TGFα might be a valuable therapeutic target in some post-traumatic forms of OA, however its role in idiopathic disease is less clear.

  4. Context-specific protection of TGFα null mice from osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, Shirine E.; Ulici, Veronica; Pest, Michael A.; Hill, Tracy L.; Welch, Ian D.; Beier, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) is a growth factor involved in osteoarthritis (OA). TGFα induces an OA-like phenotype in articular chondrocytes, by inhibiting matrix synthesis and promoting catabolic factor expression. To better understand TGFα’s potential as a therapeutic target, we employed two in vivo OA models: (1) post-traumatic and (2) aging related OA. Ten-week old and six-month old male Tgfa null mice and their heterozygous (control) littermates underwent destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Disease progression was assessed histologically using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. As well, spontaneous disease progression was analyzed in eighteen-month-old Tgfa null and heterozygous mice. Ten-week old Tgfa null mice were protected from OA progression at both seven and fourteen weeks post-surgery. No protection was seen however in six-month old null mice after DMM surgery, and no differences were observed between genotypes in the aging model. Thus, young Tgfa null mice are protected from OA progression in the DMM model, while older mice are not. In addition, Tgfa null mice are equally susceptible to spontaneous OA development during aging. Thus, TGFα might be a valuable therapeutic target in some post-traumatic forms of OA, however its role in idiopathic disease is less clear. PMID:27457421

  5. Measurement Via Optical Near-Nulling and Subaperture Stitching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, Greg; De Vries, Gary; Murphy, Paul; Brophy, Chris

    2012-01-01

    A subaperture stitching interferometer system provides near-nulling of a subaperture wavefront reflected from an object of interest over a portion of a surface of the object. A variable optical element located in the radiation path adjustably provides near-nulling to facilitate stitching of subaperture interferograms, creating an interferogram representative of the entire surface of interest. This enables testing of aspheric surfaces without null optics customized for each surface prescription. The surface shapes of objects such as lenses and other precision components are often measured with interferometry. However, interferometers have a limited capture range, and thus the test wavefront cannot be too different from the reference or the interference cannot be analyzed. Furthermore, the performance of the interferometer is usually best when the test and reference wavefronts are nearly identical (referred to as a null condition). Thus, it is necessary when performing such measurements to correct for known variations in shape to ensure that unintended variations are within the capture range of the interferometer and accurately measured. This invention is a system for nearnulling within a subaperture stitching interferometer, although in principle, the concept can be employed by wavefront measuring gauges other than interferometers. The system employs a light source for providing coherent radiation of a subaperture extent. An object of interest is placed to modify the radiation (e.g., to reflect or pass the radiation), and a variable optical element is located to interact with, and nearly null, the affected radiation. A detector or imaging device is situated to obtain interference patterns in the modified radiation. Multiple subaperture interferograms are taken and are stitched, or joined, to provide an interferogram representative of the entire surface of the object of interest. The primary aspect of the invention is the use of adjustable corrective optics in the

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes three flame test demonstrations including "Student-Presented Demonstrations on the Colors of Transition Metal Complexes,""A Flame Test Demonstration Device," and "Vivid Flame Tests." Preparation and procedures are discussed. Included in the first demonstration is an evaluation scheme for grading student demonstrations. (CW)

  7. Pharmacological targeting of VEGFR signaling with axitinib inhibits Tsc2-null lesion growth in the mouse model of lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

    PubMed

    Atochina-Vasserman, Elena N; Abramova, Elena; James, Melane L; Rue, Ryan; Liu, Amy Y; Ersumo, Nathan Tessema; Guo, Chang-Jiang; Gow, Andrew J; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2015-12-15

    Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), a rare progressive lung disease associated with mutations of the tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (Tsc2) tumor suppressor gene, manifests by neoplastic growth of LAM cells, induction of cystic lung destruction, and respiratory failure. LAM severity correlates with upregulation in serum of the prolymphangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor D (VEGF-D) that distinguishes LAM from other cystic diseases. The goals of our study was to determine whether Tsc2 deficiency upregulates VEGF-D, and whether axitinib, the Food and Drug Administration-approved small-molecule inhibitor of VEGF receptor (VEGFR) signaling, will reduce Tsc2-null lung lesion growth in a mouse model of LAM. Our data demonstrate upregulation of VEGF-D in the serum and lung lining in mice with Tsc2-null lesions. Progressive growth of Tsc2-null lesions induces recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells and increased nitric oxide production. Recruited cells isolated from the lung lining of mice with Tsc2-null lesions demonstrate upregulated expression of provasculogenic Vegfa, prolymphangiogenic Figf, and proinflammatory Nos2, Il6, and Ccl2 genes. Importantly, axitinib is an effective inhibitor of Tsc2-null lesion growth and inflammatory cell recruitment, which correlates with reduced VEGF-D levels in serum and lung lining. Our data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of VEGFR signaling with axitinib inhibits Tsc2-null lesion growth, attenuates recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells, and reduces VEGF-D levels systemically and in the lung lining. Our study suggests a potential therapeutic benefit of inhibition of VEGFR signaling for treatment of LAM.

  8. Common-path lateral-shearing nulling interferometry with a Savart plate for exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Naoshi; Baba, Naoshi

    2010-09-15

    We propose a common-path lateral-shearing nulling interferometer for direct detection of exoplanets. A Savart plate is placed between crossed polarizers to produce a lateral shear and realize fully achromatic and highly stable nulling interference for starlight. We construct a double-shearing interferometer using two Savart plates for implementing orthogonal x and y shears. A laboratory demonstration is carried out using a broadband light source with a bandwidth of Δλ/λ(0)=0.33 (Δλ=0.2 μm and λ(0)=0.6 μm). As a result, achieved extinction levels are 4 × 10(-4) at peak and 4 × 10(-7) at 10λ(0)/D(L) (D(L) is the diameter of a Lyot stop).

  9. Boosting the Power of the Sequence Kernel Association Test by Properly Estimating Its Null Distribution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai

    2016-07-01

    The sequence kernel association test (SKAT) is probably the most popular statistical test used in rare-variant association studies. Its null distribution involves unknown parameters that need to be estimated. The current estimation method has a valid type I error rate, but the power is compromised given that all subjects are used for estimation. I have developed an estimation method that uses only control subjects. Named SKAT+, this method uses the same test statistic as SKAT but differs in the way the null distribution is estimated. Extensive simulation studies and applications to data from the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 and the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study demonstrated that SKAT+ has superior power over SKAT while maintaining control over the type I error rate. This method is applicable to extensions of SKAT in the literature. PMID:27292111

  10. Common-path lateral-shearing nulling interferometry with a Savart plate for exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Naoshi; Baba, Naoshi

    2010-09-15

    We propose a common-path lateral-shearing nulling interferometer for direct detection of exoplanets. A Savart plate is placed between crossed polarizers to produce a lateral shear and realize fully achromatic and highly stable nulling interference for starlight. We construct a double-shearing interferometer using two Savart plates for implementing orthogonal x and y shears. A laboratory demonstration is carried out using a broadband light source with a bandwidth of Δλ/λ(0)=0.33 (Δλ=0.2 μm and λ(0)=0.6 μm). As a result, achieved extinction levels are 4 × 10(-4) at peak and 4 × 10(-7) at 10λ(0)/D(L) (D(L) is the diameter of a Lyot stop). PMID:20847759

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) partition coefficients; (2) Rutherford simulation experiment; and (3) demonstration of the powerful oxidizing property of dimanganeseheptoxide. Background information, materials needed, and procedures are provided for each demonstration. (JN)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations for chemical education. The activities include: (1) demonstration of vapor pressure; (2) a multicolored luminol-based chemiluminescence demonstration; and (3) a Charles's Law/Vapor pressure apparatus. (RH)

  13. Reflectance Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Presents a demonstration in which a mirror "disappears" upon rotation. The author has used the demonstration with students from fourth grade up through college. Suggestions are given for making the demonstration into a permanent hallway display. (MVL)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides procedures for demonstrations: (1) the ferrioxalate actinometer, which demonstrates a photochemical reaction; and (2) the silver mirror, which demonstrates the reduction of a metal salt to the metal and/or the reducing power of sugars. (CS)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This article details two demonstrations involving color changes. Included are "Manganese Color Reactions" and "Flame Colors Demonstration." Include a list of materials needed, procedures, cautions, and results. (CW)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information (including chemical reactions) and procedures used are provided for (1) three buffer demonstrations and (2) a demonstration of phase transfer catalysis and carbanion formation. (JN)

  17. Identification of null alleles and deletions from SNP genotypes for an intercross between domestic and wild chickens.

    PubMed

    Crooks, Lucy; Carlborg, Örjan; Marklund, Stefan; Johansson, Anna M

    2013-08-01

    We analyzed genotypes from ~10K single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two families of an F2 intercross between Red Junglefowl and White Leghorn chickens. Possible null alleles were found by patterns of incompatible and missing genotypes. We estimated that 2.6% of SNPs had null alleles compared with 2.3% with genotyping errors and that 40% of SNPs in which a parent and offspring were genotyped as different homozygotes had null alleles. Putative deletions were identified by null alleles at adjacent markers. We found two candidate deletions that were supported by fluorescence intensity data from a 60K SNP chip. One of the candidate deletions was from the Red Junglefowl, and one was present in both the Red Junglefowl and White Leghorn. Both candidate deletions spanned protein-coding regions and were close to a previously detected quantitative trait locus affecting body weight in this population. This study demonstrates that the ~50K SNP genotyping arrays now available for several agricultural species can be used to identify null alleles and deletions in data from large families. We suggest that our approach could be a useful complement to linkage analysis in experimental crosses. PMID:23708300

  18. Identification of null alleles and deletions from SNP genotypes for an intercross between domestic and wild chickens.

    PubMed

    Crooks, Lucy; Carlborg, Örjan; Marklund, Stefan; Johansson, Anna M

    2013-08-07

    We analyzed genotypes from ~10K single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two families of an F2 intercross between Red Junglefowl and White Leghorn chickens. Possible null alleles were found by patterns of incompatible and missing genotypes. We estimated that 2.6% of SNPs had null alleles compared with 2.3% with genotyping errors and that 40% of SNPs in which a parent and offspring were genotyped as different homozygotes had null alleles. Putative deletions were identified by null alleles at adjacent markers. We found two candidate deletions that were supported by fluorescence intensity data from a 60K SNP chip. One of the candidate deletions was from the Red Junglefowl, and one was present in both the Red Junglefowl and White Leghorn. Both candidate deletions spanned protein-coding regions and were close to a previously detected quantitative trait locus affecting body weight in this population. This study demonstrates that the ~50K SNP genotyping arrays now available for several agricultural species can be used to identify null alleles and deletions in data from large families. We suggest that our approach could be a useful complement to linkage analysis in experimental crosses.

  19. c-myc null cells misregulate cad and gadd45 but not other proposed c-Myc targets

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Andrew; Mateyak, Maria; Dugan, Kerri; Obaya, Alvaro; Adachi, Susumu; Sedivy, John; Cole, Michael

    1998-01-01

    We report here that the expression of virtually all proposed c-Myc target genes is unchanged in cells containing a homozygous null deletion of c-myc. Two noteworthy exceptions are the gene cad, which has reduced log phase expression and serum induction in c-myc null cells, and the growth arrest gene gadd45, which is derepressed by c-myc knockout. Thus, cad and gadd45 are the only proposed targets of c-Myc that may contribute to the dramatic slow growth phenotype of c-myc null cells. Our results demonstrate that a loss-of-function approach is critical for the evaluation of potential c-Myc target genes. PMID:9869632

  20. Precocious metamorphosis in the juvenile hormone-deficient mutant of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Daimon, Takaaki; Kozaki, Toshinori; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kobayashi, Isao; Furuta, Kenjiro; Namiki, Toshiki; Uchino, Keiro; Banno, Yutaka; Katsuma, Susumu; Tamura, Toshiki; Mita, Kazuei; Sezutsu, Hideki; Nakayama, Masayoshi; Itoyama, Kyo; Shimada, Toru; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2012-01-01

    Insect molting and metamorphosis are intricately governed by two hormones, ecdysteroids and juvenile hormones (JHs). JHs prevent precocious metamorphosis and allow the larva to undergo multiple rounds of molting until it attains the proper size for metamorphosis. In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, several "moltinism" mutations have been identified that exhibit variations in the number of larval molts; however, none of them have been characterized molecularly. Here we report the identification and characterization of the gene responsible for the dimolting (mod) mutant that undergoes precocious metamorphosis with fewer larval-larval molts. We show that the mod mutation results in complete loss of JHs in the larval hemolymph and that the mutant phenotype can be rescued by topical application of a JH analog. We performed positional cloning of mod and found a null mutation in the cytochrome P450 gene CYP15C1 in the mod allele. We also demonstrated that CYP15C1 is specifically expressed in the corpus allatum, an endocrine organ that synthesizes and secretes JHs. Furthermore, a biochemical experiment showed that CYP15C1 epoxidizes farnesoic acid to JH acid in a highly stereospecific manner. Precocious metamorphosis of mod larvae was rescued when the wild-type allele of CYP15C1 was expressed in transgenic mod larvae using the GAL4/UAS system. Our data therefore reveal that CYP15C1 is the gene responsible for the mod mutation and is essential for JH biosynthesis. Remarkably, precocious larval-pupal transition in mod larvae does not occur in the first or second instar, suggesting that authentic epoxidized JHs are not essential in very young larvae of B. mori. Our identification of a JH-deficient mutant in this model insect will lead to a greater understanding of the molecular basis of the hormonal control of development and metamorphosis.

  1. Precocious Metamorphosis in the Juvenile Hormone–Deficient Mutant of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Daimon, Takaaki; Kozaki, Toshinori; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kobayashi, Isao; Furuta, Kenjiro; Namiki, Toshiki; Uchino, Keiro; Banno, Yutaka; Katsuma, Susumu; Tamura, Toshiki; Mita, Kazuei; Sezutsu, Hideki; Nakayama, Masayoshi; Itoyama, Kyo; Shimada, Toru; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2012-01-01

    Insect molting and metamorphosis are intricately governed by two hormones, ecdysteroids and juvenile hormones (JHs). JHs prevent precocious metamorphosis and allow the larva to undergo multiple rounds of molting until it attains the proper size for metamorphosis. In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, several “moltinism” mutations have been identified that exhibit variations in the number of larval molts; however, none of them have been characterized molecularly. Here we report the identification and characterization of the gene responsible for the dimolting (mod) mutant that undergoes precocious metamorphosis with fewer larval–larval molts. We show that the mod mutation results in complete loss of JHs in the larval hemolymph and that the mutant phenotype can be rescued by topical application of a JH analog. We performed positional cloning of mod and found a null mutation in the cytochrome P450 gene CYP15C1 in the mod allele. We also demonstrated that CYP15C1 is specifically expressed in the corpus allatum, an endocrine organ that synthesizes and secretes JHs. Furthermore, a biochemical experiment showed that CYP15C1 epoxidizes farnesoic acid to JH acid in a highly stereospecific manner. Precocious metamorphosis of mod larvae was rescued when the wild-type allele of CYP15C1 was expressed in transgenic mod larvae using the GAL4/UAS system. Our data therefore reveal that CYP15C1 is the gene responsible for the mod mutation and is essential for JH biosynthesis. Remarkably, precocious larval–pupal transition in mod larvae does not occur in the first or second instar, suggesting that authentic epoxidized JHs are not essential in very young larvae of B. mori. Our identification of a JH–deficient mutant in this model insect will lead to a greater understanding of the molecular basis of the hormonal control of development and metamorphosis. PMID:22412378

  2. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Three demonstrations are described: paramagnetic properties of Fe(11) and Fe(111), the preparation of polyurethane foam: a lecture demonstration and the electrolysis of water-fuel cell reactions. A small discussion of the concepts demonstrated is included in each demonstration's description. (MR)

  3. Ballooning modes localized near the null point of a divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, W. A.

    2014-04-15

    The stability of ballooning modes localized to the null point in both the standard and snowflake divertors is considered. Ideal magnetohydrodynamics is used. A series expansion of the flux function is performed in the vicinity of the null point with the lowest, non-vanishing term retained for each divertor configuration. The energy principle is used with a trial function to determine a sufficient instability threshold. It is shown that this threshold depends on the orientation of the flux surfaces with respect to the major radius with a critical angle appearing due to the convergence of the field lines away from the null point. When the angle the major radius forms with respect to the flux surfaces exceeds this critical angle, the system is stabilized. Further, the scaling of the instability threshold with the aspect ratio and the ratio of the scrape-off-layer width to the major radius is shown. It is concluded that ballooning modes are not a likely candidate for driving convection in the vicinity of the null for parameters relevant to existing machines. However, the results place a lower bound on the width of the heat flux in the private flux region. To explain convective mixing in the vicinity of the null point, new consideration should be given to an axisymmetric mixing mode [W. A. Farmer and D. D. Ryutov, Phys. Plasmas 20, 092117 (2013)] as a possible candidate to explain current experimental results.

  4. Do Null Subjects (mis-)Trigger Pro-drop Grammars?

    PubMed

    Frazier, Lyn

    2015-12-01

    Native speakers of English regularly hear sentences without overt subjects. Nevertheless, they maintain a [−pro] grammar that requires sentences to have an overt subject. It is proposed that listeners of English recognize that speakers reduce predictable material and thus attribute null subjects to this process, rather than changing their grammars to a [−pro] setting. Mack et al. (J Memory Lang 67(1):211-223, 2012) showed that sentences with noise covering the subject are analyzed as having null subjects more often with a first person pronoun and with a present tense--properties correlated with more predictable referents--compared to a third person pronoun and past tense. However, those results might in principle have been due to reporting null subjects for verbs that often occur with null subjects. An experiment is reported here in which comparable results are found for sentences containing nonsense verbs. Participants preferred a null subject more often for first person present tense sentences than for third person past tense sentences. The results are as expected if participants are responding to predictability, the likelihood of reduction, rather than to lexical statistics. The results are argued to be important in removing a class of mis-triggering examples from the language acquisition problem.

  5. Visible Nulling Coronagraphy Testbed Development for Exoplanet Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Thompson, Patrick; Chen, Andrew; Petrone, Peter; Booth, Andrew; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew; Noecker, M. Charley; Kendrick, Stephen; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Three of the recently completed NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept (ASMC) studies addressed the feasibility of using a Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) as the prime instrument for exoplanet science. The VNC approach is one of the few approaches that works with filled, segmented and sparse or diluted aperture telescope systems and thus spans the space of potential ASMC exoplanet missions. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop VNC technologies and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance the this approach and the technologies associated with it. Herein we report on the continued development of the vacuum Visible Nulling Coronagraph testbed (VNT). The VNT is an ultra-stable vibration isolated testbed that operates under high bandwidth closed-loop control within a vacuum chamber. It will be used to achieve an incremental sequence of three visible light nulling milestones of sequentially higher contrasts of 10(exp 8) , 10(exp 9) and 10(exp 10) at an inner working angle of 2*lambda/D and ultimately culminate in spectrally broadband (>20%) high contrast imaging. Each of the milestones, one per year, is traceable to one or more of the ASMC studies. The VNT uses a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, modified with a modified "W" configuration to accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. Discussed will be the optical configuration laboratory results, critical technologies and the null sensing and control approach.

  6. Achromatic phase shifts utilizing dielectric plates for nulling interferometery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, R. M.; Burge, J. M.

    1998-12-01

    Schemes for detecting planets around other stars using interferometery have been developed which rely on a half wave phase delay to shift the central constructive fringe of an interferometer to a deep, destructive null fringe. To achieve the sensitivity and spectroscopy desired for exo-planets observations, such a null must be achromatic over a broad spectral region. One method for creating such a half wave phase delay achromatically involves the use of pairs of dielectric, plane parallel plates, analogous to the use of two types of glass in an achromatic lens. An analysis of the technique is presented with solutions using single plates to achieve null fringes to a cancellation of 10 exp -4 in the visible, near infrared, and mid infrared for null. Solutions using two matched materials show that nulls to a depth of 10 exp -6 are achievable in 2 um bands in the 7-17 um regime, or to a depth of 10 exp -5 over the entire 7-17 um band. Experimental results using a single plate of BK7 in the visible spectrum verify the technique.

  7. Do Null Subjects (mis-)Trigger Pro-drop Grammars?

    PubMed

    Frazier, Lyn

    2015-12-01

    Native speakers of English regularly hear sentences without overt subjects. Nevertheless, they maintain a [−pro] grammar that requires sentences to have an overt subject. It is proposed that listeners of English recognize that speakers reduce predictable material and thus attribute null subjects to this process, rather than changing their grammars to a [−pro] setting. Mack et al. (J Memory Lang 67(1):211-223, 2012) showed that sentences with noise covering the subject are analyzed as having null subjects more often with a first person pronoun and with a present tense--properties correlated with more predictable referents--compared to a third person pronoun and past tense. However, those results might in principle have been due to reporting null subjects for verbs that often occur with null subjects. An experiment is reported here in which comparable results are found for sentences containing nonsense verbs. Participants preferred a null subject more often for first person present tense sentences than for third person past tense sentences. The results are as expected if participants are responding to predictability, the likelihood of reduction, rather than to lexical statistics. The results are argued to be important in removing a class of mis-triggering examples from the language acquisition problem. PMID:25086703

  8. Lesion mimic mutants

    PubMed Central

    Moeder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade a substantial number of lesion mimic mutants (LMM) have been isolated and a growing number of the genes have been cloned. It is now becoming clear that these mutants are valuable tools to dissect various aspects of programmed cell death (PCD) and pathogen resistance pathways in plants. Together with other forward genetics approaches LMMs shed light on the PCD machinery in plant cells and revealed important roles for sphingolipids, Ca2+ and chloroplast-derived porphyrin-metabolites during cell death development. PMID:19513227

  9. Dissecting the cellular functions of plant microtubules using mutant tubulins.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    α- and β-tubulins, the building blocks of the microtubule (MT) polymer, are encoded by multiple genes that are largely functionally redundant in plants. Null tubulin mutants are thus phenotypically indistinguishable from the wild type, but miss-sense or deletion mutations of critical amino acid residues that are important for the assembly, stability, or dynamics of the polymer disrupt the proper organization and function of the resultant MT arrays. Mutant tubulins co-assemble with wild-type tubulins into mutant MTs with compromised functions, and thus mechanistically act as dominant-negative MT poisons. Cortical MT arrays in interphase plant cells are most sensitive to tubulin mutations, and are transformed into helical structures or random orientation, which produce twisted or radially swollen cells. Mutant plants resistant to MT-targeted herbicides may possess tubulin mutations at the binding sites of the herbicides. Tubulin mutants are valuable tools for investigating how individual MTs are organized into particular patterns in cortical arrays, and for defining the functional contribution of MTs to various MT-dependent or -assisted cellular processes in plant cells.

  10. Simulation of a Null ellipsometer and a modulating ellipsometer using Mathcad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Cynthia; Geerts, Wilhelmus

    2011-10-01

    We developed MathCad worksheets that demonstrate the working of a null Ellipsometer and a modulating Ellipsometer. The worksheet of the null ellipsometer begins with the definition of the Jones matrices for the polarizer, the quarter wave plate, the sample, and the analyzer, followed by calculations of the Jones vectors of the light reflecting of the sample and the light incident upon the detector. The optimum polarizer and analyzer angles that will null the light through the instrument are determined graphically or by two while-loops on the worksheet. Delta and Psi are calculated from those angles and compared to theoretical values. The worksheet for the modulating ellipsometer begins with the definition of the Jones matrices of the polarizer, the sample, the photo-elastic modulator, and the analyzer. From the Jones vector of the light incident upon the detector, the time dependence of the intensity is calculated. The lock-in amplifiers are employed by determining the 1st and 2nd harmonics of the intensity signal. Delta and Psi are calculated from those Fourier coefficients and compared with the values found from the Fresnel coefficients.

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for college level chemistry courses including: "Electrochemical Cells Using Sodium Silicate" and "A Simple, Vivid Demonstration of Selective Precipitation." Lists materials, preparation, procedures, and precautions. (CW)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) red cabbage and electrolysis of water to bring together acid/base and electrochemical concepts; and (2) a model to demonstrate acid/base conjugate pairs utilizing magnets. (SK)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Presents: (1) a simple demonstration which illustrates the driving force of entropy using the familiar effects of the negative thermal expansion coefficient of rubber; and (2) a demonstration of tetrahedral bonding using soap films. (CS)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations including a variation of the iodine clock reaction, and a simple demonstration of refractive index. The materials, procedures, and a discussion of probable results are given for each. (CW)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations; "Heat of Solution and Colligative Properties: An Illustration of Enthalpy and Entropy," and "A Vapor Pressure Demonstration." Included are lists of materials and experimental procedures. Apparatus needed are illustrated. (CW)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations; one on Boyle's Law, to illustrate the gas law and serve as a challenging problem for the students; the other is a modified Color Blind Traffic Light demonstration in which the oscillating reactions were speeded up. (GA)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides instructions on conducting four demonstrations for the chemistry classroom. Outlines procedures for demonstrations dealing with coupled oscillations, the evaporation of liquids, thioxanthone sulfone radical anion, and the control of variables and conservation of matter. (TW)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described which are suitable for introductory chemistry classes. The first involves the precipitation of silver, and the second is a demonstration of the relationship between rate constants and equilibrium constants using water and beakers. (BB)

  19. Phase closure nulling: results from the 2009 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvert, Gilles; Malbet, Fabien; Chelli, Alain; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Monnier, John D.; Schaefer, Gail H.

    2010-07-01

    We present here a new observational technique, Phase Closure Nulling (PCN), which has the potential to obtain very high contrast detection and spectroscopy of faint companions to bright stars. PCN consists in measuring closure phases of fully resolved objects with a baseline triplet where one of the baselines crosses a null of the object visibility function. For scenes dominated by the presence of a stellar disk, the correlated flux of the star around nulls is essentially canceled out, and in these regions the signature of fainter, unresolved, scene object(s) dominates the imaginary part of the visibility in particular the closure phase. We present here the basics of the PCN method, the initial proof-of-concept observation, the envisioned science cases and report about the first observing campaign made on VLTI/AMBER and CHARA/MIRC using this technique.

  20. Null-steering techniques for application to large array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockham, G. A.; Cho, C.; Parr, J. C.; Wolfson, R. I.

    A multimode waveguide can be employed to design an antenna which produces a beam for each propagating mode. A dual-beam waveguide slot array is particularly attractive. The antenna is compact, highly efficient, and has lower sidelobe-level performance than can be achieved with conventional monopulse techniques. Adaptive phase steering for jammer nulling is considered, taking into account a large phased array using a series feed system. The considered configuration was selected for computer simulation. A description is presented of a multiple beam antenna with independent steerable nulls. The multiple beam low-sidelobe antenna configuration has the ability to provide a radiation pattern with multiple and independently-located nulls, with minimal effect on the sidelobes of the unperturbed pattern.

  1. Null but not void: considerations for hypothesis testing.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Pamela A; Proschan, Michael A

    2013-01-30

    Standard statistical theory teaches us that once the null and alternative hypotheses have been defined for a parameter, the choice of the statistical test is clear. Standard theory does not teach us how to choose the null or alternative hypothesis appropriate to the scientific question of interest. Neither does it tell us that in some cases, depending on which alternatives are realistic, we may want to define our null hypothesis differently. Problems in statistical practice are frequently not as pristinely summarized as the classic theory in our textbooks. In this article, we present examples in statistical hypothesis testing in which seemingly simple choices are in fact rich with nuance that, when given full consideration, make the choice of the right hypothesis test much less straightforward. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:22807023

  2. A linear voltage-tunable distributed null device.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, H. F.; Mattauch, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A linear voltage-tunable null device was predicted, fabricated, and tested. This filter is conceptually a distributed parameter RC representation of the channel of a MOSFET in a network configuration with a second MOSFET that is treated as a variable resistor. Classical transmission-line theory is used to predict a linear tuning curve with applied bias for the device. This concept was used to design a null device having a null that is linearly tunable in the range of 100 kHz. Such devices were fabricated and tested. Typical MOS processing steps were used and the resulting structures are compatible with the planar technology. The compatibility leads towards extension of this work to different frequency ranges for other specific applications.

  3. Unicorns do exist: a tutorial on "proving" the null hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Streiner, David L

    2003-12-01

    Introductory statistics classes teach us that we can never prove the null hypothesis; all we can do is reject or fail to reject it. However, there are times when it is necessary to try to prove the nonexistence of a difference between groups. This most often happens within the context of comparing a new treatment against an established one and showing that the new intervention is not inferior to the standard. This article first outlines the logic of "noninferiority" testing by differentiating between the null hypothesis (that which we are trying to nullify) and the "nill" hypothesis (there is no difference), reversing the role of the null and alternate hypotheses, and defining an interval within which groups are said to be equivalent. We then work through an example and show how to calculate sample sizes for noninferiority studies. PMID:14733457

  4. Functional Prestin Transduction of Immature Outer Hair Cells from Normal and Prestin-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Anping; Wooltorton, Julian R.A.; Palmer, Donna J.; Ng, Philip; Pereira, Fred A.; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2008-01-01

    Prestin is a membrane protein in the outer hair cell (OHC) that has been shown to be essential for electromotility. OHCs from prestin-null mice do not express prestin, do not have a nonlinear capacitance (the electrical signature of electromotility), and are smaller in size than wild-type OHCs. We sought to determine whether prestin-null OHCs can be transduced to incorporate functional prestin protein in a normal fashion. A recombinant helper-dependent adenovirus expressing prestin and green fluorescent protein (HDAd–prestin–GFP) was created and tested in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK cells). Transduced HEK cells demonstrated membrane expression of prestin and nonlinear capacitance. HDAd–prestin–GFP was then applied to cochlear sensory epithelium explants harvested from wild-type and prestin-null mice at postnatal days 2–3, the age at which native prestin is just beginning to become functional in wild-type mice. At postnatal days 4–5, we investigated transduced OHCs for (1) their prestin expression pattern as revealed by immunofluorescence; (2) their cell surface area as measured by linear capacitance; and (3) their prestin function as indicated by nonlinear capacitance. HDAd–prestin–GFP efficiently transduced OHCs of both genotypes and prestin protein localized to the plasma membrane. Whole-cell voltage clamp studies revealed a nonlinear capacitance in transduced wild-type and prestin-null OHCs, but not in non-transduced cells of either genotype. Prestin transduction did not increase the linear capacitance (cell surface area) for either genotype. In peak nonlinear capacitance, voltage at peak nonlinear capacitance, charge density of the nonlinear capacitance, and shape of the voltage-capacitance curves, the transduced cells of the two genotypes resembled each other and previously reported data from adult wild-type mouse OHCs. Thus, prestin introduced into prestin-deficient OHCs segregates normally to the cell membrane and generates a normal

  5. Influence of near null magnetic field on in vitro growth of potato and wild Solanum species.

    PubMed

    Rakosy-Tican, Lenuta; Aurori, C M; Morariu, V V

    2005-10-01

    The influence of near null magnetic field on in vitro growth of different cultures of potato and related Solanum species was investigated for various exposure times and dates. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Désirée) in vitro cultures of shoot tips or nodal segments were used. Three different exposure periods revealed either stimulation or inhibition of root, stem, or leaf in vitro growth after 14 or 28 days of exposure. In one experiment the significant stimulation of leaf growth was also demonstrated at biochemical level, the quantity of chlorophyll a and b and carotenoids increasing more than two-fold. For the wild species Solanum chacoense, S. microdontum, and S. verrucosum, standardized in vitro cultures of nodal stem segments were used. Root and stem growth was either stimulated or slightly inhibited after 9 days exposure to near null magnetic field. Callus cultures obtained from potato dihaploid line 120/19 were maintained in near null magnetic field in 2 different months. For these experiments as well as for Solanum verrucosum, callus cultures recorded either slight inhibition or no effect on fresh weight. For all experiments significant growth variation was brought about only when geomagnetic activity (AP index) showed variations at the beginning of in vitro growth and when the explant had at least one meristematic tissue. Moreover longer maintenance in near null magnetic field, 28 days as compared to 14 days or the controls, can also make a difference in plant growth in response to geomagnetic field variations when static component was reduced to zero value. These results of in vitro plant growth stimulation by variable component of geomagnetic field also sustain the so-called seasonal "window" effect.

  6. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a demonstration involving the controlled combustion of a mixture of metals with black and smokeless powder in a small Erlenmeyer flask. Also describes demonstrations using a device that precludes breathing of hazardous vapors during class demonstrations; the device is easy to transport and use in rooms without sinks. (JN)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations used in laboratory chemistry courses. Discusses a "pH-activated" display used to chemically and visually supplement lecture demonstrations. Outlines another demonstration designed to show that copper(II) chloride is made of two ions, blue and yellow, which are combined to produce green. (TW)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two classroom chemistry demonstrations which focus on the descriptive chemistry of bromine and iodine. Outlines the chemicals and equipment needed, experimental procedures, and discussion of one demonstration of the oxidation states of bromine and iodine, and another demonstration of the oxidation states of iodine. (TW)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    List of materials needed, procedures used, and results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first is an inexpensive and quick method for demonstrating column chromatography of plant pigments of spinach extract. The second is a demonstration of cathodic protection by impressed current. (JN)

  12. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice.

    PubMed

    Soenjaya, Y; Foster, B L; Nociti, F H; Ao, M; Holdsworth, D W; Hunter, G K; Somerman, M J; Goldberg, H A

    2015-09-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp(-/-)) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp(-/-) mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp(-/-) mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp(-/-) and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro-computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp(-/-) mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp(-/-) mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp(-/-) mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp(-/-) mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp(-/-) mice. Bsp(-/-) incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the

  13. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Soenjaya, Y.; Foster, B.L.; Nociti, F.H.; Ao, M.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Hunter, G.K.; Somerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp-/-) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp-/- mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp-/- and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro–computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp-/- mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp-/- mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp-/- mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp-/- mice. Bsp-/- incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the importance of BSP

  14. Magnetoacoustic Waves in Stratified Atmospheres with a Magnetic Null Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarr, Lucas A.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James E.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic fields strongly modify the propagation of MHD waves from the photosphere to the low corona, as can be shown exactly for the most simple case of a uniform magnetic field and isothermally stratrified atmosphere. For slightly more realistic scenarios, where both the atmospheric parameters and the magnetic field vary spatially, the linear MHD equations typically cannot be solved analytically. We use the Lagrangian Remap code--a nonlinear, shock-capturing MHD code--to study the propagation of initially acoustic wavepackets through a model 2D atmosphere that includes a gravitationally stratified chromosphere, transition region, and low corona. The magnetic field is formed by three photospheric concentrations and includes a single magnetic null point, resulting in an inhomogeneous system with a magnetic dome topology. A portion of an introduced wavepacket will refract toward the null due to the varying Alfven speed. Waves incident on the equipartition contour surrounding the null, where the sound and Alfven speeds coincide, partially transmit, reflect, and mode convert between branches of the local dispersion relation. Outward propagating slow modes generated during conversion become strongly concentrated along the set of field lines passing near the null. Acoustic energy is beamed back downwards towards each photospheric foot point, and upwards along one separatrix that exits the top of the numerical domain. Changes in the dominant restoring force for the wavepacket, between the Lorentz and pressure gradient forces, lead to a buildup of current density along topologically important features of the system (the null point and its four separatrices) and can drive reconnection at the null point itself. Ohmic dissipation of the currents locally heats the plasma. We find that the amount of current accumulation depends on where the centroid of a wavepacket initial crosses the photosphere, but does not simply coincide with regions of open versus closed magnetic field or

  15. Interpreting null findings from trials of alcohol brief interventions.

    PubMed

    Heather, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of alcohol brief intervention (ABI) has been established by a succession of meta-analyses but, because the effects of ABI are small, null findings from randomized controlled trials are often reported and can sometimes lead to skepticism regarding the benefits of ABI in routine practice. This article first explains why null findings are likely to occur under null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) due to the phenomenon known as "the dance of the p-values." A number of misconceptions about null findings are then described, using as an example the way in which the results of the primary care arm of a recent cluster-randomized trial of ABI in England (the SIPS project) have been misunderstood. These misinterpretations include the fallacy of "proving the null hypothesis" that lack of a significant difference between the means of sample groups can be taken as evidence of no difference between their population means, and the possible effects of this and related misunderstandings of the SIPS findings are examined. The mistaken inference that reductions in alcohol consumption seen in control groups from baseline to follow-up are evidence of real effects of control group procedures is then discussed and other possible reasons for such reductions, including regression to the mean, research participation effects, historical trends, and assessment reactivity, are described. From the standpoint of scientific progress, the chief problem about null findings under the conventional NHST approach is that it is not possible to distinguish "evidence of absence" from "absence of evidence." By contrast, under a Bayesian approach, such a distinction is possible and it is explained how this approach could classify ABIs in particular settings or among particular populations as either truly ineffective or as of unknown effectiveness, thus accelerating progress in the field of ABI research.

  16. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  17. Phenotypic Characterization of Mice Heterozygous for a Null Mutation of Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liqun; Picker, Jonathan D.; Schaevitz, Laura R.; Tsai, Guochuan; Feng, Jiamin; Jiang, Zhichun; Chu, Hillary C.; Basu, Alo C.; Berger-Sweeney, Joanne; Coyle, Joseph T.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. Disturbed glutamate signaling resulting in hypofunction of NMDA receptors has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II (GCP II) hydrolyzes N-acetyl-alpha L-aspartyl-L-glutamate (NAAG) into glutamate and N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA). NAAG is a neuropeptide that is an NMDA receptor antagonist as well as an agonist for the metabotropic glutamate receptor-3 (mGluR3), which inhibits glutamate release. The aggregate effect of NAAG is thus to attenuate NMDA receptor activation. To manipulate the expression of GCP II, loxP sites were inserted flanking exon 1 and 2, which were excised by crossing with a Cre-expressing mouse. The mice heterozygous for this deletion showed a 50% reduction in the expression level of protein and functional activity of GCP II in brain samples. Heterozygous mutant crosses did not yield any homozygous null animals at birth or as embryos (N >200 live births and fetuses). These data are consistent with the previous report that GCP II homozygous mutant mice generated by removing exons 9 and 10 of GCP II gene were embryonically lethal and confirm our hypothesis that GCP II plays an essential role early in embryonic development. Heterozygous mice, however, developed normally to adulthood and exhibited increased locomotor activity, reduced social interaction, and a subtle cognitive deficit in working memory. PMID:19347959

  18. GST M1-T1 null allele frequency patterns in geographically assorted human populations: a phylogenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Kasthurinaidu, Senthilkumar Pitchalu; Ramasamy, Thirumurugan; Ayyavoo, Jayachitra; Dave, Dhvani Kirtikumar; Adroja, Divya Anantray

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity in drug metabolism and disposition is mainly considered as the outcome of the inter-individual genetic variation in polymorphism of drug-xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME). Among the XMEs, glutathione-S-transferases (GST) gene loci are an important candidate for the investigation of diversity in allele frequency, as the deletion mutations in GST M1 and T1 genotypes are associated with various cancers and genetic disorders of all major Population Affiliations (PAs). Therefore, the present population based phylogenetic study was focused to uncover the frequency distribution pattern in GST M1 and T1 null genotypes among 45 Geographically Assorted Human Populations (GAHPs). The frequency distribution pattern for GST M1 and T1 null alleles have been detected in this study using the data derived from literatures representing 44 populations affiliated to Africa, Asia, Europe, South America and the genome of PA from Gujarat, a region in western India. Allele frequency counting for Gujarat PA and scattered plot analysis for geographical distribution among the PAs were performed in SPSS-21. The GST M1 and GST T1 null allele frequencies patterns of the PAs were computed in Seqboot, Gendist program of Phylip software package (3.69 versions) and Unweighted Pair Group method with Arithmetic Mean in Mega-6 software. Allele frequencies from South African Xhosa tribe, East African Zimbabwe, East African Ethiopia, North African Egypt, Caucasian, South Asian Afghanistan and South Indian Andhra Pradesh have been identified as the probable seven patterns among the 45 GAHPs investigated in this study for GST M1-T1 null genotypes. The patternized null allele frequencies demonstrated in this study for the first time addresses the missing link in GST M1-T1 null allele frequencies among GAHPs.

  19. Identification of a subtype-specific ENC1 gene related to invasiveness in human pituitary null cell adenoma and oncocytomas.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Hong, Lichuan; Wu, Yonggang; Li, Chuzhong; Wan, Hong; Li, Guilin; Sun, Yilin; Yu, Shenyuan; Chittiboina, Prashant; Montgomery, Blake; Zhuang, Zhengping; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2014-09-01

    Non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) may be locally invasive. Surgery is a treatment option, but unlike the case for functional pituitary adenomas, there are almost no drug treatments available for NFPAs. Markers of invasiveness are needed to guide therapeutic decision-making and identify potential adjuvant drugs. Owing to the highly heterogeneous nature of NFPAs, little is known regarding the subtype-specific gene expression profiles associated with invasiveness. To identify important biomarkers of invasiveness, we selected 23 null cell adenomas and 20 oncocytomas. These tumors were classified as invasive or non-invasive adenomas based on magnetic resonance imaging, pathology slides and surgical findings. Firstly, we observed that there were significant differences in expression between invasive (n = 3) and non-invasive (n = 4) adenomas by gene expression microarray. A total of 1,188 genes were differentially expressed in the invasive and non-invasive adenomas. Among these 1,188 genes, 578 were upregulated and 610 were downregulated in invasive adenomas. Secondly, the expression of ENC1, which displayed the significant alterations, was further confirmed by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis in all 43 tumor samples and three normal pituitary glands. Low levels of ENC1 were found in tumor samples, while high levels were detected in normal pituitary glands. Interestingly, the ENC1 expression level was low in invasive null cell adenomas compared with non-invasive adenomas, but this relationship was not observed in invasive oncocytomas. Immunohistochemistry also demonstrated that the staining of ENC1 was different between invasive and non-invasive null cell adenomas. In addition, bioinformatics studies, including gene ontology and protein interaction analyses, were also performed to better understand the critical role of ENC1 in the development and progression of null cell adenomas and oncocytomas. Consequently, ENC1 may be an important biomarker for null cell

  20. Identification of a subtype-specific ENC1 gene related to invasiveness in human pituitary null cell adenoma and oncocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jie; Hong, Lichuan; Wu, Yonggang; Li, Chuzhong; Wan, Hong; Li, Guilin; Sun, Yilin; Yu, Shenyuan; Chittiboina, Prashant; Montgomery, Blake; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) may be locally invasive. Surgery is a treatment option, but unlike the case for functional pituitary adenomas, there are almost no drug treatments available for NFPAs. Markers of invasiveness are needed to guide therapeutic decision-making and identify potential adjuvant drugs. Owing to the highly heterogeneous nature of NFPAs, little is known regarding the subtype-specific gene expression profiles associated with invasiveness. To identify important biomarkers of invasiveness, we selected 23 null cell adenomas and 20 oncocytomas. These tumors were classified as invasive or non-invasive adenomas based on magnetic resonance imaging, pathology slides and surgical findings. Firstly, we observed that there were significant differences in expression between invasive (n = 3) and non-invasive (n = 4) adenomas by gene expression microarray. A total of 1,188 genes were differentially expressed in the invasive and non-invasive adenomas. Among these 1,188 genes, 578 were upregulated and 610 were downregulated in invasive adenomas. Secondly, the expression of ENC1, which displayed the significant alterations, was further confirmed by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis in all 43 tumor samples and three normal pituitary glands. Low levels of ENC1 were found in tumor samples, while high levels were detected in normal pituitary glands. Interestingly, the ENC1 expression level was low in invasive null cell adenomas compared with non-invasive adenomas, but this relationship was not observed in invasive oncocytomas. Immunohistochemistry also demonstrated that the staining of ENC1 was different between invasive and non-invasive null cell adenomas. In addition, bioinformatics studies, including gene ontology and protein interaction analyses, were also performed to better understand the critical role of ENC1 in the development and progression of null cell adenomas and oncocytomas. Consequently, ENC1 may be an important biomarker for null cell

  1. GST M1-T1 null Allele Frequency Patterns in Geographically Assorted Human Populations: A Phylogenetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Thirumurugan; Ayyavoo, Jayachitra

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity in drug metabolism and disposition is mainly considered as the outcome of the inter-individual genetic variation in polymorphism of drug-xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME). Among the XMEs, glutathione-S-transferases (GST) gene loci are an important candidate for the investigation of diversity in allele frequency, as the deletion mutations in GST M1 and T1 genotypes are associated with various cancers and genetic disorders of all major Population Affiliations (PAs). Therefore, the present population based phylogenetic study was focused to uncover the frequency distribution pattern in GST M1 and T1 null genotypes among 45 Geographically Assorted Human Populations (GAHPs). The frequency distribution pattern for GST M1 and T1 null alleles have been detected in this study using the data derived from literatures representing 44 populations affiliated to Africa, Asia, Europe, South America and the genome of PA from Gujarat, a region in western India. Allele frequency counting for Gujarat PA and scattered plot analysis for geographical distribution among the PAs were performed in SPSS-21. The GST M1 and GST T1 null allele frequencies patterns of the PAs were computed in Seqboot, Gendist program of Phylip software package (3.69 versions) and Unweighted Pair Group method with Arithmetic Mean in Mega-6 software. Allele frequencies from South African Xhosa tribe, East African Zimbabwe, East African Ethiopia, North African Egypt, Caucasian, South Asian Afghanistan and South Indian Andhra Pradesh have been identified as the probable seven patterns among the 45 GAHPs investigated in this study for GST M1-T1 null genotypes. The patternized null allele frequencies demonstrated in this study for the first time addresses the missing link in GST M1-T1 null allele frequencies among GAHPs. PMID:25867025

  2. GST M1-T1 null allele frequency patterns in geographically assorted human populations: a phylogenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Kasthurinaidu, Senthilkumar Pitchalu; Ramasamy, Thirumurugan; Ayyavoo, Jayachitra; Dave, Dhvani Kirtikumar; Adroja, Divya Anantray

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity in drug metabolism and disposition is mainly considered as the outcome of the inter-individual genetic variation in polymorphism of drug-xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME). Among the XMEs, glutathione-S-transferases (GST) gene loci are an important candidate for the investigation of diversity in allele frequency, as the deletion mutations in GST M1 and T1 genotypes are associated with various cancers and genetic disorders of all major Population Affiliations (PAs). Therefore, the present population based phylogenetic study was focused to uncover the frequency distribution pattern in GST M1 and T1 null genotypes among 45 Geographically Assorted Human Populations (GAHPs). The frequency distribution pattern for GST M1 and T1 null alleles have been detected in this study using the data derived from literatures representing 44 populations affiliated to Africa, Asia, Europe, South America and the genome of PA from Gujarat, a region in western India. Allele frequency counting for Gujarat PA and scattered plot analysis for geographical distribution among the PAs were performed in SPSS-21. The GST M1 and GST T1 null allele frequencies patterns of the PAs were computed in Seqboot, Gendist program of Phylip software package (3.69 versions) and Unweighted Pair Group method with Arithmetic Mean in Mega-6 software. Allele frequencies from South African Xhosa tribe, East African Zimbabwe, East African Ethiopia, North African Egypt, Caucasian, South Asian Afghanistan and South Indian Andhra Pradesh have been identified as the probable seven patterns among the 45 GAHPs investigated in this study for GST M1-T1 null genotypes. The patternized null allele frequencies demonstrated in this study for the first time addresses the missing link in GST M1-T1 null allele frequencies among GAHPs. PMID:25867025

  3. Collagen VI deficiency reduces muscle pathology, but does not improve muscle function, in the γ-sarcoglycan-null mouse

    PubMed Central

    de Greef, Jessica C.; Hamlyn, Rebecca; Jensen, Braden S.; O'Campo Landa, Raul; Levy, Jennifer R.; Kobuke, Kazuhiro; Campbell, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and dystrophic muscle exhibits degeneration and regeneration of muscle cells, inflammation and fibrosis. Skeletal muscle fibrosis is an excessive deposition of components of the extracellular matrix including an accumulation of Collagen VI. We hypothesized that a reduction of Collagen VI in a muscular dystrophy model that presents with fibrosis would result in reduced muscle pathology and improved muscle function. To test this hypothesis, we crossed γ-sarcoglycan-null mice, a model of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C, with a Col6a2-deficient mouse model. We found that the resulting γ-sarcoglycan-null/Col6a2Δex5 mice indeed exhibit reduced muscle pathology compared with γ-sarcoglycan-null mice. Specifically, fewer muscle fibers are degenerating, fiber size varies less, Evans blue dye uptake is reduced and serum creatine kinase levels are lower. Surprisingly, in spite of this reduction in muscle pathology, muscle function is not significantly improved. In fact, grip strength and maximum isometric tetanic force are even lower in γ-sarcoglycan-null/Col6a2Δex5 mice than in γ-sarcoglycan-null mice. In conclusion, our results reveal that Collagen VI-mediated fibrosis contributes to skeletal muscle pathology in γ-sarcoglycan-null mice. Importantly, however, our data also demonstrate that a reduction in skeletal muscle pathology does not necessarily lead to an improvement of skeletal muscle function, and this should be considered in future translational studies. PMID:26908621

  4. Mutant human torsinA, responsible for early-onset dystonia, dominantly suppresses GTPCH expression, dopamine levels and locomotion in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi-Ito, Noriko; Ajjuri, Rami R.; Henderson, Benjamin W.; Doherty, Olugbenga M.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; O'Donnell, Janis M.; Ito, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia represents the third most common movement disorder in humans with over 20 genetic loci identified. TOR1A (DYT1), the gene responsible for the most common primary hereditary dystonia, encodes torsinA, an AAA ATPase family protein. Most cases of DYT1 dystonia are caused by a 3 bp (ΔGAG) deletion that results in the loss of a glutamic acid residue (ΔE302/303) in the carboxyl terminal region of torsinA. This torsinAΔE mutant protein has been speculated to act in a dominant-negative manner to decrease activity of wild type torsinA. Drosophila melanogaster has a single torsin-related gene, dtorsin. Null mutants of dtorsin exhibited locomotion defects in third instar larvae. Levels of dopamine and GTP cyclohydrolase (GTPCH) proteins were severely reduced in dtorsin-null brains. Further, the locomotion defect was rescued by the expression of human torsinA or feeding with dopamine. Here, we demonstrate that human torsinAΔE dominantly inhibited locomotion in larvae and adults when expressed in neurons using a pan-neuronal promoter Elav. Dopamine and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) levels were significantly reduced in larval brains and the expression level of GTPCH protein was severely impaired in adult and larval brains. When human torsinA and torsinAΔE were co-expressed in neurons in dtorsin-null larvae and adults, the locomotion rates and the expression levels of GTPCH protein were severely reduced. These results support the hypothesis that torsinAΔE inhibits wild type torsinA activity. Similarly, neuronal expression of a Drosophila DtorsinΔE equivalent mutation dominantly inhibited larval locomotion and GTPCH protein expression. These results indicate that both torsinAΔE and DtorsinΔE act in a dominant-negative manner. We also demonstrate that Dtorsin regulates GTPCH expression at the post-transcriptional level. This Drosophila model of DYT1 dystonia provides an important tool for studying the differences in the molecular function between the wild type and the

  5. Rapamycin requires AMPK activity and p27 expression for promoting autophagy-dependent Tsc2-null cell survival.

    PubMed

    Campos, Tania; Ziehe, Javiera; Fuentes-Villalobos, Francisco; Riquelme, Orlando; Peña, Daniela; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Lavandero, Sergio; Morin, Violeta; Pincheira, Roxana; Castro, Ariel F

    2016-06-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) disease results from inactivation of the TSC1 or TSC2 gene, and is characterized by benign tumors in several organs. Because TSC tumorigenesis correlates with hyperactivation of mTORC1, current therapies focus on mTORC1 inhibition with rapamycin or its analogs. Rapamycin-induced tumor shrinkage has been reported, but tumor recurrence occurs on withdrawal from rapamycin. Autophagy has been associated with development of TSC tumors and with tumor cell survival during rapamycin treatment. mTORC1 and AMPK directly inhibit and activate autophagy, respectively. AMPK is hyperactivated in TSC cells and tumors, and drives cytoplasmic sequestration of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27KIP (p27). Whether AMPK and p27 are involved in rapamycin-induced autophagy and survival of TSC cells remain unexplored. Here, we show that inhibition of AMPK by compound C or by shRNA-mediated depletion of LKB1 reduces activation of autophagy by rapamycin in Tsc2-null cells. Similarly, shRNA-mediated depletion of p27 inhibited rapamycin-induced autophagy. In support of p27 lying downstream of AMPK on the activation of autophagy in Tsc2-null cells, a p27 mutant that preferentially localizes in the cytosol recovered the effect of rapamycin on autophagy in both p27- and LKB1-depleted cells, but a nuclear p27 mutant was inactive. Finally, we show that p27-dependent activation of autophagy is involved in Tsc2-null cell survival under rapamycin treatment. These results indicate that an AMPK/p27 axis is promoting a survival mechanism that could explain in part the relapse of TSC tumors treated with rapamycin, exposing new avenues for designing more efficient treatments for TSC patients. PMID:26975583

  6. Constitutive Androgen Receptor-Null Mice Are Sensitive to the Toxic Effects of Parathion: Association with Reduced Cytochrome P450-Mediated Parathion MetabolismS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Linda C.; Hernandez, Juan P.

    2010-01-01

    Constitutive androgen receptor (CAR) is activated by several chemicals and in turn regulates multiple detoxification genes. Our research demonstrates that parathion is one of the most potent, environmentally relevant CAR activators with an EC50 of 1.43 μM. Therefore, animal studies were conducted to determine whether CAR was activated by parathion in vivo. Surprisingly, CAR-null mice, but not wild-type (WT) mice, showed significant parathion-induced toxicity. However, parathion did not induce Cyp2b expression, suggesting that parathion is not a CAR activator in vivo, presumably because of its short half-life. CAR expression is also associated with the expression of several drug-metabolizing cytochromes P450 (P450). CAR-null mice demonstrate lower expression of Cyp2b9, Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, and Cyp3a11 primarily, but not exclusively in males. Therefore, we incubated microsomes from untreated WT and CAR-null mice with parathion in the presence of esterase inhibitors to determine whether CAR-null mice show perturbed P450-mediated parathion metabolism compared with that in WT mice. The metabolism of parathion to paraoxon and p-nitrophenol (PNP) was reduced in CAR-null mice with male CAR-null mice showing reduced production of both paraoxon and PNP, and female CAR-null mice showing reduced production of only PNP. Overall, the data indicate that CAR-null mice metabolize parathion slower than WT mice. These results provide a potential mechanism for increased sensitivity of individuals with lower CAR activity such as newborns to parathion and potentially other chemicals due to decreased metabolic capacity. PMID:20573718

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides three descriptions of demonstrations used in various chemistry courses. Includes the use of a simple demonstration model to illustrate principles of chromatography, techniques for using balloons to teach about the behavior of gases, and the use of small concentrations of synthetic polyelectrolytes to induce the flocculation hydrophobic…

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations: "The Construction and Use of Commercial Voltaic Cell Displays in Freshman Chemistry"; Dramatizing Isotopes: Deuterated Ice Cubes Sink"; and "A Simple Apparatus to Demonstrate Differing Gas Diffusion Rates (Graham's Law)." Materials, procedures, and safety considerations are discussed. (CW)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a demonstration utilized to measure the heat of vaporization using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Explained is that when measurement is made as part of a demonstration, it raises student's consciousness that chemistry is experimentally based. (Author/DS)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) modification of copper catalysis demonstration apparatus; (2) experiments in gas-liquid chromatography with simple gas chromatography at room temperature; and (3) equilibria in silver arsenate-arsenic acid and silver phosphate-phosphoric acid systems. Procedures and materials needed are provided.…

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two chemistry demonstrations: (1) an alternative method for the demonstration of the properties of alkali metals, water is added to small amounts of metal; (2) an exploration of the properties of hydrogen, helium, propane, and carbon dioxide using an open trough and candle. (MVL)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Described are demonstrations designed to reveal the important "nonsolvent" properties of water through its interaction with a toy called "Magic Sand" and other synthetic silica derivatives, especially those bonded with organic moities. The procedures for seven demonstrations along with a discussion of the effects are presented. (CW)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a variant of preparing purple benzene by phase transfer catalysis with quaternary ammonium salts and potassium permanganate in which crown ethers are used; (2) a corridor or "hallway" demonstration in which unknown molecular models are displayed and prizes awarded to students correctly identifying the…

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration of a solid state phase transition using a thermodynamic material which changes state at room temperature. Also describes a demonstration on kinetics using a "Big Bang" (trade mark) calcium carbide cannon. Indicates that the cannon is safe to use. (JN)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Provides directions for setup and performance of two demonstrations. The first demonstrates the principles of Raoult's Law; using a simple apparatus designed to measure vapor pressure. The second illustrates the energy available from alcohol combustion (includes safety precautions) using an alcohol-fueled missile. (JM)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations for classroom use related to precipitation of ferrous hydroxide and to variation of vapor pressure with temperature. The former demonstration is simple and useful when discussing solubility of ionic compounds electrode potential of transition elements, and mixed valence compounds. (Author/SA)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  20. Complete Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yelon, Stephen; Maddocks, Peg

    1986-01-01

    Describes four-step approach to educational demonstration: tell learners they will have to perform; what they should notice; describe each step before doing it; and require memorization of steps. Examples illustrate use of this process to demonstrate a general mental strategy, and industrial design, supervisory, fine motor, and specific…

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a second part to the dichromate volcano demonstration. The green ash produced during the demonstration is reduced to metal using aluminothermy (Goldschmide process). Also describes suitable light sources and spectroscopes for student observation of emission spectra in lecture halls. (JN)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations designed to help chemistry students visualize certain chemical properties. One experiment uses balloons to illustrate the behavior of gases under varying temperatures and pressures. The other uses a makeshift pea shooter and a commercial model to demonstrate atomic structure and the behavior of high-speed particles.…

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Provided are two demonstrations for an introductory course in chemistry. The first one emphasizes the observation and the interpretation of facts to form hypotheses during the heating of a beaker of water. The second demonstration shows the liquid phase of carbon dioxide using dry ice and a pressure gauge. (YP)

  5. The Dual Status of the Null Object in Chinese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qu, Yanfeng

    1994-01-01

    This paper investigates the status of the null object in Mandarin Chinese. It proposes that if an object is topicalized, the empty category in the object position should be analyzed as a variable. If it is not topicalized, it is a "pro." It is argued that a pro resembles an overt pronoun in obeying Condition B, but differs from the latter in being…

  6. Circumpulsar Asteroids: Inferences from Nulling Statistics and High Energy Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Cordes, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    We have proposed that some classes of radio pulsar variability are associated with the entry of neutral asteroidal material into the pulsar magnetosphere. The region surrounding neutron stars is polluted with supernova fall-back material, which collapses and condenses into an asteroid-bearing disk that is stable for millions of years. Over time, collisional and radiative processes cause the asteroids to migrate inward until they are heated to the point of ionization. For older and cooler pulsars, asteroids ionize within the large magnetospheres and inject a sufficient amount of charged particles to alter the electrodynamics of the gap regions and modulate emission processes. This extrinsic model unifies many observed phenomena of variability that occur on time scales that are disparate with the much shorter time scales associated with pulsars and their magnetospheres. One such type of variability is nulling, in which certain pulsars exhibit episodes of quiescence that for some objects may be as short as a few pulse periods, but, for others, is longer than days. Here, in the context of this model, we examine the nulling phenomenon. We analyze the relationship between in-falling material and the statistics of nulling. In addition, as motivation for further high energy observations, we consider the relationship between the nulling and other magnetospheric processes.

  7. White-Light Nulling Interferometers for Detecting Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennesson, Bertrand; Serabyn, Eugene; Shao, Michael; Levine, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    A report proposes the development of a white-light nulling interferometer to be used in conjunction with a singleaperture astronomical telescope that would be operated in outer space. When such a telescope is aimed at a given star, the interferometer would suppress the light of that star while passing enough light from planets (if any) orbiting the star, to enable imaging or spectroscopic examination of the planets. In a nulling interferometer, according to the proposal, scattered light would be suppressed by spatial filtering in an array of single-mode optical fibers rather than by requiring optical surfaces to be accurate within 1/4,000 wavelength as in a coronagraph or an apodized telescope. As a result, angstrom-level precision would be needed in only the small nulling combiner, and not in large, meter-sized optics. The nulling interferometer could work as an independent instrument in space or in conjunction with a coronagraphic system to detect planets outside our solar system.

  8. Null point of discrimination in crustacean polarisation vision.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Christy, John; Roberts, Nicholas W; Marshall, N Justin

    2014-07-15

    The polarisation of light is used by many species of cephalopods and crustaceans to discriminate objects or to communicate. Most visual systems with this ability, such as that of the fiddler crab, include receptors with photopigments that are oriented horizontally and vertically relative to the outside world. Photoreceptors in such an orthogonal array are maximally sensitive to polarised light with the same fixed e-vector orientation. Using opponent neural connections, this two-channel system may produce a single value of polarisation contrast and, consequently, it may suffer from null points of discrimination. Stomatopod crustaceans use a different system for polarisation vision, comprising at least four types of polarisation-sensitive photoreceptor arranged at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg relative to each other, in conjunction with extensive rotational eye movements. This anatomical arrangement should not suffer from equivalent null points of discrimination. To test whether these two systems were vulnerable to null points, we presented the fiddler crab Uca heteropleura and the stomatopod Haptosquilla trispinosa with polarised looming stimuli on a modified LCD monitor. The fiddler crab was less sensitive to differences in the degree of polarised light when the e-vector was at -45 deg than when the e-vector was horizontal. In comparison, stomatopods showed no difference in sensitivity between the two stimulus types. The results suggest that fiddler crabs suffer from a null point of sensitivity, while stomatopods do not.

  9. Traversable wormholes: Minimum violation of the null energy condition revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2007-08-15

    It was argued in literature that traversable wormholes can exist with an arbitrarily small violation of null energy conditions. I show that if the amount of exotic material near the wormhole throat tends to zero, either this leads to a horn instead of a wormhole or the throat approaches the horizon in such a way that infinitely large stresses develop on the throat.

  10. Null Objects in Second Language Acquisition: Grammatical vs. Performance Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zyzik, Eve C.

    2008-01-01

    Null direct objects provide a favourable testing ground for grammatical and performance models of argument omission. This article examines both types of models in order to determine which gives a more plausible account of the second language data. The data were collected from second language (L2) learners of Spanish by means of four oral…

  11. Null Lens Assembly for X-Ray Mirror Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a null lens assembly that allows laser interferometry of 60 deg. slumped glass mirror segments used in x-ray mirrors. The assembly consists of four lenses in precise alignment to each other, with incorporated piezoelectric nanometer stepping actuators to position the lenses in six degrees of freedom for positioning relative to each other.

  12. DARWIN nulling interferometer breadboard I: System engineering and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatscher, Reinhold; Sodnik, Zoran; Ergenzinger, Klaus; Johann, Ulrich; Vink, Rob

    2003-10-01

    The presented work has been funded by ESA under ESTEC/Contract No. 14827/00/NL/CK and Astrium Germany has been awarded with this first ESA breadboarding towards nulling interferometry. Astrium designed and manufactured a nulling breadboard operating in the near infrared. The selected concept is fully transferable to the mid infrared. The interferometer is based on a highly symmetric Sagnac core. A dispersive phase shifter or a periscope system maintains the required phase shift of π. Two different source simulators have been built to test the interferometer's performance. They provide two point sources simulating a typical star and a planet signal. Angular separation of the point sources and intensity can be adapted to both operation modes, nulling and imaging. The OPD is actively stabilized to a gray fringe at a shorter wavelength without wobbling the system's OPD. The best results obtained with a diode laser source were a star suppression of 408,000 and a suppression of 32,000 using a broad-band ASE source. A stable deep null with a star suppression of 50,000 to 70,000 could be achieved over half an hour.

  13. Null point of discrimination in crustacean polarisation vision.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Christy, John; Roberts, Nicholas W; Marshall, N Justin

    2014-07-15

    The polarisation of light is used by many species of cephalopods and crustaceans to discriminate objects or to communicate. Most visual systems with this ability, such as that of the fiddler crab, include receptors with photopigments that are oriented horizontally and vertically relative to the outside world. Photoreceptors in such an orthogonal array are maximally sensitive to polarised light with the same fixed e-vector orientation. Using opponent neural connections, this two-channel system may produce a single value of polarisation contrast and, consequently, it may suffer from null points of discrimination. Stomatopod crustaceans use a different system for polarisation vision, comprising at least four types of polarisation-sensitive photoreceptor arranged at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg relative to each other, in conjunction with extensive rotational eye movements. This anatomical arrangement should not suffer from equivalent null points of discrimination. To test whether these two systems were vulnerable to null points, we presented the fiddler crab Uca heteropleura and the stomatopod Haptosquilla trispinosa with polarised looming stimuli on a modified LCD monitor. The fiddler crab was less sensitive to differences in the degree of polarised light when the e-vector was at -45 deg than when the e-vector was horizontal. In comparison, stomatopods showed no difference in sensitivity between the two stimulus types. The results suggest that fiddler crabs suffer from a null point of sensitivity, while stomatopods do not. PMID:24737768

  14. Do Null Subjects (Mis-)Trigger Pro-Drop Grammars?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Lyn

    2015-01-01

    Native speakers of English regularly hear sentences without overt subjects. Nevertheless, they maintain a [[superscript -]pro] grammar that requires sentences to have an overt subject. It is proposed that listeners of English recognize that speakers reduce predictable material and thus attribute null subjects to this process, rather than changing…

  15. Isolation and characterization of the ndhF gene of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 and initial characterization of an interposon mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Schluchter, W M; Zhao, J; Bryant, D A

    1993-01-01

    The ndhF gene of the unicellular marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 was cloned and characterized. NdhF is a subunit of the type 1, multisubunit NADH:plastoquinone oxidoreductase (NADH dehydrogenase). The nucleotide sequence of the gene predicts an extremely hydrophobic protein of 664 amino acids with a calculated mass of 72.9 kDa. The ndhF gene was shown to be single copy and transcribed into a monocistronic mRNA of 2,300 nucleotides. An ndhF null mutation was successfully constructed by interposon mutagenesis, demonstrating that NdhF is not required for cell viability under photoautotrophic growth conditions. The mutant strain exhibited a negligible rate of oxygen uptake in the dark, but its photosynthetic properties (oxygen evolution, chlorophyll/P700 ratio, and chlorophyll/P680 ratio) were generally similar to those of the wild type. Although the ndhF mutant strain grew as rapidly as the wild-type strain at high light intensity, the mutant grew more slowly than the wild type at lower light intensities and did not grow at all under photoheterotrophic conditions. The roles of the NADH:plastoquinone oxidoreductase in photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport are discussed. Images PMID:8501038

  16. A dynamical system's approach to Schwarzschild null geodesics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belbruno, Edward; Pretorius, Frans

    2011-10-01

    The null geodesics of a Schwarzschild black hole are studied from a dynamical system's perspective. Written in terms of Kerr-Schild coordinates, the null geodesic equation takes on the simple form of a particle moving under the influence of a Newtonian central force with an inverse-cubic potential. We apply a McGehee transformation to these equations, which clearly elucidates the full phase space of solutions. All the null geodesics belong to one of the four families of invariant manifolds and their limiting cases, further characterized by the angular momentum L of the orbit: for |L| > |Lc|, (1) the set that flow outward from the white hole, turn around, and then fall into the black hole, (2) the set that fall inward from past null infinity, turn around outside the black hole to continue to future null infinity, and for |L| < |Lc|, (3) the set that flow outward from the white hole and continue to future null infinity and (4) the set that flow inward from past null infinity and into the black hole. The critical angular momentum Lc corresponds to the unstable circular orbit at r = 3M, and the homoclinic orbits associated with it. There are two additional critical points of the flow at the singularity at r = 0. Though the solutions of geodesic motion and Hamiltonian flow we describe here are well known, what we believe is that a novel aspect of this work is the mapping between the two equivalent descriptions, and the different insights each approach can give to the problem. For example, the McGehee picture points to a particularly interesting limiting case of the class (1) that move from the white to black hole: in the L → ∞ limit, as described in Schwarzschild coordinates, these geodesics begin at r = 0, flow along t = constant lines, turn around at r = 2M, and then continue to r = 0. During this motion they circle in azimuth exactly once, and complete the journey in zero affine time.

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Fosfomycin-Tobramycin Combination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Assessed by Time-Kill Assays and Mutant Prevention Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Aguilar, María; Tedim, Ana P.; Rodríguez, Irene; Aktaş, Zerrin; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of fosfomycin-tobramycin combination was studied by time-kill assay in eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates belonging to the fosfomycin wild-type population (MIC = 64 μg/ml) but with different tobramycin susceptibilities (MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml). The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) were determined in five of these strains (tobramycin MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions simulating environments that are present in biofilm-mediated infections. Fosfomycin-tobramycin was synergistic and bactericidal for the isolates with mutations in the mexZ repressor gene, with a tobramycin MIC of 4 μg/ml. This effect was not observed in strains displaying tobramycin MICs of 1 to 2 μg/ml due to the strong bactericidal effect of tobramycin alone. Fosfomycin presented higher MPC values (range, 2,048 to >2,048 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions than did tobramycin (range, 16 to 256 μg/ml). Interestingly, the association rendered narrow or even null MSWs in the two conditions. However, for isolates with high-level tobramycin resistance that harbored aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, time-kill assays showed no synergy, with wide MSWs in the two environments. glpT gene mutations responsible for fosfomycin resistance in P. aeruginosa were determined in fosfomycin-susceptible wild-type strains and mutant derivatives recovered from MPC studies. All mutant derivatives had changes in the GlpT amino acid sequence, which resulted in a truncated permease responsible for fosfomycin resistance. These results suggest that fosfomycin-tobramycin can be an alternative for infections due to P. aeruginosa since it has demonstrated synergistic and bactericidal activity in susceptible isolates and those with low-level tobramycin resistance. It also prevents the emergence of resistant mutants in either aerobic or anaerobic environments. PMID:26195514

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Fosfomycin-Tobramycin Combination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Assessed by Time-Kill Assays and Mutant Prevention Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Díez-Aguilar, María; Morosini, María Isabel; Tedim, Ana P; Rodríguez, Irene; Aktaş, Zerrin; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    The antibacterial activity of fosfomycin-tobramycin combination was studied by time-kill assay in eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates belonging to the fosfomycin wild-type population (MIC = 64 μg/ml) but with different tobramycin susceptibilities (MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml). The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) were determined in five of these strains (tobramycin MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions simulating environments that are present in biofilm-mediated infections. Fosfomycin-tobramycin was synergistic and bactericidal for the isolates with mutations in the mexZ repressor gene, with a tobramycin MIC of 4 μg/ml. This effect was not observed in strains displaying tobramycin MICs of 1 to 2 μg/ml due to the strong bactericidal effect of tobramycin alone. Fosfomycin presented higher MPC values (range, 2,048 to >2,048 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions than did tobramycin (range, 16 to 256 μg/ml). Interestingly, the association rendered narrow or even null MSWs in the two conditions. However, for isolates with high-level tobramycin resistance that harbored aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, time-kill assays showed no synergy, with wide MSWs in the two environments. glpT gene mutations responsible for fosfomycin resistance in P. aeruginosa were determined in fosfomycin-susceptible wild-type strains and mutant derivatives recovered from MPC studies. All mutant derivatives had changes in the GlpT amino acid sequence, which resulted in a truncated permease responsible for fosfomycin resistance. These results suggest that fosfomycin-tobramycin can be an alternative for infections due to P. aeruginosa since it has demonstrated synergistic and bactericidal activity in susceptible isolates and those with low-level tobramycin resistance. It also prevents the emergence of resistant mutants in either aerobic or anaerobic environments.

  19. The appearance, motion, and disappearance of three-dimensional magnetic null points

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Nicholas A.; Parnell, Clare E.; Haynes, Andrew L.

    2015-10-15

    While theoretical models and simulations of magnetic reconnection often assume symmetry such that the magnetic null point when present is co-located with a flow stagnation point, the introduction of asymmetry typically leads to non-ideal flows across the null point. To understand this behavior, we present exact expressions for the motion of three-dimensional linear null points. The most general expression shows that linear null points move in the direction along which the magnetic field and its time derivative are antiparallel. Null point motion in resistive magnetohydrodynamics results from advection by the bulk plasma flow and resistive diffusion of the magnetic field, which allows non-ideal flows across topological boundaries. Null point motion is described intrinsically by parameters evaluated locally; however, global dynamics help set the local conditions at the null point. During a bifurcation of a degenerate null point into a null-null pair or the reverse, the instantaneous velocity of separation or convergence of the null-null pair will typically be infinite along the null space of the Jacobian matrix of the magnetic field, but with finite components in the directions orthogonal to the null space. Not all bifurcating null-null pairs are connected by a separator. Furthermore, except under special circumstances, there will not exist a straight line separator connecting a bifurcating null-null pair. The motion of separators cannot be described using solely local parameters because the identification of a particular field line as a separator may change as a result of non-ideal behavior elsewhere along the field line.

  20. Exacerbated corneal inflammation and neovascularization in the HO-2 null mice is ameliorated by biliverdin

    PubMed Central

    Bellner, Lars; Vitto, Marco; Patil, Kiran A.; Dunn, Michael W.; Regan, Raymond; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO-1 and HO-2) represents an intrinsic cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory system based on its ability to modulate leukocyte migration and to inhibit expression of inflammatory cytokines and proteins. HO-2 deletion leads to unresolved corneal inflammation and chronic inflammatory complications including ulceration, perforation and neovascularization. We examined the consequences of HO-2 deletion on hemangiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in the model of suture-induced inflammatory neovascularization. A 8.0 silk suture was placed at the corneal apex of wild type and HO-2 null mice. Neovascularization was assessed by vital microscopy and quantified by image analysis. Hemangiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis were determined by immunofluorescence staining using anti-CD31 and anti-LYVE-1 antibodies, respectively. Inflammation was quantified by histology and myeloperoxidase activity. The levels of HO-1 expression and inflammatory cytokines were determined by real time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Corneal sutures produced a consistent inflammatory response and a time-dependent neovascularization. The response in HO-2 null mice was associated with a greater increase compared to the wild type in the number of leukocytes (827600±129000 vs. 294500±57510; p<0.05), neovessels measured by vital microscopy (21.91±1.05 vs. 12.77±1.55 mm; p<0.001) 4 days after suture placement. Hemangiogenesis but not lymphangiogenesis was more pronounced in HO-2 null mice compared to wild type mice. Induction of HO-1 in sutured corneas was greatly attenuated in HO-2 null corneas and treatment with biliverdin diminished the exaggerated inflammatory and neovascular response in HO-2 null mice. The demonstration that the inflammatory responses, including expression of proinflammatory proteins, inflammatory cell influx and hemangiogenesis are exaggerated in HO-2 knockout mice strongly supports the notion that the HO system is critical for controlling the inflammatory and neovascular

  1. Starch mutants of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Berry-Lowe, S.L.; Schmidt, G.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Wild type Chlamydomonas accumulates starch and triglycerides when grown under nitrogen limiting conditions. Toward elucidation of the mechanisms for control of starch biosynthesis, we isolated mutants impaired int he accumulation of storage carbohydrates. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (strain ya-12) was mutagenized by UV irradiation and colonies were screened by iodine staining after growth in darkness. Mutants, denoted ais for altered in iodine staining, have been characterized by electron microscopy and assays for starch synthease, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), phosphoglucomutase and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and amylase activities. Transcript analysis of wild type and mutant RNAs with PGI, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, and waxy probes have also been carried out. No deficiencies of any of these components have been detected. Furthermore, long-term cultures of ya-12 and ais-1d in nitrogen-limited chemostats have been studied; starch also does not accumulate in ais-1d under these conditions. Thus, the lesion affects an essential factor of unknown identity that is required for starch synthesis.

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a recipe for the Nylon Rope Trick, which is considered to be one of the most spectacular demonstrations in chemistry. Materials for growing the polymer and some safety precautions are given. (SA)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations suitable for chemistry instruction. One involves fractal structures obtained by electrodeposition of silver at an air-water interface and the other deals with molecular weights and music. (TW)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for a demonstration involving the transformation of a hydrophobic liquid to a partially hydrophobic semisolid. Safety considerations are noted. (JN)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roffia, Sergio; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports two electrochemical demonstrations. Uses a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell to power a clock. Includes description of methods and materials. Investigates the "potato clock" used with different fruits. Lists emf and current for various fruit and electrode combinations. (ML)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfeld, D. W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations (1) a dust explosion using a coffee can, candle, rubber tubing, and cornstarch and (2) forming a silicate-polyvinyl alcohol polymer which can be pressed into plastic sheets or molded. Gives specific instructions. (MVL)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Two demonstrations are presented: a verification of the discontinuity of matter based on the law of definite proportions, and a series of consecutive chemical reactions featuring reversible equilibria. (BB)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1982-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a sunset effect using a gooseneck lamp and 20 sheets of paper and (2) the preparation and determination of structural features of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by infrared spectroscopy. (SK)

  12. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a room-temperature method for demonstrating phosphorescence by including samples in a polymer matrix. Also discusses the Old Nassau Reaction, a clock reaction which turns orange then black. (MLH)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for use in college chemistry classes. Includes "Spectroscopy in Large Lecture Halls" and "The Endothermic Dissolution of Ammonium Nitrate." Gives materials lists and procedures as well as a discussion of the results. (CW)

  14. Mutants of Cercospora kikuchii Altered in Cercosporin Synthesis and Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Upchurch, R G; Walker, D C; Rollins, J A; Ehrenshaft, M; Daub, M E

    1991-10-01

    We have obtained spontaneous and UV-induced stable mutants, altered in the synthesis of cercosporin, of the fungal soybean pathogen Cercospora kikuchii. The mutants were isolated on the basis of colony color on minimal medium. The UV-induced mutants accumulated, at most, 2% of wild-type cercosporin levels on all media tested. In contrast, cercosporin accumulation by the spontaneous mutants was strongly medium regulated, occurring only on potato dextrose medium but at concentrations comparable to those produced by the wild-type strain. UV-induced mutants unable to synthesize cercosporin on any medium were unable to incite lesions when inoculated onto the soybean host. Cercosporin was reproducibly isolated from all inoculated leaves showing lesions. Although cercosporin involvement in disease has been indirectly suggested by many previous studies, this is the first report in which mutants blocked in cercosporin synthesis have been used to demonstrate that cercosporin is a crucial pathogenicity factor for this fungal genus.

  15. Mutants of Cercospora kikuchii Altered in Cercosporin Synthesis and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Upchurch, R. G.; Walker, D. C.; Rollins, J. A.; Ehrenshaft, M.; Daub, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    We have obtained spontaneous and UV-induced stable mutants, altered in the synthesis of cercosporin, of the fungal soybean pathogen Cercospora kikuchii. The mutants were isolated on the basis of colony color on minimal medium. The UV-induced mutants accumulated, at most, 2% of wild-type cercosporin levels on all media tested. In contrast, cercosporin accumulation by the spontaneous mutants was strongly medium regulated, occurring only on potato dextrose medium but at concentrations comparable to those produced by the wild-type strain. UV-induced mutants unable to synthesize cercosporin on any medium were unable to incite lesions when inoculated onto the soybean host. Cercosporin was reproducibly isolated from all inoculated leaves showing lesions. Although cercosporin involvement in disease has been indirectly suggested by many previous studies, this is the first report in which mutants blocked in cercosporin synthesis have been used to demonstrate that cercosporin is a crucial pathogenicity factor for this fungal genus. Images PMID:16348567

  16. Colony mutants of compatible nocardiae displaying variations in recombining capacity.

    PubMed

    Brownell, G H; Walsh, R S

    1972-03-01

    Colonial morphology mutants of Nocardia erythropolis were isolated following ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The alleles rou-1/smo-1 were located by recombinant analysis and found to be linked to previously mapped characters. On the basis of recombinant class type patterns obtained from various selective characters it was postulated that the rou-1 allele may span a region of unique nucleotides in the Mat-Ce genome. Recombination frequencies of rou-1 and smo-2 bearing mutants of the Mat-Ce mating type were found to differ by over 1000 fold. Attempts to demonstrate that low recombination frequencies produced by the Smo mutants were due to Rec(-) genes were unsuccessful. No increased sensitivity to either UV or X irradiation was observed by the Smo mutants. Acriflavine treatment of either Rou or Smo colony mutants failed to accelerate reversion or to alter the recombining potentials of the mutants.

  17. [Molecular analysis of space mutant line of kidney bean].

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Li, J G; Wang, P S; Wang, X Q; Jiang, X C

    2000-12-01

    Objective. To identify the occurrence of gene mutant in mutant lines in the offspring of Kidney bean seeds under space flight condition. Method. Kidney bean seeds were carried onboard a recoverable satellite for 15 days in space and were planted on the ground after recovery. Five mutant lines showing variation in the form of leaf blade and their parents were analyzed with RAPD technique. Result. 50 random 10-mer primers were used in this study, among which 20 primers generated 180 polymorphic DNA bands, their size ranged from 200 bp to 2000 bp. 3 primers amplified obviously different bands in the DNA of mutant lines in comparison with that of the control. Conclusion. This is the first molecular analysis of the mutant lines of Kidney bean generated by space mutagenesis at DNA level. The result of RAPD analysis indicated that distinct variations were demonstrated in the DNA of mutant lines as compared with that of the original control.

  18. Sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine oxidation and the methionine and folate cycles in female cystathionine gamma-lyase null mice: a serendipitous model of the methylfolate trap.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Hurt, K Joseph; Breen, Kelsey; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Orlicky, David J; Maclean, Kenneth N

    2015-08-14

    In addition to its role in the endogenous synthesis of cysteine, cystathionine gamma-lyase (CGL) is a major physiological source of the vasorelaxant hydrogen sulfide. Cgl null mice are potentially useful for studying the influence of this compound upon vascular tone and endothelial function. Here, we confirm a previous report that female Cgl null mice exhibit an approximate 45-fold increase in plasma total homocysteine compared to wild type controls. This level of homocysteine is approximately 3.5-fold higher than that observed in male Cgl null mice and is essentially equivalent to that observed in mouse models of cystathionine beta synthase deficient homocystinuria. Cgl null mice of both sexes exhibited decreased expression of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase compared to WT controls. Female Cgl null mice exhibited a sex-specific induction of betaine homocysteine S-methyltransferase and methionine adenosyltransferase 1, alpha and a 70% decrease in methionine synthase expression accompanied by significantly decreased plasma methionine. Decreased plasma cysteine levels in female Cgl null mice were associated with sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine dioxygenase expression. Comparative histological assessment between cystathionine beta-synthase and Cgl null mice indicated that the therapeutic potential of cystathionine against liver injury merits possible further investigation. Collectively, our data demonstrates the importance of considering sex when investigating mouse models of inborn errors of metabolism and indicate that while female Cgl null mice are of questionable utility for studying the physiological role of hydrogen sulfide, they could serve as a useful model for studying the consequences of methionine synthase deficiency and the methylfolate trap.

  19. Sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine oxidation and the methionine and folate cycles in female cystathionine gamma-lyase null mice: a serendipitous model of the methylfolate trap

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Hurt, K. Joseph; Breen, Kelsey; Stabler, Sally P.; Allen, Robert H.; Orlicky, David J.; Maclean, Kenneth N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In addition to its role in the endogenous synthesis of cysteine, cystathionine gamma-lyase (CGL) is a major physiological source of the vasorelaxant hydrogen sulfide. Cgl null mice are potentially useful for studying the influence of this compound upon vascular tone and endothelial function. Here, we confirm a previous report that female Cgl null mice exhibit an approximate 45-fold increase in plasma total homocysteine compared to wild type controls. This level of homocysteine is approximately 3.5-fold higher than that observed in male Cgl null mice and is essentially equivalent to that observed in mouse models of cystathionine beta synthase deficient homocystinuria. Cgl null mice of both sexes exhibited decreased expression of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase compared to WT controls. Female Cgl null mice exhibited a sex-specific induction of betaine homocysteine S-methyltransferase and methionine adenosyltransferase 1, alpha and a 70% decrease in methionine synthase expression accompanied by significantly decreased plasma methionine. Decreased plasma cysteine levels in female Cgl null mice were associated with sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine dioxygenase expression. Comparative histological assessment between cystathionine beta-synthase and Cgl null mice indicated that the therapeutic potential of cystathionine against liver injury merits possible further investigation. Collectively, our data demonstrates the importance of considering sex when investigating mouse models of inborn errors of metabolism and indicate that while female Cgl null mice are of questionable utility for studying the physiological role of hydrogen sulfide, they could serve as a useful model for studying the consequences of methionine synthase deficiency and the methylfolate trap. PMID:26276101

  20. Collagen V-heterozygous and -null supraspinatus tendons exhibit altered dynamic mechanical behaviour at multiple hierarchical scales.

    PubMed

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Han, Lin; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2016-02-01

    Tendons function using a unique set of mechanical properties governed by the extracellular matrix and its ability to respond to varied multi-axial loads. Reduction of collagen V expression, such as in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, results in altered fibril morphology and altered macroscale mechanical function in both clinical and animal studies, yet the mechanism by which changes at the fibril level lead to macroscale functional changes has not yet been investigated. This study addresses this by defining the multiscale mechanical response of wild-type, collagen V-heterozygous and -null supraspinatus tendons. Tendons were subjected to mechanical testing and analysed for macroscale properties, as well as microscale (fibre re-alignment) and nanoscale (fibril deformation and sliding) responses. In many macroscale parameters, results showed a dose-dependent response with severely decreased properties in the null group. In addition, both heterozygous and null groups responded to load faster than in wild-type tendons via earlier fibre re-alignment and fibril stretch. However, the heterozygous group exhibited increased fibril sliding, while the null group exhibited no fibril sliding. These studies demonstrate that dynamic responses play an important role in determining overall function and that collagen V is a critical regulator in the development of these relationships. PMID:26855746

  1. Reduced wheel running and blunted effects of voluntary exercise in LPA1-null mice: The importance of assessing the amount of running in transgenic mice studies

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Rosell-Valle, Cristina; Blanco, Eduardo; Pedraza, Carmen; Chun, Jerold; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín, Luis J.

    2014-01-01

    This work was aimed to assess whether voluntary exercise rescued behavioral and hippocampal alterations in mice lacking the lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor (LPA1-null mice), studying the potential relationship between the amount of exercise performed and its effects. Normal and LPA1-null mice underwent 23 days of free wheel running and were tested for open-field behavior and adult hippocampal neurogenesis (cell proliferation, immature neurons, cell survival). Running decreased anxiety-like behavior in both genotypes but increased exploration only in the normal mice. While running affected all neurogenesis-related measures in normal mice (especially in the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus), only a moderate increase in cell survival was found in the mutants. Importantly, the LPA1-nulls showed notably reduced running. Analysis suggested that defective running in the LPA1-null mice could contribute to explain the scarce benefit of the voluntary exercise treatment. On the other hand, a literature review revealed that voluntary exercise is frequently used to modulate behavior and the hippocampus in transgenic mice, but half of the studies did not assess the quantity of running, overlooking any potential running impairments. This study adds evidence to the relevance of the quantity of exercise performed, emphasizing the importance of its assessment in transgenic mice research. PMID:24055600

  2. Reduced wheel running and blunted effects of voluntary exercise in LPA1-null mice: the importance of assessing the amount of running in transgenic mice studies.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Rosell-Valle, Cristina; Blanco, Eduardo; Pedraza, Carmen; Chun, Jerold; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín, Luis J

    2013-11-01

    This work was aimed to assess whether voluntary exercise rescued behavioral and hippocampal alterations in mice lacking the lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor (LPA1-null mice), studying the potential relationship between the amount of exercise performed and its effects. Normal and LPA1-null mice underwent 23 days of free wheel running and were tested for open-field behavior and adult hippocampal neurogenesis (cell proliferation, immature neurons, cell survival). Running decreased anxiety-like behavior in both genotypes but increased exploration only in the normal mice. While running affected all neurogenesis-related measures in normal mice (especially in the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus), only a moderate increase in cell survival was found in the mutants. Importantly, the LPA1-nulls showed notably reduced running. Analysis suggested that defective running in the LPA1-null mice could contribute to explain the scarce benefit of the voluntary exercise treatment. On the other hand, a literature review revealed that voluntary exercise is frequently used to modulate behavior and the hippocampus in transgenic mice, but half of the studies did not assess the quantity of running, overlooking any potential running impairments. This study adds evidence to the relevance of the quantity of exercise performed, emphasizing the importance of its assessment in transgenic mice research.

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for use in chemistry instruction. The first illustrates the preparation of a less common oxide of iron, showing why this oxide is rare. The second is an explosion reaction of hydrogen and oxygen that is recommended for use as an attention-getting device. (TW)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides instructions and a list of materials needed to demonstrate: (1) a model of the quantum mechanical atom; (2) principles involved in metal corrosion and in the prevention of this destructive process by electrochemical means; and (3) a Thermit reaction, modified to make it more dramatic and interesting for students. (SK)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first involves the colorful complexes of copper(II). The second involves reverse-phase separation of Food, Drug, and Cosmetic (FD & C) dyes using a solvent gradient. (JN)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliche, Jean-Marie; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: 1) the effect of polarity on solubility using sodium dichromate, TTE, ligroin, and water to form nonpolar-polar-nonpolar layers with the polar layer being colored; 2) determination of egg whites to be yellow by determining the content of yellow colored riboflavin in the egg white. (MVL)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  8. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: one that illustrates the attainment of equilibrium in first-order reactions by changing the volumes of two beakers of water at a specified rate, and another that illustrates the role of indicators in showing pH changes in buffer solutions. (MLH)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations that require almost no preparation time, are visually stimulating, and present a variety of material for class discussion (with sample questions provided). The first involves a sodium bicarbonate hydrochloric acid volcano; the second involves a dissolving polystyrene cup. Procedures used and information on…

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus is described in which effects of pressure, volume, and temperature changes on a gas can be observed simultaneously. Includes use of the apparatus in demonstrating Boyle's, Gay-Lussac's, and Charles' Laws, attractive forces, Dalton's Law of Partial pressures, and in illustrating measurable vapor pressures of liquids and some solids.…

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first shows the effect of polarity on solubility. The second is based on the unexpected formation of a precipitate of barium nitrate when barium carbonate or barium phosphate is treated with dilute nitric acid. List of materials needed and procedures used are included. (JN)

  12. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes. PMID:9007229

  13. Molecular and biochemical characterization of xrs mutants defective in Ku80.

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, B K; Priestley, A; Steingrimsdottir, H; Gell, D; Blunt, T; Jackson, S P; Lehmann, A R; Jeggo, P A

    1997-01-01

    The gene product defective in radiosensitive CHO mutants belonging to ionizing radiation complementation group 5, which includes the extensively studied xrs mutants, has recently been identified as Ku80, a subunit of the Ku protein and a component of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Several group 5 mutants, including xrs-5 and -6, lack double-stranded DNA end-binding and DNA-PK activities. In this study, we examined additional xrs mutants at the molecular and biochemical levels. All mutants examined have low or undetectable levels of Ku70 and Ku80 protein, end-binding, and DNA-PK activities. Only one mutant, xrs-6, has Ku80 transcript levels detectable by Northern hybridization, but Ku80 mRNA was detectable by reverse transcription-PCR in most other mutants. Two mutants, xrs-4 and -6, have altered Ku80 transcripts resulting from mutational changes in the genomic Ku80 sequence affecting RNA splicing, indicating that the defects in these mutants lie in the Ku80 gene rather than a gene controlling its expression. Neither of these two mutants has detectable wild-type Ku80 transcript. Since the mutation in both xrs-4 and xrs-6 cells results in severely truncated Ku80 protein, both are likely candidates to be null mutants. Azacytidine-induced revertants of xrs-4 and -6 carried both wild-type and mutant transcripts. The results with these revertants strongly support our model proposed earlier, that CHO-K1 cells carry a copy of the Ku80 gene (XRCC5) silenced by hypermethylation. Site-directed mutagenesis studies indicate that previously proposed ATP-binding and phosphorylation sites are not required for Ku80 activity, whereas N-terminal deletions of more than the first seven amino acids result in severe loss of activities. PMID:9032253

  14. Fast and Efficient Screening for Wheat Loss-of-Gene Mutants Using Multiplexed Melt Curve Analyses.

    PubMed

    Mieog, Jos C; Ral, Jean-Philippe F

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a new approach in the screening for loss-of-gene mutants in Heavy Ion Bombardment (HIB) mutant populations of genetically complex organisms such as hexaploid bread wheat using multiplexed single-color (SYBR Green) melt curve analyses. The assay was set up for three target genes to test its validity and applicability. For each gene, three genome-specific primer pairs (one for each genome) with distinct melt curves were developed and multiplexed. This allowed screening for "single null mutants" (plants with the target gene deleted in one of the three genomes) for all three genomes in a single reaction. The first two genes (α-Amylase 3 and Epsilon Cyclase) were used to test the approach as HIB null lines for all three genomes were already available for these. The third assay was successfully applied to identify new single null lines of the target gene α-Amylase 2 in an in-house HIB wheat collection. The use of SYBR Green greatly reduced the time and/or cost investment compared to other techniques and the approach proved highly suitable for high-throughput applications. PMID:27459606

  15. Detection and characterization of mammalian DNA polymerase beta mutants by functional complementation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sweasy, J B; Loeb, L A

    1993-01-01

    We have designed and utilized a bacterial complementation system to identify and characterize mammalian DNA polymerase beta mutants. In this complementation system, wild-type rat DNA polymerase beta replaces both the replicative and repair functions of DNA polymerase I in the Escherichia coli recA718 polA12 double mutant; our 263 DNA polymerase beta mutants replace E. coli polymerase I less efficiently or not at all. Of the 10 mutants that have been shown to contain DNA sequence alterations, 2 exhibit a split phenotype with respect to complementation of the growth defect and methylmethanesulfonate sensitivity of the double mutant; one is a null mutant. The mutants possessing a split phenotype contain amino acid residue alterations within a putative nucleotide binding site of DNA polymerase beta. This approach for the isolation and evaluation of mutants of a mammalian DNA polymerase in E. coli may ultimately lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this enzyme and to precisely defining its role in vertebrate cells. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8506308

  16. Averaged-null-energy condition for electromagnetism in Minkowski spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Folacci, A. )

    1992-09-15

    We show, on four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime, that {l angle}{psi}{vert bar}{ital T}{sub {mu}{nu}}{vert bar}{psi}{r angle}, the renormalized expectation value in a general quantum state {vert bar}{psi}{r angle} of the stress-energy tensor for electromagnetism, satisfies the averaged-null-energy condition, i.e., that {integral}{ital d}{lambda}{l angle}{psi}{vert bar}{ital T}{sub {mu}{nu}}{vert bar}{psi}{r angle}{ital t}{sup {mu}}{ital t{nu}}{ge}0 where this integral is along complete null geodesics with an affine parameter {lambda} and tangent vector {ital t}{sup {mu}}.

  17. Three-dimensional kinematic reconnection of plasmoids with nulls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Yun-Tung; Finn, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The global nonlinear dynamics of magnetic field lines in plasmoids with a pair of nulls, where B = 0, is studied. The aim of this analysis is to describe the separatrix surfaces on which singularities can occur in ideal magnetohydrodynamics because of topological changes in the field. These separatrix surfaces should locate the boundary layers associated with 3D reconnection in the presence of resistivity or inertia. It is found that the field lines exhibit chaotic scattering with several properties in common with plasmoid models without nulls (in which one component of the magnetic field never changes sign). In particular, the singular surfaces can be fractal, implying complex current density structures down to the dissipation scale. These generic features are expected to exist in typical coronal magnetic geometries exhibiting three-dimensional reconnection and the formation of current sheets.

  18. Exact Null Controllability of a Nonlinear Thermoelastic Contact Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Sivergina, Irina F. Polis, Michael P.

    2005-01-15

    We study the controllability properties of a nonlinear parabolic system that models the temperature evolution of a one-dimensional thermoelastic rod that may come into contact with a rigid obstacle. Basically the system dynamics is described by a one-dimensional nonlocal heat equation with a nonlinear and nonlocal boundary condition of Newmann type.We focus on the control problem and treat the case when the control is distributed over the whole space domain. In this case the system is proved to be exactly null controllable provided the parameters of the system are smooth.The proof is based on changing the control variable and using Aubin's Compactness Lemma to obtain an invariant set for the linearized controllability map. Then, by proving that the found solution is sufficiently smooth, we get the null controllability for the original system.

  19. Null fluids: A new viewpoint of Galilean fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Nabamita; Dutta, Suvankar; Jain, Akash

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we study a Galilean fluid with a conserved U (1 ) current up to anomalies. We construct a relativistic system, which we call a null fluid and show that it is in one-to-one correspondence with a Galilean fluid living in one lower dimension. The correspondence is based on light cone reduction, which is known to reduce the Poincaré symmetry of a theory to Galilean in one lower dimension. We show that the proposed null fluid and the corresponding Galilean fluid have exactly same symmetries, thermodynamics, constitutive relations, and equilibrium partition to all orders in the derivative expansion. We also devise a mechanism to introduce U (1 ) anomaly in even dimensional Galilean theories using light cone reduction, and study its effect on the constitutive relations of a Galilean fluid.

  20. Modifications of the Schwarzschild null geodesics in effective field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, N.

    2009-12-15

    In this paper the dynamics of Schwarzschild null geodesics in the context of low-energy effective field theories incorporating some interactions violating the equivalence principle is examined. Nonperturbed geodesics are expressed in terms of a convenient set of constants called orbital elements. The modifications introduced by the effective interactions are treated as small perturbations, then the method of variation of parameters is employed to find the evolution of the orbital elements for the true worldlines. We next focus our discussion on the geometry of nondispersive photon orbits and highlight the importance of different orbital elements in long-term change of the orbit. This calculation shows that nondispersive forces acting on null geodesics drive a secular growth of the positional elements. As an application of our results we examine the evolution of mean orbital elements in the semiclassical theory of quantum gravitational optics and show that the averaged correction terms are within the range of the uncertainty principle.

  1. Nulling Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullender, Craig C.; Vazquez, Juan M.; Berru, Robert I.

    1993-01-01

    Circuit measures electrical current via combination of Hall-effect-sensing and magnetic-field-nulling techniques. Known current generated by feedback circuit adjusted until it causes cancellation or near cancellation of magnetic field produced in toroidal ferrite core by current measured. Remaining magnetic field measured by Hall-effect sensor. Circuit puts out analog signal and digital signal proportional to current measured. Accuracy of measurement does not depend on linearity of sensing components.

  2. Null result for the weight change of a spinning gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, J.M.; Wilmarth, P.A. )

    1990-04-30

    A null result was obtained for the weight change of a right-spinning gyroscope, contradicting the results recently reported by Hayasaka and Takeuchi. No weight change could be observed under a variety of spin directions for rotational frequencies between 0 and 2.2{times}10{sup 4} rpm. Our limit of {minus}0.025{plus minus}0.07 mg is more than 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the effect reported by Hayasaka and Takeuchi.

  3. (abstract) Ulysses Observations of Magnetic Nulls in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterhalter, D.; Murphy, N.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Balogh, A.; Erdos, G.

    1993-01-01

    High time resolution magnetic field measurements (1 vector/s) at radial distances out to 5.3 AU and heliographic latitudes from 0(deg) to > 35(deg) S reveal the presence of solitary pulses lasting tens of seconds in which the field magnitude approaches or reaches zero. The properties of these nulls, their spatial distribution and relation to solar wind structures and to similar-apppearing interplanetary and magnetospheric impulses will be discussed.

  4. Oncogenic signaling in Amphiregulin and EGFR-expressing PTEN-null human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kappler, Christiana S.; Guest, Stephen T.; Irish, Jonathan C.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Kratche, Zachary; Wilson, Robert C.; Ethier, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    A subset of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and loss of PTEN, and patients with these determinants have a poor prognosis. We used cell line models of EGFR-positive/PTEN null TNBC to elucidate the signaling networks that drive the malignant features of these cells and cause resistance to EGFR inhibitors. In these cells, amphiregulin (AREG)-mediated activation of EGFR results in up-regulation of fibronectin (FN1), which is known to be a mediator of invasive capacity via interaction with integrin β1. EGFR activity in this PTEN null background also results in Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and activation of NF-κB. In addition, AKT is constitutively phosphorylated in these cells and is resistant to gefitinib. Expression profiling demonstrated that AREG-activated EGFR regulates gene expression differently than EGF-activated EGFR, and functional analysis via genome-scale shRNA screening identified a set of genes, including PLK1 and BIRC5, that are essential for survival of SUM-149 cells, but are uncoupled from EGFR signaling. Thus, our results demonstrate that in cells with constitutive EGFR activation and PTEN loss, critical survival genes are uncoupled from regulation by EGFR, which likely mediates resistance to EGFR inhibitors. PMID:25454348

  5. Mutants in Drosophila TRPC Channels Reduce Olfactory Sensitivity to Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Badsha, Farhath; Kain, Pinky; Prabhakar, Sunil; Sundaram, Susinder; Padinjat, Raghu; Hasan, Gaiti

    2012-01-01

    Background Members of the canonical Transient Receptor Potential (TRPC) class of cationic channels function downstream of Gαq and PLCβ in Drosophila photoreceptors for transducing visual stimuli. Gαq has recently been implicated in olfactory sensing of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other odorants. Here we investigated the role of PLCβ and TRPC channels for sensing CO2 in Drosophila. Methodology/Principal Findings Through behavioral assays it was demonstrated that Drosophila mutants for plc21c, trp and trpl have a reduced sensitivity for CO2. Immuno-histochemical staining for TRP, TRPL and TRPγ indicates that all three channels are expressed in Drosophila antennae including the sensory neurons that express CO2 receptors. Electrophysiological recordings obtained from the antennae of protein null alleles of TRP (trp343) and TRPL (trpl302), showed that the sensory response to multiple concentrations of CO2 was reduced. However, trpl302; trp343 double mutants still have a residual response to CO2. Down-regulation of TRPC channels specifically in CO2 sensing olfactory neurons reduced the response to CO2 and this reduction was obtained even upon down-regulation of the TRPCs in adult olfactory sensory neurons. Thus the reduced response to CO2 obtained from the antennae of TRPC RNAi strains is not due to a developmental defect. Conclusion These observations show that reduction in TRPC channel function significantly reduces the sensitivity of the olfactory response to CO2 concentrations of 5% or less in adult Drosophila. It is possible that the CO2 receptors Gr63a and Gr21a activate the TRPC channels through Gαq and PLC21C. PMID:23185459

  6. Identification of novel functional null allele of SLC26A4 associated with enlarged vestibular aqueduct and its possible implication.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jeong Hun; Jung, Jinsei; Kim, Ah Reum; Cho, Young Mi; Kim, Min Young; Lee, Sang Yeon; Choi, Jae Young; Lee, Jun Ho; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the SLC26A4 gene, which encodes pendrin, cause congenital hearing loss as a manifestation of Pendred syndrome (PS) with an iodide organification defect or nonsyndromic enlarged vestibular aqueduct (NSEVA, DFNB4). There have been reports of differences between PS and NSEVA, including their auditory phenotypes and molecular genetic bases. For appropriate genetic diagnosis and counseling, it is important to functionally characterize SLC26A4 variants. In this study, we identified and evaluated a novel null mutation of SLC26A4 and report our method of assessing the pathogenic potential of mutations in SLC26A4, one of the most frequent causative genes of deafness in humans. A 3-year-old female with progressive sensorineural hearing loss and her parents were recruited. They underwent clinical, audiological, radiological and genetic evaluations, which revealed that the female patient had an enlarged vestibular aqueduct and an incomplete partition type II anomaly in the cochlea bilaterally. Sanger sequencing of the SLC26A4 gene was also performed. For a confirmatory genetic diagnosis, we first characterized the anion/base exchange ability of mutant pendrin products in HEK 293 cells and, if necessary, evaluated whether the mutant pendrin traffics to the plasma membrane in COS-7 cells. We also expressed a null function mutant, p.H723R, and a previously documented polymorphism, p.P542R, as controls. The pure tone average was 66 dB HL in the right ear and 75 dB HL in the left ear. Sequencing of SLC26A4 revealed a known pathogenic mutation (p.H723R) and a novel missense variant (p.V510D) as a compound heterozygote. When we expressed the p.V510D mutant pendrin in mammalian cells, the rate constants for Cl-/HCO3- exchange were 10.96±4.79% compared with those of wild-type pendrin. This figure was comparable to that of p.H723R, indicating p.V510D to be another pathogenic mutation with a null function. The p.V510D pendrin product was shown to be entrapped in the

  7. Human GABARAP can restore autophagosome biogenesis in a C. elegans lgg-1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Jenzer, Céline; Manil-Ségalen, Marion; Lefebvre, Christophe; Largeau, Céline; Glatigny, Annie; Legouis, Renaud

    2014-10-01

    We recently described in C. elegans embryos, the acquisition of specialized functions for orthologs of yeast Atg8 (e.g., mammalian MAP1LC3/LC3) in allophagy, a selective and developmentally regulated autophagic process. During the formation of double-membrane autophagosomes, the ubiquitin-like Atg8/LC3 proteins are recruited to the membrane through a lipidation process. While at least 6 orthologs and paralogs are present in mammals, C. elegans only possesses 2 orthologs, LGG-1 and LGG-2, corresponding to the GABARAP-GABARAPL2/GATE-16 and the MAP1LC3 families, respectively. During allophagy, LGG-1 acts upstream of LGG-2 and is essential for autophagosome biogenesis, whereas LGG-2 facilitates their maturation. We demonstrated that LGG-2 directly interacts with the HOPS complex subunit VPS-39, and mediates the tethering between autophagosomes and lysosomes, which also requires RAB-7. In the present addendum, we compared the localization of autophagosomes, endosomes, amphisomes, and lysosomes in vps-39, rab-7, and lgg-2 depleted embryos. Our results suggest that lysosomes interact with autophagosomes or endosomes through a similar mechanism. We also performed a functional complementation of an lgg-1 null mutant with human GABARAP, its closer homolog, and showed that it localizes to autophagosomes and can rescue LGG-1 functions in the early embryo.

  8. Null-space function estimation for the interior problem.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Gengsheng L; Gullberg, Grant T

    2012-04-01

    In single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), projection data can be truncated when the camera's field of view is smaller than the object to be imaged. Using truncated projections to reconstruct a region of interest (ROI) is a reality we must face if small detectors are used. The truncated data result in an underdetermined system of imaging equations, which may lead to non-unique solutions. Data sampling and photon attenuation may also affect the solution uniqueness and stability. The uniqueness of the solutions in the ROI can be investigated by studying the null-space functions in the ROI. This paper uses an iterative algorithm to estimate the null-space image, to determine the sampling conditions under which a stable ROI reconstruction is possible with truncated data and to investigate whether attenuation can influence the ROI reconstruction bias. This iterative algorithm is validated by the singular value decomposition method. We show that if the ROI is sufficiently sampled, the null-space image is close to zero inside the ROI, and any almost-zero offset is insignificant in SPECT, because the noise is a much more dominating degradation factor.

  9. Neuropathy in Human and Mice with PMP22 null

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario Andre; Katona, Istvan; Zhang, Xuebao; Roper, Helen P.; Carr, Louise; Macdonald, Fiona; Brueton, Louise; Blake, Julian; Suter, Ueli; Reilly, Mary M.; Shy, Michael E.; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objective Haploinsufficiency of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). However, the biological functions of PMP22 in humans are largely unexplored due to the absence of patients with PMP22 null mutations. Design, Setting and Participants We have evaluated a 7-year-old boy with PMP22 null. Findings were compared with those from nerves of Pmp22 null mice. Results Motor and sensory deficits in the proband were non-length dependent. Weakness was found in cranial muscles, but not in the limbs. Large fiber sensory modalities were profoundly abnormal, which started prior to the maturation of myelin. This is in line with the temporal pattern of PMP22 expression predominantly in cranial motor neurons and DRG during embryonic development, becoming undetectable in adulthood. Moreover, there were conspicuous maturation defects of myelinating Schwann cells that were more significant in motor nerve fibers than in sensory nerve fibers. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that PMP22 is important for the normal function of neurons that express PMP22 during early development, such as cranial motor neurons and spinal sensory neurons. Moreover, PMP22 deficiency differentially affects myelination between motor and sensory nerves, which may have contributed to the unique clinical phenotype in the patient with absence of PMP22. PMID:21670407

  10. Self-attraction and natural curvature in null DNA.

    PubMed

    Manning, G S

    1989-08-01

    Forces of self-attraction inherent in DNA are unmasked when its ionic charge is neutralized. On the global level, self-attraction operates between segments to condense null (charge-neutralized) DNA into a segment-rich particle. Locally, self-attraction tends to contract an individual segment along its axis. If certain conditions are satisfied, the compressed segment buckles outward from the original line of the axis. Its most stable shape is then curved, or, as an extreme case, even completely folded. Buckling conditions are derived and shown to be met by DNA, thus explaining the high degree of ordered curvature and folding in the observed morphologies of condensed null DNA. The central concept employed is the buckling persistence length. It is evaluated for null DNA (40-50 bp) and agrees with experimental data (less than 60 bp). It helps in understanding the observed cooperative unit in the condensation/decondensation equilibrium (about 60 bp) and the observed size of digestion fragments unstable in the condensed phase (about 80 bp). The root-mean-square thermal compression/extension fluctuation in DNA is estimated at about 0.1 A/bp. PMID:2684222

  11. Evaluating thermoregulation in reptiles: an appropriate null model.

    PubMed

    Christian, Keith A; Tracy, Christopher R; Tracy, C Richard

    2006-09-01

    Established indexes of thermoregulation in ectotherms compare body temperatures of real animals with a null distribution of operative temperatures from a physical or mathematical model with the same size, shape, and color as the actual animal but without mass. These indexes, however, do not account for thermal inertia or the effects of inertia when animals move through thermally heterogeneous environments. Some recent models have incorporated body mass, to account for thermal inertia and the physiological control of warming and cooling rates seen in most reptiles, and other models have incorporated movement through the environment, but none includes all pertinent variables explaining body temperature. We present a new technique for calculating the distribution of body temperatures available to ectotherms that have thermal inertia, random movements, and different rates of warming and cooling. The approach uses a biophysical model of heat exchange in ectotherms and a model of random interaction with thermal environments over the course of a day to create a null distribution of body temperatures that can be used with conventional thermoregulation indexes. This new technique provides an unbiased method for evaluating thermoregulation in large ectotherms that store heat while moving through complex environments, but it can also generate null models for ectotherms of all sizes.

  12. High-power, null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kunning G.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.

    2009-05-01

    This article presents the theory and operation of a null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand. The thrust stand design supports thrusters having a total mass up to 250 kg and measures thrust over a range of 1 mN to 5 N. The design uses a conventional inverted pendulum to increase sensitivity, coupled with a null-type feature to eliminate thrust alignment error due to deflection of thrust. The thrust stand position serves as the input to the null-circuit feedback control system and the output is the current to an electromagnetic actuator. Mechanical oscillations are actively damped with an electromagnetic damper. A closed-loop inclination system levels the stand while an active cooling system minimizes thermal effects. The thrust stand incorporates an in situ calibration rig. The thrust of a 3.4 kW Hall thruster is measured for thrust levels up to 230 mN. The uncertainty of the thrust measurements in this experiment is ±0.6%, determined by examination of the hysteresis, drift of the zero offset and calibration slope variation.

  13. High-power, null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kunning G; Walker, Mitchell L R

    2009-05-01

    This article presents the theory and operation of a null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand. The thrust stand design supports thrusters having a total mass up to 250 kg and measures thrust over a range of 1 mN to 5 N. The design uses a conventional inverted pendulum to increase sensitivity, coupled with a null-type feature to eliminate thrust alignment error due to deflection of thrust. The thrust stand position serves as the input to the null-circuit feedback control system and the output is the current to an electromagnetic actuator. Mechanical oscillations are actively damped with an electromagnetic damper. A closed-loop inclination system levels the stand while an active cooling system minimizes thermal effects. The thrust stand incorporates an in situ calibration rig. The thrust of a 3.4 kW Hall thruster is measured for thrust levels up to 230 mN. The uncertainty of the thrust measurements in this experiment is +/-0.6%, determined by examination of the hysteresis, drift of the zero offset and calibration slope variation.

  14. Chromatism compensation in wide-band nulling interferometry for exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Julien; Pereira, Silvania F; Braat, Joseph J M

    2006-02-01

    We introduce the concept of chromatism compensation in nulling interferometry that enables a high rejection ratio in a wide spectral band. Therefore the achromaticity condition considered in most nulling interferometers can be relaxed. We show that this chromatism compensation cannot be applied to a two-beam nulling interferometer, and we make an analysis of the particular case of a three-telescope configuration.

  15. Spatiotemporal disorder in the axial skeleton development of the Mesp2-null mouse: a model of spondylocostal dysostosis and spondylothoracic dysostosis.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yuji; Takahashi, Yu; Tanabe, Rieko; Tamamura, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Haraikawa, Mayu; Hamagaki, Miwako; Hata, Kenji; Kanno, Jun; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Saga, Yumiko; Goseki-Sone, Masae; Kaneko, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Iimura, Tadahiro

    2013-03-01

    Spondylocostal dysostosis (SCDO) is a genetic disorder characterized by severe malformation of the axial skeleton. Mesp2 encodes a basic helix-loop-helix type transcription factor that is required for somite formation. Its human homologue, Mesp2, is a gene affected in patients with SCDO and a related vertebral disorder, spondylothoracic dysostosis (STDO). This work investigated how the loss of Mesp2 affects axial skeleton development and causes the clinical features of SCDO and STDO. We first confirmed, by three-dimensional computed tomography scanning, that Mesp2-null mice exhibited mineralized tissue patterning resembling the radiological features of SCDO and STDO. Histological observations and in situ hybridization probing for extracellular matrix molecules demonstrated that the developing vertebral bodies in Mesp2-null mice were extensively fused with rare insertions of intervertebral tissue. Unexpectedly, the intervertebral tissues were mostly fused longitudinally in the vertebral column, instead of exhibiting extended formation, as was expected based on the caudalized properties of Mesp2-null somite derivatives. Furthermore, the differentiation of vertebral body chondrocytes in Mesp2-null mice was spatially disordered and largely delayed, with an increased cell proliferation rate. The quantitative three-dimensional immunofluorescence image analyses of phospho-Smad2 and -Smad1/5/8 revealed that these chondrogenic phenotypes were associated with spatially disordered inputs of TGF-β and BMP signaling in the Mesp2-null chondrocytes, and also demonstrated an amorphous arrangement of cells with distinct properties. Furthermore, a significant delay in ossification in Mesp2-null vertebrae was observed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. The current observations of the spatiotemporal disorder of vertebral organogenesis in the Mesp2-null mice provide further insight into the pathogenesis of SCDO and STDO, and the physiological development of the axial

  16. Somatic-cell mutation induced by short exposures to cigarette smoke in urate-null, oxidative stress-sensitive Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Tomoyo; Koike, Ryota; Yuma, Yoko; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae; Suzuki, Toshinori; Negishi, Tomoe

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that a urate-null strain of Drosophila is hypersensitive to cigarette smoke (CS), and we suggested that CS induces oxidative stress in Drosophila because uric acid is a potent antioxidant. Although the carcinogenic risk of CS exposure is widely recognized; documentation of in vivo genotoxic activity of environmental CS, especially gaseous-phase CS, remains inconclusive. To date, somatic-cell mutations in Drosophila resulting from exposure to CS have not been detected via the somatic mutation and recombination test (wing spot test) with wild-type flies, a widely used Drosophila assay for the detection of somatic-cell mutation; moreover, genotoxicity has not been documented via a DNA repair test that involves DNA repair-deficient Drosophila. In this study, we used a new Drosophila strain (y v ma-l; mwh) to examine the mutagenicity induced by gaseous-phase CS; these flies are urate-null due to a mutation in ma-l, and they are heterozygous for multiple wing hair (mwh), a mutation that functions as a marker for somatic-cell mutation. In an assay with this newly developed strain, a superoxide anion-producing weed-killer, paraquat, exhibited significant mutagenicity; in contrast, paraquat was hardly mutagenic with a wild-type strain. Drosophila larvae were exposed to CS for 2, 4 or 6h, and then kept at 25°C on instant medium until adulthood. After eclosion, mutant spots, which consisted of mutant hairs on wings, were scored. The number of mutant spots increased significantly in an exposure time-dependent manner in the urate-null females (ma-l (-/-)), but not in the urate-positive females (ma-l (+/-)). In this study, we showed that short-term exposure to CS was mutagenic in this in vivo system. In addition, we obtained suggestive data regarding reactive oxygen species production in larva after CS exposure using the fluorescence probe H2DCFDA. These results suggest that oxidative damage, which might be countered by uric acid, was partly responsible

  17. Deep Broad-Band Infrared Nulling Using A Single-Mode Fiber Beam Combiner and Baseline Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennesson, Bertrand; Haguenauer, P.; Serabyn, E.; Liewer, K.

    2006-01-01

    The basic advantage of single-mode fibers for deep nulling applications resides in their spatial filtering ability, and has now long been known. However, and as suggested more recently, a single-mode fiber can also be used for direct coherent recombination of spatially separated beams, i.e. in a 'multi-axial' nulling scheme. After the first successful demonstration of deep (<2e-6) visible LASER nulls using this technique (Haguenauer & Serabyn, Applied Optics 2006), we decided to work on an infrared extension for ground based astronomical observations, e.g. using two or more off-axis sub-apertures of a large ground based telescope. In preparation for such a system, we built and tested a laboratory infrared fiber nuller working in a wavelength regime where atmospheric turbulence can be efficiently corrected, over a pass band (approx.1.5 to 1.8 micron) broad enough to provide reasonable sensitivity. In addition, since no snapshot images are readily accessible with a (single) fiber nuller, we also tested baseline rotation as an approach to detect off-axis companions while keeping a central null. This modulation technique is identical to the baseline rotation envisioned for the TPF-I space mission. Within this context, we report here on early laboratory results showing deep stable broad-band dual polarization infrared nulls <5e-4 (currently limited by detector noise), and visible LASER nulls better than 3e-4 over a 360 degree rotation of the baseline. While further work will take place in the laboratory to achieve deeper stable broad-band nulls and test off-axis sources detection through rotation, the emphasis will be put on bringing such a system to a telescope as soon as possible. Detection capability at the 500:1 contrast ratio in the K band (2.2 microns) seem readily accessible within 50-100 mas of the optical axis, even with a first generation system mounted on a >5m AO equipped telescope such as the Palomar Hale 200 inch, the Keck, Subaru or Gemini telescopes.

  18. plenty, a novel hypernodulation mutant in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Chie; Funayama-Noguchi, Sachiko; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2010-09-01

    Nitrogen fixation in nodules that contain symbiotic rhizobial bacteria enables legumes to thrive in nitrogen-poor soils. However, this symbiosis is energy consuming. Therefore, legumes strictly control nodulation at both local and systemic levels. Mutants deficient in such controls exhibit a range of phenotypes from non-nodulation to hypernodulation. Here, we isolated a novel hypernodulation mutant from the M(2) progeny derived from Lotus japonicus MG-20 seeds mutagenized by irradiation with a carbon ion beam. We named the mutant 'plenty' because it formed more nodules than the wild-type MG-20. The nodulation zone in the plenty mutant was wider than that in the wild type, but not as enhanced as those in other previously reported hypernodulation mutants such as har1, klv or tml of L. japonicus. Unlike these hypernodulation mutants, the plenty mutant developed nodules of the same size as MG-20. Overall, the plenty mutant exhibited a unique phenotype of moderate hypernodulation. However, a biomass assay indicated that this unique pattern of hypernodulation was a hindrance to host plant growth. The plenty mutant displayed some tolerance to external nitrates and a normal triple response to ethylene. Grafting experiments demonstrated that the root of plenty was responsible for its hypernodulation phenotype. Genetic mapping indicated that the PLENTY gene was located on chromosome 2.

  19. Identification of Arabidopsis rat Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanmin; Nam, Jaesung; Humara, Jaime M.; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Lee, Lan-Ying; Cao, Hongbin; Valentine, Lisa; Li, Jingling; Kaiser, Anthony D.; Kopecky, Andrea L.; Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Rao, Praveen K.; Tzfira, Tzvi; Rajagopal, Jyothi; Yi, HoChul; Veena; Yadav, Badam S.; Crane, Yan M.; Lin, Kui; Larcher, Yves; Gelvin, Matthew J.K.; Knue, Marnie; Ramos, Cynthia; Zhao, Xiaowen; Davis, Susan J.; Kim, Sang-Ic; Ranjith-Kumar, C.T.; Choi, Yoo-Jin; Hallan, Vipin K.; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Sui, Xiangzhen; Ziemienowicz, Alicja; Matthysse, Ann G.; Citovsky, Vitaly; Hohn, Barbara; Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2003-01-01

    Limited knowledge currently exists regarding the roles of plant genes and proteins in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation process. To understand the host contribution to transformation, we carried out root-based transformation assays to identify Arabidopsis mutants that are resistant to Agrobacterium transformation (rat mutants). To date, we have identified 126 rat mutants by screening libraries of T-DNA insertion mutants and by using various “reverse genetic” approaches. These mutants disrupt expression of genes of numerous categories, including chromatin structural and remodeling genes, and genes encoding proteins implicated in nuclear targeting, cell wall structure and metabolism, cytoskeleton structure and function, and signal transduction. Here, we present an update on the identification and characterization of these rat mutants. PMID:12805582

  20. ECB deacylase mutants

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Zhao, Huimin; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  1. An extensive allelic series of Drosophila kae1 mutants reveals diverse and tissue-specific requirements for t6A biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Jung; Smibert, Peter; Zhao, Xiaoyu; Hu, Jennifer F; Ramroop, Johnny; Kellner, Stefanie M; Benton, Matthew A; Govind, Shubha; Dedon, Peter C; Sternglanz, Rolf; Lai, Eric C

    2015-12-01

    N(6)-threonylcarbamoyl-adenosine (t6A) is one of the few RNA modifications that is universally present in life. This modification occurs at high frequency at position 37 of most tRNAs that decode ANN codons, and stabilizes cognate anticodon-codon interactions. Nearly all genetic studies of the t6A pathway have focused on single-celled organisms. In this study, we report the isolation of an extensive allelic series in the Drosophila ortholog of the core t6A biosynthesis factor Kae1. kae1 hemizygous larvae exhibit decreases in t6A that correlate with allele strength; however, we still detect substantial t6A-modified tRNAs even during the extended larval phase of null alleles. Nevertheless, complementation of Drosophila Kae1 and other t6A factors in corresponding yeast null mutants demonstrates that these metazoan genes execute t6A synthesis. Turning to the biological consequences of t6A loss, we characterize prominent kae1 melanotic masses and show that they are associated with lymph gland overgrowth and ectopic generation of lamellocytes. On the other hand, kae1 mutants exhibit other phenotypes that reflect insufficient tissue growth. Interestingly, whole-tissue and clonal analyses show that strongly mitotic tissues such as imaginal discs are exquisitely sensitive to loss of kae1, whereas nonproliferating tissues are less affected. Indeed, despite overt requirements of t6A for growth of many tissues, certain strong kae1 alleles achieve and sustain enlarged body size during their extended larval phase. Our studies highlight tissue-specific requirements of the t6A pathway in a metazoan context and provide insights into the diverse biological roles of this fundamental RNA modification during animal development and disease.

  2. Three-dimensional kinematic reconnection in the presence of field nulls and closed field lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Yun-Tung; Finn, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The present investigation of three-dimensional reconnection of magnetic fields with nulls and of fields with closed lines gives attention to the geometry of the former, with a view to their gamma-line and Sigma-surface structures. The geometric structures of configurations with a pair of type A and B nulls permit reconnection across the null-null lines; these are the field lines which join the two nulls. Also noted is the case of magnetostatic reconnection, in which the magnetic field is time-independent and the electrostatic potential is constant along field lines.

  3. Nondisjunction Mutants of the Nematode CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkin, Jonathan; Horvitz, H. Robert; Brenner, Sydney

    1979-01-01

    The frequency of males (5AA; XO) among the self progeny of wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodites (5AA; XX) is about one in 500. Fifteen him (for "high incidence of males") mutations have been identified that increase this frequency by a factor of ten to 150, as a result of increased X-chromosome nondisjunction. The mutations define ten complementation groups, which have been mapped: nine are autosomal, and one sex linked. Most of the mutants are superficially wild type in anatomy and behavior; however, him-4 mutants display gonadal abnormalities, and unc-86 mutants, which have a Him phenotype, exhibit a variety of anatomical and behavioral abnormalities. All the mutants segregate fertile 3X hermaphrodite progeny as well as XO male progeny. Some produce large numbers of inviable zygotes. Mutants in all ten genes produce diplo-X and nullo-X exceptional ova, and in the four strains tested, diplo-X and nullo-X exceptional sperm are produced by 2X "transformed" males. It appears likely that most of the mutants have defects in both gamete lines of the hermaphrodite. XO males of him strains other than him-4 and unc-86 are similar to wild-type males in anatomy and behavior, and all produce equal or almost equal numbers of haplo-X and nullo-X sperm, and no diplo-X sperm. Male fertility is reduced to varying extents in all him mutants. In four of the strains, nondisjunction during oogenesis has been shown to occur at a reductional division, and in three of these strains, abnormalities in recombination have been demonstrated. One mutant also exhibits autosomal nondisjunction, but many of the others probably do not. Therefore, the X chromosome of C. elegans may differ from the autosomes in the mechanisms controlling its meiotic behavior.——3X hermaphrodites are shorter and less fertile than 2X hermaphrodites, and they produce many inviable zygotes among their self progeny: these are probably 4X zygotes. Haplo-X and diplo-X ova are produced in 2:1 ratio by 3X

  4. GASIS demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Vidas, E.H.

    1995-04-01

    A prototype of the GASIS database and retrieval software has been developed and is the subject of this poster session and computer demonstration. The prototype consists of test or preliminary versions of the GASIS Reservoir Data System and Source Directory datasets and the software for query and retrieval. The prototype reservoir database covers the Rocky Mountain region and contains the full GASIS data matrix (all GASIS data elements) that will eventually be included on the CD-ROM. It is populated for development purposes primarily by the information included in the Rocky Mountain Gas Atlas. The software has been developed specifically for GASIS using Foxpro for Windows. The application is an executable file that does not require Foxpro to run. The reservoir database software includes query and retrieval, screen display, report generation, and data export functions. Basic queries by state, basin, or field name will be assisted by scrolling selection lists. A detailed query screen will allow record selection on the basis of any data field, such as depth, cumulative production, or geological age. Logical operators can be applied to any-numeric data element or combination of elements. Screen display includes a {open_quotes}browse{close_quotes} display with one record per row and a detailed single record display. Datasets can be exported in standard formats for manipulation with other software packages. The Source Directory software will allow record retrieval by database type or subject area.

  5. Modeling the Cell Muscle Membrane from Normal and Desmin- or Dystrophin-null Mice as an Elastic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pelagio, Karla P.; Santamaría-Holek, Ivan; Bloch, Robert J.; Ortega, Alicia; González-Serratos, Hugo

    2010-12-01

    Two of the most important proteins linking the contractile apparatus and costameres at the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fibers are dystrophin and desmin. We have developed an elastic model of the proteins that link the sarcolemma to the myofibrils. This is a distributed model, with an elastic constant, k, that includes the main protein components of the costameres. The distributed spring model is composed of parallel units attached in series. To test the model, we performed experiments in which we applied negative pressure, generated by an elastimeter, to a small area of the sarcolemma from single myofiber. The negative pressure formed a bleb of variable height, dependent on the pressure applied. We normalized our measurements of k in dystrophin-null (mdx) and desmin-null (des-/-) mice to the value we obtained for wild type (WT) mice, which was set at 1.0. The relative experimental value for the stiffness of myofibers from mice lacking dystrophin or desmin was 0.5 and 0.7, respectively. The theoretical k values of the individual elements were obtained using neural networks (NN), in which the input was the k value for each parallel spring component and the output was the solution of each resulting parallel system. We compare the experimental values of k in control and mutant muscles to the theoretical values obtained by NN for each protein. Computed theoretical values were 0.4 and 0.8 for dystrophin- and desmin-null muscles, respectively, and 0.9 for WT, in reasonable agreement with our experimental results. This suggests that, although it is a simplified spring model solved by NN, it provides a good approximation of the distribution of spring elements and the elastic constants of the proteins that form the costameres. Our results show that dystrophin is the protein that contributes more than any other to the strength of the connections between the sarcolemma and the contractile apparatus, the costameres.

  6. Basigin null mutant male mice are sterile and exhibit impaired interactions between germ cells and Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Jiajia; Li, Yanfen; Sun, Fengyun; Saalbach, Anja; Klein, Claudia; Miller, David J.; Hess, Rex; Nowak, Romana A.

    2013-01-01

    Basigin (BSG) is a multifunctional glycoprotein that plays an important role in male reproduction since male knockout (KO) mice are sterile. The Bsg KO testis lacks elongated spermatids and mature spermatozoa, a phenotype similar to that of alpha-mannosidase IIx (MX) KO mice. MX regulates formation of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) terminated N-glycans that participate in germ cell-Sertoli cell adhesion. Results showed that Bsg KO spermatocytes displayed normal homologous chromosome synapsis and progression through meiosis. However, only punctate expression of the round spermatid marker SP-10 in the acrosomal granule of germ cells of Bsg KO mice was detected indicating that spermatogenesis in Bsg KO mice was arrested at the early round spermatid stages. We observed a large increase in the number of germ cells undergoing apoptosis in Bsg KO testes. Using lectin blotting, we determined that GlcNAc terminated N-glycans are linked to BSG. GlcNAc terminated N-glycans were significantly reduced in Bsg KO testes. These observations indicate that BSG may act as a germ cell-Sertoli cell attachment molecule. Loss of BSG significantly reduced adhesion between GC-2 and SF7 cells. Moreover, wild type testes showed strong expression of N-cadherin (CDH2) while expression was greatly reduced in the testes of Bsg KO mice. In addition, the integrity of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) was compromised in Bsg KO testes. In conclusion, although some Bsg KO spermatogonia can undergo normal progression to the spermatocyte stage, BSG-mediated germ cell-Sertoli cell interactions appear to be necessary for integrity of the BTB and spermatocyte progression to mature spermatozoa. PMID:23727514

  7. Increased lipolysis and altered lipid homeostasis protect y-synuclein null mutant mice from diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synucleins are a family of homologous proteins principally known for their involvement in neurodegeneration. In neurons a-synuclein promotes assembly of SNARE complexes required for fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane during neurotransmitter release. Y-synuclein is highly expressed ...

  8. Recovery of emotional behaviour in neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) null mutant mice through transgenic expression of NCAM180.

    PubMed

    Stork, O; Welzl, H; Wolfer, D; Schuster, T; Mantei, N; Stork, S; Hoyer, D; Lipp, H; Obata, K; Schachner, M

    2000-09-01

    In the present study we further investigate functions of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) in the mature central nervous system and its implications for animal behaviour. To this end we generated transgenic mice expressing the major NCAM isoform with the largest cytoplasmic domain, NCAM180, under control of a promoter for the small form neurofilament gene. Transgenic mice were also bred with mice deficient in endogenous NCAM (Ncam-/- mice) so that effects of NCAM180 could be analysed in the presence and absence of endogenous NCAM. While overexpression of transgenic NCAM180 was without apparent behavioural or morphological effect, its expression in Ncam-/- mice counteracted NCAM ablation-induced aggressive, anxiety-like and antidepressant-like behaviour. It furthermore prevented a hypersensitivity of Ncam-/- mice to the anxiolytic serotonin1A (5-HT1A) receptor agonist buspirone. Such recovery of emotional behaviour and behavioural 5-HT1A response occurred in spite of misdevelopment of the olfactory bulb and hippocampus that is characteristic of Ncam-/- mice, and without an apparent change in the expression of 5-HT1A binding sites in the brain. Hippocampus- and amygdala-dependent learning, though disturbed in Ncam-/- mice, remained unaffected by the transgenic NCAM180. We suggest an involvement of NCAM180-mediated cell recognition processes in the serotonergic modulation of emotional behaviour in adult mice.

  9. [Development of a new soybean variety with null trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase 2.3 genes--zhonghuang 16 and its cultivation practices].

    PubMed

    Han, Fen-Xia; Ding, An-Lin; Sun, Jun-Ming

    2002-12-01

    Soybean protein is a kind of high-quality protein composed of balanced amino acids, which contains all kinds of amino acid, especially 8 amino acids necessary for human, but also contains some components that are not good for human and affect food quality, such as Trypsin inhibitor and Lipoxygenase. Nutritional value and processing quality of soybean can be improved by means of development of new variety with null Lox and Ti. In this paper, a new soybean variety Zhonghuang 16 (originally name as Zhongzuo 96-952) was developed by Institute of Crop Breeding and Cultivation Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences through years of biochemical marker assistant selection for null trypsin inhibitor by Native-polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis (Native-PAGE) and null lipoxygenase by means of isoelectric focusing-polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis (IEF-PAGE) in the hybrid progenies of "ti15176" (Female parent)--a high-yielding, mosaic virus resistant and null trypsin inhibitor line and "Century-2.3" (Male parent)--a null lipoxygenase near isogene line of an elite American variety "Century". This variety was subjected to Beijing regional trial for summer-sowing soybean during 1999-2000, and to Beijing demonstration test in 2001. In 2002, it was passed the examination and approval by the Beijing Committee of Crop Variety Examination and Approval because of its outstanding characteristics such as high and stable yielding, good quality (high protein and fat content, high protein content and good protein quality-null Ti and Lox2.3), disease resistant and good general character. It is the first new soybean variety with null Ti and Lox2.3 genes in our country. In this paper, the development process and cultivation of Zhonghuang 16 were described. PMID:12693103

  10. Neto2-null mice have impaired GABAergic inhibition and are susceptible to seizures

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Vivek; Dargaei, Zahra; Ivakine, Evgueni A.; Hartmann, Anna-Maria; Ng, David; Chevrier, Jonah; Ormond, Jake; Nothwang, Hans Gerd; McInnes, Roderick R.; Woodin, Melanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Neto2 is a transmembrane protein that interacts with the neuron-specific K+-Cl− cotransporter (KCC2) in the central nervous system (CNS). Efficient KCC2 transport is essential for setting the neuronal Cl− gradient, which is required for fast GABAergic inhibition. Neto2 is required to maintain the normal abundance of KCC2 in neurons, and increases KCC2 function by binding to the active oligomeric form of this cotransporter. In the present study, we characterized GABAergic inhibition and KCC2-mediated neuronal chloride homeostasis in pyramidal neurons from adult hippocampal slices. Using gramicidin perforated patch clamp recordings we found that the reversal potential for GABA (EGABA) was significantly depolarized. We also observed that surface levels of KCC2 and phosphorylation of KCC2 serine 940 (Ser940) were reduced in Neto2−/− neurons compared to wild-type controls. To examine GABAergic inhibition we recorded spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) and found that Neto2−/− neurons had significant reductions in both their amplitude and frequency. Based on the critical role of Neto2 in regulating GABAergic inhibition we rationalized that Neto2-null mice would be prone to seizure activity. We found that Neto2-null mice demonstrated a decrease in the latency to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and an increase in seizure severity. PMID:26441539

  11. Nulling Data Reduction and On-sky Performance of the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defrère, D.; Hinz, P. M.; Mennesson, B.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Skemer, A. J.; Bailey, V.; Danchi, W. C.; Downey, E. C.; Durney, O.; Grenz, P.; Hill, J. M.; McMahon, T. J.; Montoya, M.; Spalding, E.; Vaz, A.; Absil, O.; Arbo, P.; Bailey, H.; Brusa, G.; Bryden, G.; Esposito, S.; Gaspar, A.; Haniff, C. A.; Kennedy, G. M.; Leisenring, J. M.; Marion, L.; Nowak, M.; Pinna, E.; Powell, K.; Puglisi, A.; Rieke, G.; Roberge, A.; Serabyn, E.; Sosa, R.; Stapeldfeldt, K.; Su, K.; Weinberger, A. J.; Wyatt, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) is a versatile instrument designed for high angular resolution and high-contrast infrared imaging (1.5-13 μm). In this paper, we focus on the mid-infrared (8-13 μm) nulling mode and present its theory of operation, data reduction, and on-sky performance as of the end of the commissioning phase in 2015 March. With an interferometric baseline of 14.4 m, the LBTI nuller is specifically tuned to resolve the habitable zone of nearby main-sequence stars, where warm exozodiacal dust emission peaks. Measuring the exozodi luminosity function of nearby main-sequence stars is a key milestone to prepare for future exo-Earth direct imaging instruments. Thanks to recent progress in wavefront control and phase stabilization, as well as in data reduction techniques, the LBTI demonstrated in 2015 February a calibrated null accuracy of 0.05% over a 3 hr long observing sequence on the bright nearby A3V star β Leo. This is equivalent to an exozodiacal disk density of 15-30 zodi for a Sun-like star located at 10 pc, depending on the adopted disk model. This result sets a new record for high-contrast mid-infrared interferometric imaging and opens a new window on the study of planetary systems.

  12. Neto2-null mice have impaired GABAergic inhibition and are susceptible to seizures.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Vivek; Dargaei, Zahra; Ivakine, Evgueni A; Hartmann, Anna-Maria; Ng, David; Chevrier, Jonah; Ormond, Jake; Nothwang, Hans Gerd; McInnes, Roderick R; Woodin, Melanie A

    2015-01-01

    Neto2 is a transmembrane protein that interacts with the neuron-specific K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (KCC2) in the central nervous system (CNS). Efficient KCC2 transport is essential for setting the neuronal Cl(-) gradient, which is required for fast GABAergic inhibition. Neto2 is required to maintain the normal abundance of KCC2 in neurons, and increases KCC2 function by binding to the active oligomeric form of this cotransporter. In the present study, we characterized GABAergic inhibition and KCC2-mediated neuronal chloride homeostasis in pyramidal neurons from adult hippocampal slices. Using gramicidin perforated patch clamp recordings we found that the reversal potential for GABA (EGABA) was significantly depolarized. We also observed that surface levels of KCC2 and phosphorylation of KCC2 serine 940 (Ser940) were reduced in Neto2(-/-) neurons compared to wild-type controls. To examine GABAergic inhibition we recorded spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) and found that Neto2(-/-) neurons had significant reductions in both their amplitude and frequency. Based on the critical role of Neto2 in regulating GABAergic inhibition we rationalized that Neto2-null mice would be prone to seizure activity. We found that Neto2-null mice demonstrated a decrease in the latency to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and an increase in seizure severity. PMID:26441539

  13. Non-linear tearing of 3D null point current sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Wyper, P. F. Pontin, D. I.

    2014-08-15

    The manner in which the rate of magnetic reconnection scales with the Lundquist number in realistic three-dimensional (3D) geometries is still an unsolved problem. It has been demonstrated that in 2D rapid non-linear tearing allows the reconnection rate to become almost independent of the Lundquist number (the “plasmoid instability”). Here, we present the first study of an analogous instability in a fully 3D geometry, defined by a magnetic null point. The 3D null current layer is found to be susceptible to an analogous instability but is marginally more stable than an equivalent 2D Sweet-Parker-like layer. Tearing of the sheet creates a thin boundary layer around the separatrix surface, contained within a flux envelope with a hyperbolic structure that mimics a spine-fan topology. Efficient mixing of flux between the two topological domains occurs as the flux rope structures created during the tearing process evolve within this envelope. This leads to a substantial increase in the rate of reconnection between the two domains.

  14. A near-null magnetic field affects cryptochrome-related hypocotyl growth and flowering in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chunxiao; Yin, Xiao; Lv, Yan; Wu, Changzhe; Zhang, Yuxia; Song, Tao

    2012-03-01

    The blue light receptor, cryptochrome, has been suggested to act as a magnetoreceptor based on the proposition that photochemical reactions are involved in sensing the geomagnetic field. But the effects of the geomagnetic field on cryptochrome remain unclear. Although the functions of cryptochrome have been well demonstrated for Arabidopsis, the effect of the geomagnetic field on the growth of Arabidopsis and its mechanism of action are poorly understood. We eliminated the local geomagnetic field to grow Arabidopsis in a near-null magnetic field and found that the inhibition of Arabidopsis hypocotyl growth by white light was weakened, and flowering time was delayed. The expressions of three cryptochrome-signaling-related genes, PHYB, CO and FT also changed; the transcript level of PHYB was elevated ca. 40%, and that of CO and FT was reduced ca. 40% and 50%, respectively. These data suggest that the effects of a near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis are cryptochrome-related, which may be revealed by a modification of the active state of cryptochrome and the subsequent signaling cascade.

  15. Nulling Data Reduction and On-sky Performance of the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defrère, D.; Hinz, P. M.; Mennesson, B.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Skemer, A. J.; Bailey, V.; Danchi, W. C.; Downey, E. C.; Durney, O.; Grenz, P.; Hill, J. M.; McMahon, T. J.; Montoya, M.; Spalding, E.; Vaz, A.; Absil, O.; Arbo, P.; Bailey, H.; Brusa, G.; Bryden, G.; Esposito, S.; Gaspar, A.; Haniff, C. A.; Kennedy, G. M.; Leisenring, J. M.; Marion, L.; Nowak, M.; Pinna, E.; Powell, K.; Puglisi, A.; Rieke, G.; Roberge, A.; Serabyn, E.; Sosa, R.; Stapeldfeldt, K.; Su, K.; Weinberger, A. J.; Wyatt, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) is a versatile instrument designed for high angular resolution and high-contrast infrared imaging (1.5–13 μm). In this paper, we focus on the mid-infrared (8–13 μm) nulling mode and present its theory of operation, data reduction, and on-sky performance as of the end of the commissioning phase in 2015 March. With an interferometric baseline of 14.4 m, the LBTI nuller is specifically tuned to resolve the habitable zone of nearby main-sequence stars, where warm exozodiacal dust emission peaks. Measuring the exozodi luminosity function of nearby main-sequence stars is a key milestone to prepare for future exo-Earth direct imaging instruments. Thanks to recent progress in wavefront control and phase stabilization, as well as in data reduction techniques, the LBTI demonstrated in 2015 February a calibrated null accuracy of 0.05% over a 3 hr long observing sequence on the bright nearby A3V star β Leo. This is equivalent to an exozodiacal disk density of 15–30 zodi for a Sun-like star located at 10 pc, depending on the adopted disk model. This result sets a new record for high-contrast mid-infrared interferometric imaging and opens a new window on the study of planetary systems.

  16. Yeast mutants overproducing iso-cytochromes c

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, F.; Cardillo, T.S.; Errede, B.; Friedman, L.; McKnight, G.; Stiles, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    For over 15 years, the iso-cytochrome c system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to investigate a multitude of problems in genetics and molecular biology. More recently, attention has been focused on using mutants for examining translation and transcriptional processes and for probing regulatory regions governing gene expression. In an effort to explore regulatory mechanisms and to investigate mutational alterations that lead to increased levels of gene products, we have isolated and characterized mutants that overproduce cytochrome c. In this paper we have briefly summarized background information of some essential features of the iso-cytochrome c system and we have described the types of mutants that overproduce iso-1-cytochrome c or iso-2-cytochrome c. Genetic procedures and recombinant DNA procedures were used to demonstrate that abnormally high amounts of gene products occur in mutants as result of duplications of gene copies or of extended alteration of regulatory regions. The results summarized in this paper point out the requirements of gross mutational changes or rearrangements of chromosomal segments for augmenting gene products.

  17. Genetic analysis of salt-tolerant mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Quesada, V; Ponce, M R; Micol, J L

    2000-01-01

    Stress caused by the increased salinity of irrigated fields impairs plant growth and is one of the major constraints that limits crop productivity in many important agricultural areas. As a contribution to solving such agronomic problems, we have carried out a large-scale screening for Arabidopsis thaliana mutants induced on different genetic backgrounds by EMS treatment, fast neutron bombardment, or T-DNA insertions. From the 675,500 seeds we screened, 17 mutant lines were isolated, all but one of which yielded 25-70% germination levels on 250 mm NaCl medium, a condition in which their ancestor ecotypes are unable to germinate. Monogenic recessive inheritance of NaCl-tolerant germination was displayed with incomplete penetrance by all the selected mutants, which fell into five complementation groups. These were named SALOBRENO (SAN) and mapped relative to polymorphic microsatellites, the map positions of three of them suggesting that they are novel genes. Strains carrying mutations in the SAN1-SAN4 genes display similar responses to both ionic effects and osmotic pressure, their germination being NaCl and mannitol tolerant but KCl and Na(2)SO(4) sensitive. In addition, NaCl-, KCl-, and mannitol-tolerant as well as abscisic-acid-insensitive germination was displayed by sañ5, whose genetic and molecular characterization indicates that it carries an extremely hypomorphic or null allele of the ABI4 gene, its deduced protein product lacking the APETALA2 DNA binding domain. PMID:10629000

  18. Broadband Achromatic Phase Shifter for a Nulling Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Lyon, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Nulling interferometry is a technique for imaging exoplanets in which light from the parent star is suppressed using destructive interference. Light from the star is divided into two beams and a phase shift of radians is introduced into one of the beams. When the beams are recombined, they destructively interfere to produce a deep null. For monochromatic light, this is implemented by introducing an optical path difference (OPD) between the two beams equal to lambda/2, where lambda is the wavelength of the light. For broadband light, however, a different phase shift will be introduced at each wavelength and the two beams will not effectively null when recombined. Various techniques have been devised to introduce an achromatic phase shift a phase shift that is uniform across a particular bandwidth. One popular technique is to use a series of dispersive elements to introduce a wavelength-dependent optical path in one or both of the arms of the interferometer. By intelligently choosing the number, material and thickness of a series of glass plates, a nearly uniform, arbitrary phase shift can be introduced between two arms of an interferometer. There are several constraints that make choosing the number, type, and thickness of materials a difficult problem, such as the size of the bandwidth to be nulled. Several solutions have been found for bandwidths on the order of 20 to 30 percent (Delta(lambda)/lambda(sub c)) in the mid-infrared region. However, uniform phase shifts over a larger bandwidth in the visible regime between 480 to 960 nm (67 percent) remain difficult to obtain at the tolerances necessary for exoplanet detection. A configuration of 10 dispersive glass plates was developed to be used as an achromatic phase shifter in nulling interferometry. Five glass plates were placed in each arm of the interferometer and an additional vacuum distance was also included in the second arm of the interferometer. This configuration creates a phase shift of pi radians with

  19. Huntington's disease cerebrospinal fluid seeds aggregation of mutant huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Tan, Z; Dai, W; van Erp, T G M; Overman, J; Demuro, A; Digman, M A; Hatami, A; Albay, R; Sontag, E M; Potkin, K T; Ling, S; Macciardi, F; Bunney, W E; Long, J D; Paulsen, J S; Ringman, J M; Parker, I; Glabe, C; Thompson, L M; Chiu, W; Potkin, S G

    2015-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat producing a mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) with a polyglutamine-repeat expansion. Onset of symptoms in mutant huntingtin gene-carrying individuals remains unpredictable. We report that synthetic polyglutamine oligomers and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from BACHD transgenic rats and from human HD subjects can seed mutant huntingtin aggregation in a cell model and its cell lysate. Our studies demonstrate that seeding requires the mutant huntingtin template and may reflect an underlying prion-like protein propagation mechanism. Light and cryo-electron microscopy show that synthetic seeds nucleate and enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation. This seeding assay distinguishes HD subjects from healthy and non-HD dementia controls without overlap (blinded samples). Ultimately, this seeding property in HD patient CSF may form the basis of a molecular biomarker assay to monitor HD and evaluate therapies that target mHTT.

  20. Huntington's disease cerebrospinal fluid seeds aggregation of mutant huntingtin

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Z; Dai, W; van Erp, T G M; Overman, J; Demuro, A; Digman, M A; Hatami, A; Albay, R; Sontag, E M; Potkin, K T; Ling, S; Macciardi, F; Bunney, W E; Long, J D; Paulsen, J S; Ringman, J M; Parker, I; Glabe, C; Thompson, L M; Chiu, W; Potkin, S G

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat producing a mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) with a polyglutamine-repeat expansion. Onset of symptoms in mutant huntingtin gene-carrying individuals remains unpredictable. We report that synthetic polyglutamine oligomers and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from BACHD transgenic rats and from human HD subjects can seed mutant huntingtin aggregation in a cell model and its cell lysate. Our studies demonstrate that seeding requires the mutant huntingtin template and may reflect an underlying prion-like protein propagation mechanism. Light and cryo-electron microscopy show that synthetic seeds nucleate and enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation. This seeding assay distinguishes HD subjects from healthy and non-HD dementia controls without overlap (blinded samples). Ultimately, this seeding property in HD patient CSF may form the basis of a molecular biomarker assay to monitor HD and evaluate therapies that target mHTT. PMID:26100538

  1. Vacuum Nuller Testbed Performance, Characterization and Null Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, R. G.; Clampin, M.; Petrone, P.; Mallik, U.; Madison, T.; Bolcar, M.; Noecker, C.; Kendrick, S.; Helmbrecht, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) can detect and characterize exoplanets with filled, segmented and sparse aperture telescopes, thereby spanning the choice of future internal coronagraph exoplanet missions. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed a Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) to advance this approach, and assess and advance technologies needed to realize a VNC as a flight instrument. The VNT is an ultra-stable testbed operating at 15 Hz in vacuum. It consists of a MachZehnder nulling interferometer; modified with a "W" configuration to accommodate a hexpacked MEMS based deformable mirror (DM), coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. The 2-output channels are imaged with a vacuum photon counting camera and conventional camera. Error-sensing and feedback to DM and delay line with control algorithms are implemented in a real-time architecture. The inherent advantage of the VNC is that it is its own interferometer and directly controls its errors by exploiting images from bright and dark channels simultaneously. Conservation of energy requires the sum total of the photon counts be conserved independent of the VNC state. Thus sensing and control bandwidth is limited by the target stars throughput, with the net effect that the higher bandwidth offloads stressing stability tolerances within the telescope. We report our recent progress with the VNT towards achieving an incremental sequence of contrast milestones of 10(exp 8) , 10(exp 9) and 10(exp 10) respectively at inner working angles approaching 2A/D. Discussed will be the optics, lab results, technologies, and null control. Shown will be evidence that the milestones have been achieved.

  2. Characterization of a compensatory mutant of Leishmania major that lacks ether lipids but exhibits normal growth, and G418 and hygromycin resistance.

    PubMed

    Zufferey, Rachel; Bibis, Stergios S; Zhu, Tongtong; Dhalladoo, Subbhalakshmi

    2012-03-01

    Ether glycerolipid biosynthesis in Leishmania major initiates with the acylation of dihydroxyacetonephosphate by the glycosomal dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase LmDAT. We previously reported that a null mutant of LmDAT is severely affected in logarithmic growth, survival during stationary phase, and in virulence in mice. In addition, it lacks all ether glycerolipids, produces altered forms of the ether-lipid based virulence factors lipophosphoglycan and increased levels of GPI-anchored protein gp63. Here, we describe the characterization of a compensatory mutant of a null strain of LmDAT, Δlmdat/Δlmdat(rev). Similarly to the null mutant, the Δlmdat/Δlmdat(rev) strain formed altered forms of lipophosphoglycan and increased levels of gp63, and was avirulent in mice infection. Further, dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase activity was absent in the revertant clone, indicating that a mutation in another acyltransferase gene did not confer dihydroxyacetonephosphate specificity. In contrast, the revertant grew normally but still exhibited poor survival during stationary phase. In addition, agarose gel analysis of its genomic DNA failed to detect any amplified DNA. Surprisingly, its sensitivity to aminoglycoside based antibiotics G418 and hygromycin was lower than that of the null mutant, wild type and complemented line. PMID:22306069

  3. Characterization of a compensatory mutant of Leishmania major that lacks ether lipids but exhibits normal growth, and G418 and hygromycin resistance.

    PubMed

    Zufferey, Rachel; Bibis, Stergios S; Zhu, Tongtong; Dhalladoo, Subbhalakshmi

    2012-03-01

    Ether glycerolipid biosynthesis in Leishmania major initiates with the acylation of dihydroxyacetonephosphate by the glycosomal dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase LmDAT. We previously reported that a null mutant of LmDAT is severely affected in logarithmic growth, survival during stationary phase, and in virulence in mice. In addition, it lacks all ether glycerolipids, produces altered forms of the ether-lipid based virulence factors lipophosphoglycan and increased levels of GPI-anchored protein gp63. Here, we describe the characterization of a compensatory mutant of a null strain of LmDAT, Δlmdat/Δlmdat(rev). Similarly to the null mutant, the Δlmdat/Δlmdat(rev) strain formed altered forms of lipophosphoglycan and increased levels of gp63, and was avirulent in mice infection. Further, dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase activity was absent in the revertant clone, indicating that a mutation in another acyltransferase gene did not confer dihydroxyacetonephosphate specificity. In contrast, the revertant grew normally but still exhibited poor survival during stationary phase. In addition, agarose gel analysis of its genomic DNA failed to detect any amplified DNA. Surprisingly, its sensitivity to aminoglycoside based antibiotics G418 and hygromycin was lower than that of the null mutant, wild type and complemented line.

  4. A new concept of achromatic phase shifter for nulling interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouan, Daniel; Pelat, D.; Ygouf, Marie; Reess, Jean-Michel; Chemla, Fanny; Riaud, Pierre

    2007-09-01

    Direct detection and characterization of a planet around a star by nulling interferometry, must be efficient in a large wavelength domain in order to detect simultaneously the infrared bio-tracers CO II, O 3 and H IIO. This condition requires that an achromatic phase shift of π be implemented, with an accuracy sufficient for achieving a deep nulling at all considered wavelengths. Several solutions have been presented. We present here a new concept for designing such an achromatic phase shifter. It is based on two cellular mirrors (alternatively, transparent plates can be used) where cells have thickness which are respectively odd and even multiples of a quarter of the central wavelength. Each cell introduces then a phase shift of (2k + 1)π or of 2kπ, on the fraction of the wave it reflects. Each mirror is introduced in the collimated beam issued from one or the other telescopes. Because of the odd/even distribution, a destructive interference is obviously produced on axis for the central wavelength when recombining the two beams. The trick to obtain a quasi-achromatisation is to distribute the thickness of the cells, so that the nulling is also efficient for a wavelength not too far from the central wavelength. We show that if the thicknesses are distributed according to the Pascal triangle, a fair quasi-achromatism is reached. This effect is the more efficient that the number of cells is large. For instance, with 256 × 256 cells, where phase shift range is between -6π and +6π one shows that the nulling reaches 10 -6 on the wavelength range [0.7λ 0, 1.3λ 0] which corresponds roughly to the DARWIN specification. In a second step, we study the optimum way to distribute the cells in the plane of the pupil. The most important criterion is the isolation of the planet image from the residual image of the star. Several efficient configurations are presented. Finally we consider some practical aspects on a device belonging to the real world and on the bench we are

  5. Geometrodynamics in a spherically symmetric, static crossflow of null dust

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, Zsolt; Kovacs, Zoltan; Gergely, Laszlo A.

    2006-10-15

    The spherically symmetric, static space-time generated by a crossflow of noninteracting radiation streams, treated in the geometrical optics limit (null dust), is equivalent to an anisotropic fluid forming a radiation atmosphere of a star. This reference fluid provides a preferred/internal time, which is employed as a canonical coordinate. Among the advantages we encounter a new Hamiltonian constraint, which becomes linear in the momentum conjugate to the internal time (therefore yielding a functional Schroedinger equation after quantization), and a strongly commuting algebra of the new constraints.

  6. Selective reconstitution of liver cholesterol biosynthesis promotes lung maturation but does not prevent neonatal lethality in Dhcr7 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongwei; Li, Man; Tint, G Stephen; Chen, Jianliang; Xu, Guorong; Patel, Shailendra B

    2007-01-01

    Background Targeted disruption of the murine 3β-hydroxysterol-Δ7-reductase gene (Dhcr7), an animal model of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, leads to loss of cholesterol synthesis and neonatal death that can be partially rescued by transgenic replacement of DHCR7 expression in brain during embryogenesis. To gain further insight into the role of non-brain tissue cholesterol deficiency in the pathophysiology, we tested whether the lethal phenotype could be abrogated by selective transgenic complementation with DHCR7 expression in the liver. Results We generated mice that carried a liver-specific human DHCR7 transgene whose expression was driven by the human apolipoprotein E (ApoE) promoter and its associated liver-specific enhancer. These mice were then crossed with Dhcr7+/- mutants to generate Dhcr7-/- mice bearing a human DHCR7 transgene. Robust hepatic transgene expression resulted in significant improvement of cholesterol homeostasis with cholesterol concentrations increasing to 80~90 % of normal levels in liver and lung. Significantly, cholesterol deficiency in brain was not altered. Although late gestational lung sacculation defect reported previously was significantly improved, there was no parallel increase in postnatal survival in the transgenic mutant mice. Conclusion The reconstitution of DHCR7 function selectively in liver induced a significant improvement of cholesterol homeostasis in non-brain tissues, but failed to rescue the neonatal lethality of Dhcr7 null mice. These results provided further evidence that CNS defects caused by Dhcr7 null likely play a major role in the lethal pathogenesis of Dhcr7-/- mice, with the peripheral organs contributing the morbidity. PMID:17408495

  7. TP53 mutations induced by BPDE in Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null human TP53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kucab, Jill E; van Steeg, Harry; Luijten, Mirjam; Schmeiser, Heinz H; White, Paul A; Phillips, David H; Arlt, Volker M

    2015-03-01

    Somatic mutations in the tumour suppressor gene TP53 occur in more than 50% of human tumours; in some instances exposure to environmental carcinogens can be linked to characteristic mutational signatures. The Hupki (human TP53 knock-in) mouse embryo fibroblast (HUF) immortalization assay (HIMA) is a useful model for studying the impact of environmental carcinogens on TP53 mutagenesis. In an effort to increase the frequency of TP53-mutated clones achievable in the HIMA, we generated nucleotide excision repair (NER)-deficient HUFs by crossing the Hupki mouse with an Xpa-knockout (Xpa-Null) mouse. We hypothesized that carcinogen-induced DNA adducts would persist in the TP53 sequence of Xpa-Null HUFs leading to an increased propensity for mismatched base pairing and mutation during replication of adducted DNA. We found that Xpa-Null Hupki mice, and HUFs derived from them, were more sensitive to the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) than their wild-type (Xpa-WT) counterparts. Following treatment with the reactive metabolite of BaP, benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null HUF cultures were subjected to the HIMA. A significant increase in TP53 mutations on the transcribed strand was detected in Xpa-Null HUFs compared to Xpa-WT HUFs, but the TP53-mutant frequency overall was not significantly different between the two genotypes. BPDE induced mutations primarily at G:C base pairs, with approximately half occurring at CpG sites, and the predominant mutation type was G:C>T:A in both Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null cells. Further, several of the TP53 mutation hotspots identified in smokers' lung cancer were mutated by BPDE in HUFs (codons 157, 158, 245, 248, 249, 273). Therefore, the pattern and spectrum of BPDE-induced TP53 mutations in the HIMA are consistent with TP53 mutations detected in lung tumours of smokers. While Xpa-Null HUFs exhibited increased sensitivity to BPDE-induced damage on the transcribed strand, NER-deficiency did not enhance TP53

  8. TP53 mutations induced by BPDE in Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null human TP53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse embryo fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kucab, Jill E.; van Steeg, Harry; Luijten, Mirjam; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; White, Paul A.; Phillips, David H.; Arlt, Volker M.

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the tumour suppressor gene TP53 occur in more than 50% of human tumours; in some instances exposure to environmental carcinogens can be linked to characteristic mutational signatures. The Hupki (human TP53 knock-in) mouse embryo fibroblast (HUF) immortalization assay (HIMA) is a useful model for studying the impact of environmental carcinogens on TP53 mutagenesis. In an effort to increase the frequency of TP53-mutated clones achievable in the HIMA, we generated nucleotide excision repair (NER)-deficient HUFs by crossing the Hupki mouse with an Xpa-knockout (Xpa-Null) mouse. We hypothesized that carcinogen-induced DNA adducts would persist in the TP53 sequence of Xpa-Null HUFs leading to an increased propensity for mismatched base pairing and mutation during replication of adducted DNA. We found that Xpa-Null Hupki mice, and HUFs derived from them, were more sensitive to the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) than their wild-type (Xpa-WT) counterparts. Following treatment with the reactive metabolite of BaP, benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null HUF cultures were subjected to the HIMA. A significant increase in TP53 mutations on the transcribed strand was detected in Xpa-Null HUFs compared to Xpa-WT HUFs, but the TP53-mutant frequency overall was not significantly different between the two genotypes. BPDE induced mutations primarily at G:C base pairs, with approximately half occurring at CpG sites, and the predominant mutation type was G:C > T:A in both Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null cells. Further, several of the TP53 mutation hotspots identified in smokers’ lung cancer were mutated by BPDE in HUFs (codons 157, 158, 245, 248, 249, 273). Therefore, the pattern and spectrum of BPDE-induced TP53 mutations in the HIMA are consistent with TP53 mutations detected in lung tumours of smokers. While Xpa-Null HUFs exhibited increased sensitivity to BPDE-induced damage on the transcribed strand, NER-deficiency did not

  9. The anxiety-like phenotype of 5-HT receptor null mice is associated with genetic background-specific perturbations in the prefrontal cortex GABA-glutamate system.

    PubMed

    Bruening, S; Oh, E; Hetzenauer, A; Escobar-Alvarez, S; Westphalen, R I; Hemmings, H C; Singewald, N; Shippenberg, T; Toth, M

    2006-11-01

    A deficit in the serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor has been found in panic and post-traumatic stress disorders, and genetic inactivation of the receptor results in an anxiety-like phenotype in mice on both the C57Bl6 and Swiss-Webster genetic backgrounds. Anxiety is associated with increased neuronal activity in the prefrontal cortex and here we describe changes in glutamate and GABA uptake of C57Bl6 receptor null mice. Although these alterations were not present in Swiss-Webster null mice, we have previously reported reductions in GABA(A) receptor expression in these but not in C57Bl6 null mice. This demonstrates that inactivation of the 5-HT(1A) receptor elicits different and genetic background-dependent perturbations in the prefrontal cortex GABA/glutamate system. These perturbations can result in a change in the balance between excitation and inhibition, and indeed both C57Bl6 and Swiss-Webster null mice show signs of increased neuronal excitability. Because neuronal activity in the prefrontal cortex controls the extent of response to anxiogenic stimuli, the genetic background-specific perturbations in glutamate and GABA neurotransmission in C57Bl6 and Swiss-Webster 5-HT(1A) receptor null mice may contribute to their shared anxiety phenotype. Our study shows that multiple strains of genetically altered mice could help us to understand the common and individual features of anxiety.

  10. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21-Null Mice Do Not Exhibit an Impaired Response to Fasting

    PubMed Central

    Antonellis, Patrick Joseph; Hayes, Meghan Patricia; Adams, Andrew Charles

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a pleotropic metabolic regulator, expression of which is elevated during fasting. To this end, the precise role played by FGF21 in the biology of fasting has been the subject of several recent studies, which have demonstrated contributions to the regulation of both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. In the present study, we compared wild-type (WT) and FGF21-null (FGF21KO) mice, demonstrating that, despite the significant induction of FGF21 during fasting in the WT animals, our strain of FGF21-null mice exhibits only limited impairments in their adaptation to nutrient deprivation. Specifically, fasted FGF21KO mice display a mild attenuation of gluconeogenic transcriptional induction in the liver accompanied by partially blunted glucose production in response to a pyruvate challenge. Furthermore, FGF21KO mice displayed only minor impairments in lipid metabolism in the fasted state, limited to accumulation of hepatic triglycerides and a reduction in expression of genes associated with fatty acid oxidation. To address the possibility of compensation to germline deletion of FGF21, we further interrogated the role of endogenous FGF21 via acute pharmacological blockade of FGF21 signaling. At the transcriptional level, we show that FGF21 signaling is required for full induction of gluconeogenic and oxidative genes in the liver. However, corroborating our findings in FGF21KO mice, pharmacological blockade of the FGF21 axis did not profoundly disrupt the physiological response to fasting. Taken as a whole, these data demonstrate that, while FGF21 is partially required for appropriate gene expression during the fed to fasted transition, its absence does not significantly impact the downstream physiology of the fasted state. PMID:27445980

  11. Similar L-dopa-stimulated motor activity in mice with adult-onset 6-hydroxydopamine-induced symmetric dopamine denervation and in transcription factor Pitx3 null mice with perinatal-onset symmetric dopamine denervation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Sagot, Ben; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2015-07-30

    The transcription factor Pitx3 null mutant (Pitx3Null) mice have a constitutive perinatal-onset and symmetric bilateral dopamine (DA) loss in the striatum. In these mice l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-dopa) induces apparently normal horizontal movements (walking) but also upward movements consisting of the vertical body trunk and waving paws that are absent in normal animals and in animals with the classic unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion-induced DA denervation. Thus, a concern is that the perinatal timing of the DA loss and potential developmental abnormalities in Pitx3Null mice may underlie these upward movements, thus reducing the usefulness as a DA denervation model. Here we show that in normal wild-type (Pitx3WT) mice with adult-onset symmetric, bilateral 6-OHDA-induced DA lesion in the dorsal striatum, l-dopa induces normal horizontal movements and upward movements that are qualitatively identical to those in Pitx3Null mice. Furthermore, after unilateral 6-OHDA lesion of the residual DA innervation in the striatum in Pitx3Null mice, l-dopa induces contraversive rotation that is similar to that in Pitx3WT mice with the classic unilateral 6-OHDA lesion. These results indicate that in Pitx3Null mice, the bilateral symmetric DA denervation in the dorsal striatum is sufficient for expressing the l-dopa-induced motor phenotype and the perinatal timing of their DA loss is not a determining factor, providing further evidence that Pitx3Null mice are a convenient and suitable mouse model to study the consequences of DA loss and dopaminergic replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease.

  12. Elucidation of the Photorhabdus temperata Genome and Generation of a Transposon Mutant Library To Identify Motility Mutants Altered in Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Sheldon; Rowedder, Holli; Michaels, Brandye; Bullock, Hannah; Jackobeck, Ryan; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Durakovic, Umjia; Gately, Jon; Janicki, Erik

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora forms a specific mutualistic association with its bacterial partner Photorhabdus temperata. The microbial symbiont is required for nematode growth and development, and symbiont recognition is strain specific. The aim of this study was to sequence the genome of P. temperata and identify genes that plays a role in the pathogenesis of the Photorhabdus-Heterorhabditis symbiosis. A draft genome sequence of P. temperata strain NC19 was generated. The 5.2-Mb genome was organized into 17 scaffolds and contained 4,808 coding sequences (CDS). A genetic approach was also pursued to identify mutants with altered motility. A bank of 10,000 P. temperata transposon mutants was generated and screened for altered motility patterns. Five classes of motility mutants were identified: (i) nonmotile mutants, (ii) mutants with defective or aberrant swimming motility, (iii) mutant swimmers that do not require NaCl or KCl, (iv) hyperswimmer mutants that swim at an accelerated rate, and (v) hyperswarmer mutants that are able to swarm on the surface of 1.25% agar. The transposon insertion sites for these mutants were identified and used to investigate other physiological properties, including insect pathogenesis. The motility-defective mutant P13-7 had an insertion in the RNase II gene and showed reduced virulence and production of extracellular factors. Genetic complementation of this mutant restored wild-type activity. These results demonstrate a role for RNA turnover in insect pathogenesis and other physiological functions. IMPORTANCE The relationship between Photorhabdus and entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis represents a well-known mutualistic system that has potential as a biological control agent. The elucidation of the genome of the bacterial partner and role that RNase II plays in its life cycle has provided a greater understanding of Photorhabdus as both an insect pathogen and a nematode symbiont. PMID

  13. Reexamination of alcohol dehydrogenase structural mutants in Drosophila using protein blotting

    SciTech Connect

    Hollocher, H.; Place, A.R.

    1987-06-01

    Using protein blotting and an immuno-overlay procedure, the authors have reexamined the cross-reacting material produced by ADH null-activity mutants generated with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Of the 13 mutants, 11 have an immunodetectable polypeptide of wild-type size. The native and urea denatured isoelectric points (pI) establish that 7 of 13 of the mutations have no effect on protein charge. The electrophoretic mobilities of each variant on increasing percent acrylamide gels (Ferguson analysis), reveal that 9 of the 11 immunodetectable mutations have retained the ability form dimers under native conditions. None of the inactive mutant proteins has the ability to form the adduct-bound isozyme. The authors have found no correlation between protein pI and i vivo stability. The observed frequencies of specific charge class alterations do not dispute the propensity of G:A transitions previously found for EMS mutagenesis.

  14. Particle Acceleration at Reconnecting 3D Null Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanier, A.; Browning, P.; Gordovskyy, M.; Dalla, S.

    2012-12-01

    Hard X-ray observations from the RHESSI spacecraft indicate that a significant fraction of solar flare energy release is in non-thermal energetic particles. A plausible acceleration mechanism for these are the strong electric fields associated with reconnection, a process that can be particularly efficient when particles become unmagnetised near to null points. This mechanism has been well studied in 2D, at X-points within reconnecting current sheets; however, 3D reconnection models show significant qualitative differences and it is not known whether these new models are efficient for particle acceleration. We place test particles in analytic model fields (eg. Craig and Fabling 1996) and numerical solutions to the the resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations near reconnecting 3D nulls. We compare the behaviour of these test particles with previous results for test particle acceleration in ideal MHD models (Dalla and Browning 2005). We find that the fan model is very efficient due to an increasing "guide field" that stabilises particles against ejection from the current sheet. However, the spine model, which was the most promising in the ideal case, gives weak acceleration as the reconnection electric field is localised to a narrow cylinder about the spine axis.

  15. Geometry of extended null supersymmetry in M theory

    SciTech Connect

    Conamhna, Oisin A.P. Mac

    2006-02-15

    For supersymmetric spacetimes in 11 dimensions admitting a null Killing spinor, a set of explicit necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of any number of arbitrary additional Killing spinors is derived. The necessary and sufficient conditions are comprised of algebraic relationships, linear in the spinorial components, between the spinorial components and their first derivatives, and the components of the spin connection and four-form. The integrability conditions for the Killing spinor equation are also analyzed in detail, to determine which components of the field equations are implied by arbitrary additional supersymmetries and the four-form Bianchi identity. This provides a complete formalism for the systematic and exhaustive investigation of all spacetimes with extended null supersymmetry in 11 dimensions. The formalism is employed to show that the general bosonic solution of 11 dimensional supergravity admitting a G{sub 2} structure defined by four Killing spinors is either locally the direct product of R{sup 1,3} with a seven-manifold of G{sub 2} holonomy, or locally the Freund-Rubin direct product of AdS{sub 4} with a seven-manifold of weak G{sub 2} holonomy. In addition, all supersymmetric spacetimes admitting a (G{sub 2}xR{sup 7})xR{sup 2} structure are classified.

  16. Exoplanet detection and characterization via parallel broadband nulling coronagraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    The contrast and angular resolution required to directly image and characterize mature exoplanetary systems place stringent requirements on the space-based telescopes and starlight suppression systems needed to study spatial distributions of debris disks, exozodiacal dust, and individual planets at multiple epochs in their orbits. A nulling interferometer (nuller) is a coronagraphic suppression system that can be used with all telescope types, including those with obscured and segmented apertures envisioned for upcoming and future observatories. One of the challenges for detection and characterization of exoplanetary signals is achieving high contrast with broad spectral coverage. This work presents design concepts for broadband nulling over four parallel ˜20% bandpasses spanning the visible spectrum. Contrast-limiting effects of stellar angular extent, residual chromaticity of broadband phase shifters, and aperture diffraction are considered to reach simultaneous ≲2×10-8 contrast over separations spanning 0.2 to 0.9 arc sec for a 2.4-m telescope observing a Sun-like star at 10 pc. With added dark hole wavefront control and postprocessing point spread function subtraction techniques to further reduce scattered starlight, such a system could be capable of detecting the very the nearest Earth-like exoplanets and spectral characterization of several nearby extrasolar gas giants.

  17. Osteoclast differentiation and function in aquaglyceroporin AQP9 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yangjian; Song, Linhua; Wang, Yiding; Rojek, Aleksandra; Nielsen, Søren; Agre, Peter; Carbrey, Jennifer M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Information Osteoclasts are cells specialized for bone resorption and play important roles in bone growth and calcium homeostasis. Differentiation of osteoclasts involves fusion of bone marrow macrophage mononuclear precursors in response to extracellular signals. A dramatic increase in osteoclast cell volume occurs during osteoclast biogenesis and is believed to be mediated by Aquaporin 9 (AQP9), a membrane protein that can rapidly transport water and other small neutral solutes across cell membranes. Results Here we report an increase in expression of AQP9 during differentiation of a mouse macrophage cell line into osteoclasts. Bone marrow macrophages from wild type and AQP9 null mice differentiate into osteoclasts that have similar morphology, contain comparable numbers of nuclei, and digest synthetic bone to the same extent. Bones from wild type and AQP9 null mice contain similar numbers of osteoclasts and have comparable density and structure as measured by X-ray absorptiometry and micro-computed tomography. Conclusions Our data confirm that AQP9 expression rises during osteoclast biogenesis but indicate that AQP9 is not essential for osteoclast function or differentiation under normal physiological conditions. PMID:18666888

  18. Adaptive Nulling: A New Enabling Technology for Interferometric Exoplanet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Jeganathan, Muthu; Peters, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Deep, stable nulling of starlight requires careful control of the amplitudes and phases of the beams that are being combined. The detection of earth-like planets using the interferometer architectures currently being considered for the Terrestrial Planet Finder mission require that the E-field amplitudes are balanced at the level of approx. 0.1%, and the phases are controlled at the level of 1 mrad (corresponding to approx.1.5 nm for a wavelength of 10 microns). These conditions must be met simultaneously at all wavelengths across the science band, and for both polarization states, imposing unrealistic tolerances on the symmetry between the optical beamtrains. We introduce the concept of a compensator that is inserted into the beamtrain, which can adaptively correct for the mismatches across the spectrum, enabling deep nulls with realistic, imperfect optics. The design presented uses a deformable mirror to adjust the amplitude and phase of each beam as an arbitrary function of wavelength and polarization. A proof-of-concept experiment will be conducted at visible/near-IR wavelengths, followed by a system operating in the Mid-IR band.

  19. Plate with a hole obeys the averaged null energy condition

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Noah; Olum, Ken D.

    2005-07-15

    The negative energy density of Casimir systems appears to violate general relativity energy conditions. However, one cannot test the averaged null energy condition (ANEC) using standard calculations for perfectly reflecting plates, because the null geodesic would have to pass through the plates, where the calculation breaks down. To avoid this problem, we compute the contribution to ANEC for a geodesic that passes through a hole in a single plate. We consider both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in two and three space dimensions. We use a Babinet's principle argument to reduce the problem to a complementary finite disk correction to the perfect mirror result, which we then compute using scattering theory in elliptical and spheroidal coordinates. In the Dirichlet case, we find that the positive correction due to the hole overwhelms the negative contribution of the infinite plate. In the Neumann case, where the infinite plate gives a positive contribution, the hole contribution is smaller in magnitude, so again ANEC is obeyed. These results can be extended to the case of two plates in the limits of large and small hole radii. This system thus provides another example of a situation where ANEC turns out to be obeyed when one might expect it to be violated.

  20. A search for optical beacons: implications of null results.

    PubMed

    Blair, David G; Zadnik, Marjan G

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years a series of searches for interstellar radio beacons have taken place using the Parkes radio telescope. Here we report hitherto unpublished results from a search for optical beacons from 60 solar-type stars using the Perth-Lowell telescope. We discuss the significance of the null results from these searches, all of which were based on the interstellar contact channel hypothesis. While the null results of all searches to date can be explained simply by the nonexistence of electromagnetically communicating life elsewhere in the Milky Way, four other possible explanations that do not preclude its existence are proposed: (1) Extraterrestrial civilizations desiring to make contact through the use of electromagnetic beacons have a very low density in the Milky Way. (2) The interstellar contact channel hypothesis is incorrect, and beacons exist at frequencies that have not yet been searched. (3) The search has been incomplete in terms of sensitivity and/or target directions: Beacons exist, but more sensitive equipment and/or more searching is needed to achieve success. (4) The search has occurred before beacon signals can be expected to have arrived at the Earth, and beacon signals may be expected in the future. Based on consideration of the technology required for extraterrestrial civilizations to identify target planets, we argue that the fourth possibility is likely to be valid and that powerful, easily detectable beacons could be received in coming centuries.

  1. A search for optical beacons: implications of null results.

    PubMed

    Blair, David G; Zadnik, Marjan G

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years a series of searches for interstellar radio beacons have taken place using the Parkes radio telescope. Here we report hitherto unpublished results from a search for optical beacons from 60 solar-type stars using the Perth-Lowell telescope. We discuss the significance of the null results from these searches, all of which were based on the interstellar contact channel hypothesis. While the null results of all searches to date can be explained simply by the nonexistence of electromagnetically communicating life elsewhere in the Milky Way, four other possible explanations that do not preclude its existence are proposed: (1) Extraterrestrial civilizations desiring to make contact through the use of electromagnetic beacons have a very low density in the Milky Way. (2) The interstellar contact channel hypothesis is incorrect, and beacons exist at frequencies that have not yet been searched. (3) The search has been incomplete in terms of sensitivity and/or target directions: Beacons exist, but more sensitive equipment and/or more searching is needed to achieve success. (4) The search has occurred before beacon signals can be expected to have arrived at the Earth, and beacon signals may be expected in the future. Based on consideration of the technology required for extraterrestrial civilizations to identify target planets, we argue that the fourth possibility is likely to be valid and that powerful, easily detectable beacons could be received in coming centuries. PMID:12530240

  2. Isolation and characterization of tox mutants of corynebacteriophage beta.

    PubMed Central

    Laird, W; Groman, N

    1976-01-01

    Seventeen nontoxinogenic (tox) mutants of corynebacteriophage beta have been isolated by using a tissue culture screening technique. The mutants fall into four major classes. Two of the classes, I and II, appear to contain missense and nonsense mutants, respectively. However, classes III and IV have not been previously described. Class III mutants produce two proteins (CRMs) seriologically related to diphtheria toxin, but efforts to demonstrate the presence of more than one tox gene have been successful. Class IV mutants are phenotypically CRM-, failing to produce any detectable protein serologically related to diphtheria toxin. Genetic studies indicate that the mutations in class IV strains are not in a gene distinct form the structural gene for toxin, and that the CRM- strains retain at least a portion of that gene. A natural phage isolate, gamma, behaves in a completely parallel fashion to the class IV mutants. The production of tox+ recombinants through recombination of various pairs of tox phage mutants has been demonstrated. The implications of these findings for the natural history of diphtheria are discussed. Images PMID:820873

  3. Fast and Efficient Screening for Wheat Loss-of-Gene Mutants Using Multiplexed Melt Curve Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Mieog, Jos C.; Ral, Jean-Philippe F.

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a new approach in the screening for loss-of-gene mutants in Heavy Ion Bombardment (HIB) mutant populations of genetically complex organisms such as hexaploid bread wheat using multiplexed single-color (SYBR Green) melt curve analyses. The assay was set up for three target genes to test its validity and applicability. For each gene, three genome-specific primer pairs (one for each genome) with distinct melt curves were developed and multiplexed. This allowed screening for “single null mutants” (plants with the target gene deleted in one of the three genomes) for all three genomes in a single reaction. The first two genes (α-Amylase 3 and Epsilon Cyclase) were used to test the approach as HIB null lines for all three genomes were already available for these. The third assay was successfully applied to identify new single null lines of the target gene α-Amylase 2 in an in-house HIB wheat collection. The use of SYBR Green greatly reduced the time and/or cost investment compared to other techniques and the approach proved highly suitable for high-throughput applications. PMID:27459606

  4. Active phase-nulling of the self-mixing phase in a terahertz frequency quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Dean, P; Keeley, J; Valavanis, A; Bertling, K; Lim, Y L; Taimre, T; Alhathlool, R; Li, L H; Indjin, D; Rakić, A D; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G

    2015-03-15

    We demonstrate an active phase-nulling scheme for terahertz (THz) frequency quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) under optical feedback, by active electronic feedback control of the emission frequency. Using this scheme, the frequency tuning rate of a THz QCL is characterized, with significantly reduced experimental complexity compared to alternative approaches. Furthermore, we demonstrate real-time displacement sensing of targets, overcoming the resolution limits imposed by quantization in previously implemented fringe-counting methods. Our approach is readily applicable to high-frequency vibrometry and surface profiling of targets, as well as frequency-stabilization schemes for THz QCLs.

  5. Paramagnetism Paradoxes: Projectable Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Frederick C.; Vitz, Ed

    2008-01-01

    Drops of oil in Mn(SO[subscript 4])(aq) and drops of the solution in oil show opposite effects when brought near a rare earth magnet. Oxygen, nitrogen, and air bubbles atop water show expected attraction, repulsion, and null behavior, respectively. Air bubbles atop aqueous Mn(SO[subscript 4]) show paradoxical behavior because the magnet's…

  6. Non-contact time-resolved diffuse reflectance imaging at null source-detector separation.

    PubMed

    Mazurenka, M; Jelzow, A; Wabnitz, H; Contini, D; Spinelli, L; Pifferi, A; Cubeddu, R; Mora, A Dalla; Tosi, A; Zappa, F; Macdonald, R

    2012-01-01

    We report results of the proof-of-principle tests of a novel non-contact tissue imaging system. The system utilizes a quasi-null source-detector separation approach for time-domain near-infrared spectroscopy, taking advantage of an innovative state-of-the-art fast-gated single photon counting detector. Measurements on phantoms demonstrate the feasibility of the non-contact approach for the detection of optically absorbing perturbations buried up to a few centimeters beneath the surface of a tissue-like turbid medium. The measured depth sensitivity and spatial resolution of the new system are close to the values predicted by Monte Carlo simulations for the inhomogeneous medium and an ideal fast-gated detector, thus proving the feasibility of the non-contact approach for high density diffuse reflectance measurements on tissue. Potential applications of the system are also discussed. PMID:22274351

  7. Behavioral disturbances in estrogen-related receptor alpha-null mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Huxing; Lu, Yuan; Khan, Michael Z; Anderson, Rachel M; McDaniel, Latisha; Wilson, Hannah E; Yin, Terry C; Radley, Jason J; Pieper, Andrew A; Lutter, Michael

    2015-04-21

    Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, are common and severe mental illnesses of unknown etiology. Recently, we identified a rare missense mutation in the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ESRRA) that is associated with the development of eating disorders. However, little is known about ESRRA function in the brain. Here, we report that Esrra is expressed in the mouse brain and demonstrate that Esrra levels are regulated by energy reserves. Esrra-null female mice display a reduced operant response to a high-fat diet, compulsivity/behavioral rigidity, and social deficits. Selective Esrra knockdown in the prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortices of adult female mice recapitulates reduced operant response and increased compulsivity, respectively. These results indicate that Esrra deficiency in the mouse brain impairs behavioral responses in multiple functional domains.

  8. Behavioral Disturbances in Estrogen-Related Receptor alpha-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Huxing; Lu, Yuan; Khan, Michael Z.; Anderson, Rachel M.; McDaniel, Latisha; Wilson, Hannah E.; Yin, Terry C.; Radley, Jason J.; Pieper, Andrew A.; Lutter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, are common and severe mental illnesses of unknown etiology. Recently, we identified a rare missense mutation in the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ESRRA) that is associated with the development of eating disorders. However, little is known about ESRRA function in the brain. Here, we report that Esrra is expressed in the mouse brain and demonstrate that Esrra levels are regulated by energy reserves. Esrra-null female mice display a reduced operant response to a high-fat diet, compulsivity/behavioral rigidity, and social deficits. Selective Esrra knockdown in the prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortices of adult female mice recapitulates reduced operant response and increased compulsivity, respectively. These results indicate that Esrra deficiency in the mouse brain impairs behavioral responses in multiple functional domains. PMID:25865889

  9. Altered Arachidonate Distribution in Macrophages from Caveolin-1 Null Mice Leading to Reduced Eicosanoid Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Astudillo, Alma M.; Pérez-Chacón, Gema; Meana, Clara; Balgoma, David; Pol, Albert; del Pozo, Miguel A.; Balboa, María A.; Balsinde, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    In this work we have studied the effect of caveolin-1 deficiency on the mechanisms that regulate free arachidonic acid (AA) availability. The results presented here demonstrate that macrophages from caveolin-1-deficient mice exhibit elevated fatty acid incorporation and remodeling and a constitutively increased CoA-independent transacylase activity. Mass spectrometry-based lipidomic analyses reveal stable alterations in the profile of AA distribution among phospholipids, manifested by reduced levels of AA in choline glycerophospholipids but elevated levels in ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and phosphatidylinositol. Furthermore, macrophages from caveolin-1 null mice show decreased AA mobilization and prostaglandin E2 and LTB4 production upon cell stimulation. Collectively, these results provide insight into the role of caveolin-1 in AA homeostasis and suggest an important role for this protein in the eicosanoid biosynthetic response. PMID:21852231

  10. Reactivation of autophagy by spermidine ameliorates the myopathic defects of collagen VI-null mice.

    PubMed

    Chrisam, Martina; Pirozzi, Marinella; Castagnaro, Silvia; Blaauw, Bert; Polishchuck, Roman; Cecconi, Francesco; Grumati, Paolo; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a self-degradative process responsible for the clearance of damaged or unnecessary cellular components. We have previously found that persistence of dysfunctional organelles due to autophagy failure is a key event in the pathogenesis of COL6/collagen VI-related myopathies, and have demonstrated that reactivation of a proper autophagic flux rescues the muscle defects of Col6a1-null (col6a1(-/-)) mice. Here we show that treatment with spermidine, a naturally occurring nontoxic autophagy inducer, is beneficial for col6a1(-/-) mice. Systemic administration of spermidine in col6a1(-/-) mice reactivated autophagy in a dose-dependent manner, leading to a concurrent amelioration of the histological and ultrastructural muscle defects. The beneficial effects of spermidine, together with its being easy to administer and the lack of overt side effects, open the field for the design of novel nutraceutical strategies for the treatment of muscle diseases characterized by autophagy impairment.

  11. Behavioral disturbances in estrogen-related receptor alpha-null mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Huxing; Lu, Yuan; Khan, Michael Z; Anderson, Rachel M; McDaniel, Latisha; Wilson, Hannah E; Yin, Terry C; Radley, Jason J; Pieper, Andrew A; Lutter, Michael

    2015-04-21

    Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, are common and severe mental illnesses of unknown etiology. Recently, we identified a rare missense mutation in the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ESRRA) that is associated with the development of eating disorders. However, little is known about ESRRA function in the brain. Here, we report that Esrra is expressed in the mouse brain and demonstrate that Esrra levels are regulated by energy reserves. Esrra-null female mice display a reduced operant response to a high-fat diet, compulsivity/behavioral rigidity, and social deficits. Selective Esrra knockdown in the prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortices of adult female mice recapitulates reduced operant response and increased compulsivity, respectively. These results indicate that Esrra deficiency in the mouse brain impairs behavioral responses in multiple functional domains. PMID:25865889

  12. Speckle level suppression using an unbalanced nulling interferometer in a high-contrast imaging system.

    PubMed

    Yokochi, Kaito; Murakami, Naoshi; Nishikawa, Jun; Abe, Lyu; Tamura, Motohide; Tavrov, Alexander V; Takeda, Mistuo; Kurokawa, Takashi

    2011-03-14

    High-contrast imaging systems with a stellar halo suppression level of 10(-10) are required for direct detection of Earth-like extra-solar planets. We investigated a novel high-contrast imaging system with an unbalanced nulling interferometer (UNI) followed by phase and amplitude correction (PAC), which not only can reduce starlight but also can suppress the speckle level caused by wavefront aberrations. We successfully demonstrated that wavefront aberrations were sufficiently magnified by the UNI and the magnified aberrations were effectively corrected in amplitude and phase with two deformable mirrors. We confirmed that the suppression level of the speckle pattern with the proposed optics was beyond the limit of the adaptive optics performance. PMID:21445131

  13. Impaired Thermogenesis and a Molecular Signature for Brown Adipose Tissue in Id2 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Robles-Murguia, Maricela; Mathew, Deepa; Duffield, Giles E.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (ID2) is a helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor rhythmically expressed in many adult tissues. Our previous studies have demonstrated that Id2 null mice have sex-specific elevated glucose uptake in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Here we further explored the role of Id2 in the regulation of core body temperature over the circadian cycle and the impact of Id2 deficiency on genes involved in insulin signaling and adipogenesis in BAT. We discovered a reduced core body temperature in Id2−/− mice. Moreover, in Id2−/− BAT, 30 genes including Irs1, PPARs, and PGC-1s were identified as differentially expressed in a sex-specific pattern. These data provide valuable insights into the impact of Id2 deficiency on energy homeostasis of mice in a sex-specific manner. PMID:27144179

  14. MeCP2 R168X male and female mutant mice exhibit Rett-like behavioral deficits.

    PubMed

    Schaevitz, L R; Gómez, N B; Zhen, D P; Berger-Sweeney, J E

    2013-10-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a regressive developmental disorder characterized by motor and breathing abnormalities, anxiety, cognitive dysfunction and seizures. Approximately 95% of RTT cases are caused by more than 200 different mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). While numerous transgenic mice have been created modeling common mutations in MeCP2, the behavioral phenotype of many of these male and, especially, female mutant mice has not been well characterized. Thorough phenotyping of additional RTT mouse models will provide valuable insight into the effects of Mecp2 mutations on behavior and aid in the selection of appropriate models, ages, sexes and outcome measures for preclinical trials. In this study, we characterize the phenotype of male and female mice containing the early truncating MeCP2 R168X nonsense point mutation, one of the most common in RTT individuals, and compare the phenotypes to Mecp2 null mutants. Mecp2(R168X) mutants mirror many clinical features of RTT. Mecp2(R168X/y) males exhibit impaired motor and cognitive function and reduced anxiety. The behavioral phenotype is less severe and with later onset in Mecp2(R168X/+) females. Seizures were noted in 3.7% of Mecp2(R168X) mutant females. The phenotype in Mecp2(R168X/y) mutant males is remarkably similar to our previous characterizations of Mecp2 null males, whereas Mecp2(R168X/+) females exhibit a number of phenotypic differences from females heterozygous for a null Mecp2 mutation. This study describes a number of highly robust behavioral paradigms that can be used in preclinical drug trials and underscores the importance of including Mecp2 mutant females in preclinical studies.

  15. Error analysis and system optimization of non-null aspheric testing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yongjie; Yang, Yongying; Liu, Dong; Tian, Chao; Zhuo, Yongmo

    2010-10-01

    A non-null aspheric testing system, which employs partial null lens (PNL for short) and reverse iterative optimization reconstruction (ROR for short) technique, is proposed in this paper. Based on system modeling in ray tracing software, the parameter of each optical element is optimized and this makes system modeling more precise. Systematic error of non-null aspheric testing system is analyzed and can be categorized into two types, the error due to surface parameters of PNL in the system modeling and the rest from non-null interferometer by the approach of error storage subtraction. Experimental results show that, after systematic error is removed from testing result of non-null aspheric testing system, the aspheric surface is precisely reconstructed by ROR technique and the consideration of systematic error greatly increase the test accuracy of non-null aspheric testing system.

  16. Nucleus-targeted Dmp1 transgene fails to rescue dental defects in Dmp1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Xian; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hua; Yan, Kevin; Ward, Leanne; Lu, Yong-Bo; Feng, Jian-Quan

    2014-09-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is essential to odontogenesis. Its mutations in human subjects lead to dental problems such as dental deformities, hypomineralization and periodontal impairment. Primarily, DMP1 is considered as an extracellular matrix protein that promotes hydroxyapatite formation and activates intracellular signaling pathway via interacting with αvβ3 integrin. Recent in vitro studies suggested that DMP1 might also act as a transcription factor. In this study, we examined whether full-length DMP1 could function as a transcription factor in the nucleus and regulate odontogenesis in vivo. We first demonstrated that a patient with the DMP1 M1V mutation, which presumably causes a loss of the secretory DMP1 but does not affect the nuclear translocation of DMP1, shows a typical rachitic tooth defect. Furthermore, we generated transgenic mice expressing (NLS)DMP1, in which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) entry signal sequence of DMP1 was replaced by a nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, under the control of a 3.6 kb rat type I collagen promoter plus a 1.6 kb intron 1. We then crossbred the (NLS)DMP1 transgenic mice with Dmp1 null mice to express the (NLS)DMP1 in Dmp1-deficient genetic background. Although immunohistochemistry demonstrated that (NLS)DMP1 was localized in the nuclei of the preodontoblasts and odontoblasts, the histological, morphological and biochemical analyses showed that it failed to rescue the dental and periodontal defects as well as the delayed tooth eruption in Dmp1 null mice. These data suggest that the full-length DMP1 plays no apparent role in the nucleus during odontogenesis.

  17. Rescue of PINK1 Protein Null-specific Mitochondrial Complex IV Deficits by Ginsenoside Re Activation of Nitric Oxide Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Song, Karen; Yoon, Seung-Hee; Shehzad, Omer; Kim, Yeong-Shik; Son, Jin H.

    2012-01-01

    PINK1, linked to familial Parkinson's disease, is known to affect mitochondrial function. Here we identified a novel regulatory role of PINK1 in the maintenance of complex IV activity and characterized a novel mechanism by which NO signaling restored complex IV deficiency in PINK1 null dopaminergic neuronal cells. In PINK1 null cells, levels of specific chaperones, including Hsp60, leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat-containing (LRPPRC), and Hsp90, were severely decreased. LRPPRC and Hsp90 were found to act upstream of Hsp60 to regulate complex IV activity. Specifically, knockdown of Hsp60 resulted in a decrease in complex IV activity, whereas antagonistic inhibition of Hsp90 by 17-(allylamino) geldanamycin decreased both Hsp60 and complex IV activity. In contrast, overexpression of the PINK1-interacting factor LRPPRC augmented complex IV activity by up-regulating Hsp60. A similar recovery of complex IV activity was also induced by coexpression of Hsp90 and Hsp60. Drug screening identified ginsenoside Re as a compound capable of reversing the deficit in complex IV activity in PINK1 null cells through specific increases of LRPPRC, Hsp90, and Hsp60 levels. The pharmacological effects of ginsenoside Re could be reversed by treatment of the pan-NOS inhibitor l-NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (l-NAME) and could also be reproduced by low-level NO treatment. These results suggest that PINK1 regulates complex IV activity via interactions with upstream regulators of Hsp60, such as LRPPRC and Hsp90. Furthermore, they demonstrate that treatment with ginsenoside Re enhances functioning of the defective PINK1-Hsp90/LRPPRC-Hsp60-complex IV signaling axis in PINK1 null neurons by restoring NO levels, providing potential for new therapeutics targeting mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. PMID:23144451

  18. DJ-1 Null Dopaminergic Neuronal Cells Exhibit Defects in Mitochondrial Function and Structure: Involvement of Mitochondrial Complex I Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jun Young; Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Soung Jung; Seo, Kang Sik; Han, Jeong Su; Lee, Sang Hee; Kim, Jin Man; Park, Jong Il; Park, Seung Kiel; Lim, Kyu; Hwang, Byung Doo; Shong, Minho; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2012-01-01

    DJ-1 is a Parkinson's disease-associated gene whose protein product has a protective role in cellular homeostasis by removing cytosolic reactive oxygen species and maintaining mitochondrial function. However, it is not clear how DJ-1 regulates mitochondrial function and why mitochondrial dysfunction is induced by DJ-1 deficiency. In a previous study we showed that DJ-1 null dopaminergic neuronal cells exhibit defective mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I activity. In the present article we investigated the role of DJ-1 in complex I formation by using blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 2-dimensional gel analysis to assess native complex status. On the basis of these experiments, we concluded that DJ-1 null cells have a defect in the assembly of complex I. Concomitant with abnormal complex I formation, DJ-1 null cells show defective supercomplex formation. It is known that aberrant formation of the supercomplex impairs the flow of electrons through the channels between respiratory chain complexes, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction. We took two approaches to study these mitochondrial defects. The first approach assessed the structural defect by using both confocal microscopy with MitoTracker staining and electron microscopy. The second approach assessed the functional defect by measuring ATP production, O2 consumption, and mitochondrial membrane potential. Finally, we showed that the assembly defect as well as the structural and functional abnormalities in DJ-1 null cells could be reversed by adenovirus-mediated overexpression of DJ-1, demonstrating the specificity of DJ-1 on these mitochondrial properties. These mitochondrial defects induced by DJ-1mutation may be a pathological mechanism for the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22403686

  19. Rescue of PINK1 protein null-specific mitochondrial complex IV deficits by ginsenoside Re activation of nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Song, Karen; Yoon, Seung-Hee; Shehzad, Omer; Kim, Yeong-Shik; Son, Jin H

    2012-12-28

    PINK1, linked to familial Parkinson's disease, is known to affect mitochondrial function. Here we identified a novel regulatory role of PINK1 in the maintenance of complex IV activity and characterized a novel mechanism by which NO signaling restored complex IV deficiency in PINK1 null dopaminergic neuronal cells. In PINK1 null cells, levels of specific chaperones, including Hsp60, leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat-containing (LRPPRC), and Hsp90, were severely decreased. LRPPRC and Hsp90 were found to act upstream of Hsp60 to regulate complex IV activity. Specifically, knockdown of Hsp60 resulted in a decrease in complex IV activity, whereas antagonistic inhibition of Hsp90 by 17-(allylamino) geldanamycin decreased both Hsp60 and complex IV activity. In contrast, overexpression of the PINK1-interacting factor LRPPRC augmented complex IV activity by up-regulating Hsp60. A similar recovery of complex IV activity was also induced by coexpression of Hsp90 and Hsp60. Drug screening identified ginsenoside Re as a compound capable of reversing the deficit in complex IV activity in PINK1 null cells through specific increases of LRPPRC, Hsp90, and Hsp60 levels. The pharmacological effects of ginsenoside Re could be reversed by treatment of the pan-NOS inhibitor L-NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) and could also be reproduced by low-level NO treatment. These results suggest that PINK1 regulates complex IV activity via interactions with upstream regulators of Hsp60, such as LRPPRC and Hsp90. Furthermore, they demonstrate that treatment with ginsenoside Re enhances functioning of the defective PINK1-Hsp90/LRPPRC-Hsp60-complex IV signaling axis in PINK1 null neurons by restoring NO levels, providing potential for new therapeutics targeting mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. PMID:23144451

  20. Survival of glucose phosphate isomerase null somatic cells and germ cells in adult mouse chimaeras.

    PubMed

    Keighren, Margaret A; Flockhart, Jean H; West, John D

    2016-05-15

    The mouse Gpi1 gene encodes the glycolytic enzyme glucose phosphate isomerase. Homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null mouse embryos die but a previous study showed that some homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null cells survived when combined with wild-type cells in fetal chimaeras. One adult female Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera with functional Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes was also identified in a preliminary study. The aims were to characterise the survival of Gpi1(-/-) null cells in adult Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaeras and determine if Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells are functional. Analysis of adult Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaeras with pigment and a reiterated transgenic lineage marker showed that low numbers of homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null cells could survive in many tissues of adult chimaeras, including oocytes. Breeding experiments confirmed that Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes in one female Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera were functional and provided preliminary evidence that one male putative Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera produced functional spermatozoa from homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells. Although the male chimaera was almost certainly Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c), this part of the study is considered preliminary because only blood was typed for GPI. Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells should survive in a chimaeric testis if they are supported by wild-type Sertoli cells. It is also feasible that spermatozoa could bypass a block at GPI, but not blocks at some later steps in glycolysis, by using fructose, rather than glucose, as the substrate for glycolysis. Although chimaera analysis proved inefficient for studying the fate of Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells, it successfully identified functional Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes and revealed that some Gpi1(-/-) null cells could survive in many adult tissues.

  1. Chromatism compensation in wide-band nulling interferometry for exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Julien; Pereira, Silvania F; Braat, Joseph J M

    2006-02-01

    We introduce the concept of chromatism compensation in nulling interferometry that enables a high rejection ratio in a wide spectral band. Therefore the achromaticity condition considered in most nulling interferometers can be relaxed. We show that this chromatism compensation cannot be applied to a two-beam nulling interferometer, and we make an analysis of the particular case of a three-telescope configuration. PMID:16485668

  2. Nonchemotactic Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John B.; Adler, Julius; Dahl, Margaret M.

    1967-01-01

    We have isolated 40 mutants of Escherichia coli which are nonchemotactic as judged by their failure to swarm on semisolid tryptone plates or to make bands in capillary tubes containing tryptone broth. All the mutants have normal flagella, a fact shown by their shape and reaction with antiflagella serum. All are fully motile under the microscope and all are sensitive to the phage chi. Unlike its parent, one of the mutants, studied in greater detail, failed to show chemotaxis toward oxygen, glucose, serine, threonine, or aspartic acid. The failure to exhibit chemotaxis does not result from a failure to use the chemicals. The swimming of this mutant was shown to be random. The growth rate was normal under several conditions, and the growth requirements were unchanged. Images PMID:5335897

  3. Functional complementation of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis AP endonuclease gene (lamap) in Escherichia coli mutant strains challenged with DNA damage agents

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo-Villela, Erika; Kitahara-Oliveira, Milene Yoko; dos Reis, Ana Beatriz de Bragança; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Bello, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    During its life cycle Leishmania spp. face several stress conditions that can cause DNA damages. Base Excision Repair plays an important role in DNA maintenance and it is one of the most conserved mechanisms in all living organisms. DNA repair in trypanosomatids has been reported only for Old World Leishmania species. Here the AP endonuclease from Leishmania (L.) amazonensis was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli mutants defective on the DNA repair machinery, that were submitted to different stress conditions, showing ability to survive in comparison to the triple null mutant parental strain BW535. Phylogenetic and multiple sequence analyses also confirmed that LAMAP belongs to the AP endonuclease class of proteins. PMID:27223868

  4. Premature aging-like phenotype in fibroblast growth factor 23 null mice is a vitamin D-mediated process.

    PubMed

    Razzaque, Mohammed S; Sitara, Despina; Taguchi, Takashi; St-Arnaud, René; Lanske, Beate

    2006-04-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 null mice (Fgf-23-/-) have a short lifespan and show numerous biochemical and morphological features consistent with premature aging-like phenotypes, including kyphosis, severe muscle wasting, hypogonadism, osteopenia, emphysema, uncoordinated movement, T cell dysregulation, and atrophy of the intestinal villi, skin, thymus, and spleen. Furthermore, increased vitamin D activities in homozygous mutants are associated with severe atherosclerosis and widespread soft tissue calcifications; ablation of vitamin D activity from Fgf-23-/- mice, by genetically deleting the 1alpha(OH)ase gene, eliminates atherosclerosis and ectopic calcifications and significantly rescues premature aging-like features of Fgf-23-/- mice, resulting in prolonged survival of Fgf-23-/-/1alpha(OH)ase-/- double mutants. Our results indicate a novel role of Fgf-23 in developing premature aging-like features through regulating vitamin D homeostasis. Finally, our data support a new model of interactions among Fgf-23, vitamin D, and klotho, a gene described as being associated with premature aging process.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope primary-mirror characterization by measurement of the reflective null corrector.

    PubMed

    Furey, L; Dubos, T; Hansen, D; Samuels-Schwartz, J

    1993-04-01

    The reflective null corrector used to manufacture of the Hubble Space Telescope contains valuable information about the prescription of the primary mirror since an excellent null was achieved between the null-corrector wave front and the primary-mirror wave front. During the Phase I measurements, the leading cause of the spherical aberration, the field lens position error, was discovered and remeasured to an accuracy of +/-0.005 mm. To derive the conic constant of the primary mirror to an accuracy of +/-0.0003, we remeasured the parameters of the reflective null corrector that could contribute to the spherical aberration of the primary mirror.

  6. Alignment of optical system components using an ADM beam through a null assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, Joseph E. (Inventor); Olczak, Eugene G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system for testing an optical surface includes a rangefinder configured to emit a light beam and a null assembly located between the rangefinder and the optical surface. The null assembly is configured to receive and to reflect the emitted light beam toward the optical surface. The light beam reflected from the null assembly is further reflected back from the optical surface toward the null assembly as a return light beam. The rangefinder is configured to measure a distance to the optical surface using the return light beam.

  7. Null space and resolution in dynamic computerized tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Bernadette N.

    2016-02-01

    One major challenge in computerized tomography is to image objects which change during the data acquisition and hence lead to inconsistent data sets. Motion artefacts in the reconstructions can be reduced by applying specially adapted algorithms which take the dynamic behaviour into account. Within this article, we analyse the achievable resolution in the dynamic setting in case of two-dimensional affine deformations. To this end, we characterize the null space of the operator describing the dynamic case, using its singular value decomposition and a necessary dynamic consistency condition. This shows that independent of any reconstruction method, the specimen’s dynamics results in a loss of resolution compared to the stationary setting. Our theoretical results are illustrated at a numerical example.

  8. Five-dimensional null and time-like supersymmetric geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasini, Giulio; Shahbazi, C. S.

    2016-09-01

    We show that there exist supersymmetric solutions of five-dimensional, pure, { N }=1 supergravity such that the norm of the supersymmetric Killing vector, built out of the Killing spinor, is a real not-everywhere analytic function such that all its derivatives vanish at a point where the Killing vector field becomes null. The norm of the Killing vector field then is not an analytic function on a neighborhood around this point. We explicitly construct such solutions by using a multi-center Gibbons–Hawking base. Although many of these solutions have infinite charges, we find explicit examples with finite charges that asymptote to {{AdS}}3× {S}2 and discuss their physical interpretation.

  9. Polarization interferometric nulling coronagraph for high-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Naoshi; Yokochi, Kaito; Nishikawa, Jun; Tamura, Motohide; Kurokawa, Takashi; Takeda, Mitsuo; Baba, Naoshi

    2010-06-01

    We propose a novel, high-contrast imager called a polarization interferometric nulling coronagraph (PINC) for direct detection of extrasolar planets. The PINC uses achromatic half-wave plates (HWPs) installed in a fully symmetric beam combiner based on polarizing beam splitters. Jones calculus suggests that a stellar halo suppression level of 10(-10) can be achieved at 5 lambda/D for a broad wavelength range from 1.6 to 2.2 microm by using Fresnel-rhomb HWPs made of BK7. Laboratory experiments on the PINC used two laser light sources (wavelengths of lambda=532 and 671 nm), and we obtained a halo suppression level of approximately 10(-6) at 5 lambda/D for both wavelengths. PMID:20517351

  10. On the null trajectories in conformal Weyl gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Villanueva, J.R.; Olivares, Marco E-mail: marco.olivaresrubilar@gmail.com

    2013-06-01

    In this work we find analytical solutions to the null geodesics around a black hole in the conformal Weyl gravity. Exact expressions for the horizons are found, and they depend on the cosmological constant and the coupling constants of the conformal Weyl gravity. Then, we study the radial motion from the point of view of the proper and coordinate frames, and compare it with that found in spacetimes of general relativity. The angular motion is also examined qualitatively by means of an effective potential; quantitatively, the equation of motion is solved in terms of wp-Weierstrass elliptic function. Thus, we find the deflection angle for photons without using any approximation, which is a novel result for this kind of gravity.

  11. Five-dimensional null and time-like supersymmetric geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasini, Giulio; Shahbazi, C. S.

    2016-09-01

    We show that there exist supersymmetric solutions of five-dimensional, pure, { N }=1 supergravity such that the norm of the supersymmetric Killing vector, built out of the Killing spinor, is a real not-everywhere analytic function such that all its derivatives vanish at a point where the Killing vector field becomes null. The norm of the Killing vector field then is not an analytic function on a neighborhood around this point. We explicitly construct such solutions by using a multi-center Gibbons-Hawking base. Although many of these solutions have infinite charges, we find explicit examples with finite charges that asymptote to {{AdS}}3× {S}2 and discuss their physical interpretation.

  12. Wild-type and mutant p53 differentially regulate NADPH oxidase 4 in TGF-β-mediated migration of human lung and breast epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, H E; Casterline, B W; Burke, D J; Leto, T L

    2014-01-01

    Background: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) induces the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) leading to increased cell plasticity at the onset of cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Mechanisms involved in TGF-β-mediated EMT and cell motility are unclear. Recent studies showed that p53 affects TGF-β/SMAD3-mediated signalling, cell migration, and tumorigenesis. We previously demonstrated that Nox4, a Nox family NADPH oxidase, is a TGF-β/SMAD3-inducible source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) affecting cell migration and fibronectin expression, an EMT marker, in normal and metastatic breast epithelial cells. Our present study investigates the involvement of p53 in TGF-β-regulated Nox4 expression and cell migration. Methods: We investigated the effect of wild-type p53 (WT-p53) and mutant p53 proteins on TGF-β-regulated Nox4 expression and cell migration. Nox4 mRNA and protein, ROS production, cell migration, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation were examined in three different cell models based on their p53 mutational status. H1299, a p53-null lung epithelial cell line, was used for heterologous expression of WT-p53 or mutant p53. In contrast, functional studies using siRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous p53 were conducted in MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast epithelial cells that express p53-R280K and MCF-10A normal breast cells that have WT-p53. Results: We found that WT-p53 is a potent suppressor of TGF-β-induced Nox4, ROS production, and cell migration in p53-null lung epithelial (H1299) cells. In contrast, tumour-associated mutant p53 proteins (R175H or R280K) caused enhanced Nox4 expression and cell migration in both TGF-β-dependent and TGF-β-independent pathways. Moreover, knockdown of endogenous mutant p53 (R280K) in TGF-β-treated MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast epithelial cells resulted in decreased Nox4 protein and reduced phosphorylation of FAK, a key regulator of cell motility. Expression of WT-p53 or dominant-negative Nox4

  13. Life-threatening nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia in a patient with a null mutation in the PKLR gene and no compensatory PKM gene expression.

    PubMed

    Diez, Amalia; Gilsanz, Florinda; Martinez, Joaquin; Pérez-Benavente, Susana; Meza, Néstor W; Bautista, José M

    2005-09-01

    Human erythrocyte R-type pyruvate kinase (RPK) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder produced by mutations in the PKLR gene, causing chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. Survival of patients with severe RPK deficiency has been associated with compensatory expression in red blood cells (RBCs) of M2PK, an isoenzyme showing wide tissue distribution. We describe a novel homozygous null mutation of the PKLR gene found in a girl with a prenatal diagnosis of PK deficiency. The mutant PK gene revealed an 11-nucleotide (nt) duplication at exon 8, causing frameshift of the PKLR transcript, predicting a truncated protein inferred to have no catalytic activity. Western blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) detected no M2PK expression in the peripheral blood red cell fraction. The expression of mutant RPK mRNA in the RBCs was almost 6 times higher than that detected in a control patient with hereditary spherocytosis. This molecular phenotypic analysis of the null mutation in the PKLR gene provides evidence for a lack of M2PK in the mature RBCs of this patient and suggests that normal red cell functions and survival are achieved through a population of young erythroid cells released into the circulation in response to anemia. PMID:15870173

  14. Proteasome inhibitors suppress the protein expression of mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Halasi, Marianna; Pandit, Bulbul; Gartel, Andrei L

    2014-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in cancer, with almost 50% of all types of cancer expressing a mutant form of p53. p53 transactivates the expression of its primary negative regulator, HDM2. HDM2 is a ubiquitin ligase, which initiates the proteasomal degradation of p53 following ubiquitination. Proteasome inhibitors, by targeting the ubiquitin proteasome pathway inhibit the degradation of the majority of cellular proteins including wild-type p53. In contrast, in this study we found that the protein expression of mutant p53 was suppressed following treatment with established or novel proteasome inhibitors. Furthermore, for the first time we demonstrated that Arsenic trioxide, which was previously shown to suppress mutant p53 protein level, exhibits proteasome inhibitory activity. Proteasome inhibitor-mediated suppression of mutant p53 was partially rescued by the knockdown of HDM2, suggesting that the stabilization of HDM2 by proteasome inhibitors might be responsible for mutant p53 suppression to some extent. This study suggests that suppression of mutant p53 is a general property of proteasome inhibitors and it provides additional rationale to use proteasome inhibitors for the treatment of tumors with mutant p53.

  15. Proteasome inhibitors suppress the protein expression of mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Halasi, Marianna; Pandit, Bulbul; Gartel, Andrei L

    2014-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in cancer, with almost 50% of all types of cancer expressing a mutant form of p53. p53 transactivates the expression of its primary negative regulator, HDM2. HDM2 is a ubiquitin ligase, which initiates the proteasomal degradation of p53 following ubiquitination. Proteasome inhibitors, by targeting the ubiquitin proteasome pathway inhibit the degradation of the majority of cellular proteins including wild-type p53. In contrast, in this study we found that the protein expression of mutant p53 was suppressed following treatment with established or novel proteasome inhibitors. Furthermore, for the first time we demonstrated that Arsenic trioxide, which was previously shown to suppress mutant p53 protein level, exhibits proteasome inhibitory activity. Proteasome inhibitor-mediated suppression of mutant p53 was partially rescued by the knockdown of HDM2, suggesting that the stabilization of HDM2 by proteasome inhibitors might be responsible for mutant p53 suppression to some extent. This study suggests that suppression of mutant p53 is a general property of proteasome inhibitors and it provides additional rationale to use proteasome inhibitors for the treatment of tumors with mutant p53. PMID:25485499

  16. Escherichia coli mutants resistant to inactivation by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Hauben, K J; Bartlett, D H; Soontjens, C C; Cornelis, K; Wuytack, E Y; Michiels, C W

    1997-01-01

    Alternating cycles of exposure to high pressure and outgrowth of surviving populations were used to select for highly pressure-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli MG1655. Three barotolerant mutants (LMM1010, LMM1020, and LMM1030) were isolated independently by using outgrowth temperatures of 30, 37, and 42 degrees C, respectively. Survival of these mutants after pressure treatment for 15 min at ambient temperature was 40 to 85% at 220 MPa and 0.5 to 1.5% at 800 MPa, while survival of the parent strain, MG1655, decreased from 15% at 220 MPa to 2 x 10(-8)% at 700 MPa. Heat resistance of mutants LMM1020 and LMM1030 was also altered, as evident by higher D values at 58 and 60 degrees C and reduced z values compared to those for the parent strain. D and z values for mutant LMM1010 were not significantly different from those for the parent strain. Pressure sensitivity of the mutants increased from 10 to 50 degrees C, as opposed to the parent strain, which showed a minimum around 40 degrees C. The ability of the mutants to grow at moderately elevated pressure (50 MPa) was reduced at temperatures above 37 degrees C, indicating that resistance to pressure inactivation is unrelated to barotolerant growth. The development of high levels of barotolerance as demonstrated in this work should cause concern about the safety of high-pressure food processing. PMID:9055412

  17. Long-term improvements in sensory inhibition with gestational choline supplementation linked to α7 nicotinic receptors through studies in Chrna7 null mutation mice.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Karen E; Choo, Kevin S; Stitzel, Jerry A; Marks, Michael J; Adams, Catherine E

    2014-03-13

    Perinatal choline supplementation has produced several benefits in rodent models, from improved learning and memory to protection from the behavioral effects of fetal alcohol exposure. We have shown that supplemented choline through gestation and lactation produces long-term improvement in deficient sensory inhibition in DBA/2 mice which models a similar deficit in schizophrenia patients. The present study extends that research by feeding normal or supplemented choline diets to DBA/2 mice carrying the null mutation for the α7 nicotinic receptor gene (Chrna7). DBA/2 mice heterozygotic for Chrna7 were bred together. Dams were placed on supplemented (5 gm/kg diet) or normal (1.1 gm/kg diet) choline at mating and remained on the specific diet until offspring weaning. Thereafter, offspring were fed standard rodent chow. Adult offspring were assessed for sensory inhibition. Brains were obtained to ascertain hippocampal α7 nicotinic receptor levels. Choline-supplemented mice heterozygotic or null-mutant for Chrna7 failed to show improvement in sensory inhibition. Only wildtype choline-supplemented mice showed improvement with the effect solely through a decrease in test amplitude. This supports the hypothesis that gestational-choline supplementation is acting through the α7 nicotinic receptor to improve sensory inhibition. Although there was a significant gene-dose-related change in hippocampal α7 receptor numbers, binding studies did not reveal any choline-dose-related change in binding in any hippocampal region, the interaction being driven by a significant genotype main effect (wildtype>heterozygote>null mutant). These data parallel a human study wherein the offspring of pregnant women receiving choline supplementation during gestation, showed better sensory inhibition than offspring of women on placebo. PMID:24462939

  18. How to find magnetic null and construct field topology with MMS data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Huishan; Vaivads, Andris; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Andre, Mats; Cao, Jinbin; Huang, Shiyong; Retino, Alessandro; Eastwood, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we apply a new method'Taylor expansion'to find magnetic null and construct magnetic field topology, in order to use it with the data from the forth-coming MMS mission. We compare this method with the previously used Poincare index (PI), and find that they are generally consistent, except that the PI method can only find a null inside the spacecraft (SC) tetrahedron, while the Taylor expansion can find a null both inside and outside the tetrahedron and also deduce its drift velocity. Taylor expansion can also: (1) avoid the limitations of PI method such as data resolution, instrument uncertainty (Bz offset), and SC separation; (2) identify 3D null types (A, B, As, and Bs) and determine whether these types can degenerate into 2D (X and O); (3) construct the magnetic field topology. We quantitively test the accurateness of Taylor expansion in positioning magnetic null and constructing field topology, by using the data from 3D kinetic simulations. The influences of SC separation (from 0.05 to 1 di) and null-SC distance (from 0 to 1 di) on the accurateness are both considered. We find that: (1) for single null, the method is accurate when the SC separation is smaller than 1 di, and the null-SC distance is smaller than 0.5 di (weakly chaotic reconnection) or 0.25 di (strongly chaotic reconnection); (2) for null pair, the accurateness is same as the single-null situation, except at the null-null line, where the field is nonlinear. We invent a parameter ξ ≡|(λ1 + λ2 + λ3)|/ |λ|max to quantify the quality of the method'the smaller this parameter the better the results. Comparing to the previously used one (η ≡|downtriangle -B|/ |downtriangle × B |), this parameter is more relevant. Using the new method, we construct the magnetic field topology around a radial-type null and a spiral-type null, and find that the topologies are well consistent with those predicted in theory. This means that our method is reliable. We therefore suggest using this

  19. Renal NHE expression and activity in neonatal NHE3- and NHE8-null mice.

    PubMed

    Pirojsakul, Kwanchai; Gattineni, Jyothsna; Dwarakanath, Vangipuram; Baum, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE)3 is the predominant NHE on the brush-border membrane of the proximal tubule in adult animals. NHE8 has been localized to the brush-border membrane of proximal tubules and is more highly expressed in neonates than in adult animals. However, the relative role of NHE8 in neonatal renal acidification is unclear. The present study examined if there was a compensatory increase in NHE3 in NHE8-null neonatal mice and whether there was a compensatory increase in NHE8 in NHE3-null neonatal mice. In addition, we examined whether wild-type, NHE3-null, and NHE8-null mice had an increase in NHE activity in response to metabolic acidosis. We found that at baseline, there was comparable renal NHE3 mRNA, total protein, and brush-border membrane protein abundance as in neonatal control and NHE8-null mice. There was comparable renal NHE8 mRNA, total protein, and brush-border membrane protein abundance in NHE3-null neonatal and control mice. Both NHE3- and NHE8-null mice had a comparable but lower rate of NHE activity than control mice. We next imposed metabolic acidosis in wild-type, NHE3-null, and NHE8-null mice. Acidemic NHE8-null mice had an increase in brush-border membrane vesicle NHE3 protein abundance and NHE activity compared with vehicle-treated mice. Likewise, NHE3-null mice had an increase in NHE8 brush-border membrane protein abundance and NHE activity in response to metabolic acidosis. In conclusion, both NHE3 and NHE8 likely play a role in neonatal acidification.

  20. Mutant γPKC that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 upregulates Hsp70, which protects cells from the mutant's cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kota; Seki, Takahiro; Onji, Tomoya; Adachi, Naoko; Tanaka, Shigeru; Hide, Izumi; Saito, Naoaki; Sakai, Norio

    2013-10-11

    Several missense mutations in the protein kinase Cγ (γPKC) gene have been found to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease. We previously demonstrated that the mutant γPKC found in SCA14 is misfolded, susceptible to aggregation and cytotoxic. Molecular chaperones assist the refolding and degradation of misfolded proteins and prevention of the proteins' aggregation. In the present study, we found that the expression of mutant γPKC-GFP increased the levels of heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in SH-SY5Y cells. To elucidate the role of this elevation, we investigated the effect of siRNA-mediated knockdown of Hsp70 on the aggregation and cytotoxicity of mutant γPKC. Knockdown of Hsp70 exacerbated the aggregation and cytotoxicity of mutant γPKC-GFP by inhibiting this mutant's degradation. These findings suggest that mutant γPKC increases the level of Hsp70, which protects cells from the mutant's cytotoxicity by enhancing its degradation.

  1. Mutant Alleles of lptD Increase the Permeability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Define Determinants of Intrinsic Resistance to Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Grabowicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria provide a particular challenge to antibacterial drug discovery due to their cell envelope structure. Compound entry is impeded by the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the outer membrane (OM), and those molecules that overcome this barrier are often expelled by multidrug efflux pumps. Understanding how efflux and permeability affect the ability of a compound to reach its target is paramount to translating in vitro biochemical potency to cellular bioactivity. Herein, a suite of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were constructed in either a wild-type or efflux-null background in which mutations were engineered in LptD, the final protein involved in LPS transport to the OM. These mutants were demonstrated to be defective in LPS transport, resulting in compromised barrier function. Using isogenic strain sets harboring these newly created alleles, we were able to define the contributions of permeability and efflux to the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to a variety of antibiotics. These strains will be useful in the design and optimization of future antibiotics against Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:26596941

  2. MDS1, a dosage suppressor of an mck1 mutant, encodes a putative yeast homolog of glycogen synthase kinase 3.

    PubMed Central

    Puziss, J W; Hardy, T A; Johnson, R B; Roach, P J; Hieter, P

    1994-01-01

    The yeast gene MCK1 encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase that is thought to function in regulating kinetochore activity and entry into meiosis. Disruption of MCK1 confers a cold-sensitive phenotype, a temperature-sensitive phenotype, and sensitivity to the microtubule-destabilizing drug benomyl and leads to loss of chromosomes during growth on benomyl. A dosage suppression selection was used to identify genes that, when present at high copy number, could suppress the cold-sensitive phenotype of mck1::HIS3 mutant cells. Several unique classes of clones were identified, and one of these, designated MDS1, has been characterized in some detail. Nucleotide sequence data reveal that MDS1 encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase that is highly homologous to the shaggy/zw3 kinase in Drosophila melanogaster and its functional homolog, glycogen synthase kinase 3, in rats. The presence of MDS1 in high copy number rescues both the cold-sensitive and the temperature-sensitive phenotypes, but not the benomyl-sensitive phenotype, associated with the disruption of MCK1. Analysis of strains harboring an mds1 null mutation demonstrates that MDS1 is not essential during normal vegetative growth but appears to be required for meiosis. Finally, in vitro experiments indicate that the proteins encoded by both MCK1 and MDS1 possess protein kinase activity with substrate specificity similar to that of mammalian glycogen synthase kinase 3. Images PMID:8264650

  3. A Minimalist Approach to Null Subjects and Objects in Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, H.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of the second language acquisition of pronominal arguments have observed that: (1) L1 speakers of null subject languages of the Spanish type drop more subjects in their second language (L2) English than first language (L1) speakers of null subject languages of the Korean type and (2) speakers of Korean-type languages drop more objects than…

  4. Learning How to License Null Noun-Class Prefixes in Sesotho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demuth, Katherine; Machobane, Malillo; Moloi, Francina

    2009-01-01

    Noun-class prefixes are obligatory in most Bantu languages. However, the Sotho languages (Sesotho, Setswana, Sepedi) permit a subset of prefixes to be realized as null at the intersection of "unmarked" phonological, syntactic, and discourse conditions. This raises the question of how and when the licensing of null prefixes is learned. Using…

  5. Hypersensitivities for acetaldehyde and other agents among cancer cells null for clinically relevant Fanconi anemia genes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soma; Sur, Surojit; Yerram, Sashidhar R; Rago, Carlo; Bhunia, Anil K; Hossain, M Zulfiquer; Paun, Bogdan C; Ren, Yunzhao R; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Azad, Nilofer A; Kern, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    Large-magnitude numerical distinctions (>10-fold) among drug responses of genetically contrasting cancers were crucial for guiding the development of some targeted therapies. Similar strategies brought epidemiological clues and prevention goals for genetic diseases. Such numerical guides, however, were incomplete or low magnitude for Fanconi anemia pathway (FANC) gene mutations relevant to cancer in FANC-mutation carriers (heterozygotes). We generated a four-gene FANC-null cancer panel, including the engineering of new PALB2/FANCN-null cancer cells by homologous recombination. A characteristic matching of FANCC-null, FANCG-null, BRCA2/FANCD1-null, and PALB2/FANCN-null phenotypes was confirmed by uniform tumor regression on single-dose cross-linker therapy in mice and by shared chemical hypersensitivities to various inter-strand cross-linking agents and γ-radiation in vitro. Some compounds, however, had contrasting magnitudes of sensitivity; a strikingly high (19- to 22-fold) hypersensitivity was seen among PALB2-null and BRCA2-null cells for the ethanol metabolite, acetaldehyde, associated with widespread chromosomal breakage at a concentration not producing breaks in parental cells. Because FANC-defective cancer cells can share or differ in their chemical sensitivities, patterns of selective hypersensitivity hold implications for the evolutionary understanding of this pathway. Clinical decisions for cancer-relevant prevention and management of FANC-mutation carriers could be modified by expanded studies of high-magnitude sensitivities.

  6. Qualification of a Null Lens Using Image-Based Phase Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Aronstein, David L.; Hill, Peter C.; Smith, J. Scott; Zielinski, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    In measuring the figure error of an aspheric optic using a null lens, the wavefront contribution from the null lens must be independently and accurately characterized in order to isolate the optical performance of the aspheric optic alone. Various techniques can be used to characterize such a null lens, including interferometry, profilometry and image-based methods. Only image-based methods, such as phase retrieval, can measure the null-lens wavefront in situ - in single-pass, and at the same conjugates and in the same alignment state in which the null lens will ultimately be used - with no additional optical components. Due to the intended purpose of a Dull lens (e.g., to null a large aspheric wavefront with a near-equal-but-opposite spherical wavefront), characterizing a null-lens wavefront presents several challenges to image-based phase retrieval: Large wavefront slopes and high-dynamic-range data decrease the capture range of phase-retrieval algorithms, increase the requirements on the fidelity of the forward model of the optical system, and make it difficult to extract diagnostic information (e.g., the system F/#) from the image data. In this paper, we present a study of these effects on phase-retrieval algorithms in the context of a null lens used in component development for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission. Approaches for mitigation are also discussed.

  7. Fibrosis and inflammation are greater in muscles of beta-sarcoglycan-null mouse than mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Gibertini, Sara; Zanotti, Simona; Savadori, Paolo; Curcio, Maurizio; Saredi, Simona; Salerno, Franco; Andreetta, Francesca; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato; Mora, Marina

    2014-05-01

    The Sgcb-null mouse, with knocked-down β-sarcoglycan, develops severe muscular dystrophy as in type 2E human limb girdle muscular dystrophy. The mdx mouse, lacking dystrophin, is the most used model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Unlike DMD, the mdx mouse has mild clinical features and shows little fibrosis in limb muscles. To characterize ECM protein deposition and the progression of muscle fibrosis, we evaluated protein and transcript levels of collagens I, III and VI, decorin, and TGF-β1, in quadriceps and diaphragm, at 2, 4, 8, 12, 26, and 52 weeks in Sgcb-null mice, and protein levels at 12, 26, and 52 weeks in mdx mice. In Sgcb-null mice, severe morphological disruption was present from 4 weeks in both quadriceps and diaphragm, and included conspicuous deposition of extracellular matrix components. Histopathological features of Sgcb-null mouse muscles were similar to those of age-matched mdx muscles at all ages examined, but, in the Sgcb-null mouse, the extent of connective tissue deposition was generally greater than mdx. Furthermore, in the Sgcb-null mouse, the amount of all three collagen isoforms increased steadily, while, in the mdx, they remained stable. We also found that, at 12 weeks, macrophages were significantly more numerous in mildly inflamed areas of Sgcb-null quadriceps compared to mdx quadriceps (but not in highly inflamed regions), while, in the diaphragm, macrophages did not differ significantly between the two models, in either region. Osteopontin mRNA was also significantly greater at 12 weeks in laser-dissected highly inflamed areas of the Sgcb-null quadriceps compared to the mdx quadriceps. TGF-β1 was present in areas of degeneration-regeneration, but levels were highly variable and in general did not differ significantly between the two models and controls. The roles of the various subtypes of macrophages in muscle repair and fibrosis in the two models require further study. The Sgcb-null mouse, which develops early fibrosis

  8. Role of Plasmodium vivax Duffy-binding protein 1 in invasion of Duffy-null Africans

    PubMed Central

    Gunalan, Karthigayan; Lo, Eugenia; Hostetler, Jessica B.; Yewhalaw, Delenasaw; Mu, Jianbing; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Yan, Guiyun; Miller, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax to invade erythrocytes is dependent on the expression of the Duffy blood group antigen on erythrocytes. Consequently, Africans who are null for the Duffy antigen are not susceptible to P. vivax infections. Recently, P. vivax infections in Duffy-null Africans have been documented, raising the possibility that P. vivax, a virulent pathogen in other parts of the world, may expand malarial disease in Africa. P. vivax binds the Duffy blood group antigen through its Duffy-binding protein 1 (DBP1). To determine if mutations in DBP1 resulted in the ability of P. vivax to bind Duffy-null erythrocytes, we analyzed P. vivax parasites obtained from two Duffy-null individuals living in Ethiopia where Duffy-null and -positive Africans live side-by-side. We determined that, although the DBP1s from these parasites contained unique sequences, they failed to bind Duffy-null erythrocytes, indicating that mutations in DBP1 did not account for the ability of P. vivax to infect Duffy-null Africans. However, an unusual DNA expansion of DBP1 (three and eight copies) in the two Duffy-null P. vivax infections suggests that an expansion of DBP1 may have been selected to allow low-affinity binding to another receptor on Duffy-null erythrocytes. Indeed, we show that Salvador (Sal) I P. vivax infects Squirrel monkeys independently of DBP1 binding to Squirrel monkey erythrocytes. We conclude that P. vivax Sal I and perhaps P. vivax in Duffy-null patients may have adapted to use new ligand–receptor pairs for invasion. PMID:27190089

  9. Role of Plasmodium vivax Duffy-binding protein 1 in invasion of Duffy-null Africans.

    PubMed

    Gunalan, Karthigayan; Lo, Eugenia; Hostetler, Jessica B; Yewhalaw, Delenasaw; Mu, Jianbing; Neafsey, Daniel E; Yan, Guiyun; Miller, Louis H

    2016-05-31

    The ability of the malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax to invade erythrocytes is dependent on the expression of the Duffy blood group antigen on erythrocytes. Consequently, Africans who are null for the Duffy antigen are not susceptible to P. vivax infections. Recently, P. vivax infections in Duffy-null Africans have been documented, raising the possibility that P. vivax, a virulent pathogen in other parts of the world, may expand malarial disease in Africa. P. vivax binds the Duffy blood group antigen through its Duffy-binding protein 1 (DBP1). To determine if mutations in DBP1 resulted in the ability of P. vivax to bind Duffy-null erythrocytes, we analyzed P. vivax parasites obtained from two Duffy-null individuals living in Ethiopia where Duffy-null and -positive Africans live side-by-side. We determined that, although the DBP1s from these parasites contained unique sequences, they failed to bind Duffy-null erythrocytes, indicating that mutations in DBP1 did not account for the ability of P. vivax to infect Duffy-null Africans. However, an unusual DNA expansion of DBP1 (three and eight copies) in the two Duffy-null P. vivax infections suggests that an expansion of DBP1 may have been selected to allow low-affinity binding to another receptor on Duffy-null erythrocytes. Indeed, we show that Salvador (Sal) I P. vivax infects Squirrel monkeys independently of DBP1 binding to Squirrel monkey erythrocytes. We conclude that P. vivax Sal I and perhaps P. vivax in Duffy-null patients may have adapted to use new ligand-receptor pairs for invasion.

  10. Overproduction of bioactive retinoic acid in cells expressing disease-associated mutants of retinol dehydrogenase 12.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Ah; Belyaeva, Olga V; Popov, Ivan K; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2007-12-01

    Retinol dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12) is an NADP(+)-dependent oxidoreductase that in vitro catalyzes the reduction of all-trans-retinaldehyde to all-trans-retinol or the oxidation of retinol to retinaldehyde depending on substrate and cofactor availability. Recent studies have linked the mutations in RDH12 to severe early-onset autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy. The biochemical basis of photoreceptor cell death caused by mutations in RDH12 is not clear because the physiological role of RDH12 is not yet fully understood. Here we demonstrate that, although bi-directional in vitro, in living cells, RDH12 acts exclusively as a retinaldehyde reductase, shifting the retinoid homeostasis toward the increased levels of retinol and decreased levels of bioactive retinoic acid. The retinaldehyde reductase activity of RDH12 protects the cells from retinaldehyde-induced cell death, especially at high retinaldehyde concentrations, and this protective effect correlates with the lower levels of retinoic acid in RDH12-expressing cells. Disease-associated mutants of RDH12, T49M and I51N, exhibit significant residual activity in vitro, but are unable to control retinoic acid levels in the cells because of their dramatically reduced affinity for NADPH and much lower protein expression levels. These results suggest that RDH12 acts as a regulator of retinoic acid biosynthesis and protects photoreceptors against overproduction of retinoic acid from all-trans-retinaldehyde, which diffuses into the inner segments of photoreceptors from illuminated rhodopsin. These results provide a novel insight into the mechanism of retinal degeneration associated with mutations in RDH12 and are consistent with the observation that RDH12-null mice are highly susceptible to light-induced retinal apoptosis in cone and rod photoreceptors.

  11. A method distinguishing expressed vs. null mutations of the Col1A1 gene in osteogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect

    Redford-Badwal, D.A.; Stover, M.L.; McKinstry, M.

    1994-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of heritable disorders of bone characterized by increased susceptibility to fracture. Most of the causative mutations were identified in patients with the lethal form of the disease. Attention is now shifting to the milder forms of OI where glycine substitutions and null producing mutations have been found. Single amino acid substitutions can be identified by RT/PCR of total cellular RNA, but this approach does not work well for null mutations since the defective transcript does not accumulate in the cytoplasm. We have altered our RNA extraction method to separate RNA from the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of cultured fibroblasts. Standard methods of mutation identification (RT/PCR followed by SSCP) is applied to each RNA fraction. DNA from an abnormal band on the SSCP gel is eluted and amplified by PCR for cloning and sequencing. Using this approach we have identified an Asp to Asn change in exon 50 (type II OI) and a Gly to Arg in exon 11 (type I OI) of the COL1A1 gene. These changes were found in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. These putative mutations are currently being confirmed by protein studies. In contrast, three patients with mild OI associated with reduced {proportional_to}(I)mRNA, had distinguishing SSCP bands present in the nuclear but not the cytoplasmic compartment. In one case a frame shift mutation was observed, while the other two revealed polymorphisms. The compartmentalization of the mutant allele has directed us to look elsewhere in the transcript for the causative mutation. This approach to mutation identification is capable of distinguishing these fundamentally different types of mutations and allows for preferential cloning and sequencing of the abnormal allele.

  12. Invariance Techniques And High-Resolution Null Steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, R.; Kailath, T.

    1988-02-01

    Over the past several decades, a significant amount of research has been performed in the area of high-resolution signal parameter estimation. It is a problem of significance in many signal processing applications including direction-of-arrival estimation in which the locations of multiple sources whose radiation is received by an array of sensors are sought. Much of the research has focussed on approaches based on the formation of optimal weight or copy vectors, procedures derived from the conventional practice of beamforming. This class of approached to parameter estimation problems has come to be known as high-resolution spectral analysis/beamforming since the introduction of the maximum entropy (MEM) method by Burg in 1967, and the maximum-likelihood (ML) method by Capon in 1969. These techniques provide increased resolution and accuracy over their predecessors (including conventional beamforming, but suffer from model mismatch. MUSIC and ESPRIT are recently developed geometric techniques that exploit the underlying model and thereby achieve significant improvements in performance. In this paper, these techniques are summarized. From basic physical principles, it is shown that ESPRIT is actually a multidimensional null steering algorithm, an interpretation with significant intuitive appeal. Finally, optimal signal copy vectors that naturally arise from the algorithm are presented, and their properties as beamforming vectors for this class of problems are discussed.

  13. A Null Relationship between Media Multitasking and Well-Being

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Shui-I

    2013-01-01

    There is a rapidly increasing trend in media-media multitasking or MMM (using two or more media concurrently). In a recent conference, scholars from diverse disciplines expressed concerns that indulgence in MMM may compromise well-being and/or cognitive abilities. However, research on MMM's impacts is too sparse to inform the general public and policy makers whether MMM should be encouraged, managed, or minimized. The primary purpose of the present study was to develop an innovative computerized instrument – the Survey of the Previous Day (SPD) – to quantify MMM as well as media-nonmedia and nonmedia-nonmedia multitasking and sole-tasking. The secondary purpose was to examine whether these indices could predict a sample of well-being related, psychosocial measures. In the SPD, participants first recalled (typed) what they did during each hour of the previous day. In later parts of the SPD, participants analysed activities and their timing and duration for each hour of the previous day, while relevant recall was on display. Participants also completed the Media Use Questionnaire. The results showed non-significant relationship between tasking measures and well-being related measures. Given how little is known about the associations between MMM and well-being, the null results may offer some general reassurance to those who are apprehensive about negative impacts of MMM. PMID:23691236

  14. Spatial effects in real networks: Measures, null models, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzzenenti, Franco; Picciolo, Francesco; Basosi, Riccardo; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2012-12-01

    Spatially embedded networks are shaped by a combination of purely topological (space-independent) and space-dependent formation rules. While it is quite easy to artificially generate networks where the relative importance of these two factors can be varied arbitrarily, it is much more difficult to disentangle these two architectural effects in real networks. Here we propose a solution to this problem, by introducing global and local measures of spatial effects that, through a comparison with adequate null models, effectively filter out the spurious contribution of nonspatial constraints. Our filtering allows us to consistently compare different embedded networks or different historical snapshots of the same network. As a challenging application we analyze the World Trade Web, whose topology is known to depend on geographic distances but is also strongly determined by nonspatial constraints (degree sequence or gross domestic product). Remarkably, we are able to detect weak but significant spatial effects both locally and globally in the network, showing that our method succeeds in retrieving spatial information even when nonspatial factors dominate. We finally relate our results to the economic literature on gravity models and trade globalization.

  15. Magnetic flipping - Reconnection in three dimensions without null points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, E. R.; Forbes, T. G.

    1992-01-01

    In three dimensions, magnetic reconnection may take place in a sheared magnetic field at any singular field line, where the nearby field has X-type topology in planes perpendicular to the field line and where an electric field is present parallel to the field line. In the ideal region around the singular line there will, in general, be singularities in the plasma flow and electric field, both at the singular line and at 'magnetic flipping layers', which are remnants of local magnetic separatrices. In the absence of a three-dimensional magnetic neutral point or null point, reconnection of field lines can still occur by a process of magnetic flipping, in which the plasma crosses the flipping layers but the field lines rapidly flip along them by magnetic diffusion. Depending on the boundary conditions, there may be two or four flipping layers which converge on the singular line. A boundary layer analysis of a flipping layer is given, in which the magnetic field parallel to the layer decreases as one crosses it while the plasma pressure (or magnetic pressure associated with the field along the singular line) increases. The width of the flipping layer decreases with distance from the singular line.

  16. Identification of Siglec-1 null individuals infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; McLaren, Paul J; Erkizia, Itziar; Martin, Maureen P; Benet, Susana; Rotger, Margalida; Dalmau, Judith; Ouchi, Dan; Wolinsky, Steven M; Penugonda, Sudhir; Günthard, Huldrych F; Fellay, Jacques; Carrington, Mary; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Telenti, Amalio

    2016-01-01

    Siglec-1/CD169 is a myeloid-cell surface receptor critical for HIV-1 capture and infection of bystander target cells. To dissect the role of SIGLEC1 in natura, we scan a large population genetic database and identify a loss-of-function variant (Glu88Ter) that is found in ∼1% of healthy people. Exome analysis and direct genotyping of 4,233 HIV-1-infected individuals reveals two Glu88Ter homozygous and 97 heterozygous subjects, allowing the analysis of ex vivo and in vivo consequences of SIGLEC1 loss-of-function. Cells from these individuals are functionally null or haploinsufficient for Siglec-1 activity in HIV-1 capture and trans-infection ex vivo. However, Siglec-1 protein truncation does not have a measurable impact on HIV-1 acquisition or AIDS outcomes in vivo. This result contrasts with the known in vitro functional role of Siglec-1 in HIV-1 trans-infection. Thus, it provides evidence that the classical HIV-1 infectious routes may compensate for the lack of Siglec-1 in fuelling HIV-1 dissemination within infected individuals. PMID:27510803

  17. Aspects of QCD current algebra on a null plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beane, S. R.; Hobbs, T. J.

    2016-09-01

    Consequences of QCD current algebra formulated on a light-like hyperplane are derived for the forward scattering of vector and axial-vector currents on an arbitrary hadronic target. It is shown that current algebra gives rise to a special class of sum rules that are direct consequences of the independent chiral symmetry that exists at every point on the two-dimensional transverse plane orthogonal to the lightlike direction. These sum rules are obtained by exploiting the closed, infinite-dimensional algebra satisfied by the transverse moments of null-plane axial-vector and vector charge distributions. In the special case of a nucleon target, this procedure leads to the Adler-Weisberger, Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn, Cabibbo-Radicati and Fubini-Furlan-Rossetti sum rules. Matching to the dispersion-theoretic language which is usually invoked in deriving these sum rules, the moment sum rules are shown to be equivalent to algebraic constraints on forward S-matrix elements in the Regge limit.

  18. Identification of Siglec-1 null individuals infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; McLaren, Paul J.; Erkizia, Itziar; Martin, Maureen P.; Benet, Susana; Rotger, Margalida; Dalmau, Judith; Ouchi, Dan; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Penugonda, Sudhir; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Fellay, Jacques; Carrington, Mary; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Telenti, Amalio

    2016-01-01

    Siglec-1/CD169 is a myeloid-cell surface receptor critical for HIV-1 capture and infection of bystander target cells. To dissect the role of SIGLEC1 in natura, we scan a large population genetic database and identify a loss-of-function variant (Glu88Ter) that is found in ∼1% of healthy people. Exome analysis and direct genotyping of 4,233 HIV-1-infected individuals reveals two Glu88Ter homozygous and 97 heterozygous subjects, allowing the analysis of ex vivo and in vivo consequences of SIGLEC1 loss-of-function. Cells from these individuals are functionally null or haploinsufficient for Siglec-1 activity in HIV-1 capture and trans-infection ex vivo. However, Siglec-1 protein truncation does not have a measurable impact on HIV-1 acquisition or AIDS outcomes in vivo. This result contrasts with the known in vitro functional role of Siglec-1 in HIV-1 trans-infection. Thus, it provides evidence that the classical HIV-1 infectious routes may compensate for the lack of Siglec-1 in fuelling HIV-1 dissemination within infected individuals. PMID:27510803

  19. Optical nulling apparatus and method for testing an optical surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olczak, Eugene (Inventor); Hannon, John J. (Inventor); Dey, Thomas W. (Inventor); Jensen, Arthur E. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An optical nulling apparatus for testing an optical surface includes an aspheric mirror having a reflecting surface for imaging light near or onto the optical surface under test, where the aspheric mirror is configured to reduce spherical aberration of the optical surface under test. The apparatus includes a light source for emitting light toward the aspheric mirror, the light source longitudinally aligned with the aspheric mirror and the optical surface under test. The aspheric mirror is disposed between the light source and the optical surface under test, and the emitted light is reflected off the reflecting surface of the aspheric mirror and imaged near or onto the optical surface under test. An optical measuring device is disposed between the light source and the aspheric mirror, where light reflected from the optical surface under test enters the optical measuring device. An imaging mirror is disposed longitudinally between the light source and the aspheric mirror, and the imaging mirror is configured to again reflect light, which is first reflected from the reflecting surface of the aspheric mirror, onto the optical surface under test.

  20. The antiandrogenic effect of finasteride against a mutant androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Zhang, Haitao; Ip, Clement

    2011-05-15

    Finasteride is known to inhibit Type 2 5α-reductase and thus block the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The structural similarity of finasteride to DHT raises the possibility that finasteride may also interfere with the function of the androgen receptor (AR). Experiments were carried out to evaluate the antiandrogenic effect of finasteride in LNCaP, C4-2 and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Finasteride decreased DHT binding to AR, and DHT-stimulated AR activity and cell growth in LNCaP and C4-2 cells, but not in VCaP cells. LNCaP and C4-2 (derived from castration-resistant LNCaP) cells express the T877A mutant AR, while VCaP cells express the wild type AR. When PC-3 cells, which are AR-null, were transfected with either the wild type or the T877A mutant AR, only the mutant AR-expressing cells were sensitive to finasteride inhibition of DHT binding. Peroxiredoxin-1 (Prx1) is a novel endogenous facilitator of AR binding to DHT. In Prx1-rich LNCaP cells, the combination of Prx1 knockdown and finasteride was found to produce a greater inhibitory effect on AR activity and cell growth than either treatment alone. The observation suggests that cells with a low expression of Prx1 are likely to be more responsive to the antiandrogenic effect of finasteride. Additional studies showed that the efficacy of finasteride was comparable to that of bicalutamide (a widely used non-steroidal antiandrogen). The implication of the above findings is discussed in the context of developing strategies to improve the outcome of androgen deprivation therapy.