Science.gov

Sample records for numerical control

  1. What Is Numerical Control?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goold, Vernell C.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical control (a technique involving coded, numerical instructions for the automatic control and performance of a machine tool) does not replace fundamental machine tool training. It should be added to the training program to give the student an additional tool to accomplish production rates and accuracy that were not possible before. (HD)

  2. What Is Numerical Control?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goold, Vernell C.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical control (a technique involving coded, numerical instructions for the automatic control and performance of a machine tool) does not replace fundamental machine tool training. It should be added to the training program to give the student an additional tool to accomplish production rates and accuracy that were not possible before. (HD)

  3. Numerical methods in control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrmann, Volker; Xu, Hongguo

    2000-11-01

    We study classical control problems like pole assignment, stabilization, linear quadratic control and H[infinity] control from a numerical analysis point of view. We present several examples that show the difficulties with classical approaches and suggest reformulations of the problems in a more general framework. We also discuss some new algorithmic approaches.

  4. Computerized Numerical Control Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide is intended for use in a course in programming and operating a computerized numerical control system. Addressed in the course are various aspects of programming and planning, setting up, and operating machines with computerized numerical control, including selecting manual or computer-assigned programs and matching them with…

  5. Digital numerically controlled oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cellier, A.; Huey, D. C.; Ma, L. N. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The frequency and phase of an output signal from an oscillator circuit are controlled with accuracy by a digital input word. Positive and negative alterations in output frequency are both provided for by translating all values of input words so that they are positive. The oscillator reference frequency is corrected only in one direction, by adding phase to the output frequency of the oscillator. The input control word is translated to a single algebraic sign and the digital 1 is added thereto. The translated input control word is then accumulated. A reference clock signal having a frequency at an integer multiple of the desired frequency of the output signal is generated. The accumulated control word is then compared with a threshold level. The output signal is adjusted in a single direction by dividing the frequency of the reference clock signal by a first integer or by an integer different from the first integer.

  6. Descriptive Report on Numerically Controlled Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Clifton P.

    This report presents descriptive information on numerically controlled operational devises. The information is designed for the education and training community, manufacturers, supervisors, machine operators, and others who do not have an extensive technical background in numerical control. In the first of three chapters, numerical control…

  7. An Introduction to Numerical Control. Problems for Numerical Control Part Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Clifton P.

    This combination text and workbook is intended to introduce industrial arts students to numerical control part programming. Discussed in the first section are the impact of numerical control, training efforts, numerical control in established programs, related information for drafting, and the Cartesian Coordinate System and dimensioning…

  8. Numerical Control--An Industry View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Edward E.

    1975-01-01

    The author discusses rapid changes in the fields of numerical control (N/C) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) and offers suggestions for vocational educators in meeting the need for trained workers and technically educated professionals and managers. (EA)

  9. Value-Engineering Review for Numerical Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Selecting parts for conversion from conventional machining to numerical control, value-engineering review performed for every part to identify potential changes to part design that result in increased production efficiency.

  10. Numerically Controlled Machine Tools and Worker Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Jeffrey H.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of data from "Industry Wage Surveys of Machinery Manufacturers" on the skill levels of 57 machining jobs found that introduction of numerically controlled machine tools has resulted in a very small reduction in skill levels or no significant change, supporting neither the deskilling argument nor argument that skill levels…

  11. A History of Computer Numerical Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggen, Gilbert L.

    Computer numerical control (CNC) has evolved from the first significant counting method--the abacus. Babbage had perhaps the greatest impact on the development of modern day computers with his analytical engine. Hollerith's functioning machine with punched cards was used in tabulating the 1890 U.S. Census. In order for computers to become a…

  12. A History of Computer Numerical Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggen, Gilbert L.

    Computer numerical control (CNC) has evolved from the first significant counting method--the abacus. Babbage had perhaps the greatest impact on the development of modern day computers with his analytical engine. Hollerith's functioning machine with punched cards was used in tabulating the 1890 U.S. Census. In order for computers to become a…

  13. Computerized Numerical Control Test Item Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide contains 285 test items for use in teaching a course in computerized numerical control. All test items were reviewed, revised, and validated by incumbent workers and subject matter instructors. Items are provided for assessing student achievement in such aspects of programming and planning, setting up, and operating machines with…

  14. Numerically Controlled Machine Tools and Worker Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Jeffrey H.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of data from "Industry Wage Surveys of Machinery Manufacturers" on the skill levels of 57 machining jobs found that introduction of numerically controlled machine tools has resulted in a very small reduction in skill levels or no significant change, supporting neither the deskilling argument nor argument that skill levels…

  15. Multiaxis Computer Numerical Control Internship Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouse, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    (Purpose) The purpose of this paper was to examine the issues associated with bringing new technology into the classroom, in particular, the vocational/technical classroom. (Methodology) A new Haas 5 axis vertical Computer Numerical Control machining center was purchased to update the CNC machining curriculum at a community college and the process…

  16. Research on ARM Numerical Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xu; JiHong, Chen

    Computerized Numerical Control (CNC) machine tools is the foundation of modern manufacturing systems, whose advanced digital technology is the key to solve the problem of sustainable development of machine tool manufacturing industry. The paper is to design CNC system embedded on ARM and indicates the hardware design and the software systems supported. On the hardware side: the driving chip of the motor control unit, as the core of components, is MCX314AL of DSP motion control which is developed by NOVA Electronics Co., Ltd. of Japan. It make convenient to control machine because of its excellent performance, simple interface, easy programming. On the Software side, the uC/OS-2 is selected as the embedded operating system of the open source, which makes a detailed breakdown of the modules of the CNC system. Those priorities are designed according to their actual requirements. The ways of communication between the module and the interrupt response are so different that it guarantees real-time property and reliability of the numerical control system. Therefore, it not only meets the requirements of the current social precision machining, but has good man-machine interface and network support to facilitate a variety of craftsmen use.

  17. 22 CFR 42.51 - Department control of numerical limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Department control of numerical limitations. 42... THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Numerical Controls and Priority Dates § 42.51 Department control of numerical limitations. (a) Centralized control. Centralized control of the...

  18. Numerical Issues for Circulation Control Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Roy C., Jr.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2006-01-01

    Steady-state and time-accurate two-dimensional solutions of the compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier- Stokes equations are obtained for flow over the Lockheed circulation control (CC) airfoil and the General Aviation CC (GACC) airfoil. Numerical issues in computing circulation control flows such as the effects of grid resolution, boundary and initial conditions, and unsteadiness are addressed. For the Lockheed CC airfoil computed solutions are compared with detailed experimental data, which include velocity and Reynolds stress profiles. Three turbulence models, having either one or two transport equations, are considered. Solutions are obtained on a sequence of meshes, with mesh refinement primarily concentrated on the airfoil circular trailing edge. Several effects related to mesh refinement are identified. For example, sometimes sufficient mesh resolution can exclude nonphysical solutions, which can occur in CC airfoil calculations. Also, sensitivities of the turbulence models with mesh refinement are discussed. In the case of the GACC airfoil the focus is on the difference between steady-state and time-accurate solutions. A specific objective is to determine if there is self-excited vortex shedding from the jet slot lip.

  19. Machine Shop. Module 8: CNC (Computerized Numerical Control). Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosswhite, Dwight

    This document consists of materials for a five-unit course on the following topics: (1) safety guidelines; (2) coordinates and dimensions; (3) numerical control math; (4) programming for numerical control machines; and (5) setting and operating the numerical control machine. The instructor's guide begins with a list of competencies covered in the…

  20. Numerically Controlled Machining Of Wind-Tunnel Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovtun, John B.

    1990-01-01

    New procedure for dynamic models and parts for wind-tunnel tests or radio-controlled flight tests constructed. Involves use of single-phase numerical control (NC) technique to produce highly-accurate, symmetrical models in less time.

  1. Operating System For Numerically Controlled Milling Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    OPMILL program is operating system for Kearney and Trecker milling machine providing fast easy way to program manufacture of machine parts with IBM-compatible personal computer. Gives machinist "equation plotter" feature, which plots equations that define movements and converts equations to milling-machine-controlling program moving cutter along defined path. System includes tool-manager software handling up to 25 tools and automatically adjusts to account for each tool. Developed on IBM PS/2 computer running DOS 3.3 with 1 MB of random-access memory.

  2. Operating System For Numerically Controlled Milling Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    OPMILL program is operating system for Kearney and Trecker milling machine providing fast easy way to program manufacture of machine parts with IBM-compatible personal computer. Gives machinist "equation plotter" feature, which plots equations that define movements and converts equations to milling-machine-controlling program moving cutter along defined path. System includes tool-manager software handling up to 25 tools and automatically adjusts to account for each tool. Developed on IBM PS/2 computer running DOS 3.3 with 1 MB of random-access memory.

  3. SNARC Struggles: Instant Control over Spatial-Numerical Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfister, Roland; Schroeder, Philipp A.; Kunde, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Numbers and space are tightly linked--a phenomenon that is referred to as the spatial-numerical association of response codes (SNARC) effect (Dehaene, Bossini, & Giraux, 1993). The present study investigates how quickly and flexibly the behavioral impact of such spatial-numerical associations can be controlled. Participants performed a parity…

  4. SNARC Struggles: Instant Control over Spatial-Numerical Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfister, Roland; Schroeder, Philipp A.; Kunde, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Numbers and space are tightly linked--a phenomenon that is referred to as the spatial-numerical association of response codes (SNARC) effect (Dehaene, Bossini, & Giraux, 1993). The present study investigates how quickly and flexibly the behavioral impact of such spatial-numerical associations can be controlled. Participants performed a parity…

  5. A method of numerically controlled machine part programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Computer program is designed for automatically programmed tools. Preprocessor computes desired tool path and postprocessor computes actual commands causing machine tool to follow specific path. It is used on a Cincinnati ATC-430 numerically controlled machine tool.

  6. Numerical methods for control optimization in linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyatyushkin, A. I.

    2015-05-01

    Numerical methods are considered for solving optimal control problems in linear systems, namely, terminal control problems with control and phase constraints and time-optimal control problems. Several algorithms with various computer storage requirements are proposed for solving these problems. The algorithms are intended for finding an optimal control in linear systems having certain features, for example, when the reachable set of a system has flat faces.

  7. Numerical evaluation of the performance of active noise control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollo, C. G.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a generalized numerical technique for evaluating the optimal performance of active noise controllers. In this technique, the indirect BEM numerical procedures are used to derive the active noise controllers for optimal control of enclosed harmonic sound fields where the strength of the noise sources or the description of the enclosure boundary may not be known. The performance prediction for a single-input single-output system is presented, together with the analysis of the stability and observability of an active noise-control system employing detectors. The numerical procedures presented can be used for the design of both the physical configuration and the electronic components of the optimal active noise controller.

  8. A Numerical Optimization Approach for Tuning Fuzzy Logic Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Garg, Devendra P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper develops a method to tune fuzzy controllers using numerical optimization. The main attribute of this approach is that it allows fuzzy logic controllers to be tuned to achieve global performance requirements. Furthermore, this approach allows design constraints to be implemented during the tuning process. The method tunes the controller by parameterizing the membership functions for error, change-in-error and control output. The resulting parameters form a design vector which is iteratively changed to minimize an objective function. The minimal objective function results in an optimal performance of the system. A spacecraft mounted science instrument line-of-sight pointing control is used to demonstrate results.

  9. Integrated product definition representation for agile numerical control applications

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, W.R. Jr.; Brooks, S.L.; Kirk, W.J. III; Brown, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    Realization of agile manufacturing capabilities for a virtual enterprise requires the integration of technology, management, and work force into a coordinated, interdependent system. This paper is focused on technology enabling tools for agile manufacturing within a virtual enterprise specifically relating to Numerical Control (N/C) manufacturing activities and product definition requirements for these activities.

  10. Computer numerical control grinding of spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, H. Wayne

    1991-01-01

    The development of Computer Numerical Control (CNC) spiral bevel gear grinding has paved the way for major improvement in the production of precision spiral bevel gears. The object of the program was to decrease the setup, maintenance of setup, and pattern development time by 50 percent of the time required on conventional spiral bevel gear grinders. Details of the process are explained.

  11. Computer used to program numerically controlled milling machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, T. C.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program automatically directs a numerically controlled milling machine through a series of cutting and trimming actions. It accepts engineering data points, passes smooth curve segments through the points, breaks the resulting curves into a series of closely spaced points, and transforms these points into the form required by the mechanism.

  12. Computer-Numerical-Control and the EMCO Compact 5 Lathe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Frank M.

    This laboratory manual is intended for use in teaching computer-numerical-control (CNC) programming using the Emco Maier Compact 5 Lathe. Developed for use at the postsecondary level, this material contains a short introduction to CNC machine tools. This section covers CNC programs, CNC machine axes, and CNC coordinate systems. The following…

  13. Program Helps Specify Paths For Numerically Controlled Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premack, Timothy; Poland, James, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    ESDAPT computer program provides graphical programming environment for developing APT (Automatically Programmed Tool) programs for controlling numerically controlled machine tools. Establishes graphical user interface providing user with APT syntax-sensitive text-editing subprogram and windows for displaying geometry and tool paths. APT geometry statements also created by use of menus and screen picks. Written in C language, yacc, lex, and XView for use on Sun4-series computers running SunOS.

  14. Program Helps Specify Paths For Numerically Controlled Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premack, Timothy; Poland, James, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    ESDAPT computer program provides graphical programming environment for developing APT (Automatically Programmed Tool) programs for controlling numerically controlled machine tools. Establishes graphical user interface providing user with APT syntax-sensitive text-editing subprogram and windows for displaying geometry and tool paths. APT geometry statements also created by use of menus and screen picks. Written in C language, yacc, lex, and XView for use on Sun4-series computers running SunOS.

  15. Numerical methods for solving terminal optimal control problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornov, A. Yu.; Tyatyushkin, A. I.; Finkelstein, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    Numerical methods for solving optimal control problems with equality constraints at the right end of the trajectory are discussed. Algorithms for optimal control search are proposed that are based on the multimethod technique for finding an approximate solution of prescribed accuracy that satisfies terminal conditions. High accuracy is achieved by applying a second-order method analogous to Newton's method or Bellman's quasilinearization method. In the solution of problems with direct control constraints, the variation of the control is computed using a finite-dimensional approximation of an auxiliary problem, which is solved by applying linear programming methods.

  16. Numerical and experimental exploration of phase control of chaos.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Samuel; Allaria, Enrico; Brugioni, Stefano; Leyva, Immaculada; Meucci, Riccardo; Sanjuán, Miguel A F; Arecchi, Fortunato T

    2006-03-01

    A well-known method to suppress chaos in a periodically forced chaotic system is to add a harmonic perturbation. The phase control of chaos scheme uses the phase difference between a small added harmonic perturbation and the main driving to suppress chaos, leading the system to different periodic orbits. Using the Duffing oscillator as a paradigm, we present here an in-depth study of this technique. A thorough numerical exploration has been made focused in the important role played by the phase, from which new interesting patterns in parameter space have appeared. On the other hand, our novel experimental implementation of phase control in an electronic circuit confirms both the well-known features of this method and the new ones detected numerically. All this may help in future implementations of phase control of chaos, which is globally confirmed here to be robust and easy to implement experimentally.

  17. Pixel resolution control in numerical reconstruction of digital holography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingfeng; Kim, Myung K

    2006-04-01

    A new method for resolution control in numerical reconstruction of digital holography is proposed. The wave field on a tilted or vertical plane can be reconstructed without being subject to the minimum object-to-hologram distance requirement, and the pixel resolution can be easily controlled by adjusting the position of a transitional plane. The proposed method solves the problem of pixel resolution control for small object-to-hologram distances and is especially useful for multicolor, multiwavelength digital holography and metrological applications. Experimental results are presented to verify the idea.

  18. Numerical Solution of Some Types of Fractional Optimal Control Problems

    PubMed Central

    Sweilam, Nasser Hassan; Al-Ajami, Tamer Mostafa; Hoppe, Ronald H. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present two different approaches for the numerical solution of fractional optimal control problems (FOCPs) based on a spectral method using Chebyshev polynomials. The fractional derivative is described in the Caputo sense. The first approach follows the paradigm “optimize first, then discretize” and relies on the approximation of the necessary optimality conditions in terms of the associated Hamiltonian. In the second approach, the state equation is discretized first using the Clenshaw and Curtis scheme for the numerical integration of nonsingular functions followed by the Rayleigh-Ritz method to evaluate both the state and control variables. Two illustrative examples are included to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the suggested approaches. PMID:24385874

  19. Editing of EIA coded, numerically controlled, machine tool tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Editing of numerically controlled (N/C) machine tool tapes (8-level paper tape) using an interactive graphic display processor is described. A rapid technique required for correcting production errors in N/C tapes was developed using the interactive text editor on the IMLAC PDS-ID graphic display system and two special programs resident on disk. The correction technique and special programs for processing N/C tapes coded to EIA specifications are discussed.

  20. Teaching Thermal Hydraulics & Numerical Methods: An Introductory Control Volume Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, D.S.

    2004-10-03

    This paper covers the basics of the implementation of the control volume method in the context of the Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM)(T/H) code using the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy. This primer uses the advection equation as a template. The discussion will cover the basic equations of the control volume portion of the course in the primer, which includes the advection equation, numerical methods, along with the implementation of the various equations via FORTRAN into computer programs and the final result for a three equation HEM code and its validation.

  1. Aspects of Numerical Simulation of Circulation Control Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Anders, S. G.

    2005-01-01

    The mass-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved for circulation control airfoils. Numerical solutions are computed with a multigrid method that uses an implicit approximate factorization smoother. The effects of flow conditions (e.g., free-stream Mach number, angle of attack, momentum coefficient) and mesh on the prediction of circulation control airfoil flows are considered. In addition, the impact of turbulence modeling, including curvature effects and modifications to reduce eddy viscosity levels in the wall jet (i.e., Coanda flow), is discussed. Computed pressure distributions are compared with available experimental data.

  2. Numerical Studies of a Fluidic Diverter for Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Culley, Dennis E.; Raghu, Surya

    2009-01-01

    The internal flow structure in a specific fluidic diverter is studied over a range from low subsonic to sonic inlet conditions by a time-dependent numerical analysis. The understanding will aid in the development of fluidic diverters with minimum pressure losses and advanced designs of flow control actuators. The velocity, temperature and pressure fields are calculated for subsonic conditions and the self-induced oscillatory behavior of the flow is successfully predicted. The results of our numerical studies have excellent agreement with our experimental measurements of oscillation frequencies. The acoustic speed in the gaseous medium is determined to be a key factor for up to sonic conditions in governing the mechanism of initiating the oscillations as well as determining its frequency. The feasibility of employing plasma actuation with a minimal perturbation level is demonstrated in steady-state calculations to also produce oscillation frequencies of our own choosing instead of being dependent on the fixed-geometry fluidic device.

  3. Numerical simulation of flow separation control by oscillatory fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resendiz Rosas, Celerino

    2005-07-01

    In this work, numerical simulations of flow separation control are performed. The separation control technique studied is called "synthetic jet actuation". The developed code employs a cell centered finite volume scheme which handles viscous, steady and unsteady compressible turbulent flows. The pulsating zero mass jet flow is simulated by imposing a harmonically varying transpiration boundary condition on the airfoil's surface. Turbulence is modeled with the algebraic model of Baldwin and Lomax. The application of synthetic jet actuators is based in their ability to energize the boundary layer, thereby providing significant increase in the lift coefficient. This has been corroborated experimentally and it is corroborated numerically in this research. The performed numerical simulation investigates the flow over a NACA0015 airfoil. For this flow Re = 9 x 105 and the reduced frequency and momentum coefficient are F + = 1.1 and Cmu = 0.04 respectively. The oscillatory injection takes place at 12.27% chord from the leading edge. A maximum increase in the mean lift coefficient of 93% is predicted by the code. A discrepancy of approximately 10% is observed with corresponding experimental data from the literature. The general trend is, however, well captured. The discrepancy is attributed to the modeling of the injection boundary condition and to the turbulence model. A sensitivity analysis of the lift coefficient to different values of the oscillation parameters is performed. It is concluded that tangential injection, F+ ≈ O(1) and the utilized grid resolution around the site of injection are optimal. Streamline fields obtained for different angles of injection are analyzed. Flow separation and attachment as functions of the injection angle and of the velocity of injection can be observed. It is finally concluded that a reliable numerical tool has been developed which can be utilized as a support tool in the optimization of the synthetic jet operation and in the

  4. Semi Active Control of Civil Structures, Analytical and Numerical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerboua, M.; Benguediab, M.; Megnounif, A.; Benrahou, K. H.; Kaoulala, F.

    numerical example of the parallel R-L piezoelectric vibration shunt control simulated with MATLAB® is presented. An analytical study of the resistor-inductor (R-L) passive piezoelectric vibration shunt control of a cantilever beam was undertaken. The modal and strain analyses were performed by varying the material properties and geometric configurations of the piezoelectric transducer in relation to the structure in order to maximize the mechanical strain produced in the piezoelectric transducer.

  5. A Numerical Investigation of Controllably Flexible Hydrofoil in Laminar Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, G. Y.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, S. G.; He, G. W.

    Aquatic animals, such as fishes, whales, seals and penguins, are naturally born to be flexible and deformable, which promise their effective locomotion through water. They are able to produce hydrodynamic thrust by active control of their body configurations. That is, the aquatic animals could wiggle their flexible bodies at an appropriate frequency and amplitude suitable to the hydrodynamics surrounding them. However, the mechanism for the active controls has not been adequately understood yet and attracts current research. One obstacle which hinders such investigation is the difficulty in experimental measurements of the flows around the wiggling bodies, and thus numerical simulation is becoming an indispensable alternative. In the paper, an immersed boundary method is developed to simulate the NACA 65-10 hydrofoil. It is observed that a wiggling hydrofoil exhibits a higher thrust while a stationary hydrofoil offers little improvement.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Plasma Based Flow Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzen, Y. B.; Huang, P. G.; Jacob, J. D.; Ashpis, D. E.

    2005-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to simulate flow control applications using plasma actuators. The effects of the plasma actuators on the external flow are incorporated into Navier Stokes computations as a body force vector. In order to compute this body force vector, the model solves two additional equations: one for the electric field due to the applied AC voltage at the electrodes and the other for the charge density representing the ionized air. The model is calibrated against an experiment having plasma-driven flow in a quiescent environment and is then applied to simulate a low pressure turbine flow with large flow separation. The effects of the plasma actuator on control of flow separation are demonstrated numerically.

  7. Numerical optimization of laser fields to control molecular orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Haj-Yedder, A.; Auger, A.; Dion, C.M.; Cances, E.; Le Bris, C.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.

    2002-12-01

    A thorough numerical illustration of an optimal control scenario dealing with the laser-induced orientation of a diatomic molecule (LiF) is presented. Special emphasis is laid on the definition of the various targets dealing with different orientation characteristics, identified in terms of maximum efficiency (i.e., molecular axis direction closest to the direction of the laser polarization vector), maximum duration (i.e., the time interval during which this orientation is maintained), or of a compromise between efficiency and duration. Excellent postpulse orientation is achieved by sudden, intense pulses. Thermal effects are also studied with an extension of the control scenarios to Boltzmann averaged orientation dynamics at T=5 K.

  8. Management of numerical control data from the ICEM DDN products

    SciTech Connect

    Rossini, B.F.

    1987-04-01

    NCPART is a procedure developed by the Numerical Control Department at Bendix Kansas City Division to handle the entry to and exit from ICEM DDN, and process all of the local files output by ICEM DDN. The NCPART procedure is menu driven, and provides automatic access to ICEM DDN and any files necessary to process information with ICEM for Numerical Control users. Basically, the procedure handles all of the ICEM DDN operations that involve operating system commands, and frees the NC Programmer to concentrate on his/her work as a programmer. Most NC Programmers at BKC are well versed in the use of operating system commands for attaching and cataloging files, but the use of procedures makes the programmer's job much simpler, especially in the case of ICEM, where multiple files must be present in order to take advantage of the available features. Also, much is dependent on what an individual plans to do once in ICEM, because different applications require different files, and all of these files may not be needed at any given user session.

  9. Teaching Thermal Hydraulics & Numerical Methods: An Introductory Control Volume Primer

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Lucas

    2004-10-01

    A graduate level course for Thermal Hydraulics (T/H) was taught through Idaho State University in the spring of 2004. A numerical approach was taken for the content of this course since the students were employed at the Idaho National Laboratory and had been users of T/H codes. The majority of the students had expressed an interest in learning about the Courant Limit, mass error, semi-implicit and implicit numerical integration schemes in the context of a computer code. Since no introductory text was found the author developed notes taught from his own research and courses taught for Westinghouse on the subject. The course started with a primer on control volume methods and the construction of a Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) (T/H) code. The primer was valuable for giving the students the basics behind such codes and their evolution to more complex codes for Thermal Hydraulics and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The course covered additional material including the Finite Element Method and non-equilibrium (T/H). The control volume primer and the construction of a three-equation (mass, momentum and energy) HEM code are the subject of this paper . The Fortran version of the code covered in this paper is elementary compared to its descendants. The steam tables used are less accurate than the available commercial version written in C Coupled to a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The Fortran version and input files can be downloaded at www.microfusionlab.com.

  10. Interferometric correction system for a numerically controlled machine

    DOEpatents

    Burleson, Robert R.

    1978-01-01

    An interferometric correction system for a numerically controlled machine is provided to improve the positioning accuracy of a machine tool, for example, for a high-precision numerically controlled machine. A laser interferometer feedback system is used to monitor the positioning of the machine tool which is being moved by command pulses to a positioning system to position the tool. The correction system compares the commanded position as indicated by a command pulse train applied to the positioning system with the actual position of the tool as monitored by the laser interferometer. If the tool position lags the commanded position by a preselected error, additional pulses are added to the pulse train applied to the positioning system to advance the tool closer to the commanded position, thereby reducing the lag error. If the actual tool position is leading in comparison to the commanded position, pulses are deleted from the pulse train where the advance error exceeds the preselected error magnitude to correct the position error of the tool relative to the commanded position.

  11. Emulation of multi-axis numerically controlled machine tools

    SciTech Connect

    Burd, W.C.

    1983-04-01

    The MULTAX-PLOT program provides a method for verification of numerical control part programs. Combined with other tools, such as postprocessor listings and center line (CL) pen plots generated from the CL data files, the interactive MULTAX-PLOT program provides the machinist, the parts programmer and the postprocessor implementor a tool to visualize and troubleshoot machining commands. The MULTAX-PLOT program fills a significant void in the numerically controlled (NC) machining process. The center line pen plots are made from the CL data by one postprocessor, whereas the machine command file is generated by a different postprocessor. These two postprocessors may not produce identical results. However, the MULTAX-PLOT program displays the data from the machine tool's command file that will actually drive the machine tool. The principle benefits of the MULTAX-PLOT program are: A reduction in verification times by the system programmers, the NC parts programmers and the machnists; An early error detection method that reduces possible machine tool damage and scrapped parts; and Improved machine tool utilization. MULTAX-PLOT has been implemented and has aided in the development of two multi-axis postprocessors. It has proved to be a powerful diagnostic tool for the postprocessor implementor. The parts programmers and machinists have had favorable results with their initial use of MULTAX-PLOT for verification. However, the full potential of MULTAX-PLOT will be realized as terminals are installed at the NC machine tools.

  12. Discomfort Analysis in Computerized Numeric Control Machine Operations

    PubMed Central

    Sankaranarayanasamy, Krishnasamy; Ganguli, Anindya Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The introduction of computerized numeric control (CNC) technology in manufacturing industries has revolutionized the production process, but there are some health and safety problems associated with these machines. The present study aimed to investigate the extent of postural discomfort in CNC machine operators, and the relationship of this discomfort to the display and control panel height, with a view to validate the anthropometric recommendation for the location of the display and control panel in CNC machines. Methods The postural discomforts associated with CNC machines were studied in 122 male operators using Corlett and Bishop's body part discomfort mapping, subject information, and discomfort level at various time intervals from starting to end of a shift. This information was collected using a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was carried out using ANOVA. Results Neck discomfort due to the positioning of the machine displays, and shoulder and arm discomfort due to the positioning of controls were identified as common health issues in the operators of these machines. The study revealed that 45.9% of machine operators reported discomfort in the lower back, 41.8% in the neck, 22.1% in the upper-back, 53.3% in the shoulder and arm, and 21.3% of the operators reported discomfort in the leg. Conclusion Discomfort increased with the progress of the day and was highest at the end of a shift; subject age had no effect on patient tendency to experience discomfort levels. PMID:22993720

  13. Pulse shape control in a dual cavity laser: numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashkir, Yuri

    2006-04-01

    We present a numerical model of the laser system for generating a special shape of the pulse: a steep peak at the beginning followed by a long pulse tail. Laser pulses of this nature are required for various applications (laser material processing, optical breakdown spectroscopy, etc.). The laser system consists of two "overlapped" cavities with different round-trip times. The laser crystal, the Q-switching element, the back mirror, and the output coupler are shared. A shorter pulse is generated in a short cavity. A small fraction of this pulse is injected into the long cavity as a seed. It triggers generation of the longer pulse. The output emission from this hybrid laser produces a required pulse shape. Parameters of the laser pulse (ratios of durations and energies of short- and long- pulse components) can be controlled through cavity length and the output coupler reflection. Modelling of the laser system is based on a set of coupled rate equations for dynamic variables of the system: the inverse population in an active laser media and photon densities in coupled cavities. Numerical experiments were provided with typical parameters of a Nd:YAG laser to study the system behaviour for different combinations of parameters.

  14. Computer numeric control subaperture aspheric surface polishing-microroughness evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, Frantisek; Polak, Jaroslav; Matousek, Ondrej; Tomka, David

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this work was an investigation of surface microroughness and shape accuracy achieved on an aspheric lens by subaperture computer numeric control (CNC) polishing. Different optical substrates were polished (OHARA S-LAH 58, SF4, ZERODUR) using a POLITEX™ polishing pad, synthetic pitch, and the natural optical pitch. Surface roughness was measured by light interferometer. The best results were achieved on the S-LAH58 glass and the ZERODUR™ using the natural optical pitch. In the case of SF4 glass, the natural optical pitch showed a tendency to scratch the surface. Experiments also indicated a problem in surface form deterioration when using the natural optical pitch, regardless of the type of optical material.

  15. LQR Control of Thin Shell Dynamics: Formulation and Numerical Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    delRosario, R. C. H.; Smith, R. C.

    1997-01-01

    A PDE-based feedback control method for thin cylindrical shells with surface-mounted piezoceramic actuators is presented. Donnell-Mushtari equations modified to incorporate both passive and active piezoceramic patch contributions are used to model the system dynamics. The well-posedness of this model and the associated LQR problem with an unbounded input operator are established through analytic semigroup theory. The model is discretized using a Galerkin expansion with basis functions constructed from Fourier polynomials tensored with cubic splines, and convergence criteria for the associated approximate LQR problem are established. The effectiveness of the method for attenuating the coupled longitudinal, circumferential and transverse shell displacements is illustrated through a set of numerical examples.

  16. A hierarchical energy efficiency evaluation model of numerical control workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Binzi; Wang, Yan; Ji, Zhicheng

    2017-07-01

    Energy consumption of numerical control (NC) workshop has lots of characteristics, such as hierarchy, multi-sources and time-varying. These characteristics make the modeling and evaluation of energy consumption in NC workshop very difficult. In this paper, a novel hierarchical model of the energy consumption in NC workshop is presented. Then, the calculation methods of energy efficiency in each layer are given. Furthermore, the acquisition method of the energy consumption data which is easily implemented is put forward and an experiment in NC workshop was made to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed energy consumption model. The experimental results showed that the model cannot only describe the energy consumption effectively but also provide a way to identify the bottleneck of energy consumption in the workshop.

  17. Multiresolution strategies for the numerical solution of optimal control problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sachin

    There exist many numerical techniques for solving optimal control problems but less work has been done in the field of making these algorithms run faster and more robustly. The main motivation of this work is to solve optimal control problems accurately in a fast and efficient way. Optimal control problems are often characterized by discontinuities or switchings in the control variables. One way of accurately capturing the irregularities in the solution is to use a high resolution (dense) uniform grid. This requires a large amount of computational resources both in terms of CPU time and memory. Hence, in order to accurately capture any irregularities in the solution using a few computational resources, one can refine the mesh locally in the region close to an irregularity instead of refining the mesh uniformly over the whole domain. Therefore, a novel multiresolution scheme for data compression has been designed which is shown to outperform similar data compression schemes. Specifically, we have shown that the proposed approach results in fewer grid points in the grid compared to a common multiresolution data compression scheme. The validity of the proposed mesh refinement algorithm has been verified by solving several challenging initial-boundary value problems for evolution equations in 1D. The examples have demonstrated the stability and robustness of the proposed algorithm. The algorithm adapted dynamically to any existing or emerging irregularities in the solution by automatically allocating more grid points to the region where the solution exhibited sharp features and fewer points to the region where the solution was smooth. Thereby, the computational time and memory usage has been reduced significantly, while maintaining an accuracy equivalent to the one obtained using a fine uniform mesh. Next, a direct multiresolution-based approach for solving trajectory optimization problems is developed. The original optimal control problem is transcribed into a

  18. Controlling Reflections from Mesh Refinement Interfaces in Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.; Van Meter, James R.

    2005-01-01

    A leading approach to improving the accuracy on numerical relativity simulations of black hole systems is through fixed or adaptive mesh refinement techniques. We describe a generic numerical error which manifests as slowly converging, artificial reflections from refinement boundaries in a broad class of mesh-refinement implementations, potentially limiting the effectiveness of mesh- refinement techniques for some numerical relativity applications. We elucidate this numerical effect by presenting a model problem which exhibits the phenomenon, but which is simple enough that its numerical error can be understood analytically. Our analysis shows that the effect is caused by variations in finite differencing error generated across low and high resolution regions, and that its slow convergence is caused by the presence of dramatic speed differences among propagation modes typical of 3+1 relativity. Lastly, we resolve the problem, presenting a class of finite-differencing stencil modifications which eliminate this pathology in both our model problem and in numerical relativity examples.

  19. Numerical Solution of Optimal Control Problem under SPDE Constraints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-14

    equations, Advances in Com- putational Mathematics. Vol. 33, 215–230, (2010). [3] Feng Bao, Yanzhao Cao and Weidong Zhao, Numerical solutions for forward...Visiting Scholar, Zhongshan University, China 4 Publications 1 Feng Bao, Yanzhao Cao and Weidong Zhao, Numerical solutions for forward backward doubly...Li Yin , Spectral method for nonlinear stochastic partial differ- ential equations of elliptic type, accepted by Numer. Math. Theo. Meth. App., Vol. 4

  20. Design analysis for the control and drive retrofit of a numerically controlled lathe

    SciTech Connect

    Cotter, S.L.

    1980-01-01

    A system approach to the retrofit of a numerically controlled two-axis lathe was taken to identify component function and interrelation. The dynamic system of the motor and machine was modeled and parameter identification experiments were done. This model, in state equation form, was used with the parameters data as the basis of a digital simulation of the system. From this and further analysis of the control characteristics, recommendations for component selection were presented.

  1. Numerical controlled polishing, continued force wear and part correction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hannah, P.R.; Day, R.D.; Hatch, D.J.; McClure, E.R.

    1994-09-01

    This abstract reports the near completion of the first phase of this program. It is the aim of this program to provide the operator of a N/C diamond turning machine or N/C grinding machine (jig grinder) with the wear characteristics necessary to achieve uniform material removal. The second phase of this program addresses a different problem, although solving this problem is highly dependent on the results of the first phase. Diamond turned, or any lathe turned surface, exhibits regular tool marks due to the tool passing over the surface being cut. Changes in depth of cut, feed rate and work rpm will change the character of these groves, but will not eliminate them. Optical surfaces produced by this process exhibit increased scattering as the light wavelength decreases limiting their use; at least for optical purposes, to IR and some visible applications. Utilizing wear information gathered in the first part of this program we will attempt to reduce these residual tool marks by polishing. The polishing of diamond turned surfaces is not new. Diamond turned metal surfaces, especially in electroless nickel and high phosphorus nickel electroplate have been polished to improve their scatter characteristics. What we believe is unique is the use of a spherical wheel, rotating on axis and being moved over the part in a prescribed manner by numerical control. Over the past year we have made some major changes in our polishing methods and procedures. We have listed below these changes, as a refresher for the reader as to our previous procedures. These changes will be addressed in the body of the text.

  2. Numerical modeling of active separation control by synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aram, Shawn

    Zero-Net Mass-Flux (ZNMF) actuators or synthetic jet actuators are versatile micro scale devices with numerous applications in the field of fluid mechanics. The primary focus of the current work is to use time-accurate simulations to study the interaction of these jets with cross flows and to optimize their performance for the control of boundary layer separation. This study consists of four parts. In the first part, a class of phenomenology-based models is proposed to reproduce the flow associated with synthetic jets in grazing flows and simplify the task of ZNMF-based flow control simulations. The proposed models have a non-uniform jet velocity profile with only two spatial degrees of freedom and a uniform slip velocity on the slot-flow boundary. A comparison of key integral quantities associated with the momentum, energy and vorticity fluxes shows that the models with a non-uniform jet velocity during the expulsion phase and uniform jet velocity during the ingestion phase can predict these quantities with good accuracy, whereas a simple plug flow model with a zero slip and uniform jet velocity under-predicts these three quantities during the expulsion phase. Based on our initial analysis, three of the simplest models are selected for further study, including an assessment of their performance for a canonical separated flow at different forcing frequencies. A key finding is that a simple plug-flow type model can predict incorrect trends for separation reduction with the jet frequency. A preliminary attempt is also made to provide empirical closure to these models. The effect of synthetic jets orientation on its interaction with a zero pressure gradient laminar boundary layer is explored in the second part. A rectangular slot is chosen in this study and streamwise and spanwise orientations of this slot are examined. The orientation of the slot is found to have a significant impact on its interaction with the boundary layer. The dominant feature in the streamwise

  3. Lateral Control Jets for Finned Bodies: A Numerical Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Mary Jane; Weinacht, Paul; Brandeis, Julius

    1999-11-01

    The typical jet interaction flow field is complicated due to the jet's interruption of the oncoming external flow. The qualitative features of the jet interaction flow field include regions of shock/boundary layer interaction and flow separation that have an effect on the large regions of the flow field around the body. A detailed numerical study of the interaction between a lateral jet and the external flow has been performed for a variety of missile body geometries at varying Mach numbers. The missile geometries include non-finned axisymmetric bodies and finned bodies with either strakes or aft-mounted tail fins. To obtain the numerical results, both Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and Euler techniques have been applied. The computational results were compared with results from a previously published wind tunnel study that consisted primarily of global force and moment measurements. Good agreement between numerical prediction and experimental results is found.

  4. Adaptive Numerical Dissipation Controls for High Order Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Helen C.; Sjogreen, B.; Sandham, N. D.; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A numerical scheme for direct numerical simulation of shock-turbulence interactions of high speed compressible flows would ideally not be significantly more expensive than the standard fourth or sixth-order compact or non-compact central differencing scheme. It should be possible to resolve all scales down to scales of order of the Kolmogorov scales of turbulence accurately and efficiently, while at the same time being able to capture steep gradients occurring at much smaller scales efficiently. The goal of this lecture is to review the progress and new development of the low dissipative high order shock-capturing schemes proposed by Yee et al. Comparison on the efficiency and accuracy of this class of schemes with spectral and the fifth-order WENO (weighted essentially nonoscillatory) scheme will be presented. A new approach to dynamically sense the appropriate amount of numerical dissipation to be added at each grid point using non-orthogonal wavelets will be discussed.

  5. A multilevel control system for the large space telescope. [numerical analysis/optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.; Sundareshan, S. K.; Vukcevic, M. B.

    1975-01-01

    A multilevel scheme was proposed for control of Large Space Telescope (LST) modeled by a three-axis-six-order nonlinear equation. Local controllers were used on the subsystem level to stabilize motions corresponding to the three axes. Global controllers were applied to reduce (and sometimes nullify) the interactions among the subsystems. A multilevel optimization method was developed whereby local quadratic optimizations were performed on the subsystem level, and global control was again used to reduce (nullify) the effect of interactions. The multilevel stabilization and optimization methods are presented as general tools for design and then used in the design of the LST Control System. The methods are entirely computerized, so that they can accommodate higher order LST models with both conceptual and numerical advantages over standard straightforward design techniques.

  6. Numerical research of the optimal control problem in the semi-Markov inventory model

    SciTech Connect

    Gorshenin, Andrey K.

    2015-03-10

    This paper is devoted to the numerical simulation of stochastic system for inventory management products using controlled semi-Markov process. The results of a special software for the system’s research and finding the optimal control are presented.

  7. Computer Numerical Control: Instructional Manual. The North Dakota High Technology Mobile Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinn, John W.

    This instructional manual contains five learning activity packets for use in a workshop on computer numerical control for computer-aided manufacturing. The lessons cover the following topics: introduction to computer-aided manufacturing, understanding the lathe, using the computer, computer numerically controlled part programming, and executing a…

  8. Learning Model and Form of Assesment toward the Inferensial Statistical Achievement by Controlling Numeric Thinking Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widiana, I. Wayan; Jampel, I. Nyoman

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to find out the effect of learning model and form of assessment toward inferential statistical achievement after controlling numeric thinking skills. This study was quasi experimental study with 130 students as the sample. The data analysis used ANCOVA. After controlling numeric thinking skills, the result of this study show that:…

  9. Computer Numerical Control: Instructional Manual. The North Dakota High Technology Mobile Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinn, John W.

    This instructional manual contains five learning activity packets for use in a workshop on computer numerical control for computer-aided manufacturing. The lessons cover the following topics: introduction to computer-aided manufacturing, understanding the lathe, using the computer, computer numerically controlled part programming, and executing a…

  10. Technical Report on Occupations in Numerically Controlled Metal-Cutting Machining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Employment Service.

    At the present time, only 5 percent of the short-run metal-cutting machining in the United States is done by numerically controlled machined tools, but within the next decade it is expected to increase by 50 percent. Numerically controlled machines use taped data which is changed into instructions and directs the machine to do certain steps…

  11. Numerical investigation of the AFRODITE transition control strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarri, Simone; Fransson, Jens H. M.; Talamelli, Alessandro

    2012-11-01

    The generation of properly distributed and shaped velocity streaks is a method to delay the Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) transition scenario in a boundary layer. Indeed, it is shown in the literature that stable velocity streaks in a Blasius boundary layer (BL) may lead to a damping of TS waves. This idea is explored in the AFRODITE project, where streaks are generated experimentally in a Blasius BL by placing ad-hoc miniature vortex generators (MVGs) on the plate wall. In this presentation we show representative results obtained by the numerical setup that has been designed to support the experiments of the AFRODITE project. The DNSs are carried out using an open-source tool, Nek5000, which is a spectral-element code for incompressible flows. A 3D BL solver and its adjoint version are also used as additional numerical tools. The present DNSs include the simulation of the flow around the MVGs, so that the simulated streaks are those effectively generated by the considered devices. Details of the interactions between incoming TS waves and the MVGs are also investigated by DNS. CASPUR computing center (Roma, Italy) and the ``C.M.Lerici'' Foundation are gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Forbidden Zones for Numerically-Controlled Machine Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpot, D.

    1986-01-01

    Computer-controlled machine tool prevented from striking and damaging protruding members on workpiece by creating forbidden zone in control program. With aid of computer graphics, tool profile and coordinates of forbidden zone digitized and stored in computer memory as part of tool path.

  13. Forbidden Zones for Numerically-Controlled Machine Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpot, D.

    1986-01-01

    Computer-controlled machine tool prevented from striking and damaging protruding members on workpiece by creating forbidden zone in control program. With aid of computer graphics, tool profile and coordinates of forbidden zone digitized and stored in computer memory as part of tool path.

  14. Numerical Modeling of Active Flow Control in a Boundary Layer Ingesting Offset Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Owens, Lewis R.; Berrier, Bobby L.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation evaluates the numerical prediction of flow distortion and pressure recovery for a boundary layer ingesting offset inlet with active flow control devices. The numerical simulations are computed using a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes code developed at NASA. The numerical results are validated by comparison to experimental wind tunnel tests conducted at NASA Langley Research Center at both low and high Mach numbers. Baseline comparisons showed good agreement between numerical and experimental results. Numerical simulations for the inlet with passive and active flow control also showed good agreement at low Mach numbers where experimental data has already been acquired. Numerical simulations of the inlet at high Mach numbers with flow control jets showed an improvement of the flow distortion. Studies on the location of the jet actuators, for the high Mach number case, were conducted to provide guidance for the design of a future experimental wind tunnel test.

  15. Numerically Controlled Phase Locked Loop Using Direct Digital Synthesizer

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Alex

    1993-04-13

    A direct digital synthesizer is a highly stable digitally controlled frequency generator that outputs high spectrum purity rf signals. Because of the all digital design, it is immune to various environmental disturbances that plague conventional LC based VCOs. As a result, a PLL based on DDS can achieve high spectrum purity with very narrow tracking bandwidth.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Fluidic Actuators for Flow Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasta, Veer N.; Koklu, Mehti; Wygnanski, Israel L.; Fares, Ehab

    2012-01-01

    Active flow control technology is finding increasing use in aerospace applications to control flow separation and improve aerodynamic performance. In this paper we examine the characteristics of a class of fluidic actuators that are being considered for active flow control applications for a variety of practical problems. Based on recent experimental work, such actuators have been found to be more efficient for controlling flow separation in terms of mass flow requirements compared to constant blowing and suction or even synthetic jet actuators. The fluidic actuators produce spanwise oscillating jets, and therefore are also known as sweeping jets. The frequency and spanwise sweeping extent depend on the geometric parameters and mass flow rate entering the actuators through the inlet section. The flow physics associated with these actuators is quite complex and not fully understood at this time. The unsteady flow generated by such actuators is simulated using the lattice Boltzmann based solver PowerFLOW R . Computed mean and standard deviation of velocity profiles generated by a family of fluidic actuators in quiescent air are compared with experimental data. Simulated results replicate the experimentally observed trends with parametric variation of geometry and inflow conditions.

  17. A numerical approach to controller design for the ACES facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, W. Garth; Irwin, R. Dennis

    1993-01-01

    In recent years the employment of active control techniques for improving the performance of systems involving highly flexible structures has become a topic of considerable research interest. Most of these systems are quite complicated, using multiple actuators and sensors, and possessing high order models. The majority of analytical controller synthesis procedures capable of handling multivariable systems in a systematic way require considerable insight into the underlying mathematical theory to achieve a successful design. This insight is needed in selecting the proper weighting matrices or weighting functions to cast what is naturally a multiple constraint satisfaction problem into an unconstrained optimization problem. Although designers possessing considerable experience with these techniques have a feel for the proper choice of weights, others may spend a significant amount of time attempting to find an acceptable solution. Another disadvantage of such procedures is that the resulting controller has an order greater than or equal to that of the model used for the design. Of course, the order of these controllers can often be reduced, but again this requires a good understanding of the theory involved.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Compressible Flow and Its Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Two main technical areas were addressed: nanosecond- pulse , dielectric barrier discharge flow control actuators, and large-scale unsteadiness in...interactions as a major influence on the experiments. High-fidelity fluid simulations of nanosecond- pulse discharges demonstrated the importance of rapid...shows promise for mitigating fatigue loading on high Mach number aircraft. 15. SUBJECT TERMS computational fluid dynamics, CFD , computational, flow

  19. Numerical aspects of optimal control of penicillin production.

    PubMed

    Pčolka, Matej; Celikovský, Sergej

    2014-01-01

    Since their discovery, fermentation processes have gone along not only with the industrial beverages production and breweries, but since the times of Alexander Fleming, they have become a crucial part of the health care due to antibiotics production. However, complicated dynamics and strong nonlinearities cause that the production with the use of linear control methods achieves only suboptimal yields. From the variety of nonlinear approaches, gradient method has proved the ability to handle these issues--nevertheless, its potential in the field of fermentation processes has not been revealed completely. This paper describes constant vaporization control strategy based on a double-input optimization approach with a successful reduction to a single-input optimization task. To accomplish this, model structure used in the previous work is modified so that it corresponds with the new optimization strategy. Furthermore, choice of search step is explored and various alternatives are evaluated and compared.

  20. Numerical solution of control problems governed by nonlinear differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Heinkenschloss, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this presentation the author investigates an iterative method for the solution of optimal control problems. These problems are formulated as constrained optimization problems with constraints arising from the state equation and in the form of bound constraints on the control. The method for the solution of these problems uses the special structure of the problem arising from the bound constraint and the state equation. It is derived from SQP methods and projected Newton methods and combines the advantages of both methods. The bound constraint is satisfied by all iterates using a projection, the nonlinear state equation is satisfied in the limit. Only a linearized state equation has to be solved in every iteration. The solution of the linearized problems are done using multilevel methods and GMRES.

  1. Numerical Algorithms and Mathematical Software for Linear Control and Estimation Theory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-30

    RD -R157 525 NUMERICAL ALGORITHMS AND MATHEMATICAL SOFTWJARE FOR i/i LINEAR CONTROL AND EST..U) MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE STATISTICS...PERIOD COVERED"~~ "ia--Dec. 14, 1981-- LD Numerical Algorithms and Mathematical Dec. 13, 1984*Software for Linear Control and 1.0 Estimation Theory...THIS PAGE (Wten Date Entered) .. :..0 70 FINAL REPORT--ARO Grant DAAG29-82-K-0028,"Numerical Algorithms and Mathematical Software for Linear Control and

  2. Numerical control system of battery welding with pulsed YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guoshun; Yang, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Taishi; Wei, Zhigang; Li, Chaoyang

    1999-09-01

    This article briefly introduces the pulse YAG laser welding system, a new research achievement of my section. This system can weld the electric pole, the holly board and other aluminum parts of lithium battery, and the process of loading, unloading, compressing and welding can be completed automatically. Moreover, the software proprietary of the system is very good, and its interface is friendly too. In order to achieve optimum welding effect, we have designed special laser discharging waveform. Its rise delay time, fall delay time, and width are all designed specially. With this special technology, the welding spot we get is smooth like mirror, and the welding intensity can be controlled conveniently.

  3. Evaluating the Controls on Magma Ascent Rates Through Numerical Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. E.; Neuberg, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The estimation of the magma ascent rate is a key factor in predicting styles of volcanic activity and relies on the understanding of how strongly the ascent rate is controlled by different magmatic parameters. The ability to link potential changes in such parameters to monitoring data is an essential step to be able to use these data as a predictive tool. We present the results of a suite of conduit flow models that assess the influence of individual model parameters such as the magmatic water content, temperature or bulk magma composition on the magma flow in the conduit during an extrusive dome eruption. By systematically varying these parameters we assess their relative importance to changes in ascent rate. The results indicate that potential changes to conduit geometry and excess pressure in the magma chamber are amongst the dominant controlling variables that effect ascent rate, but the single most important parameter is the volatile content (assumed in this case as only water). Modelling this parameter across a range of reported values causes changes in the calculated ascent velocities of up to 800%, triggering fluctuations in ascent rates that span the potential threshold between effusive and explosive eruptions.

  4. Optimal control in NMR spectroscopy: numerical implementation in SIMPSON.

    PubMed

    Tosner, Zdenek; Vosegaard, Thomas; Kehlet, Cindie; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2009-04-01

    We present the implementation of optimal control into the open source simulation package SIMPSON for development and optimization of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments for a wide range of applications, including liquid- and solid-state NMR, magnetic resonance imaging, quantum computation, and combinations between NMR and other spectroscopies. Optimal control enables efficient optimization of NMR experiments in terms of amplitudes, phases, offsets etc. for hundreds-to-thousands of pulses to fully exploit the experimentally available high degree of freedom in pulse sequences to combat variations/limitations in experimental or spin system parameters or design experiments with specific properties typically not covered as easily by standard design procedures. This facilitates straightforward optimization of experiments under consideration of rf and static field inhomogeneities, limitations in available or desired rf field strengths (e.g., for reduction of sample heating), spread in resonance offsets or coupling parameters, variations in spin systems etc. to meet the actual experimental conditions as close as possible. The paper provides a brief account on the relevant theory and in particular the computational interface relevant for optimization of state-to-state transfer (on the density operator level) and the effective Hamiltonian on the level of propagators along with several representative examples within liquid- and solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

  5. Numerical solutions of a control problem governed by functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Thrift, P. R.; Burns, J. A.; Cliff, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical procedure is proposed for solving optimal control problems governed by linear retarded functional differential equations. The procedure is based on the idea of 'averaging approximations', due to Banks and Burns (1975). For illustration, numerical results generated on an IBM 370/158 computer, which demonstrate the rapid convergence of the method are presented.

  6. Research on prognostics and health management technology of numerical control equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Rui; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Yingzhi

    2014-03-01

    Scheduled maintenance and corrective maintenance both construct the tradition l maintenance policy of numerical control equipment, which may bring some problems such as excessive maintenance and inadequate maintenance. Aiming at this phenomena, Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) technology is introduced to improve the reliability and availability of numerical control equipment. Before using this technology, Failure Mode Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA)should be firstly made for all the subsystems of numerical control equipment. FMECA is indispensable before PHM, and its purpose is to identify the key subsystems which are suitable for using PHM technology, find out the failure mechanisms of this subsystems, and provide references for building failure mechanism models and defining conditional parameters being monitored. Then a PHM system of numerical control equipment is designed. In this system, every conditional parameter of key subsystems is monitored by various sensors according to its respective failure mechanisms. A method based on multi - sensor data fusion is built to process information from sensors. The method uses the neural network algorithm. Applying the method can analyze the operation condition of numerical control equipment, and then prognoses its performance degradation, life evaluation, machining accuracy, and reliability. All the results can supply helpful evidence for making maintenance policy. Finally, key issues of implementing PHM theology in numerical control equipment are cited with the goal of better practical uses.

  7. Numerical approximation of null controls for the heat equation: Ill-posedness and remedies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münch, Arnaud; Zuazua, Enrique

    2010-08-01

    The numerical approximation of exact or trajectory controls for the wave equation is known to be a delicate issue, since the pioneering work of Glowinski-Lions in the nineties, because of the anomalous behavior of the high-frequency spurious numerical waves. Various efficient remedies have been developed and analyzed in the last decade to filter out these high-frequency components: Fourier filtering, Tychonoff's regularization, mixed finite-element methods, multi-grid strategies, etc. Recently convergence rate results have also been obtained. This work is devoted to analyzing this issue for the heat equation, which is the opposite paradigm because of its strong dissipativity and smoothing properties. The existing analytical results guarantee that, at least in some simple situations, as in the finite-difference scheme in 1 - d, the null or trajectory controls for numerical approximation schemes converge. This is due to the intrinsic high-frequency damping of the heat equation that is inherited by its numerical approximation schemes. But when developing numerical simulations the topic appears to be much more subtle and difficult. In fact, efficiently computing the null control for a numerical approximation scheme of the heat equation is a difficult problem in itself. The difficulty is strongly related to the regularizing effect of the heat kernel. The controls of minimal L2-norm are characterized as minima of quadratic functionals on the solutions of the adjoint heat equation, or its numerical versions. These functionals are shown to be coercive in very large spaces of solutions, sufficient to guarantee the L2 character of controls, but very far from being identifiable as energy spaces for the adjoint system. The very weak coercivity of the functionals under consideration makes the approximation problem exponentially ill-posed and the functional framework far from being well adapted to standard techniques in numerical analysis. In practice, the controls of the

  8. Neural computing for numeric-to-symbolic conversion in control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passino, Kevin M.; Sartori, Michael A.; Antsaklis, Panos J.

    1989-01-01

    A type of neural network, the multilayer perceptron, is used to classify numeric data and assign appropriate symbols to various classes. This numeric-to-symbolic conversion results in a type of information extraction, which is similar to what is called data reduction in pattern recognition. The use of the neural network as a numeric-to-symbolic converter is introduced, its application in autonomous control is discussed, and several applications are studied. The perceptron is used as a numeric-to-symbolic converter for a discrete-event system controller supervising a continuous variable dynamic system. It is also shown how the perceptron can implement fault trees, which provide useful information (alarms) in a biological system and information for failure diagnosis and control purposes in an aircraft example.

  9. Neural computing for numeric-to-symbolic conversion in control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passino, Kevin M.; Sartori, Michael A.; Antsaklis, Panos J.

    1989-01-01

    A type of neural network, the multilayer perceptron, is used to classify numeric data and assign appropriate symbols to various classes. This numeric-to-symbolic conversion results in a type of information extraction, which is similar to what is called data reduction in pattern recognition. The use of the neural network as a numeric-to-symbolic converter is introduced, its application in autonomous control is discussed, and several applications are studied. The perceptron is used as a numeric-to-symbolic converter for a discrete-event system controller supervising a continuous variable dynamic system. It is also shown how the perceptron can implement fault trees, which provide useful information (alarms) in a biological system and information for failure diagnosis and control purposes in an aircraft example.

  10. Numerical Approximations for Stochastic Systems With Delays in the State and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-26

    the boundary conditions (A2.1) and (A2.2). The interpretation of the stochastic partial differential equation (3.2), as well as of the relaxed control...Berlin and New York, 2001. [9] H.J. Kushner and D. Barnea. On the control of linear functional- differential equations with quadratic cost. SIAM J. Control... equations , numerical methods for delayed controlled diffusions, Markov chain approximation method. 2000 Mathematics Subject classifications: AMS

  11. Force-controlled absorption in a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank

    SciTech Connect

    Spinneken, Johannes Christou, Marios; Swan, Chris

    2014-09-01

    An active control methodology for the absorption of water waves in a numerical wave tank is introduced. This methodology is based upon a force-feedback technique which has previously been shown to be very effective in physical wave tanks. Unlike other methods, an a-priori knowledge of the wave conditions in the tank is not required; the absorption controller being designed to automatically respond to a wide range of wave conditions. In comparison to numerical sponge layers, effective wave absorption is achieved on the boundary, thereby minimising the spatial extent of the numerical wave tank. In contrast to the imposition of radiation conditions, the scheme is inherently capable of absorbing irregular waves. Most importantly, simultaneous generation and absorption can be achieved. This is an important advance when considering inclusion of reflective bodies within the numerical wave tank. In designing the absorption controller, an infinite impulse response filter is adopted, thereby eliminating the problem of non-causality in the controller optimisation. Two alternative controllers are considered, both implemented in a fully-nonlinear wave tank based on a multiple-flux boundary element scheme. To simplify the problem under consideration, the present analysis is limited to water waves propagating in a two-dimensional domain. The paper presents an extensive numerical validation which demonstrates the success of the method for a wide range of wave conditions including regular, focused and random waves. The numerical investigation also highlights some of the limitations of the method, particularly in simultaneously generating and absorbing large amplitude or highly-nonlinear waves. The findings of the present numerical study are directly applicable to related fields where optimum absorption is sought; these include physical wavemaking, wave power absorption and a wide range of numerical wave tank schemes.

  12. Force-controlled absorption in a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinneken, Johannes; Christou, Marios; Swan, Chris

    2014-09-01

    An active control methodology for the absorption of water waves in a numerical wave tank is introduced. This methodology is based upon a force-feedback technique which has previously been shown to be very effective in physical wave tanks. Unlike other methods, an a-priori knowledge of the wave conditions in the tank is not required; the absorption controller being designed to automatically respond to a wide range of wave conditions. In comparison to numerical sponge layers, effective wave absorption is achieved on the boundary, thereby minimising the spatial extent of the numerical wave tank. In contrast to the imposition of radiation conditions, the scheme is inherently capable of absorbing irregular waves. Most importantly, simultaneous generation and absorption can be achieved. This is an important advance when considering inclusion of reflective bodies within the numerical wave tank. In designing the absorption controller, an infinite impulse response filter is adopted, thereby eliminating the problem of non-causality in the controller optimisation. Two alternative controllers are considered, both implemented in a fully-nonlinear wave tank based on a multiple-flux boundary element scheme. To simplify the problem under consideration, the present analysis is limited to water waves propagating in a two-dimensional domain. The paper presents an extensive numerical validation which demonstrates the success of the method for a wide range of wave conditions including regular, focused and random waves. The numerical investigation also highlights some of the limitations of the method, particularly in simultaneously generating and absorbing large amplitude or highly-nonlinear waves. The findings of the present numerical study are directly applicable to related fields where optimum absorption is sought; these include physical wavemaking, wave power absorption and a wide range of numerical wave tank schemes.

  13. Large scale nonlinear numerical optimal control for finite element models of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, Christine A.; Liao, Li-Zhi

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of large scale numerical optimal control algorithms for nonlinear systems and their application to finite element models of structures. This work is based on our expansion of the optimal control algorithm (DDP) in the following steps: improvement of convergence for initial policies in non-convex regions, development of a numerically accurate penalty function method approach for constrained DDP problems, and parallel processing on supercomputers. The expanded constrained DDP algorithm was applied to the control of a four-bay, two dimensional truss with 12 soft members, which generates geometric nonlinearities. Using an explicit finite element model to describe the structural system requires 32 state variables and 10,000 time steps. Our numerical results indicate that for constrained or unconstrained structural problems with nonlinear dynamics, the results obtained by our expanded constrained DDP are significantly better than those obtained using linear-quadratic feedback control.

  14. Numerical solution of the state dependent noise problem. [optimal stationary control of linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinman, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical technique is given for solving the matrix quadratic equation that arises in the optimal stationary control of linear systems with state (and/or control) dependent noise. The technique exploits fully existing, efficient algorithms for the matrix Lyapunov and Ricatti equations. The computational requirements are discussed, with an associated example.

  15. A numerical method for solving optimal control problems using state parametrization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehne, H.; Borzabadi, A.

    2006-06-01

    A numerical method for solving a special class of optimal control problems is given. The solution is based on state parametrization as a polynomial with unknown coefficients. This converts the problem to a non-linear optimization problem. To facilitate the computation of optimal coefficients, an improved iterative method is suggested. Convergence of this iterative method and its implementation for numerical examples are also given.

  16. Time-optimal control of the race car: a numerical method to emulate the ideal driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, D. P.; Sharp, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    A numerical method for the time-optimal control of the race car is presented. The method is then used to perform the role of the driver in numerical simulations of manoeuvres at the limit of race car performance. The method does not attempt to model the driver but rather replaces the driver with methods normally associated with numerical optimal control. The method simultaneously finds the optimal driven line and the driver control inputs (steer, throttle and brake) to drive this line in minimum time. In principle, the method is capable of operation with arbitrarily complex vehicle models as it requires only limited access to the vehicle model state vector. It also requires solution of the differential equation representing the vehicle model in only the forward time direction and is hence capable of simulating the full vehicle transient response.

  17. Finite difference numerical methods for boundary control problems governed by hyperbolic partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.; Zheng, Q.; Coleman, M.; Weerakoon, S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews convergent finite difference schemes for hyperbolic initial boundary value problems and their applications to boundary control systems of hyperbolic type which arise in the modelling of vibrations. These difference schemes are combined with the primal and the dual approaches to compute the optimal control in the unconstrained case, as well as the case when the control is subject to inequality constraints. Some of the preliminary numerical results are also presented.

  18. Adaptive Numerical Dissipation Control in High Order Schemes for Multi-D Non-Ideal MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, B.

    2005-01-01

    The required type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter to accurately resolve all relevant multiscales of complex MHD unsteady high-speed shock/shear/turbulence/combustion problems are not only physical problem dependent, but also vary from one flow region to another. In addition, proper and efficient control of the divergence of the magnetic field (Div(B)) numerical error for high order shock-capturing methods poses extra requirements for the considered type of CPU intensive computations. The goal is to extend our adaptive numerical dissipation control in high order filter schemes and our new divergence-free methods for ideal MHD to non-ideal MHD that include viscosity and resistivity. The key idea consists of automatic detection of different flow features as distinct sensors to signal the appropriate type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter where needed and leave the rest of the region free from numerical dissipation contamination. These scheme-independent detectors are capable of distinguishing shocks/shears, flame sheets, turbulent fluctuations and spurious high-frequency oscillations. The detection algorithm is based on an artificial compression method (ACM) (for shocks/shears), and redundant multiresolution wavelets (WAV) (for the above types of flow feature). These filters also provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of Div(B) numerical error.

  19. Numerical Experiments in Error Control for Sound Propagation Using a Damping Layer Boundary Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents results from numerical experiments for controlling the error caused by a damping layer boundary treatment when simulating the propagation of an acoustic signal from a continuous pressure source. The computations are with the 2D Linearized Euler Equations (LEE) for both a uniform mean flow and a steady parallel jet. The numerical experiments are with algorithms that are third, fifth, seventh and ninth order accurate in space and time. The numerical domain is enclosed in a damping layer boundary treatment. The damping is implemented in a time accurate manner, with simple polynomial damping profiles of second, fourth, sixth and eighth power. At the outer boundaries of the damping layer the propagating solution is uniformly set to zero. The complete boundary treatment is remarkably simple and intrinsically independant from the dimension of the spatial domain. The reported results show the relative effect on the error from the boundary treatment by varying the damping layer width, damping profile power, damping amplitude, propagtion time, grid resolution and algorithm order. The issue that is being addressed is not the accuracy of the numerical solution when compared to a mathematical solution, but the effect of the complete boundary treatment on the numerical solution, and to what degree the error in the numerical solution from the complete boundary treatment can be controlled. We report maximum relative absolute errors from just the boundary treatment that range from O[10-2] to O[10-7].

  20. Numerical experiments on transition control in wall-bounded shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.; Caruso, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from a numerical simulation of transition control in plane channel and boundary layer flows. The analysis is based on a pseudo-spectral/finite difference semi-implicit solution procedure employed to numerically integrate the time-dependent, three-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in a doubly periodic domain. In the channel flow, it was found that the active periodic suction/blowing method was effective in controlling strongly three-dimensional disturbances. In the boundary layer, the preliminary analysis indicated that in the early stages, passive control by suction is as effective as active control to suppress instabilities. The current work is focused on a detailed comparison of active and passive control by suction/blowing in the boundary layer.

  1. Analytical and numerical investigations on spacecraft formation control by using electrostatic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felicetti, Leonard; Palmerini, Giovanni B.

    2016-06-01

    The paper investigates some analytical and numerical aspects of the formation control exploited by means of inter-spacecraft electrostatic actions. The analysis is based on the evaluation and check of the stability issues by using a sequence of purposely defined Lyapunov functions. The same Lyapunov approach can also define a specific under-actuate control strategy for controlling selected "virtual links" of the formation. Two different selection criteria for these links are then discussed, showing the implications on the control chain. An optimal charge distribution strategy, which assigns univocally the charges to all the spacecraft starting from the charge products computed by the control, is also presented and discussed. Numerical simulations prove the suitability of the proposed approach to a formation of 4 satellites.

  2. Numerical investigation on feedback control of flow around an oscillating hydrofoil by Lorentz force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zong-Kai; Zhou, Ben-Mou; Liu, Hui-Xing; Ji, Yan-Liang; Huang, Ya-Dong

    2013-06-01

    In order to improve the hydrodynamic characteristics of a hydrofoil (NACA0012), this paper investigates an oscillating hydrofoil immersed in seawater (an electrically poorly conducting fluid) with feedback control of electromagnetic force (Lorentz force). This method is used in the iterative process, by forecasting the location of boundary layer separation points and attack angle at the next time step and figuring out the optimal force distribution function based on these parameters, then returns to the current time step and applies the optimal force onto the leeside to control the flow separation. Based on the basic flow governing equations, the flow field structures, lift evolutions and energy consumptions (the input impulse of Lorentz force) have been numerically investigated. Numerical results show that with this control, the flow separation could be fully suppressed. Meanwhile, the lift increases dramatically and oscillation is suppressed successfully. Furthermore, under similar lift improvement and control effects, the feedback control optimal ratio is 72.58%.

  3. Numerical magnitude affects online execution, and not planning of visuomotor control.

    PubMed

    Namdar, Gal; Ganel, Tzvi

    2017-01-20

    Recent literature has established a directional influence of irrelevant numerical magnitude on actions performed toward neutral objects. For example, fingers' aperture during grasping is larger when associated with large compared with small numerical digits. This interaction between symbolic magnitude and visuomotor control has been attributed to the planning stage of the action prior to motor execution. However, this assumption has not been directly tested. In two experiments, we tested whether the effects of numerical magnitude on grasping derive from action planning or from action execution. Participants were asked to grasp an object following a short visual (Experiment 1) or auditory (Experiment 2) presentation of small (1/2) or large (8/9) digits. Grasping was performed under either closed-loop (CL) or open-loop (OL) visuomotor control, for which online vision was prevented during action execution. Digit magnitude affected grip apertures in the CL condition, when online vision was allowed. However, magnitude had no effects on grip aperture in the OL condition. This pattern of results strongly suggests that the processing of numerical magnitude originates from interactions between numerical magnitude and real object size during online motor execution. Unlike previously assumed, the findings also suggest that the effect of magnitude on visuomotor control is not likely to be attributed to the motor planning stage prior to action initiation.

  4. A stochastic regulator for integrated communication and control systems. I - Formulation of control law. II - Numerical analysis and simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Luen-Woei; Ray, Asok

    1991-01-01

    A state feedback control law for integrated communication and control systems (ICCS) is formulated by using the dynamic programming and optimality principle on a finite-time horizon. The control law is derived on the basis of a stochastic model of the plant which is augmented in state space to allow for the effects of randomly varying delays in the feedback loop. A numerical procedure for synthesizing the control parameters is then presented, and the performance of the control law is evaluated by simulating the flight dynamics model of an advanced aircraft. Finally, recommendations for future work are made.

  5. A stochastic regulator for integrated communication and control systems. I - Formulation of control law. II - Numerical analysis and simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Luen-Woei; Ray, Asok

    1991-01-01

    A state feedback control law for integrated communication and control systems (ICCS) is formulated by using the dynamic programming and optimality principle on a finite-time horizon. The control law is derived on the basis of a stochastic model of the plant which is augmented in state space to allow for the effects of randomly varying delays in the feedback loop. A numerical procedure for synthesizing the control parameters is then presented, and the performance of the control law is evaluated by simulating the flight dynamics model of an advanced aircraft. Finally, recommendations for future work are made.

  6. Application of numerical optimization techniques to control system design for nonlinear dynamic models of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward; Ge, Fuying

    1989-01-01

    Control system design for general nonlinear flight dynamic models is considered through numerical simulation. The design is accomplished through a numerical optimizer coupled with analysis of flight dynamic equations. The general flight dynamic equations are numerically integrated and dynamic characteristics are then identified from the dynamic response. The design variables are determined iteratively by the optimizer to optimize a prescribed objective function which is related to desired dynamic characteristics. Generality of the method allows nonlinear effects to aerodynamics and dynamic coupling to be considered in the design process. To demonstrate the method, nonlinear simulation models for an F-5A and an F-16 configurations are used to design dampers to satisfy specifications on flying qualities and control systems to prevent departure. The results indicate that the present method is simple in formulation and effective in satisfying the design objectives.

  7. VERSE-Guided Numerical RF Pulse Design: A Fast Method for Peak RF Power Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daeho; Grissom, William A.; Lustig, Michael; Kerr, Adam B.; Stang, Pascal P.; Pauly, John M.

    2013-01-01

    In parallel excitation, the computational speed of numerical radiofrequency (RF) pulse design methods is critical when subject dependencies and system nonidealities need to be incorporated on-the-fly. One important concern with optimization-based methods is high peak RF power exceeding hardware or safety limits. Hence, online controllability of the peak RF power is essential. Variable-rate selective excitation pulse reshaping is ideally suited to this problem due to its simplicity and low computational cost. In this work, we first improve the fidelity of variable-rate selective excitation implementation for discrete-time waveforms through waveform oversampling such that variable-rate selective excitation can be robustly applied to numerically designed RF pulses. Then, a variable-rate selective excitation-guided numerical RF pulse design is suggested as an online RF pulse design framework, aiming to simultaneously control peak RF power and compensate for off-resonance. PMID:22135085

  8. Numerical Investigation of Flow Control Feasibility with a Trailing Edge Flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W. J.; Shen, W. Z.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2014-06-01

    This paper concerns a numerical study of employing an adaptive trailing edge flap to control the lift of an airfoil subject to unsteady inflow conditions. The periodically varying inflow is generated by two oscillating airfoils, which are located upstream of the controlled airfoil. To establish the control system, a standard PID controller is implemented in a finite volume based incompressible flow solver. An immersed boundary method is applied to treat the problem of simulating a deformable airfoil trailing edge. The flow field is solved using a 2D Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes finite volume solver. In order to more accurately simulate wall bounded flows around the immersed boundary, a modified boundary condition is introduced in the k- ω turbulence model. As an example, turbulent flow over a NACA 64418 airfoil with a deformable trailing edge is investigated. Results from numerical simulations are convincing and may give some highlights for practical implementations of trailing edge flap to a wind turbine rotor blade

  9. Noise control in a 3-D structural acoustic system: Numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, H.T.; Smith, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    A PDE-based noise control methodology for structural acoustic systems is discussed and supporting numerical simulation results are presented. The noise in the systems is generated by vibrations in portions of the enclosing structure, and control is implemented though the excitation of piezoceramic patches bonded to the structure. The system is modeled by a coupled set of PDE`s with a corresponding finite dimensional system being obtained when the PDE`s are discretized. Periodic LQR full state feedback control results are used to obtain gains and hence voltages to the patches which ultimately lead to reduced interior sound pressure levels. The application of this theory is then demonstrated through numerical simulations comparing the uncontrolled and controlled dynamics of a structural acoustic system currently being used for validation experiments.

  10. Technology and Jobs: Computer-Aided Design. Numerical-Control Machine-Tool Operators. Office Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Michael; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Three reports on the effects of high technology on the nature of work include (1) Stanton on applications and implications of computer-aided design for engineers, drafters, and architects; (2) Nardone on the outlook and training of numerical-control machine tool operators; and (3) Austin and Drake on the future of clerical occupations in automated…

  11. Numerical Control Machining and the Issue of Deskilling. An Empirical View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zicklin, Gilbert

    1987-01-01

    Research on the effects of numerical control (NC) machining on the skills of machinists presents mixed results. Interviews with a small group of machinists experienced in both conventional and NC matching suggest seven major factors that affect whether NC automation changes the overall skill level. The deskilling hypothesis is not supported by…

  12. Followup On Use of Numerically Controlled Equipment to Improve Defense Plant Productivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-17

    DIGEST The Department of Defense owns $336 million worth of numerically controlled equipment, such as drills, mills, lathes , and machining ...operations, Most of the machines in use are drills, mills, lathes , punches, and machining centers. Photographs of some NC machines are shown on pages... machines , drilling and tapping machines , grinders, mills, lathes , and punching and shearing machines . ^/Name changed from the Energy Research and

  13. Technology and Jobs: Computer-Aided Design. Numerical-Control Machine-Tool Operators. Office Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Michael; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Three reports on the effects of high technology on the nature of work include (1) Stanton on applications and implications of computer-aided design for engineers, drafters, and architects; (2) Nardone on the outlook and training of numerical-control machine tool operators; and (3) Austin and Drake on the future of clerical occupations in automated…

  14. CNC Turning Center Advanced Operations. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-332.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skowronski, Steven D.; Tatum, Kenneth

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to introduce the student to the operations and functions of a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 presents course expectations and syllabus, covers safety precautions, and describes the CNC turning center components, CNC…

  15. Lateral control required for satisfactory flying qualities based on flight tests of numerous airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilruth, R R; Turner, W N

    1941-01-01

    Report presents the results of an analysis made of the aileron control characteristics of numerous airplanes tested in flight by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. By the use of previously developed theory, the observed values of pb/2v for the various wing-aileron arrangements were examined to determine the effective section characteristics of the various aileron types.

  16. CNC Turning Center Advanced Operations. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-332.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skowronski, Steven D.; Tatum, Kenneth

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to introduce the student to the operations and functions of a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 presents course expectations and syllabus, covers safety precautions, and describes the CNC turning center components, CNC…

  17. CNC Turning Center Operations and Prove Out. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-334.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skowronski, Steven D.

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to instruct the student in the recommended procedures used when setting up tooling and verifying part programs for a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 discusses course content and reviews and demonstrates set-up procedures…

  18. Numerical Study of Active Flow Control for a Transitional Highly-Loaded Low-Pressure Turbine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Count Using Vortex Generator Jet Separation Control,” ASME Paper GT-2002-30602, Jun. 2002. [16] Eulitz, F. and Engel , K., “Numerical Investigation of...Around a Low Pressure Turbine Blade,” Direct and Large-Eddy Simulation IV, ERCOFTAC Series Vol. 8 , edited by B. J. Guerts, R. Friedrich , and O

  19. Numerical Control Machining and the Issue of Deskilling. An Empirical View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zicklin, Gilbert

    1987-01-01

    Research on the effects of numerical control (NC) machining on the skills of machinists presents mixed results. Interviews with a small group of machinists experienced in both conventional and NC matching suggest seven major factors that affect whether NC automation changes the overall skill level. The deskilling hypothesis is not supported by…

  20. CNC Turning Center Operations and Prove Out. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-334.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skowronski, Steven D.

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to instruct the student in the recommended procedures used when setting up tooling and verifying part programs for a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 discusses course content and reviews and demonstrates set-up procedures…

  1. Advanced numerical study of the three-axis magnetic attitude control and determination with uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, D. S.; Ovchinnikov, M. Yu.; Penkov, V. I.; Roldugin, D. S.; Doronin, D. M.; Ovchinnikov, A. V.

    2017-03-01

    Attitude motion of a satellite equipped with magnetic control system is considered. System comprises of three magnetorquers and one three-axis magnetometer. Satellite is stabilized in orbital reference frame using PD controller and extended Kalman filter. Three-axis attitude is analyzed numerically with advanced assumptions: inertia tensor uncertainty, disturbances of unknown nature, magnetometer errors are taken into account. Stabilization and determination accuracy dependence on orbit inclination is studied.

  2. A numerical study of transition control by periodic suction-blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, Sedat

    1987-01-01

    The applicability of active control of transition by periodic suction-blowing is investigated via direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. The time-evolution of finite-amplitude disturbances in plane channel flow is compared in detail with and without control. The analysis indicates that, for relatively small three dimensional amplitudes, a two dimensional control effectively reduces disturbance growth rates even for linearly unstable Reynolds numbers. After the flow goes through secondary instability, three dimensional control seems necessary to stabilize the flow. An investigation of the temperature field suggests that passive temperature contamination is operative to reflect the flow dynamics during transition.

  3. Shaking table test and numerical analysis of offshore wind turbine tower systems controlled by TLCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianbing; Liu, Youkun; Bai, Xueyuan

    2015-03-01

    A wind turbine system equipped with a tuned liquid column damper (TLCD) is comprehensively studied via shaking table tests using a 1/13-scaled model. The effects of wind and wave actions are considered by inputting response-equivalent accelerations on the shaking table. The test results show that the control effect of the TLCD system is significant in reducing the responses under both wind-wave equivalent loads and ground motions, but obviously varies for different inputs. Further, a blade-hub-tower integrated numerical model for the wind turbine system is established. The model is capable of considering the rotational effect of blades by combining Kane's equation with the finite element method. The responses of the wind tower equipped with TLCD devices are numerically obtained and compared to the test results, showing that under both controlled and uncontrolled conditions with and without blades' rotation, the corresponding responses exhibit good agreement. This demonstrates that the proposed numerical model performs well in capturing the wind-wave coupled response of the offshore wind turbine systems under control. Both numerical and experimental results show that the TLCD system can significantly reduce the structural response and thus improve the safety and serviceability of the offshore wind turbine tower systems. Additional issues that require further study are discussed.

  4. Numerical simulation of the actuation system for the ALDF's propulsion control valve. [Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the actuation system for the propulsion control valve (PCV) of the NASA Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility was developed during the preliminary design of the PCV and used throughout the entire project. The simulation is based on a predictive model of the PCV which is used to evaluate and design the actuation system. The PCV controls a 1.7 million-pound thrust water jet used in propelling a 108,000-pound test carriage. The PCV can open and close in 0.300 second and deliver over 9,000 gallons of water per sec at pressures up to 3150 psi. The numerical simulation results are used to predict transient performance and valve opening characteristics, specify the hydraulic control system, define transient loadings on components, and evaluate failure modes. The mathematical model used for numerically simulating the mechanical fluid power system is described, and numerical results are demonstrated for a typical opening and closing cycle of the PCV. A summary is then given on how the model is used in the design process.

  5. Numerical Investigation of Rotorcraft Fuselage Drag Reduction Using Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Schaeffler, Norman W.

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of unsteady zero-net-mass-flux jets for fuselage drag reduction was evaluated numerically on a generic rotorcraft fuselage in forward flight with a rotor. Previous efforts have shown significant fuselage drag reduction using flow control for an isolated fuselage by experiment and numerical simulation. This work will evaluate a flow control strategy, that was originally developed on an isolated fuselage, in a more relevant environment that includes the effects of a rotor. Evaluation of different slot heights and jet velocity ratios were performed. Direct comparisons between an isolated fuselage and rotor/fuselage simulations were made showing similar flow control performance at a -3deg fuselage angle-of-attack condition. However, this was not the case for a -5deg angle-of-attack condition where the performance between the isolated fuselage and rotor/fuselage were different. The fuselage flow control resulted in a 17% drag reduction for a peak C(sub mu) of 0.0069 in a forward flight simulation where mu = 0:35 and CT/sigma = 0:08. The CFD flow control results also predicted a favorable 22% reduction of the fuselage download at this same condition, which can have beneficial compounding effects on the overall performance of the vehicle. This numerical investigation was performed in order to provide guidance for a future 1/3 scale wind tunnel experiment to be performed at the NASA 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel.

  6. Numerical Modeling of Cavitating Venturi: A Flow Control Element of Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Saxon, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a propulsion system, the propellant flow and mixture ratio could be controlled either by variable area flow control valves or by passive flow control elements such as cavitating venturies. Cavitating venturies maintain constant propellant flowrate for fixed inlet conditions (pressure and temperature) and wide range of outlet pressures, thereby maintain constant, engine thrust and mixture ratio. The flowrate through the venturi reaches a constant value and becomes independent of outlet pressure when the pressure at throat becomes equal to vapor pressure. In order to develop a numerical model of propulsion system, it is necessary to model cavitating venturies in propellant feed systems. This paper presents a finite volume model of flow network of a cavitating venturi. The venturi was discretized into a number of control volumes and mass, momentum and energy conservation equations in each control volume are simultaneously solved to calculate one-dimensional pressure, density, and flowrate and temperature distribution. The numerical model predicts cavitations at the throat when outlet pressure was gradually reduced. Once cavitation starts, with further reduction of downstream pressure, no change in flowrate is found. The numerical predictions have been compared with test data and empirical equation based on Bernoulli's equation.

  7. A numerical study for design of depth, pitch and roll control system of a towed vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Koterayama, W.; Yamaguchi, S.; Nakamura, M.; Moriyama, A.; Akamatsu, T.

    1994-12-31

    A towed vehicle system, FLYING FISH, is under development for use in making chemical and physical measurements which enable the authors to obtain spacially continuous and real time data in an ocean mixed layer. The heave, pitch and roll of FLYING FISH are controlled by a main wing and horizontal tail wings which permit its stable attitudes and assure accurate measurements. The numerical simulation of motions was carried out to design the optimal control system of this towed vehicle system and the results gave the data for the design of the mechanical parts of the control system.

  8. Numerical calculation of the operation wavelength range of a polarization controller based on rotatable wave plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee Su; Sharma, Aditya

    2016-12-01

    We calculate the operation wavelength range of polarization controllers based on rotating wave plates such as paddle-type optical fiber devices. The coverages over arbitrary polarization conversion or arbitrary birefringence compensation are numerically estimated. The results present the acceptable phase retardation range of polarization controllers composed of two quarter-wave plates or a quarter-half-quarter-wave plate combination, and thereby determines the operation wavelength range of a given design. We further prove that a quarter-quarter-half-wave-plate combination is also an arbitrary birefringence compensator as well as a conventional quarter-half-quarter-wave-plate combination, and show that the two configurations have the identical range of acceptable phase retardance within the uncertainty of our numerical method.

  9. Numerical analysis of a variable camber rotor blade as a lift control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Awani, A. O.; Stroub, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    A new rotor configuration called the variable camber rotor was numerically investigated as a lift control device. This rotor differs from a conventional (baseline) rotor only in the blade aft section. In this configuration, the aft section or flap is attached to the forward section by pin joint arrangement, and also connected to the rotor control system for the control of rotor thrust level and vectoring. Pilot action to the flap deflection controls rotor lift and tip path plane tilt. The drag due to flaps is presented and the theoretical result correlated with test data. The assessment of payoff for the variable camber rotor in comparison with conventional (baseline) rotor was examined in hover. The variable camber rotor is shown to increase hover power required by 1.35%, but such a minimal power penalty is not significant enough to be considered a negative result. In forward flight, the control needs of the variable camber rotor were evaluated.

  10. Research on temperature control with numerical regulators in electric resistance furnaces with indirect heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniş, C. M.; Popa, G. N.; Iagăr, A.

    2016-02-01

    The paper is an analysis of two-positions (hysteresis) regulators, self-tuned PID controller and PID controller for temperature control used for indirect heat resistance furnaces. For PID controller was used three methods of tuning: Ziegler-Nichols step response model, Cohen-Coon tuning rules and Ziegler-Nichols tuning rules. In experiments it used an electric furnace with indirect heating with active power of resistance of 1 kW/230V AC and a numerical temperature regulator AT-503 type (ANLY). It got a much better temperature control when using the Cohen-Coon tuning rules method than those of Ziegler-Nichols step response method and Ziegler-Nichols tuning rules method.

  11. Numerical investigations of passive flow control elements for vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunzulica, Florin; Dumitrache, Alexandru; Suatean, Bogdan

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we numerically investigate the possibilities to control the dynamic stall phenomenon, with application to vertical axis wind turbines. The dynamic stall appears at low tip speed ratio (TSR<4) and it has a great impact on structural integrity of the wind turbine and power performances. For this reason we performed a CFD 2D analysis of the dynamic stall phenomenon around NACA 0012 airfoil equipped with a passive flow control device, in pitching motion at relative low Reynolds number (˜105). Three passive flow control devices are numerically investigated: a turbulence promoter mounted on the leading edge, a thin channel and a step on the upper surface of the airfoil. For the present studies, the unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model is the suitable approach to perform the dynamic stall simulations with an acceptable computational cost and reasonable accuracy. The results are compared to those of an existing experimental case test for unmodified NACA 0012 airfoil. The capability of this device was investigated numerically on a vertical axis wind turbine (2D model), where blades are generated with NACA 0018 airfoil.

  12. Multiresolution Wavelet Based Adaptive Numerical Dissipation Control for Shock-Turbulence Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjoegreen, B.; Yee, H. C.

    2001-01-01

    The recently developed essentially fourth-order or higher low dissipative shock-capturing scheme of Yee, Sandham and Djomehri (1999) aimed at minimizing nu- merical dissipations for high speed compressible viscous flows containing shocks, shears and turbulence. To detect non smooth behavior and control the amount of numerical dissipation to be added, Yee et al. employed an artificial compression method (ACM) of Harten (1978) but utilize it in an entirely different context than Harten originally intended. The ACM sensor consists of two tuning parameters and is highly physical problem dependent. To minimize the tuning of parameters and physical problem dependence, new sensors with improved detection properties are proposed. The new sensors are derived from utilizing appropriate non-orthogonal wavelet basis functions and they can be used to completely switch to the extra numerical dissipation outside shock layers. The non-dissipative spatial base scheme of arbitrarily high order of accuracy can be maintained without compromising its stability at all parts of the domain where the solution is smooth. Two types of redundant non-orthogonal wavelet basis functions are considered. One is the B-spline wavelet (Mallat & Zhong 1992) used by Gerritsen and Olsson (1996) in an adaptive mesh refinement method, to determine regions where re nement should be done. The other is the modification of the multiresolution method of Harten (1995) by converting it to a new, redundant, non-orthogonal wavelet. The wavelet sensor is then obtained by computing the estimated Lipschitz exponent of a chosen physical quantity (or vector) to be sensed on a chosen wavelet basis function. Both wavelet sensors can be viewed as dual purpose adaptive methods leading to dynamic numerical dissipation control and improved grid adaptation indicators. Consequently, they are useful not only for shock-turbulence computations but also for computational aeroacoustics and numerical combustion. In addition, these

  13. Geometric versus numerical optimal control of a dissipative spin-(1/2) particle

    SciTech Connect

    Lapert, M.; Sugny, D.; Zhang, Y.; Braun, M.; Glaser, S. J.

    2010-12-15

    We analyze the saturation of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal using optimal magnetic fields. We consider both the problems of minimizing the duration of the control and its energy for a fixed duration. We solve the optimal control problems by using geometric methods and a purely numerical approach, the grape algorithm, the two methods being based on the application of the Pontryagin maximum principle. A very good agreement is obtained between the two results. The optimal solutions for the energy-minimization problem are finally implemented experimentally with available NMR techniques.

  14. Numerical solution of optimal control problems using multiple-interval integral Gegenbauer pseudospectral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaojun

    2016-04-01

    The main purpose of this work is to provide multiple-interval integral Gegenbauer pseudospectral methods for solving optimal control problems. The latest developed single-interval integral Gauss/(flipped Radau) pseudospectral methods can be viewed as special cases of the proposed methods. We present an exact and efficient approach to compute the mesh pseudospectral integration matrices for the Gegenbauer-Gauss and flipped Gegenbauer-Gauss-Radau points. Numerical results on benchmark optimal control problems confirm the ability of the proposed methods to obtain highly accurate solutions.

  15. Geometric versus numerical optimal control of a dissipative spin-(1)/(2) particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapert, M.; Zhang, Y.; Braun, M.; Glaser, S. J.; Sugny, D.

    2010-12-01

    We analyze the saturation of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal using optimal magnetic fields. We consider both the problems of minimizing the duration of the control and its energy for a fixed duration. We solve the optimal control problems by using geometric methods and a purely numerical approach, the grape algorithm, the two methods being based on the application of the Pontryagin maximum principle. A very good agreement is obtained between the two results. The optimal solutions for the energy-minimization problem are finally implemented experimentally with available NMR techniques.

  16. Numerical Comparison of Active Acoustic and Structural Noise Control in a Stiffened Double Wall Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1996-01-01

    The active acoustic and structural noise control characteristics of a double wall cylinder with and without ring stiffeners were numerically evaluated. An exterior monopole was assumed to acoustically excite the outside of the double wall cylinder at an acoustic cavity resonance frequency. Structural modal vibration properties of the inner and outer shells were analyzed by post-processing the results from a finite element analysis. A boundary element approach was used to calculate the acoustic cavity response and the coupled structural-acoustic interaction. In the frequency region of interest, below 500 Hz, all structural resonant modes were found to be acoustically slow and the nonresonant modal response to be dominant. Active sound transmission control was achieved by control forces applied to the inner or outer shell, or acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shell. A least mean square technique was used to minimize the interior sound pressures at the nodes of a data recovery mesh. Results showed that single acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shells resulted in better sound transmission control than six distributed point forces applied to either one of the shells. Adding stiffeners to the double wall structure constrained the modal vibrations of the shells, making the double wall stiffer with associated higher modal frequencies. Active noise control obtained for the stiffened double wall configurations was less than for the unstiffened cylinder. In all cases, the acoustic control monopoles controlled the sound transmission into the interior better than the structural control forces.

  17. Numerical solution of a conspicuous consumption model with constant control delay☆

    PubMed Central

    Huschto, Tony; Feichtinger, Gustav; Hartl, Richard F.; Kort, Peter M.; Sager, Sebastian; Seidl, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    We derive optimal pricing strategies for conspicuous consumption products in periods of recession. To that end, we formulate and investigate a two-stage economic optimal control problem that takes uncertainty of the recession period length and delay effects of the pricing strategy into account. This non-standard optimal control problem is difficult to solve analytically, and solutions depend on the variable model parameters. Therefore, we use a numerical result-driven approach. We propose a structure-exploiting direct method for optimal control to solve this challenging optimization problem. In particular, we discretize the uncertainties in the model formulation by using scenario trees and target the control delays by introduction of slack control functions. Numerical results illustrate the validity of our approach and show the impact of uncertainties and delay effects on optimal economic strategies. During the recession, delayed optimal prices are higher than the non-delayed ones. In the normal economic period, however, this effect is reversed and optimal prices with a delayed impact are smaller compared to the non-delayed case. PMID:22267871

  18. Numerical dissipation control in high order shock-capturing schemes for LES of low speed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, D. V.; Yee, H. C.; Wray, A. A.; Sjögreen, B.; Kritsuk, A. G.

    2016-02-01

    The Yee & Sjögreen adaptive numerical dissipation control in high order scheme (High Order Filter Methods for Wide Range of Compressible Flow Speeds, ICOSAHOM 09, 2009) is further improved for DNS and LES of shock-free turbulence and low speed turbulence with shocklets. There are vastly different requirements in the minimization of numerical dissipation for accurate turbulence simulations of different compressible flow types and flow speeds. Traditionally, the method of choice for shock-free turbulence and low speed turbulence are by spectral, high order central or high order compact schemes with high order linear filters. With a proper control of a local flow sensor, appropriate amount of numerical dissipation in high order shock-capturing schemes can have spectral-like accuracy for compressible low speed turbulent flows. The development of the method includes an adaptive flow sensor with automatic selection on the amount of numerical dissipation needed at each flow location for more accurate DNS and LES simulations with less tuning of parameters for flows with a wide range of flow speed regime during the time-accurate evolution, e.g., time varying random forcing. An automatic selection of the different flow sensors catered to the different flow types is constructed. A Mach curve and high-frequency oscillation indicators are used to reduce the tuning of parameters in controlling the amount of shock-capturing numerical dissipation to be employed for shock-free turbulence, low speed turbulence and turbulence with strong shocks. In Kotov et al. (High Order Numerical Methods for LES of Turbulent Flows with Shocks, ICCFD8, Chengdu, Sichuan, China, July 14-18, 2014) the LES of a turbulent flow with a strong shock by the Yee & Sjögreen scheme indicated a good agreement with the filtered DNS data. A work in progress for the application of the adaptive flow sensor for compressible turbulence with time-varying random forcing is forthcoming. The present study examines the

  19. Numerical investigation on the temperature control of a NIF cryogenic target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Zhou, G.; Li, Q.; Li, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical investigation was performed on the temperature control of NIF cryogenic target in order to get a temperature uniformity of 0.1mK on the surface of the capsule. Heat transfer process was discussed to find out major factors in the temperature control, tamping gas heat transfer and free convection of the tamping gas was calculated. Spherically symmetric temperature field is required due to energy released from the tritium decay within the capsule, auxiliary heating is set on the hohlraum to compensate the higher heat loss caused by the lower tamping gas thermal resistance on the mid plane. Free convection effect of the tamping gas is reduced by separating the tamping gas with plastic films and independent temperature control of the cooling arm. This research may provide theoretical foundation and reference for temperature control on the cryogenic target.

  20. Formulation and numerical solution of finite-level quantum optimal control problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzi`, A.; Salomon, J.; Volkwein, S.

    2008-06-01

    Optimal control of finite-level quantum systems is investigated, and iterative solution schemes for the optimization of a control representing laser pulses are developed. The purpose of this external field is to channel the system's wavefunction between given states in its most efficient way. Physically motivated constraints, such as limited laser resources or population suppression of certain states, are accounted for through an appropriately chosen cost functional. First-order necessary optimality conditions and second-order sufficient optimality conditions are investigated. For solving the optimal control problems, a cascadic non-linear conjugate gradient scheme and a monotonic scheme are discussed. Results of numerical experiments with a representative finite-level quantum system demonstrate the effectiveness of the optimal control formulation and efficiency and robustness of the proposed approaches.

  1. A numerical study of the controlled flow tunnel for a high lift model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P. C.

    1984-01-01

    A controlled flow tunnel employs active control of flow through the walls of the wind tunnel so that the model is in approximately free air conditions during the test. This improves the wind tunnel test environment, enhancing the validity of the experimentally obtained test data. This concept is applied to a three dimensional jet flapped wing with full span jet flap. It is shown that a special treatment is required for the high energy wake associated with this and other V/STOL models. An iterative numerical scheme is developed to describe the working of an actual controlled flow tunnel and comparisons are shown with other available results. It is shown that control need be exerted over only part of the tunnel walls to closely approximate free air flow conditions. It is concluded that such a tunnel is able to produce a nearly interference free test environment even with a high lift model in the tunnel.

  2. Design And Verification of Controllers for Coupled Bunch Instabilities Using Optimal Control Theory And Numerical Simulation: Predictions for PEP II

    SciTech Connect

    Hindi, Haitham; Prabhakar, Shyam; Fox, John D.; Linscott, Ivan; Teytelman, Dmitri; /SLAC

    2011-08-31

    We present a technique for the design and verification of efficient bunch-by-bunch controllers for damping longitudinal multibunch instabilities. The controllers attempt to optimize the use of available feedback amplifier power - one of the most expensive components of a feedback system - and define the limits of the closed loop system performance. Our design technique alternates between analytic computation of single bunch optimal controllers and verification on a multibunch numerical simulator. The simulator uses PEP-II parameters and identifies unstable coupled bunch modes, their growth rates and their damping rates with feedback. The results from the simulator are shown to be in reasonable agreement with analytical calculations based on the single bunch model. The technique is then used to evaluate the performance of a variety of controllers proposed for PEP-II.

  3. Design and verification of controllers for longitudinal oscillations using optimal control theory and numerical simulation: Predictions for PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Hindi, H.; Prabhakar, S.; Fox, J.; Teytelman, D.

    1997-12-01

    The authors present a technique for the design and verification of efficient bunch-by-bunch controllers for damping longitudinal multibunch instabilities. The controllers attempt to optimize the use of available feedback amplifier power--one of the most expensive components of a feedback system--and define the limits of closed loop system performance. The design technique alternates between analytic computation of single bunch optimal controllers and verification on a multibunch numerical simulator. The simulator identifies unstable coupled bunch modes and predicts their growth and damping rates. The results from the simulator are shown to be in reasonable agreement with analytical calculations based on the single bunch model. The technique is then used to evaluate the performance of a variety of controllers proposed for PEP-II.

  4. Numerical study on the influence of boss cap fins on efficiency of controllable-pitch propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ying; Wang, Zhanzhi; Qi, Wanjiang

    2013-03-01

    Numerical simulation is investigated to disclose how propeller boss cap fins (PBCF) operate utilizing Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) method. In addition, exploration of the influencing mechanism of PBCF on the open water efficiency of one controllable-pitch propeller is analyzed through the open water characteristic curves, blade surface pressure distribution and hub streamline distribution. On this basis, the influence of parameters including airfoil profile, diameter, axial position of installation and circumferential installation angle on the open water efficiency of the controllable-pitch propeller is investigated. Numerical results show: for the controllable-pitch propeller, the thrust generated is at the optimum when the radius of boss cap fins is 1.5 times of propeller hub with an optimal installation position in the axial direction, and its optimal circumferential installation position is the midpoint of the extension line of the front and back ends of two adjacent propeller roots in the front of fin root. Under these optimal parameters, the gain of open water efficiency of the controllable-pitch propeller with different advance velocity coefficients is greater than 0.01, which accounts for approximately an increase of 1%-5% of open water efficiency.

  5. Numerical studies of electrokinetic control of DNA concentration in a closed-end microchannel.

    PubMed

    Daghighi, Yasaman; Li, Dongqing

    2010-03-01

    A major challenge in lab-on-a-chip devices is how to concentrate sample molecules from a dilute solution, which is critical to the effectiveness and the detection limit of on-chip bio-chemical reactions. A numerical study of sample concentration control by electrokinetic microfluidic means in a closed-end microchannel is presented in this paper. The present method provides a simple and efficient way of concentration control by using electrokinetic trapping of a charged species of interest, controlling liquid flow and separating different sample molecules in the microchannel. The electrokinetic-concentration process and the controlled transport of the sample molecules are numerically studied. In this system, in addition to the electroosmotic flow and the electrophoresis, the closed-end of the chamber causes velocity variation at both ends of the channel and induces a pressure gradient and the associated fluid movement in the channel. The combined effects determine the final concentration field of the sample molecules. The influences of a number of parameters such as the channel dimensions, electrode size and the applied electric field are investigated.

  6. A numerical procedure to compute the stabilising solution of game theoretic Riccati equations of stochastic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragan, Vasile; Ivanov, Ivan

    2011-04-01

    In this article, the problem of the numerical computation of the stabilising solution of the game theoretic algebraic Riccati equation is investigated. The Riccati equation under consideration occurs in connection with the solution of the H ∞ control problem for a class of stochastic systems affected by state-dependent and control-dependent white noise and subjected to Markovian jumping. The stabilising solution of the considered game theoretic Riccati equation is obtained as a limit of a sequence of approximations constructed based on stabilising solutions of a sequence of algebraic Riccati equations of stochastic control with definite sign of the quadratic part. The proposed algorithm extends to this general framework the method proposed in Lanzon, Feng, Anderson, and Rotkowitz (Lanzon, A., Feng, Y., Anderson, B.D.O., and Rotkowitz, M. (2008), 'Computing the Positive Stabilizing Solution to Algebraic Riccati Equations with an Indefinite Quadratic Term Viaa Recursive Method,' IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 53, pp. 2280-2291). In the proof of the convergence of the proposed algorithm different concepts associated the generalised Lyapunov operators as stability, stabilisability and detectability are widely involved. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated by several numerical experiments.

  7. Investigation of Numerical Upscaling Techniques for Mixing-Controlled Reactions in Heterogeneous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valocchi, A. J.; Nakshatrala, K. B.

    2007-12-01

    Mixing of chemical species across plume boundaries has a major influence upon reactive pollutant fate in the subsurface. Small-scale heterogeneity leads to irregular plume boundaries which enhances mixing-controlled reactions through increasing the interfacial area of the plume. Therefore, it is crucial to capture this small-scale heterogeneity in order to properly model reactive transport. Unfortunately, computational limitations do not permit full resolution of the smallest scales of heterogeneity, and thus it is necessary to use a coarse numerical grid, particularly for cases with a large number of reactive species. In order to capture the sub-grid scale heterogeneity effects, we investigate the extension of multi-scale numerical techniques (which have been proved successful for diffusion and Darcy flow problems) to mixing-controlled reactive transport. The proposed upscaling technique is based on the multi-scale decomposition of the solution (which is similar to that proposed by Arbogast [1] for Darcy flow). We divide the governing system into two sub- problems - coarse-scale and fine-scale. We assume that the solute concentration has two components - coarse-scale (which is defined at the grid scale) and fine-scale (which is defined at the smallest modeled scale). The fine-scale sub-problems are solved locally by constructing numerical Green's functions, which are independent of the coarse-scale problem. The localization of fine-scale sub-problems is achieved by the closure assumption, which is enforced by prescribing appropriate boundary conditions for the fine-scale sub-problem. In this study, we investigate the effect of various closure approximations (i.e., boundary conditions for fine-scale sub- problem) on the overall accuracy of the numerical solution. We apply our multi-scale methods to several canonical problems for fast bi-molecular reactions. [1] T. Arbogast. Numerical subgrid upscaling of two-phase flow in porous media. In Z. Chen, R. E. Ewing, and

  8. Numerical simulation of drop impact on a controlled falling liquid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Zhizhao; Adebayo, Idris; Xie, Zhihua; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Salinas, Pablo; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    We study the impact process of droplets falling obliquely on controlled films using a numerical simulation approach. This approach is based on a finite element discretisation of the Navier Stokes equations on fully unstructured anisotropic and adaptive meshes, which are capable of representing the underlying physics of multiphase problems accurately while also reducing computational effort. Liquid film control here is applied to ensure that droplet impact occurs on different, targeted regions of a controlled film surface viz. capillary waves preceding a large-amplitude wave, flat film regions, and wave humps. The outcomes of droplet impact on these different regions are then compared and the differences discussed. The effect of varying the film flow rate, droplet speed, and droplet size on a number of droplet impact outcomes is also studied and the results further compared with those from uncontrolled as well as quiescent liquid films. EPSRC UK Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1).

  9. Numerical study of flow control strategies for a simplified square back ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eulalie, Yoann; Gilotte, Philippe; Mortazavi, Iraj

    2017-06-01

    Current automotive trends lead to vertical shapes in the region of the rear tailgates, which induce high aerodynamical losses at the rear wall of vehicles. It is therefore important to work on turbulent wake in order to find drag reduction solutions for the current vehicle design. This paper focuses on flow control strategies, which are designed to interact with shear layers backward from the detachment region, in order to increase pressure values in the wake of a square back bluff body. This study involves large eddy simulation results validated by experimental data. After the first section, which represents experimental validation of LES computations with and without active flow control on an Ahmed bluff body, we will present a wide range of numerical results describing several active and passive flow control solutions leading to drag reductions of up to 10%. The last part of this paper will focus on some fluid mechanisms, which could explain these aerodynamical performances.

  10. Development of an Intelligent Monitoring and Control System for a Heterogeneous Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, John A.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.; Lewandowski, Henry; Homer, Patrick T.; Schlichting, Richard D.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) project is exploring the use of computer simulation to facilitate the design of new jet engines. Several key issues raised in this research are being examined in an NPSS-related research project: zooming, monitoring and control, and support for heterogeneity. The design of a simulation executive that addresses each of these issues is described. In this work, the strategy of zooming, which allows codes that model at different levels of fidelity to be integrated within a single simulation, is applied to the fan component of a turbofan propulsion system. A prototype monitoring and control system has been designed for this simulation to support experimentation with expert system techniques for active control of the simulation. An interconnection system provides a transparent means of connecting the heterogeneous systems that comprise the prototype.

  11. Real time control and numerical simulation of pipeline subjected to landslide

    SciTech Connect

    Cuscuna, S.; Giusti, G.; Gramola, C.

    1984-06-01

    This paper describes SNAM research activity in the study of behaviour and real-time control of pipelines in landslide areas. The subject can be delt considering three different aspects: 1. Geotechnical characterization of unstable soils. The mechanical parameters of soil and the landslide types are defined; 2. Structural analysis of pipe-soil system. By means of a finite element program it's possible to study the pipe-soil interaction; in this numerical code the soil parameters attend by the non-linear elastic behaviour of pipe restraints. The results of this analysis are the location of the expected most stressed sections of pipe and the global behaviour of pipe inside the soil. 3. Instrumental control. The adoption of a suitable appliance of vibrating wire strain gauges allows the strain control of pipe in time. The aim is to make possible timely interventions in order to guarantee the installation safety.

  12. Numerical simulation about orthogonal single frequency dithering technique used in tilt control of fiber laser array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhixin; Zhi, Dong; Ma, Yanxing; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Beam combination of fiber laser array is an effective technique contributed to improve the brightness of fiber lasers. In order to realize high-efficiency CBC, challenges like phase distortion (mainly including piston and tilt phase aberrations) should be taken into consideration. Resent years, tilt phase aberrations control has been come true by adaptive fiber optics collimator using the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. However, the convergence rate of tilt control system still cannot satisfy the needs of practical application. In order to increase the tilt control bandwidth, a new idea is put forward that applying the orthogonal single frequency dithering (OSFD) technique into tilt control, and numerical simulation has been completed. A hexagonal laser array with 7 elements has been simulated, and each element has a pair of initial tilt angles in horizontal and vertical direction. The initial tilt angles comply with normal distribution. In the same condition, tilt phase control has been realized through SPGD and OSFD individually, and the convergence steps (defined as the iteration steps that improve the normalized PIB above 0.9) with appropriate parameters are respectively about 20 (SPGD) and 7 (OSFD). Furthermore, tilt phase control of large number hexagonal array is simulated, and the results are as follows: for 19/37 elements, the least convergence steps are about 80/160(SPGD) and 19/55(OSFD). Comparing with SPGD algorithm, it is obvious that the OSFD has higher convergence rate and greater potential for tilt control application in large number coherent fiber laser array.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Non-Equilibrium Plasma Discharge for High Speed Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Ramakrishnan; Anandhanarayanan, Karupannasamy; Krishnamurthy, Rajah; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2017-06-01

    Numerical simulation of hypersonic flow control using plasma discharge technique is carried out using an in-house developed code CERANS-TCNEQ. The study is aimed at demonstrating a proof of concept futuristic aerodynamic flow control device. The Kashiwa Hypersonic and High Temperature wind tunnel study of plasma discharge over a flat plate had been considered for numerical investigation. The 7-species, 18-reaction thermo-chemical non-equilibrium, two-temperature air-chemistry model due Park is used to model the weakly ionized flow. Plasma discharge is modeled as Joule heating source terms in both the translation-rotational and vibrational energy equations. Comparison of results for plasma discharge at Mach 7 over a flat plate with the reference data reveals that the present study is able to mimic the exact physics of complex flow such as formation of oblique shock wave ahead of the plasma discharge region with a resultant rise in surface pressure and vibrational temperature up to 7000 K demonstrating the use of non-equilibrium plasma discharge for flow control at hypersonic speeds.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Non-Equilibrium Plasma Discharge for High Speed Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Ramakrishnan; Anandhanarayanan, Karupannasamy; Krishnamurthy, Rajah; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulation of hypersonic flow control using plasma discharge technique is carried out using an in-house developed code CERANS-TCNEQ. The study is aimed at demonstrating a proof of concept futuristic aerodynamic flow control device. The Kashiwa Hypersonic and High Temperature wind tunnel study of plasma discharge over a flat plate had been considered for numerical investigation. The 7-species, 18-reaction thermo-chemical non-equilibrium, two-temperature air-chemistry model due Park is used to model the weakly ionized flow. Plasma discharge is modeled as Joule heating source terms in both the translation-rotational and vibrational energy equations. Comparison of results for plasma discharge at Mach 7 over a flat plate with the reference data reveals that the present study is able to mimic the exact physics of complex flow such as formation of oblique shock wave ahead of the plasma discharge region with a resultant rise in surface pressure and vibrational temperature up to 7000 K demonstrating the use of non-equilibrium plasma discharge for flow control at hypersonic speeds.

  15. The NC (numerically controlled) assistant: Interfacing knowledge based manufacturing tools to CAD/CAM systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burd, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    A knowledge based computer program that assists programmers of numerically controlled (NC) machine tools is described. The program uses part features identified by the NC programmer and a set of expert system manufacturing rules to select cutting parameters and produce NC part programs. An expert system shell determines the NC sequence and the machining parameters. Several point-to-point NC functions are currently in production. A CAD/CAM system interface for milling and turning functions is also described. 2 refs., 24 figs.

  16. Numerical investigation of sintering of Ti and Cu powders in the controlled heating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokova, Svetlana N.

    2016-11-01

    The model of sintering Ti and Cu powders substrate under controlled heating, taking into account the kinetic and thermal phenomena are proposed and studied. The system of chemical reactions is written according to the phase diagram of Ti-Cu. The model takes into account that the chemical reactions are slowed layer product. The problem is solved numerically. The temperature distribution and concentration of elements or compounds at different times for different synthesis conditions are determined. It is shown that at any process organization the synthesized material becomes chemically heterogeneous.

  17. Numerical prediction of energy consumption in buildings with controlled interior temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Jarošová, P.; Št’astník, S.

    2015-03-10

    New European directives bring strong requirement to the energy consumption of building objects, supporting the renewable energy sources. Whereas in the case of family and similar houses this can lead up to absurd consequences, for building objects with controlled interior temperature the optimization of energy demand is really needed. The paper demonstrates the system approach to the modelling of thermal insulation and accumulation abilities of such objetcs, incorporating the significant influence of additional physical processes, as surface heat radiation and moisture-driven deterioration of insulation layers. An illustrative example shows the numerical prediction of energy consumption of a freezing plant in one Central European climatic year.

  18. Numerical study of three-dimensional separation and flow control at a wing/body junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.; Lakshmanan, Balakrishnan

    1989-01-01

    The problem of three-dimensional separation and flow control at a wing/body junction has been investigated numerically using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code. The numerical code employs an algebraic grid generation technique for generating the grid for unmodified junction and an elliptic grid generation technique for filleted fin junction. The results for laminar flow past a blunt fin/flat plate junction demonstrate that after grid refinement, the computations agree with experiment and reveal a strong dependency of the number of vortices at the junction on Mach number and Reynolds number. The numerical results for pressure distribution, particle paths and limiting streamlines for turbulent flow past a swept fin show a decrease in the peak pressure and in the extent of the separated flow region compared to the laminar case. The results for a filleted juncture indicate that the streamline patterns lose much of their vortical character with proper filleting. Fillets with a radius of three and one-half times the fin leading edge diameter or two times the incoming boundary layer thickness, significantly weaken the usual necklace interaction vortex for the Mach number and Reynolds number considered in the present study.

  19. One tamed at a time: A new approach for controlling continuous magnitudes in numerical comparison tasks.

    PubMed

    Salti, Moti; Katzin, Naama; Katzin, David; Leibovich, Tali; Henik, Avishai

    2016-07-20

    Non-symbolic stimuli (i.e., dot arrays) are commonly used to study numerical cognition. However, in addition to numerosity, non-symbolic stimuli entail continuous magnitudes (e.g., total surface area, convex-hull, etc.) that correlate with numerosity. Several methods for controlling for continuous magnitudes have been suggested, all with the same underlying rationale: disassociating numerosity from continuous magnitudes. However, the different continuous magnitudes do not fully correlate; therefore, it is impossible to disassociate them completely from numerosity. Moreover, relying on a specific continuous magnitude in order to create this disassociation may end up in increasing or decreasing numerosity saliency, pushing subjects to rely on it more or less, respectively. Here, we put forward a taxonomy depicting the relations between the different continuous magnitudes. We use this taxonomy to introduce a new method with a complimentary Matlab toolbox that allows disassociating numerosity from continuous magnitudes and equating the ratio of the continuous magnitudes to the ratio of the numerosity in order to balance the saliency of numerosity and continuous magnitudes. A dot array comparison experiment in the subitizing range showed the utility of this method. Equating different continuous magnitudes yielded different results. Importantly, equating the convex hull ratio to the numerical ratio resulted in similar interference of numerical and continuous magnitudes.

  20. A numerical model of controlled bioinduced mineralization in a porous medium to prevent corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Michael; van Paassen, Leon; Heimovaara, Timo

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of controlled bioinduced mineralization in a porous medium as a possible corrosion protection mechanism. Corrosion is a significant economic problem - recent reports evaluate the annual cost of metal corrosion as 3-4% of the gross domestic product (GDP), in both developed and developing countries. Corrosion control methods currently used are costly and unsustainable as they require the use of larger volumes of materials, hazardous chemicals and regular inspections. As an alternative corrosion control method, bioinduced deposition of protective mineral layers has been proposed. Bioinduced precipitation of calcite has already been investigated for CO2 geological sequestration and soil improvement. To our knowledge, though, no numerical study of biomineralization for corrosion protection has been described yet. Our model includes three phases - solid, biofilm and mobile water. In the latter the reactive elements are dissolved, which are involved in the precipitation and the biofilm growth. The equations that describe the pore water flow, chemical reactions in the mobile water, consumption of substrate and expulsion of metabolic products by the biofilm are briefly presented. Also, the changes in porosity and permeability of the porous medium through biofilm growth and solids precipitation are included. Our main assumptions are that the biofilm is uniform, has a constant density and composition, that all chemical reactions except for substrate consumption occur in the mobile water, and that the precipitates are uniformly distributed on the surface of the solids. We validate the model with simple analytical solutions and against experimental data. The metabolism of the micro-organisms introduces changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the environment, such as concentrations of chemicals and pH levels. As an extension to the model, we couple these changes to the rates of biofilm growth and precipitation rates. The

  1. 3D MRI-Controlled Transurethral Ultrasound Prostate Therapy: Experimental Validation of Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtnyk, Mathieu; N'Djin, William Apoutou; Kobelevskiy, Ilya; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2011-09-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy uses a linear array of transducer elements and active temperature feedback to create volumes of thermal coagulation shaped to predefined prostate geometries in 3-D. Numerical simulations have been used to determine robust feedback control algorithms, optimal transducer designs, effects of various tissue and imaging parameters, as well as to evaluate potential treatment accuracy and safety in patient-specific anatomical models. The goal of this work is to evaluate quantitatively the accuracy with which these numerical simulations predict the extent, shape and temperature pattern of 3-D heating produced in tissue-mimicking Zerdine* gel phantoms. Methods. Eleven experiments were performed in a 1.5T MRI scanner. Temperature feedback was used to control the rotation rate and ultrasound power of a transurethral device with five 3.5×5 mm transducer elements. Heating patterns shaped to 23 and 11 cc human prostate geometries were generated using devices operating at 4.7 and 8.0 MHz, respectively, and 10 W/cm2 surface acoustic intensity. Transducer surface velocity measurements were acquired using a vibrometer and used to calculate the resulting acoustic pressure distribution in gel. Temperature dynamics were determined according to a FDTD solution to Pennes' BHTE. Results. The numerical simulations predicted the extent and shape of the coagulation boundary produced in gel to within (mean±stdev [min, max]): 0.1±0.4 [-1.4, 1.7] and 0.0±0.3 [-1.0, 1.5] mm for the treatments at 4.7 and 8.0 MHz, respectively. The temperatures across all MRI thermometry images were predicted to within 10%, and the treatment time (˜20 min) to within 20%. The simulations showed excellent agreement in regions of sharp temperature gradients, near the transurethral and endorectal devices. Conclusion. Heating patterns predicted by the numerical simulations correspond closely to those produced experimentally in gel. This work quantifies the accuracy and

  2. Adaptive Numerical Dissipative Control in High Order Schemes for Multi-D Non-Ideal MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, B.

    2004-01-01

    The goal is to extend our adaptive numerical dissipation control in high order filter schemes and our new divergence-free methods for ideal MHD to non-ideal MHD that include viscosity and resistivity. The key idea consists of automatic detection of different flow features as distinct sensors to signal the appropriate type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter where needed and leave the rest of the region free of numerical dissipation contamination. These scheme-independent detectors are capable of distinguishing shocks/shears, flame sheets, turbulent fluctuations and spurious high-frequency oscillations. The detection algorithm is based on an artificial compression method (ACM) (for shocks/shears), and redundant multi-resolution wavelets (WAV) (for the above types of flow feature). These filter approaches also provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of Div(B) numerical error. The filter scheme consists of spatially sixth order or higher non-dissipative spatial difference operators as the base scheme for the inviscid flux derivatives. If necessary, a small amount of high order linear dissipation is used to remove spurious high frequency oscillations. For example, an eighth-order centered linear dissipation (AD8) might be included in conjunction with a spatially sixth-order base scheme. The inviscid difference operator is applied twice for the viscous flux derivatives. After the completion of a full time step of the base scheme step, the solution is adaptively filtered by the product of a 'flow detector' and the 'nonlinear dissipative portion' of a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme. In addition, the scheme independent wavelet flow detector can be used in conjunction with spatially compact, spectral or spectral element type of base schemes. The ACM and wavelet filter schemes using the dissipative portion of a second-order shock-capturing scheme with sixth-order spatial central base scheme for both the inviscid and viscous MHD flux

  3. A numerical model including PID control of a multizone crystal growth furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panzarella, Charles H.; Kassemi, Mohammad

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a 2D axisymmetric combined conduction and radiation model of a multizone crystal growth furnace. The model is based on a programmable multizone furnace (PMZF) designed and built at NASA Lewis Research Center for growing high quality semiconductor crystals. A novel feature of this model is a control algorithm which automatically adjusts the power in any number of independently controlled heaters to establish the desired crystal temperatures in the furnace model. The control algorithm eliminates the need for numerous trial and error runs previously required to obtain the same results. The finite element code, FIDAP, used to develop the furnace model, was modified to directly incorporate the control algorithm. This algorithm, which presently uses PID control, and the associated heat transfer model are briefly discussed. Together, they have been used to predict the heater power distributions for a variety of furnace configurations and desired temperature profiles. Examples are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the PID controlled model in establishing isothermal, Bridgman, and other complicated temperature profies in the sample. Finally, an example is given to show how the algorithm can be used to change the desired profile with time according to a prescribed temperature-time evolution.

  4. Numerical Study of Control of Flow Separation Over a Ramp with Nanosecond Plasma Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J. G.; Khoo, B. C.; Cui, Y. D.; Zhao, Z. J.; Li, J.

    2016-06-01

    The nanosecond plasma discharge actuator driven by high voltage pulse with typical rise and decay time of several to tens of nanoseconds is emerging as a promising active flow control means in recent years and is being studied intensively. The characterization study reveals that the discharge induced shock wave propagates through ambient air and introduces highly transient perturbation to the flow. On the other hand, the residual heat remaining in the discharge volume may trigger the instability of external flow. In this study, this type of actuator is used to suppress flow separation over a ramp model. Numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the interaction of the discharge induced disturbance with the external flow. It is found that the flow separation region over the ramp can be reduced significantly. Our work may provide some insights into the understanding of the control mechanism of nanosecond pulse actuator.

  5. Numerical analysis for an optimal control of bidomain-bath model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendahmane, Mostafa; Chamakuri, Nagaiah

    2017-09-01

    This work is concerned with the study of the convergence analysis for an optimal control of bidomain-bath model. The bidomain-bath model equations describe the cardiac bioelectric activity at the tissue and bath volumes where the control acts at the boundary of the tissue domain. We establish the existence and convergence of the unique weak solution of the direct bidomain-bath model by a discrete Galerkin approach. The convergence proof is based on deriving a series of a priori estimates and using a general L2-compactness criterion. Moreover, the well-posedness of the adjoint problem and the first order necessary optimality conditions are shown. Comparing to the direct problem, the convergence proof of the adjoint problem is based on using a general L1-compactness criterion. The numerical tests are demonstrated which achieve the successful cardiac defibrillation by utilizing less total current. Finally, the robustness of the Newton optimization algorithm is presented for different finer mesh geometries.

  6. Numerical Studies of an Array of Fluidic Diverter Actuators for Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Culley, Dennis E.; Raghu, Surya

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of boundary conditions on the behavior of an array of uniformly-spaced fluidic diverters with an ultimate goal to passively control their output phase. This understanding will aid in the development of advanced designs of actuators for flow control applications in turbomachinery. Computations show that a potential design is capable of generating synchronous outputs for various inlet boundary conditions if the flow inside the array is initiated from quiescence. However, when the array operation is originally asynchronous, several approaches investigated numerically demonstrate that re-synchronization of the actuators in the array is not practical since it is very sensitive to asymmetric perturbations and imperfections. Experimental verification of the insights obtained from the present study is currently being pursued.

  7. Numerical simulation of tandem-cylinder noise-reduction using plasma-based flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Eltaweel, Ahmed; Thomas, Flint; Kozlov, Alexey; Kim, Dongjoo

    2011-11-01

    The noise of low-Mach-number flow over tandem cylinders at ReD = 22 , 000 and its reduction using plasma actuators are simulated numerically to confirm and extend earlier experimental results. The numerical approach is based on large-eddy simulation for the turbulent flow field, a semi-empirical plasma actuation model, and Lighthill's theory for acoustic calculation. Excellent agreement between LES and experimental results is obtained for both the baseline flow and flow with plasma control in terms of wake velocity profiles, turbulence intensity, and frequency spectra of pressure fluctuations on the downstream cylinder. The validated flow-field results allow an accurate acoustic analysis based on Lighthill's equation, which is solved using a boundary-element method. The effectiveness of plasma actuators for reducing noise is demonstrated. In the baseline flow, the acoustic field is dominated by the interaction of the downstream cylinder with the upstream wake. With flow control the interaction noise is reduced drastically through suppression of vortex shedding from the upstream cylinder, and the vortex-shedding noise from the downstream cylinder becomes dominant. The peak sound pressure level is reduced by approximately 15 dB. Supported by NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX07AO09A.

  8. Numerical algorithms for computations of feedback laws arising in control of flexible systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasiecka, Irena

    1989-01-01

    Several continuous models will be examined, which describe flexible structures with boundary or point control/observation. Issues related to the computation of feedback laws are examined (particularly stabilizing feedbacks) with sensors and actuators located either on the boundary or at specific point locations of the structure. One of the main difficulties is due to the great sensitivity of the system (hyperbolic systems with unbounded control actions), with respect to perturbations caused either by uncertainty of the model or by the errors introduced in implementing numerical algorithms. Thus, special care must be taken in the choice of the appropriate numerical schemes which eventually lead to implementable finite dimensional solutions. Finite dimensional algorithms are constructed on a basis of a priority analysis of the properties of the original, continuous (infinite diversional) systems with the following criteria in mind: (1) convergence and stability of the algorithms and (2) robustness (reasonable insensitivity with respect to the unknown parameters of the systems). Examples with mixed finite element methods and spectral methods are provided.

  9. Numerical algorithms for computations of feedback laws arising in control of flexible systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasiecka, Irena

    1989-01-01

    Several continuous models will be examined, which describe flexible structures with boundary or point control/observation. Issues related to the computation of feedback laws are examined (particularly stabilizing feedbacks) with sensors and actuators located either on the boundary or at specific point locations of the structure. One of the main difficulties is due to the great sensitivity of the system (hyperbolic systems with unbounded control actions), with respect to perturbations caused either by uncertainty of the model or by the errors introduced in implementing numerical algorithms. Thus, special care must be taken in the choice of the appropriate numerical schemes which eventually lead to implementable finite dimensional solutions. Finite dimensional algorithms are constructed on a basis of a priority analysis of the properties of the original, continuous (infinite diversional) systems with the following criteria in mind: (1) convergence and stability of the algorithms and (2) robustness (reasonable insensitivity with respect to the unknown parameters of the systems). Examples with mixed finite element methods and spectral methods are provided.

  10. Tailored high-resolution numerical weather forecasts for energy efficient predictive building control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauch, V. J.; Gwerder, M.; Gyalistras, D.; Oldewurtel, F.; Schubiger, F.; Steiner, P.

    2010-09-01

    The high proportion of the total primary energy consumption by buildings has increased the public interest in the optimisation of buildings' operation and is also driving the development of novel control approaches for the indoor climate. In this context, the use of weather forecasts presents an interesting and - thanks to advances in information and predictive control technologies and the continuous improvement of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models - an increasingly attractive option for improved building control. Within the research project OptiControl (www.opticontrol.ethz.ch) predictive control strategies for a wide range of buildings, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, and representative locations in Europe are being investigated with the aid of newly developed modelling and simulation tools. Grid point predictions for radiation, temperature and humidity of the high-resolution limited area NWP model COSMO-7 (see www.cosmo-model.org) and local measurements are used as disturbances and inputs into the building system. The control task considered consists in minimizing energy consumption whilst maintaining occupant comfort. In this presentation, we use the simulation-based OptiControl methodology to investigate the impact of COSMO-7 forecasts on the performance of predictive building control and the resulting energy savings. For this, we have selected building cases that were shown to benefit from a prediction horizon of up to 3 days and therefore, are particularly suitable for the use of numerical weather forecasts. We show that the controller performance is sensitive to the quality of the weather predictions, most importantly of the incident radiation on differently oriented façades. However, radiation is characterised by a high temporal and spatial variability in part caused by small scale and fast changing cloud formation and dissolution processes being only partially represented in the COSMO-7 grid point predictions. On the

  11. Numerical simulations and analyses of temperature control loop heat pipe for space CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingliang; Yang, Tao; Li, Chunlin

    2016-10-01

    As one of the key units of space CCD camera, the temperature range and stability of CCD components affect the image's indexes. Reasonable thermal design and robust thermal control devices are needed. One kind of temperature control loop heat pipe (TCLHP) is designed, which highly meets the thermal control requirements of CCD components. In order to study the dynamic behaviors of heat and mass transfer of TCLHP, particularly in the orbital flight case, a transient numerical model is developed by using the well-established empirical correlations for flow models within three dimensional thermal modeling. The temperature control principle and details of mathematical model are presented. The model is used to study operating state, flow and heat characteristics based upon the analyses of variations of temperature, pressure and quality under different operating modes and external heat flux variations. The results indicate that TCLHP can satisfy the thermal control requirements of CCD components well, and always ensure good temperature stability and uniformity. By comparison between flight data and simulated results, it is found that the model is to be accurate to within 1°C. The model can be better used for predicting and understanding the transient performance of TCLHP.

  12. Counting on the mental number line to make a move: sensorimotor ('pen') control and numerical processing.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Rebecca; van Rooijen, Maaike; Giles, Oscar; Mushtaq, Faisal; Steenbergen, Bert; Mon-Williams, Mark; Waterman, Amanda

    2017-07-27

    Mathematics is often conducted with a writing implement. But is there a relationship between numerical processing and sensorimotor 'pen' control? We asked participants to move a stylus so it crossed an unmarked line at a location specified by a symbolic number (1-9), where number colour indicated whether the line ran left-right ('normal') or vice versa ('reversed'). The task could be simplified through the use of a 'mental number line' (MNL). Many modern societies use number lines in mathematical education and the brain's representation of number appears to follow a culturally determined spatial organisation (so better task performance is associated with this culturally normal orientation-the MNL effect). Participants (counter-balanced) completed two consistent blocks of trials, 'normal' and 'reversed', followed by a mixed block where line direction varied randomly. Experiment 1 established that the MNL effect was robust, and showed that the cognitive load associated with reversing the MNL not only affected response selection but also the actual movement execution (indexed by duration) within the mixed trials. Experiment 2 showed that an individual's motor abilities predicted performance in the difficult (mixed) condition but not the easier blocks. These results suggest that numerical processing is not isolated from motor capabilities-a finding with applied consequences.

  13. Numerical analysis of phase change materials for thermal control of power battery of high power dissipations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, X.; Zhang, H. Y.; Deng, Y. C.

    2016-08-01

    Solid-fluid phase change materials have been of increasing interest in various applications due to their high latent heat with minimum volume change. In this work, numerical analysis of phase change materials is carried out for the purpose of thermal control of the cylindrical power battery cells for applications in electric vehicles. Uniform heat density is applied at the battery cell, which is surrounded by phase change material (PCM) of paraffin wax type and contained in a metal housing. A two-dimensional geometry model is considered due to the model symmetry. The effects of power densities, heat transfer coefficients and onset melting temperatures are examined for the battery temperature evolution. Temperature plateaus can be observed from the present numerical analysis for the pure PCM cases, with the temperature level depending on the power densities, heat transfer coefficients, and melting temperatures. In addition, the copper foam of high thermal conductivity is inserted into the copper foam to enhance the heat transfer. In the modeling, the local thermal non-equilibrium between the metal foam and the PCM is taken into account and the temperatures for the metal foam and PCM are obtained respectively.

  14. Numerical considerations on control of motion of nanoparticles using scattering field of laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Naomichi; Aizu, Yoshihisa

    2017-05-01

    Most of optical manipulation techniques proposed so far depend on carefully fabricated setups and samples. Similar conditions can be fixed in laboratories; however, it is still challenging to manipulate nanoparticles when the environment is not well controlled and is unknown in advance. Nonetheless, coherent light scattered by rough object generates a speckle pattern which consists of random interference speckle grains with well-defined statistical properties. In the present study, we numerically investigate the motion of a Brownian particle suspended in water under the illumination of a speckle pattern. Particle-captured time and size of particle-captured area are quantitatively estimated in relation to an optical force and a speckle diameter to confirm the feasibility of the present method for performing optical manipulation tasks such as trapping and guiding.

  15. Experimental study and numerical simulation of flow separation control with pulsed nanosecond discharge actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correale, Guiseppe; Popov, Ilya; Nikipelov, Andrey; Pancheshnyi, Sergey; Hulshoff, Seo; Veldhuis, Leo; Starikovskiy, Andrey; neqlab Team; TUDelft Team

    2011-10-01

    Active flow separation control with a nanosecond pulse plasma actuator, which is essentially a simple electrode system on the surface of an airfoil, introducing low-energy gas discharge into the boundary layer, with little extra weight and no mechanical parts, was performed in wind-tunnel experiments on various airfoil models. In stall conditions the significant lift increase up to 30% accompanied by drag reduction (up to 3 times) was observed. The critical angle of attack shifted up to 5{7 degrees. Schlieren imaging shown the shock wave propagation and formation of large-scale vortex structure in the separation zone, which led to separation elimination. The experimental work is supported by numerical simulations of the phenomena. The formation of vortex similar to that observed in experiments was simulated in the case of laminar leading edge separation. Model simulations of free shear layer shown intensification of shear layer instabilities due to shock wave to shear layer interaction.

  16. A homotopy approach for combined control-structure optimization - Constructive analysis and numerical examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheid, R. E.; Milman, M. H.; Salama, M.; Bruno, R.; Gibson, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of methods for the combined control-structure optimization of physical systems encountered in the technology of large space structures. The objectives of the approach taken in this paper is not to produce the 'best' optimized design, but rather to efficiently produce a family of design options so as to assist in early trade studies, typically before hard design constraints are imposed. The philosophy is that these are candidate designs to be passed on for further considerations, and their function is more to guide the development of the system design rather than to represent the ultimate product. A homotopy approach involving multi-objective functions is developed for this purpose. Analytical and numerical examples are also presented.

  17. Fabrication of ultrathin and highly uniform silicon on insulator by numerically controlled plasma chemical vaporization machining.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yasuhisa; Yamamura, Kazuya; Mimura, Hidekazu; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Mori, Yuzo

    2007-08-01

    Metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer operate faster and at a lower power than those fabricated on a bulk silicon wafer. Scaling down, which improves their performances, demands thinner SOI wafers. In this article, improvement on the thinning of SOI wafers by numerically controlled plasma chemical vaporization machining (PCVM) is described. PCVM is a gas-phase chemical etching method in which reactive species generated in atmospheric-pressure plasma are used. Some factors affecting uniformity are investigated and methods for improvements are presented. As a result of thinning a commercial 8 in. SOI wafer, the initial SOI layer thickness of 97.5+/-4.7 nm was successfully thinned and made uniform at 7.5+/-1.5 nm.

  18. Numerical Studies of a Supersonic Fluidic Diverter Actuator for Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Culley, Dennis e.; Raghu, Surya

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of the internal flow structure and performance of a specific fluidic diverter actuator, previously studied by time-dependent numerical computations for subsonic flow, is extended to include operation with supersonic actuator exit velocities. The understanding will aid in the development of fluidic diverters with minimum pressure losses and advanced designs of flow control actuators. The self-induced oscillatory behavior of the flow is successfully predicted and the calculated oscillation frequencies with respect to flow rate have excellent agreement with our experimental measurements. The oscillation frequency increases with Mach number, but its dependence on flow rate changes from subsonic to transonic to supersonic regimes. The delay time for the initiation of oscillations depends on the flow rate and the acoustic speed in the gaseous medium for subsonic flow, but is unaffected by the flow rate for supersonic conditions

  19. Numerical laser energy deposition on supersonic cavity flow and sensor placement strategies to control the flow.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Aradag, Selin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the impact of laser energy deposition on pressure oscillations and relative sound pressure levels (SPL) in an open supersonic cavity flow is investigated. Laser energy with a magnitude of 100 mJ is deposited on the flow just above the cavity leading edge and up to 7 dB of reduction is obtained in the SPL values along the cavity back wall. Additionally, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method is applied to the x-velocity data obtained as a result of computational fluid dynamics simulations of the flow with laser energy deposition. Laser is numerically modeled using a spherically symmetric temperature distribution. By using the POD results, the effects of laser energy on the flow mechanism are presented. A one-dimensional POD methodology is applied to the surface pressure data to obtain critical locations for the placement of sensors for real time flow control applications.

  20. Numerical control matrix rotation for the LINC-NIRVANA multiconjugate adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Bertram, Thomas; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Farinato, Jacopo; Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio; Fini, Luca; Xompero, Marco; Busoni, Lorenzo; Quiros-Pacheco, Fernando; Briguglio, Runa

    2010-07-01

    LINC-NIRVANA will realize the interferometric imaging focal station of the Large Binocular Telescope. A double Layer Oriented multi-conjugate adaptive optics system assists the two arms of the interferometer, supplying high order wave-front correction. In order to counterbalance the field rotation, mechanical derotation for the two ground wave-front sensors, and optical derotators for the mid-high layers sensors fix the positions of the focal planes with respect to the pyramids aboard the wave-front sensors. The derotation introduces pupil images rotation on the wavefront sensors: the projection of the deformable mirrors on the sensor consequently change. The proper adjustment of the control matrix will be applied in real-time through numerical computation of the new matrix. In this paper we investigate the temporal and computational aspects related to the pupils rotation, explicitly computing the wave-front errors that may be generated.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Stall Flow Control Using a DBD Plasma Actuator in Pulse Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshkhoo, R.; Jahangirian, A.

    2016-09-01

    A numerical simulation method is employed to investigate the effects of the unsteady plasma body force over the stalled NACA 0015 airfoil at low Reynolds number flow conditions. The plasma body force created by a dielectric barrier discharge actuator is modeled with a phenomenological method for plasma simulation coupled with the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The governing equations are solved using an efficient implicit finitevolume method. The responses of the separated flow field to the effects of an unsteady body force in various inter-pulses and duty cycles as well as different locations and magnitudes are studied. It is shown that the duty cycle and inter-pulse are key parameters for flow separation control. Additionally, it is concluded that the body force is able to attach the flow and can affect boundary layer grow that Mach number 0.1 and Reynolds number of 45000.

  2. Numerical simulation on edge localized mode control capability of resonant magnetic perturbation in the KSTAR tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doohyun; Han, Hyunsun; Kim, Ki Min; Park, Jong Kyu; Jeon, Young Mu; Na, Yong-Su; Hong, Sang Hee

    2010-09-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the applicability of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) to KSTAR plasmas for a possible control of edge localized mode (ELM) to suppress or mitigate its damages to divertor materials. For the verification of the feasibility of RMP application, magnetic island configurations, resonant normal fields, magnetic island widths and Chirikov parameters are calculated for two types of KSTAR operation scenarios: steady state and hybrid. Field error correction (FEC) coils in KSTAR are considered to produce externally perturbed magnetic fields for RMP, and the directions of coil currents determine the toroidal mode n and the parity (even or odd). The RMP configurations are described by vacuum superposition of the equilibrium magnetic fields and the perturbed ones induced by FEC coils. The numerical simulations for n = 2 toroidal mode in both operation scenarios show that when the pitches of the equilibrium and perturbed magnetic fields are well aligned, magnetic islands are formed for a series of m poloidal modes and the adjacent islands are overlapped to generate a stochastic layer in the edge region. Even parity turns out to be more effective in making the magnetic islands overlapped to become stochastic field lines in the steady-state operation, while odd parity in the hybrid operation. The formation of the stochastic layer is verified by the calculated Chirikov parameters, which also give basic information on the current requirement of FEC coils. Additionally, lobe structures of stochastic field lines are found in the edge region extended to the divertor plate in the hybrid scenario. Based on the standard vacuum criteria for RMP, the simulation results indicate that the FEC coils will be feasible for control of ELMs and mitigation of divertor heat load by RMP in both steady-state and hybrid operation scenarios.

  3. Numerical investigation of sound transmission through double wall cylinders with respect to active noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, T. J.; Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.

    1993-01-01

    Market pressure for more fuel efficient air travel has led to increased use of turboprop and higher bypass turbofan engines. The low frequency components of propeller, jet and boundary layer noise are difficult to attenuate with conventional passive techniques. Weight and geometric restrictions for sound absorbing meterials limit the amount and type of treatment that may be applied. An active noise control (ANC) method is providing to be an attractive alternative. The approach taken in this paper uses a numerical finite/boundary element method (FEM/BEM) that may be easilty adapted to arbitrary geometries. A double walled cylinder is modeled using commercially available software. The outer shell is modeled as an aluminum cylinder, similar to that of aircraft skins. The inner shell is modeled as a composite material representative of a lightweight, stiff trim panel. Two different inner shell materials are used. The first is representative of current trim structure, the second a much stiffer composite. The primary source is generated by an exterior acoustic monopole. Control fields are generated using normal force inputs to the inner cylindrical shell. A linear least mean square (LMS) algorithm is used to determine amplitudes of control forces that minimize the interior acoustic field. Coupling of acoustic and structural modes and noise reductions are discussed for each of the inner shell materials.

  4. Numerical investigation of sound transmission through double wall cylinders with respect to active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, T. J.; Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.

    Market pressure for more fuel efficient air travel has led to increased use of turboprop and higher bypass turbofan engines. The low frequency components of propeller, jet and boundary layer noise are difficult to attenuate with conventional passive techniques. Weight and geometric restrictions for sound absorbing meterials limit the amount and type of treatment that may be applied. An active noise control (ANC) method is providing to be an attractive alternative. The approach taken in this paper uses a numerical finite/boundary element method (FEM/BEM) that may be easilty adapted to arbitrary geometries. A double walled cylinder is modeled using commercially available software. The outer shell is modeled as an aluminum cylinder, similar to that of aircraft skins. The inner shell is modeled as a composite material representative of a lightweight, stiff trim panel. Two different inner shell materials are used. The first is representative of current trim structure, the second a much stiffer composite. The primary source is generated by an exterior acoustic monopole. Control fields are generated using normal force inputs to the inner cylindrical shell. A linear least mean square (LMS) algorithm is used to determine amplitudes of control forces that minimize the interior acoustic field. Coupling of acoustic and structural modes and noise reductions are discussed for each of the inner shell materials.

  5. Numerical investigation of sound transmission through double wall cylinders with respect to active noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, T. J.; Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.

    1993-01-01

    Market pressure for more fuel efficient air travel has led to increased use of turboprop and higher bypass turbofan engines. The low frequency components of propeller, jet and boundary layer noise are difficult to attenuate with conventional passive techniques. Weight and geometric restrictions for sound absorbing meterials limit the amount and type of treatment that may be applied. An active noise control (ANC) method is providing to be an attractive alternative. The approach taken in this paper uses a numerical finite/boundary element method (FEM/BEM) that may be easilty adapted to arbitrary geometries. A double walled cylinder is modeled using commercially available software. The outer shell is modeled as an aluminum cylinder, similar to that of aircraft skins. The inner shell is modeled as a composite material representative of a lightweight, stiff trim panel. Two different inner shell materials are used. The first is representative of current trim structure, the second a much stiffer composite. The primary source is generated by an exterior acoustic monopole. Control fields are generated using normal force inputs to the inner cylindrical shell. A linear least mean square (LMS) algorithm is used to determine amplitudes of control forces that minimize the interior acoustic field. Coupling of acoustic and structural modes and noise reductions are discussed for each of the inner shell materials.

  6. Rapid convergence of optimal control in NMR using numerically-constructed toggling frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coote, Paul; Anklin, Clemens; Massefski, Walter; Wagner, Gerhard; Arthanari, Haribabu

    2017-08-01

    We present a numerical method for rapidly solving the Bloch equation for an arbitrary time-varying spin-1/2 Hamiltonian. The method relies on fast, vectorized computations such as summation and quaternion multiplication, rather than slow computations such as matrix exponentiation. A toggling frame is constructed in which the Hamiltonian is time-invariant, and therefore has a simple analytical solution. The key insight is that constructing this frame is faster than solving the system dynamics in the original frame. Rapidly solving the Bloch equations for an arbitrary Hamiltonian is particularly useful in the context of NMR optimal control. Optimal control theory can be used to design pulse shapes for a range of tasks in NMR spectroscopy. However, it requires multiple simulations of the Bloch equations at each stage of the algorithm, and for each relevant set of parameters (e.g. chemical shift frequencies). This is typically time consuming. We demonstrate that by working in an appropriate toggling frame, optimal control pulses can be generated much faster. We present a new alternative to the well-known GRAPE algorithm to continuously update the toggling-frame as the optimal pulse is generated, and demonstrate that this approach is extremely fast. The use and benefit of rapid optimal pulse generation is demonstrated for 19F fragment screening experiments.

  7. Rapid convergence of optimal control in NMR using numerically-constructed toggling frames.

    PubMed

    Coote, Paul; Anklin, Clemens; Massefski, Walter; Wagner, Gerhard; Arthanari, Haribabu

    2017-08-01

    We present a numerical method for rapidly solving the Bloch equation for an arbitrary time-varying spin-1/2 Hamiltonian. The method relies on fast, vectorized computations such as summation and quaternion multiplication, rather than slow computations such as matrix exponentiation. A toggling frame is constructed in which the Hamiltonian is time-invariant, and therefore has a simple analytical solution. The key insight is that constructing this frame is faster than solving the system dynamics in the original frame. Rapidly solving the Bloch equations for an arbitrary Hamiltonian is particularly useful in the context of NMR optimal control. Optimal control theory can be used to design pulse shapes for a range of tasks in NMR spectroscopy. However, it requires multiple simulations of the Bloch equations at each stage of the algorithm, and for each relevant set of parameters (e.g. chemical shift frequencies). This is typically time consuming. We demonstrate that by working in an appropriate toggling frame, optimal control pulses can be generated much faster. We present a new alternative to the well-known GRAPE algorithm to continuously update the toggling-frame as the optimal pulse is generated, and demonstrate that this approach is extremely fast. The use and benefit of rapid optimal pulse generation is demonstrated for 19F fragment screening experiments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mineralogical and transport controls on the evolution of porous media texture using direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molins, Sergi; Trebotich, David; Miller, Gregory H.; Steefel, Carl I.

    2017-05-01

    The evolution of porous media due to mineral dissolution and precipitation can change the bulk properties of subsurface materials. The pore-scale structure of the media, including its physical and mineralogical heterogeneity, exerts controls on porous media evolution via transport limitations to reactive surfaces and mineral accessibility. Here we explore how these controls affect the evolution of the texture in porous media at the pore scale. For this purpose, a pore-scale flow and reactive transport model is developed that explicitly tracks mineral surfaces as they evolve using a direct numerical simulation approach. Simulations of dissolution in single-mineral domains provide insights into the transport controls at the pore scale, while the simulation of a fracture surface composed of bands of faster-dissolving calcite and slower-dissolving dolomite provides insights into the mineralogical controls on evolution. Transport-limited conditions at the grain-pack scale may result in unstable evolution, a situation in which dissolution is focused in a fast-flowing, fast-dissolving path. Due to increasing velocities, the evolution in these regions is like that observed under conditions closer to strict surface control at the pore scale. That is, grains evolve to have oblong shapes with their long dimensions aligning with the local flow directions. Another example of an evolving reactive transport regime that affects local rates is seen in the evolution of the fracture surface. As calcite dissolves, the diffusive length between the fracture flow path and the receding calcite surfaces increases. Thus, the calcite dissolution reaction becomes increasingly limited by diffusion.

  9. Numerical investigation of tandem-cylinder aerodynamic noise and its control with application to airframe noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltaweel, Ahmed

    Prediction and reduction of airframe noise are critically important to the development of quieter civil transport aircraft. The key to noise reduction is a full understanding of the underlying noise source mechanisms. In this study, tandem cylinders in cross-flow as an idealization of a complex aircraft landing gear configuration are considered to investigate the noise generation and its reduction by flow control using single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators. The flow over tandem cylinders at ReD = 22, 000 with and without plasma actuation is computed using large-eddy simulation. The plasma effect is modeled as a body force obtained from a semi-empirical model. The flow statistics and surface pressure frequency spectra show excellent agreement with previous experimental measurements. For acoustic calculations, a boundary-element method is implemented to solve the convected Lighthill equation. The solution method is validated in a number of benchmark problems including flows over a cylinder, a rod-airfoil configuration, and a sphere. With validated flow field and acoustic solver, acoustic analysis is performed for the tandem-cylinder configuration to extend the experimental results and understand the mechanisms of noise generation and its control. Without flow control, the acoustic field is dominated by the interaction between the downstream cylinder and the upstream wake. Through suppression of vortex shedding from the upstream cylinder, the interaction noise is reduced drastically by the plasma flow control, and the vortex-shedding noise from the downstream cylinder becomes equally important. At a free-stream Mach number of 0.2, the peak sound pressure level is reduced by approximately 16 dB. This suggests the viability of plasma actuation for active control of airframe noise. The numerical investigation is extended to the noise from a realistic landing gear experimental model. Coarse-mesh computations are performed, and preliminary results are

  10. Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) for optimal control in direct numerical simulation of turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badreddine, Hassan; Vandewalle, Stefan; Meyers, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The current work focuses on the development and application of an efficient algorithm for optimization of three-dimensional turbulent flows, simulated using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) or Large-Eddy Simulations, and further characterized by large-dimensional optimization-parameter spaces. The optimization algorithm is based on Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) in combination with a damped formulation of the limited-memory BFGS method. The latter is suitable for solving large-scale constrained optimization problems whose Hessian matrices cannot be computed and stored at a reasonable cost. We combine the algorithm with a line-search merit function based on an L1-norm to enforce the convergence from any remote point. It is first shown that the proposed form of the damped L-BFGS algorithm is suitable for solving equality constrained Rosenbrock type functions. Then, we apply the algorithm to an optimal-control test problem that consists of finding the optimal initial perturbations to a turbulent temporal mixing layer such that mixing is improved at the end of a simulation time horizon T. The controls are further subject to a non-linear equality constraint on the total control energy. DNSs are used to resolve all turbulent scales of motion, and a continuous adjoint formulation is employed to calculate the gradient of the cost functionals. We compare the convergence speed of the SQP L-BFGS algorithm to a conventional non-linear conjugate-gradient method (i.e. the current standard in DNS-based optimal control), and find that the SQP algorithm is more than an order of magnitude faster than the conjugate-gradient method.

  11. Numerical simulation of MEMS-based blade load distribution control in centrifugal compressor surge suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneda, Károly

    2012-11-01

    The utilization of turbomachines requires up-to-date technologies to ensure safe operation throughout the widest possible range that makes novel ideas necessary to cope with classic problems. One of the most dangerous instability in compression systems is surge that has to be suppressed before its onset to avoid structural damages as well as other adverse consequences in the system. As surge occurs at low delivered mass flow rates the conventional widely spread surge control is based on bypassing the unnecessary airflow back to the atmosphere. This method has been implemented on a large number of aircraft and provides a robust control on suppressing compressor surge while creating a significant efficiency loss. This paper deals with an idea that has been originally designed as a fixed geometry that could be realized using up-to-date MEMS technology resulting in moderate losses but comparable stability enhancement. Previously the author has established the one-dimensional mathematical model of the concept, but it is indispensable - before the real instrument can be developed - to carry out detailed numerical simulation of the device. The aim of the paper is to acquaint the efforts of this CFD simulation.

  12. Numerical simulations of a vertical tail of a commercial aircraft with active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasquin, Michel; Martin, Jeffrey; Jansen, Kenneth

    2012-11-01

    A series of numerical simulations of a realistic vertical tail of a commercial aircraft, with a tapered swept stabilizer and a rudder, is considered in this work with application of flow control. Flow control is known to have the capacity to augment the streamwise momentum near the rudder suction peak where separation is typically observed to limit rudder effectiveness for high deflection angles. Specifically, we use Delayed Detached Eddy Simulations (DDES) to study the interaction of a cross flow with an array of 24 synthetic jets for a 0° angle of attack, a 30° deflection angle and a Reynolds number of 7×105. We concentrate our analysis on the influence of the spacing between successive active jets in the spanwise direction. Indeed, our current simulations suggest that doubling the number of active jets at a lower Reynolds number improves the lateral force while opposite effect is observed at the considered Reynolds number when using the same size jets. These simulations offer insight into the fundamental physics of the flow structures in the vicinity of the synthetic jets by accurately resolving the complete synthetic jet pathway and the vorticity plume where the jet structures interact with each other and with the primary flow. The Boeing Company and the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility are acknowledged for their support and resources through the INCITE program.

  13. The Effectiveness of Actuators Used in Active Flow Controls: Numerical Simulations, Analysis and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, Hermann; Wygnanksi, Israel J.; Gaster, Michael

    2002-05-01

    Acquiring the ability to effectively modify and control the behavior of fluid flow continues to be a pervasive and important aspiration in many areas of engineering. The present research continues to advance the technology of various schemes that employ the use of wall-mounted actuators for active flow control. Any design in which fluid-flow characteristics are important (aircraft, turbomachinery, ships, etc.) stands to benefit from this new technology of manipulating the flow behavior by time dependent forcing. Research completed to date promises reduced cost, complexity, and weight along with significant improvement in design performance. A summary of this research indicates however, that the details of the disturbance excitation process have still not been completely explored, and hence an understanding of the important parameters in actuator design is currently unavailable to the engineer. Only with this knowledge will it be possible to design devices for specific tasks that are efficient and effective in their performance. Our program of research examines boundary value periodic point source excitations of laminar boundary layers, and considers how some more complex actuators might be modeled numerically. The study is carried out in three parts: 1. linear theory, and 2. wind tunnel measurements, iii. full Navier-Stokes modeling.

  14. Pore-scale controls on calcite dissolution rates from flow-through laboratory and numerical experiments.

    PubMed

    Molins, Sergi; Trebotich, David; Yang, Li; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B; Ligocki, Terry J; Shen, Chaopeng; Steefel, Carl I

    2014-07-01

    A combination of experimental, imaging, and modeling techniques were applied to investigate the pore-scale transport and surface reaction controls on calcite dissolution under elevated pCO2 conditions. The laboratory experiment consisted of the injection of a solution at 4 bar pCO2 into a capillary tube packed with crushed calcite. A high resolution pore-scale numerical model was used to simulate the experiment based on a computational domain consisting of reactive calcite, pore space, and the capillary wall constructed from volumetric X-ray microtomography images. Simulated pore-scale effluent concentrations were higher than those measured by a factor of 1.8, with the largest component of the discrepancy related to uncertainties in the reaction rate model and its parameters. However, part of the discrepancy was apparently due to mass transport limitations to reactive surfaces, which were most pronounced near the inlet where larger diffusive boundary layers formed around grains and in slow-flowing pore spaces that exchanged mass by diffusion with fast flow paths. Although minor, the difference between pore- and continuum-scale results due to transport controls was discernible with the highly accurate methods employed and is expected to be more significant where heterogeneity is greater, as in natural subsurface materials.

  15. Numerical Investigation of Active Flow Control on Wind Turbines under Yaw Misalignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Steven; Corson, David; Sahni, Onkar

    2012-11-01

    Yaw misalignment dramatically increases unsteady aerodynamic loading on wind turbine blades over each revolution. The resulting fluctuating loads on each blade cause fatigue in the system and subsequently, failure leading to increased maintenance costs and unnecessary downtime. In this study we numerically analyze the effects of yaw misalignment on complete rotating wind turbines with blades of O(5m) in length. We consider two wind speeds at rated and above-rated regimes, where the effect of yaw misalignment is more pronounced. For the baseline configuration comparisons are made with the existing experimental data. To mitigate the resulting unsteady aerodynamic loading, we apply synthetic-jet based fluidic actuation in order to achieve fast-time response (in contrast to traditional yaw control strategies). O(5-10) jets are placed along the outer half of blade span. Along the chord two jet locations (x/c = 0.05 and 0.40) are considered. Actuation strategies for jets are based on partial loop control with pulse modulation. All simulations are based on unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations. NYSERDA.

  16. Reduction Effect Analysis of Erosion Control Facilities Using Debris Flow Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Kyewon; Kim, Younghwan; Oh, Chaeyeon; Lee, Hojin; Kim, SoungDoug

    2017-04-01

    With the increase in frequency of typhoons and heavy rains following the climate change, the scale of damage from the calamities in the mountainous areas has been growing larger and larger, which is different from the past. For the case of Korea where 64% of land is consisted of the mountainous areas, establishment of the check dams has been drastically increased after 2000 in order to reduce the damages from the debris flow. However, due to the lack of data on scale, location and kind of check dams established for reducing the damages in debris flow, the measures to prevent damages based on experience and subjective basis have to be relied on. This study, the high-precision DEM data was structured by using the terrestrial LiDAR in the Jecheon area where the debris flow damage occurred in July 2009. And, from the numerical models of the debris flow, Kanako-2D that is available to reflect the erosion and deposition action was applied to install the erosion control facilities (water channel, check dam) and analyzed the effect of reducing the debris flow shown in the downstream. After installing the erosion control facilities, most of debris flow moves along the water channel to reduce the area to expand the debris flow, and after installing the check dam, the flow depth and flux of the debris flow were reduced along with the erosion. However, even after constructing the erosion control facilities, damages were still inflicted on private residences or agricultural sites located on the upper regions where the deposition was made. Acknowledgments This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education(NRF-2016R1D1A3B03933362)

  17. Method to control depth error when ablating human dentin with numerically controlled picosecond laser: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuchun; Yuan, Fusong; Lv, Peijun; Wang, Dangxiao; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yong

    2015-07-01

    A three-axis numerically controlled picosecond laser was used to ablate dentin to investigate the quantitative relationships among the number of additive pulse layers in two-dimensional scans starting from the focal plane, step size along the normal of the focal plane (focal plane normal), and ablation depth error. A method to control the ablation depth error, suitable to control stepping along the focal plane normal, was preliminarily established. Twenty-four freshly removed mandibular first molars were cut transversely along the long axis of the crown and prepared as 48 tooth sample slices with approximately flat surfaces. Forty-two slices were used in the first section. The picosecond laser was 1,064 nm in wavelength, 3 W in power, and 10 kHz in repetition frequency. For a varying number (n = 5-70) of focal plane additive pulse layers (14 groups, three repetitions each), two-dimensional scanning and ablation were performed on the dentin regions of the tooth sample slices, which were fixed on the focal plane. The ablation depth, d, was measured, and the quantitative function between n and d was established. Six slices were used in the second section. The function was used to calculate and set the timing of stepwise increments, and the single-step size along the focal plane normal was d micrometer after ablation of n layers (n = 5-50; 10 groups, six repetitions each). Each sample underwent three-dimensional scanning and ablation to produce 2 × 2-mm square cavities. The difference, e, between the measured cavity depth and theoretical value was calculated, along with the difference, e 1, between the measured average ablation depth of a single-step along the focal plane normal and theoretical value. Values of n and d corresponding to the minimum values of e and e 1, respectively, were obtained. In two-dimensional ablation, d was largest (720.61 μm) when n = 65 and smallest when n = 5 (45.00 μm). Linear regression yielded the quantitative

  18. Controls on the height and spacing of eolian ripples and transverse dunes: A numerical modeling investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, Jon D.

    2009-04-01

    Ripples and transverse dunes in areas of abundant sand supply increase in height and spacing as a function of time, grain size, and excess shear velocity. How and why each of these factors influence ripple and transverse dune size, however, is not precisely known. In this paper, the controls on the height and spacing of ripples and transverse dunes in areas of abundant sand supply are investigated using a numerical model for the formation of eolian bedforms from an initially flat surface. This bedform evolution model combines the basic elements of Werner's [Werner, B.T., 1995. Eolian dunes: Computer simulations and attractor interpretation. Geology 23, 1107-1110.] cellular automaton model of dune formation with a model for boundary layer flow over complex topography. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between bed shear stress and slope on the windward (stoss) side of evolving bedforms. Nonlinear boundary layer model results indicate that bed shear stresses on stoss slopes increase with increasing slope angle up to approximately 20°, then decrease with increasing slope angle as backpressure effects become limiting. In the bedform evolution model, the linear boundary layer flow model of Jackson and Hunt [Jackson, P.S., Hunt, J.C.R., 1975. Turbulent wind flow over a low hill. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society 101, 929-955.], generalized to 3D, is modified to include the nonlinear relationship between bed shear stress and slope. Bed shear stresses predicted by the modified Jackson and Hunt flow model are then used to predict rates of erosion and deposition iteratively through time within a mass-conservative framework similar to Werner [Werner, B.T., 1995. Eolian dunes: Computer simulations and attractor interpretation. Geology 23, 1107-1110.]. Beginning with a flat bed, the model forms ripples that grow in height and spacing until a dynamic steady-state condition is achieved in which bedforms migrate downwind without further growth

  19. Numerical approach of collision avoidance and optimal control on robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jyhshing Jack

    1990-01-01

    Collision-free optimal motion and trajectory planning for robotic manipulators are solved by a method of sequential gradient restoration algorithm. Numerical examples of a two degree-of-freedom (DOF) robotic manipulator are demonstrated to show the excellence of the optimization technique and obstacle avoidance scheme. The obstacle is put on the midway, or even further inward on purpose, of the previous no-obstacle optimal trajectory. For the minimum-time purpose, the trajectory grazes by the obstacle and the minimum-time motion successfully avoids the obstacle. The minimum-time is longer for the obstacle avoidance cases than the one without obstacle. The obstacle avoidance scheme can deal with multiple obstacles in any ellipsoid forms by using artificial potential fields as penalty functions via distance functions. The method is promising in solving collision-free optimal control problems for robotics and can be applied to any DOF robotic manipulators with any performance indices and mobile robots as well. Since this method generates optimum solution based on Pontryagin Extremum Principle, rather than based on assumptions, the results provide a benchmark against which any optimization techniques can be measured.

  20. Numerical investigation of spontaneous flame propagation under Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagatwala, Ankit; Sankaran, Ramanan; Kokjohn, Sage; Chen, Jacqueline

    2014-11-01

    Results from one and two-dimensional direct numerical simulations under dual-fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) conditions will be presented. These simulations employ an improved model of compression heating through mass source/sink terms developed in a previous work, which incorporates feedback from the flow to follow a predetermined experimental pressure trace. One-dimensional simulations explored the effect of temperature and fuel concentration gradients on the combustion mode. Two-dimensional simulations explored parametric variation in temperature stratification, pressure profiles and n-heptane concentration. Statistics derived from analysis of local diffusion/reaction balances were used to elucidate combustion characteristics for the different cases. Both deflagration and spontaneous ignition modes were observed to co-exist. Higher n-heptane concentration and higher level of thermal stratification resulted in a greater degree of flame propagation, whereas lower n-heptane concentration (higher fraction of iso-octane) and higher pressure resulted in more prevalent autoignition. Starting with a uniform initial temperature and a stratified n-heptane concentration also resulted in a large fraction of combustion occurring through flame propagation.

  1. Numerical Study Comparing RANS and LES Approaches on a Circulation Control Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Nishino, Takafumi

    2011-01-01

    A numerical study over a nominally two-dimensional circulation control airfoil is performed using a large-eddy simulation code and two Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes codes. Different Coanda jet blowing conditions are investigated. In addition to investigating the influence of grid density, a comparison is made between incompressible and compressible flow solvers. The incompressible equations are found to yield negligible differences from the compressible equations up to at least a jet exit Mach number of 0.64. The effects of different turbulence models are also studied. Models that do not account for streamline curvature effects tend to predict jet separation from the Coanda surface too late, and can produce non-physical solutions at high blowing rates. Three different turbulence models that account for streamline curvature are compared with each other and with large eddy simulation solutions. All three models are found to predict the Coanda jet separation location reasonably well, but one of the models predicts specific flow field details near the Coanda surface prior to separation much better than the other two. All Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computations produce higher circulation than large eddy simulation computations, with different stagnation point location and greater flow acceleration around the nose onto the upper surface. The precise reasons for the higher circulation are not clear, although it is not solely a function of predicting the jet separation location correctly.

  2. Numerical Simulations of the Steady and Unsteady Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Circulation Control Wing Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yi; Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Englar, Robert J.; Ahuja, Krishan K.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of a Circulation Control Wing (CCW) airfoil have been numerically investigated, and comparisons with experimental data have been made. The configuration chosen was a supercritical airfoil with a 30 degree dual-radius CCW flap. Steady and pulsed jet calculations were performed. It was found that the use of steady jets, even at very small mass flow rates, yielded a lift coefficient that is comparable or superior to conventional high-lift systems. The attached flow over the flap also gave rise to lower drag coefficients, and high L/D ratios. Pulsed jets with a 50% duty cycle were also studied. It was found that they were effective in generating lift at lower reduced mass flow rates compared to a steady jet, provided the pulse frequency was sufficiently high. This benefit was attributable to the fact that the momentum coefficient of the pulsed jet, during the portions of the cycle when the jet was on, was typically twice as much as that of a steady jet.

  3. A Method of Numerical Control Equipment Appearance Design Based on Product Identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhijuan; Zhou, Qi; Li, Bin; Visser, Steve

    Research on numerical control (NC) equipment has been more and more abundant; however, there are few existing studies in the field of appearance design for NC equipments. This paper provided a method to generate new appearance design of NC equipments based on product identity (PI). For the purpose of providing guidelines to generate new concept of NC equipment design, this paper, therefore, took the DMG Company (a Germen NC equipment company) as a case, examined the total products of this company from two aspects: Product Image and Product Family. Task 1 was an evaluate task about the Product Image by using the semantic differential (SD) evaluation method; Task 2 was a study task about Product Family to find out features of the products and classify these features. During the Task 2, several features have been found out and summarized, and these features were classified into 3 different levels according to their frequency and importance. In the end, two appearance design samples have been generated based on the analysis above to prove the application of the research.

  4. Friction role in deformation behaviors of high-strength TA18 tubes in numerical control bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jun; Liang, Chuang; Lu, Shiqiang; Wang, Kelu; Zheng, Deliang

    2017-09-01

    In order to reveal the friction role in deformation behaviors of high-strength TA18 tubes in numerical control (NC) bending, a three dimensional (3D) elastic-plastic finite element (FE) model of high-strength TA18 tubes for whole process in NC bending was established based on ABAQUS code, and its reliability was validated by the experimental results in literature. Then, the bending deformation behaviors under different friction coefficients between tube and various dies were studied with respect to multiple defects such as wall thinning, wall thickening and cross section deformation. The results show that the wall thinning ratio and cross section deformation ratio increase with the increase of the friction coefficient between mandrel and tube f m or decrease of the friction coefficient between pressure die and tube f p, while the friction coefficient between bending die and tube f b has no obvious effect on these. The wall thickening ratio decreases with the increase of f b, f m or decrease of f p.

  5. Good manufacturing practices--grade preformed ossicular prostheses from banked bone via computer numerically controlled micromilling.

    PubMed

    Berrettini, Stefano; Bruschini, Luca; Stefanini, Cesare; D'Alessandro, Delfo; D'Acunto, Mario; Danti, Serena

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was the fabrication of ossicular replacement prostheses (ORPs) from decellularized banked cortical bone via computer numerically controlled (CNC) ultraprecision micromilling, in order to obtain preformed clinical-grade tissue products, reproducing shape, size, and details perfectly comparable to those of synthetic devices. Banked femoral compact bone was used to fabricate partial and total ORPs via CNC micromilling according to Good Manufacturing Practices procedures. Drawings of ORPs with different shapes and sizes were uploaded to the computer interface, and different surface-finish parameters were tested. The obtained products underwent dimensional, weight, and surface characterizations. A histologic analysis was pursued to compare the bone matrix compactness of the produced ORPs to that of the ear ossicles. Banked-bone ORPs were produced with high dimensional accuracy. Partial ORP weights averaged (+/- SD) 31.2 +/- 0.6 mg, and total ORP weights averaged 69.3 +/- 0.7 mg. The best-finish mode allowed microscale or nanoscale roughness free from machinery textures to be obtained. Finally, the histologic analysis confirmed that the extracellular matrix compactness of the produced ORPs was suitable for ossicular chain replacement. This study assesses the fabrication feasibility of novel banked-bone ORPs of extremely high dimensional accuracy. Such devices are aimed at combining the most favorable aspects of both synthetic (reproducibility, convenience, and biosafety) and biological replacements (total biocompatibility).

  6. Improvement in thickness uniformity of thick SOI by numerically controlled local wet etching.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Kazuya; Ueda, Kazuaki; Hosoda, Mao; Zettsu, Nobuyuki

    2011-04-01

    Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers are promising semiconductor materials for high-speed LSIs, low-power-consumption electric devices and micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS). The thickness distribution of an SOI causes the variation of threshold voltage in electronic devices manufactured on the SOI wafer. The thickness distribution of a thin SOI, which is manufactured by applying a smart cut technique, is comparatively uniform. On the other hand, a thick SOI has a large thickness distribution because a bonded wafer is thinned by conventional grinding and polishing. For a thick SOI wafer with a thickness of 1 microm, it is required that the tolerance of thickness variation is less than 50 nm. However, improving the thickness uniformity of a thick SOI layer to a tolerance of +/- 5% is difficult by conventional machining because of the fundamental limitations of these techniques. We have developed numerically controlled local wet etching (NC-LWE) technique as a novel deterministic subaperture figuring and finishing technique, which utilizes a localized chemical reaction between the etchant and the surface of the workpiece. We demonstrated an improvement in the thickness distribution of a thick SOI by NC-LWE using an HF/HNO3 mixture, and thickness variation improved from 480 nm to 200 nm within a diameter of 170 mm.

  7. Controls on Yardang Morphology: Insights from Field Measurements, Lidar Topographic Analyses, and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, J. D.; Kapp, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Yardangs are streamlined bedforms sculpted by the wind and wind-blown sand. They can form as relatively resistant exposed rocks erode more slowly than surrounding exposed rocks, thus causing the more resistant rocks to stand higher in the landscape and deflect the wind and wind-blown sand into adjacent troughs in a positive feedback. How this feedback gives rise to streamlined forms that locally have a consistent size is not well understood theoretically. In this study we combine field measurements in the yardangs of Ocotillo Wells SVRA with analyses of airborne and terrestrial lidar datasets and numerical modeling to quantify and understand the controls on yardang morphology. The classic model for yardang morphology is that they evolve to an ideal 4:1 length-to-width aspect ratio that minimizes aerodynamic drag. We show using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling that this model is incorrect: the 4:1 aspect ratio is the value corresponding to minimum drag for free bodies, i.e. obstacles around which air flows on all sides. Yardangs, in contrast, are embedded in Earth's surface. For such rough streamlined half-bodies, the aspect ratio corresponding to minimum drag is larger than 20:1. As an alternative to the minimum-drag model, we propose that the aspect ratio of yardangs not significantly influenced by structural controls is controlled by the angle of dispersion of the aerodynamic jet created as deflected wind and wind-blown sand exits the troughs between incipient yardang noses. Aerodynamic jets have a universal dispersion angle of 11.8 degrees, thus predicting a yardang aspect ratio of ~5:1. We developed a landscape evolution model that combines the physics of boundary layer flow with aeolian saltation and bedrock erosion to form yardangs with a range of sizes and aspect ratios similar to those observed in nature. Yardangs with aspect ratios both larger and smaller than 5:1 occur in the model since the strike and dip of the resistant rock unit also exerts

  8. Investigating soil controls on soil moisture spatial variability: Numerical simulations and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tiejun; Franz, Trenton E.; Zlotnik, Vitaly A.; You, Jinsheng; Shulski, Martha D.

    2015-05-01

    Due to its complex interactions with various processes and factors, soil moisture exhibits significant spatial variability across different spatial scales. In this study, a modeling approach and field observations were used to examine the soil control on the relationship between mean (θ bar) and standard deviation (σθ) of soil moisture content. For the numerical experiments, a 1-D vadose zone model along with van Genuchten parameters generated by pedotransfer functions was used for simulating soil moisture dynamics under different climate and surface conditions. To force the model, hydrometeorological and physiological data that spanned over three years from five research sites within the continental US were used. The modeling results showed that under bare surface conditions, different forms of the θ bar -σθ relationship as observed in experimental studies were produced. For finer soils, a positive θ bar -σθ relationship gradually changed to an upward convex and a negative one from arid to humid conditions; whereas, a positive relationship existed for coarser soils, regardless of climatic conditions. The maximum σθ for finer soils was larger under semiarid conditions than under arid and humid conditions, while the maximum σθ for coarser soils increased with increasing precipitation. Moreover, vegetation tended to reduce θ bar and σθ, and thus affected the θ bar -σθ relationship. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted to examine the controls of different van Genuchten parameters on the θ bar -σθ relationship under bare surface conditions. It was found that the residual soil moisture content mainly affected σθ under dry conditions, while the saturated soil moisture content and the saturated hydraulic conductivity largely controlled σθ under wet conditions. Importantly, the upward convex θ bar -σθ relationship was mostly caused by the shape factor n that accounts for pore size distribution. Finally, measured soil moisture data from a

  9. Ore controls in the Charters Towers goldfield, NE Australia: Constraints from geological, geophysical and numerical analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kreuzer, O.P.; Blenkinsop, T.G.; Morrison, R.J.; Peters, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    The approach taken in this paper, namely synthesising a wealth of previous information with new data and a genetic model, in combination with integrated numerical analyses, led to new insights into the geological controls on the localisation of auriferous veins and residual prospectivity of the Charters Towers goldfield, NE Australia. The method also has implications for the assessment of other "mature" goldfields worldwide. Despite a number of different ore controls having operated within the Charters Towers goldfield, the controlling factors can be linked to a single genetic model for orogenic, granitoid-hosted lode-gold mineralisation in a brittle deformation regime (D4) of NE-SW to NNE-SSW shortening, under conditions of supralithostatic fluid pressure and low stress difference. Spatial autocorrelation results suggest district-scale alignment of the auriferous veins parallel to and overlapping with the ESE-WNW- to E-W-striking Charters Towers-Ravenswood lineament, a major crustal boundary in the basement to the Ravenswood batholith. At the camp-scale, auriferous veins have abundance and proximity relationships with NW-SE-, NNW-SSE-, NE-SW- and ENE-WSW-oriented lineaments, suggesting that structures that controlled gold deposition in one camp did not necessarily control mineralisation in other camps. Fractal dimensions obtained with the box-counting method range from 1.02 to 1.10, whereas veins in the Charters Towers City camp are characterised by a significantly higher fractal dimension of 1.28. This discrepancy may be taken to imply that most or all outcropping and near-surface deposits within the Charters Towers City camp have been found and that new discoveries are more likely to occur at greater levels of depth, or outside the boundaries of this camp. The new understanding has implications for the assessment of the residual prospectivity of the Charters Towers goldfield, where large areas of prospective rock types and structures (e.g., approximately 40% of

  10. A Numerical and Analytic Analysis of Nonlinear Implicit Differential Equations Arising in Control and Circuit Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-15

    This research project was to develop methods for the numerical and analytic analysis of implicit systems of differential equations, (DAE)- F(x’, z ,t...0 (1) which are not equivalent to an explicit ordinary differential equation (ODE), (ODE) z ’ = G( z , t) (2) That is, the Jacobian Fe of (1) is...structure theorems and a general numerical procedure for the linear time varying DAE E(t)w’(t) + F(t) z (t) = f(t) (3) This numerical algorithm was the

  11. What controls the geometry of mountain ranges: insights from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Katharina; Matenco, Liviu; Gerya, Taras; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2015-04-01

    When continents collide mountain ranges with high topographies and complex geometries are formed. Compressional stresses during ongoing convergence result in crustal thickening, localized deformation, and material transport at which crustal material is transported and redistributed within the orogen. We use numerical high-resolution thermo-mechanical models to investigate the physical processes of continent collision zones and its implications on crustal scale deformation and geometry. We demonstrate that compression of two continental blocks, separated by a rheologically weak suture zone can result in (i) double-vergent or (ii) single-vergent orogens, with distinct geometries, deformation and exhumation patterns. Double-vergent orogens are formed in response to the gradual accretion of crustal material to the upper plate along retro-shears (back thrusts) and are characterized by deformation of both upper and lower plate material. Typical examples include the collision recorded by the Swiss Alps and the Pyrenees. In contrast, single-vergent orogens are characterized by large-scale lower plate deformation and are accompanied by the subduction of lower crustal material. In this situation, no significant retro-shear formation is observed, which is in agreement with recent physical modelling studies on deformation of the continental lithosphere. Natural examples of such single vergent orogens are common in the Mediterranean (Carpathians, Dinarides, Apennines, Betics) or the SE Asia subduction zones. The transition between these different modes of collision is strongly controlled by the rheology of the continental lithosphere. Coupled crustal layers form double vergent orogens, while decoupled crustal layers result in single-vergent orogens. We conclude that deformation and exhumation in continent-continent collision zones may occur in foreland or hinterland settings, depending on the rheological structure of the continental lithosphere, forming single-vergent or double

  12. Numerical natural rubber curing simulation, obtaining a controlled gradient of the state of cure in a thick-section part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Labban, A.; Mousseau, P.; Bailleul, J. L.; Deterre, R.

    2007-04-01

    Although numerical simulation has proved to be a useful tool to predict the rubber vulcanization process, few applications in the process control have been reported. Because the end-use rubber properties depend on the state of cure distribution in the parts thickness, the prediction of the optimal distribution remains a challenge for the rubber industry. The analysis of the vulcanization process requires the determination of the thermal behavior of the material and the cure kinetics. A nonisothermal vulcanization model with nonisothermal induction time is used in this numerical study. Numerical results are obtained for natural rubber (NR) thick-section part curing. A controlled gradient of the state of cure in the part thickness is obtained by a curing process that consists not only in mold heating phase, but also a forced convection mold cooling phase in order to stop the vulcanization process and to control the vulcanization distribution. The mold design that allows this control is described. In the heating phase, the state of cure is mainly controlled by the chemical kinetics (the induction time), but in the cooling phase, it is the heat diffusion that controls the state of cure distribution. A comparison among different cooling conditions is shown and a good state of cure gradient control is obtained.

  13. Computer numerically controlled (CNC) aspheric shaping with toroidal Wheels (Abstract Only)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketelsen, D.; Kittrell, W. C.; Kuhn, W. M.; Parks, R. E.; Lamb, George L.; Baker, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Contouring with computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines can be accomplished with several different tool geometries and coordinated machine axes. To minimize the number of coordinated axes for nonsymmetric work to three, it is common practice to use a spherically shaped tool such as a ball-end mill. However, to minimize grooving due to the feed and ball radius, it is desirable to use a long ball radius, but there is clearly a practical limit to ball diameter with the spherical tool. We have found that the use of commercially available toroidal wheels permits long effective cutting radii, which in turn improve finish and minimize grooving for a set feed. In addition, toroidal wheels are easier than spherical wheels to center accurately. Cutting parameters are also easier to control because the feed rate past the tool does not change as the slope of the work changes. The drawback to the toroidal wheel is the more complex calculation of the tool path. Of course, once the algorithm is worked out, the tool path is as easily calculated as for a spherical tool. We have performed two experiments with the Large Optical Generator (LOG) that were ideally suited to three-axis contouring--surfaces that have no axis of rotational symmetry. By oscillating the cutting head horizontally or vertically (in addition to the motions required to generate the power of the surface) , and carefully coordinating those motions with table rotation, the mostly astigmatic departure for these surfaces is produced. The first experiment was a pair of reflector molds that together correct the spherical aberration of the Arecibo radio telescope. The larger of these was 5 m in diameter and had a 12 cm departure from the best-fit sphere. The second experiment was the generation of a purely astigmatic surface to demonstrate the feasibility of producing axially symmetric asphe.rics while mounted and rotated about any off-axis point. Measurements of the latter (the first experiment had relatively

  14. An Experiment Comparing the Effectiveness of Low Cost Instructional Simulation Against High Cost Equipment Utilization in Teaching Numerical Control Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummell, Winfield Raymond

    This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of low cost instructional simulation, with numerical control (N/C) used as the subject vehicle. A unit of study was developed that included a detailed list of the behavioral changes which were desired for the students and the instructional materials and procedures deemed necessary for aiding…

  15. Curriculums in Industrial Technology. Plastics Technology. Industrial Maintenance. Computer Numerical Control. Teacher's Manuals and Student Learning Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Paso Community Coll., TX.

    Curriculum guides are provided for plastics technology, industrial maintenance, and computer numerical control. Each curriculum is divided into a number of courses. For each course these instructor materials are presented in the official course outline: course description, course objectives, unit titles, texts and materials, instructor resources,…

  16. Curriculums in Industrial Technology. Plastics Technology. Industrial Maintenance. Computer Numerical Control. Teacher's Manuals and Student Learning Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Paso Community Coll., TX.

    Curriculum guides are provided for plastics technology, industrial maintenance, and computer numerical control. Each curriculum is divided into a number of courses. For each course these instructor materials are presented in the official course outline: course description, course objectives, unit titles, texts and materials, instructor resources,…

  17. An Experiment Comparing the Effectiveness of Low Cost Instructional Simulation Against High Cost Equipment Utilization in Teaching Numerical Control Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummell, Winfield Raymond

    This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of low cost instructional simulation, with numerical control (N/C) used as the subject vehicle. A unit of study was developed that included a detailed list of the behavioral changes which were desired for the students and the instructional materials and procedures deemed necessary for aiding…

  18. The hydraulic and numerical analyses of the operation of the control valve in the central heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogula, J.; Szulc, P.

    2017-08-01

    The article presents the results of experimental and numerical tests of a surface heating flow control system consisting of a distribution rail along with the fixed valve. The components were measured, their solid models were prepared and used to make a flow model. In a flow model geometry the measurements of the test stand elements were considered in order to compare the results.

  19. CO2 migration in the vadose zone: experimental and numerical modelling of controlled gas injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    gasparini, andrea; credoz, anthony; grandia, fidel; garcia, david angel; bruno, jordi

    2014-05-01

    The mobility of CO2 in the vadose zone and its subsequent transfer to the atmosphere is a matter of concern in the risk assessment of the geological storage of CO2. In this study the experimental and modelling results of controlled CO2 injection are reported to better understanding of the physical processes affecting CO2 and transport in the vadose zone. CO2 was injected through 16 micro-injectors during 49 days of experiments in a 35 m3 experimental unit filled with sandy material, in the PISCO2 facilities at the ES.CO2 centre in Ponferrada (North Spain). Surface CO2 flux were monitored and mapped periodically to assess the evolution of CO2 migration through the soil and to the atmosphere. Numerical simulations were run to reproduce the experimental results, using TOUGH2 code with EOS7CA research module considering two phases (gas and liquid) and three components (H2O, CO2, air). Five numerical models were developed following step by step the injection procedure done at PISCO2. The reference case (Model A) simulates the injection into a homogeneous soil(homogeneous distribution of permeability and porosity in the near-surface area, 0.8 to 0.3 m deep from the atmosphere). In another model (Model B), four additional soil layers with four specific permeabilities and porosities were included to predict the effect of differential compaction on soil. To account for the effect of higher soil temperature, an isothermal simulation called Model C was also performed. Finally, the assessment of the rainfall effects (soil water saturation) on CO2 emission on surface was performed in models called Model D and E. The combined experimental and modelling approach shows that CO2 leakage in the vadose zone quickly comes out through preferential migration pathways and spots with the ranges of fluxes in the ground/surface interface from 2.5 to 600 g·m-2·day-1. This gas channelling is mainly related to soil compaction and climatic perturbation. This has significant implications to

  20. A quartic B-spline based explicit time integration scheme for structural dynamics with controllable numerical dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, W. B.; Duan, S. Y.; Yan, J.; Ma, Y. B.; Wei, K.; Fang, D. N.

    2017-03-01

    An explicit time integration scheme based on quartic B-splines is presented for solving linear structural dynamics problems. The scheme is of a one-parameter family of schemes where free algorithmic parameter controls stability, accuracy and numerical dispersion. The proposed scheme possesses at least second-order accuracy and at most third-order accuracy. A 2D wave problem is analyzed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme in reducing high-frequency modes and retaining low-frequency modes. Except for general structural dynamics, the proposed scheme can be used effectively for wave propagation problems in which numerical dissipation is needed to reduce spurious oscillations.

  1. Numerical simulation of rifting controlled by magmatic underplating in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hehua

    2016-04-01

    the approach that it suggests re-meshing at every time time step, which can be easily done with marker-in-cell algorithm. Based on the numerical model behaviour in this study, the role of underplated magmatic bodies in localization is linked with an anomalously high temperature and rock melting. The most important factor in controlling localization of deformation is the strength contrast between the weakened and non-weakened regions. Studies show that the deformation can be redistributed into a different region if the underplated magmatic bodies emplacement in multiple multiple regions during the extensional process. we have discussed the microcontinent formations observed in the South China Sea.

  2. Décollement controls on strain distribution in mountain belts: insights from numerical models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grool, Arjan R.; Huismans, Ritske S.; Ford, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Doubly vergent orogens have a pro-wedge (lower plate) and a retro-wedge (upper plate). Most shortening is accommodated in the pro-wedge while retro-wedge shortening is typically limited. For example, the Eastern Pyrenees have experienced about 145 km of convergence, of which about 125 km (86%) was accommodated in the pro-wedge and about 20 km (14%) in the retro-wedge. Strain partitioning between pro- and retro-wedge is influenced by several factors, some of which have been identified in past work: Extensional inheritance and syn-orogenic sedimentation can help to increase the percentage of total shortening accommodated in the retro-wedge while erosion promotes pro-wedge shortening. We use high-resolution 2D numerical models to investigate factors that control pro- versus retro-wedge shortening. For a total convergence similar to the Eastern Pyrenees, our models predict that variations in extensional inheritance and syn-orogenic sedimentation will result in a maximum of 10% of total shortening being accommodated in the retro-wedge. Here, we investigate the role of 1) the rheology and 2) distribution of a décollement layer. Our models show that: 1) Décollement rheology has a first order control on strain distribution between the pro- and the retro-wedge. After 145 km of total convergence, a model with a weak frictional (ϕ=2, shale-like) décollement will only accommodate 10% of total shortening in the retro-wedge. In contrast, in models with a weak viscous (μ=1018, salt-like) décollement retro-wedge shortening amounts to 18% and a stronger, but still weak, viscous décollement (μ=1019) leads to 21%. 2) Décollement distribution influences the timing of the first outward propagation of thick-skinned deformation in the retro-wedge. In the Eastern Pyrenees, thick-skinned deformation propagated out into the retro-wedge within 145 km of total convergence. In models with a décollement on both sides of the orogen this only occurred after 240 km. If, as in the Eastern

  3. Numerical Investigation of Vortex Generator Flow Control for External-Compression Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydar, Ezgihan

    Vortex generators (VGs) within external-compression supersonic inlets for Mach 1.6 were investigated to determine their ability to increase total pressure recovery and reduce total pressure distortion. Ramp and vane-type VGs were studied. The geometric factors of interest included height, length, spacing, angle-of-incidence, and positions upstream and downstream of the inlet terminal shock. The flow through the inlet was simulated numerically through the solution of the steady-state, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations on multi-block, structured grids using the Wind-US flow solver. The inlet performance was characterized by the inlet total pressure recovery and the radial and circumferential total pressure distortion indices at the engine face. Previous research of downstream VGs in the low-boom supersonic inlet demonstrated improvement in radial distortion up to 24% while my work on external-compression supersonic inlets improved radial distortion up to 86%, which is significant. The design of experiments and statistical analysis methods were applied to quantify the effect of the geometric factors of VGs and search for optimal VG arrays. From the analysis, VG angle-of-incidence and VG height were the most influential factors in increasing total pressure recovery and reducing distortion. The study on the two-dimensional external-compression inlet determined which passive flow control devices, such as counter-rotating vanes or ramps, reduce high distortion levels and improve the health of the boundary layer, relative to the baseline. Downstream vanes demonstrate up to 21% improvement in boundary layer health and 86% improvement in radial distortion. Upstream vanes demonstrated up to 3% improvement in boundary layer health and 9% improvement in radial distortion. Ramps showed no improvement in boundary layer health and radial distortion. Micro-VGs were preferred for their reduced viscous drag and improvement in total pressure recovery at the AIP. Although

  4. Hydrogeologic controls on saturation profiles in heat-pipe-like hydrothermal systems: numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervin, Mollika; Ghergut, Iulia; Graf, Thomas; Peche, Aaron

    2016-04-01

    work, we explore some mechanisms and geologic controls that can lead to the formation of extensive vapor-dominated zones within a two-phase system. In particular, we investigate the effect of vertical heterogeneity of permeability (stratified reservoir, containing a permeability barrier) on the liquid water saturation profile within a modified HP model. Though in field observations liquid water has been directly encountered only within the condensation zone at reservoir top, it was speculated that large amounts of liquid water might also exist below the condensation zone. This is of great practical significance to the exploitation of vapor-dominated reservoirs, as their longevity depends on the fluid reserves in place. Within this work, we demonstrate by numerical simulations of a modified HP model that high values of liquid water saturation (>0.8) can prevail even far below the condensation zone. Such findings are useful as a baseline for future calculations regarding the economic exploitation of vapor-dominated systems, where premature productivity drop (or dry-out) is the main issue of concern. References: Eastman, G. Y:, 1968: The heat pipe. Scientific American, 218(5):38-46. Preuss, K. A., 1985: A quantitative model of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs as heat pipes in fractured porous rock, Transactions, Geothermal Resources. Council, 9(2), 353-361. Truesdell, A. H., and White, D.E. 1973: Production of superheated Steam from Vapor- dominated geothermal reservoirs. Geothermics, 2(3-4), 154-173

  5. Numerical Study of Ram Air Airfoils and Upper Surface Bleed-Air Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-16

    of ram -air parachute systems to complement the design and analysis of new and existing airdrop systems. In this paper an unsteady numerical study of...two-dimensional, rigid, ram -air sections with an array of upper surface bleed-air actuators is presented. Aerodynamic forces and lift-to-drag ratios of...a modified Clark-Y ram -air airfoil are calculated from unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations, using the Kestrel and Cobalt flow

  6. A constrained-gradient method to control divergence errors in numerical MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2016-10-01

    In numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), a major challenge is maintaining nabla \\cdot {B}=0. Constrained transport (CT) schemes achieve this but have been restricted to specific methods. For more general (meshless, moving-mesh, ALE) methods, `divergence-cleaning' schemes reduce the nabla \\cdot {B} errors; however they can still be significant and can lead to systematic errors which converge away slowly. We propose a new constrained gradient (CG) scheme which augments these with a projection step, and can be applied to any numerical scheme with a reconstruction. This iteratively approximates the least-squares minimizing, globally divergence-free reconstruction of the fluid. Unlike `locally divergence free' methods, this actually minimizes the numerically unstable nabla \\cdot {B} terms, without affecting the convergence order of the method. We implement this in the mesh-free code GIZMO and compare various test problems. Compared to cleaning schemes, our CG method reduces the maximum nabla \\cdot {B} errors by ˜1-3 orders of magnitude (˜2-5 dex below typical errors if no nabla \\cdot {B} cleaning is used). By preventing large nabla \\cdot {B} at discontinuities, this eliminates systematic errors at jumps. Our CG results are comparable to CT methods; for practical purposes, the nabla \\cdot {B} errors are eliminated. The cost is modest, ˜30 per cent of the hydro algorithm, and the CG correction can be implemented in a range of numerical MHD methods. While for many problems, we find Dedner-type cleaning schemes are sufficient for good results, we identify a range of problems where using only Powell or `8-wave' cleaning can produce order-of-magnitude errors.

  7. Assessing Geometric Controls on Tidewater Glacier Sensitivity to Frontal Perturbations Using a Numerical Ice Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, E. M.; Howat, I. M.

    2010-12-01

    Marine-terminating glaciers worldwide have undergone rapid changes in their dynamics in response to external forcing. Observations from the Greenland coast, however, reveal that outlet glaciers in close proximity to each other, likely sharing a similar external forcing, can exhibit dramatically different behavior. These behavioral differences may result from differences in glacier shape, such as the presence of basal overdeepenings and lateral constrictions near the terminus. Understanding how shape influences glacier response to forcing at the terminus is critical for predicting future change. The dependence of ice flow on shape is non-linear and complex and, therefore, best examined using numerical methods. We employ a numerical ice flow model to investigate how the shape of marine-terminating glaciers (i.e. basal topography, thickness and width) influences the dynamic response to perturbations in the stress boundary condition at the front caused by front retreat and thinning. Governing model equations are compiled from various numerical models derived for a lightly grounded outlet glaciers, grounded retreat through basal over-deepenings, and calving of marine-terminating outlet glaciers. The model is designed for tidewater glaciers confined to narrow channels so that the stress balance components consist of substantial longitudinal and lateral stresses in addition to basal drag. Emphasis is placed on conditions at the grounding zone, as it is particularly sensitive to changes in basal drag and longitudinal stress. The effect of ice softening at the shear margins as a result of glacial acceleration is also considered. Boundary conditions at the front are categorized by two different calving criteria: (1) the buoyancy stress criterion prescribed by Durand et al. (2009), and (2) the modified flotation criterion derived by Vieli et al. (2001). The model is applied to a range of glacier bed and width geometries and perturbed from steady state by prescribing increased

  8. Numerical and experimental investigation of VG flow control for a low-boom inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybalko, Michael

    The application of vortex generators (VGs) for shock/boundary layer interaction flow control in a novel external compression, axisymmetric, low-boom concept inlet was studied using numerical and experimental methods. The low-boom inlet design features a zero-angle cowl and relaxed isentropic compression centerbody spike, resulting in defocused oblique shocks and a weak terminating normal shock. This allows reduced external gas dynamic waves at high mass flow rates but suffers from flow separation near the throat and a large hub-side boundary layer at the Aerodynamic Interface Plane (AIP), which marks the inflow to the jet engine turbo-machinery. Supersonic VGs were investigated to reduce the shock-induced flow separation near the throat while subsonic VGs were investigated to reduce boundary layer radial distortion at the AIP. To guide large-scale inlet experiments, Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations using three-dimensional, structured, chimera (overset) grids and the WIND-US code were conducted. Flow control cases included conventional and novel types of vortex generators at positions both upstream of the terminating normal shock (supersonic VGs) and downstream (subsonic VGs). The performance parameters included incompressible axisymmetric shape factor, post-shock separation area, inlet pressure recovery, and mass flow ratio. The design of experiments (DOE) methodology was used to select device size and location, analyze the resulting data, and determine the optimal choice of device geometry. Based on the above studies, a test matrix of supersonic and subsonic VGs was adapted for a large-scale inlet test to be conducted at the 8'x6' supersonic wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Comparisons of RANS simulations with data from the Fall 2010 8'x6' inlet test showed that predicted VG performance trends and case rankings for both supersonic and subsonic devices were consistent with experimental results. For example, experimental surface oil

  9. Numerical Modeling of Flow Control in a Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Offset Inlet Diffuser at Transonic Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan Brian G.; Owens, Lewis, R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will investigate the validation of a NASA developed, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver, OVERFLOW, for a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) offset (S-shaped) inlet in transonic flow with passive and active flow control devices as well as the baseline case. Numerical simulations are compared to wind tunnel results of a BLI inlet conducted at the NASA Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Comparisons of inlet flow distortion, pressure recovery, and inlet wall pressures are performed. The numerical simulations are compared to the BLI inlet data at a freestream Mach number of 0.85 and a Reynolds number of approximately 2 million based on the length of the fan-face diameter. The numerical simulations with and without wind tunnel walls are performed, quantifying effects of the tunnel walls on the BLI inlet flow measurements. The wind tunnel test evaluated several different combinations of jet locations and mass flow rates as well as a vortex generator (VG) vane case. The numerical simulations will be performed on a single jet configuration for varying actuator mass flow rates at a fix inlet mass flow condition. Validation of the numerical simulations for the VG vane case will also be performed for varying inlet mass flow rates. Overall, the numerical simulations were able to predict the baseline circumferential flow distortion, DPCPavg, very well for comparisons made within the designed operating range of the BLI inlet. However the CFD simulations did predict a total pressure recovery that was 0.01 lower than the experiment. Numerical simulations of the baseline inlet flow also showed good agreement with the experimental inlet centerline surface pressures. The vane case showed that the CFD predicted the correct trends in the circumferential distortion for varying inlet mass flow but had a distortion level that was nearly twice as large as the experiment. Comparison to circumferential distortion measurements for a 15 deg clocked 40 probe

  10. Ponderomotive stabilization of flute modes in mirrors Feedback control and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Similon, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    Ponderomotive stabilization of rigid plasma flute modes is numerically investigated by use of a variational principle, for a simple geometry, without eikonal approximation. While the near field of the studied antenna can be stabilizing, the far field has a small contribution only, because of large cancellation by quasi mode-coupling terms. The field energy for stabilization is evaluated and is a nonnegligible fraction of the plasma thermal energy. A new antenna design is proposed, and feedback stabilization is investigated. Their use drastically reduces power requirements.

  11. Electrical equivalent circuit for microstrip micro-plasma: control of EM propagation and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Almustafa; Tân-Hoa, Vuong; Jacques, David

    2012-01-01

    An approach to determine an equivalent electrical circuit of a micro planar discharge on a microstrip printed circuit is reported. The micro discharge is used to realize a dynamic microwave switching circuit. This approach is based on the measurement of the discharge current and the transmission coefficient for a given frequency 2.45 GHz. Numerical methods like FEM can be used to study the effect of plasma parameters on the propagation of electromagnetic waves through a microstrip printed circuit. Plasma behaves as flexible elements that can change its electrical proprieties such as conductivity.

  12. SEMTAP (Serpentine End Match TApe program): The Easy Way to Program Your Numerically Controlled Router for the Production of SEM Joints

    Treesearch

    Ronald E. Coleman

    1977-01-01

    SEMTAP (Serpentine End Match TApe Program) is an easy and inexpensive method of programing a numerically controlled router for the manufacture of SEM (Serpentine End Matching) joints. The SEMTAP computer program allows the user to issue commands that will accurately direct a numerically controlled router along any SEM path. The user need not be a computer programer to...

  13. Numerical modeling of multi-mode active control of turbofan tonal noise using a boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Laralee Gordon

    A numerical model was developed to investigate the possibility of implementing active control (ANC) to minimize noise radiation from high-bypass turbofan engines. Previous experimental work on the NASA Glenn Research Center active noise control fan (ANCF) was encouraging, but the question remained whether the modal approach investigated could be effective on real engines. The engine model developed for this research project uses an indirect boundary element method, implemented with Sysnoise, and a multi-mode Newton's algorithm, implemented with MATLAB(TM), to simulate the active control. Noise from the inlet was targeted. Both the experimental and numerical results based on the NASA ANCF simplified cylindrical engine geometry indicate overall reductions in the m = 2 component of the noise. Reductions obtained at the numerical sensor rings range from 17 dB to 63 dB and at a plane in the duct inlet, -8 dB to 33 dB. Rings mounted on the inlet duct are unable to accurately predict the total reduction of the inlet field, but the controller is still able to effectively reduce the total acoustic field. Generally, one sensor ring and one actuator ring per propagating mode were necessary to control the inlet field. At frequencies close to the cut-off frequency of a mode, an additional sensor and actuator ring were needed to adequately control the inlet field due to the evanescent mode. A more realistic, but still axisymmetric, engine geometry based on the GE CF6-80C engine was developed and the same algorithm used. Reductions obtained at the sensor rings range from 4 dB to 56 dB and at the duct inlet plane, from 12 dB to 26 dB. The overall far field noise radiation from the engine remained unchanged (0.4 dB) or decreased slightly (3.6 dB). The inlet noise was controlled at all frequencies but the noise from the exhaust was increased. The effect of inlet control on the exhaust radiation suggests the need for a controller that targets both the inlet and exhaust noise

  14. A control volume method on an icosahedral grid for numerical integration of the shallow-water equations on the sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, I-Liang

    1994-08-01

    Two versions of a control volume method on a symmetrized icosahedral grid are proposed for solving the shallow-water equations on a sphere. One version expresses of the equations in the 3-D Cartersian coordinate system, while the other expresses the equations in the northern/southern polar sterographic coordinate systems. The pole problem is avoided because of these expressions in both versions and the quasi-homogenity of the icosahedral grid. Truncation errors and convergence tests of the numerical gradient and divergent operators associated with this method are studied. A convergence tests of the numerical gradient and divergent operators associated with this method are studied. A convergence test for a steady zonal flow is demonstrated. Several simulations of Rossby-Haurwitz waves with various numbers are also performed.

  15. Numerical simulation of stability and stability control of high speed compressible rotating couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, Sedat; Hatay, Ferhat F.

    1993-01-01

    The nonlinear temporal evolution of disturbances in compressible flow between infinitely long, concentric cylinders is investigated through direct numerical simulations of the full, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes and energy equations. Counter-rotating cylinders separated by wide gaps are considered with supersonic velocities of the inner cylinder. Initially, the primary disturbance grows exponentially in accordance with linear stability theory. As the disturbances evolve, higher harmonics and subharmonics are generated in a cascading order eventually reaching a saturation state. Subsequent highly nonlinear stages of the evolution are governed by the interaction of the disturbance modes, particularly the axial subharmonics. Nonlinear evolution of the disturbance field is characterized by the formation of high-shear layers extending from the inner cylinder towards the center of the gap in the form of jets similar to the ejection events in transitional and turbulent wall-bounded shear flows.

  16. Numerical Modeling of Flow Control in a Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Offset Inlet Diffuser at Transonic Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Owens, Lewis R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will investigate the validation of the NASA developed, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver, OVERFLOW, for a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) offset (S-shaped) inlet in transonic flow with passive and active flow control devices as well as a baseline case. Numerical simulations are compared to wind tunnel results of a BLI inlet experiment conducted at the NASA Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Comparisons of inlet flow distortion, pressure recovery, and inlet wall pressures are performed. The numerical simulations are compared to the BLI inlet data at a free-stream Mach number of 0.85 and a Reynolds number of approximately 2 million based on the fanface diameter. The numerical simulations with and without tunnel walls are performed, quantifying tunnel wall effects on the BLI inlet flow. A comparison is made between the numerical simulations and the BLI inlet experiment for the baseline and VG vane cases at various inlet mass flow rates. A comparison is also made to a BLI inlet jet configuration for varying actuator mass flow rates at a fixed inlet mass flow rate. Overall, the numerical simulations were able to predict the baseline circumferential flow distortion, DPCP avg, very well within the designed operating range of the BLI inlet. A comparison of the average total pressure recovery showed that the simulations were able to predict the trends but had a negative 0.01 offset when compared to the experimental levels. Numerical simulations of the baseline inlet flow also showed good agreement with the experimental inlet centerline surface pressures. The vane case showed that the CFD predicted the correct trends in the circumferential distortion levels for varying inlet mass flow but had a distortion level that was nearly twice as large as the experiment. Comparison to circumferential distortion measurements for a 15 deg clocked 40 probe rake indicated that the circumferential distortion levels are very sensitive to the symmetry of

  17. Numerical simulation of spatially-evolving instability control in plane channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danabasoglu, G.; Biringen, S.; Streett, C. L.

    1990-01-01

    The applicability of active control by periodic suction-blowing in spatially evolving plane Poiseuille flow is investigated by the direct simulations of the two-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. All the computations were performed for Reynolds number (Re = 7500) which is linearly unstable for this flow. The result reveal that significant reductions in perturbation amplitudes can be obtained by a proper choice of the control wave amplitude and phase even for large disturbance amplitudes. The upstream influence of the control wave is also investigated.

  18. Numerical study of active flow control over a hypersonic backward-facing step using supersonic jet in near space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guang-ming; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Near space has been paid more and more attentions in recent years due to its militarily application value. Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) which is one of the most successful particle simulation methods in treating rarefied gas dynamics is employed to investigate the flow characteristics of a hypersonic backward-facing step (BFS) under active flow control using supersonic jet in near space. The numerical tool is validated by an experimental flow of dual cusped-plate model, shock wave structures from the numerical simulation are shown in quite good agreement with the experimental result. The influence of altitude and active flow control on BFS flow are then studied in detail. Three parameters, i.e. boundary layer thickness, recirculation region length, and lean angle of the primary recirculation region that is first defined to describe recirculation region shape, are used to evaluate the flow characteristics of every case computed. The numerical results indicate that the main effect of vertical jet upstream of the step is the enhancement of boundary layer thickness downstream of the jet slot, then, it shows a weak influence on recirculation region length and a negligible effect on lean angle. Conversely, the horizontal jet near the step edge can greatly change the recirculation region length by adjusting jetting angle, but it only has a weak influence both on boundary layer thickness and on lean angle for every jetting angle considered. A significant finding is that the recirculation region length is decreased severely in near space compared with experimental and numerical results presented in the open literature.

  19. Developing a Control Strategy for Jets in Crossflow Using Direct Numerical Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-29

    described in detail by Mahesh et al. (2004). The algorithm stores the Cartesian ve- locities and the pressure at the centroids of the cells (control...Mahesh et al. (2004). The algorithm stores the Cartesian velocities and pressure at the centroids of the cells (control volumes), and stores the face... separates two regimes of flow in the presence of crossflow. The dotted line represents the transition line in stationary flow . between single vortex

  20. Numerical simulations of flow fields through conventionally controlled wind turbines & wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emre Yilmaz, Ali; Meyers, Johan

    2014-06-01

    In the current study, an Actuator-Line Model (ALM) is implemented in our in-house pseudo-spectral LES solver SP-WIND, including a turbine controller. Below rated wind speed, turbines are controlled by a standard-torque-controller aiming at maximum power extraction from the wind. Above rated wind speed, the extracted power is limited by a blade pitch controller which is based on a proportional-integral type control algorithm. This model is used to perform a series of single turbine and wind farm simulations using the NREL 5MW turbine. First of all, we focus on below-rated wind speed, and investigate the effect of the farm layout on the controller calibration curves. These calibration curves are expressed in terms of nondimensional torque and rotational speed, using the mean turbine-disk velocity as reference. We show that this normalization leads to calibration curves that are independent of wind speed, but the calibration curves do depend on the farm layout, in particular for tightly spaced farms. Compared to turbines in a lone-standing set-up, turbines in a farm experience a different wind distribution over the rotor due to the farm boundary-layer interaction. We demonstrate this for fully developed wind-farm boundary layers with aligned turbine arrangements at different spacings (5D, 7D, 9D). Further we also compare calibration curves obtained from full farm simulations with calibration curves that can be obtained at a much lower cost using a minimal flow unit.

  1. Analysis of control system responses for aircraft stability and efficient numerical techniques for real-time simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, Gabriela; Andrei, Irina-Carmen; Frunzulica, Florin

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are the study and the implementation of both aerodynamic and propulsion models, as linear interpolations using look-up tables in a database. The aerodynamic and propulsion dependencies on state and control variable have been described by analytic polynomial models. Some simplifying hypotheses were made in the development of the nonlinear aircraft simulations. The choice of a certain technique to use depends on the desired accuracy of the solution and the computational effort to be expended. Each nonlinear simulation includes the full nonlinear dynamics of the bare airframe, with a scaled direct connection from pilot inputs to control surface deflections to provide adequate pilot control. The engine power dynamic response was modeled with an additional state equation as first order lag in the actual power level response to commanded power level was computed as a function of throttle position. The number of control inputs and engine power states varied depending on the number of control surfaces and aircraft engines. The set of coupled, nonlinear, first-order ordinary differential equations that comprise the simulation model can be represented by the vector differential equation. A linear time-invariant (LTI) system representing aircraft dynamics for small perturbations about a reference trim condition is given by the state and output equations present. The gradients are obtained numerically by perturbing each state and control input independently and recording the changes in the trimmed state and output equations. This is done using the numerical technique of central finite differences, including the perturbations of the state and control variables. For a reference trim condition of straight and level flight, linearization results in two decoupled sets of linear, constant-coefficient differential equations for longitudinal and lateral / directional motion. The linearization is valid for small perturbations about the reference trim

  2. Numerically controlled atmospheric-pressure plasma sacrificial oxidation using electrode arrays for improving silicon-on-insulator layer uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Hiroyasu; Yoshinaga, Keinosuke; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Sano, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers are important semiconductor substrates in high-performance devices. In accordance with device miniaturization requirements, ultrathin and highly uniform top silicon layers (SOI layers) are required. A novel method involving numerically controlled (NC) atmospheric-pressure plasma sacrificial oxidation using an electrode array system was developed for the effective fabrication of an ultrathin SOI layer with extremely high uniformity. Spatial resolution and oxidation properties are the key factors controlling ultraprecision machining. The controllability of plasma oxidation and the oxidation properties of the resulting experimental electrode array system were examined. The results demonstrated that the method improved the thickness uniformity of the SOI layer over one-sixth of the area of an 8-in. wafer area.

  3. Fitting Microphysical Observations to a Numerical Model Through AN Optimal Control Theory Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlinde, Johannes

    Rapid advances in the quality and quantity of atmospheric observations have placed a demand for the development of techniques to assimilate these data sources into numerical forecasting models. Four-dimensional variational assimilation is a promising technique that has been applied to atmospheric and oceanic dynamical models, and also to the retrieval of three-dimensional wind fields from single Doppler radar observations. This study investigates the feasibility of using four-dimensional variational assimilation for a complex discontinuous numerical model. Three test models were developed, a positive definite advection scheme, a one -dimensional liquid physics kinematic microphysical model with a positive definite advection scheme, and a two-dimensional liquid physics kinematic microphysical model. These models were used in identical twin experiments, with observations taken intermittently. Small random errors were introduced into the observations. The retrieval runs were initialized with a large perturbation of the observation run initial conditions. All the models were able to retrieve the original initial conditions to a satisfactory degree when observations of all the model prognostic variables were used. Greater overdetermination of the degrees of freedom (the initial condition being retrieved) resulted in greater improvement of the errors in the observations of the initial conditions, but at a rapid increase in computational cost. Experiments where only some of the prognostic variables were observed also improved the initial conditions, but at a greater cost. To substantially improve the first guess of the field not observed, some spot observations are needed. The proper scaling of the variables was found to be important for the rate of convergence. This study suggests that scaling factors related to the error variance of the observations give good convergence rates. To show how this technique can be used when observations are general functions of the

  4. Nonlinear Numerical Modeling of Shape Control in IGNITOR in the Presence of 3D Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, G.; de Tommasi, G.; Pironti, A.; Rubinacci, G.; Villone, F.; Ramogida, G.; Coppi, B.

    2014-10-01

    IGNITOR is a high field compact machine designed for the investigation of fusion burning plasmas at or close to ignition. The integrated plasma position, shape and current control plays an important role in its safe operation. The analysis of its behavior taking into account nonlinear and 3D effects can be of great interest for assessing its performances. In fact, the system was designed on the basis of an axisymmetric linearized model. To this purpose, we use a computational tool, called CarMa0NL, with the unprecedented capability of simultaneously considering three-dimensional effects of conductors surrounding the plasma and the inherent nonlinearity of the plasma behaviour itself, in the presence of the complex set of circuit equations describing the control system. Preliminary results already lead to the conclusion that the vertical position response is not much influenced by nonlinear and 3D effects, as the vertical stabilization controller is able to ``hide'' the differences in open-loop models. Here we assess the performance of the shape controller, by coupling the nonlinear plasma evolution in the presence of the 3D vessel with ports to the complex circuit dynamics simulating the integrated closed loop control system.

  5. Stratal Control Volumes and Stratal Control Trajectories: A New Method to Constrain, Understand and Reconcile Results from Stratigraphic Outcrop Analysis, Subsurface Analysis and Analogue and Numerical Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, P. M.; Steel, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    Decoding a history of Earth's surface dynamics from strata requires robust quantitative understanding of supply and accommodation controls. The concept of stratigraphic solution sets has proven useful in this decoding, but application and development of this approach has so far been surprisingly limited. Stratal control volumes, areas and trajectories are new approaches defined here, building on previous ideas about stratigraphic solution sets, to help analyse and understand the sedimentary record of Earth surface dynamics. They may have particular application reconciling results from outcrop and subsurface analysis with results from analogue and numerical experiments. Stratal control volumes are sets of points in a three-dimensional volume, with axes of subsidence, sediment supply and eustatic rates of change, populated with probabilities derived from analysis of subsidence, supply and eustasy timeseries (Figure 1). These empirical probabilities indicate the likelihood of occurrence of any particular combination of control rates defined by any point in the volume. The stratal control volume can then by analysed to determine which parts of the volume represent relative sea-level fall and rise, where in the volume particular stacking patterns will occur, and how probable those stacking patterns are. For outcrop and subsurface analysis, using a stratal control area with eustasy and subsidence combined on a relative sea-level axis allows similar analysis, and may be preferable. A stratal control trajectory is a history of supply and accommodation creation rates, interpreted from outcrop or subsurface data, or observed in analogue and numerical experiments, and plotted as a series of linked points forming a trajectory through the stratal control volume (Figure 1) or area. Three examples are presented, one from outcrop and two theoretical. Much work remains to be done to build a properly representative database of stratal controls, but careful comparison of stratal

  6. Optimal control of the Lotka-Volterra system: turnpike property and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Aitziber

    2017-12-01

    The Lotka-Volterra model is a differential system of two coupled equations representing the interaction of two species: a prey one and a predator one. We formulate an optimal control problem adding the effect of hunting both species as the control variable. We analyse the optimal hunting problem paying special attention to the nature of the optimal state and control trajectories in long time intervals. To do that, we apply recent theoretical results on the frame to show that, when the time horizon is large enough, optimal strategies are nearly steady-state. Such path is known as turnpike property. Some experiments are performed to observe such turnpike phenomenon in the hunting problem. Based on the turnpike property, we implement a variant of the single shooting method to solve the previous optimisation problem, taking the middle of the time interval as starting point.

  7. Numerical simulation and sensitivity analysis of a low-Reynolds-number flow around a square cylinder controlled using plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzai, Yosuke; Fukagata, Koji; Meliga, Philippe; Boujo, Edouard; Gallaire, François

    2017-04-01

    Flow around a square cylinder controlled using plasma actuators (PAs) is numerically investigated by direct numerical simulation in order to clarify the most effective location of actuator installation and to elucidate the mechanism of control effect. The Reynolds number based on the cylinder diameter and the free-stream velocity is set to be 100 to study the fundamental effect of PAs on two-dimensional vortex shedding, and three different locations of PAs are considered. The mean drag and the root-mean-square of lift fluctuations are found to be reduced by 51% and 99% in the case where two opposing PAs are aligned vertically on the rear surface. In that case, a jet flow similar to a base jet is generated by the collision of the streaming flows induced by the two opposing PAs, and the vortex shedding is completely suppressed. The simulation results are ultimately revisited in the frame of linear sensitivity analysis, whose computational cost is much lower than that of performing the full simulation. A good agreement is reported for low control amplitudes, which allows further discussion of the linear optimal arrangement for any number of PAs.

  8. Numerical modeling and passive thermal control of external lighting systems for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory A.; Li, Weiming; Tong, Timothy W.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to three generic families of luminaries with lamp power ranging from 11 to 150 watts. A concept of an equivalent radiation node boundary temperature was used to impose worst hot and cold environments, and transient finite difference models were developed to study the effects of geometry and optical properties of thermal control coatings. Minimum and maximum transient temperatures were computed at the critical location during 90 minute orbit and were compared with allowable limits. Results show that with the proper choice of optical properties, the luminaries can be passively controlled to within acceptable limits.

  9. Laryngeal muscular control of vocal fold posturing: Numerical modeling and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jun; Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional continuum model of vocal fold posturing was developed to investigate laryngeal muscular control of vocal fold geometry, stiffness, and tension, which are difficult to measure in live humans or in vivo models. This model was able to qualitatively reproduce in vivo experimental observations of laryngeal control of vocal fold posturing, despite the many simplifications which are necessary due to the lack of accurate data of laryngeal geometry and material properties. The results present a first comprehensive study of the co-variations between glottal width, vocal fold length, stiffness, tension at different conditions of individual, and combined laryngeal muscle activation. PMID:27914396

  10. Numerical modeling and passive thermal control of external lighting systems for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory A.; Li, Weiming; Tong, Timothy W.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to three generic families of luminaries with lamp power ranging from 11 to 150 watts. A concept of an equivalent radiation node boundary temperature was used to impose worst hot and cold environments, and transient finite difference models were developed to study the effects of geometry and optical properties of thermal control coatings. Minimum and maximum transient temperatures were computed at the critical location during 90 minute orbit and were compared with allowable limits. Results show that with the proper choice of optical properties, the luminaries can be passively controlled to within acceptable limits.

  11. Magnetic flow control in growth and casting of photovoltaic silicon: Numerical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poklad, A.; Pal, J.; Galindo, V.; Grants, I.; Heinze, V.; Meier, D.; Pätzold, O.; Stelter, M.; Gerbeth, G.

    2017-07-01

    A novel, vertical Bridgman-type technique for growing multi-crystalline silicon ingots in an induction furnace is described. In contrast to conventional growth, a modified setup with a cone-shaped crucible and susceptor is used. A detailed numerical simulation of the setup is presented. It includes a global thermal simulation of the furnace and a local simulation of the melt, which aims at the influence of the melt flow on the temperature and concentration fields. Furthermore, seeded growth of cone-shaped Si ingots using either a monocrystalline seed or a seed layer formed by pieces of poly-Si is demonstrated and compared to growth without seeds. The influences of the seed material on the grain structure and the dislocation density of the ingots are discussed. The second part addresses model experiments for the Czochralski technique using the room temperature liquid metal GaInSn. The studies were focused on the influence of a rotating and a horizontally static magnetic field on the melt flow and the related heat transport in crucibles being heated from bottom and/or side, and cooled by a crystal model covering about 1/3 of the upper melt surface.

  12. What controls lateral dike propagation and arrest along rift zones? Insights from analogue and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbani, Stefano; Acocella, Valerio; Rivalta, Eleonora; Corbi, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    Recent diking events at Dabbahu (Afar, 2005-2010) and Bardarbunga (Iceland, 2014) showed lateral propagation for tens of kilometres and arrest before topographic reliefs. Here we use analogue and numerical models to investigate a) why dikes propagated laterally for so long; and b) why they arrested in front of reliefs. In the analogue models we used dyed water and pig-skin gelatin as magma and crustal analogues, respectively. We shaped the gelatin surface to reproduce the topography of the Dabbahu and Bardarbunga intrusions. Analog models show that the lateral propagation of dikes occurs only below a gentle slope (< 3°) associated with stiffness contrasts between two gelatin layers. Conversely, density contrasts between the upper and lower layer play a negligible role in our experiments. Finite Elements models mimicking the analog models reveal that the low relief area, where dikes arrest, is characterized by vertical least compressive stress. Stiffness contrasts and topographic variations may thus explain the propagation and arrest of dikes recently observed along divergent plate boundaries respectively. These results should be considered in forecasting lateral dike propagation and assessing volcanic hazard along rift zones.

  13. A numerical model for heat and pressure propagation for temperature controlled retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baade, Alexander; Schlott, Kerstin; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Retinal photocoagulation is an established treatment for various retinal diseases. The temperature development during a treatment can be monitored by applying short laser pulses in addition to the treatment laser light. The laser pulses induce thermoelastic pressure waves that can be detected at the cornea. We present a numerical model to examine the temperature development during the treatment as well as the formation and propagation of the ultrasonic waves. Using the model, it is possible to determine the peak temperature during retinal photocoagulation from the measured signal, and investigate the behaviour of the temperature profile and the accuracy of the temperature determination under varying conditions such as inhomogeneous pigmentation or change in irradiation parameters. It was shown that there is an uncertainty of 2.5 -9% in the determination of the peak temperature when the absorption coefficient between the absorbing layers is varied by a factor of 2. Furthermore the model was extended in order to incorporate the photoacoustic pressure generation and wave propagation. It was shown that for an irradiation pulse duration of 75 ns the resulting pressure wave energy is attenuated by 76 % due to frequency dependent attenuation in water.

  14. Numerical investigation on boundary layer control through moving surface in NACA 0012 airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. Sadiqul; Hakim, Shaik Merkatur; Ali, Mohammad; Islam, Md. Quamrul

    2017-06-01

    This study focuses on the drag reduction by reducing adverse pressure gradient and delaying the flow separation of 2D NACA 0012 airfoil by moving surface through numerical simulation. Two particular cases are considered here. When `single moving surface' is considered, only one moving surface of 10% of the chord length(c) is placed at upper surface of the airfoil starting from 0.05c to 0.15c. When `double moving surface' is considered, one moving surface of 10% of the chord length is placed at upper surface starting from 0.05c to 0.15c and one moving surface of same size is placed at lower surface from 0.05c to 0.15c. Momentum injection into the flow field moves the separation of boundary layer in the vicinity of trailing edge of the airfoil. By momentum injection through single moving surface with the surface velocity twice the free stream velocity and for different angle of attack it is possible to reduce the average drag coefficient by 23.9%. And for same condition with double moving surface it is possible to reduce the average drag coefficient by 25.9%. For moving surface boundary condition, boundary-layer separation is delayed along the chord length on the upper surface of the airfoil.

  15. Erosion Control of Scour during Construction. Report 6. FINITE - A Numerical Model for Combined Refraction and Diffraction of Waves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    MS HYDRA. UNCLASSIFIED J R HOUSTON ET AL . SEP 84 IES/TR/HL-8e-3- 6 F/O 13/2 N mEE~hEhh~hhE .7. 1.1 L6 01 0 =wo li 111111.251111 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST...0u TECHNICAL REPORT HL-80-3 * * * EROSION CONTROL OF SCOUR DURING CONSTRUCTION • Report 6 FINITE- A NUMERICAL MODEL FOR COMBINED REFRACTION 0 ...SOLUTION (JONSSON ET AL . 1976) 0 0 a FINITE ELEMENT SOLUTION *4 4 D3 I-- 0 15 30 5 5 75 0 15 10 13 15 16 18 AZMT, ERE Fiur 7. Sltoswt iprio 1,64lm rd

  16. Hydro-thermo-mechanical numerical simulations for the control of seafloor topography on interplate strength in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauville, A.; Furuichi, M.; Boston, B.

    2016-12-01

    The subduction of rough seafloor results in lower plate coupling compared to the subduction of smooth seafloor (Wang and Bilek, 2011). On the other hand, rough seafloor is also associated with higher effective friction coefficient of the subduction interface than smooth seafloor (Gao and Wang 2016). To investigate this paradoxical situation, we perform two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation of subduction with varying ruguosity of the seafloor. We focus on the shallow part of the subduction zone. We describe the variations in tectonic structures caused by seafloor ruguosity and we characterize the interplate region in terms of effective strength. The effective strength of the shallow interplate region is strongly affected by the presence of water, therefore, we built a so-called hydro-thermo-mechanical numerical model (e.g. Bercovici et al., 2001; Dymkova and Gerya, 2013). The numerical scheme is based on the finite-difference staggered grid method/Marker-in-cell (e.g. Gerya and Yuen, 2003). The model describes the flow of rocks on a geological time scale, as well as the porous flow of water through it. The mechanical properties of the solid are described by a visco-elasto-plastic rheology, where the viscous part of the rheology is dependent on temperature. Water affects the yield criterion of the solid phase by lowering the effective pressure. We present early results demonstrating the control of seafloor topography on the strength of the interplate and the structure of the accretionary prism, taking porous water flow into account.

  17. Permeability-control on volcanic hydrothermal system: case study for Mt. Tokachidake, Japan, based on numerical simulation and field observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ryo; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Matsushima, Nobuo; Ishido, Tsuneo

    2017-03-01

    We investigate a volcanic hydrothermal system by using numerical simulation with three key observables as reference: the magnetic total field, vent temperature, and heat flux. We model the shallow hydrothermal system of Mt. Tokachidake, central Hokkaido, Japan, as a case study. At this volcano, continuous demagnetization has been observed since at least 2008, suggesting heat accumulation beneath the active crater area. The surficial thermal manifestation has been waning since 2000. We perform numerical simulations of heat and mass flow within a modeled edifice at various conditions and calculate associated magnetic total field changes due to the thermomagnetic effect. We focus on the system's response for up to a decade after permeability is reduced at a certain depth in the modeled conduit. Our numerical simulations reveal that (1) conduit obstruction (i.e., permeability reduction in the conduit) tends to bring about a decrease in vent temperature and heat flux, as well as heat accumulation below the level of the obstruction, (2) the recorded changes cannot be consistently explained by changing heat supply from depth, and (3) caprock structure plays a key role in controlling the location of heating and pressurization. Although conduit obstruction may be caused by either physical or chemical processes in general, the latter seems more likely in the case of Mt. Tokachidake.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. When Prior Knowledge Interferes, Inhibitory Control Matters for Learning: The Case of Numerical Magnitude Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laski, Elida V.; Dulaney, Alana

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested the "interference hypothesis"-that learning and using more advanced representations and strategies requires the inhibition of prior, less advanced ones. Specifically, it examined the relation between inhibitory control and number line estimation performance. Experiment 1 compared the accuracy of adults' (N = 53)…

  19. A Numerical Process Control Method for Circular-Tube Hydroforming Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Kenneth I.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Davies, Richard W.; Grant, Glenn J.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes the development of a solution control method that tracks the stresses, strains and mechanical behavior of a tube during hydroforming to estimate the proper axial feed (end-feed) and internal pressure loads through time. The analysis uses the deformation theory of plasticity and Hill?s criterion to describe the plastic flow. Before yielding, the pressure and end-feed increments are estimated based on the initial tube geometry, elastic properties and yield stress. After yielding, the pressure increment is calculated based on the tube geometry at the previous solution increment and the current hoop stress increment. The end-feed increment is computed from the increment of the axial plastic strain. Limiting conditions such as column buckling (of long tubes), local axi-symmetric wrinkling of shorter tubes, and bursting due to localized wall thinning are considered. The process control method has been implemented in the Marc finite element code. Hydroforming simulations using this process control method were conducted to predict the load histories for controlled expansion of 6061-T4 aluminum tubes within a conical die shape and under free hydroforming conditions. The predicted loading paths were transferred to the hydroforming equipment to form the conical and free-formed tube shapes. The model predictions and experimental results are compared for deformed shape, strains and the extent of forming at rupture.

  20. When Prior Knowledge Interferes, Inhibitory Control Matters for Learning: The Case of Numerical Magnitude Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laski, Elida V.; Dulaney, Alana

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested the "interference hypothesis"-that learning and using more advanced representations and strategies requires the inhibition of prior, less advanced ones. Specifically, it examined the relation between inhibitory control and number line estimation performance. Experiment 1 compared the accuracy of adults' (N = 53)…

  1. On the numerical simulation of flutter and its suppression by active control

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, B.; Mook, D.T.

    1994-12-31

    The classic problem of predicting the motion (flutter) of a rigid airfoil mounted on an elastic support in a steady freestream is revisited. In the classic approach, the equations of motion were linearized, the supports were linear springs, the motion was assumed to be periodic, the aerodynamic loads were predicted by Wagner`s function, and the solution was obtained in the so-called frequency domain. In the present approach, the equations of motion are in their fully nonlinear form, the supports may be nonlinear springs, the motion is not assumed to be periodic, the loads are predicted by a general unsteady vorticity-panel method, and the solution is obtained in the so-called time domain. After it is demonstrated that the present approach predicts the onset of flutter and the post-flutter behavior for flat-plate as well as thick airfoils, the airfoil -is modified by the addition of a flap at the trailing edge. The flap is part of an actively controlled servomechanism, and it is demonstrated that flutter can be readily controlled with very little effort by a variety of feedback-control laws. In the present approach, emphasis is placed on considering the airfoil, its supports, the flowing air and the control/servo mechanism collectively to be a single dynamic system. All the equations of motion and control laws are solved simultaneously and interactively; thus, complete interactions among the various subsystems are captured. The present simulation of an oscillating airfoil provides some characteristics of the flutter phenomenon that were missed in previous studies: for example, it is shown that, in the absence of flaps, the motion in heave (the translational part of the motion) is responsible for adding energy to (exciting) the structural subsystem while the motion in pitch is responsible for extracting energy from (damping) the structural subsystem. Below the critical speed, there is more dissipation than excitation and hence all initial disturbances decay.

  2. Final Technical Report: Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Eugenio

    2014-05-02

    The strong coupling between the different physical variables involved in the plasma transport phenomenon and the high complexity of its dynamics call for a model-based, multivariable approach to profile control where those predictive models could be exploited. The overall objective of this project has been to extend the existing body of work by investigating numerically and experimentally active control of unstable fluctuations, including fully developed turbulence and the associated cross-field particle transport, via manipulation of flow profiles in a magnetized laboratory plasma device. Fluctuations and particle transport can be monitored by an array of electrostatic probes, and Ex B flow profiles can be controlled via a set of biased concentric ring electrodes that terminate the plasma column. The goals of the proposed research have been threefold: i- to develop a predictive code to simulate plasma transport in the linear HELCAT (HELicon-CAThode) plasma device at the University of New Mexico (UNM), where the experimental component of the proposed research has been carried out; ii- to establish the feasibility of using advanced model-based control algorithms to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles, iii- to investigate the fundamental nonlinear dynamics of turbulence and transport physics. Lehigh University (LU), including Prof. Eugenio Schuster and one full-time graduate student, has been primarily responsible for control-oriented modeling and model-based control design. Undergraduate students have also participated in this project through the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program. The main goal of the LU Plasma Control Group has been to study the feasibility of controlling turbulence-driven transport by shaping the radial poloidal flow profile (i.e., by controlling flow shear) via biased concentric ring electrodes.

  3. Numerical modeling of separated flows in three-dimensional diffusers and application of synthetic jets for separation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, S. Yu.; Pudovikov, D. E.; Torohov, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Solving the problem of creating an environmentally friendly "green plane" implies development and implementation of several actions aimed at increasing airplane performance and reducing environmental contamination. One possible way to solve this problem is to reduce the powerplant weight, in particular, by decreasing its length. The airplane engine flowpath comprises transition ducts: those between the low- and high-pressure compressors, between the compressor and combustor, and between the high- and low-pressure turbines. In a modern high-bypass turbofan, the flowpath varies in the streamwise direction. Shorter transition ducts have greater curvature. Because of this, intensive separation may occur, which leads to increased losses in the flowpath and to significant growth of nonuniformity of flow parameters. Vast experience of numerical and experimental studies of unsteady separated flows has been accumulated by now. In many cases, however, these investigations are performed in a two-dimensional (2D) formulation, which is primarily caused by the high cost of three-dimensional (3D) unsteady calculations. The numerical and experimental work [1] shows that flows in diffuser ducts can have an essentially unsteady 3D structure. This is valid even for ducts modeling 2D configurations. This paper describes the results of a numerical study of the flow structure and its features in model S-shaped transition ducts, as well as the results of using a synthetic jet generator for flow control and for reduction of total pressure losses. Three-dimensional flows are numerically modeled by the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) / RANS methods. The calculations show that the use of the synthetic jet generator can lead to duct loss reduction by 45%.

  4. Numerical and Experimental Characterizations of Damping Properties of SMAs Composite for Vibration Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, Carlo Alberto; Bassani, P.; Tuissi, A.; Carnevale, M.; Lecis, N.; LoConte, A.; Previtali, B.

    2012-12-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are very interesting smart materials not only for their shape memory and superelastic effects but also because of their significant intrinsic damping capacity. The latter is exhibited upon martensitic transformations and especially in martensitic state. The combination of these SMA properties with the mechanical and the lightweight of fiberglass-reinforced polymer (FGRP) is a promising solution for manufacturing of innovative composites for vibration suppression in structural applications. CuZnAl sheets, after laser patterning, were embedded in a laminated composite between a thick FGRP core and two thin outer layers with the aim of maximizing the damping capacity of the beam for passive vibration suppression. The selected SMA Cu66Zn24Al10 at.% was prepared by vacuum induction melting; the ingot was subsequently hot-and-cold rolled down to 0.2 mm thickness tape. The choice of a copper alloy is related to some advantages in comparison with NiTiCu SMA alloys, which was tested for the similar presented application in a previous study: lower cost, higher storage modulus and consequently higher damping properties in martensitic state. The patterning of the SMA sheets was performed by means of a pulsed fiber laser. After the laser processing, the SMA sheets were heat treated to obtain the desired martensitic state at room temperature. The transformation temperatures were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The damping properties were determined, at room temperature, on full-scale sheet, using a universal testing machine (MTS), with cyclic tensile tests at different deformation amplitudes. Damping properties were also determined as a function of the temperature on miniature samples with a dynamical mechanical analyzer (DMA). Numerical modeling of the laminated composite, done with finite element method analysis and modal strain energy approaches, was performed to estimate the corresponding total damping capacity and then

  5. Exploring tectonomagmatic controls on mid-ocean ridge faulting and morphology with 3-D numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, S. M.; Ito, G.; Behn, M. D.; Olive, J. A. L.; Kaus, B.; Popov, A.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Morrow, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    Previous two-dimensional (2-D) modeling studies of abyssal-hill scale fault generation and evolution at mid-ocean ridges have predicted that M, the ratio of magmatic to total extension, strongly influences the total slip, spacing, and rotation of large faults, as well as the morphology of the ridge axis. Scaling relations derived from these 2-D models broadly explain the globally observed decrease in abyssal hill spacing with increasing ridge spreading rate, as well as the formation of large-offset faults close to the ends of slow-spreading ridge segments. However, these scaling relations do not explain some higher resolution observations of segment-scale variability in fault spacing along the Chile Ridge and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, where fault spacing shows no obvious correlation with M. This discrepancy between observations and 2-D model predictions illuminates the need for three-dimensional (3-D) numerical models that incorporate the effects of along-axis variations in lithospheric structure and magmatic accretion. To this end, we use the geodynamic modeling software LaMEM to simulate 3-D tectono-magmatic interactions in a visco-elasto-plastic lithosphere under extension. We model a single ridge segment subjected to an along-axis gradient in the rate of magma injection, which is simulated by imposing a mass source in a plane of model finite volumes beneath the ridge axis. Outputs of interest include characteristic fault offset, spacing, and along-axis gradients in seafloor morphology. We also examine the effects of along-axis variations in lithospheric thickness and off-axis thickening rate. The main objectives of this study are to quantify the relative importance of the amount of magmatic extension and the local lithospheric structure at a given along-axis location, versus the importance of along-axis communication of lithospheric stresses on the 3-D fault evolution and morphology of intermediate-spreading-rate ridges.

  6. Experimental and numerical modeling of Czochralski crystal growth under axial vibrational control of the melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avetissov, I. Ch.; Sukhanova, E. A.; Sadovskii, A. P.; Kostikov, V. A.; Zharikov, E. V.

    2010-04-01

    A novel scheme of application of axial vibration control (AVC) technique for Czochralski crystal growth has been realized by means of oscillating baffle submerged under the growing crystal. Modeling of heat-mass transfer in the growth system has been produced by both physical experiments with water-glycerol mixture and computer simulations using FLUENT software. The laminar vibrational flows, which suppressed thermoconvectional flows, have been arranged in the proposed AVC configuration. The vibrational flows were stable and well controlled in the viscosity range 1-400 cPz, whenever the crystal-melt interface was under or over the melt surface. The direction of the vibrational flows was favorable for crystal growth. Simulations demonstrated that the shape of the crystal-melt interface is strongly dependent on vibrational parameters.

  7. Application of Control Volume Method Using the Voronoi Tessellation in Numerical Modelling of Solidification Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domański, Zbigniew; Ciesielski, Mariusz; Mochnacki, Bohdan

    2010-03-01

    The paper presents the method to analyse the thermal processes occurring in the cast composite solidification. The cast is formed by a bundle of parallel fibres randomly immersed in a host metal matrix. The heat is transferred from the metal matrix and absorbed by the fibres. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the volumetric fraction of the fibres for which the solidification of the metal matrix occurs only due to the presence of fibres playing a role of internal chills. Our method is to compute Voronoi diagrams with Voronoi regions representing the geometric location of the fibres in the metal matrix and to use these regions as control volumes within a variant of the Control Volume Method.

  8. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Controlled, Small-Scale Motions in a Turbulent Shear Layer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Control of Supersonic Impinging Jet Flows using Microjets . AIAA Journal. 41(7):1347-1355, 2001. [9] M.J. Stanek, G. Raman, V. Kibens, J.A. Ross, J. Odedra...synthetic jet actuators [4]. The previous investigations have demonstrated that high-frequency actuation has a profound impact on evolution of free ...public release, distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Third International Symposium on Integrating CFD and Experiments in Aerodynamics, June 20

  9. Analytical and numerical aspects in solving the controlled 3D Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedele, R.; Jovanovic, D.; De Nicola, S.; Eliasson, B.; Shukla, P. K.

    2009-11-10

    The results of recently developed investigations, that have been carried out within the framework of the controlling potential method (CPM), are reviewed. This method allows one to decompose a three dimensional (3D) Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) into the pair of coupled Schroedinger-type equations. Under suitable mathematical conditions, the solutions of the 3D controlled GPE can be constructed from the solutions of a 2D linear Schroedinger equation (the transverse component of the GPE) coupled with a 1D nonlinear Schroedinger equation (the longitudinal component of the GPE). Such decomposition allows one to cast the solutions in the form of the product of the solutions of the transverse and the longitudinal components of the GPE. The coupling between these two equations is the functional of both the transverse and the longitudinal profiles. It is shown that the CPM can be used to obtain a new class of three-dimensional solitary waves solutions of the GPE, which governs the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates. By imposing an external controlling potential, the desired time-dependent shape of the localized BECs is obtained. The stability of the exact solutions was checked with direct simulations of the time -dependent, three-dimensional GPE. Our simulations show that the localized condensates are stable with respect to perturbed initial conditions.

  10. Analytical and numerical aspects in solving the controlled 3D Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, R.; Jovanović, D.; De Nicola, S.; Eliasson, B.; Shukla, P. K.

    2009-11-01

    The results of recently developed investigations, that have been carried out within the framework of the controlling potential method (CPM), are reviewed. This method allows one to decompose a three dimensional (3D) Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) into the pair of coupled Schrödinger-type equations. Under suitable mathematical conditions, the solutions of the 3D controlled GPE can be constructed from the solutions of a 2D linear Schrödinger equation (the transverse component of the GPE) coupled with a 1D nonlinear Schrödinger equation (the longitudinal component of the GPE). Such decomposition allows one to cast the solutions in the form of the product of the solutions of the transverse and the longitudinal components of the GPE. The coupling between these two equations is the functional of both the transverse and the longitudinal profiles. It is shown that the CPM can be used to obtain a new class of three-dimensional solitary waves solutions of the GPE, which governs the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates. By imposing an external controlling potential, the desired time-dependent shape of the localized BECs is obtained. The stability of the exact solutions was checked with direct simulations of the time -dependent, three-dimensional GPE. Our simulations show that the localized condensates are stable with respect to perturbed initial conditions.

  11. Numerical Investigation of Bending-Body Projectile Aerodynamics for Maneuver Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Eric; Silton, Sidra

    2015-11-01

    Precision munitions are an active area of research for the U.S. Army. Canard-control actuators have historically been the primary mechanism used to maneuver fin-stabilized, gun-launched munitions. Canards are small, fin-like control surfaces mounted at the forward section of the munition to provide the pitching moment necessary to rotate the body in the freestream flow. The additional lift force due to the rotated body and the canards then alters the flight path toward the intended target. As velocity and maneuverability requirements continue to increase, investigation of other maneuver mechanisms becomes necessary. One option for a projectile with a large length-to-diameter ratio (L/D) is a bending-body design, which imparts a curvature to the projectile body along its axis. This investigation uses full Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics simulations to evaluate the effectiveness of an 8-degree bent nose tip on an 8-degree bent forward section of an L/D =10 projectile. The aerodynamic control effectiveness of the bending-body concept is compared to that of a standard L/D =10 straight-body projectile as well as that of the same projectile with traditional canards. All simulations were performed at supersonic velocities between Mach 2-4.

  12. Numerical analysis of the hydrogeologic controls in a layered coastal aquifer system, Oahu, Hawaii, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, D.S.; Souza, W.R.; Bolke, E.L.; Bauer, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    The coastal aquifer system of southern Oahu, Hawaii, USA, consists of highly permeable volcanic aquifers overlain by weathered volcanic rocks and interbedded marine and terrestrial sediments of both high and low permeability. The weathered volcanic rocks and sediments are collectively known as caprock, because they impede the free discharge of groundwater from the underlying volcanic aquifers. A cross-sectional groundwater flow and transport model was used to evaluate the hydrogeologic controls on the regional flow system in southwestern Oahu. Controls considered were: (a) overall caprock hydraulic conductivity; and (b) stratigraphic variations of hydraulic conductivity in the caprock. Within the caprock, variations in hydraulic conductivity, caused by stratigraphy or discontinuities of the stratigraphic units, are a major control on the direction of groundwater flow and the distribution of water levels and salinity. Results of cross-sectional modeling confirm the general groundwater flow pattern that would be expected in a layered coastal system. Ground-water flow is: (a) predominantly upward in the low-permeability sedimentary units; and (b) predominantly horizontal in the high-permeability sedimentary units.

  13. A modified elastance model to control mock ventricles in real-time: numerical and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Colacino, Francesco Maria; Moscato, Francesco; Piedimonte, Fabio; Danieli, Guido; Nicosia, Salvatore; Arabia, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an elastance-based mock ventricle able to reproduce the correct ventricular pressure-volume relationship and its correct interaction with the hydraulic circuit connected to it. A real-time control of the mock ventricle was obtained by a new left ventricular mathematical model including resistive and inductive terms added to the classical Suga-Sagawa elastance model throughout the whole cardiac cycle. A valved piston pump was used to mimic the left ventricle. The pressure measured into the pump chamber was fed back into the mathematical model and the calculated reference left ventricular volume was used to drive the piston. Results show that the classical model is very sensitive to pressure disturbances, especially during the filling phase, while the modified model is able to filter out the oscillations thus eliminating their detrimental effects. The presented model is thus suitable to control mock ventricles in real-time, where sudden pressure disturbances represent a key issue and are not negligible. This real-time controlled mock ventricle is able to reproduce the elastance mechanism of a natural ventricle by mimicking its preload (mean atrial pressure) and afterload (mean aortic pressure) sensitivity, i.e., the Starling law. Therefore, it can be used for designing and testing cardiovascular prostheses due to its capability to reproduce the correct ventricle-vascular system interaction.

  14. Reactive Recruitment of Attentional Control in Math Anxiety: An ERP Study of Numeric Conflict Monitoring and Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Pellicioni, Macarena; Núñez-Peña, María Isabel; Colomé, Àngels

    2014-01-01

    This study uses event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to investigate the electrophysiological correlates of numeric conflict monitoring in math-anxious individuals, by analyzing whether math anxiety is related to abnormal processing in early conflict detection (as shown by the N450 component) and/or in a later, response-related stage of processing (as shown by the conflict sustained potential; Conflict-SP). Conflict adaptation effects were also studied by analyzing the effect of the previous trial’s congruence in current interference. To this end, 17 low math-anxious (LMA) and 17 high math-anxious (HMA) individuals were presented with a numerical Stroop task. Groups were extreme in math anxiety but did not differ in trait or state anxiety or in simple math ability. The interference effect of the current trial (incongruent-congruent) and the interference effect preceded by congruence and by incongruity were analyzed both for behavioral measures and for ERPs. A greater interference effect was found for response times in the HMA group than in the LMA one. Regarding ERPs, the LMA group showed a greater N450 component for the interference effect preceded by congruence than when preceded by incongruity, while the HMA group showed greater Conflict-SP amplitude for the interference effect preceded by congruence than when preceded by incongruity. Our study showed that the electrophysiological correlates of numeric interference in HMA individuals comprise the absence of a conflict adaptation effect in the first stage of conflict processing (N450) and an abnormal subsequent up-regulation of cognitive control in order to overcome the conflict (Conflict-SP). More concretely, our study shows that math anxiety is related to a reactive and compensatory recruitment of control resources that is implemented only when previously exposed to a stimuli presenting conflicting information. PMID:24918584

  15. Controls on and effects of armoring and vertical sorting in aeolian dune fields: A numerical simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Narteau, Clément; Rozier, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    Unlike ripples, there are only few numerical studies on grain size segregation at the scale of dunes in aeolian environments. Here we use a cellular automaton model to analyze vertical sorting in granular mixtures under steady unidirectional flow conditions. We investigate the feedbacks between dune growth and the segregation mechanisms by varying the size of coarse grains and their proportion within the bed. We systematically observe the development of a horizontal layer of coarse grains at the top of which sorted bed forms may grow by amalgamation. The formation of such an armor layer controls the overall sediment transport and availability. The emergence of dunes and the transition from barchan to transverse dune fields depend only on the grain size distribution of the initial sediment layer. As confirmed by observation, this result indicates that armor layers should be present in most arid deserts, where they are likely to control dune morphodynamics.

  16. Multiple-source multiple-harmonic active vibration control of variable section cylindrical structures: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxin; Chen, Xuefeng; Gao, Jiawei; Zhang, Xingwu

    2016-12-01

    Air vehicles, space vehicles and underwater vehicles, the cabins of which can be viewed as variable section cylindrical structures, have multiple rotational vibration sources (e.g., engines, propellers, compressors and motors), making the spectrum of noise multiple-harmonic. The suppression of such noise has been a focus of interests in the field of active vibration control (AVC). In this paper, a multiple-source multiple-harmonic (MSMH) active vibration suppression algorithm with feed-forward structure is proposed based on reference amplitude rectification and conjugate gradient method (CGM). An AVC simulation scheme called finite element model in-loop simulation (FEMILS) is also proposed for rapid algorithm verification. Numerical studies of AVC are conducted on a variable section cylindrical structure based on the proposed MSMH algorithm and FEMILS scheme. It can be seen from the numerical studies that: (1) the proposed MSMH algorithm can individually suppress each component of the multiple-harmonic noise with an unified and improved convergence rate; (2) the FEMILS scheme is convenient and straightforward for multiple-source simulations with an acceptable loop time. Moreover, the simulations have similar procedure to real-life control and can be easily extended to physical model platform.

  17. Alternating irrigation water quality as a method to control solute concentrations and mass fluxes below irrigated fields: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, David

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present numerical study was to extend the data-driven protocol for the control of soil salinity, to control chloride and nitrate concentrations and mass fluxes below agricultural fields irrigated with treated waste water (TWW). The protocol is based on alternating irrigation water quality between TWW and desalinized water (DSW), guided by solute concentrations at soil depth, zs. Two different schemes, the first requires measurements of soil solution concentrations of chloride and nitrate at zs, while, the second scheme requires only measurements of soil solution EC at zs, were investigated. For this purpose, 3-D numerical simulations of flow and transport were performed for variably saturated, spatially heterogeneous, flow domains located at two different field sites. The sites differ in crop type, irrigation method, and in their lithology; these differences, in turn, considerably affect the performance of the proposed schemes, expressed in terms of their ability to reduce solute concentrations that drained below the root zone. Results of the analyses suggest that the proposed data-driven schemes allow the use of low-quality water for irrigation, while minimizing the consumption of high-quality water to a level, which, for given climate, soil, crop, irrigation method, and water quality, may be determined by the allowable nitrate and chloride concentrations in the groundwater. The results of the present study indicate that with respect to the diminution of groundwater contamination by chloride and nitrate, the more data demanding, first scheme is superior the second scheme.

  18. Diastolic Calcium Release Controls the Beating Rate of Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Cells: Numerical Modeling of the Coupling Process

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Vinogradova, Tatiana M.; Bogdanov, Konstantin Y.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Stern, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies employing Ca2+ indicators and confocal microscopy demonstrate substantial local Ca2+ release beneath the cell plasma membrane (subspace) of sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) occurring during diastolic depolarization. Pharmacological and biophysical experiments have suggested that the released Ca2+ interacts with the plasma membrane via the ion current (INaCa) produced by the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and constitutes an important determinant of the pacemaker rate. This study provides a numerical validation of the functional importance of diastolic Ca2+ release for rate control. The subspace Ca2+ signals in rabbit SANCs were measured by laser confocal microscopy, averaged, and calibrated. The time course of the subspace [Ca2+] displayed both diastolic and systolic components. The diastolic component was mainly due to the local Ca2+ releases; it was numerically approximated and incorporated into a SANC cellular electrophysiology model. The model predicts that the diastolic Ca2+ release strongly interacts with plasma membrane via INaCa and thus controls the phase of the action potential upstroke and ultimately the final action potential rate. PMID:15041695

  19. On the control of propagating acoustic waves in sonic crystals: analytical, numerical and optimization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, D. Vincent Romero

    The control of the acoustical properties of the sonic crystals (SC) needs the study of both the distribution of the scatterers in the structure and the intrinsic acoustical properties of the scatterers. In this work an exhaustive analysis of the distribution of the scatterers as well as the improvement of the acoustical properties of the SC made of scatterers with absorbent and/or resonant properties is presented. Both procedures, working together or independently, provide real possibilities to control the propagation of acoustic waves through SC. From the theoretical point of view, the wave propagation through periodic and quasiperiodic structures has been analysed by means of the multiple scattering theory, the plane wave expansion and the finite elements method. A novel extension of the plane wave expansion allowing the complex relation dispersion for SC is presented in this work. This technique complements the provided information using the classical methods and it allows us to analyse the evanescent behaviour of the modes inside of the band gaps as well as the evanescent behaviour of localized modes around the point defects in SC. The necessity of accurate measurements of the acoustical properties of the SC has motivated the development of a novel three-dimensional acquisition system that synchronises the motion of the receiver and acquisition of the temporal signals. A good agreement between the theoretical and experimental data is shown in this work. The joint work between the optimized structures of scatterers and the intrinsic properties of the scatterers themselves is applied to generate devices that present wide ranges of attenuated frequencies. These systems are presented as an alternative to the classic acoustic barrier where the propagation of waves through SC can be controlled. The results help to correctly understand the behaviour of SC for the localization of sound and for the design of both wave guides and acoustic filters.

  20. Numerical studies on surrounding rock deformation controlled by pressure relief groove in deep roadway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaoke; Ren, Jianxi; Zhang, Kun; Chen, Shaojie

    2017-05-01

    After entering deep mining, the roadway is in a high stress state, the deformation of surrounding rock becomes larger, and the roadway floor is particularly significant under unsupported state, which brings great difficulty to the safe production and support of the coal mine. Pressure relief method can change the stress field of surrounding rocks so that the surrounding rock can be in stress-reducing area. The present paper studied the deformation law of the roadway and the changes in the stress state and plastic zone of the surrounding rocks around the roadway before and after the excavation of pressure relief groove on the bottom floor of the high-stress roadway by using FLAC under the engineering background of one mine in Binchang, analyzed the influence of different groove depths and widths on the floor heave, convergence on both sides and roof subsidence. The simulation results show that: after the roadway floor was grooved in the high stress roadway, a larger stress-relaxed area will be formed near the roadway floor, the stress will be transferred to the deep roadway floor, and the pressure relief groove plays a better control effect on the deformation of the high-stress roadway. With the increase of the width and depth of the pressure relief groove, the convergence of the top and bottom of the roadway will be decreased accordingly, but the effect is not significant, while its influence on the convergence on both sides is relatively significant. After applying the simulation results to the engineering practice, the practice shows that: the combined support of anchor rod, anchor rope plus pressure relief groove can control the deformation of the roadway well and the conclusion obtained can provide some reference values for the study and design of the grooving pressure relief control technology.

  1. Numerical assessment of efficiency and control stability of an HTS synchronous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Wei; Yuan, Weijia; Coombs, T. A.

    2010-06-01

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is designed and developed in Cambridge University. It is expected to become cost competitive with the conventional PMSM owing to its high efficiency, high power density, high torque density, etc. The structure and parameters of HTS PMSM are detailed. Both AC losses by transport current and applied filed in stator armature winding of HTS PMSM are also analyzed. Computed and simulated results of the characteristics of the HTS PMSM and conventional PMSM are compared. The improvement on stability of direct torque control (DTC) on the HTS PMSM is estimated, and proved by simulation on Matlab/Simulink.

  2. Controlling fine-grain non-numeric parallelism on a combinator-based multiprocessor system

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Pong Ping.

    1989-01-01

    The author has developed a scheme to extend the SASL programming language and its run-time system for fine grain parallel processing. The proposed scheme provides a mechanism that can override the original lazy semantics by augmenting proper eager information. This information is first annotated in SASL programs and then translated to the combinator control tags by a new set of optimization rules. The effectiveness of this scheme has been evaluated through the simulation of a set of symbolic-oriented programs on an idealized shared-memory system. The results show that a considerable amount of parallelism can be extracted from a wide variety of application programs.

  3. A numerical and experimental investigation of crystalline silica exposure control during tuck pointing.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, William; Bennett, James

    2006-07-01

    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health researchers investigated control measures for the removal of mortar between bricks, using a grinder. This task, "tuck pointing," is associated with crystalline silica exposures many times greater than the permissible exposure limit enforced by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Previous studies showed that local exhaust ventilation (LEV) of the grinding wheel through a shroud was often ineffective. Tuck pointing occurs on a scaffold. For practical purposes, this limits the size and power of the LEV system. Thus, the goal of this study was to develop a recommended flow rate for exposure control. Flow induced by the rotating grinding wheel, flow induced by the mortar particle stream, and particle momentum are potential control challenges. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation of the grinder, supported by some experimental measurements, showed the relative importance of these factors through varying parameters and tracking particles. In a simulation of the shroud and grinding wheel, with the wheel inserted to a cutting depth of 0.750 inch flush into the brick wall, -0.461 cubic feet per meter (0.461 into the exhaust takeoff) was induced by the rotating wheel. The more realistic situation of the wheel in a cut in the wall 1.25 inches deep (forming a trench circumferentially 0.500 inch below the wheel edge) induced an airflow of 8.24 cfm out of the shroud exhaust. Experimental measurements taken for validation were 7.3% lower than the CFD value. The trench effect disappeared when a stream of 10-mu m particles was launched from the grinding wheel edge, as the simulations with and without the trench had nearly identical induced flow rates, 10.8 cfm and 10.9 cfm. We thus interpreted the particle stream as more important than the wheel in inducing flow. This insight was possible because of the power of CFD, compared to intuition and classical boundary layer analysis. In this situation of no forced

  4. Experimental and numerical evaluations on palm microwave heating for Red Palm Weevil pest control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Rita; Panariello, Gaetano; Pinchera, Daniele; Schettino, Fulvio; Caprio, Emilio; Griffo, Raffaele; Migliore, Marco Donald

    2017-03-01

    The invasive Red Palm Weevil is the major pest of palms. Several control methods have been applied, however concern is raised regarding the treatments that can cause significant environmental pollution. In this context the use of microwaves is particularly attractive. Microwave heating applications are increasingly proposed in the management of a wide range of agricultural and wood pests, exploiting the thermal death induced in the insects that have a thermal tolerance lower than that of the host matrices. This paper describes research aiming to combat the Red Palm pest using microwave heating systems. An electromagnetic-thermal model was developed to better control the temperature profile inside the palm tissues. In this process both electromagnetic and thermal parameters are involved, the latter being particularly critical depending on plant physiology. Their evaluation was carried out by fitting experimental data and the thermal model with few free parameters. The results obtained by the simplified model well match with both that of a commercial software 3D model and measurements on treated Phoenix canariensis palms with a ring microwave applicator. This work confirms that microwave heating is a promising, eco-compatible solution to fight the spread of weevil.

  5. Experimental and numerical evaluations on palm microwave heating for Red Palm Weevil pest control

    PubMed Central

    Massa, Rita; Panariello, Gaetano; Pinchera, Daniele; Schettino, Fulvio; Caprio, Emilio; Griffo, Raffaele; Migliore, Marco Donald

    2017-01-01

    The invasive Red Palm Weevil is the major pest of palms. Several control methods have been applied, however concern is raised regarding the treatments that can cause significant environmental pollution. In this context the use of microwaves is particularly attractive. Microwave heating applications are increasingly proposed in the management of a wide range of agricultural and wood pests, exploiting the thermal death induced in the insects that have a thermal tolerance lower than that of the host matrices. This paper describes research aiming to combat the Red Palm pest using microwave heating systems. An electromagnetic-thermal model was developed to better control the temperature profile inside the palm tissues. In this process both electromagnetic and thermal parameters are involved, the latter being particularly critical depending on plant physiology. Their evaluation was carried out by fitting experimental data and the thermal model with few free parameters. The results obtained by the simplified model well match with both that of a commercial software 3D model and measurements on treated Phoenix canariensis palms with a ring microwave applicator. This work confirms that microwave heating is a promising, eco-compatible solution to fight the spread of weevil. PMID:28361964

  6. A biochemical network can control formation of a synthetic material by sensing numerous specific stimuli.

    PubMed

    Hun Yeon, Ju; Chan, Karen Y T; Wong, Ting-Chia; Chan, Kelvin; Sutherland, Michael R; Ismagilov, Rustem F; Pryzdial, Edward L G; Kastrup, Christian J

    2015-05-15

    Developing bio-compatible smart materials that assemble in response to environmental cues requires strategies that can discriminate multiple specific stimuli in a complex milieu. Synthetic materials have yet to achieve this level of sensitivity, which would emulate the highly evolved and tailored reaction networks of complex biological systems. Here we show that the output of a naturally occurring network can be replaced with a synthetic material. Exploiting the blood coagulation system as an exquisite biological sensor, the fibrin clot end-product was replaced with a synthetic material under the biological control of a precisely regulated cross-linking enzyme. The functions of the coagulation network remained intact when the material was incorporated. Clot-like polymerization was induced in indirect response to distinct small molecules, phospholipids, enzymes, cells, viruses, an inorganic solid, a polyphenol, a polysaccharide, and a membrane protein. This strategy demonstrates for the first time that an existing stimulus-responsive biological network can be used to control the formation of a synthetic material by diverse classes of physiological triggers.

  7. A biochemical network can control formation of a synthetic material by sensing numerous specific stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Hun Yeon, Ju; Chan, Karen Y. T.; Wong, Ting-Chia; Chan, Kelvin; Sutherland, Michael R.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Pryzdial, Edward L. G.; Kastrup, Christian J.

    2015-01-01

    Developing bio-compatible smart materials that assemble in response to environmental cues requires strategies that can discriminate multiple specific stimuli in a complex milieu. Synthetic materials have yet to achieve this level of sensitivity, which would emulate the highly evolved and tailored reaction networks of complex biological systems. Here we show that the output of a naturally occurring network can be replaced with a synthetic material. Exploiting the blood coagulation system as an exquisite biological sensor, the fibrin clot end-product was replaced with a synthetic material under the biological control of a precisely regulated cross-linking enzyme. The functions of the coagulation network remained intact when the material was incorporated. Clot-like polymerization was induced in indirect response to distinct small molecules, phospholipids, enzymes, cells, viruses, an inorganic solid, a polyphenol, a polysaccharide, and a membrane protein. This strategy demonstrates for the first time that an existing stimulus-responsive biological network can be used to control the formation of a synthetic material by diverse classes of physiological triggers. PMID:25975772

  8. A biochemical network can control formation of a synthetic material by sensing numerous specific stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hun Yeon, Ju; Chan, Karen Y. T.; Wong, Ting-Chia; Chan, Kelvin; Sutherland, Michael R.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Pryzdial, Edward L. G.; Kastrup, Christian J.

    2015-05-01

    Developing bio-compatible smart materials that assemble in response to environmental cues requires strategies that can discriminate multiple specific stimuli in a complex milieu. Synthetic materials have yet to achieve this level of sensitivity, which would emulate the highly evolved and tailored reaction networks of complex biological systems. Here we show that the output of a naturally occurring network can be replaced with a synthetic material. Exploiting the blood coagulation system as an exquisite biological sensor, the fibrin clot end-product was replaced with a synthetic material under the biological control of a precisely regulated cross-linking enzyme. The functions of the coagulation network remained intact when the material was incorporated. Clot-like polymerization was induced in indirect response to distinct small molecules, phospholipids, enzymes, cells, viruses, an inorganic solid, a polyphenol, a polysaccharide, and a membrane protein. This strategy demonstrates for the first time that an existing stimulus-responsive biological network can be used to control the formation of a synthetic material by diverse classes of physiological triggers.

  9. Model reduction for the dynamics and control of large structural systems via neutral network processing direct numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becus, Georges A.; Chan, Alistair K.

    1993-01-01

    Three neural network processing approaches in a direct numerical optimization model reduction scheme are proposed and investigated. Large structural systems, such as large space structures, offer new challenges to both structural dynamicists and control engineers. One such challenge is that of dimensionality. Indeed these distributed parameter systems can be modeled either by infinite dimensional mathematical models (typically partial differential equations) or by high dimensional discrete models (typically finite element models) often exhibiting thousands of vibrational modes usually closely spaced and with little, if any, damping. Clearly, some form of model reduction is in order, especially for the control engineer who can actively control but a few of the modes using system identification based on a limited number of sensors. Inasmuch as the amount of 'control spillover' (in which the control inputs excite the neglected dynamics) and/or 'observation spillover' (where neglected dynamics affect system identification) is to a large extent determined by the choice of particular reduced model (RM), the way in which this model reduction is carried out is often critical.

  10. Numerical investigations of turbulent flow past a rectangular cylinder with active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Sanh B.

    The objective of the present research was to investigate the effects of rotating circular cylinders to control high intensity wind load. This research used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simulate high Reynolds number gust-like wind load condition for a transient duration of 12 seconds across a three-dimensional rectangular cylinder with dimension of 240x15x7 meters and aspect ratio (Breadth/Height) of 2.3. An array of 20 circular cylinders was positioned along the leading edges of the rectangular bridge cylinder. The research analyzed turbulent flow characteristics across the top and bottom deck surfaces and the development of wake region during two cases: 1) stationary cylinders and 2) rotated cylinders at 400 RPM or velocity ratio of lambda = 1.33. The Strouhal number flow characteristics of 0.08 and 0.17 for aspect ratio of 2 to 3 analyzed in this study were found to be in agreements with published literature.

  11. Numerical simulation of volume-controlled mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Zhang, Bolun; Cai, Maolin; Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2016-11-09

    Mechanical ventilation is a key therapy for patients who cannot breathe adequately by themselves, and dynamics of mechanical ventilation system is of great significance for life support of patients. Recently, models of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 1 lung are used to simulate the respiratory system of patients. However, humans have 2 lungs. When the respiratory characteristics of 2 lungs are different, a single-lung model cannot reflect real respiratory system. In this paper, to illustrate dynamic characteristics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs, we propose a mathematical model of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs and conduct experiments to verify the model. Furthermore, we study the dynamics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs. This research study can be used for improving the efficiency and safety of volume-controlled mechanical ventilation system.

  12. What controls the speed of rip currents? Comparing field observations, numerical simulations, and a parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, M.; Elgar, S.; Raubenheimer, B.; Warner, J. C.

    2016-02-01

    Wave breaking on alongshore non-uniform beaches can drive rip currents near bathymetric depressions. Understanding the controls on the speed of these offshore-directed flows is important for improving predictions of beach hazards, the transport of pollutants and larvae, and morphological evolution. To investigate the response of nearshore flows to non-uniform bathymetry, five channels (on average 30-m wide and 2-m deep) were dredged across the surf zone on the Outer Banks of NC at different times using the propellers of a landing craft, and the subsequent evolution of waves, currents, and morphology was observed for a range of incident wave conditions. In addition, flows are simulated with the COAWST modeling system for the observed incident waves and rip channel bathymetry, and for an extended range of wave conditions and rip channel geometries. A parameter for the maximum offshore-directed flow speed in the surf zone is derived using depth-averaged momentum balances and continuity. The most important terms controlling the offshore-directed flow (rip current) speed are the incident wave height and angle, the water depths in the channel and on the sandbar crest or the terrace through which the channel is incised, and the ratio of wave height to water depth at breaking. The parameter accounts for several wave-breaking regimes, and includes the effect of the suppression of cross-shore flows by the inertia of breaking-wave driven alongshore currents. The parameter has skill predicting the observed and simulated offshore-directed flow speed. Supported by ASDR&E, NDSEG, ONR, and NSF.

  13. A study of numerical methods of solution of the equations of motion of a controlled satellite under the influence of gravity gradient torque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. F.; Mcwhorter, J. C.; Siddiqi, S. A.; Shanks, S. P.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical methods of integration of the equations of motion of a controlled satellite under the influence of gravity-gradient torque are considered. The results of computer experimentation using a number of Runge-Kutta, multi-step, and extrapolation methods for the numerical integration of this differential system are presented, and particularly efficient methods are noted. A large bibliography of numerical methods for initial value problems for ordinary differential equations is presented, and a compilation of Runge-Kutta and multistep formulas is given. Less common numerical integration techniques from the literature are noted for further consideration.

  14. Numerical constraints and feedback control of double-strand breaks in mouse meiosis.

    PubMed

    Kauppi, Liisa; Barchi, Marco; Lange, Julian; Baudat, Frédéric; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott

    2013-04-15

    Different organisms display widely different numbers of the programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination (e.g., hundreds per meiocyte in mice and humans vs. dozens in nematodes), but little is known about what drives these species-specific DSB set points or the regulatory pathways that control them. Here we examine male mice with a lowered dosage of SPO11, the meiotic DSB catalyst, to gain insight into the effect of reduced DSB numbers on mammalian chromosome dynamics. An approximately twofold DSB reduction was associated with the reduced ability of homologs to synapse along their lengths, provoking prophase arrest and, ultimately, sterility. In many spermatocytes, chromosome subsets displayed a mix of synaptic failure and synapsis with both homologous and nonhomologous partners ("chromosome tangles"). The X chromosome was nearly always involved in tangles, and small autosomes were involved more often than large ones. We conclude that homolog pairing requirements dictate DSB set points during meiosis. Importantly, our results reveal that karyotype is a key factor: Smaller autosomes and heteromorphic sex chromosomes become weak links when DSBs are reduced below a critical threshold. Unexpectedly, unsynapsed chromosome segments trapped in tangles displayed an elevated density of DSB markers later in meiotic prophase. The unsynapsed portion of the X chromosome in wild-type males also showed evidence that DSB numbers increased as prophase progressed. These findings point to the existence of a feedback mechanism that links DSB number and distribution with interhomolog interactions.

  15. Thrust initiation and its control on tectonic wedge geometry: An insight from physical and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Santanu; Mandal, Nibir; Saha, Puspendu; Sarkar, Shamik; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2014-10-01

    We performed a series of sandbox experiments to investigate the initiation of thrust ramping in tectonic wedges on a mechanically continuous basal decollement. The experiments show that the decollement slope (β) is the key factor in controlling the location of thrust initiation with respect to the backstop (i.e. tectonic suture line). For β = 0, the ramping begins right at the backstop, followed by sequential thrusting in the frontal direction, leading to a typical mono-vergent wedge. In contrast, the ramp initiates away from the backstop as β > 0. Under this boundary condition an event of sequential back thrusting takes place prior to the onset of frontal thrust progression. These two-coupled processes eventually give rise to a bi-vergent geometry of the thrust wedge. Using the Drucker-Prager failure criterion in finite element (FE) models, we show the location of stress intensification to render a mechanical basis for the thrust initiation away from the backstop if β > 0. Our physical and FE model results explain why the Main Central Thrust (MCT) is located far away from the Indo-Tibetan plate contact (ITSZ) in the Himalayan fold-and-thrust belts.

  16. Numerical analysis of the primary processes controlling oxygen dynamics on the Louisiana Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Fennel, K.; Laurent, A.; Murrell, M. C.; Lehrter, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    The Louisiana shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico receives large amounts of freshwater and nutrients from the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River system. These river inputs contribute to widespread bottom-water hypoxia every summer. In this study, we use a physical-biogeochemical model that explicitly simulates oxygen sources and sinks on the Louisiana shelf to identify the key mechanisms controlling hypoxia development. First, we validate the model simulation against observed dissolved oxygen concentrations, primary production, water column respiration, and sediment oxygen consumption. In the model simulation, heterotrophy is prevalent in shelf waters throughout the year except near the mouths of the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers where primary production exceeds respiratory oxygen consumption during June and July. During this time, efflux of oxygen to the atmosphere, driven by photosynthesis and surface warming, becomes a significant oxygen sink while the well-developed pycnocline isolates autotrophic surface waters from the heterotrophic and hypoxic waters below. A substantial fraction of primary production occurs below the pycnocline in summer. We investigate whether this primary production below the pycnocline is mitigating the development of hypoxic conditions with the help of a sensitivity experiment where we disable biological processes in the water column (i.e. primary production and water column respiration). In this experiment below-pycnocline primary production reduces the spatial extent of hypoxic bottom waters only slightly. Our results suggest that the combination of physical processes and sediment oxygen consumption largely determine the spatial extent and dynamics of hypoxia on the Louisiana shelf.

  17. Numerical analysis of the primary processes controlling oxygen dynamics on the Louisiana shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Fennel, K.; Laurent, A.; Murrell, M. C.; Lehrter, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    The Louisiana shelf, in the northern Gulf of Mexico, receives large amounts of freshwater and nutrients from the Mississippi-Atchafalaya river system. These river inputs contribute to widespread bottom-water hypoxia every summer. In this study, we use a physical-biogeochemical model that explicitly simulates oxygen sources and sinks on the Louisiana shelf to identify the key mechanisms controlling hypoxia development. First, we validate the model simulation against observed dissolved oxygen concentrations, primary production, water column respiration, and sediment oxygen consumption. In the model simulation, heterotrophy is prevalent in shelf waters throughout the year, except near the mouths of the Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers, where primary production exceeds respiratory oxygen consumption during June and July. During this time, efflux of oxygen to the atmosphere, driven by photosynthesis and surface warming, becomes a significant oxygen sink. A substantial fraction of primary production occurs below the pycnocline in summer. We investigate whether this primary production below the pycnocline is mitigating the development of hypoxic conditions with the help of a sensitivity experiment where we disable biological processes in the water column (i.e., primary production and water column respiration). With this experiment we show that below-pycnocline primary production reduces the spatial extent of hypoxic bottom waters only slightly. Our results suggest that the combination of physical processes (advection and vertical diffusion) and sediment oxygen consumption largely determine the spatial extent and dynamics of hypoxia on the Louisiana shelf.

  18. Identification of the origin of odour episodes through social participation, chemical control and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, E.; Soriano, C.; Roca, F. X.; Perales, J. F.; Alarcón, M.; Guardino, X.

    Odour episodes and environmental air quality are topics of worldwide concern, mainly due to the fact that industrial facilities are often located very close to inhabited areas. Several atmospheric pollutants, mainly volatile organic compounds (VOCs), are responsible for odour episodes of varying degrees of annoyance. A methodology based on the simultaneous application of social participation (by building databases of odour episodes and acquiring air samples), chemical control and the computation of back trajectories allows us to identify the origin of odour episodes. A validated analytical method, based on thermal desorption (TD) coupled with gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry (MS), is used to identify and determine a wide range of VOCs that cause odour nuisance and affect air quality in outdoor air. Back-trajectory modelling is used to track the origin of the air mass responsible for the discomfort backwards in time, mainly to find possible VOC sources outside the urban area. The procedure combines, on one hand, an analytical approach based on the acquisition of samples, which requires the participation of the affected population (which means that social participation is used as a scientific tool), and on the other hand, a modelling approach. Three examples are described to illustrate the methodology.

  19. Numerical Simulations of Flow Separation Control in Low-Pressure Turbines using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzen, Y. B.; Huang, P. G.; Ashpis, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    A recently introduced phenomenological model to simulate flow control applications using plasma actuators has been further developed and improved in order to expand its use to complicated actuator geometries. The new modeling approach eliminates the requirement of an empirical charge density distribution shape by using the embedded electrode as a source for the charge density. The resulting model is validated against a flat plate experiment with quiescent environment. The modeling approach incorporates the effect of the plasma actuators on the external flow into Navier Stokes computations as a body force vector which is obtained as a product of the net charge density and the electric field. The model solves the Maxwell equation to obtain the electric field due to the applied AC voltage at the electrodes and an additional equation for the charge density distribution representing the plasma density. The new modeling approach solves the charge density equation in the computational domain assuming the embedded electrode as a source therefore automatically generating a charge density distribution on the surface exposed to the flow similar to that observed in the experiments without explicitly specifying an empirical distribution. The model is validated against a flat plate experiment with quiescent environment.

  20. A combined experimental and numerical approach for the control and monitoring of the SPES target during operation at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballan, Michele; Manzolaro, Mattia; Meneghetti, Giovanni; Andrighetto, Alberto; Monetti, Alberto; Bisoffi, Giovanni; Prete, Gianfranco

    2016-06-01

    The SPES project at INFN-LNL aims at the production of neutron-rich Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) using the ISOL (Isotope Separation On Line) technique. A 40 MeV 200 μA proton beam will directly impinge a uranium carbide target, generating approximately 1013 fissions per second. The target system is installed under vacuum inside a water-cooled chamber, and have to maintain high working temperatures, close to 2000 °C. During operation the proton beam provides the heating power required to keep the target at the desired temperature level. As a consequence, its characteristics have to be strictly controlled in order to avoid undesired overheating. According to the original design of the control system, the proton beam can be suddenly interrupted in case of out of range vacuum or cooling water flow levels. With the aim to improve the reliability of the control system a set of temperature sensors has been installed close to the target. Their types and installation positions were defined taking into consideration the detailed information coming from a dedicated thermal-electric model that allowed to investigate the most critical and inaccessible target hot-spots. This work is focused on the definition and experimental validation of the aforementioned numerical model. Its results were used to appropriately install two type C thermocouples, a PT100 thermo-resistance and a residual primary beam current detector. In addition the numerical model will be used for the definition of appropriate thresholds for each installed temperature sensor, since it allows to define a relationship between the locally measured values with the overall calculated temperature field. In case of over temperatures the monitoring system will send warning signals or in case interrupt the proton beam.

  1. Numerical simulation of isotope fractionation in steady-state bioreactive transport controlled by transverse mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Dominik; Rolle, Massimo; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2012-10-01

    Compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) has increasingly been used as a tool to assess intrinsic biodegradation at contaminated field sites. Typically, the Rayleigh equation is used to estimate the extent of biodegradation from measured isotope ratios of the contaminant. However, if the rate-limiting step in overall degradation is not the microbial reaction itself, the Rayleigh equation may no more be applicable. In this study we simulate biodegradation of continuously emitted petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater systems. These contaminants are effectively degraded at the plume fringe where transverse dispersion makes them mix with dissolved electron acceptors present in the ambient groundwater. We simulate reactive transport to study the coupled effects of transverse mixing and biodegradation on the spatial patterns of carbon isotope signatures and their interpretation based on depth-integrated sampling which represents the most common setup in the assessment of contaminated sites. We present scenarios mimicking a hydraulically uniform laboratory experiment and a field-scale application considering heterogeneous conductivity fields. We compare cases in which isotopologue-specific transverse dispersion is considered to those where this additional fractionation process is neglected. We show that these effects cause significant shifts in the isotopic signals and may lead to overestimation of biodegradation. Moreover, our results provide evidence that the rate-limiting effect of transverse mixing on the overall degradation spatially varies along the length of a steady-state contaminant plume. The control of biodegradation by transverse dispersion and the fractionating effect of dispersion modulate the fractionation caused by the microbial reaction alone. As a consequence, significantly nonlinear isotopic patterns are observed in a Rayleigh plot. Simulations in heterogeneous flow domains show that these effects persist at larger field scales and are sensitive

  2. Numerical Analysis of Synthetic Jet Flow Control on a Vertical Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jeff

    Airflow over a stabilizer-rudder assembly is simulated on an unstructured grid using a stream-line upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) weighted residual finite element formulation of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These studies seek to determine the effectiveness of synthetic jet flow control in increasing side force over the vertical tail. The two models under investigation are the Beta model, with 12 jets aligned along the span of the stabilizer, and a Beta model scaled up by a factor of 1.969, with 24 jets aligned along the span of the stabilizer. These two models have Reynolds numbers of 3.6x10 5 and 7.1x105, respectively, where both are based on the mean aerodynamic chord. The flow solver, Phasta, is used to run these simulations. URANS simulations on the Beta model with a 5° sideslip angle and 20° rudder deflection angle show that unsteady blowing with a blowing ratio of 1.0 increases the total side force coefficient by 14% with respect to the baseline. The Cp data obtained as a function of percent chord showed improvement in Cp from unsteady blowing in the outboard region, but negligible change in the inboard region. This data is in agreement with experimental values. Speed isosurface data was obtained for the Beta model with a 0° sideslip angle and 30° rudder deflection angle, with steady blowing. It was found that these isosurfaces create ridges and valleys along the span, suggesting interference between the jets. The same result was found for the scaled-up Beta model with a 0° sideslip angle and 30° rudder deflection angle, with steady blowing.

  3. Numerical analysis of the hydrogeologic controls in a layered coastal aquifer system, Oahu, Hawaii, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oki, Delwyn S.; Souza, William R.; Bolke, Edward L.; Bauer, Glenn R.

    The coastal aquifer system of southern Oahu, Hawaii, USA, consists of highly permeable volcanic aquifers overlain by weathered volcanic rocks and interbedded marine and terrestrial sediments of both high and low permeability. The weathered volcanic rocks and sediments are collectively known as caprock, because they impede the free discharge of groundwater from the underlying volcanic aquifers. A cross-sectional groundwater flow and transport model was used to evaluate the hydrogeologic controls on the regional flow system in southwestern Oahu. Controls considered were: (a) overall caprock hydraulic conductivity; and (b) stratigraphic variations of hydraulic conductivity in the caprock. Within the caprock, variations in hydraulic conductivity, caused by stratigraphy or discontinuities of the stratigraphic units, are a major control on the direction of groundwater flow and the distribution of water levels and salinity. Results of cross-sectional modeling confirm the general groundwater flow pattern that would be expected in a layered coastal system. Groundwater flow is: (a) predominantly upward in the low-permeability sedimentary units; and (b) predominantly horizontal in the high-permeability sedimentary units. Résumé Le système aquifère littoral du sud d'Oahu (Hawaii, États-Unis) est constitué par des aquifères de terrains volcaniques très perméables, recouverts par des roches volcaniques altérées, et interstratifiés avec des sédiments marins et continentaux de perméabilité aussi bien forte que faible. Les roches volcaniques altérées et les sédiments sont globalement considérés comme une couverture, parce qu'ils s'opposent à l'écoulement de l'eau souterraine provenant des aquifères volcaniques sous-jacents. Les contrôles hydrogéologiques sur le système aquifère régional du sud-ouest d'Oahu ont étéévaluées au moyen d'un modèle d'écoulement et de transport sur une section transversale. Ces contrôles prennent en compte la conductivit

  4. A numerical study of the effect of geometry variation, turbulence models, and dissipation on the flow past control surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaussee, Denny S.

    1993-01-01

    The steady 3D viscous flow past the ONERA M6 wing and a slender delta wing-body with trailing edge control surfaces has been computed. A cell-centered finite-volume Navier-Stokes patched zonal method has been used for the numerical simulation. Both diagonalized and LUSGS schemes have been implemented. Besides the standard nonplanar zonal interfacing techniques, a new virtual zone capability has been employed. For code validation, the transonic flow past the ONERA M5 wing is calculated for angles-of-attack of 3.06 deg and 5.06 deg and compared with the available experiments. The wing-body computational results are compared with experimental data for both trailing-edge flaps deflected. The experimental flow conditions are M subinfinity = 0.4, a turbulent Reynolds number of 5.41 million based on a mean aerodynamic chord of 25.959 inches, adiabatic wall, and angles-of-attack varying from 0 deg to 23.85 deg. The computational results are presented for the 23.85 deg angle-of-attack case. The effects of the base flow due to a model sting, the varying second and fourth order numerical dissipation, and the turbulence model are all considered.

  5. The Numerical Study with Dynamic Mesh on the Pollution Control Effect of Operating Table Protected by Laminar Flow Screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Juli; Tian, Lu; Jia, Xudong

    2016-06-01

    Transmission of airborne bacteria is the main factor causing surgical site infection (SSI). Horizontal laminar flow screen is a kind of new clean equipment, which can prevent SSI effectively. Numerical simulation is conducted on the pollution control effect of operating table protected by horizontal laminar flow screen. A three-dimensional model is established, discrete phase model (DPM) is used for calculation. Numerical simulation is carried out to evaluate the particle trajectories with the Lagrange approach, and the dynamic mesh is used. Air movement in the case with and without people’s walking is analyzed. As a result, people’s walking would not affect the distribution of pollutants at the key area of the operating table, the vertex caused by the walking person does little influence on flow field of the whole operating room and the influence area is about 0.24m to 0.75m around the walking person. The protective effect of pollutants with horizontal laminar flow screen for the key areas of operating table is excellent. This work provides references for the study on the depuration of operating room or other occasion.

  6. Factors controlling the spatiotemporal variation of (137)Cs in seabed sediment off the Fukushima coast: implications from numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Misumi, Kazuhiro; Tsumune, Daisuke; Tsubono, Takaki; Tateda, Yutaka; Aoyama, Michio; Kobayashi, Takuya; Hirose, Katsumi

    2014-10-01

    We used numerical simulations to investigate major controls on spatiotemporal variations of (137)Cs activities in seabed sediments off the Fukushima coast during the first year after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The numerical model we used includes (137)Cs transfer between bottom water and sediment by adsorption and desorption, and radioactive decay. The model successfully reproduced major features of the observed spatiotemporal variations of (137)Cs activities in sediments. The spatial pattern of (137)Cs in sediments, which mainly reflected the history of (137)Cs activities in bottom water overlying the sediments and the sediment particle size distribution, became established during the first several months after the accident. The simulated temporal persistence of the (137)Cs activity in the sediments was due to adsorption of (137)Cs onto the sediment mineral fraction having a long desorption timescale of (137)Cs. The simulated total (137)Cs inventory in sediments integrated over the offshore area, where most of the monitoring stations were located, was on the order of 10(13) Bq; this value is consistent with a previous estimate based on observed data. Taking into account (137)Cs activities in sediments in both the coastal area and in the vicinity of the power plant, the simulated total inventory of (137)Cs in sediments off the Fukushima coast increased to a value on the order of 10(14) Bq.

  7. A new numerical strategy with space-time adaptivity and error control for multi-scale streamer discharge simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Max; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Massot, Marc; Bourdon, Anne; Descombes, Stéphane; Dumont, Thierry

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a new resolution strategy for multi-scale streamer discharge simulations based on a second order time adaptive integration and space adaptive multiresolution. A classical fluid model is used to describe plasma discharges, considering drift-diffusion equations and the computation of electric field. The proposed numerical method provides a time-space accuracy control of the solution, and thus, an effective accurate resolution independent of the fastest physical time scale. An important improvement of the computational efficiency is achieved whenever the required time steps go beyond standard stability constraints associated with mesh size or source time scales for the resolution of the drift-diffusion equations, whereas the stability constraint related to the dielectric relaxation time scale is respected but with a second order precision. Numerical illustrations show that the strategy can be efficiently applied to simulate the propagation of highly nonlinear ionizing waves as streamer discharges, as well as highly multi-scale nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, describing consistently a broad spectrum of space and time scales as well as different physical scenarios for consecutive discharge/post-discharge phases, out of reach of standard non-adaptive methods.

  8. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Effects of Flow Control Devices Upon Flat-Plate Film Cooling Performance.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hirokazu; Funazaki, Ken-Ichi; Nakata, Ryota; Takahashi, Daichi

    2014-06-01

    This study deals with the experimental and numerical studies of the effect of flow control devices (FCDs) on the film cooling performance of a circular cooling hole on a flat plate. Two types of FCDs with different heights are examined in this study, where each of them is mounted to the flat plate upstream of the cooling hole by changing its lateral position with respect to the hole centerline. In order to measure the film effectiveness as well as heat transfer downstream of the cooling hole with upstream FCD, a transient method using a high-resolution infrared camera is adopted. The velocity field downstream of the cooling hole is captured by 3D laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). Furthermore, the aerodynamic loss associated with the cooling hole with/without FCD is measured by a total pressure probe rake. The experiments are carried out at blowing ratios ranging from 0.5 to 1.0. In addition, numerical simulations are also made to have a better understanding of the flow field. LES approach is employed to solve the flow field and visualize the vortex structure around the cooling hole with FCD. When a taller FCD is mounted to the plate, the film effectiveness tends to increase due to the vortex structure generated by the FCD. As FCD is laterally shifted from the centerline, the film effectiveness increases, while the lift-off of cooling air is also promoted when FCD is put on the center line.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Self-Pressurization and Pressure Control by Thermodynamic Vent System in a Cryogenic Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Valenzuela, Juan; LeClair, Andre; Moder, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of a system-level test bed - the multipurpose hydrogen test bed (MHTB) using Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). MHTB is representative in size and shape of a fully integrated space transportation vehicle liquid hydrogen (LH2) propellant tank and was tested at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to generate data for cryogenic storage. GFSSP is a finite volume based network flow analysis software developed at MSFC and used for thermo-fluid analysis of propulsion systems. GFSSP has been used to model the self-pressurization and ullage pressure control by Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS). A TVS typically includes a Joule-Thompson (J-T) expansion device, a two-phase heat exchanger, and a mixing pump and spray to extract thermal energy from the tank without significant loss of liquid propellant. Two GFSSP models (Self-Pressurization & TVS) were separately developed and tested and then integrated to simulate the entire system. Self-Pressurization model consists of multiple ullage nodes, propellant node and solid nodes; it computes the heat transfer through Multi-Layer Insulation blankets and calculates heat and mass transfer between ullage and liquid propellant and ullage and tank wall. TVS model calculates the flow through J-T valve, heat exchanger and spray and vent systems. Two models are integrated by exchanging data through User Subroutines of both models. The integrated models results have been compared with MHTB test data of 50% fill level. Satisfactory comparison was observed between test and numerical predictions.

  10. A Numerically Subdominant CD8 T Cell Response to Matrix Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Controls Infection with Limited Immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Haddad, Elias K.; Marceau, Joshua; Morabito, Kaitlyn M.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Graham, Barney S.

    2016-01-01

    CD8 T cells are involved in pathogen clearance and infection-induced pathology in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Studying bulk responses masks the contribution of individual CD8 T cell subsets to protective immunity and immunopathology. In particular, the roles of subdominant responses that are potentially beneficial to the host are rarely appreciated when the focus is on magnitude instead of quality of response. Here, by evaluating CD8 T cell responses in CB6F1 hybrid mice, in which multiple epitopes are recognized, we found that a numerically subdominant CD8 T cell response against DbM187 epitope of the virus matrix protein expressed high avidity TCR and enhanced signaling pathways associated with CD8 T cell effector functions. Each DbM187 T effector cell lysed more infected targets on a per cell basis than the numerically dominant KdM282 T cells, and controlled virus replication more efficiently with less pulmonary inflammation and illness than the previously well-characterized KdM282 T cell response. Our data suggest that the clinical outcome of viral infections is determined by the integrated functional properties of a variety of responding CD8 T cells, and that the highest magnitude response may not necessarily be the best in terms of benefit to the host. Understanding how to induce highly efficient and functional T cells would inform strategies for designing vaccines intended to provide T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:26943673

  11. A numerical study of the effect of frequency of pulsed flow control applied to a rectangular cavity in supersonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanek, Michael J.

    Stabilization of turbulent free shear flows is a poorly understood, and recently discovered flow phenomenon, not described in modern textbooks on fluid dynamics. This dissertation describes the design and large-scale experimental test of one type of flow control actuator, a rod in crossflow, which is shown to pulse at high frequency (relative to the dominant instabilities of a turbulent free shear layer), and in the process, locally stabilizes that shear layer. The shear layer in question spans a cavity (representative of a 1/10th scale modern aircraft weapons bay) in supersonic (Mach 1.2) crossflow. Without the high frequency flow control, the cavity experiences acoustic resonance (and the creation of large coherent vortical structures), which creates sound pressure levels high enough to fatigue aircraft components. With the high frequency control (and the local shear layer stabilization), the sound pressure levels are rendered benign. Evidence of suppression due to other types of high frequency pulsing devices (primarily resonance tube type designs) is also presented. A numerical study is undertaken to investigate the nature of the stabilization and acoustic suppression. An implicit, 2nd-order in space and time flow solver, coupled with a recently-developed hybrid RANS-LES turbulence model by Nichols, is utilized in a Chimera-based parallel format, to numerically simulate both the unsuppressed cavity in resonance, as well as the effect of pulsing flow control. Due to the limited ability to vary frequency using a rod in crossflow type device, a pulsed jet device is simulated instead. Frequency (and in a limited number of cases, amplitude) of pulse is varied, from 0 Hz (steady) up to 5000 Hz. The change in the character of the flow control effect as pulsing frequency is changed is described, and linked to changes in acoustic levels. The observed local stabilization of the cavity turbulent shear layer is shown in simulation to be the result of a violent instability

  12. Online machining error estimation method of numerical control gear grinding machine tool based on data analysis of internal sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fei; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Guilin; Chen, Chinyin

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an online estimation method of cutting error by analyzing of internal sensor readings. The internal sensors of numerical control (NC) machine tool are selected to avoid installation problem. The estimation mathematic model of cutting error was proposed to compute the relative position of cutting point and tool center point (TCP) from internal sensor readings based on cutting theory of gear. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed model, it was simulated and experimented in gear generating grinding process. The cutting error of gear was estimated and the factors which induce cutting error were analyzed. The simulation and experiments verify that the proposed approach is an efficient way to estimate the cutting error of work-piece during machining process.

  13. Towards Feedback Control of Bypass Transition: Numerical Simulations of Laminar Boundary Layer Response to a Plamsa Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belson, Brandt; Rowley, Clarence

    2010-11-01

    We study the effects of single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuators as a means to delay bypass transition in the Blasius boundary layer, with the eventual goal of closed-loop control. Since streamwise streaks are the structures with the largest transient growth, we orient an array of plasma actuators so as to produce spanwise forces and streamwise vorticity, and thus directly cancel the streaks. We use a pseudo-spectral solver to perform direct numerical simulations of the effect of plasma actuators, implemented as body forces. We compare two different models for the plasma actuator, and then apply each model to our spanwise geometry. We go on to compare each model's simulation results with experiments carried out by our collaborators at University of Toronto and Michigan State University as part of a multi-university research project.

  14. Projection on Proper elements for code control: Verification, numerical convergence, and reduced models. Application to plasma turbulence simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartier-Michaud, T.; Ghendrih, P.; Sarazin, Y.; Abiteboul, J.; Bufferand, H.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Garbet, X.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Norscini, C.; Passeron, C.; Tamain, P.

    2016-02-01

    The Projection on Proper elements (PoPe) is a novel method of code control dedicated to (1) checking the correct implementation of models, (2) determining the convergence of numerical methods, and (3) characterizing the residual errors of any given solution at very low cost. The basic idea is to establish a bijection between a simulation and a set of equations that generate it. Recovering equations is direct and relies on a statistical measure of the weight of the various operators. This method can be used in any number of dimensions and any regime, including chaotic ones. This method also provides a procedure to design reduced models and quantify its ratio of cost to benefit. PoPe is applied to a kinetic and a fluid code of plasma turbulence.

  15. Interactive numerals

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Although Arabic numerals (like ‘2016’ and ‘3.14’) are ubiquitous, we show that in interactive computer applications they are often misleading and surprisingly unreliable. We introduce interactive numerals as a new concept and show, like Roman numerals and Arabic numerals, interactive numerals introduce another way of using and thinking about numbers. Properly understanding interactive numerals is essential for all computer applications that involve numerical data entered by users, including finance, medicine, aviation and science. PMID:28484609

  16. Numerical modeling of self-pressurization and pressure control by a thermodynamic vent system in a cryogenic tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Valenzuela, Juan; LeClair, Andre; Moder, Jeff

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of a system-level test bed-the multipurpose hydrogen test bed (MHTB) using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). MHTB is representative in size and shape of a space transportation vehicle liquid hydrogen propellant tank, and ground-based testing was performed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to generate data for cryogenic storage. GFSSP is a finite volume-based network flow analysis software developed at MSFC and used for thermofluid analysis of propulsion systems. GFSSP has been used to model the self-pressurization and ullage pressure control by the Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS). A TVS typically includes a Joule-Thompson (J-T) expansion device, a two-phase heat exchanger (HEX), and a mixing pump and liquid injector to extract thermal energy from the tank without significant loss of liquid propellant. For the MHTB tank, the HEX and liquid injector are combined into a vertical spray bar assembly. Two GFSSP models (Self-Pressurization and TVS) were separately developed and tested and then integrated to simulate the entire system. The Self-Pressurization model consists of multiple ullage nodes, a propellant node, and solid nodes; it computes the heat transfer through multilayer insulation blankets and calculates heat and mass transfer between the ullage and liquid propellant and the ullage and tank wall. A TVS model calculates the flow through a J-T valve, HEX, and spray and vent systems. Two models are integrated by exchanging data through User Subroutines of both models. Results of the integrated models have been compared with MHTB test data at a 50% fill level. Satisfactory comparison was observed between tests and numerical predictions.

  17. Development of array-type atmospheric-pressure RF plasma generator with electric on-off control for high-throughput numerically controlled processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, H.; Kurio, S.; Matsuyama, S.; Yamauchi, K.; Sano, Y.

    2016-10-01

    An array-type atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency (RF) plasma generator is proposed for high-precision and high-throughput numerically controlled (NC) processes. We propose the use of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) circuit for direct RF switching to achieve plasma on-off control. We confirmed that this type of circuit works correctly using a MOSFET with a small parasitic capacitance between its source and gate. We examined the design method for the distance between adjacent electrodes, which corresponds to the parasitic capacitance between adjacent electrodes and is very important in the individual on-off control of each electrode. We developed a prototype array-type plasma generator apparatus with 19 electrodes and the same number of MOSFET circuits; we then confirmed that each electrode could control its plasma on-off state individually. We also demonstrated that the thickness uniformity of the surface Si layer of a silicon-on-insulator wafer could be processed to less than 1 nm peak to valley by the NC sacrificial oxidation method using the apparatus.

  18. Numerical Evaluation of the "Dual-Kernel Counter-flow" Matric Convolution Integral that Arises in Discrete/Continuous (D/C) Control Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Douglas D.

    2009-01-01

    Discrete/Continuous (D/C) control theory is a new generalized theory of discrete-time control that expands the concept of conventional (exact) discrete-time control to create a framework for design and implementation of discretetime control systems that include a continuous-time command function generator so that actuator commands need not be constant between control decisions, but can be more generally defined and implemented as functions that vary with time across sample period. Because the plant/control system construct contains two linear subsystems arranged in tandem, a novel dual-kernel counter-flow convolution integral appears in the formulation. As part of the D/C system design and implementation process, numerical evaluation of that integral over the sample period is required. Three fundamentally different evaluation methods and associated algorithms are derived for the constant-coefficient case. Numerical results are matched against three available examples that have closed-form solutions.

  19. Computer numerical control (CNC) lithography: light-motion synchronized UV-LED lithography for 3D microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkwun; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Allen, Mark G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a computer-numerical-controlled ultraviolet light-emitting diode (CNC UV-LED) lithography scheme for three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication. The CNC lithography scheme utilizes sequential multi-angled UV light exposures along with a synchronized switchable UV light source to create arbitrary 3D light traces, which are transferred into the photosensitive resist. The system comprises a switchable, movable UV-LED array as a light source, a motorized tilt-rotational sample holder, and a computer-control unit. System operation is such that the tilt-rotational sample holder moves in a pre-programmed routine, and the UV-LED is illuminated only at desired positions of the sample holder during the desired time period, enabling the formation of complex 3D microstructures. This facilitates easy fabrication of complex 3D structures, which otherwise would have required multiple manual exposure steps as in the previous multidirectional 3D UV lithography approach. Since it is batch processed, processing time is far less than that of the 3D printing approach at the expense of some reduction in the degree of achievable 3D structure complexity. In order to produce uniform light intensity from the arrayed LED light source, the UV-LED array stage has been kept rotating during exposure. UV-LED 3D fabrication capability was demonstrated through a plurality of complex structures such as V-shaped micropillars, micropanels, a micro-‘hi’ structure, a micro-‘cat’s claw,’ a micro-‘horn,’ a micro-‘calla lily,’ a micro-‘cowboy’s hat,’ and a micro-‘table napkin’ array.

  20. Detection of early landscape evolution through controlled experimentation, data analysis, and numerical modeling at the Landscape Evolution Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troch, Peter A.; Pangle, Luke; Niu, Guo-Yue; Dontsova, Katerina; Barron-Gafford, Greg; van Haren, Joost; Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitch

    2014-05-01

    The Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) at Biosphere 2-The University of Arizona consists of three identical, sloping, 333 m2 convergent landscapes inside a 5,000 m2 environmentally controlled facility. These engineered landscapes contain 1-meter depth of basaltic tephra, ground to homogenous loamy sand that will undergo physical, chemical, and mineralogical changes over many years. Each landscape contains a spatially dense sensor and sampler network capable of resolving meter-scale lateral heterogeneity and sub-meter scale vertical heterogeneity in moisture, energy and carbon states and fluxes. The density of sensors and frequency at which they can be polled allows for data collection at spatial and temporal scales that are impossible in natural field settings. Embedded solution and gas samplers allow for quantification of biogeochemical processes, and facilitate the use of chemical tracers to study water movement at very high spatial resolutions. Each ~600 metric ton landscape has load cells embedded into the structure to measure changes in total system mass with 0.05% full-scale repeatability (equivalent to less than 1 cm of precipitation). This facilitates the real time accounting of hydrological partitioning at the hillslope scale. Each hillslope is equipped with an engineered rain system capable of raining at rates between 3 and 45 mm/hr in a range of spatial patterns. The rain systems are capable of creating long-term steady state conditions or running complex simulations. The precipitation water supply storage system is flexibly designed to facilitate addition of tracers at constant or time-varying rates for any of the three hillslopes. This presentation will discuss detection of early landscape evolution in terms of hydrological, geochemical and microbial processes through controlled experimentation, data analysis, and numerical modeling during the commissioning phase of the first hillslope at LEO.

  1. Post-Gondwana geomorphic evolution of southwestern Africa: Implications for hte controls on landscape development from observations and numerical experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, Alan R.; Kooi, Henk; Beaumont, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between morphology and surficial geology is used to quantify the denudation that has occurred across southwestern Africa sicne the fragmentation of Gondwana during the Early Mesozoic. Two main points emerge. Signficant denudation, of the order of kilometers, is widespread except in the Kalahari region of the continental interior. The denudation is systematically distributed so that the continental exterior catchment, draining directly to the Cape basin, is denuded to a greater depth than the interior catchment inland of the Great Escarpment. The analysis also implies tha the majority of the denudation occurred before the beginning of the Cenozoic for both teh exerior and interior catchments. Existing models of landscape development are reviewed, and implications of the denudation chronology are incorporated into a revised conceptual model. This revision implies tha thte primary effect of rifting on the subsequent landscape evolution is that it generates two distinct drainage regimes. A marginal upwarp, or rift flank uplift, separates rejuvenated rivers that drain into the subsiding rift from rivers in the continetal interior that are deflected but not rejuvenated. The two catchments evolve independently unless they are integrated by breaching of hte marginal upwarp. If this occurs, the exterior baselevel is communicated to the interior catchment that is denuded accordingly. Denudation rates generally decrease as the margin evolves, and this decrease is reinforced by the exposure of substrate that is resistant to denudation and/or a change to a more arid climate. The observations do not reveal a particular style of smaller-scale landscape evolution, sucha s escarpment retreat, that is responsible for the differential denudation across the region. It is proposed that numerical model experiments, which reflect the observational insights at the large scale, may identify the smaller-scale controls on escarpment development if the model and natural

  2. Post-Gondwana geomorphic evolution of southwestern Africa: Implications for hte controls on landscape development from observations and numerical experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, Alan R.; Kooi, Henk; Beaumont, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between morphology and surficial geology is used to quantify the denudation that has occurred across southwestern Africa sicne the fragmentation of Gondwana during the Early Mesozoic. Two main points emerge. Signficant denudation, of the order of kilometers, is widespread except in the Kalahari region of the continental interior. The denudation is systematically distributed so that the continental exterior catchment, draining directly to the Cape basin, is denuded to a greater depth than the interior catchment inland of the Great Escarpment. The analysis also implies tha the majority of the denudation occurred before the beginning of the Cenozoic for both teh exerior and interior catchments. Existing models of landscape development are reviewed, and implications of the denudation chronology are incorporated into a revised conceptual model. This revision implies tha thte primary effect of rifting on the subsequent landscape evolution is that it generates two distinct drainage regimes. A marginal upwarp, or rift flank uplift, separates rejuvenated rivers that drain into the subsiding rift from rivers in the continetal interior that are deflected but not rejuvenated. The two catchments evolve independently unless they are integrated by breaching of hte marginal upwarp. If this occurs, the exterior baselevel is communicated to the interior catchment that is denuded accordingly. Denudation rates generally decrease as the margin evolves, and this decrease is reinforced by the exposure of substrate that is resistant to denudation and/or a change to a more arid climate. The observations do not reveal a particular style of smaller-scale landscape evolution, sucha s escarpment retreat, that is responsible for the differential denudation across the region. It is proposed that numerical model experiments, which reflect the observational insights at the large scale, may identify the smaller-scale controls on escarpment development if the model and natural

  3. Controlling dental enamel-cavity ablation depth with optimized stepping parameters along the focal plane normal using a three axis, numerically controlled picosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fusong; Lv, Peijun; Wang, Dangxiao; Wang, Lei; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a depth-control method in enamel-cavity ablation by optimizing the timing of the focal-plane-normal stepping and the single-step size of a three axis, numerically controlled picosecond laser. Although it has been proposed that picosecond lasers may be used to ablate dental hard tissue, the viability of such a depth-control method in enamel-cavity ablation remains uncertain. Forty-two enamel slices with approximately level surfaces were prepared and subjected to two-dimensional ablation by a picosecond laser. The additive-pulse layer, n, was set to 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70. A three-dimensional microscope was then used to measure the ablation depth, d, to obtain a quantitative function relating n and d. Six enamel slices were then subjected to three dimensional ablation to produce 10 cavities, respectively, with additive-pulse layer and single-step size set to corresponding values. The difference between the theoretical and measured values was calculated for both the cavity depth and the ablation depth of a single step. These were used to determine minimum-difference values for both the additive-pulse layer (n) and single-step size (d). When the additive-pulse layer and the single-step size were set 5 and 45, respectively, the depth error had a minimum of 2.25 μm, and 450 μm deep enamel cavities were produced. When performing three-dimensional ablating of enamel with a picosecond laser, adjusting the timing of the focal-plane-normal stepping and the single-step size allows for the control of ablation-depth error to the order of micrometers.

  4. A numerical analysis of biogeochemical controls with physical modulation on hypoxia during summer in the Pearl River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Hu, Jiatang; Li, Shiyu; Liu, Dehong

    2017-06-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) physical-biogeochemical coupled model was applied to explore the mechanisms controlling the dissolved oxygen (DO) dynamics and bottom hypoxia during summer in the Pearl River estuary (PRE). By using the numerical oxygen tracers, we proposed a new method (namely the physical modulation method) to quantify the contributions of boundary conditions and each source and sink process occurring in local and adjacent waters to the DO conditions. A mass balance analysis of DO based on the physical modulation method indicated that the DO conditions at the bottom layer were mainly controlled by the source and sink processes, among which the sediment oxygen demand (SOD) at the water-sediment interface and the re-aeration at the air-sea interface were the two primary processes determining the spatial extent and duration of bottom hypoxia in the PRE. The SOD could cause a significant decrease in the bottom DO concentrations (averaged over July-August 2006) by over 4 mg L-1 on the shelf off the Modaomen sub-estuary, leading to the formation of a high-frequency zone of hypoxia (HFZ). However, the hypoxia that occurred in the HFZ was intermittent and distributed in a small area due to the combined effects of re-aeration and photosynthesis, which behaved as sources for DO and offset a portion of the DO consumed by SOD. The bottom DO concentrations to the west of the lower Lingdingyang Bay (i.e. the western shoal near Qi'ao Island) were also largely affected by high SOD, but there was no hypoxia occurring there because of the influence of re-aeration. Specifically, re-aeration could lead to an increase in the bottom DO concentrations by ˜ 4.8 mg L-1 to the west of the lower Lingdingyang Bay. The re-aeration led to a strong vertical DO gradient between the surface and the lower layers. As a result, the majority (˜ 89 %) of DO supplemented by re-aeration was transported to the lower layers through vertical diffusion and ˜ 28 % reached the bottom eventually

  5. Crustal rheology control on earthquake activity across the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau: Insights from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Zhu, Bo-Jing; Yang, Xiao-Lin; Shi, Yao-Lin

    2015-03-01

    The devastating 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan and 2013 Mw6.6 Lushan earthquakes occurred in the Longmen Shan (LMS) fault zone, the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Seismology investigation reveals that earthquakes of Ms > 5.0 are frequently recorded in the eastern Tibetan Plateau, however rare earthquake of Ms > 5.0 and only a few earthquakes of 3.0 < Ms < 5.0 have been recorded in the Sichuan Basin. This study investigates the relation between the crustal rheology and the earthquake activity across the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau through 3D numerical experiments assuming visco-elasticity rheology. We setup several finite element lithospheric models based on different rheological structure. The interseismic stress accumulation processes in the models are simulated with boundary conditions of steady compressional deformation rate constrained by GPS observations. The results show that the crustal stress accumulation process across the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau is significantly controlled by the regional crustal rheology, which presents large horizontal viscosity variation in the lower crusts between the Tibetan Plateau and the Sichuan Basin. The stress accumulation rate in the upper crust of the eastern Tibetan Plateau is much higher than the Sichuan Basin. This stress spatial distribution explains the seismology observation that earthquakes are densely recorded in the eastern Tibetan Plateau, whereas rarely in the Sichuan Basin. The stress concentration nearly at the bottom of the entire LMS fault zone is thought to be responsible for the generation of the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan and 2013 Mw6.6 Lushan earthquakes. There is a high possibility of future earthquakes in the seismic gaps at the southwest segment of the LMS fault zone, where it was stress accumulated but did not rupture during the last two events of the 2008 Wenchuan and 2013 Lushan earthquakes.

  6. A numerical study of combined use of two biocontrol agents with different biocontrol mechanisms in controlling foliar pathogens.

    PubMed

    Xu, X-M; Jeffries, P; Pautasso, M; Jeger, M J

    2011-09-01

    Effective use of biocontrol agents is an important component of sustainable agriculture. A previous numerical study of a generic model showed that biocontrol efficacy was greatest for a single biocontrol agent (BCA) combining competition with mycoparasitism or antibiosis. This study uses the same mathematical model to investigate whether the biocontrol efficacy of combined use of two BCAs with different biocontrol mechanisms is greater than that of a single BCA with either or both of the two mechanisms, assuming that two BCAs occupy the same host tissue as the pathogen. Within the parameter values considered, a BCA with two biocontrol mechanisms always outperformed the combined use of two BCAs with a single but different biocontrol mechanism. Similarly, combined use of two BCAs with a single but different biocontrol mechanism is shown to be far less effective than that of a single BCA with both mechanisms. Disease suppression from combined use of two BCAs was very similar to that achieved by the more efficacious one. As expected, a higher BCA introduction rate led to increased disease suppression. Incorporation of interactions between two BCAs did not greatly affect the disease dynamics except when a mycoparasitic and, to a lesser extent, an antibiotic-producing BCA was involved. Increasing the competitiveness of a mycoparasitic BCA over a BCA whose biocontrol mechanism is either competition or antibiosis may lead to improved biocontrol initially and reduced fluctuations in disease dynamics. The present study suggests that, under the model assumptions, combined use of two BCAs with different biocontrol mechanisms in most cases only results in control efficacies similar to using the more efficacious one alone. These predictions are consistent with published experimental results, suggesting that combined use of BCAs should not be recommended without clear understanding of their main biocontrol mechanisms and relative competitiveness, and experimental evaluation.

  7. Experimental and numerical study of control of flow separation of a symmetric airfoil with trapped vortex cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Abdullah Bin; Mashud, Mohammad

    2017-06-01

    This paper summarizes the experimental campaign and numerical analysis performed aimed to analyze the potential benefit available employing a trapping vortex cell system on a high thickness symmetric aero-foil without steady suction or injection mass flow. In this work, the behavior of a two dimensional model equipped with a span wise adjusted circular cavity has been researched. Pressure distribution on the model surface and inside and the complete flow field round the model have been measured. Experimental tests have been performed varying the wind tunnel speed and also the angle of attack. For numerical analysis the two dimensional model of the airfoil and the mesh is formed through ANSYS Meshing that is run in Fluent for numerical iterate solution. In the paper the performed test campaign, the airfoil design, the adopted experimental set-up, the numerical analysis, the data post process and the results description are reported, compared a discussed.

  8. The Impact of Numerical Control Technology and Computer Aided Manufacturing on Curriculum Development in Industrial Education and Technology. A Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauch, Klaus Dieter

    The study was designed to investigate the effects of Numerical Control Technology and Computer-Aided Manufacturing (NC/CAM) in American industry on industrial education and engineering technology education. The specific purpose was to identify a data base and rationale for curriculum development in NC/CAM through a comparison of views by…

  9. Improved Understanding of Permafrost Controls on Hydrology in Interior Alaska by Integration of Ground-Based Geophysical Permafrost Characterization and Numerical Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    help elucidate permafrost-controlled surface-water/groundwater interactions. The fen and bog features in lowland terrains are dynamic wetland...2007) Groundwater flow with energy transport and water-ice phase change: numerical simulations, benchmarks, and application to freezing in peat bogs

  10. Numerical and experimental investigation of an airfoil with load control in the wake of an active grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, A.; Lutz, T.; Kramer, E.; Cordes, U.; Hufnagel, K.; Tropea, C.; Kampers, G.; Hölling, M.; Peinke, J.

    2016-09-01

    A new passive load reduction system, using coupled leading and trailing edge flaps, was developed at TU Darmstadt and investigated experimentally and numerically. The experiments were performed in the wind tunnel of the University of Oldenburg, where sinusoidal inflow conditions, representing for example the tower blockage effect, were created by means of an active grid. The numerical investigations were performed at the University of Stuttgart, using a quasi two-dimensional setup and a block structured CFD solver. In the present paper, a brief description of the experimental setup is given, whereas the numerical setup, in particular the realisation of the wind tunnel conditions, is presented in more detail. Moreover, a comparison between the measured and simulated loads for an airfoil with and without adaptive camber concept is discussed.

  11. Numerical evaluation of passive control of shock wave/boundary layer interaction on NACA0012 airfoil using jagged wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghan Manshadi, Mojtaba; Rabani, Ramin

    2016-10-01

    Shock formation due to flow compressibility and its interaction with boundary layers has adverse effects on aerodynamic characteristics, such as drag increase and flow separation. The objective of this paper is to appraise the practicability of weakening shock waves and, hence, reducing the wave drag in transonic flight regime using a two-dimensional jagged wall and thereby to gain an appropriate jagged wall shape for future empirical study. Different shapes of the jagged wall, including rectangular, circular, and triangular shapes, were employed. The numerical method was validated by experimental and numerical studies involving transonic flow over the NACA0012 airfoil, and the results presented here closely match previous experimental and numerical results. The impact of parameters, including shape and the length-to-spacing ratio of a jagged wall, was studied on aerodynamic forces and flow field. The results revealed that applying a jagged wall method on the upper surface of an airfoil changes the shock structure significantly and disintegrates it, which in turn leads to a decrease in wave drag. It was also found that the maximum drag coefficient decrease of around 17 % occurs with a triangular shape, while the maximum increase in aerodynamic efficiency (lift-to-drag ratio) of around 10 % happens with a rectangular shape at an angle of attack of 2.26°.

  12. The Milling Assistant, Case-Based Reasoning, and machining strategy: A report on the development of automated numerical control programming systems at New Mexico State University

    SciTech Connect

    Burd, W.; Culler, D.; Eskridge, T.; Cox, L.; Slater, T.

    1993-08-01

    The Milling Assistant (MA) programming system demonstrates the automated development of tool paths for Numerical Control (NC) machine tools. By integrating a Case-Based Reasoning decision processor with a commercial CAD/CAM software, intelligent tool path files for milled and point-to-point features can be created. The operational system is capable of reducing the time required to program a variety of parts and improving product quality by collecting and utilizing ``best of practice`` machining strategies.

  13. Hindi Numerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, William

    In most languages encountered by linguists, the numerals, considered as a paradigmatic set, constitute a morpho-syntactic problem of only moderate complexity. The Indo-Aryan language family of North India, however, presents a curious contrast. The relatively regular numeral system of Sanskrit, as it has developed historically into the modern…

  14. Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.; Braithwaite, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from non-symbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger…

  15. Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.; Braithwaite, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from non-symbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger…

  16. Using PASCAL for numerical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volper, D.; Miller, T. C.

    1978-01-01

    The data structures and control structures of PASCAL enhance the coding ability of the programmer. Proposed extensions to the language further increase its usefulness in writing numeric programs and support packages for numeric programs.

  17. Using PASCAL for numerical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volper, D.; Miller, T. C.

    1978-01-01

    The data structures and control structures of PASCAL enhance the coding ability of the programmer. Proposed extensions to the language further increase its usefulness in writing numeric programs and support packages for numeric programs.

  18. Numerical Development.

    PubMed

    Siegler, Robert S; Braithwaite, David W

    2017-01-03

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from nonsymbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger whole numbers, and from whole to rational numbers. One reason why this development is important is that precision of numerical magnitude knowledge is correlated with, predictive of, and causally related to both whole and rational number arithmetic. Rational number arithmetic, however, also poses challenges beyond understanding the magnitudes of the individual numbers. Some of these challenges are inherent; they are present for all learners. Other challenges are culturally contingent; they vary from country to country and classroom to classroom. Generating theories and data that help children surmount the challenges of rational number arithmetic is a promising and important goal for future numerical development research.

  19. Revisiting the factors which control the angle of shear bands in geodynamic numerical models of brittle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieulot, Cedric

    2017-04-01

    In this work I present Finite Element numerical simulations of brittle deformation in two-dimensional Cartesian systems subjected to compressional or extensional kinematical boundary conditions with a basal velocity discontinuity. The rheology is visco-plastic and is characterised by a cohesion and an angle of internal friction (Drucker-Prager type). I will explore the influence of the following factors on the recovered shear band angles when the angle of internal friction is varied: a) element type (quadrilateral vs triangle), b) element order, c) continuous vs discontinous pressure, d) visco-plasticity model implementation, e) the nonlinear tolerance value, f) the use of markers, g) Picard vs Newton-Raphson, h) velocity discontinuity nature. I will present these results in the light of already published literature (e.g. Lemiale et al, PEPI 171, 2008; Kaus, Tectonophysics 484, 2010).

  20. Numerical modelling of lithospheric flexure at subduction zones: what controls the formation of petit-spot volcanoes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessat, Annelore; Pilet, Sébastien; Duretz, Thibault; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2017-04-01

    Petit-spot volcanoes were discovered fifteen years ago by Japanese researchers at the top of the down going plate in front of Japan (1). The location of these small lava flows is unusual, and seems related to the plate flexure in front of the subduction zone. Their formation seems, therefore, not to correspond to any classical type of volcanism such as MORB generation at mid ocean ridges, arc volcanism in subduction zones or intraplate volcanoes classically associated to deep mantle plumes. The discovery of petit-spot volcanoes is of great significance as it demonstrates, for the first time, that tectonic processes could generate intraplate volcanism and supports the existence of small-degree melts at the base of the lithosphere. First models for the formation of petit-spot volcanoes suggest that plate bending produces extension at the base of the lithosphere, thus allowing large cracks to propagate across the lithosphere. These cracks promote the extraction of low degree melts from the base of the lithosphere (2). However, the study of petit-spot mantle xenoliths from Japan (3) demonstrates that low degree melts are not directly extracted to the surface, but percolate and metasomatize the oceanic lithosphere. The aim of this study is to better understand the physical processes associated with the formation of petit-spot volcanoes. These thermo-mechanical processes will be studied using upper-mantle scale numerical simulations based on a 2D finite difference code. The numerical model considers viscoelastoplastic deformation; combination of laboratory-derived flow laws (e.g. diffusion and dislocation creep, Peierls creep) and heat transfer. The first step is to quantify the deformation processes that occur in the lithosphere and at the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB). The aims are to investigate, in particular, extensional deformation at the base of the lithosphere which is induced by plate flexure in front of a subduction zone. This study focuses on

  1. Numerical generation of two-dimensional grids by the use of Poisson equations with grid control at boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, R. L.; Steger, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    A method for generating boundary-fitted, curvilinear, two dimensional grids by the use of the Poisson equations is presented. Grids of C-type and O-type were made about airfoils and other shapes, with circular, rectangular, cascade-type, and other outer boundary shapes. Both viscous and inviscid spacings were used. In all cases, two important types of grid control can be exercised at both inner and outer boundaries. First is arbitrary control of the distances between the boundaries and the adjacent lines of the same coordinate family, i.e., stand-off distances. Second is arbitrary control of the angles with which lines of the opposite coordinate family intersect the boundaries. Thus, both grid cell size (or aspect ratio) and grid cell skewness are controlled at boundaries. Reasonable cell size and shape are ensured even in cases wherein extreme boundary shapes would tend to cause skewness or poorly controlled grid spacing. An inherent feature of the Poisson equations is that lines in the interior of the grid smoothly connect the boundary points (the grid mapping functions are second order differentiable).

  2. Numerical nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijkhorst, Erik-Jan

    2005-12-01

    The late stages of evolution of stars like our Sun are dominated by several episodes of violent mass loss. Space based observations of the resulting objects, known as Planetary Nebulae, show a bewildering array of highly symmetric shapes. The interplay between gasdynamics and radiative processes determines the morphological outcome of these objects, and numerical models for astrophysical gasdynamics have to incorporate these effects. This thesis presents new numerical techniques for carrying out high-resolution three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical simulations. Such calculations require parallelization of computer codes, and the use of state-of-the-art supercomputer technology. Numerical models in the context of the shaping of Planetary Nebulae are presented, providing insight into their origin and fate.

  3. Inference of sigma factor controlled networks by using numerical modeling applied to microarray time series data of the germinating prokaryote

    PubMed Central

    Strakova, Eva; Zikova, Alice; Vohradsky, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    A computational model of gene expression was applied to a novel test set of microarray time series measurements to reveal regulatory interactions between transcriptional regulators represented by 45 sigma factors and the genes expressed during germination of a prokaryote Streptomyces coelicolor. Using microarrays, the first 5.5 h of the process was recorded in 13 time points, which provided a database of gene expression time series on genome-wide scale. The computational modeling of the kinetic relations between the sigma factors, individual genes and genes clustered according to the similarity of their expression kinetics identified kinetically plausible sigma factor-controlled networks. Using genome sequence annotations, functional groups of genes that were predominantly controlled by specific sigma factors were identified. Using external binding data complementing the modeling approach, specific genes involved in the control of the studied process were identified and their function suggested. PMID:24157841

  4. 3D Numerical Simulation versus Experimental Assessment of Pressure Pulsations Using a Passive Method for Swirling Flow Control in Conical Diffusers of Hydraulic Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TANASA, C.; MUNTEAN, S.; CIOCAN, T.; SUSAN-RESIGA, R. F.

    2016-11-01

    The hydraulic turbines operated at partial discharge (especially hydraulic turbines with fixed blades, i.e. Francis turbine), developing a swirling flow in the conical diffuser of draft tube. As a result, the helical vortex breakdown, also known in the literature as “precessing vortex rope” is developed. A passive method to mitigate the pressure pulsations associated to the vortex rope in the draft tube cone of hydraulic turbines is presented in this paper. The method involves the development of a progressive and controlled throttling (shutter), of the flow cross section at the bottom of the conical diffuser. The adjustable cross section is made on the basis of the shutter-opening of circular diaphragms, while maintaining in all positions the circular cross-sectional shape, centred on the axis of the turbine. The stagnant region and the pressure pulsations associated to the vortex rope are mitigated when it is controlled with the turbine operating regime. Consequently, the severe flow deceleration and corresponding central stagnant are diminished with an efficient mitigation of the precessing helical vortex. Four cases (one without diaphragm and three with diaphragm), are numerically and experimentally investigated, respectively. The present paper focuses on a 3D turbulent swirling flow simulation in order to evaluate the control method. Numerical results are compared against measured pressure recovery coefficient and Fourier spectra. The results prove the vortex rope mitigation and its associated pressure pulsations when employing the diaphragm.

  5. Preformulation considerations for controlled release dosage forms. Part III. Candidate form selection using numerical weighting and scoring.

    PubMed

    Chrzanowski, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Two numerical methods, Decision Analysis (DA) and Potential Problem Analysis (PPA) are presented as alternative selection methods to the logical method presented in Part I. In DA properties are weighted and outcomes are scored. The weighted scores for each candidate are totaled and final selection is based on the totals. Higher scores indicate better candidates. In PPA potential problems are assigned a seriousness factor and test outcomes are used to define the probability of occurrence. The seriousness-probability products are totaled and forms with minimal scores are preferred. DA and PPA have never been compared to the logical-elimination method. Additional data were available for two forms of McN-5707 to provide complete preformulation data for five candidate forms. Weight and seriousness factors (independent variables) were obtained from a survey of experienced formulators. Scores and probabilities (dependent variables) were provided independently by Preformulation. The rankings of the five candidate forms, best to worst, were similar for all three methods. These results validate the applicability of DA and PPA for candidate form selection. DA and PPA are particularly applicable in cases where there are many candidate forms and where each form has some degree of unfavorable properties.

  6. Thermally controlled mid-IR band-gap engineering in all-glass chalcogenide microstructured fibers: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barh, A.; Varshney, R. K.; Pal, B. P.; Sanghera, J.; Shaw, L. B.

    2017-06-01

    Presence of photonic band-gap (PBG) in an all-glass low refractive index (RI) contrast chalcogenide (Ch) microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) is investigated numerically. The effect of external temperature on the position of band-gap is explored to realize potential fiber-based wavelength filters/sensors at functional mid-IR spectral range. The cross-sectional geometry of the MOF is formed by considering a Ch glass to form the overall background cross-section as well as the central fiber core. The core region is surrounded by periodically arranged (hexagonal pattern) smaller holes, which are assumed to be filled up with another Ch glass. Thermally compatible and fabrication suitable, two Ch glasses are chosen, one (higher RI) as background material and the other (of lower RI) to fill up the holes. Two sets of such pairs of thermally compatible Ch-glasses are considered as fiber structural materials with relative RI contrast of ∼12% and ∼24%. For both such low RI contrast hexagonal structures, PBG appears only for suitable finite values of longitudinal wave vector. The structures are suitable to realize band-gap at mid-IR wavelengths and specifically optimized for operation around the ∼2 μm region. Then the temperature sensitivity of band-gaps is investigated to design fiber-based mid-IR wavelength filters/sensors.

  7. A field programmable gate array-based reconfigurable smart-sensor network for wireless monitoring of new generation computer numerically controlled machines.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Tapia, Sandra Veronica; Vera-Salas, Luis Alberto; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Aurelio; Stiharu, Ion; Romero-Troncoso, Rene de Jesus

    2010-01-01

    Computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines have evolved to adapt to increasing technological and industrial requirements. To cover these needs, new generation machines have to perform monitoring strategies by incorporating multiple sensors. Since in most of applications the online Processing of the variables is essential, the use of smart sensors is necessary. The contribution of this work is the development of a wireless network platform of reconfigurable smart sensors for CNC machine applications complying with the measurement requirements of new generation CNC machines. Four different smart sensors are put under test in the network and their corresponding signal processing techniques are implemented in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)-based sensor node.

  8. Importance of root HTO uptake in controlling land-surface tritium dynamics after an-acute HT deposition: a numerical experiment.

    PubMed

    Ota, Masakazu; Nagai, Haruyasu; Koarashi, Jun

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the role of belowground root uptake of tritiated water (HTO) in controlling land-surface tritium (T) dynamics, a sophisticated numerical model predicting tritium behavior in an atmosphere-vegetation-soil system was developed, and numerical experiments were conducted using the model. The developed model covered physical tritiated hydrogen (HT) transport in a multilayered atmosphere and soil, as well as microbial oxidation of HT to HTO in the soil, and it was incorporated into a well-established HTO-transfer organically bound tritium (OBT)-formation model. The model performance was tested through the simulation of an existing HT-release experiment. Numerical experiments involving a hypothetical acute HT exposure to a grassland field with a range of rooting depths showed that the HTO release from the leaves to the atmosphere, driven by the root uptake of the deposited HTO, can exceed the HTO evaporation from the ground surface to the atmosphere when root water absorption preferentially occurs beneath the ground surface. Such enhanced soil-leaf-atmosphere HTO transport, caused by the enhanced root HTO uptake, increased HTO concentrations in both the surface atmosphere and in the cellular water of the leaf. Consequently, leaf OBT assimilation calculated for shallow rooting depths increased by nearly an order of magnitude compared to that for large rooting depths.

  9. Numerical Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sozio, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Senior secondary students cover numerical integration techniques in their mathematics courses. In particular, students would be familiar with the "midpoint rule," the elementary "trapezoidal rule" and "Simpson's rule." This article derives these techniques by methods which secondary students may not be familiar with and an approach that…

  10. Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity have fueled an explosion of progress in understanding the predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, for the strong field dynamics, the gravitational radiation wave forms, and consequently the state of the remnant produced from the merger of compact binary objects. I will review recent results from the field, focusing on mergers of two black holes.

  11. Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity have fueled an explosion of progress in understanding the predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, for the strong field dynamics, the gravitational radiation wave forms, and consequently the state of the remnant produced from the merger of compact binary objects. I will review recent results from the field, focusing on mergers of two black holes.

  12. Stochastic Control and Numerical Methods with Applications to Communications. Game Theoretic/Subsolution to Importance Sampling for Rare Event Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    approximate the (weak-sense) solution to the Fokker - Planck equation between observations and then use Bayes’ rule 5 to incorporate the observations. In... delays as, for exam- ple in hydraulic control systems, delays due to noninstantaneous human responses or chemical reactions, or delays due to visco...of the original and approximated system were presented, and it is seen that the approximations can be quite good. Delay equations might have rapidly

  13. An analytic-numerical method for the construction of the reference law of operation for a class of mechanical controlled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizhidon, A. D.; Mizhidon, K. A.

    2017-04-01

    An analytic-numerical method for the construction of a reference law of operation for a class of dynamic systems describing vibrations in controlled mechanical systems is proposed. By the reference law of operation of a system, we mean a law of the system motion that satisfies all the requirements for the quality and design features of the system under permanent external disturbances. As disturbances, we consider polyharmonic functions with known amplitudes and frequencies of the harmonics but unknown initial phases. For constructing the reference law of motion, an auxiliary optimal control problem is solved in which the cost function depends on a weighting coefficient. The choice of the weighting coefficient ensures the design of the reference law. Theoretical foundations of the proposed method are given.

  14. The Physics of Optical Position Sensors for Robotics and Numerical Control (N/C) Machine Tool Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Jeffrey A.

    1996-03-01

    Mechanical position sensing is critical in many industrial applications, and is particularly important in automated machinery such as industrial robots and N/C machine tools. Automated machines usually require sensory feedback to control the position of end-of-arm tools and to sense changes in their environment, and mechanical position sensors based on optics often provide high spatial resolution together with large range. The design and development of optical position sensors, such as those based on interferometry, provides an excellent example of the application of physics knowledge and methodology to obtain elegant solutions to practical problems. These problems, and their solutions, can be delightfully subtle, especially when coupled with the need to control costs and allow for ease of mass production. Specific examples of problems in mechanical position sensing for automated machines will be presented, and various optical sensor solutions will be compared from an applied physics viewpoint, emphasizing especially the role of physics methodology in their design and development. The author gratefully acknowledges H. Akeel, A. Yee and M. McNeill of FANUC Berkeley Laboratory for their contributions and support

  15. 3D conformal MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound prostate therapy: validation of numerical simulations and demonstration in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Burtnyk, Mathieu; N'Djin, William Apoutou; Kobelevskiy, Ilya; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2010-11-21

    MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy uses a linear array of transducer elements and active temperature feedback to create volumes of thermal coagulation shaped to predefined prostate geometries in 3D. The specific aims of this work were to demonstrate the accuracy and repeatability of producing large volumes of thermal coagulation (>10 cc) that conform to 3D human prostate shapes in a tissue-mimicking gel phantom, and to evaluate quantitatively the accuracy with which numerical simulations predict these 3D heating volumes under carefully controlled conditions. Eleven conformal 3D experiments were performed in a tissue-mimicking phantom within a 1.5T MR imager to obtain non-invasive temperature measurements during heating. Temperature feedback was used to control the rotation rate and ultrasound power of transurethral devices with up to five 3.5 × 5 mm active transducer elements. Heating patterns shaped to human prostate geometries were generated using devices operating at 4.7 or 8.0 MHz with surface acoustic intensities of up to 10 W cm(-2). Simulations were informed by transducer surface velocity measurements acquired with a scanning laser vibrometer enabling improved calculations of the acoustic pressure distribution in a gel phantom. Temperature dynamics were determined according to a FDTD solution to Pennes' BHTE. The 3D heating patterns produced in vitro were shaped very accurately to the prostate target volumes, within the spatial resolution of the MRI thermometry images. The volume of the treatment difference falling outside ± 1 mm of the target boundary was, on average, 0.21 cc or 1.5% of the prostate volume. The numerical simulations predicted the extent and shape of the coagulation boundary produced in gel to within (mean ± stdev [min, max]): 0.5 ± 0.4 [-1.0, 2.1] and -0.05 ± 0.4 [-1.2, 1.4] mm for the treatments at 4.7 and 8.0 MHz, respectively. The temperatures across all MRI thermometry images were predicted within -0.3 ± 1.6 °C and 0

  16. 3D conformal MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound prostate therapy: validation of numerical simulations and demonstration in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtnyk, Mathieu; Apoutou N'Djin, William; Kobelevskiy, Ilya; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2010-11-01

    MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy uses a linear array of transducer elements and active temperature feedback to create volumes of thermal coagulation shaped to predefined prostate geometries in 3D. The specific aims of this work were to demonstrate the accuracy and repeatability of producing large volumes of thermal coagulation (>10 cc) that conform to 3D human prostate shapes in a tissue-mimicking gel phantom, and to evaluate quantitatively the accuracy with which numerical simulations predict these 3D heating volumes under carefully controlled conditions. Eleven conformal 3D experiments were performed in a tissue-mimicking phantom within a 1.5T MR imager to obtain non-invasive temperature measurements during heating. Temperature feedback was used to control the rotation rate and ultrasound power of transurethral devices with up to five 3.5 × 5 mm active transducer elements. Heating patterns shaped to human prostate geometries were generated using devices operating at 4.7 or 8.0 MHz with surface acoustic intensities of up to 10 W cm-2. Simulations were informed by transducer surface velocity measurements acquired with a scanning laser vibrometer enabling improved calculations of the acoustic pressure distribution in a gel phantom. Temperature dynamics were determined according to a FDTD solution to Pennes' BHTE. The 3D heating patterns produced in vitro were shaped very accurately to the prostate target volumes, within the spatial resolution of the MRI thermometry images. The volume of the treatment difference falling outside ±1 mm of the target boundary was, on average, 0.21 cc or 1.5% of the prostate volume. The numerical simulations predicted the extent and shape of the coagulation boundary produced in gel to within (mean ± stdev [min, max]): 0.5 ± 0.4 [-1.0, 2.1] and -0.05 ± 0.4 [-1.2, 1.4] mm for the treatments at 4.7 and 8.0 MHz, respectively. The temperatures across all MRI thermometry images were predicted within -0.3 ± 1.6 °C and 0

  17. Improved Antishock Air-Gap Control Algorithm with Acceleration Feedforward Control for High-Numerical Aperture Near-Field Storage System Using Solid Immersion Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Gon; Shin, Won-Ho; Hwang, Hyun-Woo; Jeong, Jun; Park, Kyoung-Su; Park, No-Cheol; Yang, Hyunseok; Park, Young-Pil; Moo Park, Jin; Son, Do Hyeon; Kyo Seo, Jeong; Choi, In Ho

    2010-08-01

    A near-field storage system using a solid immersion lens (SIL) has been studied as a high-density optical disc drive system. The major goal of this research is to improve the robustness of the air-gap controller for a SIL-based near-field recording (NFR) system against dynamic disturbances, such as external shocks. The servo system is essential in near-field (NF) technology because the nanogap distance between the SIL and the disc is 50 nm or less. Also, the air-gap distance must be maintained without collision between the SIL and the disc to detect a stable gap error and read-out signals when an external shock is applied. Therefore, we propose an improved air-gap control algorithm using only an acceleration feedforward controller (AFC) to maintain the air-gap distance without contact for a 4.48 G at 10 ms shock. Thus, the antishock control performance for the SIL-based NF storage system in the presence of external shocks is markedly improved. Furthermore, to enhance the performance of the antishock air-gap control, we use the AFC with a double disturbance observer and a dead-zone nonlinear controller. As a result, the air-gap distance is maintained without contact for a 6.56 G@10 ms shock.

  18. Numerical study of micro-ramp vortex generator for supersonic ramp flow control at Mach 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Y.; Chen, L.; Li, Q.; Liu, C.

    2017-01-01

    An implicit large eddy simulation, implemented using a fifth-order, bandwidth-optimized weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme, was used to study the flow past a compression ramp at Mach 2.5 and {Re}_{θ } = 5760 with and without a micro-ramp vortex generator (MVG) upstream. The MVG serves as a passive flow control device. The results suggested that MVGs may distinctly reduce the separation zone at the ramp corner and lower the boundary layer shape factor. New findings regarding the MVG-ramp interacting flow included the surface pressure distribution, three-dimensional structures of the re-compression shock waves, surface separation topology, and a new secondary vortex system. The formation of the momentum deficit was studied in depth. A new mechanism was observed wherein a series of vortex rings originated from the MVG-generated high shear at the boundary of the momentum deficit zone. Vortex rings strongly interact with the shock-separated flow and play an important role in the separation zone reduction.

  19. Numerical Investigation of the Control of Separation from Curved and Blunt Trailing Edges Using DNS and LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, Hermann F.

    2002-07-01

    Wall jets over a curved wall geometry (Coanda flows) are investigated using DNS and turbulence modeling. In experiments large coherent structures have enhanced the effectiveness of wall jets in delaying or preventing flow separation on airfoils. Understanding the behavior of these structures is essential for utilizing wall jets for separation control. The research objective is to investigate curvature effects on large coherent structures, in particular the development of longitudinal (Goertler-type) vortices and their interaction with 2D vortices. The focus is on Coanda cylinders using two computational approaches. With the Flow Simulation Methodology (FSM), a turbulent wall jet is computed over a cylinder segment on a body-fitted grid. In FSM, the contribution of the turbulence model depends on the grid resolution relative to a local turbulent length scale. For a flat-plate reference case, FSM is employed as DNS, LES, and URANS. In all cases the large 2D vortices are captured. For the curved-wall geometry, FSM is employed as a DNS. Goertler-type vortices emerge in the simulation but remain weak due to the narrow computational domain. In the second approach, Coanda flows including nozzle and separated region are computed using immersed boundary techniques (IBT). The feasibility of IBT for Coanda Flows is established.

  20. Numerical Investigation of Aerodynamics of Canard-Controlled Missile Using Planar and Grid Tail Fins. Part 1. Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSpirito, James; Vaughn, Milton E., Jr.; Washington, W. D.

    2002-09-01

    Viscous computational fluid dynamic simulations were used to predict the aerodynamic coefficients and flowfield around a generic canard-controlled missile configuration in supersonic flow. Computations were performed for Mach 1.5 and 3.0, at six angles of attack between 0 and 10, with 0 and 10 canard deflection, and with planar and grid tail fins, for a total of 48 cases. Validation of the computed results was demonstrated by the very good agreement between the computed aerodynamic coefficients and those obtained from wind tunnel measurements. Visualizations of the flowfield showed that the canard trailing vortices and downwash produced a low-pressure region on the starboard side of the missile that in turn produced an adverse side force. The pressure differential on the leeward fin produced by the interaction with the canard trailing vortices is primarily responsible for the adverse roll effect observed when planar fins are used. Grid tail fins improved the roll effectiveness of the canards at low supersonic speed. No adverse rolling moment was observed with no canard deflection, or at the higher supersonic speed for either tail fin type due to the lower intensity of the canard trailing vortices in these cases. Flow visualizations from the simulations performed in this study help in the understanding of the flow physics and can lead to improved canard and tail fin designs for missiles and rockets.

  1. Numerical study of active control of mixing in electro-osmotic flows by temperature difference using lattice Boltzmann methods.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, A; Wang, J K; Pooyan, S; Mirbozorgi, S A; Wang, M

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of temperature difference between inlet flow and walls on the electro-osmotic flow through a two-dimensional microchannel is investigated. The main objective is to study the effect of temperature variations on the distribution of ions and consequently internal electric potential field, electric body force, and velocity fields in an electro-osmotic flow. We assume constant temperature and zeta potential on walls and use the mean temperature of each cross section to characterize the Boltzmann ion distribution across the channel. Based on these assumptions, the multiphysical transports are still able to be described by the classical Poisson-Boltzmann model. In this work, the Navier-Stokes equation for fluid flow, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for ion distribution, and the energy equation for heat transfer are solved by a couple lattice Boltzmann method. The modeling results indicate that the temperature difference between walls and the inlet solution may lead to two symmetrical vortices at the entrance region of the microchannel which is appropriate for mixing enhancements. The advantage of this phenomenon for active control of mixing in electro-osmotic flow is the manageability of the vortex scale without extra efforts. For instance, the effective domain of this pattern could broaden by the following modulations: decreasing the external electric potential field, decreasing the electric double layer thickness, or increasing the temperature difference between inlet flow and walls. This work may provide a novel strategy for design or optimization of microsystems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hydrologic discovery through controlled experimentation, data analysis, and numerical and analytical modeling at the Landscape Evolution Observatory (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troch, P. A.; Gevaert, A.; Smit, Y.; Niu, G.; Nakolan, L.; Kyzivat, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) at Biosphere 2-The University of Arizona consists of three identical, sloping, 333 m2 convergent landscapes inside a 5,000 m2 environmentally controlled facility. These engineered landscapes contain 1-meter depth of basaltic tephra, ground to homogenous loamy sand that will undergo physical, chemical, and mineralogical changes over many years. Each landscape contains a spatially dense sensor and sampler network capable of resolving meter-scale lateral heterogeneity and sub-meter scale vertical heterogeneity in moisture, energy and carbon states and fluxes. The density of sensors and frequency at which they can be polled allows for data collection at spatial and temporal scales that are impossible in natural field settings. Embedded solution and gas samplers allow for quantification of biogeochemical processes, and facilitate the use of chemical tracers to study water movement at very high spatial resolutions. Each ~600 metric ton landscape has load cells embedded into the structure to measure changes in total system mass with 0.05% full-scale repeatability (equivalent to less than 1 cm of precipitation). This facilitates the real time accounting of hydrological partitioning at the hillslope scale. Each hillslope is equipped with an engineered rain system capable of raining at rates between 3 and 45 mm/hr in a range of spatial patterns. The rain systems are capable of creating long-term steady state conditions or running complex simulations. The precipitation water supply storage system is flexibly designed to facilitate addition of tracers at constant or time-varying rates for any of the three hillslopes. Six trenches measure subsurface flow via tipping bucket gauges and electromagnetic flowmeters. This presentation will give an overview of lessons learned during the commissioning phase of the first hillslope of LEO, and will indicate several opportunities for collaborative research at Biosphere 2.

  3. An Experimental and Numerical Study of Icing Effects on the Performance and Controllability of a Twin Engine Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, A.; Chung, J.; Potapczuk, M.; Choo, Y.; Wright, W.; Langhals, T.

    1999-01-01

    In September 1997 the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) requested assistance from the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) Icing Branch in the investigation of an aircraft accident that was suspected of being caused by ice contamination. In response to the request NASA agreed to perform an experimental and computational study. The main activities that NASA performed were LERC Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) testing to define ice shapes and 2-D Navier-Stokes analysis to determine the performance degradation that those ice shapes would have caused. An IRT test was conducted in January 1998. Most conditions for the test were based upon raw and derived data from the Flight Data Recorder (FDR) recovered from the accident and upon the current understanding of the Meteorological conditions near the accident. Using a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code, the flow field and resultant lift and drag were calculated for the wing section with various ice shapes accreted in the IRT test. Before the final calculations could be performed extensive examinations of geometry smoothing and turbulence were conducted. The most significant finding of this effort is that several of the five-minute ice accretions generated in the IRT were found by the Navier-Stokes analysis to produce severe lift and drag degradation. The information generated by this study suggests a possible scenario for the kind of control upset recorded in the accident. Secondary findings were that the ice shapes accreted in the IRT were mostly limited to the protected pneumatic boot region of the wing and that during testing, activation of the pneumatic boots cleared most of the ice.

  4. Numerical studies of independent control of electron density and gas temperature via nonlinear coupling in dual-frequency atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. L.; Nie, Q. Y. Wang, Z. B.; Gao, X. T.; Kong, F. R.; Sun, Y. F.; Jiang, B. H.

    2016-07-15

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) provide a promising technology of generating non-equilibrium cold plasmas in atmospheric pressure gases. For both application-focused and fundamental studies, it is important to explore the strategy and the mechanism for enabling effective independent tuning of key plasma parameters in a DBD system. In this paper, we report numerical studies of effects of dual-frequency excitation on atmospheric DBDs, and modulation as well as separate tuning mechanism, with emphasis on dual-frequency coupling to the key plasma parameters and discharge evolution. With an appropriately applied low frequency to the original high frequency, the numerical calculation demonstrates that a strong nonlinear coupling between two frequencies governs the process of ionization and energy deposition into plasma, and thus raises the electron density significantly (e.g., three times in this case) in comparisons with a single frequency driven DBD system. Nevertheless, the gas temperature, which is mainly determined by the high frequency discharge, barely changes. This method then enables a possible approach of controlling both averaged electron density and gas temperature independently.

  5. Vineyard weeds control practices impact on surface water transfers: using numerical tracer experiment coupled to a distributed hydrological model to manage agricultural practices spatial arrangements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, F.; Moussa, R.

    2009-04-01

    In rural basins, agricultural landscape management highly influences water and pollutants transfers. Landuse, agricultural practices and their spatial arrangements are at issue. Hydrological model are widely used to explore impacts of anthropogenic influences on experimental catchments. But planning all spatial arrangements leads to a possible cases count which cannot be considered. On the basis of the recent « numerical experiment » approach, we propose a « numerical tracer function » which had to be coupled to a distributed rainfall-runoff model. This function simulate the transfer of a virtual tracer successively spread on each distributed unit inside the catchment. It allows to rank hydrological spatial units according to their hydrological contribution to the surface flows, particularly at the catchment outlet. It was used with the distributed model MHYDAS in an agricultural context. The case study concerns the experimental Roujan vine-growing catchment (1km², south of France) studied since 1992. In this Mediterranean context, we focus on the soil hydraulic conductivity distributed parameter because it highly depends on weed control practices (chemical weeding induces a lot more runoff than mechanical weeding). We checked model sensitivity analysis to soil hydraulic conductivity spatial arrangement on runoff coefficient, peak discharge and catchment lag-time. Results show (i) the use of the tracer function is more efficient than a random approach to improve sensitivity to spatial arrangements from point of view of simulated discharge range, (ii) the first factor explaining hydrological simulations variability was practices area ratio, (iii) variability induced by practices spatial arrangements was significant on runoff coefficient and peak discharge for balanced practices area ratio and on lag-time for low area ratio of chemical weeding practices. From the actual situation on the experimental Roujan catchment (40% of tilled and 60% of non tilled vineyard

  6. A Field Programmable Gate Array-Based Reconfigurable Smart-Sensor Network for Wireless Monitoring of New Generation Computer Numerically Controlled Machines

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Tapia, Sandra Veronica; Vera-Salas, Luis Alberto; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Aurelio; Stiharu, Ion; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines have evolved to adapt to increasing technological and industrial requirements. To cover these needs, new generation machines have to perform monitoring strategies by incorporating multiple sensors. Since in most of applications the online Processing of the variables is essential, the use of smart sensors is necessary. The contribution of this work is the development of a wireless network platform of reconfigurable smart sensors for CNC machine applications complying with the measurement requirements of new generation CNC machines. Four different smart sensors are put under test in the network and their corresponding signal processing techniques are implemented in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)-based sensor node. PMID:22163602

  7. Fast numerical design of spatial-selective rf pulses in MRI using Krotov and quasi-Newton based optimal control methods.

    PubMed

    Vinding, Mads S; Maximov, Ivan I; Tošner, Zdenĕk; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2012-08-07

    The use of increasingly strong magnetic fields in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) improves sensitivity, susceptibility contrast, and spatial or spectral resolution for functional and localized spectroscopic imaging applications. However, along with these benefits come the challenges of increasing static field (B(0)) and rf field (B(1)) inhomogeneities induced by radial field susceptibility differences and poorer dielectric properties of objects in the scanner. Increasing fields also impose the need for rf irradiation at higher frequencies which may lead to elevated patient energy absorption, eventually posing a safety risk. These reasons have motivated the use of multidimensional rf pulses and parallel rf transmission, and their combination with tailoring of rf pulses for fast and low-power rf performance. For the latter application, analytical and approximate solutions are well-established in linear regimes, however, with increasing nonlinearities and constraints on the rf pulses, numerical iterative methods become attractive. Among such procedures, optimal control methods have recently demonstrated great potential. Here, we present a Krotov-based optimal control approach which as compared to earlier approaches provides very fast, monotonic convergence even without educated initial guesses. This is essential for in vivo MRI applications. The method is compared to a second-order gradient ascent method relying on the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) quasi-Newton method, and a hybrid scheme Krotov-BFGS is also introduced in this study. These optimal control approaches are demonstrated by the design of a 2D spatial selective rf pulse exciting the letters "JCP" in a water phantom.

  8. Static Analysis Numerical Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    and Honeywell Aerospace Advanced Technology to combine model-based development of complex avionics control software with static analysis of the...numerical algorithms, software verification, formal methods 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...18 3.3.4. Tool Software Integration Architecture

  9. Unusual Rh nanocrystal morphology control by hetero-epitaxially growing Rh on Au@Pt nanowires with numerous vertical twinning boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Hyohyun; Khi, Nguyen Tien; Yoon, Jisun; Lee, Hyunkyung; Baik, Hionsuck; Sohn, Jeong-Hun; Lee, Kwangyeol

    2015-04-01

    Simultaneously growing multiple nanocrystallites in a crowded space can cause a shortage of precursors, and this can lead to a vertical growth of nanocrystallites on a given substrate. The presence of surfactant-surfactant interactions among adjacent nanocrystals can also place a unique structural constraint on the growing nanocrystallites, resulting in novel nanocrystal facet control. Herein, we report the growth of Rh on Au@Pt nanowires with multiple twinning boundaries, which are found along the entire nanowire length. The Au@Pt nanowires exhibit numerous bead-like structures, resulting from the preferred Pt deposition on the twinning boundaries, which can serve as nucleation sites for Rh. The heteroepitaxial growth of Rh on the Au@Pt nanowires results in unusual crystal growth behaviours. First, novel morphologies of Rh nanorods, nanoplates, and tangled manes are obtained temperature-dependently, which are not obtained in the absence of the Au@Pt nanowire substrate. Secondly, the thickness of vertically grown nanorods and nanoplates is tightly controlled. We also report the structure-catalytic activity relationship on the catalytic hydrogenation of phthalimides by the new Rh nanostructures.Simultaneously growing multiple nanocrystallites in a crowded space can cause a shortage of precursors, and this can lead to a vertical growth of nanocrystallites on a given substrate. The presence of surfactant-surfactant interactions among adjacent nanocrystals can also place a unique structural constraint on the growing nanocrystallites, resulting in novel nanocrystal facet control. Herein, we report the growth of Rh on Au@Pt nanowires with multiple twinning boundaries, which are found along the entire nanowire length. The Au@Pt nanowires exhibit numerous bead-like structures, resulting from the preferred Pt deposition on the twinning boundaries, which can serve as nucleation sites for Rh. The heteroepitaxial growth of Rh on the Au@Pt nanowires results in unusual crystal

  10. Software For Numerically Controlled Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premo, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    APT (Automatically Programmable Tools) system represents an adaptation, with enhancements, of public-domain version of APT IV/SSX8 to DEC VAX-11/780 computer for use by Engineering Services Division of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Enhancements include super pocket feature, which allows concave polygon pockets. Recent modifications include expansion of sizes of arrays and buffers to accommodate larger part programs, insertion of user-friendly error messages, and correction of programming errors that affect POCKET command and some of sculptured-surface commands (notably SSURF and SCURV). Consists of four components: translator, execution complex, subroutine library, and CL editor. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  11. Numerical Control Lathe Language Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    CLC !IUU!a! x x *lsiw x OIM3 0 ODV ae 𔃻N a .2O3 E - 00 r- o) z 0 U. c C. LL. U- CO) z _ _ _ U. C r-’ 0120 Aig, "WW unolbIIu!"OA x x is~m 90L s~ed...Initially a set of test parts was designed and then programmed at six government installa- tions (Army, Navy , and Air Force). This served to check the part

  12. Software For Numerically Controlled Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premo, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    APT (Automatically Programmable Tools) system represents an adaptation, with enhancements, of public-domain version of APT IV/SSX8 to DEC VAX-11/780 computer for use by Engineering Services Division of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Enhancements include super pocket feature, which allows concave polygon pockets. Recent modifications include expansion of sizes of arrays and buffers to accommodate larger part programs, insertion of user-friendly error messages, and correction of programming errors that affect POCKET command and some of sculptured-surface commands (notably SSURF and SCURV). Consists of four components: translator, execution complex, subroutine library, and CL editor. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  13. Heuristic numerical and analytical models of the hydrologic controls over vertical solute transport in a domed peat bog, Jura Mountains, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.; Siegel, Donald I.; Shotyk, William; Steinmann, Philipp; Pfunder, Gabriele

    2002-04-01

    We report the results of numerical and analytical simulations to test the hypothesis that downward vertical flow of porewater from the crests of domed alpine and kettle bogs controls vertical porewater distributions of major solutes such as Ca and Mg. The domed Etang de la Gruère bog (EGr), Switzerland, characterized by a vertical downward gradient of 0·04 and stratified layers of peat, is chosen as a field site for the model calibration and evaluation. The middle 4-m section of the 6·5 m thick bog peat is heavily humified and has a hydraulic conductivity of 10-5·6 cm s-1. Above and below, peat is less humified with a hydraulic conductivity of 10-3 cm s-1. Heuristic finite difference simulations, using Visual MODFLOW, of the bog hydraulics show that the higher conductivity peat at the bog base is critical to create the observed deep, local flow cells that substantively recharge porewater.Model results and Peclet number calculations show that before 7000 14C yr BP diffusion of solutes from underlying mineral soils controlled the vertical distribution of porewater chemistry. From 7000 to 1250 14C BP the porewater chemistry was probably controlled by both upward diffusion and downward advection, and after 1250 14C yr BP porewater chemistry was probably controlled by downward advection. Concentrations of conservative major solutes in the porewaters of alpine, ombrotrophic bogs are the net effect of both downward vertical porewater movement and upward vertical diffusion, the magnitudes of which are delicately poised to the configuration of the bog water table over time and subsurface peat stratigraphy.

  14. Analytical and Numerical Investigation of the Time-scale associated with Seawater Intrusion and Retreat in a Flux-controlled Coastal Aquifer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathore, S.; Luo, J.; Zhao, Y.; Lu, C.

    2016-12-01

    Quantification of the time-scale associated with the movement of saltwater-freshwater interface is necessary for the development of efficient and effective controls of saltwater intrusion. This study presents a novel approach to understand the dynamics controlling the time-scale of saltwater intrusion and retreat. We derived an analytical solution for the time-scales of saltwater intrusion and retreat, for a flux-controlled coastal aquifer system, based on an implicit solution for the transient freshwater outflow into the sea. The simple analytical solution was able to produce the results comparable in trends of time-scale variation with the changing boundary to that obtained from the numerical simulations. We identify the flow continuity and the hydrostatic equilibrium across interface as the two processes primarily governing the time-scales. Our theoretical analyses demonstrate how different hydrogeological parameters and boundary conditions affect the above mentioned processes and subsequently control the time-scales. It was found that higher porosity, hydraulic conductivity or aquifer depth values results in longer time-scales. We quantify the temporal asymmetry in the saltwater intrusion and retreat, in the form of ratio of time-scale of interface-advance to interface-retreat, and found this ratio to be heavily dependent on changing boundary conditions and weakly influenced by aquifer parameters. The solution also has the potential to be used for the prediction purpose. The analytical nature of the solution enables us to conveniently incorporate seawater intrusion or retreat time-scale as an objective or constraint in a multi-objective optimization model for coastal aquifer management plans.

  15. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 5; Numerical Computation of Acoustic Mode Reflection Coefficients for an Unflanged Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    A computational method to predict modal reflection coefficients in cylindrical ducts has been developed based on the work of Homicz, Lordi, and Rehm, which uses the Wiener-Hopf method to account for the boundary conditions at the termination of a thin cylindrical pipe. The purpose of this study is to develop a computational routine to predict the reflection coefficients of higher order acoustic modes impinging on the unflanged termination of a cylindrical duct. This effort was conducted wider Task Order 5 of the NASA Lewis LET Program, Active Noise Control of aircraft Engines: Feasibility Study, and will be used as part of the development of an integrated source noise, acoustic propagation, ANC actuator coupling, and control system algorithm simulation. The reflection coefficient prediction will be incorporated into an existing cylindrical duct modal analysis to account for the reflection of modes from the duct termination. This will provide a more accurate, rapid computation design tool for evaluating the effect of reflected waves on active noise control systems mounted in the duct, as well as providing a tool for the design of acoustic treatment in inlet ducts. As an active noise control system design tool, the method can be used preliminary to more accurate but more numerically intensive acoustic propagation models such as finite element methods. The resulting computer program has been shown to give reasonable results, some examples of which are presented. Reliable data to use for comparison is scarce, so complete checkout is difficult, and further checkout is needed over a wider range of system parameters. In future efforts the method will be adapted as a subroutine to the GEAE segmented cylindrical duct modal analysis program.

  16. Factors controlling the configuration of the fresh-saline water interface in the Dead Sea coastal aquifers: Synthesis of TDEM surveys and numerical groundwater modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yechieli, Y.; Kafri, U.; Goldman, M.; Voss, C.I.

    2001-01-01

    TDEM (time domain electromagnetic) traverses in the Dead Sea (DS) coastal aquifer help to delineate the configuration of the interrelated fresh-water and brine bodies and the interface in between. A good linear correlation exists between the logarithm of TDEM resistivity and the chloride concentration of groundwater, mostly in the higher salinity range, close to that of the DS brine. In this range, salinity is the most important factor controlling resistivity. The configuration of the fresh-saline water interface is dictated by the hydraulic gradient, which is controlled by a number of hydrological factors. Three types of irregularities in the configuration of fresh-water and saline-water bodies were observed in the study area: 1. Fresh-water aquifers underlying more saline ones ("Reversal") in a multi-aquifer system. 2. "Reversal" and irregular residual saline-water bodies related to historical, frequently fluctuating DS base level and respective interfaces, which have not undergone complete flushing. A rough estimate of flushing rates may be obtained based on knowledge of the above fluctuations. The occurrence of salt beds is also a factor affecting the interface configuration. 3. The interface steepens towards and adjacent to the DS Rift fault zone. Simulation analysis with a numerical, variable-density flow model, using the US Geological Survey's SUTRA code, indicates that interface steep- ening may result from a steep water-level gradient across the zone, possibly due to a low hydraulic conductivity in the immediate vicinity of the fault.

  17. Numerical Optimization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Dipartimento di Fisica , II Universit L di Romna (Tor Vergata), 00173 Roma (Italy) Francesco Zirilli * m .Dipartieto di Matematica 1G. Castelnuovo", UnT.rsit... Fisica II UniversitA di Roma (Tor Vergata) 00173 Roma - Italy Francesco Zirilli Dipartimento di Matematica G. Castelnuovo Universita di Roma "La...TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS Dipartimento di Matematica -G.--iattelnuoz .’ Universita di Roma "La Sapienze" rlnlRr% Pnmaq (Tt-al’g) I$. CONTROLLING

  18. Cleaveage domains control the orientation of mylonitic shear zones at the brittle-viscous transition (Cap de Creus, NE Spain) - a combined field and numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, T.; Fusseis, F.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2009-04-01

    Propagation of greenschist-facies shear zones is often preceded by the formation of fractures in their tip process zones. These fractures tend to have a tensile nature and are generally considered as having triggered the formation of mylonites by focusing fluid flow and locally accelerating strain softening. The often-observed parallelism between the tensile fractures and the mylonitic shear zones indicates that the fractures not only control the position but also the orientation of the shear zones. The mechanical antagonism in this parallelism is usually resolved with a reorientation of the stress field between fracture formation and mylonitic shearing. Where fractures were clearly shown to form parallel to the shear zone in the same deformation, this might be due to the influence of mechanical anisotropies in the host rock. In our combined numerical and field study, we test the potential of a foliation to influence the orientation of a microfracture. We designed a numerical experiment using the finite element code Abaqus® (Hibbit et al. 2003) to simulate strain localization in metapelitic and metapsammitic rocks at greenschist-facies conditions. The experimental setup comprises a 2D parametric model with two rheological phases (‘cleavage domains' and ‘microlithons' consisting of muscovite and quartz respectively). The geometry of the model is described in terms of probability distributions which allow us to quickly generate different realizations of 2D sections with prescribed muscovite content, cleavage domains size, orientation and distribution. We consider the specific heat, thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of both materials, as well as anisotropic elastic properties for the muscovite. The plasticity flow laws used consider the temperature, pressure and strain rate dependencies. Our models are deformed under simple shear applied with velocity boundary conditions on a thin buffer zone surrounding the sample, at 450°C and under a confining

  19. Numerical simulation of a powered-lift landing, tracking flow features using overset grids, and simulation of high lift devices on a fighter-lift-and-control wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chawla, Kalpana

    1993-01-01

    Attached as appendices to this report are documents describing work performed on the simulation of a landing powered-lift delta wing, the tracking of flow features using overset grids, and the simulation of flaps on the Wright Patterson Lab's fighter-lift-and-control (FLAC) wing. Numerical simulation of a powered-lift landing includes the computation of flow about a delta wing at four fixed heights as well as a simulated landing, in which the delta wing descends toward the ground. Comparison of computed and experimental lift coefficients indicates that the simulations capture the qualitative trends in lift-loss encountered by thrust-vectoring aircraft operating in ground effect. Power spectra of temporal variations of pressure indicate computed vortex shedding frequencies close to the jet exit are in the experimentally observed frequency range; the power spectra of pressure also provide insights into the mechanisms of lift oscillations. Also, a method for using overset grids to track dynamic flow features is described and the method is validated by tracking a moving shock and vortices shed behind a circular cylinder. Finally, Chimera gridding strategies were used to develop pressure coefficient contours for the FLAC wing for a Mach no. of 0.18 and Reynolds no. of 2.5 million.

  20. Effect of clearance on wrinkling of 21-6-9 high-strength stainless steel tubes in numerical control rotary draw bending process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lu; Fang, Jun; Li, Yuan; Dai, Li; Xiong, Mengsi; Lu, Shiqiang

    2017-03-01

    Clearance between tube and all kinds of dies has a significant and complicated influence on wrinkling of 21-6-9 high-strength stainless steel tubes (HSST) during numerical control (NC) rotary draw bending process. To explore the effect of that, a three dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model of the whole process for 21-6-9 HSST was build based on FE platform of ABAQUS and validated by the experiment. Then, simulation and study of the process was carried out based on the FE model and the influence laws of clearance on wrinkling of 21-6-9 HSST in NC rotary draw bending were obtained. The results show that the wrinkling wave degree increases obviously with the increase of clearance between mandrel and tube Cm and clearance between bending die and tube Cb, while decreases with increase of clearance between pressure die and tube Cp; the wrinkling wave degree decreases sharply when clearance between wiper die and tube Cw is less than 0.2mm, and the wrinkling wave degree hardly has no variation when Cw is greater than 0.2mm.

  1. Autogenic versus allogenic controls on the evolution of a coupled fluvial megafan-mountainous catchment system: numerical modelling and comparison with the Lannemezan megafan system (northern Pyrenees, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouchené, Margaux; van der Beek, Peter; Carretier, Sébastien; Mouthereau, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    Alluvial megafans are sensitive recorders of landscape evolution, controlled by both autogenic processes and allogenic forcing, and they are influenced by the coupled dynamics of the fan with its mountainous catchment. The Lannemezan megafan in the northern Pyrenean foreland was abandoned by its mountainous feeder stream during the Quaternary and subsequently incised, leaving a flight of alluvial terraces along the stream network. We use numerical models to explore the relative roles of autogenic processes and external forcing in the building, abandonment and incision of a foreland megafan, and we compare the results with the inferred evolution of the Lannemezan megafan. Autogenic processes are sufficient to explain the building of a megafan and the long-term entrenchment of its feeding river on time and space scales that match the Lannemezan setting. Climate, through temporal variations in precipitation rate, may have played a role in the episodic pattern of incision on a shorter timescale. In contrast, base-level changes, tectonic activity in the mountain range or tilting of the foreland through flexural isostatic rebound do not appear to have played a role in the abandonment of the megafan.

  2. Salinity control in a clay soil beneath an orchard irrigated with treated waste water in the presence of a high water table: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, David; Laufer, Asher; Bardhan, Gopali; Levy, Guy J.

    2015-12-01

    A citrus orchard planted on a structured, clay soil associated with a high water table, irrigated by drip irrigation system using treated waste water (TWW) and local well water (LWW) was considered here. The scope of the present study was to analyze transport of mixed-ion, interacting salts in a combined vadose zone-groundwater flow system focusing on the following issues: (i) long-term effects of irrigation with TWW on the response of the flow system, identifying the main factors (e.g., soil salinity, soil sodicity) that control these effects, and (ii) salinity control aiming at improving both crop productivity and groundwater quality. To pursue this two-fold goal, 3-D numerical simulations of field-scale flow and transport were performed for an extended period of time, considering realistic features of the soil, water table, crop, weather and irrigation, and the coupling between the flow and the transport through the dependence of the soil hydraulic functions, K(ψ) and θ(ψ), on soil solution concentration C, and sodium adsorption ratio, SAR. Results of the analyses suggest that in the case studied, the long-term effect of irrigation with TWW on the response of the flow system is attributed to the enhanced salinity of the TWW, and not to the increase in soil sodicity. The latter findings are attributed to: (i) the negative effect of soil salinity on water uptake, and the tradeoff between water uptake and drainage flux, and, concurrently, solute discharge below the root zone; and, (ii) the tradeoff between the effects of C and SAR on K(ψ) and θ(ψ). Furthermore, it was demonstrated that a data-driven protocol for soil salinity control, based on alternating irrigation water quality between TWW and desalinized water, guided by the soil solution salinity at the centroid of the soil volume active in water uptake, may lead to a substantial increase in crop yield, and to a substantial decrease in the salinity load in the groundwater.

  3. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  4. Control of the Damped, Driven Pendulum, in both Numerical Models and Physical Apparatus to develop algorithms appropriate to the control chaotic formation of Taylor Vortex Pairs in Modified Taylor-Couette Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Eric; Zhao, Yunjie; Hill, Lucas; Brenman, David; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard

    2008-11-01

    Chaos has been observed in the formation of Taylor Vortex pairs in Modified Taylor Couette flow with hourglass geometry. Control of chaos has been demonstrated in this system employing the RPF algorithm. Seeking alternative algorithms, we are implementing the OGY algorithm in a numerical model of a damped driven mechanical pendulum and a physical apparatus. We report on both and future plans for the Modified Taylor-Couette system. Wiener et al, Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997). Rollins et al, Phys. Rev. E 47, R780 (1993). Wiener et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2340 (1999). E. Ott, C. Grebogi, & J. A. Yorke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1196 (1990). G. L. Baker, Am. J. Phys. 63, 832 (1995). J. A. Blackburn et al, Rev. Sci. Instr. 60, 422 (1989).

  5. Controlling the numerical Cerenkov instability in PIC simulations using a customized finite difference Maxwell solver and a local FFT based current correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei; Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Fiuza, Frederico; Decyk, Viktor K.; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank S.; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Mori, Warren B.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we present a customized finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) Maxwell solver for the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. The solver is customized to effectively eliminate the numerical Cerenkov instability (NCI) which arises when a plasma (neutral or non-neutral) relativistically drifts on a grid when using the PIC algorithm. We control the EM dispersion curve in the direction of the plasma drift of a FDTD Maxwell solver by using a customized higher order finite difference operator for the spatial derivative along the direction of the drift (1 ˆ direction). We show that this eliminates the main NCI modes with moderate |k1 | , while keeps additional main NCI modes well outside the range of physical interest with higher |k1 | . These main NCI modes can be easily filtered out along with first spatial aliasing NCI modes which are also at the edge of the fundamental Brillouin zone. The customized solver has the possible advantage of improved parallel scalability because it can be easily partitioned along 1 ˆ which typically has many more cells than other directions for the problems of interest. We show that FFTs can be performed locally to current on each partition to filter out the main and first spatial aliasing NCI modes, and to correct the current so that it satisfies the continuity equation for the customized spatial derivative. This ensures that Gauss' Law is satisfied. We present simulation examples of one relativistically drifting plasma, of two colliding relativistically drifting plasmas, and of nonlinear laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a Lorentz boosted frame that show no evidence of the NCI can be observed when using this customized Maxwell solver together with its NCI elimination scheme.

  6. Controlling the numerical Cerenkov instability in PIC simulations using a customized finite difference Maxwell solver and a local FFT based current correction

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Fei; Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; ...

    2017-01-12

    In this study we present a customized finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) Maxwell solver for the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. The solver is customized to effectively eliminate the numerical Cerenkov instability (NCI) which arises when a plasma (neutral or non-neutral) relativistically drifts on a grid when using the PIC algorithm. We control the EM dispersion curve in the direction of the plasma drift of a FDTD Maxwell solver by using a customized higher order finite difference operator for the spatial derivative along the direction of the drift (1ˆ direction). We show that this eliminates the main NCI modes with moderate |k1|, while keeps additionalmore » main NCI modes well outside the range of physical interest with higher |k1|. These main NCI modes can be easily filtered out along with first spatial aliasing NCI modes which are also at the edge of the fundamental Brillouin zone. The customized solver has the possible advantage of improved parallel scalability because it can be easily partitioned along 1ˆ which typically has many more cells than other directions for the problems of interest. We show that FFTs can be performed locally to current on each partition to filter out the main and first spatial aliasing NCI modes, and to correct the current so that it satisfies the continuity equation for the customized spatial derivative. This ensures that Gauss’ Law is satisfied. Lastly, we present simulation examples of one relativistically drifting plasma, of two colliding relativistically drifting plasmas, and of nonlinear laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a Lorentz boosted frame that show no evidence of the NCI can be observed when using this customized Maxwell solver together with its NCI elimination scheme.« less

  7. Are computer numerical control (CNC)-manufactured patient-specific metal templates available for posterior thoracic pedicle screw insertion? Feasibility and accuracy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangxue; Tang, Lei; Ye, Qiang; Huang, Wenhua; Li, Jianyi

    2017-07-17

    Accurate and safe posterior thoracic pedicle insertion (PTPI) remains a challenge. Patient-specific drill templates (PDTs) created by rapid prototyping (RP) can assist in posterior thoracic pedicle insertion, but pose biocompatibility risks. The aims of this study were to develop alternative PDTs with computer numerical control (CNC) and assess their feasibility and accuracy in assisting PTPI. Preoperative CT images of 31 cadaveric thoracic vertebras were obtained and then the optimal pedicle screw trajectories were planned. The PDTs with optimal screw trajectories were randomly assigned to be designed and manufactured by CNC or RP in each vertebra. With the guide of the CNC- or RP-manufactured PDTs, the appropriate screws were inserted into the pedicles. Postoperative CT scans were performed to analyze any deviations at entry point and midpoint of the pedicles. The CNC group was found to be significant manufacture-time-shortening, and cost-decreasing, when compared with the RP group (P < 0.01). The PDTs fitted the vertebral laminates well while all screws were being inserted into the pedicles. There were no significant differences in absolute deviations at entry point and midpoint of the pedicle on either axial or sagittal planes (P > 0.05). The screw positions were grade 0 in 90.3% and grade 1 in 9.7% of the cases in the CNC group and grade 0 in 93.5% and grade 1 in 6.5% of the cases in the RP group (P = 0.641). CNC-manufactured PDTs are viable for assisting in PTPI with good feasibility and accuracy.

  8. Free convective controls on sequestration of salts into low-permeability strata: Insights from sand tank laboratory experiments and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, C. T.; Post, V.

    2008-12-01

    Vertical reflux of dense brines may occur in hydrogeologic situations including seawater intrusion, transgression-regression cycles, leachate migration from landfills and brine reflux beneath salt lakes. The critical control that geologic heterogeneity plays in the free convective process is still an area which requires significant exploration. To date, no studies have been published that focus on the effect that discrete low- permeability structures have on the free convection process at the scale of individual lenses. The precise local scale solute transport mechanisms that affect solute exchange between the layers of lower and higher permeability have not been reported. Using sand tank experiments and numerical models, we explore local scale solute transport processes associated with free convection in the region both surrounding and within discrete low-permeability strata. Different permeability geometries and contrasts between high- and low- permeability regions are explored. Results show that the free convective processes are inherently complex and not intuitively obvious. In the high-permeability region, salinization was rapid and occurred predominantly by free convective flow around the low-permeability blocks, a process we refer to as 'interlayer convection'. Fresh water originally present within the overall domain considered became trapped both below and within the low-permeability structures. A free convection flow field also became concurrently established within the low-permeability lenses, a process we refer to as 'intralayer convection'. This smaller sublayer scale process is driven by both larger scale interlayer convection and by the buoyancy of the fresh water within the low permeability lenses. It was found that upward vertical flow retards salinization of the lenses as these buoyant freshwater displacements oppose the downward penetration of dissolved salts by diffusion and free convection from above. Due to the presence of vertical upward flow

  9. Numerical optimization of illumination and mask layout for the enlargement of process windows and for the control of photoresist profiles in proximity printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motzek, Kristian; Partel, Stefan; Vogler, Uwe; Erdmann, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    Although proximity printing is the oldest and, in view of the basic optical setup, simplest photolithographic technique, it still remains in heavy use in the semiconductor manufacturing industry. The fact that this technique exists for a long time does not mean that there is no more room for improvements or new applications. Lending concepts developed for modern projection scanners and steppers and adapting them for our purposes, we demonstrate how numerical simulation and optimization can help to make the proximity printing process more stable against process variations and to increase the resolution for critical features. For this purpose, we numerically optimize the angular spectrum of the illumination and the mask layout. Furthermore, we couple the optimization of the optical degrees of freedom to the simulation of photoresist development to assess the effects of changes to the illumination and mask on the final photoresist profile.

  10. Numerical study of groundwater flow cycling controlled by seawater/freshwater interaction in a coastal karst aquifer through conduit network using CFPv2.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zexuan; Hu, Bill X; Davis, Hal; Kish, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a groundwater flow cycling in a karst springshed and an interaction between two springs, Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs, through a subground conduit network are numerically simulated using CFPv2, the latest research version of MODFLOW-CFP (Conduit Flow Process). The Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs, located in a marine estuary and 11 miles inland, respectively, are two major groundwater discharge spots in the Woodville Karst Plain (WKP), North Florida, USA. A three-phase conceptual model of groundwater flow cycling between the two springs and surface water recharge from a major surface creek (Lost Creek) was proposed in various rainfall conditions. A high permeable subground karst conduit network connecting the two springs was found by tracer tests and cave diving. Flow rate of discharge, salinity, sea level and tide height at Spring Creek Springs could significantly affect groundwater discharge and water stage at Wakulla Springs simultaneously. Based on the conceptual model, a numerical hybrid discrete-continuum groundwater flow model is developed using CFPv2 and calibrated by field measurements. Non-laminar flows in conduits and flow exchange between conduits and porous medium are implemented in the hybrid coupling numerical model. Time-variable salinity and equivalent freshwater head boundary conditions at the submarine spring as well as changing recharges have significant impacts on seawater/freshwater interaction and springs' discharges. The developed numerical model is used to simulate the dynamic hydrological process and quantitatively represent the three-phase conceptual model from June 2007 to June 2010. Simulated results of two springs' discharges match reasonably well to measurements with correlation coefficients 0.891 and 0.866 at Spring Creeks Springs and Wakulla Springs, respectively. The impacts of sea level rise on regional groundwater flow field and relationship between the inland springs and submarine springs are

  11. Numerical study of groundwater flow cycling controlled by seawater/freshwater interaction in a coastal karst aquifer through conduit network using CFPv2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zexuan; Hu, Bill X.; Davis, Hal; Kish, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a groundwater flow cycling in a karst springshed and an interaction between two springs, Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs, through a subground conduit network are numerically simulated using CFPv2, the latest research version of MODFLOW-CFP (Conduit Flow Process). The Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs, located in a marine estuary and 11 miles inland, respectively, are two major groundwater discharge spots in the Woodville Karst Plain (WKP), North Florida, USA. A three-phase conceptual model of groundwater flow cycling between the two springs and surface water recharge from a major surface creek (Lost Creek) was proposed in various rainfall conditions. A high permeable subground karst conduit network connecting the two springs was found by tracer tests and cave diving. Flow rate of discharge, salinity, sea level and tide height at Spring Creek Springs could significantly affect groundwater discharge and water stage at Wakulla Springs simultaneously. Based on the conceptual model, a numerical hybrid discrete-continuum groundwater flow model is developed using CFPv2 and calibrated by field measurements. Non-laminar flows in conduits and flow exchange between conduits and porous medium are implemented in the hybrid coupling numerical model. Time-variable salinity and equivalent freshwater head boundary conditions at the submarine spring as well as changing recharges have significant impacts on seawater/freshwater interaction and springs' discharges. The developed numerical model is used to simulate the dynamic hydrological process and quantitatively represent the three-phase conceptual model from June 2007 to June 2010. Simulated results of two springs' discharges match reasonably well to measurements with correlation coefficients 0.891 and 0.866 at Spring Creeks Springs and Wakulla Springs, respectively. The impacts of sea level rise on regional groundwater flow field and relationship between the inland springs and submarine springs are

  12. Numerical derivation of linear perturbation model from nonlinear real-time vehicle simulations - A means of validation and increased credibility. [computerized simulation for aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dieudonne, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical technique has been developed which generates linear perturbation models from nonlinear real-time aircraft vehicle simulations at Langley Research Center. The technique is very general and can be applied to simulations of any system described by nonlinear differential equations. Linear models about various trim conditions have been obtained from simulations of the Boeing 737, Northrop F5-E, Cessna 180, Sikorsky CH-54, and NASA/Army Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA). One use of the derived linear models is as a validation and verification tool for the nonlinear simulation.

  13. Design and numerical evaluation of full-authority flight control systems for conventional and thruster-augmented helicopters employed in NOE operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perri, Todd A.; Mckillip, R. M., Jr.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The development and methodology is presented for development of full-authority implicit model-following and explicit model-following optimal controllers for use on helicopters operating in the Nap-of-the Earth (NOE) environment. Pole placement, input-output frequency response, and step input response were used to evaluate handling qualities performance. The pilot was equipped with velocity-command inputs. A mathematical/computational trajectory optimization method was employed to evaluate the ability of each controller to fly NOE maneuvers. The method determines the optimal swashplate and thruster input histories from the helicopter's dynamics and the prescribed geometry and desired flying qualities of the maneuver. Three maneuvers were investigated for both the implicit and explicit controllers with and without auxiliary propulsion installed: pop-up/dash/descent, bob-up at 40 knots, and glideslope. The explicit controller proved to be superior to the implicit controller in performance and ease of design.

  14. Bidirectional Modulation of Numerical Magnitude.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Qadeer; Nigmatullina, Yuliya; Nigmatullin, Ramil; Asavarut, Paladd; Goga, Usman; Khan, Sarah; Sander, Kaija; Siddiqui, Shuaib; Roberts, R E; Cohen Kadosh, Roi; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Malhotra, Paresh A

    2016-05-01

    Numerical cognition is critical for modern life; however, the precise neural mechanisms underpinning numerical magnitude allocation in humans remain obscure. Based upon previous reports demonstrating the close behavioral and neuro-anatomical relationship between number allocation and spatial attention, we hypothesized that these systems would be subject to similar control mechanisms, namely dynamic interhemispheric competition. We employed a physiological paradigm, combining visual and vestibular stimulation, to induce interhemispheric conflict and subsequent unihemispheric inhibition, as confirmed by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). This allowed us to demonstrate the first systematic bidirectional modulation of numerical magnitude toward either higher or lower numbers, independently of either eye movements or spatial attention mediated biases. We incorporated both our findings and those from the most widely accepted theoretical framework for numerical cognition to present a novel unifying computational model that describes how numerical magnitude allocation is subject to dynamic interhemispheric competition. That is, numerical allocation is continually updated in a contextual manner based upon relative magnitude, with the right hemisphere responsible for smaller magnitudes and the left hemisphere for larger magnitudes.

  15. Bidirectional Modulation of Numerical Magnitude

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Qadeer; Nigmatullina, Yuliya; Nigmatullin, Ramil; Asavarut, Paladd; Goga, Usman; Khan, Sarah; Sander, Kaija; Siddiqui, Shuaib; Roberts, R. E.; Cohen Kadosh, Roi; Bronstein, Adolfo M.; Malhotra, Paresh A.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical cognition is critical for modern life; however, the precise neural mechanisms underpinning numerical magnitude allocation in humans remain obscure. Based upon previous reports demonstrating the close behavioral and neuro-anatomical relationship between number allocation and spatial attention, we hypothesized that these systems would be subject to similar control mechanisms, namely dynamic interhemispheric competition. We employed a physiological paradigm, combining visual and vestibular stimulation, to induce interhemispheric conflict and subsequent unihemispheric inhibition, as confirmed by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). This allowed us to demonstrate the first systematic bidirectional modulation of numerical magnitude toward either higher or lower numbers, independently of either eye movements or spatial attention mediated biases. We incorporated both our findings and those from the most widely accepted theoretical framework for numerical cognition to present a novel unifying computational model that describes how numerical magnitude allocation is subject to dynamic interhemispheric competition. That is, numerical allocation is continually updated in a contextual manner based upon relative magnitude, with the right hemisphere responsible for smaller magnitudes and the left hemisphere for larger magnitudes. PMID:26879093

  16. A numerical framework for diffusion-controlled bimolecular-reactive systems to enforce maximum principles and the non-negative constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakshatrala, K. B.; Mudunuru, M. K.; Valocchi, A. J.

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel computational framework for diffusive-reactive systems that satisfies the non-negative constraint and maximum principles on general computational grids. The governing equations for the concentration of reactants and product are written in terms of tensorial diffusion-reaction equations. We restrict our studies to fast irreversible bimolecular reactions. If one assumes that the reaction is diffusion-limited and all chemical species have the same diffusion coefficient, one can employ a linear transformation to rewrite the governing equations in terms of invariants, which are unaffected by the reaction. This results in two uncoupled tensorial diffusion equations in terms of these invariants, which are solved using a novel non-negative solver for tensorial diffusion-type equations. The concentrations of the reactants and the product are then calculated from invariants using algebraic manipulations. The novel aspect of the proposed computational framework is that it will always produce physically meaningful non-negative values for the concentrations of all chemical species. Several representative numerical examples are presented to illustrate the robustness, convergence, and the numerical performance of the proposed computational framework. We will also compare the proposed framework with other popular formulations. In particular, we will show that the Galerkin formulation (which is the standard single-field formulation) does not produce reliable solutions, and the reason can be attributed to the fact that the single-field formulation does not guarantee non-negative solutions. We will also show that the clipping procedure (which produces non-negative solutions but is considered as a variational crime) does not give accurate results when compared with the proposed computational framework.

  17. Numerical Boundary Condition Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Topics include numerical procedures for treating inflow and outflow boundaries, steady and unsteady discontinuous surfaces, far field boundaries, and multiblock grids. In addition, the effects of numerical boundary approximations on stability, accuracy, and convergence rate of the numerical solution are discussed.

  18. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of historical and current numerical aerodynamic simulation (NAS) is given. The capabilities and goals of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility are outlined. Emphasis is given to numerical flow visualization and its applications to structural analysis of aircraft and spacecraft bodies. The uses of NAS in computational chemistry, engine design, and galactic evolution are mentioned.

  19. Numerical accuracy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerstoel, J. W.

    1988-12-01

    A framework is provided for numerical accuracy assessment. The purpose of numerical flow simulations is formulated. This formulation concerns the classes of aeronautical configurations (boundaries), the desired flow physics (flow equations and their properties), the classes of flow conditions on flow boundaries (boundary conditions), and the initial flow conditions. Next, accuracy and economical performance requirements are defined; the final numerical flow simulation results of interest should have a guaranteed accuracy, and be produced for an acceptable FLOP-price. Within this context, the validation of numerical processes with respect to the well known topics of consistency, stability, and convergence when the mesh is refined must be done by numerical experimentation because theory gives only partial answers. This requires careful design of text cases for numerical experimentation. Finally, the results of a few recent evaluation exercises of numerical experiments with a large number of codes on a few test cases are summarized.

  20. Numerical modeling of simultaneous tracer release and piscicide treatment for invasive species control in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Chicago, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, Zhenduo; Motta, Davide; Jackson, P. Ryan; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2017-01-01

    In December 2009, during a piscicide treatment targeting the invasive Asian carp in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Rhodamine WT dye was released to track and document the transport and dispersion of the piscicide. In this study, two modeling approaches are presented to reproduce the advection and dispersion of the dye tracer (and piscicide), a one-dimensional analytical solution and a three-dimensional numerical model. The two approaches were compared with field measurements of concentration and their applicability is discussed. Acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements were used to estimate the longitudinal dispersion coefficients at ten cross sections, which were taken as reference for calibrating the longitudinal dispersion coefficient in the one-dimensional analytical solution. While the analytical solution is fast, relatively simple, and can fairly accurately predict the core of the observed concentration time series at points downstream, it does not capture the tail of the breakthrough curves. These tails are well reproduced by the three-dimensional model, because it accounts for the effects of dead zones and a power plant which withdraws nearly 80 % of the water from the canal for cooling purposes before returning it back to the canal.

  1. A numerical method of regenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaowei; Matsubara, Yoichi

    2004-02-01

    A numerical method for regenerators is introduced in this paper. It is not only suitable for the regenerators in cryocoolers and Stirling engines, but also suitable for the stacks in acoustic engines and the pulse tubes in pulse tube refrigerators. The numerical model is one dimensional periodic unsteady flow model. The numerical method is based on the control volume concept with the implicitly solve method. The iteration acceleration method, which considers the one-dimensional periodic unsteady problem as the steady two-dimensional problem, is used for decreasing the calculation time. By this method, the regenerator in an inertance tube pulse tube refrigerator was simulated. The result is useful for understanding how the inefficiency of the regenerator changes with the inertance effect.

  2. Numerical Algorithm for Delta of Asian Option.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Boxiang; Yu, Yang; Wang, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    We study the numerical solution of the Greeks of Asian options. In particular, we derive a close form solution of Δ of Asian geometric option and use this analytical form as a control to numerically calculate Δ of Asian arithmetic option, which is known to have no explicit close form solution. We implement our proposed numerical method and compare the standard error with other classical variance reduction methods. Our method provides an efficient solution to the hedging strategy with Asian options.

  3. Numerical Stability and Control Analysis Towards Falling-Leaf Prediction Capabilities of Splitflow for Two Generic High-Performance Aircraft Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton, Eric F.

    1998-01-01

    Aerodynamic analysis are performed using the Lockheed-Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems (LMTAS) Splitflow computational fluid dynamics code to investigate the computational prediction capabilities for vortex-dominated flow fields of two different tailless aircraft models at large angles of attack and sideslip. These computations are performed with the goal of providing useful stability and control data to designers of high performance aircraft. Appropriate metrics for accuracy, time, and ease of use are determined in consultations with both the LMTAS Advanced Design and Stability and Control groups. Results are obtained and compared to wind-tunnel data for all six components of forces and moments. Moment data is combined to form a "falling leaf" stability analysis. Finally, a handful of viscous simulations were also performed to further investigate nonlinearities and possible viscous effects in the differences between the accumulated inviscid computational and experimental data.

  4. Numerical investigation on the generation of high-order Laguerre-Gaussian beams in end-pumped solid-state lasers by introducing loss control.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ajian; Lei, Jian; Chen, Peifeng; Wang, Ying; Li, Shumo

    2014-11-20

    This paper reports a robust and systematic approach to generate high-order scalar Laguerre-Gaussian (LGp,l) beams in end-pumped solid-state lasers by introducing loss control. Based on the spatial distributions of Laguerre-Gaussian modes and the theory of transverse mode selection, the "loss control" is implemented by an amplitude mask in the resonator. This proposed mechanism can be divided into three categories: radial loss, azimuthal loss, and the combination of radial and azimuthal loss, which correspond to excite radial high-order modes (LGp,0), azimuthal high-order modes (LG0,l), and regular high-order modes (LGp,l), respectively. By controlling the locations and thicknesses of opaque rings and lines on the mask, all kinds of LGp,l modes can be obtained. With the application of mode purity, all the generated modes possess high mode purities greater than 93% in simulation.

  5. First-order kinetics-controlled multiple species reactive transport of dissolved organic compounds in groundwater: Development and application of a numerical model

    SciTech Connect

    McNab, W.W. Jr.

    1990-05-01

    Reactive chemical transport models developed over the past decade have generally relied on the assumption that local thermodynamic equilibrium is achieved at all times between aqueous species in a given system. Consequently, homogeneous aqueous systems characterized by a number of kinetically slow reactions, particularly problems involving organic species, cannot be satisfactorily modeled. In this study, we present a prototype computer model, KINETRAN, which is designed to handle kinetically-controlled homogeneous reactions in the aqueous phase, along with the transport of the various species involved, through geologic media. 31 refs., 53 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Optimization of a High-Lift System to Improve Low-Speed Performance, Stability, and Control of an Arrow-Wing Supersonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E.; Glaab, Louis J.

    1999-01-01

    An investigation was performed to evaluate leading-and trailing-edge flap deflections for optimal aerodynamic performance of a High-Speed Civil Transport concept during takeoff and approach-to-landing conditions. The configuration used for this study was designed by the Douglas Aircraft Company during the 1970's. A 0.1-scale model of this configuration was tested in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel with both the original leading-edge flap system and a new leading-edge flap system, which was designed with modem computational flow analysis and optimization tools. Leading-and trailing-edge flap deflections were generated for the original and modified leading-edge flap systems with the computational flow analysis and optimization tools. Although wind tunnel data indicated improvements in aerodynamic performance for the analytically derived flap deflections for both leading-edge flap systems, perturbations of the analytically derived leading-edge flap deflections yielded significant additional improvements in aerodynamic performance. In addition to the aerodynamic performance optimization testing, stability and control data were also obtained. An evaluation of the crosswind landing capability of the aircraft configuration revealed that insufficient lateral control existed as a result of high levels of lateral stability. Deflection of the leading-and trailing-edge flaps improved the crosswind landing capability of the vehicle considerably; however, additional improvements are required.

  7. Finger-Based Numerical Skills Link Fine Motor Skills to Numerical Development in Preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Suggate, Sebastian; Stoeger, Heidrun; Fischer, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies investigating the association between fine-motor skills (FMS) and mathematical skills have lacked specificity. In this study, we test whether an FMS link to numerical skills is due to the involvement of finger representations in early mathematics. We gave 81 pre-schoolers (mean age of 4 years, 9 months) a set of FMS measures and numerical tasks with and without a specific finger focus. Additionally, we used receptive vocabulary and chronological age as control measures. FMS linked more closely to finger-based than to nonfinger-based numerical skills even after accounting for the control variables. Moreover, the relationship between FMS and numerical skill was entirely mediated by finger-based numerical skills. We concluded that FMS are closely related to early numerical skill development through finger-based numerical counting that aids the acquisition of mathematical mental representations.

  8. Comparison of the Structurally Controlled Landslides Numerical Model Results to the M 7.2 2013 Bohol Earthquake Co-seismic Landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macario Galang, Jan Albert; Narod Eco, Rodrigo; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2015-04-01

    The M 7.2 October 15, 2013 Bohol earthquake is the most destructive earthquake to hit the Philippines since 2012. The epicenter was located in Sagbayan municipality, central Bohol and was generated by a previously unmapped reverse fault called the "Inabanga Fault". Its name, taken after the barangay (village) where the fault is best exposed and was first seen. The earthquake resulted in 209 fatalities and over 57 billion USD worth of damages. The earthquake generated co-seismic landslides most of which were related to fault structures. Unlike rainfall induced landslides, the trigger for co-seismic landslides happen without warning. Preparedness against this type of landslide therefore, relies heavily on the identification of fracture-related unstable slopes. To mitigate the impacts of co-seismic landslide hazards, morpho-structural orientations or discontinuity sets were mapped in the field with the aid of a 2012 IFSAR Digital Terrain Model (DTM) with 5-meter pixel resolution and < 0.5 meter vertical accuracy. Coltop 3D software was then used to identify similar structures including measurement of their dip and dip directions. The chosen discontinuity sets were then keyed into Matterocking software to identify potential rock slide zones due to planar or wedged discontinuities. After identifying the structurally-controlled unstable slopes, the rock mass propagation extent of the possible rock slides was simulated using Conefall. The results were compared to a post-earthquake landslide inventory of 456 landslides. Out the total number of landslides identified from post-earthquake high-resolution imagery, 366 or 80% intersect the structural-controlled hazard areas of Bohol. The results show the potential of this method to identify co-seismic landslide hazard areas for disaster mitigation. Along with computer methods to simulate shallow landslides, and debris flow paths, located structurally-controlled unstable zones can be used to mark unsafe areas for settlement. The

  9. Numerical model SMODERP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavka, P.; Jeřábek, J.; Strouhal, L.

    2016-12-01

    The contribution presents a numerical model SMODERP that is used for calculation and prediction of surface runoff and soil erosion from agricultural land. The physically based model includes the processes of infiltration (Phillips equation), surface runoff routing (kinematic wave based equation), surface retention, surface roughness and vegetation impact on runoff. The model is being developed at the Department of Irrigation, Drainage and Landscape Engineering, Civil Engineering Faculty, CTU in Prague. 2D version of the model was introduced in last years. The script uses ArcGIS system tools for data preparation. The physical relations are implemented through Python scripts. The main computing part is stand alone in numpy arrays. Flow direction is calculated by Steepest Descent algorithm and in multiple flow algorithm. Sheet flow is described by modified kinematic wave equation. Parameters for five different soil textures were calibrated on the set of hundred measurements performed on the laboratory and filed rainfall simulators. Spatially distributed models enable to estimate not only surface runoff but also flow in the rills. Development of the rills is based on critical shear stress and critical velocity. For modelling of the rills a specific sub model was created. This sub model uses Manning formula for flow estimation. Flow in the ditches and streams are also computed. Numerical stability of the model is controled by Courant criterion. Spatial scale is fixed. Time step is dynamic and depends on the actual discharge. The model is used in the framework of the project "Variability of Short-term Precipitation and Runoff in Small Czech Drainage Basins and its Influence on Water Resources Management". Main goal of the project is to elaborate a methodology and online utility for deriving short-term design precipitation series, which could be utilized by a broad community of scientists, state administration as well as design planners. The methodology will account for

  10. Surveying the Numeric Databanks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Mick

    1987-01-01

    Describes six leading numeric databank services and compares them with bibliographic databases in terms of customers' needs, search software, pricing arrangements, and the role of the search specialist. A listing of the locations of the numeric databanks discussed is provided. (CLB)

  11. Control of detachment geometry on lateral variations in exhumation rates in the Himalaya: Insights from low-temperature thermochronology and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Xavier; van der Beek, Peter; Braun, Jean; Perry, Claire; Mugnier, Jean-Louis

    2011-05-01

    The Himalayan range is commonly presented as largely laterally uniform from west to east. However, geological structures, topography, precipitation rate, convergence rates, and low-temperature thermochronological ages all vary significantly along strike. Here, we focus on the interpretation of thermochronological data sets in terms of along-strike variations in geometry and kinematics of the main crustal detachment underlying the Himalaya: the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT). We report new apatite fission track (AFT) ages collected along north-south transects in western and eastern central Nepal (at the latitudes of the Annapurna and Langtang massifs, respectively). AFT ages are consistently young (<3 Ma) along both N-S transects in the high-relief zone of the Higher Himalaya and increase (4 to 6 Ma) toward the south in the Lesser Himalaya. We compare our new data to published low-temperature thermochronological data sets for Nepal and the Bhutan Himalaya. We use the full data set to perform both forward and inverse thermal kinematic modeling with a modified version of the Pecube code in order to constrain potential along-strike variations in the kinematics of the Himalayan range. Our results show that lateral variations in the geometry of the MHT (in particular the presence or absence of a major crustal-scale ramp) strongly control the kinematics and exhumation history of the orogen.

  12. Rocket engine numerical simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Ken

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: a rocket engine numerical simulator (RENS) definition; objectives; justification; approach; potential applications; potential users; RENS work flowchart; RENS prototype; and conclusion.

  13. Rocket engine numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Ken

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: a definition of the rocket engine numerical simulator (RENS); objectives; justification; approach; potential applications; potential users; RENS work flowchart; RENS prototype; and conclusions.

  14. Numerical Relativistic Quantum Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-08

    for Soft Core Potentials 6 C. Scalar Zeeman Effect 7 IV. Time Dependent Simulations 10 A. Numerical Algorithm 10 B. Validation Against Zeeman Effect 12...energies in a Coulomb potential can be found in Ref. [13]. C. Scalar Zeeman Effect Numerical solution of the nonlinear eigenvalue problem (12) allows...instability give Fig. 9(a), while parameters leading to stability give Fig. 9(b). B. Validation Against Zeeman Effect Two codes have been written

  15. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  16. Numerical models in hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belotserkovskii, Oleg Mikhailovich

    The use of numerical models in fluid mechanics is examined with emphasis on separated flows at high Reynolds numbers. Topics discussed include the splitting method, homogeneous difference schemes, calculation of the nonstationary motion of ordered and large-scale structures, and numerical modeling of the stochastic component of turbulent shear flow. Attention is also given to motion in wake flows, the problem of turbulent spot breakup, and stability problems.

  17. Numerical simulation of gravel packing

    SciTech Connect

    Winterfeld, P.H.; Schroeder, D.E. Jr. )

    1992-08-01

    To obtain maximum productivity from unconsolidated formations where sand control is required, it is important to understand the mechanics of gravel packing. This paper describes a finite-element, numerical simulator that can predict gravel placement in the perforations and annulus of a wellbore. The equations for the simulator include mass and momentum conservation. Wellbore geometry, physical properties, and fluid and gravel-pack properties are simulator input. Experiments in a 100-ft full-scale wellbore model for three gravel-packing configurations have been successfully simulated. These configurations are a circulating pack with a washpipe, a squeeze pack, and a circulating/squeeze pack with a washpipe and a lower telltale screen. The low cost, speed, and extrapolation capabilities of the numerical simulator will greatly enhance our ability to predict gravel placement in a wellbore.

  18. Frontiers in Numerical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Charles R.; Finn, Lee S.; Hobill, David W.

    2011-06-01

    Preface; Participants; Introduction; 1. Supercomputing and numerical relativity: a look at the past, present and future David W. Hobill and Larry L. Smarr; 2. Computational relativity in two and three dimensions Stuart L. Shapiro and Saul A. Teukolsky; 3. Slowly moving maximally charged black holes Robert C. Ferrell and Douglas M. Eardley; 4. Kepler's third law in general relativity Steven Detweiler; 5. Black hole spacetimes: testing numerical relativity David H. Bernstein, David W. Hobill and Larry L. Smarr; 6. Three dimensional initial data of numerical relativity Ken-ichi Oohara and Takashi Nakamura; 7. Initial data for collisions of black holes and other gravitational miscellany James W. York, Jr.; 8. Analytic-numerical matching for gravitational waveform extraction Andrew M. Abrahams; 9. Supernovae, gravitational radiation and the quadrupole formula L. S. Finn; 10. Gravitational radiation from perturbations of stellar core collapse models Edward Seidel and Thomas Moore; 11. General relativistic implicit radiation hydrodynamics in polar sliced space-time Paul J. Schinder; 12. General relativistic radiation hydrodynamics in spherically symmetric spacetimes A. Mezzacappa and R. A. Matzner; 13. Constraint preserving transport for magnetohydrodynamics John F. Hawley and Charles R. Evans; 14. Enforcing the momentum constraints during axisymmetric spacelike simulations Charles R. Evans; 15. Experiences with an adaptive mesh refinement algorithm in numerical relativity Matthew W. Choptuik; 16. The multigrid technique Gregory B. Cook; 17. Finite element methods in numerical relativity P. J. Mann; 18. Pseudo-spectral methods applied to gravitational collapse Silvano Bonazzola and Jean-Alain Marck; 19. Methods in 3D numerical relativity Takashi Nakamura and Ken-ichi Oohara; 20. Nonaxisymmetric rotating gravitational collapse and gravitational radiation Richard F. Stark; 21. Nonaxisymmetric neutron star collisions: initial results using smooth particle hydrodynamics

  19. Probabilistic numerics and uncertainty in computations

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Philipp; Osborne, Michael A.; Girolami, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We deliver a call to arms for probabilistic numerical methods: algorithms for numerical tasks, including linear algebra, integration, optimization and solving differential equations, that return uncertainties in their calculations. Such uncertainties, arising from the loss of precision induced by numerical calculation with limited time or hardware, are important for much contemporary science and industry. Within applications such as climate science and astrophysics, the need to make decisions on the basis of computations with large and complex data have led to a renewed focus on the management of numerical uncertainty. We describe how several seminal classic numerical methods can be interpreted naturally as probabilistic inference. We then show that the probabilistic view suggests new algorithms that can flexibly be adapted to suit application specifics, while delivering improved empirical performance. We provide concrete illustrations of the benefits of probabilistic numeric algorithms on real scientific problems from astrometry and astronomical imaging, while highlighting open problems with these new algorithms. Finally, we describe how probabilistic numerical methods provide a coherent framework for identifying the uncertainty in calculations performed with a combination of numerical algorithms (e.g. both numerical optimizers and differential equation solvers), potentially allowing the diagnosis (and control) of error sources in computations. PMID:26346321

  20. Probabilistic numerics and uncertainty in computations.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Philipp; Osborne, Michael A; Girolami, Mark

    2015-07-08

    We deliver a call to arms for probabilistic numerical methods: algorithms for numerical tasks, including linear algebra, integration, optimization and solving differential equations, that return uncertainties in their calculations. Such uncertainties, arising from the loss of precision induced by numerical calculation with limited time or hardware, are important for much contemporary science and industry. Within applications such as climate science and astrophysics, the need to make decisions on the basis of computations with large and complex data have led to a renewed focus on the management of numerical uncertainty. We describe how several seminal classic numerical methods can be interpreted naturally as probabilistic inference. We then show that the probabilistic view suggests new algorithms that can flexibly be adapted to suit application specifics, while delivering improved empirical performance. We provide concrete illustrations of the benefits of probabilistic numeric algorithms on real scientific problems from astrometry and astronomical imaging, while highlighting open problems with these new algorithms. Finally, we describe how probabilistic numerical methods provide a coherent framework for identifying the uncertainty in calculations performed with a combination of numerical algorithms (e.g. both numerical optimizers and differential equation solvers), potentially allowing the diagnosis (and control) of error sources in computations.

  1. Interpolator for numerically controlled machine tools

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, Gary L.; Davenport, Clyde M.; Stephens, Albert E.

    1976-01-01

    A digital differential analyzer circuit is provided that depending on the embodiment chosen can carry out linear, parabolic, circular or cubic interpolation. In the embodiment for parabolic interpolations, the circuit provides pulse trains for the X and Y slide motors of a two-axis machine to effect tool motion along a parabolic path. The pulse trains are generated by the circuit in such a way that parabolic tool motion is obtained from information contained in only one block of binary input data. A part contour may be approximated by one or more parabolic arcs. Acceleration and initial velocity values from a data block are set in fixed bit size registers for each axis separately but simultaneously and the values are integrated to obtain the movement along the respective axis as a function of time. Integration is performed by continual addition at a specified rate of an integrand value stored in one register to the remainder temporarily stored in another identical size register. Overflows from the addition process are indicative of the integral. The overflow output pulses from the second integration may be applied to motors which position the respective machine slides according to a parabolic motion in time to produce a parabolic machine tool motion in space. An additional register for each axis is provided in the circuit to allow "floating" of the radix points of the integrand registers and the velocity increment to improve position accuracy and to reduce errors encountered when the acceleration integrand magnitudes are small when compared to the velocity integrands. A divider circuit is provided in the output of the circuit to smooth the output pulse spacing and prevent motor stall, because the overflow pulses produced in the binary addition process are spaced unevenly in time. The divider has the effect of passing only every nth motor drive pulse, with n being specifiable. The circuit inputs (integrands, rates, etc.) are scaled to give exactly n times the desired number of pulses out, in order to compensate for the divider.

  2. Numerical Investigation of Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagan, Michael; Tanguy, Sebastien; Colin, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    In this work, boiling is numerically investigated, using two phase flow direct numerical simulation based on a level set / Ghost Fluid method. Nucleate boiling implies both thermal issue and multiphase dynamics issues at different scales and at different stages of bubble growth. As a result, the different phenomena are investigated separately, considering their nature and the scale at which they occur. First, boiling of a static bubble immersed in an overheated liquid is analysed. Numerical simulations have been performed at different Jakob numbers in the case of strong density discontinuity through the interface. The results show a good agreement on bubble radius evolution between the theoretical evolution and numerical simulation. After the validation of the code for the Scriven test case, interaction of a bubble with a wall is studied. A numerical method taking into account contact angle is evaluated by comparing simulations of the spreading of a liquid droplet impacting on a plate, with experimental data. Then the heat transfer near the contact line is investigated, and simulations of nucleate boiling are performed considering different contact angles values. Finally, the relevance of including a model to take into account the evaporation of the micro layer is discussed.

  3. Toward Scientific Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil

    2007-01-01

    Ultimately, scientific numerical models need quantified output uncertainties so that modeling can evolve to better match reality. Documenting model input uncertainties and verifying that numerical models are translated into code correctly, however, are necessary first steps toward that goal. Without known input parameter uncertainties, model sensitivities are all one can determine, and without code verification, output uncertainties are simply not reliable. To address these two shortcomings, two proposals are offered: (1) an unobtrusive mechanism to document input parameter uncertainties in situ and (2) an adaptation of the Scientific Method to numerical model development and deployment. Because these two steps require changes in the computational simulation community to bear fruit, they are presented in terms of the Beckhard-Harris-Gleicher change model.

  4. Toward Scientific Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil

    2007-01-01

    Ultimately, scientific numerical models need quantified output uncertainties so that modeling can evolve to better match reality. Documenting model input uncertainties and verifying that numerical models are translated into code correctly, however, are necessary first steps toward that goal. Without known input parameter uncertainties, model sensitivities are all one can determine, and without code verification, output uncertainties are simply not reliable. To address these two shortcomings, two proposals are offered: (1) an unobtrusive mechanism to document input parameter uncertainties in situ and (2) an adaptation of the Scientific Method to numerical model development and deployment. Because these two steps require changes in the computational simulation community to bear fruit, they are presented in terms of the Beckhard-Harris-Gleicher change model.

  5. Introduction to Numerical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Schoonover, Joseph A.

    2016-06-14

    These are slides for a lecture for the Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship at the National Security Education Center. This gives an introduction to numerical methods. Repetitive algorithms are used to obtain approximate solutions to mathematical problems, using sorting, searching, root finding, optimization, interpolation, extrapolation, least squares regresion, Eigenvalue problems, ordinary differential equations, and partial differential equations. Many equations are shown. Discretizations allow us to approximate solutions to mathematical models of physical systems using a repetitive algorithm and introduce errors that can lead to numerical instabilities if we are not careful.

  6. Numerical ability predicts mortgage default

    PubMed Central

    Gerardi, Kristopher; Goette, Lorenz; Meier, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Unprecedented levels of US subprime mortgage defaults precipitated a severe global financial crisis in late 2008, plunging much of the industrialized world into a deep recession. However, the fundamental reasons for why US mortgages defaulted at such spectacular rates remain largely unknown. This paper presents empirical evidence showing that the ability to perform basic mathematical calculations is negatively associated with the propensity to default on one’s mortgage. We measure several aspects of financial literacy and cognitive ability in a survey of subprime mortgage borrowers who took out loans in 2006 and 2007, and match them to objective, detailed administrative data on mortgage characteristics and payment histories. The relationship between numerical ability and mortgage default is robust to controlling for a broad set of sociodemographic variables, and is not driven by other aspects of cognitive ability. We find no support for the hypothesis that numerical ability impacts mortgage outcomes through the choice of the mortgage contract. Rather, our results suggest that individuals with limited numerical ability default on their mortgage due to behavior unrelated to the initial choice of their mortgage. PMID:23798401

  7. Numerical ability predicts mortgage default.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Kristopher; Goette, Lorenz; Meier, Stephan

    2013-07-09

    Unprecedented levels of US subprime mortgage defaults precipitated a severe global financial crisis in late 2008, plunging much of the industrialized world into a deep recession. However, the fundamental reasons for why US mortgages defaulted at such spectacular rates remain largely unknown. This paper presents empirical evidence showing that the ability to perform basic mathematical calculations is negatively associated with the propensity to default on one's mortgage. We measure several aspects of financial literacy and cognitive ability in a survey of subprime mortgage borrowers who took out loans in 2006 and 2007, and match them to objective, detailed administrative data on mortgage characteristics and payment histories. The relationship between numerical ability and mortgage default is robust to controlling for a broad set of sociodemographic variables, and is not driven by other aspects of cognitive ability. We find no support for the hypothesis that numerical ability impacts mortgage outcomes through the choice of the mortgage contract. Rather, our results suggest that individuals with limited numerical ability default on their mortgage due to behavior unrelated to the initial choice of their mortgage.

  8. Numerical pole assignment by eigenvalue Jacobian inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevaston, George E.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical procedure for solving the linear pole placement problem is developed which operates by the inversion of an analytically determined eigenvalue Jacobian matrix. Attention is given to convergence characteristics and pathological situations. It is not concluded that the algorithm developed is suitable for computer-aided control system design with particular reference to the scan platform pointing control system for the Galileo spacecraft.

  9. Numerical Estimation in Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berteletti, Ilaria; Lucangeli, Daniela; Piazza, Manuela; Dehaene, Stanislas; Zorzi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Children's sense of numbers before formal education is thought to rely on an approximate number system based on logarithmically compressed analog magnitudes that increases in resolution throughout childhood. School-age children performing a numerical estimation task have been shown to increasingly rely on a formally appropriate, linear…

  10. Numerical-Optimization Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, Garret N.

    1991-01-01

    Automated Design Synthesis (ADS) computer program is general-purpose numerical-optimization program for design engineering. Provides wide range of options for solution of constrained and unconstrained function minimization problems. Suitable for such applications as minimum-weight design. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  11. Hybrid undulator numerical optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Hairetdinov, A.H.; Zukov, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    3D properties of the hybrid undulator scheme arc studied numerically using PANDIRA code. It is shown that there exist two well defined sets of undulator parameters which provide either maximum on-axis field amplitude or minimal higher harmonics amplitude of the basic undulator field. Thus the alternative between higher field amplitude or pure sinusoidal field exists. The behavior of the undulator field amplitude and harmonics structure for a large set of (undulator gap)/(undulator wavelength) values is demonstrated.

  12. Numerical Modeling of Airblast.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    REPORT SAIC 87/1701 June 1987 Dr.. Submitted to: cp Dr. Jay Boris Laboratory for Computational Physics Accet F4,r Naval Research Laboratory I...boundary layer physical assumptions provides an unsteady prediction of the mass flux emerging from the ground. This model was first proposed by Mirels...the physics modeled will be explained. High explosive dust cloud simulation provides a research path when combined with numerical calculations can lead

  13. On Numerical Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    2013-11-01

    The development of computational fluid dynamics over the last few decades has yielded enormous successes and capabilities that are being routinely employed today; however there remain some open problems to be properly resolved. One example is the so-called overheating problem, which can arise in two very different scenarios, from either colliding or receding streams. Common in both is a localized, numerically over-predicted temperature. Von Neumann reported the former, a compressive overheating, nearly 70 years ago and numerically smeared the temperature peak by introducing artificial diffusion. However, the latter is unphysical in an expansive (rarefying) situation; it still dogs every method known to the author. We will present a study aiming at resolving this overheating problem and we find that: (1) the entropy increase is one-to-one linked to the increase in the temperature rise and (2) the overheating is inevitable in the current computational fluid dynamics framework in practice. Finally we will show a simple hybrid method that fundamentally cures the overheating problem in a rarefying flow, but also retains the property of accurate shock capturing. Moreover, this remedy (enhancement of current numerical methods) can be included easily in the present Eulerian codes. This work is performed under NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program.

  14. Recent advances in numerical PDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuev, Julia Michelle

    standard algorithm and is just as accurate. Topic 3. The well-known ADI-FDTD method for solving Maxwell's curl equations is second-order accurate in space/time, unconditionally stable, and computationally efficient. We research Richardson extrapolation -based techniques to improve time discretization accuracy for spatially oversampled ADI-FDTD. A careful analysis of temporal accuracy, computational efficiency, and the algorithm's overall stability is presented. Given the context of wave- type PDEs, we find that only a limited number of extrapolations to the ADI-FDTD method are beneficial, if its unconditional stability is to be preserved. We propose a practical approach for choosing the size of a time step that can be used to improve the efficiency of the ADI-FDTD algorithm, while maintaining its accuracy and stability. Topic 4. Shock waves and their energy dissipation properties are critical to understanding the dynamics controlling the MHD turbulence. Numerical advection algorithms used in MHD solvers (e.g. the ZEUS package) introduce undesirable numerical viscosity. To counteract its effects and to resolve shocks numerically, Richtmyer and von Neumann's artificial viscosity is commonly added to the model. We study shock power by analyzing the influence of both artificial and numerical viscosity on energy decay rates. Also, we analytically characterize the numerical diffusivity of various advection algorithms by quantifying their diffusion coefficients e.

  15. Numerical Analysis Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Michael

    1997-08-01

    The Numerical Analysis Objects project (NAO) is a project in the Mathematics Department of IBM's TJ Watson Research Center. While there are plenty of numerical tools available today, it is not an easy task to combine them into a custom application. NAO is directed at the dual problems of building applications from a set of tools, and creating those tools. There are several "reuse" projects, which focus on the problems of identifying and cataloging tools. NAO is directed at the specific context of scientific computing. Because the type of tools is restricted, problems such as tools with incompatible data structures for input and output, and dissimilar interfaces to tools which solve similar problems can be addressed. The approach we've taken is to define interfaces to those objects used in numerical analysis, such as geometries, functions and operators, and to start collecting (and building) a set of tools which use these interfaces. We have written a class library (a set of abstract classes and implementations) in C++ which demonstrates the approach. Besides the classes, the class library includes "stub" routines which allow the library to be used from C or Fortran, and an interface to a Visual Programming Language. The library has been used to build a simulator for petroleum reservoirs, using a set of tools for discretizing nonlinear differential equations that we have written, and includes "wrapped" versions of packages from the Netlib repository. Documentation can be found on the Web at "http://www.research.ibm.com/nao". I will describe the objects and their interfaces, and give examples ranging from mesh generation to solving differential equations.

  16. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, V. L.; Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.; Bailey, F. R.

    1983-01-01

    The history of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program, which is designed to provide a leading-edge capability to computational aerodynamicists, is traced back to its origin in 1975. Factors motivating its development and examples of solutions to successively refined forms of the governing equations are presented. The NAS Processing System Network and each of its eight subsystems are described in terms of function and initial performance goals. A proposed usage allocation policy is discussed and some initial problems being readied for solution on the NAS system are identified.

  17. "Recognizing Numerical Constants"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The advent of inexpensive, high performance computer and new efficient algorithms have made possible the automatic recognition of numerically computed constants. In other words, techniques now exist for determining, within certain limits, whether a computed real or complex number can be written as a simple expression involving the classical constants of mathematics. In this presentation, some of the recently discovered techniques for constant recognition, notably integer relation detection algorithms, will be presented. As an application of these methods, the author's recent work in recognizing "Euler sums" will be described in some detail.

  18. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with the aerospace industry, other government agencies, and academia, is leading the effort to develop an advanced multidisciplinary analysis environment for aerospace propulsion systems called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. The initial development of NPSS focused on the analysis and design of airbreathing aircraft engines, but the resulting NPSS framework may be applied to any system, for example: aerospace, rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and even human system modeling. NPSS provides increased flexibility for the user, which reduces the total development time and cost. It is currently being extended to support the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Fundamental Aeronautics Program and the Advanced Virtual Engine Test Cell (AVETeC). NPSS focuses on the integration of multiple disciplines such as aerodynamics, structure, and heat transfer with numerical zooming on component codes. Zooming is the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail. NPSS development includes capabilities to facilitate collaborative engineering. The NPSS will provide improved tools to develop custom components and to use capability for zooming to higher fidelity codes, coupling to multidiscipline codes, transmitting secure data, and distributing simulations across different platforms. These powerful capabilities extend NPSS from a zero-dimensional simulation tool to a multi-fidelity, multidiscipline system-level simulation tool for the full development life cycle.

  19. Confidence in Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, Francois M.

    2015-02-23

    This PowerPoint presentation offers a high-level discussion of uncertainty, confidence and credibility in scientific Modeling and Simulation (M&S). It begins by briefly evoking M&S trends in computational physics and engineering. The first thrust of the discussion is to emphasize that the role of M&S in decision-making is either to support reasoning by similarity or to “forecast,” that is, make predictions about the future or extrapolate to settings or environments that cannot be tested experimentally. The second thrust is to explain that M&S-aided decision-making is an exercise in uncertainty management. The three broad classes of uncertainty in computational physics and engineering are variability and randomness, numerical uncertainty and model-form uncertainty. The last part of the discussion addresses how scientists “think.” This thought process parallels the scientific method where by a hypothesis is formulated, often accompanied by simplifying assumptions, then, physical experiments and numerical simulations are performed to confirm or reject the hypothesis. “Confidence” derives, not just from the levels of training and experience of analysts, but also from the rigor with which these assessments are performed, documented and peer-reviewed.

  20. The Hamilton-Jacobi theory for solving two-point boundary value problems: Theory and numerics with application to spacecraft formation flight, optimal control and the study of phase space structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guibout, Vincent M.

    This dissertation has been motivated by the need for new methods to address complex problems that arise in spacecraft formation design. As a direct result of this motivation, a general methodology for solving two-point boundary value problems for Hamiltonian systems has been found. Using the Hamilton-Jacobi theory in conjunction with the canonical transformation induced by the phase flow, it is shown that generating functions solve two-point boundary value problems. Traditional techniques for addressing these problems are iterative and require an initial guess. The method presented in this dissertation solves boundary value problems at the cost of a single function evaluation, although it requires knowledge of at least one generating function. Properties of this method are presented. Specifically, we show that it includes perturbation theory and generalizes it to nonlinear systems. Most importantly, it predicts the existence of multiple solutions and allows one to recover all of these solutions. To demonstrate the efficiency of this approach, an algorithm for computing the generating functions is proposed and its convergence properties are studied. As the method developed in this work is based on the Hamiltonian structure of the problem, particular attention must be paid to the numerics of the algorithm. To address this, a general framework for studying the discretization of certain dynamical systems is developed. This framework generalizes earlier work on discretization of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems on tangent and cotangent bundles respectively. In addition, it provides new insights into some symplectic integrators and leads to a new discrete Hamilton-Jacobi theory. Most importantly, it allows one to discretize optimal control problems. In particular, a discrete maximum principle is presented. This dissertation also investigates applications of the proposed method to solve two-point boundary value problems. In particular, new techniques for designing

  1. Numerical relativity beyond astrophysics.

    PubMed

    Garfinkle, David

    2017-01-01

    Though the main applications of computer simulations in relativity are to astrophysical systems such as black holes and neutron stars, nonetheless there are important applications of numerical methods to the investigation of general relativity as a fundamental theory of the nature of space and time. This paper gives an overview of some of these applications. In particular we cover (i) investigations of the properties of spacetime singularities such as those that occur in the interior of black holes and in big bang cosmology. (ii) investigations of critical behavior at the threshold of black hole formation in gravitational collapse. (iii) investigations inspired by string theory, in particular analogs of black holes in more than 4 spacetime dimensions and gravitational collapse in spacetimes with a negative cosmological constant.

  2. Numerical relativity beyond astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkle, David

    2017-01-01

    Though the main applications of computer simulations in relativity are to astrophysical systems such as black holes and neutron stars, nonetheless there are important applications of numerical methods to the investigation of general relativity as a fundamental theory of the nature of space and time. This paper gives an overview of some of these applications. In particular we cover (i) investigations of the properties of spacetime singularities such as those that occur in the interior of black holes and in big bang cosmology. (ii) investigations of critical behavior at the threshold of black hole formation in gravitational collapse. (iii) investigations inspired by string theory, in particular analogs of black holes in more than 4 spacetime dimensions and gravitational collapse in spacetimes with a negative cosmological constant.

  3. Perspectives in numerical astrophysics:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverdy, V.

    2016-12-01

    In this discussion paper, we investigate the current and future status of numerical astrophysics and highlight key questions concerning the transition to the exascale era. We first discuss the fact that one of the main motivation behind high performance simulations should not be the reproduction of observational or experimental data, but the understanding of the emergence of complexity from fundamental laws. This motivation is put into perspective regarding the quest for more computational power and we argue that extra computational resources can be used to gain in abstraction. Then, the readiness level of present-day simulation codes in regard to upcoming exascale architecture is examined and two major challenges are raised concerning both the central role of data movement for performances and the growing complexity of codes. Software architecture is finally presented as a key component to make the most of upcoming architectures while solving original physics problems.

  4. Numeric Databases in the Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meschel, S. V.

    1984-01-01

    Provides exploration into types of numeric databases available (also known as source databases, nonbibliographic databases, data-files, data-banks, fact banks); examines differences and similarities between bibliographic and numeric databases; identifies disciplines that utilize numeric databases; and surveys representative examples in the…

  5. Developmental Change in Numerical Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slusser, Emily B.; Santiago, Rachel T.; Barth, Hilary C.

    2013-01-01

    Mental representations of numerical magnitude are commonly thought to undergo discontinuous change over development in the form of a "representational shift." This idea stems from an apparent categorical shift from logarithmic to linear patterns of numerical estimation on tasks that involve translating between numerical magnitudes and…

  6. Numerical processing efficiency improved in children using mental abacus: ERP evidence utilizing a numerical Stroop task

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuan; Du, Fenglei; Wang, Chunjie; Liu, Yuqiu; Weng, Jian; Chen, Feiyan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether long-term abacus-based mental calculation (AMC) training improved numerical processing efficiency and at what stage of information processing the effect appeard. Thirty-three children participated in the study and were randomly assigned to two groups at primary school entry, matched for age, gender and IQ. All children went through the same curriculum except that the abacus group received a 2-h/per week AMC training, while the control group did traditional numerical practice for a similar amount of time. After a 2-year training, they were tested with a numerical Stroop task. Electroencephalographic (EEG) and event related potential (ERP) recording techniques were used to monitor the temporal dynamics during the task. Children were required to determine the numerical magnitude (NC) (NC task) or the physical size (PC task) of two numbers presented simultaneously. In the NC task, the AMC group showed faster response times but similar accuracy compared to the control group. In the PC task, the two groups exhibited the same speed and accuracy. The saliency of numerical information relative to physical information was greater in AMC group. With regards to ERP results, the AMC group displayed congruity effects both in the earlier (N1) and later (N2 and LPC (late positive component) time domain, while the control group only displayed congruity effects for LPC. In the left parietal region, LPC amplitudes were larger for the AMC than the control group. Individual differences for LPC amplitudes over left parietal area showed a positive correlation with RTs in the NC task in both congruent and neutral conditions. After controlling for the N2 amplitude, this correlation also became significant in the incongruent condition. Our results suggest that AMC training can strengthen the relationship between symbolic representation and numerical magnitude so that numerical information processing becomes quicker and automatic in AMC children. PMID:26042012

  7. Numerical orbit generators of artificial earth satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugar, H. K.; Dasilva, W. C. C.

    1984-04-01

    A numerical orbit integrator containing updatings and improvements relative to the previous ones that are being utilized by the Departmento de Mecanica Espacial e Controle (DMC), of INPE, besides incorporating newer modellings resulting from the skill acquired along the time is presented. Flexibility and modularity were taken into account in order to allow future extensions and modifications. Characteristics of numerical accuracy, processing quickness, memory saving as well as utilization aspects were also considered. User's handbook, whole program listing and qualitative analysis of accuracy, processing time and orbit perturbation effects were included as well.

  8. Validity, reliability, and clinical importance of change in a 0-10 numeric rating scale measure of spasticity: a post hoc analysis of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Farrar, John T; Troxel, Andrea B; Stott, Colin; Duncombe, Paul; Jensen, Mark P

    2008-05-01

    The measurement of spasticity as a symptom of neurologic disease is an area of growing interest. Clinician-rated measures of spasticity purport to be objective but do not measure the patient's experience and may not be sensitive to changes that are meaningful to the patient. In a patient with clinical spasticity, the best judge of the perceived severity of the symptom is the patient. The aim of this study was to assess the validity and reliability, and determine the clinical importance, of change on a 0-10 numeric rating scale (NRS) as a patient-rated measure of the perceived severity of spasticity. Using data from a large,randomized, doubleblind, placebo-controlled study of an endocannabinoid system modulator in patients with multiple sclerosis-related spasticity, we evaluated the test-retest reliability and comparison-based validity of a patient-reported 0-10 NRS measure of spasticity severity with the Ashworth Scale and Spasm Frequency Scale. We estimated the level of change from baseline on the 0-10 NRS spasticity scale that constituted a clinically important difference (CID) and a minimal CID (MCID) as anchored to the patient's global impression of change (PGIC). Data from a total of 189 patients were included in this assessment (114 women, 75 men; mean age, 49.1 years). The test-retest reliability analysis found an interclass correlation coefficient of 0.83 (P < 0.001) between 2 measures of the 0-10 NRS spasticity scores recorded over a 7- to 14-day period before randomization. A significant correlation was found between change on 0-10 NRS and change in the Spasm Frequency Scale (r = 0.63; P < 0.001), and a moderate correlation was found between the change on 0-10 NRS and the PGIC (r = 0.47; P < 0.001). A reduction of approximately 30% in the spasticity 0-10 NRS score best represented the CID and a change of 18% the MCID. The measurement of the symptom of spasticity using a patient-rated 0-10 NRS was found to be both reliable and valid. The definitions of CID

  9. Numerical Relativity and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Luis; Pretorius, Frans

    2014-08-01

    Throughout the Universe many powerful events are driven by strong gravitational effects that require general relativity to fully describe them. These include compact binary mergers, black hole accretion, and stellar collapse, where velocities can approach the speed of light and extreme gravitational fields (ΦNewt/c2≃1) mediate the interactions. Many of these processes trigger emission across a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Compact binaries further source strong gravitational wave emission that could directly be detected in the near future. This feat will open up a gravitational wave window into our Universe and revolutionize our understanding of it. Describing these phenomena requires general relativity, and—where dynamical effects strongly modify gravitational fields—the full Einstein equations coupled to matter sources. Numerical relativity is a field within general relativity concerned with studying such scenarios that cannot be accurately modeled via perturbative or analytical calculations. In this review, we examine results obtained within this discipline, with a focus on its impact in astrophysics.

  10. Personalized numerical observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brankov, Jovan G.; Pretorius, P. Hendrik

    2010-02-01

    It is widely accepted that medical image quality should be assessed using task-based criteria, such as humanobserver (HO) performance in a lesion-detection (scoring) task. HO studies are time consuming and cost prohibitive to be used for image quality assessment during development of either reconstruction methods or imaging systems. Therefore, a numerical observer (NO), a HO surrogate, is highly desirable. In the past, we have proposed and successfully tested a NO based on a supervised-learning approach (namely a support vector machine) for cardiac gated SPECT image quality assessment. In the supervised-learning approach, the goal is to identify the relationship between measured image features and HO myocardium defect likelihood scores. Thus far we have treated multiple HO readers by simply averaging or pooling their respective scores. Due to observer variability, this may be suboptimal and less accurate. Therefore, in this work, we are setting our goal to predict individual observer scores independently in the hope to better capture some relevant lesion-detection mechanism of the human observers. This is even more important as there are many ways to get equivalent observer performance (measured by area under receiver operating curve), and simply predicting some joint (average or pooled) score alone is not likely to succeed.

  11. Reliable numerical computation in an optimal output-feedback design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansteenwyk, Brett; Ly, Uy-Loi

    1991-01-01

    A reliable algorithm is presented for the evaluation of a quadratic performance index and its gradients with respect to the controller design parameters. The algorithm is a part of a design algorithm for optimal linear dynamic output-feedback controller that minimizes a finite-time quadratic performance index. The numerical scheme is particularly robust when it is applied to the control-law synthesis for systems with densely packed modes and where there is a high likelihood of encountering degeneracies in the closed-loop eigensystem. This approach through the use of an accurate Pade series approximation does not require the closed-loop system matrix to be diagonalizable. The algorithm was included in a control design package for optimal robust low-order controllers. Usefulness of the proposed numerical algorithm was demonstrated using numerous practical design cases where degeneracies occur frequently in the closed-loop system under an arbitrary controller design initialization and during the numerical search.

  12. Numerical Modeling of Ablation Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Mark E.; Laker, Travis S.; Walker, David T.

    2013-01-01

    A unique numerical method has been developed for solving one-dimensional ablation heat transfer problems. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the method, along with detailed derivations of the governing equations. This methodology supports solutions for traditional ablation modeling including such effects as heat transfer, material decomposition, pyrolysis gas permeation and heat exchange, and thermochemical surface erosion. The numerical scheme utilizes a control-volume approach with a variable grid to account for surface movement. This method directly supports implementation of nontraditional models such as material swelling and mechanical erosion, extending capabilities for modeling complex ablation phenomena. Verifications of the numerical implementation are provided using analytical solutions, code comparisons, and the method of manufactured solutions. These verifications are used to demonstrate solution accuracy and proper error convergence rates. A simple demonstration of a mechanical erosion (spallation) model is also provided to illustrate the unique capabilities of the method.

  13. Numerical methods used in fusion science numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, M.

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics of burning plasma is very complicated physics, which is dominated by multi-scale and multi-physics phenomena. To understand such phenomena, numerical simulations are indispensable. Fundamentals of numerical methods used in fusion science numerical modeling are briefly discussed in this paper. In addition, the parallelization technique such as open multi processing (OpenMP) and message passing interface (MPI) parallel programing are introduced and the loop-level parallelization is shown as an example.

  14. Numerical estimation of densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascasibar, Y.; Binney, J.

    2005-01-01

    We present a novel technique, dubbed FIESTAS, to estimate the underlying density field from a discrete set of sample points in an arbitrary multidimensional space. FIESTAS assigns a volume to each point by means of a binary tree. Density is then computed by integrating over an adaptive kernel. As a first test, we construct several Monte Carlo realizations of a Hernquist profile and recover the particle density in both real and phase space. At a given point, Poisson noise causes the unsmoothed estimates to fluctuate by a factor of ~2 regardless of the number of particles. This spread can be reduced to about 1dex (~26 per cent) by our smoothing procedure. The density range over which the estimates are unbiased widens as the particle number increases. Our tests show that real-space densities obtained with an SPH kernel are significantly more biased than those yielded by FIESTAS. In phase space, about 10 times more particles are required in order to achieve a similar accuracy. As a second application we have estimated phase-space densities in a dark matter halo from a cosmological simulation. We confirm the results of Arad, Dekel & Klypin that the highest values of f are all associated with substructure rather than the main halo, and that the volume function v(f) ~f-2.5 over about four orders of magnitude in f. We show that a modified version of the toy model proposed by Arad et al. explains this result and suggests that the departures of v(f) from power-law form are not mere numerical artefacts. We conclude that our algorithm accurately measures the phase-space density up to the limit where discreteness effects render the simulation itself unreliable. Computationally, FIESTAS is orders of magnitude faster than the method based on Delaunay tessellation that Arad et al. employed, making it practicable to recover smoothed density estimates for sets of 109 points in six dimensions.

  15. Numerical Simulations of Thermobaric Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E; Khasainov, B

    2007-05-04

    A Model of the energy evolution in thermobaric explosions is presented. It is based on the two-phase formulation: conservation laws for the gas and particle phases along with inter-phase interaction terms. It incorporates a Combustion Model based on the mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gas dynamic fields. The Model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the booster with air, and the combustion of the fuel (Al or TNT detonation products) with air. Numerical simulations were performed for 1.5-g thermobaric explosions in five different chambers (volumes ranging from 6.6 to 40 liters and length-to-diameter ratios from 1 to 12.5). Computed pressure waveforms were very similar to measured waveforms in all cases - thereby proving that the Model correctly predicts the energy evolution in such explosions. The computed global fuel consumption {mu}(t) behaved as an exponential life function. Its derivative {dot {mu}}(t) represents the global rate of fuel consumption. It depends on the rate of turbulent mixing which controls the rate of energy release in thermobaric explosions.

  16. On Some Numerical Dissipation Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Radespiel, R.; Turkel, E.

    1998-01-01

    Several schemes for introducing an artificial dissipation into a central difference approximation to the Euler and Navier Stokes equations are considered. The focus of the paper is on the convective upwind and split pressure (CUSP) scheme, which is designed to support single interior point discrete shock waves. This scheme is analyzed and compared in detail with scalar dissipation and matrix dissipation (MATD) schemes. Resolution capability is determined by solving subsonic, transonic, and hypersonic flow problems. A finite-volume discretization and a multistage time-stepping scheme with multigrid are used to compute solutions to the flow equations. Numerical solutions are also compared with either theoretical solutions or experimental data. For transonic airfoil flows the best accuracy on coarse meshes for aerodynamic coefficients is obtained with a simple MATD scheme. The coarse-grid accuracy for the original CUSP scheme is improved by modifying the limiter function used with the scheme, giving comparable accuracy to that obtained with the MATD scheme. The modifications reduce the background dissipation and provide control over the regions where the scheme can become first order.

  17. Numerical solution of large Lyapunov equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saad, Youcef

    1989-01-01

    A few methods are proposed for solving large Lyapunov equations that arise in control problems. The common case where the right hand side is a small rank matrix is considered. For the single input case, i.e., when the equation considered is of the form AX + XA(sup T) + bb(sup T) = 0, where b is a column vector, the existence of approximate solutions of the form X = VGV(sup T) where V is N x m and G is m x m, with m small is established. The first class of methods proposed is based on the use of numerical quadrature formulas, such as Gauss-Laguerre formulas, applied to the controllability Grammian. The second is based on a projection process of Galerkin type. Numerical experiments are presented to test the effectiveness of these methods for large problems.

  18. Numerical Approaches to Spacetime Singularities.

    PubMed

    Berger, Beverly K

    1998-01-01

    This review updates a previous review article [22]. Numerical exploration of the properties of singularities could, in principle, yield detailed understanding of their nature in physically realistic cases. Examples of numerical investigations into the formation of naked singularities, critical behavior in collapse, passage through the Cauchy horizon, chaos of the Mixmaster singularity, and singularities in spatially inhomogeneous cosmologies are discussed.

  19. Numerical simulation of dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.

    1995-09-01

    The numerical simulation of physical processes in dusty plasmas is reviewed, with emphasis on recent results and unresolved issues. Three areas of research are discussed: grain charging, weak dust-plasma interactions, and strong dust-plasma interactions. For each area, we review the basic concepts that are tested by simulations, present some appropriate examples, and examine numerical issues associated with extending present work.

  20. Numerical simulation of Bootstrap Current

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yanlin; White, R.B.

    1993-05-01

    The neoclassical theory of Bootstrap Current in toroidal systems is calculated in magnetic flux coordinates and confirmed by numerical simulation. The effects of magnetic ripple, loop voltage, and magnetic and electrostatic perturbations on bootstrap current for the cases of zero and finite plasma pressure are studied. The numerical results are in reasonable agreement with analytical estimates.

  1. Numerical operator calculus in higher dimensions.

    PubMed

    Beylkin, Gregory; Mohlenkamp, Martin J

    2002-08-06

    When an algorithm in dimension one is extended to dimension d, in nearly every case its computational cost is taken to the power d. This fundamental difficulty is the single greatest impediment to solving many important problems and has been dubbed the curse of dimensionality. For numerical analysis in dimension d, we propose to use a representation for vectors and matrices that generalizes separation of variables while allowing controlled accuracy. Basic linear algebra operations can be performed in this representation using one-dimensional operations, thus bypassing the exponential scaling with respect to the dimension. Although not all operators and algorithms may be compatible with this representation, we believe that many of the most important ones are. We prove that the multiparticle Schrödinger operator, as well as the inverse Laplacian, can be represented very efficiently in this form. We give numerical evidence to support the conjecture that eigenfunctions inherit this property by computing the ground-state eigenfunction for a simplified Schrödinger operator with 30 particles. We conjecture and provide numerical evidence that functions of operators inherit this property, in which case numerical operator calculus in higher dimensions becomes feasible.

  2. Numerical Hydrodynamics in General Relativity.

    PubMed

    Font, José A

    2000-01-01

    The current status of numerical solutions for the equations of ideal general relativistic hydrodynamics is reviewed. Different formulations of the equations are presented, with special mention of conservative and hyperbolic formulations well-adapted to advanced numerical methods. A representative sample of available numerical schemes is discussed and particular emphasis is paid to solution procedures based on schemes exploiting the characteristic structure of the equations through linearized Riemann solvers. A comprehensive summary of relevant astrophysical simulations in strong gravitational fields, including gravitational collapse, accretion onto black holes and evolution of neutron stars, is also presented.

  3. Numerical simulation of magmatic hydrothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Geiger, S.; Hurwitz, S.; Driesner, T.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of magmatic hydrothermal systems entails coupled and nonlinear multiphase flow, heat and solute transport, and deformation in highly heterogeneous media. Thus, quantitative analysis of these systems depends mainly on numerical solution of coupled partial differential equations and complementary equations of state (EOS). The past 2 decades have seen steady growth of computational power and the development of numerical models that have eliminated or minimized the need for various simplifying assumptions. Considerable heuristic insight has been gained from process-oriented numerical modeling. Recent modeling efforts employing relatively complete EOS and accurate transport calculations have revealed dynamic behavior that was damped by linearized, less accurate models, including fluid property control of hydrothermal plume temperatures and three-dimensional geometries. Other recent modeling results have further elucidated the controlling role of permeability structure and revealed the potential for significant hydrothermally driven deformation. Key areas for future reSearch include incorporation of accurate EOS for the complete H2O-NaCl-CO2 system, more realistic treatment of material heterogeneity in space and time, realistic description of large-scale relative permeability behavior, and intercode benchmarking comparisons. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. BCJ numerators from reduced Pfaffian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi-Jian; Teng, Fei

    2017-04-01

    By expanding the reduced Pfaffian in the tree level Cachazo-He-Yuan (CHY) integrands for Yang-Mills (YM) and nonlinear sigma model (NLSM), we can get the Bern-Carrasco-Johansson (BCJ) numerators in Del Duca-Dixon-Maltoni (DDM) form for arbitrary number of particles in any spacetime dimensions. In this work, we give a set of very straightforward graphic rules based on spanning trees for a direct evaluation of the BCJ numerators for YM and NLSM. Such rules can be derived from the Laplace expansion of the corresponding reduced Pfaffian. For YM, the each one of the ( n - 2)! DDM form BCJ numerators contains exactly ( n - 1)! terms, corresponding to the increasing trees with respect to the color order. For NLSM, the number of nonzero numerators is at most ( n - 2)! - ( n - 3)!, less than those of several previous constructions.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Nix's Rotation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This is a numerical simulation of the orientation of Nix as seen from the center of the Pluto system. It has been sped up so that one orbit of Nix around Pluto takes 2 seconds instead of 25 days. L...

  6. Non-astrophysical numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkle, David; Lehner, Luis

    2012-12-01

    Numerical relativity is a powerful tool for astrophysical applications where gravity is strong, as shown dramatically by numerical studies of compact binary systems. However, as a fundamental theory of space, time and gravity, general relativity has many non-astrophysical aspects, and numerical techniques can also be used to great advantage in these areas. This is especially true now that developments in high energy physics, and particularly string theory, have led to new applications of general relativity. Numerical simulations of black holes in 4 spacetime dimensions, adapted and expanded, can be exploited to simulate higher dimensional black holes (as well as other `black objects' like black strings). Through the AdS/CFT correspondence, such simulations of higher dimensional spacetimes (in this case with AdS boundary conditions) can be used to gain information about strongly coupled field theories. High energy physics also leads us to regard general relativity as an effective low energy theory and to think of what the lowest order corrections to that theory might be. Here too, numerical relativity can be used to simulate such corrections and find their observational consequences. A promising approach to quantizing general relativity is loop quantum gravity. In particular, for the purposes of understanding cosmology, and perhaps resolving the big bang singularity through quantum effects, it is helpful to consider loop quantum gravity truncated to a small number of degrees of freedom. Even with such a truncation, loop quantum gravity is sufficiently complicated that numerical techniques can be used to great advantage. Though it is generally hoped that quantum gravity will resolve singularities, it is a good idea to understand exactly what it is that one hopes to resolve. Thus, one would like a thorough understanding of the singularities of classical general relativity. Numerical techniques are essential in obtaining this understanding of singularities. This focus

  7. Numerical Optimization Using Computer Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trosset, Michael W.; Torczon, Virginia

    1997-01-01

    Engineering design optimization often gives rise to problems in which expensive objective functions are minimized by derivative-free methods. We propose a method for solving such problems that synthesizes ideas from the numerical optimization and computer experiment literatures. Our approach relies on kriging known function values to construct a sequence of surrogate models of the objective function that are used to guide a grid search for a minimizer. Results from numerical experiments on a standard test problem are presented.

  8. Numerical Approaches to Spacetime Singularities.

    PubMed

    Berger, Beverly K

    2002-01-01

    This Living Review updates a previous version [25] which is itself an update of a review article [31]. Numerical exploration of the properties of singularities could, in principle, yield detailed understanding of their nature in physically realistic cases. Examples of numerical investigations into the formation of naked singularities, critical behavior in collapse, passage through the Cauchy horizon, chaos of the Mixmaster singularity, and singularities in spatially inhomogeneous cosmologies are discussed.

  9. Numerical modeling of preburner flowfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, A. S.; Mo, J. D.; Jin, K. R.

    1993-06-01

    This work is intended to numerically predict the flowfields inside the preburner of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The computer code (FDNS) based on pressure correction method is modified and adapted with an elliptic grid generator. The original configuration of the preburner in conjunction with downstream gas turbines has been simplified geometrically and numerically modeled at its full power in this work. The computational results are presented and qualitatively discussed with test data collected in NASA/MSFC.

  10. Numerical anomalies mimicking physical effects

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, R.

    1995-09-01

    Numerical simulations of flows with shock waves typically use finite-difference shock-capturing algorithms. These algorithms give a shock a numerical width in order to generate the entropy increase that must occur across a shock wave. For algorithms in conservation form, steady-state shock waves are insensitive to the numerical dissipation because of the Hugoniot jump conditions. However, localized numerical errors occur when shock waves interact. Examples are the ``excess wall heating`` in the Noh problem (shock reflected from rigid wall), errors when a shock impacts a material interface or an abrupt change in mesh spacing, and the start-up error from initializing a shock as a discontinuity. This class of anomalies can be explained by the entropy generation that occurs in the transient flow when a shock profile is formed or changed. The entropy error is localized spatially but under mesh refinement does not decrease in magnitude. Similar effects have been observed in shock tube experiments with partly dispersed shock waves. In this case, the shock has a physical width due to a relaxation process. An entropy anomaly from a transient shock interaction is inherent in the structure of the conservation equations for fluid flow. The anomaly can be expected to occur whenever heat conduction can be neglected and a shock wave has a non-zero width, whether the width is physical or numerical. Thus, the numerical anomaly from an artificial shock width mimics a real physical effect.

  11. Developmental Dyscalculia in Adults: Beyond Numerical Magnitude Impairment.

    PubMed

    De Visscher, Alice; Noël, Marie-Pascale; Pesenti, Mauro; Dormal, Valérie

    2017-09-01

    Numerous studies have tried to identify the core deficit of developmental dyscalculia (DD), mainly by assessing a possible deficit of the mental representation of numerical magnitude. Research in healthy adults has shown that numerosity, duration, and space share a partly common system of magnitude processing and representation. However, in DD, numerosity processing has until now received much more attention than the processing of other non-numerical magnitudes. To assess whether or not the processing of non-numerical magnitudes is impaired in DD, the performance of 15 adults with DD and 15 control participants was compared in four categorization tasks using numerosities, lengths, durations, and faces (as non-magnitude-based control stimuli). Results showed that adults with DD were impaired in processing numerosity and duration, while their performance in length and face categorization did not differ from controls' performance. Our findings support the idea of a nonsymbolic magnitude deficit in DD, affecting numerosity and duration processing but not length processing.

  12. A study of methods to predict and measure the transmission of sound through the walls of light aircraft. Numerical method for analyzing the optimal performance of active noise controllers. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollo, Christopher G.; Bernhard, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    An optimal active noise controller is formulated and analyzed for three different active noise control problems. The first problem formulated is the active control of enclosed or partially enclosed harmonic sound fields where the noise source strengths and enclosure boundary description are known. The enclosure boundary is described by either pressure, velocity, or impedance boundary conditions. The second problem formulated is the active control of the free field power radiated from a distributed noise source with a known time harmonic surface velocity. The third problem formulated is the active control of enclosed or partially enclosed harmonic sound field where the noise source strengths of enclosure boundary description may not be known. All three formulations are derived using an indirect boundary element technique. Formulation and verification of an indirect boundary element method is presented. The active noise controller formulations for enclosures are capable of analyzing systems with generalized enclosure shapes, point noise sources, and/or locally reacting impedance boundary conditions. For each formulation, representative results of optimal active noise controller case studies are presented, and some general conclusions are drawn.

  13. Numeral Incorporation in Japanese Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ktejik, Mish

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the morphological process of numeral incorporation in Japanese Sign Language. Numeral incorporation is defined and the available research on numeral incorporation in signed language is discussed. The numeral signs in Japanese Sign Language are then introduced and followed by an explanation of the numeral morphemes which are…

  14. Numeral Incorporation in Japanese Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ktejik, Mish

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the morphological process of numeral incorporation in Japanese Sign Language. Numeral incorporation is defined and the available research on numeral incorporation in signed language is discussed. The numeral signs in Japanese Sign Language are then introduced and followed by an explanation of the numeral morphemes which are…

  15. Binocular device for displaying numerical information in field of view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, H. V. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for superimposing numerical information on the field of view of binoculars. The invention has application in the flying of radio-controlled model airplanes. Information such as airspeed and angle of attack are sensed on a model airplane and transmitted back to earth where this information is changed into numerical form. Optical means are attached to the binoculars that a pilot is using to track the model air plane for displaying the numerical information in the field of view of the binoculars. The device includes means for focusing the numerical information at infinity whereby the user of the binoculars can see both the field of view and the numerical information without refocusing his eyes.

  16. Inhomogeneous cosmology with numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, Hayley J.; Lasky, Paul D.; Price, Daniel J.

    2017-03-01

    We perform three-dimensional numerical relativity simulations of homogeneous and inhomogeneous expanding spacetimes, with a view toward quantifying nonlinear effects from cosmological inhomogeneities. We demonstrate fourth-order convergence with errors less than one part in 1 06 in evolving a flat, dust Friedmann-Lemaître-Roberston-Walker spacetime using the Einstein Toolkit within the Cactus framework. We also demonstrate agreement to within one part in 1 03 between the numerical relativity solution and the linear solution for density, velocity and metric perturbations in the Hubble flow over a factor of ˜350 change in scale factor (redshift). We simulate the growth of linear perturbations into the nonlinear regime, where effects such as gravitational slip and tensor perturbations appear. We therefore show that numerical relativity is a viable tool for investigating nonlinear effects in cosmology.

  17. Numerical analysis of engine instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habiballah, M.; Dubois, I.

    Following a literature review on numerical analyses of combustion instability, to give the state of the art in the area, the paper describes the ONERA methodology used to analyze the combustion instability in liquid propellant engines. Attention is also given to a model (named Phedre) which describes the unsteady turbulent two-phase reacting flow in a liquid rocket engine combustion chamber. The model formulation includes axial or radial propellant injection, baffles, and acoustic resonators modeling, and makes it possible to treat different engine types. A numerical analysis of a cryogenic engine stability is presented, and the results of the analysis are compared with results of tests of the Viking engine and the gas generator of the Vulcain engine, showing good qualitative agreement and some general trends between experiments and numerical analysis.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teukolsky, Saul

    2003-04-01

    Einstein's equations of general relativity are prime candidates for numerical solution on supercomputers. There is some urgency in being able to carry out such simulations: Large-scale gravitational wave detectors are now coming on line, and the most important expected signals cannot be predicted except numerically. Problems involving black holes are perhaps the most interesting, yet also particularly challenging computationally. One difficulty is that inside a black hole there is a physical singularity that cannot be part of the computational domain. A second difficulty is the disparity in length scales between the size of the black hole and the wavelength of the gravitational radiation emitted. A third difficulty is that all existing methods of evolving black holes in three spatial dimensions are plagued by instabilities that prohibit long-term evolution. I will describe the ideas that are being introduced in numerical relativity to deal with these problems, and discuss the results of recent calculations of black hole collisions.

  19. Numerical cognition: Adding it up.

    PubMed

    LeFevre, Jo-Anne

    2016-03-01

    In this article, I provide a historical overview of the field of numerical cognition. I first situate the evolution and development of this field in the more general context of the cognitive revolution, which started in the mid-1950s. I then discuss the genesis of numerical cognition from 6 areas: psychophysics, information processing, neuropsychology, mathematics education, psychometrics, and cognitive development. This history is personal: I discuss some of my own work over the last 30 years and describe how each of the authors of the articles in this collection originally connected with the field. One important goal of the article is to highlight the major findings, both for experts and for those who are less familiar with research on numerical processing. In sum, I sketch a context within which to appreciate the neural, computational, and behavioural work that the other 4 authors summarise in their articles in this special section. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Numerical Package in Computer Supported Numeric Analysis Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tezer, Murat

    2007-01-01

    At universities in the faculties of Engineering, Sciences, Business and Economics together with higher education in Computing, it is stated that because of the difficulty, calculators and computers can be used in Numerical Analysis (NA). In this study, the learning computer supported NA will be discussed together with important usage of the…

  1. Applications of Numerical Conformal Mapping.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    Al A095 886 CAMBRIDGE HYDRODYNAMICS INC MA F/ A2 - APPL ICAI IONS OF NUMERICAL CONFORMAL MAPPING U) JUL AD D I MEIRON , S A ORSZAG. M ISRAELI NOI0iN...CLASSIFICATION OF THIS1 PAGE flle Dol Sneered) Q___Y , REPORT OCUMENTATION PAGE ~RAD ISTRUCTIONS~ I. REPORT NUM@Et is GOVT ACCESSION No. S . RECIPIENT’S...CATALOG NMER-...o . __ , 4. TITLE (and S uo) As O L Tm U #o V Cambridge Hydrodynamics Report No..34 Interim /echnical /pm t. Applications of Numerical

  2. Numerical Modelling of Gelating Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Babovsky, Hans

    2008-09-01

    The numerical simulation of the gel phase transition of an aerosol system is an interesting and demanding task. Here, we follow an approach first discussed in [6, 8] which turns out as a useful numerical tool. We investigate several improvements and generalizations. In the center of interest are coagulation diffusion systems, where the aerosol dynamics is supplemented with diffusive spreading in physical space. This leads to a variety of scenarios (depending on the coagulation kernel and the diffusion model) for the spatial evolution of the gelation area.

  3. Numerical relativity and spectral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandclement, P.

    2016-12-01

    The term numerical relativity denotes the various techniques that aim at solving Einstein's equations using computers. Those computations can be divided into two families: temporal evolutions on the one hand and stationary or periodic solutions on the other one. After a brief presentation of those two classes of problems, I will introduce a numerical tool designed to solve Einstein's equations: the KADATH library. It is based on the the use of spectral methods that can reach high accuracy with moderate computational resources. I will present some applications about quasicircular orbits of black holes and boson star configurations.

  4. The representation of numerical magnitude

    PubMed Central

    Brannon, Elizabeth M

    2006-01-01

    The combined efforts of many fields are advancing our understanding of how number is represented. Researchers studying numerical reasoning in adult humans, developing humans and non-human animals are using a suite of behavioral and neurobiological methods to uncover similarities and differences in how each population enumerates and compares quantities to identify the neural substrates of numerical cognition. An important picture emerging from this research is that adult humans share with non-human animals a system for representing number as language-independent mental magnitudes and that this system emerges early in development. PMID:16546373

  5. Numerical investigation of bubble nonlinear dynamics characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jie Yang, Desen; Shi, Shengguo; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Haoyang; Jiang, Wei

    2015-10-28

    The complicated dynamical behaviors of bubble oscillation driven by acoustic wave can provide favorable conditions for many engineering applications. On the basis of Keller-Miksis model, the influences of control parameters, including acoustic frequency, acoustic pressure and radius of gas bubble, are discussed by utilizing various numerical analysis methods, Furthermore, the law of power spectral variation is studied. It is shown that the complicated dynamic behaviors of bubble oscillation driven by acoustic wave, such as bifurcation and chaos, further the stimulated scattering processes are revealed.

  6. Numerical prediction of airplane trailing vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, M. J.; Crouch, J. D.; Miller, G. D.; Strelets, M.

    2004-11-01

    The accurate prediction of airplane trailing vortices is of great interest for both cruise conditions in conjunction with the formation of contrails as well as approach conditions for reasons of flight safety and active vortex control. A numerical approach is introduced based on a quasi-3D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes formulation with a one-equation turbulence model. The numerical results show good agreement with wind-tunnel data out to ten spans for a range of wing and tail loadings typical of commercial airplanes in a landing configuration. The results show a one-, two- and three-pair system in the near-field with only minor changes to the initial lift distribution. The CFD correctly predicts the strength, demise and position of the individual vortex pairs over a range of test cases. The approach is further extended by considering thrust effects. For cruise conditions, far field predictions show the entrainment of the jet plume into the wake and provide the potential for coupling with a micro-physics model to predict the formation and early evolution of contrails. Potential influences of configuration details on the plume entrainment are considered. This numerical method also offers an attractive approach for assessing active schemes designed to accelerate the break-up of airplane trailing vortices.

  7. Numerical Simulations of Radar Acoustic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boluriaan, Said; Morris, Philip J.

    1998-11-01

    Wake vortices are produced by the lifting surfaces of all aircraft. The vortex created by a large aircraft can have a catastrophic effect on a small plane following closely behind. A vortex detection system would not only increase airport productivity by allowing adaptive spacing, but would also increase the safety of all aircraft operating around the airport by alerting controllers to hazardous conditions that might exist near the runways. In the present research, one and two-dimensional models have been considered for the study of wake vortex detection using a Radar Acoustic Sounding System (RASS). The permittivity perturbation caused by the vortex is modeled as a traveling wave with a Gaussian envelope and a variable propagation speed. The model equations are solved numerically. The one-dimensional model is also solved analytically. The main problem with a time domain simulation is the number of samples required to resolve the Doppler shift. Even for a 1D model with a typical scatterer size, the CPU time required to run the code is far beyond the currently available computer resources. One way to make the time domain simulation feasible is to recast the governing differential equation in order to remove the carrier frequency and solve only for the frequency shift in the scattered wave. The numerical stability characteristics of the resulting equation with complex coefficients are discussed. In order to validate the numerical scheme, the code is run for a fictitious speed of light.

  8. Numerical abilities in fish: A methodological review.

    PubMed

    Agrillo, Christian; Miletto Petrazzini, Maria Elena; Bisazza, Angelo

    2017-02-03

    The ability to utilize numerical information can be adaptive in a number of ecological contexts including foraging, mating, parental care, and anti-predator strategies. Numerical abilities of mammals and birds have been studied both in natural conditions and in controlled laboratory conditions using a variety of approaches. During the last decade this ability was also investigated in some fish species. Here we reviewed the main methods used to study this group, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of each of the methods used. Fish have only been studied under laboratory conditions and among the methods used with other species, only two have been systematically used in fish-spontaneous choice tests and discrimination learning procedures. In the former case, the choice between two options is observed in a biologically relevant situation and the degree of preference for the larger/smaller group is taken as a measure of the capacity to discriminate the two quantities (e.g., two shoals differing in number). In discrimination learning tasks, fish are trained to select the larger or the smaller of two sets of abstract objects, typically two-dimensional geometric figures, using food or social companions as reward. Beyond methodological differences, what emerges from the literature is a substantial similarity of the numerical abilities of fish with those of other vertebrates studied.

  9. Research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE) in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science is summarized and abstracts of published reports are presented. The major categories of the ICASE research program are: (1) numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; (2) control and parameter identification; (3) computational problems in engineering and the physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and (4) computer systems and software, especially vector and parallel computers.

  10. Soil remediation by heat injection: Experiments and numerical modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Betz, C.; Emmert, M.; Faerber, A.

    1995-03-01

    In order to understand physical processes of thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction methods in porous media the isothermal, multiphase formulation for the numerical model MUFTE will be extended by a non-isothermal, multiphase-multicomponent formulation. In order to verify the numerical model, comparison with analytical solutions for well defined problems will be carried out. To identify relevant processes and their interactions, the results of the simulation will be compared with well controlled experiments with sophisticated measurement equipment in three different scales. The aim is to compare the different numerical solution techniques namely Finite Element versus Integral Finite Difference technique as implemented in MUFTE and TOUGH2 [9] respectively.

  11. Numerical techniques for generating and refining solar sail trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzyniak, Geoffrey G.; Howell, Kathleen C.

    2011-12-01

    Like all applications in trajectory design, the design of solar sail trajectories requires a transition from analytical models to numerically generated realizations of an orbit. In astrodynamics, three numerical strategies are often employed. Differential correctors (also known as shooting methods) are perhaps the most common techniques. Finite-difference methods and collocation schemes are also employed and are successful in generating trajectories with pseudo-continuous control histories. These three numerical techniques are employed here to generate periodic trajectories displaced below the Moon in a circular restricted three-body system. All these approaches reveal trajectory options within the design space for solar sail applications.

  12. Numerical Study of Damage Propagation and Dynamic Fracture in Sapphire

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-30

    ARL-RP-0570 ● JUNE 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Numerical Study of Damage Propagation and Dynamic Fracture in Sapphire by...Research Laboratory Numerical Study of Damage Propagation and Dynamic Fracture in Sapphire by Costas G Fountzoulas Weapons and Materials Research...with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1

  13. Numerical Studies of Quantum Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Makoto; Fujimoto, Kazuya; Yui, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    We review numerical studies of quantum turbulence. Quantum turbulence is currently one of the most important problems in low temperature physics and is actively studied for superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates. A key aspect of quantum turbulence is the dynamics of condensates and quantized vortices. The dynamics of quantized vortices in superfluid helium are described by the vortex filament model, while the dynamics of condensates are described by the Gross-Pitaevskii model. Both of these models are nonlinear, and the quantum turbulent states of interest are far from equilibrium. Hence, numerical studies have been indispensable for studying quantum turbulence. In fact, numerical studies have contributed to revealing the various problems of quantum turbulence. This article reviews the recent developments in numerical studies of quantum turbulence. We start with the motivation and the basics of quantum turbulence and invite readers to the frontier of this research. Though there are many important topics in the quantum turbulence of superfluid helium, this article focuses on inhomogeneous quantum turbulence in a channel, which has been motivated by recent visualization experiments. Atomic Bose-Einstein condensates are a modern issue in quantum turbulence, and this article reviews a variety of topics in the quantum turbulence of condensates, e.g., two-dimensional quantum turbulence, weak wave turbulence, turbulence in a spinor condensate, some of which have not been addressed in superfluid helium and paves the novel way for quantum turbulence researches. Finally, we discuss open problems.

  14. Adult Nonconservation of Numerical Equivalence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Frank B.; Armstrong, Sharon L.

    A conservation problem of numerical equivalence which 80% of adults reliably fail and 40% of third graders pass was developed, and responses of 188 subjects (Grades 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and college) to it and related number conservation and probability problems indicated that the differences in nonconservation were rooted in subjects' different…

  15. Numerical Calabi-Yau metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Michael R.; Karp, Robert L.; Lukic, Sergio; Reinbacher, René

    2008-03-01

    We develop numerical methods for approximating Ricci flat metrics on Calabi-Yau hypersurfaces in projective spaces. Our approach is based on finding balanced metrics and builds on recent theoretical work by Donaldson. We illustrate our methods in detail for a one parameter family of quintics. We also suggest several ways to extend our results.

  16. Numerical calculations of flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D.; Vogel, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical calculations were made of flow fields generated by various aerodynamic configurations. Data cover flow fields generated by a finitely thick lifting three dimensional wing with subsonic tips moving at supersonic speeds, cross flow instability associated with lifting delta wing configurations such as space shuttles, and flow fields produced by a lifting elliptic cone. Finite difference techniques were used to determine elliptic cone flow.

  17. Conditional Convergence of Numerical Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, E.; Plaza, A.

    2002-01-01

    One of the most astonishing properties when studying numerical series is that the sum is not commutative, that is the sum may change when the order of its elements is altered. In this note an example is given of such a series. A well-known mathematical proof is given and a MATLAB[C] program used for different rearrangements of the series…

  18. Numerical Studies of Quantum Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Makoto; Fujimoto, Kazuya; Yui, Satoshi

    2017-07-01

    We review numerical studies of quantum turbulence. Quantum turbulence is currently one of the most important problems in low temperature physics and is actively studied for superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates. A key aspect of quantum turbulence is the dynamics of condensates and quantized vortices. The dynamics of quantized vortices in superfluid helium are described by the vortex filament model, while the dynamics of condensates are described by the Gross-Pitaevskii model. Both of these models are nonlinear, and the quantum turbulent states of interest are far from equilibrium. Hence, numerical studies have been indispensable for studying quantum turbulence. In fact, numerical studies have contributed to revealing the various problems of quantum turbulence. This article reviews the recent developments in numerical studies of quantum turbulence. We start with the motivation and the basics of quantum turbulence and invite readers to the frontier of this research. Though there are many important topics in the quantum turbulence of superfluid helium, this article focuses on inhomogeneous quantum turbulence in a channel, which has been motivated by recent visualization experiments. Atomic Bose-Einstein condensates are a modern issue in quantum turbulence, and this article reviews a variety of topics in the quantum turbulence of condensates, e.g., two-dimensional quantum turbulence, weak wave turbulence, turbulence in a spinor condensate, some of which have not been addressed in superfluid helium and paves the novel way for quantum turbulence researches. Finally, we discuss open problems.

  19. Summary of research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The major categories of current ICASE research programs addressed include: numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; control and parameter identification problems, with emphasis on effective numerical methods; computational problems in engineering and physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and computer systems and software, especially vector and parallel computers.

  20. Numerical simulation of real-world flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayase, Toshiyuki

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining real flow information is important in various fields, but is a difficult issue because measurement data are usually limited in time and space, and computational results usually do not represent the exact state of real flows. Problems inherent in the realization of numerical simulation of real-world flows include the difficulty in representing exact initial and boundary conditions and the difficulty in representing unstable flow characteristics. This article reviews studies dealing with these problems. First, an overview of basic flow measurement methodologies and measurement data interpolation/approximation techniques is presented. Then, studies on methods of integrating numerical simulation and measurement, namely, four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4D-Var), Kalman filters (KFs), state observers, etc are discussed. The first problem is properly solved by these integration methodologies. The second problem can be partially solved with 4D-Var in which only initial and boundary conditions are control parameters. If an appropriate control parameter capable of modifying the dynamical structure of the model is included in the formulation of 4D-Var, unstable modes are properly suppressed and the second problem is solved. The state observer and KFs also solve the second problem by modifying mathematical models to stabilize the unstable modes of the original dynamical system by applying feedback signals. These integration methodologies are now applied in simulation of real-world flows in a wide variety of research fields. Examples are presented for basic fluid dynamics and applications in meteorology, aerospace, medicine, etc.