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Sample records for numerical generalized vibration

  1. Numerical simulations of vibrating sessile drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahouadji, Lyes; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    A vibrated drop constitutes a very rich physical system, blending both interfacial and volume phenomena. A remarkable experimental study was performed by M. Costalonga highlighting sessile drop motion subject to horizontal, vertical and oblique vibration. Several intriguing phenomena are observed such as drop walking and rapid droplet ejection. We perform three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of vibrating sessile drops where the phenomena described above are computed using the massively parallel multiphase code BLUE. EPSRC UK Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1).

  2. Numerical Hydrodynamics in General Relativity.

    PubMed

    Font, José A

    2000-01-01

    The current status of numerical solutions for the equations of ideal general relativistic hydrodynamics is reviewed. Different formulations of the equations are presented, with special mention of conservative and hyperbolic formulations well-adapted to advanced numerical methods. A representative sample of available numerical schemes is discussed and particular emphasis is paid to solution procedures based on schemes exploiting the characteristic structure of the equations through linearized Riemann solvers. A comprehensive summary of relevant astrophysical simulations in strong gravitational fields, including gravitational collapse, accretion onto black holes and evolution of neutron stars, is also presented.

  3. [Clinical aspects of vibration disease caused by general vibration].

    PubMed

    Tarasova, L A; Lagutina, G N; Komleva, L M; Suvorov, G A; Starozhuk, I A; Filatova, O V

    1989-01-01

    The clinico-functional examination of agricultural machine-operators, truck drivers, excavator and boring machine operators revealed that, under low-frequency general vibration, polymorphic pathologic changes occur in human organism. Those include peripheral vascular and neuritic disorders and changes in the vertebral column. The most peculiar symptoms of VD are dealt with. The data obtained show to the importance of further elaboration of differential diagnostic criteria of VD, specifying its pathogenic mechanisms and prevention measures working out.

  4. Experimental validation of a numerical model for subway induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Degrande, G.; Lombaert, G.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental validation of a coupled periodic finite element-boundary element model for the prediction of subway induced vibrations. The model fully accounts for the dynamic interaction between the train, the track, the tunnel and the soil. The periodicity or invariance of the tunnel and the soil in the longitudinal direction is exploited using the Floquet transformation, which allows for an efficient formulation in the frequency-wavenumber domain. A general analytical formulation is used to compute the response of three-dimensional invariant or periodic media that are excited by moving loads. The numerical model is validated by means of several experiments that have been performed at a site in Regent's Park on the Bakerloo line of London Underground. Vibration measurements have been performed on the axle boxes of the train, on the rail, the tunnel invert and the tunnel wall, and in the free field, both at the surface and at a depth of 15 m. Prior to these vibration measurements, the dynamic soil characteristics and the track characteristics have been determined. The Bakerloo line tunnel of London Underground has been modelled using the coupled periodic finite element-boundary element approach and free field vibrations due to the passage of a train at different speeds have been predicted and compared to the measurements. The correspondence between the predicted and measured response in the tunnel is reasonably good, although some differences are observed in the free field. The discrepancies are explained on the basis of various uncertainties involved in the problem. The variation in the response with train speed is similar for the measurements as well as the predictions. This study demonstrates the applicability of the coupled periodic finite element-boundary element model to make realistic predictions of the vibrations from underground railways.

  5. Results from Numerical General Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    For several years numerical simulations have been revealing the details of general relativity's predictions for the dynamical interactions of merging black holes. I will review what has been learned of the rich phenomenology of these mergers and the resulting gravitational wave signatures. These wave forms provide a potentially observable record of the powerful astronomical events, a central target of gravitational wave astronomy. Asymmetric radiation can produce a thrust on the system which may accelerate the single black hole resulting from the merger to high relative velocity.

  6. Numerical analysis of strongly nonlinear extensional vibrations in elastic rods.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of transduction, nondestructive testing, and nonlinear acoustic characterization, this article presents the analysis of strongly nonlinear vibrations by means of an original numerical algorithm. In acoustic and transducer applications in extreme working conditions, such as the ones induced by the generation of high-power ultrasound, the analysis of nonlinear ultrasonic vibrations is fundamental. Also, the excitation and analysis of nonlinear vibrations is an emergent technique in nonlinear characterization for damage detection. A third-order evolution equation is derived and numerically solved for extensional waves in isotropic dissipative media. A nine-constant theory of elasticity for isotropic solids is constructed, and the nonlinearity parameters corresponding to extensional waves are proposed. The nonlinear differential equation is solved by using a new numerical algorithm working in the time domain. The finite-difference numerical method proposed is implicit and only requires the solution of a linear set of equations at each time step. The model allows the analysis of strongly nonlinear, one-dimensional vibrations and can be used for prediction as well as characterization. Vibration waveforms are calculated at different points, and results are compared for different excitation levels and boundary conditions. Amplitude distributions along the rod axis for every harmonic component also are evaluated. Special attention is given to the study of high-amplitude damping of vibrations by means of several simulations. Simulations are performed for amplitudes ranging from linear to nonlinear and weak shock.

  7. Numerical investigation of vibration in a steam turbine control valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Luke Michael

    A numerical analysis is performed at North Dakota State University to investigate and resolve steam inlet control valve vibration in a Minnkota Power Cooperative turbine. Pressure fluctuations resulting from an unstable flow pattern are found to cause vibration. Multiple valve disc and seat design modifications to stabilize the flow are made and tested. The full scale geometry is used with steam as the working material. Both steady-state and transient analyses are completed. Analytical calculations are used for verification. Investigation of all modifications is discussed. Results from the original valve configuration show vortex shedding off of the disc. A currently installed cutoff disc has not removed flow-induced vibration. Flow expansion generates unstable flow, creating an unsteady separation bubble on the valve seat at the throat exit. Changing the throat from a converging-diverging to a purely converging nozzle stabilizes the flow, removing the flow-induced pressure forces causing disc vibration.

  8. Numerical modelling of longitudinal vibrations of a sucker rod string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shardakov, I. N.; Wasserman, I. N.

    2010-03-01

    A new technique for analyzing the dynamic behavior of a sucker rod string used in the oil well industry is presented. The main difficulty in the numerical calculation of the examined structure is a multivalued velocity—force relation determined by Coulomb's friction and by loads generated during operation of pump valves. Both the monotonic and nonmonotonic velocity—force relations are considered. A quasi-variational inequality formulation of the problem is proposed. The solution of the inequality amounts to finding the minimum of a convex nonsmooth functional at each time step by means of the Newmark difference time scheme, successive iterations and finite element discretization. The problem of functional minimization is reduced to construction of a sequence of smooth nonlinear programming problems by introducing the auxiliary variables and applying the augmented Lagrangian method. The proposed approach is used to study the longitudinal vibrations of sucker rod strings under near-real conditions. In such systems the most commonly occurring vibration modes are the stick-slip vibrations and the vibrations with natural force excited twice a cycle. The nonmonotonic character of the friction law leads to intensification of these vibrations. In the case of nonmonotonic friction law the stick-slip vibrations can occur even under the action of constant external forces.

  9. Numerical Approximations of Flow Induced Vibrations of Vocal Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sváček, P.; Horáček, J.

    2010-09-01

    The paper is interested in numerical modelling of incompressible channel flow interacting with elastic part of its walls simulating vocal fold oscillations. The flow in moving domain is described with the aid of the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method, see e.g. [1], and governed by the 2D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The flow model is coupled with the structural motion modelled by an aeroelastic two degrees of freedom model of the oscillating vocal folds, cf. [2], [9]. The described fluid-structure interaction problem is discretized in time and space, see also [1]. The numerical results of a channel flow modelling the glottal region of the human vocal tract including the vibrating vocal folds are shown. The vibrations of the channel walls are either prescribed (1st case) or induced by the aerodynamical forces (2nd case).

  10. Experimental and numerical study of the effect of mold vibration on aluminum castings alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Dheir, Numan

    2005-07-01

    The recent advances in scientific and engineering tools have allowed researchers to integrate more science into manufacturing, leading to improved and new innovative processes. As a result, important accomplishments have been reached in the area of designing and engineering new materials for various industrial applications. This subject is of critical significance because of the impact it could have on the manufacturing industry. In the casting industry, obtaining the desired microstructure and properties during solidification may reduce or eliminate the need for costly thermo-mechanical processing prior to secondary manufacturing processes. Several techniques have been developed to alter and control the microstructure of castings during solidification including semi-solid processing, electromagnetic stirring, electromagnetic vibration, and mechanical vibration. Although it is established that mold vibration can significantly influence the structure and properties of castings, however, most of the studies are generally qualitative, limited to a small range of conditions and no attempts have been made to simulate the effect of vibration on casting microstructure. In this work, a detailed experimental and numerical investigation is carried out to advance the utilization of mold vibration as an effective tool for controlling and modifying the casting microstructure. The effects of a wide range of vibration amplitudes and frequencies on the solidification kinetics, microstructure formation and mechanical properties of Al-Si alloys are examined. Results show strong influence of mold vibration on the resulting casting. The presence of porosity was significantly reduced as a result of mold vibration. In addition, the changes in microstructure and mechanical properties can be successfully represented by the changes in solidification characteristics. Increasing the vibration amplitude tends to reduce the lamellar spacing and change the silicon morphology to become more

  11. Numerical Hydrodynamics and Magnetohydrodynamics in General Relativity.

    PubMed

    Font, José A

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a comprehensive overview of numerical hydrodynamics and magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) in general relativity. Some significant additions have been incorporated with respect to the previous two versions of this review (2000, 2003), most notably the coverage of general-relativistic MHD, a field in which remarkable activity and progress has occurred in the last few years. Correspondingly, the discussion of astrophysical simulations in general-relativistic hydrodynamics is enlarged to account for recent relevant advances, while those dealing with general-relativistic MHD are amply covered in this review for the first time. The basic outline of this article is nevertheless similar to its earlier versions, save for the addition of MHD-related issues throughout. Hence, different formulations of both the hydrodynamics and MHD equations are presented, with special mention of conservative and hyperbolic formulations well adapted to advanced numerical methods. A large sample of numerical approaches for solving such hyperbolic systems of equations is discussed, paying particular attention to solution procedures based on schemes exploiting the characteristic structure of the equations through linearized Riemann solvers. As previously stated, a comprehensive summary of astrophysical simulations in strong gravitational fields is also presented. These are detailed in three basic sections, namely gravitational collapse, black-hole accretion, and neutron-star evolutions; despite the boundaries, these sections may (and in fact do) overlap throughout the discussion. The material contained in these sections highlights the numerical challenges of various representative simulations. It also follows, to some extent, the chronological development of the field, concerning advances in the formulation of the gravitational field, hydrodynamics and MHD equations and the numerical methodology designed to solve them. To keep the length of this article reasonable, an effort has

  12. A numerical study of non-equilibrium flows with different vibrational relaxation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, N. V.; Kirilovskiy, S. V.; Poplavskaya, T. V.; Shoev, G. V.

    2016-07-01

    Comparative analysis of a widely used Landau-Teller formula for small deviations from thermal equilibrium and its generalized form, derived from the kinetic theory of gaseous, for an arbitrary deviation from the thermal equilibrium is performed by numerical simulation. Thermally non-equilibrium flows of carbon dioxide near a sharp-edged plate, pure nitrogen flows between two symmetrically located wedges, and the N2/N mixture flow with vibrational relaxation and dissociation over a cone have been considered. A comparison has been performed with the available experimental data.

  13. Numerical Manifold Method for the Forced Vibration of Thin Plates during Bending

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Ding; Song, Chen; Wei-Bin, Wen; Shao-Ming, Luo; Xia, Huang

    2014-01-01

    A novel numerical manifold method was derived from the cubic B-spline basis function. The new interpolation function is characterized by high-order coordination at the boundary of a manifold element. The linear elastic-dynamic equation used to solve the bending vibration of thin plates was derived according to the principle of minimum instantaneous potential energy. The method for the initialization of the dynamic equation and its solution process were provided. Moreover, the analysis showed that the calculated stiffness matrix exhibited favorable performance. Numerical results showed that the generalized degrees of freedom were significantly fewer and that the calculation accuracy was higher for the manifold method than for the conventional finite element method. PMID:24883403

  14. Numerical manifold method for the forced vibration of thin plates during bending.

    PubMed

    Jun, Ding; Song, Chen; Wei-Bin, Wen; Shao-Ming, Luo; Xia, Huang

    2014-01-01

    A novel numerical manifold method was derived from the cubic B-spline basis function. The new interpolation function is characterized by high-order coordination at the boundary of a manifold element. The linear elastic-dynamic equation used to solve the bending vibration of thin plates was derived according to the principle of minimum instantaneous potential energy. The method for the initialization of the dynamic equation and its solution process were provided. Moreover, the analysis showed that the calculated stiffness matrix exhibited favorable performance. Numerical results showed that the generalized degrees of freedom were significantly fewer and that the calculation accuracy was higher for the manifold method than for the conventional finite element method.

  15. Static and Vibration Analyses of General Wing Structures Using Equivalent Plate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.; Liu, Youhua

    1999-01-01

    An efficient method, using equivalent plate model, is developed for studying the static and vibration analyses of general built-up wing structures composed of skins, spars, and ribs. The model includes the transverse shear effects by treating the built-up wing as a plate following the Reissner-Mindlin theory, the so-called First-order Shear Deformation Theory (FSDT). The Ritz method is used with the Legendre polynomials being employed as the trial functions. This is in contrast to previous equivalent plate model methods which have used simple polynomials, known to be prone to numerical ill-conditioning, as the trial functions. The present developments are evaluated by comparing the results with those obtained using MSC/NASTRAN, for a set of examples. These examples are: (i) free-vibration analysis of a clamped trapezoidal plate with (a) uniform thickness, and (b) non-uniform thickness varying as an airfoil, (ii) free-vibration and static analyses (including skin stress distribution) of a general built-up wing, and (iii) free-vibration and static analyses of a swept-back box wing. The results obtained by the present equivalent plate model are in good agreement with those obtained by the finite element method.

  16. Numerical simulation of inclination vibration in magnetic induction micromachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.-Y.; Zhou, J.-B.; Zhang, W.-M.; Meng, G.

    2008-02-01

    This paper studies the inclination vibration of an axial-flux magnetic induction micromachine which is supported by hydrostatic thrust bearings. A mechanical model for the rotor and the corresponding fluid-film bearing is combined with an electromagnetic force model to study the linear and nonlinear rotordynamics of the system. Results obtained for the stability show that magnetic induction micromachine would encounter severe instability problem at high speed operations. The model developed here could serve as a useful reference for design optimization and operation scheme.

  17. Numerical study of human vocal folds vibration using Immersed Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingshi; Zhang, Lucy; Krane, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The voice production procedure is a self-oscillating, fluid-structure interaction problem. In this study, the vocal folds vibration during phonation will be simulated by self-oscillated layered-structure vocal folds model, using Immersed Finite Element Method. With the numerical results, we will find out the vocal folds vibration pattern, and also show how the lung pressure, stiffness and geometry of vocal folds will affect the vocal folds vibration. With further analysis, we shall get better understanding of the dynamics of voice production. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.

  18. Numerical Investigation of Flapwise-Torsional Vibration Model of a Smart Section Blade with Microtab

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Nailu; Balas, Mark J.; Yang, Hua; ...

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a method to develop an aeroelastic model of a smart section blade equipped with microtab. The model is suitable for potential passive vibration control study of the blade section in classic flutter. Equations of the model are described by the nondimensional flapwise and torsional vibration modes coupled with the aerodynamic model based on the Theodorsen theory and aerodynamic effects of the microtab based on the wind tunnel experimental data. The aeroelastic model is validated using numerical data available in the literature and then utilized to analyze the microtab control capability on flutter instability case and divergence instabilitymore » case. The effectiveness of the microtab is investigated with the scenarios of different output controllers and actuation deployments for both instability cases. The numerical results show that the microtab can effectively suppress both vibration modes with the appropriate choice of the output feedback controller.« less

  19. Physical and numerical investigation of the flow induced vibration of the hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Wang, G. Y.; Huang, B.

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the flow induced vibration of a flexible hydrofoil in cavitating flows via combined experimental and numerical studies. The experiments are presented for the modified NACA66 hydrofoil made of POM Polyacetate in the closed-loop cavitation tunnel at Beijing Institute of Technology. The high-speed camera and the single point Laser Doppler Vibrometer are applied to analyze the transient flow structures and the corresponding structural vibration characteristics. The hybrid coupled fluid structure interaction model is conducted to couple the incompressible and unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes solver with a simplified two-degree-of-freedom structural model. The k-ω SST turbulence model with the turbulence viscosity correction and the Zwart cavitation model are introduced to the present simulations. The results showed that with the decreasing of the cavitation number, the cavitating flows display incipient cavitation, sheet cavitation, cloud cavitation and supercavitation. The vibration magnitude increases dramatically for the cloud cavitation and decline for the supercavitation. The cloud cavitation development strongly affects the vibration response, which is corresponding to the periodically developing and shedding of the large-scale cloud cavity. The main frequency of the vibration amplitude is accordance with the cavity shedding frequency and other two frequencies of the vibration amplitude are corresponding to the natural frequencies of the bending and twisting modes.

  20. A Numerical Study on the Screening of Blast-Induced Waves for Reducing Ground Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Dohyun; Jeon, Byungkyu; Jeon, Seokwon

    2009-06-01

    Blasting is often a necessary part of mining and construction operations, and is the most cost-effective way to break rock, but blasting generates both noise and ground vibration. In urban areas, noise and vibration have an environmental impact, and cause structural damage to nearby structures. Various wave-screening methods have been used for many years to reduce blast-induced ground vibration. However, these methods have not been quantitatively studied for their reduction effect of ground vibration. The present study focused on the quantitative assessment of the effectiveness in vibration reduction of line-drilling as a screening method using a numerical method. Two numerical methods were used to analyze the reduction effect toward ground vibration, namely, the “distinct element method” and the “non-linear hydrocode.” The distinct element method, by particle flow code in two dimensions (PFC 2D), was used for two-dimensional parametric analyses, and some cases of two-dimensional analyses were analyzed three-dimensionally using AUTODYN 3D, the program of the non-linear hydrocode. To analyze the screening effectiveness of line-drilling, parametric analyses were carried out under various conditions, with the spacing, diameter of drill holes, distance between the blasthole and line-drilling, and the number of rows of drill holes, including their arrangement, used as parameters. The screening effectiveness was assessed via a comparison of the vibration amplitude between cases both with and without screening. Also, the frequency distribution of ground motion of the two cases was investigated through fast Fourier transform (FFT), with the differences also examined. From our study, it was concluded that line-drilling as a screening method of blast-induced waves was considerably effective under certain design conditions. The design details for field application have also been proposed.

  1. [The potentials for errors in the hygienic assessment of the general vibrations in tractors].

    PubMed

    Ivanovich, E; Goranova, L; Enev, S

    1991-01-01

    The data for the parameters of the general vibrations in tractors are comparatively scanty and contradictory. In the present work are analyzed the most frequently met omissions and errors in the measurement and evaluation of the general vibrations, as well as the factors, which can effect the intensity of the general vibrations; constructive and technological peculiarities, technical state, rate of machine amortization, construction, damping qualities, and regulation of the seat, motion velocity, relief, type of the performed agricultural activity. The necessity for taking under consideration these factors in measuring the general vibrations and the hygiene interpretation of the data, as well as precise report on the daily, weekly and general exposure, in view of defining the total vibration loading, is underlined.

  2. Efficient Procedure for the Numerical Calculation of Harmonic Vibrational Frequencies Based on Internal Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2013-08-15

    We propose a general procedure for the numerical calculation of the harmonic vibrational frequencies that is based on internal coordinates and Wilson’s GF methodology via double differentiation of the energy. The internal coordinates are defined as the geometrical parameters of a Z-matrix structure, thus avoiding issues related to their redundancy. Linear arrangements of atoms are described using a dummy atom of infinite mass. The procedure has been automated in FORTRAN90 and its main advantage lies in the nontrivial reduction of the number of single-point energy calculations needed for the construction of the Hessian matrix when compared to the corresponding number using double differentiation in Cartesian coordinates. For molecules of C1 symmetry the computational savings in the energy calculations amount to 36N – 30, where N is the number of atoms, with additional savings when symmetry is present. Typical applications for small and medium size molecules in their minimum and transition state geometries as well as hydrogen bonded clusters (water dimer and trimer) are presented. Finally, in all cases the frequencies based on internal coordinates differ on average by <1 cm–1 from those obtained from Cartesian coordinates.

  3. Efficient procedure for the numerical calculation of harmonic vibrational frequencies based on internal coordinates.

    PubMed

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S

    2013-08-15

    We propose a general procedure for the numerical calculation of the harmonic vibrational frequencies that is based on internal coordinates and Wilson's GF methodology via double differentiation of the energy. The internal coordinates are defined as the geometrical parameters of a Z-matrix structure, thus avoiding issues related to their redundancy. Linear arrangements of atoms are described using a dummy atom of infinite mass. The procedure has been automated in FORTRAN90 and its main advantage lies in the nontrivial reduction of the number of single-point energy calculations needed for the construction of the Hessian matrix when compared to the corresponding number using double differentiation in Cartesian coordinates. For molecules of C1 symmetry the computational savings in the energy calculations amount to 36N - 30, where N is the number of atoms, with additional savings when symmetry is present. Typical applications for small and medium size molecules in their minimum and transition state geometries as well as hydrogen bonded clusters (water dimer and trimer) are presented. In all cases the frequencies based on internal coordinates differ on average by <1 cm(-1) from those obtained from Cartesian coordinates.

  4. Vibration and buckling of general periodic lattice structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. S.; Williams, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    A method is presented for vibration and buckling analysis of arbitrary lattice structures having repetitive geometry in any combination of coordinate directions. The approach is based on exact member theory for representing the stiffness of an individual member subject to axial load, and in the case of vibration, undergoing harmonic oscillation. The method is an extension of previous work that was limited to specific geometries. The resulting eigenvalue problem is of the size associated with the repeating element of the structure. A computer program has been developed incorporating the theory and results are given for vibration of rectangular platforms and a large antenna structure having rotational symmetry. Buckling and vibration results for cable-stiffened rings are also given.

  5. Hybrid predictions of railway induced ground vibration using a combination of experimental measurements and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, K. A.; Verbraken, H.; Degrande, G.; Lombaert, G.

    2016-07-01

    Along with the rapid expansion of urban rail networks comes the need for accurate predictions of railway induced vibration levels at grade and in buildings. Current computational methods for making predictions of railway induced ground vibration rely on simplifying modelling assumptions and require detailed parameter inputs, which lead to high levels of uncertainty. It is possible to mitigate against these issues using a combination of field measurements and state-of-the-art numerical methods, known as a hybrid model. In this paper, two hybrid models are developed, based on the use of separate source and propagation terms that are quantified using in situ measurements or modelling results. These models are implemented using term definitions proposed by the Federal Railroad Administration and assessed using the specific illustration of a surface railway. It is shown that the limitations of numerical and empirical methods can be addressed in a hybrid procedure without compromising prediction accuracy.

  6. The influence of source-receiver interaction on the numerical prediction of railway induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulier, P.; Lombaert, G.; Degrande, G.

    2014-06-01

    The numerical prediction of vibrations in buildings due to railway traffic is a complicated problem where wave propagation in the soil couples the source (railway tunnel or track) and the receiver (building). This through-soil coupling is often neglected in state-of-the-art numerical models in order to reduce the computational cost. In this paper, the effect of this simplifying assumption on the accuracy of numerical predictions is investigated. A coupled finite element-boundary element methodology is employed to analyze the interaction between a building and a railway tunnel at depth or a ballasted track at the surface of a homogeneous halfspace, respectively. Three different soil types are considered. It is demonstrated that the dynamic axle loads can be calculated with reasonable accuracy using an uncoupled strategy in which through-soil coupling is disregarded. If the transfer functions from source to receiver are considered, however, large local variations in terms of vibration insertion gain are induced by source-receiver interaction, reaching up to 10 dB and higher, although the overall wave field is only moderately affected. A global quantification of the significance of through-soil coupling is made, based on the mean vibrational energy entering a building. This approach allows assessing the common assumption in seismic engineering that source-receiver interaction can be neglected if the distance between source and receiver is sufficiently large compared to the wavelength of waves in the soil. It is observed that the interaction between a source at depth and a receiver mainly affects the power flow distribution if the distance between source and receiver is smaller than the dilatational wavelength in the soil. Interaction effects for a railway track at grade are observed if the source-receiver distance is smaller than six Rayleigh wavelengths. A similar trend is revealed if the passage of a freight train is considered. The overall influence of dynamic

  7. Numerical study on reducing the vibration of spur gear pairs with phasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Gill-Jeong

    2010-09-01

    A new method of reducing gear vibration was analyzed using a simple spur gear pair with phasing. This new method is based on reducing the variation in mesh stiffness by adding another pair of gears with half-pitch phasing. This reduces the variation in the mesh stiffness of the final (phasing) gear, because each gear compensates for the variation in the other's mesh stiffness. A single gear pair model with a time-varying rectangular-type mesh stiffness function and backlash was used, and the dynamic response over a wide range of speeds was obtained by numerical integration. Because of the reduced variation in mesh stiffness and the double frequency, the phasing gear greatly reduced the dynamic response and nonlinear behavior of the normal gears. The results of the analysis indicate the possibility of reducing vibration of spur gear pairs using the proposed method.

  8. Application of Numerical Simulation and Vibration Measurements for Seismic Damage Assessment of Railway Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehan, Fumiaki; Meguro, Kimiro

    In this study, the authors discuss methods to assess the future/actual damage to RC structures by using numerical simulations and vibration measurements. First, the applicability of the Applied Element Method (AEM) is examined as an assessment tool for the seismic performance of RC structures with/without retrofit. Cyclic loading tests and seismic response of RC structures are simulated. Next, a method to improve the accuracy of vibration diagnoses of earthquake damaged RC structures is discussed by using damage assessment criteria calculated with the AEM. The AEM could simulate the damage behavior of RC columns, jacketed RC columns and an actual railway viaduct. The change of natural frequencies due to damage to RC columns and an actual railway viaduct with steel jacket were also correctly estimated. Seismic performance check of structures and development of assessment criteria for damage inspection can be effectively done by the AEM.

  9. Numerical study of liquid-hydrogen droplet generation from a vibrating orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Celik, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2005-08-01

    Atomic hydrogen propellant feed systems for far-future spacecraft may utilize solid-hydrogen particle carriers for atomic species that undergo recombination to create hot rocket exhaust. Such technology will require the development of particle generation techniques. One such technique could involve the production of hydrogen droplets from a vibrating orifice that would then freeze in cryogenic helium vapor. Among other quantities, the shape and size of the droplet are of particular interest. The present paper addresses this problem within the framework of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for multiphase flows, in order to unravel the basic mechanisms of droplet formation with a view to control them. Surface tension, one of the most important mechanisms to determine droplet shape, is modeled as the source term in the momentum equation. Droplet shape is tracked using a volume-of-fluid approach. A dynamic meshing technique is employed to accommodate the vibration of the generator orifice. Numerically predicted droplet shapes show satisfactory agreement with photographs of droplets generated in experiments. A parametric study is carried out to understand the influence of injection velocity, nozzle vibrational frequency, and amplitude on the droplet shape and size. The computational model provides a definitive qualitative picture of the evolution of droplet shape as a function of the operating parameters. It is observed that, primarily, the orifice vibrational frequency affects the shape, the vibrational amplitude affects the time until droplet detachment from the orifice, and the injection velocity affects the size. However, it does not mean that, for example, there is no secondary effect of amplitude on shape or size.

  10. Numerical and experimental investigation of natural flow-induced vibrations of flexible hydrofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Eun Jung; Akcabay, Deniz Tolga; Lelong, Alexandra; Astolfi, Jacques Andre; Young, Yin Lu

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this work is to present combined numerical and experimental studies of natural flow-induced vibrations of flexible hydrofoils. The focus is on identifying the dependence of the foil's vibration frequencies and damping characteristics on the inflow velocity, angle of attack, and solid-to-fluid added mass ratio. Experimental results are shown for a cantilevered polyacetate (POM) hydrofoil tested in the cavitation tunnel at the French Naval Academy Research Institute (IRENav). The foil is observed to primarily behave as a chordwise rigid body and undergoes spanwise bending and twisting deformations, and the flow is observed to be effectively two-dimensional (2D) because of the strong lift retention at the free tip caused by a small gap with a thickness less than the wall boundary layer. Hence, the viscous fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model is formulated by coupling a 2D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) model with a two degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) model representing the spanwise tip bending and twisting deformations. Good agreements were observed between viscous FSI predictions and experimental measurements of natural flow-induced vibrations in fully turbulent and attached flow conditions. The foil vibrations were found to be dominated by the natural frequencies in absence of large scale vortex shedding due to flow separation. The natural frequencies and fluid damping coefficients were found to vary with velocity, angle of attack, and solid-to-fluid added mass ratio. In addition, the numerical results showed that the in-water to in-air natural frequency ratios decreased rapidly, and the fluid damping coefficients increased rapidly, as the solid-to-fluid added mass ratio decreases. Uncoupled mode (UM) linear potential theory was found to significantly over-predict the fluid damping for cases of lightweight flexible hydrofoils, and this over-prediction increased with higher velocity and lower solid-to-fluid added mass ratio.

  11. Experimental and numerical study on vibrations and static deflection of a thin hyperelastic plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabili, Marco; Balasubramanian, Prabakaran; Breslavsky, Ivan D.; Ferrari, Giovanni; Garziera, Rinaldo; Riabova, Kseniia

    2016-12-01

    The hyperelastic behavior of a thin square silicone rubber plate has been investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally; the case of small-amplitude vibrations has been considered, as well as the case of large static deflection under aerostatic pressure. The Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic model has been chosen to describe the material nonlinear elasticity. The material parameters have been identified by a fitting procedure on the results of a uniaxial traction test. For the analytical model, the equations of motion have been obtained by a unified energy approach, and geometrical nonlinearities are modeled according to the Novozhilov nonlinear shell theory. A numerical model has also been developed by using a commercial Finite-Element code. In the experiments, the silicone rubber plate has been fixed to a heavy metal frame; a certain in-plane pre-load, applied by stretching the plate, has been given in order to ensure a flatness of the surface. An experimental modal analysis has been conducted; results have been used to identify the applied in-plane loads by optimization procedure with two different models: a numerical and an analytical one. The first four experimental and numerical natural modes and frequencies are in good agreement with the experiments after the pre-load identification. The static deflection has been measured experimentally for different pressures. Results have been compared to those obtained by analytical and numerical models. The static deflections are also satisfactorily compared, up to a deflection 50 times larger than the plate thickness, corresponding to a 30 percent strain.

  12. Numerical determination of the transmissibility characteristics of a squeeze film damped forced vibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, M. A.; Davis, P. K.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the governing equations of motion of a liquid squeeze film damped forced vibration system were carried out to examine the feasibility of using a liquid squeeze film to cushion and protect large structures, such as buildings, located in areas of high seismic activity. The mathematical model used was that for a single degree of freedom squeeze film damped spring mass system. The input disturbance was simulated by curve fitting actual seismic data with an eleventh order Lagranging polynomial technique. Only the normal component of the seismic input was considered. The nonlinear, nonhomogeneous governing differential equation of motion was solved numerically to determine the transmissibility over a wide range of physical parameters using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta technique. It is determined that a liquid squeeze film used as a damping agent in a spring-mass system can significantly reduce the response amplitude for a seismic input disturbance.

  13. [Changes in specific sensation in pilots exposed to systematic general vibration].

    PubMed

    Podshivalov, A A; Krylov, Iu V; Zaritskiĭ, V V

    1995-01-01

    Helicopter pilots exposed to excessive general vibration demonstrate changes of specific sensation (vibrotactile, vestibular, auditory), that could be signs of occupational disorder. Those changes are increased thresholds of vibrotactile sensation, lower vestibulovegetative stability, changed vestibulospinal reflexes, more common occurrence of consistent deafness for voice frequencies in comparison with jet aircraft pilots. Experimental vibration (50-1,800 (m/s2) 2 hour) caused no changes of the vibrotactile and auditory sensation, and the modified vestibular function could prove the increased vestibular reactivity.

  14. Numerical computation of gravitational field for general axisymmetric objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2016-10-01

    We developed a numerical method to compute the gravitational field of a general axisymmetric object. The method (i) numerically evaluates a double integral of the ring potential by the split quadrature method using the double exponential rules, and (ii) derives the acceleration vector by numerically differentiating the numerically integrated potential by Ridder's algorithm. Numerical comparison with the analytical solutions for a finite uniform spheroid and an infinitely extended object of the Miyamoto-Nagai density distribution confirmed the 13- and 11-digit accuracy of the potential and the acceleration vector computed by the method, respectively. By using the method, we present the gravitational potential contour map and/or the rotation curve of various axisymmetric objects: (i) finite uniform objects covering rhombic spindles and circular toroids, (ii) infinitely extended spheroids including Sérsic and Navarro-Frenk-White spheroids, and (iii) other axisymmetric objects such as an X/peanut-shaped object like NGC 128, a power-law disc with a central hole like the protoplanetary disc of TW Hya, and a tear-drop-shaped toroid like an axisymmetric equilibrium solution of plasma charge distribution in an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like tokamak. The method is directly applicable to the electrostatic field and will be easily extended for the magnetostatic field. The FORTRAN 90 programs of the new method and some test results are electronically available.

  15. The Vibrations Of Pre-Twisted Rotating Beams Of General Orthotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.-W.; Chern, H.-K.

    1993-11-01

    A study is presented of the coupled bending-bending-torsion vibrations of a pre-twisted rotating cantilever beam of fibre-reinforced material. The free vibration and dynamic stability problems are discussed. The transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia are included. The effect of the pre-twisted angle, fibre orientation and rotation are studied. Numerical results have been calculated by using the finite element method, and they show that the effects mentioned above are more complex for orthotropic beams than for isotropic ones.

  16. Numerical simulation of vibration of horizontal cylinder induced by progressive waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Ming-Jyh; Odhiambo, E. A.; Horng, Tzyy-Leng; Borthwick, A. G. L.

    2016-02-01

    Maritime structures often comprise cylinders of small diameter relative to the prevailing wave length. This paper describes the direct forcing immersed boundary simulation of the hydroelastic behaviour of a rigid, horizontal circular cylinder in regular progressive waves. Fluid motions are numerically solved by the full Navier-Stokes equations, and the free surface by the volume-of-fluid method. The Reynolds number Re = 110, Keulegan-Carpenter number KC = 10, Froude number Fr = 0.69 and Ursell number U rs ≈ 12. A single-degree-of-freedom model is used for the elastically mounted cylinder. Velocity profiles for the stationary cylinder case have been successfully validated using experimental results. The frequency response for reduced velocities 4.5\\lt {U}R*\\lt 5.3 have been compared with theoretical data. Three transverse vibration regimes are identified: lower beating (4\\lt {U}R*\\lt 4.5); lock-in (4.7\\lt {U}R*\\lt 4.8); and upper beating (5\\lt {U}R*\\lt 10) modes. The lower and upper beating regimes exhibit varying amplitude response. The lock-in mode represents the region of fixed and maximum response. The lower beating and lock-in modes have peaks at a common vibration to wave frequency ratio {f}{{w}}* = 2. For the upper beating mode, {f}{{w}}* = 1, except for {U}R*=10 when {f}{{w}}* = 2.

  17. Numerical solution of quadratic matrix equations for free vibration analysis of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1975-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the efficient and accurate solution of the eigenvalue problem represented by quadratic matrix equations. Such matrix forms are obtained in connection with the free vibration analysis of structures, discretized by finite 'dynamic' elements, resulting in frequency-dependent stiffness and inertia matrices. The paper presents a new numerical solution procedure of the quadratic matrix equations, based on a combined Sturm sequence and inverse iteration technique enabling economical and accurate determination of a few required eigenvalues and associated vectors. An alternative procedure based on a simultaneous iteration procedure is also described when only the first few modes are the usual requirement. The employment of finite dynamic elements in conjunction with the presently developed eigenvalue routines results in a most significant economy in the dynamic analysis of structures.

  18. Guidelines for numerical vibration and acoustic analysis of disc brake squeal using simple models of brake systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberst, S.; Lai, J. C. S.; Marburg, S.

    2013-04-01

    Brake squeal has become of increasing concern to the automotive industry but guidelines on how to confidently predict squeal propensity are yet to be established. While it is standard practice to use the complex eigenvalue analysis to predict unstable vibration modes, there have been few attempts to calculate their acoustic radiation. Here guidelines are developed for numerical vibration and acoustic analysis of brake squeal using models of simplified brake systems with friction contact by considering (1) the selection of appropriate elements, contact and mesh; (2) the extraction of surface velocities via forced response; and (3) the calculation of the acoustic response itself. Results indicate that quadratic tetrahedral elements offer the best option for meshing more realistic geometry. A mesh has to be sufficiently fine especially in the contact region to predict mesh-independent unstable vibration modes. Regarding the vibration response, only the direct, steady-state method with a pressurised pad and finite sliding formulation (allowing contact separation) should be used. Comparison of different numerical methods suggest that a obroadband fast multi-pole boundary element method with the Burton-Miller formulation would efficiently solve the acoustic radiation of a full brake system. Results also suggest that a pad lift-off can amplify the acoustic radiation similar to a horn effect. A horn effect is also observed for chamfered pads which are used in practice to reduce the number and strength of unstable vibration modes. These results highlight the importance of optimising the pad shape to reduce acoustic radiation of unstable vibration modes.

  19. A numerical approach to finding general stationary vacuum black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Alexander; Kitchen, Sam; Wiseman, Toby

    2012-08-01

    The Harmonic Einstein equation is the vacuum Einstein equation supplemented by a gauge fixing term which we take to be that of DeTurck. For static black holes analytically continued to Riemannian manifolds without boundary at the horizon, this equation has previously been shown to be elliptic, and Ricci flow and Newton’s method provide good numerical algorithms to solve it. Here we extend these techniques to the arbitrary cohomogeneity stationary case which must be treated in Lorentzian signature. For stationary spacetimes with globally timelike Killing vector the Harmonic Einstein equation is elliptic. In the presence of horizons and ergo-regions it is less obviously so. Motivated by the Rigidity theorem we study a class of stationary black hole spacetimes which is general enough to include many interesting higher dimensional solutions. We argue the Harmonic Einstein equation consistently truncates to this class of spacetimes giving an elliptic problem. The Killing horizons and axes of rotational symmetry are boundaries for this problem and we determine boundary conditions there. As a simple example we numerically construct 4D rotating black holes in a cavity using Anderson’s boundary conditions. We demonstrate both Newton’s method and Ricci flow to find these Lorentzian solutions.

  20. Numerical and Experimental Characterizations of Damping Properties of SMAs Composite for Vibration Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, Carlo Alberto; Bassani, P.; Tuissi, A.; Carnevale, M.; Lecis, N.; LoConte, A.; Previtali, B.

    2012-12-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are very interesting smart materials not only for their shape memory and superelastic effects but also because of their significant intrinsic damping capacity. The latter is exhibited upon martensitic transformations and especially in martensitic state. The combination of these SMA properties with the mechanical and the lightweight of fiberglass-reinforced polymer (FGRP) is a promising solution for manufacturing of innovative composites for vibration suppression in structural applications. CuZnAl sheets, after laser patterning, were embedded in a laminated composite between a thick FGRP core and two thin outer layers with the aim of maximizing the damping capacity of the beam for passive vibration suppression. The selected SMA Cu66Zn24Al10 at.% was prepared by vacuum induction melting; the ingot was subsequently hot-and-cold rolled down to 0.2 mm thickness tape. The choice of a copper alloy is related to some advantages in comparison with NiTiCu SMA alloys, which was tested for the similar presented application in a previous study: lower cost, higher storage modulus and consequently higher damping properties in martensitic state. The patterning of the SMA sheets was performed by means of a pulsed fiber laser. After the laser processing, the SMA sheets were heat treated to obtain the desired martensitic state at room temperature. The transformation temperatures were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The damping properties were determined, at room temperature, on full-scale sheet, using a universal testing machine (MTS), with cyclic tensile tests at different deformation amplitudes. Damping properties were also determined as a function of the temperature on miniature samples with a dynamical mechanical analyzer (DMA). Numerical modeling of the laminated composite, done with finite element method analysis and modal strain energy approaches, was performed to estimate the corresponding total damping capacity and then

  1. The rate parameters for coupled vibration-dissociation in a generalized SSH approximation. [Schwarz, Slawsky, and Herzfeld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Huo, Winifred M.; Park, Chul

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical study of vibrational excitations and dissociations of nitrogen undergoing a nonequilibrium relaxation process upon heating and cooling is reported. The rate coefficients for collisional induced vibrational transitions and transitions from a bound vibrational state into a dissociative state have been calculated using an extension of the theory originally proposed by Schwarz (SSH) et al. (1952). High-lying vibrational states and dissociative states were explicitly included but rotational energy transfer was neglected. The transition probabilities calculated from the SSH theory were fed into the master equation, which was integrated numerically to determine the population distribution of the vibrational states as well as bulk thermodynamic properties. The results show that: (1) the transition rates have a minimum near the middle of the bound vibrational levels, causing a bottleneck in the vibrational relaxation and dissociation rates; (2) high vibrational states are always in equilibrium with the dissociative state; (3) for the heating case, only the low vibrational states relax according to the Landau-Teller theory; (4) for the cooling case, vibrational relaxation cannot be described by a rate equation; (5) Park's (1985, 1988) two-temperature model is approximately valid; and (6) the average vibrational energy removed in dissociation is about 30 percent of the dissociation energy.

  2. Modelling the Source of Blasting for the Numerical Simulation of Blast-Induced Ground Vibrations: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainalis, Daniel; Kaufmann, Olivier; Tshibangu, Jean-Pierre; Verlinden, Olivier; Kouroussis, Georges

    2017-01-01

    The mining and construction industries have long been faced with considerable attention and criticism in regard to the effects of blasting. The generation of ground vibrations is one of the most significant factors associated with blasting and is becoming increasingly important as mining sites are now regularly located near urban areas. This is of concern to not only the operators of the mine but also residents. Mining sites are subjected to an inevitable compromise: a production blast is designed to fragment the utmost amount of rock possible; however, any increase in the blast can generate ground vibrations which can propagate great distances and cause structural damage or discomfort to residents in surrounding urban areas. To accurately predict the propagation of ground vibrations near these sensitive areas, the blasting process and surrounding environment must be characterised and understood. As an initial step, an accurate model of the source of blast-induced vibrations is required. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the approaches to model the blasting source in order to critically evaluate developments in the field. An overview of the blasting process and description of the various factors which influence the blast performance and subsequent ground vibrations are also presented. Several approaches to analytically model explosives are discussed. Ground vibration prediction methods focused on seed waveform and charge weight scaling techniques are presented. Finally, numerical simulations of the blasting source are discussed, including methods to estimate blasthole wall pressure time-history, and hydrodynamic codes.

  3. A General Framework for Multiphysics Modeling Based on Numerical Averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunati, I.; Tomin, P.

    2014-12-01

    In the last years, multiphysics (hybrid) modeling has attracted increasing attention as a tool to bridge the gap between pore-scale processes and a continuum description at the meter-scale (laboratory scale). This approach is particularly appealing for complex nonlinear processes, such as multiphase flow, reactive transport, density-driven instabilities, and geomechanical coupling. We present a general framework that can be applied to all these classes of problems. The method is based on ideas from the Multiscale Finite-Volume method (MsFV), which has been originally developed for Darcy-scale application. Recently, we have reformulated MsFV starting with a local-global splitting, which allows us to retain the original degree of coupling for the local problems and to use spatiotemporal adaptive strategies. The new framework is based on the simple idea that different characteristic temporal scales are inherited from different spatial scales, and the global and the local problems are solved with different temporal resolutions. The global (coarse-scale) problem is constructed based on a numerical volume-averaging paradigm and a continuum (Darcy-scale) description is obtained by introducing additional simplifications (e.g., by assuming that pressure is the only independent variable at the coarse scale, we recover an extended Darcy's law). We demonstrate that it is possible to adaptively and dynamically couple the Darcy-scale and the pore-scale descriptions of multiphase flow in a single conceptual and computational framework. Pore-scale problems are solved only in the active front region where fluid distribution changes with time. In the rest of the domain, only a coarse description is employed. This framework can be applied to other important problems such as reactive transport and crack propagation. As it is based on a numerical upscaling paradigm, our method can be used to explore the limits of validity of macroscopic models and to illuminate the meaning of

  4. A Numerical Simulator for Three-Dimensional Flows Through Vibrating Blade Rows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, H. Andrew; Verdon, Joseph M.

    1998-01-01

    The three-dimensional, multi-stage, unsteady, turbomachinery analysis, TURBO, has been extended to predict the aeroelastic and aeroacoustic response behaviors of a single blade row operating within a cylindrical annular duct. In particular, a blade vibration capability has been incorporated so that the TURBO analysis can be applied over a solution domain that deforms with a vibratory blade motion. Also, unsteady far-field conditions have been implemented to render the computational boundaries at inlet and exit transparent to outgoing unsteady disturbances. The modified TURBO analysis is applied herein to predict unsteady subsonic and transonic flows. The intent is to partially validate this nonlinear analysis for blade flutter applications, via numerical results for benchmark unsteady flows, and to demonstrate the analysis for a realistic fan rotor. For these purposes, we have considered unsteady subsonic flows through a 3D version of the 10th Standard Cascade, and unsteady transonic flows through the first stage rotor of the NASA Lewis, Rotor 67, two-stage fan.

  5. Nonlinear numerical modelling and experimental validation of multilayer piezoelectric vibration energy scavengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blažević, D.; Zelenika, S.

    2015-05-01

    Scavenging of low-level ambient vibrations i.e. the conversion of kinetic into electric energy, is proven as effective means of powering low consumption electronic devices such as wireless sensor nodes. Cantilever based scavengers are characterised by several advantages and thus thoroughly investigated; analytical models based on a distributed parameter approach, Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and eigenvalue analysis have thus been developed and experimentally verified. Finite element models (FEM) have also been proposed employing different modelling approaches and commercial software packages with coupled analysis capabilities. An approach of using a FEM analysis of a piezoelectric cantilever bimorph under harmonic excitation is used in this work. Modal, harmonic and linear and nonlinear transient analyses are performed. Different complex dynamic effects are observed and compared to the results obtained by using a distributed parameter model. The influence of two types of finite elements and three mesh densities is also investigated. A complex bimorph cantilever, based on commercially available Midé Technology® Volture energy scavengers, is then considered. These scavengers are characterised by an intricate multilayer structure not investigated so far in literature. An experimental set-up is developed to evaluate the behaviour of the considered class of devices. The results of the modal and the harmonic FEM analyses of the behaviour of the multilayer scavengers are verified experimentally for three different tip masses and 12 different electrical load values. A satisfying agreement between numerical and experimental results is achieved.

  6. Parametric design-based modal damped vibrational piezoelectric energy harvesters with arbitrary proof mass offset: Numerical and analytical validations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumentut, Mikail F.; Howard, Ian M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper focuses on the primary development of novel numerical and analytical techniques of the modal damped vibration energy harvesters with arbitrary proof mass offset. The key equations of electromechanical finite element discretisation using the extended Lagrangian principle are revealed and simplified to give matrix and scalar forms of the coupled system equations, indicating the most relevant numerical technique for the power harvester research. To evaluate the performance of the numerical study, the analytical closed-form boundary value equations have been developed using the extended Hamiltonian principle. The results from the electromechanical frequency response functions (EFRFs) derived from two theoretical studies show excellent agreement with experimental studies. The benefit of the numerical technique is in providing effective and quick predictions for analysing parametric designs and physical properties of piezoelectric materials. Although analytical technique provides a challenging process for analysing the complex smart structure, it shows complementary study for validating the numerical technique.

  7. Automatic differentiation method for numerical construction of the rotational-vibrational Hamiltonian as a power series in the curvilinear internal coordinates using the Eckart frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yachmenev, Andrey; Yurchenko, Sergei N.

    2015-07-01

    We present a new numerical method to construct a rotational-vibrational Hamiltonian of a general polyatomic molecule in the Eckart frame as a power series expansion in terms of curvilinear internal coordinates. The expansion of the kinetic energy operator of an arbitrary order is obtained numerically using an automatic differentiation (AD) technique. The method is applicable to molecules of arbitrary size and structure and is flexible for choosing various types of internal coordinates. A new way of solving the Eckart-frame equations for curvilinear coordinates also based on the AD technique is presented. The resulting accuracy of the high-order expansion coefficients for the kinetic energy operator using our numerical technique is comparable to that obtained by symbolic differentiation, with the advantage of being faster and less demanding in memory. Examples for H2CO, NH3, PH3, and CH3Cl molecules demonstrate the advantages of the curvilinear internal coordinates and the Eckart molecular frame for accurate ro-vibrational calculations. Our results show that very high accuracy and quick convergence can be achieved even with moderate expansions if curvilinear coordinates are employed, which is important for applications involving large polyatomic molecules.

  8. Automatic differentiation method for numerical construction of the rotational-vibrational Hamiltonian as a power series in the curvilinear internal coordinates using the Eckart frame.

    PubMed

    Yachmenev, Andrey; Yurchenko, Sergei N

    2015-07-07

    We present a new numerical method to construct a rotational-vibrational Hamiltonian of a general polyatomic molecule in the Eckart frame as a power series expansion in terms of curvilinear internal coordinates. The expansion of the kinetic energy operator of an arbitrary order is obtained numerically using an automatic differentiation (AD) technique. The method is applicable to molecules of arbitrary size and structure and is flexible for choosing various types of internal coordinates. A new way of solving the Eckart-frame equations for curvilinear coordinates also based on the AD technique is presented. The resulting accuracy of the high-order expansion coefficients for the kinetic energy operator using our numerical technique is comparable to that obtained by symbolic differentiation, with the advantage of being faster and less demanding in memory. Examples for H2CO, NH3, PH3, and CH3Cl molecules demonstrate the advantages of the curvilinear internal coordinates and the Eckart molecular frame for accurate ro-vibrational calculations. Our results show that very high accuracy and quick convergence can be achieved even with moderate expansions if curvilinear coordinates are employed, which is important for applications involving large polyatomic molecules.

  9. Generalized Database Management System Support for Numeric Database Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominick, Wayne D.; Weathers, Peggy G.

    1982-01-01

    This overview of potential for utilizing database management systems (DBMS) within numeric database environments highlights: (1) major features, functions, and characteristics of DBMS; (2) applicability to numeric database environment needs and user needs; (3) current applications of DBMS technology; and (4) research-oriented and…

  10. A fundamental numerical and theoretical study for the vibrational properties of nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, H. F.; Gu, Y. T.

    2012-06-01

    Based on the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and the classical Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, a fundamental study of the vibrational performance of the Ag nanowire (NW) is carried out. A comprehensive analysis of the quality (Q)-factor, natural frequency, beat vibration, as well as high vibration mode is presented. Two excitation approaches, i.e., velocity excitation and displacement excitation, have been successfully implemented to achieve the vibration of NWs. Upon these two kinds of excitations, consistent results are obtained, i.e., the increase of the initial excitation amplitude will lead to a decrease to the Q-factor, and moderate plastic deformation could increase the first natural frequency. Meanwhile, the beat vibration driven by a single relatively large excitation or two uniform excitations in both two lateral directions is observed. It is concluded that the nonlinear changing trend of external energy magnitude does not necessarily mean a non-constant Q-factor. In particular, the first order natural frequency of the Ag NW is observed to decrease with the increase of temperature. Furthermore, comparing with the predictions by Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, the MD simulation provides a larger and smaller first vibration frequencies for the clamped-clamped and clamped-free thin Ag NWs, respectively. Additionally, for thin NWs, the first order natural frequency exhibits a parabolic relationship with the excitation magnitudes. The frequencies of the higher vibration modes tend to be low in comparison to Euler-Bernoulli beam theory predictions. A combined initial excitation is proposed which is capable to drive the NW under a multi-mode vibration and arrows the coexistence of all the following low vibration modes. This work sheds lights on the better understanding of the mechanical properties of NWs and benefits the increasing utilities of NWs in diverse nano-electronic devices.

  11. Experimental and numerical study on vibration of the full-revolving propulsion ship stern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang-qing; Che, Chi-dong; Shen, Xiao-han

    2015-03-01

    In order to solve the severe vibration problems of an ocean engineering ship with a full-revolving propulsion system, the navigation tests, including forced vibration response test and modal test, are carried out in its stern. It is concluded from the comparison of the time-domain waveform and spectrum from different measurement points that three main factors lead to a high-level stern vibration. Firstly, the specific dynamic stiffness of a water tank is relatively small compared with its neighbor hold, which makes it act like a vibration isolator preventing vibrational energy transmitting to the main hold. Secondly, there exists high-density local modes in the working frequency range of the main engine and thus the local resonance occurs. Thirdly, the abnormal engagement of gears caused by the large deflection of the shaft bearing due to its low mounting rigidity leads to violent extra impulse excitations at high speeds. Then the modification against the dynamic defects is given by simply improving the specific stiffness of the water tanks. And the effect is validated by the FEM calculation. Some important experience is obtained with the problems being solved, which is useful in the design of ships with the same propulsion system. It is also believed that the dynamic consideration is as important as the static analysis for the ships, and that most of the vibration problems may be avoided with a proper acoustic design.

  12. A numerical model for calculating vibration from a railway tunnel embedded in a full-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M. F. M.; Hunt, H. E. M.

    2007-08-01

    Vibration generated by underground railways transmits to nearby buildings causing annoyance to inhabitants and malfunctioning to sensitive equipment. Vibration can be isolated through countermeasures by reducing the stiffness of railpads, using floating-slab tracks and/or supporting buildings on springs. Modelling of vibration from underground railways has recently gained more importance on account of the need to evaluate accurately the performance of vibration countermeasures before these are implemented. This paper develops an existing model, reported by Forrest and Hunt, for calculating vibration from underground railways. The model, known as the Pipe-in-Pipe model, has been developed in this paper to account for anti-symmetrical inputs and therefore to model tangential forces at the tunnel wall. Moreover, three different arrangements of supports are considered for floating-slab tracks, one which can be used to model directly-fixed slabs. The paper also investigates the wave-guided solution of the track, the tunnel, the surrounding soil and the coupled system. It is shown that the dynamics of the track have significant effect on the results calculated in the wavenumber-frequency domain and therefore an important role on controlling vibration from underground railways.

  13. A general numerical model for wave rotor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel W.

    1992-01-01

    Wave rotors represent one of the promising technologies for achieving very high core temperatures and pressures in future gas turbine engines. Their operation depends upon unsteady gas dynamics and as such, their analysis is quite difficult. This report describes a numerical model which has been developed to perform such an analysis. Following a brief introduction, a summary of the wave rotor concept is given. The governing equations are then presented, along with a summary of the assumptions used to obtain them. Next, the numerical integration technique is described. This is an explicit finite volume technique based on the method of Roe. The discussion then focuses on the implementation of appropriate boundary conditions. Following this, some results are presented which first compare the numerical approximation to the governing differential equations and then compare the overall model to an actual wave rotor experiment. Finally, some concluding remarks are presented concerning the limitations of the simplifying assumptions and areas where the model may be improved.

  14. A general numerical model for wave rotor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxson, Daniel W.

    1992-07-01

    Wave rotors represent one of the promising technologies for achieving very high core temperatures and pressures in future gas turbine engines. Their operation depends upon unsteady gas dynamics and as such, their analysis is quite difficult. This report describes a numerical model which has been developed to perform such an analysis. Following a brief introduction, a summary of the wave rotor concept is given. The governing equations are then presented, along with a summary of the assumptions used to obtain them. Next, the numerical integration technique is described. This is an explicit finite volume technique based on the method of Roe. The discussion then focuses on the implementation of appropriate boundary conditions. Following this, some results are presented which first compare the numerical approximation to the governing differential equations and then compare the overall model to an actual wave rotor experiment. Finally, some concluding remarks are presented concerning the limitations of the simplifying assumptions and areas where the model may be improved.

  15. A GENERAL MASS-CONSERVATIVE NUMERICAL SOLUTION FOR THE UNSATURATED FLOW EQUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical approximations based on different forms of the governing partial differential equation can lead to significantly different results for unsaturated flow problems. Numerical solution based on the standard h-based form of Richards equation generally yields poor results, ch...

  16. Multiple-source multiple-harmonic active vibration control of variable section cylindrical structures: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxin; Chen, Xuefeng; Gao, Jiawei; Zhang, Xingwu

    2016-12-01

    Air vehicles, space vehicles and underwater vehicles, the cabins of which can be viewed as variable section cylindrical structures, have multiple rotational vibration sources (e.g., engines, propellers, compressors and motors), making the spectrum of noise multiple-harmonic. The suppression of such noise has been a focus of interests in the field of active vibration control (AVC). In this paper, a multiple-source multiple-harmonic (MSMH) active vibration suppression algorithm with feed-forward structure is proposed based on reference amplitude rectification and conjugate gradient method (CGM). An AVC simulation scheme called finite element model in-loop simulation (FEMILS) is also proposed for rapid algorithm verification. Numerical studies of AVC are conducted on a variable section cylindrical structure based on the proposed MSMH algorithm and FEMILS scheme. It can be seen from the numerical studies that: (1) the proposed MSMH algorithm can individually suppress each component of the multiple-harmonic noise with an unified and improved convergence rate; (2) the FEMILS scheme is convenient and straightforward for multiple-source simulations with an acceptable loop time. Moreover, the simulations have similar procedure to real-life control and can be easily extended to physical model platform.

  17. Numerical methods for a general class of porous medium equations

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, M. E.

    1980-03-01

    The partial differential equation par. deltau/par. deltat + par. delta(f(u))/par. deltax = par. delta(g(u)par. deltau/par. deltax)/par. deltax, where g(u) is a non-negative diffusion coefficient that may vanish for one or more values of u, was used to model fluid flow through a porous medium. Error estimates for a numerical procedure to approximate the solution are derived. A revised version of this report will appear in Computers and Mathematics with Applications.

  18. Numerical implementation of generalized Coddington equations for ophthalmic lens design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojo, P.; Royo, S.; Ramírez, J.; Madariaga, I.

    2014-02-01

    A method for general implementation in any software platform of the generalized Coddington equations is presented, developed, and validated within a Matlab environment. The ophthalmic lens design strategy is presented thoroughly, and the basic concepts of generalized ray tracing are introduced. The methodology for ray tracing is shown to include two inter-related processes. Firstly, finite ray tracing is used to provide the main direction of propagation of the considered ray at the incidence point of interest. Afterwards, generalized ray tracing provides the principal curvatures of the local wavefront at that point, and its orientation after being refracted by the lens. The curvature values of the local wavefront are interpreted as the sagital and tangential powers of the lens at the point of interest. The proposed approach is validated using a double-check of the calculated lens performance in the spherical lens case: while finite ray tracing is validated using a commercial ray tracing software, generalized ray tracing is validated using a software application for ophthalmic lens design based on the classical version of Coddington equations. Equations of the complete tracing process are developed in detail for the case of generic astigmatic ophthalmic lenses as an example. Three-dimensional representation of the sagital and tangential powers of the ophthalmic lens at all directions of gaze then becomes possible, and results are presented for lenses with different geometries.

  19. Vibration-induced drop atomization and the numerical simulation of low-frequency single-droplet ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Ashley J.; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    2003-02-01

    Vibration-induced droplet ejection is a novel way to create a spray. In this method, a liquid drop is placed on a vertically vibrating solid surface. The vibration leads to the formation of waves on the free surface. Secondary droplets break off from the wave crests when the forcing amplitude is above a critical value. When the forcing frequency is small, only low-order axisymmetric wave modes are excited, and a single secondary droplet is ejected from the tip of the primary drop. When the forcing frequency is high, many high-order non-axisymmetric modes are excited, the motion is chaotic, and numerous small secondary droplets are ejected simultaneously from across the surface of the primary drop. In both frequency regimes a crater may form that collapses to create a liquid spike from which droplet ejection occurs. An axisymmetric, incompressible, Navier Stokes solver was developed to simulate the low-frequency ejection process. A volume-of-fluid method was used to track the free surface, with surface tension incorporated using the continuum-surface-force method. A time sequence of the simulated interface shape compared favourably with an experimental sequence. The dynamics of the droplet ejection process was investigated, and the conditions under which ejection occurs and the effect of the system parameters on the process were determined.

  20. HARM: A Numerical Scheme for General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammie, Charles, F.; McKinney, Jonathan C.; Tóth, Gábor

    2012-09-01

    HARM uses a conservative, shock-capturing scheme for evolving the equations of general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics. The fluxes are calculated using the Harten, Lax, & van Leer scheme. A variant of constrained transport, proposed earlier by Tóth, is used to maintain a divergence-free magnetic field. Only the covariant form of the metric in a coordinate basis is required to specify the geometry. On smooth flows HARM converges at second order.

  1. [Study on the vibrational spectra characterization of synthetic jadeite jade made by General electric Company].

    PubMed

    Cao, Shu-Min; Qi, Li-Jian; Guo, Qing-Hong; Zhong, Zeng-Qiu; Qiu, Zhi-Li; Li, Zhi-Gang

    2008-04-01

    The object of the present study is the synthetic jadeite jade produced by American General Electric Corporation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Laser Raman spectroscopy were used to test its spectral properties in order to examine the feature of this kind of synthetic jadeite jade by vibrational spectroscopy and to figure out the mark for discriminate synthetic jadeite jade from natural jadeite jade. The study shows that GE synthetic jadeite jade is identical with natural jadeite jade in the main on fingerprint region in FTIR; There are clearly differences in the 2 000 -4 000 cm(-1) functional region in FTIR: a group of frequencies at 3 375, 3 471 and 3 614 cm(-1) indicate vibration absorption of O-H. GE synthetic jadeite jade has proven consistent with natural jadeite jade in the laser Raman spectra by a group of sharp scattering peaks at 376, 700, 989 and 1 039 cm(-1). In addition these scattering peaks show an intact crystal shape. The FTIR peaks and Raman spectral peaks shift to higher frequencies showing GE synthetic jadeite jade lacking isomorphism of heavy positive ions.

  2. Branch switching at Hopf bifurcation analysis via asymptotic numerical method: Application to nonlinear free vibrations of rotating beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekhoucha, Ferhat; Rechak, Said; Duigou, Laëtitia; Cadou, Jean-Marc

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with the computation of backbone curves bifurcated from a Hopf bifurcation point in the framework of nonlinear free vibrations of a rotating flexible beams. The intrinsic and geometrical equations of motion for anisotropic beams subjected to large displacements are used and transformed with Galerkin and harmonic balance methods to one quadratic algebraic equation involving one parameter, the pulsation. The latter is treated with the asymptotic numerical method using Padé approximants. An algorithm, equivalent to the Lyapunov-Schmidt reduction is proposed, to compute the bifurcated branches accurately from a Hopf bifurcation point, with singularity of co-rank 2, related to a conservative and gyroscopic dynamical system steady state, toward a nonlinear periodic state. Numerical tests dealing with clamped, isotropic and composite, rotating beams show the reliability of the proposed method reinforced by accurate results.

  3. Intensification of syngas ignition through the excitation of CO molecule vibrations: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starik, A. M.; Sharipov, A. S.; Titova, N. S.

    2010-06-01

    A comparative analysis of the kinetic mechanisms that proceed in CO-O2 and syngas-air mixtures when CO molecule vibrations are excited by laser radiation with a wavelength of 4.7 µm and when the laser radiation energy supplied to the gas is spent on heating the mixture is conducted. The efficiencies of both methods of combustion initiation are compared. The simulation shows that the excitation of CO molecule vibrations by laser photons allows significant intensification of the chain processes both in CO-O2(air) and in syngas-air mixtures. This method is much more effective in shortening the induction time and in decreasing the ignition temperature than the method of laser-induced thermal ignition. It was found that in order to ensure the identical delay time it is necessary to add a noticeably higher energy in the case of heating the gas by laser radiation than when exciting the CO molecule vibrations. In addition, a low temperature ignition of the mixture with laser-excited CO molecules makes it possible to raise the efficiency of conversion of the reactant chemical energy to the thermal energy released during combustion compared with the method of heating the mixture by laser radiation.

  4. Generalized propagation of light through optical systems. II. Numerical implications.

    PubMed

    Tessmer, Manuel; Gross, Herbert

    2015-12-01

    We present an algorithm implemented in a MATLAB toolbox that is able to compute the wave propagation of coherent visible light through macroscopic lenses. The mathematical operations that complete the status at the end of the first paper of this sequence, where only limited configurations of the propagation direction were allowed toward arbitrarily directed input beam computations, are provided. With their help, high numerical aperture (NA) field tracing is made possible that is based on fast Fourier routines and is Maxwell exact in the limit of macroscopic structures and large curvature radii, including reflection and transmission. Whereas the curvature-dependent terms in the Helmholtz equation are under analytical control through the first perturbation order in the curvature, they are only included in the propagation distance in the current investigation for the sake of reasonable time consumption. We give a number of examples that demonstrate the strengths of our approach, describe essential differences from other approaches that were not obvious when Paper 1 was written, and list a number of drawbacks and possible simplifications to overcome them.

  5. A general numerical analysis program for the superconducting quasiparticle mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, R. G.; Feldman, M. J.; Kerr, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    A user-oriented computer program SISCAP (SIS Computer Analysis Program) for analyzing SIS mixers is described. The program allows arbitrary impedance terminations to be specified at all LO harmonics and sideband frequencies. It is therefore able to treat a much more general class of SIS mixers than the widely used three-frequency analysis, for which the harmonics are assumed to be short-circuited. An additional program, GETCHI, provides the necessary input data to program SISCAP. The SISCAP program performs a nonlinear analysis to determine the SIS junction voltage waveform produced by the local oscillator. The quantum theory of mixing is used in its most general form, treating the large signal properties of the mixer in the time domain. A small signal linear analysis is then used to find the conversion loss and port impedances. The noise analysis includes thermal noise from the termination resistances and shot noise from the periodic LO current. Quantum noise is not considered. Many aspects of the program have been adequately verified and found accurate.

  6. A general classification of New World Leishmania using numerical zymotaxonomy.

    PubMed

    Cupolillo, E; Grimaldi, G; Momen, H

    1994-03-01

    More than 250 strains of Leishmania isolated from different localities and hosts in the New World were analyzed by enzyme electrophoresis, and their electromorphic profiles were compared with 19 reference strains representing most of the described species of this parasite. The 18 enzymic loci analyzed were very polymorphic, and the strains were classified into 44 zymodemes, each grouping strains with the same enzyme profiles. Each zymodeme was considered as an elementary taxon and the phenetic and phylogenetic relationships were determined by agglomerative hierarchical, ordination, and cladistic techniques. The different classification methods produced very similar results. The 44 zymodemes could be clustered into two groups, corresponding to the subgenera Leishmania and Viannia, by the numerical methods. The subgenus Viannia was shown to be monophyletic and could be further divided into species complexes representing L. braziliensis, L. naiffi, and L. guyanensis/L. panamensis/L. shawi, as well as some isolated taxa including L. lainsoni. The subgenus Leishmania, on the other hand, was polyphyletic, with New World isolates related to L. major clustered separately from the L. mexicana species complex. Most of the other zymodemes in this group represented independent taxa. The results confirm Viannia as a valid taxon but suggest that the status of the subgenus Leishmania should be further investigated. Leishmania braziliensis and L. naiffi were shown to be the most polymorphic species, while L. guyanensis, in spite of being the most common species found in this study, was remarkably homogeneous. The only variants were found south of the Amazon river. North of this river, the species was monomorphic.

  7. A general purpose cold finger using a vibration-free mounted He closed-cycle cryostata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boolchand, P.; Lemon, G. H.; Bresser, W. J.; Enzweiler, R. N.; Harris, R.

    1995-04-01

    A method for mounting a He closed-cycle cryostat which consists of an exchange gas envelope around the cold head to cool an independently supported sample mount as in model DE202 with a DMX-20 interface from APD Cryogenics, Inc. is described. No detectable vibration of the sample mount is observed as evaluated using 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and a piezoelectric accelerometer. Using a 25 μm thick α-Fe foil a linewidth of 0.231(3) mm/s at 300 K with the refrigerator on and the same linewidth with the refrigerator off is observed. The easy optical access afforded by such a cold finger makes it an economical general purpose laboratory tool for performing low-T spectroscopic investigations, such as microwave, optical, γ-ray, x-ray and neutron-scattering measurements. Other applications include electrical transport, SIMS, RBS, and rare-gas matrix isolation.

  8. Vibrational circular dichroism in general anisotropic thin solid films: measurement and theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Buffeteau, Thierry; Lagugné-Labarthet, François; Sourisseau, Claude

    2005-06-01

    In this study, the measurement of the true vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectrum is considered from an experimental and theoretical approach for any general anisotropic thin solid sample exhibiting linear as well as circular birefringence (LB, CB) and dichroism (LD, CD) properties. For this purpose, we have made use of a simple model alpha-helix polypeptide, namely, the poly(gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate) or PBLG, reference sample possessing a well-known VCD spectrum and giving rise to slightly oriented films by deposition onto a solid substrate. Also, we have used a different Fourier transform infrared modulation of polarization (PM-FTIR) optical setup with two-channel electronic processing in order to record the PM-VLD and PM-VCD spectra for various sample orientations in its film plane. All the corresponding general relations of the expected intensities in these experiments and the related properly designed calibration measurements were established using the Stokes-Mueller formalism; in addition, the residual birefringence of the optical setup and the transmittance anisotropy of the detector were estimated. From a comparative study of the results obtained in solution and in the solid state, we then propose a simple new experimental procedure to extract the true VCD spectrum of an oriented PBLG thin film: its consists of calculating the half-sum of two spectra recorded at theta and at theta +/- 90 degrees sample orientations. Moreover, the complete linear and circular birefringence and dichroism properties of the ordered PBLG thin film are estimated in the amide I and amide II vibrational regions. This allows us to establish for any sample orientation various theoretical simulations of the VCD spectra that agree nicely with the observed experimental results; this confirms that the measurement of LD and LB is in this case a prerequisite in simulating the true VCD spectrum of a partly oriented anisotropic sample. This validates our combined experimental and

  9. A numerical method for determining the natural vibration characteristics of rotating nonuniform cantilever blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F., Jr.; Malatino, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for determining the free vibration characteristics of a rotating blade having nonuniform spanwise properties and cantilever boundary conditions. The equations which govern the coupled flapwise, chordwise, and torsional motion of such a blade are solved using an integrating matrix method. By expressing the equations of motion and matrix notation, utilizing the integrating matrix as an operator, and applying the boundary conditions, the equations are formulated into an eigenvalue problem whose solutions may be determined by conventional methods. Computer results are compared with experimental data.

  10. A numerical-perturbation method for the nonlinear analysis of structural vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Mook, D. T.; Lobitz, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    A numerical-perturbation method is proposed for the determination of the nonlinear forced response of structural elements. Purely analytical techniques are capable of determining the response of structural elements having simple geometries and simple variations in thickness and properties, but they are not applicable to elements with complicated structure and boundaries. Numerical techniques are effective in determining the linear response of complicated structures, but they are not optimal for determining the nonlinear response of even simple elements when modal interactions take place due to the complicated nature of the response. Therefore, the optimum is a combined numerical and perturbation technique. The present technique is applied to beams with varying cross sections.

  11. Numerical and experimental study of unsteady flow field and vibration in radial inflow turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuz-Ihli, T.; Filsinger, D.; Schulz, A.; Wittig, S.

    2000-04-01

    The blades of turbocharger impellers are exposed to unsteady aerodynamic forces, which cause blade vibrations and may lead to failures. An indispensable requirement for a safe design of radial inflow turbines is a detailed knowledge of the exciting forces. Up to now, only a few investigations relating to unsteady aerodynamic forces in radial turbines have been presented. To give a detailed insight into the complex phenomena, a comprehensive research project was initiated at the Institut fuer Thermische Stroemungsmaschinen, at the University of Karlsruhe. A turbocharger test rig was installed in the high-pressure, high-temperature laboratory of the institute. The present paper gives a description of the test rig design and the measuring techniques. The flow field in a vaneless radial inflow turbine was analyzed using laser-Doppler anemometry. First results of unsteady flow field investigations in the turbine scroll and unsteady phase-resolved measurements of the flow field in the turbine rotor will be discussed. Moreover, results from finite element calculations analyzing frequencies and mode shapes are presented. As vibrations in turbines of turbochargers are assumed to be predominantly excited by unsteady aerodynamic forces, a method to predict the actual transient flow in a radial turbine utilizing the commercial Navier-Stokes solver TASCflow3d was developed. Results of the unsteady calculations are presented and comparisons with the measured unsteady flow field are made. As a major result, the excitation effect of the tongue region in a vaneless radial inflow turbine can be demonstrated.

  12. A numerical investigation of flow induced vibrations in a rocket engine manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peugeot, John W.

    2011-12-01

    Flow induced vibrations are common in liquid rocket engine components and have been the subject of several recent studies within the Space Shuttle and Delta launch vehicle programs. Understanding how unsteady flow phenomena develop is important when investigating failures in existing hardware and in the design of new propulsion systems. In this study, a subsonic turbulent flow in a rocket engine manifold is analyzed using a compressible form of the viscous flow equations coupled with a hybrid RANS-DES turbulence model. It is found that vortex shedding and pressure perturbations within a manifold significantly influence the stability of shear layers and flow through exit cooling tubes. By adding a chamfer to the inlet of the cooling tubes, it was demonstrated that greater shear layer stability can be obtaIned at a given pressure ratio.

  13. Transverse vibrations of shear-deformable beams using a general higher order theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmatka, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    A general higher order theory is developed to study the static and vibrational behavior of beam structures having an arbitrary cross section that utilizes both out-of-plane shear-dependent warping and in-plane (anticlastic) deformations. The equations of motion are derived via Hamilton's principle, where the full 3D constitutive relations are used. A simplified version of the general higher-order theory is also presented for beams having an arbitrary cross section that includes out-of-plane shear deformation but assumes that stresses within the cross section and in-plane deformations are negligible. This simplified model, which is accurate for long to moderately short wavelengths, offers substantial improvements over existing higher order theories that are limited to beams with thin rectangular cross sections. The current approach will be very useful in the study of thin-wall closed-cell beams such as airfoil-type sections where the magnitude of shear-related cross-sectional warping is significant.

  14. A numerical scheme for the identification of hybrid systems describing the vibration of flexible beams with tip bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, I. G.

    1984-01-01

    A cubic spline based Galerkin-like method is developed for the identification of a class of hybrid systems which describe the transverse vibration to flexible beams with attached tip bodies. The identification problem is formulated as a least squares fit to data subject to the system dynamics given by a coupled system of ordnary and partial differential equations recast as an abstract evolution equation (AEE) in an appropriate infinite dimensional Hilbert space. Projecting the AEE into spline-based subspaces leads naturally to a sequence of approximating finite dimensional identification problems. The solutions to these problems are shown to exist, are relatively easily computed, and are shown to, in some sense, converge to solutions to the original identification problem. Numerical results for a variety of examples are discussed.

  15. A numerical analysis of the influence of tram characteristics and rail profile on railway traffic ground-borne noise and vibration in the Brussels Region.

    PubMed

    Kouroussis, G; Pauwels, N; Brux, P; Conti, C; Verlinden, O

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, damage potentially caused by passing train in dense cities is of increasing concern and restricts improvement to the interconnection of various public transport offers. Although experimental studies are common to quantify the effects of noise and vibration on buildings and on people, their reach is limited since the causes of vibrations can rarely be deduced from data records. This paper presents the numerical calculations that allow evaluating the main contributions of railway-induced ground vibrations in the vicinity of buildings. The reference case is the Brussels Region and, more particularly, the T2000 tram circulating in Brussels city. Based on a pertinent selection of the vibration assessment indicators and a numerical prediction approach, various results are presented and show that the free-field analysis is often improperly used in this kind of analysis as the interaction of soil and structure is required. Calculated high ground vibrations stem from singular rail surface defects. The use of resilient wheels is recommended in order to reduce the ground-borne noise and vibration to permissible values.

  16. The Numerical Studies Program for the Atmospheric General Circulation Experiment (AGCE) for Spacelab Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowlis, W. W. (Editor); Davis, M. H. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The atmospheric general circulation experiment (AGCE) numerical design for Spacelab flights was studied. A spherical baroclinic flow experiment which models the large scale circulations of the Earth's atmosphere was proposed. Gravity is simulated by a radial dielectric body force. The major objective of the AGCE is to study nonlinear baroclinic wave flows in spherical geometry. Numerical models must be developed which accurately predict the basic axisymmetric states and the stability of nonlinear baroclinic wave flows. A three dimensional, fully nonlinear, numerical model and the AGCE based on the complete set of equations is required. Progress in the AGCE numerical design studies program is reported.

  17. Numerical investigation of nonlinear vibration for rotor-seal system of centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W. J.; Yang, Y. C.; Xing, G. K.; Wang, L. Q.

    2013-12-01

    The exciting force in the seal is an important factor for the stability of a multiple stage centrifugal pump. With the speed increasing, the rotor system of multiple stage centrifugal pump presents some nonlinear characters. In order to provide supports for the research of nonlinear characters of multiple stage centrifugal pump, a rotor-seal system model of centrifugal pump is presented and the Muszynska nonlinear seal model is used to express the seal exciting force with multiple parameters in the paper. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta method is also used to determine the vibration response at the impeller place and obtain bifurcation diagram, axis orbit, phase diagram as well as Poincaré Map. The bifurcation results show that the rotor-seal system would be stable under a lower speed and change to be unstable as the rotor speed increases. Various multi-periodic motions and quasi-periodic motions are found showing the complicated motions in the rotor-seal system under nonlinear seal forces.

  18. Numerical investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a cylindrical enclosure due to ultrasonic vibrations.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Maryam; Setareh, Milad; Saffar-Avval, Majid; Hosseini Abardeh, Reza

    2017-04-01

    Application of ultrasonic waves for heat transfer augmentation has been proposed in the last few decades. Due to limited researches on acoustic streaming induced by ultrasonic oscillation, the effect of ultrasonic waves on natural convection heat transfer is the main purpose of this paper. At first, natural convection on up-ward-facing heating surface in a cylindrical enclosure filled with air is investigated numerically by the finite difference method, then the effect of upper surface oscillation on convection heat transfer is considered. The conservation equations in Lagrangian approach and compressible fluid are assumed for the numerical simulation. Results show that acoustic pressure will become steady after some milliseconds also pressure oscillation amplitude and acoustic velocity components will be constant therefore steady state velocity is used for solving energy equation. Results show that Enhancement of heat transfer coefficient can be up to 175% by induced ultrasonic waves. In addition, the effect of different parameters on acoustic streaming and heat transfer has been studied.

  19. The Generalized Coherent State ansatz: Application to quantum electron-vibrational dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrelli, Raffaele; Gelin, Maxim F.

    2016-12-01

    A new ansatz for molecular vibronic wave functions based on a superposition of time-dependent Generalized Coherent States is developed and analysed. The methodology is specifically tailored to describe the time evolution of the wave function of a system in which several interacting electronic states are coupled to a bath of harmonic oscillators. The equations of motion for the wave packet parameters are obtained by using the Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variational principle. The methodology is used to describe the quantum dynamical behavior of a model polaron system and its scaling and convergence properties are discussed and compared with numerically exact results.

  20. Two Generalized Higher Order Theories in Free Vibration Studies of Multilayered Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MESSINA, A.

    2001-04-01

    This paper presents an extension of two-dimensional models for the analysis of freely vibrating laminated plates. The extension concerns the enlargement of higher order theories, recently introduced by different authors in several forms, to encompass higher order terms over the cubic one usually taken into consideration. Higher order effects such as rotatory inertia and transverse shear stress are naturally included without any shear correction factors. Namely, two different models are introduced by expanding, on different functional bases, displacements (D2D) and transverse shear stresses in conjunction with displacements (M2D). The expansion is considered to be consistent with the traction-type boundary condition on the external surfaces of the plate. The governing equations and associated boundary conditions are consistently obtained by the classical Hamilton's variational principle and Reissner's mixed variational theorem. Both models are equivalent single layer type and, therefore, differ according to the layer-wise descriptions, preserve the independence of the number of unknown variables on the number of layers. However, this feature is presented together with intrinsic physical violations for both models. Model D2D violates the interlaminar stress continuity requirement and model M2D violates in a weaker from the same requirement (derivatives are not piecewise continuous), besides neglecting the transverse normal stress. The importance of completely fulfilling the mentioned continuity is then discussed once the relevant governing equations are tailored for the cylindrical bending condition. The effectiveness of the models is indicated by making numerical comparisons with the exact three-dimensional theory of the elasticity for several lamination schemes, angle/cross-ply lay-ups, and characteristic geometric ratios for low and higher frequencies.

  1. Numerical investigation of two-degree-of-freedom vortex-induced vibration of a circular cylinder in oscillatory flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming

    2013-05-01

    Two-degree-of-freedom (2dof) vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a circular cylinder in oscillatory flow is investigated numerically. The direction of the oscillatory flow is perpendicular to the spanwise direction of the circular cylinder. Simulations are carried out for the Keulegan-Carpenter (KC) numbers of 10, 20 and 40 and the Reynolds numbers ranging from 308 to 9240. The ratio of the Reynolds number to the reduced velocity is 308. At KC=10, the amplitude of the primary frequency component is much larger than those of other frequency components. Most vibrations for KC=20 and 40 have multiple frequencies. The primary frequency of the response in the cross-flow direction decreases with the increasing reduced velocity, except when the reduced velocity is very small. Because the calculated primary frequencies of the response in the cross-flow direction are multiple of the oscillatory flow frequency in most of the calculated cases, the responses are classified into single-frequency mode, double-frequency mode, triple frequency mode, etc. If the reduced velocity is in the range where the VIV is transiting from one mode to another, the vibration is very irregular.For each KC number the range of the reduced velocity can be divided into a cross-flow-in-phase regime (low Vr), where the response and the hydrodynamic force in the cross-flow direction synchronize, and a cross-flow-anti-phase regime (high Vr), where the response and the hydrodynamic force in the cross-flow direction are in anti-phase with each other. The boundary values of Vr between the cross-flow-in-phase and the cross-flow-anti-phase regimes are 7, 9 and 11 for KC=10, 20 and 40, respectively. For KC=20, another cross-flow-anti-phase regime is found between 15≤Vr≤19. Similarly the in-line-in-phase and the in-line-anti-phase regimes are also identified for the response in the in-line direction. It is found that the boundary value of Vr between the in-line-in-phase and the in-line-anti-phase regimes is

  2. Modal wavefront estimation from its slopes by numerical orthogonal transformation method over general shaped aperture.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jingfei; Wang, Wei; Gao, Zhishan; Liu, Zhiying; Wang, Shuai; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C; Yuan, Qun

    2015-10-05

    Wavefront estimation from the slope-based sensing metrologies zis important in modern optical testing. A numerical orthogonal transformation method is proposed for deriving the numerical orthogonal gradient polynomials as numerical orthogonal basis functions for directly fitting the measured slope data and then converting to the wavefront in a straightforward way in the modal approach. The presented method can be employed in the wavefront estimation from its slopes over the general shaped aperture. Moreover, the numerical orthogonal transformation method could be applied to the wavefront estimation from its slope measurements over the dynamic varying aperture. The performance of the numerical orthogonal transformation method is discussed, demonstrated and verified by the examples. They indicate that the presented method is valid, accurate and easily implemented for wavefront estimation from its slopes.

  3. [The influence of vibration training in combination with general magnetotherapy on dynamics of performance efficiency in athletes].

    PubMed

    Mikheev, A A; Volchkova, O A; Voronitskiĭ, N E

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of a combined treatment including vibrostimulation and magnetotherapy on the working capacity of athletes. Participants of the study were 8 male judo wrestlers. It was shown that implementation of a specialized training program comprising seances of vibration loading and general magnetotherapy 40 and 60 min in duration respectively during 3 consecutive days produced marked beneficial effect on the hormonal status of the athletes. Specifically, the three-day long treatment resulted in a significant increase of blood cortisol and testosterone levels considered to be an objective sign of improved performance parameters in athletes engaged in strength and speed sports. The optimal length of vibration training during 3 days of specialized training is estimated at 20 to 40 minutes supplemented by general magnetotherapy for 60 minutes.

  4. Study and numerical solution of a generalized mathematical model of isothermal adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Komissarov, Yu.A.; Vetokhin, V.N.; Tsenev, V.A.; Gordeeva, E.L.

    1995-06-01

    A generalized mathematical model of isothermal adsorption that takes into account mass transfer on the surface of a particle, diffusion in micro- and macropores, and dispersion along the length of the apparatus is considered The parameters {lambda} and {var_phi}{sup 2} determine the dominating effect of any of the mass transfer mechanisms of the adsorption process. A numerical algorithm for solving the generalized adsorption model is suggested.

  5. Sensitivity to general and specific numerical features in typical achievers and children with mathematics learning disability.

    PubMed

    Rotem, Avital; Henik, Avishai

    2015-01-01

    We examined the development of sensitivity to general and specific numerical features in typical achievers and in 6th and 8th graders with mathematics learning disability (MLD), using two effects in mental multiplication: operand-relatedness (i.e., difficulty in avoiding errors that are related to the operands via a shared multiplication row) and decade-consistency (i.e., difficulty in avoiding errors that are operand related and also share a decade with the true result). Responses to decade-consistent products were quick but erroneous. In line with the processing sequence in adults, children first became sensitive to the general numerical feature of operand-relatedness (typical achievers--from 3rd grade; children with MLD in 8th grade) and only later to the specific feature of decade-consistency (typical achievers--from 4th grade, but only from 6th grade in a mature pattern). Implications of the numerical sensitivity in children with MLD are discussed.

  6. Numerically pricing American options under the generalized mixed fractional Brownian motion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenting; Yan, Bowen; Lian, Guanghua; Zhang, Ying

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a robust numerical method, based on the upwind scheme, for the pricing of American puts under the generalized mixed fractional Brownian motion (GMFBM) model. By using portfolio analysis and applying the Wick-Itô formula, a partial differential equation (PDE) governing the prices of vanilla options under the GMFBM is successfully derived for the first time. Based on this, we formulate the pricing of American puts under the current model as a linear complementarity problem (LCP). Unlike the classical Black-Scholes (B-S) model or the generalized B-S model discussed in Cen and Le (2011), the newly obtained LCP under the GMFBM model is difficult to be solved accurately because of the numerical instability which results from the degeneration of the governing PDE as time approaches zero. To overcome this difficulty, a numerical approach based on the upwind scheme is adopted. It is shown that the coefficient matrix of the current method is an M-matrix, which ensures its stability in the maximum-norm sense. Remarkably, we have managed to provide a sharp theoretic error estimate for the current method, which is further verified numerically. The results of various numerical experiments also suggest that this new approach is quite accurate, and can be easily extended to price other types of financial derivatives with an American-style exercise feature under the GMFBM model.

  7. Application of the generalized Euler series transformation for calculation of vibration-rotation energy levels of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglova, T. V.

    2004-01-01

    The detailed spectroscope information about highly excited molecules and radicals such us as H+3, H2, HI, H2O, CH2 is needed for a number of applications in the field of laser physics, astrophysics and chemistry. Studies of highly excited molecular vibration-rotation states face several problems connected with slowly convergence or even divergences of perturbation expansions. The physical reason for a perturbation expansion divergence is the large amplitude motion and strong vibration-rotation coupling. In this case one needs to use the special method of series summation. There were a number of papers devoted to this problem: papers 1-10 in the reference list are only example of studies on this topic. The present report is aimed at the application of GET method (Generalized Euler Transformation) to the diatomic molecule. Energy levels of a diatomic molecule is usually represented as Dunham series on rotational J(J+1) and vibrational (V+1/2) quantum numbers (within the perturbation approach). However, perturbation theory is not applicable for highly excited vibration-rotation states because the perturbation expansion in this case becomes divergent. As a consequence one need to use special method for the series summation. The Generalized Euler Transformation (GET) is known to be efficient method for summing of slowly convergent series, it was already used for solving of several quantum problems Refs.13 and 14. In this report the results of Euler transformation of diatomic molecule Dunham series are presented. It is shown that Dunham power series can be represented of functional series that is equivalent to its partial summation. It is also shown that transformed series has the butter convergent properties, than the initial series.

  8. Experiments and numerical simulations of nonlinear vibration responses of an assembly with friction joints - Application on a test structure named "Harmony"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, M.; Sinou, J.-J.; Lambelin, J.-P.; Todeschini, R.

    2016-03-01

    In presence of friction, the frequency response function of a metallic assembly is strongly dependent on the excitation level. The local stick-slip behavior at the friction interfaces induces energy dissipation and local stiffness softening. These phenomena are studied both experimentally and numerically on a test structure named "Harmony". Concerning the numerical part, a classical complete methodology from the finite element and friction modeling to the prediction of the nonlinear vibrational response is implemented. The well-known Harmonic Balance Method with a specific condensation process on the nonlinear frictional elements is achieved. Also, vibration experiments are performed to validate not only the finite element model of the test structure named "Harmony" at low excitation levels but also to investigate the nonlinear behavior of the system on several excitation levels. A scanning laser vibrometer is used to measure the nonlinear behavior and the local stick-slip movement near the contacts.

  9. Numerical validation of the generalized Harvey-Shack surface scatter theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Narak; Harvey, James E.

    2013-11-01

    The generalized Harvey-Shack (GHS) surface scatter theory is numerically compared to the classical small perturbation method, the Kirchhoff approximation method, and the rigorous method of moments for one-dimensional ideally conducting surfaces whose surface power spectral density function is Gaussian or exhibits an inverse power law (fractal) behavior. In spite of its simple analytic form, our numerical comparison shows that the new GHS theory is valid (with reasonable accuracy) over a broader range of surface parameter space than either of the two classical surface scatter theories.

  10. Generalized thick strip modelling for vortex-induced vibration of long flexible cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Y.; Palacios, R.; Graham, M.; Sherwin, S.

    2016-09-15

    We propose a generalized strip modelling method that is computationally efficient for the VIV prediction of long flexible cylinders in three-dimensional incompressible flow. In order to overcome the shortcomings of conventional strip-theory-based 2D models, the fluid domain is divided into “thick” strips, which are sufficiently thick to locally resolve the small scale turbulence effects and three dimensionality of the flow around the cylinder. An attractive feature of the model is that we independently construct a three-dimensional scale resolving model for individual strips, which have local spanwise scale along the cylinder's axial direction and are only coupled through the structural model of the cylinder. Therefore, this approach is able to cover the full spectrum for fully resolved 3D modelling to 2D strip theory. The connection between these strips is achieved through the calculation of a tensioned beam equation, which is used to represent the dynamics of the flexible body. In the limit, however, a single “thick” strip would fill the full 3D domain. A parallel Fourier spectral/hp element method is employed to solve the 3D flow dynamics in the strip-domain, and then the VIV response prediction is achieved through the strip–structure interactions. Numerical tests on both laminar and turbulent flows as well as the comparison against the fully resolved DNS are presented to demonstrate the applicability of this approach.

  11. The dynamic response of prone-to-fall columns to ambient vibrations: comparison between measurements and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentin, J.; Capron, A.; Jongmans, D.; Baillet, L.; Bottelin, P.; Donze, F.; Larose, E.; Mangeney, A.

    2016-11-01

    Seismic noise measurements (ambient vibrations) have been increasingly used in rock slope stability assessment for both investigation and monitoring purposes. Recent studies made on gravitational hazard revealed significant spectral amplification at given frequencies and polarization of the wave-field in the direction of maximum rock slope displacement. Different properties (resonance frequencies, polarization, and spectral ratio amplitudes) can be derived from the spectral analysis of the seismic noise to characterize unstable rock masses. The objective here is to identify the dynamic parameters that could be used to gain information on prone-to-fall rock columns geometry. To do so, the dynamic response of prone-to-fall columns to seismic noise has been studied on two different sites exhibiting cliff-like geometry. Dynamic parameters (main resonance frequency and spectral ratio amplitudes) that could characterize the column decoupling were extracted from seismic noise and their variations were studied taking into account the external environmental parameter fluctuations. Based on this analysis, a two-dimensional numerical model has been set up to assess the influence of the rear vertical fractures identified on both sites on the rock column motion response. Although a simple relation was found between spectral ratio amplitudes and the rock column slenderness, it turned out that the resonance frequency is more stable than the spectral ratio amplitudes to characterize this column decoupling, provided that the elastic properties of the column can be estimated. The study also revealed the effect of additional remote fractures on the dynamic parameters, which in turn could be used for detecting the presence of such discontinuities.

  12. The dynamic response of prone-to-fall columns to ambient vibrations: comparison between measurements and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentin, J.; Capron, A.; Jongmans, D.; Baillet, L.; Bottelin, P.; Donze, F.; Larose, E.; Mangeney, A.

    2017-02-01

    Seismic noise measurements (ambient vibrations) have been increasingly used in rock slope stability assessment for both investigation and monitoring purposes. Recent studies made on gravitational hazard revealed significant spectral amplification at given frequencies and polarization of the wave-field in the direction of maximum rock slope displacement. Different properties (resonance frequencies, polarization and spectral ratio amplitudes) can be derived from the spectral analysis of the seismic noise to characterize unstable rock masses. The objective here is to identify the dynamic parameters that could be used to gain information on prone-to-fall rock columns' geometry. To do so, the dynamic response of prone-to-fall columns to seismic noise has been studied on two different sites exhibiting cliff-like geometry. Dynamic parameters (main resonance frequency and spectral ratio amplitudes) that could characterize the column decoupling were extracted from seismic noise and their variations were studied taking into account the external environmental parameter fluctuations. Based on this analysis, a two-dimensional numerical model has been set up to assess the influence of the rear vertical fractures identified on both sites on the rock column motion response. Although a simple relation was found between spectral ratio amplitudes and the rock column slenderness, it turned out that the resonance frequency is more stable than the spectral ratio amplitudes to characterize this column decoupling, provided that the elastic properties of the column can be estimated. The study also revealed the effect of additional remote fractures on the dynamic parameters, which in turn could be used for detecting the presence of such discontinuities.

  13. Numerical solution of shock and ramp compression for general material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D C

    2009-01-28

    A general formulation was developed to represent material models for applications in dynamic loading. Numerical methods were devised to calculate response to shock and ramp compression, and ramp decompression, generalizing previous solutions for scalar equations of state. The numerical methods were found to be flexible and robust, and matched analytic results to a high accuracy. The basic ramp and shock solution methods were coupled to solve for composite deformation paths, such as shock-induced impacts, and shock interactions with a planar interface between different materials. These calculations capture much of the physics of typical material dynamics experiments, without requiring spatially-resolving simulations. Example calculations were made of loading histories in metals, illustrating the effects of plastic work on the temperatures induced in quasi-isentropic and shock-release experiments, and the effect of a phase transition.

  14. Numerical investigation of entropy generation in unsteady MHD generalized Couette flow with variable electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Chinyoka, T; Makinde, O D

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamic second law analysis is utilized to investigate the inherent irreversibility in an unsteady hydromagnetic generalized Couette flow with variable electrical conductivity in the presence of induced electric field. Based on some simplified assumption, the model nonlinear governing equations are obtained and solved numerically using semidiscretization finite difference techniques. Effects of various thermophysical parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature, current density, skin friction, the Nusselt number, entropy generation number, and the Bejan number are presented graphically and discussed quantitatively.

  15. Numerical stability of the Z4c formulation of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhoujian; Hilditch, David

    2012-06-01

    We study numerical stability of different approaches to the discretization of a conformal decomposition of the Z4 formulation of general relativity. We demonstrate that in the linear, constant coefficient regime a novel discretization for tensors is formally numerically stable with a method of lines time integrator. We then perform a full set of “apples with apples” tests on the nonlinear system, and thus present numerical evidence that both the new and standard discretizations are, in some sense, numerically stable in the nonlinear regime. The results of the Z4c numerical tests are compared with those of Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura-Oohara-Kojima (BSSNOK) evolutions. We typically do not employ the Z4c constraint damping scheme and find that in the robust stability and gauge wave tests the Z4c evolutions result in lower constraint violation at the same resolution as the BSSNOK evolutions. In the gauge wave tests, we find that the Z4c evolutions maintain the desired convergence factor over many more light-crossing times than the BSSNOK tests. The difference in the remaining tests is marginal.

  16. A general rigorous quantum dynamics algorithm to calculate vibrational energy levels of pentaatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hua-Gen

    2009-08-01

    An exact variational algorithm is presented for calculating vibrational energy levels of pentaatomic molecules without any dynamical approximation. The quantum mechanical Hamiltonian of the system is expressed in a set of orthogonal coordinates defined by four scattering vectors in the body-fixed frame. The eigenvalue problem is solved using a two-layer Lanczos iterative diagonalization method in a mixed grid/basis set. A direct product potential-optimized discrete variable representation (PO-DVR) basis is used for the radial coordinates while a non-direct product finite basis representation (FBR) is employed for the angular variables. The two-layer Lanczos method requires only the actions of the Hamiltonian operator on the Lanczos vectors, where the potential-vector products are accomplished via a pseudo-spectral transform technique. By using Jacobi, Radau and orthogonal satellite vectors, we have proposed 21 types of orthogonal coordinate systems so that the algorithm is capable of describing most five-atom systems with small and/or large amplitude vibrational motions. Finally, an universal program ( PetroVib) has been developed. Its applications to the molecules CH and HO2-, and the van der Waals cluster HeCl are also discussed.

  17. The experimental validation of a numerical model for the prediction of the vibrations in the free field produced by road traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombaert, G.; Degrande, G.

    2003-04-01

    The objective of the present paper is the experimental validation of a numerical model for the prediction of traffic-induced vibrations. The vibrations in the free field, generated by the passage of a vehicle on an uneven road, are predicted in two stages. First, the equations of motion of the vehicle are solved to determine the dynamic axle loads. Next, these axle loads are applied to the road and the free field vibrations are computed. An elaborate measurement campaign has been set up to validate this model. The response of a Volvo FL6 truck and the response in the free field have been measured simultaneously during the passage of the truck over an artificial road unevenness. The parameters related to the vehicle, the road and the soil have been determined experimentally. A comparison of the predicted and the measured response demonstrates the predictive qualities of the numerical model. Furthermore, the results provide a clear insight in the influence of the vehicle speed on the vehicle's and the free field response.

  18. First-principle calculation of reduced masses in vibrational analysis using generalized internal coordinates: some crucial aspects and examples.

    PubMed

    Stare, Jernej

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present and analyze the most essential aspects of reduced masses along generalized internal coordinates. The definition of reduced masses in the internal coordinate formalism is established through the Wilson G-matrix concept and includes sophisticated relations between internal and Cartesian coordinates. Moreover, reduced masses in internal coordinates are, in general, no longer constant but coordinate-dependent. Based on the approach presented earlier [Stare, J.; Balint-Kurti, G. G. J. Phys. Chem. A 2003, 107, 7204-7214] and on our experience with reduced masses discussed in this paper, we have developed a robust program for the calculation of Wilson G-matrix elements and their functional coordinate dependence. The approach is based on the first principles and can be used in virtually any (internal) coordinate set. Since the program allows for projection of any kind of nuclear motion on the selected internal coordinates, the method is particularly suitable for ab initio or DFT potential energy functions calculated by partial geometry optimization. Moreover, reduced masses obtained by this program can be used as a decision tool for selecting the most appropriate internal coordinates for the considered vibrational problem and for the inclusion or omission of the kinetic coupling terms in the vibrational Hamiltonian.

  19. Physical formulation and numerical algorithm for simulating N immiscible incompressible fluids involving general order parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, S.

    2015-02-15

    We present a family of physical formulations, and a numerical algorithm, based on a class of general order parameters for simulating the motion of a mixture of N (N⩾2) immiscible incompressible fluids with given densities, dynamic viscosities, and pairwise surface tensions. The N-phase formulations stem from a phase field model we developed in a recent work based on the conservations of mass/momentum, and the second law of thermodynamics. The introduction of general order parameters leads to an extremely strongly-coupled system of (N−1) phase field equations. On the other hand, the general form enables one to compute the N-phase mixing energy density coefficients in an explicit fashion in terms of the pairwise surface tensions. We show that the increased complexity in the form of the phase field equations associated with general order parameters in actuality does not cause essential computational difficulties. Our numerical algorithm reformulates the (N−1) strongly-coupled phase field equations for general order parameters into 2(N−1) Helmholtz-type equations that are completely de-coupled from one another. This leads to a computational complexity comparable to that for the simplified phase field equations associated with certain special choice of the order parameters. We demonstrate the capabilities of the method developed herein using several test problems involving multiple fluid phases and large contrasts in densities and viscosities among the multitude of fluids. In particular, by comparing simulation results with the Langmuir–de Gennes theory of floating liquid lenses we show that the method using general order parameters produces physically accurate results for multiple fluid phases.

  20. Vibration absorbers for chatter suppression: A new analytical tuning methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Neil D.

    2007-04-01

    Vibration absorbers have been widely used to suppress undesirable vibrations in machining operations, with a particular emphasis on avoiding chatter. However, it is well known that for vibration absorbers to function effectively their stiffness and damping must be accurately tuned based upon the natural frequency of the vibrating structure. For general vibration problems, suitable tuning strategies were developed by Den Hartog and Brock over 50 years ago. However, the special nature of the chatter stability problem means that this classical tuning methodology is no longer optimal. Consequently, vibration absorbers for chatter mitigation have generally been tuned using ad hoc methods, or numerical or graphical approaches. The present article introduces a new analytical solution to this problem, and demonstrates its performance using time domain milling simulations. A 40-50% improvement in the critical limiting depth of cut is observed, compared to the classically tuned vibration absorber.

  1. Generalization Evaluation of Machine Learning Numerical Observers for Image Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Kalayeh, Mahdi M.; Marin, Thibault; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present two new numerical observers (NO) based on machine learning for image quality assessment. The proposed NOs aim to predict human observer performance in a cardiac perfusion-defect detection task for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Human observer (HumO) studies are now considered to be the gold standard for task-based evaluation of medical images. However such studies are impractical for use in early stages of development for imaging devices and algorithms, because they require extensive involvement of trained human observers who must evaluate a large number of images. To address this problem, numerical observers (also called model observers) have been developed as a surrogate for human observers. The channelized Hotelling observer (CHO), with or without internal noise model, is currently the most widely used NO of this kind. In our previous work we argued that development of a NO model to predict human observers' performance can be viewed as a machine learning (or system identification) problem. This consideration led us to develop a channelized support vector machine (CSVM) observer, a kernel-based regression model that greatly outperformed the popular and widely used CHO. This was especially evident when the numerical observers were evaluated in terms of generalization performance. To evaluate generalization we used a typical situation for the practical use of a numerical observer: after optimizing the NO (which for a CHO might consist of adjusting the internal noise model) based upon a broad set of reconstructed images, we tested it on a broad (but different) set of images obtained by a different reconstruction method. In this manuscript we aim to evaluate two new regression models that achieve accuracy higher than the CHO and comparable to our earlier CSVM method, while dramatically reducing model complexity and computation time. The new models are defined in a Bayesian machine-learning framework: a channelized

  2. Numerical study into the morphology and formation mechanisms of three-dimensional particle structures in vibrated cylindrical cavities with various heating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappa, Marcello

    2016-10-01

    The present analysis extends the author's earlier work [Lappa, Phys. Fluids 26, 093301 (2014), 10.1063/1.4893078] on the properties of patterns formed by the spontaneous accumulation and ordering of solid particles in certain types of flow. It is shown that under certain conditions, when subjected to vibrations to induce natural flow, nonisothermal fluids with dispersed solid particles are characterized by intervals of solid-pattern-forming behavior due to particle rearrangements preceded by intervals in which no recognizable structures of solid matter can be detected. The dynamics of these systems are highly nonlinear in nature. Because this family of particle attractors is known to exhibit strong sensitivity to the symmetry properties of the considered vibrated system and related geometrical constraints, the present study attempts to clarify the related dynamics in a geometry with curved walls (cylindrical enclosure). In particular, by assuming vibrations always directed perpendicularly to the imposed temperature gradient, we show that the morphology, spatial extension (percentage of physical volume occupied), separation (spatial distance), and mechanisms responsible for the formation of the resulting particle structures change significantly according to whether the temperature gradient is parallel or perpendicular to the symmetry axis of the cylinder. This indicates that the physics is not invariant with respect to 90° rotations in space of the specific forcing considered (direction of the imposed temperature gradient and associated perpendicular vibrations). Additional insights into the problem are obtained by assessing separately the influence played by the time-averaged (mean) and oscillatory effects. According to the numerical results, the intriguing diversity of particle agglomerates results from the different role or importance played by (curved or straight) boundaries in constraining particles and from the different structure and topology of the

  3. Quantum mechanical calculations of vibrational population inversion in chemical reactions - Numerically exact L-squared-amplitude-density study of the H2Br reactive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Y. C.; Zhang, J. Z. H.; Kouri, D. J.; Haug, K.; Schwenke, D. W.

    1988-01-01

    Numerically exact, fully three-dimensional quantum mechanicl reactive scattering calculations are reported for the H2Br system. Both the exchange (H + H-prime Br to H-prime + HBr) and abstraction (H + HBR to H2 + Br) reaction channels are included in the calculations. The present results are the first completely converged three-dimensional quantum calculations for a system involving a highly exoergic reaction channel (the abstraction process). It is found that the production of vibrationally hot H2 in the abstraction reaction, and hence the extent of population inversion in the products, is a sensitive function of initial HBr rotational state and collision energy.

  4. Vibrational optical activity of chiral carbon nanoclusters treated by a generalized π-electron method

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Péter R.; Surján, Péter R.; Szabados, Ágnes

    2014-01-28

    Cross sections of inelastic light scattering accompanied by vibronic excitation in large conjugated carbon structures is assessed at the π-electron level. Intensities of Raman and vibrational Raman optical activity (VROA) spectra of fullerenes are computed, relying on a single electron per atom. When considering only first neighbor terms in the Hamiltonian (a tight-binding (TB) type or Hückel-model), Raman intensities are captured remarkably well, based on comparison with frequency-dependent linear response of the self-consistent field (SCF) method. Resorting to π-electron levels when computing spectral intensities brings a beneficial reduction in computational cost as compared to linear response SCF. At difference with total intensities, the first neighbor TB model is found inadequate for giving the left and right circularly polarized components of the scattered light, especially when the molecular surface is highly curved. To step beyond first neighbor approximation, an effective π-electron Hamiltonian, including interaction of all sites is derived from the all-electron Fockian, in the spirit of the Bloch-equation. Chiroptical cross-sections computed by this novel π-electron method improve upon first-neighbor TB considerably, with no increase in computational cost. Computed VROA spectra of chiral fullerenes, such as C{sub 76} and C{sub 28}, are reported for the first time, both by conventional linear response SCF and effective π-electron models.

  5. Numerical methods for the weakly compressible Generalized Langevin Model in Eulerian reference frame

    SciTech Connect

    Azarnykh, Dmitrii Litvinov, Sergey; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-06-01

    A well established approach for the computation of turbulent flow without resolving all turbulent flow scales is to solve a filtered or averaged set of equations, and to model non-resolved scales by closures derived from transported probability density functions (PDF) for velocity fluctuations. Effective numerical methods for PDF transport employ the equivalence between the Fokker–Planck equation for the PDF and a Generalized Langevin Model (GLM), and compute the PDF by transporting a set of sampling particles by GLM (Pope (1985) [1]). The natural representation of GLM is a system of stochastic differential equations in a Lagrangian reference frame, typically solved by particle methods. A representation in a Eulerian reference frame, however, has the potential to significantly reduce computational effort and to allow for the seamless integration into a Eulerian-frame numerical flow solver. GLM in a Eulerian frame (GLMEF) formally corresponds to the nonlinear fluctuating hydrodynamic equations derived by Nakamura and Yoshimori (2009) [12]. Unlike the more common Landau–Lifshitz Navier–Stokes (LLNS) equations these equations are derived from the underdamped Langevin equation and are not based on a local equilibrium assumption. Similarly to LLNS equations the numerical solution of GLMEF requires special considerations. In this paper we investigate different numerical approaches to solving GLMEF with respect to the correct representation of stochastic properties of the solution. We find that a discretely conservative staggered finite-difference scheme, adapted from a scheme originally proposed for turbulent incompressible flow, in conjunction with a strongly stable (for non-stochastic PDE) Runge–Kutta method performs better for GLMEF than schemes adopted from those proposed previously for the LLNS. We show that equilibrium stochastic fluctuations are correctly reproduced.

  6. Numerical methods for the weakly compressible Generalized Langevin Model in Eulerian reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarnykh, Dmitrii; Litvinov, Sergey; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-06-01

    A well established approach for the computation of turbulent flow without resolving all turbulent flow scales is to solve a filtered or averaged set of equations, and to model non-resolved scales by closures derived from transported probability density functions (PDF) for velocity fluctuations. Effective numerical methods for PDF transport employ the equivalence between the Fokker-Planck equation for the PDF and a Generalized Langevin Model (GLM), and compute the PDF by transporting a set of sampling particles by GLM (Pope (1985) [1]). The natural representation of GLM is a system of stochastic differential equations in a Lagrangian reference frame, typically solved by particle methods. A representation in a Eulerian reference frame, however, has the potential to significantly reduce computational effort and to allow for the seamless integration into a Eulerian-frame numerical flow solver. GLM in a Eulerian frame (GLMEF) formally corresponds to the nonlinear fluctuating hydrodynamic equations derived by Nakamura and Yoshimori (2009) [12]. Unlike the more common Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes (LLNS) equations these equations are derived from the underdamped Langevin equation and are not based on a local equilibrium assumption. Similarly to LLNS equations the numerical solution of GLMEF requires special considerations. In this paper we investigate different numerical approaches to solving GLMEF with respect to the correct representation of stochastic properties of the solution. We find that a discretely conservative staggered finite-difference scheme, adapted from a scheme originally proposed for turbulent incompressible flow, in conjunction with a strongly stable (for non-stochastic PDE) Runge-Kutta method performs better for GLMEF than schemes adopted from those proposed previously for the LLNS. We show that equilibrium stochastic fluctuations are correctly reproduced.

  7. 24 CFR 3280.903 - General requirements for designing the structure to withstand transportation shock and vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the structure to withstand transportation shock and vibration. 3280.903 Section 3280.903 Housing and... structure to withstand transportation shock and vibration. (a) The cumulative effect of highway transportation shock and vibration upon a manufactured home structure may result in incremental degradation...

  8. 24 CFR 3280.903 - General requirements for designing the structure to withstand transportation shock and vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the structure to withstand transportation shock and vibration. 3280.903 Section 3280.903 Housing and... structure to withstand transportation shock and vibration. (a) The cumulative effect of highway transportation shock and vibration upon a manufactured home structure may result in incremental degradation...

  9. 24 CFR 3280.903 - General requirements for designing the structure to withstand transportation shock and vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the structure to withstand transportation shock and vibration. 3280.903 Section 3280.903 Housing and... structure to withstand transportation shock and vibration. (a) The cumulative effect of highway transportation shock and vibration upon a manufactured home structure may result in incremental degradation...

  10. 24 CFR 3280.903 - General requirements for designing the structure to withstand transportation shock and vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the structure to withstand transportation shock and vibration. 3280.903 Section 3280.903 Housing and... structure to withstand transportation shock and vibration. (a) The cumulative effect of highway transportation shock and vibration upon a manufactured home structure may result in incremental degradation...

  11. 24 CFR 3280.903 - General requirements for designing the structure to withstand transportation shock and vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the structure to withstand transportation shock and vibration. 3280.903 Section 3280.903 Housing and... structure to withstand transportation shock and vibration. (a) The cumulative effect of highway transportation shock and vibration upon a manufactured home structure may result in incremental degradation...

  12. Measured Vibration Effect of Numerous Sine Swept Harmonics on Random Shaker Applied to Effective Flight Model Representative Dummy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polome, J.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the performance methodology and the achieved results of a vibration test campaign. The test performed by shaker simulates an unusual acoustic excitation containing a harmonic serial superimposed on random noise seen by electronic flight equipment. The paper is focused on main experimental aspects resulting of “helicopter simulation” capability applied on (representative) dummy electronic equipment. Wide internal instrumentation shows that the equipment is effectively answering to the stimuli by resonances excitation.

  13. Fixtureless geometric inspection of nonrigid parts using "generalized numerical inspection fixture"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radvar Esfahlan, Hassan

    Free-form nonrigid parts form the substance of today's automotive and aerospace industries. These parts have different shapes in free state due to their dimensional and geometric variations, gravity and residual strains. For the geometric inspection of such compliant parts, special inspection fixtures, in combination with coordinate measuring systems (CMM) and/or optical data acquisition devices (scanners) are used. This inevitably causes additional costs and delays that result in a lack of competitiveness in the industry. The goal of this thesis is to facilitate the dimensional and geometrical inspection of flexible components from a point cloud without using a jig or secondary conformation operation. More specifically, we aim to develop a methodology to localize and quantify the profile defects in the case of thin shells which are typical to the aerospace and automotive industries. The presented methodology is based on the fact that the interpoint geodesic distance between any two points of a shape remains unchangeable during an isometric deformation. This study elaborates on the theory and general methods for the metrology of nonrigid parts. We have developed a Generalized Numerical Inspection Fixture (GNIF), a robust methodology which merges existing technologies in metric and computational geometry, nonlinear dimensionality reduction techniques, and finite element methods to introduce a general approach to the fixtureless geometrical inspection of nonrigid parts.

  14. Do different types of school mathematics development depend on different constellations of numerical versus general cognitive abilities?

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Lynn S; Geary, David C; Compton, Donald L; Fuchs, Douglas; Hamlett, Carol L; Seethaler, Pamela M; Bryant, Joan D; Schatschneider, Christopher

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the interplay between basic numerical cognition and domain-general abilities (such as working memory) in explaining school mathematics learning. First graders (N = 280; mean age = 5.77 years) were assessed on 2 types of basic numerical cognition, 8 domain-general abilities, procedural calculations, and word problems in fall and then reassessed on procedural calculations and word problems in spring. Development was indexed by latent change scores, and the interplay between numerical and domain-general abilities was analyzed by multiple regression. Results suggest that the development of different types of formal school mathematics depends on different constellations of numerical versus general cognitive abilities. When controlling for 8 domain-general abilities, both aspects of basic numerical cognition were uniquely predictive of procedural calculations and word problems development. Yet, for procedural calculations development, the additional amount of variance explained by the set of domain-general abilities was not significant, and only counting span was uniquely predictive. By contrast, for word problems development, the set of domain-general abilities did provide additional explanatory value, accounting for about the same amount of variance as the basic numerical cognition variables. Language, attentive behavior, nonverbal problem solving, and listening span were uniquely predictive.

  15. Do Different Types of School Mathematics Development Depend on Different Constellations of Numerical versus General Cognitive Abilities?

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Geary, David C.; Compton, Donald L.; Fuchs, Douglas; Hamlett, Carol L.; Seethaler, Pamela M.; Bryant, Joan D.; Schatschneider, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the interplay between basic numerical cognition and domain-general abilities (such as working memory) in explaining school mathematics learning. First graders (n=280; 5.77 years) were assessed on 2 types of basic numerical cognition, 8 domain-general abilities, procedural calculations (PCs), and word problems (WPs) in fall and then reassessed on PCs and WPs in spring. Development was indexed via latent change scores, and the interplay between numerical and domain-general abilities was analyzed via multiple regression. Results suggest that the development of different types of formal school mathematics depends on different constellations of numerical versus general cognitive abilities. When controlling for 8 domain-general abilities, both aspects of basic numerical cognition were uniquely predictive of PC and WP development. Yet, for PC development, the additional amount of variance explained by the set of domain-general abilities was not significant, and only counting span was uniquely predictive. By contrast, for WP development, the set of domain- general abilities did provide additional explanatory value, accounting for about the same amount of variance as the basic numerical cognition variables. Language, attentive behavior, nonverbal problem solving, and listening span were uniquely predictive. PMID:20822213

  16. Oxygenation to Bovine Blood in Artificial Heart and Lung Using Vibrating Flow Pump: Experiment and Numerical Analysis Based on Non-Newtonian Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintaku, Hirofumi; Yonemura, Tsubasa; Tsuru, Kazuaki; Isoyama, Takashi; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Kawano, Satoyuki

    In this study, we construct an experimental apparatus for a prototype artificial heart and lung (AHL) by installing hollow fibers into the cylindrical tube of the vibrating flow pump (VFP). The oxygenation characteristics are investigated both by experiments using bovine blood and by numerical analyses based on the computational fluid dynamics. The analyses are carried out at the Reynolds numbers Re ranged from O(1) to O(103), which are determined based on the experimental conditions. The blood flow and the diffusion of oxygen gas are analyzed based on the Newtonian/non-Newtonian, unsteady, incompressible and axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations, and the advection-diffusion equation. The results show that the oxygenation rate increases in proportion to Re1/3, where the phenomenon corresponds to the decreasing thickness of the concentration boundary layer with Re. Although the effects of the vibrating flow and the rheology of the blood are clearly appeared on the velocity field, their effects on the gas exchange are relatively small at the ranges of prescribed Reynolds numbers. Furthermore, the numerical results in terms of the oxygenation rate are compared with the experimental ones. The basic design data of VFP were accumulated for the development of AHL in the clinical applications.

  17. Analytical and Numerical Solutions of Generalized Fokker-Planck Equations - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Prinja, Anil K.

    2000-12-31

    The overall goal of this project was to develop advanced theoretical and numerical techniques to quantitatively describe the spreading of a collimated beam of charged particles in space, in angle, and in energy, as a result of small deflection, small energy transfer Coulomb collisions with the target nuclei and electrons. Such beams arise in several applications of great interest in nuclear engineering, and include electron and ion radiotherapy, ion beam modification of materials, accelerator transmutation of waste, and accelerator production of tritium, to name some important candidates. These applications present unique and difficult modeling challenges, but from the outset are amenable to the language of ''transport theory'', which is very familiar to nuclear engineers and considerably less-so to physicists and material scientists. Thus, our approach has been to adopt a fundamental description based on transport equations, but the forward peakedness associated with charged particle interactions precludes a direct application of solution methods developed for neutral particle transport. Unique problem formulations and solution techniques are necessary to describe the transport and interaction of charged particles. In particular, we have developed the Generalized Fokker-Planck (GFP) approach to describe the angular and radial spreading of a collimated beam and a renormalized transport model to describe the energy-loss straggling of an initially monoenergetic distribution. Both analytic and numerical solutions have been investigated and in particular novel finite element numerical methods have been developed. In the first phase of the project, asymptotic methods were used to develop closed form solutions to the GFP equation for different orders of expansion, and was described in a previous progress report. In this final report we present a detailed description of (i) a novel energy straggling model based on a Fokker-Planck approximation but which is adapted for a

  18. A numerical algorithm to propagate navigation error covariance matrices associated with generalized strapdown inertial measurement units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, Kent A.; Wells, Eugene M.

    1990-01-01

    The design and operation of a Strapdown Navigation Analysis Program (SNAP) developed to perform covariance analysis on spacecraft inertial-measurement-unit (IMU) navigation errors are described and demonstrated. Consideration is given to the IMU modeling subroutine (with user-specified sensor characteristics), the data input procedures, state updates and the simulation of instrument failures, the determination of the nominal trajectory, the mapping-matrix and Monte Carlo covariance-matrix propagation methods, and aided-navigation simulation. Numerical results are presented in tables for sample applications involving (1) the Galileo/IUS spacecraft from its deployment from the Space Shuttle to a point 10 to the 8th ft from the center of the earth and (2) the TDRS-C/IUS spacecraft from Space Shuttle liftoff to a point about 2 h before IUS deployment. SNAP is shown to give reliable results for both cases, with good general agreement between the mapping-matrix and Monte Carlo predictions.

  19. The sensitivity of the general circulation to Arctic Sea ice boundaries - A numerical experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, G. F.; Johnson, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for a set of numerical experiments conducted with the Goddard (formerly GISS) general circulation model. The experiments were designed to test the model atmospheric response to a single fixed and specified parameter, the total ice cover in the Davis Strait, Barents Sea, East Greenland Sea, Sea of Okhotsk and Bering Sea. Margin variations are considered that are substantially smaller than those involved in ice age or ice-free Arctic simulations. Anomaly is defined as the mean of two runs corresponding to climatological maximum sea ice conditions. Model results indicate that the ice margin anomalies are capable of altering local climates in certain regions of high and middle latitudes. Possible interactions between high latitudes and subtropical regions are suggested.

  20. Numerical models for stationary superfluid neutron stars in general relativity with realistic equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourie, Aurélien; Oertel, Micaela; Novak, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    We present a numerical model for uniformly rotating superfluid neutron stars in a fully general relativistic framework with, for the first time, realistic microphysics including entrainment. We compute stationary and axisymmetric configurations of neutron stars composed of two fluids, namely superfluid neutrons and charged particles (protons and electrons), rotating with different rates around a common axis. Both fluids are coupled by entrainment, a nondissipative interaction which in the case of a nonvanishing relative velocity between the fluids causes the fluid momenta to be not aligned with the respective fluid velocities. We extend the formalism put forth by Comer and Joynt in order to calculate the equation of state (EOS) and entrainment parameters for an arbitrary relative velocity as far as superfluidity is maintained. The resulting entrainment matrix fulfills all necessary sum rules, and in the limit of small relative velocity our results agree with Fermi liquid theory ones derived to lowest order in the velocity. This formalism is applied to two new nuclear equations of state which are implemented in the numerical model, which enables us to obtain precise equilibrium configurations. The resulting density profiles and moments of inertia are discussed employing both EOSs, showing the impact of entrainment and the dependence on the EOS.

  1. Generalized monotone method and numerical approach for coupled reaction diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowmya, M.; Vatsala, Aghalaya S.

    2017-01-01

    Study of coupled reaction diffusion systems are very useful in various branches of science and engineering. In this paper, we provide a methodology to construct the solution for the coupled reaction diffusion systems, with initial and boundary conditions, where the forcing function is the sum of an increasing and decreasing function. It is known that the generalized monotone method coupled with coupled lower and upper solutions yield monotone sequences which converges uniformly and monotonically to coupled minimal and maximal solutions. In addition, the interval of existence is guaranteed by the lower and upper solutions, which are relatively easy to compute. Using the lower and upper solutions as the initial approximation, we develop a method to compute the sequence of coupled lower and upper solutions on the interval or on the desired interval of existence. Further, if the uniqueness conditions are satisfied, the coupled minimal and maximal solutions converge to the unique solution of the reaction diffusion systems. We will provide some numerical results as an application of our numerical methodology.

  2. Stability and free vibration analyses of an orthotropic singly symmetric Timoshenko beam-column with generalized end conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsalve-Cano, J. F.; Darío Aristizábal-Ochoa, J.

    2009-12-01

    The stability and free vibration analyses (i.e., buckling, natural frequencies and modal shapes) of an orthotropic singly symmetric 3D Timoshenko beam-column with generalized boundary conditions (i.e., with bending and torsional semirigid restraints and lateral bracings as well as lumped masses at both ends) subjected to an eccentric end axial load are presented in a classical manner. The five governing equations of dynamic equilibrium (i.e., two transverse shear equations, two bending moment equations and pure torsional moment equation) are sufficient to determine the natural frequencies and the corresponding modal shapes of the beam-column in the two principal planes of bending and torsion about its longitudinal axis. The proposed model includes the coupling effects among: (1) the deformations due to bending, shear and pure torsion; (2) inertias (translational, rotational and torsional) of all masses considered; (3) eccentric axial loads applied at the ends, and (4) restraints at the supports (bending, torsional and lateral bracings at both ends of the member). However, the effects of axial deformations and warping torsion produced by the axial load are not included; consequently the proposed model is not capable of capturing the phenomena of torsional buckling or combined lateral bending-torsional buckling. The proposed analytical model indicates that the stability and dynamic response of beam-columns are highly sensitive to the coupling effects, particularly in members with both ends free to rotate. The natural frequencies and modal shapes can be determined from the eigenvalues of a full 4×4 matrix for vibration in the plane of symmetry (using the uncoupled equations of transverse force and moment equilibrium at both ends) and from a full 6×6 matrix for the coupled shear-bending-torsional vibration (using the coupled equations of transverse shear, bending and torsional moment equilibrium at both ends). Also, it is shown that the proposed method reproduces the

  3. Numerical assessment of fore-and-aft suspension performance to reduce whole-body vibration of wheel loader drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Gérard; Mistrot, Pierre

    2006-12-01

    While driving off-road vehicles, operators are exposed to whole-body vibration acting in the fore-and-aft direction. Seat manufacturers supply products equipped with fore-and-aft suspension but only a few studies report on their performance. This work proposes a computational approach to design fore-and-aft suspensions for wheel loader seats. Field tests were conducted in a quarry to analyse the nature of vibration to which the driver was exposed. Typical input signals were recorded to be reproduced in the laboratory. Technical specifications are defined for the suspension. In order to evaluate the suspension vibration attenuation performance, a model of a sitting human body was developed and coupled to a seat model. The seat model combines the models of each suspension component. A linear two-degree-of-freedom model is used to describe the dynamic behaviour of the sitting driver. Model parameters are identified by fitting the computed apparent mass frequency response functions to the measured values. Model extensions are proposed to investigate postural effects involving variations in hands and feet positions and interaction of the driver's back with the backrest. Suspension design parameters are firstly optimized by computing the seat/man model response to sinusoidal acceleration. Four criteria including transmissibility, interaction force between the driver's back and the backrest and relative maximal displacement of the suspension are computed. A new suspension design with optimized features is proposed. Its performance is checked from calculations of the response of the seat/man model subjected to acceleration measured on the wheel loader during real work conditions. On the basis of the computed values of the SEAT factors, it is found possible to design a suspension that would increase the attenuation provided by the seat by a factor of two.

  4. Influence of numerical model decisions on the flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Shurtz, Timothy E.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    Computational vocal fold models are often used to study the physics of voice production. In this paper the sensitivity of predicted vocal fold flow-induced vibration and resulting airflow patterns to several modeling selections is explored. The location of contact lines used to prevent mesh collapse and assumptions of symmetry were found to influence airflow patterns. However, these variables had relatively little effect on the vibratory response of the vocal fold model itself. Model motion was very sensitive to Poisson’s ratio. The importance of these parameter sensitivities in the context of vocal fold modeling is discussed. PMID:23794762

  5. A three-dimensional, compressible, laminar boundary-layer method for general fuselages. Volume 1: Numerical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Yong-Sun

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for calculating 3-D, compressible laminar boundary layer flow on general fuselage shapes is described. The boundary layer solutions can be obtained in either nonorthogonal 'body oriented' coordinates or orthogonal streamline coordinates. The numerical procedure is 'second order' accurate, efficient and independent of the cross flow velocity direction. Numerical results are presented for several test cases, including a sharp cone, an ellipsoid of revolution, and a general aircraft fuselage at angle of attack. Comparisons are made between numerical results obtained using nonorthogonal curvilinear 'body oriented' coordinates and streamline coordinates.

  6. Numerical model of Zeeman splitting of ro-vibrational lines in the fundamental band of NO molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkov, Yu. G.; Sulakshina, O. N.; Klimachev, Yu. M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the results of calculation the LMR spectrograms of NO molecule in a variable magnetic field with maximum induction up to 6 T for probed CO laser lines. For the simulation of the LMR spectrum a numerical model was developed. This model is based on the numerical diagonalization the matrix of the effective molecular Hamiltonian, which includes Zeeman operator corresponding to interaction an external magnetic field with NO molecule. The comparison of calculated and experimental spectrograms has shown that the numerical model is very reliable and can reproduce the location of absorption peaks measured in a damped oscillating magnetic field.

  7. Full-dimensional quantum calculations of vibrational spectra of six-atom molecules. I. Theory and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hua-Gen

    2004-02-01

    Two quantum mechanical Hamiltonians have been derived in orthogonal polyspherical coordinates, which can be formed by Jacobi and/or Radau vectors etc., for the study of the vibrational spectra of six-atom molecules. The Hamiltonians are expressed in an explicit Hermitian form in the spatial representation. Their matrix representations are described in both full discrete variable representation (DVR) and mixed DVR/nondirect product finite basis representation (FBR) bases. The two-layer Lanczos iteration algorithm [H.-G. Yu, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 8190 (2002)] is employed to solve the eigenvalue problem of the system. A strategy regarding how to carry out the Hamiltonian-vector products for a high-dimensional problem is discussed. By exploiting the inversion symmetry of molecules, a unitary sequential 1D matrix-vector multiplication algorithm is proposed to perform the action of the Hamiltonian on the wavefunction in a symmetrically adapted DVR or FBR basis in the azimuthal angular variables. An application to the vibrational energy levels of the molecular hydrogen trimer (H2)3 in full dimension (12D) is presented. Results show that the rigid-H2 approximation can underestimate the binding energy of the trimer by 27%. Finally, it is demonstrated that the two-layer Lanczos algorithm is also capable of computing the eigenvectors of the system with minor effort.

  8. Global numerical simulations of the rise of vortex-mediated pulsar glitches in full general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourie, A.; Chamel, N.; Novak, J.; Oertel, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we study in detail the role of general relativity on the global dynamics of giant pulsar glitches as exemplified by Vela. For this purpose, we carry out numerical simulations of the spin up triggered by the sudden unpinning of superfluid vortices. In particular, we compute the exchange of angular momentum between the core neutron superfluid and the rest of the star within a two-fluid model including both (non-dissipative) entrainment effects and (dissipative) mutual friction forces. Our simulations are based on a quasi-stationary approach using realistic equations of state (EoSs). We show that the evolution of the angular velocities of both fluids can be accurately described by an exponential law. The associated characteristic rise time τr, which can be precisely computed from stationary configurations only, has a form similar to that obtained in the Newtonian limit. However, general relativity changes the structure of the star and leads to additional couplings between the fluids due to frame-dragging effects. As a consequence, general relativity can have a large impact on the actual value of τr: the errors incurred by using Newtonian gravity are thus found to be as large as ˜40 per cent for the models considered. Values of the rise time are calculated for Vela and compared with current observational limits. Finally, we study the amount of gravitational waves emitted during a glitch. Simple expressions are obtained for the corresponding characteristic amplitudes and frequencies. The detectability of glitches through gravitational wave observatories is briefly discussed.

  9. A general spectral method for the numerical simulation of one-dimensional interacting fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clason, Christian; von Winckel, Gregory

    2012-02-01

    This work introduces a general framework for the direct numerical simulation of systems of interacting fermions in one spatial dimension. The approach is based on a specially adapted nodal spectral Galerkin method, where the basis functions are constructed to obey the antisymmetry relations of fermionic wave functions. An efficient MATLAB program for the assembly of the stiffness and potential matrices is presented, which exploits the combinatorial structure of the sparsity pattern arising from this discretization to achieve optimal run-time complexity. This program allows the accurate discretization of systems with multiple fermions subject to arbitrary potentials, e.g., for verifying the accuracy of multi-particle approximations such as Hartree-Fock in the few-particle limit. It can be used for eigenvalue computations or numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Program summaryProgram title: assembleFermiMatrix Catalogue identifier: AEKO_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKO_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 102 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2294 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MATLAB Computer: Any architecture supported by MATLAB Operating system: Any supported by MATLAB; tested under Linux (x86-64) and Mac OS X (10.6) RAM: Depends on the data Classification: 4.3, 2.2 Nature of problem: The direct numerical solution of the multi-particle one-dimensional Schrödinger equation in a quantum well is challenging due to the exponential growth in the number of degrees of freedom with increasing particles. Solution method: A nodal spectral Galerkin scheme is used where the basis functions are constructed to obey the antisymmetry relations of the fermionic wave

  10. Generalized ``thick'' strip modelling for vortex-induced vibration of long flexible cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yan; Palocios, Rafael; Sherwin, Spencer; Nektar++ Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We propose a generalized strip modelling method that is computationally efficient for the VIV prediction of long flexible cylinders in three-dimensional incompressible flow. In order to overcome the shortcomings of conventional strip theory-based 2D models, the fluid domain is divided into ``thick'' strips, which are sufficiently thick to locally resolve the small scale turbulence effects and three dimensionality of the flow around the cylinder. An attractive feature of the model is that we independently construct a three-dimensional scale resolving model for individual strips, which have local spanwise scale along the cylinder's axial direction and are only coupled through the structural model of the cylinder. Therefore, this model is able to cover the situations of fully resolved 3D model and 2D strip theory model. The connection between these strips is achieved through the calculation of a tensioned beam equation, which is used to represent the dynamics of the flexible body. In the limit, however, a single ``thick'' strip would request the full 3D domain. A parallel Fourier spectral/hp element method is employed to solve the 3D flow dynamics in the strip-domain, and then the VIV response prediction is achieved through the strip-structure interactions. This work is supported by EPSRC grant EP/K037536/1. Acknowledge UK Turbulence Consortium (UKTC) for ARCHER time under EPSRC grant EP/L000261/1.

  11. Energy conservation in the transient response of nonlinear beam vibration problems subjected to pulse loading - A numerical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, E. T., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The nonlinear vibration response of a double cantilevered beam subjected to pulse loading over a central sector is studied. The initial response is generated in detail to ascertain the energetics of the response. The total energy is used as a gauge of the stability and accuracy of the solution. It is shown that to obtain accurate and stable initial solutions an extremely high spatial and time resolution is required. This requirement was only evident through an examination of the energy of the system. It is proposed, therefore, to use the total energy of the system as a necessary stability and accuracy criterion for the nonlinear response of conservative systems. The results also demonstrate that even for moderate nonlinearities, the effects of membrane forces have a significant influence on the system. It is also shown that while the fundamental response is contained in a first mode envelope, the fluctuations caused by the higher order modes must be resolved.

  12. Assignment of terahertz vibrational modes of L-glutamine using density functional theory within generalized-gradient approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Han; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Zhao, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Tian-Yao; Yan, Fang; Shen, Jiang

    2015-07-01

    The crystal structure of L-glutamine is stabilized by a three-dimensional network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. We utilize plane-wave density functional theory lattice-dynamics calculations within the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE), PBE for solids (PBEsol), PBE with Wu-Cohen exchange (WC), and dispersion-corrected PBE, to investigate the effect of these intermolecular contacts on the absorption spectra of glutamine in the terahertz frequency range. Among these calculations, the solid-state simulated results obtained using the WC method exhibit a good agreement with the measured absorption spectra, and the absorption features are assigned with the help of WC. This indicates that the vibrational modes of glutamine were related to the combination of intramolecular and intermolecular motions, the intramolecular modes were dominated by rocking or torsion involving functional groups; the intermolecular modes mainly result from the translational motions of individual molecules, and the rocking of the hydrogen-bonded functional groups. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61302007 and 60977065), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. FRF-SD-12-016A), and the Engineering Research Center of Industrial Spectrum Imaging of Beijing, China.

  13. Effects on the torsional vibration behavior in the investigation of dental implant osseointegration using resonance frequency analysis: a numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Min; Li, Bing; Li, Dehua

    2017-02-07

    Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) methods are widely used to assess implant stability, particularly the Osstell(®) device. The potential effects associated with this method have been discussed in the literature. Torsional RFA (T-RFA), mentioned in our previous study, could represent a new measurement method. The purpose of this study was to simulate T-shaped and Osstell(®) transducer-implant-bone system models; compare their vibration modes and corresponding resonance frequencies; and investigate the effects of their parameters, such as the effective implant length (EIL), bone quality, and osseointegration level, on the torsional resonance frequency (TRF) and bending resonance frequency (BRF) using three-dimensional finite element analysis. Following the finite element model validation, the TRFs and BRFs for three different EILs and four types of bone quality were obtained, and the change rates during 25 degrees of osseointegration were observed. The analysis showed that an increase in the EIL and a decrease in bone quality have less effect on the declination rate of TRFs than on that of BRFs. TRFs are highly sensitive to the stiffness of the implant-bone interface during the healing period. It was concluded that T-RFA has better sensitivity and specificity.

  14. Engine dynamic analysis with general nonlinear finite element codes. Part 2: Bearing element implementation overall numerical characteristics and benchmaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Adams, M.; Fertis, J.; Zeid, I.; Lam, P.

    1982-01-01

    Finite element codes are used in modelling rotor-bearing-stator structure common to the turbine industry. Engine dynamic simulation is used by developing strategies which enable the use of available finite element codes. benchmarking the elements developed are benchmarked by incorporation into a general purpose code (ADINA); the numerical characteristics of finite element type rotor-bearing-stator simulations are evaluated through the use of various types of explicit/implicit numerical integration operators. Improving the overall numerical efficiency of the procedure is improved.

  15. A general spectral method for the numerical simulation of one-dimensional interacting fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clason, Christian; von Winckel, Gregory

    2012-08-01

    This software implements a general framework for the direct numerical simulation of systems of interacting fermions in one spatial dimension. The approach is based on a specially adapted nodal spectral Galerkin method, where the basis functions are constructed to obey the antisymmetry relations of fermionic wave functions. An efficient Matlab program for the assembly of the stiffness and potential matrices is presented, which exploits the combinatorial structure of the sparsity pattern arising from this discretization to achieve optimal run-time complexity. This program allows the accurate discretization of systems with multiple fermions subject to arbitrary potentials, e.g., for verifying the accuracy of multi-particle approximations such as Hartree-Fock in the few-particle limit. It can be used for eigenvalue computations or numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The new version includes a Python implementation of the presented approach. New version program summaryProgram title: assembleFermiMatrix Catalogue identifier: AEKO_v1_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKO_v1_1.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 332 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5418 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MATLAB/GNU Octave, Python Computer: Any architecture supported by MATLAB, GNU Octave or Python Operating system: Any supported by MATLAB, GNU Octave or Python RAM: Depends on the data Classification: 4.3, 2.2. External routines: Python 2.7+, NumPy 1.3+, SciPy 0.10+ Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEKO_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Commun. 183 (2012) 405 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: The direct numerical

  16. Numerical solutions of boundary value problems for variable coefficient generalized KdV equations using Lie symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaneeva, O. O.; Papanicolaou, N. C.; Christou, M. A.; Sophocleous, C.

    2014-09-01

    The exhaustive group classification of a class of variable coefficient generalized KdV equations is presented, which completes and enhances results existing in the literature. Lie symmetries are used for solving an initial and boundary value problem for certain subclasses of the above class. Namely, the found Lie symmetries are applied in order to reduce the initial and boundary value problem for the generalized KdV equations (which are PDEs) to an initial value problem for nonlinear third-order ODEs. The latter problem is solved numerically using the finite difference method. Numerical solutions are computed and the vast parameter space is studied.

  17. TOUGH2: A general-purpose numerical simulator for multiphase nonisothermal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1991-06-01

    Numerical simulators for multiphase fluid and heat flows in permeable media have been under development at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for more than 10 yr. Real geofluids contain noncondensible gases and dissolved solids in addition to water, and the desire to model such `compositional` systems led to the development of a flexible multicomponent, multiphase simulation architecture known as MULKOM. The design of MULKOM was based on the recognition that the mass-and energy-balance equations for multiphase fluid and heat flows in multicomponent systems have the same mathematical form, regardless of the number and nature of fluid components and phases present. Application of MULKOM to different fluid mixtures, such as water and air, or water, oil, and gas, is possible by means of appropriate `equation-of-state` (EOS) modules, which provide all thermophysical and transport parameters of the fluid mixture and the permeable medium as a function of a suitable set of primary thermodynamic variables. Investigations of thermal and hydrologic effects from emplacement of heat-generating nuclear wastes into partially water-saturated formations prompted the development and release of a specialized version of MULKOM for nonisothermal flow of water and air, named TOUGH. TOUGH is an acronym for `transport of unsaturated groundwater and heat` and is also an allusion to the tuff formations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The TOUGH2 code is intended to supersede TOUGH. It offers all the capabilities of TOUGH and includes a considerably more general subset of MULKOM modules with added capabilities. The paper briefly describes the simulation methodology and user features.

  18. Automatic generation of force fields and property surfaces for use in variational vibrational calculations of anharmonic vibrational energies and zero-point vibrational averaged properties.

    PubMed

    Kongsted, Jacob; Christiansen, Ove

    2006-09-28

    An automatic and general procedure for the calculation of geometrical derivatives of the energy and general property surfaces for molecular systems is developed and implemented. General expressions for an n-mode representation are derived, where the n-mode representation includes only the couplings between n or less degrees of freedom. The general expressions are specialized to derivative force fields and property surfaces, and a scheme for calculation of the numerical derivatives is implemented. The implementation is interfaced to electronic structure programs and may be used for both ground and excited electronic states. The implementation is done in the context of a vibrational structure program and can be used in combination with vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF), vibrational configuration interaction (VCI), vibrational Moller-Plesset, and vibrational coupled cluster calculations of anharmonic wave functions and calculation of vibrational averaged properties at the VSCF and VCI levels. Sample calculations are presented for fundamental vibrational energies and vibrationally averaged dipole moments and frequency dependent polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of water and formaldehyde.

  19. The Contributions of Domain-General and Numerical Factors to Third-Grade Arithmetic Skills and Mathematical Learning Disability.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Richard; Powell, Daisy

    2014-02-01

    Explanations of the marked individual differences in elementary school mathematical achievement and mathematical learning disability (MLD or dyscalculia) have involved domain-general factors (working memory, reasoning, processing speed, and oral language) and numerical factors that include single-digit processing efficiency and multidigit skills such as number system knowledge and estimation. This study of 3rd graders (N = 258) finds both domain-general and numerical factors contribute independently to explaining variation in 3 significant arithmetic skills: basic calculation fluency, written multidigit computation, and arithmetic word problems. Estimation accuracy and number system knowledge show the strongest associations with every skill, and their contributions are independent of both each other and other factors. Different domain-general factors independently account for variation in each skill. Numeral comparison, a single digit processing skill, uniquely accounts for variation in basic calculation. Subsamples of children with MLD (at or below 10th percentile, n = 29) are compared with low achievement (LA, 11th to 25th percentiles, n = 42) and typical achievement (above 25th percentile, n = 187). Examination of these and subsets with persistent difficulties supports a multiple deficits view of number difficulties: Most children with number difficulties exhibit deficits in both domain-general and numerical factors. The only factor deficit common to all persistent MLD children is in multidigit skills. These findings indicate that many factors matter but multidigit skills matter most in 3rd grade mathematical achievement.

  20. The Contributions of Domain-General and Numerical Factors to Third-Grade Arithmetic Skills and Mathematical Learning Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Richard; Powell, Daisy

    2014-01-01

    Explanations of the marked individual differences in elementary school mathematical achievement and mathematical learning disability (MLD or dyscalculia) have involved domain-general factors (working memory, reasoning, processing speed, and oral language) and numerical factors that include single-digit processing efficiency and multidigit skills…

  1. Variation of Student Numerical and Figural Reasoning Approaches by Pattern Generalization Type, Strategy Use and Grade Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Mouhayar, Rabih; Jurdak, Murad

    2016-01-01

    This paper explored variation of student numerical and figural reasoning approaches across different pattern generalization types and across grade level. An instrument was designed for this purpose. The instrument was given to a sample of 1232 students from grades 4 to 11 from five schools in Lebanon. Analysis of data showed that the numerical…

  2. A general discrete variable method to calculate vibrational energy levels of three- and four-atom molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramley, Matthew J.; Carrington, Tucker, Jr.

    1993-12-01

    We present a general variational method to calculate vibrational energy levels of polyatomic molecules without dynamical approximation. The method is based on a Lanczos algorithm, which does not require storage of the Hamiltonian matrix. The rate-determining step of each Lanczos iteration is the evaluation of the product of the matrix and a trial vector. We use simple product basis functions and write the Hamiltonian as a sum of factorizable terms. With n one-dimensional functions in each of f dimensions, the matrix-vector product requires no more than cnf+1 multiplications for a single term involving c coordinates. Choosing a (potential optimized) discrete variable representation (DVR) in each dimension, the potential energy matrix is diagonal. The rate-determining step is now the multiplication of a vector by the kinetic energy matrix and c is effectively (with rare exceptions) at most two. The nf+1 scaling holds for both diagonal and mixed second derivative operators. The method is directly applicable to any three-atom and any nonlinear four-atom molecule. We use a variety of coordinate systems (Jacobi, Radau, a hybrid of the two, and bond), for which the total number of factorizable terms in the exact kinetic energy operator is never large, to calculate very well-converged band origins of H2O up to 22 000 cm-1, of H+3 up to 18 000 cm-1, and of CH2O up to 5700 cm-1; and low-lying levels of H2O2. The results for CH2O are new, and those for H+3 clarify the causes of discrepancies in published work. The product basis results in very large matrices (up to 500 000×500 000 for four atoms), but the cost is within an order of magnitude of that of contracted-basis approaches using explicit diagonalization. While contracted basis approaches are molecule and Hamiltonian specific, it was possible to apply the DVR-Lanczos method to all the examples presented here with a single computer program. The principal advantage of our method is thus its generality, and in this

  3. Polariton condensation threshold investigation through the numerical resolution of the generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargoubi, Hamis; Guillet, Thierry; Jaziri, Sihem; Balti, Jalloul; Guizal, Brahim

    2016-10-01

    We present a numerical approach for the solution of the dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii equation coupled to the reservoir equation governing the exciton-polaritons Bose-Einstein condensation. It is based on the finite difference method applied to space variables and on the fourth order Range-Kutta algorithm applied to the time variable. Numerical tests illustrate the stability and accuracy of the proposed scheme. Then results on the behavior of the condensate under large Gaussian pumping and around the threshold are presented. We determine the threshold through the particular behavior of the self-energy and characterize it by tracking the establishment time of the steady state.

  4. Polariton condensation threshold investigation through the numerical resolution of the generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation.

    PubMed

    Gargoubi, Hamis; Guillet, Thierry; Jaziri, Sihem; Balti, Jalloul; Guizal, Brahim

    2016-10-01

    We present a numerical approach for the solution of the dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii equation coupled to the reservoir equation governing the exciton-polaritons Bose-Einstein condensation. It is based on the finite difference method applied to space variables and on the fourth order Range-Kutta algorithm applied to the time variable. Numerical tests illustrate the stability and accuracy of the proposed scheme. Then results on the behavior of the condensate under large Gaussian pumping and around the threshold are presented. We determine the threshold through the particular behavior of the self-energy and characterize it by tracking the establishment time of the steady state.

  5. Mediation Effects of Latent Numerical Abilities on the Associations between Domain General Competencies and Fraction Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ye, Ai; Hansen, Nicole; Resnick, Ilyse; Carrique, Jessica; Jordan, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to reveal the developmental pathway from third grade cognitive competencies to sixth grade conceptual and procedural fraction knowledge through the intervening whole numerical skills at fifth grade. The study used empirical data that come from 536 students in nine schools across two Delaware public school…

  6. Some Numerical Methods for Exponential Analysis with Connection to a General Identification Scheme for Linear Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    generalized nodel described by Eykhoff [1, 2], Astrom and Eykhoff [3], and on pages 209-220 of Eykhoff [4]. The origin of the general- ized model can be...aspects of process-parameter estimation," IEEE Trans. Auto. Control, October 1963, pp. 347-357. 3. K. J. Astrom and P. Eykhoff, "System

  7. Engine dynamic analysis with general nonlinear finite element codes. II - Bearing element implementation, overall numerical characteristics and benchmarking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Adams, M.; Lam, P.; Fertis, D.; Zeid, I.

    1982-01-01

    Second-year efforts within a three-year study to develop and extend finite element (FE) methodology to efficiently handle the transient/steady state response of rotor-bearing-stator structure associated with gas turbine engines are outlined. The two main areas aim at (1) implanting the squeeze film damper element into a general purpose FE code for testing and evaluation; and (2) determining the numerical characteristics of the FE-generated rotor-bearing-stator simulation scheme. The governing FE field equations are set out and the solution methodology is presented. The choice of ADINA as the general-purpose FE code is explained, and the numerical operational characteristics of the direct integration approach of FE-generated rotor-bearing-stator simulations is determined, including benchmarking, comparison of explicit vs. implicit methodologies of direct integration, and demonstration problems.

  8. Preliminary sizing of vibration absorber for space mast structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, M. F.; Mccomb, H. G., Jr.; Peebles, S. W.

    1982-01-01

    A simple method of sizing a vibration absorber for a large, cantilevered flexible mast is presented. The method is based on Den Hartog's vibration absorber theory for two-degree-of-freedom systems. Generalized design curves are presented as well as specific numerical results for a candidate space experiment in which a long flexible antenna mast is attached to the shuttle orbiter and dynamically excited by orbiter accelerations. Results indicate that for large flexible masts, the mass of the vibration absorber required to meet stringent tip deflection tolerances becomes prohibitively large.

  9. Analytical and experimental study of vibrations in a gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Ruan, Y. F.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Oswald, F. B.; Coy, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical simulation of the dynamics of a gear transmission system is presented and compared to experimental results from a gear noise test rig at NASA Lewis. The analytical procedure developed couples the dynamic behaviors of the rotor-bearing-gear system with the response of the gearbox structure. Transient and steady-state vibrations of the gearbox system are presented in the time and frequency domains. The vibration characteristics of a simple single-mesh-gear noise test rig are modeled. The numerical simulations are compared to experimental data measured under typical operating conditions. The system natural frequencies, peak vibration amplitudes, and gear mesh frequencies are generally in good agreement.

  10. A semi analytical method for electro-thermo-mechanical nonlinear vibration analysis of nanobeam resting on the Winkler-Pasternak foundations with general elastic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarepour, Misagh; Amirhosein Hosseini, Seyed

    2016-08-01

    This study presents an examination of nonlinear free vibration of a nanobeam under electro-thermo-mechanical loading with elastic medium and various boundary conditions, especially the elastic boundary condition. The nanobeam is modeled as an Euler-Bernoulli beam. The von Kármán strain-displacement relationship together with Hamilton’s principle and Eringen’s theory are employed to derive equations of motion. The nonlinear free vibration frequency is obtained for simply supported (S-S) and elastic supported (E-E) boundary conditions. E-E boundary condition is a general and actual form of boundary conditions and it is chosen because of more realistic behavior. By applying the differential transform method (DTM), the nanobeam’s natural frequencies can be easily obtained for the two different boundary conditions mentioned above. Performing a precise study led to investigation of the influences of nonlocal parameter, temperature change, spring constants (either for elastic medium or boundary condition) and imposed electric potential on the nonlinear free vibration characteristics of nanobeam. The results for S-S and E-E nanobeams are compared with each other. In order to validate the results, some comparisons are presented between DTM results and open literature to show the accuracy of this new approach. It has been discovered that DTM solves the equations with minimum calculation cost.

  11. A novel numerical flux for the 3D Euler equations with general equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toro, Eleuterio F.; Castro, Cristóbal E.; Lee, Bok Jik

    2015-12-01

    Here we extend the flux vector splitting approach recently proposed in E.F. Toro and M.E. Vázquez-Cendón (2012) [42]. The scheme was originally presented for the 1D Euler equations for ideal gases and its extension presented in this paper is threefold: (i) we solve the three-dimensional Euler equations on general meshes; (ii) we use a general equation of state; and (iii) we achieve high order of accuracy in both space and time through application of the semi-discrete ADER methodology on general meshes. The resulting methods are systematically assessed for accuracy, robustness and efficiency on a carefully selected suite of test problems. Formal high accuracy is assessed through convergence rates studies for schemes of up to 4th order of accuracy in both space and time on unstructured meshes.

  12. A Numerical Treatment of the Rf SQUID: I. General Properties andNoise Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Clarke, John

    2007-01-15

    We investigate the characteristics and noise performance of rf Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) by solving the corresponding Langevin equations numerically and optimizing the model parameters with respect to noise energy. After introducing the basic concepts of the numerical simulations, we give a detailed discussion of the performance of the SQUID as a function of all relevant parameters. The best performance is obtained in the crossover region between the dispersive and dissipative regimes, characterized by an inductance parameter {beta}{prime}{sub L} {triple_bond} 2{pi}LI{sub 0}/{Phi}{sub 0} {approx} 1; L is the loop inductance, I{sub 0} the critical current of the Josephson junction, and {phi}{sub 0} the flux quantum. In this regime, which is not well explored by previous analytical approaches, the lowest (intrinsic) values of noise energy are a factor of about 2 above previous estimates based on analytical approaches. However, several other analytical predictions, such as the inverse proportionality of the noise energy on the tank circuit quality factor and the square of the coupling coefficient between the tank circuit and the SQUID loop, could not be well reproduced. The optimized intrinsic noise energy of the rf SQUID is superior to that of the dc SQUID at all temperatures. Although for technologically achievable parameters this advantage shrinks, particularly at low thermal fluctuation levels, we give an example for realistic parameters that leads to a noise energy comparable to that of the dc SQUID even in this regime.

  13. TOUGH2: A general-purpose numerical simulator for multiphase fluid and heat flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1991-05-01

    TOUGH2 is a numerical simulation program for nonisothermal flows of multicomponent, multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The chief applications for which TOUGH2 is designed are in geothermal reservoir engineering, nuclear waste disposal, and unsaturated zone hydrology. A successor to the TOUGH program, TOUGH2 offers added capabilities and user features, including the flexibility to handle different fluid mixtures, facilities for processing of geometric data (computational grids), and an internal version control system to ensure referenceability of code applications. This report includes a detailed description of governing equations, program architecture, and user features. Enhancements in data inputs relative to TOUGH are described, and a number of sample problems are given to illustrate code applications. 46 refs., 29 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Numerical Solution of the Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in Three-dimensional Generalized Curvilinear Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, S. E.; Kwak, D.; Chang, J. L. C.

    1986-01-01

    Numerically solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is known to be time consuming and expensive. Testing of the INS3D computers code, which solves these equations with the use of the pseudocompressibility method, shows this method to be an efficient way to obtain the steady state solution. The effects of the waves introduced by the pseudocompressibility method are analyzed and criteria are set and tested for the choice of the pseudocompressibility parameter which governs the artificial sound speed. The code is tested using laminar flow over a two dimensional backward-facing step, and laminar flow over a two dimensional circular cylinder. The results of the computations over the backward-facing step are in excellent agreement with experimental results. The transient solution of the flow over the cylinder impulsively started from rest is in good agreement with experimental results. However, the computed frequency of periodic shedding of vortices behind the cylinder is not in agreement with the experimental value. For a three dimensional test case, computations were conducted for a cylinder end wall junction. The saddle point separation and horseshoe vortex system appear in the computed field. The solution also shows secondary vortex filaments which wrap around the cylinder and spiral up in the wake.

  15. Vibration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C.

    1971-01-01

    Guidelines of the methods and applications used in vibration technology at the MSFC are presented. The purpose of the guidelines is to provide a practical tool for coordination and understanding between industry and government groups concerned with vibration of systems and equipments. Topics covered include measuring, reducing, analyzing, and methods for obtaining simulated environments and formulating vibration specifications. Methods for vibration and shock testing, theoretical aspects of data processing, vibration response analysis, and techniques of designing for vibration are also presented.

  16. Generalized Vibrational Perturbation Theory for Rotovibrational Energies of Linear, Symmetric and Asymmetric Tops: Theory, Approximations, and Automated Approaches to Deal with Medium-to-Large Molecular Systems

    PubMed Central

    Piccardo, Matteo; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Models going beyond the rigid-rotor and the harmonic oscillator levels are mandatory for providing accurate theoretical predictions for several spectroscopic properties. Different strategies have been devised for this purpose. Among them, the treatment by perturbation theory of the molecular Hamiltonian after its expansion in power series of products of vibrational and rotational operators, also referred to as vibrational perturbation theory (VPT), is particularly appealing for its computational efficiency to treat medium-to-large systems. Moreover, generalized (GVPT) strategies combining the use of perturbative and variational formalisms can be adopted to further improve the accuracy of the results, with the first approach used for weakly coupled terms, and the second one to handle tightly coupled ones. In this context, the GVPT formulation for asymmetric, symmetric, and linear tops is revisited and fully generalized to both minima and first-order saddle points of the molecular potential energy surface. The computational strategies and approximations that can be adopted in dealing with GVPT computations are pointed out, with a particular attention devoted to the treatment of symmetry and degeneracies. A number of tests and applications are discussed, to show the possibilities of the developments, as regards both the variety of treatable systems and eligible methods. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26345131

  17. Generalized Vibrational Perturbation Theory for Rotovibrational Energies of Linear, Symmetric and Asymmetric Tops: Theory, Approximations, and Automated Approaches to Deal with Medium-to-Large Molecular Systems.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, Matteo; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-08-05

    Models going beyond the rigid-rotor and the harmonic oscillator levels are mandatory for providing accurate theoretical predictions for several spectroscopic properties. Different strategies have been devised for this purpose. Among them, the treatment by perturbation theory of the molecular Hamiltonian after its expansion in power series of products of vibrational and rotational operators, also referred to as vibrational perturbation theory (VPT), is particularly appealing for its computational efficiency to treat medium-to-large systems. Moreover, generalized (GVPT) strategies combining the use of perturbative and variational formalisms can be adopted to further improve the accuracy of the results, with the first approach used for weakly coupled terms, and the second one to handle tightly coupled ones. In this context, the GVPT formulation for asymmetric, symmetric, and linear tops is revisited and fully generalized to both minima and first-order saddle points of the molecular potential energy surface. The computational strategies and approximations that can be adopted in dealing with GVPT computations are pointed out, with a particular attention devoted to the treatment of symmetry and degeneracies. A number of tests and applications are discussed, to show the possibilities of the developments, as regards both the variety of treatable systems and eligible methods.

  18. Numerical study of a multigrid method with four smoothing methods for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in general coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, S.; Wesseling, P.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of a linear multigrid method using four smoothing methods, called SCGS (Symmetrical Coupled GauBeta-Seidel), CLGS (Collective Line GauBeta-Seidel), SILU (Scalar ILU), and CILU (Collective ILU), is investigated for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in general coordinates, in association with Galerkin coarse grid approximation. Robustness and efficiency are measured and compared by application to test problems. The numerical results show that CILU is the most robust, SILU the least, with CLGS and SCGS in between. CLGS is the best in efficiency, SCGS and CILU follow, and SILU is the worst.

  19. A new trigonometric spline approach to numerical solution of generalized nonlinear Klien-Gordon equation.

    PubMed

    Mat Zin, Shazalina; Abbas, Muhammad; Majid, Ahmad Abd; Ismail, Ahmad Izani Md

    2014-01-01

    The generalized nonlinear Klien-Gordon equation plays an important role in quantum mechanics. In this paper, a new three-time level implicit approach based on cubic trigonometric B-spline is presented for the approximate solution of this equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The usual finite difference approach is used to discretize the time derivative while cubic trigonometric B-spline is applied as an interpolating function in the space dimension. Several examples are discussed to exhibit the feasibility and capability of the approach. The absolute errors and L∞ error norms are also computed at different times to assess the performance of the proposed approach and the results were found to be in good agreement with known solutions and with existing schemes in literature.

  20. Experimental Analysis of a Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting System for Harmonic, Random, and Sine on Random Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Cryns, Jackson W.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Santiago-Rojas, Emiliano; Silvers, Kurt L.

    2013-07-01

    Formal journal article Experimental analysis of a piezoelectric energy harvesting system for harmonic, random, and sine on random vibration Abstract: Harvesting power with a piezoelectric vibration powered generator using a full-wave rectifier conditioning circuit is experimentally compared for varying sinusoidal, random and sine on random (SOR) input vibration scenarios. Additionally, the implications of source vibration characteristics on harvester design are discussed. Studies in vibration harvesting have yielded numerous alternatives for harvesting electrical energy from vibrations but piezoceramics arose as the most compact, energy dense means of energy transduction. The rise in popularity of harvesting energy from ambient vibrations has made piezoelectric generators commercially available. Much of the available literature focuses on maximizing harvested power through nonlinear processing circuits that require accurate knowledge of generator internal mechanical and electrical characteristics and idealization of the input vibration source, which cannot be assumed in general application. In this manuscript, variations in source vibration and load resistance are explored for a commercially available piezoelectric generator. We characterize the source vibration by its acceleration response for repeatability and transcription to general application. The results agree with numerical and theoretical predictions for in previous literature that load optimal resistance varies with transducer natural frequency and source type, and the findings demonstrate that significant gains are seen with lower tuned transducer natural frequencies for similar source amplitudes. Going beyond idealized steady state sinusoidal and simplified random vibration input, SOR testing allows for more accurate representation of real world ambient vibration. It is shown that characteristic interactions from more complex vibrational sources significantly alter power generation and power processing

  1. Individual differences in children's mathematics achievement: The roles of symbolic numerical magnitude processing and domain-general cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Vanbinst, K; De Smedt, B

    2016-01-01

    This contribution reviewed the available evidence on the domain-specific and domain-general neurocognitive determinants of children's arithmetic development, other than nonsymbolic numerical magnitude processing, which might have been overemphasized as a core factor of individual differences in mathematics and dyscalculia. We focused on symbolic numerical magnitude processing, working memory, and phonological processing, as these determinants have been most researched and their roles in arithmetic can be predicted against the background of brain imaging data. Our review indicates that symbolic numerical magnitude processing is a major determinant of individual differences in arithmetic. Working memory, particularly the central executive, also plays a role in learning arithmetic, but its influence appears to be dependent on the learning stage and experience of children. The available evidence on phonological processing suggests that it plays a more subtle role in children's acquisition of arithmetic facts. Future longitudinal studies should investigate these factors in concert to understand their relative contribution as well as their mediating and moderating roles in children's arithmetic development.

  2. Numerical study of blow-up and dispersive shocks in solutions to generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, C.; Peter, R.

    2015-06-01

    We present a detailed numerical study of solutions to general Korteweg-de Vries equations with critical and supercritical nonlinearity, both in the context of dispersive shocks and blow-up. We study the stability of solitons and show that they are unstable against being radiated away and blow-up. In the L2 critical case, the blow-up mechanism by Martel, Merle and Raphaël can be numerically identified. In the limit of small dispersion, it is shown that a dispersive shock always appears before an eventual blow-up. In the latter case, always the first soliton to appear will blow up. It is shown that the same type of blow-up as for the perturbations of the soliton can be observed which indicates that the theory by Martel, Merle and Raphaël is also applicable to initial data with a mass much larger than the soliton mass. We study the scaling of the blow-up time t∗ in dependence of the small dispersion parameter ɛ and find an exponential dependence t∗(ɛ) and that there is a minimal blow-up time t0∗ greater than the critical time of the corresponding Hopf solution for ɛ → 0. To study the cases with blow-up in detail, we apply the first dynamic rescaling for generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations. This allows to identify the type of the singularity.

  3. Frequency-Dependent Attenuation of Blasting Vibration Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Junru; Lu, Wenbo; Yan, Peng; Chen, Ming; Wang, Gaohui

    2016-10-01

    The dominant frequency, in addition to the peak particle velocity, is a critical factor for assessing adverse effects of the blasting vibration on surrounding structures; however, it has not been fully considered in blasting design. Therefore, the dominant frequency-dependent attenuation mechanism of blast-induced vibration is investigated in the present research. Starting with blasting vibration induced by a spherical charge propagating in an infinite viscoelastic medium, a modified expression of the vibration amplitude spectrum was derived to reveal the frequency dependency of attenuation. Then, ground vibration induced by more complex and more commonly used cylindrical charge that propagates in a semi-infinite viscoelastic medium was analyzed by numerical simulation. Results demonstrate that the absorptive property of the medium results in the frequency attenuation versus distance, whereas a rapid drop or fluctuation occurs during the attenuation of ground vibration. Fluctuation usually appears at moderate to far field, and the dominant frequency generally decreases to half the original value when rapid drop occurs. The decay rate discrepancy between different frequency components and the multimodal structure of vibration spectrum lead to the unsmooth frequency-dependent attenuation. The above research is verified by two field experiments. Furthermore, according to frequency-based vibration standards, frequency drop and fluctuation should be considered when evaluating blast safety. An optimized piecewise assessment is proposed for more accurate evaluation: With the frequency drop point as the breakpoint, the assessment is divided into two independent sections along the propagating path.

  4. Generalized semi-analytical finite difference method for dispersion curves calculation and numerical dispersion analysis for Lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Packo, Pawel; Uhl, Tadeusz; Staszewski, Wieslaw J

    2014-09-01

    The paper presents an efficient and accurate method for dispersion curve calculation and analysis of numerical models for guided waves. The method can be used for any arbitrarily selected anisotropic material. The proposed approach utilizes the wave equation and through-thickness-only discretization of anisotropic, layered plates to obtain the Lamb wave characteristics. Thus, layered structures, such as composites, can be analyzed in a straightforward manner. A general framework for the proposed analysis is given, along with application examples. Although these examples are based on the local interaction simulation approach for elastic waves propagation, the proposed methodology can be easily adopted for other methods (e.g., finite elements). The method can be also used to study the influence of discretization parameters on dispersion curves estimates.

  5. An eddy resolving numerical study of the general circulation and deep-water formation in the Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantziafou, A.; Lascaratos, A.

    2004-07-01

    General circulation and deep-water formation (DWF) processes in the Adriatic basin in a climatological year were numerically simulated in a high-resolution (1/20th of a degree) implementation of the Princeton Ocean Model (POM). The "perpetual" year atmospheric data were computed from the ECMWF Reanalysis data (1°×1°) covering the period 1979-1994. The model reproduces the main basin features of the general circulation, water mass distribution and their seasonal variability. The Adriatic Deep Water exiting through the Otranto Strait is produced with two different mechanisms inside the basin: (a) by open ocean deep convection over the Southern Adriatic Pit and Middle Adriatic Pit (b) on the continental shelf of the Northern and Middle Adriatic. The estimated contributions of both mechanisms suggest that 82% of the Adriatic Deep Water is formed inside the Southern Adriatic Pit, while all the higher density water in this water mass comes from the northern regions. The role of mesoscale eddies at the periphery of the dense-water chimney in the Southern Adriatic Pit was examined and their contribution to the lateral buoyancy flux, during the convection process, found to be small. The DWF rate at Otranto Strait is 0.28 Sv with σθ over 29.15. The sensitivity of the DWF processes to interannual variability of the buoyancy forcing and river runoff was assessed with a number of process-study numerical experiments. In these experiments the effect of an imposed "extreme" buoyancy forcing during 1 year, on the DWF rates, was to modify them during the specific year, but the effects were still present in the following normal climatological year. This shows that the DWF rates and their mass characteristics at a specific year depend not only on the atmospheric conditions prevailing that specific year but on the previous year's as well, thus leading to the concept of a "memory" of the basin.

  6. Prediction and mitigation analysis of ground vibration caused by running high-speed trains on rigid-frame viaducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liangming; Xie, Weiping; He, Xingwen; Hayashikawa, Toshiro

    2016-03-01

    In this study a 3D numerical analysis approach is developed to predict the ground vibration around rigid-frame viaducts induced by running high-speed trains. The train-bridge-ground interaction system is divided into two subsystems: the train-bridge interaction and the soil-structure interaction. First, the analytical program to simulate bridge vibration with consideration of train-bridge interaction is developed to obtain the vibration reaction forces at the pier bottoms. The highspeed train is described by a multi-DOFs vibration system and the rigid-frame viaduct is modeled with 3D beam elements. Second, applying these vibration reaction forces as input external excitations, the ground vibration is simulated by using a general-purpose program that includes soil-structure interaction effects. The validity of the analytical procedure is confirmed by comparing analytical and experimental results. The characteristics of high-speed train-induced vibrations, including the location of predominant vibration, are clarified. Based on this information a proposed vibration countermeasure using steel strut and new barrier is found effective in reducing train-induced vibrations and it satisfies environmental vibration requirements. The vibration screening efficiency is evaluated by reduction VAL based on 1/3 octave band spectral analysis.

  7. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  8. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  9. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  10. Numerical Solution to Generalized Burgers'-Fisher Equation Using Exp-Function Method Hybridized with Heuristic Computation

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Suheel Abdullah; Qureshi, Ijaz Mansoor; Amir, Muhammad; Malik, Aqdas Naveed; Haq, Ihsanul

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new heuristic scheme for the approximate solution of the generalized Burgers'-Fisher equation is proposed. The scheme is based on the hybridization of Exp-function method with nature inspired algorithm. The given nonlinear partial differential equation (NPDE) through substitution is converted into a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (NODE). The travelling wave solution is approximated by the Exp-function method with unknown parameters. The unknown parameters are estimated by transforming the NODE into an equivalent global error minimization problem by using a fitness function. The popular genetic algorithm (GA) is used to solve the minimization problem, and to achieve the unknown parameters. The proposed scheme is successfully implemented to solve the generalized Burgers'-Fisher equation. The comparison of numerical results with the exact solutions, and the solutions obtained using some traditional methods, including adomian decomposition method (ADM), homotopy perturbation method (HPM), and optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM), show that the suggested scheme is fairly accurate and viable for solving such problems. PMID:25811858

  11. Numerical solution to generalized Burgers'-Fisher equation using Exp-function method hybridized with heuristic computation.

    PubMed

    Malik, Suheel Abdullah; Qureshi, Ijaz Mansoor; Amir, Muhammad; Malik, Aqdas Naveed; Haq, Ihsanul

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new heuristic scheme for the approximate solution of the generalized Burgers'-Fisher equation is proposed. The scheme is based on the hybridization of Exp-function method with nature inspired algorithm. The given nonlinear partial differential equation (NPDE) through substitution is converted into a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (NODE). The travelling wave solution is approximated by the Exp-function method with unknown parameters. The unknown parameters are estimated by transforming the NODE into an equivalent global error minimization problem by using a fitness function. The popular genetic algorithm (GA) is used to solve the minimization problem, and to achieve the unknown parameters. The proposed scheme is successfully implemented to solve the generalized Burgers'-Fisher equation. The comparison of numerical results with the exact solutions, and the solutions obtained using some traditional methods, including adomian decomposition method (ADM), homotopy perturbation method (HPM), and optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM), show that the suggested scheme is fairly accurate and viable for solving such problems.

  12. Vertical Distribution of Vibrationally Excited Hydroxyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grygalashvyly, Mykhaylo; Becker, Erich; Sonnemann, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge about the vertical distribution of the vibrationally excited states of hydroxyl (OH*) is important for the interpretation of airglow measurements with respect to dynamical processes in the mesopause region. We derive an approximate analytical expression for the distribution of OH* that highlights the dependence on atomic oxygen and temperature. In addition, we use an advanced numerical model for the formation and relaxation of OH* and investigate the distributions of the different vibrationally exited states of OH*. For the production of OH*, the model includes the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ozone, as well as the reaction of atomic oxygen with hydroperoxy radicals. As loss processes we include 1) deactivation by atomic oxygen, molecular oxygen, and molecular nitrogen, 2) spontaneous emission, and 3) loss due to chemical reaction with atomic oxygen. All these processes take the dependence on the vibrational number into account. The quenching by molecular and atomic oxygen is parameterized by a multi-quantum relaxation scheme. This diagnostic model for OH* has been implemented as part of a chemistry-transport model that is driven by the dynamics simulated with the KMCM (Kühlungsborn Mechanistic general Circulation Model). Numerical results confirm that emission from excited states with higher vibrational number is weaker and emanates from higher altitudes. In addition we find that the OH*-peak altitudes depend significantly on season and latitude. This behavior is mainly controlled by the corresponding variations of atomic oxygen and temperature, as is also confirmed by the aforementioned approximate theory.

  13. Rotation and vibration of diatomic molecule in the spatially-dependent mass Schrödinger equation with generalized q-deformed Morse potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhdair, Sameer M.

    2009-06-01

    The analytic solutions of the spatially-dependent mass Schrödinger equation of diatomic molecules with the centrifugal term l(l+1)/r2 for the generalized q-deformed Morse potential are obtained approximately by means of a parametric generalization of the Nikiforov-Uvarov (NU) method combined with the Pekeris approximation scheme. The energy eigenvalues and the corresponding normalized radial wave functions are calculated in closed form with a physically motivated choice of a reciprocal Morse-like mass function, m(r)=m0/(1-δe)2,0⩽δ<1, where a and re are the range of the potential and the equilibrium position of the nuclei. The constant mass case when δ→0 is also studied. The energy states for H 2, LiH, HCl and CO diatomic molecules are calculated and compared favourably well with those obtained by using other approximation methods for arbitrary vibrational n and rotational l quantum numbers.

  14. È VIVO: Virtual eruptions at Vesuvius; A multimedia tool to illustrate numerical modeling to a general public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todesco, Micol; Neri, Augusto; Demaria, Cristina; Marmo, Costantino; Macedonio, Giovanni

    2006-07-01

    Dissemination of scientific results to the general public has become increasingly important in our society. When science deals with natural hazards, public outreach is even more important: on the one hand, it contributes to hazard perception and it is a necessary step toward preparedness and risk mitigation; on the other hand, it contributes to establish a positive link of mutual confidence between scientific community and the population living at risk. The existence of such a link plays a relevant role in hazard communication, which in turn is essential to mitigate the risk. In this work, we present a tool that we have developed to illustrate our scientific results on pyroclastic flow propagation at Vesuvius. This tool, a CD-ROM that we developed joining scientific data with appropriate knowledge in communication sciences is meant to be a first prototype that will be used to test the validity of this approach to public outreach. The multimedia guide contains figures, images of real volcanoes and computer animations obtained through numerical modeling of pyroclastic density currents. Explanatory text, kept as short and simple as possible, illustrates both the process and the methodology applied to study this very dangerous natural phenomenon. In this first version, the CD-ROM will be distributed among selected categories of end-users together with a short questionnaire that we have drawn to test its readability. Future releases will include feedback from the users, further advancement of scientific results as well as a higher degree of interactivity.

  15. Vibrations in a moving flexible robot arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. K. C.; Wei, Jin-Duo

    1987-01-01

    The vibration in a flexible robot arm modeled by a moving slender prismatic beam is considered. It is found that the extending and contracting motions have destabilizing and stabilizing effects on the vibratory motions, respectively. The vibration analysis is based on a Galerkin approximation with time-dependent basis functions. Typical numerical results are presented to illustrate the qualitative features of vibrations.

  16. Fourier Analysis Of Vibrations Of Round Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Gary A.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier-series representation developed for analysis of vibrations in complicated, round structures like turbopump impellers. Method eliminates guesswork involved in characterization of shapes of vibrational modes. Easy way to characterize complicated modes, leading to determination of responsiveness of given mode to various forcing functions. Used in conjunction with finite-element numerical simulation of vibrational modes of structure.

  17. Skyrmion vibration modes within the rational map ansatz

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W. T.; Piette, B.

    2008-06-15

    We study the vibration modes of the Skyrme model within the rational map ansatz. We show that the vibrations of the radial profiles and the rational maps are decoupled and we consider explicitly the cases B=1, B=2, and B=4. We then compare our results with the vibration modes obtained numerically by Barnes et al. and show that qualitatively the rational map reproduces the vibration modes obtained numerically but that the vibration frequencies of these modes do not match very well.

  18. Modeling and analysis of vibration effects on signal quality for angular multiplexed holographic data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Toshiki; Shimada, Ken-ichi; Hoshizawa, Taku; Takashima, Yuzuru

    2016-09-01

    A practical optical system design that takes into account environmental factors is highly desirable. However, it is in general a time-consuming process, which requires a massive iterations of simulations. This is also one of the bottlenecks of the optical design of angular multiplexed holographic data storage systems. To develop a practical method to evaluate the effect of vibrations, a three-dimensional vibration model is developed. The model describes the vibration effect on normalized intensity on the basis of a single statistical figure of merit. Such a single figure of merits is adopted for designing a robust and efficient write strategy, which is applicable to a wide range of vibration waveforms to increase write data transfer rate. Also, optimum optical system parameters are identified. We propose a numerical aperture of 0.572 and a pixel pitch of 6.9 µm which can improve capacity and data transfer rate without sacrificing the vibration margin.

  19. Numerical simulation of 137Cs and (239,240)Pu concentrations by an ocean general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Tsumune, Daisuke; Aoyama, Michio; Hirose, Katsumi

    2003-01-01

    We simulated the spatial distributions and the temporal variations of 137Cs and (239,240)Pu concentrations in the ocean by using the ocean general circulation model which was developed by National Center of Atmospheric Research. These nuclides are introduced into seawaters from global fallout due to atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. The distribution of radioactive deposition on the world ocean is estimated from global precipitation data and observed values of annual deposition of radionuclides at the Meteorological Research Institute in Japan and several observed points in New Zealand. Radionuclides from global fallout have been transported by advection, diffusion and scavenging, and this concentration reduces by radioactive decay in the ocean. We verified the results of the model calculations by comparing simulated values of 137Cs and (239,240)Pu in seawater with the observed values included in the Historical Artificial Radionuclides in the HAM database, which has been constructed by the Meteorological Research Institute. The vertical distributions of the calculated 137Cs concentrations were in good agreement and are in good agreement with the observed profiles in the 1960s up to 250 m, in the 1970s up to 500 m, in the 1980s up to 750 m and in the 1990s up to 750 m. However, the calculated 137Cs concentrations were underestimated compared with the observed 137Cs at the deeper layer. This may suggest other transport processes of 137Cs to deep waters. The horizontal distributions of 137Cs concentrations in surface water could be simulated. A numerical tracer release experiment was performed to explain the horizontal distribution pattern. A maximum (239,240)Pu concentration layer occurs at an intermediate depth for both observed and calculated values, which is formed by particle scavenging. The horizontal distributions of the calculated (239,240)Pu concentrations in surface water could be simulated by considering the scavenging effect.

  20. Vibration Prediction Method of Electric Machines by using Experimental Transfer Function and Magnetostatic Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, A.; Kuroishi, M.; Nakai, H.

    2016-09-01

    This paper concerns the noise and structural vibration caused by rotating electric machines. Special attention is given to the magnetic-force induced vibration response of interior-permanent magnet machines. In general, to accurately predict and control the vibration response caused by the electric machines, it is inevitable to model not only the magnetic force induced by the fluctuation of magnetic fields, but also the structural dynamic characteristics of the electric machines and surrounding structural components. However, due to complicated boundary conditions and material properties of the components, such as laminated magnetic cores and varnished windings, it has been a challenge to compute accurate vibration response caused by the electric machines even after their physical models are available. In this paper, we propose a highly-accurate vibration prediction method that couples experimentally-obtained discrete structural transfer functions and numerically-obtained distributed magnetic-forces. The proposed vibration synthesis methodology has been applied to predict vibration responses of an interior permanent magnet machine. The results show that the predicted vibration response of the electric machine agrees very well with the measured vibration response for several load conditions, for wide frequency ranges.

  1. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  2. Statistical analysis of vibration in tyres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bot, Alain; Bazari, Zakia; Klein, Philippe; Lelong, Joël

    2017-03-01

    The vibration in tyres submitted to random forces in the contact zone is investigated with the model of prestressed orthotropic plate on visco-elastic foundation. It is shown that beyond a cut-on frequency a single wave propagates whose speed is directional-dependent. A systematic numerical exploration of the governing equation solutions shows that three regimes may exist in such plates. These are modal field, diffuse field and free field. For actual tyres which present a high level of damping, the passage from low to high frequencies generally explores the modal and free field regimes but not the diffuse field regime.

  3. A numerical model for calculating vibration due to a harmonic moving load on a floating-slab track with discontinuous slabs in an underground railway tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M. F. M.; Hunt, H. E. M.

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents a new method for modelling floating-slab tracks with discontinuous slabs in underground railway tunnels. The track is subjected to a harmonic load moving with a constant velocity. The model consists of two sub-models. The first is an infinite track with periodic double-beam unit formulated as a periodic infinite structure. The second is modelled with a new version of the Pipe-in-Pipe (PiP) model that accounts for a tunnel wall embedded in a half-space. The two sub-models are coupled by writing the force transmitted from the track to the tunnel as a continuous function using Fourier series representation and satisfying the compatibility condition. The displacements at the free surface are calculated for a track with discontinuous slab and compared with those of a track with continuous slab. The results show that the far-field vibration can be significantly increased due to resonance frequencies of slabs for tracks with discontinuous slabs.

  4. Vibrational autoionization in polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Pratt, S T

    2005-01-01

    The vibrationally autoionizing Rydberg states of small polyatomic molecules provide a fascinating laboratory in which to study fundamental nonadiabatic processes. In this review, recent results on the vibrational mode dependence of vibrational autoionization are discussed. In general, autoionization rates depend strongly on the character of the normal mode driving the process and on the electronic character of the Rydberg electron. Although quantitative calculations based on multichannel quantum defect theory are available for some polyatomic molecules, including H3, only qualitative information exists for most molecules. This review shows how qualitative information, such as Walsh diagrams along different normal coordinates of the molecule, can provide insight into the vibrational autoionization rates.

  5. A numerical analysis of Stefan problems for generalized multi-dimensional phase-change structures using the enthalpy transforming model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Yiding; Faghri, Amir; Chang, Won Soon

    1989-01-01

    An enthalpy transforming scheme is proposed to convert the energy equation into a nonlinear equation with the enthalpy, E, being the single dependent variable. The existing control-volume finite-difference approach is modified so it can be applied to the numerical performance of Stefan problems. The model is tested by applying it to a three-dimensional freezing problem. The numerical results are in agreement with those existing in the literature. The model and its algorithm are further applied to a three-dimensional moving heat source problem showing that the methodology is capable of handling complicated phase-change problems with fixed grids.

  6. Automatic Generation of Analytic Equations for Vibrational and Rovibrational Constants from Fourth-Order Vibrational Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Devin A.; Gong, Justin Z.; Stanton, John F.

    2014-06-01

    The derivation of analytic expressions for vibrational and rovibrational constants, for example the anharmonicity constants χij and the vibration-rotation interaction constants α^B_r, from second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2) can be accomplished with pen and paper and some practice. However, the corresponding quantities from fourth-order perturbation theory (VPT4) are considerably more complex, with the only known derivations by hand extensively using many layers of complicated intermediates and for rotational quantities requiring specialization to orthorhombic cases or the form of Watson's reduced Hamiltonian. We present an automatic computer program for generating these expressions with full generality based on the adaptation of an existing numerical program based on the sum-over-states representation of the energy to a computer algebra context. The measures taken to produce well-simplified and factored expressions in an efficient manner are discussed, as well as the framework for automatically checking the correctness of the generated equations.

  7. 14 CFR 27.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine vibration. 27.907 Section 27.907... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 27.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b) The addition of...

  8. 14 CFR 27.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine vibration. 27.907 Section 27.907... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 27.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b) The addition of...

  9. 14 CFR 29.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine vibration. 29.907 Section 29.907... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b)...

  10. 14 CFR 29.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engine vibration. 29.907 Section 29.907... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b)...

  11. 14 CFR 29.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine vibration. 29.907 Section 29.907... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b)...

  12. 49 CFR 178.985 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.985 Section 178.985... Packagings § 178.985 Vibration test. (a) General. All rigid Large Packaging and flexible Large Packaging design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b) Test method. (1) A sample...

  13. 14 CFR 27.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engine vibration. 27.907 Section 27.907... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 27.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b) The addition of...

  14. 49 CFR 178.985 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.985 Section 178.985... Packagings § 178.985 Vibration test. (a) General. All rigid Large Packaging and flexible Large Packaging design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b) Test method. (1) A sample...

  15. 14 CFR 29.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine vibration. 29.907 Section 29.907... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b)...

  16. 14 CFR 27.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine vibration. 27.907 Section 27.907... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 27.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b) The addition of...

  17. 14 CFR 27.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine vibration. 27.907 Section 27.907... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 27.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b) The addition of...

  18. 14 CFR 29.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine vibration. 29.907 Section 29.907... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.907 Engine vibration. (a) Each engine must be installed to prevent the harmful vibration of any part of the engine or rotorcraft. (b)...

  19. 49 CFR 178.985 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.985 Section 178.985... Packagings § 178.985 Vibration test. (a) General. All rigid Large Packaging and flexible Large Packaging design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b) Test method. (1) A sample...

  20. Vibration generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lerwill, W.E.

    1980-09-16

    Apparatus for generating vibrations in a medium, such as the ground, comprises a first member which contacts the medium, means , preferably electromagnetic, which includes two relatively movable members for generating vibrations in the apparatus and means operatively connecting the said two members to said first member such that the relatively amplitudes of the movements of said three members can be adjusted to match the impedances of the apparatus and the medium.

  1. Generalized Free-Surface Effect and Random Vibration Theory: a new tool for computing moment magnitudes of small earthquakes using borehole data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malagnini, Luca; Dreger, Douglas S.

    2016-07-01

    Although optimal, computing the moment tensor solution is not always a viable option for the calculation of the size of an earthquake, especially for small events (say, below Mw 2.0). Here we show an alternative approach to the calculation of the moment-rate spectra of small earthquakes, and thus of their scalar moments, that uses a network-based calibration of crustal wave propagation. The method works best when applied to a relatively small crustal volume containing both the seismic sources and the recording sites. In this study we present the calibration of the crustal volume monitored by the High-Resolution Seismic Network (HRSN), along the San Andreas Fault (SAF) at Parkfield. After the quantification of the attenuation parameters within the crustal volume under investigation, we proceed to the spectral correction of the observed Fourier amplitude spectra for the 100 largest events in our data set. Multiple estimates of seismic moment for the all events (1811 events total) are obtained by calculating the ratio of rms-averaged spectral quantities based on the peak values of the ground velocity in the time domain, as they are observed in narrowband-filtered time-series. The mathematical operations allowing the described spectral ratios are obtained from Random Vibration Theory (RVT). Due to the optimal conditions of the HRSN, in terms of signal-to-noise ratios, our network-based calibration allows the accurate calculation of seismic moments down to Mw < 0. However, because the HRSN is equipped only with borehole instruments, we define a frequency-dependent Generalized Free-Surface Effect (GFSE), to be used instead of the usual free-surface constant F = 2. Our spectral corrections at Parkfield need a different GFSE for each side of the SAF, which can be quantified by means of the analysis of synthetic seismograms. The importance of the GFSE of borehole instruments increases for decreasing earthquake's size because for smaller earthquakes the bandwidth available

  2. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  3. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  4. The Physics of Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pippard, A. B.

    1989-11-01

    The study of vibration in physical systems is an important part of almost all fields in physics and engineering. This work, originally published in two volumes, examines the classical aspects in Part I and the quantum oscillator in Part II. The classical linear vibrator is treated first and the underlying unity of all linear oscillations in electrical, mechanical and acoustic systems is emphasized. Following this the book turns to the treatment of nonlinear vibrations, a field with which engineers and physicists are generally less familiar. In Part II the emphasis turns to quantum systems, that is those systems which can only be adequately described by quantum mechanics. The treatment concentrates on vibrations in atoms and molecules and their interaction with electromagnetic radiation. The similarities of classical and quantum methods are stressed and the limits of the classical treatment are examined. Throughout the book, each phenomenon discussed is illustrated with many examples and theory and experiment are compared. Although the reader may find that the physics discussed is demanding and the concepts are subtle in places, all mathematics used is familiar to both engineers and experimental scientists. Although not a textbook this is a useful introduction to the more advanced mathematical treatment of vibrations as it bridges the gap between the basic principles and more specialized concepts. It will be of great interest to advanced undergraduates and postgraduates as well as applied mathematicians, physicists and engineers in university and industry.

  5. Development of a numerical procedure to map a general 3-d body onto a near-circle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hommel, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Conformal mapping is a classical technique utilized for solving problems in aerodynamics and hydrodynamics. Conformal mapping is utilized in the construction of grids around airfoils, engine inlets and other aircraft configurations. These shapes are transformed onto a near-circle image for which the equations of fluid motion are discretized on the mapped plane and solved numerically by utilizing the appropriate techniques. In comparison to other grid-generation techniques such as algerbraic or differential type, conformal mapping offers an analytical and accurate form even if the grid deformation is large. One of the most appealing features is that the grid can be constrained to remain orthogonal to the body after the transformation. Hence, the grid is suitable for analyzing the supersonic flow past a blunt object. The associated shock as a coordinate surface adjusts its position in the course of computation until convergence is reached. The present work applied conformal mapping to 3-D bodies with no axis of symmetry such as the Aerobraking Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle, transforming the AFE shape onto a near-circle image. A numerical procedure and code are used to generate grids around the AFE body.

  6. Optimum vibration control of flexible beams by piezo-electric actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.

    1987-01-01

    The utilization of piezoelectric actuators in controlling the structural vibrations of flexible beams is examined. A Modified Independent Modal Space Control (MIMSC) method is devised to enable the selection of the optimal location, control gains and excitation voltage of the piezoelectric actuators in a way that would minimize the amplitudes of vibrations of beams to which these actuators are bonded, as well as the input control energy necessary to suppress these vibrations. The developed method accounts for the effects that the piezoelectric actuators have on changing the elastic and inertial properties of the flexible beams. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of the developed MIMSC method in minimizing the structural vibrations of beams of different materials when subjected to different loading and end conditions using ceramic or polymeric piezoelectric actuators. The obtained results emphasize the importance of the devised method in designing more realistic active control systems for flexible beams, in particular, and large flexible structures in general.

  7. Optimum vibration control of flexible beams by piezo-electric actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.; Studer, P.

    1988-01-01

    The utilization of piezoelectric actuators in controlling the structural vibrations of flexible beams is examined. A Modified Independent Modal Space Control (MIMSC) method is devised to enable the selection of the optimal location, control gains and excitation voltage of the piezoelectric actuators in a way that would minimize the amplitudes of vibrations of beams to which these actuators are bonded, as well as the input control energy necessary to suppress these vibrations. The developed method accounts for the effects that the piezoelectric actuators have on changing the elastic and inertial properties of the flexible beams. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of the developed MIMSC method in minimizing the structural vibrations of beams of different materials when subjected to different loading and end conditions using ceramic or polymeric piezoelectric actuators. The obtained results emphasize the importance of the devised method in designing more realistic active control systems for flexible beams, in particular, and large flexible structures in general.

  8. Parameter Reconstruction of Vibration Systems from Partial Eigeninformation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Matthew M.

    2013-01-01

    Quadratic matrix polynomials are fundamental to vibration analysis. Because of the predetermined interconnectivity among the constituent elements and the mandatory nonnegativity of the physical parameters, most given vibration systems will impose some inherent structure on the coefficients of the corresponding quadratic matrix polynomials. In the inverse problem of reconstructing a vibration system from its observed or desirable dynamical behavior, respecting the intrinsic structure becomes important and challenging both theoretically and practically. The issue of whether a structured inverse eigenvalue problem is solvable is problem dependent and has to be addressed structure by structure. In an earlier work, physical systems that can be modeled under the paradigm of a serially linked mass-spring system have been considered via specifically formulated inequality systems. In this paper, the framework is generalized to arbitrary generally linked systems. In particular, given any configuration of interconnectivity in a mass-spring system, this paper presents a mechanism that systematically and automatically generates a corresponding inequality system. A numerical approach is proposed to determine whether the inverse problem is solvable and, if it is so, computes the coefficient matrices while providing an estimate of the residual error. The most important feature of this approach is that it is problem independent, that is, the approach is general and robust for any kind of physical configuration. The ideas discussed in this paper have been implemented into a software package by which some numerical experiments are reported. PMID:23966750

  9. Experimental modeling of cavitation occurring at vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaynutdinova, D. F.; Modorskii, V. Ya.; Shevelev, N. A.

    2016-10-01

    The article investigates the problem of effects in two-stage centrifugal pumps due to hydro-gas-dynamic processes resulting from vibrations of design elements which are difficult to forecast. Numerical and experimental simulation of this problem was conducted. The experiment discovered cavitation effects brought about by the vibrations. The area of cavitations was plotted. Dependence of cavitation bubble concentration on amplitude and frequency of the vibrations was found.

  10. On the dynamics of droughts in northeast Brazil - Observations, theory and numerical experiments with a general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moura, A. D.; Shukla, J.

    1981-01-01

    The establishment of a thermally direct local circulation which has its ascending branch at about 10 deg N and its descending branch over northeast Brazil and the adjoining oceanic region is proposed as a possible mechanism for the occurrence of severe droughts over this Brazilian region. The driving for this anomalous circulation is provided by enhanced moist convection due to the effect of warmer sea surface anomalies over the northern tropical Atlantic and cooling associated with colder sea surface temperature anomalies in the southern tropical Atlantic. A simple primitive equation model is used to calculate the frictionally-controlled and thermally-driven circulation due to a prescribed heating function in a resting atmosphere, and a series of numerical experiments are carried out to test the sensitivity of the Goddard Laboratory's model to prescribed sea surface temperature anomalies over the tropical Atlantic.

  11. Electron-vibration relaxation in oxygen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporta, V.; Heritier, K. L.; Panesi, M.

    2016-06-01

    An ideal chemical reactor model is used to study the vibrational relaxation of oxygen molecules in their ground electronic state, X3Σg-, in presence of free electrons. The model accounts for vibrational non-equilibrium between the translational energy mode of the gas and the vibrational energy mode of individual molecules. The vibrational levels of the molecules are treated as separate species, allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their population. The electron and vibrational temperatures are varied in the range [0-20,000] K. Numerical results show a fast energy transfer between oxygen molecules and free electron, which causes strong deviation of the vibrational distribution function from Boltzmann distribution, both in heating and cooling conditions. Comparison with Landau-Teller model is considered showing a good agreement for electron temperature range [2000-12,000] K. Finally analytical fit of the vibrational relaxation time is given.

  12. Mechanism of Interaction between the General Anesthetic Halothane and a Model Ion Channel Protein, II: Fluorescence and Vibrational Spectroscopy Using a Cyanophenylalanine Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Strzalka, J; Tronin, A; Johansson, J; Blasie, J

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that cyano-phenylalanine (PheCN) can be utilized to probe the binding of the inhalational anesthetic halothane to an anesthetic-binding, model ion channel protein hbAP-PheCN. The Trp to PheCN mutation alters neither the a-helical conformation nor the 4-helix bundle structure. The halothane binding properties of this PheCN mutant hbAP-PheCN, based on fluorescence quenching, are consistent with those of the prototype, hbAP1. The dependence of fluorescence lifetime as a function of halothane concentration implies that the diffusion of halothane in the nonpolar core of the protein bundle is one-dimensional. As a consequence, at low halothane concentrations, the quenching of the fluorescence is dynamic, whereas at high concentrations the quenching becomes static. The 4-helix bundle structure present in aqueous detergent solution and at the air-water interface, is preserved in multilayer films of hbAP-PheCN, enabling vibrational spectroscopy of both the protein and its nitrile label (-CN). The nitrile groups' stretching vibration band shifts to higher frequency in the presence of halothane, and this blue-shift is largely reversible. Due to the complexity of this amphiphilic 4-helix bundle model membrane protein, where four PheCN probes are present adjacent to the designed cavity forming the binding site within each bundle, all contributing to the infrared absorption, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is required to interpret the infrared results. The MD simulations indicate that the blue-shift of -CN stretching vibration induced by halothane arises from an indirect effect, namely an induced change in the electrostatic protein environment averaged over the four probe oscillators, rather than a direct interaction with the oscillators. hbAP-PheCN therefore provides a successful template for extending these investigations of the interactions of halothane with the model membrane protein via vibrational spectroscopy, using cyano-alanine residues to form the

  13. Active vibration control in Duffing mechanical systems using dynamic vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán-Carbajal, F.; Silva-Navarro, G.

    2014-07-01

    This paper deals with the multi-frequency harmonic vibration suppression problem in forced Duffing mechanical systems using passive and active linear mass-spring-damper dynamic vibration absorbers. An active vibration absorption scheme is proposed to extend the vibrating energy dissipation capability of a passive dynamic vibration absorber for multiple excitation frequencies and, simultaneously, to perform reference position trajectory tracking tasks planned for the nonlinear primary system. A differential flatness-based disturbance estimation scheme is also described to estimate the unknown multiple time-varying frequency disturbance signal affecting the differentially flat nonlinear vibrating mechanical system dynamics. Some numerical simulation results are provided to show the efficient performance of the proposed active vibration absorption scheme and the fast estimation of the vibration disturbance signal.

  14. Vibration Induced Microfluidic Atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie; Qi, Aisha; Friend, James

    2008-11-01

    We demonstrate rapid generation of micron aerosol droplets in a microfluidic device in which a fluid drop is exposed to surface vibration as it sits atop a piezoelectric substrate. Little, however, is understood about the processes by which these droplets form due to the complex hydrodynamic processes that occur across widely varying length and time scales. Through experiments, scaling theory and numerical modelling, we elucidate the interfacial destabilization mechanisms that lead to droplet formation. Droplets form due to the axisymmetric break-up of cylindrical liquid jets ejected as a consequence of interfacial destabilization. Their 10 μm size correlates with the jet radius and the instability wavelength, both determined from a viscous-capillary dominant force balance and confirmed through a numerical solution. With the exception of drops that spread into thin films with thicknesses on the order of the boundary layer dimension, the free surface is always observed to vibrate at the capillary-viscous resonance frequency despite the surface vibration frequency being several orders larger. This is contrary to common assumptions used in deriving subharmonic models resulting in a Mathieu equation, which has commonly led to spurious predictions in the droplet size.

  15. High-resolution numerical simulation of Venus atmosphere by AFES (Atmospheric general circulation model For the Earth Simulator)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko; AFES project Team

    2016-10-01

    We have developed an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) for Venus on the basis of AFES (AGCM For the Earth Simulator) and performed a high-resolution simulation (e.g., Sugimoto et al., 2014a). The highest resolution is T639L120; 1920 times 960 horizontal grids (grid intervals are about 20 km) with 120 vertical layers (layer intervals are about 1 km). In the model, the atmosphere is dry and forced by the solar heating with the diurnal and semi-diurnal components. The infrared radiative process is simplified by adopting Newtonian cooling approximation. The temperature is relaxed to a prescribed horizontally uniform temperature distribution, in which a layer with almost neutral static stability observed in the Venus atmosphere presents. A fast zonal wind in a solid-body rotation is given as the initial state.Starting from this idealized superrotation, the model atmosphere reaches a quasi-equilibrium state within 1 Earth year and this state is stably maintained for more than 10 Earth years. The zonal-mean zonal flow with weak midlatitude jets has almost constant velocity of 120 m/s in latitudes between 45°S and 45°N at the cloud top levels, which agrees very well with observations. In the cloud layer, baroclinic waves develop continuously at midlatitudes and generate Rossby-type waves at the cloud top (Sugimoto et al., 2014b). At the polar region, warm polar vortex surrounded by a cold latitude band (cold collar) is well reproduced (Ando et al., 2016). As for horizontal kinetic energy spectra, divergent component is broadly (k > 10) larger than rotational component compared with that on Earth (Kashimura et al., in preparation). We will show recent results of the high-resolution run, e.g., small-scale gravity waves attributed to large-scale thermal tides. Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014a), Baroclinic modes in the Venus atmosphere simulated by GCM, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Vol. 119, p1950-1968.Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014b), Waves in a Venus general

  16. Polarization effects in the N-bar+N{yields}{pi}+l{sup +}+l{sup -} reaction: General analysis and numerical estimations

    SciTech Connect

    Gakh, G. I.; Rekalo, A. P.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Boucher, J.; Gakh, A. G.

    2011-02-15

    A general formalism is developed to calculate the cross section and the polarization observables for the reaction N-bar+N{yields}{pi}+l{sup +}+l{sup -}. The matrix element and the observables are expressed in terms of six scalar amplitudes (complex functions of three kinematical variables) that determine the reaction dynamics. The numerical predictions are given in the frame of a particular model in the kinematical range accessible in the antiproton annihilation at Darmstadt (PANDA) experiment at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR).

  17. Stress analysis of vibrating pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachwieja, Janusz

    2017-03-01

    The pipelines are subject to various constraints variable in time. Those vibrations, if not monitored for amplitude and frequency, may result in both the fatigue damage in the pipeline profile at high stress concentration and the damage to the pipeline supports. If the constraint forces are known, the system response may be determined with high accuracy using analytical or numerical methods. In most cases, it may be difficult to determine the constraint parameters, since the industrial pipeline vibrations occur due to the dynamic effects of the medium in the pipeline. In that case, a vibration analysis is a suitable alternative method to determine the stress strain state in the pipeline profile. Monitoring the pipeline vibration levels involves a comparison between the measured vibration parameters and the permissible values as depicted in the graphs for a specific pipeline type. Unfortunately, in most cases, the studies relate to the petrochemical industry and thus large diameter, long and straight pipelines. For a pipeline section supported on both ends, the response in any profile at the entire section length can be determined by measuring the vibration parameters at two different profiles between the pipeline supports. For a straight pipeline section, the bending moments, variable in time, at the ends of the analysed section are a source of the pipe excitation. If a straight pipe section supported on both ends is excited by the bending moments in the support profile, the starting point for the stress analysis are the strains, determined from the Euler-Bernoulli equation. In practice, it is easier to determine the displacement using the experimental methods, since the factors causing vibrations are unknown. The industrial system pipelines, unlike the transfer pipelines, are straight sections at some points only, which makes it more difficult to formulate the equation of motion. In those cases, numerical methods can be used to determine stresses using the

  18. Vibration of gold nanobeam with variable thermal conductivity: state-space approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, H. M.

    2013-10-01

    The non-Fourier effect in heat conduction and the coupling effect between temperature and strain rate are the two significant effects in the nanoscale beam. In the present work, the solution of vibration of gold nanobeam resonator induced by thermal shock is developed in the context of generalized thermoelasticity with variable thermal conductivity. State-space and Laplace transform methods are used to determine the lateral vibration, the temperature, the displacement, the strain, the stress, and the strain-stress energy. The numerical results have been studied and represented graphically with some comparisons to stand on the effects of the variability of thermal conductivity.

  19. Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity have fueled an explosion of progress in understanding the predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, for the strong field dynamics, the gravitational radiation wave forms, and consequently the state of the remnant produced from the merger of compact binary objects. I will review recent results from the field, focusing on mergers of two black holes.

  20. Optimal active vibration absorber: Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina; Juang, Jer-Nan; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1992-01-01

    An optimal active vibration absorber can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability and control for large flexible space structures with collocated sensors/actuators. The active vibration absorber is a second-order dynamic system which is designed to suppress any unwanted structural vibration. This can be designed with minimum knowledge of the controlled system. Two methods for optimizing the active vibration absorber parameters are illustrated: minimum resonant amplitude and frequency matched active controllers. The Controls-Structures Interaction Phase-1 Evolutionary Model at NASA LaRC is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the active vibration absorber for vibration suppression. Performance is compared numerically and experimentally using acceleration feedback.

  1. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far-field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far-field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  2. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1993-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  3. Eckart frame vibration-rotation Hamiltonians: Contravariant metric tensor

    SciTech Connect

    Pesonen, Janne

    2014-02-21

    Eckart frame is a unique embedding in the theory of molecular vibrations and rotations. It is defined by the condition that the Coriolis coupling of the reference structure of the molecule is zero for every choice of the shape coordinates. It is far from trivial to set up Eckart kinetic energy operators (KEOs), when the shape of the molecule is described by curvilinear coordinates. In order to obtain the KEO, one needs to set up the corresponding contravariant metric tensor. Here, I derive explicitly the Eckart frame rotational measuring vectors. Their inner products with themselves give the rotational elements, and their inner products with the vibrational measuring vectors (which, in the absence of constraints, are the mass-weighted gradients of the shape coordinates) give the Coriolis elements of the contravariant metric tensor. The vibrational elements are given as the inner products of the vibrational measuring vectors with themselves, and these elements do not depend on the choice of the body-frame. The present approach has the advantage that it does not depend on any particular choice of the shape coordinates, but it can be used in conjunction with all shape coordinates. Furthermore, it does not involve evaluation of covariant metric tensors, chain rules of derivation, or numerical differentiation, and it can be easily modified if there are constraints on the shape of the molecule. Both the planar and non-planar reference structures are accounted for. The present method is particular suitable for numerical work. Its computational implementation is outlined in an example, where I discuss how to evaluate vibration-rotation energies and eigenfunctions of a general N-atomic molecule, the shape of which is described by a set of local polyspherical coordinates.

  4. Reduced elbow extension torque during vibrations.

    PubMed

    Friesenbichler, Bernd; Coza, Aurel; Nigg, Benno M

    2012-08-31

    Impact sports and vibration platforms trigger vibrations within soft tissues and the skeleton. Although the long-term effects of vibrations on the body have been studied extensively, the acute effects of vibrations are little understood. This study determined the influence of acute vibrations at different frequencies and elbow angles on maximal isometric elbow extension torque and muscle activity. Vibrations were generated by a pneumatic vibrator attached to the lever of a dynamometer, and were applied on the forearm of 15 healthy female subjects. The subjects were instructed to push maximally against the lever at three different elbow angles, while extension torque and muscle activity were quantified and compared between vibration and non-vibration (control) conditions. A change in vibration frequency had no significant effects on torque and muscle activity although vibrations in general decreased the maximal extension torque relative to the control by 1.8% (±5.7%, p>0.05), 7.4% (±7.9%, p<0.01), and 5.0% (±8.2%, p<0.01) at elbow angles of 60°, 90°, and 120°, respectively. Electromyographic activity increased significantly between ∼30% and 40% in both triceps and biceps with vibrations. It is speculated that a similar increase in muscle activity between agonist and antagonist, in combination with an unequal increase in muscle moment arms about the elbow joint, limit the maximal extension torque during exposure to vibrations. This study showed that maximal extension torque decreased during vibration exposure while muscle activity increased and suggests that vibrations may be counterproductive during activities requiring maximal strength but potentially beneficial for strength training.

  5. Vibrational Control of a Nonlinear Elastic Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, P. L.; Maestrello, L.

    1998-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the stabilization of the nonlinear panel oscillation by an active control. The control is actuated by a combination of additive and parametric vibrational forces. A general method of vibrational control is presented for stabilizing panel vibration satisfying a nonlinear beam equation. To obtain analytical results, a perturbation technique is used in the case of weak nonlinearity. Possible application to other types of problems is briefly discussed.

  6. Meshfree natural vibration analysis of 2D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosta, Tomislav; Tsukanov, Igor

    2014-02-01

    Determination of resonance frequencies and vibration modes of mechanical structures is one of the most important tasks in the product design procedure. The main goal of this paper is to describe a pioneering application of the solution structure method (SSM) to 2D structural natural vibration analysis problems and investigate the numerical properties of the method. SSM is a meshfree method which enables construction of the solutions to the engineering problems that satisfy exactly all prescribed boundary conditions. This method is capable of using spatial meshes that do not conform to the shape of a geometric model. Instead of using the grid nodes to enforce boundary conditions, it employs distance fields to the geometric boundaries and combines them with the basis functions and prescribed boundary conditions at run time. This defines unprecedented geometric flexibility of the SSM as well as the complete automation of the solution procedure. In the paper we will explain the key points of the SSM as well as investigate the accuracy and convergence of the proposed approach by comparing our results with the ones obtained using analytical methods or traditional finite element analysis. Despite in this paper we are dealing with 2D in-plane vibrations, the proposed approach has a straightforward generalization to model vibrations of 3D structures.

  7. Vibrational dynamics of DNA. I. Vibrational basis modes and couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chewook; Park, Kwang-Hee; Cho, Minhaeng

    2006-09-01

    Carrying out density functional theory calculations of four DNA bases, base derivatives, Watson-Crick (WC) base pairs, and multiple-layer base pair stacks, we studied vibrational dynamics of delocalized modes with frequency ranging from 1400to1800cm-1. These modes have been found to be highly sensitive to structure fluctuation and base pair conformation of DNA. By identifying eight fundamental basis modes, it is shown that the normal modes of base pairs and multilayer base pair stacks can be described by linear combinations of these vibrational basis modes. By using the Hessian matrix reconstruction method, vibrational coupling constants between the basis modes are determined for WC base pairs and multilayer systems and are found to be most strongly affected by the hydrogen bonding interaction between bases. It is also found that the propeller twist and buckle motions do not strongly affect vibrational couplings and basis mode frequencies. Numerically simulated IR spectra of guanine-cytosine and adenine-thymine bases pairs as well as of multilayer base pair stacks are presented and described in terms of coupled basis modes. It turns out that, due to the small interlayer base-base vibrational interactions, the IR absorption spectrum of multilayer base pair system does not strongly depend on the number of base pairs.

  8. The analysis of nonstationary vibration data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, Allan G.

    1987-01-01

    The general methodology for the analysis of arbitrary nonstationary random data is reviewed. A specific parametric model, called the product model, that has applications to space vehicle launch vibration data analysis is discussed. Illustrations are given using the nonstationary launch vibration data measured on the Space Shuttle orbiter vehicle.

  9. Vibrational Properties of Hydrogen-Bonded Systems Using the Multireference Generalization to the "On-the-Fly" Electronic Structure within Quantum Wavepacket ab Initio Molecular Dynamics (QWAIMD).

    PubMed

    Li, Junjie; Li, Xiaohu; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2014-06-10

    agreement with experiments. Spectroscopic features are computed using a unified velocity/flux autocorrelation function and include vibrational fundamentals and combination bands. These agree well with experiments and other theories.

  10. Nonlinear vibration of moderately thick anti-symmetric angle-ply shallow spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, C. Y.; Chia, D. S.

    1992-08-01

    Equations of motion for the large-amplitude flexural vibration of an anti-symmetrically laminated angle-ply shallow spherical shell with rectangular planform are derived by use of Hamilton's principle. The effects of transverse shear and rotatory inertia are included in this study. A solution is formulated in the form of generalized double Fourier series with time-dependent coefficients and satisfies the five boundary conditions along each of simply supported edges. The Galerkin procedure furnishes an infinite system of ordinary differential equations for the time-dependent coefficients. These equations can be truncated to obtain any desired degree of accuracy. The method of harmonic balance is used for a solution. Numerical results for nonlinear free vibrations of isotropic, orthotropic and laminated shallow shells are presented graphically for various shell parameters and lamination geometries. The transverse shear effect on the shell frequency of vibration is discussed in some detail.

  11. Maneuver and vibration control of flexible manipulators using variable-speed control moment gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Quan; Zhang, Jingrui

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the variable-speed control moment gyros (VS-CMGs) are adopted as actuators for vibration suppression of space flexible manipulators. They are directly mounted on the flexible links of the manipulator. Such system can be viewed as a flexible multibody system in chain topology actuated by both joint motors and VS-CMGs. We first develop a general approach for establishing the system equations of motion through Kane's method. Then, two controllers are designed for trajectory tracking and vibration suppression: one is an inverse dynamics control, whereas the other is based on the singular perturbation method. The proposed two control strategies are applied to a free-flying platform with a flexible manipulator. Sample numerical results show that the VS-CMGs can significantly suppress the induced vibration of the flexible links during the large angle maneuver.

  12. Chaotic vortex induced vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Sheridan, J.; Leontini, J. S.; Lo Jacono, D.

    2014-12-15

    This study investigates the nature of the dynamic response of an elastically mounted cylinder immersed in a free stream. A novel method is utilized, where the motion of the body during a free vibration experiment is accurately recorded, and then a second experiment is conducted where the cylinder is externally forced to follow this recorded trajectory. Generally, the flow response during both experiments is identical. However, particular regimes exist where the flow response is significantly different. This is taken as evidence of chaos in these regimes.

  13. Active control of high-frequency vibration: Optimisation using the hybrid modelling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthalif, Asan G. A.; Langley, Robin S.

    2012-06-01

    This work presents active control of high-frequency vibration using skyhook dampers. The choice of the damper gain and its optimal location is crucial for the effective implementation of active vibration control. In vibration control, certain sensor/actuator locations are preferable for reducing structural vibration while using minimum control effort. In order to perform optimisation on a general built-up structure to control vibration, it is necessary to have a good modelling technique to predict the performance of the controller. The present work exploits the hybrid modelling approach, which combines the finite element method (FEM) and statistical energy analysis (SEA) to provide efficient response predictions at medium to high frequencies. The hybrid method is implemented here for a general network of plates, coupled via springs, to allow study of a variety of generic control design problems. By combining the hybrid method with numerical optimisation using a genetic algorithm, optimal skyhook damper gains and locations are obtained. The optimal controller gain and location found from the hybrid method are compared with results from a deterministic modelling method. Good agreement between the results is observed, whereas results from the hybrid method are found in a significantly reduced amount of time.

  14. In-plane vibration analysis of annular plates with arbitrary boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianjie; Shi, Dongyan; Qin, Zhengrong; Wang, Qingshan

    2014-01-01

    In comparison with the out-of-plane vibrations of annular plates, far less attention has been paid to the in-plane vibrations which may also play a vital important role in affecting the sound radiation from and power flows in a built-up structure. In this investigation, a generalized Fourier series method is proposed for the in-plane vibration analysis of annular plates with arbitrary boundary conditions along each of its edges. Regardless of the boundary conditions, the in-plane displacement fields are invariantly expressed as a new form of trigonometric series expansions with a drastically improved convergence as compared with the conventional Fourier series. All the unknown expansion coefficients are treated as the generalized coordinates and determined using the Rayleigh-Ritz technique. Unlike most of the existing studies, the presented method can be readily and universally applied to a wide spectrum of in-plane vibration problems involving different boundary conditions, varying material, and geometric properties with no need of modifying the basic functions or adapting solution procedures. Several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and reliability of the current solution for predicting the in-plane vibration characteristics of annular plates subjected to different boundary conditions.

  15. Decoherence by coupling to internal vibrational modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Todd A.; Mlodinow, Leonard

    2016-11-01

    We consider a composite system consisting of coupled particles, and investigate decoherence due to coupling of the center-of-mass degree of freedom to the internal vibrational degrees of freedom. For a composite system of bound particles, we show that in general such a decoherence effect exists, and leads to suppression of interference between different paths of the center-of-mass. For the special case of harmonically-bound particles moving in an external potential, we show that the coupling between the center-of-mass and internal degrees of freedom takes the form of parametric driving of the vibrational degrees of freedom, and that nontrivial coupling depends on the second derivative of the external potential. We find a solution to this parametric driving problem in one dimension for a fixed center-of-mass trajectory. We also propose a measure of compositeness, which quantifies the extent to which such a composite system cannot be approximated as a single, indivisible particle. We perform numerical simulations for a simple interference experiment, consisting of two wave packets scattering off of a square well, and show a close connection between suppression of interference and entanglement between the center-of-mass and internal degrees of freedom, which depends on the initial state of the internal mode. We also calculate the measure of compositeness for this system.

  16. Systematic vibration thermodynamic properties of bromine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G. Y.; Sun, W. G.; Liao, B. T.

    2015-11-01

    Based on the analysis of the maturity and finiteness of vibrational levels of bromine molecule in ground state and evaluating the effect on statistical computation, according to the elementary principles of quantum statistical theorem, using the full set of bromine molecular vibrational levels determined with algebra method, the statistical contribution for bromine systematical macroscopic thermodynamic properties is discussed. Thermodynamic state functions Helmholtz free energy, entropy and observable vibration heat capacity are calculated. The results show that the determination of full set of vibrational levels and maximum vibrational quantum number is the key in the correct statistical analysis of bromine systematical thermodynamic property. Algebra method results are clearly different from data of simple harmonic oscillator and the related algebra method results are no longer analytical but numerical and are superior to simple harmonic oscillator results. Compared with simple harmonic oscillator's heat capacities, the algebra method's heat capacities are more consistent with the experimental data in the given temperature range of 600-2100 K.

  17. Analytical and experimental study of vibrations in a gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Ruan, Y. F.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Oswald, Fred B.; Coy, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical simulation of the dynamics of a gear transmission system is presented and compared to experimental results from a gear noise test rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The analytical procedure developed couples the dynamic behaviors of the rotor-bearing-gear system with the response of the gearbox structure. The modal synthesis method is used in solving the overall dynamics of the system. Locally each rotor-gear stage is modeled as an individual rotor-bearing system using the matrix transfer technique. The dynamics of each individual rotor are coupled with other rotor stages through the nonlinear gear mesh forces and with the gearbox structure through bearing support systems. The modal characteristics of the gearbox structure are evaluated using the finite element procedure. A variable time steping integration routine is used to calculate the overall time transient behavior of the system in modal coordinates. The global dynamic behavior of the system is expressed in a generalized coordinate system. Transient and steady state vibrations of the gearbox system are presented in the time and frequency domains. The vibration characteristics of a simple single mesh gear noise test rig is modeled. The numerical simulations are compared to experimental data measured under typical operating conditions. The comparison of system natural frequencies, peak vibration amplitudes, and gear mesh frequencies are generally in good agreement.

  18. Noncontact Electromagnetic Vibration Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Fulton, James P.; Wincheski, Buzz A.

    1994-01-01

    Metal aircraft skins scanned rapidly in vibration tests. Relatively simple combination of permanent magnets and electromagnet serves as noncontact vibration source for nondestructive testing of metal aircraft skins. In test, source excites vibrations, and vibration waveforms measured, then analyzed for changes in resonances signifying cracks and other flaws.

  19. Vibration and noise analysis of a gear transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Qian, W.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Oswald, F. B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive procedure to predict both the vibration and noise generated by a gear transmission system under normal operating conditions. The gearbox vibrations were obtained from both numerical simulation and experimental studies using a gear noise test rig. In addition, the noise generated by the gearbox vibrations was recorded during the experimental testing. A numerical method was used to develop linear relationships between the gearbox vibration and the generated noise. The hypercoherence function is introduced to correlate the nonlinear relationship between the fundamental noise frequency and its harmonics. A numerical procedure was developed using both the linear and nonlinear relationships generated from the experimental data to predict noise resulting from the gearbox vibrations. The application of this methodology is demonstrated by comparing the numerical and experimental results from the gear noise test rig.

  20. Mass and position determination of an accreted particle from the vibration of a beam-based nanomechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shujun; Xiu, Qiang

    2017-02-01

    We present a generalized theoretical analysis of the vibration of a micro/nano bridge resonator with a particle at an arbitrary location by considering the combined effect of the beam stiffness and string tension in the resonator. By combining resonant frequencies of at most three consecutive symmetric vibration modes, the developed model can unambiguously resolve the particle mass and position. The methodology is verified using published results. The finding is further validated numerically by finite element modeling using a microbridge with and without an added particle, which proves that the method resolves the particle mass and position with high accuracy.

  1. Numerical integration of gravitational field for general three-dimensional objects and its application to gravitational study of grand design spiral arm structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2016-12-01

    We present a method to integrate the gravitational field for general three-dimensional objects. By adopting the spherical polar coordinates centred at the evaluation point as the integration variables, we numerically compute the volume integral representation of the gravitational potential and of the acceleration vector. The variable transformation completely removes the algebraic singularities of the original integrals. The comparison with exact solutions reveals around 15 digits accuracy of the new method. Meanwhile, the six digit accuracy of the integrated gravitational field is realized by around 106 evaluations of the integrand per evaluation point, which costs at most a few seconds at a PC with Intel Core i7-4600U CPU running at 2.10 GHz clock. By using the new method, we show the gravitational field of a grand design spiral arm structure as an example. The computed gravitational field shows not only spiral shaped details but also a global feature composed of a thick oblate spheroid and a thin disc. The developed method is directly applicable to the electromagnetic field computation by means of Coulomb's law, the Biot-Savart law, and their retarded extensions. Sample FORTRAN 90 programs and test results are electronically available.

  2. LSENS: A General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code for homogeneous gas-phase reactions. Part 1: Theory and numerical solution procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan

    1994-01-01

    LSENS, the Lewis General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems and contains sensitivity analysis for a variety of problems, including nonisothermal situations. This report is part 1 of a series of three reference publications that describe LENS, provide a detailed guide to its usage, and present many example problems. Part 1 derives the governing equations and describes the numerical solution procedures for the types of problems that can be solved. The accuracy and efficiency of LSENS are examined by means of various test problems, and comparisons with other methods and codes are presented. LSENS is a flexible, convenient, accurate, and efficient solver for chemical reaction problems such as static system; steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow; reaction behind incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; and perfectly stirred (highly backmixed) reactor. In addition, the chemical equilibrium state can be computed for the following assigned states: temperature and pressure, enthalpy and pressure, temperature and volume, and internal energy and volume. For static problems the code computes the sensitivity coefficients of the dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of the dependent variables and/or the three rate coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions.

  3. Aeolic vibration of aerial electricity transmission cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, A.; Rodriguez-Vera, Ramon; Rayas, Juan A.; Barrientos, Bernardino

    2005-02-01

    A feasibility study for amplitude and frequency vibration measurement in aerial electricity transmission cable has been made. This study was carried out incorporating a fringe projection method for the experimental part and horizontal taut string model for theoretical one. However, this kind of model ignores some inherent properties such as cable sag and cable inclination. Then, this work reports advances on aeolic vibration considering real cables. Catenary and sag are considered in our theoretical model in such a way that an optical theodolite for measuring has been used. Preliminary measurements of the catenary as well as numerical simulation of a sagged cable vibration are given.

  4. Numerical analysis of stiffened shells of revolution. Volume 3: Users' manual for STARS-2B, 2V, shell theory automated for rotational structures, 2 (buckling, vibrations), digital computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalbonas, V.

    1973-01-01

    The User's manual for the shell theory automated for rotational structures (STARS) 2B and 2V (buckling, vibrations) is presented. Several features of the program are: (1) arbitrary branching of the shell meridians, (2) arbitrary boundary conditions, (3) minimum input requirements to describe a complex, practical shell of revolution structure, and (4) accurate analysis capability using a minimum number of degrees of freedom.

  5. Vibrational force constants for acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, B.

    1990-05-01

    The vibrational force field of ethanal (acetaldehyde), CH 3CHO, is refined by using procedures with differential increments for the force constants (Commun. Dep. Chem., Bulg. Acad. Sci., 21/3 (1988) 433). The characteristics general valence force constants of the high-dimensional symmetry classes of ethanal, A' of tenth and A″ of fifth order, are determined for the experimental assignment of bands. The low barrier to hindered internal rotation about the single carbon—carbon bond is quantitatively estimated on the grounds of normal vibrational analysis.

  6. Radial vibrations of BPS skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Haberichter, M.; Romanczukiewicz, T.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2016-11-01

    We study radial vibrations of spherically symmetric Skyrmions in the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Skyrme model. Concretely, we numerically solve the linearized field equations for small fluctuations in a Skyrmion background, both for linearly stable oscillations and for (unstable) resonances. This is complemented by numerical solutions of the full nonlinear system, which confirm all the results of the linear analysis. In all cases, the resulting fundamental excitation provides a rather accurate value for the Roper resonance, supporting the hypothesis that the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Skyrme model already gives a reasonable approximate description of this resonance. Furthermore, for many potentials additional higher resonances appear, again in agreement with known experimental results.

  7. Tunneling ionization of vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornev, Aleksei S.; Zon, Boris A.

    2015-09-01

    Ionization of molecular nitrogen plays an important role in the process of light-filament formation in air. In the present paper we theoretically investigated tunneling ionization of the valence 3 σg and 1 πu shells in a N2 molecule using a strong near-infrared laser field. This research is based on our previously proposed theory of anti-Stokes-enhanced tunneling ionization with quantum accounting for the vibrationally excited states of the molecules [A. S. Kornev and B. A. Zon, Phys. Rev. A 86, 043401 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.043401]. We demonstrated that if the N2 molecule is ionized from the ground vibrational state, then the contribution of the 1 πu orbital is 0.5%. In contrast, for vibrationally excited states with a certain angle between the light polarization vector and the molecule axis, both shells can compete and even reverse their contributions due to the anti-Stokes mechanism. The structure constants of molecular orbitals are extracted from numerical solutions to the Hartree-Fock equations. This approach correctly takes into account the exchange interaction. Quantum consideration of vibrational motion results in the occurrence of the critical vibrational state, the tunneling ionization from which has the maximum rate. The numbers of the critical vibrational states are different for different valence shells. In addition, quantum description of vibrations changes the rate of ionization from the ground vibrational state by 20%-40% in comparison with the quasiclassical results.

  8. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors.

    PubMed

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Solarz, Lech; Steczko, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  9. Vibration driven random walk in a Chladni experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabec, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Drifting of sand particles bouncing on a vibrating membrane of a Chladni experiment is characterized statistically. Records of trajectories reveal that bounces are circularly distributed and random. The mean length of their horizontal displacement is approximately proportional to the vibration amplitude above the critical level and amounts about one fourth of the corresponding bounce height. For the description of horizontal drifting of particles a model of vibration driven random walk is proposed that yields a good agreement between experimental and numerically simulated data.

  10. Non-Linear Vibration Characteristics of Clamped Laminated Shallow Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ABE, A.; KOBAYASHI, Y.; YAMADA, G.

    2000-07-01

    This paper examines non-linear free vibration characteristics of first and second vibration modes of laminated shallow shells with rigidly clamped edges. Non-linear equations of motion for the shells based on the first order shear deformation and classical shell theories are derived by means of Hamilton's principle. We apply Galerkin's procedure to the equations of motion in which eigenvectors for first and second modes of linear vibration obtained by the Ritz method are employed as trial functions. Then simultaneous non-linear ordinary differential equations are derived in terms of amplitudes of the first and second vibration modes. Backbone curves for the first and second vibration modes are solved numerically by the Gauss-Legendre integration method and the shooting method respectively. The effects of lamination sequences and transverse shear deformation on the behavior are discussed. It is also shown that the motion of the first vibration mode affects the response for the second vibration mode.

  11. Analytic calculations of anharmonic infrared and Raman vibrational spectra.

    PubMed

    Cornaton, Yann; Ringholm, Magnus; Louant, Orian; Ruud, Kenneth

    2016-02-07

    Using a recently developed recursive scheme for the calculation of high-order geometric derivatives of frequency-dependent molecular properties [Ringholm et al., J. Comp. Chem., 2014, 35, 622], we present the first analytic calculations of anharmonic infrared (IR) and Raman spectra including anharmonicity both in the vibrational frequencies and in the IR and Raman intensities. In the case of anharmonic corrections to the Raman intensities, this involves the calculation of fifth-order energy derivatives-that is, the third-order geometric derivatives of the frequency-dependent polarizability. The approach is applicable to both Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham density functional theory. Using generalized vibrational perturbation theory to second order, we have calculated the anharmonic infrared and Raman spectra of the non- and partially deuterated isotopomers of nitromethane, where the inclusion of anharmonic effects introduces combination and overtone bands that are observed in the experimental spectra. For the major features of the spectra, the inclusion of anharmonicities in the calculation of the vibrational frequencies is more important than anharmonic effects in the calculated infrared and Raman intensities. Using methanimine as a trial system, we demonstrate that the analytic approach avoids errors in the calculated spectra that may arise if numerical differentiation schemes are used.

  12. Analytic calculations of anharmonic infrared and Raman vibrational spectra

    PubMed Central

    Louant, Orian; Ruud, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Using a recently developed recursive scheme for the calculation of high-order geometric derivatives of frequency-dependent molecular properties [Ringholm et al., J. Comp. Chem., 2014, 35, 622], we present the first analytic calculations of anharmonic infrared (IR) and Raman spectra including anharmonicity both in the vibrational frequencies and in the IR and Raman intensities. In the case of anharmonic corrections to the Raman intensities, this involves the calculation of fifth-order energy derivatives—that is, the third-order geometric derivatives of the frequency-dependent polarizability. The approach is applicable to both Hartree–Fock and Kohn–Sham density functional theory. Using generalized vibrational perturbation theory to second order, we have calculated the anharmonic infrared and Raman spectra of the non- and partially deuterated isotopomers of nitromethane, where the inclusion of anharmonic effects introduces combination and overtone bands that are observed in the experimental spectra. For the major features of the spectra, the inclusion of anharmonicities in the calculation of the vibrational frequencies is more important than anharmonic effects in the calculated infrared and Raman intensities. Using methanimine as a trial system, we demonstrate that the analytic approach avoids errors in the calculated spectra that may arise if numerical differentiation schemes are used. PMID:26784673

  13. Portable vibration exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beecher, L. C.; Williams, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-driven vibration exciter produces a sinusoidal excitation function controllable in frequency and in amplitude. It allows direct vibration testing of components under normal loads, removing the possibility of component damage due to high static pressure.

  14. INS3D - NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF THE INCOMPRESSIBLE NAVIER-STOKES EQUATIONS IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL GENERALIZED CURVILINEAR COORDINATES (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.

    1994-01-01

    INS3D computes steady-state solutions to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The INS3D approach utilizes pseudo-compressibility combined with an approximate factorization scheme. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code has been verified on problems such as flow through a channel, flow over a backwardfacing step and flow over a circular cylinder. Three dimensional cases include flow over an ogive cylinder, flow through a rectangular duct, wind tunnel inlet flow, cylinder-wall juncture flow and flow through multiple posts mounted between two plates. INS3D uses a pseudo-compressibility approach in which a time derivative of pressure is added to the continuity equation, which together with the momentum equations form a set of four equations with pressure and velocity as the dependent variables. The equations' coordinates are transformed for general three dimensional applications. The equations are advanced in time by the implicit, non-iterative, approximately-factored, finite-difference scheme of Beam and Warming. The numerical stability of the scheme depends on the use of higher-order smoothing terms to damp out higher-frequency oscillations caused by second-order central differencing. The artificial compressibility introduces pressure (sound) waves of finite speed (whereas the speed of sound would be infinite in an incompressible fluid). As the solution converges, these pressure waves die out, causing the derivation of pressure with respect to time to approach zero. Thus, continuity is satisfied for the incompressible fluid in the steady state. Computational efficiency is achieved using a diagonal algorithm. A block tri-diagonal option is also available. When a steady-state solution is reached, the modified continuity equation will satisfy the divergence-free velocity field condition. INS3D is capable of handling several different types of boundaries encountered in numerical simulations, including solid-surface, inflow and outflow, and far

  15. INS3D - NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF THE INCOMPRESSIBLE NAVIER-STOKES EQUATIONS IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL GENERALIZED CURVILINEAR COORDINATES (DEC RISC ULTRIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biyabani, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    INS3D computes steady-state solutions to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The INS3D approach utilizes pseudo-compressibility combined with an approximate factorization scheme. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code has been verified on problems such as flow through a channel, flow over a backwardfacing step and flow over a circular cylinder. Three dimensional cases include flow over an ogive cylinder, flow through a rectangular duct, wind tunnel inlet flow, cylinder-wall juncture flow and flow through multiple posts mounted between two plates. INS3D uses a pseudo-compressibility approach in which a time derivative of pressure is added to the continuity equation, which together with the momentum equations form a set of four equations with pressure and velocity as the dependent variables. The equations' coordinates are transformed for general three dimensional applications. The equations are advanced in time by the implicit, non-iterative, approximately-factored, finite-difference scheme of Beam and Warming. The numerical stability of the scheme depends on the use of higher-order smoothing terms to damp out higher-frequency oscillations caused by second-order central differencing. The artificial compressibility introduces pressure (sound) waves of finite speed (whereas the speed of sound would be infinite in an incompressible fluid). As the solution converges, these pressure waves die out, causing the derivation of pressure with respect to time to approach zero. Thus, continuity is satisfied for the incompressible fluid in the steady state. Computational efficiency is achieved using a diagonal algorithm. A block tri-diagonal option is also available. When a steady-state solution is reached, the modified continuity equation will satisfy the divergence-free velocity field condition. INS3D is capable of handling several different types of boundaries encountered in numerical simulations, including solid-surface, inflow and outflow, and far

  16. The spectrum of vibration modes in soft opals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, W; Wang, J J; Jonas, U; Steffen, W; Fytas, G; Penciu, R S; Economou, E N

    2005-09-22

    Numerous vibrational modes of spherical submicrometer particles in fabricated soft opals are experimentally detected by Brillouin light scattering and theoretically identified by their spherical harmonics by means of single-phonon scattering-cross-section calculations. The particle size polydispersity is reflected in the line shape of the low-frequency modes, whereas lattice vibrations are probably responsible for the observed overdamped transverse mode.

  17. Tunable Passive Vibration Suppressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boechler, Nicholas (Inventor); Dillon, Robert Peter (Inventor); Daraio, Chiara (Inventor); Davis, Gregory L. (Inventor); Shapiro, Andrew A. (Inventor); Borgonia, John Paul C. (Inventor); Kahn, Daniel Louis (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An apparatus and method for vibration suppression using a granular particle chain. The granular particle chain is statically compressed and the end particles of the chain are attached to a payload and vibration source. The properties of the granular particles along with the amount of static compression are chosen to provide desired filtering of vibrations.

  18. Hermetically sealed vibration damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, D. G.

    1969-01-01

    Simple fluidic vibration damper for installation at each pivotal mounting between gimbals isolates inertial measuring units from external vibration and other disruptive forces. Installation between each of the three gimbal axes can dampen vibration and shock in any direction while permitting free rotation of the gimbals.

  19. Magnetically levitated autoparametric broadband vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmann, L.; Jia, Y.; Manoli, Y.; Woias, P.

    2016-11-01

    Some of the lingering challenges within the current paradigm of vibration energy harvesting (VEH) involve narrow operational frequency range and the inevitable non-resonant response from broadband noise excitations. Such VEHs are only suitable for limited applications with fixed sinusoidal vibration, and fail to capture a large spectrum of the real world vibration. Various arraying designs, frequency tuning schemes and nonlinear vibratory approaches have only yielded modest enhancements. To fundamentally address this, the paper proposes and explores the potentials in using highly nonlinear magnetic spring force to activate an autoparametric oscillator, in order to realize an inherently broadband resonant system. Analytical and numerical modelling illustrate that high spring nonlinearity derived from magnetic levitation helps to promote the 2:1 internal frequency matching required to activate parametric resonance. At the right internal parameters, the resulting system can intrinsically exhibit semi-resonant response regardless of the bandwidth of the input vibration, including broadband white noise excitation.

  20. Vibration-translation energy transfer in vibrationally excited diatomic molecules. Ph.D. Thesis - York Univ., Toronto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A semiclassical collision model is applied to the study of energy transfer rates between a vibrationally excited diatomic molecule and a structureless atom. The molecule is modeled as an anharmonic oscillator with a multitude of dynamically coupled vibrational states. Three main aspects in the prediction of vibrational energy transfer rates are considered. The applicability of the semiclassical model to an anharmonic oscillator is first evaluated for collinear encounters. Second, the collinear semiclassical model is applied to obtain numerical predictions of the vibrational energy transfer rate dependence on the initial vibrational state quantum number. Thermally averaged vibration-translation rate coefficients are predicted and compared with CO-He experimental values for both ground and excited initial states. The numerical model is also used as a basis for evaluating several less complete but analytic models. Third, the role of rational motion in the dynamics of vibrational energy transfer is examined. A three-dimensional semiclassical collision model is constructed with coupled rotational motion included. Energy transfer within the molecule is shown to be dominated by vibration-rotation transitions with small changes in angular momentum. The rates of vibrational energy transfer in molecules with rational frequencies that are very small in comparison to their vibrational frequency are shown to be adequately treated by the preceding collinear models.

  1. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  2. The nonlinear piezoelectric tuned vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, P.; Kerschen, G.

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a piezoelectric vibration absorber, termed the nonlinear piezoelectric tuned vibration absorber (NPTVA), for the mitigation of nonlinear resonances of mechanical systems. The new feature of the NPTVA is that its nonlinear restoring force is designed according to a principle of similarity, i.e., the NPTVA should be an electrical analog of the nonlinear host system. Analytical formulas for the NPTVA parameters are derived using the homotopy perturbation method. Doing so, a nonlinear generalization of Den Hartog’s equal-peak tuning rule is developed for piezoelectric vibration absorbers.

  3. Direct simulation with vibration-dissociation coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, David B.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    The majority of implementations of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird do not account for vibration-dissociation coupling. Haas and Boyd have proposed the vibrationally-favored dissociation model to accomplish this task. This model requires measurements of induction distance to determine model constants. A more general expression has been derived that does not require any experimental input. The model is used to calculate one-dimensional shock waves in nitrogen and the flow past a lunar transfer vehicle (LTV). For the conditions considered in the simulation, the influence of vibration-dissociation coupling on heat transfer in the stagnation region of the LTV can be significant.

  4. On the non-linear vibrations of a projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, P. C.; Sharma, S. M.

    1981-08-01

    The Nonlinear Magnus effect on the nutational oscillations of a missile has been studied. In particular the existence of self-sustained vibrations has been proved. A numerical method is suggested to obtain the limit cycles wherever they exist.

  5. [Occupational therapy for work-related damage induced by mechanical vibration].

    PubMed

    Foti, C; Ciocchetti, E; Antignani, E; Pitruzzella, M; Laurini, A

    2010-01-01

    Vibrations are defined as repeated oscillatory movements of a body; they can be transmitted by contact to humans. From the point of view of physics, vibrations can be differentiated on the basis of frequency, wavelength, amplitude of the oscillation, velocity and acceleration. As far as concerns occupational hazards, two risk factors have been identified: the first involves low frequency vibrations (vehicle drivers), while the second involves high frequency vibrations (manual percussion tools). The transmission of vibration energy can be localized or generalized. Tertiary prevention of exposure to vibrations is based on the use of anti-vibration gloves (for vibrations of the hand and arm) and on anti-vibration shoes (for vibrations of the whole body). The damage caused by vibrations is due to reduced blood circulation and mechanical stimulation in the joints exposed.

  6. Active structures to reduce torsional vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthias, M.; Schlote, D.; Atzrodt, H.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development of different active measures to reduce torsional vibrations in power trains. The measures are based on concepts developed for active mounts to reduce the transmission of structure-borne sound. To show the potential of these active measures and investigate their mode of operation to influence torsional vibrations, numerical simulations of powertrains with different active measures were done. First experimental results from tests on an experimental (reduced size) power train were used to align the numerical models. The work was done within the project 'LOEWE-Zentrum AdRIA: Adaptronik - Research, Innovation, Application' funded by the German federal state of Hessen, and the Project AKTos: 'Active control of torsional vibrations by coupling elements' placed in the research Framework program 'Navigation and Maritime Technology for the 21st Century' funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

  7. Characteristics of steady vibration in a rotating hub-beam system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhen; Liu, Caishan; Ma, Wei

    2016-02-01

    A rotating beam features a puzzling character in which its frequencies and modal shapes may vary with the hub's inertia and its rotating speed. To highlight the essential nature behind the vibration phenomena, we analyze the steady vibration of a rotating Euler-Bernoulli beam with a quasi-steady-state stretch. Newton's law is used to derive the equations governing the beam's elastic motion and the hub's rotation. A combination of these equations results in a nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) that fully reflects the mutual interaction between the two kinds of motion. Via the Fourier series expansion within a finite interval of time, we reduce the PDE into an infinite system of a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) in spatial domain. We further nondimensionalize the ODE and discretize it via a difference method. The frequencies and modal shapes of a general rotating beam are then determined numerically. For a low-speed beam where the ignorance of geometric stiffening is feasible, the beam's vibration characteristics are solved analytically. We validate our numerical method and the analytical solutions by comparing with either the past experiments or the past numerical findings reported in existing literature. Finally, systematic simulations are performed to demonstrate how the beam's eigenfrequencies vary with the hub's inertia and rotating speed.

  8. Anti-vibration gloves?

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sue; Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    For exposure to hand-transmitted vibration (HTV), personal protective equipment is sold in the form of anti-vibration (AV) gloves, but it remains unclear how much these gloves actually reduce vibration exposure or prevent the development of hand-arm vibration syndrome in the workplace. This commentary describes some of the issues that surround the classification of AV gloves, the assessment of their effectiveness and their applicability in the workplace. The available information shows that AV gloves are unreliable as devices for controlling HTV exposures. Other means of vibration control, such as using alternative production techniques, low-vibration machinery, routine preventative maintenance regimes, and controlling exposure durations are far more likely to deliver effective vibration reductions and should be implemented. Furthermore, AV gloves may introduce some adverse effects such as increasing grip force and reducing manual dexterity. Therefore, one should balance the benefits of AV gloves and their potential adverse effects if their use is considered.

  9. Prediction of vibrations induced by underground railway traffic in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Liu, W. F.; Degrande, G.; Lombaert, G.; Liu, W. N.

    2008-02-01

    This paper examines the problem of subway induced vibrations on line 4 of Beijing metro, which is currently under construction and is planned to pass in close proximity of the Physics Laboratory of Beijing University. The laboratory has a lot of equipment that is very sensitive to traffic induced vibrations and future operation of metro line 4 is a matter of concern. Hence, it is important to study the influence of subway induced vibrations inside the laboratory and to propose a viable solution to mitigate the vibrations. In this paper, the tunnel north of Chengfulu station is modelled using a coupled periodic FE-BE model and the free-field response due to moving trains is predicted. In addition, vibration measurements have been performed on the site of the Physics Laboratory to estimate the existing vibration levels due to road traffic. The predicted and measured vibrations are superimposed to assess the vibrations due to the combined effect of road and railway traffic in the vicinity of the Physics Laboratory. Apart from the numerical investigations, vibration measurements have also been performed on a similar site at line 1 of Beijing metro to substantiate the estimated results on metro line 4. Finally, it is studied how the vibrations can be controlled using a floating slab track, which is widely used as an effective measure of vibration isolation in tunnels. The efficiency of a 7.9 Hz floating slab track as a vibration countermeasure is assessed in this paper. This study demonstrates the applicability of the numerical model for the relevant assessment of subway induced vibrations and its use to study the performance of different track structures in the tunnel.

  10. Thermal Vibrational Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershuni, G. Z.; Lyubimov, D. V.

    1998-08-01

    Recent increasing awareness of the ways in which vibrational effects can affect low-gravity experiments have renewed interest in the study of thermal vibrational convection across a wide range of fields. For example, in applications where vibrational effects are used to provide active control of heat and mass transfer, such as in heat exchangers, stirrers, mineral separators and crystal growth, a sound understanding of the fundamental theory is required. In Thermal Vibrational Convection, the authors present the theory of vibrational effects caused by a static gravity field, and of fluid flows which appear under vibration in fluid-filled cavities. The first part of the book discusses fluid-filled cavities where the fluid motion only appears in the presence of temperature non-uniformities, while the second considers those situations where the vibrational effects are caused by a non-uniform field. Throughout, the authors concentrate on consideration of high frequency vibrations, where averaging methods can be successfully applied in the study of the phenomena. Written by two of the pioneers in this field, Thermal Vibrational Convection will be of great interest to scientists and engineers working in the many areas that are concerned with vibration, and its effect on heat and mass transfer. These include hydrodynamics, hydro-mechanics, low gravity physics and mechanics, and geophysics. The rigorous approach adopted in presenting the theory of this fascinating and highly topical area will facilitate a greater understanding of the phenomena involved, and will lead to the development of more and better-designed experiments.

  11. Rejecting harmonic vibrations at Gemini with real-time vibration tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rippa, Mathew J.; Bonnet, Henri; Hayward, Thomas L.; Trujillo, Chadwick; Cavedoni, Chas P.; Cumming, Tom; Yamasaki, Chris; Masuda, Neal; Bagano, Cy; Hardash, Steve

    2016-08-01

    Fighting vibrations on large telescopes is an arduous task. At Gemini, vibrations originating from cryogenic coolers have been shown to degrade the optical wavefront, in certain cases by as much as 40%. This paper discusses a general solution to vibration compensation by tracking the real time vibration state of the telescope and using M2 to apply corrections. Two approaches are then presented: an open loop compensation at M2 based on the signal of accelerometers at the M1 glass, and a closed loop compensation at M2 based on optical measurements from the wave front sensor. The paper elaborates on the pros and cons of each approach and the challenges faced during commissioning. A conclusion is presented with the final results of vibration tracking integrated with operations.

  12. Vibrational nonequilibrium effects on diatomic dissociation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. F.

    1993-01-01

    The collision-induced dissociation rate of diatomic molecules from a ladder of rotational and anharmonic vibrational states is developed, and the correction for vibrational nonequilibrium is considered. The result is similar to an analytic correction derived by Hammerling et al. (1959) for harmonic oscillators. An empirical correction algorithm suggested by Park (1987, 1990) gives similar results when vibrational temperature is comparable to kinetic temperature but underestimates the dissociation rate when vibrational temperature is small compared with the kinetic temperature. This algorithm uses an effective temperature in the experimentally determined Arrhenius expression for the rate coefficient, which is a weighted average of the vibrational and kinetic temperature, whereas theory indicates that kinetic temperature should appear only in the exponential term of the Arrhenius expression. Nevertheless, an effective temperature can always be found that will numerically duplicate the proper rate coefficient at any given condition, but a constant weighting factor cannot be expected to provide this. However, the algorithm can he adjusted to give reasonable results over a range of conditions if the geometric weighting factor is taken to be a simple linear function of the ratio of vibrational to kinetic temperature in the gas.

  13. Frequency adjustable MEMS vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podder, P.; Constantinou, P.; Amann, A.; Roy, S.

    2016-10-01

    Ambient mechanical vibrations offer an attractive solution for powering the wireless sensor nodes of the emerging “Internet-of-Things”. However, the wide-ranging variability of the ambient vibration frequencies pose a significant challenge to the efficient transduction of vibration into usable electrical energy. This work reports the development of a MEMS electromagnetic vibration energy harvester where the resonance frequency of the oscillator can be adjusted or tuned to adapt to the ambient vibrational frequency. Micro-fabricated silicon spring and double layer planar micro-coils along with sintered NdFeB micro-magnets are used to construct the electromagnetic transduction mechanism. Furthermore, another NdFeB magnet is adjustably assembled to induce variable magnetic interaction with the transducing magnet, leading to significant change in the spring stiffness and resonance frequency. Finite element analysis and numerical simulations exhibit substantial frequency tuning range (25% of natural resonance frequency) by appropriate adjustment of the repulsive magnetic interaction between the tuning and transducing magnet pair. This demonstrated method of frequency adjustment or tuning have potential applications in other MEMS vibration energy harvesters and micromechanical oscillators.

  14. A Comparison of Molecular Vibrational Theory to Huckel Molecular Orbital Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    1986-01-01

    Compares the similar mathematical problems of molecular vibrational calculations (at any intermediate level of sophistication) and molecular orbital calculations (at the Huckel level). Discusses how the generalizations of Huckel treatment of molecular orbitals apply to vibrational theory. (TW)

  15. A nonlocal shell theory model for evaluation of thermoelastic damping in the vibration of a double-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseinzadeh, M. S.; Khadem, S. E.

    2014-03-01

    Thermoelastic damping (TED) is a major factor of dissipating energy in the vibration control of nanodevices. On the other hand, application of classic theory in the study of nanostructures is not reasonable. In this paper, a model based on nonlocal shell theory, accounting for the small-scale effects, is used to investigate thermoelastic vibration behavior and damping of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with simply supported boundary conditions. The inner and outer carbon nanotubes are considered as two individual thin shells. The set of general thermoelastic coupled equations are numerically solved. The results show that the small-scale effects decrease natural frequencies and increase thermoelastic damping compared to the local model, especially for the coaxial frequency and large circumferential wave numbers. The numerical results also show that when the radius of nanotubes rises, the influence of small-size effect on natural frequencies and thermoelastic damping drops dramatically.

  16. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    that leads to splitting (fluid separation). We investigate the interaction of these prominent interfacial instabilities in the absence of gravity, concentrating on harmonically vibrated rectangular containers of fluid. We compare vibroequilibria theory with direct numerical simulations and consider the effect of surfaces waves, which can excite sloshing motion of the vibroequilibria. We systematically investigate the saddle-node bifurcation experienced by a symmetric singly connected vibroequilibria solution, for sufficiently deep containers, as forcing is increased. Beyond this instability, the fluid rapidly separates into (at least) two distinct masses. Pronounced hysteresis is associated with this transition, even in the presence of gravity. The interaction of vibroequilibria and frozen waves is investigated in two-fluid systems. Preparations for a parabolic flight experiment on fluids vibrated at high frequencies are discussed.

  17. Vibrating fuel grapple. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Chertock, A.J.; Fox, J.N.; Weissinger, R.B.

    A reactor refueling method is described which utilizes a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core. It incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head which allows additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  18. Vibrating fuel grapple

    DOEpatents

    Chertock, deceased, Alan J.; Fox, Jack N.; Weissinger, Robert B.

    1982-01-01

    A reactor refueling method utilizing a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core which incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head, enabling additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  19. VIBRATION DAMPING AND SHOCK MOUNT

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, D.J.; Forman, G.W.

    1963-12-10

    A shock absorbing mount in which vibrations are damped by an interference fit between relatively movable parts of the mount is described. A pair of generally cup-shaped parts or members have skirt portions disposed in an oppositely facing nesting relationship with the skirt of one member frictionally engaging the skirt of the other. The outermost skirt may be slotted to provide spring-like segments which embrace the inner skirt for effecting the interference fit. Belleville washers between the members provide yieldable support for a load carried by the mount. When a resonant frequency of vibration forces acting upon the moumt attains a certain level the kinetic energy of these forces is absorbed by sliding friction between the parts. (AEC)

  20. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

    2013-03-14

    This three-year project, in cooperation with Professor Bob Houze at University of Washington, has been successfully finished as planned. Both ARM (the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program) data and cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations were used to identify the water budgets of clouds observed in two international field campaigns. The research results achieved shed light on several key processes of clouds in climate change (or general circulation models), which are summarized below. 1. Revealed the effect of mineral dust on mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) Two international field campaigns near a desert and a tropical coast provided unique data to drive and evaluate CRM simulations, which are TWP-ICE (the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment) and AMMA (the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis). Studies of the two campaign data were contrasted, revealing that much mineral dust can bring about large MCSs via ice nucleation and clouds. This result was reported as a PI presentation in the 3rd ASR Science Team meeting held in Arlington, Virginia in March 2012. A paper on the studies was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2013). 2. Identified the effect of convective downdrafts on ice crystal concentration Using the large-scale forcing data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP (the Southern Great Plains) and other field campaigns, Goddard CRM simulations were carried out in comparison with radar and satellite observations. The comparison between model and observations revealed that convective downdrafts could increase ice crystal concentration by up to three or four orders, which is a key to quantitatively represent the indirect effects of ice nuclei, a kind of aerosol, on clouds and radiation in the Tropics. This result was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2011) and summarized in the DOE/ASR Research Highlights Summaries (see http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/RMjY5/view). 3. Used radar

  1. Preparation research on novel dampers used in large optical telescope's noise and vibrations attenuating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiu-ping; Yang, Jian-chun; Zhang, Li

    2010-10-01

    General rubber damping materials used in noise and vibrations attenuating system can not adapt large optical telescope's working temperatures and environments. While Metal Rubber material which has loose, reticulate structures can endure high or low temperatures, rigorous space environments, erosions, aging, volatilization and radiations due to its metallic properties because it is made of stainless steel wires of φ 0.1~0.3 mm. When the MR damping component is uploaded with vibrating force, the displacement will cause intense frictions between wires' surfaces which will dissipate abundant energy and thus it can serve as dampers like natural rubbers. Since Metal Rubber components are prepared by compression moulding, various complex shapes of dampers can be produced conveniently to fulfill large optical telescope's noise and vibrations attenuating tasks. Based on the Metal Rubber component's four preparation approaches, helix-making, planar roughcast-weaving, planar roughcast-rolling and 3D roughcast punching, a ring-shaped 3D parametrical numerical model is founded by CAD technology. Definitely, this modeling research work may support the optimization of the current trial and try preparation of MR component and it will provide necessary foundations for its further application in noise and vibrations attenuating system in large optical telescopes.

  2. Investigation of a cup-shaped ultrasonic transducer operated in the full-wave vibrational mode.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long

    2015-05-01

    Cup-shaped horn has significant applications in ultrasonic machining, such as continuous bonding of plastic sheet or strips. Generally, it is excited by a sandwich piezoelectric transducer and both together constitute a cup-shaped ultrasound transducer (CUT). To provide a concise theoretical model for its engineering applications, the equivalent circuit of the cup-shaped ultrasonic transducer is deduced and the resonance/anti-resonance frequency equations are obtained. Meanwhile, the vibrational characteristics of the cup-shaped ultrasonic transducer have been investigated by using the analytical and numerical methods, and then confirmed by the experiment. The results show that the cup-shaped horn has a distinctive equivalent circuit, and the cup-shaped ultrasonic transducer has a good vibrational performance.

  3. Influence of Combined Whole-Body Vibration Plus G-Loading on Visual Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelstein, Bernard D.; Beutter, Brent Robert; Kaiser, Mary K.; McCann, Robert S.; Stone, Leland S.; Anderson, Mark R.; Renema, Fritz; Paloski, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Recent engineering analyses of the integrated Ares-Orion stack show that vibration levels for Orion crews have the potential to be much higher than those experienced in Gemini, Apollo, and Shuttle vehicles. Of particular concern to the Constellation Program (CxP) is the 12 Hz thrust oscillation (TO) that the Ares-I rocket develops during the final 20 seconds preceding first-stage separation, at maximum G-loading. While the structural-dynamic mitigations being considered can assure that vibration due to TO is reduced to below the CxP crew health limit, it remains to be determined how far below this limit vibration must be reduced to enable effective crew performance during launch. Moreover, this "performance" vibration limit will inform the operations concepts (and crew-system interface designs) for this critical phase of flight. While Gemini and Apollo studies provide preliminary guidance, the data supporting the historical limits were obtained using less advanced interface technologies and very different operations concepts. In this study, supported by the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Human Research Program, we investigated display readability-a fundamental prerequisite for any interaction with electronic crew-vehicle interfaces-while observers were subjected to 12 Hz vibration superimposed on the 3.8 G loading expected for the TO period of ascent. Two age-matched groups of participants (16 general population and 13 Crew Office) performed a numerical display reading task while undergoing sustained 3.8 G loading and whole-body vibration at 0, 0.15, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 g in the eyeballs in/out (x-axis) direction. The time-constrained reading task used an Orion-like display with 10- and 14-pt non-proportional sans-serif fonts, and was designed to emulate the visual acquisition and processing essential for crew system monitoring. Compared to the no-vibration baseline, we found no significant effect of vibration at 0.15 and 0.3 g on task error rates (ER

  4. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    DOEpatents

    Cericola, Fred; Doggett, James W.; Ernest, Terry L.; Priddy, Tommy G.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 degrees around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis.

  5. [Vibration on agricultural tractors].

    PubMed

    Peretti, Alessandro; Delvecchio, Simone; Bonomini, Francesco; di Bisceglie, Anita Pasqua; Colosio, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    In the article, details related to the diffusion of agricultural tractors in Italy are given and considerations about the effects of vibration on operators, the sources of vibration and suggestions to reduce them are presented. The acceleration values observed in Italy amongst 244 tractors and levels of worker exposure are shown by means of histograms. The relevant data variability is discussed.

  6. Vibrational Schroedinger Cats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kis, Z.; Janszky, J.; Vinogradov, An. V.; Kobayashi, T.

    1996-01-01

    The optical Schroedinger cat states are simple realizations of quantum states having nonclassical features. It is shown that vibrational analogues of such states can be realized in an experiment of double pulse excitation of vibrionic transitions. To track the evolution of the vibrational wave packet we derive a non-unitary time evolution operator so that calculations are made in a quasi Heisenberg picture.

  7. Computational procedures for evaluating the sensitivity derivatives of vibration frequencies and Eigenmodes of framed structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterman, Timothy L.; Noor, Ahmed K.

    1987-01-01

    Computational procedures are presented for evaluating the sensitivity derivatives of the vibration frequencies and eigenmodes of framed structures. Both a displacement and a mixed formulation are used. The two key elements of the computational procedure are: (a) Use of dynamic reduction techniques to substantially reduce the number of degrees of freedom; and (b) Application of iterative techniques to improve the accuracy of the derivatives of the eigenmodes. The two reduction techniques considered are the static condensation and a generalized dynamic reduction technique. Error norms are introduced to assess the accuracy of the eigenvalue and eigenvector derivatives obtained by the reduction techniques. The effectiveness of the methods presented is demonstrated by three numerical examples.

  8. Performance, robustness and sensitivity analysis of the nonlinear tuned vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detroux, T.; Habib, G.; Masset, L.; Kerschen, G.

    2015-08-01

    The nonlinear tuned vibration absorber (NLTVA) is a recently developed nonlinear absorber which generalizes Den Hartog's equal peak method to nonlinear systems. If the purposeful introduction of nonlinearity can enhance system performance, it can also give rise to adverse dynamical phenomena, including detached resonance curves and quasiperiodic regimes of motion. Through the combination of numerical continuation of periodic solutions, bifurcation detection and tracking, and global analysis, the present study identifies boundaries in the NLTVA parameter space delimiting safe, unsafe and unacceptable operations. The sensitivity of these boundaries to uncertainty in the NLTVA parameters is also investigated.

  9. Stability and chaotification of vibration isolation floating raft systems with time-delayed feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, D. L.; Fu, Y. M.; Zhou, J. X.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a systematic study on the stability of a two-dimensional vibration isolation floating raft system with a time-delayed feedback control. Based on the generalized Sturm criterion, the critical control gain for the delay-independent stability region and critical time delays for the stability switches are derived. The critical conditions can provide a theoretical guidance of chaotification design for line spectra reduction. Numerical simulations verify the correctness of the approach. Bifurcation analyses reveal that chaotification is more likely to occur in unstable region defined by these critical conditions, and the stiffness of the floating raft and mass ratio are the sensitive parameters to reduce critical control gain.

  10. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  11. Vibration in textile mills.

    PubMed

    Sorainen, E

    1988-12-01

    The vibration in nine halls of the six weaving mills was measured in 1978-80. The measurements were taken at regular intervals in the working area of the weavers, which was the wooden support attached to the machine or the floor of the textile mill. The accelerometer was mounted with screws onto the working area, and all vibration samples were analyzed immediately, in situ. The vibration of the floor was tangent to or exceeded slightly the "reduced comfort boundary" specified in International Standard ISO 2631/1 (1985) only in the areas where the floor was not against the ground. The greatest amount of vibration occurred on the supports which had been attached to the machines. On these supports the vibration in places exceeded the "fatigue-decreased proficiency boundary."

  12. Diffusion of vibrations in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltukov, Y. M.; Kozub, V. I.; Parshin, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    We consider diffusion of vibrations in random lattices with translational invariance. Above the frequency ωIR corresponding to the Ioffe-Regel crossover (and depending on the strength of disorder), phonons cannot propagate through the lattice and transfer energy. At the same time, most of the vibrations in this range are not localized. We show that these delocalized excitations are similar to diffusons introduced by P. B. Allen, J. L. Feldman, J. Fabian, and F. Wooten (see, e.g., Phil. Mag. B 79, 1715 (1999)) to describe heat transport in glasses. In this range the energy in the lattice is transferred by means of diffusion of vibrational excitations. We have calculated the diffusivity of the modes D(ω) using both the direct numerical solution of Newton equations and the Edwards-Thouless formula. It is nearly constant above ωIR and goes to zero at the localization threshold.

  13. Modeling of flexible waveguides for ultrasonic vibrations transmission: longitudinal and flexural vibrations of non-deformed waveguide.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Dmitry A; Minchenya, Vladimir T

    2010-03-01

    The article presents the mathematical model allowing to investigate longitudinal and flexural vibrations of stepped flexible waveguides with transitional section without regard to various vibration modes interaction. The model uses original numerical-analytic calculations based on analytical solutions of the equation of waveguide steps vibrations and their continuous matching with numerical solution of the equation of transitional section vibrations. The proposed model can be considered as an initial approximation to the solution of the problem of flexible waveguides design, which makes it possible to determine and validate effective methods of its addressing. Resonant curves of longitudinal and flexural vibrations of two-step waveguide are traced for the given vibration frequency. Step lengths values providing simultaneous resonance of longitudinal and flexural vibrations for the given frequency are determined. Validity of the proposed model is proved by the results of finite elements method (FEM) modeling using ANSYS software. Application of Timoshenko's model instead of Euler-Bernoulli's model for description of flexural vibrations enabled reduction of relative deviation of resonant frequencies calculated using ANSYS from the value specified during resonant curves tracing down to negligible value (0.17%).

  14. The Shock and Vibration Digest, Volume 16, Number 10

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    measurement and analysis; also vibration and include gears , bearing (fluid film and antifriction), shock environmental testing to prove survivability, shafts...vibration analysis of general equipment including the course are fundamental relationships, material bearings and gears using the time and frequency...September 16-20. 1985 Leszno, Poland INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ROTORDYNAMICS Applied Mechanics Institute, Technical University September 14-17, 1986 of

  15. The Shock and Vibration Digest. Volume 16, Number 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    sources of noise contains sections on fans, jets, gears and a single section on pumps, presses, electrical equipment, and vibration bowls. Bell has... gears , bearings (fluid film and antifriction), shafts, couplings, motors, turbines, engines, pumps, compressors, fluid drives, gearboxes, and slow-speed...equip- ment evaluation techniques including test equipment; vibration analysis of general equipment including bearings and gears using the time and

  16. 14 CFR 23.907 - Propeller vibration and fatigue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller vibration and fatigue. 23.907... General § 23.907 Propeller vibration and fatigue. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood propellers of conventional design. (a) The applicant must determine the magnitude of the propeller...

  17. 14 CFR 23.907 - Propeller vibration and fatigue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Propeller vibration and fatigue. 23.907... General § 23.907 Propeller vibration and fatigue. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood propellers of conventional design. (a) The applicant must determine the magnitude of the propeller...

  18. 14 CFR 23.907 - Propeller vibration and fatigue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Propeller vibration and fatigue. 23.907... General § 23.907 Propeller vibration and fatigue. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood propellers of conventional design. (a) The applicant must determine the magnitude of the propeller...

  19. 14 CFR 23.907 - Propeller vibration and fatigue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Propeller vibration and fatigue. 23.907... General § 23.907 Propeller vibration and fatigue. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood propellers of conventional design. (a) The applicant must determine the magnitude of the propeller...

  20. 14 CFR 23.907 - Propeller vibration and fatigue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Propeller vibration and fatigue. 23.907... General § 23.907 Propeller vibration and fatigue. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood propellers of conventional design. (a) The applicant must determine the magnitude of the propeller...

  1. Design of a nonlinear torsional vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Ammaar Bin

    Tuned mass dampers (TMD) utilizing linear spring mechanisms to mitigate destructive vibrations are commonly used in practice. A TMD is usually tuned for a specific resonant frequency or an operating frequency of a system. Recently, nonlinear vibration absorbers attracted attention of researchers due to some potential advantages they possess over the TMDs. The nonlinear vibration absorber, or the nonlinear energy sink (NES), has an advantage of being effective over a broad range of excitation frequencies, which makes it more suitable for systems with several resonant frequencies, or for a system with varying excitation frequency. Vibration dissipation mechanism in an NES is passive and ensures that there is no energy backflow to the primary system. In this study, an experimental setup of a rotational system has been designed for validation of the concept of nonlinear torsional vibration absorber with geometrically induced cubic stiffness nonlinearity. Dimensions of the primary system have been optimized so as to get the first natural frequency of the system to be fairly low. This was done in order to excite the dynamic system for torsional vibration response by the available motor. Experiments have been performed to obtain the modal parameters of the system. Based on the obtained modal parameters, the design optimization of the nonlinear torsional vibration absorber was carried out using an equivalent 2-DOF modal model. The optimality criterion was chosen to be maximization of energy dissipation in the nonlinear absorber attached to the equivalent 2-DOF system. The optimized design parameters of the nonlinear absorber were tested on the original 5-DOF system numerically. A comparison was made between the performance of linear and nonlinear absorbers using the numerical models. The comparison showed the superiority of the nonlinear absorber over its linear counterpart for the given set of primary system parameters as the vibration energy dissipation in the former is

  2. Heat, cold, noise, and vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, S.M.; Bedi, J.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Exposure to a cold environment induces a number of physiological alterations, the most serious being hypothermia. This state can occur in all individuals, but the very young and the elderly are more susceptible. Environmental and industrially generated high ambient temperature can place further stress on aged individuals and workers, resulting in a complex symptom picture. Morbidity and death may result from such exposures. Causative factors have been identified. Noise exposure induces hearing losses above those secondary to the aging process. Psychophysiological effects during noise exposure are considered to result from the sympathetic activity secondary to a general stress reaction. Vibration from the use of power tools results in Raynaud's phenomenon. However, modification of power tools has reduced the symptoms associated with vibration exposure. Termination of exposure to vibration appears eventually to reduce symptoms related to white-finger spasms. Interaction between these stressors has not been clarified because of the complex effects of each. The need for additional information about the response to these stressors is evident. 38 references.

  3. Piezoelectric Vibration Damping Study for Rotating Composite Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Resonant vibrations of aircraft engine blades cause blade fatigue problems in engines, which can lead to thicker and aerodynamically lower performing blade designs, increasing engine weight, fuel burn, and maintenance costs. In order to mitigate undesirable blade vibration levels, active piezoelectric vibration control has been investigated, potentially enabling thinner blade designs for higher performing blades and minimizing blade fatigue problems. While the piezoelectric damping idea has been investigated by other researchers over the years, very little study has been done including rotational effects. The present study attempts to fill this void. The particular objectives of this study were: (a) to develop and analyze a multiphysics piezoelectric finite element composite blade model for harmonic forced vibration response analysis coupled with a tuned RLC circuit for rotating engine blade conditions, (b) to validate a numerical model with experimental test data, and (c) to achieve a cost-effective numerical modeling capability which enables simulation of rotating blades within the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Dynamic Spin Rig Facility. A numerical and experimental study for rotating piezoelectric composite subscale fan blades was performed. It was also proved that the proposed numerical method is feasible and effective when applied to the rotating blade base excitation model. The experimental test and multiphysics finite element modeling technique described in this paper show that piezoelectric vibration damping can significantly reduce vibrations of aircraft engine composite fan blades.

  4. Nozzle flow with vibrational nonequilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, J. H.; Landry, J. G.

    1995-01-01

    This research concerns the modeling and numerical solutions of the coupled system of compressible Navier-Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinates under conditions of equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The problem considered was the modeling of a high temperature diatomic gas N2 flowing through a converging-diverging high expansion nozzle. The problem was modeled in two ways. The first model uses a single temperature with variable specific heats as functions of this temperature. For the second model we assume that the various degrees of freedom all have a Boltzmann distribution and that there is a continuous redistribution of energy among the various degrees of freedom as the gas passes through the nozzle. Each degree of freedom is assumed to have its own temperature and, consequently, each system state can be characterized by these temperatures. This suggests that formulation of a second model with a vibrational degree of freedom along with a rotational-translation degree of freedom, each degree of freedom having its own temperature. Initially the vibrational degree of freedom is excited by heating the gas to a high temperature. As the high temperature gas passes through the nozzle throat there is a sudden drop in temperature along with a relaxation time for the vibrational degree of freedom to achieve equilibrium with the rotational-translation degree of freedom. That is, we assume that the temperature change upon passing through the throat is so great that the changes in the vibrational degree of freedom occur at a much slower pace and consequently lags behind the rotational-translational energy changes. This lag results in a finite relaxation time. In this context the term nonequilibrium is used to denote the fact that the energy content of the various degrees of freedom are characterized by two temperatures. We neglect any chemical reactions which could also add nonequilibrium effects. We develop the energy equations for the nonequilibrium model

  5. Dynamic modelling and active vibration controller design for a cylindrical shell equipped with piezoelectric sensors and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Heo, Seok; Jeong, Moonsan

    2009-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the dynamic modelling, active vibration controller design and experiments for a cylindrical shell equipped with piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The dynamic model was derived by using Rayleigh-Ritz method based on the Donnel-Mushtari shell theory. The actuator equations which relate the applied voltages to the generalized force and sensor equations which relate the generalized displacements to the sensor output voltages for the piezoelectric wafer were derived based on the pin-force model. The equations of motion along with the piezoelectric sensor equations were then reduced to modal forms considering the modes of interest. An aluminium shell was fabricated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the modelling and control techniques. The boundary conditions at both ends of the shell were assumed to be a shear diaphragm in the numerical analysis. Theoretical natural frequencies of the aluminium shell were then calculated and compared to experimental result. They were in good agreement with experimental result for the first two free-vibration modes. The multi-input and multi-output positive position feedback controller, which can cope with the first two vibration modes, was designed based on the block-inverse theory and was implemented digitally using the DSP board. The experimental results showed that vibrations of the cylindrical shell can be successfully suppressed by the piezoelectric actuator and the proposed controller.

  6. Vibrational dephasing in matter-wave interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembold, A.; Schütz, G.; Röpke, R.; Chang, W. T.; Hwang, I. S.; Günther, A.; Stibor, A.

    2017-03-01

    Matter-wave interferometry is a highly sensitive tool to measure small perturbations in a quantum system. This property allows the creation of precision sensors for dephasing mechanisms such as mechanical vibrations. They are a challenge for phase measurements under perturbing conditions that cannot be perfectly decoupled from the interferometer, e.g. for mobile interferometric devices or vibrations with a broad frequency range. Here, we demonstrate a method based on second-order correlation theory in combination with Fourier analysis, to use an electron interferometer as a sensor that precisely characterizes the mechanical vibration spectrum of the interferometer. Using the high spatial and temporal single-particle resolution of a delay line detector, the data allows to reveal the original contrast and spatial periodicity of the interference pattern from ‘washed-out’ matter-wave interferograms that have been vibrationally disturbed in the frequency region between 100 and 1000 Hz. Other than with electromagnetic dephasing, due to excitations of higher harmonics and additional frequencies induced from the environment, the parts in the setup oscillate with frequencies that can be different to the applied ones. The developed numerical search algorithm is capable to determine those unknown oscillations and corresponding amplitudes. The technique can identify vibrational dephasing and decrease damping and shielding requirements in electron, ion, neutron, atom and molecule interferometers that generate a spatial fringe pattern on the detector plane.

  7. Pattern classification by a neurofuzzy network: application to vibration monitoring.

    PubMed

    Meesad, P; Yen, G G

    2000-01-01

    An innovative neurofuzzy network is proposed herein for pattern classification applications, specifically for vibration monitoring. A fuzzy set interpretation is incorporated into the network design to handle imprecise information. A neural network architecture is used to automatically deduce fuzzy if-then rules based on a hybrid supervised learning scheme. The neurofuzzy classifier proposed is equipped with a one-pass, on-line, and incremental learning algorithm. This network can be considered a self-organized classifier with the ability to adaptively learn new information without forgetting old knowledge. The classification performance of the proposed neurofuzzy network is validated on the Fisher's Iris data, which is a well-known benchmark data set. For the generalization capability, the neurofuzzy network can achieve 97.33% correct classification. In addition, to demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed neurofuzzy paradigm, numerical simulations have been performed using the Westland data set. The Westland data set consists of vibration data collected from a US Navy CH-46E helicopter test stand. Using a simple fast Fourier transform technique for feature extraction, the proposed neurofuzzy network has shown promising results. Using various torque levels for training and testing, the network achieved 100% correct classification.

  8. Spontaneous and stimulated Raman studies of vibrational dephasing in condensed phases

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, P.A.

    1980-05-01

    Vibrational dephasing in condensed phases is studied from both a theoretical and experimental standpoint. A theory is presented which describes the dynamics of motional or exchange processes in weakly perturbed systems. This general formalism, which has been previously used to describe motional narrowing in magnetic resonance, is applied to vibrational spectroscopy. The model treats the case of a high frequency vibration anharmonically coupled to a low-frequency vibration. Intermolecular exchange of low frequency vibrational quanta results in a temperature dependent broadening and frequency shift of the high frequency vibration. Analysis of experimental data by this model yields both the exchange rates and the anharmonic couplings.

  9. Molecular vibrational trapping revisited: a case study with D2+

    PubMed Central

    Badankó, Péter; Halász, Gábor J.; Vibók, Ágnes

    2016-01-01

    The present theoretical study is concerned with the vibrational trapping or bond hardening, which is a well-known phenomenon predicted by a dressed state representation of small molecules like and in an intense laser field. This phenomenon is associated with a condition where the energy of the light induced, vibrational level coincides with one of the vibrational levels on the field-free potential curve, which at the same time maximizes the wave function overlap between these two levels. One-dimensional numerical simulations were performed to investigate this phenomenon in a more quantitative way than has been done previously by calculating the photodissociation probability of for a wide range of photon energy. The obtained results undoubtedly show that the nodal structure of the field-free vibrational wave functions plays a decisive role in the vibrational trapping, in addition to the current understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:27550642

  10. The Role of Resonant Vibrations in Electronic Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Somsen, Oscar J. G.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear vibrations play a prominent role in the spectroscopy and dynamics of electronic systems. As recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest, this may be even more so when vibrational frequencies are resonant with transitions between the electronic states. Herein, a vibronic multilevel Redfield model is reported for excitonically coupled electronic two‐level systems with a few explicitly included vibrational modes and interacting with a phonon bath. With numerical simulations the effects of the quantized vibrations on the dynamics of energy transfer and coherence in a model dimer are illustrated. The resonance between the vibrational frequency and energy gap between the sites leads to a large delocalization of vibronic states, which then results in faster energy transfer and longer‐lived mixed coherences. PMID:26910485

  11. Vibration-assisted resonance in photosynthetic excitation-energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irish, E. K.; Gómez-Bombarelli, R.; Lovett, B. W.

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how the effectiveness of natural photosynthetic energy-harvesting systems arises from the interplay between quantum coherence and environmental noise represents a significant challenge for quantum theory. Recently it has begun to be appreciated that discrete molecular vibrational modes may play an important role in the dynamics of such systems. Here we present a microscopic mechanism by which intramolecular vibrations may be able to contribute to the efficiency and directionality of energy transfer. Excited vibrational states create resonant pathways through the system, supporting fast and efficient energy transport. Vibrational damping together with the natural downhill arrangement of molecular energy levels gives intrinsic directionality to the energy flow. Analytical and numerical results demonstrate a significant enhancement of the efficiency and directionality of energy transport that can be directly related to the existence of resonances between vibrational and excitonic levels.

  12. Vibrational energy transport in the presence of intrasite vibrational energy redistribution.

    PubMed

    Schade, Marco; Hamm, Peter

    2009-07-28

    The mechanism of vibrational energy flow is studied in a regime where a diffusion equation is likely to break down, i.e., on length scales of a few chemical bonds and time scales of a few picoseconds. This situation occurs, for example, during photochemical reactions in protein environment. To that end, a toy model is introduced that on the one hand mimics the vibrational normal mode distribution of proteins, and on the other hand is small enough to numerically time propagate the system fully quantum mechanically. Comparing classical and quantum-mechanical results, the question is addressed to what extent the classical nature of the molecular dynamics simulations (which would be the only choice for the modeling of a real molecular system) affects the vibrational energy flow mechanism. Small differences are found which are due to the different ways classical and quantum mechanics distribute thermal energy over vibrational modes. In either case, a ballistic and a diffusive phase can be identified. For these small length and time scales, the latter is governed by intrasite vibrational energy redistribution, since vibrational energy does not necessarily thermalize completely within individual peptide units. Overall, the model suggests a picture that unifies many of the observations made recently in experiments.

  13. Low-frequency vibration control of floating slab tracks using dynamic vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shengyang; Yang, Jizhong; Yan, Hua; Zhang, Longqing; Cai, Chengbiao

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to effectively and robustly suppress the low-frequency vibrations of floating slab tracks (FSTs) using dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs). First, the optimal locations where the DVAs are attached are determined by modal analysis with a finite element model of the FST. Further, by identifying the equivalent mass of the concerned modes, the optimal stiffness and damping coefficient of each DVA are obtained to minimise the resonant vibration amplitudes based on fixed-point theory. Finally, a three-dimensional coupled dynamic model of a metro vehicle and the FST with the DVAs is developed based on the nonlinear Hertzian contact theory and the modified Kalker linear creep theory. The track irregularities are included and generated by means of a time-frequency transformation technique. The effect of the DVAs on the vibration absorption of the FST subjected to the vehicle dynamic loads is evaluated with the help of the insertion loss in one-third octave frequency bands. The sensitivities of the mass ratio of DVAs and the damping ratio of steel-springs under the floating slab are discussed as well, which provided engineers with the DVA's adjustable room for vibration mitigation. The numerical results show that the proposed DVAs could effectively suppress low-frequency vibrations of the FST when tuned correctly and attached properly. The insertion loss due to the attachment of DVAs increases as the mass ratio increases, whereas it decreases with the increase in the damping ratio of steel-springs.

  14. Crowd-induced random vibration of footbridge and vibration control using multiple tuned mass dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quan; Fan, Jiansheng; Nie, Jianguo; Li, Quanwang; Chen, Yu

    2010-09-01

    This paper investigates vibration characteristics of footbridge induced by crowd random walking, and presents the application of multiple tuned mass dampers (MTMD) in suppressing crowd-induced vibration. A single foot force model for the vertical component of walking-induced force is developed, avoiding the phase angle inaccessibility of the continuous walking force. Based on the single foot force model, the crowd-footbridge random vibration model, in which pedestrians are modeled as a crowd flow characterized with the average time headway, is developed to consider the worst vibration state of footbridge. In this random vibration model, an analytic formulation is developed to calculate the acceleration power spectral density in arbitrary position of footbridge with arbitrary span layout. Resonant effect is observed as the footbridge natural frequencies fall within the frequency bandwidth of crowd excitation. To suppress the excessive acceleration for human normal walking comfort, a MTMD system is used to improve the footbridge dynamic characteristics. According to the random vibration model, an optimization procedure, based on the minimization of maximum root-mean-square (rms) acceleration of footbridge, is introduced to determine the optimal design parameters of MTMD system. Numerical analysis shows that the proposed MTMD designed by random optimization procedure, is more effective than traditional MTMD design methodology in reducing dynamic response during crowd-footbridge resonance, and that the proper frequency spacing enlargement will effectively reduce the off-tuning effect of MTMD.

  15. Transient vibration analytical modeling and suppressing for vibration absorber system under impulse excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Yang, Bintang; Yu, Hu; Gao, Yulong

    2017-04-01

    The impulse excitation of mechanism causes transient vibration. In order to achieve adaptive transient vibration control, a method which can exactly model the response need to be proposed. This paper presents an analytical model to obtain the response of the primary system attached with dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) under impulse excitation. The impulse excitation which can be divided into single-impulse excitation and multi-impulse excitation is simplified as sinusoidal wave to establish the analytical model. To decouple the differential governing equations, a transform matrix is applied to convert the response from the physical coordinate to model coordinate. Therefore, the analytical response in the physical coordinate can be obtained by inverse transformation. The numerical Runge-Kutta method and experimental tests have demonstrated the effectiveness of the analytical model proposed. The wavelet of the response indicates that the transient vibration consists of components with multiple frequencies, and it shows that the modeling results coincide with the experiments. The optimizing simulations based on genetic algorithm and experimental tests demonstrate that the transient vibration of the primary system can be decreased by changing the stiffness of the DVA. The results presented in this paper are the foundations for us to develop the adaptive transient vibration absorber in the future.

  16. Relating normal vibrational modes to local vibrational modes: benzene and naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wenli; Kalescky, Robert; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2013-07-01

    Local vibrational modes can be directly derived from normal vibrational modes using the method of Konkoli and Cremer (Int J Quant Chem 67:29, 1998). This implies the calculation of the harmonic force constant matrix F (q) (expressed in internal coordinates q) from the corresponding Cartesian force constant matrix f (x) with the help of the transformation matrix U = WB (†)(BWB (†))(-1) (B: Wilson's B-matrix). It is proven that the local vibrational modes are independent of the choice of the matrix W. However, the choice W = M (-1) (M: mass matrix) has numerical advantages with regard to the choice W = I (I: identity matrix), where the latter is frequently used in spectroscopy. The local vibrational modes can be related to the normal vibrational modes in the form of an adiabatic connection scheme (ACS) after rewriting the Wilson equation with the help of the compliance matrix. The ACSs of benzene and naphthalene based on experimental vibrational frequencies are discussed as nontrivial examples. It is demonstrated that the local-mode stretching force constants provide a quantitative measure for the C-H and C-C bond strength.

  17. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Robert A. Houze, Jr.

    2013-11-13

    We examined cloud radar data in monsoon climates, using cloud radars at Darwin in the Australian monsoon, on a ship in the Bay of Bengal in the South Asian monsoon, and at Niamey in the West African monsoon. We followed on with a more in-depth study of the continental MCSs over West Africa. We investigated whether the West African anvil clouds connected with squall line MCSs passing over the Niamey ARM site could be simulated in a numerical model by comparing the observed anvil clouds to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model at high resolution using six different ice-phase microphysical schemes. We carried out further simulations with a cloud-resolving model forced by sounding network budgets over the Niamey region and over the northern Australian region. We have devoted some of the effort of this project to examining how well satellite data can determine the global breadth of the anvil cloud measurements obtained at the ARM ground sites. We next considered whether satellite data could be objectively analyzed to so that their large global measurement sets can be systematically related to the ARM measurements. Further differences were detailed between the land and ocean MCS anvil clouds by examining the interior structure of the anvils with the satellite-detected the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR). The satellite survey of anvil clouds in the Indo-Pacific region was continued to determine the role of MCSs in producing the cloud pattern associated with the MJO.

  18. Active vibration control of civil structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.; Baker, W.; Fales, J.; Shevitz, D.

    1996-11-01

    This is a final report of a one year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Active vibration control (AVC) of structural and mechanical systems is one of the rapidly advancing areas of engineering research. The multifaceted nature of AVC covers many disciplines, such as sensors and instrumentation, numerical modeling, experimental mechanics, and advanced power systems. This work encompassed a review of the literature on active control of structures focusing both on active control hardware and on control algorithms, a design of an isolation systems using magneto-rheological fluid-filled (MRF) dampers and numerical simulations to study the enhanced vibration mitigation effects of this technology.

  19. Seminar on Understanding Digital Control and Analysis in Vibration Test Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The advantages of the digital methods over the analog vibration methods are demonstrated. The following topics are covered: (1) methods of computer-controlled random vibration and reverberation acoustic testing, (2) methods of computer-controlled sinewave vibration testing, and (3) methods of computer-controlled shock testing. General algorithms are described in the form of block diagrams and flow diagrams.

  20. Shaft vibrations in turbomachinery excited by cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabowski, B.

    1982-01-01

    During the past years the dynamic behavior of rotors with cracks has been investigated mainly theoretically. This paper deals with the comparison of analytical and experimental results of the dynamics of a rotor with an artificial crack. The experimental results verify the crack model used in the analysis. They show the general possibility to determine a crack by extended vibration control.

  1. Vibration Analysis and the Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever put your hand on an electric motor or motor-driven electric appliance and felt it vibrate? Ever wonder why it vibrates? What is there about the operation of the motor, or the object to which it is attached, that causes the vibrations? Is there anything "regular" about the vibrations, or are they the result of random causes? In this…

  2. PREFACE: Vibrations at surfaces Vibrations at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2011-12-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces—a topic that was indispensible a couple of decades ago, since it was one of the few phenomena capable of revealing the nature of binding at solid surfaces. For clean surfaces, the frequencies of modes with characteristic displacement patterns revealed how surface geometry, as well as the nature of binding between atoms in the surface layers, could be different from that in the bulk solid. Dispersion of the surface phonons provided further measures of interatomic interactions. For chemisorbed molecules on surfaces, frequencies and dispersion of the vibrational modes were also critical for determining adsorption sites. In other words, vibrations at surfaces served as a reliable means of extracting information about surface structure, chemisorption and overlayer formation. Experimental techniques, such as electron energy loss spectroscopy and helium-atom-surface scattering, coupled with infra-red spectroscopy, were continually refined and their resolutions enhanced to capture subtleties in the dynamics of atoms and molecules at surfaces. Theoretical methods, whether based on empirical and semi-empirical interatomic potential or on ab initio electronic structure calculations, helped decipher experimental observations and provide deeper insights into the nature of the bond between atoms and molecules in regions of reduced symmetry, as encountered on solid surfaces. Vibrations at surfaces were thus an integral part of the set of phenomena that characterized surface science. Dedicated workshops and conferences were held to explore the variety of interesting and puzzling features revealed in experimental and theoretical investigations of surface vibrational modes and their dispersion. One such conference, Vibrations at Surfaces, first organized by Harald Ibach in Juelich in 1980, continues to this day. The 13th International Conference on Vibrations at Surfaces was held at the University of

  3. Vibration-translation energy transfer in anharmonic diatomic molecules. 2: The vibrational quantum number dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    A semiclassical model of the inelastic collision between a vibrationally excited anharmonic oscillator and a structureless atom was used to predict the variation of thermally averaged vibration-translation rate coefficients with temperature and initial-state quantum number. Multiple oscillator states were included in a numerical solution for collinear encounters. The results are compared with CO-He experimental values for both ground and excited initial states using several simplified forms of the interaction potential. The numerical model was also used as a basis for evaluating several less complete but analytic models. Two computationally simple analytic approximations were found that successfully reproduced the numerical rate coefficients for a wide range of molecular properties and collision partners. Their limitations were also identified. The relative rates of multiple-quantum transitions from excited states were evaluated for several molecular types.

  4. Vibration-translation energy transfer in anharmonic diatomic molecules. II - The vibrational quantum-number dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A semiclassical model of the inelastic collision between a vibrationally excited anharmonic oscillator and a structureless atom is used to predict the variation of thermally averaged vibrational-translational rate coefficients with temperature and initial-state quantum number. Multiple oscillator states are included in a numerical solution for collinear encounters. The results are compared with CO-He experimental values for both ground and excited initial states using several simplified forms of the interaction potential. The numerical model is also used as a basis for evaluating several less complete, but analytic, models. Two computationally simple analytic approximations are found that successfully reproduce the numerical rate coefficients for a wide range of molecular properties and collision partners. Their limitations are identified, and the relative rates of multiple-quantum transitions from excited states are evaluated for several molecular types.

  5. Countermeasure for reducing vibrations of a building for running trains

    SciTech Connect

    Yonekura, Yorio

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes the with vibration reduction effect of a railway station building, by making use of special rail fastening devices and track girders for running trains set on the second floor. To estimate the vibration reduction effect, dynamic interaction between trains, supporting girders and building members was analyzed numerically. In order to make a few corrections for calculated values, correction coefficients were introduced by comparing analytical values with measured ones obtained by running trains.

  6. NIF Ambient Vibration Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C.R.; Hoehler, M.S., S.C. Sommer

    1999-11-29

    LLNL has an ongoing research and development project that includes developing data acquisition systems with remote wireless communication for monitoring the vibrations of large civil engineering structures. In order to establish the capability of performing remote sensing over an extended period of time, the researchers needed to apply this technology to a real structure. The construction of the National Ignition Facility provided an opportunity to test the data acquisition system on a large structure to monitor whether the facility is remaining within the strict ambient vibration guidelines. This document will briefly discuss the NIF ambient vibration requirements and summarize the vibration measurements performed during the Spring and Summer of 1999. In addition, a brief description of the sensors and the data acquisition systems will be provided in Appendix B.

  7. Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.; Braithwaite, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from non-symbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger…

  8. Hindi Numerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, William

    In most languages encountered by linguists, the numerals, considered as a paradigmatic set, constitute a morpho-syntactic problem of only moderate complexity. The Indo-Aryan language family of North India, however, presents a curious contrast. The relatively regular numeral system of Sanskrit, as it has developed historically into the modern…

  9. 2008 Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Philip J. Reid

    2009-09-21

    The conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and interfaces. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of systems.

  10. Vibration suppression in MEMS devices using electrostatic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad Khodaparast, Hamed; Madinei, Hadi; Friswell, Michael I.; Adhikari, Sondipon

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the use of electrostatic forces for vibration control of MEMS devices. A micro beam subject to electrostatic loading is considered. The electrostatic forces cause softening nonlinearity and their amplitudes are proportional to the square of applied DC voltages. An optimization problem is set up to minimize the vibration level of the micro-beam at given excitation frequencies. A new method based on incrementing nonlinear control parameters of the system and Harmonic Balance is used to obtain the required DC voltages that suppress unwanted vibration of the micro-beam. The results are illustrated using numerical simulations

  11. Numerical simulation on slabs dislocation of Zipingpu concrete faced rockfill dam during the Wenchuan earthquake based on a generalized plasticity model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Zhou, Yang; Zou, Degao

    2014-01-01

    After the Wenchuan earthquake in 2008, the Zipingpu concrete faced rockfill dam (CFRD) was found slabs dislocation between different stages slabs and the maximum value reached 17 cm. This is a new damage pattern and did not occur in previous seismic damage investigation. Slabs dislocation will affect the seepage control system of the CFRD gravely and even the safety of the dam. Therefore, investigations of the slabs dislocation's mechanism and development might be meaningful to the engineering design of the CFRD. In this study, based on the previous studies by the authors, the slabs dislocation phenomenon of the Zipingpu CFRD was investigated. The procedure and constitutive model of materials used for finite element analysis are consistent. The water elevation, the angel, and the strength of the construction joints were among major variables of investigation. The results indicated that the finite element procedure based on a modified generalized plasticity model and a perfect elastoplastic interface model can be used to evaluate the dislocation damage of face slabs of concrete faced rockfill dam during earthquake. The effects of the water elevation, the angel, and the strength of the construction joints are issues of major design concern under seismic loading.

  12. Numerical Simulation on Slabs Dislocation of Zipingpu Concrete Faced Rockfill Dam during the Wenchuan Earthquake Based on a Generalized Plasticity Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Zou, Degao

    2014-01-01

    After the Wenchuan earthquake in 2008, the Zipingpu concrete faced rockfill dam (CFRD) was found slabs dislocation between different stages slabs and the maximum value reached 17 cm. This is a new damage pattern and did not occur in previous seismic damage investigation. Slabs dislocation will affect the seepage control system of the CFRD gravely and even the safety of the dam. Therefore, investigations of the slabs dislocation's mechanism and development might be meaningful to the engineering design of the CFRD. In this study, based on the previous studies by the authors, the slabs dislocation phenomenon of the Zipingpu CFRD was investigated. The procedure and constitutive model of materials used for finite element analysis are consistent. The water elevation, the angel, and the strength of the construction joints were among major variables of investigation. The results indicated that the finite element procedure based on a modified generalized plasticity model and a perfect elastoplastic interface model can be used to evaluate the dislocation damage of face slabs of concrete faced rockfill dam during earthquake. The effects of the water elevation, the angel, and the strength of the construction joints are issues of major design concern under seismic loading. PMID:25013857

  13. Vibration Penalty Estimates for Indoor Annoyance Caused by Sonic Boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathsam, Jonathan; Klos, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Commercial supersonic flight is currently forbidden over land because sonic booms have historically caused unacceptable annoyance levels in overflown communities. NASA is providing data and expertise to noise regulators as they consider relaxing the ban for future quiet supersonic aircraft. One key objective is a predictive model for indoor annoyance based on factors such as noise and indoor vibration levels. The current study quantified the increment in indoor sonic boom annoyance when sonic booms can be felt directly through structural vibrations in addition to being heard. A shaker mounted below each chair in the sonic boom simulator emulated vibrations transmitting through the structure to that chair. The vibration amplitudes were determined from numeric models of a large range of residential structures excited by the same sonic boom waveforms used in the experiment. The analysis yielded vibration penalties, which are the increments in sound level needed to increase annoyance as much as the vibration does. For sonic booms at acoustic levels from 75 to 84 dB Perceived Level, vibration signals with lower amplitudes (+1 sigma) yielded penalties from 0 to 5 dB, and vibration signals with higher amplitudes (+3 sigma) yielded penalties from 6 to 10 dB.

  14. Characteristics of laterally vibrating resonant microcantilevers in viscous liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Russell; Josse, Fabien; Heinrich, Stephen M.; Brand, Oliver; Dufour, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of microcantilevers vibrating laterally in viscous liquid media are investigated and compared to those of similar microcantilevers vibrating in the out-of-plane direction. The hydrodynamic loading on the vibrating beam is first determined using a numerical model. A semi-analytical expression for the hydrodynamic forces in terms of the Reynolds number and the aspect ratio (beam thickness over beam width) is obtained by introducing a correction factor to Stokes' solution for a vibrating plate of infinite area to account for the effects of the thickness. The results enable the effects of fluid damping and effective fluid mass on the resonant frequency and the quality factor (Q) to be investigated as a function of both the beam's geometry and liquid medium's properties and compared to experimentally determined values given in the literature. The resonant frequency and Q are found to be higher for laterally vibrating microcantilevers compared to those of similar geometry experiencing transverse (out-of-plane) vibration. Compared to transversely vibrating beams, the resonant frequency of laterally vibrating beams is shown to decrease at a slower rate (with respect to changes in viscosity) in media having higher viscosities than water. The theoretical results are compared to experimental data obtained for cantilevers completely immersed in solutions of varying aqueous percent glycerol. The increases in resonant frequency and Q are expected to yield much lower limits of detection in liquid-phase chemical sensing applications.

  15. Segregation simulation of binary granular matter under horizontal pendulum vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xuedong; Zhang, Yanbing; Ran, Heli; Zhang, Qingying

    2016-08-01

    Segregation of binary granular matter with different densities under horizontal pendulum vibrations was investigated through numerical simulation using a 3D discrete element method (DEM). The particle segregation mechanism was theoretically analyzed using gap filling, momentum and kinetic energy. The effect of vibrator geometry on granular segregation was determined using the Lacey mixing index. This study shows that dynamic changes in particle gaps under periodic horizontal pendulum vibrations create a premise for particle segregation. The momentum of heavy particles is higher than that of light particles, which causes heavy particles to sink and light particles to float. With the same horizontal vibration parameters, segregation efficiency and stability, which are affected by the vibrator with a cylindrical convex geometry, are superior to that of the original vibrator and the vibrator with a cross-bar structure. Moreover, vibrator geometry influences the segregation speed of granular matter. Simulation results of granular segregation by using the DEM are consistent with the final experimental results, thereby confirming the accuracy of the simulation results and the reliability of the analysis.

  16. Structural Damage Detection Using Slopes of Longitudinal Vibration Shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Zhu, W. D.; Smith, S. A.; Cao, M. S.

    2016-03-18

    While structural damage detection based on flexural vibration shapes, such as mode shapes and steady-state response shapes under harmonic excitation, has been well developed, little attention is paid to that based on longitudinal vibration shapes that also contain damage information. This study originally formulates a slope vibration shape for damage detection in bars using longitudinal vibration shapes. To enhance noise robustness of the method, a slope vibration shape is transformed to a multiscale slope vibration shape in a multiscale domain using wavelet transform, which has explicit physical implication, high damage sensitivity, and noise robustness. These advantages are demonstrated in numerical cases of damaged bars, and results show that multiscale slope vibration shapes can be used for identifying and locating damage in a noisy environment. A three-dimensional (3D) scanning laser vibrometer is used to measure the longitudinal steady-state response shape of an aluminum bar with damage due to reduced cross-sectional dimensions under harmonic excitation, and results show that the method can successfully identify and locate the damage. Slopes of longitudinal vibration shapes are shown to be suitable for damage detection in bars and have potential for applications in noisy environments.

  17. Continuous Vibrational Cooling of Ground State Rb2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallant, Jonathan; Marcassa, Luis

    2014-05-01

    The process of photoassociation generally results in a distribution of vibrational levels in the electronic ground state that is energetically close to the dissociation limit. Several schemes have appeared that aim to transfer the population from the higher vibrational levels to lower ones, especially the ground vibrational state. We demonstrate continuous production of vibrationally cooled Rb2 using optical pumping. The vibrationally cooled molecules are produced in three steps. First, we use a dedicated photoassociation laser to produce molecules in high vibrational levels of the X1Σg+ state. Second, a broadband fiber laser at 1071 nm is used to transfer the molecules to lower vibrational levels via optical pumping through the A1Σu+ state. This process transfers the molecules from vibrational levels around ν ~= 113 to a distribution of levels where ν < 35. The molecules may then be further cooled using a broadband superluminescent diode near 685 nm that has its frequency spectrum shaped. The resulting vibrational distributions are probed using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization with a pulsed dye laser near 670 nm. The results are presented and compared with theoretical simulations. This work was supported by Fapesp and INCT-IQ.

  18. Analytical prediction of aerospace vehicle vibration environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilby, J. F.; Piersol, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    Considerable attention has been given recently to the formulation and validation of analytical models for the prediction of aerospace vehicle vibration response to acoustic and fluctuating pressures. This paper summarizes the development of such analytical models for two applications, (1) structural vibrations of the Space Shuttle orbiter vehicle due to broadband rocket noise and aerodynamic boundary layer turbulence, and (2) structural vibrations of general aviation aircraft due to discrete frequency propeller and reciprocating engine exhaust noise. In both cases, the spatial exterior excitations are convected pressure fields which are described on the basis of measured cross spectra (coherence and phase) information. Structural modal data are obtained from analytical predictions, and structural responses to appropriate excitation fields are calculated. The results are compared with test data, and the strengths and weaknesses of the analytical models are assessed.

  19. Vibration-rotation-tunneling dynamics in small water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliano, N.

    1992-11-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize the intermolecular vibrations of small water clusters. Using tunable far infrared laser absorption spectroscopy, large amplitude vibration-rotation-tunneling (VRT) dynamics in vibrationally excited states of the water dimer and the water trimer are investigated. This study begins with the measurement of 12 VRT subbands, consisting of approximately 230 transitions, which are assigned to an 82.6 cm[sup [minus]1] intermolecular vibration of the water dimer-d[sub 4]. Each of the VRT subbands originate from K[sub a][double prime]=0 and terminate in either K[sub a][prime]=0 or 1. These data provide a complete characterization of the tunneling dynamics in the vibrationally excited state as well as definitive symmetry labels for all VRT energy levels. Furthermore, an accurate value for the A[prime] rotational constant is found to agree well with its corresponding ground state value. All other excited state rotational constants are fitted, and discussed in terms of the corresponding ground state constants. In this vibration, the quantum tunneling motions are determined to exhibit large dependencies with both the K[sub a][prime] quantum number and the vibrational coordinate, as is evidenced by the measured tunneling splittings. The generalized internal-axis-method treatment which has been developed to model the tunneling dynamics, is considered for the qualitative description of each tunneling pathway, however, the variation of tunneling splittings with vibrational excitation indicate that the high barrier approximation does not appear to be applicable for this vibrational coordinate. The data are consistent with a motion possessing a[prime] symmetry, and the vibration is assigned as the [nu][sub 12] acceptor bending coordinate. This assignment is in agreement with the vibrational symmetry, the resultsof high level ab initio calculations, and preliminary data assigned to the analogous vibration in the D[sub 2]O-DOH isotopomer.

  20. Vibration-rotation-tunneling dynamics in small water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliano, N.

    1992-11-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize the intermolecular vibrations of small water clusters. Using tunable far infrared laser absorption spectroscopy, large amplitude vibration-rotation-tunneling (VRT) dynamics in vibrationally excited states of the water dimer and the water trimer are investigated. This study begins with the measurement of 12 VRT subbands, consisting of approximately 230 transitions, which are assigned to an 82.6 cm{sup {minus}1} intermolecular vibration of the water dimer-d{sub 4}. Each of the VRT subbands originate from K{sub a}{double_prime}=0 and terminate in either K{sub a}{prime}=0 or 1. These data provide a complete characterization of the tunneling dynamics in the vibrationally excited state as well as definitive symmetry labels for all VRT energy levels. Furthermore, an accurate value for the A{prime} rotational constant is found to agree well with its corresponding ground state value. All other excited state rotational constants are fitted, and discussed in terms of the corresponding ground state constants. In this vibration, the quantum tunneling motions are determined to exhibit large dependencies with both the K{sub a}{prime} quantum number and the vibrational coordinate, as is evidenced by the measured tunneling splittings. The generalized internal-axis-method treatment which has been developed to model the tunneling dynamics, is considered for the qualitative description of each tunneling pathway, however, the variation of tunneling splittings with vibrational excitation indicate that the high barrier approximation does not appear to be applicable for this vibrational coordinate. The data are consistent with a motion possessing a{prime} symmetry, and the vibration is assigned as the {nu}{sub 12} acceptor bending coordinate. This assignment is in agreement with the vibrational symmetry, the resultsof high level ab initio calculations, and preliminary data assigned to the analogous vibration in the D{sub 2}O-DOH isotopomer.

  1. Vibration suppression of advanced space cryocoolers: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    2003-07-01

    Mechanical cryocoolers represent a significant enabling technology for precision space instruments by providing cryogenic temperatures for sensitive infrared, gamma-ray, and x-ray detectors. However, the vibration generated by the cryocooler's refrigeration compressor has long been identified as a critical integration issue. The key sensitivity is the extent to which the cooler's vibration harmonics excite spacecraft resonances and prevent on-board sensors from achieving their operational goals with respect to resolution and pointing accuracy. To reduce the cryocooler's vibration signature to acceptable levels, a variety of active vibration suppression technologies have been developed and implemented over the past 15 years. At this point, nearly all space cryocoolers have active vibration suppression systems built into their drive electronics that reduce the peak unbalanced forces to less than 1% of their original levels. Typical systems of today individually control the vibration in each of the cryocoolers lowest drive harmonics, with some controlling as many as 16 harmonics. A second vibration issue associated with cryocoolers is surviving launch. Here the same pistons and coldfingers that generate vibration during operation are often the most critical elements in terms of surviving high input acceleration levels. Since electrical power is generally not available during launch, passive vibration suppression technologies have been developed. Common vibration damping techniques include electrodynamic braking via shorted motor coils and the use of particle dampers on sensitive cryogenic elements. This paper provides an overview of the vibration characteristics of typical linear-drive space cryocoolers, outlines their history of development, and presents typical performance of the various active and passive vibration suppression systems being used.

  2. Vibration Control of Shallow Shell Structures Using a Shell-Type Dynamic Vibration Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida, T.; Aso, T.; Nakamoto, K.; Kawazoe, K.

    1998-11-01

    In this study, a new shell-type dynamic vibration absorber is presented for suppressing several modes of vibration of the shallow shell (main shell) under harmonic load. It consists of a shallow shell (the dynamic absorbing shell), under the same boundary condition and with the same shape as those of the main shell, with connecting springs and dampers in the vertical direction between the main and dynamic absorbing shells. Formulae for an approximate tuning method for the shell-type dynamic absorber are also presented using the optimum tuning method for a dynamic absorber in the two-degree-of-freedom system, obtained by the Den Hartog method. Subsequently, numerical calculations are presented which demonstrate the usefulness of the shell-type dynamic vibration absorbers.

  3. Vibration and chaos control of non-linear torsional vibrating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bassiouny, A. F.

    2006-07-01

    Vibration of a mechanical system is often an undesirable phenomenon, as it may cause damage, disturbance, discomfort and, sometimes, destruction of systems and structures. To reduce vibration, many methods can be used. The most famous method is using dynamic absorbers or dampers. In the present work, a non-linear elastomeric damper or absorber is used to control the torsional vibrations of the crankshaft in internal combustion engines, when subjected to both external and parametric excitation torques. The multiple time scale perturbation method is applied to determine the equations governing the modulation of both amplitudes and phases of the crankshaft and the absorber. These equations are used to determine the steady-state amplitudes and system stability. Numerical integration of the basic equations is applied to investigate the effects of the different parameters on system behavior. A comparison is made with the available published work. Some recommendations are given at the end of the work.

  4. Use of chaotic and random vibrations to generate high frequency test inputs: Part 2, Chaotic vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T.L.; Gregory, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper and a companion paper show that the traditional limits on amplitude and frequency that can be generated in a laboratory test on a vibration exciter can be substantially extended. This is accomplished by attaching a device to the shaker that permits controlled metal to metal impacts that generate a high acceleration, high frequency environment on a test surface. A companion paper derives some of the mechanical relations for the system. This paper shows that a sinusoidal shaker input can be used to excite deterministic chaotic dynamics of the system yielding a random vibration environment on the test surface, or a random motion of the shaker can be used to generate a random vibration environment on the test surface. Numerical examples are presented to show the kind of environments that can be generated in this system. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Flow-Induced Vibration of Circular Cylindrical Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shoei-Sheng

    1985-06-01

    Flow-induced vibration is a term to denote those phenomena associated with the response of structures placed in or conveying fluid flow. More specifically, the terra covers those cases in which an interaction develops between fluid-dynamic forces and the inertia, damping or elastic forces in the structures. The study of these phenomena draws on three disciplines: (1) structural mechanics, (2) mechanical vibration, and (3) fluid dynamics. The vibration of circular cylinders subject to flow has been known to man since ancient times; the vibration of a wire at its natural frequency in response to vortex shedding was known in ancient Greece as aeolian tones. But systematic studies of the problem were not made until a century ago when Strouhal established the relationship between vortex shedding frequency and flow velocity for a given cylinder diameter. The early research in this area has beer summarized by Zdravkovich (1985) and Goldstein (1965). Flow-induced structural vibration has been experienced in numerous fields, including the aerospace industry, power generation/transmission (turbine blades, heat exchanger tubes, nuclear reactor components), civil engineering (bridges, building, smoke stacks), and undersea technology. The problems have usually been encountered or created accidentally through improper design. In most cases, a structural or mechanical component, designed to meet specific objectives, develops problems when the undesired effects of flow field have not been accounted for in the design. When a flow-induced vibration problem is noted in the design stage, the engineer has different options to eliminate the detrimental vibration. Unfortunately, in many situations, the problems occur after the components are already in operation; the "fix" usually is very costly. Flow-induced vibration comprises complex and diverse phenomena; subcritical vibration of nuclear fuel assemblies, galloping of transmission lines, flutter of pipes conveying fluid, and whirling

  6. Wave based optimization of distributed vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marty; Batton, Brad

    2005-09-01

    The concept of distributed vibration absorbers or DVAs has been investigated in recent years as a method of vibration control and sound radiation control for large flexible structures. These devices are comprised of a distributed compliant layer with a distributed mass layer. When such a device is placed onto a structure it forms a sandwich panel configuration with a very soft core. With this configuration the main effect of the DVA is to create forces normal to the surface of the structure and can be used at low frequencies to either add damping, where constrain layer damper treatments are not very effective, or to pin the structure over a narrow frequency bandwidth (i.e., large input impedance/vibration absorber approach). This paper analyses the behavior of these devices using a wave based approach and finds an optimal damping level for the control of broadband disturbances in panels. The optimal design is calculated by solving the differential equations for waves propagating in coupled plates. It is shown that the optimal damping calculated using the infinite case acts as a good ``rule of thumb'' for designing DVAs to control the vibration of finite panels. This is bourn out in both numerical simulations and experiments.

  7. Vibration damping for the Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Yingling, Adam J.; Griffin, Steven F.; Agrawal, Brij N.; Cobb, Richard G.; Chambers, Trevor S.

    2012-09-01

    The Segmented Mirror Telescope (SMT) at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey is a next-generation deployable telescope, featuring a 3-meter 6-segment primary mirror and advanced wavefront sensing and correction capabilities. In its stowed configuration, the SMT primary mirror segments collapse into a small volume; once on location, these segments open to the full 3-meter diameter. The segments must be very accurately aligned after deployment and the segment surfaces are actively controlled using numerous small, embedded actuators. The SMT employs a passive damping system to complement the actuators and mitigate the effects of low-frequency (<40 Hz) vibration modes of the primary mirror segments. Each of the six segments has three or more modes in this bandwidth, and resonant vibration excited by acoustics or small disturbances on the structure can result in phase mismatches between adjacent segments thereby degrading image quality. The damping system consists of two tuned mass dampers (TMDs) for each of the mirror segments. An adjustable TMD with passive magnetic damping was selected to minimize sensitivity to changes in temperature; both frequency and damping characteristics can be tuned for optimal vibration mitigation. Modal testing was performed with a laser vibrometry system to characterize the SMT segments with and without the TMDs. Objectives of this test were to determine operating deflection shapes of the mirror and to quantify segment edge displacements; relative alignment of λ/4 or better was desired. The TMDs attenuated the vibration amplitudes by 80% and reduced adjacent segment phase mismatches to acceptable levels.

  8. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Ronald J.

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  9. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  10. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  11. Effects of rotated square inserts on the longitudinal vibration band gaps in thin phononic crystal plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haojiang; Liu, Rongqiang; Shi, Chuang; Guo, Hongwei; Deng, Zongquan

    2015-07-01

    Longitudinal vibration of thin phononic crystal plates with a hybrid square-like array of square inserts is investigated. The plane wave expansion method is used to calculate the vibration band structure of the plate. Numerical results show that rotated square inserts can open several vibration gaps, and the band structures are twisted because of the rotation of inserts. Filling fraction and material of the insert affect the change law of the gap width versus the rotation angles of square inserts.

  12. Criteria for first- and second-order vibrational resonances and correct evaluation of the Darling-Dennison resonance coefficients using the canonical Van Vleck perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnoshchekov, Sergey V.; Isayeva, Elena V.; Stepanov, Nikolay F.

    2014-12-21

    The second-order vibrational Hamiltonian of a semi-rigid polyatomic molecule when resonances are present can be reduced to a quasi-diagonal form using second-order vibrational perturbation theory. Obtaining exact vibrational energy levels requires subsequent numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix including the first- and second-order resonance coupling coefficients. While the first-order Fermi resonance constants can be easily calculated, the evaluation of the second-order Darling-Dennison constants requires more complicated algebra for seven individual cases with different numbers of creation-annihilation vibrational quanta. The difficulty in precise evaluation of the Darling-Dennison coefficients is associated with the previously unrecognized interference with simultaneously present Fermi resonances that affect the form of the canonically transformed Hamiltonian. For the first time, we have presented the correct form of the general expression for the evaluation of the Darling-Dennison constants that accounts for the underlying effect of Fermi resonances. The physically meaningful criteria for selecting both Fermi and Darling-Dennison resonances are discussed and illustrated using numerical examples.

  13. Fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes via torsional vibration signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Zuo, Ming J.

    2013-04-01

    Torsional vibration signals are theoretically free from the amplitude modulation effect caused by time variant vibration transfer paths due to the rotation of planet carrier and sun gear, and therefore their spectral structure are simpler than transverse vibration signals. Thus, it is potentially easy and effective to diagnose planetary gearbox faults via torsional vibration signal analysis. We give explicit equations to model torsional vibration signals, considering both distributed gear faults (like manufacturing or assembly errors) and local gear faults (like pitting, crack or breakage of one tooth), and derive the characteristics of both the traditional Fourier spectrum and the proposed demodulated spectra of amplitude envelope and instantaneous frequency. These derivations are not only effective to diagnose single gear fault of planetary gearboxes, but can also be generalized to detect and locate multiple gear faults. We validate experimentally the signal models, as well as the Fourier spectral analysis and demodulation analysis methods.

  14. Hydrogen Bonds and Vibrations of Water on (110) Rutile

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Nitin; Neogi, Sanghamitra; Kent, Paul R; Bandura, Andrei V.; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R; Sofo, Jorge O.

    2009-01-01

    We study the relation between hydrogen bonding and the vibrational frequency spectra of water on the (110) surface of rutile (α-TiO2) with three structural layers of adsorbed water. Using ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations at 280, 300 and 320K, we find strong, crystallographically-controlled adsorption sites, in general agreement with synchrotron X-ray and classical MD simulations. We demonstrate that these sites are produced by strong hydrogen bonds formed between the surface oxygen atoms and sorbed water molecules. The strength of these bonds is manifested by substantial broadening of the stretching mode vibrational band. The overall vibrational spectrum obtained from our simulations is in good agreement with inelastic neutron scattering experiments. We correlate the vibrational spectrum with different bonds at the surface in order to transform these vibrational measurements into a spectroscopy of surface interactions.

  15. Emitted vibration measurement device and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gisler, G. L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention is directed to a method and apparatus for measuring emitted vibrational forces produced by a reaction wheel assembly due to imbalances, misalignment, bearing defects and the like. The apparatus includes a low mass carriage supported on a large mass base. The carriage is in the form of an octagonal frame having an opening which is adapted for receiving the reaction wheel assembly supported thereon by means of a mounting ring. The carriage is supported on the base by means of air bearings which support the carriage in a generally frictionless manner when supplied with compressed air from a source. A plurality of carriage brackets and a plurality of base blocks provided for physical coupling of the base and carriage. The sensing axes of the load cells are arranged generally parallel to the base and connected between the base and carriage such that all of the vibrational forces emitted by the reaction wheel assembly are effectively transmitted through the sensing axes of the load cells. In this manner, a highly reliable and accurate measurment of the vibrational forces of the reaction wheel assembly can be had. The output signals from the load cells are subjected to a dynamical analyzer which analyzes and identifies the rotor and spin bearing components which are causing the vibrational forces.

  16. Piezoelectric vibration-driven locomotion systems - Exploiting resonance and bistable dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongbin; Wang, K. W.

    2017-03-01

    While a piezoelectric-based vibration-driven system is an excellent candidate for actuating small-size crawling-type locomotion robots, it has the major drawback of limited stroke output that would severely constraint the system's locomotion performance. In this paper, to advance the state of the art, we propose two novel designs of piezoelectric vibration-driven locomotion systems. The first utilizes the resonant amplification concept, and the second explores the design of a bistable device. While these two ideas have been explored for piezoelectric actuation amplification in general, they have never been exploited for crawling-type robotic locomotion. Numerical analyses on both systems reveal that resonance and bistability can substantially increase the systems' average locomotion speed. Moreover, this research shows that with bistability, the system is able to output high average locomotion speed in a wider frequency band, possess multiple locomotion modes, and achieve fast switches among them. Through proof-of-concept prototypes, the predicted locomotion performance improvements brought by resonance and bistability are verified. Finally, the basin stability is evaluated to systematically describe the occurring probability of certain locomotion behavior of the bistable system, which would provide useful guideline to the design and control of bistable vibration-driven locomotion systems.

  17. Vibration and acoustic response of an orthotropic composite laminated plate in a hygroscopic environment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Geng, Qian; Li, Yueming

    2013-03-01

    This paper is a study of the vibration and acoustic response characteristics of orthotropic laminated composite plate with simple supported boundary conditions excited by a harmonic concentrated force in a hygroscopic environment. First the natural vibration of the plate with the in-plane forces induced by hygroscopic stress is obtained analytically. Secondly, the sound pressure distribution of the plate at the far field is obtained using the Rayleigh integral. Furthermore, the sound radiation efficiency is deduced. Third, different ratios of elastic modulus in material principal directions are set to research the effects of increasing stiffness of the orthotropic plate on the vibration and acoustic radiation characteristics. Finally, to verify the theoretical solution, numerical simulations are also carried out with commercial finite software. It is found that the natural frequencies decrease with the increase of the moisture content and the first two order modes interconvert at high moisture content. The dynamic response and sound pressure level float to lower frequencies with elevated moisture content. Acoustic radiation efficiency generally floats to the low frequencies and decreases with an increase of moisture content. The dynamic and acoustic responses reduce and the coincidence frequency decreases with the enhanced stiffness.

  18. Modeling and dynamic properties of dual-chamber solid and liquid mixture vibration isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F. S.; Chen, Q.; Zhou, J. H.

    2016-07-01

    The dual-chamber solid and liquid mixture (SALiM) vibration isolator, mainly proposed for vibration isolation of heavy machines with low frequency, consists of four principle parts: SALiM working media including elastic elements and incompressible oil, multi-layers bellows container, rigid reservoir and the oil tube connecting the two vessels. The isolation system under study is governed by a two-degrees-of-freedom (2-DOF) nonlinear equation including quadratic damping. Simplifying the nonlinear damping into viscous damping, the equivalent stiffness and damping model is derived from the equation for the response amplitude. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation reveal that the isolator's stiffness and damping have multiple properties with different parameters, among which the effects of exciting frequency, vibrating amplitude, quadratic damping coefficient and equivalent stiffness of the two chambers on the isolator's dynamics are discussed in depth. Based on the boundary characteristics of stiffness and damping and the main causes for stiffness hardening effect, improvement strategies are proposed to obtain better dynamic properties. At last, experiments were implemented and the test results were generally consistent with the theoretical ones, which verified the reliability of the nonlinear dynamic model.

  19. Analytical model and spectral correction of vibration effects on Fourier transform spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatalina, Irina; Schmidt, Frederic; Saggin, Bortolino; Gac, Nicolas; Kowalski, Matthieu; Giuranna, Marco

    2013-10-01

    Sensitivity to mechanical vibrations of Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS) is a well-known phenomenon. It is especially critical for FTS devoted to atmospheric studies (like the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer (PFS) onboard Mars Express 2003), as absorption bands for the gases of low concentration are comparable with the generated instrument spectral noise. The adopted techniques for the vibration sensitivity reduction suffer of limitations in practical implementation, leaving residual modulations of the interferogram and the so-called ghosts in the spectra. Moreover as it is often impossible to measure the vibrations during the FTS measurement, the position and magnitude of these ghosts cannot be evaluated. Up to now the adopted ghost reduction techniques are mostly based on the averaging of spectra, because the disturbance phase is randomly distributed. This paper presents an innovative data treatment technique which allows single spectrum correction from distortions of unknown nature. Such a technique would increase the spatial resolution of the mapping process and becomes crucial when the desired information is linked to a particular mapping area associated to an individual spectrum. The full study consists in the explicit analysis of the ghost formation and the post-processing algorithm based on the semiblind deconvolution method - an iterative numerical algorithm of the series of consecutive deconvolutions. The technique was tested on the data from the PFS and the algorithm proved to be consistent according to the selected efficiency criteria (coming from the available general information about the signal spectral shape).

  20. Vibrational spectroscopy of resveratrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans; Tyihák, Ernő

    2007-11-01

    In this article the authors deal with the experimental and theoretical interpretation of the vibrational spectra of trans-resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy- trans-stilbene) of diverse beneficial biological activity. Infrared and Raman spectra of the compound were recorded; density functional calculations were carried out resulting in the optimized geometry and several properties of the molecule. Based on the calculated force constants, a normal coordinate analysis yielded the character of the vibrational modes and the assignment of the measured spectral bands.

  1. Vibration-free stirling cryocooler for high definition microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabzev, S. V.; Veprik, A. M.; Vilenchik, H. S.; Pundak, N.; Castiel, E.

    2009-12-01

    The normal operation of high definition Scanning Electronic and Helium Ion microscope tools often relies on maintaining particular components at cryogenic temperatures. This has traditionally been accomplished by using liquid coolants such as liquid Nitrogen. This inherently limits the useful temperature range to above 77 K, produces various operational hazards and typically involves elevated ownership costs, inconvenient logistics and maintenance. Mechanical coolers, over-performing the above traditional method and capable of delivering required (even below 77 K) cooling to the above cooled components, have been well-known elsewhere for many years, but their typical drawbacks, such as high purchasing cost, cooler size, low reliability and high power consumption have so far prevented their wide-spreading. Additional critical drawback is inevitable degradation of imagery performance originated from the wideband vibration export as typical for the operation of the mechanical cooler incorporating numerous movable components. Recent advances in the development of reliable, compact, reasonably priced and dynamically quiet linear cryogenic coolers gave rise to so-called "dry cooling" technologies aimed at eventually replacing the traditional use of outdated liquid Nitrogen cooling facilities. Although much improved these newer cryogenic coolers still produce relatively high vibration export which makes them incompatible with modern high definition microscopy tools. This has motivated further research activity towards developing a vibration free closed-cycle mechanical cryocooler. The authors have successfully adapted the standard low vibration Stirling cryogenic refrigerator (Ricor model K535-LV) delivering 5 W@40 K heat lift for use in vibration-sensitive high definition microscopy. This has been achieved by using passive mechanical counterbalancing of the main portion of the low frequency vibration export in combination with an active feed-forward multi

  2. Development of vibration isolation platform for low amplitude vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Oen; Park, Geeyong; Han, Jae-Hung

    2014-03-01

    The performance of high precision payloads on board a satellite is extremely sensitive to vibration. Although vibration environment of a satellite on orbit is very gentle compared to the launch environment, even a low amplitude vibration disturbances generated by reaction wheel assembly, cryocoolers, etc may cause serious problems in performing tasks such as capturing high resolution images. The most commonly taken approach to protect sensitive payloads from performance degrading vibration is application of vibration isolator. In this paper, development of vibration isolation platform for low amplitude vibration is discussed. Firstly, single axis vibration isolator is developed by adapting three parameter model using bellows and viscous fluid. The isolation performance of the developed single axis isolator is evaluated by measuring force transmissibility. The measured transmissibility shows that both the low Q-factor (about 2) and the high roll-off rate (about -40 dB/dec) are achieved with the developed isolator. Then, six single axis isolators are combined to form Stewart platform in cubic configuration to provide multi-axis vibration isolation. The isolation performance of the developed multi-axis isolator is evaluated using a simple prototype reaction wheel model in which wheel imbalance is the major source of vibration. The transmitted force without vibration isolator is measured and compared with the transmitted force with vibration isolator. More than 20 dB reduction of the X and Y direction (radial direction of flywheel) disturbance is observed for rotating wheel speed of 100 Hz and higher.

  3. Numerical-Optimization Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, Garret N.

    1991-01-01

    Automated Design Synthesis (ADS) computer program is general-purpose numerical-optimization program for design engineering. Provides wide range of options for solution of constrained and unconstrained function minimization problems. Suitable for such applications as minimum-weight design. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  4. Numerical methods in control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrmann, Volker; Xu, Hongguo

    2000-11-01

    We study classical control problems like pole assignment, stabilization, linear quadratic control and H[infinity] control from a numerical analysis point of view. We present several examples that show the difficulties with classical approaches and suggest reformulations of the problems in a more general framework. We also discuss some new algorithmic approaches.

  5. Vibrational molecular modulation in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shu Wei; Chen, Wei-Jan; Kung, A. H.

    2006-12-01

    Detailed numerical modeling of using the vibrational coherence of H2 for molecular modulation is presented. The focus of the calculation is on a strongly driven system aimed at producing many sidebands in the presence of Doppler broadening and the effects of collisions at room temperature. It is shown that Dicke narrowing that reduces the Doppler width plays a critical role in high order sideband generation in room temperature H2 . In addition, the calculation shows that generation of many sidebands favors the phased state as has been reported in all gas phase experiments and is primarily a consequence of the Stark shifts that result from the applied high intensities. The influence of self-focusing in the gas medium that has been conjectured in previous studies is only secondary. The numerical results agree with experimental data obtained in our laboratory, where we have succeeded in generating collinearly propagating Raman sidebands with wavelengths that range from 2216nm in the infrared to 133nm in the vacuum ultraviolet. The frequencies covered by these sidebands span over four octaves for a total of more than 70600cm-1 in the optical region of the spectrum.

  6. A study of circumferentially-heated and block-heated heat pipes. I - Experimental analysis and generalized analytical prediction of capillary limits. II - Three-dimensional numerical modeling as a conjugate problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalhofer, Joseph; Faghri, Amir

    1993-01-01

    The wall and centerline vapor temperatures and heat output are determined experimentally for a low-temperature copper-water heat pipe under uniform circumferential heating and block heating. The time required to reach a vapor temperature of 60 C from an initial ambient temperature of 21 C is determined for both modes of heating. The experimental capillary limit of the heat pipe is compared to the generalized capillary limits for block-heated pipes over a range of vapor temperatures. A three-dimensional numerical model is then developed for determining the temperature, pressure, and velocity distributions in the entire domain of a circumferentially heated and a block-heated pipe. The problem is formulated as a conjugate problem, without the assumption of a uniform vapor temperature. The predictions of the model are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Analytical estimation on divergence and flutter vibrations of symmetrical three-phase induction stator via field-synchronous coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ying; Wang, Shiyu; Sun, Wenjia; Xiu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    The electromagnetically induced parametric vibration of the symmetrical three-phase induction stator is examined. While it can be analyzed by an approximate analytical or numerical method, more accurate and simple analytical method is desirable. This work proposes a new method based on the field-synchronous coordinates. A mechanical-electromagnetic coupling model is developed under this frame such that a time-invariant governing equation with gyroscopic term can be developed. With the general vibration theory, the eigenvalue is formulated; the transition curves between the stable and unstable regions, and response are all determined as closed-form expressions of basic mechanical-electromagnetic parameters. The dependence of these parameters on the instability behaviors is demonstrated. The results imply that the divergence and flutter instabilities can occur even for symmetrical motors with balanced, constant amplitude and sinusoidal voltage. To verify the analytical predictions, this work also builds up a time-variant model of the same system under the conventional inertial frame. The Floquét theory is employed to predict the parametric instability and the numerical integration is used to obtain the parametric response. The parametric instability and response are both well compared against those under the field-synchronous coordinates. The proposed field-synchronous coordinates allows a quick estimation on the electromagnetically induced vibration. The convenience offered by the body-fixed coordinates is discussed across various fields.

  8. Vibrations of fiber-reinforced laminated deep shells

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.; Singh, A.V.

    1996-11-01

    This paper deals with a numerical method for the free vibrational analysis of laminated deep shells. The strain-displacement relations are obtained for a general laminated shell geometry described by orthogonal curvilinear coordinates. Parabolic variation of transverse shear stresses along the thickness and the effects of rotary inertia are included in the formulation. The displacement fields are represented by Bezier patches. The shape and size of these patches are controlled by certain arbitrary points called control points. Owing to the special characteristics of these control points, the treatment of displacements, slopes, curvatures, etc., at a particular edge becomes very simple. Hence, the enforcement of boundary conditions along the edges is straightforward. Ritz-type solution procedure is used for the eigen-analysis of the shell structure. Numerical examples involving laminated spherical, conical, and cylindrical shells are investigated in detail. Such shell geometries usually have planes of symmetry; hence, only one-quarter of the shell is analyzed in this study. Good convergence of the natural frequencies is observed by using eight-order Bezier functions. The results are compared with the existing sources in the literature. The influences of material strength and number of layers on the natural frequencies are also examined.

  9. Vibration Propagation in Spider Webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Ross; Otto, Andrew; Elias, Damian

    Due to their poor eyesight, spiders rely on web vibrations for situational awareness. Web-borne vibrations are used to determine the location of prey, predators, and potential mates. The influence of web geometry and composition on web vibrations is important for understanding spider's behavior and ecology. Past studies on web vibrations have experimentally measured the frequency response of web geometries by removing threads from existing webs. The full influence of web structure and tension distribution on vibration transmission; however, has not been addressed in prior work. We have constructed physical artificial webs and computer models to better understand the effect of web structure on vibration transmission. These models provide insight into the propagation of vibrations through the webs, the frequency response of the bare web, and the influence of the spider's mass and stiffness on the vibration transmission patterns. Funded by NSF-1504428.

  10. Numerical Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sozio, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Senior secondary students cover numerical integration techniques in their mathematics courses. In particular, students would be familiar with the "midpoint rule," the elementary "trapezoidal rule" and "Simpson's rule." This article derives these techniques by methods which secondary students may not be familiar with and an approach that…

  11. Vibration attenuation of conductive beams by inducing eddy currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irazu, L.; Elejabarrieta, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    The increasing requirements for structural vibration control in many industries, require innovative attenuation techniques. In this work, the phenomenon of eddy currents is proposed to reduce the vibration of conductive and non-magnetic beam-like structures without modifying the system, neither the weight nor the stiffness. The motion of a conductive material in a stationary magnetic field induces eddy currents, which in turn generate a repulsive force and attenuate the vibration. In this study, the vibrational response of a thin aluminium beam under a partial and stationary magnetic field is analysed. The influence of the eddy currents is experimentally studied in the bandwidth from 0 to 1 kHz and a preliminary numerical model is proposed. The results show the vibration of all the length of the beam can be attenuated by inducing eddy currents, whereas the natural frequencies of the system remain unmodified. The attenuation of the vibration is more remarkable at low frequencies and when the position of the magnetic field coincides with a maximum vibration of a mode.

  12. Vibration suppression of composite laminated plate with nonlinear energy sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye-Wei; Zhang, Hao; Hou, Shuai; Xu, Ke-Fan; Chen, Li-Qun

    2016-06-01

    The composite laminated plate is widely used in supersonic aircraft. So, there are many researches about the vibration suppression of composite laminated plate. In this paper, nonlinear energy sink (NES) as an effective method to suppress vibration is studied. The coupled partial differential governing equations of the composite laminated plate with the nonlinear energy sink (NES) are established by using the Hamilton principle. The fourth-order Galerkin discrete method is used to truncate the partial differential equations, which are solved by numerical integration method. Meanwhile study about the precise effectiveness of the nonlinear energy sink (NES) by discussing the different installation location of the nonlinear energy sink (NES) at the same speed. The results indicate that the nonlinear energy sink (NES) can significantly suppress the severe vibration of the composite laminated plate with speed wind loadings in to protect the composite laminated plate from excessive vibration.

  13. Improved estimation of random vibration loads in launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R.; Erwin, E.; Suryanarayan, S.; Krishna, Murali M. R.

    1993-01-01

    Random vibration induced load is an important component of the total design load environment for payload and launch vehicle components and their support structures. The current approach to random vibration load estimation is based, particularly at the preliminary design stage, on the use of Miles' equation which assumes a single degree-of-freedom (DOF) system and white noise excitation. This paper examines the implications of the use of multi-DOF system models and response calculation based on numerical integration using the actual excitation spectra for random vibration load estimation. The analytical study presented considers a two-DOF system and brings out the effects of modal mass, damping and frequency ratios on the random vibration load factor. The results indicate that load estimates based on the Miles' equation can be significantly different from the more accurate estimates based on multi-DOF models.

  14. E/M launcher vibration and acceleration data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grzesik, R.G.; Mitchell, D.E.; Sebastian, J.H. ); Chin, I.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on acquired acceleration curves for projectiles electromagnetically launched out of the non-stiff, (epoxy fiber wrapped copper rails) 50 mm Benet barrel which were very noisy and difficult to interpret. The cause for the noise was assumed to be the induced vibration from the barrel and projectile. Standard numerical smoothing techniques were not deemed plausible candidates for mathematical analysis because using them alone would have resulted in curves which would have been superficially smoothed over, concealing possibly interesting transient responses and/or distorting valuable acceleration data. The barrel low frequency vibrations were too interwoven with the acceleration signal and could not be extracted non-intrusively, and the high frequency barrel vibrations were not apparent. The projectile vibrations turned out to be negligible being on the order of magnitude of the accelerometer's background noise.

  15. Energy evaluation of protection effectiveness of anti-vibration gloves.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Tomasz; Dobry, Marian Witalis

    2016-10-06

    This article describes an energy method of assessing protection effectiveness of anti-vibration gloves on the human dynamic structure. The study uses dynamic models of the human and the glove specified in Standard No. ISO 10068:2012. The physical models of human-tool systems were developed by combining human physical models with a power tool model. The combined human-tool models were then transformed into mathematical models from which energy models were finally derived. Comparative energy analysis was conducted in the domain of rms powers. The energy models of the human-tool systems were solved using numerical simulation implemented in the MATLAB/Simulink environment. The simulation procedure demonstrated the effectiveness of the anti-vibration glove as a method of protecting human operators of hand-held power tools against vibration. The desirable effect is achieved by lowering the flow of energy in the human-tool system when the anti-vibration glove is employed.

  16. Simulation of stochastic vibration of maglev track inspection vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingchu; Guan, Xiqiang; Zhang, Jianwu

    2007-05-01

    The stochastic vibration of a maglev track inspection vehicle is the main factor that has direct influence on the accuracy of geometrical measurements of the maglev tracks on board whenever the inspection vehicle is operated at a certain speed. Based upon the principle of motions of the specified vehicle, a vibration model of 5 dof for the maglev track inspection vehicle is proposed and a numerical example is made for the analysis of dynamic responses of the vehicle in stochastic excitation of the maglev track. Effects of vibrations of the vehicle on the accuracy of measuring displacement by laser triangle method are examined. Simulation results of lateral, vertical, roll, pitch, and yaw vibrations for the maglev track inspection vehicle equipped with the measuring system of high precision are provided for the design of the similar vehicles.

  17. Vibration of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vibrational characteristics and mechanical properties of shell structures are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) fundamental equations of thin shell theory, (2) characteristics of thin circular cylindrical shells, (3) complicating effects in circular cylindrical shells, (4) noncircular cylindrical shell properties, (5) characteristics of spherical shells, and (6) solution of three-dimensional equations of motion for cylinders.

  18. Blade Vibration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that an advanced noncontacting stress measurement system (NSMS) could improve classification of blade vibration response in terms of mistuning and closely spaced modes. The Phase II work confirmed the microwave sensor design process, modified the sensor so it is compatible as an upgrade to existing NSMS, and improved and finalized the NSMS software. The result will be stand-alone radar/tip timing radar signal conditioning for current conventional NSMS users (as an upgrade) and new users. The hybrid system will use frequency data and relative mode vibration levels from the radar sensor to provide substantially superior capabilities over current blade-vibration measurement technology. This frequency data, coupled with a reduced number of tip timing probes, will result in a system capable of detecting complex blade vibrations that would confound traditional NSMS systems. The hardware and software package was validated on a compressor rig at Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI). Finally, the hybrid radar/tip timing NSMS software package and associated sensor hardware will be installed for use in the NASA Glenn spin pit test facility.

  19. Compact Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A vibration damper includes a rigid base with a mass coupled thereto for linear movement thereon. Springs coupled to the mass compress in response to the linear movement along either of two opposing directions. A converter coupled to the mass converts the linear movement to a corresponding rotational movement. A rotary damper coupled to the converter damps the rotational movement.

  20. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  1. C0 Vibrational analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Craig D.; Johnson, Todd; Martens, Mike; Syphers, Mike; McCrory, E.; McGee, Mike; Reilly, Rob; /Fermilab

    1999-08-01

    This is an attempt to document some of the measurements and analysis relating to the modulation of the spill due to the vibration of the magnets in the new C0 area. Not all of the relevant graphs were saved at the time, however an attempt has been made to show representative illustrations albeit not in the proper chronological order.

  2. Friction induced rail vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralov, Ivan; Sinapov, Petko; Nedelchev, Krasimir; Ignatov, Ignat

    2012-11-01

    A model of rail, considered as multiple supported beam, subjected on friction induced vibration is studied in this work using FEM. The model is presented as continuous system and the mass and elastic properties of a real object are taken into account. The friction forces are nonlinear functions of the relative velocity during slipping. The problem is solved using Matlab Simulink.

  3. Frontiers in Numerical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Charles R.; Finn, Lee S.; Hobill, David W.

    2011-06-01

    Preface; Participants; Introduction; 1. Supercomputing and numerical relativity: a look at the past, present and future David W. Hobill and Larry L. Smarr; 2. Computational relativity in two and three dimensions Stuart L. Shapiro and Saul A. Teukolsky; 3. Slowly moving maximally charged black holes Robert C. Ferrell and Douglas M. Eardley; 4. Kepler's third law in general relativity Steven Detweiler; 5. Black hole spacetimes: testing numerical relativity David H. Bernstein, David W. Hobill and Larry L. Smarr; 6. Three dimensional initial data of numerical relativity Ken-ichi Oohara and Takashi Nakamura; 7. Initial data for collisions of black holes and other gravitational miscellany James W. York, Jr.; 8. Analytic-numerical matching for gravitational waveform extraction Andrew M. Abrahams; 9. Supernovae, gravitational radiation and the quadrupole formula L. S. Finn; 10. Gravitational radiation from perturbations of stellar core collapse models Edward Seidel and Thomas Moore; 11. General relativistic implicit radiation hydrodynamics in polar sliced space-time Paul J. Schinder; 12. General relativistic radiation hydrodynamics in spherically symmetric spacetimes A. Mezzacappa and R. A. Matzner; 13. Constraint preserving transport for magnetohydrodynamics John F. Hawley and Charles R. Evans; 14. Enforcing the momentum constraints during axisymmetric spacelike simulations Charles R. Evans; 15. Experiences with an adaptive mesh refinement algorithm in numerical relativity Matthew W. Choptuik; 16. The multigrid technique Gregory B. Cook; 17. Finite element methods in numerical relativity P. J. Mann; 18. Pseudo-spectral methods applied to gravitational collapse Silvano Bonazzola and Jean-Alain Marck; 19. Methods in 3D numerical relativity Takashi Nakamura and Ken-ichi Oohara; 20. Nonaxisymmetric rotating gravitational collapse and gravitational radiation Richard F. Stark; 21. Nonaxisymmetric neutron star collisions: initial results using smooth particle hydrodynamics

  4. The effects of vibration-reducing gloves on finger vibration.

    PubMed

    Welcome, Daniel E; Dong, Ren G; Xu, Xueyan S; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W

    2014-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been used to reduce the hand-transmitted vibration exposures from machines and powered hand tools but their effectiveness remains unclear, especially for finger protection. The objectives of this study are to determine whether VR gloves can attenuate the vibration transmitted to the fingers and to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of how these gloves work. Seven adult male subjects participated in the experiment. The fixed factors evaluated include hand force (four levels), glove condition (gel-filled, air bladder, no gloves), and location of the finger vibration measurement. A 3-D laser vibrometer was used to measure the vibrations on the fingers with and without wearing a glove on a 3-D hand-arm vibration test system. This study finds that the effect of VR gloves on the finger vibration depends on not only the gloves but also their influence on the distribution of the finger contact stiffness and the grip effort. As a result, the gloves increase the vibration in the fingertip area but marginally reduce the vibration in the proximal area at some frequencies below 100 Hz. On average, the gloves reduce the vibration of the entire fingers by less than 3% at frequencies below 80 Hz but increase at frequencies from 80 to 400 Hz. At higher frequencies, the gel-filled glove is more effective at reducing the finger vibration than the air bladder-filled glove. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. Active vibration control of structures undergoing bending vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An active vibration control subassembly for a structure (such as a jet engine duct or a washing machine panel) undergoing bending vibrations caused by a source (such as the clothes agitator of the washing machine) independent of the subassembly. A piezoceramic actuator plate is vibratable by an applied electric AC signal. The plate is connected to the structure such that vibrations in the plate induced by the AC signal cause canceling bending vibrations in the structure and such that the plate is compressively pre-stressed along the structure when the structure is free of any bending vibrations. The compressive prestressing increases the amplitude of the canceling bending vibrations before the critical tensile stress level of the plate is reached. Preferably, a positive electric DC bias is also applied to the plate in its poling direction.

  6. Low vibration high numerical aperture automated variable temperature Raman microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Y.; Reijnders, A. A.; Osterhoudt, G. B.; Valmianski, I.; Ramirez, J. G.; Urban, C.; Zhong, R.; Schneeloch, J.; Gu, G.; Henslee, I.; Burch, K. S.

    2016-04-05

    Raman micro-spectroscopy is well suited for studying a variety of properties and has been applied to wide- ranging areas. Combined with tuneable temperature, Raman spectra can offer even more insights into the properties of materials. However, previous designs of variable temperature Raman microscopes have made it extremely challenging to measure samples with low signal levels due to thermal and positional instability as well as low collection efficiencies. Thus, contemporary Raman microscope has found limited applicability to probing the subtle physics involved in phase transitions and hysteresis. This paper describes a new design of a closed-cycle, Raman microscope with full polarization rotation. High collection efficiency, thermal and mechanical stability are ensured by both deliberate optical, cryogenic, and mechanical design. Measurements on two samples, Bi2Se3 and V2O3, which are known as challenging due to low thermal conductivities, low signal levels and/or hysteretic effects, are measured with previously undemonstrated temperature resolution.

  7. Low vibration high numerical aperture automated variable temperature Raman microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Y.; Reijnders, A. A.; Osterhoudt, G. B.; ...

    2016-04-05

    Raman micro-spectroscopy is well suited for studying a variety of properties and has been applied to wide- ranging areas. Combined with tuneable temperature, Raman spectra can offer even more insights into the properties of materials. However, previous designs of variable temperature Raman microscopes have made it extremely challenging to measure samples with low signal levels due to thermal and positional instability as well as low collection efficiencies. Thus, contemporary Raman microscope has found limited applicability to probing the subtle physics involved in phase transitions and hysteresis. This paper describes a new design of a closed-cycle, Raman microscope with full polarizationmore » rotation. High collection efficiency, thermal and mechanical stability are ensured by both deliberate optical, cryogenic, and mechanical design. Measurements on two samples, Bi2Se3 and V2O3, which are known as challenging due to low thermal conductivities, low signal levels and/or hysteretic effects, are measured with previously undemonstrated temperature resolution.« less

  8. Numerical Studies of Localized Vibrating Structures in Nonlinear Lattices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    unity, except in Chapter V, where nonuniformities are discussed. Thus, the lattice in each case is characterized by coupling and damping constants. The...with a simple lattice of point masses connected by massless springs. Except in Chapter V, this and all other lattices will be taken to consist of...next to last element and to the first element; this is essentially a finite ring lattice, except that all effects of curvature of such a ring lattice are

  9. The effects of vibration-reducing gloves on finger vibration

    PubMed Central

    Welcome, Daniel E.; Dong, Ren G.; Xu, Xueyan S.; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been used to reduce the hand-transmitted vibration exposures from machines and powered hand tools but their effectiveness remains unclear, especially for finger protection. The objectives of this study are to determine whether VR gloves can attenuate the vibration transmitted to the fingers and to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of how these gloves work. Seven adult male subjects participated in the experiment. The fixed factors evaluated include hand force (four levels), glove condition (gel-filled, air bladder, no gloves), and location of the finger vibration measurement. A 3-D laser vibrometer was used to measure the vibrations on the fingers with and without wearing a glove on a 3-D hand-arm vibration test system. This study finds that the effect of VR gloves on the finger vibration depends on not only the gloves but also their influence on the distribution of the finger contact stiffness and the grip effort. As a result, the gloves increase the vibration in the fingertip area but marginally reduce the vibration in the proximal area at some frequencies below 100 Hz. On average, the gloves reduce the vibration of the entire fingers by less than 3% at frequencies below 80 Hz but increase at frequencies from 80 to 400 Hz. At higher frequencies, the gel-filled glove is more effective at reducing the finger vibration than the air bladder-filled glove. The implications of these findings are discussed. Relevance to industry Prolonged, intensive exposure to hand-transmitted vibration can cause hand-arm vibration syndrome. Vibration-reducing gloves have been used as an alternative approach to reduce the vibration exposure. However, their effectiveness for reducing finger-transmitted vibrations remains unclear. This study enhanced the understanding of the glove effects on finger vibration and provided useful information on the effectiveness of typical VR gloves at reducing the vibration transmitted to the fingers. The new

  10. A Study on Vibration Isolator for Reaction Wheel Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsutori, Yoichi; Nakasuka, Shinichi

    Reaction wheel assembly used as main actuator of an attitude control system can be a major source of disturbances. Although vibration isolator for a reaction wheel assembly is required to attenuate a disturbance, a control torque has to be transmitted for an attitude control of a satellite. This paper introduces a new design method of vibration isolator for reaction wheel assembly. Proposed method is based on H-infinity formulation and optimizes not only parameters of vibration isolator, but also parameters of satellite's controller simultaneously. At first, numerical model of a parallel link isolator is formulated. Next, the formulations of new design method and constraint conditions are described. After that, results of numerical analysis and availability of proposed method are shown.

  11. Numerical Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    fisica matematica . ABSTRACT - We consider a new method for the numerical solution both of non- linear systems of equations and of cornplementauity... Matematica , Serie V11 Volume 9 , Roma (1989), 521-543 An Inexact Continuous Method for the Solution of Large Systems of Equations and Complementarity...34 - 00185 Roma - Italy APPENDIX 2 A Quadratically Convergent Method for Unear Programming’ Stefano Herzel Dipartimento di Matematica -G. Castelnuovo

  12. Combined effect of noise and vibration produced by high-speed trains on annoyance in buildings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pyoung Jik; Griffin, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    The effects of noise and vibration on annoyance in buildings during the passage of a nearby high-speed train have been investigated in a laboratory experiment with recorded train noise and 20 Hz vibration. The noises included the effects of two types of façade: windows-open and windows-closed. Subjects were exposed to six levels of noise and six magnitudes of vibration, and asked to rate annoyance using an 11-point numerical scale. The experiment consisted of four sessions: (1) evaluation of noise annoyance in the absence of vibration, (2) evaluation of total annoyance from simultaneous noise and vibration, (3) evaluation of noise annoyance in the presence of vibration, and (4) evaluation of vibration annoyance in the absence of noise. The results show that vibration did not influence ratings of noise annoyance, but that total annoyance caused by combined noise and vibration was considerably greater than the annoyance caused by noise alone. The noise annoyance and the total annoyance caused by combined noise and vibration were associated with subject self-ratings of noise sensitivity. Two classical models of total annoyance due to combined noise sources (maximum of the single source annoyance or the integration of individual annoyance ratings) provided useful predictions of the total annoyance caused by simultaneous noise and vibration.

  13. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Barna, B.A.

    1989-04-25

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure are disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration. 4 figs.

  14. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Barna, B.A.

    1987-07-07

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure is disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration. 4 figs.

  15. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Barna, Basil A.

    1989-04-25

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure is disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration.

  16. Free vibration analysis of beams and shafts by programmable calculators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, M. T.; Dias, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The general problem of free vibration analysis of beams and shafts is presented in such a way that the necessary computations can be carried out by using tables, a programmable calculator, or a microcomputer. This approach is of interest to both the vibration specialist and the design engineer. Illustrative examples are given, in which the transfer matrix method is implemented with a programmable calculator or microcomputer.

  17. Vibration analysis of coupled conical-cylindrical-spherical shells using a Fourier spectral element method.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhu; Jin, Guoyong

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a Fourier spectral element method (FSEM) to analyze the free vibration of conical-cylindrical-spherical shells with arbitrary boundary conditions. Cylindrical-conical and cylindrical-spherical shells as special cases are also considered. In this method, each fundamental shell component (i.e., cylindrical, conical, and spherical shells) is divided into appropriate elements. The variational principle in conjunction with first-order shear deformation shell theory is employed to model the shell elements. Since the displacement and rotation components of each element are expressed as a linear superposition of nodeless Fourier sine functions and nodal Lagrangian polynomials, the global equations of the coupled shell structure can be obtained by adopting the assembly procedure. The Fourier sine series in the displacement field is introduced to enhance the accuracy and convergence of the solution. Numerical results show that the FSEM can be effectively applied to vibration analysis of the coupled shell structures. Numerous results for coupled shell structures with general boundary conditions are presented. Furthermore, the effects of geometric parameters and boundary conditions on the frequencies are investigated.

  18. Recursive-operator method in vibration problems for rod systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkova, E. V.

    2009-12-01

    Using linear differential equations with constant coefficients describing one-dimensional dynamical processes as an example, we show that the solutions of these equations and systems are related to the solution of the corresponding numerical recursion relations and one does not have to compute the roots of the corresponding characteristic equations. The arbitrary functions occurring in the general solution of the homogeneous equations are determined by the initial and boundary conditions or are chosen from various classes of analytic functions. The solutions of the inhomogeneous equations are constructed in the form of integro-differential series acting on the right-hand side of the equation, and the coefficients of the series are determined from the same recursion relations. The convergence of formal solutions as series of a more general recursive-operator construction was proved in [1]. In the special case where the solutions of the equation can be represented in separated variables, the power series can be effectively summed, i.e., expressed in terms of elementary functions, and coincide with the known solutions. In this case, to determine the natural vibration frequencies, one obtains algebraic rather than transcendental equations, which permits exactly determining the imaginary and complex roots of these equations without using the graphic method [2, pp. 448-449]. The correctness of the obtained formulas (differentiation formulas, explicit expressions for the series coefficients, etc.) can be verified directly by appropriate substitutions; therefore, we do not prove them here.

  19. Animal Communications Through Seismic Vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Peggy

    2001-05-02

    Substrate vibration has been important to animals as a channel of communication for millions of years, but our literature on vibration in this context of biologically relevant information is only decades old. The jaw mechanism of the earliest land vertebrates allowed them to perceive substrate vibrations as their heads lay on the ground long before airborne sounds could be heard. Although the exact mechanism of vibration production and the precise nature of the wave produced are not always understood, recent development of affordable instrumentation to detect and measure vibrations has allowed researchers to answer increasingly sophisticated questions about how animals send and receive vibration signals. We now know that vibration provides information used in predator defense, prey detection, recruitment to food, mate choice, intrasexual competition, and maternal/brood social interactions in a variety of insect orders, spiders, crabs, scorpions, chameleons, frogs, golden moles, mole rats, kangaroos rats, wallabies, elephants and bison.

  20. Nonlinear nonuniform torsional vibrations of bars by the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapountzakis, E. J.; Tsipiras, V. J.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper a boundary element method is developed for the nonuniform torsional vibration problem of bars of arbitrary doubly symmetric constant cross-section taking into account the effect of geometrical nonlinearity. The bar is subjected to arbitrarily distributed or concentrated conservative dynamic twisting and warping moments along its length, while its edges are supported by the most general torsional boundary conditions. The transverse displacement components are expressed so as to be valid for large twisting rotations (finite displacement-small strain theory), thus the arising governing differential equations and boundary conditions are in general nonlinear. The resulting coupling effect between twisting and axial displacement components is considered and torsional vibration analysis is performed in both the torsional pre- or post-buckled state. A distributed mass model system is employed, taking into account the warping, rotatory and axial inertia, leading to the formulation of a coupled nonlinear initial boundary value problem with respect to the variable along the bar angle of twist and to an "average" axial displacement of the cross-section of the bar. The numerical solution of the aforementioned initial boundary value problem is performed using the analog equation method, a BEM based method, leading to a system of nonlinear differential-algebraic equations (DAE), which is solved using an efficient time discretization scheme. Additionally, for the free vibrations case, a nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problem is formulated with respect to the fundamental mode shape at the points of reversal of motion after ignoring the axial inertia to verify the accuracy of the proposed method. The problem is solved using the direct iteration technique (DIT), with a geometrically linear fundamental mode shape as a starting vector. The validity of negligible axial inertia assumption is examined for the problem at hand.

  1. Concorde noise-induced building vibrations: John F. Kennedy International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayes, W. H.; Stephens, D. G.; Deloach, R.; Cawthorn, J. M.; Holmes, H. K.; Lewis, R. B.; Holliday, B. G.; Ward, D. W.; Miller, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    Outdoor and indoor noise levels resulting from aircraft flyovers and certain nonaircraft events were recorded at eight homesites and a school along with the associated vibration levels in the walls, windows, and floors at these test sites. Limited subjective tests were conducted to examine the human detection and annoyance thresholds for building vibration and rattle caused by aircraft noise. Both vibration and rattle were detected subjectively in several houses for some operations of both the Concorde and subsonic aircraft. Seated subjects more readily detected floor vibrations than wall or window vibrations. Aircraft noise generally caused more window vibrations than common nonaircraft events such as walking and closing doors. Nonaircraft events and aircraft flyovers resulted in comparable wall vibration levels, while floor vibrations were generally greater for nonaircraft events than for aircraft flyovers. The relationship between structural vibration and aircraft noise is linear, with vibration levels being accurately predicted from overall sound pressure levels (OASPL) measured near the structure. Relatively high levels of structural vibration measured during Concorde operations are due more to higher OASPL levels than to unique Concorde-source characteristics.

  2. Maladie des vibrations

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shixin (Cindy); House, Ronald A.

    2017-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Permettre aux médecins de famille de comprendre l’épidémiologie, la pathogenèse, les symptômes, le diagnostic et la prise en charge de la maladie des vibrations, une maladie professionnelle importante et courante au Canada. Sources d’information Une recherche a été effectuée sur MEDLINE afin de relever les recherches et comptes rendus portant sur la maladie des vibrations. Une recherche a été effectuée sur Google dans le but d’obtenir la littérature grise qui convient au contexte canadien. D’autres références ont été tirées des articles relevés. Message principal La maladie des vibrations est une maladie professionnelle répandue touchant les travailleurs de diverses industries qui utilisent des outils vibrants. La maladie est cependant sous-diagnostiquée au Canada. Elle compte 3 éléments : vasculaire, sous la forme d’un phénomène de Raynaud secondaire; neurosensoriel; et musculosquelettique. Aux stades les plus avancés, la maladie des vibrations entraîne une invalidité importante et une piètre qualité de vie. Son diagnostic exige une anamnèse minutieuse, en particulier des antécédents professionnels, un examen physique, des analyses de laboratoire afin d’éliminer les autres diagnostics, et la recommandation en médecine du travail aux fins d’investigations plus poussées. La prise en charge consiste à réduire l’exposition aux vibrations, éviter les températures froides, abandonner le tabac et administrer des médicaments. Conclusion Pour assurer un diagnostic rapide de la maladie des vibrations et améliorer le pronostic et la qualité de vie, les médecins de famille devraient connaître cette maladie professionnelle courante, et pouvoir obtenir les détails pertinents durant l’anamnèse, recommander les patients aux cliniques de médecine du travail et débuter les demandes d’indemnisation de manière appropriée. PMID:28292812

  3. The growth of railway ground vibration problems - A review.

    PubMed

    Connolly, David P; Marecki, Grzegorz P; Kouroussis, Georges; Thalassinakis, Ioannis; Woodward, Peter K

    2016-10-15

    Ground-borne noise and vibration from railway lines can cause human distress/annoyance, and also negatively affect real estate property values. Therefore this paper analyses a collection of technical ground-borne noise and vibration reports, detailing commercial vibration assessments undertaken at 1604 railway track sections, in 9 countries across the world. A wide range of rail projects are considered including light rail, tram lines, underground/tunnelled lines, freight, conventional rail and high speed rail. It documents the rise in ground-borne vibration problems and trends in the prediction industry, with the aim of informing the current research area. Firstly, the reports are analysed chronologically and it is found that railway vibration is a growing global concern, and as such, assessments have become more prevalent. International assessment metrics are benchmarked and it is found that velocity decibels (VdB), vibration dose value (VDV) and peak particle velocity (PPV) are the most commonly used methods of assessment. Furthermore, to predict vibration levels, the physical measurement of frequency transfer functions is preferential to numerical modelling. Results from the reports show that ground vibration limits are exceeded in 44% of assessments, and that ground-borne noise limits are exceeded in 31%. Moreover, mitigation measures were required on approximately 50% of projects, revealing that ground-borne noise and vibration is a widespread railroad engineering challenge. To solve these problems, the most commonly used abatement strategy is a modification of the railtrack structure (active mitigation), rather than the implementation of a more passive solution in the far-field.

  4. Polyad quantum numbers and multiple resonances in anharmonic vibrational studies of polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnoshchekov, Sergey V.; Stepanov, Nikolay F.

    2013-11-01

    In the theory of anharmonic vibrations of a polyatomic molecule, mixing the zero-order vibrational states due to cubic, quartic and higher-order terms in the potential energy expansion leads to the appearance of more-or-less isolated blocks of states (also called polyads), connected through multiple resonances. Such polyads of states can be characterized by a common secondary integer quantum number. This polyad quantum number is defined as a linear combination of the zero-order vibrational quantum numbers, attributed to normal modes, multiplied by non-negative integer polyad coefficients, which are subject to definition for any particular molecule. According to Kellman's method [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 6630 (1990)], the corresponding formalism can be conveniently described using vector algebra. In the present work, a systematic consideration of polyad quantum numbers is given in the framework of the canonical Van Vleck perturbation theory (CVPT) and its numerical-analytic operator implementation for reducing the Hamiltonian to the quasi-diagonal form, earlier developed by the authors. It is shown that CVPT provides a convenient method for the systematic identification of essential resonances and the definition of a polyad quantum number. The method presented is generally suitable for molecules of significant size and complexity, as illustrated by several examples of molecules up to six atoms. The polyad quantum number technique is very useful for assembling comprehensive basis sets for the matrix representation of the Hamiltonian after removal of all non-resonance terms by CVPT. In addition, the classification of anharmonic energy levels according to their polyad quantum numbers provides an additional means for the interpretation of observed vibrational spectra.

  5. Influence of inhomogeneous damping distribution on sound radiation properties of complex vibration modes in rectangular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    In order to reduce noise emitted by vibrating structures additional damping treatments such as constraint layer damping or embedded elastomer layers can be used. To save weight and cost, the additional damping is often placed at some critical locations of the structure, what leads to spatially inhomogeneous distribution of damping. This inhomogeneous distribution of structural damping leads to an occurrence of complex vibration modes, which are no longer dominated by pure standing waves, but by a superposition of travelling and standing waves. The existence of complex vibration modes raises the question about their influence on sound radiation. Previous studies on the sound radiation of complex modes of rectangular plates reveal, that, depending on the direction of travelling waves, the radiation efficiency of structural modes can slightly decrease or significantly increase. These observations have been made using a rectangular plate with a simple inhomogeneous damping configuration which includes a single plate boundary with a higher structural damping ratio. In order to answer the question about the influence of other possible damping configurations on the sound radiation properties, this paper addresses the self- and mutual-radiation efficiencies of the resulting complex vibration modes. Numerical simulations are used for the calculation of complex structural modes of different inhomogeneous damping configurations with varying geometrical form and symmetry. The evaluation of self- and mutual-radiation efficiencies reveals that primarily the symmetry properties of the inhomogeneous damping distribution affect the sound radiation characteristics. Especially the asymmetric distributions of inhomogeneous damping show a high influence on the investigated acoustic metrics. The presented study also reveals that the acoustic cross-coupling between structural modes, which is described by the mutual-radiation efficiencies, generally increases with the presence of

  6. Polyad quantum numbers and multiple resonances in anharmonic vibrational studies of polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Krasnoshchekov, Sergey V; Stepanov, Nikolay F

    2013-11-14

    In the theory of anharmonic vibrations of a polyatomic molecule, mixing the zero-order vibrational states due to cubic, quartic and higher-order terms in the potential energy expansion leads to the appearance of more-or-less isolated blocks of states (also called polyads), connected through multiple resonances. Such polyads of states can be characterized by a common secondary integer quantum number. This polyad quantum number is defined as a linear combination of the zero-order vibrational quantum numbers, attributed to normal modes, multiplied by non-negative integer polyad coefficients, which are subject to definition for any particular molecule. According to Kellman's method [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 6630 (1990)], the corresponding formalism can be conveniently described using vector algebra. In the present work, a systematic consideration of polyad quantum numbers is given in the framework of the canonical Van Vleck perturbation theory (CVPT) and its numerical-analytic operator implementation for reducing the Hamiltonian to the quasi-diagonal form, earlier developed by the authors. It is shown that CVPT provides a convenient method for the systematic identification of essential resonances and the definition of a polyad quantum number. The method presented is generally suitable for molecules of significant size and complexity, as illustrated by several examples of molecules up to six atoms. The polyad quantum number technique is very useful for assembling comprehensive basis sets for the matrix representation of the Hamiltonian after removal of all non-resonance terms by CVPT. In addition, the classification of anharmonic energy levels according to their polyad quantum numbers provides an additional means for the interpretation of observed vibrational spectra.

  7. Free vibrations of rectangular orthotropic shallow shells with varying thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budak, V. D.; Grigorenko, A. Ya.; Puzyrev, S. V.

    2007-06-01

    The paper proposes a numerical-analytic approach to studying the free vibrations of orthotropic shallow shells with double curvature and rectangular planform. The approach is based on the spline-approximation of unknown functions. Calculations are carried out for different types of boundary conditions. The influence of the mid-surface curvature and variable thickness on the behavior of dynamic characteristics is studied

  8. Self-reported back pain in tractor drivers exposed to whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Boshuizen, H C; Bongers, P M; Hulshof, C T

    1990-01-01

    A postal questionnaire on symptoms of ill health and exposure to whole-body vibration was completed by 577 workers (response rate 79%) who were employed in certain functions by two companies 11 years before. The relation between the occupational history of driving vibrating vehicles (mainly agricultural tractors) and back pain has been analyzed. The prevalence of reported back pain is approximately 10% higher in the tractor drivers than in workers not exposed to vibration. The increase is mainly due to more pain in the lower back and more pain lasting at least several days. A vibration dose was calculated by assigning each vehicle driven a vibration magnitude, estimated on the base of vibration measurements. The prevalence of back pain increases with the vibration dose. The highest prevalence odds ratios are found for the more severe types of back pain. These prevalence odds ratios do not increase with the vibration dose. This might be due to health-related selection which is more pronounced for severe back pain than for back pain in general. The two components of the vibration dose, duration of exposure and estimated mean vibration magnitude, have also been considered separately. Back pain increases with duration of exposure but it does not increase with the estimated mean magnitude of vibration. This is probably due to the inaccuracy of this estimate. The higher prevalence of back pain in tractor drivers might be (partly) caused by whole-body vibration, but prolonged sitting and posture might also be of influence.

  9. Vibration-reducing gloves: transmissibility at the palm of the hand in three orthogonal directions.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Thomas W; Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; Xu, Xueyan S; Warren, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves are commonly used as a means to help control exposures to hand-transmitted vibrations generated by powered hand tools. The objective of this study was to characterise the vibration transmissibility spectra and frequency-weighted vibration transmissibility of VR gloves at the palm of the hand in three orthogonal directions. Seven adult males participated in the evaluation of seven glove models using a three-dimensional hand-arm vibration test system. Three levels of hand coupling force were applied in the experiment. This study found that, in general, VR gloves are most effective at reducing vibrations transmitted to the palm along the forearm direction. Gloves that are found to be superior at reducing vibrations in the forearm direction may not be more effective in the other directions when compared with other VR gloves. This casts doubts on the validity of the standardised glove screening test. Practitioner Summary: This study used human subjects to measure three-dimensional vibration transmissibility of vibration-reducing gloves at the palm and identified their vibration attenuation characteristics. This study found the gloves to be most effective at reducing vibrations along the forearm direction. These gloves did not effectively attenuate vibration along the handle axial direction.

  10. Analysis of real-time vibration data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, a few structures have been instrumented to provide continuous vibration data in real time, recording not only large-amplitude motions generated by extreme loads, but also small-amplitude motions generated by ambient loads. The main objective in continuous recording is to track any changes in structural characteristics, and to detect damage after an extreme event, such as an earthquake or explosion. The Fourier-based spectral analysis methods have been the primary tool to analyze vibration data from structures. In general, such methods do not work well for real-time data, because real-time data are mainly composed of ambient vibrations with very low amplitudes and signal-to-noise ratios. The long duration, linearity, and the stationarity of ambient data, however, allow us to utilize statistical signal processing tools, which can compensate for the adverse effects of low amplitudes and high noise. The analysis of real-time data requires tools and techniques that can be applied in real-time; i.e., data are processed and analyzed while being acquired. This paper presents some of the basic tools and techniques for processing and analyzing real-time vibration data. The topics discussed include utilization of running time windows, tracking mean and mean-square values, filtering, system identification, and damage detection.

  11. Molecular vibrational energy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruebele, M.; Bigwood, R.

    This article reviews some recent work in molecular vibrational energy flow (IVR), with emphasis on our own computational and experimental studies. We consider the problem in various representations, and use these to develop a family of simple models which combine specific molecular properties (e.g. size, vibrational frequencies) with statistical properties of the potential energy surface and wavefunctions. This marriage of molecular detail and statistical simplification captures trends of IVR mechanisms and survival probabilities beyond the abilities of purely statistical models or the computational limitations of full ab initio approaches. Of particular interest is IVR in the intermediate time regime, where heavy-atom skeletal modes take over the IVR process from hydrogenic motions even upon X H bond excitation. Experiments and calculations on prototype heavy-atom systems show that intermediate time IVR differs in many aspects from the early stages of hydrogenic mode IVR. As a result, IVR can be coherently frozen, with potential applications to selective chemistry.

  12. Vibration-Response Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic behaviors of structures analyzed interactively. Interactive steadystate vibration-response program, VIBRA, developed. Frequency-response analyses commonly used in evaluating dynamic behaviors of structures subjected to cyclic external forces. VIBRA calculates frequency response using modalsuperposition approach. Method applicable to single or multiple forces applied to linear, proportionally damped structure in which damping is viscous or structural. VIBRA written in FORTRAN 77 for interactive execution.

  13. Vibrational relaxation in hypersonic flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Willard E.; Miner, Gilda A.; Heinbockel, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical formulations of vibrational relaxation are derived from first principles for application to fluid dynamic computations of hypersonic flow fields. Relaxation within and immediately behind shock waves is shown to be substantially faster than that described in current numerical codes. The result should be a significant reduction in nonequilibrium radiation overshoot in shock layers and in radiative heating of hypersonic vehicles; these results are precisely the trends needed to bring theoretical predictions more in line with flight data. Errors in existing formulations are identified and qualitative comparisons are made.

  14. Vibration isolation mounting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Sam D. (Inventor); Bastin, Paul H. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A system is disclosed for mounting a vibration producing device onto a spacecraft structure and also for isolating the vibration forces thereof from the structure. The system includes a mount on which the device is securely mounted and inner and outer rings. The rings and mount are concentrically positioned. The system includes a base (secured to the structure) and a set of links which are interconnected by a set of torsion bars which allow and resist relative rotational movement therebetween. The set of links are also rotatably connected to a set of brackets which are rigidly connected to the outer ring. Damped leaf springs interconnect the inner and outer rings and the mount allow relative translational movement therebetween in X and Y directions. The links, brackets and base are interconnected and configured so that they allow and resist translational movement of the device in the Z direction so that in combination with the springs they provide absorption of vibrational energy produced by the device in all three dimensions while providing rotational stiffness about all three axes to prevent undesired rotational motions.

  15. Vibrational stability of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangfan; Wang, Biao

    2013-05-01

    The mechanical stability of graphene as temperature rises is analyzed based on three different self-consistent phonon (SCP) models. Compared with three-dimensional (3-D) materials, the critical temperature Ti at which instability occurs for graphene is much closer to its melting temperature Tm obtained from Monte Carlo simulation (Ti ≃ 2Tm, K. V. Zakharchenko, A. Fasolino, J. H. Los, and M. I. Katsnelson, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 23, 202202). This suggests that thermal vibration plays a significant role in melting of graphene while melting for 3-D materials is often dominated by topologic defects. This peculiar property of graphene derives from its high structural anisotropy, which is characterized by the vibrational anisotropic coefficient (VAC), defined upon its Lindermann ratios in different directions. For any carbon based material with a graphene-like structure, the VAC value must be smaller than 5.4 to maintain its stability. It is also found that the high VAC value of graphene is responsible for its negative thermal expansion coefficient at low temperature range. We believe that the VAC can be regarded as a new criterion concerning the vibrational stability of any low-dimensional (low-D) materials.

  16. Coupled mode parametric resonance in a vibrating screen model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepyan, Leonid I.; Slepyan, Victor I.

    2014-02-01

    We consider a simple dynamic model of the vibrating screen operating in the parametric resonance (PR) mode. This model was used in the course of designing and setting of such a screen in LPMC. The PR-based screen compares favorably with conventional types of such machines, where the transverse oscillations are excited directly. It is characterized by larger values of the amplitude and by insensitivity to damping in a rather wide range. The model represents an initially strained system of two equal masses connected by a linearly elastic string. Self-equilibrated, longitudinal, harmonic forces act on the masses. Under certain conditions this results in transverse, finite-amplitude oscillations of the string. The problem is reduced to a system of two ordinary differential equations coupled by the geometric nonlinearity. Damping in both the transverse and longitudinal oscillations is taken into account. Free and forced oscillations of this mass-string system are examined analytically and numerically. The energy exchange between the longitudinal and transverse modes of free oscillations is demonstrated. An exact analytical solution is found for the forced oscillations, where the coupling plays the role of a stabilizer. In a more general case, the harmonic analysis is used with neglect of the higher harmonics. Explicit expressions for all parameters of the steady nonlinear oscillations are determined. The domains are found where the analytically obtained steady oscillation regimes are stable. Over the frequency ranges, where the steady oscillations exist, a perfect correspondence is found between the amplitudes obtained analytically and numerically. Illustrations based on the analytical and numerical simulations are presented.

  17. A critical study on the experimental determination of stiffness and viscosity of the human triceps surae by free vibration methods.

    PubMed

    París-García, Federico; Barroso, Alberto; Cañas, José; Ribas, Juan; París, Federico

    2013-09-01

    Muscles and tendons play an important role in human performance. Their mechanical behaviour can be described by analytical/numerical models including springs and dampers. Free vibration techniques are a widely used approach to the in vivo determination of stiffness and viscosity of muscle-tendon complexes involved in sport movements. By considering the data reported in the literature, it appears that the visco-elastic properties of the triceps surae muscle-tendon complexes are independent of the modality in which free vibration is induced as well as they do not depend on the composition of the population of subjects submitted to the experiments. This research will critically discuss this important aspect focussing in particular on two studies documented in the literature. For this purpose, two equipments will be developed to reproduce literature experiments under the assumption that the oscillating part of the body behaves as a single-degree-of-freedom system: The governing degree of freedom is associated with the vertical displacement of the lower leg or with the rotation of the foot around the ankle articulation. Unlike literature, measurements are now conducted on the same population of subjects in order to draw more general conclusions on the real equivalence of results and validity of the mechanical properties determined experimentally. Free vibration tests are accurately simulated by analytical models describing the response of each vibrating system. It is found that if the two measurement protocols are applied to the same population of individuals as it is done in this study, values of visco-elastic properties of muscle-tendon complexes extracted from experimental data are significantly different, the differences presenting a convincing consistency. This result is in contrast with the literature and confirms the need to evaluate results of free vibration techniques by taking homogeneous bases of comparison.

  18. Multi-modal vibration amplitudes of taut inclined cables due to direct and/or parametric excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, J. H. G.

    2016-02-01

    Cables are often prone to potentially damaging large amplitude vibrations. The dynamic excitation may be from external loading or motion of the cable ends, the latter including direct excitation, normally from components of end motion transverse to the cable, and parametric excitation induced by axial components of end motion causing dynamic tension variations. Geometric nonlinearity can be important, causing stiffening behaviour and nonlinear modal coupling. Previous analyses of the vibrations, often neglecting sag, have generally dealt with direct and parametric excitation separately or have reverted to numerical solutions of the responses. Here a nonlinear cable model is adopted, applicable to taut cables such as on cable-stayed bridges, that allows for cable inclination, small sag (such that the vibration modes are similar to those of a taut string), multiple modes in both planes and end motion and/or external forcing close to any natural frequency. Based on the method of scaling and averaging it is found that, for sinusoidal inputs and positive damping, non-zero steady state responses can only occur in the modes in each plane with natural frequencies close to the excitation frequency and those with natural frequencies close to half this frequency. Analytical solutions, in the form of non-dimensional polynomial equations, are derived for the steady state vibration amplitudes in up to three modes simultaneously: the directly excited mode, the corresponding nonlinearly coupled mode in the orthogonal plane and a parametrically excited mode with half the natural frequency. The stability of the solutions is also identified. The outputs of the equations are consistent with previous results, where available. Example results from the analytical solutions are presented for a typical inclined bridge cable subject to vertical excitation of the lower end, and they are validated by numerical integration of the equations of motion and against some previous experimental

  19. Coupling system dynamics and contact behaviour: Modelling bearings subjected to environmental induced vibrations and ‘false brinelling’ degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massi, Francesco; Rocchi, J.; Culla, A.; Berthier, Y.

    2010-05-01

    During the last decades the increase in power of mechanical systems and the demand for increasing service life leads mechanical components of a system to work in extreme conditions. Moreover, actual mechanical systems include surfaces in sliding contact that are subjected to wear if exposed to high vibration. In fact, the vibration of components in contact results in large oscillations of the local contact stresses, due to the local deformation of the components at the contact interfaces. To approach correctly tribological problems, the coupling between the scale of the mechanism (system dynamics) and the scale of the contact needs to be accounted for. This paper presents an analysis concerning the influence of the vibrations induced by aircraft engines on the contact stresses of rolling bearings of the bleed system valves. To study the wear, resulting from false brinelling at the contact surfaces between balls and races of the bearings, it is then necessary to determine the forces due to the system vibrations and acting at the bearing connections with the structure. In order to perform a numerical transient analysis of the system dynamics a nonlinear simplified model of the valve (mechanism scale) is developed. The model is validated by comparing the numerical results with experimental tests. The time behaviour of the global forces on the bearings, and the respective displacements between the contact surfaces, are then used as inputs for a finite element model of the bearings (contact scale). The model is used to calculate and analyze the behaviour in time of the local contact constraints between race and balls. This analysis, developed in the framework of a European project, is an example of the proposed general approach to contact problems, by coupling the analysis of the mechanism and contact scales.

  20. Anti-correlated vibrations drive fast non-adiabatic light harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, David

    2015-03-01

    We have recently shown that intramolecular vibrations shared across pigments can drive electronic energy transfer beyond the Born-Oppenheimer framework developed by Forster. The key features of this mechanism are a small change in vibrational equilibrium (less than the zero point amplitude) upon electronic excitation of the pigments and vibrational resonance with the adiabatic electronic energy gap. For identical pigments, delocalized, anti-correlated vibrations increase the speed of energy transfer. The same anti-correlated vibrations are excited by an electronically enhanced Raman process on the ground electronic state of photosynthetic antennas, and these vibrational wavepackets generate all of the reported signatures of photosynthetic energy transfer in femtosecond two-dimensional Fourier transform spectra. The talk will discuss how these results are generalized for differences between donor and acceptor and for multiple vibrations. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award No. FA9550-14-1-0258.

  1. Simulation of Satellite Vibration Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettacchioli, Alain

    2014-06-01

    During every mechanical qualification test of satellites on vibrator, we systematically notice beating phenomena that appear every time we cross a mode's frequency. There could lead to an over-qualification of the tested specimen when the beating reaches a maximum and a under-qualification when the beating passes by a minimum. On a satellite, three lateral modes raise such a problem in a recurring way: the first structure mode (between 10 and 15 hertz) and the two tanks modes (between 35 and 50 hertz).To step forward in the resolution of this problem, we are developing a simulator which is based on the identification of the responses of the accelerometers that are fixed on the satellite and on the shaker slip table. The estimated transfer functions then allow to reconstruct at once the sensors response and the drive which generated them.For the simulation, we do not select all the sensors but only those on the slip table and those used to limit the input level (notching). We may also add those which were close to generate a notching.To perform its calculations, the simulator reproduces on one hand the unity amplitude signal (cola) which serves as frequency reference for the sweep achievement (generally 3 octaves per minute from 5 to 100 and even 150 Hertz), and on the other hand, the vibrator control loop. The drive amplitude is calculated at each cola's period by taking into account a compression factor. The control applied through the amplifier to the shaker coil is the product of this amplitude by the cola. The simulated measurements are updated at each sampling period thanks to the propagation of the identified model. The superposition of these curves on those supplied by real sensors during the tests allows to validate the simulation.Thereby, it seems possible to actively control the beatings thanks to a real-time corrector which uses these identifications.

  2. Nonlinear frequency response analysis of structural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeger, Oliver; Wever, Utz; Simeon, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present a method for nonlinear frequency response analysis of mechanical vibrations of 3-dimensional solid structures. For computing nonlinear frequency response to periodic excitations, we employ the well-established harmonic balance method. A fundamental aspect for allowing a large-scale application of the method is model order reduction of the discretized equation of motion. Therefore we propose the utilization of a modal projection method enhanced with modal derivatives, providing second-order information. For an efficient spatial discretization of continuum mechanics nonlinear partial differential equations, including large deformations and hyperelastic material laws, we employ the concept of isogeometric analysis. Isogeometric finite element methods have already been shown to possess advantages over classical finite element discretizations in terms of higher accuracy of numerical approximations in the fields of linear vibration and static large deformation analysis. With several computational examples, we demonstrate the applicability and accuracy of the modal derivative reduction method for nonlinear static computations and vibration analysis. Thus, the presented method opens a promising perspective on application of nonlinear frequency analysis to large-scale industrial problems.

  3. Free Vibration of Uncertain Unsymmetrically Laminated Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.; Goyal, Vijay K.

    2001-01-01

    Monte Carlo Simulation and Stochastic FEA are used to predict randomness in the free vibration response of thin unsymmetrically laminated beams. For the present study, it is assumed that randomness in the response is only caused by uncertainties in the ply orientations. The ply orientations may become random or uncertain during the manufacturing process. A new 16-dof beam element, based on the first-order shear deformation beam theory, is used to study the stochastic nature of the natural frequencies. Using variational principles, the element stiffness matrix and mass matrix are obtained through analytical integration. Using a random sequence a large data set is generated, containing possible random ply-orientations. This data is assumed to be symmetric. The stochastic-based finite element model for free vibrations predicts the relation between the randomness in fundamental natural frequencies and the randomness in ply-orientation. The sensitivity derivatives are calculated numerically through an exact formulation. The squared fundamental natural frequencies are expressed in terms of deterministic and probabilistic quantities, allowing to determine how sensitive they are to variations in ply angles. The predicted mean-valued fundamental natural frequency squared and the variance of the present model are in good agreement with Monte Carlo Simulation. Results, also, show that variations between plus or minus 5 degrees in ply-angles can affect free vibration response of unsymmetrically and symmetrically laminated beams.

  4. CFD Simulations of Vibration Induced Droplet Ejection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Ashley; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1998-11-01

    Vibration-induced droplet ejection is a process that occurs when a liquid droplet is placed on a vibrating membrane. Above a critical value of the excitation amplitude, Faraday waves form on the surface of the drop. As the amplitude is increased secondary drops are ejected from the wave crests. A Navier-Stokes solver designed to simulate the transient fluid mechanics of the process is presented. The solver is based on a MAC method on a staggered grid. A volume of fluid method is implemented to track the free surface. The volume fraction is advected via a second-order, unsplit method that minimizes numerical diffusion of the interface. Surface tension is incorporated as a continuum surface force. This work is intended to provide a comprehensive description of the fluid dynamics involved in vibration-induced droplet ejection, with the aim of understanding the mechanism behind the ejection process. The evolution of the interface through droplet ejection will be simulated. The dependence of the ejection process on the driving parameters will be evaluated and the resonance characteristics of the drop will be determined. The results of the computations will be compared with experimental results.

  5. Theoretical and experimental study of vibration, generated by monorail trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybak, Samuil A.; Makhortykh, Sergey A.; Kostarev, Stanislav A.

    2002-11-01

    Monorail transport as all other city transport vehicles is the source of high noise and vibration levels. It is less widespread than cars or underground transport but its influence in modern cities enhances. Now in Moscow the first monorail road with trains on tires is designed, therefore the problem of vibration and noise assessments and prediction of its impact on the residential region appears. To assess the levels of generated vibration a physical model of interaction in the system wagon-tire-road coating-viaduct-soil has been proposed and then numerically analyzed. The model is based on the known from publications facts of automobile transport vibration and our own practice concerning underground trains vibration generation. To verify computer simulation results and adjust model parameters the series of measurements of noise and vibration near experimental monorail road was carried out. In the report the results of calculations and measurements will be presented and some outcomes of possible acoustical ecologic situation near monorail roads will be proposed.

  6. Vibration-Based Damage Detection in Rotating Machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffey, T.A.

    1999-06-28

    Damage detection as determined from changes in the vibration characteristics of a system has been a popular research topic for the last thirty years. Numerous damage identification algorithms have been proposed for detecting and locating damage in structural and mechanical systems. To date, these damage-detection methods have shown mixed results. A particular application of vibration-based damage detection that has perhaps enjoyed the greatest success is that of damage detection in rotating machinery. This paper summarizes the state of technology in vibration-based damage detection applied to rotating machinery. The review interprets the damage detection process in terms of a statistical pattern recognition paradigm that encompasses all vibration-based damage detection methods and applications. The motivation for the study reported herein is to identify the reasons that vibration-based damage detection has been successfully applied to rotating machinery, but has yet to show robust applications to civil engineering infrastructure. The paper concludes by comparing and contrasting the vibration-based damage detection applied to rotating machinery with large civil engineering infrastructure applications.

  7. Railway ground vibrations induced by wheel and rail singular defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouroussis, Georges; Connolly, David P.; Alexandrou, Georgios; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos

    2015-10-01

    Railway local irregularities are a growing source of ground-borne vibration and can cause negative environmental impacts, particularly in urban areas. Therefore, this paper analyses the effect of railway track singular defects (discontinuities) on ground vibration generation and propagation. A vehicle/track/soil numerical railway model is presented, capable of accurately predicting vibration levels. The prediction model is composed of a multibody vehicle model, a flexible track model and a finite/infinite element soil model. Firstly, analysis is undertaken to assess the ability of wheel/rail contact models to accurately simulate the force generation at the wheel/rail contact, in the presence of a singular defect. It is found that, although linear contact models are sufficient for modelling ground vibration on smooth tracks, when singular defects are present higher accuracy wheel/rail models are required. Furthermore, it is found that the variation in wheel/rail force during the singular defect contact depends on the track flexibility, and thus requires a fully coupled vehicle/track/foundation model. Next, a parametric study of ground vibrations generated by singular rail and wheel defects is undertaken. Six shapes of discontinuity are modelled, representing various defect types such as transition zones, switches, crossings, rail joints and wheel flats. The vehicle is modelled as an AM96 train set and it is found that ground vibration levels are highly sensitive to defect height, length and shape.

  8. Harmonic motion detection in a vibrating scattering medium.

    PubMed

    Urban, Matthew W; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James

    2008-09-01

    Elasticity imaging is an emerging medical imaging modality that seeks to map the spatial distribution of tissue stiffness. Ultrasound radiation force excitation and motion tracking using pulse-echo ultrasound have been used in numerous methods. Dynamic radiation force is used in vibrometry to cause an object or tissue to vibrate, and the vibration amplitude and phase can be measured with exceptional accuracy. This paper presents a model that simulates harmonic motion detection in a vibrating scattering medium incorporating 3-D beam shapes for radiation force excitation and motion tracking. A parameterized analysis using this model provides a platform to optimize motion detection for vibrometry applications in tissue. An experimental method that produces a multifrequency radiation force is also presented. Experimental harmonic motion detection of simultaneous multifrequency vibration is demonstrated using a single transducer. This method can accurately detect motion with displacement amplitude as low as 100 to 200 nm in bovine muscle. Vibration phase can be measured within 10 degrees or less. The experimental results validate the conclusions observed from the model and show multifrequency vibration induction and measurements can be performed simultaneously.

  9. Detecting small surface vibrations by passive electro-optical illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buoni, Matthew; Pereira, Wellesley; Weber, Reed A.; Garcia-Cervera, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    We have performed research to understand the feasibility of using signals received by EOIR sensors to detect small vibrations in surfaces illuminated by sunlight. The vibration models consider buildings with vibrating roofs, as well as ground vibrations due to buried structures. For the surface buildings, we investigated two approaches. One involved treating the roof as an elastic medium subject to deformation resulting in a PDE whose solution describes the fluctuation in the surface's normal direction vector. The second approach treated the roof as a rigid mass subject to motion in six degrees of freedom, while modeling the dynamics of the building's frame, and tuning the parameters to result in resonant frequencies similar to real buildings (~3-7 Hz). We applied the appropriate physical models of reflected and scattered light to various surfaces, specular (insulator or conductor), rough but still reflective, or diffusely scattering (Lambertian). Matlab code was developed to perform numerical simulations of any system configuration described above and easily add new models. The main engine of the code is a signal calculator and analyzer that sums the total intensity of received light over a "scene" with a variety of surface materials, orientations, polarization (if any), and other parameters. A resulting signal versus time is generated that may be analyzed in order to: 1) optimize sensitivity, or 2) detect the vibration signature of a structure of interest. The results of this study will enable scientists/engineers to optimize signal detection, possibly from space, for passive exploitation of scattered light modulated by vibrating surfaces.

  10. Large amplitude vibrations and damage detection of rectangular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoach, Emil; Trendafilova, Irina

    2008-08-01

    In this work, geometrically nonlinear vibrations of fully clamped rectangular plates are used to study the sensitivity of some nonlinear vibration response parameters to the presence of damage. The geometrically nonlinear version of the Mindlin plate theory is used to model the plate behaviour. Damage is represented as a stiffness reduction in a small area of the plate. The plate is subjected to harmonic loading with a frequency of excitation close to the first natural frequency leading to large amplitude vibrations. The plate vibration response is obtained by a pseudo-load mode superposition method. The main results are focussed on establishing the influence of damage on the vibration response of the plate and the change in the time-history diagrams and the Poincaré maps caused by the damage. Finally, a criterion and a damage index for detecting the presence and the location of the damage is proposed. The criterion is based on analysing the points in the Poincaré sections of the damaged and healthy plate. Numerical results for large amplitude vibrations of damaged and healthy rectangular and square plates are presented and the proposed damage index for the considered cases is calculated. The criterion demonstrates quite good abilities to detect and localize damage.

  11. Harmonic Motion Detection in a Vibrating Scattering Medium

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Elasticity imaging is an emerging medical imaging modality that seeks to map the spatial distribution of tissue stiffness. Ultrasound radiation force excitation and motion tracking using pulse-echo ultrasound have been used in numerous methods. Dynamic radiation force is used in vibrometry to cause an object or tissue to vibrate, and the vibration amplitude and phase can be measured with exceptional accuracy. This paper presents a model that simulates harmonic motion detection in a vibrating scattering medium incorporating 3-D beam shapes for radiation force excitation and motion tracking. A parameterized analysis using this model provides a platform to optimize motion detection for vibrometry applications in tissue. An experimental method that produces a multifrequency radiation force is also presented. Experimental harmonic motion detection of simultaneous multifrequency vibration is demonstrated using a single transducer. This method can accurately detect motion with displacement amplitude as low as 100 to 200 nm in bovine muscle. Vibration phase can be measured within 10° or less. The experimental results validate the conclusions observed from the model and show multifrequency vibration induction and measurements can be performed simultaneously. PMID:18986892

  12. Shunted Piezoelectric Vibration Damping Analysis Including Centrifugal Loading Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Provenza, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive vibration of turbomachinery blades causes high cycle fatigue problems which require damping treatments to mitigate vibration levels. One method is the use of piezoelectric materials as passive or active dampers. Based on the technical challenges and requirements learned from previous turbomachinery rotor blades research, an effort has been made to investigate the effectiveness of a shunted piezoelectric for the turbomachinery rotor blades vibration control, specifically for a condition with centrifugal rotation. While ample research has been performed on the use of a piezoelectric material with electric circuits to attempt to control the structural vibration damping, very little study has been done regarding rotational effects. The present study attempts to fill this void. Specifically, the objectives of this study are: (a) to create and analyze finite element models for harmonic forced response vibration analysis coupled with shunted piezoelectric circuits for engine blade operational conditions, (b) to validate the experimental test approaches with numerical results and vice versa, and (c) to establish a numerical modeling capability for vibration control using shunted piezoelectric circuits under rotation. Study has focused on a resonant damping control using shunted piezoelectric patches on plate specimens. Tests and analyses were performed for both non-spinning and spinning conditions. The finite element (FE) shunted piezoelectric circuit damping simulations were performed using the ANSYS Multiphysics code for the resistive and inductive circuit piezoelectric simulations of both conditions. The FE results showed a good correlation with experimental test results. Tests and analyses of shunted piezoelectric damping control, demonstrating with plate specimens, show a great potential to reduce blade vibrations under centrifugal loading.

  13. Vibrational averages along thermal lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserrat, Bartomeu

    2016-01-01

    A method is proposed for the calculation of vibrational quantum and thermal expectation values of physical properties from first principles. Thermal lines are introduced: these are lines in configuration space parametrized by temperature, such that the value of any physical property along them is approximately equal to the vibrational average of that property. The number of sampling points needed to explore the vibrational phase space is reduced by up to an order of magnitude when the full vibrational density is replaced by thermal lines. Calculations of the vibrational averages of several properties and systems are reported, namely, the internal energy and the electronic band gap of diamond and silicon, and the chemical shielding tensor of L-alanine. Thermal lines pave the way for complex calculations of vibrational averages, including large systems and methods beyond semilocal density functional theory.

  14. Vibration Behavior of Composite Beams with Rectangular Sections Considering the Different Shear Correction Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldırım, Vebil

    As is well known, there are the first and higher order shear deformation theories that involve the shear correction factor (k- factor), which appears as a coefficient in the expression for the transverse shear stress resultant, to consider the shear deformation effects with a good approximation as a result of non-uniform distribution of the shear stresses over the cross-section of the beam. Timoshenko's beam theory (TBT) accounts both the shear and rotatory inertia effects based upon the first order shear deformation theory which offers the simple and acceptable solutions. The numerical value of the k-factor which was originally proposed by Timoshenko depends upon generally both the Poisson's ratio of the material and the shape of the cross-section. Recently, especially the numerical value of the k-factor for rectangular sections is examined by both theoretical and experimental manners. Although there are no large numerical differences among the most of the theories, a few of them says that the k-factor varies obviously with the aspect ratio of rectangular sections while Timoshenko's k-factor is applicable for small aspect ratios. In this study, the effect of the different k-factors developed by Timoshenko, Cowper and Hutchinson on the in-plane free vibration of the orthotropic beams with different boundary conditions and different aspect ratios are studied numerically based on the transfer matrix method. For the first six frequencies, the relative differences of among the theories are presented by charts.

  15. Integrated passive/active vibration absorber for multi-story buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina J.; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Horta, Lucas G.

    1995-01-01

    Passive isolator, active vibration absorber, and an integrated passive/active (hybrid) control are studied for their effectiveness in reducing structural vibration under seismic excitations. For the passive isolator, a laminated rubber bearing base isolator which has been studied and used extensively by researchers and seismic designers is considered. An active vibration absorber concept, which can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability with minimum knowledge of the controlled system, is used to reduce the passive isolator displacement and to suppress the top floor vibration. A three-story building model is used for the numerical simulation. The performance of an active vibration absorber and a hybrid vibration controller in reducing peak structural responses is compared with the passively isolated structural response and with absence of vibration control systems under the N00W component of El Centro 1940 and N90W component of the Mexico City earthquake excitation records. The results show that the integrated passive/active vibration control system is most effective in suppressing the peak structural acceleration for the El Centro 1940 earthquake when compared with the passive or active vibration absorber alone. The active vibration absorber, however, is the only system that suppresses the peak acceleration of the structure for the Mexico City 1985 earthquake.

  16. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, James M.; Barney, Patrick S.; Parker, Gordon G.; Smith, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof.

  17. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, J.M.; Barney, P.S.; Parker, G.G.; Smith, D.A.

    1999-06-22

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof. 38 figs.

  18. Blasting vibrations control: The shortcomings of traditional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Vuillaume, P.M.; Kiszlo, M.; Bernard, T.

    1996-12-31

    In the context of its studies for the French ministry of the environment and for the French national coal board, INERIS (the French institute for the industrial environment and hazards, formerly CERCHAR) has made a complete critical survey of the methods generally used to reduce the levels of blasting vibrations. It is generally acknowledged that the main parameter to control vibrations is the so-called instantaneous charge, or charge per delay. This should be reduced as much as possible in order to diminish vibration levels. On account of this, the use of a new generation of blasting devices, such as non-electric detonators or electronic sequential timers has been developed since the seventies. INERIS has collected data from about 900 blasts in 2 quarries and 3 open pit mines. These data include input parameters such as borehole diameter, burden, spacing, charge per hole, charge per delay, total fired charge, etc ... They also include output measurements, such as vibration peak particle velocities, and main frequencies. These data have been analyzed with the help of multi variable statistical tools. Blasting tests were undertaken to evaluate new methods of vibrations control, such as the superposition of vibration signals. These methods appear to be accurate in many critical cases, but certainly would be highly improved with a better accuracy of firing delays. The development of electronic detonators seems to be the way of the future for a better blasting control.

  19. Hydrogen bonded OH-stretching vibration in the water dimer.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Daniel P; Lane, Joseph R; Kjaergaard, Henrik G

    2007-02-01

    We have calculated the frequencies and intensities of the hydrogen-bonded OH-stretching transitions in the water dimer complex. The potential-energy curve and dipole-moment function are calculated ab initio at the coupled cluster with singles, doubles, and perturbative triples level of theory with correlation-consistent Dunning basis sets. The vibrational frequencies and wavefunctions are found from a numerical solution to a one-dimensional Schrödinger equation. The corresponding transition intensities are found from numerical integration of these vibrational wavefunctions with the ab initio calculated dipole moment function. We investigate the effect of counterpoise correcting both the potential-energy surface and dipole-moment function. We find that the effect of using a numeric potential is significant for higher overtones and that inclusion of a counterpoise correction for basis set superposition error is important.

  20. Vibration Transmission through Bearings with Application to Gearboxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Cabin noise has become a major concern to manufacturers and users of helicopters. Gear noise is the largest part of this unwanted sound. The crucial noise path is generally considered to be from the gears through the gear-supporting shafts and bearings into the gearbox case, and from there either through the gearbox mounts or the surrounding air to the helicopter cabin. If the noise, that is, the gear and shaft vibration, can be prevented from traveling through the gearbox bearings, then the noise cannot make its way into the helicopter cabin. Thus the vibration-transmitting properties of bearings are of paramount importance. This paper surveys the literature concerning evaluation of properties for the types of bearings used in helicopter gearboxes. A simple model is proposed to evaluate vibration transmission, using measured or calculated bearing stiffness and damping. Less-commonly used types of gearbox bearings (e.g., fluid film) are evaluated for their potential in reducing vibration transmission.

  1. Investigation of Vibrational Control of the Bridgman Crystal Growth Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedoseyev, Alexandre I.; Alexander, J. I. D.; Feigelson, R. S.; Zharikov, E. V.; Ostrogorsky, A. G.; Marin, C.; Volz, M. P.; Kansa, E. J.; Friedman, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    The character of natural buoyant convection in rigidly contained inhomogeneous fluids can be drastically altered by vibrating the container. Vibrations are expected to play a crucial influence on heat and mass transfer onboard the International Space Station (ISS). It is becoming evident that substantial vibrations will exist on the ISS in the wide frequency spectrum. In general, vibrational flows are very complex and governed by many parameters. In many terrestrial crystal growth situations, convective transport of heat and constituent components is dominated by buoyancy driven convection arising from compositional and thermal gradients. Thus, it may be concluded that vibro-convective flow can potentially be used to influence and even control transport in some crystal growth situations.

  2. Minimax design of vibration absorbers for linear damped systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Brandon; Singh, Tarunraj

    2011-05-01

    This paper addresses the issue of design of a passive vibration absorber in the presence of uncertainties in the forcing frequency. A minimax problem is formulated to determine the parameters of a vibration absorber which minimize the maximum motion of the primary mass over the domain of the forcing frequency. The limiting solutions corresponding to the forcing frequency being unrestricted and to that where the forcing frequency is known exactly, are shown to match those available in the literature. The transition of the optimal vibration absorber parameters between the extreme two cases is presented and the solutions are generalized by permitting the mass ratio of the absorber mass and the primary mass to be design parameters. For the specific case where the primary system is undamped, detailed analysis is presented to determine the transition of the optimal vibration absorber parameters between three distinct domains of solutions.

  3. Effect of the vibration profile on shallow granular systems.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Patricio; Risso, Dino; Soto, Rodrigo

    2015-12-13

    We describe the collective behaviour of a system of many inelastic spherical particles inside a box which is being periodically vibrated. The box is shallow, with large horizontal dimensions, while the height is less than two particle diameters. The vibrations are not symmetric: the time the box is moving up is, in general, different from the time it is moving down. The limit cycles of isolated grains are largely affected by the asymmetry of the vibration mode, increasing the size in phase space of the chaotic regions. When many grains are placed in the box, the phase separation between dense, solid-like regions, coexisting with fluid-like regions takes place at smaller global densities for asymmetric vibration profiles. Besides, the order parameter of the transition takes larger values when asymmetric forcing is used.

  4. Chaotic vibrations: An introduction for applied scientists and engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Francis C.

    Mathematical models of chaotic phenomena in physical systems are discussed in an introductory overview. Chapters are devoted to the nature of chaotic dynamics, the classical theory of nonlinear vibrations, maps and flows, the identification of chaotic vibrations, mathematical and experimental models of chaos, experimental measurement techniques, empirical criteria for chaos, theoretical predictive criteria, and Liapunov exponents. Particular attention is given to the use of fractal concepts in nonlinear dynamics, including measures of fractal dimension, the fractal dimension of strange attractors, optical measurement of fractal dimension, fractal basin boundaries, and complex maps and the Mandelbrot set. A set of numerical experiments, descriptions and drawings of chaotic toys, and a glossary of terms are provided.

  5. Simulation of nonlinear random vibrations using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T.L.; Tucker, S.; O`Gorman, C.

    1997-02-01

    The simulation of mechanical system random vibrations is important in structural dynamics, but it is particularly difficult when the system under consideration is nonlinear. Artificial neural networks provide a useful tool for the modeling of nonlinear systems, however, such modeling may be inefficient or insufficiently accurate when the system under consideration is complex. This paper shows that there are several transformations that can be used to uncouple and simplify the components of motion of a complex nonlinear system, thereby making its modeling and random vibration simulation, via component modeling with artificial neural networks, a much simpler problem. A numerical example is presented.

  6. Free torsional vibrations of tapered cantilever I-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, C. Kameswara; Mirza, S.

    1988-08-01

    Torsional vibration characteristics of linearly tapered cantilever I-beams have been studied by using the Galerkin finite element method. A third degree polynomial is assumed for the angle of twist. The analysis presented is valid for long beams and includes the effect of warping. The individual as well as combined effects of linear tapers in the width of the flanges and the depth of the web on the torsional vibration of cantilever I-beams are investigated. Numerical results generated for various values of taper ratios are presented in graphical form.

  7. Intermolecular Vibrational Modes Speed Up Singlet Fission in Perylenediimide Crystals.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Nicolas; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2015-02-05

    We report numerical simulations based on a non-Markovian density matrix propagation scheme of singlet fission (SF) in molecular crystals. Ab initio electronic structure calculations were used to parametrize the exciton and phonon Hamiltonian as well as the interactions between the exciton and the intramolecular and intermolecular vibrational modes. We demonstrate that the interactions of the exciton with intermolecular vibrational modes are highly sensitive to the stacking geometry of the crystal and can, in certain cases, significantly accelerate SF. This result may help in understanding the fast SF experimentally observed in a broad range of molecular crystals and offers a new direction for the engineering of efficient SF sensitizers.

  8. A MEMS vibration energy harvester for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Schaijk, R.; Elfrink, R.; Oudenhoven, J.; Pop, V.; Wang, Z.; Renaud, M.

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this work is to develop MEMS vibration energy harvesters for tire pressure monitoring systems (TPMS), they can be located on the rim or on the inner-liner of the car tire. Nowadays TPMS modules are powered by batteries with a limited lifetime. A large effort is ongoing to replace batteries with small and long lasting power sources like energy harvesters [1]. The operation principle of vibration harvesters is mechanical resonance of a seismic mass, where mechanical energy is converted into electrical energy. In general, vibration energy harvesters are of specific interest for machine environments where random noise or repetitive shock vibrations are present. In this work we present the results for MEMS based vibration energy harvesting for applying on the rim or inner-liner. The vibrations on the rim correspond to random noise. A vibration energy harvester can be described as an under damped mass-spring system acting like a mechanical band-pass filter, and will resonate at its natural frequency [2]. At 0.01 g2/Hz noise amplitude the average power can reach the level that is required to power a simple wireless sensor node, approximately 10 μW [3]. The dominant vibrations on the inner-liner consist mainly of repetitive high amplitude shocks. With a shock, the seismic mass is displaced, after which the mass will "ring-down" at its natural resonance frequency. During the ring-down period, part of the mechanical energy is harvested. On the inner-liner of the tire repetitive (one per rotation) high amplitude (few hundred g) shocks occur. The harvester enables an average power of a few tens of μW [4], sufficient to power a more sophisticated wireless sensor node that can measure additional tire-parameters besides pressure. In this work we characterized MEMS vibration energy harvesters for noise and shock excitation. We validated their potential for TPMS modules by measurements and simulation.

  9. Head and Helmet Biodynamics and Tracking Performance During Exposure to Whole-Body Vibration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    Vibration Suzanne D. Smith Air Force Research Laboratory Jeanne A. Smith Raymond J. Newman Advanced Information Engineering Services, Inc. A General...AND HELMET BIODYNAMICS AND TRACKING PERFORMANCE DURING EXPOSURE TO WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62202F 6. AUTHOR(S...distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Presented at the UK Conference on Human Response to Vibration , England Sep 2004 14. ABSTRACT Helmet

  10. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, C.C.; Pytanowski, G.P.; Vendituoli, J.S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass ``M`` or combined mass ``CM`` of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics. 5 figs.

  11. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, Charles C.; Pytanowski, Gregory P.; Vendituoli, Jonathan S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass "M" or combined mass "CM" of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics.

  12. Cement mixing with vibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.E.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes a method of cementing a casing string in a bore hole of a well. It comprises introducing water and dry cement material into a mixing vessel; mixing the water and dry cement material in the mixing vessel to form a cement slurry, the slurry including lumps of the dry cement material, the mixing including steps of: agitating the slurry; and while agitating the slurry, transmitting vibrational energy into the slurry and thereby aiding disintegration and subsequent wetting of the lumps of the dry cement material in the slurry; and pumping the slurry into an annulus between the casing string and the bore hole.

  13. Nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging.

    PubMed

    Marks, Daniel L; Boppart, Stephen A

    2004-03-26

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) processes are "coherent," but the phase of the anti-Stokes radiation is lost by most incoherent spectroscopic CARS measurements. We propose a Raman microscopy imaging method called nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging, which measures Raman spectra by obtaining the temporal anti-Stokes signal through nonlinear interferometry. With a more complete knowledge of the anti-Stokes signal, we show through simulations that a high-resolution Raman spectrum can be obtained of a molecule in a single pulse using broad band radiation. This could be useful for identifying the three-dimensional spatial distribution of molecular species in tissue.

  14. Simulation and experimental study of cavitation region caused by longitudinal and transverse vibration of casting ultrasonic radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Q.; Li, R. Q.; Dong, F.; Chen, P. H.; Jiang, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic simulation of casting ultrasonic vibration system were studied based on dynamic characteristics of the system and numerical simulation of ultrasonic sound pressure field under different vibration depths in water was performed. According to the simulation results, the cavitation region was estimated, and the experiment of cavitation erosion of aluminum foil in water and amplitude test were done to verify simulation results. The results showed that the longitudinal vibration at the end of face was the major vibration of ultrasonic radiation, while there was a strong vibration on cylindrical surface. Results of amplitude test are consistent with simulation results. Cavitation region caused by ultrasonic vibration mainly below the end face of radiation. The scope and intensity of cavitation were inversely related to the distance from the end face of radiation. With the vibrating depth increased, some small cavitation regions were found at the side of radiation, cavitation region distributed uncontinuously below radiation. Cavitation field measurement and simulation results were basically consistent.

  15. Development of vibrating insoles.

    PubMed

    Hijmans, Juha M; Geertzen, Jan H B; Schokker, Bart; Postema, Klaas

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the development of vibrating insoles. Insoles, providing a subsensory mechanical noise signal to the plantar side of the feet, may improve balance in healthy young and older people and in patients with stroke or diabetic neuropathy. This study describes the requirements for the tactors, (tactile actuators) insole material and noise generator. A search for the components of vibrating insoles providing mechanical noise to the plantar side of the feet was performed. The mechanical noise signal should be provided by tactors built in an insole or shoe and should obtain an input signal from a noise generator and an amplifier. Possible tactors are electromechanical tactors, a piezo actuator or the VBW32 skin transducer. The Minirator MR1 of NTI, a portable MP3 player or a custom-made noise generator can provide these tactors with input. The tactors can be built in foam, silicone or cork insoles. In conclusion, a C2 electromechanical tactor, a piezo actuator or the VBW32 skin transducer, activated by a custom-made noise generator, built in a cork insole covered with a leather layer seems the ideal solution.

  16. Active control of panel vibrations induced by a boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1995-01-01

    The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to consider the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. Although the sound radiation has not been included, the vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings are presented in three sections. In section two we describe results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Sections three and four are concerned with some analytical and numerical results in the optimal control of the linear and nonlinear panel vibrations, respectively, excited by the flow pressure fluctuations. Finally, in section five, we draw some conclusions from research findings.

  17. Vibrations of blades with variable thickness and curvature by shell theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. K.; Leissa, A. W.; Wang, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    A procedure for analyzing the vibrations of rotating turbomachinery blades has been previously developed. This procedure is based upon shallow shell theory, and utilizes the Ritz method to determine frequencies and mode shapes. However, it has been limited heretofore to blades of uniform thickness, uniform curvature, and/or twist and rectangular planform. The present work shows how the procedure may be generalized to eliminate the aforementioned restrictions. Nonrectangular planforms are dealt with by a suitable coordinate transformation. This, as well as variable thickness, curvature and twist, require using numerical integration. The procedure is demonstrated on four examples of cantilevered blades for which theoretical and experimental data have been previously published: (1) flat plate with spanwise taper, (2) flat plate with chordwise taper, (3) twisted plate with chordwise taper, and (4) cylindrical shell with chordwise taper.

  18. Effect of Multiple Delamination on Free Vibration Behaviour of Quasi-Isotropic Composite Conical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, S.; Karmakar, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a finite element method is employed to investigate the free vibration characteristics of single and multiple delaminated graphite-epoxy quasi-isotropic composite conical shells. The generalized dynamic equilibrium equation is derived from Lagrange's equation of motion neglecting Coriolis effect for moderate rotational speeds. The formulation is based on Mindlin's theory considering eight-noded isoparametric plate bending element. The multipoint constraint algorithm is employed to ensure the compatibility of deformation and equilibrium of resultant forces and moments at the delamination crack front. The QR iteration algorithm is utilized for solution of standard eigen value problem. Finite element codes are developed to obtain the natural frequencies of single and multiple delaminated quasi-isotropic composite conical shells. The mode shapes for a typical laminate configuration are also depicted. Numerical results obtained are the first known values which could serve as reference solutions for the future investigators.

  19. Equivalent Linearization Analysis of Geometrically Nonlinear Random Vibrations Using Commercial Finite Element Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Muravyov, Alexander A.

    2002-01-01

    Two new equivalent linearization implementations for geometrically nonlinear random vibrations are presented. Both implementations are based upon a novel approach for evaluating the nonlinear stiffness within commercial finite element codes and are suitable for use with any finite element code having geometrically nonlinear static analysis capabilities. The formulation includes a traditional force-error minimization approach and a relatively new version of a potential energy-error minimization approach, which has been generalized for multiple degree-of-freedom systems. Results for a simply supported plate under random acoustic excitation are presented and comparisons of the displacement root-mean-square values and power spectral densities are made with results from a nonlinear time domain numerical simulation.

  20. Nonlinear vibration phenomenon of an aircraft rub-impact rotor system due to hovering flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lei; Chen, Yushu; Cao, Qingjie

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the nonlinear vibration phenomenon caused by aircraft hovering flight in a rub-impact rotor system supported by two general supports with cubic stiffness. The effect of aircraft hovering flight on the rotor system is considered as a maneuver load to formulate the equations of motion, which might result in periodic response instability to the rotor system even the eccentricity is small. The dynamic responses of the system under maneuver load are presented by bifurcation diagrams and the corresponding Lyapunov exponent spectrums. Numerical analyses are carried out to detect the periodic, sub-harmonic and quasi-periodic motions of the system, which are presented by orbit diagrams, phase trajectories, Poincare maps and amplitude power spectrums. The results obtained in this paper will contribute an understanding of the nonlinear dynamic behaviors of aircraft rotor systems in maneuvering flight.

  1. Vibration Response of Airplane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theodorsen, Theodore; Gelalles, A G

    1935-01-01

    This report presents test results of experiments on the vibration-response characteristics of airplane structures on the ground and in flight. It also gives details regarding the construction and operation of vibration instruments developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.

  2. Vibration Analysis by Speckle Interferometry,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The vibrational modes of complex systems can be visualized with high sensitivity by laser light speckle interferometry. Electronic speckle pattern...interferometry (ESPI), in contrast to holography, does not use photo-chemical storage media but shows a live image of the vibrational modes created by

  3. Analytical and numerical studies on the nonlinear dynamic response of orthotropic membranes under impact load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changjiang; Zheng, Zhoulian; Yang, Xiaoyan

    2016-12-01

    Orthotropic membrane components and structures are widely used in building structures, instruments and meters, electronic engineering, space and aeronautics, etc., because of their light weights. However, the same lightweight combined with low stiffness make membranes prone to vibration under dynamic loads, and in some cases the vibration may lead to structural failure. Herein, the undamped nonlinear vibration response of pretension rectangular orthotropic membrane structures subjected to impact loading is studied by analytical and numerical methods. The analytical solution is obtained by solving the governing equations by the Bubnov-Galerkin method and the Lindstedt-Poincaré perturbation method. Numerical analysis has also been carried out based on the same theoretical model. The analytical and numerical results have been compared and analyzed, and the influence of various model parameters on membrane vibration discussed. The results obtained herein provide some theoretical basis for the vibration control and dynamic design of orthotropic membrane components and structures.

  4. Force Limited Vibration Testing Monograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1997-01-01

    The practice of limiting the shaker force in vibration tests was investigated at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in 1990 after the mechanical failure of an aerospace component during a vibration test. Now force limiting is used in almost every major vibration test at JPL and in many vibration tests at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and at many aerospace contractors. The basic ideas behind force limiting have been in the literature for several decades, but the piezo-electric force transducers necessary to conveniently implement force limiting have been available only in the last decade. In 1993, funding was obtained from the NASA headquarters Office of Chief Engineer to develop and document the technology needed to establish force limited vibration testing as a standard approach available to all NASA centers and aerospace contractors. This monograph is the final report on that effort and discusses the history, theory, and applications of the method in some detail.

  5. The origins of vibration theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimarogonas, A. D.

    1990-07-01

    The Ionian School of natural philosophy introduced the scientific method of dealing with natural phenomena and the rigorous proofs for abstract propositions. Vibration theory was initiated by the Pythagoreans in the fifth century BC, in association with the theory of music and the theory of acoustics. They observed the natural frequency of vibrating systems and proved that it is a system property and that it does not depend on the excitation. Pythagoreans determined the fundamental natural frequencies of several simple systems, such as vibrating strings, pipes, vessels and circular plates. Aristoteles and the Peripatetic School founded mechanics and developed a fundamental understanding of statics and dynamics. In Alexandrian times there were substantial engineering developments in the field of vibration. The pendulum as a vibration, and probably time, measuring device was known in antiquity, and was further developed by the end of the first millennium AD.

  6. Vibration analysis using digital correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.; Lehner, David L.; Dudderar, T. Dixon; Matthys, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of a computer-based optical method for locating the positions of nodes and antinodes in vibrating members. Structured light patterns are projected at an angle onto the vibrating surface using a 35 mm slide projector. The vibrating surface and the projected images are captured in a time averaged photograph which is subsequently digitized. The inherent fringe patterns are filtered to determine amplitudes of vibration, and computer programs are used to compare the time averaged images to images recorded prior to excitation to locate nodes and antinodes. Some of the influences of pattern regularity on digital correlation are demonstrated, and a speckle-based method for determining the mode shapes and the amplitudes of vibration with variable sensitivity is suggested.

  7. Dynamic tire pressure sensor for measuring ground vibration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; McDaniel, James Gregory; Wang, Ming L

    2012-11-07

    This work presents a convenient and non-contact acoustic sensing approach for measuring ground vibration. This approach, which uses an instantaneous dynamic tire pressure sensor (DTPS), possesses the capability to replace the accelerometer or directional microphone currently being used for inspecting pavement conditions. By measuring dynamic pressure changes inside the tire, ground vibration can be amplified and isolated from environmental noise. In this work, verifications of the DTPS concept of sensing inside the tire have been carried out. In addition, comparisons between a DTPS, ground-mounted accelerometer, and directional microphone are made. A data analysis algorithm has been developed and optimized to reconstruct ground acceleration from DTPS data. Numerical and experimental studies of this DTPS reveal a strong potential for measuring ground vibration caused by a moving vehicle. A calibration of transfer function between dynamic tire pressure change and ground acceleration may be needed for different tire system or for more accurate application.

  8. Dynamic Tire Pressure Sensor for Measuring Ground Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; McDaniel, James Gregory; Wang, Ming L.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a convenient and non-contact acoustic sensing approach for measuring ground vibration. This approach, which uses an instantaneous dynamic tire pressure sensor (DTPS), possesses the capability to replace the accelerometer or directional microphone currently being used for inspecting pavement conditions. By measuring dynamic pressure changes inside the tire, ground vibration can be amplified and isolated from environmental noise. In this work, verifications of the DTPS concept of sensing inside the tire have been carried out. In addition, comparisons between a DTPS, ground-mounted accelerometer, and directional microphone are made. A data analysis algorithm has been developed and optimized to reconstruct ground acceleration from DTPS data. Numerical and experimental studies of this DTPS reveal a strong potential for measuring ground vibration caused by a moving vehicle. A calibration of transfer function between dynamic tire pressure change and ground acceleration may be needed for different tire system or for more accurate application. PMID:23202206

  9. Active vibration isolation through a Stewart platform with piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaoxin; Xie, Xiling; Chen, Yanhao; Zhang, Zhiyi

    2016-09-01

    A Stewart platform with piezoelectric actuators is presented for micro-vibration isolation. The Jacobian matrix of the Stewart platform, which reveals the relationship between the position/pointing of the payload and the extensions of the struts, is derived by the kinematic analysis and modified according to measured FRFs(frequency response function). The dynamic model of the Stewart platform is established by the FRF synthesis method to accommodate flexible modes of the platform. In active isolation, the LMS-based adaptive method is adopted and combined with the Jacobian matrix to suppress pure vibrations of the payload. Numerical simulations and experiments were conducted to prove vibration isolation performance of the Stewart platform subjected to periodical disturbances, and the results have demonstrated that considerable attenuations can be achieved.

  10. Vibrational transfer functions for complex structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, P. A.; Berry, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Evaluation of effects of vibrational multiple frequency forcing functions is discussed. Computer program for developing vibrational transfer functions is described. Possible applications of computer program are enumerated.

  11. Nonstationary Vibrations of Transversely Reinforced Elliptic Cylindrical Shells on an Elastic Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meish, Yu. A.

    2016-11-01

    The forced vibrations of transversely reinforced elliptic cylindrical shells on an elastic foundation under nonstationary loads are studied using the Timoshenko-type theory of shells and rods. A numerical algorithm for solving problems of this class is developed. A numerical example for the case of distributed impulsive loading is given

  12. Silicon Micromachined Sensor for Broadband Vibration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Adolfo; Edmans, Daniel; Cormeau, Chris; Seidler, Gernot; Deangelis, Dave; Maby, Edward

    1995-01-01

    The development of a family of silicon based integrated vibration sensors capable of sensing mechanical resonances over a broad range of frequencies with minimal signal processing requirements is presented. Two basic general embodiments of the concept were designed and fabricated. The first design was structured around an array of cantilever beams and fabricated using the ARPA sponsored multi-user MEMS processing system (MUMPS) process at the Microelectronics Center of North Carolina (MCNC). As part of the design process for this first sensor, a comprehensive finite elements analysis of the resonant modes and stress distribution was performed using PATRAN. The dependence of strain distribution and resonant frequency response as a function of Young's modulus in the Poly-Si structural material was studied. Analytical models were also studied. In-house experimental characterization using optical interferometry techniques were performed under controlled low pressure conditions. A second design, intended to operate in a non-resonant mode and capable of broadband frequency response, was proposed and developed around the concept of a cantilever beam integrated with a feedback control loop to produce a null mode vibration sensor. A proprietary process was used to integrat a metal-oxide semiconductor (MOS) sensing device, with actuators and a cantilever beam, as part of a compatible process. Both devices, once incorporated as part of multifunction data acquisition and telemetry systems will constitute a useful system for NASA launch vibration monitoring operations. Satellite and other space structures can benefit from the sensor for mechanical condition monitoring functions.

  13. Vibration Control in Turbomachinery Using Active Magnetic Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Josiah D.

    1996-01-01

    The effective use of active magnetic bearings for vibration control in turbomachinery depends on an understanding of the forces available from a magnetic bearing actuator. The purpose of this project was to characterize the forces as functions shaft position. Both numerical and experimental studies were done to determine the characteristics of the forces exerted on a stationary shaft by a magnetic bearing actuator. The numerical studies were based on finite element computations and included both linear and nonlinear magnetization functions. Measurements of the force versus position of a nonrotating shaft were made using two separate measurement rigs, one based on strain gage measurement of forces, the other based on deflections of a calibrated beam. The general trends of the measured principal forces agree with the predictions of the theory while the magnitudes of forces are somewhat smaller than those predicted. Other aspects of theory are not confirmed by the measurements. The measured forces in the normal direction are larger than those predicted by theory when the rotor has a normal eccentricity. Over the ranges of position examined, the data indicate an approximately linear relationship between the normal eccentricity of the shaft and the ratio of normal to principal force. The constant of proportionality seems to be larger at lower currents, but for all cases examined its value is between 0.14 and 0.17. The nonlinear theory predicts the existence of normal forces, but has not predicted such a large constant of proportionality for the ratio. The type of coupling illustrated by these measurements would not tend to cause whirl, because the coupling coefficients have the same sign, unlike the case of a fluid film bearing, where the normal stiffness coefficients often have opposite signs. They might, however, tend to cause other self-excited behavior. This possibility must be considered when designing magnetic bearings for flexible rotor applications, such as gas

  14. Comparative estimation of vibrational entropy changes in proteins through normal modes analysis.

    PubMed

    Carrington, Benjamin J; Mancera, Ricardo L

    2004-10-01

    We compare the vibrational entropy changes of proteins calculated using a full and a number of approximate normal modes analysis methods. The vibrational entropy differences for three conformational changes and three protein binding interactions were computed. In general, the approximate methods yield good estimates of the vibrational entropy change in a fraction of the time required by full normal modes analysis. The absolute entropies are either overestimated or greatly underestimated, but the difference is sufficiently accurate for some methods. This indicates that some of the approximate methods can give reasonable estimates of the associated vibrational entropy changes, making them suitable for inclusion in free energy calculations.

  15. Inter-plant vibrational communication in a leafhopper insect.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Anna; Anfora, Gianfranco; Lucchi, Andrea; Virant-Doberlet, Meta; Mazzoni, Valerio

    2011-05-05

    Vibrational communication is one of the least understood channels of communication. Most studies have focused on the role of substrate-borne signals in insect mating behavior, where a male and a female establish a stereotyped duet that enables partner recognition and localization. While the effective communication range of substrate-borne signals may be up to several meters, it is generally accepted that insect vibrational communication is limited to a continuous substrate. Until now, interplant communication in absence of physical contact between plants has never been demonstrated in a vibrational communicating insect. With a laser vibrometer we investigated transmission of natural and played back vibrational signals of a grapevine leafhopper, Scaphoideus titanus, when being transmitted between leaves of different cuttings without physical contact. Partners established a vibrational duet up to 6 cm gap width between leaves. Ablation of the antennae showed that antennal mechanoreceptors are not essential in detection of mating signals. Our results demonstrate for the first time that substrate discontinuity does not impose a limitation on communication range of vibrational signals. We also suggest that the behavioral response may depend on the signal intensity.

  16. Vibration Response of Multi Storey Building Using Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chik, T. N. T.; Zakaria, M. F.; Remali, M. A.; Yusoff, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Interaction between building, type of foundation and the geotechnical parameter of ground may trigger a significant effect on the building. In general, stiffer foundations resulted in higher natural frequencies of the building-soil system and higher input frequencies are often associated with other ground. Usually, vibrations transmitted to the buildings by ground borne are often noticeable and can be felt. It might affect the building and become worse if the vibration level is not controlled. UTHM building is prone to the ground borne vibration due to closed distance from the main road, and the construction activities adjacent to the buildings. This paper investigates the natural frequency and vibration mode of multi storey office building with the presence of foundation system and comparison between both systems. Finite element modelling (FEM) package software of LUSAS is used to perform the vibration analysis of the building. The building is modelled based on the original plan with the foundation system on the structure model. The FEM results indicated that the structure which modelled with rigid base have high natural frequency compare to the structure with foundation system. These maybe due to soil structure interaction and also the damping of the system which related to the amount of energy dissipated through the foundation soil. Thus, this paper suggested that modelling with soil is necessary to demonstrate the soil influence towards vibration response to the structure.

  17. Evaluating vehicular-induced bridge vibrations for energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Matthew; Fasl, Jeremiah; Samaras, Vasilis A.; Wood, Sharon; Helwig, Todd; Lindenberg, Richard

    2012-04-01

    Highway bridges are vital links in the transportation network in the United States. Identifying possible safety problems in the approximately 600,000 bridges across the country is generally accomplished through labor-intensive, visual inspections. Ongoing research sponsored by NIST seeks to improve inspection practices by providing real-time, continuous monitoring technology for steel bridges. A wireless sensor network with a service life of ten years that is powered by an integrated energy harvester is targeted. In order to achieve the target ten-year life for the monitoring system, novel approaches to energy harvesting for use in recharging batteries are investigated. Three main sources of energy are evaluated: (a) vibrational energy, (b) solar energy, and (c) wind energy. Assessing the energy produced from vehicular-induced vibrations and converted through electromagnetic induction is the focus of this paper. The goal of the study is to process acceleration data and analyze the vibrational response of steel bridges to moving truck loads. Through spectral analysis and harvester modeling, the feasibility of vibration-based energy harvesting for longterm monitoring can be assessed. The effects of bridge conditions, ambient temperature, truck traffic patterns, and harvester position on the power content of the vibrations are investigated. With sensor nodes continually recharged, the proposed real-time monitoring system will operate off the power grid, thus reducing life cycle costs and enhancing inspection practices for state DOTs. This paper will present the results of estimating the vibration energy of a steel bridge in Texas.

  18. Hand-arm vibration in tropical rain forestry workers.

    PubMed

    Futatsuka, M; Inaoka, T; Ohtsuka, R; Sakurai, T; Moji, K; Igarashi, T

    1995-01-01

    Working conditions and health hazards including vibration syndrome related to forestry work using chain-saws were studied in Papua New Guinea and Indonesia. The subjects comprised 291 workers including 97 chain-saw operators. The health examination consisted of peripheral circulatory and sensory tests in the upper extremities. The vibration spectrum measured at the handle of the chain-saw indicated that these acceleration levels would lead to a moderately high risk of hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). The peripheral circulatory function tests revealed dysfunction after more than five years vibration exposure. However, in general, the results of the function tests and subjective complaints showed fewer health problems compared to those of Japanese forestry workers. The reason of such differences of vibration effects seem to be the following: (1) warmer climate (more than 25 degrees C throughout the year), (2) young workers and short work experience. (3) short time vibration exposures on working days in the natural forests, (4) seasonal changes in logging work (5) healthy workers effects. Thus, we found no clear evidence that the workers of our study suffered from HAVS. A principal component analysis was applied. The factor score of the components of the reactive dynamics of peripheral circulation differed significantly after more than five years' exposure. On the other hand, we cannot deny the possibility that subclinical dysfunction of peripheral circulation may be caused by chain-saw operation in the tropics in future. Further investigations on the HAVS among forestry workers in the tropic environment are needed.

  19. Violin bow vibrations.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin E

    2012-05-01

    The modal frequencies and bending mode shapes of a freely supported tapered violin bow are investigated by finite element analysis and direct measurement, with and without tensioned bow hair. Such computations are used with analytic models to model the admittance presented to the stretched bow hairs at the ends of the bow and to the string at the point of contact with the bow. Finite element computations are also used to demonstrate the influence of the lowest stick mode vibrations on the low frequency bouncing modes, when the hand-held bow is pressed against the string. The possible influence of the dynamic stick modes on the sound of the bowed instrument is briefly discussed.

  20. Ross ice shelf vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromirski, P. D.; Diez, A.; Gerstoft, P.; Stephen, R. A.; Bolmer, T.; Wiens, D. A.; Aster, R. C.; Nyblade, A.

    2015-09-01

    Broadband seismic stations were deployed across the Ross Ice Shelf (RIS) in November 2014 to study ocean gravity wave-induced vibrations. Initial data from three stations 100 km from the RIS front and within 10 km of each other show both dispersed infragravity (IG) wave and ocean swell-generated signals resulting from waves that originate in the North Pacific. Spectral levels from 0.001 to 10 Hz have the highest accelerations in the IG band (0.0025-0.03 Hz). Polarization analyses indicate complex frequency-dependent particle motions, with energy in several frequency bands having distinctly different propagation characteristics. The dominant IG band signals exhibit predominantly horizontal propagation from the north. Particle motion analyses indicate retrograde elliptical particle motions in the IG band, consistent with these signals propagating as Rayleigh-Lamb (flexural) waves in the ice shelf/water cavity system that are excited by ocean wave interactions nearer the shelf front.

  1. Understanding nuclear motions in molecules: Derivation of Eckart frame ro-vibrational Hamiltonian operators via a gateway Hamiltonian operator

    SciTech Connect

    Szalay, Viktor

    2015-05-07

    A new ro-vibrational Hamiltonian operator, named gateway Hamiltonian operator, with exact kinetic energy term, T-hat, is presented. It is in the Eckart frame and it is of the same form as Watson’s normal coordinate Hamiltonian. However, the vibrational coordinates employed are not normal coordinates. The new Hamiltonian is shown to provide easy access to Eckart frame ro-vibrational Hamiltonians with exact T-hat given in terms of any desired set of vibrational coordinates. A general expression of the Eckart frame ro-vibrational Hamiltonian operator is given and some of its properties are discussed.

  2. Vibration energy harvesting by magnetostrictive material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yuan, F. G.

    2008-08-01

    A new class of vibration energy harvester based on magnetostrictive material (MsM), Metglas 2605SC, is designed, developed and tested. It contains two submodules: an MsM harvesting device and an energy harvesting circuit. Compared to piezoelectric materials, the Metglas 2605SC offers advantages including higher energy conversion efficiency, longer life cycles, lack of depolarization and higher flexibility to survive in strong ambient vibrations. To enhance the energy conversion efficiency and alleviate the need of a bias magnetic field, Metglas ribbons are transversely annealed by a strong magnetic field along their width direction. To analyze the MsM harvesting device a generalized electromechanical circuit model is derived from Hamilton's principle in conjunction with the normal mode superposition method based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. The MsM harvesting device is equivalent to an electromechanical gyrator in series with an inductor. In addition, the proposed model can be readily extended to a more practical case of a cantilever beam element with a tip mass. The energy harvesting circuit, which interfaces with a wireless sensor and accumulates the harvested energy into an ultracapacitor, is designed on a printed circuit board (PCB) with plane dimension 25 mm × 35 mm. It mainly consists of a voltage quadrupler, a 3 F ultracapacitor and a smart regulator. The output DC voltage from the PCB can be adjusted within 2.0-5.5 V. In experiments, the maximum output power and power density on the resistor can reach 200 µW and 900 µW cm-3, respectively, at a low frequency of 58 Hz. For a working prototype under a vibration with resonance frequency of 1.1 kHz and peak acceleration of 8.06 m s-2 (0.82 g), the average power and power density during charging the ultracapacitor can achieve 576 µW and 606 µW cm-3, respectively, which compete favorably with piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters.

  3. Effective Schrödinger equation with general ordering ambiguity position-dependent mass Morse potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhdair, Sameer M.

    2012-07-01

    We solve the parametric generalized effective Schrödinger equation with a specific choice of position-dependent mass function and Morse oscillator potential by means of the Nikiforov-Uvarov method combined with the Pekeris approximation scheme. All bound-state energies are found explicitly and all corresponding radial wave functions are built analytically. We choose the Weyl or Li and Kuhn ordering for the ambiguity parameters in our numerical work to calculate the energy spectrum for a few (H2, LiH, HCl and CO) diatomic molecules with arbitrary vibration n and rotation l quantum numbers and different position-dependent mass functions. Two special cases including the constant mass and the vibration s-wave (l = 0) are also investigated.

  4. Fluid patterns and dynamics induced by vibrations in microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana

    Understanding the effects of vibrations is extremely important in microgravity environments where residual acceleration, or g-jitter, is easily generated by crew manoeuvring or machinery, and can have a significant impact on material processing systems and on-board experiments. Indeed, vibrations can dramatically affect fluid behaviour whether gravity is present or not, inducing instability in some cases while suppressing it in others. We will describe the results of investigations being conducted at the ESA affiliated Spanish User Support and Operations Centre (E-USOC) on the effect of vibrations on fluids interfaces, most notably with the forcing oriented parallel to the fluid surface. Pattern formation properties will be described in detail, and the importance of symmetry constraints and mean flows will be considered. Current exper-imental results are intriguing and have challenged existing assumptions in the field, particularly with regard to the parametric instability underlying subharmonic cross-waves. They suggest an intimate connection between Faraday waves, which are observed in vertically vibrated systems, and cross-waves, which are found in horizontally forced systems. Concurrent theoretical work, based on the analysis of reduced models, and on numerical simulations, will then be described. Finally, this research will be placed in a microgravity context and used to motivate the defini-tion of a proposed set of experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The experiments would be in the large-aspect-ratio-limit, requiring relatively high frequency but low amplitude vibrations, where comparatively little microgravity research has been done. The interest of such a microgravity experiment will be discussed, with emphasis on fluid management and the potential of vibrations to act as a kind of artificial gravity by orienting surfaces (or density contours) perpendicular to the axis of vibration.

  5. [Dynamics of morphofunctional state of central nervous system in white rates exposed to vibration].

    PubMed

    Pankov, V A; Katamanova, E V; Kuleshova, M V; Titov, E A; Kartapol'tseva, N V; Iakimova, N L; Lizarev, A V

    2014-01-01

    The authors presented results of experimental studies assessing influence of vibration on white rats. Dynamics of morphologic changes development in brain of experimental animals exposed to vibration were shown. Exposure to vibration in white rats daily during 4 hours over 15 days causes astrogliosis--compensation process in response to brain injury; over 1 month--causes morphologic brain changes (vacuoles formation in neuropile, decrease in astroglia cells number); over 2 months--causes lower plasticity of brain neurons, preserved astrogliosis; over 4 months--causes perivascular edema. Changes in brain bioelectric activity indicate stages of pathologic process in central nervous system. Increase in vibration exposure duration leads to more severe diffuse pathologic changes in brain and local cortical and diencephalic disorders. Exposure to vibration in white rats causes increase in general mobility, nonspecific activation of behaviour, intense emotional exertion, negative emotional state, but less severe effects of vibration were seen in orientative-trying reactions that are inborn, inherited forms of behaviour.

  6. Reference Excitation Unit for Micro-Vibration Test Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veal, Dan; Hughes, Ben; Wagner, Mark

    2012-07-01

    The verification of hardware, in particular with respect to micro-vibration requirements, is challenging for both numerical simulation and experimental methodology. A commonly used test approach is to measure the interface reaction forces, torques, accelerations, velocities or displacements in all six degrees of freedom generated by the unit under test. In Europe, several test facilities exist to measure these generated micro-vibration forces based on dynamometer, pendulum and reverse pendulum principles. All these facilities and test setups need to be validated and calibrated with traceability to recognized international standards to ensure validity of the measurement results. Ideally, inter-facility comparisons would be conducted with identical excitation input signals and identical boundary conditions to increase confidence in the validity of the measurement produced by different facilities. To facilitate this requirement, the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) - the UK’s national measurement institute, is developing a reference vibration excitation unit that will be capable of generating vibrations, linear or angular, of known amplitude and direction traceable to international standards. This activity is funded by the European Space Agency (ESA) in the frame of a Technology Research Study. This paper covers the design of the unit and how the vibrations generated will be traceable to international standards.

  7. Rate coefficients for dissociative attachment and resonant electron-impact dissociation involving vibrationally excited O{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Laporta, V.; Celiberto, R.; Tennyson, J.

    2014-12-09

    Rate coefficients for dissociative electron attachment and electron-impact dissociation processes, involving vibrationally excited molecular oxygen, are presented. Analytical fits of the calculated numerical data, useful in the applications, are also provided.

  8. On the vibration of axisymmetric shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heppler, G. R.; Wahl, L.

    1989-05-01

    The application of nonconventional basis functions to the linear vibration problem is explored. By employing shell coordinates the elements allow the exact geometrical modelling of shells of revolution with arbitrary meridians and the elements are able to reproduce strain free states under an arbitrary rigid body motion due to the use of these special basis functions. A generalization of the Reissner Mindlin plate theories is used because they have a broader range of applicability than the usual thin/shallow shell theories and also the trial functions need only be of class C(sup 0). The geometry treated is a hyperbola of revolution, in two configurations.

  9. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Paschoal, Vitor H; Faria, Luiz F O; Ribeiro, Mauro C C

    2017-01-04

    Vibrational spectroscopy has continued use as a powerful tool to characterize ionic liquids since the literature on room temperature molten salts experienced the rapid increase in number of publications in the 1990's. In the past years, infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies have provided insights on ionic interactions and the resulting liquid structure in ionic liquids. A large body of information is now available concerning vibrational spectra of ionic liquids made of many different combinations of anions and cations, but reviews on this literature are scarce. This review is an attempt at filling this gap. Some basic care needed while recording IR or Raman spectra of ionic liquids is explained. We have reviewed the conceptual basis of theoretical frameworks which have been used to interpret vibrational spectra of ionic liquids, helping the reader to distinguish the scope of application of different methods of calculation. Vibrational frequencies observed in IR and Raman spectra of ionic liquids based on different anions and cations are discussed and eventual disagreements between different sources are critically reviewed. The aim is that the reader can use this information while assigning vibrational spectra of an ionic liquid containing another particular combination of anions and cations. Different applications of IR and Raman spectroscopies are given for both pure ionic liquids and solutions. Further issues addressed in this review are the intermolecular vibrations that are more directly probed by the low-frequency range of IR and Raman spectra and the applications of vibrational spectroscopy in studying phase transitions of ionic liquids.

  10. Vibration control of rotor shaft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, K.

    1985-01-01

    Suppression of flexural forced vibration or the self-excited vibration of a rotating shaft system not by passive elements but by active elements is described. The distinctive feature of this method is not to dissipate the vibration energy but to provide the force cancelling the vibration displacement and the vibration velocity through the bearing housing in rotation. Therefore the bearings of this kind are appropriately named Active Control Bearings. A simple rotor system having one disk at the center of the span on flexible supports is investigated in this paper. The actuators of the electrodynamic transducer are inserted in the sections of the bearing housing. First, applying the optimal regulator of optimal control theory, the flexural vibration control of the rotating shaft and the vibration control of support systems are performed by the optimal state feedback system using these actuators. Next, the quasi-modal control based on a modal analysis is applied to this rotor system. This quasi-modal control system is constructed by means of optimal velocity feedback loops. The differences between optimal control and quasi-modal control are discussed and their merits and demerits are made clear. Finally, the experiments are described concerning only the optimal regulator method.

  11. Theoretical and experimental study of vibration suppression for stayed cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shieh-Kung; Lin, Pei-Yang; Loh, Chin-Hsiung

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a numerical model of a stay cable interacted with deck, and to examine the vibration suppression technique of the stayed cable subject to external loading. First, a numerical model based on the finite difference method and the finite element method has been developed to simulate the effects of the bending stiffness and its sag-extensibility characteristics of the cable. Accurate vibration mode shapes and modal frequency of the interaction between stay cable and deck are examined. For the vibration control of cable, a MR-damper is used as control device. This damper can be achieved either through the passive control strategy or the semi-active control strategy employing decentralized sliding mode control (DSMC) and maximum energy dissipation (MED) on the staycable. To verify this study, a scaled-down cable structure is designed and constructed in NCREE, Taiwan. A small shaker is designed and mounted onto the cable to generate the sinusoid excitation with different amplitudes and frequencies. Dynamic characteristics of the cable-deck system are identified and the system model is developed for control purpose. The DSMC algorithm using MR damper was studied to reduce the cable vibration under different excitation frequencies.

  12. Exploration of nonlinearly shunted piezoelectrics as vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, B.; Zang, C.; Wang, X.

    2016-09-01

    Practical realization of a nonlinearly shunted piezoelectric vibration absorber is numerically explored in this research. It is widely known that the linear resonant piezoelectric shunting strategy, acting as a tuned mass damper, is limited by the massive inductance required in low-frequency cases and sensitivity to drifts in structural frequencies. In order to overcome this limitation, a nonlinear piezoelectric shunting strategy is proposed based on the nonlinear energy sink theory. The essential idea is to passively absorb vibrational energy from the host structure through the intentional use of nonlinearity in piezoelectric shunting. The nonlinearly shunted piezoelectrics are supposed to work over a broad frequency band with a smaller inductance requirement compared with the linear resonant shunting. The nonlinearly shunted piezoelectric vibration absorber is built and applied in a cantilevered beam. Major challenges coming from the nonlinear tuning design for an effective vibration absorber exempted from high isolated response curves will be covered in this research. This numerical study is supposed to pave the way for experimental investigations that are currently in process.

  13. Investigation of the Crystal Growth of Dielectric Materials by the Bridgman Technique Using Vibrational Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.; Zharikov, Evgenii

    2002-01-01

    The principal goal of this ground-based program, which started on February 1, 1998 and concluded on April 30, 2002, was to investigate the influence of low frequency vibrations on the fluid flow and quality of dielectric oxide crystals grown by the vertical Bridgman method. This experimental program was a collaborative effort between Stanford University and the General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, and included a strong emphasis on both physical modeling and the growth of some technologically important materials. Additionally it was carried out initially in collaboration with the theoretical and numerical investigations of A.Fedoseyev and I.Alexander (ongoing in another NASA sponsored program). This latter program involved a study of vibro-convective buoyancy-driven flows in cylindrical configurations with the expectation of being able to use vibrational flows to control buoyancy driven fluid transport to off-set the effect of "g-jitter" during microgravity Bridgman crystal growth. These two programs taken together, were designed to lead to a new parametric control variable which can be used to either suppress or control convection, and thereby heat and mass transport during Bridgman crystal growth. It was expected to be effective in either a terrestrial or space environment.

  14. Free vibrations of a trapezoidal plate with an internal line hinge.

    PubMed

    Quintana, María Virginia; Grossi, Ricardo Oscar

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with a general variational formulation for the determination of natural frequencies and mode shapes of free vibrations of laminated thin plates of trapezoidal shape with an internal line hinge restrained against rotation. The analysis was carried out by using the kinematics corresponding to the classical laminated plate theory (CLPT). The eigenvalue problem is obtained by employing a combination of the Ritz method and the Lagrange multipliers method. The domain of the plate is transformed into a rectangular domain in the computational space by using nonorthogonal triangular coordinates and the transverse displacements are approximated with a set of simple polynomials automatically generated and expressed in the triangular coordinates. The developed algorithm allows obtaining approximate analytical solutions for mentioned plate with different geometries, aspect ratio, position of the line hinge, and boundary conditions including translational and rotational elastically restrained edges. It allows studying the influence of the mentioned line on the vibration frequencies and respective mode shapes. The algorithm can easily be programmed and it is numerically stable. Additionally, as a particular case, the results of triangular plates can be easily generated.

  15. Prebending effects upon the vibrational modes of thermally prestressed planar beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treyssède, Fabien

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, the linear vibrations of thermally prestressed beams are studied including the effects of predisplacement due to prebending and initial imperfections. Only low prestressed states far from the buckling stage are considered, one of the motivations of this paper being the issue of taking into account climatic temperature effects in damage detection based on modal techniques. A brief general review is first presented in order to give some theoretical and physical insights upon structural vibrations superimposed on an initial static state. Both the total Lagrangian and the updated Lagrangian formulations are applied to a planar Euler-Bernouli beam under the assumption of small prestrains and large predisplacements. The governing equilibrium equations are solved using a finite element method. Some illustrative numerical results are given. The model is then validated through experiments inside a climatic chamber. It is concluded that in addition to the axial prestress, the presence of prebending is also likely to have a significant effect upon some eigenfrequencies, even in the case of rather small predisplacements.

  16. Structural vibration control by tuned mass damper using central pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iba, Daisuke; Hongu, Junichi

    2011-04-01

    This paper proposes a new control method for active mass dampers using a Central Pattern Generator in vibration mitigation. The active mass dampers (or active dynamic absorbers) have been applied to structural vibration control of high-rise buildings, bridges and so on. In this case, the mass of the active mass damper must oscillate in an appropriate phase in relation to the control object, and generally, the damper has been designed by linear control theory as pole placement method, optimal control method or H infinity control method, and all the rest. On the other hand, on walking of animate beings like mammals or insects, both side feet have appropriate phase relations; moreover, it is possible to keep moving on irregular ground. That is, algorithms for the walking would be embedded into the animate beings to control the complicated and redundant bodies with ease and robustness. In biological study, the Central Pattern Generators in bodies playing a significant role in the walking have been learned over the last few decades, and some studies said that some animate beings are able to control their feet by using the generators without their brains in the walking. Moreover, mathematical models of the pattern generators have been proposed, and some researchers have been studying to realize walking of biped-robots using the pattern generators embedded in a computer. In this study, the algorithm is installed into a controller for the active mass damper; furthermore, validation of the controller is performed by numerical simulation.

  17. Dynamics of liquid state chemical reactions: Vibrational energy relaxation of molecular iodine in liquid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, C. L., III; Balk, M. W.; Adelman, S. A.

    1983-07-01

    The dynamics of vibrational energy relaxation of highly excited molecular iodine in three monatomic solvents is studied via stochastic classical trajectory simulations based on the molecular timescale generalized Langevin equation (MTGLE) of motion for liquid state chemical reactions [S. A. Adelman, J. Chem. Phys. 73, 3145 (1980)]. Also presented for comparison purposes are parallel studies based on a matrix Langevin equation of motion characterized by friction coefficients which depend on the instantaneous I2 internuclear separation R. The qualitative features of the energy relaxation may be interpreted as effects arising from modifications of the solute dynamics due to molecular timescale correlations between its motion and that of its solvation shells. Such dynamical solvent effects are realistically described by the MTGLE equation of motion but not by the Langevin equation. Thus, for example, the marked slowdown of the rate of I2 energy relaxtion in simple solvents when the I2 vibrational quantum number drops below a solvent-dependent critical value, earlier predicted by Nesbitt and Hynes, is predicted by MTGLE dynamics but not by Langevin dynamics. Finally, practical algorithms for numerically constructing the MTGLE and Langevin equations for specific solute-solvent systems are presented.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of velocity distributions in an ultrasonically vibrated granular bed.

    PubMed

    Huntley, J M; Tarvaz, T; Mantle, M D; Sederman, A J; Gladden, L F; Sheikh, N A; Wildman, R D

    2014-05-13

    We report the results of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging experiments on granular beds of mustard grains fluidized by vertical vibration at ultrasonic frequencies. The variation of both granular temperature and packing fraction with height was measured within the three-dimensional cell for a range of vibration frequencies, amplitudes and numbers of grains. Small increases in vibration frequency were found--contrary to the predictions of classical 'hard-sphere' expressions for the energy flux through a vibrating boundary--to result in dramatic reductions in granular temperature. Numerical simulations of the grain-wall interactions, using experimentally determined Hertzian contact stiffness coefficients, showed that energy flux drops significantly as the vibration period approaches the grain-wall contact time. The experiments thus demonstrate the need for new models for 'soft-sphere' boundary conditions at ultrasonic frequencies.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of velocity distributions in an ultrasonically vibrated granular bed

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, J. M.; Tarvaz, T.; Mantle, M. D.; Sederman, A. J.; Gladden, L. F.; Sheikh, N. A.; Wildman, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging experiments on granular beds of mustard grains fluidized by vertical vibration at ultrasonic frequencies. The variation of both granular temperature and packing fraction with height was measured within the three-dimensional cell for a range of vibration frequencies, amplitudes and numbers of grains. Small increases in vibration frequency were found—contrary to the predictions of classical ‘hard-sphere’ expressions for the energy flux through a vibrating boundary—to result in dramatic reductions in granular temperature. Numerical simulations of the grain–wall interactions, using experimentally determined Hertzian contact stiffness coefficients, showed that energy flux drops significantly as the vibration period approaches the grain–wall contact time. The experiments thus demonstrate the need for new models for ‘soft-sphere’ boundary conditions at ultrasonic frequencies. PMID:24711488

  20. A vibration-based strategy for health monitoring of offshore pipelines' girth-welds.

    PubMed

    Razi, Pejman; Taheri, Farid

    2014-09-15

    This study presents numerical simulations and experimental verification of a vibration-based damage detection technique. Health monitoring of a submerged pipe's girth-weld against an advancing notch is attempted. Piezoelectric transducers are bonded on the pipe for sensing or actuation purposes. Vibration of the pipe is excited by two means: (i) an impulsive force; (ii) using one of the piezoelectric transducers as an actuator to propagate chirp waves into the pipe. The methodology adopts the empirical mode decomposition (EMD), which processes vibration data to establish energy-based damage indices. The results obtained from both the numerical and experimental studies confirm the integrity of the approach in identifying the existence, and progression of the advancing notch. The study also discusses and compares the performance of the two vibration excitation means in damage detection.